497 1 anchor_497.htm 497

 

Anchor Risk Managed Income Strategies Fund

(formerly, “Anchor Risk Managed Credit Strategies Fund”)

Advisor Class Shares – ATCAX

 

Anchor Risk Managed Equity Strategies Fund

Advisor Class Shares – ATEAX

 

Anchor Risk Managed Global Strategies Fund

Advisor Class Shares – ATAGX

 

 

 

Each a series of Northern Lights Fund Trust IV

 

 

PROSPECTUS

December 29, 2023

 

 

Advised by:

Anchor Capital Management Group, Inc.

15 Enterprise, Suite 450

Aliso Viejo, California 92656

 

1-844-594-1226 (toll-free)

www.anchor-capital.com/funds

 

 

This Prospectus provides important information about the Funds that you should know before investing. Please read it carefully and keep it for future reference.

 

These securities have not been approved or disapproved by the Securities and Exchange Commission nor has the Securities and Exchange Commission passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of this Prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

 
 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

   
FUND SUMMARY - ANCHOR RISK MANAGED INCOME STRATEGIES FUND 1
FUND SUMMARY – ANCHOR RISK MANAGED EQUITY STRATEGIES FUND 5
FUND SUMMARY – ANCHOR RISK MANAGED GLOBAL STRATEGIES FUND 10
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RELATED RISKS
15
Investment Objective 15
Principal Investment Strategies 15
Principal Investment Risks 16
Temporary Defensive Positions 20
Portfolio Holdings Disclosure 20
Operational and Cybersecurity 20
MANAGEMENT 21
Investment Adviser 21
Portfolio Managers 21
HOW SHARES ARE PRICED 22
HOW TO PURCHASE SHARES 23
HOW TO REDEEM SHARES 24
FREQUENT PURCHASES AND REDEMPTIONS OF FUND SHARES 26
TAX STATUS, DIVIDENDS AND DISTRIBUTIONS 27
DISTRIBUTION OF SHARES 27
Distributor 27
Householding 27
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS 28

 

 
 

FUND SUMMARY - ANCHOR RISK MANAGED INCOME STRATEGIES FUND
(formerly, “Anchor Risk Managed Credit Strategies Fund”)

 

Investment Objective: The Fund seeks to provide long-term growth of capital while providing current income.

 

Fees and Expenses of the Fund: This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, sell and hold shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. More information about these fees and expenses is available from your financial intermediary and under the heading How to Purchase Shares on page 23 of the Fund’s Prospectus.

 


Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)
Advisor
Class
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases
(as a percentage of offering price)
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load)
(as a percentage of offering price)
None
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed
on Reinvested Dividends and other Distributions
(as a percentage of offering price)
None
Redemption Fee
(as a % of amount redeemed on shares held less than 60 days)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Management Fees 1.60%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees None
Other Expenses 0.72%
Interest and dividend expense on securities sold short 0.96%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses(1) 0.16%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 3.44%
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement(2) (0.32%)
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement 3.12%
(1)Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are the indirect costs of investing in other investment companies. The operating expenses in this fee table will not correlate to the expense ratio in the Fund’s financial highlights because the financial statements include only the direct operating expenses incurred by the Fund, not the indirect costs of investment companies.
(2)The Fund’s adviser has contractually agreed to reduce its fees and/or absorb expenses of the Fund, until at least December 31, 2024 to ensure that total annual fund operating expenses after fee waiver and/or reimbursement excluding
(i) any frontend or contingent deferred loads; (ii) brokerage fees and commissions, (iii) acquired fund fees and expenses;
(iv) fees and expenses associated with investments in other collective investment vehicles or derivative instruments (including for example option and swap fees and expenses); (v) borrowing costs (such as interest and dividend expense on securities sold short); (vi) taxes; and (vii) extraordinary expenses, such as litigation expenses (which may include indemnification of Fund officers and Trustees, contractual indemnification of Fund service providers (other than the adviser)), will not exceed 2.00% of the Fund’s average daily net assets attributable to Advisor Class shares; subject to possible recoupment from the Fund in future years (within the three years after the fees have been waived or reimbursed) if such recoupment can be achieved within the lesser of the expense limitation in place at the time of wavier and the expense limitation in place at the time of recapture. The expense limit arrangement may not be terminated during this time period without prior approval of the Board of Trustees only on 60 days’ written notice to the Fund’s adviser.

 

Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.

 

The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based upon these assumptions your costs would be:

 

  1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
Advisor Class $315 $1,027 $1,761 $3,699

 

Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 1,097%.

1 
 

Principal Investment Strategies: The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective, utilizing a fund of funds structure, by allocating assets among worldwide market segments based on the adviser’s research and analysis regarding market trends. A market trend is the movement of a financial market in a particular direction over time. “Worldwide” means developed and emerging markets, as those terms are defined below.

 

The Fund invests its assets (plus the amount of borrowings, if any) in long and short positions in unaffiliated exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”), open-end and closed-end mutual funds (together with ETFs, the “Underlying Funds”) and derivative instruments . The Fund primarily takes long and short positions in Underlying Funds and derivatives instruments in domestic and worldwide markets. The Fund takes a long position by buying shares of Underlying Funds, or derivative instruments, when the Adviser believes those assets will increase in value. The Fund takes a short position by selling those assets when the Adviser believes they will decrease in value.

 

The Fund invests primarily in:

(1)       Underlying Funds that invest in or are otherwise exposed to developed and emerging markets, which are countries listed on the MSCI All World Country Index and MSCI Emerging Markets Index;

(2)       derivative instruments, either directly or indirectly, including options and futures, designed to substitute for or replicate some or all of the features of the Underlying Funds; and

(3)       U.S. or foreign cash equivalents, without limitation, as collateral for derivative instruments or as a temporary defensive measure during periods of market volatility.

 

The adviser seeks to manage risk by hedging the Fund’s investment portfolio when it believes security prices will decline. The adviser will hedge by:

(i)increasing allocations to cash equivalents or U.S. Treasury securities; and
(ii)selling short ETFs or derivative instruments the adviser believes have a high correlation to the Fund’s core holdings. Correlation is the measure of the similarity between two assets.

 

Generally, the adviser does not attempt to evaluate individual securities held by the Underlying Funds.

 

Principal Investment Risks: As with all mutual funds, there is a risk that you could lose money through your investment in the Fund. The Fund is not intended to be a complete investment program. Many factors affect the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”) and performance. The following describes the risks the Fund bears directly or indirectly through investments in Underlying Funds. As with any mutual fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its goal.

 

Cash or Cash Equivalents Risk. The Fund may have significant investments in cash or cash equivalents. When a substantial portion of a portfolio is held in cash or cash equivalents, there is the risk that the value of the cash account, including interest, will not keep pace with inflation, thus reducing purchasing power over time.

 

Derivatives Risk. The use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. These risks include (i) the risk that the counterparty to a derivative transaction may not fulfill its contractual obligations; (ii) the risk of mispricing or improper valuation; and (iii) the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. Derivative prices are highly volatile and may fluctuate substantially during a short period of time. Such prices are influenced by numerous factors that affect the markets, including, but not limited to: changing supply and demand relationships; government programs and policies; national and international political and economic events, changes in interest rates, inflation and deflation and changes in supply and demand relationships.

 

Emerging Markets Risk. Investing in emerging markets, including frontier markets, involves not only the risks described below with respect to investing in foreign securities, but also other risks, including exposure to economic structures that are generally less diverse and mature, limited availability and reliability of information material to an investment decision, and to political systems that can be expected to have less stability, than those of developed countries. The typically small size of the markets of securities of issuers located in emerging markets and the possibility of a low or nonexistent volume of trading in those securities may also result in a lack of liquidity and in price volatility of those securities.

 

Exchange Traded Funds Risk. ETFs may be actively or passively managed. The ETFs in which the Fund invests will not be able to replicate exactly the performance of the indices they track and may result in a loss. The market price of an ETF may deviate from the price of the underlying assets in various situations, including market stress which will result in the Fund paying significantly more or receiving significantly less than the net asset value. An active trading market may not develop or be maintained at times of market stress, and market makers and authorized participants may step away from their respective roles in making a market for shares and executing purchase or redemption orders. To the extent all or a portion of an ETF’s underlying holdings are traded on foreign markets that are closed when the market on which the ETF is traded is open, there may be a change in last close price on the foreign market and the price of the ETF which is traded daily domestically. In addition, shareholders bear both their proportionate share of the Fund’s expenses and similar expenses of the underlying investment company when the Fund invests in shares of another investment company.

2 
 

Foreign Investment Risk. The risk that investing in foreign (non-U.S.) securities either directly or indirectly may result in the Fund experiencing more rapid and extreme changes in value than the Fund that invests exclusively in securities of U.S. companies, due to smaller markets, differing reporting, accounting and auditing standards, nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, currency blockages and political changes or diplomatic developments. The costs of investing in many foreign markets are higher than the U.S. and investments may be less liquid. Foreign markets may be closed when U.S. markets are open which may impact Fund pricing.

 

Fund of Funds Risk. The ability of the Fund to meet its investment objective is directly related to the ability of the Underlying Funds in which it invests and their respective investment managers, to meet their investment objectives. Certain investment managers may be dependent upon a single individual or small group of individuals, the loss of which could adversely affect their success. There can be no assurance that any Underlying Fund will achieve its investment objectives.

 

Futures Risk. In addition to all the risks associated with the underlying, a future, which is a contract that derives its value from the price performance of an underlying entity, such as an asset, index, or interest rate, has additional risks because it is a financial contract rather than a security, including counterparty risk, and liquidity risk. Where futures are used for hedging, lack of the desired or expected correlation between the future and the underlying, known as basis risk, would reduce the desired effectiveness of the hedging instrument.

 

Hedging Risk. Although intended to limit or reduce investment risk, hedging strategies may also limit or reduce the potential for profit. There is no assurance that hedging strategies will be successful.

 

Management Risk. The adviser may be incorrect in its assessment of the intrinsic value of the securities the Fund holds which may result in a decline in the value of Fund shares and failure to achieve its investment objective. The Fund’s portfolio managers use technical analysis and/or trend models. Any imperfections or limitations in such analyses and models could affect the ability of the portfolio managers to implement strategies.

 

Market and Geopolitical Risk. The increasing interconnectivity between global economies and financial markets increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market. Securities in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform due to inflation (or expectations for inflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters, climate-change and climate related events, pandemics, epidemics, terrorism, international conflicts, regulatory events and governmental or quasi-governmental actions. The occurrence of global events similar to those in recent years may result in market volatility and may have long-term effects on both the U.S. and global financial markets.

 

Options Risk. There are risks associated with the sale and purchase of call and put options. As a seller (writer) of a put option, the Fund will tend to lose money if the value of the reference index or security falls below the strike price. As the seller (writer) of a call option, the Fund may experience lower returns if the value of the reference index or security rises above the strike price.

 

Portfolio Turnover Risk. The Fund’s high portfolio turnover will increase its transaction costs and may result in increased realization of net short-term capital gains (which are taxable to shareholders as ordinary income when distributed to them), higher taxable distributions and lower after-tax performance.

 

Securities Market Risk. The value of securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to factors affecting particular companies or the securities markets generally. A general downturn in the securities market may cause multiple asset classes to decline in value simultaneously.

 

Short Sales Risk. Short sales risk is the risk of loss associated with any appreciation on the price of a security borrowed in connection with a short sale. The Fund may engage in short sales that are not made “against-the-box,” which means that the Fund may sell short securities even when they are not actually owned or otherwise covered at all times during the period the short position is open. Short sales that are not made “against-the-box” theoretically involve unlimited loss potential since the market price of securities sold short may continuously increase.

 

Small and Medium Capitalization Companies Risk. The earnings and prospects of small and medium sized companies are more volatile than larger companies and may experience higher failure rates than larger companies. Small and medium sized companies normally have a lower trading volume than larger companies, which may tend to make their market price fall more disproportionately than larger companies in response to selling pressures and may have limited markets, product lines, or financial resources and lack management experience.

3 
 

 

Performance: The bar chart and performance table below show the variability of the Fund’s returns, which is some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year and by showing the Fund’s one-year and since inception performance compared with those of a broad measure of market performance. Although the Fund commenced operations in 2015, the bar chart shows performance of the Fund’s Advisor Class shares for each calendar year since the Advisor Class’s inception. The performance table compares the performance of the Fund over time to the performance of a broad-based securities market index. You should be aware that the Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available at no cost by visiting www.anchor-capital.com/funds or by calling 1-844-594-1226.

 

Advisor Class Performance Bar Chart For Calendar Years Ended December 31

Best Quarter: 9/30/2022 1.65%
Worst Quarter: 6/30/2022 (3.49)%

 

The Fund’s Advisor Class year-to-date return as of September 30, 2023 was (4.99)%.

 

Performance Table

Average Annual Total Returns

(For periods ended December 31, 2022)

  One
Year

Since Inception

(9/11/20)

Return before taxes – Advisor Class Shares (6.49)% (1.35)%
Return after taxes on distributions – Advisor Class Shares (6.49)% (1.91)%
Return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares – Advisor Class Shares (3.84)% (1.16)%
Index – HFRX Absolute Return Index(1) 0.85% 2.41%
(1)The HFRX Absolute Return Index is designed to be representative of the overall composition of the Hedge Fund Universe. It is comprised of all eligible hedge fund strategies including, but not limited to, convertible arbitrage, distressed securities, equity hedge, equity market neutral, event driven, macro, merger arbitrage, and relative value arbitrage. As a component of the optimization process, the index selects constituents which characteristically exhibit lower volatilities and lower correlations to standard directional benchmarks of equity market and hedge fund industry performance. Hedge Fund Research, Inc. (HFR) utilizes a UCITSIII compliant methodology to construct the HFRX Hedge Fund Indices. The methodology is based on defined and predetermined rules and objective criteria to select and rebalance components to maximize representation of the Hedge Fund Universe. HFRX Indices utilize state-of-the-art quantitative techniques and analysis, multi-level screening, cluster analysis, Monte-Carlo simulations and optimization techniques to ensure that each index is a pure representation of its corresponding investment focus. Investors cannot invest directly in an index, and unlike the Fund, returns do not reflect any fees, expenses or sales charges.

 

Investment Adviser: Anchor Capital Management Group, Inc. (the “Adviser”)

 

Portfolio Managers: Garrett Waters, Chief Executive Officer of the Adviser and Eric Leake CMT®, President of the Adviser are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and have served the Fund as its portfolio managers since it commenced operations in September 2015.

 

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares: The minimum initial investment in the Fund for Advisor Class shares is $1,000 for all account types, and the minimum subsequent investment is $100. You may purchase and redeem shares of the Fund on any day that the New York Stock Exchange is open. Redemption requests may be made in writing, by telephone, or through a financial intermediary and will be paid by automated clearing house funds (“ACH”), check or wire transfer. The Fund or its Adviser may waive any of the minimum initial and subsequent investment amounts.

 

Tax Information: Dividends and capital gain distributions you receive from the Fund, whether you reinvest your distributions in additional Fund shares or receive them in cash, are taxable to you at either ordinary income or capital gains tax rates unless you are investing through a tax-deferred plan such as an IRA or 401(k) plan. However, these dividend and capital gain distributions may be taxable upon their eventual withdrawal from tax-deferred plans.

 

Payments to Broker-Dealers: When you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer, the Fund and its related companies may pay the broker-dealer for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your broker-dealer’s website for more information.

4 
 

FUND SUMMARY – ANCHOR RISK MANAGED EQUITY STRATEGIES FUND

 

Investment Objective: The Fund seeks to provide total return from income and capital appreciation with a secondary objective of limiting risk during unfavorable market conditions.

 

Fees and Expenses of the Fund: This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, sell and hold shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. More information about these fees and expenses is available from your financial intermediary and under the heading How to Purchase Shares on page 23 of the Fund’s Prospectus.

 

Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)
Advisor
Class
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases
(as a percentage of offering price)
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load)
(as a percentage of offering price)
None
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed
on Reinvested Dividends and other Distributions
(as a percentage of offering price)
None
Redemption Fee
(as a % of amount redeemed on shares held less than 60 days)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Management Fees 1.60%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees None
Other Expenses 0.24%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses(1) 0.17%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 2.01%
(1)Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are the indirect costs of investing in other investment companies. The operating expenses in this fee table will not correlate to the expense ratio in the Fund’s financial highlights because the financial statements include only the direct operating expenses incurred by the Fund, not the indirect costs of investment companies.

 

Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.

 

The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based upon these assumptions your costs would be:

 

  1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
Advisor Class $204 $630 $1,083 $2,338

 

Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 0%.

 

Principal Investment Strategies: The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective, utilizing a “fund of funds” structure, by allocating assets among various strategies based on the adviser’s research and analysis regarding market trends. A market trend is the movement of a financial market in a particular direction over time. Under normal market conditions, the Fund invests, directly or indirectly through unaffiliated exchange traded funds (“ETFs”) and mutual funds (together with ETFs, “Underlying Funds”), at least 80% of its net assets (plus the amount of borrowings, if any) in long and short positions in equity securities. The Fund takes a long position, or purchases shares of a security, when the adviser believes a security will increase in value, and a short position, or sells shares of borrowed stock, when the adviser believes the value of a security will decrease. The Fund takes long and short positions in securities that are highly correlated to major U.S. equity indices based on long, intermediate, and short-term trends.

 

At least 80% of the Fund’s assets will be invested in:

(1)U.S. or foreign equity securities of any market capitalization including Underlying Funds that primarily invest in or are otherwise exposed to domestic and foreign equity securities; and
(2)derivative instruments, including options, futures, and total return swaps, designed to replicate some or all of the features of an underlying portfolio of equity securities.
5 
 

The Fund may also invest in U.S. or foreign cash equivalents including money market funds and treasuries.

 

The adviser seeks to achieve the Fund’s secondary objective by managing risk through hedging the Fund’s investment portfolio when it believes security prices will decline. The adviser will hedge by:

(i)            increasing allocations to cash equivalents or U.S. Treasury securities;

(ii)          purchasing inverse mutual funds or inverse ETFs; and

(iii)        selling short ETFs or securities the adviser believes have demonstrated a high correlation to the broader equity indices.

 

The Fund may invest in inverse funds linked to equity securities or indices when the adviser believes this strategy will provide an effective hedge to manage risk for the Fund’s equity investments.

 

Generally, the adviser does not attempt to evaluate individual securities. The adviser uses technical analysis, including monitoring price movements and price trends, of equity markets in an effort to achieve the Fund’s objective through proper allocation of the Fund’s portfolio securities. The adviser’s decision to buy or sell a Fund holding will be made based on adviser-developed trend and risk models that evaluate current market conditions, and this analysis will guide the adviser’s determination of the appropriate exposure level to the equity market. The adviser buys and sells securities and derivatives to increase or decrease the Fund’s exposure to the equity market.

 

Principal Investment Risks: As with all mutual funds, there is a risk that you could lose money through your investment in the Fund. The Fund is not intended to be a complete investment program. Many factors affect the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”) and performance. The following describes the risks the Fund bears directly or indirectly through investments in Underlying Funds. As with any mutual fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its goal.

 

Cash or Cash Equivalents Risk. The Fund may have significant investments in cash or cash equivalents. When a substantial portion of a portfolio is held in cash or cash equivalents, there is the risk that the value of the cash account, including interest, will not keep pace with inflation, thus reducing purchasing power over time.

 

Counterparty Risk. A counterparty (the other party to a transaction or an agreement or the party with whom the Fund executes transactions) to a transaction with the Fund may be unable or unwilling to make timely principal, interest or settlement payments, or otherwise honor its obligations.

 

Derivatives Risk. The use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. These risks include (i) the risk that the counterparty to a derivative transaction may not fulfill its contractual obligations; (ii) the risk of mispricing or improper valuation; and (iii) the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. Derivative prices are highly volatile and may fluctuate substantially during a short period of time. Such prices are influenced by numerous factors that affect the markets, including, but not limited to: changing supply and demand relationships; government programs and policies; national and international political and economic events, changes in interest rates, inflation and deflation and changes in supply and demand relationships.

 

Equity Securities Risk. Fluctuations in the value of equity securities held by the Fund will cause the net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund and the price of its shares to fluctuate. Common stock of an issuer in the Fund’s portfolio may decline in price if the issuer fails to make anticipated dividend payments. Common stock will be subject to greater dividend risk than preferred stocks or debt instruments of the same issuer. In addition, common stocks have experienced significantly more volatility in returns than other asset classes.

 

Exchange-Traded Funds Risk. ETFs may be actively or passively managed. The ETFs in which the Fund invests will not be able to replicate exactly the performance of the indices they track and may result in a loss. The market price of an ETF may deviate from the price of the underlying assets in various situations, including markets stress which will result in the Fund paying significantly more or receiving significantly less than the net asset value. An active trading market may not develop or be maintained at times of market stress, and market makers and authorized participants may step away from their respective roles in making a market for shares and executing purchase or redemption orders. To the extent all or a portion of an ETF’s underlying holdings are traded on foreign markets that are closed when the market on which the ETF is traded is open, there may be a change in last close price on the foreign market and the price of the ETF which is traded daily domestically. In addition, shareholders bear both their proportionate share of the Fund’s expenses and similar expenses of the underlying investment company when the Fund invests in shares of another investment company. reasons.

 

Foreign Investment Risk. The risk that investing in foreign (non-U.S.) securities either directly or indirectly may result in the Fund experiencing more rapid and extreme changes in value than the Fund that invests exclusively in securities of U.S. companies, due to smaller markets, differing reporting, accounting and auditing standards, nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, currency blockages and political changes or diplomatic developments. The costs of investing in many foreign markets are higher than the U.S. and investments may be less liquid.

6 
 

Fund of Funds Risk. The ability of the Fund to meet its investment objective is directly related to the ability of the Underlying Funds in which it invests and their respective investment managers, to meet their investment objectives. Certain investment managers may be dependent upon a single individual or small group of individuals, the loss of which could adversely affect their success. There can be no assurance that any Underlying Fund will achieve its investment objectives.

 

Futures Risk. In addition to all the risks associated with Underlying Funds, a future, which is a contract that derives its value from the price performance of an underlying entity, such as an asset, index, or interest rate, has additional risks because it is a financial contract rather than a security, including counterparty risk, and liquidity risk. Where futures are used for hedging, lack of the desired or expected correlation between the future and the Underlying Fund, known as basis risk, would reduce the desired effectiveness of the hedging instrument.

 

Hedging Risk. Although intended to limit or reduce investment risk, hedging strategies may also limit or reduce the potential for profit. There is no assurance that hedging strategies will be successful.

 

Inverse ETF Risk. Inverse ETFs seek to provide investment results that will match a certain percentage of the inverse of the performance of a specific benchmark on a daily basis. Because they reset daily there may be significant volatility associated with inverse ETFs. The inverse ETFs in which the Fund invests may not be able to replicate exactly the inverse of the performance of the indices they track. Inverse ETFs fall in price when stock prices are rising. Additionally, inverse ETFs may employ leverage which magnifies the changes in the underlying stock index upon which they are based. Investments in inverse ETFs will prevent the Fund from participating in market-wide or sector-wide gains and may not prove to be an effective hedge. During periods of increased volatility, inverse ETFs may not perform in the manner they are designed. Investments in inverse funds are intended to be short-term in nature and may, therefore, lead to increased turnover and transaction costs to the Fund.

 

Inverse Funds Risk. Inverse funds typically lose value as the index or security tracked by the fund increases in value; a result that is the opposite from traditional funds. Because they reset daily there may be significant volatility associated with inverse funds. The inverse funds in which the Fund invests may not be able to replicate exactly the inverse of the performance of the benchmark they track. Inverse funds fall in price when its benchmark prices are rising. Additionally, inverse funds may employ leverage which magnifies the changes in the underlying benchmark upon which they are based. Investments in inverse funds will prevent the Fund from participating in market-wide or sector-wide gains and may not prove to be an effective hedge. During periods of increased volatility, inverse funds may not perform in the manner they are designed. Investments in inverse funds are intended to be short-term in nature and may, therefore, lead to increased turnover and transaction costs to the Fund.

 

Large Market Capitalization Companies Risk.  The value of investments in larger companies may not rise as much as smaller companies, or larger companies may be unable to respond quickly to competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes.

 

Management Risk. The adviser may be incorrect in its assessment of the intrinsic value of the securities the Fund holds which may result in a decline in the value of Fund shares and failure to achieve its investment objective. The Fund’s portfolio managers use technical analysis and/or trend models. Any imperfections or limitations in such analyses and models could affect the ability of the portfolio managers to implement strategies.

 

Market and Geopolitical Risk. The increasing interconnectivity between global economies and financial markets increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market. Securities in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform due to inflation (or expectations for inflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters, climate-change and climate related events, pandemics, epidemics, terrorism, international conflicts, regulatory events and governmental or quasi-governmental actions. The occurrence of global events similar to those in recent years may result in market volatility and may have long-term effects on both the U.S. and global financial markets.

 

Options Risk. There are risks associated with the sale and purchase of call and put options. As a seller (writer) of a put option, the Fund will tend to lose money if the value of the reference index or security falls below the strike price. As the seller (writer) of a call option, the Fund may experience lower returns if the value of the reference index or security rises above the strike price.

 

Securities Market Risk. The value of securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to factors affecting particular companies or the securities markets generally. A general downturn in the securities market may cause multiple asset classes to decline in value simultaneously.

7 
 

 

Short Sales Risk. Short sales risk is the risk of loss associated with any appreciation on the price of a security borrowed in connection with a short sale. The Fund may engage in short sales that are not made “against-the-box,” which means that the Fund may sell short securities even when they are not actually owned or otherwise covered at all times during the period the short position is open. Short sales that are not made “against-the-box” theoretically involve unlimited loss potential since the market price of securities sold short may continuously increase.

 

Small and Medium Capitalization Companies Risk. The earnings and prospects of small and medium sized companies are more volatile than larger companies and may experience higher failure rates than larger companies. Small and medium sized companies normally have a lower trading volume than larger companies, which may tend to make their market price fall more disproportionately than larger companies in response to selling pressures and may have limited markets, product lines, or financial resources and lack management experience.

 

Total Return Swap Risk. In a total return swap, the buyer receives a periodic return equal to the total return of a specified security, securities or index, for a specified period of time. In return, the buyer pays the counterparty a variable stream of payments, typically based upon short-term interest rates, possibly plus or minus an agreed upon spread. For example, if the Fund enters into a swap where it agrees to exchange a floating rate of interest for a fixed rate of interest, the Fund may have to pay more money than it receives. Total return swaps entered into in which payments are not netted may entail greater risk than a swap entered into a net basis. There is a risk that adverse price movements in an instrument can result in a loss substantially greater than the Fund’s initial investment in that instrument (in some cases, the potential loss is unlimited). If there is a default by the other party to such a transaction, the Fund will have contractual remedies pursuant to the agreements related to the transaction. However, particularly in the case of privately negotiated instruments, there is a risk that the counterparty will not perform its obligations, which could leave the Fund worse off than if it had not entered into the position. These instruments are subject to high levels of volatility, in some cases due to the high levels of leverage the Fund may achieve with them.

 

Performance: The bar chart and performance table below show the variability of the Fund’s returns, which is some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year and by showing the Fund’s one-year and since inception performance compared with those of a broad measure of market performance. Although the Fund commenced operations in 2016, the bar chart shows performance of the Fund’s Advisor Class shares for each calendar year since the Fund’s inception. The performance table compares the performance of the Fund over time to the performance of a broad-based securities market index. You should be aware that the Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available at no cost by visiting www.anchor-capital.com/funds or by calling 1-844-594-1226.

 

Advisor Class Performance Bar Chart For Calendar Years Ended December 31

Best Quarter: 6/30/2021 7.25%
Worst Quarter: 12/31/22 (7.10)%

 

The Fund’s Advisor Class year-to-date return as of September 30, 2023 was 4.47%.

8 
 

 

Performance Table

Average Annual Total Returns

(For periods ended December 31, 2022)

 

  One
Year
Since
Inception
(4/30/20)
Return before taxes – Advisor Class Shares (9.00)% 8.48%
Return after taxes on distributions – Advisor Class Shares (10.91)% 7.63%
Return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares – Advisor Class Shares (4.69)% 6.37%
Index – S&P 500 Total Return Index(1) (18.11)% 12.68%
(1)The S&P 500 Total Return Index is an unmanaged market capitalization-weighted index which is comprised of 500 of the largest U.S. domiciled companies and includes the reinvestment of all dividends. Investors cannot invest directly in an index or benchmark.

 

Investment Adviser: Anchor Capital Management Group, Inc. (the “Adviser”)

 

Portfolio Managers: Garrett Waters, Chief Executive Officer of the Adviser and Eric Leake CMT®, President of the Adviser are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and have served the Fund as its portfolio managers since it commenced operations in 2016.

 

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares: The minimum initial investment in the Fund for Advisor Class shares is $1,000 for all account types, and the minimum subsequent investment is $100. You may purchase and redeem shares of the Fund on any day that the New York Stock Exchange is open. Redemption requests may be made in writing, by telephone, or through a financial intermediary and will be paid by automated clearing house funds (“ACH”), check or wire transfer. The Fund or its Adviser may waive any of the minimum initial and subsequent investment amounts.

 

Tax Information: Dividends and capital gain distributions you receive from the Fund, whether you reinvest your distributions in additional Fund shares or receive them in cash, are taxable to you at either ordinary income or capital gains tax rates unless you are investing through a tax-deferred plan such as an IRA or 401(k) plan. However, these dividend and capital gain distributions may be taxable upon its eventual withdrawal from tax-deferred plans.

 

Payments to Broker-Dealers: When you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer, the Fund and its related companies may pay the broker-dealer for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your broker-dealer’s website for more information.

9 
 

 

FUND SUMMARY – ANCHOR RISK MANAGED GLOBAL STRATEGIES FUND

 

Investment Objective: The Fund seeks to achieve above average total returns over a full market cycle with lower correlation and reduced risk when compared to traditional world indices.

 

Fees and Expenses of the Fund: This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, sell and hold shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. More information about these fees and expenses is available from your financial intermediary and under the heading How to Purchase Shares on page 23 of the Fund’s Prospectus.

 

Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)
Advisor
Class
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases
(as a percentage of offering price)
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load)
(as a percentage of offering price)
None
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed
on Reinvested Dividends and other Distributions
(as a percentage of offering price)
None
Redemption Fee
(as a % of amount redeemed on shares held less than 60 days)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year
as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Management Fees 1.60%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees None
Other Expenses 0.40%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses(1) 0.21%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 2.21%
(1)Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are the indirect costs of investing in other investment companies. The operating expenses in this fee table will not correlate to the expense ratio in the Fund’s financial highlights because the financial statements include only the direct operating expenses incurred by the Fund.

 

Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.

 

The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based upon these assumptions your costs would be:

 

  1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
Advisor Class $224 $691 $1,185 $2,544

 

Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 50%.

10 
 

Principal Investment Strategies: The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by allocating assets among various strategies based on the adviser’s research and analysis regarding market trends. A market trend is the movement of a financial market in a particular direction over time. The Fund invests at least 40% of its assets (plus the amount of borrowings, if any) in long and short positions in exchange-traded funds, mutual funds and derivative instruments registered and offered in the U.S with underlying holdings in non-U.S. companies. The Fund primarily takes long and short positions in exchange traded funds that are highly correlated to regional and country specific indices based on the adviser’s long, intermediate, and short-term price trends analysis.

 

The Fund is invested primarily in:

(1)Underlying Funds that primarily invest in or are otherwise exposed to domestic and worldwide markets;
(2)derivative instruments, including options, futures, and total return swaps, designed to replicate some or all of the features of an underlying portfolio of equity securities;
(3)Underlying Funds that are other U.S. or foreign equity securities of any market capitalization; and
(4)U.S. or foreign cash equivalents.

 

The adviser seeks to achieve the Fund’s objective by managing risk through hedging the Fund’s investment portfolio when it believes security prices will decline. The adviser will hedge by:

(i)increasing allocations to cash equivalents or U.S. Treasury securities;
(ii)selling short ETFs or securities the adviser believes have demonstrated a high correlation to the broader global equity indices; and
(iii)purchasing inverse mutual funds or inverse ETFs. The Fund may invest in inverse funds linked to equity securities or indices when the adviser believes this strategy will provide an effective hedge to manage risk offer the Fund’s equity investments.

 

Generally, the adviser does not attempt to evaluate individual securities. The adviser uses technical analysis, including monitoring price movements and price trends, of equity markets in an effort to achieve the Fund’s objective through proper allocation of the Fund’s portfolio securities. The adviser’s decision to buy or sell a Fund holding is made based on adviser developed trend and risk models that evaluate current market conditions, and this analysis guides the adviser’s determination of the appropriate exposure level to the equity market. The adviser buys and sells securities and derivatives to increase or decrease the Fund’s exposure to the equity market.

 

Principal Investment Risks: As with all mutual funds, there is a risk that you could lose money through your investment in the Fund. The Fund is not intended to be a complete investment program. Many factors affect the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”) and performance.

 

The following describes the risks the Fund bears directly or indirectly through investments in Underlying Funds. As with any mutual fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its goal.

 

Cash or Cash Equivalents Risk. The Fund may have significant investments in cash or cash equivalents. When a substantial portion of a portfolio is held in cash or cash equivalents, there is the risk that the value of the cash account, including interest, will not keep pace with inflation, thus reducing purchasing power over time.

 

Counterparty Risk. A counterparty (the other party to a transaction or an agreement or the party with whom the Fund executes transactions) to a transaction with the Fund may be unable or unwilling to make timely principal, interest or settlement payments, or otherwise honor its obligations.

 

Derivatives Risk. The use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. These risks include (i) the risk that the counterparty to a derivative transaction may not fulfill its contractual obligations; (ii) the risk of mispricing or improper valuation; and (iii) the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. Derivative prices are highly volatile and may fluctuate substantially during a short period of time. Such prices are influenced by numerous factors that affect the markets, including, but not limited to: changing supply and demand relationships; government programs and policies; national and international political and economic events, changes in interest rates, inflation and deflation and changes in supply and demand relationships.

 

11 
 

 

Equity Securities Risk. Fluctuations in the value of equity securities held by the Fund will cause the net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund and the price of its shares to fluctuate. Common stock of an issuer in the Fund’s portfolio may decline in price if the issuer fails to make anticipated dividend payments. Common stock will be subject to greater dividend risk than preferred stocks or debt instruments of the same issuer. In addition, common stocks have experienced significantly more volatility in returns than other asset classes.

 

Exchange Traded Funds Risk. ETFs may be actively or passively managed. The ETFs in which the Fund invests will not be able to replicate exactly the performance of the indices they track and may result in a loss. The market price of an ETF may deviate from the price of the underlying assets in various situations, including markets stress which will result in the Fund paying significantly more or receiving significantly less than the net asset value. An active trading market may not develop or be maintained at times of market stress, and market makers and authorized participants may step away from their respective roles in making a market for shares and executing purchase or redemption orders. To the extent all or a portion of an ETF’s underlying holdings are traded on foreign markets that are closed when the market on which the ETF is traded is open, there may be a change in last close price on the foreign market and the price of the ETF which is traded daily domestically. In addition, shareholders bear both their proportionate share of the Fund’s expenses and similar expenses of the underlying investment company when the Fund invests in shares of another investment company.

 

Foreign Investment Risk. The risk that investing in foreign (non-U.S.) securities either directly or indirectly may result in the Fund experiencing more rapid and extreme changes in value than the Fund that invests exclusively in securities of U.S. companies, due to smaller markets, differing reporting, accounting and auditing standards, nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, currency blockages and political changes or diplomatic developments. The costs of investing in many foreign markets are higher than the U.S. and investments may be less liquid.

 

Fund of Funds Risk. The ability of the Fund to meet its investment objective is directly related to the ability of the Underlying Funds in which it invests and their respective investment managers, to meet their investment objectives. Certain investment managers may be dependent upon a single individual or small group of individuals, the loss of which could adversely affect their success. There can be no assurance that any Underlying Fund will achieve its investment objectives.

 

Futures Risk. In addition to all the risks associated with the Underlying Fund, a future, which is a contract that derives its value from the price performance of an underlying entity, such as an asset, index, or interest rate, has additional risks because it is a financial contract rather than a security, including counterparty risk, and liquidity risk. Where futures are used for hedging, lack of the desired or expected correlation between the future and the Underlying Fund, known as basis risk, would reduce the desired effectiveness of the hedging instrument.

 

Hedging Risk. Although intended to limit or reduce investment risk, hedging strategies may also limit or reduce the potential for profit. There is no assurance that hedging strategies will be successful.

 

Inverse ETF Risk. Inverse ETFs seek to provide investment results that will match a certain percentage of the inverse of the performance of a specific benchmark on a daily basis. Because they reset daily there may be significant volatility associated with inverse ETFs. The inverse ETFs in which the Fund invests may not be able to replicate exactly the inverse of the performance of the indices they track. Inverse ETFs fall in price when stock prices are rising. Additionally, inverse ETFs may employ leverage which magnifies the changes in the underlying stock index upon which they are based. Investments in inverse ETFs will prevent the Fund from participating in market-wide or sector-wide gains and may not prove to be an effective hedge. During periods of increased volatility, inverse ETFs may not perform in the manner they are designed. Investments in inverse funds are intended to be short-term in nature and may, therefore, lead to increased turnover and transaction costs to the Fund.

 

Inverse Funds Risk. Inverse funds typically lose value as the index or security tracked by the fund increases in value; a result that is the opposite from traditional funds. Because they reset daily there may be significant volatility associated with inverse funds. The inverse funds in which the Fund invests may not be able to replicate exactly the inverse of the performance of the benchmark they track. Inverse funds fall in price when its benchmark prices are rising. Additionally, inverse funds may employ leverage which magnifies the changes in the underlying benchmark upon which they are based. Investments in inverse funds will prevent the Fund from participating in market-wide or sector-wide gains and may not prove to be an effective hedge. During periods of increased volatility, inverse funds may not perform in the manner they are designed. Investments in inverse funds are intended to be short-term in nature and may, therefore, lead to increased turnover and transaction costs to the Fund.

 

Large Market Capitalization Companies Risk.  The value of investments in larger companies may not rise as much as smaller companies, or larger companies may be unable to respond quickly to competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes.

12 
 

 

Management Risk. The adviser may be incorrect in its assessment of the intrinsic value of the securities the Fund holds which may result in a decline in the value of Fund shares and failure to achieve its investment objective. The Fund’s portfolio managers use technical analysis and/or trend models. Any imperfections or limitations in such analyses and models could affect the ability of the portfolio managers to implement strategies.

 

Market and Geopolitical Risk. The increasing interconnectivity between global economies and financial markets increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market. Securities in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform due to inflation (or expectations for inflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters, climate-change and climate related events, pandemics, epidemics, terrorism, international conflicts, regulatory events and governmental or quasi-governmental actions. The occurrence of global events similar to those in recent years may result in market volatility and may have long-term effects on both the U.S. and global financial markets.

 

Options Risk. There are risks associated with the sale and purchase of call and put options. As a seller (writer) of a put option, the Fund will tend to lose money if the value of the reference index or security falls below the strike price. As the seller (writer) of a call option, the Fund may experience lower returns if the value of the reference index or security rises above the strike price.

 

Securities Market Risk. The value of securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to factors affecting particular companies or the securities markets generally. A general downturn in the securities market may cause multiple asset classes to decline in value simultaneously.

 

Short Sales Risk. Short sales risk is the risk of loss associated with any appreciation on the price of a security borrowed in connection with a short sale. The Fund may engage in short sales that are not made “against-the-box,” which means that the Fund may sell short securities even when they are not actually owned or otherwise covered at all times during the period the short position is open. Short sales that are not made “against-the-box” theoretically involve unlimited loss potential since the market price of securities sold short may continuously increase.

 

Small and Medium Capitalization Companies Risk. The earnings and prospects of small and medium sized companies are more volatile than larger companies and may experience higher failure rates than larger companies. Small and medium sized companies normally have a lower trading volume than larger companies, which may tend to make their market price fall more disproportionately than larger companies in response to selling pressures and may have limited markets, product lines, or financial resources and lack management experience.

 

Total Return Swap Risk. In a total return swap, the buyer receives a periodic return equal to the total return of a specified security, securities or index, for a specified period of time. In return, the buyer pays the counterparty a variable stream of payments, typically based upon short-term interest rates, possibly plus or minus an agreed upon spread. For example, if the Fund enters into a swap where it agrees to exchange a floating rate of interest for a fixed rate of interest, the Fund may have to pay more money than it receives. Total return swaps entered into in which payments are not netted may entail greater risk than a swap entered into a net basis. There is a risk that adverse price movements in an instrument can result in a loss substantially greater than the Fund’s initial investment in that instrument (in some cases, the potential loss is unlimited). If there is a default by the other party to such a transaction, the Fund will have contractual remedies pursuant to the agreements related to the transaction. However, particularly in the case of privately negotiated instruments, there is a risk that the counterparty will not perform its obligations, which could leave the Fund worse off than if it had not entered into the position. These instruments are subject to high levels of volatility, in some cases due to the high levels of leverage the Fund may achieve with them.

 

13 
 

 

Performance: The bar chart and performance table below show the variability of the Fund’s returns, which is some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year and by showing the Fund’s one-year and since inception performance compared with those of a broad measure of market performance. Although the Fund commenced operations in 2019, the bar chart shows performance of the Fund’s Advisor Class shares for each calendar year since the Fund’s inception. The performance table compares the performance of the Fund over time to the performance of a broad-based securities market index. You should be aware that the Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information will be available at no cost by visiting www.anchor-capital.com/funds or by calling 1-844-594-1226.

 

Advisor Class Performance Bar Chart For Calendar Year Ended December 31

Best Quarter: 9/30/2022 5.36%
Worst Quarter: 12/31/2022 (3.26)%

 

The Fund’s Advisor Class year-to-date return as of September 30, 2023 was 0.12%.

 

Performance Table

Average Annual Total Returns

(For periods ended December 31, 2022)

 

  One
Year
Since
Inception
(7/15/2020)
Return before taxes – Advisor Class Shares (2.23)% 1.56%
Return after taxes on distributions – Advisor Class Shares (2.23)% 0.18%
Return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares – Advisor Class Shares (1.32)% 1.06%
Index –MSCI All Country World Index(1) (18.37)% 5.64%
(1)The MSCI All Country World Index is composed of large and mid-capitalization developed and emerging market equities. Investors cannot invest directly in an index or benchmark.

 

Investment Adviser: Anchor Capital Management Group, Inc. (the “Adviser”)

 

Portfolio Managers: Garrett Waters, Chief Executive Officer of the Adviser and Eric Leake CMT®, President of the Adviser are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and have served the Fund as its portfolio managers since it commenced operations in 2019.

 

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares: The minimum initial investment in the Fund for Advisor Class shares is $1,000 for all account types, and the minimum subsequent investment is $100. You may purchase and redeem shares of the Fund on any day that the New York Stock Exchange is open. Redemption requests may be made in writing, by telephone, or through a financial intermediary and will be paid by automated clearing house funds (“ACH”), check or wire transfer. The Fund or its Adviser may waive any of the minimum initial and subsequent investment amounts.

 

Tax Information: Dividends and capital gain distributions you receive from the Fund, whether you reinvest your distributions in additional Fund shares or receive them in cash, are taxable to you at either ordinary income or capital gains tax rates unless you are investing through a tax-deferred plan such as an IRA or 401(k) plan. However, these dividend and capital gain distributions may be taxable upon their eventual withdrawal from tax-deferred plans.

 

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries: If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

14 
 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RELATED RISKS

 

Investment Objective:

 

Fund Investment Objective
Anchor Risk Managed Income Strategies Fund (formerly, “Anchor Risk Managed Credit Strategies Fund”)(“Income Fund”) seeks to provide long-term growth of capital while providing current income
Anchor Risk Managed Equity Strategies Fund
(“Equity Fund”)
seeks to provide total return from income and capital appreciation with a secondary objective of limiting risk during unfavorable market conditions
Anchor Risk Managed Global Strategies Fund
(“Global Fund”)
seeks to achieve above average total returns over a full market cycle with lower correlation and reduced risk when compared to traditional world indices

 

Each Fund’s investment objective may be changed by the Board of Trustees upon 60 days’ written notice to shareholders.

 

Principal Investment Strategies: Each Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective utilizing a “fund of funds” structure, by allocating assets among various strategies based on the Adviser’s research and analysis regarding market trends. A market trend is the movement of a financial market in a particular direction over time. Each Fund primarily takes long and short positions in securities that are highly correlated to its applicable market based on long, intermediate, and short-term trends. The Adviser considers a long-term trend to be those that are observed over two years or more; intermediate trends to last between nine to 24 months; and short-term trends to take place up to nine months.

 

The Income Fund invests primarily in:

(1)Underlying Funds that invest in or are otherwise exposed to developed and emerging markets, which are countries listed on the MSCI All World Country Index and MSCI Emerging Markets Index;
(2)derivative instruments, either directly or indirectly, including options and futures designed to substitute for or replicate some or all of the features of the Underlying Funds; and
(3)U.S. or foreign cash equivalents, without limitation, as collateral for derivative instruments or as a temporary defensive measure during periods of market volatility.

 

The Adviser seeks to manage risk by hedging the Fund’s investment portfolio when it believes security prices will decline. The Adviser will hedge by:

(i)increasing allocations to cash equivalents or U.S. Treasury securities; and
(ii)selling short ETFs or derivative instruments the Adviser believes have a high correlation the Fund’s core holdings. Correlation is the measure of the similarity between two assets.

Generally, the adviser does not attempt to evaluate individual securities held by the Underlying Funds.

 

At least 80% of the Equity Fund is invested in:

(1)U.S. or foreign equity securities of any market capitalization including Underlying Funds that primarily invest in or are otherwise exposed to domestic and foreign equity securities; and
(2)derivative instruments, including options, futures, and total return swaps, designed to replicate some or all of the features of an underlying portfolio of equity securities.

 

Under normal market conditions, Global Fund invests at least 40% of its assets (plus the amount of borrowings, if any) in long and short positions in exchange-traded funds and mutual funds registered and offered in the U.S with underlying holdings in non-U.S. companies.

 

In determining whether a company is a non-U.S. company, the Adviser will consider whether the company:

·has a class of securities whose principal securities market is outside the U.S.;
·has its principal office outside the U.S.; or
·is otherwise determined to be economically tied to a country outside the U.S. by the Adviser in its discretion (e.g., using classifications assigned by third parties, including an issuer’s “country of risk” as determined by Bloomberg or the classifications assigned to a company by the Fund’s benchmark index provider).
15 
 

A swap is an agreement in which one party makes payments based on a set rate, either fixed or variable, while the other party makes payments based on the return of an underlying asset, which includes both the income it generates and any capital gains. Credit default swaps (“CDS”) are typically two-party financial contracts that transfer credit exposure between the two parties. Under a typical CDS, one party (the “seller”) receives pre-determined periodic payments from the other party (the “buyer”). The seller agrees to make compensating specific payments to the buyer if a negative credit event occurs, such as the bankruptcy or default by the issuer of the underlying debt instrument. Total return swaps (“TRS”) are similar. In a TRS, the underlying asset, referred to as the reference asset, is often an equity or bond index. This is owned by the party receiving the set rate payment. TRS allow the party receiving the total return to gain exposure and benefit from a reference asset without actually having to own it. For example, a Fund may seek exposure to the Merrill Lynch High Yield Master II Bond Index. It can do so by agreeing to exchange cash flows with an investment bank or other party based on the movement of this index.

 

The Adviser seeks to achieve a Fund’s secondary objective by managing risk through hedging the Fund’s investment portfolio when it believes security prices will decline. The Adviser will hedge by (i) increasing allocations to cash equivalents or U.S. Treasury securities;
(ii) purchasing inverse mutual funds or inverse ETFs; (iii) selling short ETFs or securities the Adviser believes have demonstrated a high correlation to the applicable markets. The Fund may invest in inverse funds linked to the applicable security type as suggested by the Fund’s name and as described above when the Adviser believes this strategy will provide an effective hedge to manage risk of the Fund’s investments.

 

Generally, the Adviser does not attempt to evaluate individual securities. The Adviser uses technical analysis, including monitoring price movements and price trends, of markets in an effort to identify the proper weighting of a Fund’s portfolio. The Adviser buys and sells securities and derivatives to increase or decrease the Fund’s exposure to the applicable market. The Adviser’s decision to buy or sell the Fund holding will be made based on the Adviser’s technically based trend and risk models that evaluate current market conditions and the Adviser’s determination of the appropriate exposure level to the applicable market.

 

The Adviser may engage in active and frequent trading of the Fund’s portfolio securities and derivatives to achieve the Fund’s investment objective.

 

Principal Investment Risks

 

The following describes the risks each Fund (unless otherwise noted) bears directly through its investments or indirectly through its investments in Underlying Funds.

 

Cash or Cash Equivalents Risk. The Fund may have significant investments in cash or cash equivalents. When a substantial portion of a portfolio is held in cash or cash equivalents, there is the risk that the value of the cash account, including interest, will not keep pace with inflation, thus reducing purchasing power over time.

 

Counterparty Risk. The Fund may engage in transactions in securities and financial instruments that involve counterparties. Counterparty risk is the risk that a counterparty (the other party to a transaction or an agreement or the party with whom the Fund executes transactions) to a transaction with the Fund may be unable or unwilling to make timely principal, interest or settlement payments, or otherwise honor its obligations. To limit the counterparty risk associated with such transactions, the Fund conducts business only with financial institutions judged by the Adviser to present acceptable credit risk.

 

Derivatives Risk. The Fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. These risks include (i) the risk that the counterparty to a derivative transaction may not fulfill its contractual obligations; (ii) the risk of mispricing or improper valuation; and (iii) the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. Derivative prices are highly volatile and may fluctuate substantially during a short period of time. Such prices are influenced by numerous factors that affect the markets, including, but not limited to: changing supply and demand relationships; government programs and policies; national and international political and economic events, changes in interest rates, inflation and deflation and changes in supply and demand relationships. Trading derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities including:

·Leverage and Volatility Risk. Derivative contracts ordinarily have leverage inherent in their terms. The low margin deposits normally required in trading derivatives, including futures contracts, permit a high degree of leverage. Accordingly, a relatively small price movement may result in an immediate and substantial loss to the Fund. The use of leverage may also cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions when it would not be advantageous to do so in order to satisfy its obligations or to meet collateral segregation requirements. The use of leveraged derivatives can magnify the Fund’s potential for gain or loss and, therefore, amplify the effects of market volatility on the Fund’s share price.
·Liquidity Risk. It is possible that particular derivative investments might be difficult to purchase or sell, possibly preventing the Fund from executing positions at an advantageous time or price, or possibly requiring them to dispose of other investments at unfavorable times or prices in order to satisfy their obligations. Most U.S. commodity futures exchanges impose daily limits regulating the maximum amount above or below the previous day’s settlement price which a futures contract price may fluctuate during a single day. During a single trading day no trades may be executed at prices beyond the daily limit. Once the price of a particular futures contract has increased or decreased to the limit point, it may be difficult, costly or impossible to liquidate a position. It is also possible that an exchange or the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”), which regulates commodity futures exchanges, may suspend trading in a particular contract, order immediate settlement of a contract or order trading to the liquidation of open positions only.
16 
 

Equity Securities Risk (Equity Fund and Global Fund only). Fluctuations in the value of equity securities held by the Fund will cause the net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund and the price of its shares to fluctuate. Common stock of an issuer in the Fund’s portfolio may decline in price if the issuer fails to make anticipated dividend payments. Common stock will be subject to greater dividend risk than preferred stocks or debt instruments of the same issuer. In addition, common stocks have experienced significantly more volatility in returns than other asset classes.

 

Emerging Markets Risk (Income Fund only). The Fund may invest in countries with newly organized or less developed securities markets. There are typically greater risks involved in investing in emerging markets securities. Generally, economic structures in these countries are less diverse and mature than those in developed countries and their political systems tend to be less stable. Emerging market countries may have different regulatory, accounting, auditing, and financial reporting and record keeping standards and may have material limitations on PCAOB (the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board) inspection, investigation, and enforcement. Therefore, the availability and reliability of information material to an investment decision, particularly financial information, in emerging market companies may be limited in the scope and reliability as compared to information provided by U.S. companies. Emerging market economies may be based on only a few industries, therefore security issuers, including governments, may be more susceptible to economic weakness and more likely to default. Emerging market countries also may have relatively unstable governments, weaker economies, and less-developed legal systems with fewer security holder rights. Investments in emerging markets countries may be affected by government policies that restrict foreign investment in certain issuers or industries. The potentially smaller size of their securities markets and lower trading volumes can make investments relatively illiquid and potentially more volatile than investments in developed countries, and such securities may be subject to abrupt and severe price declines. Due to this relative lack of liquidity, the Fund may have to accept a lower price. An inability to sell a portfolio position can adversely affect the Fund’s value or prevent the Fund from being able to meet cash obligations or take advantage of other investment opportunities.

 

Exchange Traded Funds Risk. ETFs are investment companies, which may be managed or unmanaged, that generally seek to track the performance of a specific index. The value of ETFs can be expected to increase and decrease in value in proportion to increases and decreases in the indices that they are designed to track. The volatility of different index tracking stocks can be expected to vary in proportion to the volatility of the particular index they track. ETFs are traded similarly to stocks of individual companies. Although an ETF is designed to provide investment performance corresponding to its index, it may not be able to exactly replicate the performance of its index because of its operating expenses and other factors. When the Fund invests in another investment company, including an ETF, it will indirectly bear its proportionate share of any fees and expenses payable directly by the other investment company. Therefore, the Fund will incur higher expenses, many of which may be duplicative. In addition, the Fund may be affected by losses of the underlying funds and the level of risk arising from the investment practices of the underlying funds (such as the use of leverage by the funds). The Fund has no control over the investments and related risks taken by the underlying funds in which it invests. Investments in ETFs are also subject to the following risks: (i) the market price of an ETF’s shares may trade above or below their net asset value; (ii) an active trading market for an ETF’s shares may not develop or be maintained; or (iii) trading of an ETF’s shares may be halted for a number of reasons.

 

Foreign Investment Risk. Investing in foreign securities, including depositary receipts, or securities of U.S. entities with significant foreign operations, involves additional risks that can affect the Fund’s performance. Foreign markets may be less liquid, more volatile and subject to less regulation than U.S. markets. There may be difficulties in enforcing contractual obligations, and it may take more time for transactions to clear and settle in foreign countries than in the U.S. Less information may be available about foreign issuers. The costs of buying and selling foreign securities, including tax, brokerage and custody costs, generally are higher than those involving domestic transactions. The specific risks of investing in foreign securities include valuation risk and:

·Currency Risk. The values of foreign investments may be affected by changes in currency rates or exchange control regulations. If the local currency gains strength against the U.S. dollar, the value of the foreign security increases in U.S. dollar terms. Conversely, if the local currency weakens against the U.S. dollar, the value of the foreign security declines in U.S. dollar terms. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers, including depositary receipts, also are subject to currency risk based on their related investments. The Fund is permitted to hedge against foreign currency risk, but normally will not do so.
·Political/Economic Risk. Changes in economic, tax or foreign investment policies, government stability, war or other political or economic actions may have an adverse effect on the Fund’s foreign investments.
·Regulatory Risk. Foreign companies often are not subject to uniform accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards or to other regulatory practices and requirements common to U.S. companies.

 

There may be less information publicly available about foreign issuers than about most publicly-traded U.S. companies, and foreign issuers are usually not subject to accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards and practices as stringent as those in the United States. In addition, the Fund may be subject to non-U.S. taxes, including potentially on a retroactive basis, on (i) capital gains it realizes or dividends or interest it receives on non-U.S. securities, (ii) transactions in those securities and (iii) the repatriation of proceeds generated from the sale of those securities.

 

Additional risks have arisen related to the high levels of debt of various European countries such as Greece, Italy and Spain. One or more member states might exit the European Union, placing its currency and banking system in jeopardy. These problems, and related political and monetary efforts to address these problems, may increase the potential for market declines in one or more member states that can spread to global markets. These increased risks may persist and may result in greater volatility in the securities markets and the potential for impaired liquidity and valuation.

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Fund of Funds Risk. The ability of the Fund to meet its investment objectives is directly related to the ability of the Underlying Funds in which it invests and their respective investment managers, to meet their investment objectives. Certain investment managers may be dependent upon a single individual or small group of individuals, the loss of which could adversely affect their success. There can be no assurance that any Underlying Fund will achieve its investment objectives.

 

Futures Risk. In addition to all the risks associated with the underlying, a future, which is a contract that derives its value from the price performance of an underlying entity, such as an asset, index, or interest rate, has additional risks because it is a financial contract rather than a security, including counterparty risk, and liquidity risk. Where futures are used for hedging, lack of the desired or expected correlation between the future and the underlying, known as basis risk, would reduce the desired effectiveness of the hedging instrument.

 

Hedging Risk. Each Fund’s use of inverse securities or other transactions to reduce risk involves costs and will be subject to the Adviser’s ability to predict correctly changes in the relationships of such hedge instruments to each Fund’s portfolio holdings or other factors. No assurance can be given that the Adviser’s judgment in this respect will be correct. In addition, no assurance can be given that the applicable Fund will enter into hedging or other transactions at times or under circumstances in which it may be advisable to do so.

 

Inverse ETF Risk (Equity Fund and Global Fund only). Inverse ETF index funds seek to provide investment results that will match a certain percentage of the inverse of the performance of a specific benchmark on a daily basis. Because they reset daily there may be significant volatility associated with inverse ETFs. The inverse ETFs in which the Fund invests may not be able to replicate exactly the inverse of the performance of the indices they track. Inverse ETFs fall in price when stock prices are rising. Additionally, inverse ETFs may employ leverage which magnifies the changes in the underlying stock index upon which they are based. Investing in inverse ETFs may result in increased volatility due to the Fund’s possible use of short sales of securities and swaps. The use of leverage by an ETF increases risk to the Fund. The more a fund invests in leveraged instruments, the more the leverage will magnify any gains or losses on those investments. During periods of increased volatility, inverse ETFs may not perform in the manner they are designed. Investments in inverse funds are intended to be short-term in nature and may, therefore, lead to increased turnover and transaction costs to the Fund.

 

Inverse Funds Risk (Equity Fund and Global Fund only). Inverse funds typically lose value as the index or security tracked by the fund increases in value; a result that is the opposite from traditional funds. Because they reset daily there may be significant volatility associated with inverse funds. The inverse funds in which the Fund invests may not be able to replicate exactly the inverse of the performance of the benchmark they track. Inverse funds fall in price when its benchmark prices are rising. Additionally, inverse funds may employ leverage which magnifies the changes in the underlying benchmark upon which they are based. Investments in inverse funds will prevent the Fund from participating in market-wide or sector-wide gains and may not prove to be an effective hedge. During periods of increased volatility, inverse funds may not perform in the manner they are designed. Investments in inverse funds are intended to be short-term in nature and may, therefore, lead to increased turnover and transaction costs to the Fund.

 

Large Market Capitalization Companies Risk (Equity Fund and Global Fund only. The value of investments in larger companies may not rise as much as smaller companies, or larger companies may be unable to respond quickly to competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes.

 

Management Risk. The Fund’s ability to identify and invest in attractive opportunities is dependent upon the Adviser. If one or more key individuals leave, the Adviser may not be able to hire qualified replacements or may require extended time to do so. This situation could prevent the Fund from achieving its investment objectives. The Fund’s portfolio managers use technical analysis and/or trend models. Any imperfections or limitations in such analyses and models could affect the ability of the portfolio managers to implement strategies. By necessity, these analyses and models make simplifying assumptions that limit their efficacy. Models that appear to explain prior market data can fail to predict future market events. Further, the data used in models may be inaccurate and/or it may not include the most recent information about a company or a security.

 

Market and Geopolitical Risk. The increasing interconnectivity between global economies and financial markets increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market. Securities in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform due to inflation (or expectations for inflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters, climate-change and climate related events, pandemics, epidemics, terrorism, international conflicts, regulatory events and governmental or quasi-governmental actions. The occurrence of global events similar to those in recent years, such as terrorist attacks around the world, natural disasters, social and political discord or debt crises and downgrades, among others, may result in market volatility and may have long-term effects on both the U.S. and global financial markets. It is difficult to predict when similar events affecting the U.S. or global financial markets may occur, the effects that such events may have and the duration of those effects. Any such event(s) could have a significant adverse impact on the value and risk profile of the Fund’s portfolio. The COVID-19 pandemic and the aggressive responses taken by many governments, had negative impacts, and in many cases severe negative impacts, on markets worldwide. It is not known how long such impacts, or any future impacts of other significant events described above, will or would last, but there could be a prolonged period of global economic slowdown, which may impact your Fund investment. Therefore, the Fund could lose money over short periods due to short-term market movements and over longer periods during more prolonged market downturns. During a general market downturn, multiple asset classes may be negatively affected. Changes in market conditions and interest rates can have the same impact on all types of securities and instruments. In times of severe market disruptions you could lose your entire investment.

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Options Risk. There are risks associated with the sale and purchase of call and put options. As a seller (writer) of a put option, the Fund will tend to lose money if the value of the reference index or security falls below the strike price. As the seller (writer) of a call option, the Fund may experience lower returns if the value of the reference index or security rises above the strike price.

 

Portfolio Turnover Risk (Income Fund only). The Fund’s annual portfolio turnover rate may vary greatly from year to year. A high rate of portfolio turnover (i.e., 100% or more) will result in increased transaction costs for the Fund in the form of increased dealer spreads and brokerage commissions. Greater transaction costs may reduce Fund performance. High portfolio turnover also may result in increased realization of net short-term capital gains (which are taxable to shareholders as ordinary income when distributed to them), higher taxable distributions and lower the Fund’s after-tax performance.

 

Securities Market Risk. The value of securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to factors affecting particular companies or the securities markets generally. A general downturn in the securities market may cause multiple asset classes to decline in value simultaneously, although equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed income securities. Despite gains in some markets after steep declines during certain periods of 2020, negative conditions and price declines may return unexpectedly and dramatically. In addition, the Fund could experience a loss when selling securities in order to meet unusually large or frequent redemption requests in times of overall market turmoil or declining prices for the securities sold.

·Stock Market Risk (Equity Fund and Global Fund only). The risk that the value of equity securities may decline. Stock prices change daily, sometimes rapidly, in response to company activity and general economic and market conditions. Certain stocks may decline in value even during periods when the prices of equity securities in general are rising, or may not perform as well as the market in general. Stock prices may also experience greater volatility during periods of challenging market conditions such as the one that the market recently experienced. Additional stock market risk may be introduced when a particular equity security is traded on a foreign market. For more detail on the related risks involved in foreign markets, see Foreign Investment Risk above.
·Bond Market Risk (Global Fund only). The risk that the value and liquidity of debt securities may be reduced under certain circumstances. Bond prices can change daily, sometimes rapidly, in response to issuer activity and general economic and credit market conditions. Bond prices can be volatile and there can be severe limitations in the ability to value or sell certain bonds, including those that are of higher credit quality, during periods of reduced credit market liquidity such as the one that the market recently experienced.

 

Short Sales Risk. Short sales by the Fund that are not made “against-the-box” (that is when the Fund has an offsetting long position in the asset that it is selling short) theoretically involve unlimited loss potential since the market price of securities sold short may continuously increase. Short selling allows the Fund to profit from declines in market prices to the extent such decline exceeds the transaction costs and the costs of borrowing the securities. However, since the borrowed securities must be replaced by purchases at market prices in order to close out the short position, any appreciation in the price of the borrowed securities would result in a loss. Purchasing securities to close out the short position can itself cause the price of the securities to rise further, thereby exacerbating the loss. The Fund may mitigate such losses by replacing the securities sold short before the market price has increased significantly. Under adverse market conditions, the Fund might have difficulty purchasing securities to meet its short sale delivery obligations, and might have to sell portfolio securities to raise the capital necessary to meet its short sale obligations at a time when fundamental investment considerations would not favor such sales.

 

Small and Medium Capitalization Companies Risk. The stocks of small and medium capitalization companies involve substantial risk. These companies may have limited product lines, markets or financial resources, and they may be dependent on a limited management group. Stocks of these companies may be subject to more abrupt or erratic market movements than those of larger, more established companies or the market averages in general.

 

Total Return Swap Risk (Equity Fund and Global Fund only). In a total return swap, the buyer receives a periodic return equal to the total return of a specified security, securities or index, for a specified period of time. In return, the buyer pays the counterparty a variable stream of payments, typically based upon short-term interest rates, possibly plus or minus an agreed upon spread. For example, if the Fund enters into a swap where it agrees to exchange a floating rate of interest for a fixed rate of interest, the Fund may have to pay more money than it receives. Total return swaps entered into in which payments are not netted may entail greater risk than a swap entered into a net basis. There is a risk that adverse price movements in an instrument can result in a loss substantially greater than the Fund’s initial investment in that instrument (in some cases, the potential loss is unlimited). If there is a default by the other party to such a transaction, the Fund will have contractual remedies pursuant to the agreements related to the transaction. However, particularly in the case of privately-negotiated instruments, there is a risk that the counterparty will not perform its obligations, which could leave the Fund worse off than if it had not entered into the position. These instruments are subject to high levels of volatility, in some cases due to the high levels of leverage the Fund may achieve with them.

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Temporary Defensive Positions: To respond to adverse market, economic, political or other conditions, each Fund may invest 100% of its total assets, without limitation, in short-term debt securities and money market instruments. These short-term debt securities and money market instruments include: shares of money market mutual funds, commercial paper, certificates of deposit, bankers’ acceptances, U.S. government securities and repurchase agreements. While a Fund is in a defensive position, the opportunity to achieve its investment objective will be limited. Furthermore, to the extent that a Fund invests in money market mutual funds for cash positions, there will be some duplication of expenses because the Fund pays its pro-rata portion of such money market funds’ advisory fees and operational fees.

 

Portfolio Holdings Disclosure: A description of the Funds’ policies and procedures regarding the release of portfolio holdings information is available in the Funds’ Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”).

 

OPERATIONAL AND Cybersecurity: Fund operations, including business, financial, accounting, data processing systems or other operating systems and facilities may be disrupted, disabled or damaged as a result of a number of factors, including events that are wholly or partially beyond the Funds’ control. For example, there could be electrical or telecommunications outages; degradation or loss of internet or web services; natural disasters, such as earthquakes, tornados and hurricanes; climate-change and climate-related events; disease pandemics; or events arising from local or larger scale political or social events, as well as terrorist acts.

 

The Funds are also subject to the risk of cyber incidents, which may include, but are not limited to, the harming of or unauthorized access to digital systems (for example, through “hacking” or infection by computer viruses or other malicious software code), denial-of-service attacks on websites, and the inadvertent or intentional release of confidential or proprietary information. Cyber incidents may, among other things, harm Fund operations, result in financial losses to the Funds and their shareholders, cause the release of confidential or highly restricted information, and result in regulatory penalties, reputational damage, and/or increased compliance, reimbursement or other compensation costs. Fund operations that may be disrupted or halted due to a cyber incident include trading, the processing of shareholder transactions, and the calculation of each Fund’s NAV.

 

Issues affecting operating systems and facilities through cyber incidents, any of the scenarios described above, or other factors, may harm the Funds by affecting the Adviser, or other service providers, or issuers of securities in which the Funds invest. Although the Funds have business continuity plans and other safeguards in place, including what the Funds believe to be robust information security procedures and controls, there is no guarantee that these measures will prevent cyber incidents or prevent or ameliorate the effects of significant and widespread disruption to our physical infrastructure or operating systems. Furthermore, the Funds cannot directly control the security or other measures taken by unaffiliated service providers or the issuers of securities in which the Funds invest. Such risks at issuers of securities in which the Funds invest could result in material adverse consequences for such issuers, and may cause the Funds’ investments in such securities to lose value.

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MANAGEMENT

 

Investment Adviser: Anchor Capital Management Group, Inc., located at 15 Enterprise, Suite 450, Aliso Viejo, California 92656, serves as the Funds’ investment adviser. The Adviser is registered with the SEC as an investment adviser under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, as amended. The Adviser is a California corporation formed in 1995. Its clients are pooled investment vehicles and mutual funds. As of October 31, 2023, the Adviser had approximately $451.1 million in asset under management.

 

Subject to the oversight of the Board of Trustees, the Adviser is responsible for managing the Funds’ investments, placing trade orders and providing related administrative services and facilities under an Investment Advisory Agreement between the Fund and the Adviser.

 

The management fee set forth in the Investment Advisory Agreement is the percentage of the annualized average daily net assets for each Fund as set forth below, to be paid on a monthly basis. In addition to investment advisory fees, each Fund pays other expenses including costs incurred in connection with the maintenance of securities law registration, printing and mailing prospectuses and statements of additional information to shareholders, certain financial accounting services, taxes or governmental fees, custodial, transfer and shareholder servicing agent costs, expenses of outside counsel and independent accountants, preparation of shareholder reports and expenses of trustee and shareholders meetings.

 

The Adviser has contractually agreed to reduce its fees and/or absorb expenses of each Fund, until at least December 31, 2024, to ensure that total annual fund operating expenses after fee waiver and/or reimbursement (exclusive of any front-end or contingent deferred loads, taxes, brokerage fees and commissions, borrowing costs (such as interest and dividend expense on securities sold short), acquired fund fees and expenses, fees and expenses associated with investments in other collective investment vehicles or derivative instruments (including for example option and swap fees and expenses), or extraordinary expenses such as litigation) will not exceed 2.00% of each Fund’s average daily net assets attributable to Advisor Class shares, subject to possible recoupment from each Fund in future years within three years after the fees have been waived or reimbursed if such recoupment can be achieved within the lesser of the foregoing expense limits or the expense limits in place at the time of the recoupment. Fee waiver and reimbursement arrangements can decrease each Fund’s expenses and boost its performance. A discussion regarding the basis for the Board of Trustees’ renewal of the advisory agreement with respect to the Income Fund, Equity Fund and Global Fund is available in the Funds’ annual report to shareholders dated August 31, 2023.

 

Advisory Fee Expense Cap
1.60% Advisor Class – 2.00%
1.60% Advisor Class – 2.00%
1.60% Advisor Class – 2.00%

 

During the fiscal year ended August 31, 2023, the Adviser earned the following:

 

Fund Advisory Fee Earned
Income Fund 1.26%
Equity Fund 1.60%
Global Fund 1.57%

 

Portfolio Managers: Garrett Waters, Chief Executive Officer of the Adviser and Eric Leake CMT®, President of the Adviser have served as each Fund’s portfolio managers since each Fund commenced operations in 2015 (Income Fund), 2016 (Equity Fund) and 2019 (Global Fund).

 

Garrett Waters: Garrett Waters has been a Partner and Chief Executive Officer with the Adviser since 2009. Prior to joining the Adviser, Mr. Waters started his investment career in the institutional investment management division at J.P. Morgan Investment Management. He then went on to hold positions with Barclays Global Investors, Hollencrest Capital Management, and Pacific Financial Advisors. Mr. Waters is a graduate of Villanova University with a degree in business.

 

Eric Leake: Eric Leake CMT® is a Partner and President of the Adviser, where he has served as portfolio manager for the Adviser’s separate accounts since 1996. He is an active member of the Market Technicians Association (MTA). Mr. Leake attended Azusa Pacific University from 1988 – 1992.

 

The portfolio managers are supported by other members of the Adviser’s investment team who provide research, analysis and trading support.

 

The SAI provides additional information about the portfolio managers’ compensation, other accounts managed and ownership of Fund shares.

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HOW SHARES ARE PRICED

 

Shares of each Fund are sold at NAV. The NAV of each Fund is determined at close of regular trading (normally 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time) on each day the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) is open for business. NAV is computed by determining, on a per class basis, the aggregate market value of all assets of each Fund, less its liabilities, divided by the total number of shares outstanding ((assets-liabilities)/number of shares = NAV). The NYSE is closed on weekends and New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents’ Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Juneteenth, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day (“NYSE Close”). The NAV takes into account, on a per class basis, the expenses and fees of each Fund, including management, administration, and distribution fees, which are accrued daily. The determination of NAV for each Fund for a particular day is applicable to all applications for the purchase of shares, as well as all requests for the redemption of shares, received by each Fund (or an authorized broker or agent, or its authorized designee) before the close of trading on the NYSE on that day.

 

Generally, each Fund’s securities, including securities issued by ETFs, are valued each day at the last quoted sales price on each security’s primary exchange. Securities traded or dealt in upon one or more securities exchanges (whether domestic or foreign) for which market quotations are readily available and not subject to restrictions against resale shall be valued at the last quoted sales price on the primary exchange or, in the absence of a sale on the primary exchange, at the mean between the current bid and ask prices on such exchange. Securities primarily traded in the National Association of Securities Dealers’ Automated Quotation System (“NASDAQ”) National Market System for which market quotations are readily available shall be valued using the NASDAQ Official Closing Price. Securities that are not traded on any securities exchange (whether domestic or foreign) and for which over-the-counter market quotations are readily available generally shall be valued at the last sale price or, in the absence of a sale, at the mean between the current bid and ask price on such over-the-counter market. Debt securities not traded on an exchange may be valued at prices supplied by a pricing agent(s) based on broker or dealer supplied valuations or matrix pricing, a method of valuing securities by reference to the value of other securities with similar characteristics, such as rating, interest rate and maturity.

 

If market quotations are not readily available, securities will be valued at their fair market value as determined using the “fair value” procedures approved by the Board of Trustees. Fair value pricing involves subjective judgments and it is possible that the fair value determined for a security may be materially different than the value that could be realized upon the sale of that security. The fair value prices can differ from market prices when they become available or when a price becomes available. The Board of Trustees has designated the Adviser as the “Valuation Designee” to execute these procedures. The Adviser may also enlist third party consultants such as an audit firm or financial officer of a security issuer on an as-needed basis to assist in determining a security-specific fair value. The Board of Trustees reviews the execution of this process and the resultant fair value prices at least quarterly to assure the process produces reliable results.

 

Each Fund may use independent pricing services to assist in calculating the value of its securities. In addition, market prices for foreign securities are not determined at the same time of day as the NAV for each Fund. Because each Fund may invest in underlying ETFs which hold portfolio securities primarily listed on foreign exchanges, and these exchanges may trade on weekends or other days when the underlying ETFs do not price their shares, the value of some of each Fund’s portfolio securities may change on days when you may not be able to buy or sell Fund shares.

 

In computing NAV, each Fund values foreign securities held by it at the latest closing price on the exchange in which they are traded immediately prior to closing of the NYSE. Prices of foreign securities quoted in foreign currencies are translated into
U.S. dollars at current rates. If events materially affecting the value of a security in a Fund’s portfolio, particularly foreign securities, occur after the close of trading on a foreign market but before a Fund prices its shares, the security will be valued at fair value. For example, if trading in a portfolio security is halted and does not resume before a Fund calculates its NAV, the Adviser may need to price the security using the Fund’s fair value pricing guidelines. Without a fair value price, short-term traders could take advantage of the arbitrage opportunity and dilute the NAV of long-term investors. Fair valuation of a Fund’s portfolio securities can serve to reduce arbitrage opportunities available to short-term traders, but there is no assurance that fair value pricing policies will prevent dilution of a Fund’s NAV by short-term traders. The determination of fair value involves subjective judgments. As a result, using fair value to price a security may result in a price materially different from the prices used by other mutual funds to determine NAV, or from the price that may be realized upon the actual sale of the security.

 

With respect to any portion of a Fund’s assets that are invested in one or more open-end management investment companies registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”), the Fund’s NAV is calculated based upon the NAVs of those open-end management investment companies, and the prospectuses for these companies explain the circumstances under which those companies will use fair value pricing and the effects of using fair value pricing.

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HOW TO PURCHASE SHARES

 

Share Classes: This Prospectus describes Advisor Class shares offered by each Fund. Another class of shares of each Fund is offered for sale through a separate prospectus. The main differences between the share classes are investment minimums, ongoing fees and distribution channels they are sold through. In choosing which class of shares to purchase, you should consider which are available to you, and, if available to you, which will be most beneficial to you, given the amount of your purchase and the length of time you expect to hold the shares. Each class of shares in the Funds represents interest in the same portfolio of investments within the Funds. Advisor Class shares are only available for purchase through brokers or agents who have entered into selling agreements with the Funds’ distributor. All share classes may not be available for purchase in all states

 

Advisor Class shares are offered at their NAV without an initial sales charge. This means that 100% of your initial investment is placed into shares of each Fund. The minimum initial investment in the Advisor Class shares is $1,000 for all types of accounts and the minimum subsequent investment is $100. There are no sales charges on reinvested distributions.

 

Purchasing Shares: You may purchase shares of each Fund by sending a completed application form (the “Application”) to the following address:

 

Regular Mail

Anchor Risk Managed Income Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Equity Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Global Strategies Fund

c/o Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC

P.O. Box 514450

Omaha, Nebraska 68154

Express/Overnight Mail

Anchor Risk Managed Income Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Equity Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Global Strategies Fund

c/o Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC

4221 North 203rd Street, Suite 100

Elkhorn, Nebraska 68022

 

The USA PATRIOT Act requires financial institutions, including the Funds, to adopt certain policies and programs to prevent money-laundering activities, including procedures to verify the identity of customers opening new accounts. As requested on the Application, you should supply your full name, date of birth, social security number and permanent street address. Mailing addresses containing a P.O. Box will not be accepted. This information will assist the Funds in verifying your identity. Until such verification is made, the Funds may temporarily limit additional share purchases. In addition, the Funds may limit additional share purchases or close an account if it is unable to verify a shareholder’s identity. As required by law, the Funds may employ various procedures, such as comparing the information to fraud databases or requesting additional information or documentation from you, to ensure that the information supplied by you is correct.

 

Purchase through a Broker: You may invest in each Fund through a broker that has entered into a selling agreement with the Funds’ distributor. The broker is authorized to receive purchase and redemption orders on behalf of each Fund. Such broker is authorized to designate other intermediaries to receive purchase and redemption orders on each Fund’s behalf. Each Fund will be deemed to have received a purchase or redemption order when an authorized broker or its designee receives the order. The broker or agent may set their own initial and subsequent investment minimums. You may be charged a fee if you use a broker or agent to buy or redeem shares of each Fund. Finally, various servicing agents use procedures and impose restrictions that may be in addition to, or different from those applicable to investors purchasing shares directly from each Fund. You should carefully read the program materials provided to you by your servicing agent.

 

Purchase by Wire: If you wish to wire money to make an investment in a Fund, please call the Fund at 1-844-594-1226 for wiring instructions and to notify the Fund that a wire transfer is coming. Any commercial bank can transfer same-day funds via wire. The Funds will normally accept wired funds for investment on the day received if they are received by the Funds’ designated bank before the close of regular trading on the NYSE. Your bank may charge you a fee for wiring same-day funds.

 

Automated Clearing House (ACH) Purchase: Current shareholders may purchase additional shares via Automated Clearing House (“ACH”). To have this option added to your account, please send a letter requesting this option to the relevant Fund and supply a voided check for the bank account. Only bank accounts held at domestic institutions that are ACH members may be used for these transactions.

 

You may not use ACH transactions for your initial purchase of Fund shares. ACH purchases will be effective at the closing price per share on the business day after the order is placed. The Fund may alter, modify or terminate this purchase option at any time.

 

Shares purchased by ACH will not be available for redemption until the transactions have cleared. Shares purchased via ACH transfer may take up to 15 days to clear.

 

Automatic Investment Plan: You may participate in the Funds’ Automatic Investment Plan, an investment plan that automatically moves money from your bank account and invests it in a Fund through the use of electronic funds transfers or automatic bank drafts. You may elect to make subsequent investments by transfers of a minimum of $100 on specified days of each month into your established Fund account. Please contact the Funds at 1-844-594-1226 for more information about the Funds’ Automatic Investment Plan.

23 
 

Minimum and Additional Investment Amounts: The minimum initial investment in each Fund’s Advisor Class shares is $1,000 for all account types, and the minimum subsequent investment is $100. There is no minimum investment requirement when you are buying shares by reinvesting dividends and distributions from each Fund. Each Fund reserves the right to waive any investment minimum requirement.

 

Each Fund reserves the right, in its sole discretion, to reject any Application to purchase shares. Applications will not be accepted unless they are accompanied by a check drawn on a U.S. bank, thrift institutions, or credit union in U.S. funds for the full amount of the shares to be purchased. After you open an account, you may purchase additional shares by sending a check together with written instructions stating the name(s) on the account and the account number, to the above address. Make all checks payable to the applicable Fund. The Funds will not accept payment in cash, credit cards, cashier’s checks or money orders. Also, to prevent check fraud, the Funds will not accept third-party checks, U.S. Treasury checks, credit card checks or starter checks for the purchase of shares. Redemptions of shares of any Fund purchased by check may be subject to a hold period until the check has been cleared by the issuing bank. To avoid such holding periods, shares may be purchased through a broker or by wire, as described in this section.

 

Note: Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC, the Funds’ transfer agent, will charge a $25 fee against a shareholder’s account, in addition to any loss sustained by a Fund, for any check or electronic payment returned to the transfer agent for insufficient funds.

 

When Order is Processed: All shares will be purchased at the NAV per share (plus applicable sales charges, if any) next determined after a Fund receives your Application or request in good order. All requests received in good order by a Fund before 4:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) will be processed on that same day. Requests received after 4:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) will be processed on the next business day.

 

Good Order: When making a purchase request, make sure your request is in good order. “Good order” means your purchase request includes:

·the name of the applicable Fund;
·the dollar amount of shares to be purchased;
·a completed purchase application or investment stub; and
·check payable to the applicable Fund.

 

Retirement Plans: You may purchase shares of each Fund for your individual retirement plans. Please call each Fund at 1-844-594-1226 for the most current listing and appropriate disclosure documentation on how to open a retirement account.

 

 

HOW TO REDEEM SHARES

 

Redeeming Shares: Each Fund typically expects that it will take up to three business days following the receipt of your redemption request to pay out redemption proceeds by check or electronic transfer. Each Fund typically expects to pay redemptions from cash, cash equivalent, proceeds from the sale of Fund shares, any lines of portfolio securities. These redemption payment methods will be used in regular and stressed market conditions. You may redeem all or any portion of the shares credited to your account by submitting a written request for redemption to:

 

Regular Mail

Anchor Risk Managed Income Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Equity Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Global Strategies Fund

c/o Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC

P.O. Box 541150

Omaha, Nebraska 68154

Express/Overnight Mail

Anchor Risk Managed Income Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Equity Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Global Strategies Fund

c/o Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC

4221 North 203rd Street, Suite 100

Elkhorn, Nebraska 68022

 

Redemptions by Telephone: The telephone redemption privilege is automatically available to all new accounts. If you do not want the telephone redemption privilege, you must indicate this in the appropriate area on your account application or you must write to each Fund and instruct it to remove this privilege from your account. If you own an IRA, you will be asked whether or not the Fund(s) should withhold federal income tax. The proceeds, which are equal to number of shares times NAV less any applicable deferred sales charges or redemption fees, will be sent by mail to the address designated on your account or sent electronically, via ACH or wire, directly to your existing account in a bank or brokerage firm in the United States as designated on your Application. To redeem by telephone, call 1-844-594-1226.

 

During periods of high market activity, you may encounter higher than usual wait times. Please allow sufficient time to ensure that you will be able to complete your telephone transaction prior to market close. Neither the Funds nor their transfer agent will be held liable if you are unable to place your trade due to high call volume.

24 
 

Each Fund reserves the right to suspend the telephone redemption privileges with respect to your account if the name(s) or the address on the account has been changed within the previous 30 days. Neither the Funds, the transfer agent, nor their respective affiliates will be liable for complying with telephone instructions they reasonably believe to be genuine or for any loss, damage, cost or expenses in acting on such telephone instructions and you will be required to bear the risk of any such loss. The Funds or the transfer agent, or both, will employ reasonable procedures to determine that telephone instructions are genuine. If the Funds and/or the transfer agent do not employ these procedures, they may be liable to you for losses due to unauthorized or fraudulent instructions. These procedures may include, among others, requiring forms of personal identification prior to acting upon telephone instructions, providing written confirmation of the transactions and/or tape recording telephone instructions.

 

Redemptions through Broker: Since shares of each Fund are held by a broker-dealer, you must contact that broker-dealer to redeem shares of a Fund. The servicing agent may charge a fee for this service.

 

Redemptions by Wire: You may request that your redemption proceeds be wired directly to your bank account. The Funds’ transfer agent imposes a $15 fee for each wire redemption and deducts the fee directly from your account. Your bank may also impose a fee for the incoming wire.

 

Systematic Withdrawal Plan: If your individual account, IRA or other qualified plan account has a current account value of at least $50,000, you may participate in the Funds’ Systematic Withdrawal Plan, an investment plan that automatically moves money to your bank account from the Funds through the use of electronic funds transfers. You may elect to make subsequent withdrawals by transfers of a minimum of $500 on specified days of each month into your established bank account. Please contact the Funds at 1-844-594-1226 for more information about the Funds’ Systematic Withdrawal Plan.

 

Redemptions in Kind: Each Fund reserves the right to honor requests for redemption or repurchase orders by making payment in whole or in part in readily marketable securities (“redemption in kind”) if the amount is greater than $250,000 or 1% of each Fund’s assets. The securities will be chosen by each Fund and valued using each Fund’s net asset value pricing procedures. A shareholder will be exposed to market risk until these securities are converted to cash and may incur transaction expenses in converting these securities to cash.

 

When Redemptions are Sent: Once a Fund receives your redemption request in “good order” as described below, it will issue a check based on the next determined NAV following your redemption request. The redemption proceeds normally will be sent by mail or by wire within three business days after receipt of a request in “good order.” If you purchase shares using a check and soon after request a redemption, your redemption proceeds, which are payable at the next determined NAV following the receipt your redemption request in “good order,” as described below, will not be sent until the check used for your purchase has cleared your bank.

 

Good Order: Your redemption request will be processed if it is in “good order.” To be in good order, the following conditions must be satisfied:

·The request should be in writing, unless redeeming by telephone, indicating the number of shares or dollar amount to be redeemed;
·The request must identify your account number;
·The request should be signed by you and any other person listed on the account, exactly as the shares are registered; and
·If you request that the redemption proceeds be sent to a person, bank or an address other than that of record or paid to someone other than the record owner(s), or if the address was changed within the last 30 days, or if the proceeds of a requested redemption exceed $50,000, the signature(s) on the request must be medallion signature guaranteed by an eligible signature guarantor.

 

When You Need Medallion Signature Guarantees: If you wish to change the bank or brokerage account that you have designated on your account, you may do so at any time by writing to the Funds with your signature guaranteed. A medallion signature guarantee assures that a signature is genuine and protects you from unauthorized account transfers. You will need your signature guaranteed if:

·you request a redemption to be made payable to a person not on record with the Funds;
·you request that a redemption be mailed to an address other than that on record with the Funds;
·the proceeds of a requested redemption exceed $50,000;
·any redemption is transmitted by federal wire transfer to a bank other than the bank of record; or
·your address was changed within 30 days of your redemption request.

 

Signatures may be guaranteed by any eligible guarantor institution (including banks, brokers and dealers, credit unions, national securities exchanges, registered securities associations, clearing agencies and savings associations). Further documentation will be required to change the designated account if shares are held by a corporation, fiduciary or other organization. A notary public cannot guarantee signatures.

25 
 

Retirement Plans: If you own an IRA or other retirement plan, you must indicate on your redemption request whether the Funds should withhold federal income tax. Unless you elect in your redemption request that you do not want to have federal tax withheld, the redemption will be subject to withholding.

 

Low Balances: If at any time your account balance falls below $2,500, a Fund may notify you that, unless the account is brought up to at least $2,500 within 30 days of the notice, your account could be closed. After the notice period, the Fund may redeem all of your shares and close your account by sending you a check to the address of record. Your account will not be closed if the account balance drops below $2,500 due to a decline in NAV. The Funds will not charge any redemption fee on involuntary redemptions.

 

 

FREQUENT PURCHASES AND REDEMPTIONS OF FUND SHARES

 

Each Fund discourages and does not accommodate market timing. Frequent trading into and out of a Fund can harm all Fund shareholders by disrupting the Fund’s investment strategies, increasing Fund expenses, decreasing tax efficiency and diluting the value of shares held by long-term shareholders. Each Fund is designed for long-term investors and is not intended for market timing or other disruptive trading activities. Accordingly, the Board of Trustees has approved policies that seek to curb these disruptive activities while recognizing that shareholders may have a legitimate need to adjust their Fund investments as their financial needs or circumstances change. Each Fund currently uses several methods to reduce the risk of market timing. These methods include:

  • Committing staff to review, on a continuing basis, recent trading activity in order to identify trading activity that may be contrary to each Funds’ Market Timing Trading Policy;
  • Rejecting or limiting specific purchase requests; and
  • Rejecting purchase requests from certain investors.

 

Though these methods involve judgments that are inherently subjective and involve some selectivity in their application, each Fund seeks to make judgments and applications that are consistent with the interests of Fund shareholders.

 

Based on the frequency of redemptions in your account, the Adviser or transfer agent may in its sole discretion determine that your trading activity is detrimental to a Fund as described in the Fund’ Market Timing Trading Policy and elect to reject or limit the amount, number, frequency or method for requesting future purchases or redemptions into the Fund.

 

Each Fund reserves the right to reject or restrict purchase requests for any reason, particularly when the shareholder’s trading activity suggests that the shareholder may be engaged in market timing or other disruptive trading activities. Neither the Fund nor the Adviser will be liable for any losses resulting from rejected purchase orders. The Adviser may also bar an investor who has violated these policies (and the investor’s financial advisor) from opening new accounts with any Fund.

 

Although the Funds attempt to limit disruptive trading activities, some investors use a variety of strategies to hide their identities and their trading practices. There can be no guarantee that each Fund will be able to identify or limit these activities. Omnibus account arrangements are common forms of holding shares of each Fund. While each Fund will encourage financial intermediaries to apply each Funds’ Market Timing Trading Policy to their customers who invest indirectly in a Fund, each Fund is limited in its ability to monitor the trading activity or enforce its Funds’ Market Timing Trading Policy with respect to customers of financial intermediaries. For example, should it occur, a Fund may not be able to detect market timing that may be facilitated by financial intermediaries or made difficult to identify in the omnibus accounts used by those intermediaries for aggregated purchases, exchanges and redemptions on behalf of all their customers. More specifically, unless the financial intermediaries have the ability to apply the Funds’ Market Timing Trading Policy to their customers through such methods as implementing short-term trading limitations or restrictions and monitoring trading activity for what might be market timing, each Fund may not be able to determine whether trading by customers of financial intermediaries is contrary to its Market Timing Trading Policy. Brokers maintaining omnibus accounts with the Funds have agreed to provide shareholder transaction information to the extent known to the broker to the Funds upon request. If any Fund or its transfer agent or shareholder servicing agent suspects there is market timing activity in the account, the Fund will seek full cooperation from the service provider maintaining the account to identify the underlying participant. At the request of the Adviser, the service providers may take immediate action to stop any further short-term trading by such participants.

 

26 
 

 

TAX STATUS, DIVIDENDS AND DISTRIBUTIONS

 

Any sale or exchange of a Fund’s shares may generate tax liability (unless you are a tax-exempt investor or your investment is in a qualified retirement account). When you redeem your shares you may realize a taxable gain or loss. This is measured by the difference between the proceeds of the sale and the tax basis for the shares you sold. (To aid in computing your tax basis, you generally should retain your account statements for the period that you hold shares in each Fund).

 

Dividends from net investment income, if any, are declared quarterly by the Income Fund, Equity Fund and Global Fund. Each Fund distributes its net capital gains, if any, annually. Both types of distributions will be reinvested in shares of each Fund unless you elect to receive cash. Dividends from net investment income (including any excess of net short-term capital gain over net long-term capital loss) are taxable to investors as ordinary income, while distributions of net capital gain (the excess of net long-term capital gain over net short-term capital loss) are generally taxable as long-term capital gain, regardless of your holding period for the shares. Any dividends or capital gain distributions you receive from a Fund will normally be taxable to you when made, regardless of whether you reinvest dividends or capital gain distributions or receive them in cash. Certain dividends or distributions declared in October, November or December will be taxed to shareholders as if received in December if they are paid during the following January. Each year the Funds will inform you of the amount and type of your distributions. IRAs and other qualified retirement plans are exempt from federal income taxation until retirement proceeds are paid out to the participant.

 

Your redemptions, including exchanges, may result in a capital gain or loss for federal tax purposes. A capital gain or loss on your investment is the difference between the cost of your shares, including any sales charges, and the amount you receive when you sell them. The Funds must report to the IRS and furnish to shareholders the cost basis information for shares purchased and sold. The Funds have chosen average cost as its standing (default) tax lot identification method for all shareholders, which means the Funds will use this method to determine which specific shares are deemed to be sold when there are multiple purchases on different dates at differing NAVs, and the entire position is not sold at one time. Shareholders may, however, choose a method other than the Fund’s standing method at the time of their purchase or upon sale of covered shares. Shareholders should consult their tax advisors to determine the best IRS-accepted cost basis method for their tax situation and to obtain more information about how cost basis reporting applies to them. Shareholders also should carefully review the cost basis information provided to them by the Funds and make any additional basis, holding period or other adjustments that are required when reporting these amounts on their federal income tax returns.

 

On the Application, you will be asked to certify that your social security number or taxpayer identification number is correct and that you are not subject to backup withholding for failing to report income to the IRS. If you are subject to backup withholding or you did not certify your taxpayer identification number, the IRS requires each Fund to withhold a percentage of any dividend, redemption or exchange proceeds. Each Fund reserves the right to reject any application that does not include a certified social security or taxpayer identification number. If you do not have a social security number, you should indicate on the purchase form that your application to obtain a number is pending. Each Fund is required to withhold taxes if a number is not delivered to the Fund within seven days.

 

This summary is not intended to be and should not be construed to be legal or tax advice. You should consult your own tax advisers to determine the tax consequences of owning a Fund’s shares.

 

 

DISTRIBUTION OF SHARES

 

Distributor: Northern Lights Distributors, LLC, (the “Distributor”) located at 4221 North 203rd Street, Suite 100, Elkhorn, Nebraska 68022, is the distributor for the shares of each Fund. The Distributor is a registered broker-dealer and member of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (“FINRA”). Shares of each Fund are offered on a continuous basis. The Distributor or an affiliate may, from time to time, at its expense and out of its own resources, make cash payments to some but not all brokers, dealers or financial intermediaries (“securities dealers”) for shareholder services, as an incentive to sell shares of each Fund and/or to promote retention of their customers’ assets in each Fund. These payments may be referred to as “revenue sharing,” but do not change the price paid by investors to purchase a Fund’s shares or the amount each Fund receives as proceeds from such sales. Revenue sharing payments may be made to securities dealers that provide services to each Fund or its shareholders, including (without limitation) shareholder servicing, transaction processing, sub-accounting or marketing support. The Distributor negotiates the level of payments described above to any particular securities dealers with each firm, based on, among other things, the nature and level of services provided by such securities dealers and the significance of the overall relationship of the securities dealers to the Distributor and its affiliate. The amount of these payments may be significant and may create an incentive for the securities dealers to sell shares of each Fund to you or to recommend one fund complex over another. Please speak with your securities dealer to learn more about payments made to them by the Distributor or an affiliate.

 

Householding: To reduce expenses, the Funds mail only one copy of the prospectus and each annual and semi-annual report to those addresses shared by accounts that have elected to receive paper copies of these documents. If you wish to receive individual copies of these documents, please call the Funds at 1-844-594-1226 on days the Funds are open for business or contact your financial institution. The Funds will begin sending you individual copies thirty days after receiving your request.

27 
 

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS

 

The financial highlights tables are intended to help you better understand the Income Fund, Equity Fund and Global Fund’s financial performance for the period since each Fund’s inception. Certain information reflects financial results for a single Fund share. Total return represents the rate that an investor would have earned (or lost) on an investment in each of the Income Fund, Equity Fund and Global Fund, assuming reinvestment of all dividends and distributions. This information for the fiscal year ended August 31, 2023, has been audited by Cohen & Company, Ltd., an independent registered public accounting firm, whose report, along with each of the Income Fund, Equity Fund and Global Fund’s financial statements, is included in the Funds’ annual report, which is available upon request. The information for the previous fiscal years was audited by BBD, LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm.

 

Anchor Risk Managed Income Strategies Fund

(formerly, “Anchor Risk Managed Credit Strategies Fund”)

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
 
Per Share Data and Ratios for a Share of Beneficial Interest Outstanding Throughout the Year/Periods Presented.

 

    Advisor Class  
    For the     For the     For the  
    Year Ended     Year Ended     Period Ended  
    August 31, 2023     August 31, 2022     August 31, 2021*  
Net asset value, beginning of Year/period   $ 9.74     $ 10.81     $ 10.37  
Activity from investment operations:                        
Net investment income (loss)(1)(6)(11)     0.11       (0.17 )     0.07  
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investments     (0.74 )     (0.64 )     0.54  
Total from investment operations     (0.63 )     (0.81 )     0.61  
                         
Less distributions:                        
From net investment income     (0.17 )           (0.16 )
From net realized gains           (0.26 )     (0.01 )
Total distributions     (0.17 )     (0.26 )     (0.17 )
                         
Net asset value, end of year/period   $ 8.94     $ 9.74     $ 10.81  
                         
Total return(2)     (6.50 )%     (7.65 )%     5.92 %(3)
                         
Net assets, end of year/period (000s)   $ 3,076     $ 10,232     $ 7,545  
                         
Ratio of gross expenses to average net assets
including interest and dividend expense(5)(7)(9)
    3.28 %     4.35 %     2.44 %(4)
                         
Ratio of net expenses to average net assets
including interest and dividend expense(5)(8)
    2.96 %     4.25 %     2.33 %(4)
                         
Ratio of net investment income (loss) to average net assets(5)(6)     1.16 %     (1.65 )%     0.64 %(4)
                         
Portfolio turnover rate     1,097 %     1,181 %     727 %(10)
                         

 

*For the period September 11, 2020 (commencement of operations) through August 31, 2021.
(1)Per share amounts calculated using the average shares method, which more appropriately presents the per share data for the year/period.
(2)Total returns are historical in nature and assume changes in share price, and reinvestment of dividends and capital gains distributions, if any.
(3)Not annualized.
(4)Annualized.
(5)The ratios of expenses to average net assets and net investment income (loss) to average net assets do not reflect the expenses of the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.
(6)Recognition of net investment income (loss) by the Fund is affected by the timing and declaration of dividends by the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.

(7) Ratio of gross expenses to average net assets excluding interest expense and dividend expense(5) 2.32% 2.10% 2.11%(4)

(8) Ratio of net expenses to average net assets excluding interest expense and dividend expense(5) 2.00% 2.00% 2.00%(4)

(9)Represents the ratio of expenses to average net assets absent fee waivers and/or expense reimbursements by the adviser.
(10)The portfolio turnover rate is for the entire Fund for the year ended August 31, 2021.
(11)Does not include the expenses of the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.
28 
 

 

Anchor Risk Managed Equity Strategies Fund
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
 
Per Share Data and Ratios for a Share of Beneficial Interest Outstanding Throughout Each Year/Period Presented.

 

    Advisor Class  
    For the     For the     For the     For the Period  
    Year Ended     Year Ended     Year Ended     Ended  
    August 31, 2023     August 31, 2022     August 31, 2021     August 31, 2020*  
Net asset value, beginning of year/period   $ 14.90     $ 15.28     $ 13.19     $ 11.07  
Activity from investment operations:                                
Net investment income (loss)(1)(6)(10)     0.10       (0.18 )     (0.21 )     (0.06 )
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investments     (0.36 )     (0.20 )     2.30       2.18  
Total from investment operations     (0.26 )     (0.38 )     2.09       2.12  
                                 
Less distributions:                                
From net investment income     (0.10 )                  
From net realized gains     (0.78 )                  
From return of capital     (0.17 )                  
Total distributions     (1.05 )                  
                                 
Net asset value, end of year/period   $ 13.59     $ 14.90     $ 15.28     $ 13.19  
                                 
Total return(2)     (1.42 )%     (2.49 )%     15.85 %     19.15 %(3)
                                 
Net assets, end of year/period (000s)   $ 297,163     $ 320,893     $ 143,664     $ 15,385  
                                 
Ratio of gross expenses to average net assets including interest and dividend expense(5)(7)     1.84 %     1.84 %     1.86 %     1.90 %(4)
                                 
Ratio of net expenses to average net assets including interest and dividend expense(5)(8)     1.84 %     1.84 %     1.86 %     1.90 %(4)
                                 
Ratio of net investment income (loss) to
 average net assets(5)(6)
    0.75 %     (1.21 )%     (1.49 )%     (1.34 )%(4)
                                 
Portfolio turnover rate     0 %     0 %     0 %     204 %(9)
                                 
*For the period April 30, 2020 (commencement of operations) through August 31, 2020.
(1)Per share amounts calculated using the average shares method, which more appropriately presents the per share data for the year/period.
(2)Total returns are historical in nature and assume changes in share price, and reinvestment of dividends and capital gains distributions, if any.
(3)Not annualized.
(4)Annualized.
(5)The ratios of expenses to average net assets and net investment loss to average net assets do not reflect the expenses of the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.
(6)Recognition of net investment loss by the Fund is affected by the timing and declaration of dividends by the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.

(7) Ratio of gross expenses to average net assets
excluding interest expense and dividend expense(5) 1.84% 1.84% 1.86% 1.90%(4)

(8) Ratio of net expenses to average net assets
excluding interest expense and dividend expense(5) 1.84% 1.84% 1.86% 1.90%(4)

(9)The portfolio turnover rate is for the entire Fund for the year ended August 31, 2020.
(10)Does not include the expenses of the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.

 

29 
 

 

 

Anchor Risk Managed Global Strategies Fund
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
 
Per Share Data and Ratios for a Share of Beneficial Interest Outstanding Throughout Each Year/Period Presented.

 

    Advisor Class  
    For the     For the     For the     For the  
    Year Ended     Year Ended     Year Ended     Period Ended  
    August 31, 2023     August 31, 2022     August 31, 2021     August 31, 2020*  
Net asset value, beginning of year/period   $ 10.37     $ 12.45     $ 11.26     $ 11.05  
Activity from investment operations:                                
Net investment income (loss)(1)(6)(13)     0.16       (0.14 )     (0.23 )     (0.00 )(9)
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investments     (0.35 )     (0.63 )     1.56       0.21  
Total from investment operations     (0.19 )     (0.77 )     1.33       0.21  
                                 
Less distributions:                                
From net investment income     (0.13 )           (0.02 )      
From net realized gains           (1.31 )     (0.12 )      
From return of capital     (0.03 )                  
Total distributions     (0.16 )     (1.31 )     (0.14 )      
                                 
Net asset value, end of year/period   $ 10.02     $ 10.37     $ 12.45     $ 11.26  
                                 
Total return(2)     (1.80 )%     (6.30 )%     11.94 %     1.90 %(3)
                                 
Net assets, end of year/period (000s)   $ 19,499     $ 6,540     $ 6,777     $ 11 (7)
                                 
Ratio of gross expenses to average net assets including interest and dividend expense(5)(8)(11)     1.99 %     2.19 %     2.15 %     2.67 %(4)
                                 
Ratio of net expenses to average net assets including interest and dividend expense(5)(12)     2.00 %     2.00 %     2.00 %     2.00 %(4)
                                 
Ratio of net investment income (loss) to
average net assets(5)(6)
    1.54 %     (1.33 )%     (1.95 )%     (0.00 )%(4)
                                 
Portfolio turnover rate     50 %     0 %     118 %     869 %(10)
                                 
*For the period July 15, 2020 (commencement of operations) through August 31, 2020.
(1)Per share amounts calculated using the average shares method, which more appropriately presents the per share data for the year/period.
(2)Total returns are historical in nature and assume changes in share price, and reinvestment of dividends and capital gains distributions, if any.
(3)Not annualized.
(4)Annualized.
(5)The ratios of expenses to average net assets and net investment loss to average net assets do not reflect the expenses of the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.
(6)Recognition of net investment income (loss) by the Fund is affected by the timing and declaration of dividends by the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.
(7)Amount is actual; not presented in thousands.
(8)Represents the ratio of expenses to average net assets absent fee waivers and/or expense reimbursements by the adviser.
(9)Amount is less than $0.005.
(10)The portfolio turnover rate is for the entire Fund for the year ended August 31, 2020.

(11) Ratio of gross expenses to average net assets
excluding interest expense and dividend expense(5) 1.99% 2.19% 2.15% 2.67%(4)

(12) Ratio of net expenses to average net assets
excluding interest expense and dividend expense(5) 2.00% 2.00% 2.00% 2.00%(4)

(13)Does not include the expenses of the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.

 

30 
 

 

PRIVACY NOTICE

 

Northern Lights Fund Trust IV

Rev. April 2021

 

FACTS WHAT DOES NORTHERN LIGHTS FUND TRUST IV DO WITH YOUR PERSONAL INFORMATION?

 

Why? Financial companies choose how they share your personal information.  Federal law gives consumers the right to limit some, but not all sharing.  Federal law also requires us to tell you how we collect, share, and protect your personal information.  Please read this notice carefully to understand what we do.

 

What?

The types of personal information we collect and share depends on the product or service that you have with us. This information can include:

·         Social Security number and wire transfer instructions

·         account transactions and transaction history

·         investment experience and purchase history

When you are no longer our customer, we continue to share your information as described in this notice.

 

How? All financial companies need to share customers’ personal information to run its everyday business.  In the section below, we list the reasons financial companies can share its customers’ personal information; the reasons Northern Lights Fund Trust IV chooses to share; and whether you can limit this sharing.

 

Reasons we can share your personal information: Does Northern Lights Fund Trust IV share information? Can you limit this sharing?
For our everyday business purposes - such as to process your transactions, maintain your account(s), respond to court orders and legal investigations, or report to credit bureaus. YES NO
For our marketing purposes - to offer our products and services to you. NO We don’t share
For joint marketing with other
financial companies.
NO We don’t share
For our affiliates’ everyday business purposes - information about your transactions and records. NO We don’t share
For our affiliates’ everyday business purposes - information about your
credit worthiness.
NO We don’t share
For non-affiliates to market to you NO We don’t share

 

QUESTIONS?   Call 1-631-490-4300

 

 
 

PRIVACY NOTICE

 

Northern Lights Fund Trust IV

 

Page 2  

 

What we do:
How does Northern Lights Fund Trust IV protect my personal information?

To protect your personal information from unauthorized access and use, we use security measures that comply with federal law. These measures include computer safeguards and secured files and buildings.

Our service providers are held accountable for adhering to strict policies and procedures to prevent any misuse of your nonpublic personal information.

How does Northern Lights Fund Trust IV collect my personal information?

We collect your personal information, for example, when you

·          open an account or deposit money

·          direct us to buy securities or direct us to sell your securities

·          seek advice about your investments

We also collect your personal information from others, such as credit bureaus, affiliates, or other companies.

Why can’t I limit all sharing?

Federal law gives you the right to limit only:

·          sharing for affiliates’ everyday business purposes – information about
your creditworthiness.

·          affiliates from using your information to market to you.

·          sharing for nonaffiliates to market to you.

State laws and individual companies may give you additional rights to limit sharing.

 

Definitions
Affiliates

Companies related by common ownership or control. They can be financial and nonfinancial companies.

·         Northern Lights Fund Trust IV has no affiliates.

Nonaffiliates

Companies not related by common ownership or control. They can be financial and nonfinancial companies.

·          Northern Lights Fund Trust IV does not share with nonaffiliates so they can market to you.

Joint marketing

A formal agreement between nonaffiliated financial companies that together market financial products or services to you.

·          Northern Lights Fund Trust IV does not jointly market.

 
 

Anchor Risk Managed Income Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Equity Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Global Strategies Fund

 

Adviser

Anchor Capital Management Group, Inc.

15 Enterprise, Suite 450

Aliso Viejo, CA 92656

Distributor

Northern Lights Distributors, LLC

4221 North 203rd Street, Suite 100

Elkhorn, NE 68022

Custodian

U.S. Bank, N.A.

1555 North River Center Drive, Suite 202

Milwaukee, WI 53212

Legal
Counsel

Thompson Hine LLP

41 South High Street, Suite 1700

Columbus, OH 43215

Transfer
Agent

Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC

225 Pictoria Drive, Suite 450

Cincinnati, OH 42546

Independent
Registered
Public Accounting Firm

Cohen & Company, Ltd

1835 Market Street, Suite 310, Philadelphia, PA 19103

 

Additional information about each Fund is included in the Funds’ SAI dated December 29, 2023. The SAI is incorporated into this Prospectus by reference (i.e., legally made a part of this Prospectus). The SAI provides more details about each Fund’s policies and management. Additional information about the Funds’ investments is also available in the Funds’ Annual and Semi-Annual Reports to Shareholders. In the Funds’ Annual Report, you will find a discussion of the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected each Fund’s performance during the last fiscal year.

 

To obtain a free copy of the SAI and the Annual and Semi-Annual Reports to Shareholders, or other information about the Funds, or to make shareholder inquiries about the Funds, please call 1-844-594-1226. Information relating to the Funds can be found on the Funds’ website at www.anchor-capital.com/funds. You may also write to:

 

Anchor Risk Managed Income Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Equity Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Global Strategies Fund

c/o Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC

4221 North 203rd Street, Suite 100

Elkhorn, NE 68022

 

Reports and other information about each Fund are available on the EDGAR Database on the SEC’s Internet site at http://www.sec.gov. Copies of the information may be obtained, after paying a duplicating fee, by electronic request at the following E-mail address: publicinfo@sec.gov.

 

 

Investment Company Act File # 811-23066

 
 

 

Anchor Risk Managed Income Strategies Fund

(formerly, “Anchor Risk Managed Credit Strategies Fund”)

Institutional Class Shares – ATCSX

 

Anchor Risk Managed Equity Strategies Fund

Institutional Class Shares – ATESX

 

Anchor Risk Managed Global Strategies Fund

Institutional Class Shares – ATGSX

 

 

 

Each a Series of Northern Lights Fund Trust IV

 

 

PROSPECTUS

December 29, 2023

 

 

Advised by:

Anchor Capital Management Group, Inc.

15 Enterprise, Suite 450

Aliso Viejo, California 92656

 

 

www.anchor-capital.com/funds                                                                          1-844-594-1226 (toll-free)

 

 

This Prospectus provides important information about the Fund that you should know before investing. Please read it carefully and keep it for future reference.

 

These securities have not been approved or disapproved by the Securities and Exchange Commission nor has the Securities and Exchange Commission passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of this Prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

 
 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

FUND SUMMARY - ANCHOR RISK MANAGED INCOME STRATEGIES FUND 1
FUND SUMMARY - ANCHOR RISK MANAGED EQUITY STRATEGIES FUND 5
FUND SUMMARY - ANCHOR RISK MANAGED GLOBAL STRATEGIES FUND 10
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RELATED RISKS
15
Investment Objective 15
Principal Investment Strategies 15
Principal Investment Risks 16
Temporary Defensive Positions 20
Portfolio Holdings Disclosure 20
Operational and Cybersecurity 20
MANAGEMENT 21
Investment Adviser 21
Portfolio Managers 21
HOW SHARES ARE PRICED 22
HOW TO PURCHASE SHARES 23
HOW TO REDEEM SHARES 24
FREQUENT PURCHASES AND REDEMPTIONS OF FUND SHARES 26
TAX STATUS, DIVIDENDS AND DISTRIBUTIONS 27
DISTRIBUTION OF SHARES 28
Distributor 28
Distribution Fees 28
Additional Compensation To Financial Intermediaries 28
Householding 28
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS 29


 
 

FUND SUMMARY - ANCHOR RISK MANAGED INCOME STRATEGIES FUND
(formerly, “Anchor Risk Managed Credit Strategies Fund”)

 

Investment Objective: The Fund seeks to provide long-term growth of capital while providing current income.

Fees and Expenses of the Fund: This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, sell and hold shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. More information about these fees and expenses is available from your financial intermediary and under the heading How to Purchase Shares on page 23 of the Fund’s Prospectus.

 


Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)
Institutional
Class
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases
(as a percentage of offering price)
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load)
(as a percentage of offering price)
None
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed
on Reinvested Dividends and other Distributions
(as a percentage of offering price)
None
Redemption Fee
(as a % of amount redeemed on shares held less than 60 days)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year
as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Management Fees 1.60%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees 0.25%
Other Expenses 0.75%
Interest Expense and Dividend Expenses on Short sales 0.89%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses(1) 0.16%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 3.65%
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement(2) (0.35%)
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
After Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement
3.30%
(1)Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are the indirect costs of investing in other investment companies. The operating expenses in this fee table will not correlate to the expense ratio in the Fund’s financial highlights because the financial statements include only the direct operating expenses incurred by the Fund, not the indirect costs of investment companies.
(2)The Fund’s adviser has contractually agreed to reduce its fees and/or absorb expenses of the Fund, until at least December 31, 2024 to ensure that total annual fund operating expenses after fee waiver and/or reimbursement excluding (i) any front-end or contingent deferred loads; (ii) brokerage fees and commissions, (iii) acquired fund fees and expenses; (iv) fees and expenses associated with investments in other collective investment vehicles or derivative instruments (including for example option and swap fees and expenses); (v) borrowing costs (such as interest and dividend expense on securities sold short); (vi) taxes; and (vii) extraordinary expenses, such as litigation expenses (which may include indemnification of Fund officers and Trustees, contractual indemnification of Fund service providers (other than the adviser)), will not exceed 2.25% of the Fund’s average daily net assets attributable to Institutional Class shares; subject to possible recoupment from the Fund in future years (within the three years after the fees have been waived or reimbursed) if such recoupment can be achieved within the lesser of the expense limitation in place at the time of wavier and the expense limitation in place at the time of recapture. The expense limit arrangement may not be terminated during this time period without prior approval of the Board of Trustees only on 60 days’ written notice to the Fund’s adviser.

 

Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.

 

The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based upon these assumptions your costs would be:

 

  1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
Institutional Class $333 $1,085 $1,858 $3,884

 

Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 1,097%.

1 
 

Principal Investment Strategies: The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective, utilizing a fund of funds structure, by allocating assets among worldwide market segments based on the adviser’s research and analysis regarding market trends. A market trend is the movement of a financial market in a particular direction over time. “Worldwide” means developed and emerging markets, as those terms are defined below.

 

The Fund invests its assets (plus the amount of borrowings, if any) in long and short positions in unaffiliated exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”), open-end and closed-end mutual funds (together with ETFs, the “Underlying Funds”) and derivative instruments. The Fund primarily takes long and short positions in Underlying Funds and derivatives instruments, in domestic and worldwide markets. The Fund takes a long position by buying shares of Underlying Funds, or derivative instruments, when the Adviser believes those assets will increase in value. The Fund takes a short position by selling those assets when the Adviser believes they will decrease in value.

 

The Fund invests primarily in:

(1)Underlying Funds that invest in or are otherwise exposed to developed and emerging markets, which are countries listed on the MSCI All World Country Index and MSCI Emerging Markets Index;
(2)derivative instruments, either directly or indirectly, including options and futures, designed to substitute for or replicate some or all of the features of the Underlying Funds; and
(3)U.S. or foreign cash equivalents, without limitation, as collateral for derivative instruments or as a temporary defensive measure during periods of market volatility.

 

The adviser seeks to manage risk by hedging the Fund’s investment portfolio when it believes security prices will decline. The adviser will hedge by:

(i)increasing allocations to cash equivalents or U.S. Treasury securities; and
(ii)selling short ETFs or derivative instruments the adviser believes have a high correlation to the Fund’s core holdings. Correlation is the measure of the similarity between two assets.

 

Generally, the adviser does not attempt to evaluate individual securities held by the Underlying Funds.

 

Principal Investment Risks: As with all mutual funds, there is a risk that you could lose money through your investment in the Fund. The Fund is not intended to be a complete investment program. Many factors affect the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”) and performance.

 

The following describes the risks the Fund bears directly or indirectly through investments in Underlying Funds. As with any mutual fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its goal.

 

Cash or Cash Equivalents Risk. The Fund may have significant investments in cash or cash equivalents. When a substantial portion of a portfolio is held in cash or cash equivalents, there is the risk that the value of the cash account, including interest, will not keep pace with inflation, thus reducing purchasing power over time.

 

Derivatives Risk. The use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. These risks include (i) the risk that the counterparty to a derivative transaction may not fulfill its contractual obligations; (ii) the risk of mispricing or improper valuation; and (iii) the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. Derivative prices are highly volatile and may fluctuate substantially during a short period of time. Such prices are influenced by numerous factors that affect the markets, including, but not limited to: changing supply and demand relationships; government programs and policies; national and international political and economic events, changes in interest rates, inflation and deflation and changes in supply and demand relationships.

 

Emerging Markets Risk. Investing in emerging markets, including frontier markets, involves not only the risks described below with respect to investing in foreign securities, but also other risks, including exposure to economic structures that are generally less diverse and mature, limited availability and reliability of information material to an investment decision, and to political systems that can be expected to have less stability, than those of developed countries. The typically small size of the markets of securities of issuers located in emerging markets and the possibility of a low or nonexistent volume of trading in those securities may also result in a lack of liquidity and in price volatility of those securities.

2 
 

 

Exchange-Traded Funds Risk. ETFs may be actively or passively managed. The ETFs in which the Fund invests will not be able to replicate exactly the performance of the indices they track and may result in a loss. The market price of an ETF may deviate from the price of the underlying assets in various situations, including markets stress which will result in the Fund paying significantly more or receiving significantly less than the net asset value. An active trading market may not develop or be maintained at times of market stress, and market makers and authorized participants may step away from their respective roles in making a market for shares and executing purchase or redemption orders. To the extent all or a portion of an ETF’s underlying holdings are traded on foreign markets that are closed when the market on which the ETF is traded is open, there may be a change in last close price on the foreign market and the price of the ETF which is traded daily domestically. In addition, shareholders bear both their proportionate share of the Fund’s expenses and similar expenses of the underlying investment company when the Fund invests in shares of another investment company.

 

Foreign Investment Risk. The risk that investing in foreign (non-U.S.) securities either directly or indirectly may result in the Fund experiencing more rapid and extreme changes in value than the Fund that invests exclusively in securities of U.S. companies, due to smaller markets, differing reporting, accounting and auditing standards, nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, currency blockages and political changes or diplomatic developments. The costs of investing in many foreign markets are higher than the U.S. and investments may be less liquid. Foreign markets may be closed when U.S. markets are open which may impact Fund pricing.

 

Fund of Funds Risk. The ability of the Fund to meet its investment objective is directly related to the ability of the Underlying Funds in which it invests and their respective investment managers, to meet their investment objectives. Certain investment managers may be dependent upon a single individual or small group of individuals, the loss of which could adversely affect their success. There can be no assurance that any Underlying Fund will achieve its investment objectives.

 

Futures Risk. In addition to all the risks associated with the underlying, a future, which is a contract that derives its value from the price performance of an underlying entity, such as an asset, index, or interest rate, has additional risks because it is a financial contract rather than a security, including counterparty risk, and liquidity risk. Where futures are used for hedging, lack of the desired or expected correlation between the future and the underlying, known as basis risk, would reduce the desired effectiveness of the hedging instrument.

 

Hedging Risk. Although intended to limit or reduce investment risk, hedging strategies may also limit or reduce the potential for profit. There is no assurance that hedging strategies will be successful.

 

Management Risk. The adviser may be incorrect in its assessment of the intrinsic value of the securities the Fund holds which may result in a decline in the value of Fund shares and failure to achieve its investment objective. The Fund’s portfolio managers use technical analysis and/or trend models. Any imperfections or limitations in such analyses and models could affect the ability of the portfolio managers to implement strategies.

 

Market and Geopolitical Risk. The increasing interconnectivity between global economies and financial markets increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market. Securities in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform due to inflation (or expectations for inflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters, climate-change and climate related events, pandemics, epidemics, terrorism, international conflicts, regulatory events and governmental or quasi-governmental actions. The occurrence of global events similar to those in recent years may result in market volatility and may have long term effects on both the U.S. and global financial markets.

 

Options Risk. There are risks associated with the sale and purchase of call and put options. As a seller (writer) of a put option, the Fund will tend to lose money if the value of the reference index or security falls below the strike price. As the seller (writer) of a call option, the Fund may experience lower returns if the value of the reference index or security rises above the strike price.

 

Portfolio Turnover Risk. The Fund’s high portfolio turnover will increase its transaction costs and may result in increased realization of net short-term capital gains (which are taxable to shareholders as ordinary income when distributed to them), higher taxable distributions and lower after-tax performance.

 

Securities Market Risk. The value of securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to factors affecting particular companies or the securities markets generally. A general downturn in the securities market may cause multiple asset classes to decline in value simultaneously.

 

Short Sales Risk. Short sales risk is the risk of loss associated with any appreciation on the price of a security borrowed in connection with a short sale. The Fund may engage in short sales that are not made “against-the-box,” which means that the Fund may sell short securities even when they are not actually owned or otherwise covered at all times during the period the short position is open. Short sales that are not made “against-the-box” theoretically involve unlimited loss potential since the market price of securities sold short may continuously increase.

 

Small and Medium Capitalization Companies Risk. The earnings and prospects of small and medium sized companies are more volatile than larger companies and may experience higher failure rates than larger companies. Small and medium sized companies normally have a lower trading volume than larger companies, which may tend to make their market price fall more disproportionately than larger companies in response to selling pressures and may have limited markets, product lines, or financial resources and lack management experience.

3 
 

Performance: The bar chart and performance table below show the variability of the Fund’s returns, which is some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year and by showing the Fund’s one-year, five-year and since inception performance compared with those of a broad measure of market performance. The bar chart shows performance of the Fund’s Institutional Class shares for each calendar year since the Fund’s inception. The performance table compares the performance of the Fund over time to the performance of a broad-based securities market index. You should be aware that the Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available at no cost by visiting www.anchor-capital.com/funds or by calling 1-844-594-1226.

 

Institutional Class Performance Bar Chart For Calendar Years Ended December 31

Best Quarter: 6/30/2020 4.21%
Worst Quarter: 6/30/2022 (3.60)%

 

The Fund’s Institutional Class year-to-date return as of September 30, 2023 was (5.30)%.

 

Performance Table

Average Annual Total Returns

(For periods ended December 31, 2022)

 

  One
Year
Five
Years

Since Inception

(9/29/15)

Return before taxes – Institutional Class Shares (6.60)% 0.64% 1.22%
Return after taxes on distributions – Institutional Class Shares (6.60)% 0.20% 0.54%
Return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares – Institutional Class Shares (3.91)% 0.35% 0.67%
Index –HFRX Absolute Return Index(1) 0.85% 1.91% 1.93%
(1)The HFRX Absolute Return Index is designed to be representative of the overall composition of the Hedge Fund Universe. It is comprised of all eligible hedge fund strategies including, but not limited to, convertible arbitrage, distressed securities, equity hedge, equity market neutral, event driven, macro, merger arbitrage, and relative value arbitrage. As a component of the optimization process, the index selects constituents which characteristically exhibit lower volatilities and lower correlations to standard directional benchmarks of equity market and hedge fund industry performance. Hedge Fund Research, Inc. (HFR) utilizes a UCITSIII compliant methodology to construct the HFRX Hedge Fund Indices. The methodology is based on defined and predetermined rules and objective criteria to select and rebalance components to maximize representation of the Hedge Fund Universe. HFRX Indices utilize state-of-the-art quantitative techniques and analysis, multi-level screening, cluster analysis, Monte-Carlo simulations and optimization techniques to ensure that each index is a pure representation of its corresponding investment focus. Investors cannot invest directly in an index, and unlike the Fund, returns do not reflect any fees, expenses or sales charges.

 

Investment Adviser: Anchor Capital Management Group, Inc. (the “Adviser”).

 

Portfolio Managers: Garrett Waters, Chief Executive Officer of the Adviser and Eric Leake CMT®, President of the Adviser are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and have served the Fund as its portfolio managers since it commenced operations in September 2015.

 

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares: The minimum initial investment in the Fund for Institutional Class shares is $1,000 for all account types and the minimum subsequent investment is $100. You may purchase and redeem shares of the Fund on any day that the New York Stock Exchange is open. Redemption requests may be made in writing, by telephone, or through a financial intermediary and will be paid by automated clearing house funds (“ACH”), check or wire transfer. The Fund or its Adviser may waive any of the minimum initial and subsequent investment amounts.

 

Tax Information: Dividends and capital gain distributions you receive from the Fund, whether you reinvest your distributions in additional Fund shares or receive them in cash, are taxable to you at either ordinary income or capital gains tax rates unless you are investing through a tax-deferred plan such as an IRA or 401(k) plan. However, these dividend and capital gain distributions may be taxable upon their eventual withdrawal from tax-deferred plans.

 

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries: If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

4 
 

FUND SUMMARY - ANCHOR RISK MANAGED EQUITY STRATEGIES FUND

 

Investment Objective: The Fund seeks to provide total return from income and capital appreciation with a secondary objective of limiting risk during unfavorable market conditions.

 

Fees and Expenses of the Fund: This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, sell and hold shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. More information about these fees and expenses is available from your financial intermediary and under the heading How to Purchase Shares on page 23 of the Fund’s Prospectus.

 

Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)
Institutional
Class
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases
(as a percentage of offering price)
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load)
(as a percentage of offering price)
None
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed
on Reinvested Dividends and other Distributions
(as a percentage of offering price)
None
Redemption Fee
(as a % of amount redeemed on shares held less than 60 days)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year
as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Management Fees 1.60%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees 0.25%
Other Expenses 0.25%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses(1) 0.17%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 2.27%
(1)Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are the indirect costs of investing in other investment companies. The operating expenses in this fee table will not correlate to the expense ratio in the Fund’s financial highlights because the financial statements include only the direct operating expenses incurred by the Fund, not the indirect costs of investment companies.

 

Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.

 

The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based upon these assumptions your costs would be:

 

  1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
Institutional Class $230 $709 $1,215 $2,605

 

Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 0.00%.

 

Principal Investment Strategies: The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective, utilizing a “fund of funds” structure, by allocating assets among various strategies based on the adviser’s research and analysis regarding market trends. A market trend is the movement of a financial market in a particular direction over time. Under normal market conditions, the Fund invests, directly or indirectly through unaffiliated exchange traded funds (“ETFs”) and mutual funds (together with ETFs, “Underlying Funds”), at least 80% of its net assets (plus the amount of borrowings, if any) in long and short positions in equity securities. The Fund takes a long position, or purchases shares of a security, when the adviser believes a security will increase in value, and a short position, or sells shares of borrowed stock, when the adviser believes the value of a security will decrease. The Fund takes long and short positions in securities that are highly correlated to major U.S. equity indices based on long, intermediate, and short-term trends.

5 
 

 

At least 80% of the Fund’s assets is invested in:

(1)U.S. or foreign equity securities of any market capitalization including Underlying Funds that primarily invest in or are otherwise exposed to domestic and foreign equity securities; and
(2)derivative instruments, including options, futures, and total return swaps, designed to replicate some or all of the features of an underlying portfolio of equity securities.

 

The Fund may also invest in U.S. or foreign cash equivalents including money market funds and treasuries.

 

The adviser seeks to achieve the Fund’s secondary objective by managing risk through hedging the Fund’s investment portfolio when it believes security prices will decline. The adviser will hedge by:

(i)            increasing allocations to cash equivalents or U.S. Treasury securities;

(ii)          purchasing inverse mutual funds or inverse ETFs; and

(iii)        selling short ETFs or securities the adviser believes have demonstrated a high correlation to the broader equity indices.

 

The Fund may invest in inverse funds linked to equity securities or indices when the adviser believes this strategy will provide an effective hedge to manage risk for the Fund’s equity investments.

 

Generally, the adviser does not attempt to evaluate individual securities. The adviser uses technical analysis, including monitoring price movements and price trends, of equity markets in an effort to achieve the Fund’s objective through proper allocation of the Fund’s portfolio securities. The adviser’s decision to buy or sell a Fund holding will be made based on adviser-developed trend and risk models that evaluate current market conditions, and this analysis will guide the adviser’s determination of the appropriate exposure level to the equity market. The adviser buys and sells securities and derivatives to increase or decrease the Fund’s exposure to the equity market.

 

Principal Investment Risks: As with all mutual funds, there is a risk that you could lose money through your investment in the Fund. The Fund is not intended to be a complete investment program. Many factors affect the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”) and performance.

 

The following describes the risks the Fund bears directly or indirectly through investments in Underlying Funds. As with any mutual fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its goal.

 

Cash or Cash Equivalents Risk. The Fund may have significant investments in cash or cash equivalents. When a substantial portion of a portfolio is held in cash or cash equivalents, there is the risk that the value of the cash account, including interest, will not keep pace with inflation, thus reducing purchasing power over time.

 

Counterparty Risk. A counterparty (the other party to a transaction or an agreement or the party with whom the Fund executes transactions) to a transaction with the Fund may be unable or unwilling to make timely principal, interest or settlement payments, or otherwise honor its obligations.

 

Derivatives Risk. The use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. These risks include (i) the risk that the counterparty to a derivative transaction may not fulfill its contractual obligations; (ii) the risk of mispricing or improper valuation; and (iii) the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. Derivative prices are highly volatile and may fluctuate substantially during a short period of time. Such prices are influenced by numerous factors that affect the markets, including, but not limited to: changing supply and demand relationships; government programs and policies; national and international political and economic events, changes in interest rates, inflation and deflation and changes in supply and demand relationships.

 

Equity Securities Risk. Fluctuations in the value of equity securities held by the Fund will cause the net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund and the price of its shares to fluctuate. Common stock of an issuer in the Fund’s portfolio may decline in price if the issuer fails to make anticipated dividend payments. Common stock will be subject to greater dividend risk than preferred stocks or debt instruments of the same issuer. In addition, common stocks have experienced significantly more volatility in returns than other asset classes.

 

Exchange-Traded Funds Risk. ETFs may be actively or passively managed. The ETFs in which the Fund invests will not be able to replicate exactly the performances of the indices they track and may result in a loss. The market price of an ETF may deviate from the price of the underlying assets in various situations, including market stress which will result in the Fund paying significantly more or receiving significantly less than the net asset value. An active trading market may not develop or be maintained at times of market stress, and market makers and authorized participants may step away from their respective roles in making a market for shares and executing purchase or redemption orders. To the extent all or a portion of an ETF’s underlying holdings are traded on foreign markets that are closed when the market on which the ETF is traded is open, there may be a change in last close price on the foreign market and the price of the ETF which is traded daily domestically. In addition, shareholders bear both their proportionate share of the Fund’s expenses and similar expenses of the underlying investment company when the Fund invests in shares of another investment company.

6 
 

Foreign Investment Risk. The risk that investing in foreign (non-U.S.) securities either directly or indirectly may result in the Fund experiencing more rapid and extreme changes in value than the Fund that invests exclusively in securities of U.S. companies, due to smaller markets, differing reporting, accounting and auditing standards, nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, currency blockages and political changes or diplomatic developments. The costs of investing in many foreign markets are higher than the U.S. and investments may be less liquid.

 

Fund of Funds Risk. The ability of the Fund to meet its investment objective is directly related to the ability of the Underlying Funds in which it invests and their respective investment managers, to meet their investment objectives. Certain investment managers may be dependent upon a single individual or small group of individuals, the loss of which could adversely affect their success. There can be no assurance that any Underlying Fund will achieve its investment objectives.

 

Futures Risk. In addition to all the risks associated with the Underlying Funds, a future, which is a contract that derives its value from the price performance of an underlying entity, such as an asset, index, or interest rate, has additional risks because it is a financial contract rather than a security, including counterparty risk, and liquidity risk. Where futures are used for hedging, lack of the desired or expected correlation between the future and the Underlying Fund, known as basis risk, would reduce the desired effectiveness of the hedging instrument.

 

Hedging Risk. Although intended to limit or reduce investment risk, hedging strategies may also limit or reduce the potential for profit. There is no assurance that hedging strategies will be successful.

 

Inverse ETF Risk. Inverse ETFs seek to provide investment results that will match a certain percentage of the inverse of the performance of a specific benchmark on a daily basis. Because they reset daily there may be significant volatility associated with inverse ETFs. The inverse ETFs in which the Fund invests may not be able to replicate exactly the inverse of the performance of the indices they track. Inverse ETFs fall in price when stock prices are rising. Additionally, inverse ETFs may employ leverage which magnifies the changes in the underlying stock index upon which they are based. Investments in inverse ETFs will prevent the Fund from participating in market-wide or sector-wide gains and may not prove to be an effective hedge. During periods of increased volatility, inverse ETFs may not perform in the manner they are designed. Investments in inverse funds are intended to be short-term in nature and may, therefore, lead to increased turnover and transaction costs to the Fund.

 

Inverse Funds Risk. Inverse funds typically lose value as the index or security tracked by the fund increases in value; a result that is the opposite from traditional funds. Because they reset daily there may be significant volatility associated with inverse funds. The inverse funds in which the Fund invests may not be able to replicate exactly the inverse of the performance of the benchmark they track. Inverse funds fall in price when its benchmark prices are rising. Additionally, inverse funds may employ leverage which magnifies the changes in the underlying benchmark upon which they are based. Investments in inverse funds will prevent the Fund from participating in market-wide or sector-wide gains and may not prove to be an effective hedge. During periods of increased volatility, inverse funds may not perform in the manner they are designed. Investments in inverse funds are intended to be short-term in nature and may, therefore, lead to increased turnover and transaction costs to the Fund.

 

Large Market Capitalization Companies Risk.  The value of investments in larger companies may not rise as much as smaller companies, or larger companies may be unable to respond quickly to competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes.

 

Management Risk. The adviser may be incorrect in its assessment of the intrinsic value of the securities the Fund holds which may result in a decline in the value of Fund shares and failure to achieve its investment objective. The Fund’s portfolio managers use technical analysis and/or trend models. Any imperfections or limitations in such analyses and models could affect the ability of the portfolio managers to implement strategies.

 

Market and Geopolitical Risk. The increasing interconnectivity between global economies and financial markets increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market. Securities in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform due to inflation (or expectations for inflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters, climate-change and climate related events, pandemics, epidemics, terrorism, international conflicts, regulatory events and governmental or quasi-governmental actions. The occurrence of global events similar to those in recent years may result in market volatility and may have long term effects on both the U.S. and global financial markets.

 

Options Risk. There are risks associated with the sale and purchase of call and put options. As a seller (writer) of a put option, the Fund will tend to lose money if the value of the reference index or security falls below the strike price. As the seller (writer) of a call option, the Fund may experience lower returns if the value of the reference index or security rises above the strike price.

 

Securities Market Risk. The value of securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to factors affecting particular companies or the securities markets generally. A general downturn in the securities market may cause multiple asset classes to decline in value simultaneously.

7 
 

Short Sales Risk. Short sales risk is the risk of loss associated with any appreciation on the price of a security borrowed in connection with a short sale. The Fund may engage in short sales that are not made “against-the-box,” which means that the Fund may sell short securities even when they are not actually owned or otherwise covered at all times during the period the short position is open. Short sales that are not made “against-the-box” theoretically involve unlimited loss potential since the market price of securities sold short may continuously increase.

 

Small and Medium Capitalization Companies Risk. The earnings and prospects of small and medium sized companies are more volatile than larger companies and may experience higher failure rates than larger companies. Small and medium sized companies normally have a lower trading volume than larger companies, which may tend to make their market price fall more disproportionately than larger companies in response to selling pressures and may have limited markets, product lines, or financial resources and lack management experience.

 

Total Return Swap Risk. In a total return swap, the buyer receives a periodic return equal to the total return of a specified security, securities or index, for a specified period of time. In return, the buyer pays the counterparty a variable stream of payments, typically based upon short term interest rates, possibly plus or minus an agreed upon spread. For example, if the Fund enters into a swap where it agrees to exchange a floating rate of interest for a fixed rate of interest, the Fund may have to pay more money than it receives. Total return swaps entered into in which payments are not netted may entail greater risk than a swap entered into a net basis. There is a risk that adverse price movements in an instrument can result in a loss substantially greater than the Fund’s initial investment in that instrument (in some cases, the potential loss is unlimited). If there is a default by the other party to such a transaction, the Fund will have contractual remedies pursuant to the agreements related to the transaction. However, particularly in the case of privately negotiated instruments, there is a risk that the counterparty will not perform its obligations, which could leave the Fund worse off than if it had not entered into the position. These instruments are subject to high levels of volatility, in some cases due to the high levels of leverage the Fund may achieve with them.

 

Performance: The bar chart and performance table below show the variability of the Fund’s returns, which is some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year and by showing the Fund’s one-year and since inception performance compared with those of a broad measure of market performance. The bar chart shows performance of the Fund’s Institutional Class shares for each calendar year since the Fund’s inception. The performance table compares the performance of the Fund over time to the performance of a broad-based securities market index. You should be aware that the Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available at no cost by visiting www.anchor-capital.com/funds or by calling 1-844-594-1226.

 

Institutional Class Performance Bar Chart For Calendar Years Ended December 31

Best Quarter: 12/31/2020 9.00%
Worst Quarter: 12/31/2022 (7.14)%

 

The Fund’s Institutional Class year-to-date return as of September 30, 2023 was 4.31%.

8 
 

 

Performance Table

Average Annual Total Returns

(For periods ended December 31, 2022)

 

  One
Year
Five
Years
Since Inception
(9/6/16)
Return before taxes – Institutional Class Shares (9.24)% 8.22% 9.36%
Return after taxes on distributions – Institutional Class Shares (11.15)% 6.27% 7.33%
Return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares – Institutional Class Shares (4.83)% 5.64% 6.54%
Index – S&P 500 Total Return Index(1) (18.11)% 9.42% 11.33%
(1)The S&P 500 Total Return Index is an unmanaged market capitalization-weighted index which is comprised of 500 of the largest U.S. domiciled companies and includes the reinvestment of all dividends. Investors cannot invest directly in an index or benchmark.

 

Investment Adviser: Anchor Capital Management Group, Inc. (the “Adviser”)

 

Portfolio Managers: Garrett Waters, Chief Executive Officer of the Adviser and Eric Leake CMT®, President of the Adviser are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and have served the Fund as its portfolio managers since it commenced operations in 2016.

 

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares: The minimum initial investment in the Fund for Institutional Class shares is $1,000 for all account types and the minimum subsequent investment is $100. You may purchase and redeem shares of the Fund on any day that the New York Stock Exchange is open. Redemption requests may be made in writing, by telephone, or through a financial intermediary and will be paid by automated clearing house funds (“ACH”), check or wire transfer. The Fund or its Adviser may waive any of the minimum initial and subsequent investment amounts.

 

Tax Information: Dividends and capital gain distributions you receive from the Fund, whether you reinvest your distributions in additional Fund shares or receive them in cash, are taxable to you at either ordinary income or capital gains tax rates unless you are investing through a tax-deferred plan such as an IRA or 401(k) plan. However, these dividend and capital gain distributions may be taxable upon their eventual withdrawal from tax-deferred plans.

 

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries: If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

9 
 

 

FUND SUMMARY - ANCHOR RISK MANAGED GLOBAL STRATEGIES FUND

 

Investment Objective: The Fund seeks to achieve above average total returns over a full market cycle with lower correlation and reduced risk when compared to traditional world indices.

 

Fees and Expenses of the Fund: This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, sell and hold shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. More information about these fees and expenses is available from your financial intermediary and under the heading How to Purchase Shares on page 23 of the Fund’s Prospectus.

 

Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)
Institutional
Class
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases
(as a percentage of offering price)
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load)
(as a percentage of offering price)
None
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed
on Reinvested Dividends and other Distributions
(as a percentage of offering price)
None
Redemption Fee
(as a % of amount redeemed on shares held less than 60 days)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year
as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Management Fees 1.60%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees 0.25%
Other Expenses 0.48%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses(1) 0.21%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 2.54%
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement(2) (0.08)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
After Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement
2.46%
(1)Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are the indirect costs of investing in other investment companies. The operating expenses in this fee table will not correlate to the expense ratio in the Fund’s financial highlights because the financial statements include only the direct operating expenses incurred by the Fund.

(2)      The Fund’s adviser has contractually agreed to reduce its fees and/or absorb expenses of the Fund, until at least December 31, 2024 to ensure that total annual fund operating expenses after fee waiver and/or reimbursement excluding (i) any front-end or contingent deferred loads; (ii) brokerage fees and commissions, (iii) acquired fund fees and expenses; (iv) fees and expenses associated with investments in other collective investment vehicles or derivative instruments (including for example option and swap fees and expenses); (v) borrowing costs (such as interest and dividend expense on securities sold short); (vi) taxes; and (vii) extraordinary expenses, such as litigation expenses (which may include indemnification of Fund officers and Trustees, contractual indemnification of Fund service providers (other than the adviser)), will not exceed 2.25% of the Fund’s average daily net assets attributable to Institutional Class shares; subject to possible recoupment from the Fund in future years (within the three years after the fees have been waived or reimbursed) if such recoupment can be achieved within the lesser of the expense limitation in place at the time of wavier and the expense limitation in place at the time of recapture. The expense limit arrangement may not be terminated during this time period without prior approval of the Board of Trustees on 60 days’ written notice to the Fund’s adviser.

 

Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.

 

The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based upon these assumptions your costs would be:

 

  1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
Institutional Class $249 $783 $1,343 $2,869

 

Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 50%.

10 
 

 

Principal Investment Strategies: The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by allocating assets among various strategies based on the adviser’s research and analysis regarding market trends. A market trend is the movement of a financial market in a particular direction over time. The Fund invests at least 40% of its assets (plus the amount of borrowings, if any) in long and short positions in exchange-traded funds, mutual funds and derivative instruments registered and offered in the U.S with underlying holdings in non-U.S. companies. The Fund primarily takes long and short positions in exchange-traded funds that are highly correlated to regional and country specific indices based on the adviser’s long, intermediate, and short-term price trends analysis

 

The Fund is invested primarily in:

(1)Underlying Funds that primarily invest in or are otherwise exposed to domestic and worldwide markets;
(2)derivative instruments, including options, futures, and total return swaps, designed to replicate some or all of the features of an underlying portfolio of equity securities;
(3)Underlying Funds that are other U.S. or foreign equity securities of any market capitalization; and
(4)U.S. or foreign cash equivalents.

 

The adviser seeks to achieve the Fund’s objective by managing risk through hedging the Fund’s investment portfolio when it believes security prices will decline. The adviser will hedge by:

(i)increasing allocations to cash equivalents or U.S. Treasury securities;
(ii)selling short ETFs or securities the adviser believes have demonstrated a high correlation to the broader global equity indices; and
(iii)purchasing inverse mutual funds or inverse ETFs. The Fund may invest in inverse funds linked to equity securities or indices when the adviser believes this strategy will provide an effective hedge to manage risk offer the Fund’s equity investments.

 

Generally, the adviser does not attempt to evaluate individual securities. The adviser uses technical analysis, including monitoring price movements and price trends, of equity markets in an effort to achieve the Fund’s objective through proper allocation of the Fund’s portfolio securities. The adviser’s decision to buy or sell a Fund holding is made based on adviser developed trend and risk models that evaluate current market conditions, and this analysis guides the adviser’s determination of the appropriate exposure level to the equity market. The adviser buys and sells securities and derivatives to increase or decrease the Fund’s exposure to the equity market.

 

Principal Investment Risks: As with all mutual funds, there is a risk that you could lose money through your investment in the Fund. The Fund is not intended to be a complete investment program. Many factors affect the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”) and performance.

 

The following describes the risks the Fund bears directly or indirectly through investments in Underlying Funds. As with any mutual fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its goal.

 

Cash or Cash Equivalents Risk. The Fund may have significant investments in cash or cash equivalents. When a substantial portion of a portfolio is held in cash or cash equivalents, there is the risk that the value of the cash account, including interest, will not keep pace with inflation, thus reducing purchasing power over time.

 

Counterparty Risk. A counterparty (the other party to a transaction or an agreement or the party with whom the Fund executes transactions) to a transaction with the Fund may be unable or unwilling to make timely principal, interest or settlement payments, or otherwise honor its obligations.

 

Derivatives Risk. The use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. These risks include (i) the risk that the counterparty to a derivative transaction may not fulfill its contractual obligations; (ii) the risk of mispricing or improper valuation; and (iii) the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. Derivative prices are highly volatile and may fluctuate substantially during a short period of time. Such prices are influenced by numerous factors that affect the markets, including, but not limited to: changing supply and demand relationships; government programs and policies; national and international political and economic events, changes in interest rates, inflation and deflation and changes in supply and demand relationships.

 

Equity Securities Risk. Fluctuations in the value of equity securities held by the Fund will cause the net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund and the price of its shares to fluctuate. Common stock of an issuer in the Fund’s portfolio may decline in price if the issuer fails to make anticipated dividend payments. Common stock will be subject to greater dividend risk than preferred stocks or debt instruments of the same issuer. In addition, common stocks have experienced significantly more volatility in returns than other asset classes.

 

11 
 

 

Exchange-Traded Funds Risk. ETFs may be actively or passively managed. The ETFs in which the Fund invests will not be able to replicate exactly the performances of the indices they track and may result in a loss. The market price of an ETF may deviate from the price of the underlying assets in various situations, including market stress which will result in the Fund paying significantly more or receiving significantly less than the net asset value. An active trading market may not develop or be maintained at times of market stress, and market makers and authorized participants may step away from their respective roles in making a market for shares and executing purchase or redemption orders. To the extent all or a portion of an ETF’s underlying holdings are traded on foreign markets that are closed when the market on which the ETF is traded is open, there may be a change in last close price on the foreign market and the price of the ETF which is traded daily domestically. In addition, shareholders bear both their proportionate share of the Fund’s expenses and similar expenses of the underlying investment company when the Fund invests in shares of another investment company.

 

Foreign Investment Risk. The risk that investing in foreign (non-U.S.) securities either directly or indirectly may result in the Fund experiencing more rapid and extreme changes in value than the Fund that invests exclusively in securities of U.S. companies, due to smaller markets, differing reporting, accounting and auditing standards, nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, currency blockages and political changes or diplomatic developments. The costs of investing in many foreign markets are higher than the U.S. and investments may be less liquid.

 

Fund of Funds Risk. The ability of the Fund to meet its investment objective is directly related to the ability of the Underlying Funds in which it invests and their respective investment managers, to meet their investment objectives. Certain investment managers may be dependent upon a single individual or small group of individuals, the loss of which could adversely affect their success. There can be no assurance that any Underlying Fund will achieve its investment objectives.

 

Futures Risk. In addition to all the risks associated with the Underlying Fund, a future, which is a contract that derives its value from the price performance of an underlying entity, such as an asset, index, or interest rate, has additional risks because it is a financial contract rather than a security, including counterparty risk, and liquidity risk. Where futures are used for hedging, lack of the desired or expected correlation between the future and the Underlying Fund, known as basis risk, would reduce the desired effectiveness of the hedging instrument.

 

Hedging Risk. Although intended to limit or reduce investment risk, hedging strategies may also limit or reduce the potential for profit. There is no assurance that hedging strategies will be successful.

 

Inverse ETF Risk. Inverse ETFs seek to provide investment results that will match a certain percentage of the inverse of the performance of a specific benchmark on a daily basis. Because they reset daily there may be significant volatility associated with inverse ETFs. The inverse ETFs in which the Fund invests may not be able to replicate exactly the inverse of the performance of the indices they track. Inverse ETFs fall in price when stock prices are rising. Additionally, inverse ETFs may employ leverage which magnifies the changes in the underlying stock index upon which they are based. Investments in inverse ETFs will prevent the Fund from participating in market-wide or sector-wide gains and may not prove to be an effective hedge. During periods of increased volatility, inverse ETFs may not perform in the manner they are designed. Investments in inverse funds are intended to be short-term in nature and may, therefore, lead to increased turnover and transaction costs to the Fund.

 

Inverse Funds Risk. Inverse funds typically lose value as the index or security tracked by the fund increases in value; a result that is the opposite from traditional funds. Because they reset daily there may be significant volatility associated with inverse funds. The inverse funds in which the Fund invests may not be able to replicate exactly the inverse of the performance of the benchmark they track. Inverse funds fall in price when its benchmark prices are rising. Additionally, inverse funds may employ leverage which magnifies the changes in the underlying benchmark upon which they are based. Investments in inverse funds will prevent the Fund from participating in market-wide or sector-wide gains and may not prove to be an effective hedge. During periods of increased volatility, inverse funds may not perform in the manner they are designed. Investments in inverse funds are intended to be short-term in nature and may, therefore, lead to increased turnover and transaction costs to the Fund.

 

Large Market Capitalization Companies Risk.  The value of investments in larger companies may not rise as much as smaller companies, or larger companies may be unable to respond quickly to competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes.

 

Management Risk. The adviser may be incorrect in its assessment of the intrinsic value of the securities the Fund holds which may result in a decline in the value of Fund shares and failure to achieve its investment objective. The Fund’s portfolio managers use technical analysis and/or trend models. Any imperfections or limitations in such analyses and models could affect the ability of the portfolio managers to implement strategies.

 

Market and Geopolitical Risk. The increasing interconnectivity between global economies and financial markets increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market. Securities in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform due to inflation (or expectations for inflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters, climate-change and climate related events, pandemics, epidemics, terrorism, international conflicts, regulatory events and governmental or quasi-governmental actions. The occurrence of global events similar to those in recent years may result in market volatility and may have long term effects on both the U.S. and global financial markets.

12 
 

Options Risk. There are risks associated with the sale and purchase of call and put options. As a seller (writer) of a put option, the Fund will tend to lose money if the value of the reference index or security falls below the strike price. As the seller (writer) of a call option, the Fund may experience lower returns if the value of the reference index or security rises above the strike price.

 

Securities Market Risk. The value of securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to factors affecting particular companies or the securities markets generally. A general downturn in the securities market may cause multiple asset classes to decline in value simultaneously.

 

Short Sales Risk. Short sales risk is the risk of loss associated with any appreciation on the price of a security borrowed in connection with a short sale. The Fund may engage in short sales that are not made “against-the-box,” which means that the Fund may sell short securities even when they are not actually owned or otherwise covered at all times during the period the short position is open. Short sales that are not made “against-the-box” theoretically involve unlimited loss potential since the market price of securities sold short may continuously increase.

 

Small and Medium Capitalization Companies Risk. The earnings and prospects of small and medium sized companies are more volatile than larger companies and may experience higher failure rates than larger companies. Small and medium sized companies normally have a lower trading volume than larger companies, which may tend to make their market price fall more disproportionately than larger companies in response to selling pressures and may have limited markets, product lines, or financial resources and lack management experience.

 

Total Return Swap Risk. In a total return swap, the buyer receives a periodic return equal to the total return of a specified security, securities or index, for a specified period of time. In return, the buyer pays the counterparty a variable stream of payments, typically based upon short term interest rates, possibly plus or minus an agreed upon spread. For example, if the Fund enters into a swap where it agrees to exchange a floating rate of interest for a fixed rate of interest, the Fund may have to pay more money than it receives. Total return swaps entered into in which payments are not netted may entail greater risk than a swap entered into a net basis. There is a risk that adverse price movements in an instrument can result in a loss substantially greater than the Fund’s initial investment in that instrument (in some cases, the potential loss is unlimited). If there is a default by the other party to such a transaction, the Fund will have contractual remedies pursuant to the agreements related to the transaction. However, particularly in the case of privately negotiated instruments, there is a risk that the counterparty will not perform its obligations, which could leave the Fund worse off than if it had not entered into the position. These instruments are subject to high levels of volatility, in some cases due to the high levels of leverage the Fund may achieve with them.

 

Performance: The bar chart and performance table below show the variability of the Fund’s returns, which is some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year and by showing the Fund’s one-year and since inception performance compared with those of a broad measure of market performance. The bar chart shows performance of the Fund’s Institutional Class shares for each calendar year since the Fund’s inception. The performance table compares the performance of the Fund over time to the performance of a broad-based securities market index. You should be aware that the Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information will be available at no cost by visiting www.anchor-capital.com/funds or by calling 1-844-594-1226.

 

Institutional Class Performance Bar Chart For Calendar Year Ended December 31

Best Quarter: 9/30/2022 5.28%
Worst Quarter: 12/31/2022 (3.28)%

 

The Fund’s Institutional Class year-to-date return as of September 30, 2023 was (0.03)%.

13 
 

Performance Table

Average Annual Total Returns

(For periods ended December 31, 2022)

 

  One
Year
Since Inception
(1/15/19)
Return before taxes – Institutional Class Shares (2.43)% 5.24%
Return after taxes on distributions – Institutional Class Shares (2.43)% 3.66%
Return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares – Institutional Class Shares (1.44)% 3.69%
Index – MSCI All Country World Index(1) (18.37)% 8.20%
(1)The MSCI All Country World Index is composed of large and mid-capitalization developed and emerging market equities. Investors cannot invest directly in an index or benchmark.

 

Investment Adviser: Anchor Capital Management Group, Inc. (the “Adviser”)

 

Portfolio Managers: Garrett Waters, Chief Executive Officer of the Adviser and Eric Leake CMT®, President of the Adviser are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and have served the Fund as its portfolio managers since it commenced operations in 2019.

 

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares: The minimum initial investment in the Fund for Institutional Class shares is $1,000 for all account types and the minimum subsequent investment is $100. You may purchase and redeem shares of the Fund on any day that the New York Stock Exchange is open. Redemption requests may be made in writing, by telephone, or through a financial intermediary and will be paid by automated clearing house funds (“ACH”), check or wire transfer. The Fund or its Adviser may waive any of the minimum initial and subsequent investment amounts.

 

Tax Information: Dividends and capital gain distributions you receive from the Fund, whether you reinvest your distributions in additional Fund shares or receive them in cash, are taxable to you at either ordinary income or capital gains tax rates unless you are investing through a tax-deferred plan such as an IRA or 401(k) plan. However, these dividend and capital gain distributions may be taxable upon their eventual withdrawal from tax-deferred plans.

 

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries: If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

14 
 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RELATED RISKS

 

Investment Objective:

 

Fund Investment Objective
Anchor Risk Managed Income Strategies Fund (formerly, “Anchor Risk Managed Credit Strategies Fund”)(“Income Fund”) seeks to provide long-term growth of capital while providing current income
Anchor Risk Managed Equity Strategies Fund
(“Equity Fund”)
seeks to provide total return from income and capital appreciation with a secondary objective of limiting risk during unfavorable market conditions
Anchor Risk Managed Global Strategies Fund
(“Global Fund”)
seeks to achieve above average total returns over a full market cycle with lower correlation and reduced risk when compared to traditional world indices

 

Each Fund’s investment objective may be changed by the Board of Trustees upon 60 days’ written notice to shareholders.

 

Principal Investment Strategies: Each Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective utilizing a “fund of funds” structure, by allocating assets among various strategies based on the Adviser’s research and analysis regarding market trends. A market trend is the movement of a financial market in a particular direction over time. Each Fund primarily takes long and short positions in securities that are highly correlated to its applicable market based on long, intermediate, and short-term trends. The Adviser considers a long-term trend to be those that are observed over two years or more; intermediate trends to last between nine to 24 months; and short-term trends to take place up to nine months.

 

The Income Fund invests primarily in:

(1)Underlying Funds that invest in or are otherwise exposed to developed and emerging markets, which are countries listed on the MSCI All World Country Index and MSCI Emerging Markets Index;
(2)derivative instruments, either directly or indirectly, including options and futures designed to substitute for or replicate some or all of the features of the Underlying Funds; and
(3)U.S. or foreign cash equivalents, without limitation, as collateral for derivative instruments or as a temporary defensive measure during periods of market volatility.

 

The Adviser seeks to manage risk by hedging the Fund’s investment portfolio when it believes security prices will decline. The Adviser will hedge by:

(i)increasing allocations to cash equivalents or U.S. Treasury securities; and
(ii)selling short ETFs or derivative instruments the adviser believes have a high correlation the Fund’s core holdings. Correlation is the measure of the similarity between two assets.

Generally, the adviser does not attempt to evaluate individual securities held by the Underlying Funds.

 

At least 80% of the Equity Fund is invested in:

(1)U.S. or foreign equity securities of any market capitalization including Underlying Funds that primarily invest in or are otherwise exposed to domestic and foreign equity securities; and
(2)derivative instruments, including options, futures, and total return swaps, designed to replicate some or all of the features of an underlying portfolio of equity securities.

 

Under normal market conditions, Global Fund invests at least 40% of its assets (plus the amount of borrowings, if any) in long and short positions in exchange-traded funds and mutual funds registered and offered in the U.S with underlying holdings in non-U.S. companies.

 

In determining whether a company is a non-U.S. company, the Adviser will consider whether the company:

·has a class of securities whose principal securities market is outside the U.S.;
·has its principal office outside the U.S.; or 
·is otherwise determined to be economically tied to a country outside the U.S. by the Adviser in its discretion (e.g., using classifications assigned by third parties, including an issuer’s “country of risk” as determined by Bloomberg or the classifications assigned to a company by the Fund’s benchmark index provider).
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A swap is an agreement in which one party makes payments based on a set rate, either fixed or variable, while the other party makes payments based on the return of an underlying asset, which includes both the income it generates and any capital gains. Credit default swaps (“CDS”) are typically two-party financial contracts that transfer credit exposure between the two parties. Under a typical CDS, one party (the “seller”) receives pre-determined periodic payments from the other party (the “buyer”). The seller agrees to make compensating specific payments to the buyer if a negative credit event occurs, such as the bankruptcy or default by the issuer of the underlying debt instrument. Total return swaps (“TRS”) are similar. In a TRS, the underlying asset, referred to as the reference asset, is often an equity or bond index. This is owned by the party receiving the set rate payment. TRS allow the party receiving the total return to gain exposure and benefit from a reference asset without actually having to own it. For example, a Fund may seek exposure to the Merrill Lynch High Yield Master II Bond Index. It can do so by agreeing to exchange cash flows with an investment bank or other party based on the movement of this index.

 

The Adviser seeks to achieve a Fund’s secondary objective by managing risk through hedging the Fund’s investment portfolio when it believes security prices will decline. The Adviser will hedge by (i) increasing allocations to cash equivalents or U.S. Treasury securities;
(ii) purchasing inverse mutual funds or inverse ETFs; (iii) selling short ETFs or securities the Adviser believes have demonstrated a high correlation to the applicable markets. The Fund may invest in inverse funds linked to the applicable security type as suggested by the Fund’s name and as described above when the Adviser believes this strategy will provide an effective hedge to manage risk of a Fund’s investments.

 

Generally, the Adviser does not attempt to evaluate individual securities. The Adviser uses technical analysis, including monitoring price movements and price trends, of markets in an effort to identify the proper weighting of a Fund’s portfolio. The Adviser buys and sells securities and derivatives to increase or decrease a Fund’s exposure to the applicable market. The Adviser’s decision to buy or sell a Fund holding will be made based on the Adviser’s technically based trend and risk models that evaluate current market conditions and the Adviser’s determination of the appropriate exposure level to the applicable market.

 

The Adviser may engage in active and frequent trading of each Fund’s portfolio securities and derivatives to achieve the Fund’s investment objective.

 

Principal Investment Risks

 

The following describes the risks each Fund (unless otherwise noted) bears directly through its investments or indirectly through its investments in Underlying Funds.

 

Cash or Cash Equivalents Risk. The Fund may have significant investments in cash or cash equivalents. When a substantial portion of a portfolio is held in cash or cash equivalents, there is the risk that the value of the cash account, including interest, will not keep pace with inflation, thus reducing purchasing power over time.

 

Counterparty Risk. The Fund may engage in transactions in securities and financial instruments that involve counterparties. Counterparty risk is the risk that a counterparty (the other party to a transaction or an agreement or the party with whom the Fund executes transactions) to a transaction with the Fund may be unable or unwilling to make timely principal, interest or settlement payments, or otherwise honor its obligations. To limit the counterparty risk associated with such transactions, the Fund conducts business only with financial institutions judged by the Adviser to present acceptable credit risk.

 

Derivatives Risk. The Fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. These risks include (i) the risk that the counterparty to a derivative transaction may not fulfill its contractual obligations; (ii) the risk of mispricing or improper valuation; and (iii) the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. Derivative prices are highly volatile and may fluctuate substantially during a short period of time. Such prices are influenced by numerous factors that affect the markets, including, but not limited to: changing supply and demand relationships; government programs and policies; national and international political and economic events, changes in interest rates, inflation and deflation and changes in supply and demand relationships. Trading derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities including:

·Leverage and Volatility Risk. Derivative contracts ordinarily have leverage inherent in their terms. The low margin deposits normally required in trading derivatives, including futures contracts, permit a high degree of leverage. Accordingly, a relatively small price movement may result in an immediate and substantial loss to the Fund. The use of leverage may also cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions when it would not be advantageous to do so in order to satisfy its obligations or to meet collateral segregation requirements. The use of leveraged derivatives can magnify the Fund’s potential for gain or loss and, therefore, amplify the effects of market volatility on the Fund’s share price.
·Liquidity Risk. It is possible that particular derivative investments might be difficult to purchase or sell, possibly preventing the Fund from executing positions at an advantageous time or price, or possibly requiring them to dispose of other investments at unfavorable times or prices in order to satisfy their obligations. Most U.S. commodity futures exchanges impose daily limits regulating the maximum amount above or below the previous day’s settlement price which a futures contract price may fluctuate during a single day. During a single trading day no trades may be executed at prices beyond the daily limit. Once the price of a particular futures contract has increased or decreased to the limit point, it may be difficult, costly or impossible to liquidate a position. It is also possible that an exchange or the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”), which regulates commodity futures exchanges, may suspend trading in a particular contract, order immediate settlement of a contract or order trading to the liquidation of open positions only.
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Equity Securities Risk (Equity Fund and Global Fund only). Fluctuations in the value of equity securities held by the Fund will cause the net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund and the price of its shares to fluctuate. Common stock of an issuer in the Fund’s portfolio may decline in price if the issuer fails to make anticipated dividend payments. Common stock will be subject to greater dividend risk than preferred stocks or debt instruments of the same issuer. In addition, common stocks have experienced significantly more volatility in returns than other asset classes.

 

Emerging Markets Risk (Income Fund only). The Fund may invest in countries with newly organized or less developed securities markets. There are typically greater risks involved in investing in emerging markets securities. Generally, economic structures in these countries are less diverse and mature than those in developed countries and their political systems tend to be less stable. Emerging market countries may have different regulatory, accounting, auditing, and financial reporting and record keeping standards and may have material limitations on PCAOB (the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board) inspection, investigation, and enforcement. Therefore, the availability and reliability of information material to an investment decision, particularly financial information, in emerging market companies may be limited in the scope and reliability as compared to information provided by U.S. companies. Emerging market economies may be based on only a few industries, therefore security issuers, including governments, may be more susceptible to economic weakness and more likely to default. Emerging market countries also may have relatively unstable governments, weaker economies, and less-developed legal systems with fewer security holder rights. Investments in emerging markets countries may be affected by government policies that restrict foreign investment in certain issuers or industries. The potentially smaller size of their securities markets and lower trading volumes can make investments relatively illiquid and potentially more volatile than investments in developed countries, and such securities may be subject to abrupt and severe price declines. Due to this relative lack of liquidity, the Fund may have to accept a lower price. An inability to sell a portfolio position can adversely affect the Fund’s value or prevent the Fund from being able to meet cash obligations or take advantage of other investment opportunities.

 

Exchange-Traded Funds Risk. ETFs are investment companies, which may be managed or unmanaged, that generally seek to track the performance of a specific index. The value of ETFs can be expected to increase and decrease in value in proportion to increases and decreases in the indices that they are designed to track. The volatility of different index tracking stocks can be expected to vary in proportion to the volatility of the particular index they track. ETFs are traded similarly to stocks of individual companies. Although an ETF is designed to provide investment performance corresponding to its index, it may not be able to exactly replicate the performance of its index because of its operating expenses and other factors. When the Fund invests in another investment company, including an ETF, it will indirectly bear its proportionate share of any fees and expenses payable directly by the other investment company. Therefore, the Fund will incur higher expenses, many of which may be duplicative. In addition, the Fund may be affected by losses of the underlying funds and the level of risk arising from the investment practices of the underlying funds (such as the use of leverage by the funds). The Fund has no control over the investments and related risks taken by the underlying funds in which it invests. Investments in ETFs are also subject to the following risks: (i) the market price of an ETF’s shares may trade above or below their net asset value; (ii) an active trading market for an ETF’s shares may not develop or be maintained; or (iii) trading of an ETF’s shares may be halted for a number of reasons.

 

Foreign Investment Risk. Investing in foreign securities, including depositary receipts, or securities of U.S. entities with significant foreign operations, involves additional risks that can affect the Fund’s performance. Foreign markets may be less liquid, more volatile and subject to less regulation than U.S. markets. There may be difficulties in enforcing contractual obligations, and it may take more time for transactions to clear and settle in foreign countries than in the U.S. Less information may be available about foreign issuers. The costs of buying and selling foreign securities, including tax, brokerage and custody costs, generally are higher than those involving domestic transactions. The specific risks of investing in foreign securities include valuation risk and:

·Currency Risk. The values of foreign investments may be affected by changes in currency rates or exchange control regulations. If the local currency gains strength against the U.S. dollar, the value of the foreign security increases in U.S. dollar terms. Conversely, if the local currency weakens against the U.S. dollar, the value of the foreign security declines in U.S. dollar terms. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers, including depositary receipts, also are subject to currency risk based on their related investments. The Fund is permitted to hedge against foreign currency risk, but normally will not do so.
·Political/Economic Risk. Changes in economic, tax or foreign investment policies, government stability, war or other political or economic actions may have an adverse effect on a Fund’s foreign investments.
·Regulatory Risk. Foreign companies often are not subject to uniform accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards or to other regulatory practices and requirements common to U.S. companies.

 

There may be less information publicly available about foreign issuers than about most publicly-traded U.S. companies, and foreign issuers are usually not subject to accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards and practices as stringent as those in the United States. In addition, a Fund may be subject to non-U.S. taxes, including potentially on a retroactive basis, on (i) capital gains it realizes or dividends or interest it receives on non-U.S. securities, (ii) transactions in those securities and (iii) the repatriation of proceeds generated from the sale of those securities.

 

Additional risks have arisen related to the high levels of debt of various European countries such as Greece, Italy and Spain. One or more member states might exit the European Union, placing its currency and banking system in jeopardy. These problems, and related political and monetary efforts to address these problems, may increase the potential for market declines in one or more member states that can spread to global markets. These increased risks may persist and may result in greater volatility in the securities markets and the potential for impaired liquidity and valuation.

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Fund of Funds Risk. The ability of the Fund to meet its investment objective is directly related to the ability of the Underlying Funds in which it invests and their respective investment managers, to meet their investment objectives. Certain investment managers may be dependent upon a single individual or small group of individuals, the loss of which could adversely affect their success. There can be no assurance that any Underlying Fund will achieve its investment objectives.

 

Futures Risk. In addition to all the risks associated with the underlying, a future, which is a contract that derives its value from the price performance of an underlying entity, such as an asset, index, or interest rate, has additional risks because it is a financial contract rather than a security, including counterparty risk, and liquidity risk. Where futures are used for hedging, lack of the desired or expected correlation between the future and the underlying, known as basis risk, would reduce the desired effectiveness of the hedging instrument.

 

Hedging Risk. The Fund’s use of inverse securities or other transactions to reduce risk involves costs and will be subject to the Adviser’s to predict correctly changes in the relationships of such hedge instruments to the Fund’s portfolio holdings or other factors. No assurance can be given that the Adviser’s judgment in this respect will be correct. In addition, no assurance can be given that the Fund will enter into hedging or other transactions at times or under circumstances in which it may be advisable to do so.

 

Inverse ETF Risk (Equity Fund and Global Fund only). Inverse ETF index funds seek to provide investment results that will match a certain percentage of the inverse of the performance of a specific benchmark on a daily basis. Because they reset daily there may be significant volatility associated with inverse ETFs. The inverse ETFs in which the Fund invests may not be able to replicate exactly the inverse of the performance of the indices they track. Inverse ETFs fall in price when stock prices are rising. Additionally, inverse ETFs may employ leverage which magnifies the changes in the underlying stock index upon which they are based. Investing in inverse ETFs may result in increased volatility due to the Fund’s possible use of short sales of securities and swaps. The use of leverage by an ETF increases risk to the Fund. The more a fund invests in leveraged instruments, the more the leverage will magnify any gains or losses on those investments. During periods of increased volatility, inverse ETFs may not perform in the manner they are designed. Investments in inverse funds are intended to be short-term in nature and may, therefore, lead to increased turnover and transaction costs to the Fund.

 

Inverse Funds Risk (Equity Fund and Global Fund only). Inverse funds typically lose value as the index or security tracked by the fund increases in value; a result that is the opposite from traditional funds. Because they reset daily there may be significant volatility associated with inverse funds. The inverse funds in which a Fund invests may not be able to replicate exactly the inverse of the performance of the benchmark they track. Inverse funds fall in price when its benchmark prices are rising. Additionally, inverse funds may employ leverage which magnifies the changes in the underlying benchmark upon which they are based. Investments in inverse funds will prevent the Fund from participating in market-wide or sector-wide gains and may not prove to be an effective hedge. During periods of increased volatility, inverse funds may not perform in the manner they are designed. Investments in inverse funds are intended to be short-term in nature and may, therefore, lead to increased turnover and transaction costs to the Fund.

 

Large Market Capitalization Companies Risk (Equity Fund and Global Fund only). The value of investments in larger companies may not rise as much as smaller companies, or larger companies may be unable to respond quickly to competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes.

 

Management Risk. The Fund’s ability to identify and invest in attractive opportunities is dependent upon the Adviser. If one or more key individuals leave, the Adviser may not be able to hire qualified replacements or may require extended time to do so. This situation could prevent the Fund from achieving its investment objectives. The Fund’s portfolio managers use technical analysis and/or trend models. Any imperfections or limitations in such analyses and models could affect the ability of the portfolio managers to implement strategies. By necessity, these analyses and models make simplifying assumptions that limit their efficacy. Models that appear to explain prior market data can fail to predict future market events. Further, the data used in models may be inaccurate and/or it may not include the most recent information about a company or a security.

 

Market and Geopolitical Risk. The increasing interconnectivity between global economies and financial markets increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market. Securities in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform due to inflation (or expectations for inflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters, climate-change and climate-related events, pandemics, epidemics, terrorism, international conflicts, regulatory events and governmental or quasi-governmental actions. The occurrence of global events similar to those in recent years, such as terrorist attacks around the world, natural disasters, social and political discord or debt crises and downgrades, among others, may result in market volatility and may have long term effects on both the U.S. and global financial markets. It is difficult to predict when similar events affecting the U.S. or global financial markets may occur, the effects that such events may have and the duration of those effects. Any such event(s) could have a significant adverse impact on the value and risk profile of the Fund’s portfolio. The COVID-19 pandemic and the aggressive responses taken by many governments, had negative impacts, and in many cases severe negative impacts, on markets worldwide. It is not known how long such impacts, or any future impacts of other significant events described above, will or would last, but there could be a prolonged period of global economic slowdown, which may impact your Fund investment. Therefore, the Fund could lose money over short periods due to short-term market movements and over longer periods during more prolonged market downturns. During a general market downturn, multiple asset classes may be negatively affected. Changes in market conditions and interest rates can have the same impact on all types of securities and instruments. In times of severe market disruptions you could lose your entire investment.

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Options Risk. There are risks associated with the sale and purchase of call and put options. As a seller (writer) of a put option, the Fund will tend to lose money if the value of the reference index or security falls below the strike price. As the seller (writer) of a call option, the Fund may experience lower returns if the value of the reference index or security rises above the strike price.

 

Portfolio Turnover Risk (Income Fund only). The Fund’s annual portfolio turnover rate may vary greatly from year to year. A high rate of portfolio turnover (i.e., 100% or more) will result in increased transaction costs for the Fund in the form of increased dealer spreads and brokerage commissions. Greater transaction costs may reduce Fund performance. High portfolio turnover also may result in increased realization of net short-term capital gains (which are taxable to shareholders as ordinary income when distributed to them), higher taxable distributions and lower a Fund’s after-tax performance.

 

Securities Market Risk. The value of securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to factors affecting particular companies or the securities markets generally. A general downturn in the securities market may cause multiple asset classes to decline in value simultaneously, although equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed income securities. Despite gains in some markets after steep declines during certain periods of 2020, negative conditions and price declines may return unexpectedly and dramatically. In addition, the Fund could experience a loss when selling securities in order to meet unusually large or frequent redemption requests in times of overall market turmoil or declining prices for the securities sold.

·Stock Market Risk (Equity Fund and Global Fund only). The risk that the value of equity securities may decline. Stock prices change daily, sometimes rapidly, in response to company activity and general economic and market conditions. Certain stocks may decline in value even during periods when the prices of equity securities in general are rising, or may not perform as well as the market in general. Stock prices may also experience greater volatility during periods of challenging market conditions such as the one that the market recently experienced. Additional stock market risk may be introduced when a particular equity security is traded on a foreign market. For more detail on the related risks involved in foreign markets, see Foreign Investment Risk above.
·Bond Market Risk (Global Fund only). The risk that the value and liquidity of debt securities may be reduced under certain circumstances. Bond prices can change daily, sometimes rapidly, in response to issuer activity and general economic and credit market conditions. Bond prices can be volatile and there can be severe limitations in the ability to value or sell certain bonds, including those that are of higher credit quality, during periods of reduced credit market liquidity such as the one that the market recently experienced.

 

Short Sales Risk. Short sales by the Fund that are not made “against-the-box” (that is when the Fund has an offsetting long position in the asset that it is selling short) theoretically involve unlimited loss potential since the market price of securities sold short may continuously increase. Short selling allows the Fund to profit from declines in market prices to the extent such decline exceeds the transaction costs and the costs of borrowing the securities. However, since the borrowed securities must be replaced by purchases at market prices in order to close out the short position, any appreciation in the price of the borrowed securities would result in a loss. Purchasing securities to close out the short position can itself cause the price of the securities to rise further, thereby exacerbating the loss. The Fund may mitigate such losses by replacing the securities sold short before the market price has increased significantly. Under adverse market conditions, the Fund might have difficulty purchasing securities to meet its short sale delivery obligations, and might have to sell portfolio securities to raise the capital necessary to meet its short sale obligations at a time when fundamental investment considerations would not favor such sales.

 

Small and Medium Capitalization Companies Risk. The stocks of small and medium capitalization companies involve substantial risk. These companies may have limited product lines, markets or financial resources, and they may be dependent on a limited management group. Stocks of these companies may be subject to more abrupt or erratic market movements than those of larger, more established companies or the market averages in general.

 

Total Return Swap Risk (Equity Fund and Global Fund only). In a total return swap, the buyer receives a periodic return equal to the total return of a specified security, securities or index, for a specified period of time. In return, the buyer pays the counterparty a variable stream of payments, typically based upon short term interest rates, possibly plus or minus an agreed upon spread. For example, if the Fund enters into a swap where it agrees to exchange a floating rate of interest for a fixed rate of interest, the Fund may have to pay more money than it receives. Total return swaps entered into in which payments are not netted may entail greater risk than a swap entered into a net basis. There is a risk that adverse price movements in an instrument can result in a loss substantially greater than the Fund’s initial investment in that instrument (in some cases, the potential loss is unlimited). If there is a default by the other party to such a transaction, the Fund will have contractual remedies pursuant to the agreements related to the transaction. However, particularly in the case of privately-negotiated instruments, there is a risk that the counterparty will not perform its obligations, which could leave the Fund worse off than if it had not entered into the position. These instruments are subject to high levels of volatility, in some cases due to the high levels of leverage the Fund may achieve with them.

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Temporary Defensive Positions: To respond to adverse market, economic, political or other conditions, each Fund may invest 100% of its total assets, without limitation, short-term debt securities and money market instruments. These short-term debt securities and money market instruments include: shares of money market mutual funds, commercial paper, certificates of deposit, bankers’ acceptances, U.S. government securities and repurchase agreements. While each Fund is in a defensive position, the opportunity to achieve its investment objective will be limited. Furthermore, to the extent that a Fund invests in money market mutual funds for cash positions, there will be some duplication of expenses because the Fund pays its pro-rata portion of such money market funds’ advisory fees and operational fees.

 

Portfolio Holdings Disclosure: A description of the Funds policies and procedures regarding the release of portfolio holdings information is available in the Funds’ Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”).

 

Operational and Cybersecurity: Fund operations, including business, financial, accounting, data processing systems or other operating systems and facilities may be disrupted, disabled or damaged as a result of a number of factors, including events that are wholly or partially beyond the Funds’ control. For example, there could be electrical or telecommunications outages; degradation or loss of internet or web services; natural disasters, such as earthquakes, tornados and hurricanes; climate-change and climate-related events; disease pandemics; or events arising from local or larger scale political or social events, as well as terrorist acts.

 

The Funds are also subject to the risk of potential cyber incidents, which may include, but are not limited to, the harming of or unauthorized access to digital systems (for example, through “hacking” or infection by computer viruses or other malicious software code), denial-of-service attacks on websites, and the inadvertent or intentional release of confidential or proprietary information. Cyber incidents may, among other things, harm Fund operations, result in financial losses to the Funds and their shareholders, cause the release of confidential or highly restricted information, and result in regulatory penalties, reputational damage, and/or increased compliance, reimbursement or other compensation costs. Fund operations that may be disrupted or halted due to a cyber incident include trading, the processing of shareholder transactions, and the calculation of each Fund’s NAV.

 

Issues affecting operating systems and facilities through cyber incidents, any of the scenarios described above, or other factors, may harm the Funds by affecting the Adviser, or other service providers, or issuers of securities in which the Funds invest. Although the Funds have business continuity plans and other safeguards in place, including what the Funds believe to be robust information security procedures and controls, there is no guarantee that these measures will prevent cyber incidents or prevent or ameliorate the effects of significant and widespread disruption to our physical infrastructure or operating systems. Furthermore, the Funds cannot directly control the security or other measures taken by unaffiliated service providers or the issuers of securities in which the Funds invest. Such risks at issuers of securities in which the Funds invest could result in material adverse consequences for such issuers, and may cause the Funds’ investments in such securities to lose value.

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MANAGEMENT

 

Investment Adviser: Anchor Capital Management Group, Inc., located at 15 Enterprise, Suite 450, Aliso Viejo, California 92656, serves as each Fund’s investment adviser. The Adviser is registered with the SEC as an investment adviser under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, as amended. The Adviser is a California corporation formed in 1995. Its clients are pooled investment vehicles and mutual funds. As of October 31, 2023, the Adviser had approximately $451.1 million in asset under management.

 

Subject to the oversight of the Board of Trustees, the Adviser is responsible for managing the Funds’ investments, placing trade orders and providing related administrative services and facilities under an Investment Advisory Agreement between each Fund and the Adviser.

 

The management fee set forth in the Investment Advisory Agreement is the percentage of the annualized average daily net assets for each Fund as set forth below, to be paid on a monthly basis. In addition to investment advisory fees, each Fund pays other expenses including costs incurred in connection with the maintenance of securities law registration, printing and mailing prospectuses and statements of additional information to shareholders, certain financial accounting services, taxes or governmental fees, custodial, transfer and shareholder servicing agent costs, expenses of outside counsel and independent accountants, preparation of shareholder reports and expenses of trustee and shareholders meetings.

 

The Adviser has contractually agreed to reduce its fees and/or absorb expenses of each Fund, until at least December 31, 2024, to ensure that total annual fund operating expenses after fee waiver and/or reimbursement (exclusive of any front-end or contingent deferred loads, taxes, brokerage fees and commissions, borrowing costs (such as interest and dividend expense on securities sold short), acquired fund fees and expenses, fees and expenses associated with investments in other collective investment vehicles or derivative instruments (including for example option and swap fees and expenses), or extraordinary expenses such as litigation) will not exceed 2.25% of each Fund’s average daily net assets attributable to Institutional Class shares, subject to possible recoupment from the Fund in future years within the three years after the fees have been waived or reimbursed if such recoupment can be achieved within the lesser of the foregoing expense limits or the expense limits in place at the time of the recoupment. Fee waiver and reimbursement arrangements can decrease each Fund’s expenses and boost its performance. A discussion regarding the basis for the Board of Trustees’ renewal of the advisory agreement with respect to the Income Fund, Equity Fund and Global Fund is available in the Funds’ annual report to shareholders dated August 31, 2023.

 

Advisory Fee Expense Cap
1.60% Institutional Class – 2.25%
1.60% Institutional Class – 2.25%
1.60% Institutional Class – 2.25%

 

During the fiscal year or period ended August 31, 2023, the Adviser earned the following:

 

Fund Advisory Fee Earned
Income Fund 1.26%
Equity Fund 1.60%
Global Fund 1.57%

 

Portfolio Managers: Garrett Waters, Chief Executive Officer of the Adviser and Eric Leake CMT®, President of the Adviser have served as each Fund’s portfolio managers since each Fund commenced operations in 2015 (Income Fund); 2016 (Equity Fund) and 2019 (Global Fund).

 

Garrett Waters: Garrett Waters has been a Partner and Chief Executive Officer with the Adviser since 2009. Prior to joining the Adviser, Mr. Waters started his investment career in the institutional investment management division at J.P. Morgan Investment Management. He then went on to hold positions with Barclays Global Investors, Hollencrest Capital Management, and Pacific Financial Advisors. Mr. Waters is a graduate of Villanova University with a degree in business.

 

Eric Leake: Eric Leake CMT® is a Partner and President of the Adviser, where he has served as portfolio manager for the Adviser’s separate accounts since 1996. He is an active member of the Market Technicians Association (MTA). Mr. Leake attended Azusa Pacific University from 1988 – 1992.

 

The portfolio managers are supported by other members of the Adviser’s investment team who provide research, analysis and trading support.

 

The SAI provides additional information about the portfolio managers’ compensation, other accounts managed and ownership of Fund shares.

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HOW SHARES ARE PRICED

 

Shares of each Fund are sold at NAV. The NAV of each Fund is determined at close of regular trading (normally 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time) on each day the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) is open for business. NAV is computed by determining, on a per class basis, the aggregate market value of all assets of the applicable Fund, less its liabilities, divided by the total number of shares outstanding ((assets-liabilities)/number of shares = NAV). The NYSE is closed on weekends and New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents’ Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Juneteenth, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day (“NYSE Close”). The NAV takes into account, on a per class basis, the expenses and fees of each Fund, including management, administration, and distribution fees, which are accrued daily. The determination of NAV for each Fund for a particular day is applicable to all applications for the purchase of shares, as well as all requests for the redemption of shares, received by each Fund (or an authorized broker or agent, or its authorized designee) before the close of trading on the NYSE on that day.

 

Generally, each Fund’s securities, including securities issued by ETFs, are valued each day at the last quoted sales price on each security’s primary exchange. Securities traded or dealt in upon one or more securities exchanges (whether domestic or foreign) for which market quotations are readily available and not subject to restrictions against resale shall be valued at the last quoted sales price on the primary exchange or, in the absence of a sale on the primary exchange, at the mean between the current bid and ask prices on such exchange. Securities primarily traded in the National Association of Securities Dealers’ Automated Quotation System (“NASDAQ”) National Market System for which market quotations are readily available shall be valued using the NASDAQ Official Closing Price. Securities that are not traded on any securities exchange (whether domestic or foreign) and for which over-the-counter market quotations are readily available generally shall be valued at the last sale price or, in the absence of a sale, at the mean between the current bid and ask price on such over-the- counter market. Debt securities not traded on an exchange may be valued at prices supplied by a pricing agent(s) based on broker or dealer supplied valuations or matrix pricing, a method of valuing securities by reference to the value of other securities with similar characteristics, such as rating, interest rate and maturity.

 

If market quotations are not readily available, securities will be valued at their fair market value as determined using the “fair value” procedures approved by the Board of Trustees. Fair value pricing involves subjective judgments and it is possible that the fair value determined for a security may be materially different than the value that could be realized upon the sale of that security. The fair value prices can differ from market prices when they become available or when a price becomes available. The Board of Trustees has designated the Adviser as the “Valuation Designee” to execute these procedures. The Adviser may also enlist third party consultants such as an audit firm or financial officer of a security issuer on an as-needed basis to assist in determining a security-specific fair value. The Board of Trustees reviews the execution of this process and the resultant fair value prices at least quarterly to assure the process produces reliable results.

 

The Funds may use independent pricing services to assist in calculating the value of each Fund’s securities. In addition, market prices for foreign securities are not determined at the same time of day as the NAV for the Funds. Because the Funds may invest in underlying ETFs which hold portfolio securities primarily listed on foreign exchanges, and these exchanges may trade on weekends or other days when the underlying ETFs do not price their shares, the value of some of the Funds’ portfolio securities may change on days when you may not be able to buy or sell Fund shares.

 

In computing NAV, the Funds value foreign securities held by a Fund at the latest closing price on the exchange in which they are traded immediately prior to closing of the NYSE. Prices of foreign securities quoted in foreign currencies are translated into U.S. dollars at current rates. If events materially affecting the value of a security in a Fund’s portfolio, particularly foreign securities, occur after the close of trading on a foreign market but before the Fund prices its shares, the security will be valued at fair value. For example, if trading in a portfolio security is halted and does not resume before a Fund calculates its NAV, the Adviser may need to price the security using the Fund’s fair value pricing guidelines. Without a fair value price, short-term traders could take advantage of the arbitrage opportunity and dilute the NAV of long-term investors. Fair valuation of a Fund’s portfolio securities can serve to reduce arbitrage opportunities available to short-term traders, but there is no assurance that fair value pricing policies will prevent dilution of a Fund’s NAV by short term traders. The determination of fair value involves subjective judgments. As a result, using fair value to price a security may result in a price materially different from the prices used by other mutual funds to determine NAV, or from the price that may be realized upon the actual sale of the security.

 

With respect to any portion of a Fund’s assets that are invested in one or more open-end management investment companies registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”), the Fund’s NAV is calculated based upon the NAVs of those open-end management investment companies, and the prospectuses for these companies explain the circumstances under which those companies will use fair value pricing and the effects of using fair value pricing.

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HOW TO PURCHASE SHARES

 

Share Classes: This Prospectus describes Institutional Class shares offered by each Fund: Another class of shares of each Fund is offered for sale through another prospectus shares. The main differences between the share classes are investment minimums, ongoing fees and distribution channels they are sold through. Institutional Class shares pay an annual fee of up to 0.25%, respectively, for distribution and shareholder services expenses pursuant to a plan under Rule 12b-1. In choosing which class of shares to purchase, you should consider which will be most beneficial to you, given the amount of your purchase and the length of time you expect to hold the shares. Each class of shares in a Fund represents interest in the same portfolio of investments within the Fund. Each Fund reserves the right to waive sales charges. All share classes may not be available for purchase in all states.

 

Institutional Class shares are offered at their NAV without an initial sales charge. This means that 100% of your initial investment is placed into shares of a Fund. Institutional Class shares pay up to 0.25% on an annualized basis of the average daily net assets as reimbursement or compensation for service and distribution-related activities with respect to a Fund and/or shareholder services. Over time, fees paid under this distribution and service plan will increase the cost of an Institutional Class shareholder’s investment and may cost more than other types of sales charges.

 

Purchasing Shares: You may purchase shares of the Funds by sending a completed application form (the “Application”) to the following address:

 

Regular Mail

Anchor Risk Managed Income Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Equity Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Global Strategies Fund

c/o Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC

P.O. Box 514450

Omaha, Nebraska 68154

Express/Overnight Mail

Anchor Risk Managed Income Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Equity Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Global Strategies Fund

c/o Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC

4221 North 203rd Street, Suite 100

Elkhorn, Nebraska 68022

 

The USA PATRIOT Act requires financial institutions, including the Funds, to adopt certain policies and programs to prevent money-laundering activities, including procedures to verify the identity of customers opening new accounts. As requested on the Application, you should supply your full name, date of birth, social security number and permanent street address. Mailing addresses containing a P.O. Box will not be accepted. This information will assist the Funds in verifying your identity. Until such verification is made, the Funds may temporarily limit additional share purchases. In addition, the Funds may limit additional share purchases or close an account if it is unable to verify a shareholder’s identity. As required by law, the Funds may employ various procedures, such as comparing the information to fraud databases or requesting additional information or documentation from you, to ensure that the information supplied by you is correct.

 

Purchase through Brokers: You may invest in the Funds through brokers or agents who have entered into selling agreements with the Funds’ distributor. The brokers and agents are authorized to receive purchase and redemption orders on behalf of the Funds. Such brokers are authorized to designate other intermediaries to receive purchase and redemption orders on the Funds’ behalf. The Funds will be deemed to have received a purchase or redemption order when an authorized broker or its designee receives the order. The broker or agent may set their own initial and subsequent investment minimums. You may be charged a fee if you use a broker or agent to buy or redeem shares of the Funds. Finally, various servicing agents use procedures and impose restrictions that may be in addition to, or different from those applicable to investors purchasing shares directly from the Funds. You should carefully read the program materials provided to you by your servicing agent.

 

Purchase by Wire: If you wish to wire money to make an investment in a Fund, please call the Fund at 1-844-594-1226 for wiring instructions and to notify the Fund that a wire transfer is coming. Any commercial bank can transfer same-day funds via wire. The Funds will normally accept wired funds for investment on the day received if they are received by the Funds’ designated bank before the close of regular trading on the NYSE. Your bank may charge you a fee for wiring same-day funds.

 

Automated Clearing House (ACH) Purchase: Current shareholders may purchase additional shares via Automated Clearing House (“ACH”). To have this option added to your account, please send a letter requesting this option to the relevant Fund and supply a voided check for the bank account. Only bank accounts held at domestic institutions that are ACH members may be used for these transactions.

 

You may not use ACH transactions for your initial purchase of Fund shares. ACH purchases will be effective at the closing price per share on the business day after the order is placed. The Fund may alter, modify or terminate this purchase option at any time.

 

Shares purchased by ACH will not be available for redemption until the transactions have cleared. Shares purchased via ACH transfer may take up to 15 days to clear.

 

Automatic Investment Plan: You may participate in the Funds’ Automatic Investment Plan, an investment plan that automatically moves money from your bank account and invests it in a Fund through the use of electronic funds transfers or automatic bank drafts. You may elect to make subsequent investments by transfers of a minimum of $100 on specified days of each month into your established Fund account. Please contact the Funds at 1-844-594-1226 for more information about the Funds’ Automatic Investment Plan.

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Minimum and Additional Investment Amounts: The minimum initial investment in each Fund’s Institutional Class shares is $1,000 for all account types and the minimum subsequent investment is $100. There is no minimum investment requirement when you are buying shares by reinvesting dividends and distributions from a Fund. The Funds reserve the right to waive any investment minimum requirement.

 

Each Fund reserves the right, in its sole discretion, to reject any Application to purchase shares. Applications will not be accepted unless they are accompanied by a check drawn on a U.S. bank, thrift institutions, or credit union in U.S. funds for the full amount of the shares to be purchased. After you open an account, you may purchase additional shares by sending a check together with written instructions stating the name(s) on the account and the account number, to the above address. Make all checks payable to the applicable Fund. The Funds will not accept payment in cash, credit cards, cashier’s checks or money orders. Also, to prevent check fraud, the Funds will not accept third-party checks, U.S. Treasury checks, credit card checks or starter checks for the purchase of shares. Redemptions of shares of the Funds purchased by check may be subject to a hold period until the check has been cleared by the issuing bank. To avoid such holding periods, shares may be purchased through a broker or by wire, as described in this section.

 

Note: Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC, the Funds’ transfer agent, will charge a $25 fee against a shareholder’s account, in addition to any loss sustained by the Funds, for any check or electronic payment returned to the transfer agent for insufficient funds.

 

When Order is Processed: All shares will be purchased at the NAV per share (plus applicable sales charges, if any) next determined after a Fund receives your Application or request in good order. All requests received in good order by a Fund before 4:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) will be processed on that same day. Requests received after 4:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) will be processed on the next business day.

 

Good Order: When making a purchase request, make sure your request is in good order. “Good order” means your purchase request includes:

·the name of the applicable Fund;
·the dollar amount of shares to be purchased;
·a completed purchase application or investment stub; and
·check payable to the applicable Fund.

 

Retirement Plans: You may purchase shares of a Fund for your individual retirement plans. Please call the Funds at 1-844-594-1226 for the most current listing and appropriate disclosure documentation on how to open a retirement account.

 

 

HOW TO REDEEM SHARES

 

Redeeming Shares: The Funds typically expect that it will take up to three business days following the receipt of your redemption request to pay out redemption proceeds by check or electronic transfer. The Funds typically expect to pay redemptions from cash, cash equivalents, proceeds from the sale of Fund shares, any lines of portfolio securities. These redemption payment methods will be used in regular and stressed market conditions. You may redeem all or any portion of the shares credited to your account by submitting a written request for redemption to:

 

Regular Mail

Anchor Risk Managed Income Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Equity Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Global Strategies Fund

c/o Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC

P.O. Box 541150

Omaha, Nebraska 68154

Express/Overnight Mail

Anchor Risk Managed Income Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Equity Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Global Strategies Fund

c/o Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC

4221 North 203rd Street, Suite 100

Elkhorn, Nebraska 68022

 

Redemptions by Telephone: The telephone redemption privilege is automatically available to all new accounts. If you do not want the telephone redemption privilege, you must indicate this in the appropriate area on your account application or you must write to the Fund and instruct it to remove this privilege from your account. If you own an IRA, you will be asked whether or not the Fund(s) should withhold federal income tax. The proceeds, which are equal to number of shares times NAV less any applicable deferred sales charges or redemption fees, will be sent by mail to the address designated on your account or sent electronically, via ACH or wire, directly to your existing account in a bank or brokerage firm in the United States as designated on your Application. To redeem by telephone, call 1-844-594-1226.

 

During periods of high market activity, you may encounter higher than usual wait times. Please allow sufficient time to ensure that you will be able to complete your telephone transaction prior to market close. Neither the Funds nor their transfer agent will be held liable if you are unable to place your trade due to high call volume.

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Each Fund reserves the right to suspend the telephone redemption privileges with respect to your account if the name(s) or the address on the account has been changed within the previous 30 days. Neither the Funds, the transfer agent, nor their respective affiliates will be liable for complying with telephone instructions they reasonably believe to be genuine or for any loss, damage, cost or expenses in acting on such telephone instructions and you will be required to bear the risk of any such loss. The Funds or the transfer agent, or both, will employ reasonable procedures to determine that telephone instructions are genuine. If the Funds and/or the transfer agent do not employ these procedures, they may be liable to you for losses due to unauthorized or fraudulent instructions. These procedures may include, among others, requiring forms of personal identification prior to acting upon telephone instructions, providing written confirmation of the transactions and/or tape recording telephone instructions.

 

Redemptions through Broker: If shares of the Funds are held by a broker-dealer, financial institution or other servicing agent, you must contact that servicing agent to redeem shares of the Funds. The servicing agent may charge a fee for this service.

 

Redemptions by Wire: You may request that your redemption proceeds be wired directly to your bank account. The Funds’ transfer agent imposes a $15 fee for each wire redemption and deducts the fee directly from your account. Your bank may also impose a fee for the incoming wire.

 

Systematic Withdrawal Plan: If your individual account, IRA or other qualified plan account has a current account value of at least $50,000, you may participate in the Funds’ Systematic Withdrawal Plan, an investment plan that automatically moves money to your bank account from the Funds through the use of electronic funds transfers. You may elect to make subsequent withdrawals by transfers of a minimum of $500 on specified days of each month into your established bank account. Please contact the Funds at 1-844-594-1226 for more information about the Funds’ Systematic Withdrawal Plan.

 

Redemptions in Kind: Each Fund reserves the right to honor requests for redemption or repurchase orders by making payment in whole or in part in readily marketable securities (“redemption in kind”) if the amount is greater than $250,000 or 1% of the Fund’s assets. The securities will be chosen by a Fund and valued using the Fund’s net asset value pricing procedures. A shareholder will be exposed to market risk until these securities are converted to cash and may incur transaction expenses in converting these securities to cash.

 

When Redemptions are Sent: Once a Fund receives your redemption request in “good order” as described below, it will issue a check based on the next determined NAV following your redemption request. The redemption proceeds normally will be sent by mail or by wire within three business days after receipt of a request in “good order.” If you purchase shares using a check and soon after request a redemption, your redemption proceeds, which are payable at the next determined NAV following the receipt your redemption request in “good order,” as described below, will not be sent until the check used for your purchase has cleared your bank.

 

Good Order: Your redemption request will be processed if it is in “good order.” To be in good order, the following conditions must be satisfied:

·The request should be in writing, unless redeeming by telephone, indicating the number of shares or dollar amount to be redeemed;
·The request must identify your account number;
·The request should be signed by you and any other person listed on the account, exactly as the shares are registered; and
·If you request that the redemption proceeds be sent to a person, bank or an address other than that of record or paid to someone other than the record owner(s), or if the address was changed within the last 30 days, or if the proceeds of a requested redemption exceed $50,000, the signature(s) on the request must be medallion signature guaranteed by an eligible signature guarantor.

 

When You Need Medallion Signature Guarantees: If you wish to change the bank or brokerage account that you have designated on your account, you may do so at any time by writing to the applicable Fund with your signature guaranteed. A medallion signature guarantee assures that a signature is genuine and protects you from unauthorized account transfers. You will need your signature guaranteed if:

·you request a redemption to be made payable to a person not on record with the Fund;
·you request that a redemption be mailed to an address other than that on record with the Fund;
·the proceeds of a requested redemption exceed $50,000;
·any redemption is transmitted by federal wire transfer to a bank other than the bank of record; or
·your address was changed within 30 days of your redemption request.

 

Signatures may be guaranteed by any eligible guarantor institution (including banks, brokers and dealers, credit unions, national securities exchanges, registered securities associations, clearing agencies and savings associations). Further documentation will be required to change the designated account if shares are held by a corporation, fiduciary or other organization. A notary public cannot guarantee signatures.

25 
 

Retirement Plans: If you own an IRA or other retirement plan, you must indicate on your redemption request whether the Fund(s) should withhold federal income tax. Unless you elect in your redemption request that you do not want to have federal tax withheld, the redemption will be subject to withholding.

 

Low Balances: If at any time your account balance falls below $2,500, a Fund may notify you that, unless the account is brought up to at least $2,500 within 30 days of the notice, your account could be closed. After the notice period, the Fund may redeem all of your shares and close your account by sending you a check to the address of record. Your account will not be closed if the account balance drops below $2,500 due to a decline in NAV. The Funds will not charge any redemption fee on involuntary redemptions.

 

FREQUENT PURCHASES AND REDEMPTIONS OF FUND SHARES

 

The Funds discourage and do not accommodate market timing. Frequent trading into and out of a Fund can harm all Fund shareholders by disrupting the Fund’s investment strategies, increasing Fund expenses, decreasing tax efficiency and diluting the value of shares held by long-term shareholders. Each Fund is designed for long-term investors and is not intended for market timing or other disruptive trading activities. Accordingly, the Board of Trustees has approved policies that seek to curb these disruptive activities while recognizing that shareholders may have a legitimate need to adjust their Fund investments as their financial needs or circumstances change. The Funds currently use several methods to reduce the risk of market timing. These methods include:

  • Committing staff to review, on a continuing basis, recent trading activity in order to identify trading activity that may be contrary to the Funds’ Market Timing Trading Policy;
  • Rejecting or limiting specific purchase requests; and
  • Rejecting purchase requests from certain investors.

 

Though these methods involve judgments that are inherently subjective and involve some selectivity in their application, the Funds seek to make judgments and applications that are consistent with the interests of Fund shareholders.

 

Based on the frequency of redemptions in your account, the Adviser or transfer agent may in its sole discretion determine that your trading activity is detrimental to the Funds as described in the Funds’ Market Timing Trading Policy and elect to reject or limit the amount, number, frequency or method for requesting future purchases or redemptions into the Funds.

 

The Funds reserve the right to reject or restrict purchase requests for any reason, particularly when the shareholder’s trading activity suggests that the shareholder may be engaged in market timing or other disruptive trading activities. Neither the Funds nor the Adviser will be liable for any losses resulting from rejected purchase orders. The Adviser may also bar an investor who has violated these policies (and the investor’s financial advisor) from opening new accounts with a Fund.

 

Although the Funds attempt to limit disruptive trading activities, some investors use a variety of strategies to hide their identities and their trading practices. There can be no guarantee that the Funds will be able to identify or limit these activities. Omnibus account arrangements are common forms of holding shares of the Funds. While the Funds will encourage financial intermediaries to apply the Funds’ Market Timing Trading Policy to their customers who invest indirectly in the Funds, the Funds are limited in its ability to monitor the trading activity or enforce the Funds’ Market Timing Trading Policy with respect to customers of financial intermediaries. For example, should it occur, the Funds may not be able to detect market timing that may be facilitated by financial intermediaries or made difficult to identify in the omnibus accounts used by those intermediaries for aggregated purchases, exchanges and redemptions on behalf of all their customers. More specifically, unless the financial intermediaries have the ability to apply the Funds’ Market Timing Trading Policy to their customers through such methods as implementing short-term trading limitations or restrictions and monitoring trading activity for what might be market timing, the Funds may not be able to determine whether trading by customers of financial intermediaries is contrary to the Funds’ Market Timing Trading Policy. Brokers maintaining omnibus accounts with the Funds have agreed to provide shareholder transaction information to the extent known to the broker to the Funds upon request. If a Fund or its transfer agent or shareholder servicing agent suspects there is market timing activity in the account, the Fund will seek full cooperation from the service provider maintaining the account to identify the underlying participant. At the request of the Adviser, the service providers may take immediate action to stop any further short-term trading by such participants.

26 
 

 

TAX STATUS, DIVIDENDS AND DISTRIBUTIONS

 

Any sale or exchange of a Fund’s shares may generate tax liability (unless you are a tax-exempt investor or your investment is in a qualified retirement account). When you redeem your shares you may realize a taxable gain or loss. This is measured by the difference between the proceeds of the sale and the tax basis for the shares you sold. (To aid in computing your tax basis, you generally should retain your account statements for the period that you hold shares in a Fund).

 

Dividends from net investment income, if any, are declared quarterly by the Income Fund, Equity Fund and Global Fund. Each Fund distributes its net capital gains, if any, annually. Both types of distributions will be reinvested in shares of the Fund unless you elect to receive cash. Dividends from net investment income (including any excess of net short-term capital gain over net long-term capital loss) are taxable to investors as ordinary income, while distributions of net capital gain (the excess of net long-term capital gain over net short-term capital loss) are generally taxable as long-term capital gain, regardless of your holding period for the shares. Any dividends or capital gain distributions you receive from a Fund will normally be taxable to you when made, regardless of whether you reinvest dividends or capital gain distributions or receive them in cash. Certain dividends or distributions declared in October, November or December will be taxed to shareholders as if received in December if they are paid during the following January. Each year the Funds will inform you of the amount and type of your distributions. IRAs and other qualified retirement plans are exempt from federal income taxation until retirement proceeds are paid out to the participant.

 

Your redemptions, including exchanges, may result in a capital gain or loss for federal tax purposes. A capital gain or loss on your investment is the difference between the cost of your shares, including any sales charges, and the amount you receive when you sell them The Funds must report to the IRS and furnish to shareholders the cost basis information for shares purchased and sold. The Funds have chosen average cost as its standing (default) tax lot identification method for all shareholders, which means the Funds will use this method to determine which specific shares are deemed to be sold when there are multiple purchases on different dates at differing NAVs, and the entire position is not sold at one time. Shareholders may, however, choose a method other than the Fund’s standing method at the time of their purchase or upon sale of covered shares. Shareholders should consult their tax advisors to determine the best IRS-accepted cost basis method for their tax situation and to obtain more information about how cost basis reporting applies to them. Shareholders also should carefully review the cost basis information provided to them by the Funds and make any additional basis, holding period or other adjustments that are required when reporting these amounts on their federal income tax returns.

 

On the Application, you will be asked to certify that your social security number or taxpayer identification number is correct and that you are not subject to backup withholding for failing to report income to the IRS. If you are subject to backup withholding or you did not certify your taxpayer identification number, the IRS requires the Funds to withhold a percentage of any dividend, redemption or exchange proceeds. The Funds reserve the right to reject any application that does not include a certified social security or taxpayer identification number. If you do not have a social security number, you should indicate on the purchase form that your application to obtain a number is pending. Each Fund is required to withhold taxes if a number is not delivered to the Fund within seven days.

 

This summary is not intended to be and should not be construed to be legal or tax advice. You should consult your own tax adviser to determine the tax consequences of owning a Fund’s shares.

 

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DISTRIBUTION OF SHARES

 

Distributor: Northern Lights Distributors, LLC, (the “Distributor”) located at 4221 North 203rd Street, Suite 100, Elkhorn, Nebraska 68022, is the distributor for the shares of the Funds. The Distributor is a registered broker-dealer and member of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (“FINRA”). Shares of the Funds are offered on a continuous basis.

 

Distribution Fees:

 

The Trust, on behalf of the Funds, has adopted the Trust’s Master Distribution and Shareholder Servicing Plan for Institutional Class shares (the “Plans”), pursuant to Rule 12b-1 of the 1940 Act, which allows the Funds to pay the Distributor an annual fee for distribution and shareholder servicing expenses of 0.25% of the Fund’s average daily net assets attributable to Institutional Class shares.

 

The Distributor and other entities are paid under the Plan for services provided and the expenses borne by the distributor and others in the distribution of Fund shares, including the payment of commissions for sales of the shares and incentive compensation to and expenses of dealers and others who engage in or support distribution of shares or who service shareholder accounts, including overhead and telephone expenses; printing and distribution of prospectuses and reports used in connection with the offering of the Funds’ shares to other than current shareholders; and preparation, printing and distribution of sales literature and advertising materials. In addition, the distributor or other entities may utilize fees paid pursuant to the Plans to compensate dealers or other entities for their opportunity costs in advancing such amounts, which compensation would be in the form of a carrying charge on any un-reimbursed expenses.

 

You should be aware that if you hold your shares for a substantial period of time, you may indirectly pay more than the economic equivalent of the maximum front-end sales charge allowed by FINRA due to the recurring nature of distribution (12b-1) fees.

 

Additional Compensation To Financial Intermediaries: The Distributor, its affiliates, and the Adviser and its affiliates may, at their own expense and out of their own assets including legitimate profits, provide additional cash payments to financial intermediaries who sell shares of the Funds. Financial intermediaries include brokers, financial planners, banks, insurance companies, retirement or 401(k) plan administrators and others. These payments may be in addition to the Rule 12b-1 fees and any sales charges that are disclosed elsewhere in this Prospectus. These payments are generally made to financial intermediaries that provide shareholder or administrative services, or marketing support. Marketing support may include access to sales meetings, sales representatives and financial intermediary management representatives, inclusion of a Fund on a sales list, including a preferred or select sales list, or other sales programs. These payments also may be made as an expense reimbursement in cases where the financial intermediary provides shareholder services to Fund shareholders. The Distributor may, from time to time, provide promotional incentives to certain investment firms. Such incentives may, at the Distributor’s discretion, be limited to investment firms who allow their individual selling representatives to participate in such additional compensation

 

Householding: To reduce expenses, the Funds mail only one copy of the prospectus and each annual and semi-annual report to those addresses shared by accounts that have elected to receive paper copies of these documents. If you wish to receive individual copies of these documents, please call the Funds at 1-844-594-1226 on days the Funds are open for business or contact your financial institution. The Funds will begin sending you individual copies thirty days after receiving your request.

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FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS

 

The following tables are intended to help you better understand the Income Fund, Equity Fund, Global Fund’s financial performance for the period since each Fund’s inception. Certain information reflects financial results for a single Fund share. Total return represents the rate you would have earned (or lost) on an investment in each of the Income Fund, Equity Fund and Global Fund, assuming reinvestment of all dividends and distributions. This information for the fiscal year ended August 31, 2023 has been audited by Cohen & Company, Ltd., an independent registered public accounting firm, whose report, along with the Income Fund, Equity Fund and Global Fund’s financial statements, is included in the Funds’ annual report, which is available upon request. The information for the previous fiscal years was audited by BBD, LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm.

 

Anchor Risk Managed Income Strategies Fund

(formerly, “Anchor Risk Managed Credit Strategies Fund”)

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
 
Per Share Data and Ratios for a Share of Beneficial Interest Outstanding Throughout Each Year Presented.

 

    Institutional Class  
    For the     For the     For the     For the     For the  
    Year Ended     Year Ended     Year Ended     Year Ended     Year Ended  
    August 31, 2023     August 31, 2022     August 31, 2021     August 31, 2020     August 31, 2019  
Net asset value, beginning of year   $ 9.71     $ 10.80     $ 10.48     $ 9.70     $ 9.73  
Activity from investment operations:                                        
Net investment income (loss)(1)(4)(9)     0.10       (0.19 )     0.12       0.10       0.00 (5)
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss)
on investments
    (0.75 )     (0.64 )     0.35       0.88        
Total from investment operations     (0.65 )     (0.83 )     0.47       0.98       0.00  
                                         
Less distributions:                                        
From net investment income     (0.14 )           (0.14 )     (0.19 )     (0.01 )
From net realized gains           (0.26 )     (0.01 )            
From return of capital                       (0.01 )     (0.02 )
Total distributions     (0.14 )     (0.26 )     (0.15 )     (0.20 )     (0.03 )
                                         
Paid-in capital from redemption fees(1)                              
                                         
Net asset value, end of year   $ 8.92     $ 9.71     $ 10.80     $ 10.48     $ 9.70  
                                         
Total return(2)                                        
      (6.70 )%     (7.85 )%     4.57 %     10.32 %     (0.04 )%
                                         
Net assets, end of year (000s)   $ 13,137     $ 27,697     $ 39,937     $ 43,528     $ 23,086  
                                         
Ratio of gross expenses to
average net assets including
interest and dividend expense(3)(6)(8)
    3.49 %     4.60 %     2.56 %     3.04 %     4.02 %
                                         
Ratio of net expenses to
average net assets including
interest and dividend expense(3)(7)
    3.14 %     4.50 %     2.50 %     2.91 %     3.85 %
                                         
Ratio of net investment income (loss) to
average net assets(3)(4)
    1.10 %     (1.89 )%     1.11 %     1.03 %     (0.01 )%
                                         
Portfolio turnover rate     1,097 %     1,181 %     727 %     1,114 %     1,816 %
                                         
(1)Per share amounts calculated using the average shares method, which more appropriately presents the per share data for the year/period.
(2)Total returns are historical in nature and assume changes in share price, and reinvestment of dividends and capital gains distributions, if any.
(3)The ratios of expenses to average net assets and net investment income (loss) to average net assets do not reflect the expenses of the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.
(4)Recognition of net investment income (loss) by the Fund is affected by the timing and declaration of dividends by the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.
(5)Amount is less than $0.005.

(6) Ratio of gross expenses to average net assets excluding
interest expense and dividend expense(3) 2.60% 2.35% 2.31% 2.38% 2.42%

(7) Ratio of net expenses to average net assets
excluding interest expense and dividend expense(3) 2.25% 2.25% 2.25% 2.25% 2.25%

(8)Represents the ratio of expenses to average net assets absent fee waivers and/or expense reimbursements by the adviser.
(9)Does not include the expenses of the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.
29 
 

 

 

Anchor Risk Managed Equity Strategies Fund
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
 
Per Share Data and Ratios for a Share of Beneficial Interest Outstanding Throughout Each Year Presented.

 

    Institutional Class  
    For the     For the     For the     For the     For the  
    Year Ended     Year Ended     Year Ended     Year Ended     Year Ended  
    August 31, 2023     August 31, 2022     August 31, 2021     August 31, 2020     August 31, 2019  
Net asset value, beginning of year   $ 14.81     $ 15.23     $ 13.19     $ 12.06     $ 12.13  
Activity from investment operations:                                        
Net investment income (loss)(1)(5)(8)     0.06       (0.23 )     (0.21 )     (0.15 )     (0.09 )
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss)
on investments
    (0.34 )     (0.19 )     2.25       2.63       0.84  
Total from investment operations     (0.28 )     (0.42 )     2.04       2.48       0.75  
                                         
Less distributions:                                        
From net investment income     (0.07 )                        
From net realized gains     (0.75 )                 (1.35 )     (0.82 )
From return of capital     (0.20 )                        
Total distributions     (1.02 )                 (1.35 )     (0.82 )
                                         
Paid-in capital from redemption fees(1)                             0.00 (3)
                                         
Net asset value, end of year   $ 13.51     $ 14.81     $ 15.23     $ 13.19     $ 12.06  
                                         
Total return(2)     (1.61 )%     (2.76 )%     15.47 %     22.29 %     7.08 %
                                         
Net assets, end of year (000s)   $ 123,380     $ 162,410     $ 176,806     $ 212,726     $ 124,361  
                                         
Ratio of gross expenses to average net assets including interest and dividend expense(4)(6)     2.10 %     2.10 %     2.07 %     2.20 %     2.19 %
                                         
Ratio of net expenses to average net assets including interest and dividend expense(4)(7)     2.10 %     2.10 %     2.07 %     2.20 %     2.19 %
                                         
Ratio of net investment income (loss) to
average net assets(4)(5)
    0.46 %     (1.52 )%     (1.58 )%     (1.27 )%     (0.80 )%
                                         
Portfolio turnover rate     0 %     0 %     0 %     204 %     1,068 %
                                         

 

(1)Per share amounts calculated using the average shares method, which more appropriately presents the per share data for the year/period.
(2)Total returns are historical in nature and assume changes in share price, and reinvestment of dividends and capital gains distributions, if any.
(3)Amount is less than $0.005.
(4)The ratios of expenses to average net assets and net investment loss to average net assets do not reflect the expenses of the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.
(5)Recognition of net investment income (loss) by the Fund is affected by the timing and declaration of dividends by the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.

(6) Ratio of gross expenses to average net assets
excluding interest expense and dividend expense(4) 2.10% 2.10% 2.07% 2.11% 2.10%

(7) Ratio of net expenses to average net assets
excluding interest expense and dividend expense(4) 2.10% 2.10% 2.07% 2.11% 2.10%

(8)Does not include the expenses of the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.
30 
 

 

 

Anchor Risk Managed Global Strategies Fund
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
 
Per Share Data and Ratios for a Share of Beneficial Interest Outstanding Throughout Each Year/Period Presented.

 

    Institutional Class  
    For the     For the     For the     For the     For the  
    Year Ended     Year Ended     Year Ended     Year Ended     Period Ended  
    August 31, 2023     August 31, 2022     August 31, 2021     August 31, 2020     August 31, 2019*  
Net asset value, beginning of year/period   $ 10.32     $ 12.43     $ 11.26     $ 11.07     $ 10.00  
Activity from investment operations:                                        
Net investment income (loss)(1)(6)(10)     0.08       (0.17 )     (0.24 )     (0.02 )     (0.16 )
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss)
on investments
    (0.28 )     (0.63 )     1.55       0.98       1.23  
Total from investment operations     (0.20 )     (0.80 )     1.31       0.96       1.07  
                                         
Less distributions:                                        
From net investment income     (0.08 )           (0.02 )            
From net realized gains           (1.31 )     (0.12 )     (0.77 )      
From return of capital     (0.06 )                        
Total distributions     (0.14 )     (1.31 )     (0.14 )     (0.77 )      
                                         
Net asset value, end of year/period   $ 9.98     $ 10.32     $ 12.43     $ 11.26     $ 11.07  
                                         
Total return(2)     (1.96 )%     (6.57 )%     11.76 %     8.99 %     10.70 %(3)
                                         
Net assets, end of year/period (000s)   $ 24,285     $ 24,852     $ 30,938     $ 21,118     $ 9,961  
                                         
Ratio of gross expenses to
average net assets including
interest and dividend expense(5)(7)(9)
    2.33 %     2.44 %     2.48 %     2.92 %     4.96 %(4)
                                         
Ratio of net expenses to
average net assets including
interest and dividend expenses(5)(8)
    2.25 %     2.25 %     2.27 %     2.25 %     3.60 %(4)
                                         
Ratio of net investment income (loss) to average net assets(5)(6)     0.80 %     (1.59 )%     (2.06 )%     (0.22 )%     (2.45 )%(4)
                                         
Portfolio turnover rate     50 %     0 %     118 %     869 %     746 %(3)
                                         
*For the period January 15, 2019 (commencement of operations) through August 31, 2019.
(1)Per share amounts calculated using the average shares method, which more appropriately presents the per share data for the year/period.
(2)Total returns are historical in nature and assume changes in share price, and reinvestment of dividends and capital gains distributions, if any.
(3)Not annualized.
(4)Annualized.
(5)The ratios of expenses to average net assets and net investment loss to average net assets do not reflect the expenses of the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.
(6)Recognition of net investment income (loss) by the Fund is affected by the timing and declaration of dividends by the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.

(7) Ratio of gross expenses to average net assets excluding
interest expense and dividend expense(5) 2.33% 2.44% 2.46% 2.92% 3.61%(4)

(8) Ratio of net expenses to average net assets
excluding interest expense and dividend expense(5) 2.25% 2.25% 2.25% 2.25% 2.25%(4)

(9)Represents the ratio of expenses to average net assets absent fee waivers and/or expense reimbursements by the adviser.
(10)Does not include the expenses of the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.

 

31 
 

PRIVACY NOTICE

 

Northern Lights Fund Trust IV

Rev. April 2021

FACTS WHAT DOES NORTHERN LIGHTS FUND TRUST IV DO WITH YOUR PERSONAL INFORMATION?

 

Why? Financial companies choose how they share your personal information.  Federal law gives consumers the right to limit some, but not all sharing.  Federal law also requires us to tell you how we collect, share, and protect your personal information.  Please read this notice carefully to understand what we do.

 

What?

The types of personal information we collect and share depends on the product or service that you have with us. This information can include:

·         Social Security number and wire transfer instructions

·         account transactions and transaction history

·         investment experience and purchase history

When you are no longer our customer, we continue to share your information as described in this notice.

 

How? All financial companies need to share customers’ personal information to run their everyday business.  In the section below, we list the reasons financial companies can share their customers’ personal information; the reasons Northern Lights Fund Trust IV chooses to share; and whether you can limit this sharing.

 

Reasons we can share your
personal information:
Does Northern Lights Fund Trust IV share information? Can you limit this sharing?
For our everyday business purposes - such as to process your transactions, maintain your account(s), respond to court orders and legal investigations,
or report to credit bureaus.
YES NO
For our marketing purposes - to offer our products and services to you. NO We don’t share
For joint marketing with other
financial companies.
NO We don’t share
For our affiliates’ everyday business purposes - information about your transactions and records. NO We don’t share
For our affiliates’ everyday business purposes - information about your
credit worthiness.
NO We don’t share
For non-affiliates to market to you NO We don’t share

 

QUESTIONS?   Call 1-631-490-4300

 

 
 

PRIVACY NOTICE

 

Northern Lights Fund Trust IV

 

Page 2  

 

What we do:
How does Northern Lights Fund Trust IV protect my personal information?

To protect your personal information from unauthorized access and use, we use security measures that comply with federal law. These measures include computer safeguards and secured files and buildings.

Our service providers are held accountable for adhering to strict policies and procedures to prevent any misuse of your nonpublic personal information.

How does Northern Lights Fund Trust IV collect my personal information?

We collect your personal information, for example, when you

·          open an account or deposit money

·          direct us to buy securities or direct us to sell your securities

·          seek advice about your investments

We also collect your personal information from others, such as credit bureaus, affiliates, or other companies.

Why can’t I limit all sharing?

Federal law gives you the right to limit only:

·          sharing for affiliates’ everyday business purposes – information about
your creditworthiness.

·          affiliates from using your information to market to you.

·          sharing for nonaffiliates to market to you.

State laws and individual companies may give you additional rights to limit sharing.

 

Definitions
Affiliates

Companies related by common ownership or control. They can be financial and nonfinancial companies.

·         Northern Lights Fund Trust IV has no affiliates.

Nonaffiliates

Companies not related by common ownership or control. They can be financial and nonfinancial companies.

·          Northern Lights Fund Trust IV does not share with nonaffiliates so they can market to you.

Joint marketing

A formal agreement between nonaffiliated financial companies that together market financial products or services to you.

·          Northern Lights Fund Trust IV does not jointly market.

 
 

Anchor Risk Managed Income Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Equity Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Global Strategies Fund

 

Adviser

Anchor Capital Management Group, Inc.

15 Enterprise, Suite 450

Aliso Viejo, CA 92656

Distributor

Northern Lights Distributors, LLC

4221 North 203rd Street, Suite 100, Elkhorn, NE 68022

Custodian

U.S. Bank, N.A.

1555 North River Center Drive, Suite 202

Milwaukee, WI 53212

Legal
Counsel

Thompson Hine LLP

41 South High Street, Suite 1700

Columbus, OH 43215

Transfer
Agent

Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC

225 Pictoria Drive, Suite 450

Cincinnati, OH 45246

Independent
Registered Public Accounting Firm

Cohen & Company, Ltd.

1835 Market Street, Suite 310,

Philadelphia, PA 19103

 

Additional information about each Fund is included in the Funds’ SAI dated December 29, 2023. The SAI is incorporated into this Prospectus by reference (i.e., legally made a part of this Prospectus). The SAI provides more details about the Funds’ policies and management. Additional information about the Funds’ investments is also available in the Funds’ Annual and Semi-Annual Reports to Shareholders. In the Funds’ Annual Report, you will find a discussion of the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected the Funds’ performance during the last fiscal year.

 

To obtain a free copy of the SAI and the Annual and Semi-Annual Reports to Shareholders, or other information about the Funds, or to make shareholder inquiries about the Funds, please call 1-844-594-1226. Information relating to the Funds can be found on the Funds’ website at www.anchor-capital.com/funds. You may also write to:

 

Anchor Risk Managed Income Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Equity Strategies Fund

Anchor Risk Managed Global Strategies Fund

c/o Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC

225 Pictoria Drive, Suite 450

Cincinnati, Ohio 45246

 

You may review and obtain copies of the Funds’ information at the SEC Public Reference Room in Washington, D.C. Please call
1-202-551-8090 for information relating to the operation of the Public Reference Room. Reports and other information about the Funds are available on the EDGAR Database on the SEC’s Internet site at http://www.sec.gov. Copies of the information may be obtained, after paying a duplicating fee, by electronic request at the following E-mail address: publicinfo@sec.gov.

 

 

Investment Company Act File # 811-23066

 
 

Anchor Risk Managed Income Strategies Fund

(formerly “Anchor Risk Managed Credit Strategies Fund”)

Advisor Class Shares – ATCAX

 

Anchor Risk Managed Equity Strategies Fund

Advisor Class Shares – ATEAX

 

Anchor Risk Managed Global Strategies Fund

Advisor Class Shares – ATAGX

 

 

Each a Series of Northern Lights Fund Trust IV

 

 

STATEMENT OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

December 29, 2023

 

 

 

 

This Statement of Additional Information ("SAI") is not a prospectus and should be read in conjunction with the combined Prospectus of the Anchor Risk Managed Income Strategies Fund, Anchor Risk Managed Equity Strategies Fund and Anchor Risk Managed Global Strategies Fund (each a "Fund" and, together, the Funds) dated December 29, 2023. The Funds’ Prospectus is hereby incorporated by reference, which means it is legally part of this document. You can obtain copies of the Funds’ Prospectus, annual or semi-annual reports without charge by contacting the Funds’ transfer agent, Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC, 225 Pictoria Drive, Suite 450, Cincinnati, Ohio 45246 or by calling 1-844-594-1226. You may also obtain a Prospectus by visiting the website at www.anchor-capital.com/funds.

 

 

 
 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

THE FUNDS 1
TYPES OF INVESTMENTS 2
INVESTMENT RESTRICTIONS 18
POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR DISCLOSURE OF PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS 20
MANAGEMENT 21
CONTROL PERSONS AND PRINCIPAL HOLDERS 26
INVESTMENT ADVISER 28
THE DISTRIBUTOR 31
PORTFOLIO MANAGERS 33
ALLOCATION OF PORTFOLIO BROKERAGE 34
PORTFOLIO TURNOVER 35
OTHER SERVICE PROVIDERS 36
DESCRIPTION OF SHARES 39
ANTI-MONEY LAUNDERING PROGRAM 39
PURCHASE, REDEMPTION AND PRICING OF SHARES 39
TAX STATUS 44
INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM 50
LEGAL COUNSEL 50
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 50
APPENDIX A – PROXY VOTING POLICIES AND PROCEDURES A-1
 
 

THE FUNDS

The Funds are each diversified series of Northern Lights Fund Trust IV, a Delaware statutory trust organized on June 2, 2015 (the "Trust"). The Trust is registered as an open-end management investment company. The Trust is governed by its Board of Trustees (the "Board"). Prior to December 29, 2023, the Anchor Risk Managed Income Strategies Fund was known as the Anchor Risk Managed Credit Strategies Fund.

 

The Funds may issue an unlimited number of shares of beneficial interest. All shares have equal rights and privileges. Each share of each Fund is entitled to one vote on all matters as to which shares are entitled to vote. In addition, each share of each Fund is entitled to participate equally with other shares (i) in dividends and distributions declared by each Fund and (ii) on liquidation to its proportionate share of the assets remaining after satisfaction of outstanding liabilities. Shares of each Fund are fully paid, non-assessable and fully transferable when issued and have no pre-emptive, conversion or exchange rights. Fractional shares have proportionately the same rights, including voting rights, as are provided for a full share.

 

Each Fund’s investment objective, restrictions and policies are more fully described here and in the Prospectus. The Board may add classes to and reclassify the shares of each Fund, start other series and offer shares of a new fund under the Trust at any time.

 

Each Fund offers two classes of shares: Advisor Class shares and Institutional Class shares. Only Advisor Class shares are described in this SAI. Institutional Class shares of the Funds are offered by a separate Prospectus and SAI. Each share class represents an interest in the same assets of the Funds, has the same rights and is identical in all material respects except that (i) each class of shares may be subject to different (or no) sales loads; (ii) each class of shares may bear different (or no) distribution fees; (iii) each class of shares may have different shareholder features, such as minimum investment amounts; (iv) certain other class-specific expenses will be borne solely by the class to which such expenses are attributable, including transfer agent fees attributable to a specific class of shares, printing and postage expenses related to preparing and distributing materials to current shareholders of a specific class, registration fees paid by a specific class of shares, the expenses of administrative personnel and services required to support the shareholders of a specific class, litigation or other legal expenses relating to a class of shares, Trustees’ fees or expenses paid as a result of issues relating to a specific class of shares and accounting fees and expenses relating to a specific class of shares and (v) each class has exclusive voting rights with respect to matters relating to its own distribution arrangements. The Board may classify and reclassify the shares of the Funds into additional classes of shares at a future date.

 

Shares of each Fund are fully paid, non-assessable and fully transferable when issued and have no pre-emptive, conversion or exchange rights. Fractional shares have proportionately the same rights, including voting rights, as are provided for a full share.

 

Under the Trust's Agreement and Declaration of Trust, each Trustee will continue in office until the termination of the Trust or his/her earlier death, incapacity, resignation or removal. Shareholders can remove a Trustee to the extent provided by the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the "1940 Act") and the rules and regulations promulgated thereunder. Vacancies may be filled by a majority of the remaining Trustees, except insofar as the 1940 Act may require the election by shareholders. As a result, normally no annual or regular meetings of shareholders will be held unless

1 
 

matters arise requiring a vote of shareholders under the Agreement and Declaration of Trust or the 1940 Act.

TYPES OF INVESTMENTS

The investment objective of each and the descriptions of each Fund’s principal investment strategies are set forth under "Investment Objective” and “Principal Investment Strategies” in the Prospectus. Each Fund’s investment objective is not fundamental and may be changed without the approval of a majority of the outstanding voting securities of the Trust.

 

The following pages contain more detailed information about the types of instruments in which a Fund may invest directly or indirectly as a principal or non-principal investment strategy. These instruments include (i) open-end investment companies (mutual funds), (ii) closed-end funds, (iii) exchange-traded funds ("ETFs"), (iv) limited partnerships, (v) limited liability companies and (vi) other types of pooled investment vehicles (collectively, "Underlying Funds") and strategies Anchor Capital Management Group, Inc. (the “Adviser”) employs in pursuit of a Fund’s investment objective and a summary of related risks.

 

Securities of Other Investment Companies

 

The Funds may invest in securities issued by other investment companies. The Funds intend to limit their investments in accordance with applicable law or as permitted by Rule 12d1-4 under the 1940 Act. Among other things, such law would limit these investments so that, as determined immediately after a securities purchase is made by a Fund: (a) not more than 5% of the value of its total assets will be invested in the securities of any one investment company (the “5% Limitation”); (b) not more than 10% of the value of its total assets will be invested in the aggregate in securities of investment companies as a group (the “10% Limitation”); (c) not more than 3% of the outstanding voting stock of any one investment company will be owned by the Fund (the “3% Limitation”); and (d) not more than 10% of the outstanding voting stock of any one closed-end investment company will be owned by the Fund together with all other investment companies that have the same advisor. Under certain sets of conditions, different sets of restrictions may be applicable. As a shareholder of another investment company, a Fund would bear, along with other shareholders, its proportionate share of that investment company’s expenses, including advisory fees. These expenses would be in addition to the advisory and other expenses that the Fund bears directly in connection with its own operations. Investment companies in which the Fund may invest may also impose a sales or distribution charge in connection with the purchase or redemption of their shares and other types of commissions or charges. Such charges will be payable by the Fund and, therefore, will be borne directly by the Fund’s shareholders.

 

To the extent applicable, the Funds intend to rely on Section 12(d)(1)(F) and Rule 12d1-4 under the 1940 Act, which in conjunction with one another allow registered investment companies (such as the Fund) to exceed the 3%, 5% and 10% Limitation and the 10% Limitations, provided the aggregate sales loads any investor pays (i.e., the combined distribution expenses of both the acquiring fund and the acquired funds) do not exceed the limits on sales loads established by Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”) for funds of funds, and the registered investment company “mirror votes” any securities purchased pursuant to Section 12(d)(1)(F).

 

Investments in ETFs and mutual funds involve certain additional expenses and certain tax results, which would not be present in a direct investment in such funds. Each Fund intends to limit its investments in accordance with applicable law or as permitted by Rule 12d1-4. Among other things, such law would limit these investments so that, as determined immediately after a securities purchase

2 
 

is made by a Fund: (a) not more than 5% of the value of its total assets will be invested in the securities of any one investment company (the "5% Limitation"); (b) not more than 10% of the value of its total assets will be invested in the aggregate in securities of investment companies as a group (the "10% Limitation"); (c) not more than 3% of the outstanding voting stock of any one investment company will be owned by the Fund (the 3% Limitation”); and (d) not more than 10% of the outstanding voting stock of any one closed-end investment company will be owned by the Fund together with all other investment companies that have the same advisor. Under certain sets of conditions, different sets of restrictions may be applicable. As a shareholder of another investment company, a Fund would bear, along with other shareholders, its pro rata portion of that investment company’s expenses, including advisory fees. These expenses would be in addition to the advisory and other expenses that the Fund bears directly in connection with its own operations. Investment companies in which a Fund may invest may also impose a sales or distribution charge in connection with the purchase or redemption of their Shares and other types of commissions or charges. Such charges will be payable by a Fund and, therefore, will be borne directly by Shareholders.

 

The Funds intend to rely on Section 12(d)(1)(F) and Rule 12d1-4 under the 1940 Act which in conjunction with one another allow registered investment companies (such as the Funds) to exceed the 3%, 5% and 10% Limitation, provided the aggregate sales loads any investor pays (i.e., the combined distribution expenses of both the acquiring fund and the acquired funds) does not exceed the limits on sales loads established by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”) for funds of funds, and the registered investment company “mirror votes” any securities purchased pursuant to Section 12(d)(1)(F).

 

Open-End Investment Companies

 

Under certain circumstances an underlying fund may determine to make payment of a redemption by a Fund wholly or partly by a distribution in kind of securities from its portfolio, in lieu of cash, in conformity with the rules of the SEC. In such cases, the Fund may hold securities distributed by an underlying fund until the Adviser determines that it is appropriate to dispose of such securities.

 

Investment decisions by the investment advisers of the underlying fund(s) are made independently of a Fund and the Adviser. Therefore, the investment adviser of one underlying fund may be purchasing shares of the same issuer whose shares are being sold by the investment adviser of another such fund. The result would be an indirect expense to the Fund without accomplishing any investment purpose.

 

Exchange Traded Funds

 

ETFs are generally passive funds that track their related index and have the flexibility of trading like a security. They are managed by professionals and typically provide the investor with diversification, cost and tax efficiency, liquidity, marginability, are useful for hedging, have the ability to go long and short, and some provide quarterly dividends. Additionally, some ETFs are unit investment trusts. Under certain circumstances, the Adviser may invest in ETFs, known as "inverse funds," which are designed to produce results opposite to market trends. Inverse ETFs are funds designed to rise in price when stock prices are falling.

 

ETFs have two markets. The primary market is where institutions swap "creation units" in block-multiples of, for example, 50,000 shares for in-kind securities and cash in the form of dividends. The secondary market is where individual investors can trade as little as a single share during trading hours on the exchange. This is different from open-ended mutual funds that are traded after hours once the net asset value (“NAV”) is calculated. ETFs share many similar risks with open-end and closed-end funds.

3 
 

Foreign Securities

 

Investing in securities of foreign companies and countries involves certain considerations and risks that are not typically associated with investing in U.S. government securities and securities of domestic companies. There may be less publicly available information about a foreign issuer than a domestic one, and foreign companies are not generally subject to uniform accounting, auditing and financial standards and requirements comparable to those applicable to U.S. companies. There may also be less government supervision and regulation of foreign securities exchanges, brokers and listed companies than exists in the United States. Interest and dividends paid by foreign issuers may be subject to withholding and other foreign taxes, which may decrease the net return on such investments as compared to dividends and interest paid to a Fund by domestic companies or the U.S. government. There may be the possibility of expropriations, seizure or nationalization of foreign deposits, confiscatory taxation, political, economic or social instability or diplomatic developments that could affect assets of a Fund held in foreign countries.  Finally, the establishment of exchange controls or other foreign governmental laws or restrictions could adversely affect the payment of obligations.

 

To the extent currency exchange transactions do not fully protect a Fund against adverse changes in currency exchange rates, decreases in the value of currencies of the foreign countries in which the Fund will invest relative to the U.S. dollar will result in a corresponding decrease in the U.S. dollar value of the Fund’s assets denominated in those currencies (and possibly a corresponding increase in the amount of securities required to be liquidated to meet distribution requirements). Conversely, increases in the value of currencies of the foreign countries in which a Fund invests relative to the U.S. dollar will result in a corresponding increase in the U.S. dollar value of the Fund’s assets (and possibly a corresponding decrease in the amount of securities to be liquidated).

 

Short Sales

 

A Fund may sell securities short as an outright investment strategy and to offset potential declines in long positions in similar securities. A short sale is a transaction in which a Fund sells a security it does not own or have the right to acquire (or that it owns but does not wish to deliver) in anticipation that the market price of that security will decline.

 

When a Fund makes a short sale, the broker-dealer through which the short sale is made must borrow the security sold short and deliver it to the party purchasing the security. The Fund is required to make a margin deposit in connection with such short sales; the Fund may have to pay a fee to borrow particular securities and will often be obligated to pay over any dividends and accrued interest on borrowed securities.

 

If the price of the security sold short increases between the time of the short sale and the time a Fund covers its short position, the Fund will incur a loss; conversely, if the price declines, the Fund will realize a capital gain. Any gain will be decreased, and any loss increased, by the transaction costs described above. The successful use of short selling may be adversely affected by imperfect correlation between movements in the price of the security sold short and the securities being hedged.

 

To the extent a Fund sells securities short, it will provide collateral to the broker-dealer. A short sale is "against the box" to the extent a Fund contemporaneously owns, or has the right to obtain at no added cost, securities identical to those sold short.

 

 

 

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Equity Securities

 

Equity securities include common stocks, preferred stocks and securities convertible into common stocks, such as convertible bonds, warrants, rights and options. The value of equity securities varies in response to many factors, including the activities and financial condition of individual companies, the business market in which individual companies compete and general market and economic conditions. Equity securities fluctuate in value, often based on factors unrelated to the value of the issuer of the securities, and such fluctuations can be significant.

 

Common Stock

 

Common stock represents an equity (ownership) interest in a company, and usually possesses voting rights and earns dividends. Dividends on common stock are not fixed but are declared at the discretion of the issuer. Common stock generally represents the riskiest investment in a company. In addition, common stock generally has the greatest appreciation and depreciation potential because increases and decreases in earnings are usually reflected in a company's stock price.

 

Preferred Stock

 

Preferred stock is a class of stock having a preference over common stock as to the payment of dividends and the recovery of investment should a company be liquidated, although preferred stock is usually junior to the debt securities of the issuer. Preferred stock typically does not possess voting rights and its market value may change based on changes in interest rates.

 

A fundamental risk of investing in common and preferred stock is the risk that the value of the stock might decrease. Stock values fluctuate in response to the activities of an individual company or in response to general market and/or economic conditions. Historically, common stocks have provided greater long-term returns and have entailed greater short-term risks than preferred stocks, fixed-income securities and money market investments. The market value of all securities, including common and preferred stocks, is based upon the market's perception of value and not necessarily the book value of an issuer or other objective measures of a company's worth.

 

Convertible Securities

 

Convertible securities include fixed income securities that may be exchanged or converted into a predetermined number of shares of the issuer's underlying common stock at the option of the holder during a specified period. Convertible securities may take the form of convertible preferred stock, convertible bonds or debentures, units consisting of "usable" bonds and warrants or a combination of the features of several of these securities. Convertible securities are senior to common stocks in an issuer's capital structure, but are usually subordinated to similar non-convertible securities. While providing a fixed-income stream (generally higher in yield than the income derivable from common stock but lower than that afforded by a similar nonconvertible security), a convertible security also gives an investor the opportunity, through its conversion feature, to participate in the capital appreciation of the issuing company depending upon a market price advance in the convertible security's underlying common stock.

 

 

 

 

 

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Real Estate Investment Trusts

 

A Fund may invest in securities of real estate investment trusts ("REITs"). REITs are publicly traded corporations or trusts that specialize in acquiring, holding and managing residential, commercial or industrial real estate. A REIT is not taxed at the entity level on income distributed to its shareholders or unitholders if it distributes to shareholders or unitholders at least 95% of its taxable income for each taxable year and complies with regulatory requirements relating to its organization, ownership, assets and income.

 

REITs generally can be classified as "Equity REITs", "Mortgage REITs" and "Hybrid REITs." An Equity REIT invests the majority of its assets directly in real property and derives its income primarily from rents and from capital gains on real estate appreciation, which are realized through property sales. A Mortgage REIT invests the majority of its assets in real estate mortgage loans and services its income primarily from interest payments. A Hybrid REIT combines the characteristics of an Equity REIT and a Mortgage REIT. Although a Fund can invest in all three kinds of REITs, its emphasis is expected to be on investments in Equity REITs.

 

Investments in the real estate industry involve particular risks. The real estate industry has been subject to substantial fluctuations and declines on a local, regional and national basis in the past and may continue to be in the future. Real property values and income from real property continue to be in the future. Real property values and income from real property may decline due to general and local economic conditions, overbuilding and increased competition, increases in property taxes and operating expenses, changes in zoning laws, casualty or condemnation losses, regulatory limitations on rents, changes in neighborhoods and in demographics, increases in market interest rates, or other factors. Factors such as these may adversely affect companies that own and operate real estate directly, companies that lend to such companies, and companies that service the real estate industry.

 

Investments in REITs also involve risks. Equity REITs will be affected by changes in the values of and income from the properties they own, while Mortgage REITs may be affected by the credit quality of the mortgage loans they hold. In addition, REITs are dependent on specialized management skills and on their ability to generate cash flow for operating purposes and to make distributions to shareholders or unitholders. REITs may have limited diversification and are subject to risks associated with obtaining financing for real property, as well as to the risk of self-liquidation. REITs also can be adversely affected by their failure to qualify for tax-free pass-through treatment of their income under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or their failure to maintain an exemption from registration under the 1940 Act. By investing in REITs indirectly through a Fund, a shareholder bears not only a proportionate share of the expenses of the Fund, but also may indirectly bear similar expenses of some of the REITs in which it invests.

 

Warrants

 

Warrants are options to purchase common stock at a specific price (usually at a premium above the market value of the optioned common stock at issuance) valid for a specific period of time. Warrants may have a life ranging from less than one year to twenty years, or they may be perpetual. However, most warrants have expiration dates after which they are worthless. In addition, a warrant is worthless if the market price of the common stock does not exceed the warrant's exercise price during the life of the warrant. Warrants have no voting rights, pay no dividends, and have no rights with respect to the assets of the corporation issuing them. The percentage increase or decrease in the market price of the warrant may tend to be greater than the percentage increase or decrease in the market price of the optioned common stock.

 

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Depositary Receipts

 

Sponsored and unsponsored American Depositary Receipts ("ADRs"), are receipts issued by an American bank or trust company evidencing ownership of underlying securities issued by a foreign issuer. ADRs, in registered form, are designed for use in U.S. securities markets. Unsponsored ADRs may be created without the participation of the foreign issuer. Holders of these ADRs generally bear all the costs of the ADR facility, whereas foreign issuers typically bear certain costs in a sponsored ADR. The bank or trust company depositary of an unsponsored ADR may be under no obligation to distribute shareholder communications received from the foreign issuer or to pass through voting rights. Many of the risks described below regarding foreign securities apply to investments in ADRs.

 

Emerging Markets Securities

 

Investing in emerging market securities imposes risks different from, or greater than, risks of investing in foreign developed countries. These risks include: smaller market capitalization of securities markets, which may suffer periods of relative illiquidity; significant price volatility; restrictions on foreign investment; possible repatriation of investment income and capital. In addition, foreign investors may be required to register the proceeds of sales; future economic or political crises could lead to price controls, forced mergers, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, seizure, nationalization, or creation of government monopolies. The currencies of emerging market countries may experience significant declines against the U.S. dollar, and devaluation may occur subsequent to investments in these currencies by a Fund. Inflation and rapid fluctuations in inflation rates have had, and may continue to have, negative effects on the economies and securities markets of certain emerging market countries.

 

Additional risks of emerging markets securities may include: greater social, economic and political uncertainty and instability; more substantial governmental involvement in the economy; less governmental supervision and regulation; unavailability of currency hedging techniques; companies that are newly organized and small; differences in auditing and financial reporting standards, which may result in unavailability of material information about issuers; and less developed legal systems. In addition, emerging securities markets may have different clearance and settlement procedures, which may be unable to keep pace with the volume of securities transactions or otherwise make it difficult to engage in such transactions. Settlement problems may cause a Fund to miss attractive investment opportunities, hold a portion of its assets in cash pending investment, or be delayed in disposing of a portfolio security. Such a delay could result in possible liability to a purchaser of the security.

 

Certificates of Deposit and Bankers' Acceptances

 

Certificates of deposit are receipts issued by a depository institution in exchange for the deposit of funds. The issuer agrees to pay the amount deposited plus interest to the bearer of the receipt on the date specified on the certificate. The certificate usually can be traded in the secondary market prior to maturity. Bankers' acceptances typically arise from short-term credit arrangements designed to enable businesses to obtain funds to finance commercial transactions. Generally, an acceptance is a time draft drawn on a bank by an exporter or an importer to obtain a stated amount of funds to pay for specific merchandise. The draft is then "accepted" by a bank that, in effect, unconditionally guarantees to pay the face value of the instrument on its maturity date. The acceptance may then be held by the accepting bank as an earning asset or it may be sold in the secondary market at the going rate of discount for a specific maturity. Although maturities for acceptances can be as long as 270 days, most acceptances have maturities of six months or less.

 

 

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Commercial Paper

 

Commercial paper consists of short-term (usually from 1 to 270 days) unsecured promissory notes issued by corporations in order to finance their current operations. It may be secured by letters of credit, a surety bond or other forms of collateral. Commercial paper is usually repaid at maturity by the issuer from the proceeds of the issuance of new commercial paper. As a result, investment in commercial paper is subject to the risk the issuer cannot issue enough new commercial paper to satisfy its outstanding commercial paper, also known as rollover risk. Commercial paper may become illiquid or may suffer from reduced liquidity in certain circumstances. Like all fixed income securities, commercial paper prices are susceptible to fluctuations in interest rates. If interest rates rise, commercial paper prices will decline. The short-term nature of a commercial paper investment makes it less susceptible to interest rate risk than many other fixed income securities because interest rate risk typically increases as maturity lengths increase. Commercial paper tends to yield smaller returns than longer-term corporate debt because securities with shorter maturities typically have lower effective yields than those with longer maturities. As with all fixed income securities, there is a chance that the issuer will default on its commercial paper obligation.

 

Information on Time Deposits and Variable Rate Notes

 

Time deposits are issued by a depository institution in exchange for the deposit of funds. The issuer agrees to pay the amount deposited plus interest to the depositor on the date specified with respect to the deposit. Time deposits do not trade in the secondary market prior to maturity. However, some time deposits may be redeemable prior to maturity and may be subject to withdrawal penalties.

 

The commercial paper obligations are typically unsecured and may include variable rate notes. The nature and terms of a variable rate note (i.e., a "Master Note") permit a Fund to invest fluctuating amounts at varying rates of interest pursuant to a direct arrangement between the Fund and the issuer. It permits daily changes in the amounts invested. A Fund, typically, has the right at any time to increase up to the full amount stated in the note agreement, or to decrease the amount outstanding under the note. The issuer may prepay at any time and without penalty any part of or the full amount of the note. The note may or may not be backed by one or more bank letters of credit. Because these notes are direct investment arrangements between a Fund and the issuer, it is not generally contemplated that they will be traded; moreover, there is currently no secondary market for them. Except as specifically provided in the Prospectus, there is no limitation on the type of issuer from whom these notes may be purchased; however, in connection with such purchase and on an ongoing basis, the Adviser will consider the earning power, cash flow and other liquidity ratios of the issuer, and its ability to pay principal and interest on demand, including a situation in which all holders of such notes made demand simultaneously. Variable rate notes are subject to a Fund’s investment restriction on illiquid securities investments unless such notes can be put back to the issuer (redeemed) on demand within seven days.

 

Insured Bank Obligations

 

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation ("FDIC") insures the deposits of federally insured banks and savings and loan associations (collectively referred to as "banks") up to $250,000. The Fund may elect to purchase bank obligations in small amounts so as to be fully insured as to principal by the FDIC. Currently, to remain fully insured as to principal, these investments must be limited to $250,000 per bank; if the principal amount and accrued interest together exceed $250,000, the excess principal and accrued interest will not be insured. Insured bank obligations may have limited marketability.

 

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Closed-End Investment Companies

 

The Fund may invest its assets in "closed-end" investment companies (or "closed-end funds"), subject to the investment restrictions set forth above. Shares of closed-end funds are typically offered to the public in a one-time initial public offering by a group of underwriters who retain a spread or underwriting commission of between 4% or 6% of the initial public offering price. Such securities are then listed for trading on the New York Stock Exchange, the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System (commonly known as "NASDAQ") or, in some cases, may be traded in other over-the-counter markets. Because the shares of closed-end funds cannot be redeemed upon demand to the issuer like the shares of an open-end investment company (such as the Fund), investors seek to buy and sell shares of closed-end funds in the secondary market.

 

The Fund generally will purchase shares of closed-end funds only in the secondary market. A Fund will incur normal brokerage costs on such purchases similar to the expenses the Fund would incur for the purchase of securities of any other type of issuer in the secondary market. A Fund may, however, also purchase securities of a closed-end fund in an initial public offering when, in the opinion of the Adviser, based on a consideration of the nature of the closed-end fund’s proposed investments, the prevailing market conditions and the level of demand for such securities, they represent an attractive opportunity for growth of capital. The initial offering price typically will include a dealer spread, which may be higher than the applicable brokerage cost if a Fund purchased such securities in the secondary market.

 

The shares of many closed-end funds, after their initial public offering, frequently trade at a price per share, which is less than the NAV per share, the difference representing the "market discount" of such shares. This market discount may be due in part to the investment objective of long-term appreciation, which is sought by many closed-end funds, as well as to the fact that the shares of closed-end funds are not redeemable by the holder upon demand to the issuer at the next determined NAV but rather are subject to the principles of supply and demand in the secondary market. A relative lack of secondary market purchasers of closed-end fund shares also may contribute to such shares trading at a discount to their NAV.

 

A Fund may invest in shares of closed-end funds that are trading at a discount to NAV or at a premium to NAV. There can be no assurance that the market discount on shares of any closed-end fund purchased by a Fund will ever decrease. In fact, it is possible that this market discount may increase and a Fund may suffer realized or unrealized capital losses due to further decline in the market price of the securities of such closed-end funds, thereby adversely affecting the NAV of the Fund’s shares. Similarly, there can be no assurance that any shares of a closed-end fund purchased by a Fund at a premium will continue to trade at a premium or that the premium will not decrease subsequent to a purchase of such shares by the Fund.

 

Closed-end funds may issue senior securities (including preferred stock and debt obligations) for the purpose of leveraging the closed-end fund’s common shares in an attempt to enhance the current return to such closed-end fund’s common shareholders. A Fund’s investment in the common shares of closed-end funds that are financially leveraged may create an opportunity for greater total return on its investment, but at the same time may be expected to exhibit more volatility in market price and NAV than an investment in shares of investment companies without a leveraged capital structure.

 

 

 

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United States Government Obligations

 

These consist of various types of marketable securities issued by the United States Treasury, i.e., bills, notes and bonds. Such securities are direct obligations of the United States government and differ mainly in the length of their maturity. Treasury bills, the most frequently issued marketable government security, have a maturity of up to one year and are issued on a discount basis.

Debt Issued by United States Government Agencies

 

These consist of debt securities issued by agencies and instrumentalities of the United States government, including the various types of instruments currently outstanding or which may be offered in the future. Agencies include, among others, the Federal Housing Administration, Government National Mortgage Association ("Ginnie Mae"), Farmer's Home Administration, Export-Import Bank of the United States, Maritime Administration, and General Services Administration. Instrumentalities include, for example, each of the Federal Home Loan Banks, the National Bank for Cooperatives, the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation ("Freddie Mac"), the Farm Credit Banks, the Federal National Mortgage Association ("Fannie Mae"), and the United States Postal Service. These securities are either: (i) backed by the full faith and credit of the United States government (e.g., United States Treasury Bills); (ii) guaranteed by the United States Treasury (e.g., Ginnie Mae mortgage-backed securities); (iii) supported by the issuing agency's or instrumentality's right to borrow from the United States Treasury (e.g., Fannie Mae Discount Notes); or (iv) supported only by the issuing agency's or instrumentality's own credit (e.g., Tennessee Valley Association).

 

Government-related guarantors (i.e. not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States government) include Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Fannie Mae is a government-sponsored corporation owned entirely by private stockholders. It is subject to general regulation by the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. Fannie Mae purchases conventional (i.e., not insured or guaranteed by any government agency) residential mortgages from a list of approved seller/servicers which include state and federally chartered savings and loan associations, mutual savings banks, commercial banks and credit unions and mortgage bankers. Pass-through securities issued by Fannie Mae are guaranteed as to timely payment of principal and interest by Fannie Mae but are not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States government.

 

Freddie Mac was created by Congress in 1970 for the purpose of increasing the availability of mortgage credit for residential housing. It is a government-sponsored corporation formerly owned by the twelve Federal Home Loan Banks and now owned entirely by private stockholders. Freddie Mac issues participation certificates (“PCs”), which represent interests in conventional mortgages from Freddie Mac's national portfolio. Freddie Mac guarantees the timely payment of interest and ultimate collection of principal, but PCs are not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States government. Commercial banks, savings and loan institutions, private mortgage insurance companies, mortgage bankers and other secondary market issuers also create pass-through pools of conventional residential mortgage loans. Such issuers may, in addition, be the originators and/or servicers of the underlying mortgage loans as well as the guarantors of the mortgage-related securities. Pools created by such nongovernmental issuers generally offer a higher rate of interest than government and government-related pools because there are no direct or indirect government or agency guarantees of payments in the former pools. However, timely payment of interest and principal of these pools may be supported by various forms of insurance or guarantees, including individual loan, title, pool and hazard insurance and letters of credit. The insurance and guarantees are issued by governmental entities, private insurers and the mortgage poolers.

 

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On September 7, 2008, the U.S. Treasury Department and the Federal Housing Finance Authority (the "FHFA") announced that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac had been placed into conservatorship, a statutory process designed to stabilize a troubled institution with the objective of returning the entity to normal business operations. The U.S. Treasury Department and the FHFA at the same time established a secured lending facility and a Secured Stock Purchase Agreement with both Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to ensure that each entity had the ability to fulfill its financial obligations. The FHFA announced that it does not anticipate any disruption in pattern of payments or ongoing business operations of Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac.

 

Securities Options

A Fund may purchase and write (i.e., sell) put and call options. Such options may relate to particular securities or stock indices, and may or may not be listed on a domestic or foreign securities exchange and may or may not be issued by the Options Clearing Corporation. Options trading is a highly specialized activity that entails greater than ordinary investment risk. Options may be more volatile than the underlying instruments, and therefore, on a percentage basis, an investment in options may be subject to greater fluctuation than an investment in the underlying instruments themselves.

A call option for a particular security gives the purchaser of the option the right to buy, and the writer (seller) the obligation to sell, the underlying security at the stated exercise price at any time prior to the expiration of the option, regardless of the market price of the security. The premium paid to the writer is in consideration for undertaking the obligation under the option contract. A put option for a particular security gives the purchaser the right to sell the security at the stated exercise price at any time prior to the expiration date of the option, regardless of the market price of the security.

Stock index options are put options and call options on various stock indices. In most respects, they are identical to listed options on common stocks. The primary difference between stock options and index options occurs when index options are exercised. In the case of stock options, the underlying security, common stock, is delivered. However, upon the exercise of an index option, settlement does not occur by delivery of the securities comprising the index. The option holder who exercises the index option receives an amount of cash if the closing level of the stock index upon which the option is based is greater than, in the case of a call, or less than, in the case of a put, the exercise price of the option. This amount of cash is equal to the difference between the closing price of the stock index and the exercise price of the option expressed in dollars times a specified multiple. A stock index fluctuates with changes in the market value of the stocks included in the index. For example, some stock index options are based on a broad market index, such as the Standard & Poor's 500® Index or the Value Line Composite Index or a narrower market index, such as the Standard & Poor's 100®. Indices may also be based on an industry or market segment, such as the NYSE Arca Oil Index. Options on stock indices are currently traded on the Chicago Board Options Exchange, the New York Stock Exchange and the NASDAQ OMX PHLX.

A Fund’s obligation to sell an instrument subject to a call option written by it, or to purchase an instrument subject to a put option written by it, may be terminated prior to the expiration date of the option by the Fund’s execution of a closing purchase transaction, which is effected by purchasing on an exchange an option of the same series (i.e., same underlying instrument, exercise price and expiration date) as the option previously written. A closing purchase transaction will ordinarily be effected to realize a profit on an outstanding option, to prevent an underlying instrument from being called, to permit the sale of the underlying instrument or to permit the writing of a new option containing different terms on such underlying instrument. The cost of such a liquidation purchase plus transactions costs may be greater than the premium received upon the original option, in which event a Fund will

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have paid a loss in the transaction. There is no assurance that a liquid secondary market will exist for any particular option. An option writer unable to effect a closing purchase transaction will not be able to sell the underlying instrument until the option expires or the optioned instrument is delivered upon exercise. In such circumstances, the writer will be subject to the risk of market decline or appreciation in the instrument during such period.

 

If an option purchased by a Fund expires unexercised, the Fund realizes a loss equal to the premium paid. If a Fund enters into a closing sale transaction on an option purchased by it, the Fund will realize a gain if the premium received by the Fund on the closing transaction is more than the premium paid to purchase the option, or a loss if it is less. If an option written by a Fund expires on the stipulated expiration date or if the Fund enters into a closing purchase transaction, it will realize a gain (or loss if the cost of a closing purchase transaction exceeds the net premium received when the option is sold). If an option written by a Fund is exercised, the proceeds of the sale will be increased by the net premium originally received and the Fund will realize a gain or loss.

 

Certain Risks Regarding Options

 

There are several risks associated with transactions in options. For example, there are significant differences between the securities and options markets that could result in an imperfect correlation between these markets, causing a given transaction not to achieve its objectives. In addition, a liquid secondary market for particular options, whether traded over-the-counter or on an exchange, may be absent for reasons which include the following: there may be insufficient trading interest in certain options; restrictions may be imposed by an exchange on opening transactions or closing transactions or both; trading halts, suspensions or other restrictions may be imposed with respect to particular classes or series of options or underlying securities or currencies; unusual or unforeseen circumstances may interrupt normal operations on an exchange; the facilities of an exchange or the Options Clearing Corporation may not at all times be adequate to handle current trading value; or one or more exchanges could, for economic or other reasons, decide or be compelled at some future date to discontinue the trading of options (or a particular class or series of options), in which event the secondary market on that exchange (or in that class or series of options) would cease to exist, although outstanding options that had been issued by the Options Clearing Corporation as a result of trades on that exchange would continue to be exercisable in accordance with their terms.

Successful use by a Fund of options on stock indices will be subject to the ability of the Adviser to correctly predict movements in the directions of the stock market. This requires different skills and techniques than predicting changes in the prices of individual securities. In addition, a Fund’s ability to effectively hedge all or a portion of the securities in its portfolio, in anticipation of or during a market decline, through transactions in put options on stock indices, depends on the degree to which price movements in the underlying index correlate with the price movements of the securities held by the Fund. Inasmuch as a Fund’s securities will not duplicate the components of an index, the correlation will not be perfect. Consequently, a Fund bears the risk that the prices of its securities being hedged will not move in the same amount as the prices of its put options on the stock indices. It is also possible that there may be a negative correlation between the index and a Fund’s securities that would result in a loss on both such securities and the options on stock indices acquired by the Fund.

The hours of trading for options may not conform to the hours during which the underlying securities are traded. To the extent that the options markets close before the markets for the underlying securities, significant price and rate movements can take place in the underlying markets that cannot be reflected in the options markets. The purchase of options is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. The purchase of stock index options involves the risk that the premium and transaction

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costs paid by a Fund in purchasing an option will be lost as a result of unanticipated movements in prices of the securities comprising the stock index on which the option is based.

There is no assurance that a liquid secondary market on an options exchange will exist for any particular option, or at any particular time, and for some options no secondary market on an exchange or elsewhere may exist. If a Fund is unable to close out a call option on securities that it has written before the option is exercised, the Fund may be required to purchase the optioned securities in order to satisfy its obligation under the option to deliver such securities. If a Fund is unable to effect a closing sale transaction with respect to options on securities that it has purchased, it would have to exercise the option in order to realize any profit and would incur transaction costs upon the purchase and sale of the underlying securities.

 

Cover for Options Positions

 

Transactions using options (other than options that a Fund has purchased) expose a Fund to an obligation to another party. A Fund will not enter into any such transactions unless it owns either (i) an offsetting ("covered") position in securities or other options or (ii) cash or liquid securities with a value sufficient at all times to cover its potential obligations not covered as provided in (i) above.

 

 

Options on Futures Contracts

 

A Fund may purchase and sell options on the same types of futures in which it may invest. Options on futures are similar to options on underlying instruments except that options on futures give the purchaser the right, in return for the premium paid, to assume a position in a futures contract (a long position if the option is a call and a short position if the option is a put), rather than to purchase or sell the futures contract, at a specified exercise price at any time during the period of the option. Upon exercise of the option, the delivery of the futures position by the writer of the option to the holder of the option will be accompanied by the delivery of the accumulated balance in the writer's futures margin account which represents the amount by which the market price of the futures contract, at exercise, exceeds (in the case of a call) or is less than (in the case of a put) the exercise price of the option on the futures contract. Purchasers of options who fail to exercise their options prior to the exercise date suffer a loss of the premium paid.

 

Dealer Options

 

A Fund may engage in transactions involving dealer options as well as exchange-traded options. Certain additional risks are specific to dealer options. While a Fund might look to a clearing corporation to exercise exchange-traded options, if the Fund were to purchase a dealer option it would need to rely on the dealer from which it purchased the option to perform if the option were exercised. Failure by the dealer to do so would result in the loss of the premium paid by the Fund as well as loss of the expected benefit of the transaction.

 

Exchange-traded options generally have a continuous liquid market while dealer options may not. Consequently, a Fund may generally be able to realize the value of a dealer option it has purchased only by exercising or reselling the option to the dealer who issued it. Similarly, when a Fund writes a dealer option, it may generally be able to close out the option prior to its expiration only by entering into a closing purchase transaction with the dealer to whom the Fund originally wrote the option. While a Fund will seek to enter into dealer options only with dealers who will agree to and which are expected to be capable of entering into closing transactions with the Fund, there can be no assurance that a Fund will at any time be able to liquidate a dealer option at a favorable price at any time prior to expiration. Unless a Fund, as a covered dealer call option writer, is able to effect a closing

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purchase transaction, it will not be able to liquidate securities (or other assets) used as cover until the option expires or is exercised. In the event of insolvency of the other party, a Fund may be unable to liquidate a dealer option. With respect to options written by a Fund, the inability to enter into a closing transaction may result in material losses to the Fund. For example, because a Fund must maintain a secured position with respect to any call option on a security it writes, the Fund may not sell the assets while it is obligated under the option. This requirement may impair the Fund’s ability to sell portfolio securities at a time when such sale might be advantageous.

 

The Staff of the SEC has taken the position that purchased dealer options are illiquid investments. A Fund may treat the cover used for written dealer options as liquid if the dealer agrees that the Fund may repurchase the dealer option it has written for a maximum price to be calculated by a predetermined formula. In such cases, the dealer option would be considered illiquid only to the extent the maximum purchase price under the formula exceeds the intrinsic value of the option. Accordingly, each Fund treats dealer options as subject to its limitation on illiquid investments. If the SEC changes its position on the liquidity of dealer options, the Funds will change their treatment of such instruments accordingly.

 

Spread Transactions

 

A Fund may purchase covered spread options from securities dealers. These covered spread options are not presently exchange-listed or exchange-traded. The purchase of a spread option gives a Fund the right to put securities that it owns at a fixed dollar spread or fixed yield spread in relationship to another security that the Fund does not own, but which is used as a benchmark. The risk to a Fund, in addition to the risks of dealer options described above, is the cost of the premium paid as well as any transaction costs. The purchase of spread options will be used to protect the Fund against adverse changes in prevailing credit quality spreads, i.e., the yield spread between high quality and lower quality securities. This protection is provided only during the life of the spread options.

 

Repurchase Agreements

 

A Fund may enter into repurchase agreements. In a repurchase agreement, an investor (such as a Fund) purchases a security (known as the "underlying security") from a securities dealer or bank. Any such dealer or bank must be deemed creditworthy by the Adviser. At that time, the bank or securities dealer agrees to repurchase the underlying security at a mutually agreed upon price on a designated future date. The repurchase price may be higher than the purchase price, the difference being income to a Fund, or the purchase and repurchase prices may be the same, with interest at an agreed upon rate due to the Fund on repurchase. In either case, the income to the Fund generally will be unrelated to the interest rate on the underlying securities. Repurchase agreements must be "fully collateralized," in that the market value of the underlying securities (including accrued interest) must at all times be equal to or greater than the repurchase price. Therefore, a repurchase agreement can be considered a loan collateralized by the underlying securities.

 

Repurchase agreements are generally for a short period of time, often less than a week, and will generally be used by a Fund to invest excess cash or as part of a temporary defensive strategy. Repurchase agreements that do not provide for payment within seven days will be treated as illiquid securities. In the event of a bankruptcy or other default by the seller of a repurchase agreement, a Fund could experience both delays in liquidating the underlying security and losses. These losses could result from: (a) possible decline in the value of the underlying security while the Fund is seeking to enforce its rights under the repurchase agreement; (b) possible reduced levels of income or lack of access to income during this period; and (c) expenses of enforcing its rights.

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Trading in Futures Contracts

 

A futures contract provides for the future sale by one party and purchase by another party of a specified amount of a specific financial instrument (e.g., units of a stock index) for a specified price, date, time and place designated at the time the contract is made. Brokerage fees are paid when a futures contract is bought or sold and margin deposits must be maintained. Entering into a contract to buy is commonly referred to as buying or purchasing a contract or holding a long position. Entering into a contract to sell is commonly referred to as selling a contract or holding a short position.

 

Unlike when a Fund purchases or sells a security, no price would be paid or received by the Fund upon the purchase or sale of a futures contract. The margin required for a particular futures contract is set by the exchange on which the contract is traded, and may be significantly modified from time to time by the exchange during the term of the contract. Futures contracts are customarily purchased and sold on margins that may range upward from less than 5% of the value of the contract being traded.

 

If the price of an open futures contract changes (by increase in underlying instrument or index in the case of a sale or by decrease in the case of a purchase) so that the loss on the futures contract reaches a point at which the margin on deposit does not satisfy margin requirements, the broker will require an increase in the margin. However, if the value of a position increases because of favorable price changes in the futures contract so that the margin deposit exceeds the required margin, the broker will pay the excess to the Fund.

 

These subsequent payments, called "variation margin," to and from the futures broker, are made on a daily basis as the price of the underlying assets fluctuate making the long and short positions in the futures contract more or less valuable, a process known as "marking to the market." The Funds expect to earn interest income on margin deposits.

 

Although certain futures contracts, by their terms, require actual future delivery of and payment for the underlying instruments, in practice most futures contracts are usually closed out before the delivery date. Closing out an open futures contract purchase or sale is effected by entering into an offsetting futures contract sale or purchase, respectively, for the same aggregate amount of the identical underlying instrument or index and the same delivery date. If the offsetting purchase price is less than the original sale price, a Fund realizes a gain; if it is more, the Fund realizes a loss. Conversely, if the offsetting sale price is more than the original purchase price, a Fund realizes a gain; if it is less, the Fund realizes a loss. The transaction costs must also be included in these calculations. There can be no assurance, however, that a Fund will be able to enter into an offsetting transaction with respect to a particular futures contract at a particular time. If a Fund is not able to enter into an offsetting transaction, the Fund will continue to be required to maintain the margin deposits on the futures contract.

 

Settlement of a stock index futures contract may or may not be in the underlying instrument or index. If not in the underlying instrument or index, then settlement will be made in cash, equivalent over time to the difference between the contract price and the actual price of the underlying asset at the time the stock index futures contract expires.

 

Regulation as a Commodity Pool Operator

 

The Adviser, on behalf of the Funds, has filed with the National Futures Association, a notice claiming an exclusion from the definition of the term "commodity pool operator" under the Commodity

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Exchange Act, as amended, and the rules of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission promulgated thereunder, with respect to the Funds’ operation. Accordingly, the Funds are not subject to registration or regulation as a commodity pool operator.

 

When-Issued, Forward Commitments and Delayed Settlements

 

A Fund may purchase and sell securities on a when-issued, forward commitment or delayed settlement basis. In this event, the Custodian (as defined under the section entitled "Custodian") will segregate liquid assets equal to the amount of the commitment in a separate account. Normally, the Custodian will set aside portfolio securities to satisfy a purchase commitment. In such a case, a Fund may be required subsequently to segregate additional assets in order to assure that the value of the account remains equal to the amount of the Fund’s commitment. It may be expected that a Fund’s net assets will fluctuate to a greater degree when it sets aside portfolio securities to cover such purchase commitments than when it sets aside cash.

 

A Fund does not intend to engage in these transactions for speculative purposes but only in furtherance of its investment objectives.

 

A Fund will purchase securities on a when-issued, forward commitment or delayed settlement basis only with the intention of completing the transaction. If deemed advisable as a matter of investment strategy, however, a Fund may dispose of or renegotiate a commitment after it is entered into, and may sell securities it has committed to purchase before those securities are delivered to the Fund on the settlement date. In these cases, the Fund may realize a taxable capital gain or loss. When a Fund engages in when-issued, forward commitment and delayed settlement transactions, it relies on the other party to consummate the trade. Failure of such party to do so may result in a Fund incurring a loss or missing an opportunity to obtain a price credited to be advantageous.

 

The market value of the securities underlying a when-issued purchase, forward commitment to purchase securities, or a delayed settlement and any subsequent fluctuations in their market value is taken into account when determining the market value of a Fund starting on the day the Fund agrees to purchase the securities. A Fund does not earn interest on the securities it has committed to purchase until it has paid for and delivered on the settlement date.

 

Illiquid and Restricted Investments

 

A Fund may invest up to 15% of its net assets in illiquid investments. Illiquid investments include securities subject to contractual or legal restrictions on resale (e.g., because they have not been registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act")) and securities that are otherwise not readily marketable (e.g., because trading in the security is suspended or because market makers do not exist or will not entertain bids or offers). Securities that have not been registered under the Securities Act are referred to as private placements or restricted securities and are purchased directly from the issuer or in the secondary market. Foreign securities that are freely tradable in their principal markets are not considered to be illiquid.

 

Restricted and other illiquid investments may be subject to the potential for delays on resale and uncertainty in valuation. A Fund might be unable to dispose of illiquid securities promptly or at reasonable prices and might thereby experience difficulty in satisfying redemption requests from shareholders. A Fund might have to register restricted securities in order to dispose of them, resulting in additional expense and delay. Adverse market conditions could impede such a public offering of securities.

 

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A large institutional market exists for certain securities that are not registered under the Securities Act, including foreign securities. The fact that there are contractual or legal restrictions on resale to the general public or to certain institutions may not be indicative of the liquidity of such investments. Rule 144A under the Securities Act allows such a broader institutional trading market for securities otherwise subject to restrictions on resale to the general public. Rule 144A establishes a "safe harbor" from the registration requirements of the Securities Act for resale of certain securities to qualified institutional buyers. Rule 144A has produced enhanced liquidity for many restricted securities, and market liquidity for such securities may continue to expand as a result of this regulation and the consequent existence of the PORTAL system, which is an automated system for the trading, clearance and settlement of unregistered securities of domestic and foreign issuers sponsored by NASDAQ.

 

Under guidelines adopted by the Board, the Adviser may determine that particular Rule 144A securities, and commercial paper issued in reliance on the private placement exemption from registration afforded by Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act, are liquid even though they are not registered. A determination of whether such a security is liquid or not is a question of fact. In making this determination, the Adviser will consider, as it deems appropriate under the circumstances and among other factors: (1) the frequency of trades and quotes for the security; (2) the number of dealers willing to purchase or sell the security; (3) the number of other potential purchasers of the security; (4) dealer undertakings to make a market in the security; (5) the nature of the security (e.g., debt or equity, date of maturity, terms of dividend or interest payments, and other material terms) and the nature of the marketplace trades (e.g., the time needed to dispose of the security, the method of soliciting offers, and the mechanics of transfer); and (6) the rating of the security and the financial condition and prospects of the issuer. In the case of commercial paper, the Adviser will also determine that the paper (1) is not traded flat or in default as to principal and interest, and (2) is rated in one of the two highest rating categories by at least two Nationally Recognized Statistical Rating Organizations ("NRSROs") or, if only one NRSRO rates the security, by that NRSRO, or, if the security is unrated, the Adviser determines that it is of equivalent quality.

 

Rule 144A securities and Section 4(a)(2) commercial paper that have been deemed liquid as described above will continue to be monitored by the Adviser to determine if the security is no longer liquid as the result of changed conditions. Investing in Rule 144A securities or Section 4(a)(2) commercial paper could have the effect of increasing the amount of a Fund’s assets invested in illiquid investments if institutional buyers are unwilling to purchase such securities.

 

Lending Portfolio Securities

 

For the purpose of achieving income, a Fund may lend its portfolio securities, provided (1) the loan is secured continuously by collateral consisting of U.S. government securities or cash or cash equivalents (cash, U.S. government securities, negotiable certificates of deposit, bankers' acceptances or letters of credit) maintained on a daily mark-to-market basis in an amount at least equal to the current market value of the securities loaned, (2) the Fund may at any time call the loan and obtain the return of securities loaned, (3) the Fund will receive any interest or dividends received on the loaned securities, and (4) the aggregate value of the securities loaned will not at any time exceed one-third of the total assets of the Fund.

 

 

 

 

 

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INVESTMENT RESTRICTIONS

 

Each Fund has adopted the following investment restrictions that may not be changed without approval by a "majority of the outstanding shares" of the Fund, which, as used in this SAI, means the vote of the lesser of (a) 67% or more of the shares of the Fund represented at a meeting, if the holders of more than 50% of the outstanding shares of the Fund are present or represented by proxy, or (b) more than 50% of the outstanding shares of the Fund. Each Fund may not:

 

1. Issue senior securities, except as otherwise permitted under the 1940 Act, and the rules and regulations promulgated thereunder;

 

2. Borrow money, except (a) from a bank, provided that immediately after such borrowing there is an asset coverage of 300% for all borrowings of the Fund; or (b) from a bank or other persons for temporary purposes only, provided that such temporary borrowings are in an amount not exceeding 5% of the Fund’s total assets at the time when the borrowing is made. This limitation does not preclude the Fund from entering into reverse repurchase transactions, provided that the Fund has an asset coverage of 300% for all borrowings and repurchase commitments of the Fund pursuant to reverse repurchase transactions;

 

3. Purchase securities on margin, participate on a joint or joint and several basis in any securities trading account, or underwrite securities. This limitation does not preclude the Fund from obtaining such short-term credit as may be necessary for the clearance of purchases and sales of its portfolio securities, and except to the extent that the Fund may be deemed an underwriter under the Securities Act, by virtue of disposing of portfolio securities;

 

4. Purchase or sell real estate or interests in real estate. This limitation is not applicable to investments in marketable securities that are secured by or represent interests in real estate.  This limitation does not preclude the Fund from investing in mortgage-related securities or investing in companies engaged in the real estate business or that have a significant portion of their assets in real estate (including REITs);

 

5. Invest more than 25% of the market value of its assets in the securities of companies engaged in any one industry or group of industries. This limitation does not apply to investment in the securities of the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities;

 

6. Purchase or sell commodities (unless acquired as a result of ownership of securities or other investments) or commodity futures contracts, except that the Fund may purchase and sell futures contracts and options to the full extent permitted under the 1940 Act, sell foreign currency contracts in accordance with any rules of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, invest in securities or other instruments backed by commodities, and invest in companies that are engaged in a commodities business or have a significant portion of their assets in commodities; or

 

7. Make loans to others, except that the Fund may, in accordance with its investment objective and policies, (i) lend portfolio securities, (ii) purchase and hold debt securities or other debt instruments, including but not limited to loan participations and sub-participations, assignments, and structured securities, (iii) make loans secured by mortgages on real property, (iv) enter into repurchase agreements, (v) enter into transactions where each loan is represented by a note executed by the borrower, and (vi) make time deposits with financial institutions and invest in instruments issued by

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financial institutions. For purposes of this limitation, the term "loans" shall not include the purchase of a portion of an issue of publicly distributed bonds, debentures or other securities.

 

Each Fund observes the following policies, which are not deemed fundamental and which may be changed without shareholder vote. A Fund may not:

 

1. Invest in any issuer for purposes of exercising control or management;

 

2. Invest in securities of other investment companies except as permitted under the 1940 Act;

 

3. Invest, in the aggregate, more than 15% of its net assets in securities with legal or contractual restrictions on resale, securities, which are not readily marketable and repurchase agreements with more than seven days to maturity. However, if more than 15% of Fund assets (defined as net assets plus the amount of any borrowing for investment purposes) are illiquid, the Adviser will reduce illiquid assets such that they do not represent more than 15% of Fund assets, subject to timing and other considerations which are in the best interests of the Fund and its shareholders; or

 

4. Mortgage, pledge, hypothecate or in any manner transfer, as security for indebtedness, any assets of the Fund except as may be necessary in connection with borrowings described in limitation (1) above. Margin deposits, security interests, liens and collateral arrangements with respect to transactions involving options, futures contracts, short sales and other permitted investments and techniques are not deemed to be a mortgage, pledge or hypothecation of assets for purposes of this limitation.

 

If a restriction on the Fund’s investments is adhered to at the time an investment is made, a subsequent change in the percentage of Fund assets invested in certain securities or other instruments of the Fund’s investment portfolio, resulting from changes in the value of the Fund’s total assets, will not be considered a violation of the restriction; provided, however, that the asset coverage requirement applicable to borrowings shall be maintained in the manner contemplated by applicable law.

 

With respect to fundamental investment restriction #2 above, if a Fund’s asset coverage falls below 300%, the Fund will reduce borrowing within 3 days in order to ensure that the Fund has 300% asset coverage.

 

With respect to fundamental investment restriction #5, if a Fund invests in one or more investment companies that concentrates its investments in a particular industry, the Fund will examine its other investment company holdings to ensure that the Fund is not indirectly concentrating its investments in a particular industry.

 

Although fundamental investment restriction #7 reserves for a Fund the ability to make loans, there is no present intent to loan money or portfolio securities and additional disclosure will be provided if such a strategy is implemented in the future.

 

In addition to the requirements set forth in Section 3816 of the Delaware Statutory Trust Act, a shareholder may bring a derivative action on behalf of the Trust only if the shareholder first make a pre-suit demand upon the Board to bring the subject action unless such pre-suit demand is excused. A demand on the Board shall only be excused if a majority of the Board, or a majority of any committee established to consider the merits of such action, has a personal financial interest in the action at issue. A Trustee shall not be deemed to have a personal financial interest in an action or otherwise be

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disqualified from ruling on a shareholder demand by virtue of the fact that such Trustee receives remuneration from his or her service on the Board.

 

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR DISCLOSURE OF PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS

 

The Trust has adopted policies and procedures that govern the disclosure of a Fund’s portfolio holdings. These policies and procedures are designed to ensure that such disclosure is in the best interests of Fund shareholders.

 

It is the Trust's policy to: (1) ensure that any disclosure of portfolio holdings information is in the best interest of Trust shareholders; (2) protect the confidentiality of portfolio holdings information; (3) have procedures in place to guard against personal trading based on the information; and (4) ensure that the disclosure of portfolio holdings information does not create conflicts between the interests of the Trust's shareholders and those of the Trust's affiliates.

 

Each Fund discloses its portfolio holdings by mailing the annual and semi-annual reports to shareholders and by filing Form N-CSR with the SEC approximately two months after the end of the fiscal year and semi-annual period. In addition, each Fund discloses its portfolio holdings by filing Form N-PORT with the SEC approximately two months after the end of each calendar quarter.

 

The Funds may choose to make portfolio holdings information available to rating agencies such as Lipper, Morningstar or Bloomberg more frequently on a confidential basis.

 

Under limited circumstances, as described below, a Fund’s portfolio holdings may be disclosed to, or known by, certain third parties in advance of their filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Form N-CSR or Form N-PORT. In each case, a determination has been made that such advance disclosure is supported by a legitimate business purpose and that the recipient is subject to a duty to keep the information confidential and is prohibited from trading on material non-public information.  

 

The Adviser. Personnel of the Adviser, including personnel responsible for managing each Fund’s portfolio, may have full daily access to Fund portfolio holdings since that information is necessary in order for the Adviser to provide its management, administrative, and investment services to the Funds. As required for purposes of analyzing the impact of existing and future market changes on the prices, availability, as demand and liquidity of such securities, as well as for the assistance of portfolio managers in the trading of such securities, Adviser personnel may also release and discuss certain portfolio holdings with various broker-dealers.

 

Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC. Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC is the transfer agent, fund accountant, administrator and custody administrator for the Funds; therefore, its personnel have full daily access to each Fund’s portfolio holdings since that information is necessary in order for them to provide the agreed-upon services for the Trust.

 

U. S. Bank, N.A. U. S. Bank, N.A. is custodian for the Funds; therefore, its personnel have full daily access to each Fund’s portfolio holdings since that information is necessary in order for them to provide the agreed-upon services for the Trust.

 

Cohen & Company, Ltd. Cohen & Company, Ltd. is the Funds’ independent registered public accounting firm; therefore, its personnel have access to each Fund’s portfolio holdings in connection with auditing of each Fund’s annual financial statements and providing assistance and consultation in connection with SEC filings.

 

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Thompson Hine LLP. Thompson Hine LLP is counsel to the Trust; therefore, its personnel have access to each Fund’s portfolio holdings in connection with review of each Fund’s annual and semi-annual shareholder reports and SEC filings.

 

Derivatives Risk Consultant. The Trust has engaged a derivatives risk consultant (“Consultant”) to consult with the Board, and the Adviser regarding the effectiveness of derivatives risk management. The Consultant therefore may have access to the Funds’ portfolio holdings in order to provide such services to the Trust.

 

Additions to List of Approved Recipients

 

The Trust’s Chief Compliance Officer is the person responsible, and whose prior approval is required, for any disclosure of each Fund’s portfolio securities at any time or to any persons other than those described above. In such cases, the recipient must have a legitimate business need for the information and must be subject to a duty to keep the information confidential and not trade on any material, non-public information. There are no ongoing arrangements in place with respect to the disclosure of portfolio holdings. In no event shall a Fund, the Adviser, or any other party receive any direct or indirect compensation in connection with the disclosure of information about the Fund’s portfolio holdings.

 

Compliance with Portfolio Holdings Disclosure Procedures

 

The Trust’s Chief Compliance Officer will report periodically to the Board with respect to compliance with each Fund’s portfolio holdings disclosure procedures, and from time to time will provide the Board any updates to the portfolio holdings disclosure policies and procedures.

 

There is no assurance that the Trust's policies on disclosure of portfolio holdings will protect a Fund from the potential misuse of holdings information by individuals or firms in possession of that information.

 

MANAGEMENT

 

The business of the Trust is managed under the direction of the Board in accordance with the Agreement and Declaration of Trust and the Trust's By-laws (the "Governing Documents"), which have been filed with the SEC and are available upon request. The Board consists of four (4) individuals, three (3) of whom are not "interested persons" (as defined under the 1940 Act) of the Trust or any investment adviser to any series of the Trust ("Independent Trustees"). Pursuant to the Governing Documents, the Board shall elect officers including a President, a Secretary, a Treasurer, a Principal Executive Officer and a Principal Accounting Officer. The Board retains the power to conduct, operate and carry on the business of the Trust and has the power to incur and pay any expenses, which, in the opinion of the Board, are necessary or incidental to carry out any of the Trust's purposes. The Trustees, officers, employees and agents of the Trust, when acting in such capacities, shall not be subject to any personal liability except for his or her own bad faith, willful misfeasance, gross negligence or reckless disregard of his or her duties.

 

Board Leadership Structure

 

The Trust is led by Joseph Breslin, who has served as the Chairman of the Board since July 2015. Under certain 1940 Act governance guidelines that apply to the Trust, the Independent Trustees

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meet in executive session, at least quarterly. Under the Governing Documents, the Chairman of the Board is responsible for (a) presiding at Board meetings, (b) calling special meetings on an as-needed basis, (c) executing and administering of Trust policies including (i) setting the agendas for Board meetings and (ii) providing information to Board members in advance of each Board meeting and between Board meetings. The Trust believes that its Chairman, the independent chair of the Audit Committee, and, as an entity, the full Board, provide effective leadership that is in the best interests of the Trust, its funds and each shareholder.

Board Risk Oversight

 

The Board has a standing independent Audit Committee, Nominating and Governance Committee and Contract Review Committee, each with a separate chair. The Board is responsible for overseeing risk management, and the full Board regularly engages in discussions of risk management and receives compliance reports that inform its oversight of risk management from its Chief Compliance Officer at quarterly meetings and on an ad hoc basis, when and if necessary. The Audit Committee considers financial risk and reporting within its area of responsibilities. Generally, the Board believes that its oversight of material risks is adequately maintained through the compliance-reporting chain where the Chief Compliance Officer is the primary recipient and communicator of such risk-related information. The primary purposes of the Nominating and Governance Committee are to consider and evaluate the structure, composition and operation of the Board, to evaluate and recommend individuals to serve on the Board, and to consider and make recommendations relating to the compensation of the Trust’s independent trustees.  The Nominating and Governance Committee may consider recommendations for candidates to serve on the Board from any source it deems appropriate. The primary purpose of the Contract Review Committee is to oversee and guide the process by which the Independent Trustees annually consider whether to approve or renew the Trust’s investment advisory, sub-advisory and distribution agreements, Rule 12b-1 plans, and such other agreements or plans involving the Trust as specified in the Contract Review Committee’s charter or as the Board determines from time to time.

 

Trustee Qualifications

 

Generally, the Trust believes that each Trustee is competent to serve because of his or her individual overall merits including: (i) experience, (ii) qualifications, (iii) attributes and (iv) skills.

 

Mr. Breslin has over 20 years of business experience in the investment management and brokerage business and possesses a strong understanding of the regulatory framework under which investment companies must operate based, in part, upon his years of service as an officer and/or Trustee to other registered investment companies.

 

Thomas Sarkany is qualified to serve as a Trustee based on his experience in various business and consulting positions, and through his experience from service as a board member of the Trust and other investment companies. Since 2010, he has been the President of a financial services firm and from 1994 through 2010, held various roles at a publicly held company providing financial research, publications and money management services to retail and institutional investors, including Director of Marketing and Asset Management, Director of Index Licensing, and member of the Board of Directors. In addition to his service as a Trustee of the Trust, Mr. Sarkany serves as a trustee of the Northern Lights Fund Trust II and has previously served as a director of certain public companies.

 

Charles R. Ranson has more than 20 years’ experience in strategic analysis and planning, risk assessment, and capital formation in the operation of complex organizations and entrepreneurial

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ventures. In addition to his service to the Trust, Mr. Ranson serves as an independent trustee to another mutual fund complex. Each Trustee’s ability to perform his duties effectively also has been enhanced by his educational background and professional training. The Trust does not believe any one factor is determinative in assessing a Trustee's qualifications, but that the collective experience of each Trustee makes them each highly qualified.

 

Wendy Wang has more than 30 years’ experience in the mutual fund tax and compliance services industry. Ms. Wang has served as Senior Vice President and Director of Tax and Compliance Administration of Ultimus since 2019, overseeing both the Post-Trade Compliance Team and Tax Team at Ultimus. Ms. Wang is an “interested person” under the 1940 Act because of her role as President of the Trust.