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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021

Commission file number 001-37420

 

SERITAGE GROWTH PROPERTIES

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

Maryland

38-3976287

(State or Other Jurisdiction of

Incorporation or Organization)

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

500 Fifth Avenue, Suite 1530, New York, New York

10110

(Address of principal executive offices)

(Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (212) 355-7800

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

Trading Symbols

Name of each exchange on which registered

Class A common shares of beneficial interest, par value $0.01 per share

SRG

New York Stock Exchange

7.00% Series A cumulative redeemable preferred shares of beneficial interest, par value $0.01 per share

SRG-PA

New York Stock Exchange

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None.

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ☐ No

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ☐ No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒ No ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes ☒ No ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of large accelerated filer,” accelerated filer,” smaller reporting company" and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act:

 

Large accelerated filer

Accelerated filer

Non-Accelerated filer

Smaller reporting company

 

 

Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes ☐ No

On June 30, 2021, the last business day of the most recently completed second quarter of the registrant, the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $540,000,000 based upon the closing price of $18.40 of the common stock as reported on the New York Stock Exchange on such date.

As of March 11, 2022, the registrant had the following common shares outstanding:

 

Class

 

Shares Outstanding

Class A common shares of beneficial interest, par value $0.01 per share

 

43,632,364

Class B common shares of beneficial interest, par value $0.01 per share

 

0

Class C common shares of beneficial interest, par value $0.01 per share

 

0

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of Seritage Growth Properties’ Proxy Statement for its 2022 Annual Meeting of Shareholders are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 


 

SERITAGE GROWTH PROPERTIES

ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K

DECEMBER 31, 2021

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

 

 

Page

PART I

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

 

Business

 

1

Item 1A.

 

Risk Factors

 

6

Item 1B.

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

 

32

Item 2.

 

Properties

 

33

Item 3.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

44

Item 4.

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

 

45

PART II

 

 

 

 

Item 5.

 

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

46

Item 6.

 

Reserved

 

48

Item 7.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

49

Item 7A.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

62

Item 8.

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

62

Item 9.

 

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

 

62

Item 9A.

 

Controls and Procedures

 

62

Item 9B.

 

Other Information

 

63

Item 9C.

 

Disclosure Regarding Foreign Jurisdictions that Prevent Inspections

 

63

PART III

 

 

 

 

Item 10.

 

Directors, Executive Officers, and Corporate Governance

 

64

Item 11.

 

Executive Compensation

 

64

Item 12.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

 

64

Item 13.

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

 

64

Item 14.

 

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

 

64

PART IV

 

 

 

 

Item 15.

 

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedule

 

65

 

 

Signatures

 

69

 

i


 

CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This Annual Report on Form 10-K (the “Annual Report”) of Seritage Growth Properties contains statements that constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of the federal securities laws. Any statements that do not relate to historical or current facts or matters are forward-looking statements. You can identify forward-looking statements by the use of forward-looking terminology such as “believes,” “expects,” “may,” “will,” “should,” “seeks,” “approximately,” “intends,” “plans,” “pro forma,” “estimates” or “anticipates” or the opposite of these words and phrases or similar words or phrases which are predictions of or indicate future events or trends and which do not relate solely to historical matters. Statements concerning current conditions may also be forward-looking if they imply a continuation of current conditions. You can also identify forward-looking statements by discussions of strategy, plans or intentions.

Forward-looking statements involve numerous risks and uncertainties and you should not rely on them as predictions of future events. Forward-looking statements depend on assumptions, data or methods which may be incorrect or imprecise and we may not be able to realize them. The following factors, among others, could cause actual results and future events to differ materially from those set forth or contemplated in the forward-looking statements:

Declines in retail, real estate and general economic conditions;
Competition and related challenges in the real estate and retail industries and the ability of our top tenants to successfully operate their businesses;
Failure to achieve expected occupancy and/or rent levels within the projected time frame or at all;
Our historical exposure to Sears Holdings and the effects of its previously announced bankruptcy filing;
The litigation filed against us and other defendants in the Sears Holdings adversarial proceeding pending in bankruptcy court;
Risks relating to our redevelopment activities and potential acquisition or disposition of properties;
The process and results of our review of strategic alternatives;
The impact of ongoing negative operating cash flow on our ability to fund operations and ongoing development;
Contingencies to the commencement of rent under signed leases;
Environmental, health, safety and land use and other laws and regulations;
The terms of our indebtedness and availability or sources of liquidity;
Possible acts of war, terrorist activity or other acts of violence or cybersecurity interests; and
The impact of the coronavirus (“COVID-19”) pandemic on the business of our tenants and our business, income, cash flow, results of operations, financial condition, liquidity, prospects, ability to service our debt obligations and our ability to pay dividends and other distributions to our shareholders;

While forward-looking statements reflect our good faith beliefs, they are not guarantees of future performance. Except as required by law, we disclaim any obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statement to reflect changes in underlying assumptions or factors of new information, data or methods, future events or other changes. For a further discussion of these and other factors that could impact our future results, performance or transactions, see “Item 1A. Risk Factors.”

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PART I

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

The Company

Seritage Growth Properties (“Seritage”) (NYSE: SRG), a Maryland real estate investment trust formed on June 3, 2015, is a fully integrated, self-administered and self-managed real estate investment trust (“REIT”) as defined under Section 856(c) of the Internal Revenue Code (the “Code”). Seritage’s assets are held by and its operations are primarily conducted, directly or indirectly, through Seritage Growth Properties, L.P., a Delaware limited partnership (the “Operating Partnership”). Under the partnership agreement of the Operating Partnership, Seritage, as the sole general partner, has exclusive responsibility for and discretion in the management and control of the Operating Partnership. Unless otherwise expressly stated or the context otherwise requires, the “Company”, “we,” “us,” and “our” as used herein refer to Seritage, the Operating Partnership and its owned and controlled subsidiaries.

Seritage is principally engaged in the ownership, development, redevelopment, management, sale and leasing of diversified retail and mixed-use properties throughout the United States. As of December 31, 2021, the Company’s portfolio consisted of interests in 162 properties comprised of approximately 19.2 million square feet of gross leasable area (“GLA”) or build-to-suit leased area, approximately 600 acres held for or under development and approximately 9.4 million square feet or approximately 800 acres to be disposed of. The portfolio consists of approximately 15.4 million square feet of GLA held by 137 wholly owned properties (such properties, the “Consolidated Properties”) and 3.9 million square feet of GLA held by 25 unconsolidated entities (such properties, the “Unconsolidated Properties”).

The Company’s mission is to create long-term value for our shareholders by unlocking the value of our portfolio whether through re-leasing, redevelopment, dispositions, formation of strategic partnerships or other bespoke solutions.

Background

The Company commenced operations on July 7, 2015 following a rights offering to the shareholders of Sears Holding Corporation (“Sears Holdings” or “Sears”) to purchase common shares of Seritage in order to fund, in part, the $2.7 billion acquisition of certain of Sears Holdings’ owned properties and its 50% interests in three joint ventures which were simultaneously leased back to Sears Holdings under master lease agreements (the “Original Master Lease” and the “JV Original Master Leases”, respectively).

On October 15, 2018, Sears Holdings and certain of its affiliates filed voluntary petitions for relief under chapter 11 of title 11 of the United States Code with the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York (the “Bankruptcy Court”). Subsequently, the Company and certain affiliates of Transform Holdco LLC (“Holdco”), an affiliate of ESL Investments, Inc., executed a master lease (the “Holdco Master Lease”) with respect to 51 Consolidated Properties, which became effective when the Bankruptcy Court issued an order approving the rejection of the Original Master Lease.

As of December 31, 2021, the Company did not have any remaining properties leased to Holdco or Sears Holdings after giving effect to the termination of the remaining five Consolidated Properties, which were completed in March 2021.

Edward S. Lampert is the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of ESL Investments, Inc, which owns Holdco. Mr. Lampert was also the Chairman of Seritage prior to his retirement, effective March 1, 2022, and controlled each of the tenant entities that was a party to the Holdco Master Lease prior to the termination of the remaining five Consolidated Properties in March 2021.

Board of Trustees Matters

On March 1, 2022, the Company announced that Mr. Lampert retired as its Chairman and resigned from its board of trustees (the “Board of Trustees”) effective March 1, 2022, and that each of Messrs. David S. Fawer and Thomas M. Steinberg, members of the Board of Trustees, notified the Board of Trustees that he would not stand for reelection as a trustee. Messrs. Fawer’s and Steinberg’s terms will each end at our 2022 annual meeting of shareholders.

Review of Strategic Alternatives
 

On March 1, 2022, the Company announced that its Board of Trustees has commenced a process to review a broad range of strategic alternatives to enhance shareholder value. The Board of Trustees created a special committee of the Board of Trustees (the “Special Committee”) to oversee the process. The Special Committee has retained a financial advisor. The Company is in the early stages of the strategic review process and its current intention is not to disclose or comment on interim developments with respect to the process. There can be no assurance that the review process will result in any transaction or any strategic change at this time. See “Item 1A. Risk Factors—Risks Related to Our Business and Operations— There can be no assurance that our review of strategic alternatives will result in any transaction or any strategic change at this time.”
 

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Business Strategies

The Company’s primary objective is to create value for its shareholders through the re-leasing and redevelopment of its core Consolidated Properties and Unconsolidated Properties, except for certain of its non-core assets which have been identified for near term disposition. In particular, we have identified various sites that we believe have the demand and demographic profile to support other uses such as residential, biotechnology, office and others. Given our fee ownership of these properties and control over parking lots and outparcels, we believe that these sites are well positioned for such value creation opportunities. We additionally look to further lease our built retail footprint and densify any excess parking land through the addition of triple net (“NNN”) pad sites, which are standalone sites upon which a customized space can be built or leased for a tenant.

In order to achieve its objective, the Company intends to execute the following strategies:

Multi-tenant Retail: Our portfolio of over 40 multitenant retail assets provide positive cash flow and are primarily leased to a variety of national credit tenants. As of December 31, 2021, this portfolio was 85.1% leased with a pipeline of 0.2 million square feet. A majority of our leases are effectively NNN based on the structure of our leases, providing an important inflation hedge. This portfolio also affords numerous further densification opportunities through the addition of pads on excess parking areas.
Densification and Redevelopment Opportunities: In particular, we have identified various sites that we believe have the demand and demographic profile to support other uses such as residential, biotechnology, office and others. Given our fee ownership of these properties and control over parking lots and outparcels, we believe that these sites are well positioned for such value creation opportunities. We additionally look to further densification by converting vacant land to pad sites.
Premier/Master Planned Mixed Use and Residential: As of December 31, 2021, our full portfolio included approximately 2,150 acres of land, or an average of 13 acres per site, and our most significant geographic concentrations were in higher growth markets in California, Florida, Texas, and the Northeast. We believe these land holdings will provide meaningful opportunities to create value through relevant investments and developments. Thirty-three sites have been identified as potential residential developments. The average acreage per site is 14. We are in the process of hiring a development services firm to augment our own internal development team in an effort to accelerate the entitlements of the properties.
Non-core Assets for Monetization: We continue to assess the best use for all sites within our portfolio, including residential, retail, and converting excess land area to pad sites, and will strategically dispose of non-core assets in order to fund development and deploy capital more strategically.

On March 1, 2022, the Company announced that its Board of Trustees has commenced a process to review a broad range of strategic alternatives to enhance shareholder value. The Company will continue to evaluate its portfolio strategy and corporate structure to optimize the outcome of such review. See “—Review of Strategic Alternatives.”

COVID-19 Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to have a significant impact on conditions in the real estate industry in the United States, including the Company’s properties.

These conditions may change, significantly, in future periods and results for the year ended December 31, 2021 may not be indicative of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Company's business for future periods. As such, the Company cannot reasonably estimate the impact of COVID-19 on its financial condition, results of operations or cash flows over the foreseeable future.

As of December 31, 2021, the Company had collected 97% of rental income for the year ended December 31, 2021 and agreed to defer an additional 1%. While the Company intends to enforce its contractual rights under its leases, there can be no assurance that tenants will meet their future obligations or that additional rental modification agreements will not be necessary.

Significant Tenants

Management believes the Company’s portfolio is reasonably diversified and does not contain any significant concentrations of credit risk. As of December 31, 2021, the Company has one tenant that comprises 10.2% annualized based rent, with no other tenants exceeding 10% of annualized base rent. The Company's portfolio of 137 Consolidated Properties and 25 Unconsolidated Properties was diversified by location across 38 states and Puerto Rico.

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Competition

We compete for investment opportunities and prospective tenants with other REITs, real estate partnerships and other real estate companies, private individuals, investment companies, private equity and hedge fund investors, sovereign funds, pension funds, insurance companies, lenders and other investors, including retailer operators that may close stores and pursue similar real estate strategies. In addition, revenues from our properties are dependent on the ability of our tenants and operators to compete.

Some of our competitors are significantly larger and have greater financial resources and lower costs of capital than we have. Increased competition will make it more challenging to identify and successfully capitalize on investment opportunities that meet our objectives. Our ability to compete is also impacted by national and local economic trends, availability of investment alternatives, availability and cost of capital, construction and renovation costs, existing laws and regulations, new legislation and population trends.

As a landlord, we compete in the real estate market with numerous developers and owners of properties, including the shopping centers in which our properties are located. Some of our competitors have greater economies of scale, relationships with national tenants at multiple properties which are owned or operated by such competitors, access to more resources and greater name recognition than we do. If our competitors offer space at rental rates below the current market rates or below the rentals we currently charge, or on terms and conditions which include locations at multiple properties, we may lose our existing and/or potential tenants and we may be pressured to reduce our rental rates or to offer substantial rent abatements, tenant improvement allowances, early termination rights or below-market renewal options in order to win new tenants and retain tenants when our leases expire.

Environmental Matters

Our properties are subject to environmental laws regulating, among other things, air emissions, wastewater discharges and the handling and disposal of wastes. Certain of the properties were built during the time that asbestos-containing building materials were routinely installed in residential and commercial structures. In addition, a substantial portion of the properties we acquired from Sears Holdings currently include, or previously included, automotive care center facilities and retail fueling facilities, and are or were subject to laws and regulations governing the handling, storage and disposal of hazardous substances contained in some of the products or materials used or sold in the automotive care center facilities (such as motor oil, fluid in hydraulic lifts, antifreeze and solvents and lubricants), the recycling/disposal of batteries and tires, air emissions, wastewater discharges and waste management. In addition to these products or materials, the equipment in use or previously used at such properties, such as service equipment, car lifts, oil/water separators, and storage tanks, has been subject to increasing environmental regulation relating to, among other things, the storage, handling, use, disposal, and transportation of hazardous materials. Our leases include, or are expected to include, provisions obligating the operator to comply with applicable environmental laws and to indemnify us if such operator’s noncompliance results in losses or claims against us with respect to environmental matters first arising during such operator’s occupancy. An operator’s failure to comply could result in fines and penalties or the requirement to undertake corrective actions which may result in significant costs to the operator and thus adversely affect their ability to meet their obligations to us.

Pursuant to U.S. federal, state and local environmental laws and regulations, a current or previous owner or operator of real property may be required to investigate, remove and/or remediate a release of hazardous substances or other regulated materials at, or emanating from, such property. Further, under certain circumstances, such owners or operators of real property may be held liable for property damage, personal injury and/or natural resource damage resulting from or arising in connection with such releases. Certain of these laws have been interpreted to be joint and several unless the harm is divisible and there is a reasonable basis for allocation of responsibility. We also may be liable under certain of these laws for damage that occurred prior to our ownership of a property or at a site where we sent wastes for disposal. The failure to properly remediate a property may also adversely affect our ability to lease, sell or rent the property or to borrow funds using the property as collateral.

Under the Holdco Master Lease, Holdco is required to indemnify us from certain environmental liabilities at the Consolidated Properties before or during the period in which any such Consolidated Property was leased to Holdco, including removal and remediation of all affected facilities and equipment constituting the automotive care center facilities. In addition, an environmental reserve was funded concurrently with the formation of the Company in the amount of approximately $12.0 million. As of December 31, 2021, the balance of the environmental reserve was approximately $9.5 million.

In connection with the ownership of our current or past properties and any properties that we may acquire in the future, we could be legally responsible for environmental liabilities or costs relating to a release of hazardous substances or other regulated materials at or emanating from such property. We are not aware of any environmental issues that are expected to have a material impact on the operations of our properties. However, we can make no assurances that the discovery of previously unknown environmental conditions or future laws, ordinances or regulations will not impose material environmental liabilities on us, or the current environmental condition of our properties will not be affected by tenants, the condition of land or operations in the vicinity of our properties (such as releases from underground storage tanks), or by third parties unrelated to us.

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Insurance

We have comprehensive liability, property and rental loss insurance with respect to our portfolio of properties. We believe that such insurance provides adequate coverage.

REIT Qualification

We elected to be treated as a REIT commencing with the taxable year ended December 31, 2015. So long as we qualify as a REIT, we generally will not be subject to U.S. federal income tax on net taxable income that we distribute annually to our shareholders, but net taxable income generated by our taxable REIT subsidiary (our “TRS”) will be subject to U.S. federal, state and local income tax. In order to qualify as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes, we must continually satisfy tests concerning, including, but not limited to, the real estate qualification of sources of our income, the composition and values of our assets, the amounts we distribute to our shareholders and the diversity of ownership of our stock. In order to comply with REIT requirements, we may need to forego otherwise attractive opportunities and limit our expansion opportunities and the manner in which we conduct our operations. See “Risk Factors—Risks Related to Status as a REIT.”

Financial Information about Industry Segments

We currently operate in a single reportable segment, which includes the ownership, development, redevelopment, management, sale and leasing of real estate properties. We review operating and financial results for each property on an individual basis. We, therefore, aggregate all of our properties into one reportable segment due to their similarities with regard to the nature and economics of the properties, tenants and operational process.

Human Capital

We believe that our employees are our most important asset. As of December 31, 2021, we had 40 full-time employees, all of whom are located in the United States, with the majority located in New York. We strive to hire and develop the top talent in the industry, and we believe that our business offers a unique opportunity for individuals to grow and learn.

During 2021, our number one priority was the health and safety of our team, our families and loved ones, our communities and our partners, including our tenants, contractors, and other stakeholders. We understand the importance of the mental, physical and social health and well-being of our employees and take actions to promote good health such as providing mental health days off.

Our core principles guide how we conduct ourselves and approach the challenges and opportunities that we face. Our core principles are:

Maintain a diverse and inclusive culture based on respect
Build relationships for the long term
Create an environment of constant improvement
Be entrepreneurial and proactive
Inspire people and communities through our projects

We believe that diversity and inclusion at all levels of our organization are imperative to our future successes. This means that bringing your authentic self to work every day is seen as an asset. We have focused our diversity and inclusion efforts on employee recruitment, employee engagement, community outreach and partnering with like-minded organizations. As of December 31, 2021, our organization was comprised of 45% women and 30% people of color. Our management team, which is defined as Senior Vice Presidents and above, was comprised of 33% women. We had three diverse members of our Board of Trustees. We also take diversity into consideration when evaluating vendor selection. We regularly review our compensation practices to ensure employees from underrepresented groups are not being underpaid relative to others doing the same or similar work. All employees receive training in the prevention and reporting of sexual harassment, discriminatory and abusive conduct in the workplace.

Because the engagement of our employees is important, we encourage a work environment that fosters collaboration across departments and levels. We take pride in being able to have the newest member of the team work side-by-side with our most tenured and senior executives. We believe this encourages creativity, creates opportunities for improvements and efficiencies, and strengthens our team. We regularly solicit feedback from our employees and take actions designed to increase employee engagement.

We depend on our people to create value in our portfolio and company. We offer attractive compensation with comprehensive benefits for employees and their dependents.

 

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Available Information

Our office is located at 500 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York 10110 and our telephone number is (212) 355-7800. Our website address is www.seritage.com. Our reports electronically filed with or furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act can be accessed through this site, free of charge, as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file or furnish such reports. These filings are also available on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov. Our website also contains copies of our corporate governance guidelines and code of business conduct and ethics as well as the charters of our audit, compensation and nominating and corporate governance committees. The information on our website is not part of this or any other report we file with or furnish to the SEC.

 

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ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

Certain factors may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. You should consider carefully the risks and uncertainties described below, in addition to other information contained in this Annual Report, including our consolidated financial statements and related notes. The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones we face. Additional risks and uncertainties that we are unaware of, or that we currently believe are not material, may also become important factors that adversely affect our business. If any of the following risks actually occurs, our business, financial condition, results of operations, and future prospects could be materially and adversely affected. In that event, the trading price of our common shares of beneficial interest could decline, and you could lose part or all of your investment.

 

Risk Factor Summary

The following is a summary of the principal factors that make an investment in our securities speculative or risky.

Risks Related to Our Business and Operations

We are dependent on the ability of our top tenants to successfully operate their businesses and a failure to operate successfully, including a bankruptcy or insolvency, could have a material adverse effect on our business.
We may not be able to renew leases or re-lease space at our properties and property vacancies could result in significant capital expenditures.
Following the Sears Holdings bankruptcy, we have been named as a defendant in litigation that could adversely affect our business, divert management’s attention from our business and subject us to liabilities.
Real estate investments are relatively illiquid and our pursuit of investments, including redevelopments, in properties may be unsuccessful or fail to meet our expectations.
Our review of strategic alternatives may not result in any transaction or any strategic change.
Both we and our tenants face a wide range of competition and related challenges that could affect our ability to operate profitably.
We have ongoing capital needs and may not be able to obtain additional financing on acceptable terms. We may incur mortgage indebtedness and other borrowings, which may increase our business risks.
Changes in building and/or zoning laws may require us to meet additional or more stringent construction requirements.
Our real estate assets may be subject to impairment charges.
Properties in our portfolio may be subject to ground leases; if we are found to be in breach of these ground leases or are unable to renew them, we could be materially and adversely affected.
Certain properties within our portfolio are subject to restrictions, some of which contain a purchase option or right of first refusal or right of first offer in favor of a third party.
Rising expenses could reduce cash flow, funds available for future development, and increase development costs.
Compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act may require us to make expenditures.
Environmental, health, safety and land use laws and regulations may limit or restrict some of our operations and compliance costs or liabilities may materially and adversely affect us.
Possible acts of war, terrorist activity or other acts of violence or cybersecurity incidents could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.
Covenants in our Term Loan Facility may limit our operational flexibility and a covenant breach or default could adversely affect our business and financial condition.

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Our rights and the rights of our shareholders to take action against our trustees and officers are limited.
Our and the Operating Partnership’s organizational documents and Maryland law contain provisions that may delay, defer or prevent an acquisition of Class A common shares or a change in control.
We may experience insurance related losses or insurance proceeds may not be available to us, which could result in a significant loss, decrease anticipated future revenues or cause us to incur unanticipated expense.
Conflicts of interest may exist between the interests of our shareholders and the interests of holders of Operating Partnership units, which could result in harm the interests of our shareholders.
ESL Investments, Inc. (“ESL”) exerts substantial influence over us, and its interests may differ from or conflict with the interests of our other shareholders. ESL owns a substantial percentage of the Operating Partnership units, which may be exchanged, and which will result in certain transactions requiring the approval of ESL.
The businesses of several of our unconsolidated entities are similar to each other and the occurrence of risks that adversely affect one unconsolidated entity could also adversely affect the others.
The COVID-19 pandemic has continued to, and the future outbreak of other highly infectious or contagious diseases may, materially and adversely impact the business of our tenants and our business.

 

Risks Related to Status as a REIT

Qualifying as a REIT involves highly technical and complex provisions of the Code. If we do not qualify to be taxed as a REIT, or fail to remain qualified as a REIT, and do not qualify for certain statutory relief provisions, we will be subject to U.S. federal income tax as a regular corporation and could face a substantial tax liability, which would reduce the amount of cash available for distribution to our shareholders. Even if we remain qualified as a REIT, we may face other tax liabilities that reduce our cash flow.
REIT distribution requirements could adversely affect our ability to execute our business plan. We may from time to time make distributions to our shareholders in the form of taxable stock dividends, which could result in shareholders incurring tax liability without receiving sufficient cash to pay such tax.
Complying with REIT requirements may cause us to liquidate or forgo otherwise attractive opportunities, including limitations on our ability to hedge effectively, and may cause us to incur tax liabilities.
The prohibited transactions tax may limit our ability to engage in sale transactions.
Our ownership of our TRS is subject to limitations and our transactions with our TRS will cause us to be subject to a 100% penalty tax on certain income or deductions if those transactions are not conducted on arm’s-length terms.

Risks Related to Ownership of our Securities

The market price and trading volume of our securities may be volatile.
Debt or preferred equity securities, such as the Series A Preferred Shares, rank senior to our common shares and may adversely affect the market price of our common shares.
The transactions with Sears Holdings and Holdco could give rise to disputes or other unfavorable effects, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.
The number of shares available for future sale, our earnings and cash distributions could adversely affect the market price of Class A common shares.
A lack of active trading market for the Series A Preferred Shares may negatively affect the market value of, and the ability of holders of our Series A Preferred Shares to transfer or sell, their shares.

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The Series A Preferred Shares are subordinate in right of payment to debt. The interests of holders of Series A Preferred Shares could be diluted by transactions such as the issuance of additional preferred shares.
Dividends on our preferred shares, including the Series A Preferred Shares, are discretionary.
Holders of Series A Preferred Shares have limited voting rights.

Risks Related to Our Business and Operations

We are dependent on the ability of our major tenants, to successfully operate their businesses. Our tenants’ failure to operate their businesses successfully, or the occurrence of an event that has a material adverse effect on the business, financial condition or results of operations of any of our major tenants, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

A significant portion of our leased properties are leased to our major tenants. As a result, the success of our investments, at least in the short-term, is materially dependent on the financial condition of our major tenants. At any time, our tenants may experience a downturn in their respective businesses that may significantly weaken their financial condition, particularly during periods of economic uncertainty. This uncertainty may be exacerbated as a result of actual changes in economic conditions, including as a result of market dynamics, trends in consumer income, rising energy prices, tariffs or trade disputes, and natural or manmade disasters, including epidemic or pandemic disease, or the impact of the fear of such changes on consumer behavior. As a result, our tenants may delay lease commencements, decline to extend or renew leases upon expiration, fail to make rental payments when due, close a number of locations or declare bankruptcy.

The inability or unwillingness of our any of major tenants to meet rent obligations and other obligations could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations, including a reduction in operating cash flow that can be used to pay the interest, principal and other costs and expenses under our financings, or to pay cash dividends to our shareholders.

In addition, certain of our lease agreements require our tenants to pay certain insurance, taxes, utilities and maintenance and repair expenses in connection with the leased properties and to indemnify, defend and hold us harmless from and against various claims, litigation and liabilities arising in connection with their respective business, subject to proportionate sharing of expenses and certain other limitations. Our exposure to rental payments from our major tenants as a material source of our rental income may limit our ability to enforce our rights under our lease agreements with such tenants.

The risk of financial failure of, or default in payment by, a major tenant is magnified in situations where we lease multiple properties to a single tenant under a master lease, and we may be limited in our ability to enforce our rights under such agreements. In such event, we may have been unable to locate a suitable master lessee or a lessee for individual properties at similar rental rates and other obligations and in a timely manner at all, which would have had the effect of reducing our rental revenues.

There can be no assurance as to how our major tenants will perform in the future. Outcomes not currently foreseen by us may occur, any of which could have a material and adverse impact on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

The future bankruptcy or insolvency of any of our tenants could result in the termination of such tenant’s lease and material losses to us.

The future bankruptcy or insolvency of any of our tenants, could diminish the rental revenue we receive from that property or could force us to “take back” tenant space as a result of a default or a rejection of the lease by a tenant in bankruptcy. Any claims against bankrupt tenants for unpaid future rent are subject to statutory limitations that would likely result in our receipt of rental revenues that are substantially less than the contractually specified rent we are owed under their leases or no payments at all. In addition, any claim we have for unpaid past rent may not be paid in full. Federal law may prohibit us from evicting a tenant based solely upon its recent bankruptcy filing (or a tenant in the event of such tenant’s bankruptcy or insolvency). We may also be unable to re-lease a terminated or rejected space or re-lease it on comparable or more favorable terms. If we do re-lease rejected space, we may incur costs for brokerage, marketing and tenant expenses.

Bankruptcy laws afford certain protections to tenants that may also affect the treatment of master leases. Subject to certain restrictions, a tenant under a master lease generally is required to assume or reject the master lease as a whole, rather than making the decision on a property-by-property basis. This prevents the tenant from assuming only the better performing properties and terminating the master lease with respect to the poorer performing properties.

 

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We may not be able to renew leases or re-lease space at our properties and property vacancies could result in significant capital expenditures.

When leases for our properties expire or are terminated, the premises may not be re-leased in a timely manner or at all, or the terms of re-leasing, including the cost of allowances and concessions to tenants, may be less favorable than the then-existing lease terms. The loss of a tenant through lease expiration or other circumstances may require us to spend (in addition to other re-letting expenses) significant amounts of capital to renovate the property before it is suitable for a new tenant and cause us to incur significant costs in the form of ongoing expenses for property maintenance, taxes, insurance and other expenses. Many of the leases we will enter into or acquire may be for properties that are especially suited to the particular business of the tenants operating on those properties. Because these properties have been designed or physically modified for a particular tenant, if the current lease is terminated or not renewed, we may be required to renovate the property at substantial costs, decrease the rent we charge or provide other concessions to re-lease the property. In addition, if we are required or otherwise determine to sell the property, we may have difficulty selling it to a party other than the tenant due to the special purpose for which the property may have been designed or modified. This potential illiquidity may limit our ability to quickly modify our portfolio in response to changes in economic or other conditions, including tenant demand. Also, we may not be able to lease new properties to an appropriate mix of tenants or for rents that are consistent with our expectations. To the extent that our leasing plans are not achieved or we incur significant capital expenditures as a result of property vacancies, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be materially adversely affected.

Following the Sears Holdings bankruptcy, we have been named as a defendant in litigation that could adversely affect our business and financial condition, divert management’s attention from our business, and subject us to significant liabilities, including remedies that may be imposed as a result of a finding of fraudulent conveyance.

On April 18, 2019, at the direction of the Restructuring Sub-Committee of the Restructuring Committee of the Board of Directors of Sears Holdings, plaintiffs Sears Holdings, Sears, Roebuck & Co., Sears Development Co., Kmart Corporation, and Kmart of Washington, LLC commenced a litigation (the “Litigation”) in the Bankruptcy Court naming us and certain of our affiliates, as well as affiliates of ESL Investments, Inc. and Sears Holdings, and certain other third parties, as defendants. The Litigation is dual captioned as In re: Sears Holdings Corporation, et al., Case No. 18-23538 (RDD) and Sears Holdings Corporation et al., v. Lampert et al., Case No. 19-08250 (RDD). The initial complaint has been superseded by the Amended Complaint described below.

On October 15, 2019, the Bankruptcy Court entered an order (the “Confirmation Order”) confirming the Modified Second Amended Joint Chapter 11 Plan of Sears Holdings and its affiliated debtors (the “Chapter 11 Plan”). Pursuant to the terms of the Confirmation Order, upon the effective date of the Chapter 11 Plan, a liquidating trust will be formed, and the Litigation will vest in the liquidating trust. The Confirmation Order further provides that, prior to the effective date of the Chapter 11 Plan and the formation of the liquidating trust, the Litigation shall be controlled by five litigation designees selected by Sears Holdings and the Official Committee of Unsecured Creditors’ (the “Creditors’ Committee”). For further information, refer to the Chapter 11 Plan, Confirmation Order and liquidating trust agreement, each of which has been publicly filed with the Bankruptcy Court.

On November 25, 2019, the Creditors’ Committee filed a first amended complaint (the “Amended Complaint”) in the Bankruptcy Court naming us and certain of our affiliates, as well as affiliates of ESL Investments, Inc. and Sears Holdings, and certain other third parties, as defendants. The Amended Complaint alleges, among other things, that certain transactions undertaken by Sears Holdings since 2011 (including the July 2015 transactions giving rise to Seritage, the execution of the Master Lease with Sears Holdings (the “Original Master Lease”), and the acquisition of real estate from Sears Holdings) constituted actual and/or constructive fraudulent transfers and/or illegal dividends by Sears Holdings and that the real estate acquired by Seritage from Sears Holdings in July 2015 was worth hundreds of millions of dollars more than the purchase price paid. The Amended Complaint further alleges that certain releases provided to Seritage and certain other defendants in connection with the Sears Holdings derivative litigation in the Delaware Court of Chancery in 2017 should be avoided and/or declared null and void as an actual and/or constructive fraudulent conveyance. The Amended Complaint seeks as relief, among other things, declaratory relief, avoidance of the allegedly actual and/or constructive fraudulent transfers, disgorgement, recovery of the property fraudulently transferred or, in the alternative, compensatory damages in an unspecified amount to be determined at trial, equitable subordination and disallowance of defendants’ claims as creditors, punitive and exemplary damages for any intentional wrongdoing, and reasonable attorneys’ fees, costs, and expenses. On February 21, 2020, the Seritage defendants filed a partial motion to dismiss seeking dismissal of the claims in the Amended Complaint relating to the release received in the Sears Holdings derivative litigation unjust enrichment and equitable subordination.

On February 21, 2020, the Seritage defendants filed a partial motion to dismiss seeking dismissal of the claims in the operative complaint in the Litigation relating to the release received in the Sears Holdings derivative litigation, unjust enrichment, and equitable subordination. Briefing and oral argument on the motions were completed in August 2020, and the parties are awaiting a decision. The Company believes that the claims against the Seritage Defendants in the Litigation are without merit and intends to defend against them vigorously.

 

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On March 15, 2021, the Court consolidated the Litigation with a case captioned Sears Holding Corp. et al. v. Andrew H. Tisch, et al., Case No. 20-07007 (RDD) (the “Shareholder Litigation,” and, together with the Litigation, the “Consolidated Litigation”). The Shareholder Litigation was brought by the UCC, Sears Holdings Corporation, and Sears, Roebuck and Co., against certain shareholders of Sears Holdings or its related companies. Seritage was not named as a defendant in the Shareholder Litigation, which alleges, among other things, that certain transactions undertaken by Sears Holdings since 2014 (including the July 2015 transactions giving rise to Seritage, the execution of the Original Master Lease with Sears Holdings, and the acquisition of real estate from Sears Holdings) constituted actual and/or constructive fraudulent transfers and/or illegal dividends. The Company believes that the claims against the Seritage Defendants in the Consolidated Litigation are without merit and intends to defend against them vigorously.

Fraudulent transfers or conveyances include transfers made or obligations incurred with the actual intent to hinder, delay or defraud current or future creditors, or transfers made or obligations incurred in exchange for less than reasonably equivalent value when the debtor was, or was rendered, insolvent, inadequately capitalized or unable to pay its debts as they become due. To remedy a fraudulent conveyance, a court could void the challenged transfer or obligation, requiring us to return consideration that we received, or impose substantial liabilities upon us for the benefit of unpaid creditors of the debtor that made the fraudulent conveyance, which could adversely affect our financial condition and our results of operations. Among other things, a court could require our shareholders to return to Sears Holdings or its creditors some or all of the securities issued in the distribution made in connection with the formation of Seritage.

Although we believe that the claims against us in the Litigation are without merit and intend to defend against them vigorously, we are not able to predict the ultimate outcome of the Litigation, the magnitude of any potential losses or the effect such litigation may have on us or our operations. It is possible that the Litigation could cause us to incur substantial costs and that they could be resolved adversely to us, result in substantial damages or other forms of relief, result in or be connected to additional claims, affect our relations with counterparties to commercial transactions and divert management’s attention and resources, any of which could harm our business. Protracted litigation, including any adverse outcomes, may have an adverse impact on our business, results of operations or financial condition and could subject us to adverse publicity and require us to incur significant legal fees. Please see Note 9 – Commitments and Contingencies – in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information regarding the Litigation.

Real estate investments are relatively illiquid.

Our properties represent a substantial portion of our total consolidated assets, and these investments are relatively illiquid. Significant expenditures associated with each equity investment, such as mortgage payments, real estate taxes, insurance, and repair and maintenance costs, are generally not reduced when circumstances cause a reduction in income from the investment. If income from a property declines while the related expenses do not decline, our income and cash available to us would be adversely affected. If it becomes necessary or desirable for us to dispose of one or more of our mortgaged properties, we might not be able to obtain a release of the lien on the mortgaged property without payment of the associated debt or other costs and expenses. As a result, our ability to sell one or more of our properties or investments in real estate in response to any changes in economic or other conditions may be limited. If we want to sell a property, we may not be able to dispose of it in the desired time period or at a sale price that would exceed the cost of our investment in that property. In addition, our ability to enter into asset sales or joint ventures is subject to among other uncertainties, our ability to identify prospective purchasers, the willingness of prospective purchasers to enter into transactions on commercially reasonable terms, negotiations with counterparties, satisfactory examination of property and title by the purchasers, the ability to obtain title and other relevant insurance, applicable consent rights of the lender under our term loan facility, the ability of purchasers to obtain adequate financing, and customary closing conditions.

The number of potential buyers for certain properties that we may seek to sell may be limited by the presence of such properties in retail or mall complexes owned or managed by other property owners. If we decide to sell any of our properties, we may provide financing to purchasers and bear the risk that the purchasers may default, which may delay or prevent our use of the proceeds of the sales for other purposes or the distribution of such proceeds to our shareholders.

E-commerce and other changes in consumer buying practices present challenges for many of our tenants and may require us to modify our properties, diversify our tenant composition and adapt our leasing practices to remain competitive.

Many of our tenants face increasing competition from e-commerce and other sources that could cause them to reduce their size, limit the number of locations and/or suffer a general downturn in their businesses and ability to pay rent. We may also fail to anticipate the effects of changes in consumer buying practices, particularly of growing online sales and the resulting change in retailing practices and space needs of our tenants, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations and cash flows. We are focused on anchoring and diversifying our properties with tenants that are more resistant to competition from e-commerce (e.g. groceries, essential retailers, restaurants and service providers), but there can be no assurance that we will be successful in modifying our properties, diversifying our tenant composition and/or adapting our leasing practices.

 

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Both we and our tenants face a wide range of competition that could affect our ability to operate profitably.

The presence of competitive alternatives, both to our properties and the businesses that lease our properties, affects our ability to lease space and the level of rents we can obtain. Our properties operate in locations that compete with other retail properties and also compete with other forms of retailing, such as catalogs and e-commerce websites. Competition may also come from strip centers, outlet centers, lifestyle centers and malls, and both existing and future development projects. New construction, renovations and expansions at competing sites could also negatively affect our properties. In addition, we compete with other retail property companies for tenants and qualified management. These other retail property companies may have relationships with tenants that we do not have since we have a limited operating history, including with respect to national chains that may be desirable tenants. If we are unable to successfully compete, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be materially adversely affected. See also “Item 1. Business - Competition.”

In addition, the retail business is highly competitive and if our retail tenants fail to differentiate their shopping experiences, create an attractive value proposition or execute their business strategies, they may terminate, default on, or fail to renew their leases with us, and our results of operations and financial condition could be materially adversely affected. Furthermore, we believe that the increase in digital and mobile technology usage has increased the speed of the transition from shopping at physical locations to web-based purchases and that our tenants, including Holdco, may be negatively affected by these changing consumer spending habits. If our tenants are unsuccessful in adapting their businesses, and, as a result terminate, default on, or fail to renew their leases with us, our results of operations and financial condition could be materially adversely affected.

Our pursuit of investments in and redevelopment of properties, and investments in and acquisitions or development of additional properties, may be unsuccessful or fail to meet our expectations.

We intend to grow our business through investments in, and acquisitions or development of, properties, including through the recapture and redevelopment of space at many of our properties. However, our industry is highly competitive, and we face competition from other REITs, investment companies, private equity and hedge fund investors, sovereign funds, lenders, and other investors, some of whom are significantly larger and have greater resources and lower costs of capital. This competition will make it more challenging to identify and successfully capitalize on acquisition and development opportunities that meet our investment objectives. If we are unable to finance acquisitions or other development opportunities on commercially favorable terms, our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially adversely affected. Additionally, the fact that we must distribute 90% of our net taxable income in order to maintain our qualification as a REIT may limit our ability to rely upon rental payments from leased properties or subsequently acquired properties in order to finance acquisitions. As a result, if debt or equity financing is not available on acceptable terms, further acquisitions or other development opportunities might be limited or curtailed.

Investments in, and acquisitions of, properties we might seek to acquire entail risks associated with real estate investments generally, including (but not limited to) the following risks and as noted elsewhere in this section:

we may be unable to acquire a desired property because of competition;
even if we are able to acquire a desired property, competition from other potential acquirers may significantly increase the purchase price;
even if we enter into agreements for the acquisition of properties, these agreements are subject to customary conditions to closing, including completion of due diligence investigations to our satisfaction;
we may incur significant costs and divert management attention in connection with evaluation and negotiation of potential acquisitions, including ones that we are subsequently unable to complete;
we may acquire properties that are not initially accretive to our results upon acquisition, and we may not successfully manage and lease those properties to meet our expectations;
we may be unable to finance the acquisition on favorable terms in the time period we desire, or at all;
even if we are able to finance the acquisition, our cash flow may be insufficient to meet our required principal and interest payments;
we may spend more than budgeted to make necessary improvements or renovations to acquired properties;
we may be unable to quickly and efficiently integrate new acquisitions, particularly the acquisition of portfolios of properties, into our existing operations;
market conditions may result in higher than expected vacancy rates and lower than expected rental rates; and
we may acquire properties subject to liabilities and without any recourse, or with only limited recourse, with respect to unknown liabilities.

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In addition, we intend to redevelop a significant portion of the properties after termination or recapture of asset from the Holdco Master Lease or Original Master Lease in order to make space available for lease to additional retail tenants and potentially other lessees for other uses. The redevelopment of these properties involves the risks associated with real estate development activities generally. If we are unable to successfully redevelop properties or to lease the redeveloped properties to third parties on acceptable terms, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be materially adversely affected.

There can be no assurance that our review of strategic alternatives will result in any transaction or any strategic change at this time.
 

On March 1, 2022, we announced that our Board of Trustees has commenced a process to review a broad range of strategic alternatives to enhance shareholder value. The Board of Trustees created a Special Committee to oversee the process. The Special Committee has retained a financial advisor. We are in the early stages of the strategic review process and our current intention is not to disclose or comment on interim developments with respect to the process. There can be no assurance that the review process will result in any transaction or any strategic change at this time.

Current and future redevelopment may not yield expected returns.

We expect to undertake redevelopment, expansion and reinvestment projects involving our properties as part of our long-term strategy. Likewise, each unconsolidated entity expects to undertake redevelopment, expansion and reinvestment projects involving its Unconsolidated Properties, with respect to which we may be required to make additional capital contributions to the applicable unconsolidated entity under certain circumstances. These projects are subject to a number of risks, including (but not limited to):

abandonment of redevelopment activities after expending resources to determine feasibility;
loss of rental income, as well as payments of maintenance, repair, real estate taxes and other charges, including from Holdco related to space that is recaptured pursuant to the Holdco Master Lease, which may not be re-leased to third parties;
restrictions or obligations imposed pursuant to other agreements;
construction and/or lease-up costs (including tenant improvements or allowances) and delays and cost overruns, including construction costs that exceed original estimates;
failure to achieve expected occupancy and/or rent levels within the projected time frame or at all;
inability to operate successfully in new markets where new properties are located;
failure to successfully manage, or find suitable third-party development partners for, the development of residential, office or other mixed-use properties;
inability to successfully integrate new or redeveloped properties into existing operations;
difficulty obtaining financing on acceptable terms or paying operating expenses and debt service costs associated with redevelopment properties prior to sufficient occupancy and commencement of rental obligations under new leases;
changes in zoning, building and land use laws, and conditions, restrictions or limitations of, and delays or failures to obtain, necessary zoning, building, occupancy, land use and other governmental permits;
changes in local real estate market conditions, including an oversupply of, or a reduction in demand for, retail space or retail goods, and the availability and creditworthiness of current and prospective tenants;
negative perceptions by retailers or shoppers of the safety, convenience and attractiveness of the property;
exposure to fluctuations in the general economy due to the significant time lag between commencement and completion of redevelopment projects; and
vacancies or ability to rent space on favorable terms, including possible market pressures to offer tenants rent abatements, tenant improvements, early termination rights or below-market renewal options.

If any of these events occur at any time during the process with respect to any project, overall project costs may significantly exceed initial cost estimates, which could result in reduced returns or losses from such investments. In addition, we may not have sufficient liquidity to fund such projects, and delays in the completion of a redevelopment project may provide various tenants the right to withdraw from a property.

 

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We have ongoing capital needs and may not be able to obtain additional financing or other sources of funding on acceptable terms.

As of December 31, 2021, we had aggregate outstanding indebtedness of $1.44 billion. We may incur additional indebtedness in the future to refinance our existing indebtedness, to finance newly acquired properties or capital contributions to joint ventures, or to fund retenanting and redevelopment projects. Our existing debt and any significant additional indebtedness could require a substantial portion of our cash flow to make interest and principal payments. Demands on our cash resources from debt service will reduce funds available to us to pay dividends, make capital expenditures and acquisitions or carry out other aspects of our business strategy. Our indebtedness may also limit our ability to adjust rapidly to changing market conditions, make us more vulnerable to general adverse economic and industry conditions and create competitive disadvantages for us compared to other companies with relatively lower debt levels. Increased future debt service obligations may limit our operational flexibility, including our ability to acquire properties, finance or refinance our properties, contribute properties to joint ventures or sell properties as needed.

Our primary uses of cash include the payment of property operating and other expenses, including general and administrative expenses and debt service, and the reinvestment in and redevelopment of our properties. As a result of a decrease in occupancy levels due to our recapture of space for redevelopment purposes and the execution of termination rights under the Original Master Lease and Holdco Master Lease, our property rental income, which is our primary source of operating cash flow, did not fully fund property operating and other expenses incurred during the year ended December 31, 2021. Property operating and other expenses are projected to continue to exceed property rental income until such time as additional tenants commence paying rent, and we plan to incur additional development expenditures as we continue to invest in the redevelopment of our portfolio. While we do not currently have the liquid funds available to fully fund projected property and other expenses and planned development expenditures, we expect to fund these uses of cash with a combination of capital sources including, but not limited to, sales of Consolidated Properties, sales of interests in Unconsolidated Properties and potential credit and capital markets transactions, subject to compliance with certain conditions and/or the consent of our lender under our Term Loan Facility.

As of December 31, 2021, we were not in compliance with certain financial metrics applicable to us under the agreements governing our term loan facility. As a result, we must receive the consent of the lender to dispose of assets via sale or joint venture and, as of December 31, 2021, the lender had provided such consent for all such transactions submitted for approval. There can be no assurance that the lender will consent to future dispositions of assets. Additionally, the lender has the right to request mortgages against our assets pursuant to the mortgage and collateral requirement. During the year ended December 31, 2019, the lender requested mortgages on a majority of our portfolio, and then during the year ended December 31, 2020, the lender requested mortgages on the remaining unencumbered assets.

The Term Loan Facility also provides for a $400 million incremental facility (the “Incremental Funding Facility”). Our ability to access the Incremental Funding Facility is subject to (i) our achieving rental income from non-Sears Holdings tenants, on an annualized basis (after giving effect to SNO Leases expected to commence rent payment within 12 months) for the fiscal quarter ending prior to the date of incurrence of the Incremental Funding Facility, of not less than $200 million, (ii) our good faith projection that rental income from non-Sears Holdings tenants (after giving effect to SNO Leases expected to commence rent payment within 12 months) for the succeeding four consecutive fiscal quarters (beginning with the fiscal quarter during which the incremental facility is accessed) will be not less than $200 million, and (iii) the repayment by the Operating Partnership of any deferred interest permitted under the amendment to the Term Loan Agreement (as defined below) as further described below. As of December 31, 2021, the Company has not yet achieved the requirements to access the Incremental Funding Facility.

We may be unable to obtain additional financing or financing on favorable terms or our operating cash flow may be insufficient to satisfy our financial obligations under any indebtedness outstanding from time to time. Among other things, the absence of an investment grade credit rating or any credit rating downgrade could increase our financing costs and could limit our access to financing sources. If financing is not available when needed, or is available only on unfavorable terms, we may be unable to enhance our properties or develop new properties, complete acquisitions or otherwise take advantage of business opportunities or respond to competitive pressures, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. A decrease in available liquidity could also impair our ability to pay dividends to our shareholders.

If additional funds are raised through the issuance of equity securities, our shareholders may experience significant dilution. Additionally, sales of substantial amounts of Class A common shares in the public market, or the perception that such sales could occur, could adversely affect the market price of Class A common shares, may make it more difficult for our shareholders to sell their common shares at a time and price that they deem appropriate, and could impair our future ability to raise capital through an offering of our equity securities.

 

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Real estate related taxes may increase, and if these increases are not passed on to tenants, our income will be reduced.

Some local real property tax assessors may seek to reassess some of our properties as a result of our acquisitions and/or redevelopment of properties. Generally, from time to time, our property taxes increase as property values or assessment rates change or for other reasons deemed relevant by the assessors. An increase in the assessed valuation of a property for real estate tax purposes will result in an increase in the related real estate taxes on that property. Although some leases may permit us to pass through such tax increases to the tenants for payment, there is no assurance that renewal leases or future leases will be negotiated on the same basis. Increases not passed through to tenants will reduce our income and the cash available for distributions to our shareholders.

Changes in building and/or zoning laws may require us to update a property or prevent us from fully restoring a property in the event of a substantial casualty loss and/or require us to meet additional or more stringent construction requirements.

Due to changes in, among other things, applicable building and zoning laws, ordinances and codes that may affect certain of our properties that have come into effect after the initial construction of the properties, certain properties may not comply fully with current building and/or zoning laws, including electrical, fire, health and safety codes and regulations, use, lot coverage, parking and setback requirements, but may qualify as permitted non-conforming uses. Such changes in building and zoning laws may require updating various existing physical conditions of buildings in connection with our recapture, renovation, and/or redevelopment of properties. In addition, such changes in building and zoning laws may limit our or our tenants’ ability to restore the premises of a property to its previous condition in the event of a substantial casualty loss with respect to the property or the ability to refurbish, expand or renovate such property to remain compliant, or increase the cost of construction in order to comply with changes in building or zoning codes and regulations. If we are unable to restore a property to its prior use after a substantial casualty loss or are required to comply with more stringent building or zoning codes and regulations, we may be unable to re-lease the space at a comparable effective rent or sell the property at an acceptable price, which may materially and adversely affect us.

Our real estate assets may be subject to impairment charges.

On a periodic basis, we must assess whether there are any indicators that the value of our real estate assets and other investments may be impaired. If an impairment indicator is identified, a property’s value is considered to be impaired only if management’s estimate of current and projected operating cash flows (undiscounted and unlevered), taking into account the anticipated and probability weighted holdings periods, are less than the carrying value of the property. In our estimate of cash flow projections, we consider factors such as expected future operating income, trends and prospects, the effects of demand, competition and other factors. If we are evaluating the potential sale of an asset or development alternatives, the undiscounted future cash flows consider the most likely course of action at the balance sheet date based on current plans, intended holding periods and available market information. We are required to make subjective assessments as to whether there are impairments in the value of our real estate assets and other investments. These assessments may have a direct impact on our earnings because recording an impairment charge results in an immediate negative adjustment to earnings. We may take impairment charges in the future related to the impairment of our assets, and any future impairment could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations in the period in which the impairment charge is taken.

Properties in our portfolio may be subject to ground leases; if we are found to be in breach of these ground leases or are unable to renew them, we could be materially and adversely affected.

We currently have two properties in our consolidated portfolio that are on land subject to a ground lease. Accordingly, we only own a long-term leasehold in the land underlying these properties, and we own the improvements thereon only during the term of the ground lease. In the future, our portfolio may include additional properties subject to ground leases or similar interests. If we are found to be in breach of a ground lease, we could lose the right to use the property and could also be liable to the ground lessor for damages. In addition, unless we can purchase a fee interest in the underlying land or extend the terms of these leases before their expiration, which we may be unable to do, we will lose our right to operate these properties and our interest in the improvements upon expiration of the leases. Our ability to exercise options to extend the term of our ground lease is subject to the condition that we are not in default under the terms of the ground lease at the time that we exercise such options, and we may not be able to exercise our options at such time. In addition, two Unconsolidated Properties are currently ground leased or leased and, therefore, subject to similar risks. Furthermore, we may not be able to renew our ground lease or future ground leases upon their expiration (after the exercise of all renewal options). If we were to lose the right to use a property due to a breach or non-renewal or final expiration of the ground lease, we would be unable to derive income from such property, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial conditions or results of operations.

 

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Certain properties within our portfolio are subject to restrictions pursuant to reciprocal easement agreements, operating agreements, or similar agreements, some of which contain a purchase option or right of first refusal or right of first offer in favor of a third party.

Many of the properties in our portfolio are, and properties that we acquire in the future may be, subject to use restrictions and/or operational requirements imposed pursuant to ground leases, restrictive covenants or conditions, reciprocal easement agreements or operating agreements (collectively, “Property Restrictions”) that could adversely affect our ability to redevelop the properties or lease space to third parties. Such Property Restrictions could include, for example, limitations on alterations, changes, expansions, or reconfiguration of properties; limitations on use of properties, including for retail uses only; limitations affecting parking requirements; restrictions on exterior or interior signage or facades; or access to an adjoining mall, among other things. In certain cases, consent of the other party or parties to such agreements may be required when altering, reconfiguring, expanding, redeveloping or re-leasing properties. Failure to secure such consents when necessary may harm our ability to execute leasing, redevelopment or expansion strategies, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations. In certain cases, a third party may have a purchase option or right of first refusal or right of first offer that is activated by a sale or transfer of the property, or a change in use or operations, including a closing of the Sears operation or cessation of business operations, on the encumbered property. From time to time, we have been involved in disputes or legal proceedings relating to such Property Restrictions, which may result in the incurrence of legal costs and diversion of management resources to resolve.

Economic conditions may affect the cost of borrowing, which could materially adversely affect our business.

Our business is affected by a number of factors that are largely beyond our control but may nevertheless have a significant negative impact on us. These factors include, but are not limited to:

interest rates, which are expected to increase, and credit spreads;
the availability of credit, including the price, terms and conditions under which it can be obtained;
a decrease in consumer spending or sentiment, including as a result of increases in savings rates and tax increases, and any effect that this may have on retail activity;
the actual and perceived state of the real estate and retail markets, market for dividend-paying stocks and public capital markets in general; and
unemployment rates, both nationwide and within the primary markets in which we operate.

In addition, economic conditions such as inflation or deflation could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Deflation may have an impact on our ability to repay our debt. Deflation may delay consumption and thus weaken tenant sales, which may reduce our tenants’ ability to pay rents. Deflationary pressure on retailers may diminish their ability to rent our space and decrease our ability to re-lease the space on favorable terms to us.

The U.S. economy is currently experiencing and may continue to experience higher inflation than in prior periods. During inflationary periods, interest rates have historically increased, which may materially increase the interest expense we pay in connection with our indebtedness. Our general and administrative expenses would also be expected to increase at a rate higher than rents we collect. Also, inflation may adversely affect tenant leases with stated rent increases, which could be lower than the increase in inflation at any given time. Inflation could also have an adverse effect on consumer spending, which could impact our tenants’ sales and, in turn, our own results of operations.

Restricted lending practices may impact our ability to obtain financing for our properties and may also negatively impact our tenants’ ability to obtain credit. Decreases in consumer demand can have a direct impact on our tenants and the rents we receive.

Rising expenses could reduce cash flow and funds available for future development.

If any property is not fully occupied or becomes vacant in whole or in part, or if rents are being paid in an amount that is insufficient to cover operating costs and expenses, we could be required to expend funds with respect to that property for operating expenses. Our properties are subject to increases in tax rates and tax assessments, utility costs, insurance costs, repairs, maintenance and administrative expenses, and other operating expenses. We may also incur significant expenditures as a result of deferred maintenance for the properties we have already acquired (subject to reserved funds to cover certain of these costs) and other properties we may acquire in the future. If we are unable to lease properties on a triple-net-lease basis or on a basis requiring the tenants to pay all or some of such expenses, or if tenants fail to pay required tax, utility and other impositions and other operating expenses, we could be required to pay those costs which could adversely affect funds available for future development or cash available for distributions.

 

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We may face increased risks and costs associated with volatility in commodity and labor prices or as a result of supply chain or procurement disruptions, which may adversely affect the status of our construction projects.

The price of commodities and skilled labor for our construction projects may increase unpredictably due to external factors, including, but not limited to, performance of third-party suppliers and contractors; overall market supply and demand; government regulation; international trade; supply chain disruptions; and changes in general business, economic, or political conditions. As a result, the costs of raw construction materials and skilled labor required for the completion of our development and redevelopment projects may fluctuate significantly from time to time.

While we do not rely on any single supplier or vendor for the majority of our materials and skilled labor, we may experience difficulties obtaining necessary materials from suppliers or vendors whose supply chains might become impacted by economic or political changes, or difficulties obtaining adequate skilled labor from third-party contractors in a tightening labor market. It is uncertain whether we would be able to source the essential commodities, supplies, materials, and skilled labor timely or at all without incurring significant costs or delays, particularly during times of economic uncertainty resulting from events outside of our control. We may be forced to seek new third-party suppliers or contractors, who we have not worked with in the past.

During 2021, industry prices for certain construction materials, including steel, copper, lumber, plywood, electrical materials, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning materials, experienced significant increases as a result of low inventories; surging demand fueled by the U.S. economy rebounding from the effects of COVID-19; tariffs imposed on imports of foreign steel, including on products from key competitors in the European Union and China; and significant changes in the U.S. steel production landscape stemming from the consolidation of certain steel-producing companies. Price surges on construction materials may result in corresponding increases in our overall construction costs as our projects undergo construction.

In addition, as of December 31, 2021, the U.S. is widely reported to be experiencing serious supply chain disruptions as a result of substantial backlogs of container ships seeking to unload cargo at major ports on both the west and east coasts, with delays caused or exacerbated by port and trucking labor shortages, railway logistics issues and a shortage of warehouse space in close proximity to the affected ports. Supply chain constraints have impacted the cost, availability, and timing of certain materials deliveries. If not resolved, these backlogs and related logistics issues could result in project delays and increased costs for our construction activities and the US economy generally.

Compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act may require us to make expenditures that adversely affect our cash flows.

The Americans with Disabilities Act (the “ADA”) has separate compliance requirements for “public accommodations” and “commercial facilities,” but generally requires that buildings be made accessible to people with disabilities. Compliance with the ADA requirements could require removal of access barriers, and non-compliance could result in imposition of fines by the United States government or an award of damages to private litigants, or both. While the tenants to whom our properties are leased are generally obligated by law or lease to comply with the ADA provisions applicable to the property being leased to them, if required changes involve other property not being leased to such tenants, if the required changes include greater expenditures than anticipated, or if the changes must be made on a more accelerated basis than anticipated, the ability of these tenants to cover costs could be adversely affected. Moreover, certain other leases may require the landlord to comply with the ADA with respect to the building as a whole and/or the tenant’s space. As a result of any of the foregoing circumstances, we could be required to expend funds to comply with the provisions of the ADA, which could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

Environmental, health, safety and land use laws and regulations may limit or restrict some of our operations or otherwise cause us to incur significant costs.

As the owner or operator of various real properties and facilities, we must comply with various federal, state and local environmental, health, safety and land use laws and regulations. We and our properties are subject to such laws and regulations relating to the use, storage, disposal, emission and release of hazardous and non-hazardous substances and employee health and safety, as well as zoning restrictions. A substantial portion of our properties that have resulted in certain remediation activities currently include, or previously included, automotive care center facilities and retail fueling facilities, and/or above-ground or underground storage tanks, and are or were subject to laws and regulations governing the handling, storage and disposal of hazardous substances contained in some of the products or materials used or sold in the automotive care center facilities (such as gasoline, motor oil, fluid in hydraulic lifts, antifreeze, solvents and lubricants), the recycling/disposal of batteries and tires, air emissions, wastewater discharges and waste management. In addition to these products, the equipment in use or previously used at such properties, such as service equipment, car lifts, oil/water separators, and storage tanks, has been subject to increasing environmental regulation relating to, among other things, the storage, handling, use, disposal and transportation of hazardous materials. There are also federal, state and local laws, regulations and ordinances that govern the use, removal and/or replacement of underground storage tanks in the event of a release on, or an upgrade or redevelopment of, certain properties. Such laws, as well as common-law standards, may impose liability for any releases of hazardous substances associated with the underground storage tanks and may provide for third parties to seek recovery from owners or operators of such properties for damages associated with such releases. If hazardous substances are released from any underground storage tanks on any of our properties, we may be materially and adversely affected. In a few states, transfers of some types of sites

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are conditioned upon clean-up of contamination. If any of our properties are subject to such contamination, we may be subject to substantial clean-up costs in order to sell or otherwise transfer the property.

As the owner or operator of real property, we may also incur liability based on various building conditions. For example, buildings and other structures on properties that we currently own or operate or those we acquire or operate in the future contain, may contain, or may have contained, asbestos-containing material (or “ACM”). Environmental, health and safety laws require that ACM be properly managed and maintained and may impose fines or penalties on owners, operators or employers for non-compliance with those requirements. These requirements include special precautions, such as removal, abatement or air monitoring, if ACM would be disturbed during maintenance, renovation or demolition of a building, potentially resulting in substantial costs. In addition, we may be subject to liability for personal injury or property damage sustained as a result of exposure to ACM or releases of ACM into the environment. In addition, the presence of significant mold or other airborne contaminants at any of our properties could require us to undertake a costly remediation program to contain or remove the mold or other airborne contaminants or increase ventilation and/or expose us to liability from our tenants, employees of our tenants, or others if property damage or personal injury occurs.

Moreover, additional laws which may be passed in the future, or a finding of a violation of or liability under existing laws, could require us and/or one or more of the unconsolidated entities to make significant expenditures and otherwise limit or restrict some of our or its or their operations, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Environmental costs and liabilities associated with contamination at real estate properties owned by us may materially and adversely affect us.

Our properties may be subject to known and unknown environmental liabilities under various federal, state and local laws and regulations relating to human health and the environment. Certain of these laws and regulations may impose joint and several liability on certain statutory classes of persons, including current and former owners or operators, for the costs of investigation or remediation of contaminated properties. These laws and regulations apply to past and present business operations on the properties, including the use, storage, handling and recycling or disposal of hazardous substances or wastes. We may face liability for costs relating to the investigation and clean-up of any of our properties from which there has been a release or threatened release of hazardous substances or other regulated material or any third-party sites to which we have arranged for the disposed of hazardous substances, regardless of our knowledge of the contamination, the timing of the contamination, the cause of the contamination or the party responsible for the contamination of the property.

In addition to these costs, which could exceed a property’s value, we could be liable for certain other costs, including governmental fines, and injuries to persons, property or natural resources. Further, some environmental laws create a lien on the contaminated site in favor of the government for damages and the costs the government incurs in connection with such contamination. Any such costs or liens could have a material adverse effect on our business or financial condition. Moreover, the presence of contamination or the failure to remediate contamination may adversely affect our ability to sell or lease the real estate or to borrow using the real estate as collateral.

The Original Master Lease contained requirements that Sears Holdings indemnify us from certain environmental liabilities; however, following Sears Holdings’ bankruptcy, there can be no assurance that we would be able to collect any amounts due under such indemnification obligations. Under the Holdco Master Lease, Holdco is required to indemnify us from certain environmental liabilities at certain properties, including removal and remediation of all affected facilities and equipment constituting the automotive care center facilities. Although existing and future leases are expected to require tenants generally to indemnify us for their non-compliance with environmental laws as a result of their occupancy, such tenants typically will not be required to indemnify us for environmental non-compliance arising prior to their occupancy. In such cases, we may incur costs and expenses under such leases or as a matter of law. The amount of any environmental liabilities could exceed the amounts for which Holdco or other third parties would be required to indemnify us (or the applicable unconsolidated entity) or their financial ability to do so. In addition, under the terms of the agreements governing our indebtedness, we have deposited funds in a reserve account that will be used to fund costs incurred in correcting certain environmental and other conditions. The amount of such funds may not be sufficient to correct the environmental and other conditions to which they are expected to be applied.

Each unconsolidated entity is subject to similar risks relating to environmental compliance costs and liabilities associated with its Unconsolidated Properties, which may reduce the value of our investment in, or distributions to us by, one or more unconsolidated entities, or require that we make additional capital contributions to one or more unconsolidated entities.

Our business faces potential risks associated with natural disasters, severe weather conditions and climate change and related legislation and regulations, which could have an adverse effect on our cash flow and operating results.

Climate change may add to the unpredictability and frequency of natural disasters and severe weather conditions and create additional uncertainty as to future trends and exposures. Certain of our properties are located in areas that are subject to natural disasters and severe weather conditions, such as hurricanes, droughts, snow storms, floods and fires. Over time, the impact of climate change or the occurrence of natural disasters can delay new development and redevelopment projects, increase the costs of such projects if required to include resiliency measures to address climate-related risks, increase investment costs to repair or replace damaged properties, increase operating costs, create additional investment costs to make improvements to existing properties to comply with climate change regulations, increase future property insurance costs, and otherwise negatively impact the tenant demand for space. In addition,

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changes in federal, state and local legislation and regulations relating to climate change, such as “green building codes,” could result in increased operating expenses and capital expenditures to improve the energy efficiency of our properties, or potentially result in fines for noncompliance. We may not be able to effectively pass on such costs to our tenants. Moreover, any such legislation and regulations could impose substantial costs on our tenants, thereby impacting the financial condition of our tenants and their ability to meet their lease obligations and to lease or re-lease our properties.

Possible acts of war, terrorist activity or other acts of violence could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Acts of war, terrorist attacks or other acts of violence may result in declining economic activity, which could harm the demand for goods and services offered by our tenants and the value of our properties and might adversely affect the value of an investment in our securities. Such a resulting decrease in retail demand, could make it difficult for us to renew or re-lease our properties at lease rates equal to or above historical rates. War, terrorist activities or violence also could directly affect the value of our properties through damage, destruction or loss, and the availability of insurance for such acts, or of insurance generally, might be lower or cost more, which could increase our operating expenses and adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. To the extent that our tenants are affected by future attacks, their businesses similarly could be adversely affected, including their ability to continue to meet obligations under their existing leases. These acts might erode business and consumer confidence and spending and might result in increased volatility in national and international financial markets and economies. Any one of these events might decrease demand for real estate, decrease or delay the occupancy of our new or redeveloped properties, and limit our access to capital or increase our cost of raising capital.

Cybersecurity incidents could cause a disruption to our operations, a compromise of confidential information and damage to our business relationships, all of which could negatively impact our business, financial condition and operating results.

We are susceptible to cybersecurity risks that include, among other things, theft, unauthorized monitoring, release, misuse, loss, destruction or corruption of confidential and highly restricted data; denial of service attacks; unauthorized access to relevant systems, compromises to networks or devices; or operational disruption or failures in the physical infrastructure or operating systems of Our information systems. Our information systems are essential to the operation of our business and our ability to perform day-to-day operations, including for the secure processing, storage and transmission of confidential and personal information. We must continuously monitor and develop its systems to protect its technology infrastructure and data from misappropriation, corruption and disruption. Cybersecurity risks may also impact properties in which we invest on behalf of clients and tenants of those properties, which could result in a loss of value in our clients’ investment. In addition, due to our interconnectivity with third-party service providers and other entities with which we conduct business, we could be adversely impacted if any of them is subject to a successful cyber incident. Although we and our service providers have implemented processes, procedures and controls to help mitigate these risks, there can be no assurance that these measures will be effective or that security breaches or disruptions will not occur. The result of these incidents may include disrupted operations, liability for loss or misappropriation of data, stolen assets or information, increased cybersecurity protection and insurance costs, increased compliance costs, litigation, regulatory enforcement actions and damage to our reputation or business relationships.

We may incur mortgage indebtedness and other borrowings, which may increase our business risks.

We may incur mortgage debt and pledge all or some of our real properties as security for that debt to finance newly acquired properties or capital contributions to joint ventures, or to fund retenanting and redevelopment projects. As of December 31, 2019, we were required to provide mortgages to the lender under our term loan facility on a majority of our portfolio. This restriction, together with the other provisions of the Term Loan Facility, limits our ability to obtain additional secured financing using such properties as collateral. We may also borrow if we need funds or deem it necessary or advisable to ensure that we maintain our qualification as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes. If there is a shortfall between the cash flow from a property and the cash flow needed to service mortgage debt on a property, then the amount available for distributions to shareholders may be reduced. In addition, incurring mortgage debt increases the risk of loss since defaults on indebtedness secured by a property may result in lenders initiating foreclosure actions. In that case, we could lose the property securing the loan that is in default. For U.S. federal income tax purposes, a foreclosure of any of our properties generally would be treated as a sale of the property for a purchase price equal to the outstanding balance of the debt secured by the mortgage. If the outstanding balance of the debt secured by the mortgage exceeds our tax basis in the property, we would recognize taxable income on foreclosure, but would not receive any cash proceeds. In such event, the Company may be unable to pay the amount of distributions required in order to maintain its REIT status. If any mortgages contain cross-collateralization or cross-default provisions, a default on a single property could affect multiple properties. If any properties are foreclosed upon due to a default, our ability to pay cash distributions to our shareholders may be adversely affected.

 

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Covenants in our Term Loan Facility may limit our operational flexibility and a covenant breach or default could adversely affect our business and financial condition.

Our Term Loan Facility includes certain financial metrics to govern certain collateral and covenant exceptions set forth in the agreement, including: (i) a total fixed charge coverage ratio of not less than 1.00 to 1.00 for each fiscal quarter beginning with the fiscal quarter ending September 30, 2018 through the fiscal quarter ending June 30, 2021, and not less than 1.20 to 1.00 for each fiscal quarter thereafter; (ii) an unencumbered fixed charge coverage ratio of not less than 1.05 to 1.00 for each fiscal quarter beginning with the fiscal quarter ending September 30, 2018 through the fiscal quarter ending June 30, 2021, and not less than 1.30 to 1.00 for each fiscal quarter thereafter; (iii) a total leverage ratio of not more than 65%; (iv) an unencumbered ratio of not more than 60%; and (v) a minimum net worth of at least $1.2 billion. Any failure to satisfy any of these financial metrics will limit our ability to dispose of assets via sale or joint venture and trigger a requirement for us to provide mortgage collateral to our lender, but will not result in an event of default, mandatory amortization, cash flow sweep or similar provision. Since the year ended December 31, 2019, we have been in breach of one or more of the financial metrics described above, as a result of which we were required to provide mortgages to the lender under the Term Loan Facility with respect to a majority of our portfolio. Additionally, the lender under our Term Loan Facility has the right to consent to dispositions of properties via asset sales and formation of new joint ventures. This consent right may have the effect of limiting our ability to dispose of properties, whether for strategic reasons or to raise liquidity to fund our operations. The Term Loan Facility also includes certain limitations relating to, among other activities, our ability to: sell assets or merge, consolidate or transfer all or substantially all of our assets; incur additional debt; incur certain liens; enter into, terminate or modify certain material leases and/or the material agreements for our properties; make certain investments (including limitations on joint ventures) and other restricted payments; pay distributions on or repurchase our capital stock; and enter into certain transactions with affiliates.

The Term Loan Facility also provides for the Incremental Funding Facility. Our ability to access the incremental facility is subject to (i) our achieving rental income from non-Sears Holdings tenants, on an annualized basis (after giving effect to SNO Leases expected to commence rent payment within 12 months) for the fiscal quarter ending prior to the date of incurrence of the Incremental Funding Facility, of not less than $200 million, (ii) our good faith projection that rental income from non-Sears Holdings tenants (after giving effect to SNO Leases expected to commence rent payment within 12 months) for the succeeding four consecutive fiscal quarters (beginning with the fiscal quarter during which the incremental facility is accessed) will be not less than $200 million, and (iii) the repayment by the Operating Partnership of any deferred interest permitted under the amendment to the Term Loan Agreement. As of December 31, 2021, we have not achieved this level of rental income from non-Sears Holdings tenants.

Our rights and the rights of our shareholders to take action against our trustees and officers are limited.

As permitted by the Maryland REIT Law, the Company’s Declaration of Trust limits the liability of its trustees and officers to Seritage and its shareholders for money damages, except for liability resulting from:

actual receipt of an improper benefit or profit in money, property or services; or
a final judgment based upon a finding of active and deliberate dishonesty by the trustee or officer that was material to the cause of action adjudicated.

In addition, our Declaration of Trust authorizes us and our bylaws obligate us to indemnify our present and former trustees and officers for actions taken by them in those capacities and to pay or reimburse their reasonable expenses in advance of final disposition of a proceeding to the maximum extent permitted by Maryland law, and we have entered into indemnification agreements with our trustees and executive officers. As a result, the Company and our shareholders may have more limited rights against our trustees and officers than might otherwise exist absent the provisions in our Declaration of Trust and bylaws or that might exist with other companies. Accordingly, in the event that actions taken by any of our trustees or officers are immune or exculpated from, or indemnified against, liability but which impede our performance, the Company and our shareholders’ ability to recover damages from that trustee or officer will be limited.

Our Declaration of Trust and bylaws, Maryland law, and the partnership agreement of the Operating Partnership contain provisions that may delay, defer or prevent an acquisition of Class A common shares or a change in control.

The Company’s Declaration of Trust and bylaws, Maryland law and the partnership agreement of Operating Partnership contain a number of provisions, the exercise or existence of which could delay, defer or prevent a transaction or a change in control that might involve a premium price for our shareholders or otherwise be in their best interests, including the following:

The Company’s Declaration of Trust Contains Restrictions on the Ownership and Transfer of Our Shares of Beneficial Interest. In order for us to qualify as a REIT, no more than 50% of the value of all outstanding shares of beneficial interest may be owned, beneficially or constructively, by five or fewer individuals at any time during the last half of each taxable year other than 2015, the first taxable year for which we elected to be taxed as a REIT. Additionally, at least 100 persons must beneficially own our shares of beneficial interest during at least 335 days of a taxable year (other than 2015, the first taxable year for which we elected to be taxed as a REIT). The Company’s Declaration of Trust, with certain exceptions, authorizes the Company’s Board of Trustees, in its sole and absolute discretion, to take such actions as are necessary and desirable to preserve its qualification as a REIT. For this and other purposes, subject to certain exceptions, our Declaration of Trust

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provides that no person may beneficially or constructively own more than 9.6%, in value or in number of shares, whichever is more restrictive, of all outstanding shares, or all outstanding common shares (including our Class A common shares, our Class B non-economic common shares and our Class C non-voting common shares), of beneficial interest of the Company. We refer to these restrictions collectively as the “ownership limits.” The constructive ownership rules under the Code are complex and may cause shares owned directly or constructively by a group of related individuals or entities to be deemed to be constructively owned by one individual or entity. As a result, the acquisition of less than 9.6% of the outstanding shares of beneficial interest by an individual or entity could cause that individual or entity or another individual or entity to own, beneficially or constructively, the Company’s shares of beneficial interest in violation of the ownership limits. In addition, because we have multiple classes of common shares, the acquisition of Class A common shares may result in a shareholder inadvertently owning, beneficially or constructively, the Company’s shares of beneficial interest in violation of the ownership limits. Our Declaration of Trust also prohibits any person from owning Class A common shares, Series A Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Shares (the “Series A Preferred Shares”), or other shares of beneficial interest that would generally result in (i) our being “closely held” under Section 856(h) of the Code or otherwise cause us to fail to qualify as a REIT, (ii) our being beneficially owned by fewer than 100 persons, (iii) any of our income that would otherwise qualify as “rents from real property” for purposes of Section 856(d) of the Code failing to qualify as such, or (iv) our failing to qualify as a “domestically controlled qualified investment entity” within the meaning of Section 897(h) of the Code. Any attempt to own or transfer Class A common shares, Series A Preferred Shares or any of our other shares of beneficial interest in violation of the restrictions on ownership or transfer in our Declaration of Trust may result in the transfer being automatically void. The Company’s Declaration of Trust also provides that if any purported transfer of Class A common shares, Series A Preferred Shares, or other such shares of beneficial interest would otherwise result in any person violating the ownership limits or any other restriction on ownership and transfer of shares of beneficial interest described above, then that number of shares (rounded up to the nearest whole share) that would cause the violation will be automatically transferred to, and held by, a trust for the exclusive benefit of a designated charitable beneficiary. Any person who acquires such shares in violation of the ownership limits or any other restriction on ownership and transfer of shares of beneficial interest described above will not be entitled to any dividends on the shares or be entitled to vote the shares or receive any proceeds from the subsequent sale of the shares in excess of the lesser of the price paid by such person for the shares (or, if such person did not give value for such shares, the market price on the day the shares were transferred to the trust) or the amount realized from the sale. We or our designee will have the right to purchase the shares from the trustee at this calculated price as well. The ownership limits and other restrictions on ownership and transfer in our Declaration of Trust may have the effect of preventing, or may be relied upon to prevent, a third party from acquiring control of us if the Board of Trustees does not grant an exemption from the ownership limits, even if our shareholders believe the change in control is in their best interests.
The Company’s Board of Trustees Has the Power to Cause Us to Issue Additional Shares of Beneficial Interest and Classify and Reclassify Any Unissued Class A Common Shares without Shareholder Approval. Our Declaration of Trust authorizes us to issue additional authorized but unissued common shares or preferred shares of beneficial interest. We have also issued 2,800,000 shares of Series A Preferred Shares that are senior to our common shares with respect to priority of dividend payments and rights upon liquidation, dissolution or winding up. In addition, the Board of Trustees may, without shareholder approval, (i) amend the Declaration of Trust to increase or decrease the aggregate number of shares of beneficial interest or the number of shares of beneficial interest of any class or series that we have authority to issue and (ii) classify or reclassify any unissued common shares or preferred shares of beneficial interest and set the preferences, rights and other terms of the classified or reclassified shares. As a result, the Board of Trustees may establish a class or series of common shares or preferred shares of beneficial interest that could delay or prevent a transaction or a change in control that might involve a premium price for Class A common shares or otherwise be in the best interests of our shareholders.
The Board of Trustees Is Divided into Three Classes and Trustee Elections Require a Vote of Two-Thirds of the Class A Common Shares and Class B Non-Economic Common Shares Votes Cast. The Board of Trustees is divided into three classes of trustees, with each class to be as nearly equal in number as possible. As a result, approximately one-third of the Board of Trustees will be elected at each annual meeting of shareholders, with, in both contested and uncontested elections, trustees elected by the vote of two-thirds of the votes cast of the Class A common shares and Class B non-economic common shares (voting together as a single class) entitled to be cast in the election of trustees. In the event that an incumbent trustee does not receive a sufficient percentage of votes cast for election, he or she will continue to serve on the Board of Trustees until a successor is duly elected and qualifies. The classification of trustees and requirement that trustee nominees receive a vote of two-thirds of the votes cast of the Class A common shares and Class B non-economic shares (voting together as a single class) entitled to be cast in the election of trustees may have the effect of making it more difficult for shareholders to change the composition of the Board of Trustees. The requirement that trustee nominees receive a vote of two-thirds of the votes cast of the common shares entitled to be cast in the election of trustees may also have the effect of making it more difficult for shareholders to elect trustee nominees that do not receive the votes of shares of beneficial interest held by ESL, which controls approximately 9.3% of the voting power of the Company.

 

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The Partnership Agreement of Operating Partnership Provides Holders of Operating Partnership Units Approval Rights over Certain Change in Control Transactions Involving the Company or Operating Partnership. Pursuant to the partnership agreement of Operating Partnership, certain transactions, including mergers, consolidations, conversions or other combinations or extraordinary transactions or transactions that constitute a “change of control” of the Company or Operating Partnership, as defined in the partnership agreement, will require the approval of the partners (other than the Company and entities controlled by it) holding a majority of all the outstanding Operating Partnership units held by all partners (other than the Company and entities controlled by it). These provisions could have the effect of delaying or preventing a change in control. ESL holds all of the Operating Partnership units not held by the Company and entities controlled by it.
Certain Provisions of Maryland Law May Limit the Ability of a Third Party to Acquire Control of Us. Certain provisions of the Maryland General Corporation Law (the “MGCL”) applicable to Maryland REITs may have the effect of inhibiting a third party from acquiring us or of impeding a change of control of the Company under circumstances that otherwise could provide Class A common shareholders with the opportunity to realize a premium over the then-prevailing market price of such shares or otherwise be in the best interest of shareholders, including:
o
“business combination” provisions that, subject to certain exceptions and limitations, prohibit certain business combinations between a Maryland REIT and an “interested shareholder” (defined generally as any person who beneficially owns, directly or indirectly, 10% or more of the voting power of the Company’s outstanding voting shares or an affiliate or associate of the Maryland REIT who, at any time within the two-year period immediately prior to the date in question, was the beneficial owner of 10% or more of the voting power of the then-outstanding shares of the Company) or an affiliate of any interested shareholder and the Maryland REIT for five years after the most recent date on which the shareholder becomes an interested shareholder, and thereafter imposes two supermajority shareholder voting requirements on these combinations;
o
“control share” provisions that provide that, subject to certain exceptions, holders of “control shares” of our company (defined as voting shares that, if aggregated with all other shares owned or controlled by the acquirer, would entitle the acquirer to exercise one of three increasing ranges of voting power in electing trustees) acquired in a “control share acquisition” (defined as the direct or indirect acquisition of issued and outstanding “control shares”) have no voting rights with respect to the control shares except to the extent approved by our shareholders by the affirmative vote of at least two-thirds of all of the votes entitled to be cast on the matter, excluding all interested shares; and
o
Additionally, Title 3, Subtitle 8 of the MGCL permits the Board of Trustees, without shareholder approval and regardless of what is currently provided in our Declaration of Trust or bylaws, to implement certain takeover defenses.

The Board of Trustees has, by resolution, exempted from the provisions of the Maryland Business Combination Act all business combinations (a) between us and (i) Sears Holdings or its affiliates or (ii) ESL or Fairholme Capital Management L.L.C. (“FCM”) and/or certain clients of FCM or their respective affiliates and (b) between us and any other person, provided that in the latter case the business combination is first approved by the Board of Trustees (including a majority of our trustees who are not affiliates or associates of such person). In addition, our bylaws contain a provision opting out of the Maryland control share acquisition act.

We may experience uninsured or underinsured losses, or insurance proceeds may not otherwise be available to us which could result in a significant loss of the capital we have invested in a property, decrease anticipated future revenues or cause us to incur unanticipated expense.

While many of our existing leases require, and new lease agreements are expected to require, that comprehensive general insurance and hazard insurance be maintained by the tenants with respect to their premises, and we have obtained casualty insurance with respect to our properties, there are certain types of losses, generally of a catastrophic nature, such as earthquakes, hurricanes and floods, that may be uninsurable or not economically insurable. Insurance coverage (net of deductibles) may not be effective or be sufficient to pay the full current market value or current replacement cost of a loss. Inflation, changes in building and zoning codes and ordinances, environmental considerations, and other factors also might make it infeasible to use insurance proceeds to restore or replace the property after such property has been damaged or destroyed. Under such circumstances, the insurance proceeds received might not be adequate to restore the economic position with respect to such property or to comply with the requirements of our mortgages and Property Restrictions. Moreover, the holders of any mortgage indebtedness may require some or all property insurance proceeds to be applied to reduce such indebtedness, rather than being made available for property restoration.

If we experience a loss that is uninsured or that exceeds our policy coverage limits, we could lose the capital invested in the damaged properties as well as the anticipated future cash flows from those properties. In addition, if the damaged properties were subject to recourse indebtedness, Property Restrictions or ground leases, we could continue to be liable for the indebtedness or subject to claims for damages even if these properties were irreparably damaged.

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In addition, even if damage to our properties is covered by insurance, a disruption of our business or that of our tenants caused by a casualty event may result in the loss of business and/or tenants. The business interruption insurance we or our tenants carry may not fully compensate us for the loss of business or tenants due to an interruption caused by a casualty event. Further, if one of our tenants has insurance but is underinsured, that tenant may be unable to satisfy its payment obligations under its lease with us or its other payment or other obligations.

A disruption in the financial markets may make it more difficult to evaluate the stability, net assets and capitalization of insurance companies and any insurer’s ability to meet its claim payment obligations. A failure of an insurance company to make payments to us upon an event of loss covered by an insurance policy, losses in excess of our policy coverage limits or disruptions to our business or the business of our tenants caused by a casualty event could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Each unconsolidated entity may also experience uninsured or underinsured losses, and also faces other risks related to insurance that are similar to those we face, which could reduce the value of our investment in, or distributions to us by, one or more unconsolidated entities, or require that we make additional capital contributions to one or more unconsolidated entities.

Conflicts of interest may exist or could arise in the future between the interests of our shareholders and the interests of holders of Operating Partnership units, and the partnership agreement of Operating Partnership grants holders of Operating Partnership units certain rights, which may harm the interests of our shareholders.

Conflicts of interest may exist or could arise in the future as a result of the relationships between Seritage and its affiliates, on the one hand, and Operating Partnership or any of its partners, on the other. Our trustees and officers have duties to Seritage under Maryland law in connection with their oversight and management of the company. At the same time, Seritage, as general partner of Operating Partnership, will have duties and obligations to Operating Partnership and its limited partners under Delaware law, as modified by the partnership agreement of Operating Partnership in connection with the management of Operating Partnership.

For example, without the approval of the majority of the Operating Partnership units not held by Seritage and entities controlled by it, Seritage will be prohibited from taking certain extraordinary actions, including change of control transactions of Seritage or Operating Partnership.

ESL owns a substantial percentage of the Operating Partnership units, which may be exchanged for cash or, at our election, Class A common shares, and which will result in certain transactions involving our or Operating Partnership requiring the approval of ESL.

As of December 31, 2021, ESL owns approximately 22.1% of the Operating Partnership units, with the remainder of the units held by the Company. In addition, ESL will have the right to acquire additional Operating Partnership units in order to allow it to maintain its relative ownership interest in Operating Partnership if Operating Partnership issues additional units to the Company under certain circumstances, including if we issue additional equity and contribute the funds to Operating Partnership to fund acquisitions or redevelopment of properties, among other uses. In addition, ESL will have the right to require the Operating Partnership to redeem its Operating Partnership units in whole or in part in exchange for cash or, at the election of the Company, Class A common shares, except as described below. Due to the ownership limits set forth in our Declaration of Trust, ESL may dispose of some or all of the Class A common shares it beneficially owns prior to exercising its right to require Operating Partnership to redeem Operating Partnership units, and the partnership agreement of Operating Partnership will permit ESL (and only ESL) to transfer its Operating Partnership units to one or more underwriters to be exchanged for Class A common shares in connection with certain dispositions in order to achieve the same effect as would occur if ESL were to exchange a larger portion of its Operating Partnership units for Class A common shares and then dispose of those shares in an underwritten offering. Sales of a substantial number of Class A common shares in connection with or to raise cash proceeds to facilitate, such a redemption, or the perception that such sales may occur, could adversely affect the market price of the Class A common shares.

In addition, the partnership agreement of Operating Partnership requires the approval of a majority of the Operating Partnership units not held by the Company and entities controlled by it for certain transactions and other actions, including certain modifications to the partnership agreement, withdrawal or succession of the Company as general partner of Operating Partnership, limits on the right of holders of Operating Partnership units to redeem their units, tax elections and certain other matters. Because ESL currently owns a majority of the outstanding Operating Partnership units not held by the Company and entities controlled by it, ESL’s approval will be required in order for the general partner to undertake such actions unless ESL no longer owns a majority of such units. If ESL refuses to approve any such action, our business could be materially adversely affected. Furthermore, ESL owns approximately 9.3% of the outstanding Class A common shares. In any of these matters, the interests of ESL may differ from or conflict with the interests of our other shareholders.

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ESL exerts substantial influence over us, and its interests may differ from or conflict with the interests of our other shareholders.

ESL beneficially owns approximately 22.1% of the Operating Partnership units, and approximately 9.3% of the outstanding Class A common shares, which corresponds to 9.3% of the voting power of Seritage. Sears Holdings was, and Holdco is, an affiliate of ESL. In addition, Mr. Lampert, who previously served as the Chairman of the Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer of Sears Holdings, is the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of ESL, and was previously the Chairman of the Seritage Board of Trustees. As a result, ESL and its affiliates have substantial influence over us and Holdco. In any matter affecting us, including our relationship with Holdco, the interests of ESL may differ from or conflict with the interests of our other shareholders.

On March 1, 2022, Mr. Lampert filed a Schedule 13D/A with the SEC disclosing his support for our Board of Trustees’ efforts to explore and pursue strategic alternatives and his intention to explore alternatives for his investment in the Company, which may include, among other things, participating with third-parties that may be interested in acquiring some or all of the our assets and buying or selling our shares in open market transactions. In the event of any such transaction, the interests of Mr. Lampert and his affiliates, including ESL, may differ from or conflict with the interests of our other shareholders.

The businesses of each of the GGP joint ventures, the Simon joint venture and the Macerich joint venture are similar to each other and the occurrence of risks that adversely affect one unconsolidated entity, could also adversely affect our investment in the other unconsolidated entities.

The GGP joint ventures are joint ventures that own and operate certain Unconsolidated Properties, which consist of seven properties formerly owned or leased by Sears Holdings, the Simon joint venture is a joint venture that owns and operates certain other Unconsolidated Properties, which consist of five other properties formerly owned by Sears Holdings and the Macerich joint venture is a joint venture that owns and operates certain other Unconsolidated Properties, which consist of seven other properties formerly owned by Sears Holdings. As a result, each unconsolidated entity’s business is similar to our business, and each unconsolidated entity is subject to many of the same risks that we face. The occurrence of risks that adversely affect us could also adversely affect one or more unconsolidated entities and reduce the value of our investment in, or distributions to us from, one or more joint ventures, or require that we make additional capital contributions to one or more unconsolidated entities. Our influence over each unconsolidated entity may be limited by the fact that day-to-day operation of the GGP joint ventures, the Simon joint venture and the Macerich joint venture, and responsibility for leasing and redevelopment activities related to the Unconsolidated Properties owned by the GGP joint ventures, the Simon joint venture and the Macerich joint venture, as applicable, are generally delegated to GGP, Simon and Macerich, respectively, subject to certain exceptions. The Unconsolidated Properties owned by the GGP joint ventures are located at malls owned and operated by Brookfield Properties Retail (formerly GGP Inc.), the Unconsolidated Properties owned by the Simon joint venture are located at malls owned and operated by the Simon joint venture and the Unconsolidated Properties owned by the Macerich joint venture are located at malls owned and operated by the Macerich joint venture. As a result, conflicts of interest may exist or could arise in the future between the interests of GGP, Simon or Macerich and our interests as a holder of 50% interests in the GGP joint ventures, the Simon joint venture and the Macerich joint venture, respectively, including, for example, with respect to decisions as to whether to lease to third parties space at an Unconsolidated Property or other space at the mall at which such Unconsolidated Property is located.

The COVID-19 pandemic has continued to, and the future outbreak of other highly infectious or contagious diseases may, materially and adversely impact the business of our tenants and materially or adversely impact and disrupt our business, income, cash flow, results of operations, financial condition, liquidity, prospects, ability to service our debt obligations and our ability to pay dividends and other distributions to our shareholders.

In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic has had, and other pandemics in the future could have, repercussions across regional and global economies and financial markets. The outbreak of COVID-19 in many countries, including the United States, has significantly adversely impacted global economic activity, the U.S. economy and the local economies in which our properties are located and has contributed to significant volatility and negative pressure in financial markets. The global impact of the outbreak has been rapidly evolving and, as cases of COVID-19 have continued to be identified in additional countries, many countries, including the United States, have reacted by instituting quarantines, mandating business and school closures and restricting travel.

Certain states and cities, including where our tenants conduct their business and where we own properties, have development sites and where our corporate offices are located, have also reacted to the COVID-19 pandemic by instituting quarantines, restrictions on travel, “shelter in place” rules, restrictions on types of business that may continue to operate, and/or restrictions on the types of construction projects that may continue. The Company cannot predict if additional states and cities will implement similar restrictions, when restrictions currently in place will expire or if such restrictions will be implemented again. As a result, the COVID-19 pandemic is negatively impacting almost every industry directly or indirectly, including industries in which the Company and our tenants operate.

 

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These containment measures and other factors have affected operations at the Company’s properties. As of December 31, 2021, the Company had collected 97% of rental income for the year ended December 31, 2021, and agreed to defer an additional 1%. While the Company intends to enforce its contractual rights under its leases, there can be no assurance that tenants will meet their future obligations or that additional rental modification agreements will not be necessary. Some of our tenants may not re-open even after the aforementioned restrictions are lifted, which could have a material impact on occupancy at our properties which could result in an increase in the number of co-tenancy claims due to falling below required occupancy thresholds and may impact our results.

Furthermore, in the event of any default by a tenant for non-payment of lease charges or early or limited cessation of operations, we might not be able to fully recover and/or experience delays and additional costs in enforcing our rights as landlord to recover amounts due to us under the terms of our agreements with such parties due to potential moratoriums imposed by various jurisdictions in light of the COVID-19 pandemic on landlord initiated commercial eviction and collection actions. One or more of our tenants may seek the protection of the bankruptcy laws as a result of the prolonged impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, which could result in the termination of such tenants’ leases, and consequently causing a reduction in our income. Tenant bankruptcies may make it more difficult for us to lease the remainder of the property or properties in which the bankrupt tenant operates and adversely impact our ability to successfully execute our re-leasing strategy.

A sustained downturn in the U.S. economy and reduced consumer spending as well as consumer activity at brick-and-mortar commercial establishments due to the prolonged existence and threat of the COVID-19 pandemic, or a future pandemic, could impose an economic slowdown or recession in the United States which could impact our tenants’ ability to meet their lease obligations due to poor operating results, lack of liquidity or other reasons and therefore decrease the revenue generated by our properties or the value of our properties. Our ability to lease space and negotiate and maintain favorable rents could also be negatively impacted by a prolonged recession in the U.S. economy. Moreover, the demand for leasing space in our properties could substantially decline during a significant downturn in the U.S. economy which could make it difficult for us to renew or re-lease our properties at lease rates equal to or above historical rates and lead us to incur significant re-leasing costs.

The COVID-19 pandemic has also led to complete or partial shutdowns of manufacturing facilities and distribution centers in many countries and disruptions in our tenants’ supply chains, and may otherwise delay the delivery of inventory or other goods necessary for our tenants’ operations. Our tenants may also be negatively impacted if the outbreak of COVID-19 occurs within their workforce or otherwise disrupts their management.

The COVID-19 pandemic, or a future pandemic, could also have material and adverse effects on our ability to successfully operate and on our financial condition, results of operations, liquidity and cash flows due to, among other factors:

Difficulty accessing debt and equity capital on attractive terms, or at all, impacts to our credit ratings, and a severe disruption and instability in the global financial markets or deteriorations in credit and financing conditions may affect our access to capital necessary to fund business operations or address maturing liabilities on a timely basis and our tenants' ability to fund their business operations and meet their obligations to us;
The financial impact could negatively impact our ability to pay dividends to our shareholders;
The financial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic could negatively impact our future compliance with financial covenants of our term loan facility (the “Term Loan Facility”) with Berkshire Hathaway Life Insurance Company of Nebraska (“Berkshire Hathaway”) or result in a default and potentially an acceleration of indebtedness, which non-compliance could negatively impact our ability to make additional borrowings under our Incremental Funding Facility (as defined below), conduct asset sales, fund development activity or pay dividends to our shareholders;
The worsening of estimated future cash flows due to a change in our plans, policies, or views of market and economic conditions as it relates to one or more of our adversely impacted properties could result in the recognition of substantial impairment charges imposed on our assets;
The credit quality of our tenants could be negatively impacted and we may significantly increase our allowance for doubtful accounts;
Difficulties completing our redevelopment projects on a timely basis, on budget or at all;
A general decline in business activity and demand for real estate transactions could adversely affect our ability or desire to reinvest in or redevelop our properties; and
The potential negative impact on the health of our personnel, particularly if a significant number of them are impacted, could result in a deterioration in our ability to ensure business continuity during this disruption.

 

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The extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic, or a future pandemic, impacts our operations and those of our tenants will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted with confidence, including the scope, severity and duration of the pandemic, the actions taken to contain the pandemic or mitigate its impact, and the direct and indirect economic effects of the pandemic and containment measures, among others. Additional closures by our tenants of their stores and early terminations by our tenants of their leases could reduce our cash flows, which could impact our ability to pay dividends.

The fluidity of this situation precludes any prediction as to the full adverse impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Nevertheless, the COVID-19 pandemic presents, and future outbreak of other highly infectious or contagious diseases may present, material uncertainty and risk with respect to our business, income, cash flow, results of operations, financial condition, liquidity, prospects, ability to service our debt obligations and our ability to pay dividends and other distributions to our shareholders.

Risks Related to Status as a REIT

If we do not qualify to be taxed as a REIT, or fail to remain qualified as a REIT, we will be subject to U.S. federal income tax as a regular corporation and could face a substantial tax liability, which would reduce the amount of cash available for distribution to our shareholders.

We elected to be taxed as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes commencing with our initial taxable year ended December 31, 2015 and have operated to qualify as a REIT. We believe we have continued to operate in conformity with the requirements to qualify as a REIT and that we continue to satisfy all requirements to maintain our REIT status. However, qualification as a REIT involves the application of highly technical and complex provisions of the Code, for which only a limited number of judicial and administrative interpretations exist.

If we were to fail to qualify as a REIT in any taxable year, and no available relief provision applied, we would be subject to U.S. federal income tax, including, for any taxable year ending on or before December 31, 2017, any applicable alternative minimum tax, on our taxable income at regular corporate rates (which, in the case of U.S. federal income tax, is a maximum of 35% for periods ending on or before December 31, 2017 and 21% thereafter), as well as U.S. state and local income tax, and dividends paid to our shareholders would not be deductible by us in computing our taxable income. Any resulting corporate tax liability could be substantial and would reduce the amount of cash available for distribution to our shareholders, which in turn could have an adverse impact on the value of our common shares. Unless we were entitled to relief under certain Code provisions, we also would be disqualified from re-electing to be taxed as a REIT for the four taxable years following the year in which we failed to qualify as a REIT.

Qualifying as a REIT involves highly technical and complex provisions of the Code.

Qualification as a REIT involves the application of highly technical and complex Code provisions for which only limited judicial and administrative authorities exist. Even a technical or inadvertent violation could jeopardize our REIT qualification. Our qualification as a REIT depends on the satisfaction of certain asset, income, organizational, distribution, shareholder ownership and other requirements on a continuing basis. In addition, our ability to satisfy the requirements to qualify as a REIT may depend in part on the actions of third parties over which we have no control or only limited influence, including in cases where we own an equity interest in an entity that is classified as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

We could fail to qualify to be taxed as a REIT if income we receive is not treated as qualifying income.

Under applicable provisions of the Code, we will not be treated as a REIT unless we satisfy various requirements, including requirements relating to the sources of our gross income. Rents we receive or accrue from tenants may not be treated as qualifying rent for purposes of these requirements if the applicable lease is not respected as a true lease for U.S. federal income tax purposes and is instead treated as a service contract, joint venture, financing, or some other type of arrangement. We believe that the Holdco Master Lease should be respected as a true lease for U.S. federal income tax purposes for the years in which such lease was in effect. If, contrary to expectations, the Holdco Master Lease is not respected as a true lease for U.S. federal income tax purposes, the IRS may determine that we failed to qualify to be taxed as a REIT during such time, and we may be disqualified from re-electing to be taxed as a REIT for the four taxable years following the year in which we failed to qualify as a REIT. Furthermore, our qualification as a REIT depends on the satisfaction of certain asset, income, organizational, distribution, shareholder ownership and other requirements on a continuing basis. Our ability to satisfy the asset tests depends upon our analysis of the characterization and fair market values of our assets, some of which are not susceptible to a precise determination, and for some of which we will not obtain independent appraisals.

In addition, subject to certain exceptions, rents we receive or accrue from our tenants will not be treated as qualifying rent for purposes of these requirements if we or an actual or constructive owner of 10% or more of our outstanding shares (by value) actually or constructively owns 10% or more of the interests in the assets or net profits of a non-corporate tenant, or, if the tenant is a corporation, 10% or more of the total combined voting power of all classes of stock of such tenant entitled to vote or 10% or more of the total value of all classes of stock of such tenant. For purposes of determining whether rental payments received by a REIT are treated as qualifying rent, the stock, assets or net profits owned by a partner in an entity classified as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax

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purposes are attributed to such partnership only if the partner owns (directly or indirectly) 25% or more of the capital interest or profits interest in the partnership. As a result of these constructive ownership rules, it is possible that we could be treated as owning 10% or more of a tenant, and in such case rent payments received from such tenant may not be treated as qualifying rent for purposes of these requirements. Our Declaration of Trust provides for restrictions on ownership and transfer of Class A common shares and Series A Preferred Shares, including restrictions on such ownership or transfer that would cause the rents we receive or accrue from a tenant to be treated as non-qualifying rent for purposes of the REIT gross income requirements. Nevertheless, such restrictions may not be effective in ensuring that rents we receive or accrue from our tenants will be treated as qualifying rent for purposes of REIT qualification requirements.

Dividends payable by REITs do not qualify for the reduced tax rates available for certain “qualified dividends,” but would generally qualify for a partial deduction with respect to certain taxpayers.

The maximum U.S. federal income tax rate applicable to income from “qualified dividends” payable by U.S. corporations to U.S. shareholders that are individuals, trusts and estates is currently 20%. Ordinary dividends payable by REITs, however, generally are not eligible for the reduced rates. Although these rules do not adversely affect the taxation of REITs, the more favorable rates applicable to regular corporate qualified dividends could cause investors who are individuals, trusts and estates to perceive investments in REITs to be relatively less attractive than investments in the shares of non-REIT corporations that pay dividends, which could adversely affect the value of the shares of REITs, including the Class A common shares. However, for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017 and ending before January 1, 2026, a U.S. shareholder that is an individual, trust or estate would generally be entitled to deduct up to 20% of certain ordinary REIT dividends, effectively reducing the rate at which such ordinary REIT dividends are subject to tax. U.S. shareholders should consult their own tax advisors regarding all aspects of such rules and their potential application to dividends from us.

REIT distribution requirements could adversely affect our ability to execute our business plan.

We generally must distribute annually at least 90% of our REIT taxable income, determined without regard to the dividends paid deduction and excluding any net capital gains, in order for us to qualify to be taxed as a REIT (assuming that certain other requirements are also satisfied) so that U.S. federal corporate income tax does not apply to earnings that we distribute. To the extent that we satisfy this distribution requirement and qualify for taxation as a REIT but distribute less than 100% of our REIT taxable income, determined without regard to the dividends paid deduction and including any net capital gains, we will be subject to U.S. federal corporate income tax on our undistributed net taxable income. In addition, we will be subject to a 4% nondeductible excise tax if the actual amount that we distribute to our shareholders in a calendar year is less than a minimum amount specified under U.S. federal tax laws. We declared a dividend on the Company’s Class A and Class C common shares for the first quarter of 2019 and have not declared dividends on the Company’s Class A and Class C common shares since that time, based on our Board of Trustees’ current assessment of the Company’s investment opportunities and its expectations of taxable income.

From time to time, we may generate taxable income greater than our cash flow as a result of differences in timing between the recognition of taxable income and the actual receipt of cash or the effect of nondeductible capital expenditures, the creation of reserves or required debt or amortization payments. If we do not have other funds available in these situations, we could be required to borrow funds on unfavorable terms, sell assets at disadvantageous prices or distribute amounts that would otherwise be invested in future acquisitions to make distributions sufficient to enable us to pay out enough of our taxable income to satisfy the REIT distribution requirement and to avoid corporate income tax and the 4% excise tax in a particular year; alternatively, we may distribute taxable stock dividends to our shareholders in the form of additional shares of stock. See “—We may from time to time make distributions to our shareholders in the form of taxable stock dividends, which could result in shareholders incurring tax liability without receiving sufficient cash to pay such tax”. These alternatives could increase our costs or reduce our equity. Thus, compliance with the REIT requirements may hinder our ability to grow, which could adversely affect the value of Class A common shares.

Restrictions in our indebtedness, including restrictions on our ability to incur additional indebtedness or make certain distributions, could preclude us from meeting the 90% distribution requirement. Decreases in funds from operations due to unfinanced expenditures for acquisitions of properties or increases in the number of Class A common shares outstanding without commensurate increases in funds from operations each would adversely affect our ability to maintain distributions to our shareholders. Moreover, the failure of tenants to make rental payments under any applicable lease could materially impair our ability to make distributions. Consequently, we may be unable to make distributions at the anticipated distribution rate or any other rate.

 

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We may from time to time make distributions to our shareholders in the form of taxable stock dividends, which could result in shareholders incurring tax liability without receiving sufficient cash to pay such tax.

Although we have no current intention to do so, we may in the future distribute taxable stock dividends to our shareholders in the form of additional shares of our stock. Taxable shareholders receiving such dividends will be required to include the full amount of the dividend as ordinary income to the extent of our current and accumulated earnings and profits for U.S. federal income tax purposes. As a result, shareholders may be required to pay income taxes with respect to such dividends in excess of the cash distributions received. If a U.S. shareholder sells our shares that it receives as a dividend in order to pay this tax, the sales proceeds may be less than the amount included in income with respect to the dividend, depending on the market price of our shares at the time of the sale. Furthermore, with respect to certain non-U.S. shareholders, we may be required to withhold U.S. federal income tax with respect to such dividends, including in respect of all or a portion of such dividend that is payable in its common stock.

Even if we remain qualified as a REIT, we may face other tax liabilities that reduce our cash flow.

Even if we remain qualified for taxation as a REIT, we may be subject to certain U.S. federal, state, local and foreign taxes on our income and assets, including taxes on any undistributed income and state, local or foreign income, property and transfer taxes. For example, in order to meet the REIT qualification requirements, we hold some of our assets and conduct certain of our activities through a taxable REIT subsidiary that is subject to federal, state and local corporate-level income taxes as a regular C corporation. For taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017, taxpayers, including TRSs, are subject to a limitation on their ability to deduct net business interest (i.e., interest paid or accrued on indebtedness allocable to a trade or business), generally up to 30% of adjusted taxable income, subject to certain exceptions. This provision may limit the ability of our TRS to deduct interest, which could increase its taxable income and corporate income tax. Further, we may incur a 100% excise tax on transactions with a TRS if they are not conducted on an arm’s-length basis. Any of these taxes would decrease cash available for distribution to our shareholders.

Complying with REIT requirements may cause us to liquidate or forgo otherwise attractive opportunities.

To qualify to be taxed as a REIT, we must ensure that, at the end of each calendar quarter, at least 75% of the value of our assets consists of cash, cash items, government securities and “real estate assets” (as defined in the Code), including certain mortgage loans and securities, REIT stock and debt instruments issued by publicly offered REITs. The remainder of our investments (other than government securities, qualified real estate assets and securities issued by a TRS) generally cannot include more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of any one issuer or more than 10% of the total value of the outstanding securities of any one issuer. In addition, in general, no more than 5% of the value of our total assets can consist of the securities of any one issuer (other than government securities, qualified real estate assets and securities issued by a TRS), and no more than 20% of the value of our total assets can be represented by securities of one or more TRSs. If we fail to comply with these requirements at the end of any calendar quarter, we must correct the failure within 30 days after the end of the calendar quarter or qualify for certain statutory relief provisions to avoid losing our REIT qualification and suffering adverse tax consequences. As a result, we may be required to liquidate or forgo otherwise attractive investments. These actions could have the effect of reducing our income and amounts available for distribution to our shareholders.

In addition to the asset tests set forth above, to qualify to be taxed as a REIT, we must continually satisfy tests concerning, among other things, the sources of our income, the amounts we distribute to our shareholders and the ownership of our shares of beneficial interest. We may be unable to pursue investments that would be otherwise advantageous to us in order to satisfy the source-of-income or asset-diversification requirements for qualifying as a REIT. Thus, compliance with the REIT requirements may hinder our ability to make and, in certain cases, maintain ownership of certain attractive investments.

Complying with REIT requirements may limit our ability to hedge effectively and may cause us to incur tax liabilities.

The REIT provisions of the Code substantially limit our ability to hedge our assets and liabilities. Any income from a hedging transaction that we enter into to manage the risk of interest rate changes with respect to borrowings made or to be made to acquire or carry real estate assets (or that we enter into to manage risk with respect to a prior hedge entered into in connection with property that has been disposed of or liabilities that have been extinguished) does not constitute “gross income” for purposes of the 75% or 95% gross income tests that apply to REITs, provided that certain identification requirements are met. To the extent that we enter into other types of hedging transactions or fail to properly identify such transaction as a hedge, the income is likely to be treated as non-qualifying income for purposes of both of the gross income tests. As a result of these rules, we may be required to limit our use of advantageous hedging techniques or implement those hedges through a TRS. This could increase the cost of our hedging activities because our TRS may be subject to tax on gains or expose us to greater risks associated with changes in interest rates than we would otherwise want to bear. In addition, losses in our TRS will generally not provide any tax benefit, except that such losses may only be carried forward and may only be deducted against 80% of future taxable income in the TRS.

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Changes in federal tax law affected the taxation of us and may affect the desirability of investing in a REIT relative to a regular non-REIT corporation.

The TCJA reduced the relative competitive advantage of operating as a REIT as compared with operating as a regular non-REIT corporation by reducing the maximum tax rate applicable to regular corporations from 35% to 21% beginning on January 1, 2018. On the other hand, the TCJA also decreased the U.S. federal income tax rate applicable to non-corporate shareholders on ordinary REIT dividends by lowering the maximum applicable individual rate from 39.6% to 37% and permitting non-corporate shareholders of REITs to deduct 20% of ordinary REIT dividends from their taxable income for the taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017 and ending before January 1, 2026 (as discussed above). The TCJA and the CARES Act also provided a new limitation on the deduction of net business interest (as discussed above). A taxpayer engaged in certain businesses relating to real property may elect out of the business interest provision; however, the requirements of this election may be onerous to implement and would require the REIT to utilize potentially disadvantageous depreciation methods on some or all of its assets, including certain “qualified improvement property.” We will determine whether or not to make such an election in our sole discretion and based on all the facts and circumstances. In addition, finalized U.S. Treasury regulations could limit the deduction we may claim for our proportionate share of the compensation expense attributable to the remuneration paid by the Operating Partnership to certain of our employees who are or have been highly ranked and highly compensated employees.

The prohibited transactions tax may limit our ability to engage in sale transactions.

A REIT’s income from “prohibited transactions” is subject to a 100% tax. In general, “prohibited transactions” are sales or other dispositions of property other than foreclosure property, held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of business. We may be subject to the prohibited transactions tax equal to 100% of net gain upon a disposition of real property that we hold. Although a safe harbor is available, for which certain sales of property by a REIT are not subject to the 100% prohibited transaction tax, we cannot assure you that we can comply with the safe harbor or that we will avoid owning property that may be characterized as held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of business. Consequently, we may choose not to engage in certain sales of our properties or we may conduct such sales through our TRS, which would be subject to U.S. federal and state income taxation.

The 100% tax described above may limit our ability to enter into transactions that would otherwise be beneficial to us. For example, if circumstances make it not profitable or otherwise uneconomical for us to remain in certain states or geographical markets, the 100% tax could delay our ability to exit those states or markets by selling our assets in those states or markets other than through a TRS, which could harm our operating profits and the trading price of our shares.

Our ownership of our TRS is subject to limitations and our transactions with our TRS will cause us to be subject to a 100% penalty tax on certain income or deductions if those transactions are not conducted on arm’s-length terms.

The Code provides that no more than 20% of the value of a REIT’s assets may consist of shares or securities of one or more TRSs. Our TRS earns income that otherwise may be nonqualifying income if earned by us. Our TRS also may hold certain properties the sale of which may not qualify for the safe harbor for prohibited transactions described above. The limitation on ownership of TRS stock could limit the extent to which we can conduct these activities and other activities through our TRS. In addition, taxpayers, including our TRS, are subject to a limitation on their ability to deduct net business interest generally equal to 30% of adjusted taxable income, subject to certain exceptions. This provision may limit the ability of our TRS to deduct interest, which could increase its taxable income. The Code also imposes a 100% excise tax on certain transactions between a TRS and its parent REIT that are not conducted on an arm’s-length basis. There can be no assurance that we will be able to comply with the TRS limitation or avoid application of the 100% excise tax.

Legislative or other actions affecting REITs or other entities could have a negative effect on us.

The rules dealing with U.S. federal income taxation are constantly under review by persons involved in the legislative process and by the IRS and the U.S. Department of the Treasury. Changes to the tax laws or interpretations thereof, with or without retroactive application, including those contemplated by the new presidential administration in the United States, could materially and adversely affect our investors or us. We cannot predict how changes in the tax laws might affect our investors or us. New legislation, Treasury regulations, administrative interpretations or court decisions could significantly and negatively affect our ability to qualify as a REIT or the U.S. federal income tax consequences to us and our investors of such qualification.

 

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Risks Related to Ownership of our Securities

The market price and trading volume of our securities may be volatile.

The market price of our securities may be volatile, and the trading volume in our securities may fluctuate and cause significant price variations to occur. Some of the factors that could negatively affect the market price of our securities or result in fluctuations in the price or trading volume of our securities include:

actual or anticipated variations in our quarterly results of operations or distributions;
changes in our funds from operations or earnings estimates;
publication of research reports about us or the real estate or retail industries;
increases in market interest rates that may cause purchasers of our securities to demand a higher yield;
changes in market valuations of similar companies;
adverse market reaction to any additional debt we may incur in the future;
actions by ESL, or by institutional shareholders;
speculation in the press or investment community about our company or industry or the economy in general;
adverse performance or potential financial distress or bankruptcy of our major tenants, including Holdco;
the occurrence of any of the other risk factors presented in this filing;
adverse developments in the Litigation;
specific real estate market and real estate economic conditions; and
general market and economic conditions.

We have issued Series A Preferred Shares, which, along with future offerings of debt or preferred equity securities, rank senior to our common shares for purposes of distributions or upon liquidation, may adversely affect the market price of our common shares.

We have issued 2,800,000 Series A Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Shares, which are senior to our common shares for purposes of distributions or upon liquidation. The Series A Preferred Shares may limit our ability to make distributions to holders of our common shares.

In the future, we may attempt to increase our capital resources by making additional offerings of debt or preferred equity securities, including medium-term notes, trust preferred securities, senior or subordinated notes and preferred shares. Upon liquidation, holders of our debt securities, Series A Preferred Shares and any additional preferred shares and lenders with respect to other borrowings may receive distributions of our available assets prior to the holders of our common shares. Any additional equity offerings may dilute the holdings of our existing shareholders or reduce the market price of our common shares, or both. Holders of our common shares are not entitled to preemptive rights or other protections against dilution, and will have no voting rights in connection with the issuance of these securities. Our Series A Preferred Shares have, and any additional preferred shares of beneficial interest issued could have, a preference on liquidating distributions or a preference on distribution payments that could limit our ability to make a distribution to the holders of our common shares. Since our decision to issue securities in any future offering will depend in part on market conditions and other factors beyond our control, we cannot predict or estimate the amount, timing or nature of our future offerings. Thus, our shareholders bear the risk of our future offerings reducing the market price of our common shares and diluting their holdings in us.

The transactions with Sears Holdings and Holdco could give rise to disputes or other unfavorable effects, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

Disputes with third parties could arise out of our historical transactions with Sears Holdings or future transactions with Holdco, and we could experience unfavorable reactions from employees, ratings agencies, regulators or other interested parties. These disputes and reactions of third parties could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations. In addition, disputes between us and Sears Holdings or Holdco could arise in connection with any of our past or future agreements with those counterparties.

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On April 18, 2019, at the direction of the Restructuring Sub-Committee of the Restructuring Committee of the Board of Directors of Sears Holdings, Sears Holdings, Sears, Roebuck & Co., Sears Development Co., Kmart Corporation, and Kmart of Washington, LLC commenced the Litigation in the Bankruptcy Court against the Seritage Defendants. The Litigation is dual captioned as In re: Sears Holdings Corporation, et al., Case No. 18-23538 (RDD) and Sears Holdings Corporation et al., v. Lampert et al., Case No. 19-08250 (RDD). On November 25, 2019, acting pursuant to the Confirmation Order, the Creditors’ Committee filed the Amended Complaint alleging, among other things, that certain transactions undertaken by Sears Holdings since 2011 (including the July 2015 transactions giving rise to Seritage, the execution of the Original Master Lease with Sears Holdings, and the acquisition of real estate from Sears Holdings) constituted actual and/or constructive fraudulent transfers and/or illegal dividends by Sears Holdings and that the real estate acquired by Seritage from Sears Holdings in July 2015 was worth hundreds of millions of dollars more than the purchase price paid. The Amended Complaint further alleges, among other things, that certain releases provided to Seritage and certain other defendants in connection with the Sears Holdings derivative litigation in the Delaware Court of Chancery in 2017 should be avoided and/or declared null and void as an actual and/or constructive fraudulent conveyance. The Amended Complaint seeks as relief, among other things, declaratory relief, avoidance of the allegedly actual and/or constructive fraudulent transfers, disgorgement, recovery of the property fraudulently transferred or, in the alternative, compensatory damages in an unspecified amount to be determined at trial, equitable subordination and disallowance of defendants’ claims as creditors, punitive and exemplary damages for any intentional wrongdoing, and reasonable attorneys’ fees, costs, and expenses. On February 21, 2020, the Seritage defendants filed a partial motion to dismiss seeking dismissal of the claims in the Amended Complaint relating to the release received in the Sears Holdings derivative litigation, unjust enrichment, and equitable subordination. Briefing and oral argument on the motions were completed in August 2020, and the parties are awaiting a decision.

On March 15, 2021, the Court consolidated the Litigation with a case captioned Sears Holding Corp. et al. v. Andrew H. Tisch, et al., Case No. 20-07007 (RDD) (the “Shareholder Litigation,” and, together with the Litigation, the “Consolidated Litigation”). The Shareholder Litigation was brought by the UCC, Sears Holdings Corporation, and Sears, Roebuck and Co., against certain shareholders of Sears Holdings or its related companies. Seritage was not named as a defendant in the Shareholder Litigation, which alleges, among other things, that certain transactions undertaken by Sears Holdings since 2014 (including the July 2015 transactions giving rise to Seritage, the execution of the Original Master Lease with Sears Holdings, and the acquisition of real estate from Sears Holdings) constituted actual and/or constructive fraudulent transfers and/or illegal dividends. The Company believes that the claims against the Seritage Defendants in the Consolidated Litigation are without merit and intends to defend against them vigorously.

The number of shares available for future sale could adversely affect the market price of Class A common shares.

We cannot predict whether future issuances of Class A common shares, the availability of Class A common shares for resale in the open market or the conversion of Class C non-voting common shares into Class A common shares will decrease the market price per share of Class A common shares. Sales of a substantial number of Class A common shares in the public market, or the perception that such sales might occur, could adversely affect the market price of the Class A common shares.

Our earnings and cash distributions will affect the market price of Class A common shares.

We believe that the market value of a REIT’s equity securities is based primarily upon market perception of the REIT’s growth potential and its current and potential future cash distributions, whether from operations, sales, acquisitions, development or refinancing, and is secondarily based upon the value of the underlying assets. For these reasons, Class A common shares may trade at prices that are higher or lower than the net asset value per share. To the extent we retain operating cash flow for investment purposes, working capital reserves or other purposes rather than distributing the cash flow to shareholders, these retained funds, while increasing the value of our underlying assets, may negatively impact the market price of Class A common shares. Our failure to meet market expectations with regard to future earnings and cash distributions would likely adversely affect the market price of Class A common shares.

The Series A Preferred Shares have not been rated.

The Series A Preferred Shares have not been rated, and may never be rated, by any nationally recognized statistical rating organization, which may negatively affect their market value and your ability to sell such shares. It is possible, however, that one or more rating agencies might independently determine to assign a rating to the Series A Preferred Shares or that we may elect to obtain a rating of the Series A Preferred Shares in the future. Furthermore, we may elect to issue other securities for which we may seek to obtain a rating. If any ratings are assigned to the Series A Preferred Shares in the future or if we issue other securities with a rating, such ratings, if they are lower than market expectations or are subsequently lowered or withdrawn, could adversely affect the market for or the market value of the Series A Preferred Shares. Ratings only reflect the views of the issuing rating agency or agencies, and such ratings could at any time be revised downward or withdrawn entirely at the discretion of the issuing rating agency. Any such downward revision or withdrawal of a rating could have an adverse effect on the market price of the Series A Preferred Shares. Further, a rating is not a recommendation to purchase, sell or hold any particular security, including the Series A Preferred Shares. In addition, ratings do not reflect market prices or suitability of a security for a particular investor and any future rating of the Series A Preferred Shares may not reflect all risks related to us and our business, or the structure or market value of the Series A Preferred Shares.

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An active trading market may not develop for the Series A Preferred Shares or, even if it does develop, may not continue, which may negatively affect the market value of, and the ability of holders of our Series A Preferred Shares to transfer or sell, their shares.

Since the Series A Preferred Shares have no stated maturity date, investors seeking liquidity will be limited to selling their shares in the secondary market. The Series A Preferred Shares are listed on the NYSE under the symbol “SRG PRA,” but there can be no assurance that an active trading market on the NYSE for the Series A Preferred Shares will develop or continue, in which case the market price of the Series A Preferred Shares could be materially and adversely affected and the ability to transfer or sell Series A Preferred Shares would be limited. The market price of the shares will depend on many factors, including:

prevailing interest rates;
the market for similar securities;
investors’ perceptions of us;
our issuance of additional preferred equity or indebtedness;
general economic and market conditions; and
our financial condition, results of operations, business and prospects.

The Series A Preferred Shares are subordinate in right of payment to our existing and future debt, and the interests of the holders of Series A Preferred Shares could be diluted by the issuance of additional preferred shares, including additional Series A Preferred Shares, and by other transactions.

The Series A Preferred Shares rank junior to all of our existing and future debt and to other non-equity claims on us and our assets available to satisfy claims against us, including claims in bankruptcy, liquidation or similar proceedings. Our future debt may include restrictions on our ability to pay dividends to preferred shareholders. As of December 31, 2021, our total indebtedness was $1.44 billion. In addition, we may incur additional indebtedness in the future. Our Declaration of Trust currently authorizes the issuance of up to 10,000,000 shares of preferred shares in one or more classes or series. Our board of trustees has the power to reclassify unissued common shares and preferred shares and to amend our Declaration of Trust, without any action by our shareholders, to increase the aggregate number of shares of beneficial interest of any class or series, including preferred shares, that we are authorized to issue. The issuance of additional preferred shares on parity with or senior to the Series A Preferred Shares with respect to the payment of dividends and the distribution of assets in the event of any liquidation, dissolution or winding up would dilute the interests of the holders of the Series A Preferred Shares, and any issuance of preferred shares senior to the Series A Preferred Shares or of additional indebtedness could adversely affect our ability to pay dividends on, redeem or pay the liquidation preference on the Series A Preferred Shares. Other than the limited conversion right afforded to holders of Series A Preferred Shares that may occur in connection with a Change of Control, none of the provisions relating to the Series A Preferred Shares contain any provisions relating to or limiting our indebtedness or affording the holders of the Series A Preferred Shares protection in the event of a highly leveraged or other transaction, including a merger or the sale, lease or conveyance of all or substantially all our assets or business, that might adversely affect the holders of the Series A Preferred Shares, so long as the rights of holders of the Series A Preferred Shares are not materially and adversely affected.

Dividends on our preferred shares, including the Series A Preferred Shares, are discretionary. We cannot guarantee that we will be able to pay dividends in the future or what the actual dividends will be for any future period.

Future dividends on our preferred shares, including the Series A Preferred Shares, will be authorized by our Board of Trustees and declared by us at the discretion of our board of trustees and will depend on, among other things, our results of operations, cash flow from operations, financial condition and capital requirements, any debt service requirements and any other factors our Board of Trustees deems relevant. Accordingly, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to make cash dividends on our preferred shares or what the actual dividends will be for any future period. However, until we declare payment and pay or set apart the accrued dividends on the Series A Preferred Shares, our ability to pay dividends and make other distributions on our common shares and non-voting shares (including redemptions) will be limited by the terms of the Series A Preferred Shares.

 

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Holders of Series A Preferred Shares will have limited voting rights.

Holders of the Series A Preferred Shares have limited voting rights. Our Class A common shares and our non-economic shares are currently the only shares of beneficial interest of our company with full voting rights. Voting rights for holders of Series A Preferred Shares exist primarily with respect to the right to elect two additional trustees to our Board of Trustees in the event that six quarterly dividends (whether or not consecutive) payable on the Series A Preferred Shares are in arrears, and with respect to voting on amendments to our Declaration of Trust or articles supplementary relating to the Series A Preferred Shares that would materially and adversely affect the rights of holders of the Series A Preferred Shares or create additional classes or series of our shares that are senior to the Series A Preferred Shares with respect to the payment of dividends and the distribution of assets in the event of any liquidation, dissolution or winding up of our affairs. Other than in limited circumstances, holders of Series A Preferred Shares will not have any voting rights.

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

There are no unresolved comments from the staff of the SEC as of the date of this Annual Report.

- 32 -


 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

As of December 31, 2021, the Company’s portfolio consisted of interests in 162 properties comprised of approximately 19.2 million square feet of GLA or build-to-suit leased area, approximately 3.9 million of which consists of Unconsolidated Properties, approximately 600 acres held for or under development and approximately 9.4 million square feet or approximately 800 acres to be disposed of. The following tables set forth certain information regarding our Consolidated Properties and Unconsolidated Properties based on signed leases as of December 31, 2021, including signed but not yet open leases (“SNO” or “SNO Leases”):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GLA (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

City

 

State

 

Planned
Usage (3)

 

Total

 

 

Leased

 

 

Not
Leased

 

 

Land Acres

 

 

Significant Tenants (1)

 

Leased (1)

 

 

1

 

 

Phoenix

 

AZ

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

n/a

 

 

0.0

%

 

2

 

 

El Cajon

 

CA

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

244,900

 

 

 

184,400

 

 

 

60,500

 

 

 

20

 

 

Ashley Furniture, Bob’s Discount Furniture, Burlington Stores, Extra Space Storage

 

 

75.3

%

 

3

 

 

Riverside - Retail

 

CA

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

33,200

 

 

 

33,200

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

Bank of America, Aldi

 

 

100.0

%

 

4

 

 

Roseville

 

CA

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

125,800

 

 

 

107,800

 

 

 

17,900

 

 

 

7

 

 

AAA, Cinemark, Round One Entertainment

 

 

85.7

%

 

5

 

 

Temecula

 

CA

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

120,100

 

 

 

112,800

 

 

 

7,300

 

 

 

10

 

 

Round One Entertainment, Dick’s Sporting Goods

 

 

93.9

%

 

6

 

 

Thousand Oaks

 

CA

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

161,400

 

 

 

113,700

 

 

 

47,700

 

 

 

11

 

 

Dave & Busters, DSW, Nordstrom Rack

 

 

70.4

%

 

7

 

 

West Covina - Retail

 

CA

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

11,000

 

 

 

11,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

 

 

n/a

 

 

100.0

%

 

8

 

 

Rehoboth Beach

 

DE

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

102,100

 

 

 

75,900

 

 

 

26,200

 

 

 

13

 

 

andThat!, PetSmart, Aldi

 

 

74.3

%

 

9

 

 

Hialeah (2)

 

FL

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

106,300

 

 

 

106,300

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

 

 

Aldi, Bed Bath & Beyond, Ross Dress for Less, dd’s Discounts

 

 

100.0

%

 

10

 

 

North Miami

 

FL

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

129,400

 

 

 

129,400

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

 

 

Aldi, Burlington Stores, Ross Dress for Less, Michaels Stores

 

 

100.0

%

 

11

 

 

Orlando

 

FL

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

118,400

 

 

 

96,800

 

 

 

21,600

 

 

 

18

 

 

Floor & Décor

 

 

81.7

%

 

12

 

 

St. Petersburg

 

FL

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

141,600

 

 

 

141,600

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

 

 

Dick’s Sporting Goods, Five Below, PetSmart

 

 

100.0

%

 

13

 

 

Lombard

 

IL

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

139,300

 

 

 

139,300

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

 

 

The Dump

 

 

100.0

%

 

14

 

 

North Riverside

 

IL

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

216,400

 

 

 

183,800

 

 

 

32,600

 

 

 

13

 

 

Round One Entertainment, Aldi, Blink Fitness, Amita Health

 

 

84.9

%

 

15

 

 

Springfield

 

IL

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

119,500

 

 

 

110,000

 

 

 

9,500

 

 

 

5

 

 

Binny’s Beverage Depot, Burlington Stores, Marshalls

 

 

92.0

%

 

16

 

 

Ft. Wayne

 

IN

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

84,400

 

 

 

76,700

 

 

 

7,700

 

 

 

19

 

 

Five Below, HomeGoods

 

 

90.9

%

 

17

 

 

Merrillville

 

IN

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

170,900

 

 

 

163,000

 

 

 

7,900

 

 

 

9

 

 

At Home, Dollar Tree

 

 

95.4

%

 

18

 

 

Braintree

 

MA

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

89,800

 

 

 

85,100

 

 

 

4,600

 

 

 

34

 

 

Nordstrom Rack, Ulta Beauty

 

 

94.8

%

 

19

 

 

Greensboro

 

NC

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

178,500

 

 

 

168,200

 

 

 

10,300

 

 

 

16

 

 

Floor & Décor, Gabriel Brothers

 

 

94.3

%

 

20

 

 

Kearney

 

NE

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

64,900

 

 

 

64,900

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

 

 

Ross Dress for Less, Five Below, Marshall’s

 

 

100.0

%

 

21

 

 

Manchester

 

NH

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

106,600

 

 

 

80,400

 

 

 

26,200

 

 

 

11

 

 

Dick’s Sporting Goods, Dave & Buster’s

 

 

75.4

%

 

22

 

 

Watchung

 

NJ

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

117,100

 

 

 

117,100

 

 

 

 

 

 

12

 

 

Cinemark, HomeGoods, Sierra Trading Post, Ulta Beauty, Chick-fil-A, City MD

 

 

100.0

%

 

23

 

 

East Northport

 

NY

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

179,700

 

 

 

93,300

 

 

 

86,400

 

 

 

18

 

 

24 Hour Fitness, AMC

 

 

51.9

%

 

24

 

 

Victor

 

NY

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

138,600

 

 

 

119,600

 

 

 

19,000

 

 

 

14

 

 

Dick’s House of Sport

 

 

86.3

%

 

25

 

 

Canton

 

OH

 

Multi-tenant Retail

 

 

190,600

 

 

 

128,300