424B4 1 f424b4020216_biondvax.htm PROSPECTUS

Filed pursuant to Rule 424(b)(4)
Registration No. 333-201283

2,133,500 American Depositary Shares

Each Representing 40 Ordinary Shares

This prospectus relates to 2,133,500 American Depositary Shares, or ADSs each representing 40 of our ordinary shares, par value NIS 0.0000001 per share, or the ordinary shares, (i) 2,038,000 of which are issuable upon the exercise of ADSs warrants issued to public investors in our initial public offering and (ii) 95,500 of which are issuable upon the exercise of a warrant issued to the representative of the underwriters in connection with our initial public offering, in each case pursuant to a prospectus dated May 13, 2015. In order to obtain the ADSs (i) the holders of the ADSs warrants must pay an exercise price of $6.25 per ADS (subject to adjustments described herein) (ii) the holders of Representative’s warrants must also satisfy the vesting conditions applicable to the representative’s warrant, as more fully described herein. We will receive proceeds from the exercise of the warrants but not from the sale of the underlying ADSs.

Our ordinary shares are currently traded on the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange, or the TASE, under the symbol “BVXV.” The last reported sale price of our ordinary shares on the TASE on January 21, 2016, was NIS 0.362, or $0.09, per share (based on the exchange rate reported by the Bank of Israel on that date, which was NIS 3.972 = $1.00).

Our ADSs and the ADS warrants are currently traded on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “BVXV” and “BVXVW”, respectively. The last reported sale price of our ADSs and ADS Warrants on the NASDAQ Capital Market on January 21, 2016, was $3.68 and $0.50, respectively.

We are an “emerging growth company” as that term is used in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012, or the JOBS Act, and, as such, we have elected to take advantage of certain reduced public company reporting requirements for this prospectus and future filings.

Investing in our securities involves certain significant risks. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 14 of this prospectus. You should carefully consider these risk factors, as well as the information contained in this prospectus, before you invest.

None of the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Israeli Securities Authority or any other state or foreign regulatory body has approved or disapproved of these securities or passed upon the adequacy or accuracy of this prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

The date of this prospectus is February 2, 2016.

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

 

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SUMMARY FINANCIAL DATA

 

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RISK FACTORS

 

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SPECIAL NOTE ABOUT FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

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EXCHANGE RATE INFORMATION

 

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PRICE RANGE OF OUR ORDINARY SHARES

 

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MARKET INFORMATION FOR OUR ADS AND ADS WARRANTS

 

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USE OF PROCEEDS

 

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DIVIDENDS AND DIVIDEND POLICY

 

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CAPITALIZATION

 

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DILUTION

 

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SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

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MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

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BUSINESS

 

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MANAGEMENT

 

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BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP OF PRINCIPAL SHAREHOLDERS AND MANAGEMENT

 

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RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

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DESCRIPTION OF SHARE CAPITAL

 

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DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES

 

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SHARES ELIGIBLE FOR FUTURE SALE

 

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TAXATION

 

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ENFORCEMENT OF FOREIGN JUDGMENTS

 

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LEGAL MATTERS

 

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EXPERTS

 

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WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION

 

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INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

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About This Prospectus

You should rely only on the information contained in this prospectus, any amendment or supplement to this prospectus or any free writing prospectus prepared by, or on behalf of, us or to which we have referred you to or otherwise authorized. We have not authorized any other person to provide you with different information. If anyone provides you with different or inconsistent information, you should not rely on it. We are not offering to sell these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted. This prospectus is not an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy the securities in any circumstances under which such offer or solicitation is unlawful. This document may only be used where it is legal to sell these securities. The information in this prospectus is accurate only as of the date on the front cover of this prospectus, regardless of the time of delivery of this prospectus or when any sale of the securities occurs. Our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may have changed since that date. We do not take any responsibility for, nor do we provide any assurance as to the reliability of, any information other than the information in this prospectus, any amendment or supplement to this prospectus and any free writing prospectus prepared by us or on our behalf. Neither the delivery of this prospectus nor the sale of the securities means that information contained in this prospectus is correct after the date of this prospectus.

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Before you invest in the securities, you should read the registration statement (including the exhibits thereto) of which this prospectus forms a part and any amendment or supplement to this prospectus.

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Throughout this prospectus, unless otherwise designated, the terms “we”, “us”, “our”, “BiondVax”, “the Company” and “our Company” refer to BiondVax Pharmaceuticals Ltd. References to “ordinary shares”, “ADSs”, “ADS warrants”, “representative’s warrants” and “share capital” refer to the ordinary shares, ADSs, ADS warrants, representative’s warrants and share capital, respectively, of BiondVax. References to “securities” refer to ADS warrants and representative’s warrants.

Market data and certain industry data and forecasts used throughout this prospectus were obtained from sources we believe to be reliable, including market research databases, publicly available information, reports of governmental agencies and industry publications and surveys. We have relied on certain data from third-party sources, including internal surveys, industry forecasts and market research, which we believe to be reliable based on our management’s knowledge of the industry. Forecasts are particularly likely to be inaccurate, especially over long periods of time. In addition, we do not necessarily know what assumptions regarding general economic growth were used in preparing the third-party forecasts we cite. Statements as to our market position are based on the most currently available data. While we are not aware of any misstatements regarding the industry data presented in this prospectus, our estimates involve risks and uncertainties and are subject to change based on various factors, including those discussed under the heading “Risk Factors” in this prospectus.

Our financial statements are prepared and presented in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards, or IFRS, as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board, or IASB. Our historical results do not necessarily indicate our expected results for any future periods.

Certain figures included in this prospectus have been subject to rounding adjustments. Accordingly, figures shown as totals in certain tables may not be an arithmetic aggregation of the figures that precede them.

Unless derived from our financial statements or otherwise noted, the terms “shekels,” “Israeli shekels” and “NIS” refer to New Israeli Shekels, the lawful currency of the State of Israel, and the terms “dollar,” “US$” or “$” refer to U.S. dollars, the lawful currency of the United States. Unless otherwise indicated, “U.S. dollar,” “USD” and “$” refer to the United States dollar and “NIS” refers to the New Israeli Shekel.

We have not taken any action to permit a public offering of the securities outside the United States or to permit the possession or distribution of this prospectus outside the United States. Persons outside the United States who come into possession of this prospectus must inform themselves about and observe any restrictions relating to the offering of the securities and the distribution of this prospectus outside of the United States.

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PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

This summary highlights selected information presented in greater detail elsewhere in this prospectus. This summary does not include all the information you should consider before investing in the securities. Before investing in the securities, you should read this entire prospectus carefully for a more complete understanding of our business, including our audited and unaudited financial statements and related notes and the sections titled “Risk Factors” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”

Overview

We are a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing and, ultimately, commercializing immunomodulation therapies for infectious diseases. Our current product candidate, a universal influenza vaccine that we refer to as M-001, is a synthetic peptide-based protein targeting both seasonal and pandemic strains of the influenza virus. Unlike existing influenza vaccines, which offer only strain specific seasonal protection or pandemic prevention, M-001 is designed to provide long-lasting protection against multiple existing and future influenza strains. As a result, we believe that M-001 has the potential to become an attractive alternative to existing influenza vaccines.

M-001 is based on research initially conducted at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, or the Weizmann Institute, over a period of approximately 10 years prior to our inception in 2003. In 2003, we acquired from Yeda Research and Development Company Ltd., or Yeda, an affiliate of the Weizmann Institute, an exclusive worldwide license for the development, manufacture, use, marketing, sale, distribution and importation of products based, directly or indirectly, on patents and patent applications filed pursuant to the invention titled “Peptide Based Vaccine for Influenza”, developed on the basis of the research conducted by Professor Ruth Arnon and her team at the Weizmann Institute. Since 2003, we have continued the research and development of M-001 under the supervision of our Chief Scientific Officer, Dr. Tamar Ben-Yedidia and, at present, we own or license four families of patents filed in a large number of jurisdictions, the latest of which is expected to be in force until 2031. In addition, we have filed an international patent application that, if an application based on this international application is approved, would result in the issuance of a patent with a term expiring in 2035. For information regarding our material patents, including the expected expiration dates by jurisdiction, see “Business — Intellectual Property — Patents”.

According to a report by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the CDC, annual seasonal influenza vaccines in the U.S. were found to be effective in preventing the onset of the influenza virus in between 8% and 48% of healthy adults during the influenza seasons from 2004 to 2008 (depending on the particular season and the statistical significance of the sample). In addition, studies conducted by universities and hospitals in cooperation with the CDC from 2004 and until recently measured the effectiveness of the influenza vaccine at preventing outpatient medical visits due to laboratory-confirmed influenza. These studies estimated the adjusted influenza vaccine effectiveness to be between 10% during the 2004/2005 season and 60% during the 2010/2011 season, and only 19% effective during the 2014/2015 season. Most existing influenza vaccines are formulated based on weakened or dead strains of the influenza virus that are predicted to be the most common during the then upcoming influenza season or that are predicted to be most likely to cause a pandemic outbreak in the then upcoming influenza season. Furthermore, as seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines are strain-specific, most existing vaccines only target those specific strains and do not cope with the ever-changing nature of the influenza virus. In addition, according to the Biomedical and Advanced Research and Development Authority of the United States Department of Health, or BARDA, which is responsible for the advanced development and procurement of medical countermeasures for pandemic influenza in the United States, the production cycle of existing influenza vaccines is long (approximately 6 months), considerably limiting the ability to timely immunize the non-affected population in case of a pandemic outbreak.

We intend to seek regulatory approvals to market M-001 for the following three indications: (i) as a standalone universal vaccine suitable to be administered to the general population to provide protection against seasonal and pandemic strains of influenza, that we refer to as the Universal Standalone Indication; (ii) as a seasonal influenza vaccine, or primer, to be administered to patients over the age of 65 with additional age-related medical conditions, or elderly with co-morbidities, in combination with the existing seasonal vaccine to provide additional protection against seasonal influenza virus strains, that we refer to as the Universal Seasonal Primer for Elderly Indication; and (iii) as a pre-pandemic influenza vaccine, or primer, suitable to be administered to the general population in combination with the existing pandemic vaccine, to provide additional protection against pandemic strains of the influenza virus, that we refer to as the Universal Pandemic Primer Indication.

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To date, we have completed two Phase 1/2 clinical trials and three Phase 2 clinical trials conducted in Israel pursuant to clinical trial protocols approved by the Israeli Ministry of Health. These clinical trials were designed for adults between the ages of 18 and 49 and 55 to 75, and included an aggregate of 479 participants. Because our product candidate is a vaccine, we conducted our Phase 1/2 clinical trials on healthy participants to test both safety of M-001 as our primary endpoint and the immunogenicity of M-001 as our secondary endpoint. Results from our Phase 1/2 and Phase 2 clinical trials indicated that M-001 was well tolerated and safe across all treatment groups within the trial population and that M-001 was effective in causing an immune reaction in clinical trial participants administered with M-001. Following the completion of our clinical trial BVX-005 in February 2012, we have focused our efforts on seeking a cGMP approval for our M-001 production process. In addition, we have also focused a portion of our efforts since February 2012 on improving the manufacturing process for M-001 and on reducing production costs.

In June 2013, we submitted an Investigational New Drug, or IND, application, to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or the FDA, for a contemplated Phase 2 clinical trial intended to be conducted in the U.S. This Phase 2 clinical trial was designed to test the safety and efficacy of M-001 when administered as a primer for the H5N1 Avian flu pandemic vaccine by administering M-001 to participants prior to the administration of the H5N1 vaccine. This IND application included data, reports and summaries from our previously conducted Israeli preclinical and clinical trials. The FDA reviewed and commented on our IND application and requested, among other things, that we provide to the FDA, prior to the commencement of the proposed clinical trial, information regarding the H5N1 vaccine selected for use in this proposed clinical trial and a summary of the toxicological effect of M-001. We provided the information regarding the toxicology of M-001 as requested; however, we were unable to locate a source for or otherwise acquire the H5N1 vaccine (which was not publicly available) from a manufacturer approved for the purpose of performing clinical trials in the U.S. As a result, we were not able to satisfy the FDA’s request for information regarding such vaccine (including information as to manufacturing, dosage, formulation, etc.). Without such information, we could not complete our IND application and the FDA placed a clinical hold on the trial. In light of these events, we elected to convert our IND application into a drug master file that will serve as a Chemistry, Manufacturing and Control, preclinical and clinical database in future FDA regulated studies conducted by us or other entities, or the Drug Master File.

In June 2015, the FDA accepted our newly submitted IND application, and we were informed by our regulatory advisors that the “study may proceed”. We have submitted this IND in order to comply with Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, or BARDA, for a grant application we had previously submitted to BARDA. Following such IND acceptance, we intend to participate in a Phase 2 clinical trial to be held in the U.S. by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, or NIAID. The purpose of the planned clinical trial is to assess the ability of M-001 in humans to serve as a pandemic primer to the H7N9 avian pandemic vaccine, and we expect NIAID will launch this clinical trial during 2016.

We intend, following the receipt of all requisite regulatory approvals, to conduct Phase 3 clinical trials in the U.S., either with one or more future collaborators, or, subject to available funds, on our own, in support of FDA approval to market M-001 in the U.S. While all of our preclinical and clinical trials to date have been conducted outside the United States, considering the FDA’s review and comments to this IND application, we believe that the FDA will consider the results of our completed preclinical and clinical trials in reviewing any future IND application. We expect that phase 3 clinical trials will be planned for the 2017/2018 timeframe.

In June 2015 we received preliminary results from our Phase 2 clinical trial in Israel, which we refer to as BVX-006, indicating M-001 was safe, well tolerated and induced humoral immune responses, successfully meeting the primary safety and secondary immunogenicity endpoints. In addition, in September 2015 we initiated our BVX-007 clinical trial in Europe as part of our membership in the UNISEC Consortium following the receipt of a regulatory clearance from the relevant Hungarian Regulatory Authority. The UNISEC Consortium is a consortium of three University partners, five National Health Institutes and other companies and organizations to work on promising recently developed concepts for a universal influenza vaccine. BVX-007 includes the administration of the H5N1 vaccine following the administration of M-001 to our clinical trial participants. We entered into an agreement with a supplier for the supply of H5N1 vaccine approved by the relevant regulatory authority for the purpose of performing BVX-007. We believe that pursuant to this agreement we will be able to obtain sufficient quantities of the H5N1 vaccine (if any) on acceptable terms or at all. Although no regulatory authority has requested or instructed that we perform these or any other additional preclinical or clinical trials, we elected to conduct additional Phase 2 clinical trials at this time (rather than proceed directly to filing an IND application for Phase 3 clinical trials) in order to further expand our data to provide greater support for any Phase 3 clinical trial of M-001 we may conduct in the future.

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We do not currently have sufficient financial resources to conduct Phase 3 clinical trials of M-001 on our own. Subject to the completion of our current and planned Phase 2 clinical trials and the approval of an IND application for Phase 3 clinical trials, we intend to seek to establish collaborations with large multinational pharmaceutical companies and/or national health authorities to finance Phase 3 clinical trials of M-001. However, to the extent that we have sufficient capital to do so (whether through sales of debt or equity securities or otherwise), we may seek to conduct Phase 3 clinical trials of M-001 for some or all of our indications without such collaborations.

Our Market Opportunity

Influenza is an infectious disease caused by different strains of the influenza virus. The disease is common around the world, and appears as seasonal or pandemic outbreaks. The various strains of influenza are classified into A and B groups according to the type of proteins in the virus. According to information published in March 2014 by the World Health Organization, or the WHO, the global annual attack rate of seasonal influenza is estimated at 5% – 10% in adults and 20% – 30% in children, and between 250,000 and 500,000 of those infected die as a result of influenza related complications. In addition, during seasonal influenza epidemics from 1979/80 through 2000/01, the estimated overall number of influenza-associated hospitalizations in the United States ranged from approximately 54,000 to 430,000 per epidemic, and 63% of these cases occurred among persons over the age of 65. Infants, adults over the age of 50 and chronic disease patients are most likely to contract influenza and suffer from complications.

The influenza virus undergoes frequent mutations. These mutations decrease the effectiveness of the immune reaction of the human body. If the mutations are very significant, the mutated virus strains may cause global pandemics. Over the last few years, new strains of the influenza virus previously only existing in animals have appeared in humans, including Avian flu strains such as H5 and H7. We believe that the appearance of new potentially pandemic strains is a growing concern among health authorities, as these strains increase the risk of worldwide pandemics and high mortality and morbidity rates. Furthermore, according to the worldwide scientific journal Vaccine (Molinari et al. 2007), the direct financial loss attributed to the influenza disease in the year 2003 was estimated at a total of $87.1 billion annually, of which $55.7 billion relate to incidents of the disease among adults aged 65 years or older.

To date, the most common therapeutic treatment methods for influenza focus on pain and symptom relief. While anti-viral treatments may shorten the duration and severity of the disease, such treatments must be applied in the early stages of the course of the disease to be effective. Many countries around the world, including the United States, provide preventative treatment in the form of annual or seasonal influenza vaccines, which are especially recommended to patients in risk groups. Because seasonal vaccines target only particular influenza strains predicted for the coming year, such vaccines may not be effective against the strains that actually do appear (if different from those predicted) and may not protect against unexpected mutations of a particular influenza strain that was predicted.

The seasonal influenza vaccine market was dominated in 2012 by five large pharmaceutical companies: Sanofi, GlaxoSmithKline plc (GSK), Novartis International AG (which recently announced the sale of its influenza vaccine business to CSL Limited), Abbott Laboratories and AstraZeneca. According to Data Monitor’s Influenza vaccine forecast report, dated November 2013, sales of seasonal influenza vaccines in the 2012/2013 influenza season are estimated at $3.2 billion in the U.S., Japan, and the five major EU markets (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK), and are expected to reach $5.3 billion in the 2021/2022 influenza season. Specifically, sales in the U.S. alone in the 2012/2013 influenza season are estimated at $1.4 billion, with 140 million doses administered during this season. According to this report, U.S. sales of seasonal influenza vaccines in the 2014/2015 influenza season are forecasted to reach $1.786 billion, with 156 million persons expected to be administered a dose of the vaccine. The U.S. influenza vaccines sales in the 2021/2022 influenza season are expected to reach $2.6 billion.

Our Product Candidate M-001

Our current product candidate, M-001, is comprised of nine peptides that activate the entire immune system (including both a humoral reaction, an immune reaction causing the body to create antibodies against a pathogen or parts thereof, and a cellular immune reaction, an immune reaction causing the body to kill or assist in killing pathogens), to prevent the spread of the influenza disease within the body and shorten the duration of the illness. The selected peptides are from the HA, NP and M1 proteins of both influenza Type A and Type B virus, and each peptide comprises up to 22 amino-acids. These peptides are common in the vast majority of influenza virus strains and are combined into a single protein used in M-001.

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In order to produce M-001, we use an expression system that consists of bacteria and a DNA plasmid encoding for M-001. The DNA plasmid encoding is inserted into a proprietary E. coli bacteria specifically designed for the production of peptide-based products. The bacteria express M-001 synthetic protein from the DNA, and once expressed, M-001 is further purified from other non-related bacterial proteins. M-001 is then formulated and filled into sterile vials that are kept in cooled storage until used.

The following graph demonstrates the selection of certain peptides common in the influenza virus and the formulation of M-001:

M-001 is intended to be intramuscularly injected into the body. Once administered, M-001 is designed to be recognized by white blood cells in the body, causing both humoral and cellular immune reactions. This process is expected to result in the creation of new memory cells which, upon influenza infection, secrete antibodies to fight the influenza virus.

Our Competitive Strengths

We believe our product candidate can potentially improve influenza protection by providing several distinct advantages, including:

         Multi-strain flu protection. We believe that the peptide-based structure of M-001 will allow our product to be effective against many existing and future strains of the influenza virus and to remain effective in protecting against new strains without required updates and alterations. To test this hypothesis, in January and July 2014, we conducted a sequence examination and when possible, animal studies in our laboratories, to compare the structure of M-001 with new flu strains (H7N7, H6N1, H5N8, H7N9 and H10N8) discovered in humans in recent years similarly to the H5N1 stain. Although these strains have not yet been classified as pandemic, they are dangerous for humans and have caused morbidity and death in the past. The results of such examination and studies demonstrated that M-001 was compatible against these strains, which we believe supports our claim of the universality of M-001 for existing and future influenza virus strains.

         Long-lasting flu protection. M-001 is designed to activate both humoral and cellular reactions of the immune system. We therefore believe that M-001, if approved for commercial sale, will be more effective and provide longer-lasting protection than currently commercially available vaccines that stimulate only one type of immune response (either humoral or cellular).

         Continuous sales cycle not affected by seasonality. Because M-001 is designed to provide a multi-strain flu protection that is long lasting and is not expected to require updates for future virus strains or mutations, we do not expect future sales of M-001 as a universal standalone vaccine or as a pandemic primer to be affected by the influenza seasons. Unlike traditional influenza vaccines, which are sold and administered in western countries primarily during the period from September through

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November, we believe that M-001 for these indications can be sold and administered or sold and stored throughout the entire year. However, we expect that most sales of M-001 as a universal seasonal primer for elderly intended to be administered in combination with the existing seasonal vaccine will be conducted during the influenza season.

         Shorter production times. We believe that the production time for M-001 will be only 6 to 8 weeks, as opposed to the 16 to 24 weeks (on average) required to produce seasonal influenza vaccines. We expect that shorter production times will give manufacturers greater flexibility in their production planning, as well as the ability to execute large orders of vaccine doses in a short timeframe in response to pandemics.

         Absence of allergy inducing egg proteins. Most influenza vaccines are produced in hen eggs and may therefore cause an allergic reaction to those allergic to certain egg proteins. An epidemiological study performed by the European Food Safety Authority, or EFSA, in 2011 found that eggs are some of the most common allergens in the population. In contrast, M-001 is not produced using eggs and does not cause egg protein allergies.

We also believe the following key strengths provide us with competitive advantages relative to other companies seeking to develop novel treatments for the prevention of influenza:

         M-001 is currently in advanced clinical stage (Phase 2) for all three indications. We have completed two Phase 1/2 clinical trials and three Phase 2 clinical trials in Israel pursuant to clinical trial protocols approved by the Israeli Ministry of Health, and we are currently conducting additional Phase 2 clinical trial Europe. Our Phase 1/2 and Phase 2 clinical trial results indicated that M-001 was well tolerated and safe across all treatment groups within the trial population and was effective in causing an immune reaction in clinical trial participants administered with M-001. In June 2015, the FDA accepted our newly submitted IND application, and we were informed by our regulatory advisors that the “study may proceed”.

         Extensive knowledge and expertise in the use of peptide-based vaccines. We have extensive experience researching and developing peptide-based compounds, including M-001. Our product candidate is based on years of research, including the research headed by Professor Arnon at the Weizmann Institute during the 10 years prior to our inception. Over the course of that 10 year period the scientific concept of a peptide-based influenza vaccine was established and confirmed in numerous preclinical and clinical trials for various influenza virus strains. We believe that this knowledge and expertise gives us a competitive advantage over other universal influenza vaccine developers with less significant experience and knowledge of these fields of study.

         In-house cGMP production capacity for Phase 2 clinical trials. Our facility consists of our offices and laboratories, in addition to a warehouse for equipment and chemicals. Our laboratory facilities include an analytical lab, production rooms and a virology laboratory approved by the Ministry of Labor in Israel. Our facility was audited and approved for production according to Good Manufacturing Practice standards, or cGMP, by a European qualified person, and has the capacity to produce sufficient volumes of M-001 for use in our current and planned Phase 2 clinical trials.

Our Business Strategy

Our strategy is to complete development of, and, thereafter, manufacture and commercialize M-001 for use as a global influenza prevention therapy. Key elements of our current strategy include the following:

         Receive all required regulatory approvals for the commercialization of M-001 as a preventative therapy for influenza. We are conducting an additional Phase 2 clinical trial in Europe and plan to participate in a Phase 2 clinical trial in collaboration with the NIAID prior to conducting Phase 3 clinical trials in the U.S., (either with one or more future collaborators, or, subject to available funding, on our own), to test the efficacy of M-001 on thousands of participants for the following three indications: (i) the Universal Standalone Indication; (ii) the Universal Seasonal Primer for Elderly Indication; and (iii) the Universal Pandemic Primer Indication.

         Seek attractive partnership opportunities. We believe that the proprietary rights provided by M-001, together with the clinical and compliance benefits, will create attractive partnership opportunities for large pharmaceutical companies or health authorities in different countries around the world. We intend

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to seek to build a portfolio of commercially attractive partnerships consisting of co-developments and licenses, which will allow us to perform advanced trials (including Phase 3 clinical trials) and, following applicable regulatory approval, which we provide no assurance we will receive, to globally commercialize M-001 for all three planned indications.

         Further develop our production line. Our production facility has been Phase 1 and 2 clinical trial audited and approved for production according to cGMP. In October 2015 we entered into a Development and Manufacturing Agreement with Cytovance Biologics Inc. for the production of clinical batches of M-001. The initial clinical batches are expected to be manufactured by the end of 2016, and are intended to be used by us for our planned phase 3 clinical trials and commercialization.

Risk Factors

Our business is subject to numerous risks, as more fully described in the section titled “Risk Factors” immediately following this prospectus summary. You should read and carefully consider these risks and all of the other information in this prospectus, including the financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus, before deciding whether to invest in the securities. In particular, such risks include, but are not limited to, the following:

         We are a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company with a history of operating losses, are not currently profitable, do not expect to become profitable in the near future and may never become profitable.

         We have not yet commercialized any products or technologies, and we may never do so.

         We may never receive FDA regulatory approval for the conduct of phase 3 clinical trials in the U.S.

         Our product candidate is subject to extensive regulation and may never obtain regulatory approval.

         Our product candidate and future product candidates will remain subject to ongoing regulatory requirements even if they receive marketing approval, and if we fail to comply with these requirements, we may not obtain such approvals or could lose those approvals that have been obtained, and the sales of any approved commercial products could be suspended.

         If we, or the parties from whom we license intellectual property, fail to adequately protect, enforce or secure rights to the patents which we own or that were licensed to us or any patents we may own in the future, the value of our intellectual property rights would diminish and our business and competitive position would suffer.

         We face significant competition. If we cannot successfully compete with new or existing products, M-001 or any other product candidate that we develop may be rendered non-competitive or obsolete.

         We are subject to extensive and costly government regulations relating to our business, we may be subject to fines and other penalties that could harm our business.

         Our U.S. shareholders may suffer adverse tax consequences if we are characterized as a passive foreign investment company, or PFIC, for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

Implications of Being an Emerging Growth Company

We qualify as an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the JOBS Act. For as long as we are deemed an emerging growth company, we are permitted to and intend to take advantage of specified reduced reporting and other regulatory requirements that are generally unavailable to other public companies, including:

         an exemption from the auditor attestation requirement in the assessment of our internal controls over financial reporting required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or the Sarbanes-Oxley Act; and

         an exemption from compliance with any new requirements adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, or the PCAOB, requiring mandatory audit firm rotation or a supplement to the auditor’s report in which the auditor would be required to provide additional information about our audit and our financial statements.

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We may take advantage of these provisions until the last day of our fiscal year following the fifth anniversary of the date of the first sale of our common equity securities pursuant to an effective registration statement under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act, which such fifth anniversary will occur in May 2020. However, if certain events occur prior to the end of such five year period, including if we become a “large accelerated filer,” our annual gross revenues exceed $1.0 billion or we issue more than $1.0 billion of non-convertible debt in any three-year period, we will cease to be an emerging growth company prior to the end of such five-year period.

In addition, Section 107 of the JOBS Act also provides that an “emerging growth company” can take advantage of the extended transition period provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act for complying with new or revised accounting standards. In other words, an “emerging growth company” can delay the adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. However, we are choosing to “opt out” of such extended transition period, and as a result, we will comply with new or revised accounting standards on the relevant dates on which adoption of such standards is required for non-emerging growth companies. Section 107 of the JOBS Act provides that our decision to opt out of the extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards is irrevocable.

Implications of being a Foreign Private Issuer

We are subject to the information reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, or the Exchange Act, that are applicable to “foreign private issuers,” and under those requirements we have filed and continue to file reports with the SEC. As a foreign private issuer, we are not subject to the same requirements that are imposed upon U.S. domestic issuers by the SEC. Under the Exchange Act, we are subject to reporting obligations that, in certain respects, are less detailed and less frequent than those of U.S. domestic reporting companies. For example, although we have reported and intend to report our financial results on a quarterly basis, we are not required to issue quarterly reports, proxy statements that comply with the requirements applicable to U.S. domestic reporting companies, or individual executive compensation information that is as detailed as that required of U.S. domestic reporting companies. We also have four months after the end of each fiscal year to file our annual reports with the SEC and we are not required to file current reports as frequently or promptly as U.S. domestic reporting companies. We may also present financial statements pursuant to IFRS instead of pursuant to U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, or U.S. GAAP. Furthermore, although the members of our management and supervisory boards are required to notify the Israeli Securities Authority of certain transactions they may undertake, including with respect to our ordinary shares, our officers, directors and principal shareholders will be exempt from the requirements to report transactions in our equity securities and from the short-swing profit liability provisions contained in Section 16 of the Exchange Act. As a foreign private issuer, we are not subject to the requirements of Regulation FD (Fair Disclosure) promulgated under the Exchange Act. These exemptions and leniencies will reduce the frequency and scope of information and protections available to you in comparison to those applicable to a U.S. domestic reporting companies. We intend to take advantage of the exemptions available to us as a foreign private issuer during and after the period we qualify as an emerging growth company.

Our Corporate Information

We were incorporated in Israel in 2003 as a privately held company. In February 2007, we completed an initial public offering of our ordinary shares on the TASE. In May 2015, we completed an initial public offering of our ADSs and ADS Warrants on the Nasdaq Capital Market.

Our principal executive offices are located at 14 Einstein Street, Nes Ziona, Israel, 74036, and our telephone number is (+972) (8) 930-2529. Our website is www.biondvax.com. Information contained on, or accessible through, our website is not incorporated by reference herein and shall not be considered part of this prospectus. Our agent for service of process in the United States is Puglisi & Associates, whose address is 850 Library Avenue, Suite 204, Newark, Delaware, and whose telephone number is (302) 738-6680.

Recent Developments

Initial Public Offering on the Nasdaq Capital Market

On May 15, 2015, we consummated an initial public offering of 1,910,000 ADSs, each ADS representing 40 of our ordinary shares, and warrants to purchase up to an aggregate of 1,910,000 ADSs at an offering price of $5.00 per ADS and $0.01 per warrant. The ADS warrants have a per ADS exercise price of $6.25, are exercisable immediately

7

and are scheduled to expire on May 15, 2020. We granted the underwriters in the initial public offering 95,500 warrants, exercisable from May 11, 2016 and until May 11, 2020, to purchase up to an aggregate of 95,500 ADSs at a per ADS exercise price of $6.25. We also granted the underwriter an option, exercisable within 45 days from the initial public offering, to purchase up to an aggregate of 286,500 additional ADSs and/or additional warrants to purchase up to an aggregate amount of 286,500 ADSs solely to cover over-allotments, if any. The underwriter has partially exercised his option to purchase an additional 110,000 ADSs and 128,000 ADS Warrants. Gross proceeds from our initial public offering were approximately $10.12 million. The total expenses of the offering, including underwriting discounts and commission, were approximately $1.58 million. The net proceeds we received from the initial public offering were approximately $8.54 million.

FDA acceptance

In June 2015, the FDA accepted our newly submitted IND application, and we were informed by our regulatory advisors that the “study may proceed”. We have submitted this IND in order to comply with the requirements of BARDA, for a grant application we had previously submitted to BARDA. Following such IND acceptance, we intend to participate in a Phase 2 clinical trial to be held in the U.S. by the NIAID. The purpose of the planned clinical trial is to assess the ability of M-001 in humans to serve as a pandemic primer to the H7N9 avian pandemic vaccine, and we expect NIAID will launch this clinical trial during 2016.

Preliminary Results from BVX-006

In June 2015 we received preliminary results from our Phase 2 clinical trial in Israel, which we refer to as BVX-006, indicating M-001 was safe, well tolerated and induced humoral immune responses, successfully meeting the primary safety and secondary immunogenicity endpoints.

Change in the Composition of the Board of Directors

On May 20, 2015, Rami Epstein, a member of our board of directors, as well as the audit and compensation committees retired from all positions on the board of directors and the committees. Mr. Epstein’s departure was occasioned by the newly adopted interpretation of the Israel Securities Authority, or ISA, of Israeli law received by the Company on May 17, 2015, whereby, an “unaffiliated director” (as such term is used in the Israeli Companies Law), as Mr. Epstein, may not serve as a director for a term extending beyond nine years. Accordingly, Mr. Epstein’s term as a director is scheduled to expire in May 2015, as he has served as an “unaffiliated director” on the Company’s board of directors since May 2006. In order to fill the vacancy resulting from Mr. Epstein’s departure, on May 20, 2015, Michal Marom Brikman was appointed as a member of our board of directors, the audit committee and compensation committee. See — “Management — Executive Officers and Directors”.

On October 22, 2015, Professor Moshe Many, a member of our board of directors, passed away at the age of 87.

Agreement with CMO

In October 2015, we entered into a Development and Manufacturing Agreement for the production of clinical batches of M-001, with Cytovance Biologics Inc., a CMO based in Oklahoma, USA. Under the terms of the Agreement, Cytovance Biologics will scale up and optimize our in-house small-scale cGMP manufacturing process of M-001. The technology transfer will start immediately, with the initial clinical batches expected to be manufactured by the end of 2016. The clinical grade M-001 batch is intended to be used for Phase 3 clinical trial, planned for the 2017/18 timeframe, which is a critical step towards commercialization of M-001 in the US, Europe and the rest of the world. To date, we paid a sum of $398,000 to Cytovance, out of an expected total budget of $2,049,970.

8

THE OFFERING

Issuer

 

BiondVax Pharmaceutical Ltd.

 

 

 

Securities offered

 

2,133,500 ADSs, each representing 40 of our ordinary shares (i) 2,038,000 of which are issuable upon the exercise of ADSs warrants issued to public investors in our initial public offering and (ii) 95,500 of which are issuable upon the exercise of a warrant issued to the representative of the underwriters, in each case connection with our initial public offering pursuant to a prospectus dated May 13, 2015.

 

 

 

Ordinary shares outstanding immediately prior to the offering

 


135,097,367 ordinary shares

 

 

 

Ordinary shares to be outstanding after the offering

 


216,617,367 ordinary shares, assuming the exercise of all the ADS warrants; 138,917,367 ordinary shares, assuming the exercise of all the representative’s warrants; and 220,437,367 ordinary shares, assuming the exercise of all ADS warrants and representative’s warrants.

 

 

 

Depositary

 

The Bank of New York Mellon, Depositary

 

 

 

The ADSs

 

Each ADS represents 40 ordinary shares.

 

 

The depositary will hold the ordinary shares underlying the ADSs. You will have rights as provided in the deposit agreement.

 

 

To better understand the terms of the ADSs and warrants, you should carefully read the “Description of Securities” section of this prospectus. You should also read the deposit agreement and warrant agent agreement, which are filed as exhibits to the registration statement that includes this prospectus.

 

 

 

Description of Warrants

 

Each full warrant issued to the public investor entitles the holder to purchase one ADS at a per ADS purchase price of $6.25 at any time through the fifth anniversary of the date of issuance. Each full warrant issued to the representative of the underwriter entitled the holder to purchase one ADS at a per ADS purchase price of $6.25 commencing on the first anniversary of issuance and continuing through the fifth anniversary thereof. In each case, in the event that a registration statement covering ADSs underlying the warrants is not effective, and an exemption from registration is not available for the resale of such ordinary shares underlying the warrants, the holder may, in its sole discretion, exercise warrants and, in lieu, of making the cash payment otherwise contemplated to be made to us upon such exercise in payment of the aggregate exercise price, elect instead to receive upon such exercise the net number of ordinary shares determined according to the formula set forth in the warrant agreement. The issuance fee of $0.05 per ADS, as well as other applicable charges and taxes, are due and payable upon any cashless exercise.

 

 

 

Use of proceeds

 

Assuming the exercise of all of the ADS warrants for cash held by the public investors, we will receive gross proceeds of $12.74 million. Assuming the exercise of all representative’s warrants for cash, we will receive gross proceeds of $0.59 million.

 

 

 

 

 

We intend to use the net proceeds from this offering for working capital, operating expenses and other general corporate purposes. See “Use of Proceeds” beginning on page 47.

 

 

 

Risk Factors

 

You should read the “Risk Factors” section starting on page 14 of this prospectus for a discussion of factors to consider before deciding to invest in our securities.

9

The number of ordinary shares that will be outstanding immediately after this offering is based on 135,097,367 ordinary shares outstanding as of September 30, 2015, based on the exchange rate reported by the Bank of Israel on September 30, 2015, which is 3.923=$1.00. This number excludes, as of such date:

         ordinary shares issuable upon the exercise of 11,789,503 options at a weighted average exercise price of NIS 0.75 (or $0.19) per share;

         ordinary shares issuable upon the exercise of 5,650,000 options (series 3) outstanding at a weighted average exercise price of NIS 1.80 (or $0.46) per share;

         ordinary shares issuable upon the exercise of 5,685,000 options (series 4) outstanding at a weighted average exercise price of NIS 1.50 (or $0.38) per share;

         ordinary shares issuable upon the exercise of 6,302,000 options (series 5) outstanding at a weighted average exercise price of NIS 1.50 (or $0.38) per share;

         ordinary shares underlying the ADS warrants and representative’s warrants to be issued in this offering, at an exercise price per ADS of $6.25.

Unless otherwise indicated, all information in this prospectus assumes or gives effect to no exercise of outstanding options or options described above, the warrants to be issued in this offering and the representative’s ADS warrants.

10

SUMMARY FINANCIAL DATA

The following tables summarize our financial data. We have derived the summary statements of comprehensive loss data for the years ended 2012, 2013 and 2014 and the statement of financial position as of December 31, 2013 and 2014 from our audited financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus.

The summary financial statement data as of September 30, 2015, and for the nine months ended September 30, 2014 and 2015 are derived from our unaudited interim financial statements that are included elsewhere in this prospectus. In the opinion of management, these unaudited interim financial statements include all adjustments, consisting of normal recurring adjustments, necessary for a fair presentation of our financial position and operating results for these periods. Results from interim periods are not necessarily indicative of results that may be expected for the entire year. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected in the future.

Our consolidated financial statements included in this prospectus were prepared in accordance with IFRS, as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board.

The following summary financial data should be read in conjunction with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

 

2012

 

2013

 

2014

 

2014

 

 

NIS in thousands

 

Convenience translation into USD in thousands(2)

Statements of comprehensive loss data:(1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development expenses

 

8,616

 

 

6,723

 

 

6,441

 

 

1,656

 

Participation by the OCS

 

(1,839

)

 

(1,272

)

 

(949

)

 

(244

)

Research and development, net of participations expenses

 

6,777

 

 

5,451

 

 

5,492

 

 

1,412

 

Marketing, general and administrative expenses

 

2,357

 

 

2,190

 

 

2,650

 

 

682

 

Operating loss

 

9,134

 

 

7,641

 

 

8,142

 

 

2,094

 

Financial income

 

(321

)

 

(157

)

 

(394

)

 

(101

)

Financial expenses

 

518

 

 

552

 

 

16

 

 

4

 

Financial income (expenses), net

 

(197

)

 

(395

)

 

378

 

 

97

 

Net loss

 

9,331

 

 

8,036

 

 

7,764

 

 

1,997

 

Loss (gain) from available-for-sale financial assets

 

(11

)

 

(4

)

 

4

 

 

1

 

Total comprehensive loss

 

9,320

 

 

8,032

 

 

7,768

 

 

1,998

 

Basic and Diluted net loss per share (NIS)

 

0.22

 

 

0.17

 

 

0.14

 

 

0.03

 

Weighted average number of shares outstanding used to compute basic and diluted loss per share
(in thousands)

 

41,530

 

 

47,946

 

 

54,286

 

 

54,286

 

11

 

 

Nine months ended September 30,

 

 

2014

 

2015

 

2015

 

 

NIS in thousands

 

Convenience translation into USD in thousands(3)

Statements of comprehensive loss data:(1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development expenses

 

4,474

 

 

6,842

 

 

1,744

 

Participation by the OCS

 

 

 

(1,810

)

 

(461

)

Research and development, net of participations expenses

 

4,474

 

 

5,032

 

 

1,283

 

Marketing, general and administrative expenses

 

1,688

 

 

2,216

 

 

564

 

Operating loss

 

6,162

 

 

7,248

 

 

1,847

 

Financial income

 

(184

)

 

(651

)

 

(166

)

Financial expenses

 

12

 

 

20

 

 

5

 

Financial expenses due to issuance of warrants

 

 

 

315

 

 

80

 

Financial expenses (income), net

 

(172

)

 

(316

)

 

(81

)

Net loss

 

5,990

 

 

6,932

 

 

1,766

 

Loss (gain) from available-for-sale financial assets

 

3

 

 

5

 

 

2

 

Total comprehensive loss

 

5,993

 

 

6,937

 

 

1,768

 

Basic and Diluted net loss per share (NIS)

 

0.11

 

 

0.07

 

 

0.02

 

Weighted average number of shares outstanding used to compute basic and diluted loss per share (in thousands)

 

54,284

 

 

95,519

 

 

95,519

 

 

 

 

December 31,

 

 

2013

 

2014

 

2014

 

 

NIS in thousands

 

Convenience translation into USD in thousands(2)

Statement of financial position

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

17,863

 

9,612

 

2,472

Marketable securities – short term

 

2,013

 

2,016

 

518

Other receivables

 

489

 

1,081

 

278

Marketable securities – long term

 

2,045

 

2,049

 

527

Property, plant and equipment

 

3,285

 

2,638

 

678

Other long term assets

 

128

 

1,066

 

274

Total assets

 

25,823

 

18,462

 

4,747

Trade payables

 

392

 

524

 

135

Other payables

 

1,390

 

1,289

 

331

Severance pay liability, net

 

55

 

62

 

16

Total liabilities

 

1,837

 

1,875

 

482

Total shareholders’ equity

 

23,986

 

16,587

 

4,265

12

 

 

September 30,

 

 

2014

 

2015

 

2015

 

 

NIS in thousands

 

Convenience translation into USD in thousands(3)

Statement of financial position

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

12,411

 

36,294

 

9,252

Marketable securities – short term

 

2,014

 

2,016

 

514

Other receivables

 

266

 

2,172

 

553

Marketable securities – long term

 

2,047

 

2,047

 

522

Property, plant and equipment

 

2,793

 

2,191

 

559

Other long term assets

 

288

 

24

 

6

Total assets

 

19,819

 

44,744

 

11,406

Trade payables

 

299

 

571

 

146

Other payables

 

1,155

 

758

 

194

Options

 

 

6,863

 

1,749

Severance pay liability, net

 

61

 

67

 

17

Total liabilities

 

1,515

 

8,259

 

2,106

Total shareholders’ equity

 

18,304

 

36,485

 

9,300

____________

(1)      Diluted loss per share data is not presented because the effect of the exercise of our outstanding options is anti-dilutive.

(2)      Calculated using the exchange rate reported by the Bank of Israel for December 31, 2014, at the rate of one U.S. dollar per NIS 3.889.

(3)      Calculated using the exchange rate reported by the Bank of Israel for December 31, 2014 at the rate of one U.S. dollar per NIS 3.923.

We prepare our financial statements in NIS. This prospectus contains conversions of NIS amounts into U.S. dollars at specific rates solely for the convenience of the reader. Unless otherwise noted, for the purpose of the presentation of financial data for the period ending on September 30, 2015, all conversions from NIS to U.S. dollars and from U.S. dollars to NIS were made at a rate of 3.923 NIS to $1.00 U.S. dollar, the daily representative rate in effect as of September 30, 2015. No representation is made that the NIS amounts referred to in this prospectus could have been or could be converted into U.S. dollars at any particular rate or at all.

13

RISK FACTORS

An investment in our securities involves a high degree of risk. We operate in a dynamic industry that involves numerous risks and uncertainties. You should carefully consider the factors described below, together with all other information contained in this prospectus, including the audited and unaudited financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus, before deciding whether to invest in the securities. The following risks may adversely affect our business, financial condition, operating results and cash flows and cause the trading price of the securities to decline, and you could lose all or part of your investment.

Risks Related to Our Financial Position and Capital Requirements

We are a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company with a history of operating losses, are not currently profitable, do not expect to become profitable in the near future and may never become profitable.

We are a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company that was incorporated in 2003. Since our incorporation, we have primarily focused our efforts on research and development and clinical trials of our product candidate, M-001. M-001 is in clinical trials and has not yet been approved for commercial sale. We may not receive the necessary regulatory approvals to commercialize our product candidate. We are not profitable and have incurred losses since inception, principally as a result of research and development, clinical trials and general administrative expenses in support of our operations. We have not generated any revenue, expect to incur substantial losses for the foreseeable future and may never become profitable. For the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2014 and the nine months ended September 30, 2015, we had net losses of $2,048,000, $1,979,000 and $1,766,000, respectively, and we expect such losses to continue for the foreseeable future. In addition, as of September 30, 2015, we had an accumulated deficit of approximately $19,478,000 and we expect to experience negative cash flow for the foreseeable future. As a result, we will ultimately need to generate significant revenues in order to achieve and maintain profitability. We may not be able to generate these revenues or achieve profitability in the future. If M-001 fails in clinical trials or does not gain regulatory clearance or approval, or if M-001 does not achieve market acceptance, we may never become profitable. Our failure to achieve or maintain profitability, or substantial delays in achieving profitability, could negatively impact the value of the securities and our ability to raise additional financing. A substantial decline in the value of the securities would also affect the price at which we could sell them to secure future funding, which could dilute the ownership interest of current shareholders. Even if we achieve profitability in the future, we may not be able to sustain profitability in subsequent periods. Accordingly, it is difficult to evaluate our business prospects. Moreover, our prospects must be considered in light of the risks and uncertainties encountered by an early-stage company in highly regulated and competitive markets, such as the biopharmaceutical market, where regulatory approval and market acceptance of our products are uncertain. There can be no assurance that our efforts will ultimately be successful or result in revenues or profits.

We will require substantial additional financing to achieve our goals, and a failure to obtain this necessary capital when needed could force us to delay, limit, reduce or terminate our product development or commercialization efforts.

As of September 30, 2015, we had approximately $10,288,000 in cash, marketable securities and cash equivalents, a working capital of $9,979,000 and an accumulated deficit of $19,478,000. As of September 30, 2015, we had sufficient cash and cash commitments to fund operations for at least 15 months if we do not raise additional capital. Since our inception, most of our resources have been dedicated to the development of M-001. In particular, we have expended and believe that we will continue to expend significant operating and capital expenditures for the foreseeable future developing M-001 and any future product candidate. These expenditures will include, but are not limited to, costs associated with research and development, manufacturing, conducting preclinical experiments and clinical trials, contracting CMOs, hiring additional management and other personnel and obtaining regulatory approvals, as well as commercializing any products approved for sale. Furthermore, we incur additional costs associated with operating as a public company in the United States. Because the outcome of our planned and anticipated clinical trials is highly uncertain, we cannot reasonably estimate the actual amounts necessary to successfully complete the development and commercialization of our product candidates. On September 30, 2015, we entered into an agreement with a CMO, for the manufacturing of M-001 large scale batches. Our forecasted budget for this agreement is $2,049,970. As of December 31, 2015, we have paid a sum of $398,000 to the CMO. We may incur additional unexpected costs circulating our engagements with the CMO.

14

As a result of these and other factors currently unknown to us, we will require additional funds, through public or private equity or debt financings or other sources, such as strategic partnerships and alliances and licensing arrangements. In addition, we may seek additional capital due to favorable market conditions or strategic considerations even if we believe we have sufficient funds for our current or future operating plans. A failure to fund these activities may harm our growth strategy, competitive position, quality compliance and financial condition.

Our future capital requirements depend on many factors, including:

         the number and characteristics of the product candidates we pursue;

         the scope, progress, results and costs of researching and developing M-001 and any future product candidate, and conducting preclinical and clinical trials;

         the timing of, and the costs involved in, obtaining regulatory approvals for M-001 and any future product candidate;

         the cost of commercialization activities if any of M-001 and any future product candidate are approved for sale, including marketing, sales and distribution costs;

         the cost of manufacturing of M-001 and any future product candidate and any products we successfully commercialize;

         our ability to establish and maintain strategic partnerships, licensing or other arrangements and the financial terms of such agreements;

         the costs involved in preparing, filing, prosecuting, maintaining, defending and enforcing patent claims, including litigation costs and the outcome of such litigation;

         the timing, receipt and amount of sales of, or royalties on, any future products;

         the expenses needed to attract and retain skilled personnel; and

         any product liability or other lawsuits related to any future products.

Additional funds may not be available when we need them, on terms that are acceptable to us, or at all. If adequate funds are not available to us on a timely basis, we may be required to delay, limit, reduce or terminate preclinical studies, clinical trials or other research and development activities for M-001 or any future product candidate or delay, limit, reduce or terminate our establishment of sales and marketing capabilities or other activities that may be necessary to commercialize M-001 or any future product candidate.

Raising additional capital may cause dilution to our existing shareholders, restrict our operations or require us to relinquish rights to our technologies or product candidates.

We may seek additional capital through a combination of private and public equity offerings, debt financings, strategic partnerships and alliances and licensing arrangements. To the extent that we raise additional capital through the sale of equity or convertible debt securities, the ownership interests of existing shareholders will be diluted, and the terms may include liquidation or other preferences that adversely affect shareholder rights. Debt financing, if available, may involve agreements that include covenants limiting or restricting our ability to take certain actions, such as incurring debt, making capital expenditures or declaring dividends. If we raise additional funds through strategic partnerships and alliances and licensing arrangements with third parties, we may have to relinquish valuable rights to our technologies or any product candidate, or grant licenses on terms that are not favorable to us. If we are unable to raise additional funds through equity or debt financing when needed, we may be required to delay, limit, reduce or terminate our product development or commercialization efforts or grant rights to develop and market product candidates that we would otherwise prefer to develop and market ourselves.

15

Risks Related to Development, Clinical Testing and Regulatory Approval of M-001 and Any Future Product Candidate

We have not yet commercialized any products, and we may never become profitable.

We currently have one product candidate, M-001, in Phase 2 clinical development and no products on the market or close to entering the market. We do not know when or if we will complete our product development efforts, obtain regulatory approval for M-001 or successfully commercialize M-001. Even if we are successful in developing M-001 or any product candidate that we may develop in the future (if any), we will not be successful unless such product gains market acceptance for appropriate indications at favorable reimbursement rates. The degree of market acceptance of these products will depend on a number of factors, including, but not limited to:

         the timing of regulatory approvals in the U.S. and other countries, and for the uses, we intend to pursue with respect to the commercialization of M-001 or any future product candidate;

         the competitive environment;

         the establishment and demonstration in, and acceptance by, the medical community of the safety and clinical efficacy of our product candidate and its potential advantages over other competitive products;

         our ability to enter into supply agreements with health organizations and governments around the world for the supply of our product candidate or our ability to enter into strategic agreements with pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies with strong marketing and sales capabilities;

         the establishment of external, and potentially, internal, sales and marketing capabilities to effectively market and sell M-001 or any future product candidate in the United States, Israel, Europe and other countries;

         the adequacy and success of our distribution, sales and marketing efforts; and

         the pricing and reimbursement policies of government and third-party payors, such as insurance companies, health maintenance organizations and other plan administrators.

Physicians, patients, third-party payors or the medical community in general may be unwilling to accept, utilize or recommend, and in the case of third-party payors, cover payment for M-001 or any future product candidate. As a result, we are unable to predict the extent of our future losses or the time required for us to achieve profitability, if at all. Even if we successfully develop one or more products, we may not become profitable.

We may not develop additional product candidates other than M-001.

M-001 is our only product candidate in development. Other than M-001, we may not develop additional product candidates based on our research and know-how and we may never attempt to develop other peptide-based products. As a result, our business and future success depends on our ability to obtain regulatory approval of and then successfully commercialize M-001.

We may never receive FDA regulatory approval for the performance of phase 3 clinical trial in the U.S.

In June 2015, the FDA has accepted our newly submitted IND application, and we were informed by our regulatory advisors that the “study may proceed”. We currently intend, following the receipt of all required regulatory approvals, to conduct Phase 3 clinical trials in the U.S, either with one or more future collaborators, or, subject to available funds, on our own, in support of FDA approval to market M-001 in the U.S. Although we believe that the previous approved preclinical and clinical trials we performed will serve as an adequate basis for future FDA regulated clinical trials in the U.S., we may not receive FDA approval to conduct Phase 3 clinical trials in the U.S. Failure to receive FDA approval for the conduct of Phase 3 clinical trials in the U.S will materially reduce our target market and the future profitability of M-001, may have a material adverse effect on our business and could potentially cause us to cease operations. It is also possible that we may decide or that the FDA may require that we conduct further clinical trials, provide additional data and information, and meet additional standards for receipt of approval. If this were to occur, the time and financial resources required for obtaining FDA approval for Phase 3 clinical trials, and complications and risks associated therewith, would likely substantially increase. Moreover, while

16

receipt of clinical trial approval by the FDA does not ensure the receipt of clinical trial approval in other countries, failure or delay in obtaining clinical trial approval by the FDA may have a negative effect on the regulatory process in other countries. Any failure or any delay or setback in obtaining clinical trial approval in the U.S. or in other countries would impair our ability to develop M-001.

If we receive approval to conduct Phase 3 clinical trials in Israel (but not the U.S.), we may nevertheless determine to abandon our development efforts with respect to M-001, as the small market size in Israel as compared to the larger U.S. market, would represent a significantly decreased market opportunity that we may determine does not justify our incurrence of the material expenses related to the development and commercialization of M-001 in Israel only.

We may not obtain the necessary materials for the performance of additional clinical trials in the U.S. or other countries around the world.

Some of our clinical trials involve obtaining materials and information that may not currently be in our possession and that we rely on suppliers and manufactures to provide. Specifically, we were not able to satisfy the FDA’s request for information regarding the H5N1 vaccine (including information as to manufacturing, dosage, formulation, etc.) required for our contemplated Phase 2 clinical trial in the U.S., and as a result we elected to convert our IND application submitted in June 2013 into a Drug Master File. Our BVX-007 Phase 2 clinical trial includes the administration of the H5N1 vaccine following the administration of M-001 to our clinical trial participants. We entered into an agreement with a supplier for such vaccine approved by the relevant regulatory authority for the purpose of performing BVX-007. We believe that pursuant to this agreement we will be able to obtain sufficient quantities of the H5N1 vaccine (if any) on acceptable terms or at all. If we are unable to obtain sufficient quantities of the vaccine we may not be able to complete our BVX-007 clinical trial, and may not receive grant funds awarded to us as a member of the UNISEC Consortium for the purpose of financing a trial with respect to M-001 as a potential primer to H5N1. While we do not believe that the successful completion of BVX-0007 will be a predicate to the necessary regulatory approval support of Phase 3 clinical trials, it is possible that the FDA will require us to complete clinical trials administering M-001 as a primer to H5N1 before approving any proposed Phase 3 clinical trials to test the safety and efficacy of M-001 for such indication.

M-001 is subject to extensive regulation and may never obtain regulatory approval.

M-001 must satisfy rigorous standards of safety and efficacy before it can be approved for commercial use by the FDA or foreign regulatory authorities for all or any of the three indications for which it has undergone or is planned to undergo testing. The FDA and foreign regulatory authorities have full discretion over this approval process. We will need to conduct significant additional research, including testing in animals and in humans, before we can file applications for product approval. Typically, in the pharmaceutical industry, there is a high rate of attrition for product candidates in preclinical testing and clinical trials. Satisfying FDA and foreign regulatory requirements typically takes many years, is dependent upon the type, complexity and novelty of the product and requires the expenditure of substantial resources. Success in preclinical testing and early clinical trials does not ensure that later clinical trials will be successful. For example, a number of companies in the pharmaceutical industry have suffered significant setbacks in advanced clinical trials, even after promising results in earlier trials. In addition, delays or rejections may be encountered based upon additional government regulation, including any changes in legislation or FDA or foreign regulatory policy, during the process of product development, clinical trials and regulatory reviews. Failure to obtain FDA or foreign regulatory approval of M-001 in a timely manner or at all will severely undermine our business by delaying or halting commercialization of our products, imposing costly procedures, diminishing competitive advantages and reducing the number of saleable products and, therefore, corresponding product revenues.

M-001 and any product candidate we may develop in the future will remain subject to ongoing regulatory requirements even if we receive regulatory approval to market such product, and if we fail to comply with such requirements, we may not obtain such approvals or could lose those approvals that have been obtained, and the sales of any approved commercial products could be suspended.

Even if we receive regulatory approval to market M-001 and/or other product candidates, any such product will remain subject to extensive regulatory requirements, including requirements relating to manufacturing, labeling, packaging, adverse event reporting, storage, advertising, promotion, distribution and record keeping. Even if

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regulatory approval of a product is granted, the approval may be subject to limitations on the uses for which the product may be marketed or the conditions of approval, or may contain requirements for costly post-marketing testing and surveillance to monitor the safety or efficacy of the product, which could negatively impact us or our collaboration partners by reducing revenues or increasing expenses, and cause the approved product candidate not to be commercially viable. In addition, as clinical experience with a drug expands after approval, typically because it is used by a greater number and more diverse group of patients after approval than during clinical trials, side effects and other problems may be observed over time after approval that were not seen or anticipated during pre-approval clinical trials or other studies. Any adverse effects observed after the approval and marketing of a product candidate could result in limitations on the use of, withdrawal of FDA or foreign regulatory approval or withdrawal of any approved products from the marketplace. Absence of long-term safety data may also limit the approved uses of our products, if any. If we fail to comply with the regulatory requirements of the FDA and other applicable U.S. and foreign regulatory authorities, or previously unknown problems with any approved commercial products, manufacturers or manufacturing processes are discovered, we could be subject to administrative or judicially imposed sanctions or other setbacks, including, without limitation, the following:

         suspension or imposition of restrictions on the products, manufacturers or manufacturing processes, including costly new manufacturing requirements;

         warning letters;

         civil or criminal penalties, fines and/or injunctions;

         product seizures or detentions;

         import or export bans or restrictions;

         voluntary or mandatory product recalls and related publicity requirements;

         suspension or withdrawal of regulatory approvals;

         total or partial suspension of production; and

         refusal to approve pending applications for marketing approval of new products or supplements to approved applications.

If we or our collaborators are slow to adapt, or are unable to adapt, to changes in existing regulatory requirements or adoption of new regulatory requirements or policies, marketing approval for our product candidates may be lost or cease to be achievable, resulting in decreased revenue from milestones, product sales or royalties, which would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

If clinical trials for M-001 are prolonged or delayed, we would be unable to commercialize our M-001 on a timely basis, which would require us to incur additional costs and delay our receipt of any revenues from potential M-001 sales.

We cannot predict whether we will encounter problems with any of our completed, ongoing or planned clinical trials that will cause us or any regulatory authority to delay or suspend those clinical trials or delay the analysis of data derived from them. A number of events, including any of the following, could delay the completion of our ongoing and planned clinical trials and negatively impact our ability to obtain regulatory approval for, and to market and sell, a particular product candidate:

         conditions imposed on us by the FDA or any applicable foreign regulatory authority regarding the scope or design of our clinical trials;

         delays in recruiting and enrolling patients or volunteers into clinical trials;

         delays in obtaining, or our inability to obtain, required approvals from institutional review boards or other reviewing entities at clinical sites selected for participation in our clinical trials;

         insufficient supply or deficient quality of our product candidates or other materials necessary to conduct our clinical trials;

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         lower than anticipated retention rate of subjects and patients in clinical trials;

         negative or inconclusive results from clinical trials, or results that are inconsistent with earlier results, that necessitate additional clinical study;

         serious and unexpected drug-related side effects experienced by subjects and patients in clinical trials; or

         failure of our third-party contractors to comply with regulatory requirements or otherwise meet their contractual obligations to us in a timely manner.

Clinical trials require sufficient patient enrollment, which is a function of many factors, including the size of the patient population, the nature of the trial protocol, the proximity of patients to clinical sites, the availability of effective treatments for the relevant disease and the eligibility criteria for the clinical trial. Delays in patient enrollment can result in increased costs and longer development times. The failure to enroll patients in a clinical trial could delay the completion of the clinical trial beyond our current expectations. In addition, the FDA or foreign applicable regulatory authorities could require us to conduct clinical trials with a larger number of subjects than we have projected for any of our product candidates. We may not be able to enroll a sufficient number of patients in a timely or cost-effective manner. Furthermore, enrolled patients may drop out of clinical trials, which could impair the validity or statistical significance of those clinical trials.

Prior to commencing clinical trials in the United States, we must submit an IND application to the FDA and the IND application must become effective. In June 2015, the FDA accepted our IND and we were informed by our regulatory advisors that “the study may proceed”. Until this FDA acceptance, we conducted our completed Phase 1 and Phase 2 clinical trials for M-001 outside the United States (in Israel) and we are currently conducting BVX-007 clinical trial in Europe. We intend to participate in a Phase 2 clinical trial to be held in the U.S. by NIAID. The purpose of the planned clinical trial is to assess the ability of M-001 in human subjects to serve as a pandemic primer to the H7N9 avian pandemic vaccine, and we expect NIAID will launch this clinical trial during 2016.

We do not know whether our additional clinical trials will begin as planned, will need to be restructured or will be completed on schedule, if at all. Delays in our clinical trials will result in increased development costs for M-001. In addition, if our clinical trials are delayed, our competitors may be able to bring products to market before we do and the commercial viability of M-001 or any other future candidates could be limited.

Clinical trials are very expensive, time-consuming and difficult to design and implement, and, as a result, we may suffer delays or suspensions in future trials which would have a material adverse effect on our ability to generate revenues.

Human clinical trials are very expensive and difficult to design and implement, in part because they are subject to rigorous regulatory requirements. Regulatory authorities, such as the FDA, may preclude clinical trials from proceeding. Additionally, the clinical trial process is time-consuming, failure can occur at any stage of the trials and we may encounter problems that cause us to abandon or repeat clinical trials. The commencement and completion of clinical trials may be delayed by several factors, including:

         unforeseen safety issues;

         determination of proper dosing;

         lack of effectiveness or efficacy during clinical trials;

         failure of our contract manufacturers or inability of our in-house facility to manufacture our product candidates in accordance with cGMP;

         failure of third party suppliers to perform final manufacturing steps for the drug substance;

         slower than expected rates of patient recruitment and enrollment;

         lack of healthy volunteers and patients to conduct trials;

         inability to monitor patients adequately during or after treatment;

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         failure of third party contract research organizations to properly implement or monitor the clinical trial protocols;

         failure of the FDA, institutional review boards, or IRBs, or other regulatory bodies to approve our clinical trial protocols;

         inability or unwillingness of medical investigators and IRBs to follow our clinical trial protocols; and

         lack of sufficient funding to finance the clinical trials.

In addition, we or regulatory authorities may suspend our clinical trials at any time if it appears that we are exposing participants to unacceptable health risks or if the regulatory authorities find deficiencies in our regulatory submissions or the conduct of these trials. Any suspension of clinical trials will delay possible regulatory approval, if any, and adversely impact our ability to develop products and generate revenue.

We have only conducted Phase 1 and Phase 2 clinical trials. We have never conducted a Phase 3 clinical trial, and may be unable to do so for M-001 or any other future product candidates we may develop.

We have never conducted a Phase 3 clinical trial. In 2013 we submitted an IND application to the FDA for a contemplated Phase 2 clinical trial intended to be conducted in the U.S., to test the safety and efficacy of M-001 as a primer for the H5N1 Avian flu pandemic vaccine. Due to difficulties in obtaining the requisite H5N1 avian flu vaccine (which is not publicly available) required for the performance of the clinical trial, we were not able to satisfy the FDA’s requests for information concerning the H5N1 vaccine to be used in such trial (e.g., information as to the manufacturer, dosage, formulation, etc.). Without such information, we could not complete our IND application and the FDA placed a clinical hold on the trial. As a result of these events, we elected to convert our IND application into a Drug Master File. However, in June 2015 were received FDA approval for our newly submitted IND for a phase 2 clinical trial, and we were informed by our regulatory advisors that the “study may proceed”.

The submission of a successful IND application and, subject to receipt of required approvals, the conduct of later-stage clinical trials, are complicated processes. As an organization, we have conducted only Phase 1 and Phase 2 clinical trials in Israel in accordance with Israeli Public Health Regulations (Clinical Trials in Human Subjects), as amended from time to time, and other applicable Israeli legislation, and we are currently conducting a phase 2 clinical trial in Europe. However, we have not conducted a Phase 3 clinical trial or any FDA approved clinical trials before. We also have had limited interactions with the FDA and have not discussed our proposed future Phase 3 clinical trial designs or implementation with the FDA. Consequently, we may be unable to successfully and efficiently execute and complete our planned Phase 2 clinical trials in a way that leads to the approval of Phase 3 clinical trials for M-001. We may require more time and incur greater costs than our competitors and may not succeed in obtaining regulatory approvals of M-001. Failure to commence or complete, or delays in, our planned clinical trials, would prevent us from or delay us in developing and commercializing M-001 or any other product candidate we are developing.

We may be forced to abandon development of M-001 altogether, which will significantly impair our ability to generate product revenues.

Upon the completion of any clinical trial, the results of such trial might not support the claims sought by us. Further, success in preclinical testing and early clinical trials does not ensure that later clinical trials will be successful, and the results of later clinical trials may not replicate the results of prior clinical trials and preclinical testing. The clinical trial process may fail to demonstrate that M-001 is safe for humans and effective for indicated uses. Any such failure may cause us to abandon M-001 and may delay development of other product candidates. Any delay in, or termination or suspension of, our clinical trials will delay the requisite filings with the relevant foreign regulatory authorities and, ultimately, our ability to commercialize M-001 and generate product revenues. If the clinical trials do not support our drug product claims, the completion of development of M-001 may be significantly delayed or abandoned, which would materially adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations.

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Positive results in the previous clinical trials of M-001 may not be replicated in future clinical trials of such product candidate, which could result in development delays or a failure to obtain marketing approval.

Positive results in the previous clinical trials of M-001 may not be predictive of similar results in future clinical trials for such product candidate. Also, interim results during a clinical trial do not necessarily predict final results. A number of companies in the pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical industries have suffered significant setbacks in late-stage clinical trials even after achieving promising results in early-stage development. Accordingly, the results from the completed preclinical studies and clinical trials for M-001 may not be predictive of the results we may obtain in later stage trials. Our clinical trials may produce negative or inconclusive results, and we may decide, or regulators may require us, to conduct additional clinical trials. Moreover, clinical data are often susceptible to varying interpretations and analyses, and many companies that believed their product candidates performed satisfactorily in preclinical studies and clinical trials have nonetheless failed to obtain FDA or European Medicines Agency, or other applicable regulatory agency, approval for their products.

If we experience delays in the enrollment of participants in our clinical trials, our receipt of necessary regulatory approvals could be delayed or prevented.

We may not be able to initiate or continue clinical trials for M-001 or any future product candidate if we are unable to locate and enroll a sufficient number of eligible participants to participate in these trials as required by the FDA or other regulatory authorities. Participant enrollment, a significant factor in the timing of clinical trials, is affected by many factors including the size and nature of the population eligible to participate, the proximity of potential participants to clinical sites, the eligibility criteria for the trial, the design of the clinical trial, competing clinical trials and clinicians’ and participants’ perceptions as to the potential advantages of the drug being studied in relation to other available therapies, including any new drugs that may be approved for the indications we are investigating. If we fail to enroll and maintain the number of participants for which the clinical trial was designed, the statistical power of that clinical trial may be reduced, which would make it harder to demonstrate that the product candidate being tested in such clinical trial is safe and effective. Additionally, enrollment delays in our clinical trials may result in increased development costs for M-001 and any future product candidate, which would cause our value to decline and limit our ability to obtain additional financing. Our inability to enroll a sufficient number of participants for any of our current or future clinical trials would result in significant delays or may require us to abandon one or more clinical trials altogether.

If we are not successful in discovering, developing and commercializing additional product candidates, our ability to expand our business and achieve our strategic objectives may be impaired.

Although all of our efforts to date have been, and a substantial amount of our efforts in the future are expected to be focused on of the development of M-001, another possible future element of our strategy may include identifying and testing additional compounds that are optimized for peptide-based products. Research programs designed to identify additional product candidates require substantial technical, financial and human resources, whether or not any product candidates are ultimately identified. Our research programs may initially show promise in identifying potential product candidates, yet fail to yield product candidates for clinical development or commercialization for many reasons, including the following:

         the research methodology used may not be successful in identifying potential product candidates;

         competitors may develop alternatives that render our product candidates obsolete;

         a product candidate may, on further study, be shown to have harmful side effects or other characteristics that indicate it is unlikely to be effective or otherwise does not meet applicable regulatory criteria;

         a product candidate may not be capable of being produced in commercial quantities at an acceptable cost, or at all; and

         a product candidate may not be accepted as safe and effective by regulatory authorities, patients, the medical community or third-party payors.

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If we are unable to identify suitable compounds for preclinical and clinical development, we may not be able to obtain sufficient product revenues in future periods, which likely would result in significant harm to our financial position and adversely impact our stock price.

Reimbursement may not be available for M-001 (if and when approved for commercial sale) or any future product candidates, which could make it difficult for us to sell such products profitably.

Market acceptance and sales of M-001 or any future product candidate will depend on coverage and reimbursement policies and may be affected by healthcare reform measures. Government authorities and third-party payors, such as private health insurers and health maintenance organizations, decide which products they will pay for and establish reimbursement levels. We cannot be sure that coverage and reimbursement will be available for our products. We also cannot be sure that the amount of reimbursement available, if any, will not reduce the demand for, or the price of, our products. If reimbursement is not available or is available only at limited levels, we may not be able to successfully compete through sales of our proposed products.

Increasing expenditures for healthcare have been the subject of considerable public attention in the United States. Both private and government entities are seeking ways to reduce or contain healthcare costs. Numerous proposals that would effect changes in the U.S. healthcare system have been introduced or proposed in Congress and in some state legislatures, including reducing reimbursement for prescription products and reducing the levels at which consumers and healthcare providers are reimbursed for purchases of pharmaceutical products.

The Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003, or the Medicare Modernization Act, changed the way Medicare covers and pays for pharmaceutical products. The legislation expanded Medicare coverage for drug purchases by the elderly and certain others and introduced a new reimbursement methodology based on average sales prices for physician-administered drugs. In recent years, Congress has considered further reductions in Medicare reimbursement for drugs administered by physicians. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, or CMS, has issued and will continue to issue regulations to implement the new law which will affect Medicare, Medicaid and other third-party payors. In addition, this legislation provided authority for limiting the number of certain outpatient drugs that will be covered in any therapeutic class. The CMS also has the authority to revise reimbursement rates and to implement coverage restrictions for some drugs. If M-001 or any other product we may develop in the future is approved for commercialization and marketing in the United States, cost reduction initiatives and changes in coverage implemented through legislation or regulation could decrease utilization of and reimbursement for any such approved products, which in turn would affect the price we can receive for those products. While the Medicare Modernization Act and Medicare regulations apply only to drug benefits for Medicare beneficiaries, private payors often follow Medicare coverage policy and payment limitations in setting their own reimbursement rates. Therefore, any reduction in reimbursement that results from federal legislation or regulation may result in a similar reduction in payments from private payors.

In March 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended, or the Affordable Care Act, which was amended by the Health Care and Education Affordability Reconciliation Act, or collectively, the PPACA, became law in the United States. The goal of the PPACA is to reduce the cost of healthcare and substantially change the way healthcare is financed by both governmental and private insurers. Among other measures, the PPACA imposes increased rebates on manufacturers for certain covered drug products reimbursed by state Medicaid programs. While we cannot predict the full effect PPACA will have on federal reimbursement policies in general or on our business specifically, the PPACA may result in downward pressure on drug reimbursement, which could negatively affect market acceptance of our products. In addition, we cannot predict whether new proposals will be made or adopted, when they may be adopted or what impact they may have on us if they are adopted.

We expect to experience pricing pressures in connection with the sale of any of our products, should we receive approval, generally due to the trend toward managed healthcare, the increasing influence of health maintenance organizations, and additional legislative proposals. If we fail to successfully secure and maintain adequate coverage and reimbursement for our future products or are significantly delayed in doing so, we will have difficulty achieving market acceptance of our products and our business will be harmed.

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We are subject to extensive and costly government regulation.

The product we are developing is, and any products we may develop in the future will be, subject to extensive and rigorous domestic government regulation, including with respect to Israel, regulation by the Israeli Ministry of Health, and with respect to the U.S. regulation by the FDA, the CMS, other divisions of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, including its Office of Inspector General, the U.S. Department of Justice, the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs and, to the extent our products are paid for directly or indirectly by those departments, state and local governments and their respective foreign equivalents. The FDA regulates the research, development, preclinical and clinical testing, manufacture, safety, effectiveness, record keeping, reporting, labeling, storage, approval, advertising, promotion, sale, distribution, import and export of pharmaceutical products under various regulatory provisions. M-001 or any product candidates we may develop, which will be tested and marketed abroad, will be subject to extensive regulation by foreign governments, whether or not we have obtained the Israeli ministry of Health’s approval and/or FDA approval for M-001 or any other a given product and its uses. Such foreign regulation may be equally or more demanding than corresponding Israeli or U.S. regulation.

Government regulation substantially increases the cost and risk of researching, developing, manufacturing, and selling products. Our failure to comply with these regulations could result in, by way of example, significant fines, criminal and civil liability, product seizures, recalls, withdrawals, withdrawals of approvals, and exclusion and debarment from government programs. Any of these actions, including the inability of our proposed products to obtain and maintain regulatory approval, would have a materially adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Changes in regulatory requirements and guidance or unanticipated events during our clinical trials may occur, which may result in necessary changes to clinical trial protocols, which could result in increased costs to us, delay our development timeline or reduce the likelihood of successful completion of our clinical trials.

Changes in regulatory requirements and guidance or unanticipated events during our clinical trials may occur, as a result of which we may need to amend clinical trial protocols. Amendments may require us to resubmit our clinical trial protocols to IRBs for review and approval, which may adversely affect the cost, timing and successful completion of a clinical trial. If we experience delays in the completion of, or if we terminate, any of our clinical trials, the commercial prospects for any affected product candidate would be harmed and our ability to generate product revenue would be delayed, possibly materially.

If we acquire or license additional technologies or product candidates, we may incur a number of additional costs, have integration difficulties and/or experience other risks that could harm our business and results of operations.

We may acquire and in-license additional product candidates and technologies. Any product candidate or technologies we in-license or acquire will likely require additional development efforts prior to commercial sale, including extensive preclinical or clinical testing, or both, and approval by the FDA and applicable foreign regulatory authorities, if any. All product candidates are prone to risks of failure inherent in pharmaceutical product development, including the possibility that the product candidate or product developed based on in-licensed technology will not be shown to be sufficiently safe and effective for approval by regulatory authorities. In addition, we cannot assure you that any product candidate that we develop based on acquired or licensed technology that is granted regulatory approval will be manufactured or produced economically, successfully commercialized or widely accepted or competitive in the marketplace. Moreover, integrating any newly acquired or in-licensed product candidates could be expensive and time-consuming. If we cannot effectively manage these aspects of our business strategy, our business may not succeed.

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry

We are a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company with no approved products, which makes it difficult to assess our future viability.

We are a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company with a limited operating history. We have not yet demonstrated an ability to successfully overcome many of the risks and uncertainties frequently encountered by

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companies in rapidly evolving fields, particularly in the pharmaceutical area. For example, to execute our business plan, we will need to successfully:

         execute on product candidate development activities;

         obtain required FDA and applicable foreign regulatory approvals for the development and commercialization of any product candidate;

         maintain, leverage and expand our intellectual property portfolio;

         build and maintain robust sales, distribution and marketing capabilities, either on our own or in collaboration with strategic partners;

         gain market acceptance for our products;

         develop and maintain any strategic relationships we elect to enter into; and

         manage our spending as costs and expenses increase due to drug discovery, preclinical development, clinical trials, regulatory approvals and commercialization.

If we are unsuccessful in accomplishing these objectives, we may not be able to develop product candidates, raise capital, expand our business or continue our operations.

The members of our management team and certain consultants are important to the efficient and effective operation of our business, and we may need to add and retain additional leading experts. Failure to retain our management and consulting team and add additional leading experts could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

Our executive officers, our management team and technical personnel, as well as certain consultants, are important to the efficient and effective operation of our business, particularly Dr. Ron Babecoff, our Chief Executive Officer, and Dr. Tamar Ben-Yedidia, our Chief Scientific Officer. Our failure to retain the personnel that have developed much of the technology we utilize today, or any other key management and technical personnel, could have a material adverse effect on our future operations. Our success is also dependent on our ability to attract, retain and motivate highly trained technical, and management personnel, among others, to continue the development and commercialization of our current and future products. As of the date of this prospectus, we do not have key-man insurance on any of our officers or consultants.

As such, our future success highly depends on our ability to attract, retain and motivate personnel, including contractors, required for the development, maintenance and expansion of our activities. There can be no assurance that we will be able to retain our existing personnel or attract additional qualified employees or consultants. The loss of personnel or the inability to hire and retain additional qualified personnel in the future could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operation.

We face significant competition. If we cannot successfully compete with new or existing products, our marketing and sales will suffer and we may never be profitable.

We will compete against fully integrated pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies and smaller companies that are collaborating with pharmaceutical companies, academic institutions, government agencies and other public and private research organizations. In addition, many of these competitors, either alone or together with their collaborative partners, operate larger research and development programs than we do, and have substantially greater financial resources than we do, as well as significantly greater experience in:

         developing immuno-modulating products (including vaccines);

         undertaking preclinical testing and human clinical trials;

         obtaining FDA approvals and addressing various regulatory matters and obtaining other regulatory approvals of drugs;

         formulating and manufacturing drugs; and

         launching, marketing and selling drugs.

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Generally, our competitors currently include large fully integrated pharmaceutical companies such as Sanofi-Aventis, GlaxoSmithKline, Novartis, AstraZeneca, bioCSL, Baxter and Abbott (Solvay). Our direct competitors are companies and academic research institutes in various developmental stages attempting to develop a universal influenza vaccine, such as SEEK Group, Immune Targeting Systems (ITS) Ltd., Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc., FluGen, Inc., Okairos and Janssen Pharmaceutica. See “Business – Competition”. If our competitors develop and commercialize products faster than we do, or develop and commercialize products that are superior to our product candidates, our commercial opportunities will be reduced or eliminated. Our competitors may succeed in developing and commercializing products earlier and obtaining regulatory approvals from the FDA and foreign regulatory authorities more rapidly than we do. Our competitors may also develop products or technologies that are superior to those we are developing, and render our product candidate obsolete or non-competitive. If we cannot successfully compete with new or existing products, our marketing and sales will suffer and we may never be profitable.

The extent to which our product candidate achieves market acceptance will depend on competitive factors, many of which are beyond our control. Competition in the biotechnology and biopharmaceutical industry is intense and has been accentuated by the rapid pace of technology development. Our competitors also compete with us to:

         attract parties for acquisitions, joint ventures or other collaborations;

         license proprietary technology that is competitive with M-001;

         attract funding; and

         attract and hire scientific talent and other qualified personnel.

We may be subject to legal proceedings and/or to product liability lawsuits.

We could incur substantial costs in connection with product liability claims relating to our current or potential product candidates. We may incur substantial liabilities and may be required to limit commercialization of our products in response to product liability lawsuits, which may result in substantial losses.

M-001 or any future product candidate could cause adverse events, including injury, disease or adverse side effects. These adverse events may not be observed in clinical trials, but may nonetheless occur in the future. If any of these adverse events occur, they may render M-001 or any future product candidate ineffective or harmful in some patients, and any future sales would suffer, materially adversely affecting our business, financial condition and results of operations.

In addition, potential adverse events caused by M-001 or any future product candidate could lead to product liability lawsuits. If product liability lawsuits are successfully brought against us, we may incur substantial liabilities and may be required to limit the marketing and commercialization of any future product. Our business exposes us to potential product liability risks, which are inherent in the testing, manufacturing, marketing and sale of pharmaceutical products. We may not be able to avoid product liability claims. For example, changes in laws outside the U.S. are expanding our potential liability for injuries that occur during clinical trials. Product liability insurance is expensive, subject to deductibles and coverage limitations, and may not be available in the amounts that we desire for a price we are willing to pay. Product liability insurance for the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries is generally expensive, if available at all. If, at any time, we are unable to obtain sufficient insurance coverage on reasonable terms or to otherwise protect against potential product liability claims, we may be unable to clinically test, market or commercialize our product candidate. A successful product liability claim brought against us in excess of our insurance coverage, if any, may cause us to incur substantial liabilities, and, as a result, our business, liquidity and results of operations would be materially adversely affected. In addition, the existence of a product liability claim could affect the market price of our ordinary shares, ADSs and ADS warrants.

We are defendants in a lawsuit arising from the cancellation of a Consulting Services Agreement and the outcome is unpredictable.

On May 29, 2014, we entered into a Consulting Services Agreement with a consultant. Pursuant to the Consulting Services Agreement the consultant was granted 1,000,000 options exercisable for 1,000,000 of our ordinary shares, with 50% of the options exercisable at an exercise price of NIS 1.00 (approximately $0.26), and

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the remaining 50% options at an exercise price of NIS 2.50 (approximately $0.64). In addition, under the terms of the agreement, the consultant contended that it was also entitled to 2.5% of the net proceeds received as a result of our initial public offering in May 2015. On March 2, 2015, we unilaterally cancelled this Consulting Services Agreement. As a result of the cancellation of the Consulting Services Agreement all options previously granted to the consultant, vested or unvested, expired. The cancellation notice also provided that all rights and benefits previously granted to the consultant pursuant to the Consulting Services Agreement are invalid. On September 9, 2015, the consultant brought a suit against us in the Israeli magistrate court in Tel Aviv, claiming that we wrongfully terminated the Consulting Services Agreement and requesting monetary compensation in the amount of approximately NIS 1.5 million (approximately $380,000) and the reinstatement of the previously cancelled options. On November 11, 2015, we filed our defense with the court wherein we contented that the Consulting Services Agreement was lawfully cancelled and that the consultant’s suit has no legal basis. We intend to vigorously defend against such claim. However, litigation is unpredictable, and we cannot make any representations as to what the actual outcome would be due to the many intangibles presented in all litigations. We believe this monetary compensation and the reinstatement of the cancelled options will not pose a material financial burden on us in the event that the Israeli court rules in favor of the consultant.

If our employees commit fraud or other misconduct, including noncompliance with regulatory standards and requirements and insider trading, our business may experience serious adverse consequences.

We are exposed to the risk of employee fraud or other misconduct. Misconduct by employees could include intentional failures to comply with FDA regulations, to provide accurate information to the FDA, to comply with manufacturing standards we have established, to comply with federal and state health-care fraud and abuse laws and regulations, to report financial information or data accurately or to disclose unauthorized activities to us. In particular, sales, marketing and business arrangements in the healthcare industry are subject to extensive laws and regulations intended to prevent fraud, kickbacks, self-dealing and other abusive practices. These laws and regulations may restrict or prohibit a wide range of pricing, discounting, marketing and promotion, sales commission, customer incentive programs and other business arrangements. Employee misconduct could also involve the improper use of information obtained in the course of clinical trials, which could result in regulatory sanctions and serious harm to our reputation. Our board of directors adopted a Code of Ethics upon the listing of our securities on the NASDAQ Capital Market. However, it is not always possible to identify and deter employee misconduct, and the precautions we take to detect and prevent this activity may not be effective in controlling unknown or unmanaged risks or losses or in protecting us from governmental investigations or other actions or lawsuits stemming from a failure to be in compliance with such laws or regulations. If any such actions are instituted against us, and we are not successful in defending ourselves or asserting our rights, those actions could have a significant impact on our business, including the imposition of significant fines or other sanctions.

In addition, during the course of our operations, our directors, executives and employees may have access to material, nonpublic information regarding our business, our results of operations or potential transactions we are considering. If a director, executive or employee was to be investigated, or an action was to be brought against a director, executive or employee for insider trading, it could have a negative impact on our reputation and the market price of the securities. Such a claim, with or without merit, could also result in substantial expenditures of time and money, and divert attention of our management team from other tasks important to the success of our business.

We may encounter difficulties in managing our growth. Failure to manage our growth effectively will have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We may not be able to successfully grow and expand. Successful implementation of our business plan will require management of growth, including potentially rapid and substantial growth, which will result in an increase in the level of responsibility for management personnel and place a strain on our human and capital resources. To manage growth effectively, we will be required to continue to implement and improve our operating and financial systems and controls to expand, train and manage our employee base. Our ability to manage our operations and growth effectively will require us to continue to expend funds to enhance our operational, financial and management controls, reporting systems and procedures and to attract and retain sufficient talented personnel. If we are unable to scale up and implement improvements to our control systems in an efficient or timely manner, or if we encounter deficiencies in existing systems and controls, then we will not be able to successfully commercialize our product candidate or future products. Failure to attract and retain sufficient talented personnel will further strain our human resources and could impede our growth or result in ineffective growth. Moreover, the management, systems and

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controls currently in place or to be implemented may not be adequate for such growth, and the steps we have taken to hire personnel and to improve such systems and controls might not be sufficient. If we are unable to manage our growth effectively, it will have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

If we are unable to obtain adequate insurance, our financial condition could be adversely affected in the event of uninsured or inadequately insured loss or damage. Our ability to effectively recruit and retain qualified officers and directors could also be adversely affected if we experience difficulty in obtaining adequate directors’ and officers’ liability insurance.

Our business will expose us to potential liability that results from risks associated with conducting clinical trials of BVX-007 and any future product candidate. We currently have EUR1,000,000 of clinical trial liability insurance covering the clinical trials of BVX-007. A successful clinical trial liability claim, if any, brought against us could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations even though clinical trial insurance is successfully maintained or obtained. The current and planned insurance coverages may only mitigate a small portion of a substantial claim against us.

In addition, we may be unable to maintain sufficient insurance as a public company to cover liability claims made against our officers and directors. If we are unable to adequately insure our officers and directors, we may not be able to retain or recruit qualified officers and directors to manage the Company.

Recent disruptions in the financial markets and economic conditions could affect our ability to raise capital.

In recent years, the U.S. and global economies suffered dramatic downturns as the result of a deterioration in the credit markets and related financial crisis as well as a variety of other factors including, among other things, extreme volatility in security prices, severely diminished liquidity and credit availability, ratings downgrades of certain investments and declining valuations of others. The U.S. and certain foreign governments have recently taken unprecedented actions in an attempt to address and rectify these extreme market and economic conditions by providing liquidity and stability to the financial markets. If the actions taken by these governments are not successful, the return of adverse economic conditions may cause a significant impact on our ability to raise capital, if needed, on a timely basis and on acceptable terms or at all.

Our current management team has limited experience in managing and operating a publicly traded U.S. company. Any failure to comply or adequately comply with federal securities laws, rules or regulations could subject us to fines or regulatory actions, which may materially adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Although our ordinary shares trade on the TASE and we file reports in Israel, our current management team has limited experience managing and operating a publicly traded U.S. company. Failure to comply or adequately comply with any laws, rules or regulations applicable to our business may result in fines or regulatory actions, which may materially adversely affect our business, results of operation or financial condition and could result in delays in achieving the development of an active and liquid trading market for the securities.

We may be subject to extensive environmental, health and safety, and other laws and regulations in multiple jurisdictions.

Our business involves the controlled use, directly or indirectly through our service providers, of hazardous materials, various biological compounds and chemicals; therefore, we, our agents and our service providers may be subject to various environmental, health and safety laws and regulations, including those governing air emissions, water and wastewater discharges, noise emissions, the use, management and disposal of hazardous, radioactive and biological materials and wastes and the cleanup of contaminated sites. The risk of accidental contamination or injury from these materials cannot be eliminated. If an accident, spill or release of any regulated chemicals or substances occurs, we could be held liable for resulting damages, including for investigation, remediation and monitoring of the contamination, including natural resource damages, the costs of which could be substantial. We are also subject to numerous environmental, health and workplace safety laws and regulations, including those governing laboratory procedures, exposure to blood-borne pathogens and the handling of biohazardous materials and chemicals. Although we maintain workers’ compensation insurance to cover the costs and expenses that may be incurred because of injuries to our employees resulting from the use of these materials, this insurance may not provide adequate coverage

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against potential liabilities. Additional or more stringent federal, state, local or foreign laws and regulations affecting our operations may be adopted in the future. We may incur substantial capital costs and operating expenses and may be required to obtain consents to comply with any of these or certain other laws or regulations and the terms and conditions of any permits or licenses required pursuant to such laws and regulations, including costs to install new or updated pollution control equipment, modify our operations or perform other corrective actions at our respective facilities or the facilities of our service providers. For instance, we have undergone inspections and obtained approvals from various governmental agencies.

Governments outside the United States tend to impose strict price controls, which may adversely affect our revenues, if any.

In some countries, particularly the countries comprising the European Union, or the EU, the pricing of pharmaceuticals and certain other therapeutics is subject to governmental control. In these countries, pricing negotiations with governmental authorities can take considerable time after the receipt of marketing approval for a product. To obtain reimbursement or pricing approval in some countries, we may be required to conduct a clinical trial that compares the cost-effectiveness of our product candidate to other available therapies. If reimbursement of our products is unavailable or limited in scope or amount, or if pricing is set at unsatisfactory levels, our business could be harmed, possibly materially.

Risks Related to Our Intellectual Property

M-001 is based on an exclusive license from Yeda, and we could lose our rights to this license if a dispute with Yeda arises or if we fail to comply with the financial and other terms of the license.

We license our core intellectual property from Yeda under an exclusive license agreement, pursuant to which received an exclusive worldwide license for the development, manufacturing, use, marketing, sale, distribution and importing of products that are directly or indirectly based on certain patents and patent applications owned by Yeda and/or certain other intellectual property to be developed by Yeda and related thereto. Pursuant to the terms of the license agreement, unless earlier terminated in accordance with the provisions thereof, the license agreement will terminate upon the later of: (i) the expiration date of the last patent licensed thereunder; (ii) in the event only one product will be developed and/or commercialized by utilizing the licensed intellectual property, 15 years from the date of first commercial sale of such product in either the U.S or Europe, following receipt of New Drug Approval from the FDA or equivalent approval in any European country for such product; (iii) in the event that more than one product will be developed and/or commercialized by utilizing the licensed intellectual property, following the receipt of New Drug Approval from the FDA or equivalent approval in any European country for such product, the expiry of a 20 year period during which there shall not have been a sale of any such products in either the U.S. or Europe. However, Yeda is entitled to terminate the exclusivity rights or to terminate the license agreement with 30 days prior written notice to us if: (a) no commercial sales of at least one product are initiated during six months after receipt of an FDA or similar regulatory approval for commercial marketing; or (b) no sales of any products are reported for over a year after sales of a product have commenced. Yeda will also be entitled to terminate the license agreement by written notice: (x) in the event we materially breach any of our obligations under the agreement, provided that such material breach is un-curable or, if curable, is not cured by us within 30 days (or in the case of failure by us to make payments due to Yeda in connection with the license agreement, 10 days) from receipt of notice of such breach; or (y) in the event a temporary or permanent liquidator is appointed for our Company, a resolution is passed to voluntary wind up our Company, or an order or act is granted for the winding up of our Company, provided that if such order or act was initiated by any third party, such order or act is not cancelled within 120 days; or (z) we contest the validity of one of the patents registered by Yeda. Upon termination of the license agreement, other than pursuant to (i) through (iii) above, all rights and documents will be returned to Yeda, and we will be required to grant Yeda an exclusive world-wide irrevocable license to our know-how and products which are based on the intellectual property licensed form Yeda or that were discovered or occur or arise from the performance of our development work pursuant to the license agreement. In the event that Yeda terminates the license agreement due to any reason other than (a), (b) or (x) through (z) above, we will be entitled to receive royalty payments equal to 25% of the net proceeds received by Yeda from the grant to third parties, within the five years following the termination of the license agreement, of a license or other rights which include our developments, up to the aggregate amount of research fund actually expended by us for development. If Yeda terminates the license agreement or licenses to a third party the intellectual property licenses to us pursuant to the license agreement, or if any dispute arises with

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respect to our arrangement with Yeda, such dispute may disrupt our operations and would likely have a material and adverse impact on us if resolved in a manner that is unfavorable to us. Our current product candidate is based on the intellectual property licensed under the license agreement, and if the license agreement is terminated, it would have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects and results of operations.

If we fail to adequately protect, enforce or secure rights to the patents which we own or that were licensed to us or any patents we may own in the future, the value of our intellectual property rights would diminish and our business and competitive position would suffer.

Our success, competitive position and future revenues, if any, depend in part on our ability to obtain and successfully leverage intellectual property covering our products and product candidates, know-how, methods, processes and other technologies, to protect our trade secrets, to prevent others from using our intellectual property and to operate without infringing the intellectual property rights of third parties.

The risks and uncertainties that we face with respect to our intellectual property rights include, but are not limited to, the following:

         the degree and range of protection any patents will afford us against competitors;

         the patents concerning our business activities were not registered in all countries and therefore our patent protection may be lacking in some territories;

         if and when patents will be issued;

         whether or not others will obtain patents claiming aspects similar to those covered by our own or licensed patents and patent applications;

         we may be subject to interference proceedings;

         we may be subject to opposition or post-grant proceedings in foreign countries;

         any patents that are issued may not provide meaningful protection;

         we may not be able to develop additional proprietary technologies that are patentable;

         other companies may challenge patents licensed or issued to us or our customers;

         other companies may independently develop similar or alternative technologies, or duplicate our technologies;

         other companies may design around technologies we have licensed or developed;

         enforcement of patents is complex, uncertain and expensive; and

         we may need to initiate litigation or administrative proceedings that may be costly whether we win or lose.

If patent rights covering our products and methods are not sufficiently broad, they may not provide us with any protection against competitors with similar products and technologies. Furthermore, if the United States Patent and Trademark Office, or the USPTO, or any foreign patent office issue patents to us or our licensors, others may challenge the patents or design around the patents, or the patent office or the courts may invalidate the patents. Thus, any patents we own or license from or to third parties may not provide any protection against our competitors.

We cannot be certain that patents will be issued as a result of any pending applications, and we cannot be certain that any of our issued patents or patents licensed from Yeda (or any other third-party in the future) will give us adequate protection from competing products. For example, issued patents, including the patents licensed by us, may be circumvented or challenged, declared invalid or unenforceable, or narrowed in scope.

In addition, since publication of discoveries in the scientific or patent literature often lags behind actual discoveries, we cannot be certain that we were the first to make our inventions or to file patent applications covering those inventions.

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It is also possible that others may obtain issued patents that could prevent us from commercializing our products or require us to obtain licenses requiring the payment of significant fees or royalties in order to enable us to conduct our business. As to those patents that we have licensed, our rights depend on maintaining our obligations to the licensor under the applicable license agreement, and we may be unable to do so.

In addition to patents and patent applications, we depend upon proprietary know-how to protect our proprietary technology. We require our employees, consultants, advisors and collaborators to enter into confidentiality agreements that prohibit the disclosure of confidential information to any other parties. We also require our employees and consultants to disclose and assign to us their ideas, developments, discoveries and inventions. These agreements may not, however, provide adequate protection for our know-how or other proprietary information in the event of any unauthorized use or disclosure.

Obtaining and maintaining our patent protection depends on compliance with various procedural, document submission, fee payment and other requirements imposed by governmental patent agencies, and our patent protection could be reduced or eliminated for noncompliance with these requirements.

Periodic maintenance fees on any issued patent are due to be paid to the USPTO and foreign patent agencies in several stages over the lifetime of the patent. The USPTO and various foreign governmental patent agencies require compliance with a number of procedural, documentary, fee payment and other similar provisions during the patent application process. While an inadvertent lapse can in many cases be cured by payment of a late fee or by other means in accordance with the applicable rules, there are situations in which noncompliance can result in abandonment or lapse of the patent or patent application, resulting in partial or complete loss of patent rights in the relevant jurisdiction. Noncompliance events that could result in abandonment or lapse of a patent or patent application include, but are not limited to, failure to respond to office actions within prescribed time limits, non-payment of fees and failure to properly legalize and submit formal documents. In such an event, our competitors might be able to enter the market, which would have a material adverse effect on our business.

Costly litigation may be necessary to protect our intellectual property rights and we may be subject to claims alleging the violation of the intellectual property rights of others.

We may face significant expense and liability as a result of litigation or other proceedings relating to patents and other intellectual property rights of others. In the event that another party has also filed a patent application or been issued a patent relating to an invention or technology claimed by us in pending applications, we may be required to participate in an interference proceeding declared by the USPTO to determine priority of invention, which could result in substantial uncertainties and costs for us, even if the eventual outcome is favorable to us. We, or our licensors, also could be required to participate in interference proceedings involving issued patents and pending applications of another entity. An adverse outcome in an interference proceeding could require us to cease using the technology or to license rights from prevailing third parties.

The cost to us of any patent litigation or other proceeding relating to our licensed patents or patent applications, even if resolved in our favor, could be substantial and could divert management’s resources and attention. Our ability to enforce our patent protection could be limited by our financial resources, and may be subject to lengthy delays. A third party may claim that we are using inventions claimed by their patents and may go to court to stop us from engaging in our normal operations and activities, such as research, development and the sale of any future products. Such lawsuits are expensive and would consume time and other resources. There is a risk that a court will decide that we are infringing the third party’s patents and will order us to stop the activities claimed by the patents, redesign our products or processes to avoid infringement or obtain licenses (which may not be available on commercially reasonable terms or at all). In addition, there is a risk that a court will order us to pay the other party damages for having infringed their patents.

Moreover, there is no guarantee that any prevailing patent owner would offer us a license so that we could continue to engage in activities claimed by the patent, or that such a license, if made available to us, could be acquired on commercially acceptable terms. In addition, third parties may, in the future, assert other intellectual property infringement claims against us with respect to our product candidate, technologies or other matters. Any claims of infringement asserted against us, whether or not successful, may have a material adverse effect on us.

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We rely on confidentiality agreements that could be breached and may be difficult to enforce, which could result in third parties using our intellectual property to compete against us.

Although we believe that we take reasonable steps to protect our intellectual property, including the use of agreements relating to the non-disclosure of confidential information to third parties, as well as agreements that purport to require the disclosure and assignment to us of the rights to the ideas, developments, discoveries and inventions of our employees and consultants while we employ them, the agreements can be difficult and costly to enforce. Although we seek to enter into these types of agreements with our contractors, consultants, advisors and research collaborators, to the extent that employees and consultants utilize or independently develop intellectual property in connection with any of our projects, disputes may arise as to the intellectual property rights associated with M-001 or any future product candidates. If a dispute arises, a court may determine that the right belongs to a third party. In addition, enforcement of our rights can be costly and unpredictable. We also rely on trade secrets and proprietary know-how that we seek to protect in part by confidentiality agreements with our employees, contractors, consultants, advisors or others. Despite the protective measures we employ, we still face the risk that:

         these agreements may be breached;

         these agreements may not provide adequate remedies for the applicable type of breach;

         our proprietary know-how will otherwise become known; or

         our competitors will independently develop similar technology or proprietary information.

International patent protection is particularly uncertain, and if we are involved in opposition proceedings in foreign countries, we may have to expend substantial sums and management resources.

Patent law outside the United States may be different than in the United States. Further, the laws of some foreign countries, such as China where certain patents owned or licensed by us were granted, may not protect our intellectual property rights to the same extent as the laws of the United States, if at all. A failure to obtain sufficient intellectual property protection in any foreign country could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations and future prospects. Moreover, we may participate in opposition proceedings to determine the validity of our foreign patents or our competitors’ foreign patents, which could result in substantial costs and divert management’s resources and attention. Additionally, due to uncertainty in patent protection law, we have not filed patent applications in many countries where significant markets exist.

Intellectual property rights do not necessarily address all potential threats to our competitive advantage.

The degree of future protection afforded by our intellectual property rights is uncertain because intellectual property rights have limitations, and may not adequately protect our business, or permit us to maintain our competitive advantage. The following examples are illustrative:

         others may be able to make compounds that are the same as or similar to M-001 or any future product candidate but that are not covered by the claims of the patents that we own or have exclusively licensed;

         we or our licensors or any future strategic partners might not have been the first to make the inventions covered by the issued patent or pending patent application that we own or have exclusively licensed;

         we or our licensors or any future strategic partners might not have been the first to file patent applications covering certain of our inventions;

         others may independently develop similar or alternative technologies or duplicate any of our technologies without infringing our intellectual property rights;

         it is possible that our pending patent applications will not lead to issued patents;

         issued patents that we own or have exclusively licensed may not provide us with any competitive advantages, or may be held invalid or unenforceable, as a result of legal challenges by our competitors;

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         our competitors might conduct research and development activities in countries where we do not have patent rights and then use the information learned from such activities to develop competitive products for sale in our major commercial markets;

         we may not develop additional proprietary technologies that are patentable; and

         the patents of others may have an adverse effect on our business.

We may be subject to claims challenging the inventorship of our patents and other intellectual property.

We may be subject to claims that former employees, collaborators or other third parties have an interest in our patents or other intellectual property as an inventor or co-inventor. For example, we may have inventorship disputes arise from conflicting obligations of consultants or others who are involved in developing our product candidates. Litigation may be necessary to defend against these and other claims challenging inventorship. If we fail in defending any such claims, in addition to paying monetary damages, we may lose valuable intellectual property rights, such as exclusive ownership of, or right to use, valuable intellectual property. Such an outcome could have a material adverse effect on our business. Even if we are successful in defending against such claims, litigation could result in substantial costs and be a distraction to management and other employees. In addition, the Israeli Supreme Court ruled in 2012 that an employee who receives a patent or contributes to an invention during his employment may be allowed to seek compensation for such contributions from his or her employer, even if the employee’s contract of employment specifically states otherwise and the employee has transferred all intellectual property rights to the employer. The Israeli Supreme Court ruled that the fact that a contract revokes an employee’s right for royalties and compensation, does not rule out the right of the employee to claim their right for royalties. As a result, it is unclear whether and, if so, to what extent our employees may be able to claim compensation with respect to our future revenue. We may receive less revenue from future products if any of our employees successfully claim for compensation for their work in developing our intellectual property, which in turn could impact our future profitability.

Risks Related to Our Operations in Israel

Potential political, economic and military instability in the State of Israel, where our senior management, our head executive office, research and development, and manufacturing facilities are located, may adversely affect our results of operations.

Our head executive office, our research and development facilities, our current manufacturing facility, as well as some of our clinical sites are located in Israel. Our officers and most of our directors are residents of Israel. Accordingly, political, economic and military conditions in Israel and the surrounding region may directly affect our business and operations. Since the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, a number of armed conflicts have taken place between Israel and its neighboring countries. Any hostilities involving Israel or the interruption or curtailment of trade between Israel and its trading partners could adversely affect our operations and results of operations. During the summer of 2006 and the fall of 2012, Israel was engaged in an armed conflict with Hezbollah, a Lebanese Islamist Shiite militia group and political party. In December 2008, January 2009, November 2012 and July 2014, there were escalations in violence between Israel, on the one hand, and Hamas, the Palestinian Authority and/or other groups, on the other hand, as well as extensive hostilities along Israel’s border with the Gaza Strip, which resulted in missiles being fired from the Gaza Strip into Southern and central Israel, including near Tel Aviv and at areas surrounding Jerusalem. These conflicts involved missile strikes against civilian targets in various parts of Israel, including areas in which our employees and some of our consultants are located, and negatively affected business conditions in Israel. Our offices and laboratory, located in Nes Ziona, Israel, are within the range of the missiles and rockets that have been fired at Israeli cities and towns from Gaza sporadically since 2006, with escalations in violence (such as the recent escalation in July 2014) during which there were a substantially larger number of rocket and missile attacks aimed at Israel. In addition, since February 2011, Egypt has experienced political turbulence and an increase in terrorist activity in the Sinai Peninsula following the resignation of Hosni Mubarak as president. This turbulence included protests throughout Egypt, and the appointment of a military regime in his stead, followed by the elections to parliament which brought groups affiliated with the Muslim Brotherhood (which had been previously outlawed by Egypt), and the subsequent overthrow of this elected government by a military regime. Such political turbulence and violence may damage peaceful and diplomatic relations between Israel and Egypt, and could affect the region as a whole. Similar civil unrest and political turbulence has occurred in

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other countries in the region, including Syria which shares a common border with Israel, and is affecting the political stability of those countries. Since April 2011, internal conflict in Syria has escalated, and evidence indicates that chemical weapons have been used in the region. Intervention may be contemplated by outside parties in order to prevent further chemical weapon use. This instability and any intervention may lead to deterioration of the political and economic relationships that exist between the State of Israel and some of these countries, and may have the potential for causing additional conflicts in the region. In addition, Iran has threatened to attack Israel and is widely believed to be developing nuclear weapons. Iran is also believed to have a strong influence among extremist groups in the region, such as Hamas in Gaza, Hezbollah in Lebanon, and various rebel militia groups in Syria. Additionally, a violent jihadist group named Islamic State of Iraq and Levant (ISIL) is involved in hostilities in Iraq and Syria and have been growing in influence. Although ISIL’s activities have not directly affected the political and economic conditions in Israel, ISIL’s stated purpose is to take control of the Middle East, including Israel. These situations may potentially escalate in the future to more violent events which may affect Israel and us. Any armed conflicts, terrorist activities or political instability in the region could adversely affect business conditions and could harm our results of operations and could make it more difficult for us to raise capital. Parties with whom we do business may decline to travel to Israel during periods of heightened unrest or tension, forcing us to make alternative arrangements when necessary in order to meet our business partners face to face. In addition, the political and security situation in Israel may result in parties with whom we have agreements involving performance in Israel claiming that they are not obligated to perform their commitments under those agreements pursuant to force majeure provisions in such agreements. Further, in the past, the State of Israel and Israeli companies have been subjected to economic boycotts. Several countries still restrict business with the State of Israel and with Israeli companies. These restrictive laws and policies may have an adverse impact on our operating results, financial condition or the expansion of our business.

Our operations may be disrupted as a result of the obligation of Israeli citizens to perform military service.

Many Israeli citizens are obligated to perform several days, and in some cases more, of annual military reserve duty each year until they reach the age of 40 (or older, for reservists who are military officers or who have certain occupations) and, in the event of a military conflict, may be called to active duty. In response to increases in terrorist activity, there have been periods of significant call-ups of military reservists. It is possible that there will be military reserve duty call-ups in the future. Our operations could be disrupted by such call-ups, which may include the call-up of members of our management. Such disruption could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Investors may have difficulties enforcing a U.S. judgment, including judgments based upon the civil liability provisions of the U.S. federal securities laws, against us, or our executive officers and directors or asserting U.S. securities laws claims in Israel.

None of our directors or officers are residents of the United States, except for director Jack Rosen. Director George Lowell is a dual U.S. and Israel citizen. Most of our directors’ and officers’ assets and our assets are located outside the United States. Service of process upon us or our non-U.S. resident directors and officers and enforcement of judgments obtained in the United States against us or our non-U.S. our directors and executive officers may be difficult to obtain within the United States. We have been informed by our legal counsel in Israel that it may be difficult to assert claims under U.S. securities laws in original actions instituted in Israel or obtain a judgment based on the civil liability provisions of U.S. federal securities laws. Israeli courts may refuse to hear a claim based on a violation of U.S. securities laws against us or our officers and directors because Israel may not be the most appropriate forum to bring such a claim. In addition, even if an Israeli court agrees to hear a claim, it may determine that Israeli law and not U.S. law is applicable to the claim. If U.S. law is found to be applicable, the content of applicable U.S. law must be proved as a fact, which can be a time-consuming and costly process. Certain matters of procedure will also be governed by Israeli law. There is little binding case law in Israel addressing the matters described above. Israeli courts might not enforce judgments rendered outside Israel, which may make it difficult to collect on judgments rendered against us or our officers and directors.

Moreover, among other reasons, including but not limited to, fraud or absence of due process, or the existence of a judgment which is at variance with another judgment that was given in the same matter if a suit in the same matter between the same parties was pending before a court or tribunal in Israel, an Israeli court will not enforce a foreign judgment if it was given in a state whose laws do not provide for the enforcement of judgments of Israeli courts (subject to exceptional cases) or if its enforcement is likely to prejudice the sovereignty or security of the State of Israel.

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Under applicable U.S. and Israeli law, we may not be able to enforce covenants not to compete and therefore may be unable to prevent our competitors from benefiting from the expertise of some of our former employees.

We generally enter into non-competition agreements with our employees and key consultants. These agreements prohibit our employees and key consultants, if they cease working for us, from competing directly with us or working for our competitors or clients for a limited period of time. We may be unable to enforce these agreements under the laws of the jurisdictions in which our employees work and it may be difficult for us to restrict our competitors from benefitting from the expertise our former employees or consultants developed while working for us. For example, Israeli courts have required employers seeking to enforce non-compete undertakings of a former employee to demonstrate that the competitive activities of the former employee will harm one of a limited number of material interests of the employer which have been recognized by the courts, such as the secrecy of a company’s confidential commercial information or the protection of its intellectual property. If we cannot demonstrate that such interests will be harmed, we may be unable to prevent our competitors from benefiting from the expertise of our former employees or consultants and our ability to remain competitive may be diminished.

Your rights and responsibilities as our shareholder will be governed by Israeli law, which may differ in some respects from the rights and responsibilities of shareholders of U.S. corporations.

Since we are incorporated under Israeli law, the rights and responsibilities of our shareholders are governed by our articles of association and Israeli law. These rights and responsibilities differ in some respects from the rights and responsibilities of shareholders of U.S. based corporations. In particular, a shareholder of an Israeli company, such as us, has a duty to act in good faith and in a customary manner in exercising its rights and performing its obligations towards us and other shareholders and to refrain from abusing its power in us, including, among other things, in voting at the general meeting of shareholders on certain matters, such as an amendment to our articles of association, an increase of our authorized share capital, a merger and approval of related party transactions that require shareholder approval. A shareholder also has a general duty to refrain from discriminating against other shareholders. In addition, a controlling shareholder or a shareholder who knows that it possesses the power to determine the outcome of a shareholders vote or to appoint or prevent the appointment of an office holder of ours or other power towards us has a duty to act in fairness towards us. However, Israeli law does not define the substance of this duty of fairness. See “Management — Approval of Related Party Transactions under Israeli Law.” Since Israeli corporate law underwent extensive revisions approximately 15 years ago, the parameters and implications of the provisions that govern shareholder behavior have not been clearly determined. These provisions may be interpreted to impose additional obligations and liabilities on our shareholders that are not typically imposed on shareholders of U.S. corporations.

Provisions of Israeli law may delay, prevent or otherwise impede a merger with, or an acquisition of, our company, which could prevent a change of control, even when the terms of such a transaction are favorable to us and our shareholders.

Israeli corporate law regulates mergers, requires tender offers for acquisitions of shares above specified thresholds, requires special approvals for transactions involving directors, officers or significant shareholders and regulates other matters that may be relevant to these types of transactions. For example, a merger may not be consummated unless at least 50 days have passed from the date that a merger proposal was filed by each merging company with the Israel Registrar of Companies and at least 30 days from the date that the shareholders of both merging companies approved the merger. In addition, the holder of a majority of each class of securities of the target company must approve a merger. Moreover, a full tender offer can only be completed if the acquirer receives at least 95% of the issued share capital (provided that a majority of the offerees that do not have a personal interest in such tender offer shall have approved the tender offer, except that if the total votes to reject the tender offer represent less than 2% of the company’s issued and outstanding share capital, in the aggregate, approval by a majority of the offerees that do not have a personal interest in such tender offer is not required to complete the tender offer), and the shareholders, including those who indicated their acceptance of the tender offer, may, at any time within six months following the completion of the tender offer, petition the court to alter the consideration for the acquisition (unless the acquirer stipulated in the tender offer that a shareholder that accepts the offer may not seek appraisal rights).

Our articles of association provide that our directors (other than external directors) are elected to terms, with only a fraction of our directors (other than external directors) to be elected each year, in each case to for a term of three years. On February 12, 2015, our annual general meeting of our shareholders approved the staggering and

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extension of the term of our board members as follows: (1) the term of our former directors Moshe Many and Rami Epstein shall be extended by one year ending on the first annual shareholders meeting; (2) the term of Chairman Avner Rotman and director Jack Rosen shall be extended for a period of two years ending on the second annual shareholders meeting; and (3) the term of CEO and director Ron Babecoff and director George Lowell shall be extended for a period of three years until the third annual shareholders meeting. Following the passing of Moshe Many and the resignation of Rami Epstein, Michal Brikman was appointed as a board member until the upcoming annual shareholders meeting. The staggering of the terms of our directors prevents a potential acquirer from readily replacing our entire board of directors at a single annual general shareholder meeting. This could prevent an acquirer from seeking to effect a change in control of our company by proposing an acquisition proposal offer opposed by our board, even if beneficial to our shareholders.

Furthermore, Israeli tax considerations may make potential transactions unappealing to us or to those of our shareholders whose country of residence does not have a tax treaty with Israel exempting such shareholders from Israeli tax. For example, Israeli tax law does not recognize tax-free share exchanges to the same extent as U.S. tax law. With respect to mergers, Israeli tax law allows for tax deferral in certain circumstances but makes the deferral contingent on the fulfillment of numerous conditions, including a holding period of two years from the date of the transaction during which sales and dispositions of shares of the participating companies are restricted. Moreover, with respect to certain share swap transactions, the tax deferral is limited in time, and when such time expires, the tax becomes payable even if no actual disposition of the shares has occurred.

These and other similar provisions could delay, prevent or impede an acquisition of us or our merger with another company, even if such an acquisition or merger would be beneficial to us or to our shareholders.

We have received Israeli government grants for certain research and development expenditures. The terms of these grants and loans may require us to satisfy specified conditions in order to manufacture products and transfer technologies outside of Israel. In addition, under the Encouragement of Industrial, Research and Development Law, 5744-1984, or the Research Law, to which we are subject due to our receipt of grants from the Office of the Chief Scientist of the Israeli Ministry of Economy, or OCS, a recipient of OCS grants such as us must report to the applicable authority of the OCS regarding any change of control or any change in the holding of the means of control of our Company which transforms any non-Israeli citizen or resident into an “interested party”, as defined in the Research Law, in our Company, and in the latter event, the non-Israeli citizen or resident shall execute an undertaking in favor of the OCS, in a form provided under the OCS guidelines.

Because a certain portion of our expenses is incurred in currencies other than the U.S. Dollar, our results of operations may be harmed by currency fluctuations and inflation.

Our reporting and functional currency is the NIS, but some portion of our clinical trials and operations expenses are in the U.S. Dollar and Euro. As a result, we are exposed to some currency fluctuation risks. We may, in the future, decide to enter into currency hedging transactions to decrease the risk of financial exposure from fluctuations in the exchange rate of the currencies mentioned above in relation to the NIS. These measures, however, may not adequately protect us from adverse effects.

We have received Israeli government grants for certain of our research and development activities. The terms of these grants may require us to satisfy specified conditions in order to manufacture products and transfer technologies outside of Israel. We may be required to pay penalties in addition to the repayment of the grants. Such grants may be terminated or reduced in the future, which would increase our costs.

Under the Research Law, research and development programs which meet specified criteria and are approved by a committee of the OCS are eligible for grants (see “Business — Research Grants — Grants under the Israeli Encouragement of Industrial and Development Law”). The grants awarded are typically up to 50% of the project’s expenditures, as determined by the research committee. The grantee is required to pay royalties to the OCS on income generated from the sale of products (and related services associated with such products), whether received by the grantee or any affiliated entity, as defined in the Encouragement of Industrial Research and Development Regulations (Royalty Rates and Rules for Payment), 5756-1996, or the Royalty Regulations, developed, in whole or in part, within the framework of an OCS-funded project or deriving therefrom. In accordance with the provisions of the Royalty Regulations, royalties are paid beginning from the date of the sale of the first product developed according to an OCS-funded project at rates between 3% to 6% of sales of the product, depending on the situation

35

and applicable criteria, and are payable until the repayment of the full amount of the total OCS funding and accrued interest (LIBOR), or in certain cases, payable up to the increased royalty cap. The terms of the OCS participation also require that products developed using government grants be manufactured in Israel and that the technology developed thereunder may not be transferred outside of Israel, unless approval is received from the OCS (such approval is not required for the transfer of a portion of the manufacturing capacity which does not exceed, in the aggregate, 10% of the portion declared to be manufactured abroad in the applications for funding, in which case only notification is required) and additional payments are made to the OCS. However, this does not restrict the export of products that incorporate the funded technology. Following the full payment of such royalties and interest, there is generally no further liability for payment. Nonetheless, the restrictions under the Research Law (as generally specified herein) will continue to apply even after we have repaid the full amount of royalty payable pursuant to the grants.

Subject to prior consent of the OCS, we may transfer the OCS-funded know-how to another Israeli company. If the OCS-funded know-how is transferred to another Israeli entity, the transfer would still require OCS approval but will not be subject to the payment of the redemption fee (although there will be an obligation to pay royalties to the OCS from the income of such sale transaction as part of the royalty payment obligation). In such case, the acquiring company would have to assume all of the selling company’s responsibilities towards the OCS as a condition to OCS approval.

Our research and development efforts have been financed, partially, through grants that we have received from the OCS. We therefore must comply with the requirements of the Research Law and related regulations. As of December 31, 2015, we have received NIS 17.9 million ($4.5 million) in OCS grants. We received additional OCS grants in the amount of NIS 71,761 from September 30, 2015 through the date of this prospectus. As a result of our receipt of these grants, the discretionary approval of an OCS committee will be required for any transfer to third parties outside of Israel of rights related to M-001, which has been developed with OCS funding. We may not receive the required approvals should we wish to transfer this technology, manufacturing and/or development outside of Israel in the future. We may be required to pay penalties in addition to repayment of the grants. Such grants may be terminated or reduced in the future, which would increase our costs. OCS approval is not required for the export of any products resulting from the OCS funded research or development in the ordinary course of business.

On July 29, 2015, the Israeli parliament amended the Research Law to establish the National Authority for Technological Innovations, or the Authority, which will replace the OCS. The Authority is intended to have greater power and freedom than the OCS in launching creative funding tracks and instituting new guidelines that will govern the transferability and licensing of the resulting technology. The Authority was formed as of January 1, 2016, and new grant tracks and guidelines will be published from time to time. Until the Authority launches into full operations, which may take a few months, the existing OCS regulations will continue to apply. We cannot assess at this time how the amended Research Law will affect our obligations to the OCS and any future grants received, if at all from the Authority.

Risks Related to our Securities

The warrants are speculative in nature and with no established trading market.

The ADS warrants do not confer any rights of ownership of ADSs on its holders but only represent the right to acquire ADSs at a fixed price for a limited period of time. Specifically, commencing on the date of issuance, holders of the warrants may exercise their right to acquire the ADSs and pay an exercise price per share of $6.25 per ADS, subject to adjustment upon certain events, prior to five years from the date of issuance, after which date any unexercised ADS warrants will expire and have no further value. Furthermore, at the time of exercise the holder must pay a fee of $0.05 per ADS and any other applicable taxes or charges for issuance of ADSs.

We incur significant additional increased costs as a result of becoming a public company in the United States as well as in Israel, and our management is required to devote substantial additional time to new compliance initiatives as well as to compliance with ongoing U.S. and Israeli reporting requirements.

We are a publicly traded company in the U.S and Israel. As a public company in the U.S., we incur additional significant accounting, legal and other expenses that we did not incur before our initial public offering. We also incur costs associated with corporate governance requirements of the SEC and the NASDAQ Capital Market, as

36

well as requirements under Section 404 and other provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. We expect these rules and regulations to increase our legal and financial compliance costs, introduce new costs such as investor relations, stock exchange listing fees and shareholder reporting, and to make some activities more time consuming and costly. The implementation and testing of such processes and systems may require us to hire outside consultants and incur other significant costs. Any future changes in the laws and regulations affecting public companies in the United States, including Section 404 and other provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, and the rules and regulations adopted by the SEC and the NASDAQ Capital Market, for so long as they apply to us, will result in increased costs to us as we respond to such changes. These laws, rules and regulations could make it more difficult or more costly for us to obtain certain types of insurance, including director and officer liability insurance, and we may be forced to accept reduced policy limits and coverage or incur substantially higher costs to obtain the same or similar coverage. The impact of these requirements could also make it more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified persons to serve on our board of directors, our board committees, if any, or as executive officers.

Our Israeli share registrar ceased its operation and we therefore may experience delays in issuances and transfers of new ordinary shares and ADSs

Most of the shareholders who hold our publicly traded ordinary shares hold their shares through our Israeli share registrar, Bank Leumi Registration Company Ltd. The Israeli share registrar maintains and updates the shareholders records and facilitates new issuances, exercises and other share transfers in coordination with the TASE clearing house. In August 2015, Bank Leumi Registration Company Ltd. ceased operations and no longer provides services to Israeli public companies listed on the TASE. Subsequently, we attempted to contract with a different Israeli share registrar but were unable to locate an appropriate registrar under reasonable commercial terms. To date, we have not yet contracted with an alternative Israeli share registrar. Accordingly, we may experience delays in issuing our ordinary shares and recording such shares for our shareholders. A delay in the issuance of ordinary shares underlying our ADSs will also result in a delay in the issuance of new ADSs.

Our U.S. shareholders may suffer adverse tax consequences if we are characterized as a PFIC.

Generally, if for any taxable year 75% or more of our gross income is passive income, or at least 50% of our assets are held for the production of, or produce, passive income, we would be characterized as a PFIC for U.S. federal income tax purposes. We have not determined whether we will be a PFIC in the year in which the offering was completed or in future years because, among other things, PFIC status is determined annually and is based on our income, assets and activities for the entire taxable year. There can be no assurance that we are not or will not be classified as a PFIC in any year. If we were to be characterized as a PFIC for U.S. federal income tax purposes in any taxable year during which a U.S. Investor, as defined in “Taxation — U.S. Federal Income Tax Consequences”, owns ADSs, such U.S. Investor could face adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences, including having gains realized on the sale of the ADSs classified as ordinary income, rather than as capital gain, the loss of the preferential rate applicable to dividends received on the ADSs by individuals who are U.S. Investors, and having interest charges apply to distributions by us and the proceeds of ADS sales. Certain elections exist that may alleviate some adverse consequences of PFIC status and would result in an alternative treatment (such as mark-to-market treatment) of the ADSs; however, we do not intend to provide the information necessary for U.S. Investors to make “qualified electing fund elections” if we are classified as a PFIC. If we are a PFIC in any year, U.S. investors may be subject to additional IRS filing requirements, including the filing of IRS Form 8621, as a result of directly or indirectly owning stock of a PFIC. See “Taxation — U.S. Federal Income Tax Consequences.”

Failure to achieve and maintain effective internal controls in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operation or financial condition. In addition, current and potential shareholders could lose confidence in our financial reporting, which could have a material adverse effect on the price of the ADSs and warrants.

Effective internal controls are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports and effectively prevent fraud. We will be required to document and test our internal control procedures in order to satisfy the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, which requires annual management assessments of the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting. In addition, if we fail to maintain the adequacy of our internal controls, as such standards are modified, supplemented or amended from time to time, we may not be able to ensure that we can conclude on an ongoing basis that we have effective internal controls over financial reporting in accordance with

37

Section 404. Disclosing deficiencies or weaknesses in our internal controls, failing to remediate these deficiencies or weaknesses in a timely fashion or failing to achieve and maintain an effective internal control environment may cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, which could have a material adverse effect on the price of the ADSs and warrants. If we cannot provide reliable financial reports or prevent fraud, our operating results could be harmed.

As an “emerging growth company” under the JOBS Act, we are permitted to, and intend to, rely on exemptions from certain disclosure requirements, which could make the ADSs and warrants less attractive to investors.

For as long as we are deemed an emerging growth company, we are permitted to and intend to take advantage of specified reduced reporting and other regulatory requirements that are generally unavailable to other public companies, including:

         an exemption from the auditor attestation requirement in the assessment of our internal controls over financial reporting required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or the Sarbanes-Oxley Act; and

         an exemption from compliance with any new requirements adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, or the PCAOB, requiring mandatory audit firm rotation or a supplement to the auditor’s report in which the auditor would be required to provide additional information about our audit and our financial statements.

We will be an emerging growth company until the earliest of: (i) the last day of the fiscal year during which we had total annual gross revenues of $1 billion or more, (ii) the last day of the fiscal year following the fifth anniversary of the date of the first sale of the ADSs pursuant to an effective registration statement, (iii) the date on which we have, during the previous three-year period, issued more than $1 billion in non-convertible debt or (iv) the date on which we are deemed a “large accelerated issuer” as defined in Regulation S-K of the Securities Act.:

We cannot predict if investors will find the securities less attractive because we may rely on these exemptions. If some investors find the securities less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for securities and the market price of the securities may be more volatile.

We are a “foreign private issuer” and have disclosure obligations that are different from those of U.S. domestic reporting companies.

We are a foreign private issuer and are not subject to the same requirements that are imposed upon U.S. domestic issuers by the SEC. Under the Exchange Act, we will be subject to reporting obligations that, in certain respects, are less detailed and less frequent than those of U.S. domestic reporting companies. For example, we will not be required to issue quarterly reports, proxy statements that comply with the requirements applicable to U.S. domestic reporting companies. Furthermore, although under a recent amendment to the regulations promulgated under the Companies Law, as an Israeli public company listed overseas we will be required to disclose the compensation of our five most highly compensated officers on an individual basis (rather than on an aggregate basis, as was previously permitted for Israeli public companies listed overseas prior to such amendment), this disclosure will not be as extensive as that required of U.S. domestic reporting companies. We will also have four months after the end of each fiscal year to file our annual reports with the SEC and will not be required to file current reports as frequently or promptly as U.S. domestic reporting companies. Furthermore, our officers, directors and principal shareholders will be exempt from the requirements to report short-swing profit recovery contained in Section 16 of the Exchange Act. Also, as a “foreign private issuer,” we are also not subject to the requirements of Regulation FD (Fair Disclosure) promulgated under the Exchange Act. These exemptions and leniencies will reduce the frequency and scope of information and protections available to you in comparison to those applicable to a U.S. domestic reporting companies.

As a “foreign private issuer,” we are permitted, and intend, to follow certain home country corporate governance practices instead of otherwise applicable SEC and NASDAQ Capital Market requirements, which may result in less protection than is accorded to investors under rules applicable to domestic U.S. issuers.

As a “foreign private issuer,” we will be permitted, and intend, to follow certain home country corporate governance practices instead of those otherwise required under the listing rules of the NASDAQ Capital Market for

38

domestic U.S. issuers. For instance, we intend to follow home country practice in Israel with regard to, among other things, board independence requirements, director nomination procedures and quorum requirements. In addition, we may follow our home country law instead of the listing rules of the NASDAQ Capital Market that require that we obtain shareholder approval for certain dilutive events, such as the establishment or amendment of certain equity based compensation plans, an issuance that will result in a change of control of us, certain transactions other than a public offering involving issuances of a 20% or greater interest in the company, and certain acquisitions of the stock or assets of another company. We also intend to follow our home country rules regarding the periodic approval of and changes to the formal charter for our compensation committee instead of the listing rules of the NASDAQ Capital Market. We may in the future elect to follow home country corporate governance practices in Israel with regard to other matters. Following our home country corporate governance practices as opposed to the requirements that would otherwise apply to a U.S. company listed on the NASDAQ Capital Market may provide less protection to you than what is accorded to investors under the listing rules of the NASDAQ Capital Market applicable to domestic U.S. issuers. See “Management — NASDAQ Capital Market listing rules and Home Country Practices.”

If securities or industry analysts do not publish or cease publishing research or reports about us, our business or our market, or if they adversely change their recommendations or publish negative reports regarding our business or our traded securities, our securities price and trading volume could be negatively impacted.

The trading market for our securities will be influenced by the research and reports that industry or securities analysts may publish about us, our business, our market or our competitors. We do not have any control over these analysts, and we cannot provide any assurance that analysts will cover us or provide favorable coverage. If any of the analysts who may cover us adversely change their recommendation regarding the securities, or provide more favorable relative recommendations about our competitors, the price of the securities would likely decline. If any analyst who may cover us were to cease coverage of our company or fail to regularly publish reports on us, we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which in turn could negatively impact the price of the securities or their trading volume.

The market price for the ADS warrants may be volatile.

The market price for the ADS warrants is likely to be highly volatile and subject to wide fluctuations in response to numerous factors including the following:

         our failure to obtain the approvals necessary to commence further clinical trials;

         results of clinical and preclinical studies;

         announcements of regulatory approval or the failure to obtain it, or specific label indications or patient populations for its use, or changes or delays in the regulatory review process;

         announcements of technological innovations, new products or product enhancements by us or others;

         adverse actions taken by regulatory agencies with respect to our clinical trials, manufacturing supply chain or sales and marketing activities;

         changes or developments in laws, regulations or decisions applicable to our product candidates or patents;

         any adverse changes to our relationship with manufacturers or suppliers;

         announcements concerning our competitors or the pharmaceutical or biotechnology industries in general;

         achievement of expected product sales and profitability or our failure to meet expectations;

         our commencement of or results of, or involvement in, litigation, including, but not limited to, any product liability actions or intellectual property infringement actions;

         any major changes in our board of directors, management or other key personnel;

         legislation in the United States, Europe and other foreign countries relating to the sale or pricing of pharmaceuticals;

39

         announcements by us of significant strategic partnerships, out-licensing, in-licensing, joint ventures, acquisitions or capital commitments;

         expiration or terminations of licenses, research contracts or other collaboration agreements;

         public concern as to the safety of therapeutics we, our licensees or others develop;

         success of research and development projects;

         developments concerning intellectual property rights or regulatory approvals;

         variations in our and our competitors’ results of operations;

         changes in earnings estimates or recommendations by securities analysts, if our ordinary shares or the ADSs are covered by analysts;

         future issuances of ordinary shares, ADSs or other securities;

         general market conditions, including the volatility of market prices for shares of biotechnology companies generally, and other factors, including factors unrelated to our operating performance; and

         the other factors described in this “Risk Factors” section.

These factors and any corresponding price fluctuations may materially and adversely affect the market price of the ADS warrants, which would result in substantial losses by our investors.

In addition, the securities market has from time to time experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that are not related to the operating performance of any particular company. These market fluctuations may also have a material adverse effect on the market price of the ADS warrants.

Our ordinary shares, the ADSs and ADS warrants will be traded on different markets and this may result in price variations.

Our ordinary shares have been traded on the TASE since August 2007. Our ADSs and warrants are traded on The NASDAQ Capital Market. Trading in these securities on these markets takes place in different currencies (dollars on NASDAQ and NIS on the TASE), and at different times (resulting from different time zones, different trading days and different public holidays in the United States and Israel). The trading prices of our securities on these two markets may differ due to these and other factors.

Substantial future sales or perceived potential sales of our ordinary shares, ADSs or warrants in the public market could cause the price of our ordinary shares, the ADSs and warrants to decline.

Substantial sales of our ordinary shares the ADSs or ADS warrants, either on the TASE or on NASDAQ, as applicable, may cause the market price of our ordinary shares, ADSs and ADS warrants to decline. All of our outstanding ordinary shares are registered and available for sale in Israel. Sales by us or our security holders of substantial amounts of our ordinary shares, ADSs or ADS warrants, or the perception that these sales may occur in the future, could cause a reduction in the market price of our ordinary shares, ADSs or ADS warrants.

The issuance of any additional ordinary shares, any additional ADSs, or any securities that are exercisable for or convertible into our ordinary shares or ADSs, may have an adverse effect on the market price of our ordinary shares, the ADSs and the ADS warrants and will have a dilutive effect on our existing shareholders and holders of ADSs and ADS warrants.

We have not paid, and do not intend to pay, dividends on our ordinary shares and, therefore, unless our traded securities appreciate in value, our investors may not benefit from holding our securities.

We have not paid any cash dividends on our ordinary shares since inception. We do not anticipate paying any cash dividends our ordinary shares in the foreseeable future. Moreover, the Israeli Companies Law, as amended, or the Companies Law, imposes certain restrictions on our ability to declare and pay dividends. See “Description of

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Share Capital — Dividends” for additional information. As a result, investors in the ADSs, ADS warrants or ordinary shares will not be able to benefit from owning these securities unless their market price becomes greater than the price paid by such investors and they are able to sell such securities. We cannot assure you that you will ever be able to resell our securities at a price in excess of the price paid.

You may not receive the same distributions or dividends as those we make to the holders of our ordinary shares, and, in some limited circumstances, you may not receive dividends or other distributions on our ordinary shares and you may not receive any value for them, if it is illegal or impractical to make them available to you.

The depositary for the ADSs has agreed to pay to you the cash dividends or other distributions it or the custodian receives on ordinary shares or other deposited securities underlying the ADSs, after deducting its fees and expenses. You will receive these distributions in proportion to the number of ordinary shares your ADSs represent. However, the depositary is not responsible if it decides that it is unlawful or impractical to make a distribution available to any holders of ADSs. For example, it would be unlawful to make a distribution to a holder of ADSs if it consists of securities that require registration under the Securities Act, but that are not properly registered or distributed under an applicable exemption from registration. In addition, conversion into U.S. dollars from foreign currency that was part of a dividend made in respect of deposited ordinary shares may require the approval or license of, or a filing with, any government or agency thereof, which may be unobtainable. In these cases, the depositary may determine not to distribute such property and hold it as “deposited securities” or may seek to effect a substitute dividend or distribution, including net cash proceeds from the sale of the dividends that the depositary deems an equitable and practicable substitute. We have no obligation to register under U.S. securities laws any ADSs, ordinary shares, rights or other securities received through such distributions. We also have no obligation to take any other action to permit the distribution of ADSs, ordinary shares, rights or anything else to holders of ADSs. In addition, the depositary may withhold from such dividends or distributions its fees and an amount on account of taxes or other governmental charges to the extent the depositary believes it is required to make such withholding. This means that you may not receive the same distributions or dividends as those we make to the holders of our ordinary shares, and, in some limited circumstances, you may not receive any value for such distributions or dividends if it is illegal or impractical for us to make them available to you. These restrictions may cause a material decline in the value of the ADSs.

Holders of ADSs must act through the depositary to exercise their rights as our shareholders.

Holders of the ADSs do not have the same rights of our shareholders and may only exercise the voting rights with respect to the underlying ordinary shares in accordance with the provisions of the deposit agreement for the ADSs. Under Israeli law, the minimum notice period required to convene a shareholders meeting is no less than 35 or 21 calendar days, depending on the proposals on the agenda for the shareholders meeting. When a shareholder meeting is convened, holders of the ADSs may not receive sufficient notice of a shareholders’ meeting to permit them to withdraw their ordinary shares to allow them to cast their vote with respect to any specific matter. In addition, the depositary and its agents may not be able to send voting instructions to holders of the ADSs or carry out their voting instructions in a timely manner. We will make all reasonable efforts to cause the depositary to extend voting rights to holders of the ADSs in a timely manner, but we cannot assure holders that they will receive the voting materials in time to ensure that they can instruct the depositary to vote their ADSs. Furthermore, the depositary and its agents will not be responsible for any failure to carry out any instructions to vote, for the manner in which any vote is cast or for the effect of any such vote. As a result, holders of the ADSs may not be able to exercise their right to vote and they may lack recourse if their ADSs are not voted as they requested. In addition, in the capacity as a holder of ADSs, they will not be able to call a shareholders’ meeting.

You may be subject to limitations on transfer of your ADSs.

Your ADSs and ADS warrants are transferable on the books of the depositary. However, the depositary may close its transfer books at any time or from time to time when it deems expedient in connection with the performance of its duties. In addition, the depositary may refuse to deliver, transfer or register transfers of ADSs and ADS warrants generally when our books or the books of the depositary are closed, or at any time if we or the depositary deems it advisable to do so because of any requirement of law or of any government or governmental body, or under any provision of the deposit agreement, or for any other reason in accordance with the terms of the deposit agreement.

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Your percentage ownership in us may be diluted by future issuances of share capital, which could reduce your influence over matters on which shareholders vote.

Our board of directors has the authority, in most cases without action or vote of our shareholders, to issue all or any part of our authorized but unissued shares, including ordinary shares issuable upon the exercise of outstanding warrants and options. Issuances of additional shares would reduce your influence over matters on which our shareholders vote.

Management will have broad discretion as to the use of the proceeds from the exercise of the warrants, and we may not use the proceeds effectively.

Our management will have broad discretion in the application of the net proceeds from the exercise of the ADS warrants held by the public investor and the representatives of the underwriters and could spend the proceeds in ways that you do not agree with or that do not improve our results of operations or enhance the value of ADSs or ADS warrants (see “Use of Proceeds”). Our failure to apply these funds effectively could have a material adverse effect on our business and cause the price of the ADSs and ADS warrants to decline.

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SPECIAL NOTE ABOUT FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This prospectus contains forward-looking statements about our expectations, beliefs and intentions regarding, among other things, our product development efforts, business, financial condition, results of operations, strategies, plans and prospects. In addition, from time to time, we or our representatives have made or may make forward-looking statements, orally or in writing. Forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of forward-looking words such as “believe”, “expect”, “intend”, “plan”, “may”, “should”, “could”, “might”, “seek”, “target”, “will”, “project”, “forecast”, “continue” or “anticipate” or their negatives or variations of these words or other comparable words or by the fact that these statements do not relate strictly to historical matters. These forward-looking statements may be included in, among other things, various filings made by us with the SEC, press releases or oral statements made by or with the approval of one of our authorized executive officers. Forward-looking statements relate to anticipated or expected events, activities, trends or results as of the date they are made. Because forward-looking statements relate to matters that have not yet occurred, these statements are inherently subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from any future results expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. Many factors could cause our actual activities or results to differ materially from the activities and results anticipated in forward-looking statements.

This prospectus identifies important factors which could cause our actual results to differ materially from those indicated by the forward-looking statements, particularly those set forth under the heading “Risk Factors.”

We believe these forward-looking statements are reasonable; however, these statements are only current predictions and are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our or our industry’s actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from those anticipated by the forward-looking statements. We discuss many of these risks in this prospectus in greater detail under the heading “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this prospectus. Given these uncertainties, you should not rely upon forward-looking statements as predictions of future events.

All forward-looking statements attributable to us or persons acting on our behalf speak only as of the date hereof and are expressly qualified in their entirety by the cautionary statements included in this prospectus. We undertake no obligations to update or revise forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances that arise after the date made or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events, except as required by applicable law. In evaluating forward-looking statements, you should consider these risks and uncertainties.

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EXCHANGE RATE INFORMATION

As of September 30, 2015, the daily representative exchange rate of NIS per U.S. dollars was 3.923. The following table sets forth information regarding the exchange rates of NIS per U.S. dollars for the periods indicated. Average rates are calculated by using the daily representative rates as reported by the Bank of Israel on the last day of each month during the periods presented.

 

 

NIS per U.S. $

Year Ended December 31,

 

High

 

Low

 

Average

 

Period End

2015

 

4.0530

 

3.7610

 

3.8869

 

3.9020

2014

 

3.9940

 

3.4020

 

3.5774

 

3.8890

2013

 

3.7910

 

3.4710

 

3.6094

 

3.4710

2012

 

4.0840

 

3.7000

 

3.8580

 

3.7330

2011

 

3.8210

 

3.3630

 

3.5791

 

3.8210

2010

 

3.8940

 

3.5490

 

3.7319

 

3.5490

2009

 

4.2560

 

3.6900

 

3.9234

 

3.7750

 

 

 

NIS per U.S. $

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 

High

 

Low

 

Average

 

Period End

2015

 

4.0530

 

3.7610

 

3.8860

 

3.9230

2014

 

3.6950

 

3.4020

 

3.4911

 

3.6950

 

 

 

NIS per U.S. $

Month Ended

 

High

 

Low

 

Average

 

Period End

Dec 31, 2015

 

3.9050

 

3.855

 

3.8814

 

3.9020

Nov 30, 2015

 

3.9210

 

3.8680

 

3.8893

 

3.8770

Oct 31, 2015

 

3.9230

 

3.8160

 

3.8630

 

3.8670

Sep 30, 2015

 

3.9490

 

3.8630

 

3.9129

 

3.9230

Aug 31, 2015

 

3.9300

 

3.7720

 

3.8449

 

3.9300

July 31, 2015

 

3.8250

 

3.7650

 

3.7890

 

3.7830

June 30, 2015

 

3.8720

 

3.7610

 

3.8245

 

3.7690

44

PRICE RANGE OF OUR ORDINARY SHARES

Our ordinary shares have been trading on the TASE under the symbol “BNDX” since June 18, 2007 and under the symbol “BVXV” since May 18, 2015. No trading market currently exists for our ordinary shares in the United States. Following the completion of an initial public offering, we listed ADSs and ADS warrants on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “BVXV” and “BVXVW”, respectively.

The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, the reported high and low closing sale prices of our ordinary shares on the TASE in NIS and U.S. dollars.

 

 

NIS

 

U.S. dollar ($)

 

 

Price Per Ordinary
Share

 

Price Per Ordinary Share(1)

 

 

High

 

Low

 

High

 

Low

Annual:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2015

 

0.769

 

0.330

 

0.196

 

0.084

2014

 

0.796

 

0.575

 

0.203

 

0.147

2013

 

1.052

 

0.597

 

0.268

 

0.152

2012

 

1.712

 

0.736

 

0.436

 

0.188

2011

 

3.139

 

1.37

 

0.800

 

0.349

2010

 

4.005

 

2.026

 

1.021

 

0.516

2009

 

7.70

 

0.28

 

1.963

 

0.071

Quarterly:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Third Quarter 2015

 

0.462

 

0.330

 

0.118

 

0.084

Second Quarter 2015

 

0.728

 

0.420

 

0.186

 

0.107

First Quarter 2015

 

0.769

 

0.623

 

0.196

 

0.159

Fourth Quarter 2014

 

0.759

 

0.595

 

0.193

 

0.152

Third Quarter 2014

 

0.788

 

0.594

 

0.201

 

0.151

Second Quarter 2014

 

0.79

 

0.69

 

0.201

 

0.176

First Quarter 2014

 

0.796

 

0.575

 

0.203

 

0.147

Fourth Quarter 2013

 

0.817

 

0.601

 

0.208

 

0.153

Third Quarter 2013

 

0.822

 

0.638

 

0.210

 

0.163

Second Quarter 2013

 

0.751

 

0.597

 

0.191

 

0.152

First Quarter 2013

 

1.052

 

0.668

 

0.268

 

0.170

Fourth Quarter 2012

 

1.225

 

0.794

 

0.312

 

0.202

Third Quarter 2012

 

0.944

 

0.736

 

0.241

 

0.188

Most Recent Six Months:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dec 2015

 

0.389

 

0.351

 

0.099

 

0.089

Nov 2015

 

0.405

 

0.366

 

0.103

 

0.093

Oct 2015

 

0.400

 

0.367

 

0.102

 

0.094

Sep 2015

 

0.462

 

0.339

 

0.118

 

0.086

Aug 2015

 

0.437

 

0.330

 

0.111

 

0.084

July 2015

 

0.452

 

0.406

 

0.115

 

0.103

June 2015

 

0.524

 

0.421

 

0.134

 

0.107

____________

(1)      Calculated using the exchange rate reported by the Bank of Israel for September 30, 2015, at the rate of one U.S. dollar per NIS 3.9230.

As of September 30, 2015, there were two shareholders of record of our ordinary shares. The number of record holders is not representative of the number of beneficial holders of our ordinary shares, as the shares of most our shareholders who hold ordinary shares that are traded on the TASE are recorded in the name of our Israeli share registrar, Bank Leumi Registration Company Ltd. As of September 30, 2015, there were no record holders of our ordinary shares in the United States.

45

MARKET INFORMATION FOR OUR ADS and ADS WARRANTS

We listed ADSs and ADS warrants on the NASDAQ Capital Market on May 12, 2015, under the symbols “BVXV” and “BVXVW”, respectively. Prior to that date, there was no public trading market for our securities on NASDAQ. Our initial public offering was priced at $5.00 per ADS and $0.01 per ADS warrant on May 11, 2015. Each whole ADS warrant entitles the holder to purchase one ADS at an exercise price of $6.25. The following tables set forth for the periods indicated the high and low sales prices per ADS and ADS warrants as reported on the NASDAQ Capital Market:

BVXV

 

 

 

 

Month Ended

 

High

 

Low

December 31, 2015

 

$

3.96

 

$

3.57

November 30, 2015

 

$

4.08

 

$

3.72

October 30, 2015

 

$

4.04

 

$

3.71

September 30, 2015

 

$

4.12

 

$

3.49

August 31, 2015

 

$

4.35

 

$

3.39

July 31, 2015

 

$

4.69

 

$

4.13

June 30, 2015

 

$

5.39

 

$

4.26

May 31, 2015

 

$

4.71

 

$

3.99

 

BVXVW

 

 

 

 

Month Ended

 

High

 

Low

December 31, 2015

 

$

0.84

 

$

0.71

November 30, 2015

 

$

0.93

 

$

0.89

October 30, 2015

 

$

0.98

 

$

0.82

September 30, 2015

 

$

0.90

 

$

0.75

August 31, 2015

 

$

0.91

 

$

0.70

July 31, 2015

 

$

0.99

 

$

0.86

June 30, 2015

 

$

1.27

 

$

0.96

May 31, 2015

 

$

1.37

 

$

0.95

On December 31, 2015, the last reported sale price of our ADS and the ADS warrants on the Nasdaq Capital Market was $3.96 and $0.72, respectively.

46

USE OF PROCEEDS

Assuming the exercise of all of the ADS warrants for cash held by the public investors, of which no assurance can be provided, we will receive gross proceeds of $12.74 million. Assuming the exercise of all of the representative’s warrants for cash held by the representatives of the underwriters, of which no assurance can be provided, we will receive gross proceeds of $0.59 million. Assuming the exercise of all of the ADS warrants and the representative’s warrants in full for cash, we will receive gross proceeds of $13.33 million.

We intend to use the proceeds from the exercise of the ADS warrants and representative’s warrants for working capital, operating expenses and other general corporate purposes.

DIVIDENDS AND DIVIDEND POLICY

We have never declared or paid cash dividends to our shareholders. Currently, we do not intend to pay cash dividends. We intend to reinvest any earnings in developing and expanding our business. Any future determination relating to our dividend policy will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend on a number of factors, including future earnings, our financial condition, operating results, contractual restrictions, capital requirements, business prospects, applicable Israeli law and other factors our board of directors may deem relevant. In addition, the distribution of dividends is limited by Israeli law, which permits the distribution of dividends only out of distributable profits. See “Description of Share Capital — Dividends.” In addition, if we pay a dividend out of income attributed to our Benefited Enterprise during the tax exemption period, we may be subject to tax on the grossed-up amount of such income at the corporate tax rate which would have been applied to such Benefited Enterprise’s income had we not enjoyed the exemption. See “Taxation — Israeli Tax Considerations and Government Programs.”

If we pay any dividends, we will also pay such dividends to the ADS holders to the same extent as holders of our ordinary shares, subject to the terms of the deposit agreement, including the fees and expenses payable thereunder. See “Description of Securities.” Cash dividends on our ordinary shares, if any, will be paid to ADS holders in U.S. dollars.

47

CAPITALIZATION

The following table sets forth our cash and cash equivalents, total debt and capitalization as of September 30, 2015 and as of December 31, 2014. This table should be read in conjunction with “Selected Financial Data,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus.

The data below is based on the September 30, 2015 exchange rate of 3.923 = $1.00

 

 

As of September 30, 2015

 

 

Actual

 

As Adjusted

 

 

In thousands, in $

Cash and cash equivalents, and marketable securities

 

10,288

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

Warrants to purchase ADS’s

 

1,749

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shareholders’ equity:

 

 

 

 

 

Ordinary shares

 

*)

 

 

Share Premium

 

28,129

 

 

 

Options

 

646

 

 

 

Unrealized gain on available-for-sale financial assets

 

3

 

 

 

Accumulated deficit

 

(19,478

)

 

 

Total shareholders’ equity

 

9,300

 

 

 

Total capitalization

 

11,049

 

 

 

____________

*)        The amount is less than 1 USD.

48

DILUTION

If you exercise ADS warrants and Representative warrants in this offering, your ownership interest in us will be diluted to the extent of the difference between the exercise price per ADS you will pay and the pro forma net tangible book value per ADS and Representative warrants after the exercise. Dilution results from the fact that the initial public offering price per ADS and representative warrants is substantially in excess of the book value per ADS and Representative warrants attributable to the existing warrant holders for our presently outstanding warrants.

Our historical net tangible book value as of September 30, 2015, was approximately NIS 36.5 million, or $9.3 million, corresponding to a net tangible book value of NIS 0.27 or $0.07 per ordinary share or $2.75 per ADS (using the ratio of 40 ordinary shares to one ADS), as of such date. We calculate our historical net tangible book value per share or per ADS by taking the amount of our total tangible assets, subtracting the amount of our total liabilities, and then dividing the difference by the actual total number of ordinary shares or ADSs outstanding, as applicable.

The pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value per share as of September 30, 2015 was NIS 0.70 or $0.18 per ordinary share or $7.11 per ADS (using the ratio of 40 ordinary shares to one ADS). The pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value per share gives effect to exercise of 2,133,500 warrants to ordinary shares. The pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value per share after the offering is calculated by dividing the pro forma net tangible book value of NIS 95.66 million or $24.38 million, by 137,230,867, which is equal to our pro forma issued and outstanding ordinary shares. The difference between the public offering price and the pro forma net tangible book value per share represents an immediate increase in the net tangible book value of NIS 0.43, or $0.11 per ordinary share or $4.35 per ADS to existing shareholders.

The following table illustrates this dilution on a per share basis:

Price per warrant

 

NIS 24.52

 

 

$

6.25

 

Actual net tangible book value per ADS as of September 30, 2015

 

10.79

 

 

 

2.75

 

Decrease in net tangible book value per share attributable to exercise of warrants in this offering

 

(7.42

)

 

 

(1.89

)

Pro forma net tangible book value per share of ADSs, as adjusted to give effect to this offering

 

27.89

 

 

 

7.11

 

49

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The following tables summarize our financial data. We have derived the selected statements of comprehensive loss data for the years ended December 31, 2012, 2013 and 2014 and the balance sheet data as of December 31, 2013 and 2014 from our audited financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. The selected financial statement data as of September 30, 2015 and for the nine months ended September 30, 2014 and 2015 are derived from our unaudited interim financial statements that are included elsewhere in this prospectus. In the opinion of management, these unaudited interim financial statements include all adjustments, consisting of normal recurring adjustments, necessary for a fair presentation of our financial position and operating results for these periods. Results from interim periods are not necessarily indicative of results that may be expected for the entire year. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected in the future. The following selected financial data should be read in conjunction with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus.

Our financial statements included in this prospectus were prepared in accordance with IFRS, as issued by the IASB, and reported in NIS.

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

 

2012

 

2013

 

2014

 

2014

 

 

NIS in thousands

 

Convenience translation into USD in thousands(2)

Statements of comprehensive loss data:(1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development expenses

 

8,616

 

 

6,723

 

 

6,441

 

 

1,656

 

Participation by the OCS

 

(1,839

)

 

(1,272

)

 

(949

)

 

(244

)

Research and development, net of participations expenses

 

6,777

 

 

5,451

 

 

5,492

 

 

1,412

 

Marketing, general and administrative expenses

 

2,357

 

 

2,190

 

 

2,650

 

 

682

 

Operating loss

 

9,134

 

 

7,641

 

 

8,142

 

 

2,094

 

Financial income

 

(321

)

 

(157

)

 

(394

)

 

(101

)

Financial expenses