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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 10-K 
(Mark One)
 
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019
or
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from     to     
Commission file number:  001-37352
Virtu Financial, Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware
32-0420206
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
One Liberty Plaza
 
165 Broadway
10006
New York,
New York
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip Code)

 (212) 418-0100
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code) 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
 
Trading symbol(s)
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Class A common stock, par value $0.00001 per share
 
VIRT
 
The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
None
(Title of class)

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes No
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act.
Yes No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15 (d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer
Accelerated filer
Non-accelerated filer
Smaller reporting company
 
 
 
 
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
Emerging growth company
 
 
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes     No
Class of Stock
 
Shares Outstanding as of February 28, 2020
Class A common stock, par value $0.00001 per share
 
119,921,738
Class C common stock, par value $0.00001 per share
 
12,162,851
Class D common stock, par value $0.00001 per share
 
60,091,740
The aggregate market value of voting and non-voting common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of June 30, 2019 was approximately $1,677.1 million, based on the closing price of $21.78 per share as reported by NASDAQ on such date.
 Portions of Part III of this Form 10-K are incorporated by reference from the Registrant’s definitive proxy statement (the “2020 Proxy Statement”) for its 2020 annual meeting of shareholders to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission no later than 120 days after the end of the Registrant’s fiscal year.
 


Table of Contents

VIRTU FINANCIAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
INDEX TO FORM 10-K
FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019
 
    
 
PAGE
NUMBER
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Unless the context otherwise requires, the terms “we,” “us,” “our,” “Virtu” and the “Company” refer to Virtu Financial, Inc., a Delaware corporation, and its consolidated subsidiaries and the term “Virtu Financial” refers to Virtu Financial LLC, a Delaware limited liability company and a consolidated subsidiary of ours.

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PART I

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS
This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements. You should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements because they are subject to numerous uncertainties and factors relating to our operations and business environment, all of which are difficult to predict and many of which are beyond our control. Forward-looking statements include information concerning our possible or assumed future results of operations, including descriptions of our business strategy. These forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology, including the terms “may,” “will,” “should,” “believe,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “estimate,” “project” or, in each case, their negative, or other variations or comparable terminology and expressions. These statements are based on assumptions that we have made in light of our experience in the industry as well as our perceptions of historical trends, current conditions, expected future developments and other factors we believe are appropriate under the circumstances. As you read and consider this Annual Report on Form 10-K, you should understand that forward-looking statements are not guarantees of performance or results and that our actual results of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and the development of the industry in which we operate, may differ materially from those made in or suggested by the forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. By their nature, forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks and uncertainties, including those described under the heading “Risk Factors” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, because they relate to events and depend on circumstances that may or may not occur in the future. Although we believe that the forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K are based on reasonable assumptions, you should be aware that many factors, including those described under the heading “Risk Factors” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, could affect our actual financial results or results of operations and cash flows, and could cause actual results to differ materially from those in such forward-looking statements, including but not limited to:
reduced levels of overall trading activity;
dependence upon trading counterparties and clearing houses performing their obligations to us;
failures of our customized trading platform;
risks inherent to the electronic market making business and trading generally;
increased competition in market making activities and execution services;
dependence on continued access to sources of liquidity;
risks associated with self‑clearing and other operational elements of our business;
obligations to comply with applicable regulatory capital requirements;
litigation or other legal and regulatory‑based liabilities;
proposed legislation that would impose taxes on certain financial transactions in the European Union, the U.S. and other jurisdictions;
obligations to comply with laws and regulations applicable to our operations in the U.S. and abroad;
enhanced media and regulatory scrutiny and its impact upon public perception of us or of companies in our industry;
need to maintain and continue developing proprietary technologies;
the effect of the ITG Acquisition (as defined below) on existing business relationships, operating results, and ongoing business operations generally;
the significant costs and significant indebtedness that we have incurred in connection with the ITG Acquisition, and the integration of ITG (as defined below) into our business;
the risk that we may encounter significant difficulties or delays in integrating the ITG business with ours and that the anticipated benefits, cost savings and synergies or capital release may not be achieved;
the assumption of potential liabilities and risks relating to ITG's business;
capacity constraints, system failures, and delays;
dependence on third party infrastructure or systems;
use of open source software;
failure to protect or enforce our intellectual property rights in our proprietary technology;

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failure to protect confidential and proprietary information;
failure to protect our systems from internal or external cyber threats that could result in damage to our computer systems, business interruption, loss of data or other consequences;
risks associated with international operations and expansion, including failed acquisitions or dispositions;
the effects of and changes in economic conditions (such as volatility in the financial markets, inflation, monetary conditions and foreign currency and exchange rate fluctuations, foreign currency controls and/or government mandated pricing controls, as well as in trade, monetary, fiscal and tax policies in international markets), political conditions (such as military actions and terrorist activities), and other global events such as fires, natural disasters, pandemics, or extreme weather;
risks associated with potential growth and associated corporate actions;
inability to access, or delay in accessing the capital markets to sell shares or raise additional capital;
loss of key executives and failure to recruit and retain qualified personnel; and
risks associated with losing access to a significant exchange or other trading venue.

We undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances that may arise after the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

BUSINESS

Overview

We are a leading financial firm that leverages cutting edge technology to deliver liquidity to the global markets and innovative, transparent trading solutions to our clients. Leveraging our global market structure expertise and scaled, multi-asset infrastructure, we provide our clients a robust product suite including offerings in execution, liquidity sourcing, analytics and broker-neutral, multi-dealer platforms in workflow technology. Our product offerings allow our clients to trade on hundreds of venues across over 50 countries and in multiple asset classes, including global equities, ETFs, foreign exchange, futures, fixed income and myriad other commodities. Our integrated, multi-asset analytics platform provides a range of pre and post-trade services, data products and compliance tools that our clients rely upon to invest, trade and manage risk across global markets. We believe that our broad diversification, in combination with our proprietary technology platform and low-cost structure, gives us the scale necessary to grow our business around the globe as we service clients and facilitate risk transfer between global capital markets participants by providing liquidity, while at the same time earning attractive margins and returns.

Technology and operational efficiency are at the core of our business, and our focus on market making and order routing technology is a key element of our success. We have developed a proprietary, multi‑asset, multi‑currency technology platform that is highly reliable, scalable and modular, and we integrate directly with exchanges, liquidity centers, and our clients. Our market data, order routing, transaction processing, risk management and market surveillance technology modules manage our market making and institutional agency activities in an efficient manner that enables us to scale our activities globally, across additional securities and other financial instruments and asset classes, without significant incremental costs or third‑party licensing or processing fees.

We believe that technology-enabled market makers like Virtu serve an important role in maintaining and improving the overall health and efficiency of the global capital markets by ensuring that market participants have an efficient means to transfer risk and analyze the quality of execution. We believe that market participants benefit from the increased liquidity, lower overall trading costs and execution transparency that Virtu provides.

Our execution services and client solutions products are designed to be transparent, because we believe transparency makes markets more efficient and helps investors make better, more informed decisions. We use the latest technology to create and deliver liquidity to global markets and innovative trading solutions and analytics tools to our clients. We interact directly with hundreds of retail brokers, Registered Investment Advisors, private client networks, sell-side brokers, and buy-side institutions.


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On July 20, 2017 (the “KCG Closing Date”), we completed our all-cash acquisition (the “Acquisition of KCG”) of KCG Holdings, Inc. (“KCG”). KCG was a leading independent securities firm offering clients a range of services designed to address trading needs across asset classes, product types and geographies. KCG combined advanced technology with specialized client service across market making, agency execution and trading venues and also engaged in principal trading via electronic market making.

On March 1, 2019 (the “ITG Closing Date”), we completed our acquisition of Investment Technology Group, Inc. (“ITG”) for approximately $1.0 billion (the “ITG Acquisition”). As described in “Acquisition of Investment Technology Group, Inc.” below, ITG was a global financial technology company that offered a suite of trading and financial technology products to help leading brokers and asset managers improve returns for investors around the world. ITG empowered traders and investors to reduce the end-to-end cost of implementing investment decisions via liquidity, execution, analytics and workflow technology solutions.

We have two operating segments: Market Making and Execution Services, and one non-operating segment: Corporate. Our management allocates resources, assesses performance and manages our business according to these segments.

We primarily conduct our Americas equities business through our SEC registered broker‑dealers. We are registered with the Central Bank of Ireland and the Financial Conduct Authority in the UK for our European trading, the Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada and the Ontario Securities Commission for our Canadian trading, and the Monetary Authority of Singapore, Securities and Futures Commission of Hong Kong, and Australian Securities and Investments Commission for our Asia-Pacific (“APAC”) trading. We are registered as a market maker or liquidity provider and/or enter into direct obligations to provide liquidity on nearly every exchange or venue that offers such programs. We engage regularly with regulators around the world on issues affecting electronic trading and to advocate for increased transparency. In the U.S., we conduct our business from our headquarters in New York, New York and our trading centers in Austin, Texas and Chicago, Illinois. Abroad, we conduct our business through trading centers located in London, England, Dublin, Ireland and Singapore.

Market Making

Our Market Making segment principally consists of market making in the cash, futures, and options markets across global equities, options, fixed income, currencies and commodities. As a leading, low‑cost market maker dedicated to improving efficiency and providing liquidity across multiple asset classes and geographies, we aim to provide critical market functionality and robust price competition in the securities and other financial instruments in which we provide liquidity. The scale and diversity of our market making activities provide added liquidity and transparency to the financial markets, which we believe are necessary and valuable components to the efficient functioning of markets and benefit all market participants. We support transparent and efficient, technologically advanced marketplaces, and advocate for legislation and regulation that promotes fair and transparent access to the financial markets.

As a market maker, we commit capital on a principal basis by offering to buy securities from, or sell securities to, broker dealers, banks and institutions. We engage in principal trading in the Market Making segment direct to clients as well as in a supplemental capacity on exchanges and on alternative trading systems (“ATSs”). As a complement to electronic market making, our cash trading business handles specialized orders and transacts on the OTC Link ATS operated by OTC Markets Group Inc. and the Alternative Investment Market of the London Stock Exchange (“AIM”).

We make markets in a number of different asset classes, which are discussed in more detail below. We register as market makers and liquidity providers where available and support affirmative market making obligations.

We provide competitive and deep liquidity that helps to create more efficient markets around the world. We stand ready, at any time, to buy or sell a broad range of securities, and we generate revenue by buying and selling large volumes of securities and other financial instruments while earning small bid/ask spreads.

We believe the overall level of volumes and realized volatility in the various markets we serve have the greatest impact on our businesses. Increases in market volatility can cause bid/ask spreads to temporarily widen as market participants are more willing to transact immediately and as a result market makers’ capture rate per notional amount transacted increases.

Technology is at the core of our business. Our team of in-house software engineers develops our software and applications, and we utilize optimized infrastructure to integrate directly with the exchanges and other trading venues on which we provide liquidity. Our focus on technology and our ability to leverage our technology enables us to be one of the lowest cost providers of liquidity to the global electronic trading marketplace.

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Leveraging the scalability and low costs of our platform, we are able to test and rapidly deploy new liquidity provisioning strategies, expand to new securities, asset classes and geographies and increase transaction volumes at little incremental cost. These efficiencies are central to our ability to deliver consistently positive Adjusted Net Trading Income (as defined below) as our profitability per trade and per instrument is not significant, particularly in U.S. equities.

Our transaction processing is automated over the full life cycle of a trade. Our market making platform generates and disseminates continuous bid and offer quotes. At the moment when a trade is executed, our systems capture and deliver this information back to the source, in most cases within a fraction of a second, and the trade record is written into our clearing system, where it flows through a chain of control accounts that allow us to automatically and efficiently reconcile trades, positions and payments until the final settlement occurs.

We have built and continuously refine our automated and integrated, real time systems for global trading, risk management, clearing and cash management, among other purposes. We have also assembled a proprietary connectivity network between us and exchanges around the world. Efficiency and speed in performing prescribed functions are always crucial requirements for our systems, and generally we focus on opportunities in markets that are sufficiently advanced to allow the seamless deployment of our automated strategies, risk management system and core technology.

Our systems are monitored 24 hours a day, five days a week by our core operations team across our offices in North America, Asia Pacific, and Europe. This function provides coverage for our full technology platform, including our market data, order routing, transaction processing, and risk management technology modules.

Clients and Products

We offer direct-to-client market making services across multiple asset classes primarily to sell-side clients including global, national and regional broker dealers and banks as well as buy-side clients comprising, among others, mutual funds, pension plans, plan sponsors, hedge funds, trusts and endowments in North America, Europe and Asia.

We generally compete based on execution quality, market coverage, payment for order flow, and client service. In direct-to-client electronic market making in U.S. equities, execution quality is generally measured based on factors that include speed of execution, fulfillment rates, opportunity and amounts of price improvement, using metrics defined in SEC Rule 605. In other asset classes, metrics for execution quality are not prescribed by applicable regulation, and in many cases, are client defined.

We continually work to provide clients with high quality, low-cost trade executions that enable them to satisfy their fiduciary obligation to seek the best execution on behalf of the end client. We continually refine our automated order routing models so that we may remain competitive.

Global Equities

We trade over 25,000 listed Americas equity securities including, among others, equity related futures and exchange traded products, on thirteen U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) registered exchanges and other market centers around the world, including the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”), the NASDAQ, NYSE Arca, Cboe BATS, Chicago Stock Exchange, the TSX in Canada, Bovespa in Brazil and BMV in Mexico, as well as other ATSs and more than 20 private liquidity pools.

Our strategy in the Americas and the rest of world is to utilize high speed, efficient connections to all of the registered exchanges and market centers, including the London Stock Exchange, Cboe Europe Equities, Euronext, Six Swiss Exchange, Australian Securities Exchange, Tokyo Stock Exchange and Singapore Exchange, as well as other trading venues and additional pools of liquidity to which we can gain access either directly or through a broker.

As exchange traded products, or “ETPs,” and other similar products have proliferated both domestically and internationally, demand has increased for trading the underlying assets or hedging such funds. Our technology has enabled us to expand into providing liquidity to this growing area by making markets across these assets in a variety of trading venues globally. We are authorized participants, and can create and/or redeem ETPs in the Americas. As of December 31, 2019, we are the Lead Market Maker or Designated Liquidity Provider in over 600 ETPs listed in the Americas.

We are also well positioned in European ETPs, as an authorized participant in many European ETPs. We are authorized participants in over 2,000 ETPs and can create and/or redeem ETPs listed outside the Americas. As of December 31,

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2019, we are the registered Market Maker in over 500 ETPs listed abroad. We also hold a minority stake in SBI Japannext Co., Ltd. (“SBI”), a leading Proprietary Trading System in Japan.

Global Fixed Income, Currencies and Commodities (FICC), Options, and Other

Our Fixed Income market making includes our activity in U.S. Treasury securities and other sovereign debt, corporate bonds, and other debt instruments. We trade these products on a variety of specialized exchanges, direct to counterparties, and other trading venues, including BrokerTec, eSpeed, DealerWeb, and BGS’s Fenics UTS.

Our Currencies market making, including spot, futures and forwards, comprises our activity in over 80 currencies, including deliverable, non-deliverable, fiat, and digital currencies, across dozens of venues and direct to counterparties. During the years ended December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017, we were a leading participant in the major foreign exchange venues, including Reuters, Currenex, Cboe FX and NEX.

Our Commodities market making takes place on the CME, ICE, and Nasdaq Futures in crude oil, natural gas, heating oil, and gasoline futures. We trade approximately 100 energy products and futures on the ICE, CME, and TOCOM. We also actively trade precious metals, including gold, silver, platinum and palladium, as well as base metals such as aluminum and copper.

Our Options and Other market making includes our activity on all of the U.S. options exchanges of which we are a member (i.e., Cboe, ISE and NYSE Arca) and on the U.S. futures exchanges.

Execution Services

We offer agency execution services and trading venues that provide transparent trading in global equities, ETFs, fixed income, currencies, and commodities to institutions, banks and broker dealers. We generally earn commissions when transacting as an agent for our clients. Within the Execution Services segment, we offer the following categories of products and services:

Agency-based, execution-only trading, done through a variety of access points including:
algorithmic trading and order routing;
institutional sales traders who offer portfolio trading and single stock sales trading providing execution expertise for program, block and riskless principal trades in global equities and ETFs; and
matching of client conditional orders in POSIT Alert and in our ATSs, including Virtu MatchIt, POSIT and MATCHNow. 

Workflow Technology, and our integrated, broker-neutral trading tools delivered across the globe including order and execution management systems and order management software applications and network connectivity; and

Trading Analytics, including
tools enabling portfolio managers and traders to improve pre-trade and real-time execution performance and post-trade analysis;
portfolio construction and optimization decisions; and
securities valuation.

Clients and Products 

We offer agency execution services across multiple asset classes to buy-side clients including mutual funds, pension plans, plan sponsors, hedge funds, trusts and endowments and sell-side clients including global, national and regional broker dealers and banks in North America, Europe and Asia. In 2019 our Execution Services segment did not have any client that accounted for more than 10% of our commissions earned.

Clients may access a broad range of products and services that includes electronic execution services in global equities via algorithmic trading, order routing and an execution management system (“EMS”) as well as internal crossing through our registered ATSs. Our ATSs provide clients with anonymous sources of non-displayed liquidity. We also offer clients voice access to global markets including sales and trading for equities, ETFs and options. Certain broker-dealer affiliates also engage in foreign exchange trading to facilitate equity trades by clients in different currencies as well as other client foreign exchange trades unrelated to equity trades. We handle large complex trades, accessing liquidity from our order flow and other sources. We provide soft dollar and commission recapture programs.

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In this segment, we generally compete on trading technology, execution performance, costs, client service, market coverage, liquidity, platform capabilities and anonymity. We draw on in-house developed trading technologies to meet client criteria for execution quality and for managing trading costs. As a result, we are able to attract a diverse array of clients in terms of strategy, size and style. We also provide algorithmic trading and order routing that combine technology, access to our differentiated liquidity and support from experienced professionals to help clients execute trades.

Agency-based, Execution-only Trading
    
Our clients may access a broad range of products and services that includes electronic execution services in global equities via algorithmic trading, order routing and an EMS as well as internal crossing through our registered ATSs. Our algorithms and order routers help portfolio managers and traders to trade orders quickly, comprehensively and cost‑efficiently from our EMS or our Order Management System (“OMS”) and most third‑party trading platforms. Our institutional sales traders offer portfolio trading and single stock sales trading which provides execution expertise for program, block and riskless principal trades in global equities and ETFs.

We provide matching of client orders in our ATSs, including Virtu MatchIt, POSIT ATS, POSIT MTF, and MATCHNow. MatchIt provides two crossing sessions, a Main Session and a Conditional Session. The Main Session provides continuous crossing with price/time priority and is available to our subsidiaries and external subscribers. The Conditional Session accepts conditional orders with price/size priority, and is only available to our subsidiaries. POSIT provides continuous crossing of non‑displayed (or dark) equity orders and price improvement opportunities within the published best bid and offer price. POSIT Alert is a block crossing mechanism within POSIT. POSIT Alert unites liquidity sourced directly from trader OMSs with conditional orders from electronic participants for matching using a conditional order process. In addition, POSIT MTF Auction provides frequent batch auctions which display indicative size/price prior to trade execution. MATCHNow is an ATS for Canadian‑listed equities, operated by our wholly‑owned subsidiary, TriAct Canada Marketplace LP (“TriAct”). MATCHNow is a dark pool ATS in Canada, offering a call auction marketplace with a non‑displayed book with trades executed at or within the Canadian National Best Bid and Offer.

Workflow Technology

Our workflow technology tools are designed to meet the needs of a broad range of trading styles. As an example, Triton Valor, the most recent release of our multi‑asset and broker‑neutral Triton EMS, helps to bring integrated execution and analytical tools to the user’s desktop, including the Algo Wheel, an algorithmic way for a portfolio manager to intelligently allocate volume between different providers. Triton supports global list‑based and single‑stock trading, as well as futures and options capabilities and includes a fully integrated and supported financial services communications network (ITG Net). Triton also provides traders with access to scalable, low‑latency, multi‑asset trading opportunities. Our OMS combines portfolio management, compliance functionality, and a fully integrated and supported financial services communications network (ITG Net) with a consolidated, outsourced service for global trade matching and settlement that provides connectivity to the industry’s post‑trade utilities, as well as support for multiple, flexible settlement communication methods and a real‑time process monitor.

ITG Net is our global financial communications network that provides reliable and fully-supported connectivity between buy‑side and sell‑side firms for multi‑asset order routing and indication‑of‑interest messages with Virtu and third‑party trading platforms. ITG Net supports approximately 9,000 global billable connections to more than 600 unique execution destinations worldwide. ITG Net also integrates the trading products of third‑party brokers and ATSs into our OMS and EMS platforms.

RFQ‑hub, a multi‑asset platform for global listed and over‑the‑counter (“OTC”) financial instruments, connects buy‑side trading desks and portfolio managers with a large network of sell‑side market makers in Europe, North America and the Asia Pacific region, allowing these trading desks to place requests‑for‑quotes (“RFQ”) in negotiated equities, futures, options, swaps, convertible bonds, structured products and commodities. RFQ‑hub is available as a stand‑alone platform and is also integrated with Triton.

We offer administration and consolidation of client commission arrangements across a wide range of our clients’ preferred brokerage and research providers through Commission Manager, a robust, multi‑asset, web‑based commission management portal, and Budget Tracker, which enables asset managers to set research allocations and create and track budgets for their end clients. We also offer a comprehensive research payment account solution, enabling clients to unbundle research and execution payments to comply with the European Markets in Financial Instruments Directive (“MiFID”) II regulations.


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Analytics
    
Our trading analytics suite helps enable portfolio managers and traders to analyze execution performance before the trade happens (pre‑trade) and during trading (real‑time) by providing trading analytics and risk models that help them perform predictive analysis, manage risk, change strategy and reduce trading costs. Trading costs are affected by multiple factors, such as execution strategies, time horizon, volatility, spread, volume and order size. Our trading analytics suite is designed to gauge the effects of these factors and aid in the understanding of the trade‑off between market impact and opportunity cost. For example, our transaction cost analysis (“TCA”) offers measurement and reporting capabilities to analyze costs and performance across the trading continuum. TCA assesses trading performance and implicit costs under various market conditions so users can adjust strategies and potentially reduce costs and boost investment performance. TCA is also available for foreign exchange transactions (FX TCA) and for corporate and sovereign bond trading (FI TCA).

Corporate

Our Corporate segment contains investments principally in strategic financial services-oriented opportunities and maintains corporate overhead expenses and all other income and expenses that are not attributable to our operating segments.

Risk Management

We are acutely focused on risk management. Our market making activities involve taking on risk positions and our execution services business involves providing trading, clearing and related services on behalf of customers and clients. These activities expose us to market, counterparty, operational, and regulatory risk. We aim to mitigate these risks through prudent risk management practices.

We have appointed a Chief Risk Officer (“CRO”) who reports independently into the Board Risk Committee. We have created a Risk Advisory Committee, which includes key personnel from each of our regions globally and is comprised of our CRO and our Chief Compliance Officer (“CCO”), members of our senior management team, senior technologists and traders, and certain senior officers. Our Risk Advisory Committee provides advice to our CRO and our senior management team in connection with our key risk management policies, procedures and risk limits. Our board of directors, through the Board Risk Committee, is regularly apprised of risk events, risk profiles, trends and the activities of our Risk Advisory Committee, including our risk management policies, procedures and controls.

Our approach to managing risk includes the following practices:

Pre-Trade Risk Controls. Messages that leave our trading environment must first pass through a series of preset risk controls, which are intended to minimize the likelihood of unintended activities by our algorithms. Certain risk controls, when triggered, result in a strategy lockdown, which requires a manual reset in order to restart the strategy.

Model Restrictions. Trading models have limits in place which restrict individual position sizes, sector exposures and imbalanced portfolios with significant directional risks. Trading strategies are designed to automatically reduce exposures when limits are reached. The models are monitored continuously by the trading team and the risk managers.

Aggregate Exposure Monitoring. Pursuant to our risk management policies, our automated management information systems monitor in real‑time and generate report on daily and periodic bases. Exposures monitored include:

Risk Profiles
Statistical Risk Measures including Value at Risk (“VaR”), and Equity Betas
Stress and Scenario analysis
Concentration measures
Profit and Loss analysis
Trading performance reports

Our trading assets and liabilities are marked‑to‑market daily for financial reporting purposes by reference to official exchange prices, and they are re‑valued continuously throughout the trading day for risk management and asset/liability management purposes.

Operational Controls. We have a series of automated controls over our business. Key automated controls include:


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Our technical operations system continuously monitors our network and the proper functioning of each of our trading centers around the world;
Our market making system continuously evaluates the listed securities in which we provide bid and offer quotes and changes its bids and offers in such a way as to minimize exposure to directional price movements. The speed of communicating with exchanges and market centers is maximized through continuous software and network engineering innovation, allowing us to achieve real‑time controls over market exposure. We connect to exchanges and other electronic venues through a network of co‑location facilities around the world that are monitored 24 hours a day, five days a week, by our staff of experienced network professionals;
Our clearing system captures trades in real-time and performs automated reconciliations of trades and positions, corporate action processing, options exercises, securities lending and inventory management, allowing us to effectively manage operational risk;
Software developed to support our market making systems performs daily profit and loss and position reconciliations; and
After event reviews where operational issues are evaluated and risk mitigations are identified and subsequently implemented.

Credit Controls. Trading notional limits are applied to customers and counterparts. These are monitored throughout the day by trading support and risk.

Liquidity Controls. We seek to minimize liquidity risk by focusing the majority of trading in highly active and liquid instruments. Less liquid securities are identified and restrictions are in place as to the size of positions we hold in such instruments.

Our approach to risk mitigation can in some cases limit our overall opportunities, including by adding a degree of latency to our trading infrastructure which can, for example, prevent us from earning outsized returns in times of extreme market volatility. We believe that these trade-offs are necessary to properly limit risk.

We rely on technology and automation to perform many functions within Virtu. Cyber threats are a risk that we are exposed to as a result of our heavy reliance on technology. These threats could include the introduction of malicious code or unauthorized access, and could result in data loss or destruction, business interruption, and the unavailability of service and other risks. We have taken steps to mitigate the various cyber threats, and we devote resources to maintain and regularly upgrade our systems and networks and review the ever-changing threat landscape. We periodically review policies and procedures to seek to ensure they are effective in mitigating current cyber and other information security threats. In addition to the policy reviews, we continue to look to implement technology solutions that enhance preventive and detection capabilities. We also maintain insurance coverage that may, subject to policy terms and conditions, cover certain aspects of cyber risks. However, such insurance may be insufficient to cover all losses or may not provide any coverage.

Competition

The financial services industry generally, and the institutional securities brokerage business in which we operate, are extremely competitive, and we expect them to remain so for the foreseeable future. Our full suite of products does not directly compete with any particular firm; however, individual products compete with various firms and consortia:

Within the market making segment, our competition has been registered market making firms ranging from sole proprietors with very limited resources to large, integrated broker‑dealers. Today, a range of market participants may compete with us for revenues generated by market making activities across one or more asset classes and geographies, including market participants, such as Citadel Securities, Susquehanna International Group LLP, Two Sigma, Jane Street, DRW Holdings, IMC, and Optiver.

In the execution services segment, our algorithmic and smart routing products, as well as our high‑touch agency execution and portfolio trading internalizers services, compete with agency‑only and other sell‑side firms. Our trading and portfolio analytics compete with offerings from several sell‑side‑affiliated and independent companies. POSIT and MATCHNow compete with various national and regional securities exchanges, ATSs, Electronic Communication Networks, MTFs and systematic internalizers for trade execution services. Our EMS, OMS, connectivity and RFQ services compete with offerings from independent vendors, agency‑only firms and other sell‑side firms.

Some of our competitors in market making and execution services are larger than we are and have more captive order flow in certain assets. We believe that the high cost of developing a competitive technological framework is a significant barrier to entry by new market participants. Technology and software innovation is a primary focus for us, rather than relying solely on

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the speed of our network. We believe that our scalable technology allows us to access new markets and increase volumes with limited incremental costs.

Intellectual Property and Other Proprietary Rights

We rely on federal and state laws that govern trade secrets, trademarks, domain names, patents, copyright and contract law to protect our intellectual property and proprietary technology. We enter into confidentiality, intellectual property invention assignment and/or non‑competition and non‑solicitation agreements or restrictions with our employees, independent contractors and business partners, and we control access to, and distribution of, our intellectual property.

Employees

As of February 21, 2020, we had approximately 1,012 employees, all of whom were employed on a full‑time basis and in good standing. None of our employees are covered by collective bargaining agreements. We believe that our employee relations are good.

Regulation

We conduct our U.S. equities and options market making and provide execution services through our SEC‑registered broker‑dealers: Virtu Americas LLC, Virtu ITG LLC, Virtu Financial BD LLC, Virtu Financial Capital Markets LLC, and Virtu AlterNet Securities LLC. Both Virtu Americas LLC and Virtu ITG LLC are broker‑dealers regulated by the SEC and their designated examining authority is the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (“FINRA”). Virtu Americas LLC is also registered as a floor trader firm with the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”), while Virtu ITG LLC is registered as an introducing broker with the CFTC and is a member of the National Futures Association (“NFA”). Virtu Financial BD LLC is regulated by the SEC and its designated examining authority is the Chicago Stock Exchange. Virtu AlterNet Securities LLC and Virtu Financial Capital Markets LLC are also regulated by the SEC and are members of FINRA. Over the course of 2019, in furtherance of our integration efforts, we worked to consolidate U.S. brokerage activity into Virtu Americas LLC and, to that effect, submitted applications to withdraw the SEC registrations of Virtu Financial BD LLC and Virtu Financial Capital Markets LLC. We expect to continue this consolidation in 2020.

Our activities in U.S. equities are primarily self‑cleared. We are a full clearing member of the National Securities Clearing Corporation (“NSCC”) and the Depository Trust & Clearing Corporation (“DTCC”). We use the services of prime brokers, primarily in other asset classes, who provide us direct market access to markets and often cross‑margining and margin financing in return for execution and clearing fees. We continually monitor the credit quality of our prime brokers and rely on large multinational banks for most of our execution and clearing needs globally.

Our energy, commodities and currency market making and trading activities are primarily conducted through Virtu Financial Global Markets LLC.

We conduct our European, Middle Eastern and African (“EMEA”) market making activities from Dublin and through our subsidiary Virtu Financial Ireland Limited, which is authorized as an “Investment Firm” with the Central Bank of Ireland. Virtu Financial Ireland Limited maintains a branch office in London. We conduct our EMEA execution services trading activity from Dublin, London, and Paris through our subsidiary Virtu ITG Europe Limited. Virtu ITG Europe Limited is authorized and regulated by the Central Bank of Ireland as an “Investment Firm” and maintains branch offices in London and Paris. Virtu ITG Europe Limited’s London branch is registered with the UK Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”) and its Paris branch is registered with the Banque de France. Virtu ITG Europe Limited also operates a multi-lateral trading facility (“MTF”) in Ireland and Virtu ITG UK Limited, a U.K. investment firm, operates a MTF in the U.K. Virtu ITG UK Limited is an investment firm which is authorized and regulated with the FCA.

We conduct our Asia-Pacific (“APAC”) market making activities from Singapore and through our Singapore subsidiary, Virtu Financial Singapore Pte. Ltd. Virtu Financial Singapore Pte. Ltd. is registered with the Monetary Authority of Singapore (“MAS”) for an investment incentive arrangement. We conduct our APAC execution services trading activity from Singapore, Hong Kong, and Australia through our subsidiaries Virtu ITG Singapore Pte. Limited, Virtu ITG Hong Kong Limited, and Virtu ITG Australia Limited. Virtu ITG Singapore Pte. Limited is a holder of a Capital Markets Services License from the MAS, with the MAS acting as its principal regulator. Virtu ITG Hong Kong Limited is a participating organization of the Hong Kong Stock Exchange and a holder of a securities dealer’s license issued by the Securities and Futures Commission of Hong Kong (“SFC”), with the SFC acting as its principal regulator. Virtu ITG Australia Limited is a market participant of the Australian Securities Exchange (“ASX”) and Chi X Australia Limited, and is also a holder of an Australian Financial Services

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License issued by the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (“ASIC”). Virtu ITG Australia Limited’s principal regulators are the ASX and ASIC.

Our Canadian market making activities are conducted through our subsidiary Virtu Financial Canada ULC. Virtu Financial Canada ULC is a Canadian broker‑dealer registered as an investment dealer with the Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada (“IIROC”). Our Canadian execution services trading activities are conducted through our subsidiary Virtu ITG Canada Corp. Virtu ITG Canada Corp. is a Canadian broker‑dealer registered as an investment dealer with IIROC, Ontario Securities Commission (“OSC”), the Autorité Des Marchés Financiers in Quebec, Alberta Securities Commission (“ASC”), British Columbia Securities Commission, Manitoba Securities Commission, New Brunswick Securities Commission, Nova Scotia Securities Commission and Saskatchewan Financial Services Commission. Virtu ITG Canada Corp. is also registered as a Futures Commission Merchant in Ontario and Manitoba and Derivatives Dealer in Quebec.

Most aspects of our business are subject to regulation under federal, state and foreign laws and regulations, as well as the rules of the various self-regulatory organization (“SROs”) of which our broker-dealer subsidiaries are members. The SEC, FINRA, CFTC, NFA, U.S. state securities regulators, the European Securities and Markets Authority (“ESMA”) in the European Union, the Central Bank of Ireland, FCA in the UK, Banque de France in France, MAS in Singapore, SFC in Hong Kong, ASX and ASIC in Australia, IIROC and OSC in Canada, other SROs and other U.S. and foreign governmental regulatory bodies promulgate numerous rules and regulations that may impact our business. As a matter of public policy, regulatory bodies are charged with safeguarding the integrity of the securities and other financial markets and with protecting the interests of investors in those markets, including, but not limited to, trading practices, order handling, best execution practices, anti‑money laundering and financial crimes, handling of material non‑public information, safeguarding data, compliance with exchange and clearinghouse rules, capital adequacy, customer protection, reporting, record retention, market access and the conduct of officers, employees and other associated persons.

Rulemaking by these and other regulators (foreign and domestic), including resulting market structure changes, has had an impact on our regulated subsidiaries by directly affecting our method of operation and, at times, our profitability. Legislation can impose, and has imposed, significant obligations on broker‑dealers, including our regulated subsidiaries. These increased obligations require the implementation and maintenance of internal practices, procedures and controls which have increased our costs and may subject us to government and regulatory inquiries, claims or penalties.

Failure to comply with any laws, rules or regulations could result in administrative or court proceedings, censures, fines, penalties, judgments, disgorgement, restitution and censures, suspension or expulsion from a certain jurisdiction, SRO or market, the revocation or limitation of licenses, the issuance of cease‑and‑desist orders or injunctions or the suspension or disqualification of the entity and/or its officers, employees or other associated persons. From time to time, we are the subject of requests for information and documents from the SEC, FINRA and other regulators. It is our practice to cooperate and comply with the requests for information and documents. These requests could lead to administrative or court proceedings. Whether or not they result in adverse findings, they can require substantial expenditures of time and money and can have an adverse impact on a firm’s reputation, customer relationship and profitability.

The regulatory environment in which we operate is subject to constant change. Our business, financial condition and operating results may be adversely affected as a result of new or revised legislation or regulations imposed by the U.S. Congress, foreign legislative bodies, state securities regulators, U.S. and foreign governmental regulatory bodies and SROs. Additional regulations, changes in existing laws and rules, or changes in interpretations or enforcement of existing laws and rules often directly affect the method of operation and profitability of regulated broker‑dealers. We cannot predict what effect, if any, future legislative or regulatory changes might have. However, there have been in the past, and could be in the future, significant technological, operational and compliance costs associated with the obligations which derive from compliance with such regulations. Regulators may propose market structure changes particularly considering the continued regulatory scrutiny of high frequency trading, alternative trading systems, market fragmentation, colocation, access to market data feeds, and remuneration arrangements such as payment for order flow, profit-sharing relationships, and exchange fee and rebate structures.

The SEC and other SROs have enacted and are actively considering rules that may affect our operations and profitability. Among these are changes the SEC has made to Reg NMS Rule 606, as well as changes the SEC is considering to Rule 605 which are intended to provide additional information on order routing and execution quality. Regulation ATS-N recently became effective and requires operators of alternative trading systems to provide additional information regarding the ATS and other business of the operator that may pose conflicts. Broker-dealers will be subject to the reporting requirements under the Reg NMS Plan providing for a Consolidated Audit Trail of equities and options data commencing in 2020. The SEC has adopted NMS Rule 610T to conduct a transaction fee pilot (the “Pilot”) designed to generate data that will help the SEC analyze the effects of exchange transaction fee and rebate pricing models on order routing behavior, execution quality, and market quality generally. Data from the Pilot will be used to facilitate an empirical evaluation of whether the exchange

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transaction-based fee and rebate structure is operating effectively to further statutory goals and whether there is a need for any potential regulatory action in this area. The Pilot implementation date has been stayed pursuant to the SEC’s Partial Stay Order of March 28, 2019. These changes and others impose additional technological, operational and compliance costs on us and creates uncertainty with regard to their effects.

On July 21, 2010, the Dodd‑Frank Act was enacted in the U.S. Implementation of the Dodd‑Frank Act is being accomplished through extensive rulemaking by the SEC, the CFTC and other governmental agencies. The Dodd‑Frank Act includes the “Volcker Rule,” which significantly limits the ability of banks and their affiliates to engage in proprietary trading, and Title VII, which provides a framework for the regulation of the swap markets. The CFTC has largely finalized its rules with respect to those swaps markets and participants it regulates, while the SEC has not yet completed all of its rules relating to security‑based swaps. One of our subsidiaries is registered with the CFTC as a floor trader, and is exempt from registration as a swap dealer based on its current activity. Registration as a swap dealer would subject our subsidiary to various requirements, including those related to capital, conduct, and reporting.

We have foreign subsidiaries and plan to continue to expand our international presence. The market making and execution services industry in many foreign countries is heavily regulated, much like in the U.S. The varying compliance requirements of these different regulatory jurisdictions and other factors may limit our ability to conduct business or expand internationally. MiFID, which was implemented in November 2007, has been replaced by a more prescriptive MiFIR Regulation and MiFID II. MiFID II represented the most significant change to take place in the operation of European capital markets to date and became effective on January 3, 2018. MiFID II introduced requirements for increased pre- and post-trade transparency, technological and organizational requirements for firms deploying algorithmic trading techniques, restrictions on dark trading, and the roll out of a new bi-lateral OTC equity trading regime called the Systematic Internaliser regime. MiFID II requires European firms to conduct all trading on European Trading Venues including Regulated Markets, MTFs, Organized Trading Facilities, Systematic Internalisers or equivalent third country venues, requires market makers, such as Virtu Financial Ireland Limited, to post firm quotes at competitive prices and supplemented requirements with regards to investment firms’ pre-trade risk controls related to the safe operation of electronic systems. MiFID II also imposed additional requirements on trading platforms, such as additional technological requirements, clock synchronization, microsecond processing granularity, pre-trade risk controls, transaction reporting requirements and limits on the ratio of unexecuted orders to trades. The MiFID II regime is currently under review, with European Union authorities considering making further changes to the regime. Various consultation papers have been published on different aspects of the MiFID II regime, including, on February 4, 2020, an ESMA Consultation Paper entitled “MiFID II/MiFIR Review Report on the Transparency Regime for Equity and Equity-like Instruments, the Double Volume Cap Mechanism and the Trading Obligations for Shares” and, on February 17, 2020, a European Commission public consultation on the review of the MiFIDII/MiFIR regulatory framework.

Each of these legislative and regulatory requirements imposes additional technological, operational and compliance costs on us. New laws, rules or regulations as well as any regulatory or legal actions or proceedings, changes in legislation or regulation and changes in market customs and practices could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows.

Certain of our subsidiaries are subject to regulatory capital rules of the SEC, FINRA, other SROs and foreign regulators. These rules, which specify minimum capital requirements for our regulated subsidiaries, are designed to measure the general financial integrity and liquidity of a broker‑dealer and require that at least a minimum part of its assets be kept in relatively liquid form. Failure to maintain required minimum capital may subject a regulated subsidiary to a fine, requirement to cease conducting business, suspension, revocation of registration or expulsion by applicable regulatory authorities, and ultimately could require the relevant entity’s liquidation. See “Item 1A. Risk Factors - Risks Related to Our Business - Failure to comply with applicable regulatory capital requirements could subject us to sanctions imposed by the SEC, FINRA and other SROs or regulatory bodies.”



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Corporate History

We and our predecessors have been in the electronic trading and market making business for more than 15 years. We conduct our business through Virtu Financial LLC (“Virtu Financial”) and its subsidiaries. We completed our initial public offering (“IPO”) in April 2015, after which shares of our Class A common stock, par value $0.00001 per share (the “Class A Common Stock”) began trading on NASDAQ under the ticker symbol “VIRT.”

Prior to our IPO, we completed a series of reorganization transactions (the “Reorganization Transactions”) pursuant to which, among other things, we acquired equity interests in Virtu Financial as a result of certain mergers involving wholly owned subsidiaries of ours, an affiliate of Silver Lake Partners and Temasek Holdings (Private) Limited (“Temasek”), and an affiliate of Temasek (the “Temasek Pre-IPO Member”) (the “Mergers”), and in exchange we issued to an affiliate of Silver Lake Partners (such affiliate, the “Silver Lake Post-IPO Stockholder”) and an affiliate of Temasek (such affiliate, the “Temasek Post-IPO Stockholder”, and together with the Silver Lake Post-IPO Stockholder, the “Investor Post-IPO Stockholders”), shares of our Class A Common Stock and rights to receive payments under a tax receivable agreement described below, we became the sole managing member of Virtu Financial, all of the existing equity interests in Virtu Financial were reclassified into non-voting common interest units (“Virtu Financial Units”), our certificate of incorporation was amended and restated to authorize the issuance of four classes of common stock: Class A Common Stock, Class B Common Stock (as defined below), Class C Common Stock (as defined below) and Class D Common Stock (as defined below), and the holders of Virtu Financial Units other than us subscribed for shares of Class C common stock, par value $0.00001 per share (the “Class C Common Stock”) or Class D common stock, par value $0.00001 per share (the “Class D Common Stock”) (in the case of the Founder Post-IPO Member, as defined below) in an amount equal to the number of Virtu Financial Units held by such member.

The Class A Common Stock and Class C Common Stock each provide holders with one vote on all matters submitted to a vote of stockholders, and the Class B Common Stock, par value $0.00001 per share (the “Class B Common Stock”) and Class D Common Stock each provide holders with 10 votes on all matters submitted to a vote of stockholders. The holders of Class C Common Stock and Class D Common Stock do not have any of the economic rights (including rights to dividends and distributions upon liquidation) provided to holders of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock. Shares of our common stock generally vote together as a single class on all matters submitted to a vote of our stockholders.

On July 20, 2017, the Company completed the all-cash Acquisition of KCG. In connection with the Acquisition of KCG, the Company issued 8,012,821 shares of the Company’s Class A stock to Aranda Investments Pte. Ltd. (“Aranda”), an affiliate of Temasek, for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $125.0 million and 40,064,103 shares of the Company’s Class A stock to North Island Holdings I, LP (the “North Island Stockholder”) for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $618.7 million, in each case in accordance with terms of an investment agreement in a private placement exempt from the registration requirements of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), pursuant to Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act, (collectively, the “July 2017 Private Placement”).

On March 1, 2019, the Company completed the acquisition of Investment Technology Group, Inc. and its subsidiaries (“ITG”) in an all-cash transaction valued at $30.30 per ITG share, for a total of approximately $1.0 billion (the “ITG Acquisition”).
        
As a result of the completion of the IPO, the Reorganization Transactions, the July 2017 Private Placement, and certain other secondary offerings and permitted exchanges by current and former employees of Virtu Financial Units for shares of the Company’s Class A Common Stock, the Company holds an approximately 62.2% interest in Virtu Financial at December 31, 2019. The remaining issued and outstanding Virtu Financial Units are held by an affiliate of Mr. Vincent Viola (the “Founder Post-IPO Member”), two entities whose equity holders include certain members of the management of Virtu Financial and certain other current and former members of management of Virtu Financial (collectively, the “Virtu Post-IPO Members”). The Founder Post-IPO Member controls approximately 82.1% of the combined voting power of our outstanding common stock as of December 31, 2019. As a result, the Founder Post-IPO Member controls any actions requiring the general approval of our stockholders, including the election of our board of directors, the adoption of amendments to our certificate of incorporation and bylaws and the approval of any merger or sale of substantially all of our assets. The Founder Post-IPO Member is controlled by family members of Mr. Viola, our Founder and Chairman Emeritus.


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Available Information

Our website address is www.virtu.com. The information on our website is not, and shall not be deemed to be, a part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K or incorporated into any other filings we make with the SEC. Our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”) are available free of charge on our website as soon as possible after we electronically file them with, or furnish them to, the SEC.

Our Investor Relations Department can be contacted at Virtu Financial, Inc., One Liberty Plaza, 165 Broadway, New York, NY, 10006, Attn: Investor Relations, e-mail: investor_relations@virtu.com.

From time to time, we use our website, public conference calls, and social media channels, including our Twitter account (twitter.com/virtufinancial) and our LinkedIn account (linkedin.com/company/virtu-financial), as additional means of disclosing public information to investors, the media and others interested in us. It is possible that certain information we post on our website and on social media could be deemed to be material information, and we encourage investors, the media and others interested in us to review the business and financial information we post on our website and on the social media channels identified above. The information on our website and our social media channels is not incorporated by reference into this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

Risks Related to Our Business

Because our revenues and profitability depend on trading volume and volatility in the markets in which we operate, they are subject to factors beyond our control, are prone to significant fluctuations and are difficult to predict.

Our revenues and profitability depend in part on the level of trading activity of securities, derivatives and other financial products on exchanges and in other trading venues in the U.S. and abroad, which are directly affected by factors beyond our control, including economic and political conditions, emergencies and pandemics, broad trends in business and finance and changes in the markets in which such transactions occur. Weaknesses in the markets in which we operate, including economic slowdowns in recent years, have historically resulted in reduced trading volumes for us. Declines in trading volumes generally result in lower revenues from market making and transaction execution activities. Lower levels of volatility generally have the same directional impact. Declines in market values of securities or other financial instruments can also result in illiquid markets, which can also result in lower revenues and profitability from market making and transaction execution activities. Lower price levels of securities and other financial instruments, as well as compressed bid/ask spreads, which often follow lower pricing, can further result in reduced revenues and profitability. These factors can also increase the potential for losses on securities or other financial instruments held in inventory and failures of buyers and sellers to fulfill their obligations and settle their trades, as well as claims and litigation. Declines in the trading activity of institutional or “buy-side” market participants may result in lower revenue and/or diminished opportunities for us to earn commissions from execution activities. Any of the foregoing factors could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. In the past, our revenues and operating results have varied significantly from period to period due primarily to movements and trends in the underlying markets and to fluctuations in trading volumes and volatility levels. As a result, period to period comparisons of our revenues and operating results may not be meaningful, and future revenues and profitability may be subject to significant fluctuations or declines.

We are dependent upon our trading counterparties and clearing houses to perform their obligations to us.

Our business consists of providing consistent two‑sided liquidity to market participants across numerous geographies and asset classes. In the event of a systemic market event, resulting from large price movements or otherwise, certain market participants may not be able to meet their obligations to their trading counterparties, who, in turn, may not be able to meet their obligations to their other trading counterparties, which could lead to major defaults by one or more market participants. Following the implementation of certain mandates under the Dodd‑Frank Act in the U.S. and similar legislation worldwide, many trades in the securities and futures markets, and an increasing number of trades in the over‑the‑counter derivatives markets, are cleared through central counterparties. These central counterparties assume, and specialize in managing, counterparty performance risk relating to such trades. However, even when trades are cleared in this manner, there can be no assurance that a clearing house’s risk management methodology will be adequate to manage one or more defaults. Given the concentration of counterparty performance risk that is concentrated in central clearing parties, any failure by a clearing house to properly manage a default could lead to a systemic market failure. If our trading counterparties do not meet their obligations to

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us, or if any central clearing parties fail to properly manage defaults by market participants, we could suffer a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We may incur losses in our market making activities and our execution services businesses in the event of failures of our customized trading platform.

The success of our business is substantially dependent on the accuracy and performance of our customized trading platform, which evaluates and monitors the risks inherent in our market making strategies and execution services business, assimilates market data and reevaluates our outstanding quotes and positions continuously throughout the trading day. Our strategies are designed to automatically rebalance our positions throughout the trading day to manage risk exposures on our positions. Flaws in our strategies, order management system, risk management processes, latencies or inaccuracies in the market data that we use to generate our quotes, or human error in managing risk parameters or other strategy inputs, may lead to unexpected and unprofitable trades, which may result in material trading losses and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We may incur material trading losses from our market making activities.

A significant portion of our revenues are derived from our trading as principal in our role as a formal or registered market maker and liquidity provider on various exchanges and markets, as well as direct to customer market making. We may incur trading losses relating to these activities since each primarily involves the purchase, sale or short sale of securities, futures and other financial instruments for our own account. In any period, we may incur significant trading losses for a variety of reasons, including price changes, performance, size and volatility of portfolios we may hold in connection with our customer market making activities, lack of liquidity in instruments in which we have positions and the required performance of our market making obligations. Furthermore, we may from time to time develop large position concentrations in securities or other financial instruments of a single issuer or issuers engaged in a specific industry, or alternatively a single future or other financial instrument, which would result in the risk of higher trading losses than if our concentration were lower.

These risks may limit or restrict, for example, our ability to either resell securities we have purchased or to repurchase securities we have sold. In addition, we may experience difficulty borrowing securities to make delivery to purchasers to whom we have sold securities short or lenders from whom we have borrowed securities.

In our role as a market maker, we attempt to derive a profit from bid/ask spreads. However, competitive forces often require us to match or improve upon the quotes that other market makers display, thereby narrowing bid/ask spreads, and to hold long or short positions in securities, futures or other financial instruments. We cannot assure you that we will be able to manage these risks successfully or that we will not experience significant losses from such activities, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Our risk management activities related to our on exchange market making strategies utilize a four‑pronged approach, consisting of strategy lockdowns, centralized strategy monitoring, aggregate exposure monitoring and operational controls. In particular, messages that leave our trading environment first must pass through a series of preset risk controls or “lockdowns” that are intended to minimize the likelihood of unintended activities. In certain cases, this layer of risk management, which adds a layer of latency to our process, may limit our ability to profit from acute volatility in the markets. This would be the case, for example, where a particular strategy being utilized by one of our traders is temporarily locked down for generating revenue in excess of the preset risk limit. Even if we are able to quickly and correctly identify the reasons for a lockdown and quickly resume the trading strategy, we may limit our potential upside as a result of our risk management policies.

The valuation of the securities we hold at any particular time may result in large and occasionally anomalous swings in the value of our positions and in our earnings in any period.

The market prices of our long and short positions are reflected on our books at closing prices, which are typically the last trade prices before the official close of the primary exchange on which each such security trades. Given that we manage a globally integrated portfolio, we may have large and substantially offsetting positions in securities that trade on different exchanges that close at different times of the trading day and may be denominated in different currencies. Further, there may be large and occasionally anomalous swings in the value of our positions on any particular day and in our earnings in any period. Such swings may be especially pronounced on the last business day of each calendar quarter, as the discrepancy in official closing prices resulting from the asynchronous closing times may cause us to recognize a gain or loss in one quarter which would be substantially offset by a corresponding loss or gain in the following quarter.


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We are exposed to losses due to lack of perfect information.

As a market maker, we provide liquidity by consistently buying securities from sellers and selling securities to buyers. We may at times trade with others who have information that may be more accurate or complete than the information we have, and as a result we may accumulate unfavorable positions preceding large price movements in a given instrument. Should the frequency or magnitude of these events increase, our losses would likely increase correspondingly, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We face substantial competition and are subject to other competitive dynamics which could harm our financial performance.

Revenues from our market making activities depend on our ability to offer to buy and sell financial instruments at prices that are attractive and represent the best bid and/or offer in a given instrument at a given time. To attract order flow, we compete with other firms not only on our ability to provide liquidity at competitive prices, but also on other factors such as order execution speed and technology. Similarly, revenues from our technology services and agency execution services depend on our ability to offer cutting edge technology and risk management solutions. Across our businesses, our relationships with clients, customers and other counterparties could be adversely impacted by competitive dynamics across the industry, including but not limited to consolidation in the retail brokerage industry or asset management industry.

Our competitors include other registered market makers, as well as unregulated or lesser‑regulated trading and technology firms that also compete to provide liquidity and execution services. Our competitors range from sole proprietors with very limited resources to highly sophisticated groups, hedge funds, well‑capitalized broker‑dealers and proprietary trading firms or other market makers that have substantially greater financial and other resources than we do. These larger and better capitalized competitors may be better able to respond to changes in the market making industry, to compete for skilled professionals, to finance acquisitions, to fund internal growth, to manage costs and expenses and to compete for market share generally. Trading firms that are not registered as broker‑dealers or broker‑dealers not registered as market makers may in some instances have certain advantages over more regulated firms, including our subsidiaries that may allow them to bypass regulatory restrictions and trade more cheaply than more regulated participants on some markets or exchanges. In addition, we may in the future face enhanced competition from new market participants that may also have substantially greater financial and other resources than we do, which may result in compressed bid/ask spreads in the marketplace that may negatively impact our financial performance. Moreover, current and potential competitors may establish cooperative relationships among themselves or with third parties or may consolidate to enhance their services and products. The trend toward increased competition in our business is expected to continue, and it is possible that our competitors may acquire increased market share. Increased competition or consolidation in the marketplace could reduce the bid/ask spreads on which our business and profitability depend, and may also reduce commissions paid by institutional clients for execution services, negatively impacting our financial performance. As a result, there can be no assurance that we will be able to compete effectively with current or future competitors, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Our market making business is concentrated in U.S. equities; accordingly, our operating results may be negatively impacted by changes that affect the U.S. equity markets.

A majority of our market making revenue for 2019 was derived from our market making in U.S. equities. The level of activity in the U.S. equity markets is directly affected by factors beyond our control, including U.S. economic and political conditions, broad trends in business and finance, legislative and regulatory changes and changes in volume and price levels of U.S. equity transactions. As a result, to the extent these or other factors reduce trading volume or volatility or result in a downturn in the U.S. equity markets, we may experience a material adverse effect on, our business, financial condition and operating results.

We could lose significant sources of revenues if we lose any of our larger clients.

At times, a limited number of clients could account for a significant portion of our order flow, revenues and profitability, and we expect a large portion of the future demand for, and profitability from, our trade execution services to remain concentrated within a limited number of clients. The loss of one or more larger clients could have an adverse effect on our revenues and profitability in the future. None of these clients is currently contractually obligated to utilize us for trade execution services and, accordingly, these clients may direct their trade execution activities to other execution providers or market centers at any time. Some of these clients have grown organically or acquired market makers and specialist firms to internalize order flow or will have entered into strategic relationships with competitors. There can be no assurance that we will be able to retain these significant clients or that such clients will maintain or increase their demand for our trade execution

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services. Further, the continued integration of legacy systems and the development of new systems could result in disruptions to our ongoing businesses and relationships or cause issues with standards, controls, procedures and policies that adversely affect our ability to maintain relationships with customers, or to solicit new customers. The loss, or a significant reduction, of demand for our services from any of these clients could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We are subject to liquidity risk in our operations.

We require liquidity to fund various ongoing obligations, including operating expenses, capital expenditures, debt service and dividend payments. Our main sources of liquidity are cash flow from the operations of our subsidiaries, our broker‑dealer revolving credit facility (described under “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - Liquidity and Capital Resources - Long-Term Borrowings”), margin financing provided by our prime brokers and cash on hand. Our liquidity could be materially impaired by a number of factors, including reduced business activity due to a market downturn, adverse regulatory action or a downgrade of our credit rating. If our business activities decrease or we are unable to borrow additional funds in the future on terms that are acceptable to us, or at all, we could suffer a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Self‑clearing and other elements of our trade processing operations expose us to significant operational, financial and liquidity risks.

We currently self‑clear substantially all of our domestic equity trades and may expand our self‑clearing operations internationally and across product offerings and asset classes in the future. Self‑clearing exposes our business to operational risks, including business disruption, operational inefficiencies, liquidity, financing risks, counterparty performance risk and potentially increased expenses and lost revenue opportunities. While our clearing platform, operational processes, risk methodologies, enhanced infrastructure and current and future financing arrangements have been carefully designed, we may nevertheless encounter difficulties that may lead to operating inefficiencies, including delays in implementation, disruption in the infrastructure that supports the business, inadequate liquidity and financial loss. Any such delay, disruption or failure could negatively impact our ability to effect transactions and manage our exposure to risk and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations cash flows.

We have a substantial amount of indebtedness, which could negatively impact our business and financial condition, and our debt agreements contain restrictions that will limit our flexibility in operating our business.

We are a highly leveraged company. As of December 31, 2019, we had an aggregate of $1,957.2 million outstanding indebtedness under our long-term borrowings. If we cannot generate sufficient cash flow from operations to service our debt, we may need to refinance our debt, dispose of assets or issue equity to obtain necessary funds. We do not know whether we will be able to take any of such actions on a timely basis, on terms satisfactory to us or at all.

Additionally, we are party to an uncommitted facility (the “Uncommitted Facility”), subject to a maximum borrowing limit of $200 million, which was subsequently increased to $300 million in January 2020, under which we had $30.0 million of borrowings outstanding as of December 31, 2019. We are also a party to a $600.0 million broker-dealer revolving credit facility (the “Committed Facility”) under which we had no borrowings outstanding as of December 31, 2019. Also, certain of our non-guarantor subsidiaries are party to various short-term credit facilities with various prime brokers and other financial institutions in an aggregate amount of $586.0 million under which we had $134.3 million in borrowings outstanding at December 31, 2019.

The credit agreement entered into on March 1, 2019 by and among Virtu Financial, VFH Parent LLC, a Delaware limited liability company and a subsidiary of Virtu Financial (“VFH”), Impala Borrower LLC (the “Acquisition Borrower”), a subsidiary of the Company, the lenders party thereto and Jeffries Finance LLC, as administrative agent (as amended on October 9, 2019 and as further amended from time to time, the “Credit Agreement”) contains, and any other existing or future indebtedness of ours may contain, a number of covenants that impose significant operating and financial restrictions on us, including restrictions on our and our restricted subsidiaries’ ability to, among other things:

incur additional debt, guarantee indebtedness or issue certain preferred equity interests;
pay dividends on or make distributions in respect of, or repurchase or redeem, our equity interests or make other restricted payments;
prepay, redeem or repurchase certain debt;
make loans or certain investments;
sell certain assets;
create liens on our assets;

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consolidate, merge or sell or otherwise dispose of all or substantially all of our assets;
enter into certain transactions with our affiliates;
enter into agreements restricting our subsidiaries’ ability to pay dividends; and
designate our subsidiaries as unrestricted subsidiaries.

As a result of these covenants, we are limited in the manner in which we conduct our business, and we may be unable to successfully execute our strategy, engage in favorable business activities or finance future operations or capital needs. In addition, the revolving credit facility under the Credit Agreement is subject to a springing financial covenant which, if in effect, may require us to take action to reduce our debt or to act in a manner contrary to our business objectives.

We may be unable to remain in compliance with covenants contained in the Credit Agreement, and our obligation to comply with these covenants may adversely affect our ability to operate our business. A failure to comply with the covenants under the Credit Agreement or any of our other future indebtedness could result in an event of default, which, if not cured or waived, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. If any such event of default has occurred and is continuing, the lenders under our Credit Agreement, among other things:

will not be required to lend any additional amounts to us; or
could elect to declare all borrowings outstanding, together with accrued and unpaid interest and fees, to be immediately due and payable and terminate all commitments to extend further credit;

any of which could result in cross defaults under our other indebtedness. If we default on our indebtedness, our business, financial condition and results of operation could suffer a material adverse effect.

We pledge substantially all of our and our guarantor subsidiaries’ assets as collateral under the Credit Agreement. If we were unable to repay such indebtedness, the lenders under the Credit Agreement could proceed to exercise remedies against the collateral granted to them to secure that indebtedness. If any of our outstanding indebtedness under the Credit Agreement or our other indebtedness were to be accelerated, there can be no assurance that our assets would be sufficient to repay such indebtedness in full. We do not have sufficient working capital to satisfy our debt obligations in the event of an acceleration of all or a significant part of our outstanding indebtedness.

Despite our substantial indebtedness, we may still be able to incur significantly more debt, which could intensify the risks associated with our substantial indebtedness.

Borrowings under the Credit Agreement, the Uncommitted Facility and the Committed Facility are at variable rates of interest and expose us to interest rate risk. If interest rates increase, our debt service obligations on certain of our variable rate indebtedness will increase even though the amount borrowed remained the same, and our net income and cash flows, including cash available for servicing our indebtedness, will correspondingly decrease. We have entered into, and may enter into additional, interest rate swaps that involve the exchange of floating for fixed rate interest payments in order to reduce interest rate volatility. However, we may not maintain interest rate swaps with respect to all of our variable rate indebtedness, and any swaps we enter into may not fully mitigate our interest rate risk, may prove disadvantageous or may create additional risks. Rising interest rates could also limit our ability to refinance existing debt when it matures or cause us to pay higher interest rates upon refinancing.

Regulatory and legal uncertainties could harm our business.

Securities and derivatives businesses are heavily regulated. Firms in the financial services industry have been subject to an increasingly regulated environment over recent years, and penalties and fines sought by regulatory authorities have increased considerably. In addition, following recent news media attention to electronic trading and market structure, the regulatory and enforcement environment has created uncertainty with respect to various types of transactions that historically had been entered into by financial services firms and that were generally believed to be permissible and appropriate. “High frequency” and other forms of low latency or electronic trading strategies continue to be the focus of extensive regulatory scrutiny by federal, state and foreign regulators and SROs, and such scrutiny is likely to continue. Our market making and trading activities are characterized by substantial volumes, an emphasis on technology and certain other characteristics that are also commonly associated with high frequency trading.

In addition, certain market participants, SROs, government officials and regulators have requested that the U.S. Congress, the SEC, and the CFTC propose and adopt additional laws and rules, including rules relating to additional registration requirements, restrictions on co‑location, order‑to‑execution ratios, minimum quote life for orders, incremental messaging fees to be imposed by exchanges for “excessive” order placements and/or cancellations, further transaction taxes,

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tick sizes, changes to maker/taker rebates programs, and other market structure proposals. For example, the SEC's Rule 613 in respect of consolidated audit trail imposes new reporting requirements and additional costs on U.S. broker-dealers. In December 2018, the SEC approved a Transaction Fee Pilot for NMS Securities which will create three groups of securities that will be subject to restrictions on access fees and rebates. Finally, the SEC has proposed amendments to regulations that would require our registered broker‑dealer that is not currently a FINRA member to become a member of FINRA, which, if adopted as proposed, would subject the broker‑dealer to FINRA’s rules and require payment of additional fees per trade that could adversely affect our profits given that we seek to make small profits on individual trades. Additionally, the CFTC has proposed the adoption of Regulation Automated Trading, which would, among other requirements, require registration by direct market participants, mandate the use of certain types of risk controls, and require the maintenance of a source code repository in accordance with certain specifications.

Any or all of these proposals or additional proposals may be adopted by the SEC, CFTC or other U.S. or foreign legislative or regulatory bodies, and news media attention to electronic trading and market structure could increase the likelihood of adoption. These potential market structure and regulatory changes could cause a change in the manner in which we make markets, impose additional costs and expenses on our business or otherwise have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

In addition, the financial services industry is heavily regulated in many foreign countries. The varying compliance requirements of these different regulatory jurisdictions and other factors may limit our ability to conduct business or expand internationally. For example, MiFID, which was implemented in November 2007, has been replaced by MiFID II/Markets in Financial Investments Regulation (“MiFIR”), which was adopted by the European Parliament on April 15, 2014 and by the Council on May 13, 2014, entered into force on July 2, 2014, and became effective on January 3, 2018. MiFID II requires certain types of firms, including Virtu Financial Ireland Limited, to post firm quotes at competitive prices and supplements previous requirements with regard to investment firms’ risk controls related to the safe operation of electronic systems. MiFID II also imposes additional requirements on market structure, such as the introduction of a harmonized tick size regime, the introduction of new trading venues known as Organized Trading Facilities, and the promulgation of a new bilateral trading arrangement called the Systematic Internaliser regime, new open access provisions, market making requirements and various other pre‑ and post‑trade risk management requirements. The MiFID II regime is currently under review, with European Union authorities considering making further changes to the regime. Various consultation papers have been published on different aspects of the MiFID II regime, including, on February 4, 2020, an ESMA Consultation Paper entitled “MiFID II/MiFIR Review Report on the Transparency Regime for Equity and Equity-like Instruments, the Double Volume Cap Mechanism and the Trading Obligations for Shares” and, on February 17, 2020, a European Commission public consultation on the review of the MiFIDII/MiFIR regulatory framework. Each of these and other proposals may impose technological and compliance costs on us. Any of these laws, rules or regulations, as well as changes in legislation or regulation and changes in market customs and practices could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. These risks may be enhanced by recent scrutiny of electronic trading and market structure from regulators, lawmakers and the financial news media.

In addition, we maintain borrowing facilities with banks, prime brokers and Futures Commission Merchants (“FCMs”), and we obtain uncommitted margin financing from our prime brokers and FCMs, which are in many cases affiliated with banks. In response to the financial crisis, the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision issued a new, more stringent capital and liquidity framework known as Basel III, which national banking regulators have been implementing in the various jurisdictions in which our lenders may be incorporated. As these rules are implemented and impose more stringent capital and liquidity requirements, certain of our lenders may revise the terms of our borrowing facilities or margin financing arrangements, reduce the amount of financing they provide, or cease providing us financing, each of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Non‑compliance with applicable laws or regulatory requirements could negatively impact our reputation, prospects, revenues and earnings.

Our subsidiaries are subject to regulations in the U.S., and our foreign subsidiaries are subject to regulations abroad, in each case covering all aspects of their business. Regulatory bodies that exercise or may exercise authority over us include, without limitation, in the U.S., the SEC, FINRA, the Chicago Stock Exchange, the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, the Intercontinental Exchange, the CFTC, the NFA Exchanges and the various state securities regulators; in the European Union, the European Securities and Markets Authority (“ESMA”); in Ireland, the Central Bank of Ireland; in Switzerland, the Swiss Financial Market Supervisory Authority; in France, the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (“AMF”); in the United Kingdom, the FCA; in Hong Kong, the SFC; in Australia, the Australian Securities and Investment Commission; in Canada, the Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada and various Canadian provincial securities commissions; in Singapore, the Monetary Authority of Singapore and the Singapore Exchange; and in Japan, the Financial Services Agency and the Japan

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Securities Dealers Association. Our mode of operation and profitability may be directly affected by additional legislation and changes in rules promulgated by various domestic and foreign government agencies and SROs that oversee our businesses, as well as by changes in the interpretation or enforcement of existing laws and rules, including the potential imposition of additional capital and margin requirements and/or transaction taxes. While we endeavor to deliver required annual filings in all jurisdictions in a timely manner, we cannot guarantee that we will meet every applicable filing deadline globally. Noncompliance with applicable laws or regulations could result in sanctions being levied against us, including fines, penalties, judgments, disgorgement, restitution and censures, suspension or expulsion from a certain jurisdiction, SRO or market or the revocation or limitation of licenses. Noncompliance with applicable laws or regulations could also negatively impact our reputation, prospects, revenues and earnings. In addition, changes in current laws or regulations or in governmental policies could negatively impact our operations, revenues and earnings.

Domestic and foreign stock exchanges, other SROs and state and foreign securities commissions can censure, fine, impose undertakings, issue cease‑and‑desist orders and suspend or expel a broker‑dealer or other market participant or any of its officers or employees. Our ability to comply with all applicable laws and rules is largely dependent on our internal systems to ensure compliance, as well as our ability to attract and retain qualified compliance personnel. We could be subject to disciplinary or other actions in the future due to claimed noncompliance, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. We have been, are currently, and may in the future be, the subject of one or more regulatory or SRO enforcement actions, including but not limited to targeted and routine regulatory inquiries and investigations involving Regulation NMS, Regulation SHO, Regulation SCI, market access rules, capital requirements and other domestic and foreign securities rules and regulations. We and other broker-dealers and trading firms have also been the subject of requests for information and documents from the SEC and other regulators. We have cooperated and complied with these requests for information and documents. Our business or reputation could be negatively impacted if it were determined that disciplinary or other enforcement actions were required. For example, in December 2015, the enforcement committee of the AMF fined our European subsidiary in the amount of €5.0 million (approximately $5.4 million) based on its conclusion that the subsidiary engaged in price manipulation and violations of the AMF General Regulation and Euronext Market Rules. In 2017, the fine was reduced to €3.3 million (approximately $3.9 million) and in 2018 was reduced to €3.0 million (approximately $3.4 million). The relevant trading activities were conducted on or around 2009, prior to our acquisition of that subsidiary from Madison Tyler Holdings, which acquisition was consummated in 2011. To continue to operate and to expand our services internationally, we will have to comply with the regulatory controls of each country in which we conduct or intend to conduct business, the requirements of which may not be clearly defined. The varying compliance requirements of these different regulatory jurisdictions, which are often unclear, may limit our ability to continue existing international operations and further expand internationally.

Failure to comply with applicable regulatory capital requirements could subject us to sanctions imposed by the SEC, FINRA and other SROs or regulatory bodies.

Certain of our subsidiaries are subject to regulatory capital rules of the SEC, FINRA, other SROs and foreign regulators. These rules, which specify minimum capital requirements for our regulated subsidiaries, are designed to measure the general financial integrity and liquidity of a broker‑dealer and require that at least a minimum part of its assets be kept in relatively liquid form. In general, net capital is defined as net worth (assets minus liabilities), plus qualifying subordinated borrowings, less certain mandatory deductions that result from, among other things, excluding assets that are not readily convertible into cash and from valuing conservatively certain other assets. Among these deductions are adjustments, commonly called haircuts, which reflect the possibility of a decline in the market value of an asset before disposition, and non‑allowable assets.

Failure to maintain the required minimum capital may subject our regulated subsidiaries to a fine, requirement to cease conducting business, suspension, revocation of registration or expulsion by the applicable regulatory authorities, reputational harm and ultimately could require the relevant entity’s liquidation. Events relating to capital adequacy could give rise to regulatory actions that could limit business expansion or require business reduction. SEC and SRO net capital rules prohibit payments of dividends, redemptions of stock, prepayments of subordinated indebtedness and the making of any unsecured advances or loans to a stockholder, employee or affiliate, in certain circumstances, including if such payment would reduce the firm’s net capital below required levels. Similar issues and risks arise in connection with the capital adequacy requirements of foreign regulators.

A change in the net capital rules, the imposition of new rules or any unusually large charges against net capital could limit our operations that require the intensive use of capital and also could restrict our ability to withdraw capital from our broker‑dealer subsidiaries. A significant operating loss or any unusually large charge against net capital could negatively impact our ability to expand or even maintain our present levels of business. Similar issues and risks arise in connection with

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the capital adequacy requirements of foreign regulators. Any of these results could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We are subject to risks relating to litigation and potential securities law liability.

We are exposed to substantial risks of liability under federal and state securities laws and other federal and state laws and court decisions, as well as rules and regulations promulgated by the SEC, the CFTC, state securities regulators, SROs and foreign regulatory agencies. These risks may be enhanced by recent scrutiny of electronic trading and market structure from regulators, lawmakers and the financial news media. We are also subject to the risk of litigation and claims that may be without merit. At present and from time to time, we, our past and present officers, directors and employees are and may be named in legal actions, regulatory investigations and proceedings, arbitrations and administrative claims and may be subject to claims alleging the violations of laws, rules and regulations, some of which may ultimately result in the payment of fines, awards, judgments and settlements. We could incur significant legal expenses in defending ourselves against and resolving lawsuits or claims even if we believe them to be meritless. An adverse resolution of any current or future lawsuits or claims against us could result in a negative perception of our Company and cause the market price of our common stock to decline or otherwise have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Proposed legislation in the European Union, the U.S. and other jurisdictions that would impose taxes on certain financial transactions could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial results.

On September 28, 2011, the former president of the European Commission officially presented a plan to create a new financial transactions tax which in February 2013 was formally presented for consideration by the European Commission under an enhanced cooperation procedure among 11 European Union Member States (Belgium, Germany, Estonia, Greece, Spain, France, Italy, Austria, Portugal, Slovenia and Slovakia) for the purposes of a financial transaction tax among those Member States (the “EU Financial Transaction Tax”). The EU Financial Transaction Tax was initially intended to be implemented within those 11 European Union Member States in January 2014. In 2016, Estonia, one of the original members, withdrew its support for the proposal. As of December 31, 2019 such tax has not yet been implemented within the European Union although draft legislative proposals are currently under consideration. Similarly, in 2013, U.S. Representative Peter DeFazio and former Senator Thomas Harkin introduced proposed legislation, a bill entitled the “Wall Street Trading and Speculators Tax Act,” which would have, subject to certain exceptions, imposed an excise tax on the purchase of a security, including equities, bonds, debentures, other debt and interests in derivative financial instruments, if the purchase occurred or was cleared on a trading facility in the U.S. and the purchaser or seller is a U.S. person. More recently, in late 2018 and 2019 U.S. legislators, including U.S. Senators Kirsten Gillibrand and Brian Schatz, as well as potential Democratic candidates for the 2020 U.S. Presidential election, have announced proposals or plans that include a financial transaction fee. These proposed transaction taxes would apply to certain aspects of our business and transactions in which we are involved. Any such tax would increase our cost of doing business to the extent that (i) the tax is regularly applicable to transactions in the markets in which we operate, (ii) the tax does not include exceptions for market makers or market making activities that is broad enough to cover our activities or (iii) we are unable to widen our bid/ask spreads in the markets in which such a tax would be applicable to compensate for its imposition. Furthermore, the proposed taxes may reduce or negatively impact trading volume and transactions on which we are dependent for revenues. While it is difficult to assess the impact the proposed taxes could have on us, if either transaction tax is implemented or any similar tax is implemented in any other jurisdiction in which we operate, our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows could suffer a material adverse effect, and could be impacted to a greater degree than other market participants.

We depend on our technology, and our future results may be negatively impacted if we cannot remain technologically competitive.

We believe that our success in the past has largely been attributable to our technology, which has taken many years to develop. If technology equivalent to ours becomes more widely available for any reason, our operating results may be negatively impacted. Additionally, adoption or development of similar or more advanced technologies by our competitors may require that we devote substantial resources to the development of more advanced technology to remain competitive. Regulators and exchanges may also introduce risk control and other technological requirements on our business that could result in increased costs of compliance and divert our technological resources away from their primary strategy development and maintenance duties. The markets in which we compete are characterized by rapidly changing technology, evolving industry standards and changing trading systems, practices and techniques. The widespread adoption of new internet, networking or telecommunications technologies or other technological changes could require us to incur substantial expenditures to modify or adapt our services or infrastructure. We may not be able to anticipate or respond adequately or in a cost‑efficient and competitive manner to technological advancements (including advancements related to low‑latency technologies, execution

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and messaging speeds) or changing industry standards. If any of these risks materialize, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Our reliance on our computer systems and software could expose us to material financial and reputational harm if any of our computer systems or software were subject to any material disruption or corruption.

We rely significantly on our computer systems and software to receive and properly process internal and external data and utilize such data to generate orders and other messages. A disruption or corruption of the proper functioning of our computer systems or software could cause us to make erroneous trades or result in other negative circumstances, which could result in material losses or reputational harm. We cannot guarantee that our efforts to maintain competitive computer systems and software will be successful. Our computer systems and software may fail or be subject to bugs or other errors, including human error, resulting in service interruptions or other unintended consequences. If any of these risks materialize, they could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We could be the target of a significant cyber-attack, threat or incident that impairs internal systems, results in adverse consequences to information our system process, store or transmit or causes reputation damages as a consequence.

Our business relies on technology and automation to perform significant functions within our firm. Because of our reliance on technology, we may be susceptible to various forms of cyber-attacks by third parties or insiders. Though we take steps to mitigate the various cyber threats and devote significant resources to maintain and update our systems and networks, we may be unable to anticipate attacks or to implement adequate preventative measures. Our cybersecurity measures may not detect or prevent all attempts to compromise our systems, including denial‑of‑service attacks, viruses, malicious software, break‑ins, phishing attacks, social engineering, security breaches or other attacks and similar disruptions that may jeopardize the security of information stored in and transmitted by our systems or that we otherwise maintain. Furthermore, we may have little or no oversight with respect to security measures employed by third-party service providers, which may ultimately prove to be ineffective at countering threats. Although we maintain insurance coverage that may, subject to policy terms and conditions, cover certain aspects of cyber risks, such insurance coverage may be insufficient to cover all losses or may not cover any losses. Breaches of our cybersecurity measures or those of our third-party service providers could result in any of the following: unauthorized access to our systems; unauthorized access to and misappropriation of information or data, including confidential or proprietary information about ourselves, third parties with whom we do business or our proprietary systems; viruses, worms, spyware or other malware being placed in our systems and intellectual property; deletion or modification of client information; or a denial‑of‑service or other interruptions to our business operations. While we have not suffered a material breach of our cybersecurity, any actual or perceived breach of our cybersecurity could damage our reputation, expose us to a risk of loss or litigation and possible liability, require us to expend significant capital and other resources to alleviate problems caused by such breaches and otherwise have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

A failure in our computer systems and software, operations, capacity constraints, malfunctions and delays, as well as human error or malfeasance, could harm our business.

Our business activities are heavily dependent on the integrity and performance of the computer and communications systems supporting them. Our systems and operations are vulnerable to damage or interruption from human error, software bugs and errors, electronic and physical security breaches, natural disasters, economic or political developments, pandemics, weather events, power loss, utility or internet outages, computer viruses, intentional acts of vandalism, war, terrorism and other similar events. Extraordinary trading volumes or other events could cause our computer systems to operate in ways that we did not intend, at an unacceptably low speed or even fail. While we have invested significant amounts of capital to upgrade the capacity, reliability and scalability of our systems, there can be no assurance that our systems will always operate properly or be sufficient to handle such extraordinary trading volumes. Any disruption for any reason in the proper functioning or any corruption of our software or erroneous or corrupted data may cause us to make erroneous trades or suspend our services and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Although our systems and infrastructure are generally designed to accommodate additional growth without redesign or replacement, we may need to make significant investments in additional hardware and software to accommodate growth. Failure to make necessary expansions and upgrades to our systems and infrastructure could not only limit our growth and business prospects but could also cause substantial losses and have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Since the timing and impact of disasters and disruptions are unpredictable, we may not be able to respond to actual events as they occur. Business disruptions can vary in their scope and significance and can affect one or more of our facilities.

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These disruptions may occur as a result of events that affect only our buildings or systems or those of such third parties, or as a result of events with a broader impact globally, regionally or in the cities where those buildings or systems are located, including, but not limited to, natural disasters, economic or political developments, pandemics, weather events, war, terrorism and other similar events.

Further, the severity of the disruption can also vary from minimal to severe. Although we have employed efforts to develop, implement and maintain reasonable disaster recovery and business continuity plans, we cannot guarantee that our systems will fully recover after a significant business disruption in a timely fashion or at all. Our ability to conduct business may be adversely impacted by a disruption in the infrastructure that supports our businesses and the communities in which we are located. This may include a disruption involving electrical, satellite, undersea cable or other communications, internet, transportation or other services facilities used by us, our employees or third parties with which we conduct business. If we are prevented from using any of our current trading operations, or if our business continuity operations do not work effectively, we may not have complete business continuity, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Failure or poor performance of third‑party software, infrastructure or systems on which we rely could adversely affect our business.

We depend on third parties to provide and maintain certain infrastructure that is critical to our business. For example, we rely on third parties to provide software, data center services and dedicated fiber optic, microwave, wireline and wireless communication infrastructure. This infrastructure may malfunction or fail due to events outside of our control, which could disrupt our operations and have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. Any failure to maintain and renew our relationships with these third parties on commercially favorable terms, or to enter into similar relationships in the future, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We also rely on certain third‑party software, third‑party computer systems and third‑party service providers, including clearing systems, exchange systems, alternate trading systems, order routing systems, internet service providers, communications facilities and other facilities. Any interruption in these third‑party services or software, deterioration in their performance, or other improper operation could interfere with our trading activities, cause losses due to erroneous or delayed responses, or otherwise be disruptive to our business. If our arrangements with any third party are terminated, we may not be able to find an alternative source of software or systems support on a timely basis or on commercially reasonable terms. This could also have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

The use of open source software may expose us to additional risks.

We use software development tools covered by open source licenses and may incorporate such open source software into our proprietary software from time to time. “Open source software” refers to any code, shareware or other software that is made generally available to the public without requiring payment of fees or royalties and/or that may require disclosure or licensing of any software that incorporates such source code, shareware or other software. Given the nature of open source software, third parties might assert contractual or copyright and other intellectual property‑related claims against us based on our use of such tools and software programs or might seek to compel the disclosure of the source code of our software or other proprietary information. If any such claims materialize, we could be required to (i) seek licenses from third parties in order to continue to use such tools and software or to continue to operate certain elements of our technology, (ii) release certain proprietary software code comprising our modifications to such open source software, (iii) make our software available under the terms of an open source license, (iv) re‑engineer all, or a portion of, that software, any of which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows or (v) be required to pay significant damages as a result of substantiated unauthorized use. While we monitor the use of all open source software in our solutions, processes and technology and try to ensure that no open source software is used (i) in such a way as to require us to disclose the source code to the related solution when we do not wish to do so nor (ii) in connection with critical or fundamental elements of our software or technology, such use may have inadvertently occurred in deploying our proprietary solutions. If a third‑party software provider has incorporated certain types of open source software into software we license from such third party for our products and solutions, we could, under certain circumstances, be required to disclose the source code to our solutions. In addition to risks related to license requirements, usage of open software can lead to greater risks than use of third‑party commercial software because open source licensors generally do not provide warranties or controls on the origin of the software. Many of the risks associated with usage of open source software cannot be eliminated and could potentially have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.


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We may not be able to protect our intellectual property rights or may be prevented from using intellectual property necessary for our business.

We rely on federal and state law, trade secrets, trademarks, domain names, copyrights and contract law to protect our intellectual property and proprietary technology. It is possible that third parties may copy or otherwise obtain and use our intellectual property or proprietary technology without authorization or otherwise infringe on our rights. For example, while we have a policy of entering into confidentiality, intellectual property invention assignment and/or non‑competition and non‑solicitation agreements or restrictions with our employees, independent contractors and business partners, such agreements may not provide adequate protection or may be breached, or our proprietary technology may otherwise become available to or be independently developed by our competitors. The promulgation of laws or rules which require the maintenance of source code or other intellectual property in a repository subject to certain requirements and/or which enhance or facilitate access to such source code by regulatory authorities could inhibit our ability to protect against unauthorized dissemination or use of our intellectual property. Third parties have alleged and may in the future allege that we are infringing, misappropriating or otherwise violating their intellectual property rights. Third parties may initiate litigation against us without warning, or may send us letters or other communications that make allegations without initiating litigation. We may elect not to respond to these letters or other communications if we believe they are without merit, or we may attempt to resolve these disputes out of court by negotiating a license, but in either case it is possible that such disputes will ultimately result in litigation. Any such claims could interfere with our ability to use technology or intellectual property that is material to the operation of our business. Such claims may be made by competitors seeking to obtain a competitive advantage or by other parties, such as entities that purchase intellectual property assets for the purpose of bringing infringement claims. We also periodically employ individuals who were previously employed by our competitors or potential competitors, and we may therefore be subject to claims that such employees have used or disclosed the alleged trade secrets or other proprietary information of their former employers.

At times we rely on litigation to enforce our intellectual property rights, protect our trade secrets, determine the validity and scope of the proprietary rights of others or defend against claims of infringement or invalidity. Any such litigation, whether successful or unsuccessful, could result in substantial costs and the diversion of resources and the attention of management. If unsuccessful, such litigation could result in the loss of important intellectual property rights, require us to pay substantial damages, subject us to injunctions that prevent us from using certain intellectual property, require us to make admissions that affect our reputation in the marketplace and require us to enter into license agreements that may not be available on favorable terms or at all. Finally, even if we prevail in any litigation, the remedy may not be commercially meaningful or fully compensate us for the harm we suffer or the costs we incur. Any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We are exposed to risks associated with our international operations and expansion and failure to comply with laws and regulations applicable to our international operations may increase costs, reduce profits, limit growth or subject us to broader liability.

We are exposed to risks and uncertainties inherent in doing business in international markets, particularly in the heavily regulated broker‑dealer industry. Such risks and uncertainties include political, economic and financial instability, unexpected changes in regulatory requirements, tariffs and other trade barriers, exchange rate fluctuations, applicable currency controls, the imposition of restrictions on currency conversion or the transfer of funds, limitations on our ability to repatriate non‑U.S. earnings in a tax efficient manner and difficulties in staffing and managing foreign operations, including reliance on local experts. Such restrictions generally include those by imposed by the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (the “FCPA”) and trade sanctions administered by the Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”). The FCPA is intended to prohibit bribery of foreign officials and requires companies whose securities are listed in the U.S. to keep books and records that accurately and fairly reflect those companies’ transactions and to devise and maintain an adequate system of internal accounting controls. OFAC administers and enforces economic and trade sanctions based on U.S. foreign policy and national security goals against designated foreign states, organizations and individuals. Though we have policies in place designed to comply with applicable OFAC sanctions, rules and regulations as well as the FCPA and equivalent laws and rules of other jurisdictions, if we fail to comply with these laws and regulations, we could be exposed to claims for damages, financial penalties, reputational harm, incarceration of employees and restrictions on our operations and cash flows.

In addition, the varying compliance requirements of these different regulatory jurisdictions and other factors may limit our ability to successfully conduct or expand our business internationally and may increase our costs of investment. Expansion into international locations involves substantial operational and execution risk. We may not be able to manage these costs or risks effectively.


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The results of the United Kingdom’s referendum on withdrawal from the European Union may negatively impact the global economy, financial markets and our business.

In June 2016, UK voters approved a referendum to withdraw the UK's membership from the EU, which is commonly referred to as “Brexit”. In March 2017, the UK government initiated the exit process under Article 50 of the Treaty of the European Union, commencing a period of up to two years for the UK and the other EU member states to negotiate the terms of the withdrawal, such period ending on March 29, 2019 unless extended. Following extensions to that period, a Withdrawal Agreement and Political Declaration were reached between the U.K. and the E.U. On January 23, 2020, the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Act 2020 received Royal Assent in the U.K., and on January 31, 2020 the U.K. left the E.U. Pursuant to the terms of the Withdrawal Agreement. The U.K. and E.U. are in a transition period which is currently set to end as of December 31, 2020. During the transition period, the current rules on trade, travel, and business for the U.K. and E.U. continue to apply, with new U.K. regimes set to take effect on January 1, 2021. We presently access the E.U. markets primarily through our Irish regulated subsidiaries and have a U.K. subsidiary, which is an authorized and regulated investment firm with permission to operate a U.K. MTF, and we therefore do not expect any impact on our access to E.U. markets as a result of Brexit. However, it is not possible at this point in time to predict fully the effects of the end of the U.K.’s transition period with the E.U., including with respect to volatility in exchange rates and interest rates and potential material changes to the regulatory regime applicable to our activities in the U.K. or the potential impact of interacting with U.K.-based market participants. Poor future relations between the U.K. and E.U. could adversely affect European or worldwide political, fiscal, regulatory, economic or market conditions and could contribute to instability in global political institutions, regulatory agencies and financial markets. For example, depending on the terms of the future relationship between the E.U. and the U.K., the U.K. could also lose access to the single E.U. market and to the global trade deals negotiated by the E.U. on behalf of its members. Disruptions and uncertainty caused by these events may also cause our clients to closely monitor their costs and reduce their spending budget on our services. Any of these effects of the U.K.’s departure from the E.U., and others we cannot anticipate or that may evolve over time, could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Fluctuations in currency exchange rates could negatively impact our earnings.

A significant portion of our international business is conducted in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, and changes in foreign exchange rates relative to the U.S. dollar can therefore affect the value of our non‑U.S. dollar net assets, revenues and expenses. Although we closely monitor potential exposures as a result of these fluctuations in currencies, and where cost‑justified we adopt strategies that are designed to reduce the impact of these fluctuations on our financial performance, including the financing of non‑U.S. dollar assets with borrowings in the same currency and the use of various hedging transactions related to net assets, revenues, expenses or cash flows, there can be no assurance that we will be successful in managing our foreign exchange risk. Our exposure to currency exchange rate fluctuations will grow if the relative contribution of our operations outside the U.S. increases. Any material fluctuations in currencies could have a material effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We may incur material losses on foreign exchange transactions entered into on behalf of clients and be exposed to material liquidity risk due to counterparty defaults or errors.

We enable clients to settle cross‑border equity transactions in their local currency through the use of foreign exchange contracts. These arrangements typically involve the delivery of securities or cash to a counterparty that is not processed through a central clearing facility in exchange for a simultaneous receipt of cash or securities. We may operate as either a principal or agent in these transactions. As a result, a default by one of our counterparties prior to the settlement of their obligation could materially impact our liquidity and have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

In addition, we are exposed to operational risk. Employee and technological errors in executing, recording or reporting foreign exchange transactions may result in material losses due to the large size of such transactions and the underlying market risk in correcting such errors.

We may experience risks associated with future growth or expansion of our operations or acquisitions, strategic investments or dispositions of businesses, and we may never realize the anticipated benefits of such activities.

As a part of our business strategy, we may make acquisitions or significant investments in and/or disposals of businesses. Any such future acquisitions, investments and/or dispositions would be accompanied by risks such as assessment of values for acquired businesses, intangible assets and technologies, difficulties in assimilating the operations and personnel of acquired companies or businesses, diversion of our management’s attention from ongoing business concerns, our potential inability to maximize our financial and strategic position through the successful incorporation or disposition of operations, maintenance of uniform standards, controls, procedures and policies and the impairment of existing relationships with

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employees, contractors, suppliers and customers as a result of the integration of new management personnel and cost‑saving initiatives. We cannot guarantee that we will be able to successfully integrate any company or business that we might acquire in the future, and our failure to do so could harm our current business.

In addition, we may not realize the anticipated benefits of any such transactions, and there may be other unanticipated or unidentified effects. While we would seek protection, for example, through warranties and indemnities in the case of acquisitions, significant liabilities may not be identified in due diligence or come to light after the expiration of warranty or indemnity periods. Additionally, while we would seek to limit our ongoing exposure, for example, through liability caps and period limits on warranties and indemnities in the case of disposals, some warranties and indemnities may give rise to unexpected and significant liabilities. If we fail to realize any such anticipated benefits, or if we experience any such unanticipated or unidentified effects in connection with any future acquisitions, investments or dispositions, we could suffer a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. Finally, strategic investments may involve additional risks associated with holding a minority or non-controlling position in an illiquid business or asset.

Our future efforts to sell shares of our common stock or raise additional capital may be delayed or prohibited by regulations.

As certain of our subsidiaries are members of FINRA and other SROs, we are subject to certain regulations regarding changes in ownership or control and material changes in operations. For example, FINRA’s NASD Rule 1017 generally provides that FINRA approval must be obtained in connection with certain change of ownership or control transactions, such as a transaction that results in a single entity or person owning 25% or more our equity. Similarly, Virtu Financial Ireland Limited,Virtu ITG Europe Limited and Virtu ITG UK Limited, our regulated subsidiaries in the Ireland and the U.K., are subject to change in control regulations promulgated by the Central Bank of Ireland and/or the FCA, and other registered or regulated foreign subsidiaries may be subject to similar regulations in applicable jurisdictions. As a result of these regulations, our future efforts to sell shares of our common stock or raise additional capital may be delayed or prohibited. We may be subject to similar restrictions in other jurisdictions in which we operate.

We are dependent on the continued service of certain key executives, the loss or diminished performance of whom could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Our performance is substantially dependent on the performance of our senior management, including Douglas Cifu, our Chief Executive Officer and Alexander Ioffe, our Chief Financial Officer. In connection with and subsequent to the IPO, we have entered into employment and other related agreements with certain members of our senior management team that restrict their ability to compete with us should they decide to leave our Company. Even though we have entered into these agreements, we cannot be sure that any member of our senior management will remain with us or that they will not compete with us in the future. The loss of any member of our senior management team could impair our ability to execute our business plan and growth strategy and have a negative impact on our revenues, in addition to potentially causing employee morale problems and/or the loss of key employees. In particular, Mr. Cifu invests in other businesses and spends time on such matters, which could divert their attention from us. Our employment agreement with Mr. Cifu specifically permits his participation in and attention to certain other business activities, including but not necessarily limited to his role as the Vice Chairman and Alternate Governor of the Florida Panthers, a National Hockey League franchise. We cannot guarantee that these or other permitted outside activities will not impact his performance as Chief Executive Officer.

Our success depends, in part, on our ability to identify, recruit and retain skilled management and technical personnel. If we fail to recruit and retain suitable candidates or if our relationship with our employees changes or deteriorates, it could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Our future success depends, in part, upon our continued ability to identify, attract, hire and retain highly qualified personnel, including skilled technical, management, product and technology, trading, sales and marketing personnel, all of whom are in high demand and are often subject to competing offers. Competition for qualified personnel in the financial services industry is intense and we cannot assure you that we will be able to hire or retain a sufficient number of qualified personnel to meet our requirements, or that we will be able to do so at salary, benefit and other compensation costs that are acceptable to us or that would allow us to achieve operating results consistent with our historical results. A loss of qualified employees, or an inability to attract, retain and motivate additional highly skilled employees in the future, could have a material adverse effect on our business.


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We could lose significant sources of revenues if we were to lose access to an important exchange or other trading venue.

Changes in applicable laws, regulations or rules promulgated by exchanges could conceivably prevent us from providing liquidity to an exchange or other trading venue where we provide liquidity today. Though our revenues are diversified across exchanges and other trading venues, asset classes and geographies, the loss of access to one or more significant exchanges and other trading venues for any reason could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

In connection with the Acquisition of KCG, we have assumed potential liabilities relating to KCG’s business.

In connection with the Acquisition of KCG, we have assumed potential regulatory, litigation and other liabilities relating to KCG’s business. For example, KCG is currently the subject of various regulatory reviews and investigations by federal, state and foreign regulators and SROs, including the SEC, FINRA and the FCA. In some instances, these matters may rise to a disciplinary action and/or a civil or administrative action, penalties, fines, judgments, censures and settlements. To the extent we have not identified such liabilities or miscalculated their potential financial impact, these liabilities could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, results of operations, financial condition and/or cash flows.

We may incur losses as a result of unforeseen or catastrophic events, including the emergence of a pandemic, terrorist attacks, extreme weather events or other natural disasters.

The occurrence of unforeseen or catastrophic events, including the emergence of a pandemic, such as the Ebola or Zika viruses, the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), or other widespread health emergency (or concerns over the possibility of such an emergency), terrorist attacks, extreme terrestrial or solar weather events or other natural disasters, could create economic and financial disruptions, and could lead to operational difficulties (including travel limitations) that could impair our ability to manage our businesses.

Risks Related to Our Organization and Structure

We are a holding company and our principal asset is our 62.2% of equity interest in Virtu Financial, and we are accordingly dependent upon distributions from Virtu Financial to pay dividends, if any, taxes and other expenses.

We are a holding company and our principal asset is our direct and indirect ownership of 62.2% of the Virtu Financial Units as of December 31, 2019. We have no independent means of generating revenue. As the sole managing member of Virtu Financial, we cause Virtu Financial to make distributions to its equityholders, including the Founder Post-IPO Member, Virtu Employee Holdco, certain current and former members of management of the Company and their affiliates (the “Management Members”) and us, in amounts sufficient to fund dividends to our stockholders in accordance with our dividend policy and, as further described below, to cover all applicable taxes payable by us and any payments we are obligated to make under the tax receivable agreements we entered into as part of the Reorganization Transactions, but we are limited in our ability to cause Virtu Financial to make these and other distributions to us (including for purposes of paying corporate and other overhead expenses and dividends) under our Credit Agreement governing our First Lien Term Loan Facility (as defined below). In addition, certain laws and regulations may result in restrictions on Virtu Financial’s ability to make distributions to its equityholders (including us), or the ability of its subsidiaries to make distributions to it. These include:

the SEC Uniform Net Capital Rule (Rule 15c3‑1), which requires each of Virtu Financial’s registered broker‑dealer subsidiaries to maintain specified levels of net capital;
FINRA Rule 4110, which imposes a requirement of prior FINRA approval for any distribution by Virtu Financial’s FINRA member registered broker‑dealer subsidiary in excess of 10% of its excess net capital; and
the requirement for prior approval from the Central Bank of Ireland before Virtu Financial’s regulated Irish subsidiary completes any distribution or dividend.

To the extent that we need funds and Virtu Financial is restricted from making such distributions to us, under applicable law or regulation, as a result of covenants in our Credit Agreement, we may not be able to obtain such funds on terms acceptable to us or at all and as a result could suffer a material adverse effect on our liquidity and financial condition.

Under the Third Amended and Restated Limited Liability Company Agreement of Virtu Financial (as amended, the “Amended and Restated Virtu Financial LLC Agreement”), Virtu Financial from time to time makes pro rata distributions in cash to its equityholders, including the Founder Post‑IPO Member, the trust that holds equity interests in Virtu Financial on behalf of certain employees of ours based outside the United States, which we refer to as the “Employee Trust”, Virtu Employee Holdco and us, in amounts sufficient to cover the taxes on their allocable share of the taxable income of Virtu

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Financial. As a result of (i) potential differences in the amount of net taxable income allocable to us and to Virtu Financial’s other equityholders, (ii) the lower tax rate applicable to corporations than individuals and (iii) the favorable tax benefits that we anticipate from (a) the exchange of Virtu Financial Units and corresponding shares of Class C Common Stock or Class D Common Stock, (b) payments under the tax receivable agreements and (c) future deductions attributable to the prior acquisition of interests in Virtu Financial by certain affiliates of Silver Lake Partners and Temasek, we expect that these tax distributions will be in amounts that exceed our tax liabilities. Our board of directors will determine the appropriate uses for any excess cash so accumulated, which may include, among other uses, the payment of obligations under the tax receivable agreements, the payment of other expenses or the repurchase of shares of common stock or Virtu Financial Units. We will have no obligation to distribute such cash (or other available cash) to our shareholders. No adjustments to the exchange ratio for Virtu Financial Units and corresponding shares of common stock will be made as a result of any cash distribution by us or any retention of cash by us, and in any event the ratio will remain one‑to‑one.

We are controlled by the Founder Post‑IPO Member, whose interests in our business may be different than yours, and certain statutory provisions afforded to stockholders are not applicable to us.

The Founder Post‑IPO Member controls approximately 82.1% of the combined voting power of our common stock as a result of its ownership of our Class D Common Stock, each share of which is entitled to 10 votes on all matters submitted to a vote of our stockholders.

The Founder Post‑IPO Member has the ability to substantially control our Company, including the ability to control any action requiring the general approval of our stockholders, including the election of our board of directors, the adoption of amendments to our certificate of incorporation and by‑laws and the approval of any merger or sale of substantially all of our assets. This concentration of ownership and voting power may also delay, defer or even prevent an acquisition by a third party or other change of control of our Company and may make some transactions more difficult or impossible without the support of the Founder Post‑IPO Member, even if such events are in the best interests of minority stockholders. This concentration of voting power with the Founder Post‑IPO Member may have a negative impact on the price of our Class A Common Stock. In addition, because shares of our Class B Common Stock and Class D Common Stock each have 10 votes per share on matters submitted to a vote of our stockholders, the Founder Post‑IPO Member is able to control our Company as long as it owns at least 25% of our issued and outstanding common Stock.

The Founder Post-IPO Member’s interests may not be fully aligned with yours, which could lead to actions that are not in your best interest. Because the Founder Post-IPO Member holds part of its economic interest in our business through Virtu Financial, rather than through the public company, it may have conflicting interests with holders of shares of our Class A Common Stock. For example, the Founder Post-IPO Member may have a different tax position from us, which could influence its decisions regarding whether and when we should dispose of assets or incur new or refinance existing indebtedness, especially in light of the existence of the tax receivable agreements that we entered into in connection with the IPO, and whether and when we should undergo certain changes of control within the meaning of the tax receivable agreements or terminate the tax receivable agreements. In addition, the structuring of future transactions may take into consideration these tax or other considerations even where no similar benefit would accrue to us. See “Item 1A. Risk Factors - Risks Related to Our Organizational Structure - We are required to pay the Virtu Post IPO Members and the Investor Post-IPO Stockholders for certain tax benefits we may claim, and the amounts we may pay could be significant.” In addition, pursuant to an exchange agreement, the holders of Virtu Financial Units and shares of our Class C Common Stock or Class D Common Stock are not required to participate in a proposed sale of our Company that is tax‑free for our stockholders unless the transaction is also tax‑free for such holders of Virtu Financial Units and shares of our Class C Common Stock or Class D Common Stock. This requirement could limit structural alternatives available to us in any such proposed transaction and could have the effect of discouraging transactions that might benefit you as a holder of shares of our Class A Common Stock. In addition, the Founder Post-IPO Member’s significant ownership in us and resulting ability to effectively control us may discourage someone from making a significant equity investment in us, or could discourage transactions involving a change in control, including transactions in which you as a holder of shares of our Class A Common Stock might otherwise receive a premium for your shares over the then‑current market price.

We have opted out of Section 203 of the General Corporation Law of the State of Delaware (the “Delaware General Corporation Law”), which prohibits a publicly held Delaware corporation from engaging in a business combination transaction with an interested stockholder for a period of three years after the interested stockholder became such unless the transaction fits within an applicable exemption, such as board approval of the business combination or the transaction which resulted in such stockholder becoming an interested stockholder. Therefore, the Founder Post‑IPO Member is able to transfer control of us to a third party by transferring its shares of our common stock (subject to certain restrictions and limitations), which would not require the approval of our board of directors or our other stockholders.


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Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation provides that, to the fullest extent permitted by law, the doctrine of “corporate opportunity” does not apply against the Founder Post-IPO Member, Mr. Viola, Temasek, any of our non‑employee directors or any of their respective affiliates in a manner that would prohibit them from investing in competing businesses or doing business with our clients or customers. In addition, subject to the restrictions on competitive activities described below, Mr. Cifu is permitted to become engaged in, or provide services to, any other business or activity in which Mr. Viola is currently engaged or permitted to become engaged, to the extent that Mr. Cifu’s level of participation in such businesses or activities is consistent with his current participation in such businesses and activities. The Amended and Restated Virtu Financial LLC Agreement provides that Mr. Viola, in addition to our other executive officers and our employees that are Virtu Post-IPO Members, including Mr. Cifu, may not directly or indirectly engage in certain competitive activities until the third anniversary of the date on which such person ceases to be an officer, director or employee of ours. Temasek and our non‑employee directors are not subject to any such restriction. To the extent that the Founder Post-IPO Member, Mr. Viola, Temasek, our non‑employee directors or any of their respective affiliates invests in other businesses, they may have differing interests than our other stockholders. Messrs. Viola and Cifu also have business relationships outside of our business.

We may be unable to remain in compliance with the covenants contained in our Credit Agreement and our obligation to comply with these covenants may adversely affect our ability to operate our business.

The covenants in our Credit Agreement may negatively impact our ability to finance future operations or capital needs or to engage in other business activities. Our Credit Agreement restricts our ability to, among other things, incur additional indebtedness, dispose of assets, guarantee debt obligations, repay other indebtedness, pay dividends, pledge assets, make investments, including in certain of our operating subsidiaries, make acquisitions or consummate mergers or consolidations and engage in certain transactions with subsidiaries and affiliates.

A failure to comply with the restrictions contained in our Credit Agreement could lead to an event of default, which could result in an acceleration of our indebtedness. Our future operating results may not be sufficient to enable compliance with the covenants in our Credit Agreement or to remedy such a default. In addition, in the event of an acceleration, we may not have or be able to obtain sufficient funds to refinance our indebtedness or to make any accelerated payments. Even if we were able to obtain new financing, we would not be able to guarantee that the new financing would be on commercially reasonable terms. If we default on our indebtedness, our business, financial condition and results of operation could suffer a material adverse effect.

Our reported financial results depend on management’s selection of accounting methods and certain assumptions and estimates.

Our accounting policies and assumptions are fundamental to our reported financial condition, and results of operations and cash flows. Our management must exercise judgment in selecting and applying many of these accounting policies and methods to comply with generally accepted accounting principles and reflect management’s judgment of the most appropriate manner to report our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. In some cases, management must select the accounting policy or method to apply from multiple alternatives, any of which may be reasonable under the circumstances, yet each may result in the reporting of materially different results than would have been reported under a different alternative.

Certain accounting policies are critical to presenting our reported financial condition and results. They require management to make difficult, subjective or complex judgments about matters that are uncertain. Materially different amounts could be reported under different conditions or using different assumptions or estimates. If such estimates or assumptions underlying our financial statements are incorrect, we may experience material losses.

Additionally, from time to time, the Financial Accounting Standards Board and the SEC change the financial accounting and reporting standards or the interpretation of those standards that govern the preparation of our financial statements. These changes are beyond our control, can be difficult to predict and could materially impact how we report our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. Changes in these standards are continuously occurring, and given the current economic environment, more drastic changes may occur. The implementation of such changes could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operation.

We are exempt from certain corporate governance requirements since we are a “controlled company” within the meaning of the NASDAQ rules, and as a result our stockholders do not have the protections afforded by these corporate governance requirements.

The Founder Post‑IPO Member controls more than 50% of our combined voting power. As a result, we are considered a “controlled company” for purposes of the NASDAQ rules and corporate governance standards, and therefore we are

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permitted and may elect not to or may have elected not to, comply with certain NASDAQ corporate governance requirements, including those that would otherwise require our board of directors to have a majority of independent directors and require that we either establish a Compensation and Nominating and Corporate Governance Committees, each comprised entirely of independent directors, or otherwise ensure that the compensation of our executive officers and nominees for directors are determined or recommended to the board of directors by the independent members of the board of directors. Accordingly, holders of our Class A Common Stock do not have the same protections afforded to stockholders of companies that are subject to all of the NASDAQ rules and corporate governance standards, and the ability of our independent directors to influence our business policies and affairs may be reduced.

We are required to pay the Virtu Post‑IPO Members and the Investor Post‑IPO Stockholders for certain tax benefits we may claim, and the amounts we may pay could be significant.

In connection with the Reorganization Transactions, we acquired equity interests in Virtu Financial from an affiliate of Silver Lake Partners (which, following a secondary offering completed in November 2015, no longer holds any equity interest in us) and the Temasek Pre-IPO Member in the Mergers. In addition, we used a portion of the net proceeds from our IPO and our Secondary Offerings (as defined below) to purchase Virtu Financial Units and corresponding shares of Class C Common Stock from certain Virtu Post-IPO Members, including affiliates of Silver Lake Partners (the “Silver Lake Post-IPO Members”), the Founder Post-IPO Member, and certain employees. These acquisitions of interests in Virtu Financial, along with certain subsequent exchanges of interests in Virtu Financial by current and former employees, resulted in tax basis adjustments to the assets of Virtu Financial that were allocated to us and our subsidiaries. Future acquisitions of interests in Virtu Financial are expected to produce favorable tax attributes. In addition, future exchanges by the Virtu Post-IPO Members of Virtu Financial Units and corresponding shares of Class C Common Stock or Class D Common Stock, as the case may be, for shares of our Class A Common Stock or Class B Common Stock, respectively, are expected to produce favorable tax attributes. These tax attributes would not be available to us in the absence of such transactions. Both the existing and anticipated tax basis adjustments are expected to reduce the amount of tax that we would otherwise be required to pay in the future.

We entered into three tax receivable agreements with the Virtu Post-IPO Members and the Investor Post-IPO Stockholders (one with the Founder Post-IPO Member, the Employee Trust, Virtu Employee Holdco and other post IPO investors, other than affiliates of Silver Lake Partners and affiliates of Temasek, another with the Investor Post-IPO Stockholders and the other with the Silver Lake Post-IPO Members) that provide for the payment by us to the Virtu Post-IPO Members and the Investor Post-IPO Stockholders (or their transferees of Virtu Financial Units or other assignees) of 85% of the amount of actual cash savings, if any, in U.S. federal, state and local income tax or franchise tax that we actually realize as a result of (i) any increase in tax basis in Virtu Financial’s assets resulting from (a) the acquisition of equity interests in Virtu Financial from an affiliate of Silver Lake Partners and Temasek, and the Temasek Pre-IPO Member in the Reorganization Transactions (which represents the unamortized portion of the increase in tax basis in Virtu Financial’s assets resulting from a prior acquisition of interests in Virtu Financial by an affiliate of Silver Lake Partners and Temasek, and the Temasek Pre-IPO Member), (b) the purchases of Virtu Financial Units (along with the corresponding shares of our Class C Common Stock or Class D Common Stock, as applicable) from certain of the Virtu Post-IPO Members using a portion of the net proceeds from the IPO or in any subsequent offering (including, without limitation, the Secondary Offerings), (c) exchanges by the Virtu Post-IPO Members of Virtu Financial Units (along with the corresponding shares of our Class C Common Stock or Class D Common Stock, as applicable) for shares of our Class A Common Stock or Class B Common Stock, as applicable, or (d) payments under the tax receivable agreements, (ii) any net operating losses available to us as a result of the Mergers and (iii) tax benefits related to imputed interest deemed arising as a result of payments made under the tax receivable agreements.

The actual increase in tax basis, as well as the amount and timing of any payments under these tax receivable agreements, will vary depending upon a number of factors, including the timing of exchanges by the Virtu Post‑IPO Members, the price of our Class A Common Stock at the time of the exchange, the extent to which such exchanges are taxable, the amount and timing of the taxable income we generate in the future and the tax rate then applicable and the portion of our payments under the tax receivable agreements constituting imputed interest.

The payments we are required to make under the tax receivable agreements, which represent 85% of the amount of actual cash savings, if any, in U.S. federal, state and local income tax or franchise tax that we actually realize, could be substantial. We expect that, as a result of the amount of the increases in the tax basis of the tangible and intangible assets of Virtu Financial, assuming no material changes in the relevant tax law and that we earn sufficient taxable income to realize in full the potential tax benefits described above, future payments to the Virtu Post‑IPO Members and the Investor Post‑IPO Stockholders in respect of the purchases, the exchanges and the Mergers in connection with the IPO, the purchases and exchanges completed in connection with our subsequent public offerings, the Secondary Offerings, and exchanges by employees and other Virtu Post-IPO Members will range from approximately $3.3 million to $20.7 million per year over the

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next 15 years. Future payments under the tax receivable agreements in respect of subsequent exchanges would be in addition to these amounts. The payments under the tax receivable agreements are not conditioned upon the Virtu Post‑IPO Members’ or the Investor Post‑IPO Stockholders’ continued ownership of us.

In addition, although we are not aware of any issue that would cause the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) to challenge the tax basis increases or other benefits arising under the tax receivable agreements, the Virtu Post‑IPO Members and the Investor Post‑IPO Stockholders (or their transferees or other assignees) will not reimburse us for any payments previously made if such tax basis increases or other tax benefits are subsequently disallowed, except that any excess payments made to the Virtu Post‑IPO Members and the Investor Post‑IPO Stockholders will be netted against future payments otherwise to be made under the tax receivable agreements, if any, after our determination of such excess. As a result, in such circumstances we could make payments to the Virtu Post‑IPO Members and the Investor Post‑IPO Stockholders under the tax receivable agreements that are greater than our actual cash tax savings and may not be able to recoup those payments, which could negatively impact our liquidity.

In addition, the tax receivable agreements provide that, upon certain mergers, asset sales or other forms of business combination, or certain other changes of control, our or our successor’s obligations with respect to tax benefits would be based on certain assumptions, including that we or our successor would have sufficient taxable income to fully utilize the increased tax deductions and tax basis and other benefits covered by the tax receivable agreements. As a result, upon a change of control, we could be required to make payments under a tax receivable agreement that are greater than the specified percentage of our actual cash tax savings, which could negatively impact our liquidity.

In addition, the tax receivable agreements provide that in the case of a change in control of the Company, the Virtu Post‑IPO Members and the Investor Post‑IPO Stockholders have the option to terminate the applicable tax receivable agreement, and we are required to make a payment to such electing party in an amount equal to the present value of future payments (calculated using a discount rate equal to the lesser of 6.5% or LIBOR plus 100 basis points, which may differ from our, or a potential acquirer’s, then‑current cost of capital) under the tax receivable agreement, which payment would be based on certain assumptions, including those relating to our future taxable income. In these situations, our obligations under the tax receivable agreements could have a substantial negative impact on our, or a potential acquirer’s, liquidity and could have the effect of delaying, deferring, modifying or preventing certain mergers, asset sales, other forms of business combinations or other changes of control. These provisions of the tax receivable agreements may result in situations where the Virtu Post‑IPO Members and the Investor Post‑IPO Stockholders have interests that differ from or are in addition to those of our other shareholders. In addition, we could be required to make payments under the tax receivable agreements that are substantial and in excess of our, or a potential acquirer’s, actual cash savings in income tax.

Finally, because we are a holding company with no operations of our own, our ability to make payments under the tax receivable agreements are dependent on the ability of our subsidiaries to make distributions to us. Our Credit Agreement restricts the ability of our subsidiaries to make distributions to us, which could affect our ability to make payments under the tax receivable agreements. To the extent that we are unable to make payments under the tax receivable agreements for any reason, such payments will be deferred and will accrue interest until paid, which could negatively impact our results of operations and cash flows and could also affect our liquidity in periods in which such payments are made.

Risks Related to Our Class A Common Stock

Substantial future sales of shares of our Class A common stock in the public market could cause our stock price to fall.

As of December 31, 2019, we had 118,257,141 shares of Class A Common Stock outstanding, excluding 3,689,991 shares of Class A Common Stock issuable pursuant to the Amended and Restated 2015 Management Incentive Plan (as defined below) and 72,978,918 shares of Class A Common Stock issuable upon potential exchanges and/or conversions. Of these shares, the 61,312,535 shares sold in the IPO and the Secondary Offerings are freely tradable without further restriction under the Securities Act. The remaining 132,917,013 shares of Class A Common Stock outstanding as of December 31, 2019 (including shares issuable upon exchange and/or conversion) are “restricted securities,” as that term is defined under Rule 144 of the Securities Act. The holders of these remaining 132,917,013 shares of our Class A Common Stock, including shares issuable upon exchange or conversion as described above, are entitled to dispose of their shares pursuant to (i) the applicable holding period, volume and other restrictions of Rule 144 or (ii) another exemption from registration under the Securities Act. Additional sales of a substantial number of our shares of Class A Common Stock in the public market, or the perception that sales could occur, could have a material adverse effect on the price of our Class A Common Stock.

We have filed a registration statement under the Securities Act registering 16,000,000 shares of our Class A Common Stock reserved for issuance under our Amended and Restated 2015 Management Incentive Plan, 3,689,991 of which are

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issuable, and we entered into the Registration Rights Agreement (as defined below) pursuant to which we granted demand and piggyback registration rights to the Founder Post-IPO Member, Temasek, the North Island Stockholder and piggyback registration rights to certain of the other Virtu Post-IPO Members.

Failure to establish and maintain effective internal control over financial reporting could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows, and stock price.

Maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting is necessary for us to produce reliable financial reports and is important in helping to prevent financial fraud. If we are unable to maintain adequate internal controls over financial reporting, our business and operating results could be harmed. Effective December 31, 2018, we are no longer an “emerging growth company”, and therefore under applicable SEC rules we must maintain internal controls over financial reporting to satisfy the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (“Sarbanes-Oxley”) and the related rules of the SEC, which require, among other things, our management to assess annually the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting and our independent registered public accounting firm to issue a report on the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting with our Annual Report on Form 10-K. The internal control assessment required by Section 404 of Sarbanes-Oxley may divert internal resources and we may experience higher operating expenses, higher independent auditor and consulting fees during the implementation of these changes. Any material weaknesses or any failure to implement required new or improved controls or difficulties encountered in their implementation could cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations or result in material misstatements in our consolidated financial statements. If our management or our independent registered public accounting firm were to conclude in their reports that our internal control over financial reporting was not effective, investors could lose confidence in our reported financial information, and the trading price of our Class A Common Stock could drop significantly. Failure to comply with Section 404 of Sarbanes-Oxley could potentially subject us to sanctions or investigations by the SEC, FINRA or other regulatory authorities, as well as increase the risk of liability arising from litigation based on securities law.

We intend to pay regular dividends to our stockholders, but our ability to do so may be limited by our holding company structure, contractual restrictions and regulatory requirements.

We intend to pay cash dividends on a quarterly basis. See Item 5, “Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.” However, we are a holding company, with our principal asset being our direct and indirect equity interests in Virtu Financial, and we will have no independent means of generating revenue. Accordingly, as the sole managing member of Virtu Financial, we intend to cause, and will rely on, Virtu Financial to make distributions to its equityholders, including the Founder Post-IPO Member, the Employee Trust, Virtu Employee Holdco and us, to fund our dividends. When Virtu Financial makes such distributions, the other equityholders of Virtu Financial will be entitled to receive equivalent distributions pro rata based on their economic interests in Virtu Financial. In order for Virtu Financial to make distributions, it may need to receive distributions from its subsidiaries. Certain of these subsidiaries are or may in the future be subject to regulatory capital requirements that limit the size or frequency of distributions. See “Item 1A. Risk Factors - Risks Related to Our Business - Failure to comply with applicable regulatory capital requirements could subject us to sanctions imposed by the SEC, FINRA and other SROs or regulatory bodies.” If Virtu Financial is unable to cause these subsidiaries to make distributions, we may not receive adequate distributions from Virtu Financial in order to fund our dividends.

Our board of directors will periodically review the cash generated from our business and the capital expenditures required to finance our global growth plans and determine whether to modify the amount of regular dividends and/or declare periodic special dividends to our stockholders. Our board of directors will take into account general economic and business conditions, including our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows, capital requirements, contractual restrictions, including restrictions contained in our Credit Agreement, business prospects and other factors that our board of directors considers relevant. There can be no assurance that our board of directors will not reduce the amount of regular cash dividends or cause us to cease paying dividends altogether. In addition, our Credit Agreement limits the amount of distributions our subsidiaries, including Virtu Financial, can make to us and the purposes for which distributions could be made. Accordingly, we may not be able to pay dividends even if our board of directors would otherwise deem it appropriate. See “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - Liquidity and Capital Resources.”

Provisions in our charter documents and certain rules imposed by regulatory authorities may delay or prevent our acquisition by a third party.

Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and by-laws contain several provisions that may make it more difficult or expensive for a third party to acquire control of us without the approval of our board of directors. These provisions, which may delay, prevent or deter a merger, acquisition, tender offer, proxy contest or other transaction that stockholders may

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consider favorable, include the following, some of which may only become effective when the Founder Post-IPO Member or any of its affiliates or permitted transferees no longer beneficially own shares representing 25% of our issued and outstanding common stock (the “Triggering Event”):

the 10 vote per share feature of our Class B Common Stock and Class D Common Stock;
the division of our board of directors into three classes and the election of each class for three-year terms;
the sole ability of the board of directors to fill a vacancy created by the expansion of the board of directors;
advance notice requirements for stockholder proposals and director nominations;
after the Triggering Event, provisions limiting stockholders' ability to call special meetings of stockholders, to require special meetings of stockholders to be called and to take action by written consent;
after the Triggering Event, in certain cases, the approval of holders of at least 75% of the shares entitled to vote generally on the making, alteration, amendment or repeal of our certificate of incorporation or by-laws will be required to adopt, amend or repeal our by-laws, or amend or repeal certain provisions of our certificate of incorporation;
after the Triggering Event, the required approval of holders of at least 75% of the shares entitled to vote at an election of the directors to remove directors, which removal may only be for cause; and
the ability of our board of directors to designate the terms of and issue new series of preferred stock without stockholder approval, which could be used, among other things, to institute a rights plan that would have the effect of significantly diluting the stock ownership of a potential hostile acquirer, likely preventing acquisitions that have not been approved by our board of directors.

These provisions of our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and by-laws could discourage potential takeover attempts and reduce the price that investors might be willing to pay for shares of our Class A Common Stock in the future, which could reduce the market price of our Class A Common Stock.

In addition, a third party attempting to acquire us or a substantial position in our Class A Common Stock may be delayed or ultimately prevented from doing so by change in ownership or control regulations to which certain of our regulated subsidiaries are subject. FINRA’s NASD Rule 1017 generally provides that FINRA approval must be obtained in connection with any transaction resulting in a single person or entity owning, directly or indirectly, 25% or more of a member firm’s equity and would include a change in control of a parent company. Similarly, Virtu Financial Ireland Limited is subject to change in control regulations promulgated by the Central Bank of Ireland. We may also be subject to similar restrictions in other jurisdictions in which we operate. These regulations could discourage potential takeover attempts and reduce the price that investors might be willing to pay for shares of our Class A Common Stock in the future, which could reduce the market price of our Class A Common Stock.

Our stock price may be volatile.

The market price of our Class A Common Stock is subject to significant fluctuations in response to, among other factors, variations in our operating results and market conditions specific to our business. Furthermore, in recent years the stock market has experienced significant price and volume fluctuations. This volatility has had a significant impact on the market price of securities issued by many companies, including companies in our industry. The changes frequently appear to occur without regard to the operating performance of the affected companies. As such, the price of our Class A Common Stock could fluctuate based upon factors that have little or nothing to do with us, and these fluctuations could materially reduce the price of our Class A Common Stock and materially affect the value of your investment.

We will incur increased costs as a result of being a public company.

We completed the IPO in April 2015, and therefore we have a limited history operating as a public company. As a public company, we incur significant levels of legal, accounting and other expenses that we did not incur as a privately-owned company. Sarbanes-Oxley and related rules of the SEC, together with the listing requirements of NASDAQ, impose significant requirements relating to disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting. We have incurred increased costs as a result of compliance with these public company requirements, which require additional resources and make some activities more time consuming than they have been in the past when we were privately owned. We may experience higher than anticipated operating expenses as well as higher independent auditor and consulting fees during the implementation of these changes and thereafter and we may need to hire additional qualified personnel in order to continue to satisfy these public company requirements. We are required to expend considerable time and resources complying with public company regulations. In addition, these laws and regulations may make it more difficult or costly for us to obtain certain types of insurance, including director and officer liability insurance, and we may be forced to accept reduced policy limits and coverage or incur substantially higher costs to obtain the same or similar coverage. In addition, these laws and regulations could make it

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more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified persons to serve on our board of directors or as executive officers and may divert management’s attention. Furthermore, if we are unable to satisfy our obligations as a public company, we could be subject to delisting of our Class A Common Stock, fines, sanctions and other regulatory action.

If securities or industry analysts cease to publish research or publish inaccurate or unfavorable research about us or our business, or publish projections for our business that exceed our actual results, our stock price and trading volume could decline.

The trading market for our Class A Common Stock may be affected by the research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us or our business. If one or more of the analysts who covers us downgrades our Class A Common Stock or publishes inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our stock price could decline. In addition, the analysts’ projections may have little or no relationship to the results we actually achieve and could cause our stock price to decline if we fail to meet their projections. If one or more of these analysts ceases coverage of us or fails to publish reports on us regularly, our stock price or trading volume could decline.

Risks Related to the ITG Acquisition

Significant costs and significant indebtedness were incurred in connection with the consummation of the ITG Acquisition and significant costs have been and will be incurred in connection with the integration of ITG into our business, including legal, accounting, financial advisory and other costs.

We expect to incur significant costs in connection with integrating the operations, products and personnel of ITG into our business, in addition to costs related directly to completing the ITG Transactions. These costs may include:

employee retention, redeployment, relocation or severance;
integration of information systems;
combination of corporate and administrative functions; and
potential or pending litigation or other proceedings related to the ITG Acquisition.

The costs related to the ITG Transactions could be higher than currently estimated, depending on how difficult it will be to integrate our business with that of ITG, and the expected cost reductions and synergies may not be achieved.

In addition, we expect to incur a number of non-recurring costs associated with combining the operations of ITG with ours, which cannot be estimated accurately at this time. While we expect to incur a significant amount of transaction fees and other costs related to the consummation of the ITG Transactions, additional unanticipated costs may be incurred.  Any expected elimination of duplicative costs, as well as the expected realization of other cost reductions, efficiencies and synergies related to the integration of our operations with those of ITG, that may offset incremental transaction and transaction-related costs over time, may not be achieved as projected, or at all.

In addition, we incurred $1.5 billion of new indebtedness in connection with the ITG Acquisition, the proceeds of which were used to refinance existing indebtedness in the amount of approximately $400 million, and the remainder of which funded the ITG Acquisition and related fees and expenses. The incremental debt we incurred in connection with the ITG Acquisition may limit our financial and operating flexibility, and we may incur additional debt, which could increase the risks associated with our substantial indebtedness. Our substantial indebtedness may have material consequences for our business, prospects, results of operations, financial condition and/or cash flows. 

Integrating ITG’s business into our business may divert management’s attention away from operations, and we may also encounter significant difficulties in integrating the two businesses.

The ITG Acquisition involves the integration of two companies that have previously operated independently. The success of the ITG Acquisition and its anticipated financial and operational benefits, including increased revenues, synergies and cost reductions, will depend in part on our ability to successfully combine and integrate ITG’s business into ours, and there can be no assurance regarding when or the extent to which we will be able to realize these increased revenues, synergies, cost reductions or other benefits. These benefits may not be achieved within the anticipated time frame, or at all.

Successful integration of ITG’s operations, products and personnel may place a significant burden on management and other internal resources. The diversion of management’s attention, and any difficulties encountered in the transition and integration process, could harm our business, prospects, results of operations, financial condition and/or cash flows.


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In addition, the overall integration of the businesses may result in material unanticipated problems, expenses, liabilities, and competitive responses. The difficulties of combining the operations of the companies include, among others:

difficulties in achieving anticipated cost reductions, synergies, business opportunities and growth prospects from the combination;
difficulties in the integration of operations and systems;
difficulties in conforming standards, controls, procedures and accounting and other policies and compensation structures between the two companies;
difficulties in the assimilation of employees and the integration of the companies’ different organizational structure;
difficulties in managing the expanded operations of a larger and more complex company with increased international operations;
challenges in integrating the business culture of each company;
challenges in attracting and retaining key personnel; and
difficulties in replacing numerous systems, including those involving management information, purchasing, accounting and finance, sales, billing, employee benefits, payroll, data privacy and security and regulatory compliance, many of which may be dissimilar.

These factors could result in increased costs, decreases in the amount of expected revenues and diversion of management’s time and energy, which could materially impact our business, prospects, results of operations, financial condition and/or cash flows.

We may not realize the anticipated synergies, net cost reductions and growth opportunities from the ITG Acquisition.

The benefits that we expect to achieve as a result of the ITG Acquisition will depend, in part, on the ability of the combined company to realize anticipated growth opportunities, net cost reductions and synergies. Our success in realizing these growth opportunities, net cost reductions and synergies, and the timing of this realization, depends on the successful integration of our historical business and operations and the historical business and operations of ITG. Even if we are able to integrate the businesses and operations of the Company and ITG successfully, this integration may not result in the realization of the full benefits of the growth opportunities, net cost reductions and synergies that we currently expect from this integration within the anticipated time frame or at all.  For example, we may be unable to eliminate duplicative costs. Moreover, we may incur substantial expenses in connection with the integration of our business and ITG’s business. While we anticipate that certain expenses will be incurred, such expenses are difficult to estimate accurately and may exceed current estimates. Accordingly, the benefits from the ITG Acquisition may be offset by costs or delays incurred in integrating the businesses. The projected net cost reductions and synergies described in our press release and supplemental materials announcing the ITG Acquisition are based on a number of assumptions relating to our business and ITG’s business. Those assumptions may be inaccurate, and, as a result, our projected net cost reductions and synergies may be inaccurate, and our business, prospects, results of operations, financial condition and/or cash flows could be materially and adversely affected.

In connection with the ITG Acquisition, the Company will be subject to business uncertainties that could materially and adversely affect our business.

Uncertainty about the effect of the ITG Acquisition on employees, customers and suppliers may have both a material and adverse effect on both the Company and ITG. These uncertainties may impair both companies’ ability to attract, retain and motivate key personnel for a period of time after the ITG Acquisition is completed, and could cause customers, suppliers and others who deal with the Company and ITG to seek to change existing business relationships. If key employees depart because of issues related to the uncertainty and difficulty of integration or a desire not to remain with us after the ITG Acquisition, or if customers, suppliers or others seek to change their dealings with us as a result of the ITG Acquisition, our business could be materially and adversely impacted.

In connection with the ITG Acquisition, we assumed potential liabilities relating to ITG’s business.

In connection with the ITG Acquisition, we assumed potential liabilities and other risks relating to ITG’s business, including but not limited to those liabilities and risks arising from or related to pending, threatened or potential litigation or regulatory matters. For example, ITG is currently the subject of various regulatory reviews and investigations by federal, state and foreign regulators and SROs, including the SEC and FINRA. In some instances, these matters may ultimately result in a disciplinary action and/or a civil or administrative action, penalties, fines, judgments, censures and settlements. To the extent we have not identified such liabilities or miscalculated their potential financial impact, these liabilities could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, results of operations, financial condition and/or cash flows.


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As a clearing member firm in certain jurisdictions we are subject to significant default risk.

In connection with our operation of ITG’s business, we are required to finance our clients’ unsettled positions from time to time and we could be held responsible for the defaults of our clients. Default by our clients may also give rise to our incurring penalties imposed by execution venues, regulatory authorities and clearing and settlement organizations. Although we regularly review our credit exposure, default risk may arise from events or circumstances that may be difficult to detect or foresee. In addition, concerns about, or a default by, one institution could lead to significant liquidity problems, losses or defaults by other institutions that could in turn adversely affect us.

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
None.

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

Our headquarters are located in leased office space at One Liberty Plaza, 165 Broadway, New York, NY 10006. We also lease space for our offices in the U.S., Canada, Europe, Asia and Australia. We consider the current arrangements to be sufficient for our present needs, and we are in the process of terminating or subleasing office space that we no longer need, subsequent to the consolidations in staff and technology following the Acquisition of KCG and ITG Acquisition.

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

The information required by this item is set forth in the “Legal Proceedings” section in Note 15 “Commitments, Contingencies and Guarantees” to the Company’s Consolidated financial statements included in Item 8 “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, which is incorporated by reference herein.

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

None.

PART II


ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Market Information

The Class A Common Stock trade on NASDAQ under the ticker symbol “VIRT”. There is no established public trading market for Class B Common Stock, Class C Common Stock or Class D Common Stock.

Holders

Based on information made available to us by the transfer agent, as of February 28, 2020, there are forty-three stockholders of record of our Class A Common Stock, one of which was Cede & Co., a nominee for The Depository Trust Company, zero stockholders of record of our Class B Common Stock, eight stockholders of record of our Class C Common Stock and one stockholder of record of our Class D Common Stock. All of our Class A Common Stock held by brokerage firms, banks and other financial institutions as nominees for beneficial owners is considered to be held of record by Cede & Co., who is considered to be one stockholder of record. A substantially greater number of holders of our Class A Common Stock are “street name” or beneficial holders, whose shares of Class A Common Stock are held of record by banks, brokers and other financial institutions. Because such shares of Class A Common Stock are held on behalf of stockholders, and not by the stockholders directly, and because a stockholder can have multiple positions with different brokerage firms, banks and other financial institutions, we are unable to determine the total number of stockholders we have.


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Dividend and Capital Return Policy

Our board of directors has adopted a policy of returning excess cash to our stockholders. Subject to the sole discretion of our board of directors and the considerations discussed below, we intend to pay dividends that will annually equal, in the aggregate, at least 70% of our net income.

The board of directors declared and we paid quarterly cash dividends of $0.24 during the years ended December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017. The Company intends to continue paying regular quarterly dividends to holders of our Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock and to holders of RSUs (as defined below); however, the payment of dividends will be subject to general economic and business conditions, including the Company’s financial condition, results of operations and cash flows, capital requirements, contractual restrictions, including restrictions contained in our Credit Agreement, regulatory restrictions, business prospects and other factors that the Company’s board of directors considers relevant. The terms of the Credit Agreement contain a number of covenants, including a restriction on our and our restricted subsidiaries’ ability to pay dividends on, or make distributions in respect of, our equity interests. See “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - Liquidity and Capital Resources - Long-Term Borrowings”.

Stock Performance

The following performance graph and related information shall not be deemed “soliciting material” or to be “filed” with the Securities and Exchange Commission, nor shall such information be incorporated by reference into any future filing under the Securities Act or the Exchange Act except to the extent we specifically incorporate it by reference into such filing. Our stock price performance shown in the graph below is not indicative of future stock price performance.


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Table of Contents

The stock performance graph below compares the performance of an investment in our Class A Common Stock, from April 16, 2015, the date of the IPO, through December 31, 2019, with the S&P 500 Index and the NYSE ARCA Securities Broker/Dealer Index. The graph assumes $100 was invested in our Class A Common Stock, the S&P 500 Index and the NYSE Arca Securities Broker/Dealer Index. It assumes that dividends were reinvested on the date of payment without payment of any commissions or consideration of income taxes.


chart-7a36115432225649aaf.jpg

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Index
 
4/16/2015
 
6/30/2015
 
12/31/2015
 
6/30/2016
 
12/30/2016
 
6/30/2017
 
12/29/2017
 
6/29/2018
 
12/31/2018
 
06/28/2019
 
12/31/2019
Virtu Financial Inc.
 
100.00

 
99.14

 
97.67

 
79.61

 
72.85

 
82.96

 
88.52

 
130.48

 
129.21

 
111.47

 
84.16

S&P 500
 
100.00

 
97.53

 
97.02

 
99.63

 
106.28

 
115.04

 
126.91

 
129.04

 
119.00

 
139.64

 
153.36

NYSE Arca Securities Broker/Dealer
 
100.00

 
103.10

 
93.33

 
78.83

 
107.58

 
118.13

 
139.00

 
142.77

 
124.38

 
140.01

 
152.17



Stock and Common Units Repurchases

Pursuant to the exchange agreement (the “Exchange Agreement”) entered into on April 15, 2015 by and among the Company, Virtu Financial and holders of Virtu Financial Units, Virtu Financial Units (along with the corresponding shares of our Class C Common Stock or Class D Common Stock, as applicable) may be exchanged at any time for shares of our Class A Common Stock or Class B Common Stock, as applicable, on a one-for-one basis, subject to customary conversion rate adjustments for stock splits, stock dividends and reclassifications.

In February 2018, the Company's board of directors authorized a new share repurchase program of up to $50.0 million in Class A Common Stock and Virtu Financial Units by March 31, 2019. On July 27, 2018, the Company's board of directors authorized the expansion of the Company's share repurchase program, increasing the total authorized amount by $50.0 million

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to $100.0 million and extending the duration of the program through September 30, 2019. The share repurchase program entitled the Company to repurchase shares from time to time in open market transactions, privately negotiated transactions or by other means. Repurchases were also permitted to be made under Rule 10b5-1 plans. The timing and amount of repurchase transactions were determined by the Company's management based on its evaluation of market conditions, share price, legal requirements and other factors. The program expired on September 30, 2019. From the inception of the program in February 2018, the Company repurchased approximately 2.6 million shares of Class A Common Stock and Virtu Financial Units for approximately $65.9 million.
The following table contains information about the Company’s purchases of its Class A Common Stock and Class C Common Stock during the three months ended December 31, 2019:
Period
 
Total Number of Shares Purchased (1)
 
Average Price Paid per Share
 
Total Number of Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Plans or Programs
 
Approximate Dollar Value of Shares that May Yet Be Purchased Under the Plans or Programs
October 1, 2019 - October 31, 2019
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Class A Common Stock / Virtu Financial Units repurchases
 
10,949

 
$
15.76

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
November 1, 2019 - November 30, 2019
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Class A Common Stock / Virtu Financial Units repurchases
 
36,931

 
16.53

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
December 1, 2019 - December 31, 2019
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Class A Common Stock / Virtu Financial Units repurchases
 
198,506

 
16.32

 

 
 
Class C Common Stock/ Virtu Financial Units repurchases
 
5,957

 
16.75

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total Common Stock / Virtu Financial Unit repurchases
 
252,343

 
$
16.34

 

 
$

(1) Includes the repurchase of 246,386 shares from employees in order to satisfy statutory tax withholding requirements upon the net settlement of equity awards for the three months ended December 31, 2019
During the year ended December 31, 2019, pursuant to the Exchange Agreement, certain current and former employees elected to exchange 4,089,598 units in Virtu Financial held directly or on their behalf by Virtu Employee Holdco LLC (“Employee Holdco”) on a one-for-one basis for shares of Class A Common Stock. The shares of our Class A Common Stock were issued in reliance on the registration exemption contained in Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act, on the basis that the transaction did not involve a public offering. No underwriters were involved in the transaction.

Equity Compensation Plan Information

The following table provides information about shares of common stock available for future awards under all of the Company’s equity compensation plans as of December 31, 2019:

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Plan Category
 
Number of securities to be issued upon exercise of outstanding options, warrants and rights
 
Weighted-average exercise price of outstanding options, warrants and rights
 
Number of securities remaining available for future issuance under equity compensation plans (excluding securities reflected in first column)
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders
 
Amended and Restated 2015 Management Incentive Plan
 
3,077,650

 
19.00

 
3,689,991

Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders
 
None
 

 

 

Total
 
 
 
3,077,650

 
$
19.00

 
3,689,991



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ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

SELECTED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA

The following table sets forth selected historical consolidated financial data for the periods beginning on and after January 1, 2015. We were formed on October 16, 2013 and, prior to the consummation of the Reorganization Transactions and the IPO, did not conduct any activities other than those incident to our formation and the IPO. Our consolidated financial statements reflect, for all the periods prior to April 16, 2015 (the period prior to completion of the Reorganization Transactions), the operations of Virtu Financial and its consolidated subsidiaries, and for all periods on or after April 16, 2015, the operations of the Company and its consolidated subsidiaries (including Virtu Financial).

On July 20, 2017 we acquired KCG, which is accounted for under the acquisition method of accounting. Under the acquisition method of accounting, the assets and liabilities of KCG as of the KCG Closing Date were recorded at their respective fair values and added to the carrying value of our existing assets and liabilities. Our reported financial condition, results of operations and cash flows for the periods following the Acquisition of KCG reflect KCG's and our balances and reflect the impact of purchase accounting adjustments. As we are the accounting acquirer, the financial results for the year ended December 31, 2017 comprise our results for the entire applicable period and the results of KCG from the KCG Closing Date through December 31, 2017. All periods prior to the KCG Closing Date comprise solely our results.

On March 1, 2019 we acquired ITG, which is accounted for under the acquisition method of accounting. Under the acquisition method of accounting, the assets and liabilities of ITG as of the ITG Closing Date were recorded at their respective fair values and added to the carrying value of our existing assets and liabilities. Our reported financial condition, results of operations and cash flows for the periods following the ITG Acquisition reflect ITG's and our balances, and reflect the impact of purchase accounting adjustments. The financial results for the year ended December 31, 2019 comprise our results for the entire applicable period and the results of ITG from the ITG Closing Date through December 31, 2019. All periods prior to the ITG Closing Date comprise our results without the results of ITG (and, as discussed above, with the results of KCG for the relevant periods).

The Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income data for the years ended December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017 and the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition data as of December 31, 2019 and 2018 have been derived from our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The following selected historical financial and other data should be read in conjunction with “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our respective consolidated financial statements and related notes thereto included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

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Table of Contents

 
 
Year Ended December 31,
(In thousands, except share and per share data)
 
2019
 
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Trading income, net
 
$
912,316

 
$
1,266,682

 
$
766,027

 
$
665,465

 
$
757,455

Interest and dividends income
 
108,778

 
87,508

 
50,407

 
26,419

 
28,136

Commissions, net and technology services(1)
 
498,544

 
184,339

 
116,503

 
10,352

 
10,622

Other, net(2)
 
10,444

 
340,189

 
95,045

 
36

 

Total revenues
 
1,530,082

 
1,878,718

 
1,027,982

 
702,272

 
796,213

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating Expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Brokerage, exchange and clearance fees, net
 
284,768

 
301,779

 
256,926

 
221,214

 
232,469

Communication and data processing
 
209,393

 
176,120

 
131,506

 
71,001

 
68,647

Employee compensation and payroll taxes
 
383,713

 
215,556

 
177,489

 
85,295

 
88,026

Payments for order flow(3)
 
102,120

 
74,645

 
27,727

 

 

Interest and dividends expense
 
158,039

 
141,814

 
91,993

 
56,557

 
52,423

Operations and administrative
 
116,232

 
66,769

 
62,123

 
23,358

 
23,262

Depreciation and amortization
 
65,644

 
61,154

 
47,327

 
29,703

 
33,629

Amortization of purchased intangibles and acquired capitalized software
 
70,595

 
26,123

 
15,447

 
211

 
211

Termination of office leases
 
66,452

 
23,357

 
3,671

 
(319
)
 
2,729

Debt issue cost related to debt refinancing(4)
 
41,132

 
11,727

 
10,460

 
5,579

 

Transaction advisory fees and expenses(5)
 
26,117

 
11,487

 
25,270

 

 

Reserve for legal matters(6)
 

 

 

 

 
5,440

Charges related to share based compensation at IPO(7)
 

 
24

 
772

 
1,755

 
44,194

Financing interest expense on long-term borrowings
 
121,859

 
71,800

 
64,107

 
28,327

 
29,254

Total operating expenses
 
1,646,064

 
1,182,355

 
914,818

 
522,681

 
580,284

Income (loss) before income taxes
 
(115,982
)
 
696,363

 
113,164

 
179,591

 
215,929

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Provision for (benefit from) income taxes(8)
 
(12,277
)
 
76,171

 
94,266

 
21,251

 
18,439

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income (loss)
 
(103,705
)
 
620,192

 
18,898

 
158,340

 
197,490

Noncontrolling interest
 
45,110

 
(330,751
)
 
(15,959
)
 
(125,360
)
 
(176,603
)
Net income (loss) available for common stockholders
 
$
(58,595
)
 
$
289,441

 
$
2,939

 
$
32,980