S-11 1 v351151_s11.htm FORM S-11

As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on August 13, 2013

Registration No. 333-    

 

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549



 

FORM S-11

REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933
OF SECURITIES OF CERTAIN REAL ESTATE COMPANIES



 

Phillips Edison – ARC Grocery Center REIT II, Inc.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Governing Instruments)



 

11501 Northlake Drive
Cincinnati, Ohio 45249
(513) 554-1110

(Address, Including Zip Code, and Telephone Number,
Including Area Code, of Registrant’s Principal Executive Offices)

Jeffrey S. Edison
Chief Executive Officer and Chairman
11501 Northlake Drive
Cincinnati, Ohio 45249
(513) 554-1110

(Name, Address, Including Zip Code, and Telephone Number, Including Area Code, of Agent for Service)



 

Copies to:

 
Peter M. Fass, Esq.
James P. Gerkis, Esq.
Proskauer Rose LLP
Eleven Times Square
New York, New York 10036-8299
(212) 969-3000
  Robert H. Bergdolt, Esq.
DLA Piper LLP (US)
4141 Parklake Avenue, Suite 300
Raleigh, North Carolina 27612-2350
(919) 786-2000


 

Approximate Date of Commencement of Proposed Sale to the Public: As soon as practicable after the effective date of this Registration Statement.

If any of the Securities being registered on this form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 of the Securities Act of 1933, check the following box. x

If this Form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. o

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. o

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. o

If delivery of the prospectus is expected to be made pursuant to Rule 434, please check the following box. o

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

     
Large accelerated filer o   Accelerated filer o   Non-accelerated filer o   Smaller reporting company x
          (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE

       
Title of Securities to Be Registered   Amount to Be Registered   Proposed
Maximum Offering Price Per Share
  Proposed
Maximum Aggregate
Offering Price
  Amount of Registration Fee
Common stock, $0.01 par value per share     80,000,000 shares     $ 25.00     $ 2,000,000,000     $ 272,800  
Common stock, $0.01 par value per share     20,000,000 shares (1)    $ 23.75     $ 475,000,000     $ 64,790  

(1) Represents shares to be issued pursuant to the distribution reinvestment plan. The offering price per share issuable pursuant to the distribution reinvestment plan is estimated for purposes of calculating the registration fee at $23.75 per share. We reserve the right to reallocate the shares of common stock we are offering between our primary offering and the distribution reinvestment plan.

THE REGISTRANT HEREBY AMENDS THIS REGISTRATION STATEMENT ON SUCH DATE OR DATES AS MAY BE NECESSARY TO DELAY ITS EFFECTIVE DATE UNTIL THE REGISTRANT SHALL FILE A FURTHER AMENDMENT WHICH SPECIFICALLY STATES THAT THIS REGISTRATION STATEMENT SHALL THEREAFTER BECOME EFFECTIVE IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 8(A) OF THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 OR UNTIL THE REGISTRATION STATEMENT SHALL BECOME EFFECTIVE ON SUCH DATE AS THE COMMISSION, ACTING PURSUANT TO SAID SECTION 8(A), MAY DETERMINE.

 

 


 
 

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The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. The prospectus is not an offer to sell the securities and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.

 
PRELIMINARY PROSPECTUS DATED AUGUST 13, 2013   SUBJECT TO COMPLETION

[GRAPHIC MISSING]

Phillips Edison — ARC Grocery Center REIT II, Inc.

80,000 shares of common stock — minimum offering
80,000,000 shares of common stock — maximum offering

Phillips Edison — ARC Grocery Center REIT II, Inc. is a Maryland corporation that intends to invest primarily in well-occupied grocery-anchored neighborhood and community shopping centers leased to a mix of national and regional creditworthy retailers selling necessity-based goods and services in strong demographic markets throughout the United States. In addition, we may invest in other retail properties including power and lifestyle shopping centers, multi-tenant shopping centers, free-standing single-tenant retail properties, and other real estate and real estate-related loans and securities depending on real estate market conditions and investment opportunities. We intend to elect to be taxed as a real estate investment trust for U.S. federal income tax purposes, or REIT, commencing with our tax year ending December 31, 2013. We are offering up to 80,000,000 shares of our common stock on a “reasonable best efforts” basis, as further described herein, through Realty Capital Securities, LLC, or our dealer manager, in our primary offering at a per share price of up to $25.00 (including the maximum allowed to be charged for commissions and fees, subject to certain discounts as described in this prospectus). We also are offering up to 20,000,000 shares of our common stock pursuant to our distribution reinvestment plan, or DRIP, at a price initially equal to $23.75 per share, which is 95% of the primary offering price. Beginning with the filing of our second Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q (or our Annual Report on Form 10-K should such filing constitute the second quarterly financial filing) with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC, pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, following the earlier to occur of (i) our acquisition of $2.0 billion in total portfolio assets and (ii)            , 2015, which is two years from the effective date of this offering, or the NAV pricing date, the per share price for shares in our primary offering and our DRIP will vary quarterly and will be equal to the net asset value of our company as determined by our sub-advisor, or NAV, divided by the number of shares of our common stock outstanding as of the end of the business day immediately preceding the day on which we make each quarterly financial filing, or per share NAV, plus, in the case of our primary offering, applicable commissions and fees. We reserve the right to reallocate the shares of common stock we are offering between our primary offering and the DRIP.

Investing in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 29 to read about risks you should consider before buying shares of our common stock. These risks include the following:

We have no prior operating history or established financing sources and will rely on our sub-advisor to conduct our operations. Our advisor and our sub-advisor are newly formed and have no experience operating a public company.
There is no guarantee that distributions will be paid. If distributions are declared and paid, the amount of the distributions paid may decrease or distributions may be eliminated at any time. Due to the risks involved in the ownership of real estate, there is no guarantee of any return on your investment, and you may lose all or a portion of your investment.
We are a “blind pool” offering because we currently do not own any properties and we have not identified any properties to acquire. Since we have neither identified nor acquired any investments, you will not have the opportunity to evaluate the merits and/or demerits of such investments prior to your purchase of our common stock.
Because we are dependent upon our Advisor Entities (as defined herein) and their affiliates to conduct our operations, any adverse changes in the financial health of our Advisor Entities or their affiliates or our relationship with them could hinder our operating performance and the return on our stockholders’ investments.
No public market exists for our shares of common stock, nor may a public market ever exist and our shares are, and may continue to be, illiquid. Our share repurchase program may be the only way to dispose of your shares, but there are a number of limitations placed on such repurchases. See “Share Repurchase Program.”
Market conditions and other factors could cause us to delay our liquidity event beyond the sixth anniversary of the termination of the primary offering. We also cannot assure you that we will be able to achieve a liquidity event.
We established the initial offering price on an arbitrary basis; as a result, the actual value of your investment may be substantially less than what you pay.
There are substantial conflicts among the interests of our investors, our interests and the interests of our Advisor Entities, sponsors, dealer manager and our and their respective affiliates, which could result in decisions that are not in the best interests of our stockholders.
One of our sponsors, AR Capital, LLC, is the sponsor of seven other publicly offered investment programs that are currently offering shares of their common stock which invest generally in real estate assets, but not primarily in our target assets, and two publicly offered investment programs that are currently offering shares of their common stock that invest in the same or similar assets as our target assets (one of which is co-sponsored by our Phillips Edison sponsor), each of which has more resources than we do.
We may change our investment objectives and strategies without stockholder consent.
We are obligated to pay substantial fees to our Advisor Entities, which may result in our Advisor Entities recommending riskier investments.
We are obligated to pay the special limited partner a subordinated distribution upon termination of the advisory agreement, which may be substantial and therefore may discourage us from terminating the advisor.
We may incur substantial debt, which could hinder our ability to pay distributions to our stockholders or could decrease the value of your investment if income on, or the value of, the property securing the debt falls.
Our organizational documents permit us to pay distributions from any source, including unlimited amounts from offering proceeds and borrowings. Any of these distributions may reduce the amount of capital we ultimately invest in properties and other permitted investments and negatively impact the value of your investment, especially if a substantial portion of our distributions are paid from offering proceeds.
Our failure to qualify or remain qualified as a REIT would result in higher taxes, may adversely affect our operations, would reduce the amount of income available for distribution and would limit our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.
Commencing with the NAV pricing date, the offering price for shares in our primary offering and pursuant to our DRIP, as well as the repurchase price for our shares, will be based on NAV, which may not accurately reflect the value of our assets.
There are limitations on ownership and transferability of our shares. Please see “Description of Securities — Restrictions on Ownership and Transfer.”

Neither the SEC, the Attorney General of the State of New York nor any other state securities regulator has approved or disapproved of our common stock, determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete or passed on or endorsed the merits of this offering. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense. The use of projections or forecasts in this offering is prohibited. Any representation to the contrary and any predictions, written or oral, as to the amount or certainty of any future benefit or tax consequence that may flow from an investment in our common stock is not permitted.

This offering will end no later than            , 2015, which is two years from the effective date of this offering. If we decide to continue our primary offering beyond two years from the date of this prospectus, we will provide that information in a prospectus supplement. This offering must be registered in every state in which we offer or sell shares. Generally, such registrations are for a period of one year. Thus, we may have to stop selling shares in any state in which our registration is not renewed or otherwise extended annually. Until we satisfy the minimum offering requirements set forth in this prospectus, we will deposit subscription payments in an escrow account held by the escrow agent, UMB Bank, N.A., or UMB Bank, in trust for the subscriber’s benefit, pending release to us. A minimum of $2,000,000 of shares of common stock must be sold within one year following the commencement of this offering or we will terminate this offering and promptly return your subscription payments with your pro rata share of the interest earned on such funds in accordance with the provisions of the escrow agreement. Any purchase of shares by our sponsors, directors, officers and other affiliates will be included for purposes of determining whether the minimum of $2,000,000 of shares of common stock required to release funds from the escrow account has been sold.

PENNSYLVANIA INVESTORS:  The minimum closing amount is $2,000,000. Because the minimum closing amount is less than $200,000,000, you are cautioned to carefully evaluate this program’s ability to fully accomplish its stated objectives and inquire as to the current dollar volume of the program subscriptions. We will not release any proceeds for subscriptions from Pennsylvania investors from escrow until we have $100,000,000 in aggregate subscriptions.

     
  Per Share(1)   Minimum Offering   Maximum Offering
Public offering price, primary shares   $ 25.00     $ 2,000,000     $ 2,000,000,000  
Public offering price, distribution reinvestment plan(2)   $ 23.75     $     $ 475,000,000  
Selling commissions and dealer manager fee(3)   $ 2.50     $ 200,000     $ 200,000,000  
Proceeds, before expenses, to us   $ 22.50     $ 1,800,000     $ 1,800,000,000  

(1) The purchase price per share shown will apply until the NAV pricing date. Commencing with the NAV pricing date, the per share price in our primary offering will vary quarterly and will be equal to per share NAV plus applicable commissions and fees. The purchase price per share pursuant to the DRIP shown above is 95% of the primary offering price and will apply until the NAV pricing date (at which time the per share price for DRIP shares will be per share NAV).
(2) We reserve the right to reallocate the shares of common stock we are offering between our primary offering and our DRIP.
(3) In determining the amount of selling commissions and dealer manager fees, we have assumed the sale of 80,000,000 shares in our primary offering at a purchase price of $25.00 per share. Selling commissions and the dealer manager fee are paid only for shares in our primary offering offered on a reasonable best efforts basis and will equal 7.0% and 3.0% of aggregate gross proceeds, respectively. Each is payable to our dealer manager. Selling commissions will be reduced in connection with (i) sales of certain minimum numbers of shares and (ii) sales of shares to our executive officers and directors, employees of our dealer manager and their family members and friends or other affiliates; see the section entitled “Plan of Distribution — Volume Discounts” and “— Shares Purchased by Affiliates” in this prospectus.

The date of this prospectus is            , 2013.


 
 

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Basis of Presentation

We use certain defined terms throughout this prospectus that have the following meanings:

In this prospectus, references to “Phillips Edison — ARC Grocery Center REIT II, Inc.,” “our company,” “the company,” “we,” “us” and “our” shall mean Phillips Edison — ARC Grocery Center REIT II, Inc., a Maryland corporation, together with its consolidated subsidiaries, including Phillips Edison — ARC Grocery Center Operating Partnership II, L.P., a Delaware limited partnership of which PE-ARC Grocery Center OP GP II LLC, our wholly owned subsidiary, is the sole general partner and which is the subsidiary through which we will conduct substantially all of our business, which we refer to as “our operating partnership,” except where it is clear from the context that the term only means the issuer of the common stock in this offering, Phillips Edison — ARC Grocery Center REIT II, Inc.
We use the term “Advisor Entities” throughout this prospectus. “Advisor Entities” refers collectively to (1) American Realty Capital PECO II Advisors, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company that is indirectly wholly owned by our AR Capital sponsor, which we refer to as “our advisor,” and (2) Phillips Edison NTR II LLC, a Delaware limited liability company that is indirectly wholly owned by our Phillips Edison sponsor, which we refer to as “our sub-advisor.” We have entered into a contractual relationship with our advisor. In exchange for services provided to us, we will pay our advisor certain fees and reimburse certain expenses. Our advisor has entered into a contractual relationship with our sub-advisor whereby our sub-advisor provides most of these services to us on behalf of our advisor. A substantial portion of any fees that we pay to our advisor has been assigned by our advisor to our sub-advisor according to the terms of the sub-advisory agreement between those parties, as described herein. Our advisor has also assigned expense reimbursements to our sub-advisor in proportion to the expenses the parties have incurred on our behalf. Any references in this prospectus to fees or expenses that we pay to our Advisor Entities refer to (i) fees that we pay to our advisor which are then assigned to our sub-advisor or (ii) fees that are allocated proportionately among our advisor and our sub-advisor.
The “special limited partner” refers to PE-ARC Special Limited Partner II LLC, an entity in which both Advisor Entities or their affiliates retain an interest.
We use the term “net lease” throughout this prospectus. Under a net lease, the tenant occupying the leased property (usually as a single tenant) does so in much the same manner as if the tenant were the owner of the property. There are various forms of net leases, most typically classified as triple-net or double-net. Triple-net leases typically require the tenant to pay all costs associated with a property, including real estate taxes, insurance, utilities and routine maintenance in addition to the base rent. Double-net leases typically require the tenant to pay all the costs of triple-net leases, but the landlord remains responsible for capital expenditures, including the repair or replacement of specific structural or bearing components of a property, such as the roof or structure of the building. Accordingly, the owner receives the rent “net” of these expenses, rendering the cash flow associated with the lease predictable for the term of the lease. Under a net lease, the tenant generally agrees to lease the property for a significant term and agrees that it will have no right or a limited right to terminate the lease or abate rent prior to the expiration of the term of the lease as a result of real estate-driven events such as casualty, condemnation or failure by the landlord to fulfill its obligations under the lease.
We use the term “our dealer manager” throughout this prospectus. Such term refers to Realty Capital Securities, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company that is under common ownership with our AR Capital sponsor.
We use the term “our sponsors” throughout this prospectus. Such term refers collectively to Phillips Edison Limited Partnership, a Delaware limited partnership, which we refer to as “our Phillips Edison sponsor,” and AR Capital, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, which we refer to as “our AR Capital sponsor.”

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INVESTOR SUITABILITY STANDARDS

An investment in our common stock involves significant risk and is suitable only for persons who have adequate financial means, desire a relatively long-term investment and will not need immediate liquidity from their investment. To the extent that you qualify as an “institutional investor” for the purposes of a state exemption from registration in your state of residence, these investor suitability standards do not apply to you. Persons who meet the applicable investor suitability standards and seek to diversify their personal portfolios with a finite-life, real estate-based investment, which among its benefits hedges against inflation and the volatility of the stock market, seek to receive current income, seek to preserve capital, wish to obtain the benefits of potential long-term capital appreciation and who are able to hold their investment for a time period consistent with our liquidity plans, are most likely to benefit from an investment in our company. On the other hand, we caution persons who require immediate liquidity or guaranteed income, or who seek a short-term investment, not to consider an investment in our common stock as meeting these needs. Notwithstanding these investor suitability standards, potential investors should note that investing in shares of our common stock involves a high degree of risk and should consider all the information contained in this prospectus, including the “Risk Factors” section contained herein, in determining whether an investment in our common stock is appropriate.

We have established suitability standards for initial stockholders and subsequent purchasers of shares from our stockholders. In order to purchase shares in this offering, you must:

meet the applicable financial suitability standards as described below; and
purchase at least the minimum number of shares as described below.

The minimum purchase is $2,500 (which would purchase 100 shares at the full, undiscounted primary offering price). You may not transfer fewer shares than the minimum purchase requirement. In addition, you may not transfer, fractionalize or subdivide your shares so as to retain less than the number of shares required for the minimum purchase. In order to satisfy the minimum purchase requirements for individual retirement accounts, or IRAs, unless otherwise prohibited by applicable state law, a husband and wife may jointly contribute funds from their separate IRAs if each such contribution is made in increments of $100. You should note that an investment in shares of our common stock will not, in itself, create a retirement plan and that, in order to create a retirement plan, you must comply with all applicable provisions of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or the Code.

Several states have established suitability requirements that are more stringent than the standards that we have established, as described below. Shares in this offering will be sold to investors in these states only if they meet the applicable suitability standards set forth below. In each case, the applicable standards exclude from the calculation of net worth or liquid net worth the value of the investor’s home, home furnishings and automobiles.

General Standards for all Investors

An investor must have either (a) a net worth of at least $250,000 or (b) an annual gross income of at least $70,000 and a minimum net worth of at least $70,000.

Kentucky

An investor must have either (a) a net worth of $250,000 or (b) a gross annual income of at least $70,000 and a net worth of at least $70,000, with the amount invested in this offering not to exceed 10% of the Kentucky investor’s liquid net worth.

Massachusetts, Ohio, Oregon and New Mexico

An investor must have either (a) a minimum net worth of at least $250,000 or (b) an annual gross income of at least $70,000 and a net worth of at least $70,000. The investor’s maximum investment in us and our affiliates also cannot exceed 10% of the Oregon or New Mexico resident’s net worth. A Massachusetts or Ohio investor’s aggregate investment in us, shares of our affiliates and in other non-traded real estate investment programs may not exceed ten percent (10%) of his or her liquid net worth. “Liquid net worth” is defined as that portion of net worth (total assets exclusive of home,

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home furnishings and automobiles minus total liabilities) that is comprised of cash, cash equivalents and readily marketable securities. Note that Ohio investors cannot participate in the DRIP feature that reinvests distributions into subsequent affiliated programs.

Iowa

The maximum investment allowable in us or our affiliates is 10% of an Iowa investor’s liquid net worth. “Liquid net worth” is defined as that portion of net worth (total assets minus total liabilities) that is comprised of cash, cash equivalents and readily marketable securities, but excluding IRA assets owned or held by such investor.

Pennsylvania and Michigan

The maximum investment allowable in us for a Pennsylvania or Michigan investor is 10% of his or her net worth.

New Jersey

An investor who resides in the state of New Jersey must have either (i) a minimum liquid net worth of $100,000 and a minimum annual gross income of not less than $85,000 or (ii) a minimum liquid net worth of $350,000. Additionally, a New Jersey investor’s total investment in us, shares of our affiliates and other non-traded real estate investment trusts shall not exceed 10% of his or her liquid net worth. “Liquid net worth” is defined as that portion of net worth (total assets exclusive of home, home furnishings and automobiles minus total liabilities) that consists of cash, cash equivalents and readily marketable securities.

Nebraska

An investor must have either (a) a minimum net worth of $100,000 and an annual income of $70,000 or (b) a minimum net worth of $350,000. The investor’s maximum investment in us and our affiliates cannot exceed 10% of the investor’s net worth.

Maine

The Maine Office of Securities recommends that an investor’s aggregate investment in us and similar direct participation investments not exceed 10% of the investor’s liquid net worth. For this purpose, “liquid net worth” is defined as that portion of net worth that consists of cash, cash equivalents and readily marketable securities. Note that Maine investors cannot participate in the DRIP feature that reinvests distributions into subsequent affiliated programs.

North Dakota

Shares will only be sold to a resident of North Dakota who represents that he or she has a net worth of at least ten times his or her investment in us and that they meet one of the general suitability standards described above.

Kansas

In addition to the general suitability requirements described above, it is recommended that investors should invest no more than 10% of their liquid net worth, in the aggregate, in us and securities of other real estate investment trusts. “Liquid net worth” is defined as that portion of net worth (total assets minus total liabilities) that is comprised of cash, cash equivalents and readily marketable securities.

Missouri

In addition to the general suitability requirements described above, no more than ten percent (10%) of any one Missouri investor’s liquid net worth may be invested in the securities registered by us for this offering with the Missouri Securities Division.

California

In addition to the general suitability requirements described above, a California investor’s maximum investment in us will be limited to 10% of his or her net worth (exclusive of home, home furnishings and automobile).

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Alabama

In addition to the general suitability requirements described above, shares will only be sold to an Alabama resident that represents that he or she has a liquid net worth of at least 10 times the amount of their investment in this real estate investment program and other similar programs. Note that Alabama investors cannot participate in the DRIP feature that reinvests distributions into subsequent affiliated programs or our Automatic Purchase Plan.

Tennessee

A Tennessee resident’s investment in us must not exceed 10% of his or her liquid net worth (exclusive of home, home furnishings and automobile).

In the case of sales to fiduciary accounts (such as an IRA, Keogh Plan or pension or profit-sharing plan), these minimum suitability standards must be satisfied by the beneficiary, the fiduciary account or by the donor or grantor who directly or indirectly supplies the funds to purchase our common stock if the donor or the grantor is the fiduciary. Prospective investors with investment discretion over the assets of an individual retirement account, employee benefit plan or other retirement plan or arrangement that is covered by the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended, or ERISA, or Code Section 4975 should carefully review the information in the section of this prospectus entitled “Investment by Tax-Exempt Entities and ERISA Considerations.” Any such prospective investors are required to consult their own legal and tax advisors on these matters.

In the case of gifts to minors, the minimum suitability standards must be met by the custodian of the account or by the donor.

In order to ensure adherence to the suitability standards described above, requisite criteria must be met, as set forth in the subscription agreement in the form attached hereto as Appendix C. In addition, our sponsors, our dealer manager and the soliciting dealers, as our agents, must make every reasonable effort to determine that the purchase of our shares is a suitable and appropriate investment for an investor. In making this determination, the soliciting dealers will rely on relevant information provided by the investor in the investor’s subscription agreement, including information regarding the investor’s age, investment objectives, investment experience, income, net worth, financial situation, other investments and any other pertinent information, including whether (i) the participant is or will be in a financial position appropriate to enable him to realize the benefits described in the prospectus, (ii) the participant has a fair market net worth sufficient to sustain the risks inherent in the investment program, and (iii) the investment program is otherwise suitable for the participant. Executed subscription agreements will be maintained in our records for six years.

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CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This prospectus contains forward-looking statements. You can identify forward-looking statements by the use of forward-looking terminology such as “believes,” “expects,” “may,” “will,” “would,” “could,” “should,” “seeks,” “intends,” “plans,” “projects,” “estimates,” “anticipates,” “predicts” or “potential”, or by the negative of these words and phrases, or by similar words or phrases. You can also identify forward-looking statements by discussions of strategy, plans or intentions. Statements regarding the following subjects may be impacted by a number of risks and uncertainties which may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performances or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements:

our use of the proceeds of this offering;
our business and investment strategy;
our ability to make investments in a timely manner or on acceptable terms;
current credit market conditions and our ability to obtain long-term financing for our property investments in a timely manner and on terms that are consistent with what we project when we invest in the property;
the effect of general market, real estate market, economic and political conditions, including the recent economic slowdown and dislocation in the global credit markets;
our ability to make scheduled payments on our debt obligations;
our ability to generate sufficient cash flows to make distributions to our stockholders;
the degree and nature of our competition;
the availability of qualified personnel at our advisor, sub-advisor and dealer manager;
our ability to qualify and maintain our qualification as a REIT; and
other subjects referenced in this prospectus, including those set forth under the caption “Risk Factors.”

The forward-looking statements contained in this prospectus reflect our beliefs, assumptions and expectations of our future performance, taking into account all information currently available to us. These beliefs, assumptions and expectations are subject to risks and uncertainties and can change as a result of many possible events or factors, not all of which are known to us. If a change occurs, our business, financial condition, liquidity and results of operations may vary materially from those expressed in our forward-looking statements. You should carefully consider these risks before you make an investment decision with respect to our common stock.

For more information regarding risks that may cause our actual results to differ materially from any forward-looking statements, see “Risk Factors.” We disclaim any obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements to reflect changes in underlying assumptions or factors, new information, future events or other changes.

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  Page
INVESTOR SUITABILITY STANDARDS     ii  
CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS     v  
PROSPECTUS SUMMARY     1  
RISK FACTORS     29  
Risks Related to an Investment in Phillips Edison — ARC Grocery Center REIT II Inc.     29  
Risks Related to Conflicts of Interest     36  
Risks Related to This Offering and Our Corporate Structure     40  
General Risks Related to Investments in Real Estate     49  
Risks Related to Real Estate-Related Investments     61  
Risks Associated with Debt Financing     65  
U.S. Federal Income Tax Risks     67  
Retirement Plan Risks     73  
ESTIMATED USE OF PROCEEDS     75  
MARKET OPPORTUNITY     78  
The Opportunity     78  
The Portfolio     80  
Demographics     82  
MANAGEMENT     83  
Board of Directors     83  
Committees of our Board of Directors     84  
Executive Officers and Directors     85  
Compensation of Directors     88  
2013 Long-Term Incentive Plan     88  
2013 Independent Director Stock Plan     90  
Compliance with the American Jobs Creation Act     91  
Limited Liability and Indemnification of Directors, Officers, Employees and Other Agents     92  
Our Advisor and Sub-advisor     93  
The Property Manager     97  
Our Sponsors     97  
Our Dealer Manager     102  
Management Decisions     104  
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions     104  
MANAGEMENT COMPENSATION     106  
PRINCIPAL STOCKHOLDERS     121  
CONFLICTS OF INTEREST     122  
Our Sponsors’ Interests in Other Real Estate Programs     122  
Receipt of Fees and Other Compensation by Our Sponsors and Their Respective Affiliates     126  
Our Board’s Loyalties to Current and Possibly to Future Phillips Edison- or AR Capital-sponsored Programs     127  
Our Executive Officers and Some of Our Directors are Affiliates of Our Advisor, Our Sub-advisor and Their Respective Affiliates     127  
Affiliated Transactions Best Practices Policy     127  
Affiliated Dealer Manager     127  
Affiliated Property Manager     128  
Valuation Conflicts     128  
Lack of Separate Representation for Us, Our Adviser and Their Affiliates     129  
Joint Ventures with Affiliates of Our Advisor Entities     129  

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  Page
Receipt of Fees and Other Compensation by Our Adviser Entities and Their Affiliates     129  
Certain Conflict Resolution Measures     130  
Independent Directors     134  
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES AND CRITERIA     136  
General     136  
Grocery-Anchored Retail Properties Focus     137  
Other Real Estate and Real Estate-Related Loans and Securities     137  
Acquisition Policies     138  
Borrowing Policies     141  
Certain Risk Management Policies     142  
Equity Capital Policies     142  
Exit Strategy — Liquidity Event     142  
Investment Limitations     143  
Disclosure Policies with Respect to Future Probable Acquisitions     144  
Insurance Policies     145  
Disposition Policies     145  
Other Policies     145  
Money Market Investments     146  
Appraisals     146  
Investment Company Act Considerations     146  
Change in Investment Objectives and Limitations     149  
VALUATION POLICIES     150  
Valuation Guidelines; Calculation of NAV     150  
Independent Valuer     150  
Valuation of Our Properties     151  
Valuation of Our Real Estate Liabilities     151  
Operating Income     151  
Calculation of Per Share NAV by Our Sub-Advisor     152  
Limits on the Calculation of Our Per Share NAV     153  
MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS     154  
General     154  
Results of Operations     154  
Liquidity and Capital Resources     154  
Distributions     155  
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements     156  
Funds from Operations, Funds from Operations Adjusted for Acquisition Expenses and Modified Funds from Operations     156  
Market Risk     160  
PRIOR PERFORMANCE SUMMARY     161  
Prior Investment Programs Sponsored by Our Phillips Edison Sponsor     161  
Prior Investment Programs Sponsored by Our AR Capital Sponsor     165  
MATERIAL U.S. FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSIDERATIONS     176  
General     177  
REIT Qualification Tests     178  
Tax Aspects of Investments in Partnerships     188  
Taxation of U.S. Stockholders     190  
Taxation of Non-U.S. Stockholders     193  

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  Page
Other Tax Considerations     195  
INVESTMENT BY TAX-EXEMPT ENTITIES AND ERISA CONSIDERATIONS     196  
General     196  
Minimum and Other Distribution Requirement — Plan Liquidity     196  
Annual or More Frequent Valuation Requirement     197  
Fiduciary Obligations — Prohibited Transactions     197  
Plan Assets — Definition     198  
Plan Assets — Registered Investment Company Exception     198  
Plan Assets — Publicly Offered Securities Exception     198  
Plan Assets — Operating Company Exception     199  
Plan Assets — Not Significant Investment Exception     199  
Consequences of Holding Plan Assets     200  
Prohibited Transactions     200  
Prohibited Transactions — Consequences     200  
Reporting     201  
DESCRIPTION OF SHARES     202  
Common Stock     202  
Preferred Stock     202  
Meetings and Special Voting Requirements     203  
Restriction on Ownership of Shares     204  
Distribution Policy and Distributions     206  
Stockholder Liability     207  
Business Combinations     207  
Control Share Acquisitions     208  
Subtitle 8     209  
Restrictions on Roll-up Transactions     209  
Tender Offers     210  
DISTRIBUTION REINVESTMENT PLAN     211  
Investment of Distributions     211  
Election to Participate or Terminate Participation     211  
Reports to Participants     212  
Excluded Distributions     212  
Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations     213  
Amendment, Suspension and Termination     213  
SHARE REPURCHASE PROGRAM     214  
Share Repurchase Program Prior to our Calculation of NAV     214  
Share Repurchase Program Following our Calculation of NAV     215  
Death and Disability of a Stockholder     216  
Share Repurchase Program Generally     216  
SUMMARY OF OUR ORGANIZATIONAL DOCUMENTS     218  
Charter and Bylaw Provisions     218  
Stockholders’ Meetings and Voting Rights     218  
Board of Directors     218  
Rights of Objecting Stockholders     219  
Inspection of Books and Records; Stockholder Lists     219  
Amendment of the Organizational Documents     220  
Dissolution or Termination of the Company     220  
Advance Notice of Director Nominations and New Business     220  

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  Page
Restrictions on Certain Conversion Transactions and Roll-Ups     221  
Limitation on Total Operating Expenses     222  
Transactions With Affiliates     223  
Restrictions on Borrowing     224  
Restrictions on Investments     224  
SUMMARY OF OUR OPERATING PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT     226  
Description of Partnership Units     226  
Managment of the Operating Partnership     228  
Indemnification     228  
Transferability of Interests     229  
Extraordinary Transactions     229  
Issuance of Additional Units     229  
Capital Contributions     229  
Distributions     230  
Liquidation     231  
Allocations     231  
Operations     232  
Limited Partner Exchange Rights     232  
Special Limited Partner     232  
Tax Matters     233  
Duties and Conflicts     233  
Term     233  
PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION     234  
The Offering     234  
Dealer Manager and Compensation We Will Pay for the Sale of Our Shares     234  
Shares Purchased by Affiliates and Participating Broker Dealers     237  
Volume Discounts     237  
Subscription Process     240  
Investments by IRAs and Certain Qualified Plans     241  
Minimum Offering     241  
HOW TO SUBSCRIBE     242  
SALES MATERIAL     243  
REPORTS TO STOCKHOLDERS     243  
LITIGATION     245  
PRIVACY POLICY NOTICE     245  
LEGAL MATTERS     245  
EXPERTS     245  
ELECTRONIC DELIVERY OF DOCUMENTS     245  
WHERE YOU CAN FIND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION     245  
Index to Consolidated Financial Statement of Phillips Edison — ARC Grocery Center REIT II, Inc.     F-1  
Appendix A — Prior Performance Tables     A-1  
Appendix B — Distribution Reinvestment Plan     B-1  
Appendix C — Phillips Edison — ARC Grocery Center REIT II, Inc. Subscription Agreement     C-1  
Appendix D — Transfer on Death Designation     D-1  
Appendix E — Letter of Direction     E-1  
Appendix F — Notice of Revocation     F-1  
Appendix G — Privacy Policy Notice     G-1  

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PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

As used herein and unless otherwise required by context, (i) the term “prospectus” refers to this prospectus as amended and supplemented and (ii) the terms “the offering” “this offering” and “the primary offering” refer to the primary offering of our shares of common stock on a reasonable best efforts basis. This prospectus summary highlights material information contained elsewhere in this prospectus. Because it is a summary, it may not contain all the information that is important to you. To understand this offering fully, you should read the entire prospectus carefully, including the “Risk Factors” section, before making a decision to invest in our common stock.

What is Phillips Edison — ARC Grocery Center REIT II, Inc.?

We are a Maryland corporation incorporated on June 5, 2013 that intends to qualify as a REIT commencing with our tax year ending December 31, 2013. We were formed to leverage the expertise of our sponsors, our Phillips Edison sponsor and our AR Capital sponsor, and capitalize on the market opportunity to acquire and manage grocery-anchored neighborhood and community shopping centers located in strong demographic markets throughout the United States. We seek to acquire and manage shopping centers that are typically over 80% occupied, are anchored by the dominant grocer in the region, and have a mix of national and regional retailers selling necessity-based goods and services. We intend to build a high-quality portfolio utilizing the following acquisition strategy:

Grocery-Anchored Retail — We are focused on acquiring well-occupied grocery-anchored shopping centers serving the day-to-day shopping needs of the community in the surrounding trade area;
National and Regional Retailers — We will acquire shopping centers that have a mix of national and regional retail tenants selling necessity-based goods and services;
Diversification — We will own and operate a diversified grocery-anchored portfolio based on geography, industry, tenancy, credit and lease expirations, thereby mitigating risk;
Infill Locations/Solid Markets — We will target properties in established or growing markets based on trends in population density, population growth, employment, household income, employment diversification, and other key demographic factors having higher barriers to entry, which we believe limit additional competition;
Triple-Net Leases — We will negotiate leases we enter into or acquire to provide for tenant reimbursements of operating expenses, real estate taxes and insurance, providing a level of protection against rising expenses;
Discount To Replacement Cost — We intend to acquire properties at values based on current in-place rents and at a substantial discount to replacement cost.

Our strategy is to acquire, own and manage a high-quality, diverse, grocery-anchored real estate portfolio, while maintaining a focused approach to maximize total returns to stockholders. We believe these goals will be supported by the following attributes of our company:

Stable Income to Provide Consistent Distributions — We seek sustainable income from profitable national and regional tenants, a majority of which comes from grocery anchor tenants, that is expected to fund monthly distributions to our stockholders at a rate consistent with our operating performance.
Upside Potential — We seek to create value from a combination of the strategic leasing of portfolio vacancies, rental growth, creation of new revenue streams, and strategic expense reduction, all leading to increased cash flow.
Diversification — We intend to own and manage a retail grocery-anchored portfolio diversified by geography, tenant mix and lease expirations, thereby mitigating risk.
Low Leverage — We intend to utilize a prudent leverage strategy with an approximate 45.0% targeted loan-to-value ratio on our portfolio once we have invested substantially all of the net proceeds of this offering.

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Tenured Management with a National Platform — Our Phillips Edison sponsor’s seasoned team of professional managers has extensive retail industry expertise and established tenant relationships. Accordingly, we expect that team to provide reliable execution of our acquisition and operating strategies through their national operating and leasing platform.
Property Focus — We intend to utilize a property-specific operational focus that combines intensive leasing and merchandising plans with cost containment measures to deliver a more solid and stable income stream from each property.
Exit Strategy — We anticipate selling all or substantially all our assets, selling or merging our company, listing our common stock on a national securities exchange or engaging in another similar transaction within three to six years after the completion of our primary offering. Our board of directors, in consultation with management, may determine that it is in our best interests to begin the process of engaging advisors (including an entity which is under common ownership with our AR Capital sponsor) to consider such exit alternatives at such time during our offering stage as our board of directors can reasonably determine that all of the securities being offered in this offering will be sold within a reasonable period (i.e. three to six months).

As of the date of this prospectus, we own no properties. Because we have no portfolio of real estate investments and we have not yet identified any properties in which there is a reasonable probability we will invest the proceeds from this offering, we are considered to be a “blind pool.”

We are externally advised by our advisor and our sub-advisor. Pursuant to the sub-advisory agreement between our advisor and sub-advisor, our sub-advisor, acting on behalf of our advisor, will conduct substantially all of our operations and manage our portfolio of real estate investments under the direction of our board of directors. We have no paid employees.

Our offices are located at 11501 Northlake Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio 45249. Our telephone number is (513) 554-1110. Our fax number is (513) 554-1820, and our web site address is www.               .com.

What is a REIT?

In general, a REIT is a company that:

combines the capital of many investors to acquire a large-scale diversified real estate portfolio under professional management;
allows individual investors to invest in a diversified real estate portfolio managed by a professional management team;
makes an election to be treated as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes;
pays annual distributions to investors of at least 90% of its REIT taxable income (which does not equal net income, as calculated in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, or GAAP), determined without regard to the deduction for dividends paid and excluding net capital gain; and
generally avoids the “double taxation” treatment of income that normally results from investments in a corporation because a REIT generally is not subject to U.S. federal corporate income and excise taxes on that portion of its net income distributed to its stockholders, provided certain U.S. federal income tax requirements are satisfied.

What are your investment objectives?

Our primary investment objectives are:

to preserve and protect your capital contribution;
to provide you with stable cash distributions;
to realize growth in the value of our assets upon the sale of such assets; and

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to provide you with the potential for future liquidity through the sale of our assets, a sale or merger of our company, a listing of our common stock on a national securities exchange, or other similar transaction. See “— What are your exit strategies?”

We may return all or a portion of your capital contribution in connection with the sale of the company or the assets we will acquire or upon maturity or payoff of debt investments we may make. Alternatively, you may be able to obtain a return of all or a portion of your capital contribution in connection with the sale of your shares. However, there can be no assurance that all or a portion of your capital contribution in fact will be returned.

What is the experience of your Phillips Edison sponsor?

Formed in 1991, our Phillips Edison sponsor is a fully integrated real estate operating company that acquires and repositions underperforming (primarily grocery-anchored) neighborhood and community shopping centers throughout the United States. Since its inception, Phillips Edison has operated with financial partners through both property-specific joint ventures and multi-asset discretionary private equity funds. Phillips Edison and its affiliates have acquired assets covering approximately 29 million square feet and having an aggregate value of approximately $2.3 billion, providing its investors with a vehicle through which they could invest in a carefully selected and professionally managed portfolio of operating assets and development opportunities, which have produced a track record of strong financial results. Phillips Edison and its affiliates have over 3,500 tenants and long-standing relationships with national and regional companies with high credit ratings.

Jeffrey S. Edison, chairman of our board of directors and our chief executive officer, has served as a principal of Phillips Edison since 1995. Michael C. Phillips has served as a principal of Phillips Edison since 1991. Messrs. Phillips and Edison have significant experience in real estate acquisitions, repositionings, financings and dispositions, as well as property management, project development and leasing. Messrs. Phillips and Edison have invested in commercial real estate through all economic cycles and each has 30 years of experience in the real estate industry. Messrs. Phillips and Edison also serve as co-chairmen of the board of directors of Phillips Edison-ARC Shopping Center REIT Inc., a public REIT co-sponsored by our Phillips Edison sponsor and our AR Capital sponsor. Mr. Edison is also the chief executive officer of Phillips Edison-ARC Shopping Center REIT Inc.

What is the experience of your AR Capital sponsor?

Our AR Capital sponsor is directly or indirectly controlled by Nicholas S. Schorsch, the chief executive officer of our advisor, and William M. Kahane, one of our directors. Mr. Schorsch is an executive officer and/or a director of eleven other public REITs sponsored by our AR Capital sponsor or its affiliates and Mr. Kahane is a director of several such REITs. Mr. Schorsch and Mr. Kahane have been active in the structuring and financial management of commercial real estate investments for over 24 years and 26 years, respectively. Our AR Capital sponsor wholly owns our advisor.

Who are your advisor and sub-advisor and what do they do?

Our advisor is responsible for coordinating the management of our day-to-day operations and for identifying and making investments in real estate properties on our behalf, subject to the supervision of our board of directors. Subject to the terms of the advisory agreement between our advisor and us and the sub-advisory agreement between our Advisor Entities, our advisor has delegated most of its duties, including managing our day-to-day operations, identifying and negotiating investments on our behalf and providing asset management services, to our sub-advisor. Notwithstanding such delegation to the sub-advisor, our advisor retains ultimate responsibility for the performance of all the matters entrusted to it under the advisory agreement.

Our sub-advisor has primary responsibility, acting on behalf of our advisor, for making decisions regarding the selection and the negotiation of real estate investments. Our Advisor Entities jointly make recommendations on all investments and dispositions to our board of directors. If our Advisor Entities disagree with respect to any such recommendation, the determination of our sub-advisor prevails. Other major decisions to be jointly approved by our Advisor Entities, subject to the direction of our board of directors, include decisions with respect to the retention of investment banks, marketing methods with respect to this

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offering, the termination of this offering, the initiation of a follow-on offering, mergers and other change-of-control transactions, and certain significant press releases.

Our advisor owns 22.5% and our sub-advisor owns 77.5% of the interests in the special limited partner of our operating partnership, a Delaware limited liability company.

What is the experience of your advisor and sub-advisor?

Our advisor is a limited liability company that was formed in the State of Delaware on July 9, 2013. Our advisor has no operating history and no experience managing a public company.

Our sub-advisor is a limited liability company that was formed in the State of Delaware on June 4, 2013. Our sub-advisor has no operating history and no prior experience managing a public company.

Are there any risks involved in an investment in your shares?

Investing in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully review the “Risk Factors” section of this prospectus beginning on page 29, which contains a detailed discussion of the material risks that you should consider before you invest in our common stock. Some of the more significant risks relating to an investment in our shares include:

We have no prior operating history or established financing sources and will rely on our sub-advisor to conduct our operations. Our advisor has no prior operating history and our sub-advisor is newly formed and has no experience operating a public company.
There is no guarantee that distributions will be paid. If distributions are declared and paid, the amount of the distributions paid may decrease or distributions may be eliminated at any time. Due to the risks involved in the ownership of real estate, there is no guarantee of any return on your investment, and you may lose all or a portion of your investment.
We are a “blind pool” offering because we currently do not own any properties and we have not identified any properties to acquire. Since we have neither identified nor acquired any investments, you will not have the opportunity to evaluate the merits and/or demerits of such investments prior to your purchase of our common stock.
Because we are dependent upon our advisor, our sub-advisor and their affiliates to conduct our operations, any adverse changes in the financial health of our advisor, our sub-advisor or their affiliates or our relationship with them could hinder our operating performance and the return on our stockholders’ investments.
No public market exists for our shares of common stock, nor may a public market ever exist and our shares are, and may continue to be, illiquid. Our share repurchase program may be the only way to dispose of your shares, but there are a number of limitations placed on such repurchases. See “Share Repurchase Program.”
Market conditions and other factors could cause us to delay our liquidity event beyond the sixth anniversary of the termination of the primary offering. We also cannot assure you that we will be able to achieve a liquidity event.
We established the initial offering price on an arbitrary basis; as a result, the actual value of your investment may be substantially less than what you pay.
There are substantial conflicts among the interests of our investors, our interests and the interests of our Advisor Entities, sponsors, dealer manager and our and their respective affiliates, which could result in decisions that are not in the best interests of our stockholders.
Our AR Capital sponsor is the sponsor of seven other publicly offered investment programs that are currently offering shares of their common stock which invest generally in real estate assets, but not primarily in our target assets, and two publicly offered investment programs that are currently offering shares of their common stock that invest in the same or similar assets as our target assets (one of which is co-sponsored by our Phillips Edison sponsor), each of which has more resources than we do.

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We may change our investment strategy and objectives without stockholder consent.
We are obligated to pay substantial fees to our Advisor Entities, which may result in our Advisor Entities recommending riskier investments.
We are obligated to pay our special limited partner a subordinated distribution upon termination of the advisory agreement, which may be substantial and therefore may discourage us from terminating the advisor.
We may incur substantial debt, which could hinder our ability to pay distributions to our stockholders or could decrease the value of your investment if income on, or the value of, the property securing the debt falls.
Our organizational documents permit us to pay distributions from any source, including unlimited amounts from offering proceeds and borrowings. Any of these distributions may reduce the amount of capital we ultimately invest in properties and other permitted investments and negatively impact the value of your investment, especially if a substantial portion of our distributions are paid from offering proceeds.
Our failure to qualify or remain qualified as a REIT would result in higher taxes, may adversely affect our operations, would reduce the amount of income available for distribution and would limit our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.
Commencing with the NAV pricing date, the offering price for shares in our primary offering and pursuant to our DRIP, as well as the repurchase price for our shares, will be based on NAV, which may not accurately reflect the value of our assets.
There are limitations on ownership and transferability of our shares. Please see “Description of Securities — Restrictions on Ownership and Transfer.”

What is the role of our board of directors?

We operate under the direction of our board of directors, the members of which are accountable to us and our stockholders as fiduciaries. We have five members of our board of directors, three of whom are independent of our sponsors and their respective affiliates. Our charter requires a majority of our directors to be independent of our sponsors and creates a committee of our board consisting solely of all of our independent directors. This committee, which we call the Conflicts Committee, is responsible for reviewing the performance of our Advisor Entities and must approve other matters set forth in our charter. Our directors are elected annually by the stockholders.

How do you expect your assets to be allocated between real estate properties and real estate-related loans and securities?

We intend to acquire and manage a diverse asset base of real estate properties and real estate-related loans and securities. We plan to diversify our real estate portfolio by geographic region, anchor tenants, tenant mix, investment size and investment risk with the goal of attaining an asset base of income-producing real estate properties and real estate-related assets that provide stable returns to our investors and the potential for growth in the value of our assets. We intend to allocate approximately 90% of our asset base to investments in grocery-anchored neighborhood and community shopping centers throughout the United States with a focus on well-located shopping centers that are well occupied at the time of purchase and typically cost less than $20.0 million per property. We also intend to allocate approximately 10% of our asset base to other real estate properties, real estate-related loans and securities and the equity securities of other REITs and real estate companies, assuming we sell the maximum offering amount.

How do you select potential properties for acquisition?

To find properties that best meet our criteria for investment, our sub-advisor, acting on behalf of our advisor, has developed a disciplined investment approach that combines the experience of its team of real estate professionals with a structure that emphasizes thorough market research, stringent underwriting standards and an extensive down-side analysis of the risks of each investment.

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What types of real estate-related debt investments do you expect to make?

We expect that our real estate-related debt investments will not constitute more than 10% of our asset base or represent a substantial portion of our assets at any one time. With respect to our investments in such assets, we will primarily focus on investments in first mortgages. The other real estate-related debt investments in which we may invest include mortgages (other than first mortgages), mezzanine, bridge and other loans; debt and derivative securities related to real estate assets, including mortgage-backed securities; collateralized debt obligations; debt securities issued by real estate companies; and credit default swaps.

What types of investments will you make in the equity securities of other companies?

We may make equity investments in REITs and other real estate companies. We may purchase the common or preferred stock of these entities or options to acquire their stock. We do not expect our non-controlling equity investments in other public companies to exceed 5.0% of the proceeds of this offering, assuming we sell the maximum offering amount, or to represent a substantial portion of our assets at any one time. In addition, we do not expect our non-controlling equity investments in other public companies combined with our investments in real estate properties outside of our target shopping center investments and other real estate-related investments to exceed 10.0% of our asset base.

Will you use leverage?

Yes. We expect that once we have fully invested the proceeds of this offering, assuming we sell the maximum amount, our aggregate borowings will be limited to 45.0% of the total fair value of assets (calculated after the close of the primary offering) and our other assets. Under our charter, the maximum amount of our total indebtedness shall not exceed 300% of our total “net assets” (as defined in our charter in accordance with the Statement of Policy Regarding Real Estate Investment Trusts revised and adopted by the North American Securities Administrators Association on May 7, 2007, or the NASAA REIT Guidelines) as of the date of any borrowing, which is generally expected to be approximately 75% of the cost of our investments; however, we may exceed that limit if such excess is approved by a majority of the members of the Conflicts Committee and disclosed to stockholders in our next quarterly report following that borrowing along with justification for exceeding such limit. This charter limitation, however, does not apply to individual real estate assets or investments. In any event, we expect that the amount of our aggregate borrowings will be reasonable in relation to the fair value of our assets and will be reviewed by our board of directors at least quarterly.

In addition, we do not intend to exceed the leverage limit in our charter before we have fully invested the proceeds of this offering, except in the early stages of our development when the costs of our investments are most likely to exceed our net offering proceeds. We believe that careful use of debt will help us to achieve our diversification goals because we will have more funds available for investment.

How will you structure the ownership and operation of your assets?

We plan to own substantially all of our assets and conduct our operations through our operating partnership. Because we plan to conduct substantially all of our operations through the operating partnership, we are considered an Umbrella Partnership Real Estate Investment Trust, or UPREIT. Using an UPREIT structure may give us an advantage in acquiring properties from persons who may not otherwise sell their properties because of certain unfavorable U.S. federal income tax consequences.

Do you currently have any shares outstanding?

Yes. We have sold 8,888 shares to our sub-advisor for an aggregate purchase price of $200,000 or $22.50 per share, reflecting the fact that selling commissions and dealer manager fees were not paid in connection with the sale. The sub-advisor may not sell this initial investment while the sub-advisor remains the sub-advisor but may transfer the shares to other affiliates.

What kind of offering is this?

We are offering an aggregate of up to 80,000,000 shares of common stock in our primary offering on a reasonable best efforts basis at $25.00 per share. Discounts are available for certain categories of purchasers as described in the “Plan of Distribution” section of this prospectus. We also are offering up to 20,000,000

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shares of common stock pursuant to our DRIP at a price initially equal to $23.75, which is 95% of our primary offering price. Until the filing of our second Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q with the SEC (or our Annual Report on Form 10-K should such filing constitute the second quarterly financial filing) following the earlier to occur of (i) of our acquisition of $2.0 billion in total portfolio assets and (ii)            , 2015, which is two years from the effective date of this offering, the per share purchase price for shares in our primary offering will be up to $25.00 (including the maximum allowed to be charged for commissions and fees). Thereafter, the per share purchase price in our primary offering will vary quarterly and will be equal to per share NAV plus applicable commissions and fees.

We will offer shares of common stock in our primary offering until the earlier of            , 2015, which is two years from the effective date of this offering, and the date we sell 80,000,000 shares. If we have not sold all of the shares within two years, we may continue the primary offering for an additional year until            , 2016. If we decide to continue our primary offering beyond two years from the date of this prospectus, we will provide that information in a prospectus supplement. This offering must be registered in every state in which we offer or sell shares. Generally, these registrations are for a period of one year. Thus, we may have to stop selling shares in any state in which our registration is not renewed or otherwise extended annually.

All subscription payments (other than those from Pennsylvania residents) will be placed in an account held by the escrow agent, UMB Bank, in trust for subscribers’ benefit and will be released to us only if we have sold a minimum of $2,000,000 of shares to the public by           , 2014, which is one year from the effective date of this offering. Any purchase of shares by our sponsors, directors, officers and other affiliates and “Friends” will be included for purposes of determining whether the minimum of $2,000,000 of shares of common stock required to release funds from the escrow account has been sold. “Friends” mean those individuals who have prior business and/or personal relationships with our executive officers, directors or either sponsor, including, without limitation, any service provider. If such investment occurs, we anticipate that our board of directors will authorize release of the escrowed funds promptly thereafter, which will permit us to commence our operations. If subscriptions for at least the minimum offering have not been received and accepted by            , 2014, which is one year from the effective date of this offering, this offering will be terminated and your funds and subscription agreement will be returned to you. See “Plan of Distribution — Minimum Offering.” We will not release from escrow any proceeds received from Pennsylvania residents unless and until we raise a minimum of $100,000,000 in aggregate gross offering proceeds from all investors pursuant to this offering. Pending a satisfaction of this condition, all subscription payments from Pennsylvania residents will be placed in an account held by the escrow agent, UMB Bank, in trust for subscribers’ benefit, pending release to us. Funds in escrow will be invested in short-term investments that mature on or before            , 2014, which is one year from the effective date of this offering, or that can be readily sold or otherwise disposed of for cash by this date without any dissipation of the offering proceeds invested.

How does a “reasonable best efforts” offering work?

When shares are offered to the public on a “reasonable best efforts” basis, the brokers participating in the offering are only required to use their good faith efforts and reasonable diligence to sell the shares and have no firm commitment or obligation to purchase any of the shares. Therefore, we may not sell all the shares that we are offering.

What is the purchase price for shares of our common stock?

Until the NAV pricing date, the per share purchase price of our shares in our primary offering will be up to $25.00 (including the maximum allowed to be charged for commissions and fees). Thereafter, the per share purchase price will vary quarterly and will be equal to our NAV divided by the number of shares outstanding as of the end of business on the business day immediately preceding the day on which we make each quarterly financial filing, plus applicable commissions and fees. After the close of business on the day of each such quarterly financial filing, we will file a pricing supplement with the SEC, which will set forth the calculation of NAV for such quarter, and we will also post that pricing supplement on our website at www.              .com. After the close of business on the day of each such quarterly financial filing, we will also post the per share NAV for that quarter on our website at www.                 .com. You may also

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obtain the quarterly determination of our per share NAV by calling our toll-free, automated telephone line at 1-866-532-4743. In addition to the quarterly pricing supplements, we will provide more frequent pricing supplements if there is a change in the per share NAV by more than 5% from the per share NAV disclosed in the last filed prospectus or pricing supplement. In such event, we will, after the close of business on the day on which there is such a change in the NAV, file a pricing supplement which would show the calculation of the quarterly NAV divided by the shares outstanding as of the close of business on the business day immediately prior to such filing and will provide an explanation as to the reason for the change. Commencing on the NAV pricing date, any purchase orders that we receive prior to 4:00 p.m. Eastern time on the last business day prior to each such quarterly financial filing will be executed at a price equal to our per share NAV for that quarter. Subscriptions that we receive after 4:00 p.m. Eastern time on the last business day prior to each such quarterly financial filing will be held for five business days before execution, during which time a subscriber may withdraw his or her subscription, which will be executed at a price equal to our per share NAV as calculated by our advisor after the close of business on the day on which we make our quarterly financial filing. If, in that circumstance, the investor does not withdraw his or her subscription within five business days of the original subscription date, the subscription will be processed by us. An investor’s subscription agreement and funds will be submitted to the transfer agent by our dealer manager and/or the broker dealers participating in the offering for settlement of the transaction within three business days of placing an order, but the investor’s share price will always be the per share NAV for such quarter that we received the order, as described above, except in such case where a subscription shall be held for five business days, as described above.

How will your sub-advisor calculate per share NAV?

Commencing with the NAV pricing date, our sub-advisor will be responsible for calculating our quarterly NAV at the end of each business day on which we make our quarterly financial filing. Our board of directors will review the NAV calculation quarterly. In connection with our NAV calculation, an independent valuer will appraise our properties regularly, and our sub-advisor will review each appraisal. Our sub-advisor will also determine the valuation of our properties and will compare each appraisal to its own determinations. If in our sub-advisor’s opinion the appraisals are materially higher or lower than our sub-advisor’s determinations of value, our sub-advisor will discuss the appraisals with the independent valuer. If our sub-advisor determines that the appraisals are still materially higher or lower than its valuations, a valuation committee, comprised of our independent directors, will review the appraisals and valuations, and make a final determination of value. To calculate our quarterly per share NAV, our sub-advisor will follow the guidelines established in the Investment Program Association Practice Guideline 2013-01 titled “Valuations of Publically Registered Non-Listed REITs,” issued April 29, 2013, or IPA 2013-01. IPA 2013-01 outlines the following methodology to calculate NAV:

Step 1:  Determination of Gross Asset Value: We will establish the fair value of our wholly owned individual real properties and real estate-related assets (taking into consideration estimates provided by an independent valuer as described above) consistent with Accounting Standard Codification Topic 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, or ASC 820. We will then add the fair value of assets and liabilities related to our investment interests in joint ventures and non-wholly owned subsidiaries based on the net fair value of such entities’ assets less liabilities and the provisions of the joint venture/subsidiary agreements relating to the allocation of economic interests between the parties to such agreements. We will establish the fair value of any other tangible assets. For this purpose, cash, receivables, and certain prepaid expenses and other current assets which have a defined and quantifiable future value will be included. Assets with a future value may include, but are not necessarily limited to, prepaid expenses and taxes, acquisition deposits and prepaid rental income where not otherwise accounted for in the determination of the fair values of real estate and real estate-related assets. Intangible assets to be excluded include, but are not limited to, deferred financing costs, and all assets/liabilities required by Accounting Standard Codification Topic 805, Business Combinations, or ASC 805. Private non-listed securities and business interests will be valued at estimated fair value.

Step 2:  Determination of Liabilities: Current liabilities will be valued at GAAP book value when it approximates fair value. Long-term debt will be valued at fair value, or mark to market, of debt maturing in one year or more. The value of minority interests will be based on allocation of fair value of assets less

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liabilities of each joint venture based on each applicable provision of the joint venture agreement relating to the allocation of economic interests between the parties.

Step 3:  Preferred Securities, Special Interests & Incentive Fee Adjustments: We will calculate and deduct: (i) any net asset value allocable to preferred securities; and (ii) any estimated incentive fees, participations, or special interests held by or allocable to the sponsors, Advisor Entities or their affiliates, based on our aggregate NAV and payable in a hypothetical liquidation of the company as of the valuation date in accordance with the provisions of the operating partnership, advisory and sub-advisory agreements and the terms of the preferred securities.

Step 4:  Determination of Per Share Amount: We will divide the resulting NAV allocable to stockholders by the number of common shares outstanding on the valuation date (fully diluted).

In connection with the determination of the fair value of the real estate and real estate-related assets, an independent valuer will provide an estimate of the market value of our real estate assets, which will primarily be held in our operating partnership. In order to determine a quarterly estimate of our portfolio’s market value, the independent valuer will analyze the cash flow from and other characteristics of each property in the portfolio and compile a projection of cash flows for the portfolio, as a whole. The independent valuer will analyze the portfolio’s projected cash flows utilizing a discounted cash flow approach to valuation and may also consider additional valuation methodologies; provided, that all methodologies, opinions and judgments used by the independent valuer will be consistent with our valuation guidelines, as established by our board of directors, and industry practices. Each of our properties will be appraised at least annually by the independent valuer, with such appraisals spread out over the course of a year so that approximately 25% of all properties are appraised each quarter.

We aim to provide a reasonable estimate of the market value of our shares. However, the methodologies will be based on a number of judgments, assumptions and opinions about future events that may or may not prove to be correct, and if different judgments, assumptions or opinions were used, different estimates would likely result. Therefore, the quarterly per share NAV calculation is an estimate and may not reflect the precise amount that you could receive for your shares in a market transaction. It is not known whether repurchasing or non-repurchasing stockholders or purchasers of our common stock will benefit from such disparity. In addition, our published per share NAV will be an estimate and may not fully reflect the economic impact of certain extraordinary events, including, without limitation, the unexpected renewal or termination of a material lease or unanticipated structural or environmental events affecting the value of a property, on our portfolio that may have occurred since the prior valuation because we may not be able to immediately quantify the economic impact of such events. If our sub-advisor determines there has been an extraordinary event that may have materially changed the estimated value of our portfolio, we will make an announcement regarding such extraordinary event. Our sub-advisor will analyze the impact of such extraordinary event and determine, considering the views of the independent valuer, the appropriate adjustment to be made to our NAV. We will not, however, retroactively adjust our NAV. To the extent the extraordinary events may result in a material change in value of a specific property, the independent valuer will be asked to review such events and, if it believes that such extraordinary events are reasonably likely to have affected the appraised value, will prepare an additional appraisal of the property.

For whom may an investment in our shares be appropriate?

An investment in our shares may be appropriate for you if you meet the minimum suitability standards mentioned above, seek to diversify your personal portfolio with a finite-life, real estate-based investment, which among its benefits hedges against inflation, seek to receive current income, seek to preserve capital, wish to obtain the benefits of potential long-term capital appreciation, and are able to hold your investment for a time period consistent with our liquidity plans. Persons who require immediate liquidity or guaranteed income, or who seek a short-term investment, are not appropriate investors for us, as our shares will not meet those needs.

Is there a minimum number of shares that must be purchased and must investors meet specific suitability criteria?

Generally, you must invest at least $2,500. Investors who already own our shares can make additional purchases for less than the minimum investment. You should carefully read the more detailed description of

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the minimum investment requirements appearing under the section entitled “Investor Suitability Standards” immediately following the cover page of this prospectus.

Generally, you may buy shares pursuant to this prospectus if you have either (a) a net worth of at least $70,000 and a gross annual income of at least $70,000, or (b) a net worth of at least $250,000. For this purpose, net worth does not include your home, home furnishings and automobiles. Residents of certain states may have a different standard. You should carefully read the more detailed description under the section entitled “Investor Suitability Standards” immediately following the cover page of this prospectus.

How will you use the proceeds raised in this offering?

Depending primarily on the number of shares we sell in this offering, the amounts listed in the table below represent our current estimates concerning the use of the offering proceeds. Since these are estimates, they may not accurately reflect the actual receipt or application of the offering proceeds. The first scenario assumes we sell the minimum number of 80,000 shares of common stock in this offering and the second scenario assumes that we sell the maximum number of 80,000,000 shares in this offering, with both scenarios contemplating a price of $25.00 per share. We estimate that for each share sold in this offering, approximately $21.75 (assuming no shares available under the DRIP are sold) will be available for the purchase of real estate in both the first scenario and second scenario. The remainder of the offering proceeds will be used to pay the costs of the offering, selling commissions and the dealer manager fee, and to pay a fee to our Advisor Entities for their services in connection with the selection and acquisition of properties. We may fund distributions from unlimited amounts of proceeds raised in this offering. The table does not give effect to special sales or volume discounts which could reduce selling commissions and many of the figures represent management’s best estimate because they cannot be precisely calculated at this time.

       
  Minimum Offering
(Not Including Distribution Reinvestment Plan)
  Maximum Offering
(Not Including Distribution Reinvestment Plan)
     Amount   Percent   Amount   Percent
Gross offering proceeds   $ 2,000,000       100.0 %    $ 2,000,000,000       100.0 % 
Less offering expenses:
                                   
Selling commissions and dealer
manager fee
  $ 200,000       10.0     $ 200,000,000       10.0 (1) 
Organization and offering expenses(2)   $ 40,000       2.0     $ 40,000,000       2.0  
Amount available for investment   $ 1,760,000       88.0 %    $ 1,760,000,000       88.0 % 
Acquisition:
                                   
Acquisition fees   $ 17,720       0.9     $ 17,720,000       0.9  
Acquisition expenses   $ 8,860       0.4     $ 8,860,000       0.4  
Amount invested in properties(3)   $ 1,733,420       86.7 %    $ 1,733,420,000       86.7 % 

(1) Until the NAV pricing date, the per share purchase price for shares in our primary offering will be up to $25.00 (including the maximum allowed to be charged for commissions and fees, subject to certain discounts as described in the prospectus). In determining the amount of selling commissions and dealer manager fees, we have assumed the sale of 80,000,000 shares at a purchase price of $25.00 per share.
(2) Pursuant to the terms of the advisory agreement, we have agreed to reimburse our advisor and its affiliates for organization and offering expenses up to 2.0% of the gross proceeds from our primary offering. Pursuant to the terms of the sub-advisory agreement between our advisor and our sub-advisor, the organization and offering expense reimbursement of 2.0% will be allocated as follows: 1.5% to our sub-advisor and 0.5% to our advisor.
(3) This table does not give effect to any leverage, the use of which would entitle our advisor or its assignees to a financing coordination fee and, as a result, would decrease the percentage of offering proceeds that would be invested in properties.

If I buy shares, will I receive distributions and how often?

To maintain our qualification as a REIT, we generally are required to make aggregate annual distributions to our stockholders of at least 90% of our annual REIT taxable income (which does not equal net income, as

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calculated in accordance with GAAP), determined without regard to the deduction for dividends paid and excluding net capital gain. Our board of directors may authorize distributions in excess of those required for us to maintain REIT status and depending on our financial condition and other factors as our board of directors deems relevant.

Once we commence paying distributions we expect to pay distributions monthly and continue paying distributions monthly unless our results of operations, our general financial conditions, general economic conditions, applicable provisions of Maryland law or other factors make it imprudent to do so. The timing and amount of distributions will be determined by our board of directors, in its discretion, and may vary from time to time. The discretion of our board of directors will be influenced in substantial part by its obligation to cause us to comply with REIT requirements of the Code.

We may fund distributions from unlimited amounts of any source, which may include borrowing funds, or selling assets in order to fund distributions if we are unable to make distributions with our cash flows from our operations. Until we are generating operating cash flow sufficient to make distributions to our stockholders, we intend to pay all or a substantial portion of our distributions from borrowings, including possible borrowings from our advisor or its affiliates, in anticipation of future cash flow, which may reduce the amount of capital we ultimately invest in properties or other permitted investments, and negatively impact the value of your investment. Our distribution policy is not to use the proceeds of this offering to pay distributions. However, our board has the authority under our organizational documents, to the extent permitted by Maryland law, to pay distributions from any source without limit, including proceeds from this offering or the proceeds from the issuance of securities in the future.

What are your exit strategies?

It is our intention to begin the process of achieving a Liquidity Event not later than three to six years after the termination of our primary offering. A “Liquidity Event” includes a sale of all or substantially all of our assets, a sale or merger of our company, a listing of our common stock on a national securities exchange, or other similar transaction. Our board of directors, in consultation with management, may determine that it is in our best interests to begin the process of engaging advisors to consider alternatives with respect to a Liquidity Event at such time during our offering stage that it can reasonably determine that all of the securities being offered in this offering will be sold within a reasonable period (i.e., three to six months). Any Liquidity Event is subject to the determination of our board of directors that such Liquidity Event is appropriate to commence.

If we do not begin the process of achieving a Liquidity Event by the sixth anniversary of the termination of our primary offering, our charter requires our board of directors to adopt a resolution declaring that a plan of liquidation of our company is advisable and to direct that the plan of liquidation be submitted for consideration at either an annual or special meeting of stockholders, unless the adoption of a plan of liquidation by the board and submission thereof to stockholders is postponed by a majority of the board of directors and a majority of the independent directors. If we have sought and failed to receive stockholder approval of a plan of liquidation, our company will continue operating, and upon the written request of stockholders owning in the aggregate not less than 10% of the then outstanding common shares, the plan of liquidation will be submitted for consideration by proxy statement to the stockholders up to once every two years.

In making the decision to apply for listing of our shares, our directors will try to determine whether listing our shares or liquidating our assets will result in greater value for stockholders. One of the factors our board of directors will consider when making this determination is the liquidity needs of our stockholders. In assessing whether to list, our board of directors would likely solicit input from financial advisors as to the likely demand for our shares upon listing. If, after listing, our board of directors believed that it would be difficult for stockholders to dispose of their shares, then that factor would weigh against listing. However, this would not be the only factor considered by our board of directors. If listing still appeared to be in the best long-term interests of our stockholders, despite the prospects of a relatively small market for our shares upon the initial listing, our board of directors may still opt to list our shares of common stock in keeping with its obligations under Maryland law. Our board of directors would also likely consider whether there was a large pent-up demand to sell our shares when making decisions regarding listing. The degree of participation in our

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DRIP and the number of requests for repurchases under the share repurchase program at this time could be an indicator of stockholder demand to liquidate their investment.

What conflicts of interest do your sponsors face?

Each of our sponsors and its respective affiliates and personnel experiences conflicts of interest in connection with the management of our business. Some of the material conflicts that our sponsors and their respective affiliates face include the following:

Our Phillips Edison sponsor and its affiliates must determine which investment opportunities to recommend to us and to other operating private programs or joint ventures sponsored by our Phillips Edison sponsor for which the offering proceeds have not been fully invested, and must determine how to allocate resources among us and any other programs sponsored by our Phillips Edison sponsor in the future;
Our AR Capital sponsor and its affiliates must determine which investment opportunities to recommend to us and to other programs or joint ventures sponsored by our AR Capital sponsor, and must determine how to allocate resources among us and any other such programs that our AR Capital sponsor may sponsor in the future;
Because our AR Capital sponsor is the sponsor of other publicly offered investment programs selling shares of capital stock concurrently with this offering, we will have to compete with such other programs sponsored by our AR Capital sponsor for the same investors when raising capital;
Our advisor, sub-advisor and their respective affiliates may structure the terms of joint ventures between us and other programs sponsored by or affiliated with our sponsors;
Our sponsors and their respective affiliates will have to allocate their time between us and other real estate programs and activities in which they are involved;
Because each of our sponsors and their respective affiliates will receive fees in connection with transactions involving the purchase, origination, management and sale of our assets regardless of the quality of the asset acquired or the services provided to us, the interests of each of our sponsors are not wholly aligned with those of our stockholders;
Our dealer manager is under common ownership with our advisor, is the dealer manager for other publicly offered investment programs sponsored by our AR Capital sponsor and receives fees in connection with such other publicly offered investment programs; and
We may only terminate our dealer manager in limited circumstances and, under certain conditions, may be obligated to use our dealer manager in future offerings.

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What is the ownership structure of the company and the entities that perform services for you?

The following chart shows the ownership structure of the various entities that perform or are likely to perform important services for us.

[GRAPHIC MISSING]

What are the fees that you pay to the Advisor Entities, their affiliates, the dealer manager and your directors?

Although we have executive officers who manage our operations, we have no paid employees. We have entered into an advisory agreement with our advisor to manage our day-to-day affairs. Our advisor has entered into a sub-advisory agreement with our sub-advisor, pursuant to which the advisor has delegated many of its duties to the sub-advisor and the sub-advisor will manage our day-to-day affairs and our portfolio of real estate investments on behalf of our advisor, subject to the supervision of our board of directors. The following table summarizes all of the compensation, fees and expenses that we pay or reimburse to the respective affiliates of our sponsors including our advisor and sub-advisor (and their affiliates) and our dealer manager. The table also summarizes fees to be paid to our independent directors. Unless otherwise noted, the fees to be paid and expenses to be reimbursed described in this section are paid or reimbursed to our advisor, an entity indirectly wholly owned by our AR Capital sponsor. Our advisor has assigned 77.5% of such fees to our sub-advisor, an affiliate of our Phillips Edison sponsor pursuant to the sub-advisory agreement between our advisor and our sub-advisor. Our advisor has also assigned expense reimbursements to our sub-advisor in proportion to the expenses the parties have incurred on our behalf. Selling commissions and dealer manager fees may vary for different categories of purchasers as described under “Plan of Distribution.”

Except if a form of payment or distribution is specifically provided for in the table below, our advisor may, in its sole discretion, elect to have certain fees and commissions paid, in whole or in part, in cash or shares of our common stock. Each of the following fees (which respectively correspond to their limitations in order) are limited as follows, (a) acquisition fees, acquisition expense reimbursements and financing coordination fees, (b) total operating expenses (as defined below), (c) disposition fees and (d) aggregate subordinated distributions by the operating partnership payable to the advisor (or its assignees), together with the fair market value of any shares of restricted stock granted under our 2013 Long Term Incentive Plan and 2013 Independent Director Stock Plan, shall not exceed (a) 4.5% of all properties’ aggregate gross contract purchase price, (b) as determined annually, the greater, in the aggregate, of 2.0% of average invested assets and 25.0% of net income other than any additions to reserves for depreciation, bad debt or other similar non-cash reserves and excluding any gain from the sale of assets for that period, (c) disposition fees, if any, of up to 3.0% of the contract sales price of all properties that we sell and (d) 15.0% of remaining net sales proceeds after return of capital contributions plus payment to investors of a 6.0% cumulative, pre-tax, non-compounded

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return on the capital contributed by investors. The selling commissions may vary for different categories of purchasers. See the section entitled “Plan of Distribution” in this prospectus. This table assumes the shares are sold through distribution channels associated with the highest possible selling commissions and dealer manager fee. No effect is given to any shares sold through the DRIP.

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Type of Compensation and Recipient   Determination of Amount   Estimated Amount for
Minimum Offering
(80,000 shares)/Maximum Offering (80,000,000 shares)
     Organization and Offering Stage     
Selling Commissions — 
Dealer Manager
  Our dealer manager will be paid 7.0% of the per share purchase price of shares in our primary offering, which will initially be up to $25.00. No selling commissions will be paid on sales of shares under the DRIP. Our dealer manager will reallow all selling commissions to participating broker dealers. Alternatively, a participating broker dealer may elect to receive a fee equal to 7.5% of the gross proceeds from the sale of shares by such participating broker dealer, with 2.5% thereof paid at the time of such sale and 1.0% thereof paid on each anniversary of the closing of such sale up to and including the fifth anniversary of the closing of such sale, in which event, a portion of the dealer manager fee will be reallowed such that the combined selling commission and dealer manager fee do not exceed 10.0% of the gross proceeds from the sale of our common stock. The total amount of all items of compensation from any source, payable to our dealer manager or the soliciting dealers will not exceed an amount that equals 10.0% of the gross proceeds of the offering (excluding securities purchased through the DRIP).   $140,000/$140,000,000(1)
Dealer Manager Fee — Dealer Manager   Our dealer manager will be paid 3.0% of gross offering proceeds, except no dealer manager fee is payable on shares sold under the DRIP or to “Friends.” The dealer manager reallows all or a portion of its dealer manager fees to participating broker-dealers.   $60,000/$60,000,000(1) (assumes a 3% dealer manager fee)
Other Organization and Offering Expenses — Advisor, Sub-advisor and their Affiliates   We will reimburse our Advisor Entities for organization and offering expenses, which may include reimbursements to our Advisor Entities for other organization and offering expenses that it incurs for due diligence fees included in detailed and itemized invoices. Pursuant to the terms of our advisory agreement, we have agreed to reimburse our advisor up to 2.0% of the gross proceeds from our primary offering. Pursuant to the terms of the sub-advisory agreement, such organization and offering expense reimbursement will be allocated as follows: 1.5% to our sub-advisor and 0.5% to our advisor.   $40,000/$40,000,000

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Type of Compensation and Recipient   Determination of Amount   Estimated Amount for
Minimum Offering
(80,000 shares)/Maximum Offering (80,000,000 shares)
     Operational Stage     
Acquisition Fees — Advisor, Sub-advisor and their Affiliates   We will pay to our Advisor Entities or their assignees 1.0% of the contract purchase price of each property acquired (including our pro rata share of any indebtedness assumed or incurred in respect of that investment and exclusive of acquisition fees, acquisition expenses and financing coordination fees) and 1.0% of the amount advanced for a loan or other investment (including our pro rata share of any indebtedness assumed or incurred in respect of that investment and exclusive of acquisition fees, acquisition expenses and financing coordination fees). For purposes of this prospectus, “contract purchase price” or the “amount advanced for a loan or other investment” means the amount actually paid or allocated in respect of the purchase, development, construction or improvement of a property or the amount of funds advanced with respect to a mortgage, or the amount actually paid or allocated in respect of the purchase of loans or other real-estate related assets, in each case inclusive of any indebtedness assumed or incurred in respect of such investment, but exclusive of acquisition fees and acquisition expenses.   $17,720/$17,720,000 (or $32,218/$32,218,182 assuming we incur our expected leverage of 45% set forth in our investment guidelines or
$70,880/$70,880,000 assuming the maximum leverage of approximately 75% permitted by our charter)
     Once the proceeds from the primary offering have been fully invested, the aggregate amount of acquisition fees and financing coordination fees (as described below) shall not exceed 1.5% of the contract purchase price and the amount advanced for a loan or other investment, as applicable, for all the assets acquired.  

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Type of Compensation and Recipient   Determination of Amount   Estimated Amount for
Minimum Offering
(80,000 shares)/Maximum Offering (80,000,000 shares)
Acquisition Expenses — Advisor, Sub-advisor and their Affiliates   We reimburse our Advisor Entities for expenses actually incurred related to selecting, evaluating and acquiring assets on our behalf, regardless of whether we actually acquire the related assets. In addition, we also pay third parties, or reimburse our Advisor Entities or their affiliates, for any investment-related expenses due to third parties, including, but not limited to, legal fees and expenses, travel and communications expenses, costs of appraisals, accounting fees and expenses, third-party brokerage or finders’ fees, title insurance expenses, survey expenses, property inspection expenses and other closing costs regardless of whether we acquire the related assets. We expect these expenses to be approximately 0.5% of the purchase price of each property (including our pro rata share of debt attributable to such property) and 0.5% of the amount advanced for a loan or other investment (including our pro rata share of debt attributable to such investment). In no event will the total of all acquisition fees (including the financing coordination fees described below) and acquisition expenses payable with respect to a particular investment exceed 4.5% of the contract purchase price of each property (including our pro rata share of debt attributable to such property) or 4.5% of the amount advanced for a loan or other investment (including our pro rata share of debt attributable to such investment).   $8,860/$8,860,000 (or $16,109/$16,109,091 assuming we incur our expected leverage of 45% set forth in our investment guidelines or $35,440/$35,440,000 assuming the maximum leverage of 75% permitted by our charter)
Asset Management Subordinated Participation — Advisor, Sub-advisor and their Affiliates   Within 60 days after the end of each calendar quarter (subject to the approval of our board of directors), we, as the sole member of the general partner of the operating partnership, will cause the operating partnership to pay an asset management subordinated participation by issuing a number of restricted operating partnership units designated as Class B Units of our operating partnership, or Class B Units, to our Advisor Entities equal to: (i) 0.25% multiplied by (a) prior to the NAV pricing date, the cost of assets and (b) on and after the NAV pricing date, the lower of the cost of assets and the applicable quarterly NAV divided by (ii) (a) prior to the NAV pricing date, the value of one share of common stock as of the last day of such calendar quarter, which is equal initially to $22.50 (the primary offering price minus selling commissions and dealer manager fees) and (b) on and after the NAV pricing date, the per share NAV.(2)   Not determinable at this time. Because the subordinated participation is based on a fixed percentage of aggregate asset value, there is no maximum dollar amount of this participation.

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Type of Compensation and Recipient   Determination of Amount   Estimated Amount for
Minimum Offering
(80,000 shares)/Maximum Offering (80,000,000 shares)
     Our Advisor Entities will be entitled to receive distributions on the vested and unvested Class B units they receive in connection with their asset management subordinated participation at the same rate as distributions received on our common stock; such distributions will be in addition to the incentive fees that our Advisor Entities and their affiliates may receive from us, including, without limitation, the annual subordinated performance fee and the subordinated participation in net sales proceeds, the subordinated incentive listing distribution or the subordinated distribution upon termination of the advisory agreement, as applicable.     
     Class B Units are subject to forfeiture until such time as: (a) the value of the operating partnership's assets plus all distributions made equals or exceeds the total amount of capital contributed by investors plus a 6.0% cumulative, pretax, non-compounded annual return thereon, or the “economic hurdle”; (b) any one of the following events occurs concurrently with or subsequently to the achievement of the economic hurdle described above: (i) a listing of our common stock on a national securities exchange; (ii) a transaction to which we or our operating partnership shall be a party, as a result of which partnership units in our partnership, or OP Units, or our common stock shall be exchanged for or converted into the right, or the holders of such securities shall otherwise be entitled, to receive cash, securities or other property or any combination thereof; or (iii) the termination of the advisory agreement without cause; and (c) the advisor pursuant to the advisory agreement is providing services to us immediately prior to the occurrence of an event of the type described in clause (b) above, unless the failure to provide such services is attributable to the termination without cause of the advisory agreement by an affirmative vote of a majority of our independent directors after the economic hurdle described above has been met.     
     Any outstanding Class B Units will be forfeited immediately if the advisory agreement is terminated for any reason other than a termination without cause. Any outstanding Class B Units will be forfeited immediately if the advisory agreement is terminated without cause by an affirmative vote of a majority of our board of directors before the economic hurdle described above has been met.  

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Type of Compensation and Recipient   Determination of Amount   Estimated Amount for
Minimum Offering
(80,000 shares)/Maximum Offering (80,000,000 shares)
Operating Expenses — Our Advisor, Sub-advisor and their Affiliates   We will reimburse the expenses incurred by our Advisor Entities in connection with their provision of services to us, including our allocable share of our Advisor Entities’ overhead, such as rent, personnel costs, utilities and IT costs, subject to the limitation that we will not reimburse our Advisor Entities for any amount by which our operating expenses at the end of the four preceding fiscal quarters exceeds the greater of (a) 2.0% of average invested assets and (b) 25.0% of net income other than any additions to reserves for depreciation, bad debt or other similar non-cash reserves and excluding any gain from the sale of assets for that period. For these purposes, “average invested assets” means, for any period, the average of the aggregate book value of our assets invested, directly or indirectly, in equity interests in and loans secured by real estate assets (including amounts invested in REITs and other real estate operating companies) before deducting reserves for depreciation or bad debts or other similar non-cash reserves, computed by taking the average of these values at the end of each month during the period. We will not reimburse our Advisor Entities for the personnel costs of acquisition, financing or disposition personnel if such personnel perform services for which the Advisor Entities earn an acquisition fee, a financing coordination fee or a disposition fee or for which acquisition expenses are incurred and reimbursed.   Not determinable at this time.
Financing Coordination Fee — Our Advisor, Sub-advisor and their Affiliates   If our Advisor Entities provide services in connection with the origination or refinancing of any debt that we obtain and use to finance properties or other permitted investments, or that is assumed, directly or indirectly, in connection with the acquisition of properties or other permitted investments, we will pay the Advisor Entities or their assignees a financing coordination fee equal to 0.75% of the amount available and/or outstanding under such financing or such assumed debt, subject to certain limitations. The Advisor Entities may reallow some of or all of this financing coordination fee to reimburse third parties with whom they may subcontract to procure such financing.   Actual amounts depend on the amount of any debt financed and therefore cannot be determined at the present time. If we utilize leverage equal to 45.0% of the cost of the aggregate value of our assets, the maximum fees would be $10.8 million. If we utilize leverage equal to 75.0% of the cost of the aggregate value of our assets, the maximum fees would be $39.9 million.

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Type of Compensation and Recipient   Determination of Amount   Estimated Amount for
Minimum Offering
(80,000 shares)/Maximum Offering (80,000,000 shares)
Property Management Fees — Property Manager   Property management fees equal to 4.5% of the monthly gross receipts from the properties managed by Phillips Edison & Company Ltd., or our property manager, are payable monthly to our property manager. Our property manager may subcontract the performance of its property management and leasing duties to third parties, and our property manager may pay a portion of its property management or leasing fees to the third parties with whom it subcontracts for these services. We reimburse the costs and expenses incurred by our property manager on our behalf, including legal, travel and other out-of-pocket expenses that are directly related to the management of specific properties, as well as fees and expenses of third-party service providers. We do not, however, reimburse our property manager for general overhead costs or for the wages and salaries and other employee-related expenses of employees of our property manager other than employees or subcontractors who are engaged in the on-site operation, management, maintenance or access control of our properties.   Actual amounts depend on gross revenues of specific properties and actual management fees or property management fees and customary leasing fees and therefore cannot be determined at the present time.
Leasing Fee — Property Manager   We have engaged our property manager to provide leasing services with respect to our properties. We pay a leasing fee to our property manager in an amount that is usual and customary for comparable services rendered in the geographic market of the property.   Not determinable at this time.
Construction Management Fee — Our Property Manager or Other Parties   We expect to engage our property manager, as permitted by our charter, to provide construction management services, as needed, for some of our properties. We will pay a construction management fee in an amount that is usual and customary for comparable services rendered to similar projects in the geographic market of the project to our property manager or such other entity that provides construction management services.   Actual amounts cannot be determined at the present time.

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Type of Compensation and Recipient   Determination of Amount   Estimated Amount for
Minimum Offering
(80,000 shares)/Maximum Offering (80,000,000 shares)
Independent Director Compensation — 
Independent Directors
  We pay each of our independent directors an annual retainer of $30,000. In our management’s discretion, we may also pay our independent directors for attending meetings as follows: (1) $1,000 for each board meeting attended in person or telephonically; and (2) $1,000 for each committee meeting attended in person or telephonically. The Audit Committee chair also receives an annual retainer of $5,000 and the Conflicts Committee chair receives an annual retainer of $3,000. In addition, we may grant our independent directors an annual award of 1,000 shares of restricted stock pursuant to our 2013 Independent Director Stock Plan. All directors receive reimbursement of reasonable out-of-pocket expenses incurred in connection with attendance at meetings of the board of directors and the committees thereof.   Actual amounts depend on the total number of board and committee meetings that each independent director attends; we cannot determine these amounts at the present time.
     Liquidation/Listing Stage          
Disposition Fees — Advisor, Sub-advisor and their Affiliates   For substantial assistance in connection with the sale of properties or other investments, we will pay our Advisor Entities or their respective affiliates 2.0% of the contract sales price of each property or other investment sold; provided, however, that (i) if a third party also receives a commission on the sale, our Advisor Entities and their affiliates may receive up to one-half of the total brokerage commissions paid but in no event an amount that exceeds 3.0% of the contract sales price of such investment, and (ii) total real estate commissions paid (to our Advisor Entities and others) in connection with the sale may not exceed the lesser of a competitive real estate commission and 6.0% of the contract sales price. The Conflicts Committee will determine whether our Advisor Entities or their affiliates have provided substantial assistance to us in connection with the sale of an asset. Substantial assistance in connection with the sale of a property includes our Advisor Entities’ preparation of an investment package for the property (including an investment analysis, rent rolls, tenant information regarding credit, a property title report, an environmental report, a structural report and exhibits) or such other substantial services performed by our Advisor Entities in connection with a sale. If we were to sell an asset to an affiliate, our organizational documents prohibit us from paying our Advisor Entities a disposition fee. Before we sold an asset to an affiliate, our charter would require that a majority of our board of directors, including a majority of our Conflicts Committee not otherwise interested in the transaction, conclude that the transaction is fair and reasonable to us and on terms and conditions no less favorable to us than those available from third parties.   Actual amounts depend on the results of our operations; we cannot determine these amounts at the present time.

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Type of Compensation and Recipient   Determination of Amount   Estimated Amount for
Minimum Offering
(80,000 shares)/Maximum Offering (80,000,000 shares)
Annual Subordinated Performance Fee — Advisor, Sub-advisor and their Affiliates   We will pay our Advisor Entities an annual subordinated performance fee calculated on the basis of our total return to stockholders, payable annually in arrears, such that for any year in which our total return on stockholders’ capital exceeds 6.0% per annum, our Advisor Entities will be entitled to 15.0% of the amount in excess of such 6.0% per annum, provided that the amount paid to the Advisor Entities does not exceed 10.0% of the aggregate total return for such year. Such fee shall only be payable from “net sales proceeds.”   The actual amount will depend on our performance, as well as on the number of shares sold, the per share NAV and the period of time that the investor continues to hold the shares. Prior to the calculation of NAV, the annual subordinated performance fee will be payable only if total distributions to stockholders exceed 6.0% per annum. Such distributions may be paid from any source, including offering proceeds, DRIP proceeds, financing proceeds and cash flows. Any payment of distributions from sources other than cash flows could result in the dilution of stockholders’ interests.
Subordinated Participation in Net Sales Proceeds (payable only if we are not listed on an exchange) — Advisor, Sub-advisor and their Affiliates   The special limited partner will receive from time to time, when available, 15.0% of remaining “net sales proceeds” after return of capital contributions plus payment to investors of an annual 6.0% cumulative, pre-tax, non-compounded return on the capital contributed by investors. “Net sales proceeds” generally refers to the proceeds of sale transactions less selling expenses incurred by or on our behalf, including legal fees, closing costs or other applicable fees. For the full definition of “net sales proceeds,” you should refer to our charter. We cannot assure you that we will provide this 6.0% return, which we have disclosed solely as a measure for the special limited partner and its affiliates’ incentive compensation.   Not determinable at this time. There is no maximum amount of these payments.
Subordinated Incentive Listing Distribution (payable only if we are listed on an exchange) — Advisor, Sub-advisor and their Affiliates   Upon the listing of our shares on a national securities exchange, the special limited partner will receive distributions from our operating partnership equal to 15.0% of the amount by which the sum of our market value plus distributions exceeds the sum of the aggregate capital contributed by investors plus an amount equal to an annual 6.0% cumulative, pre-tax, non-compounded return to investors. We cannot assure you that we will provide this 6.0% return, which we have disclosed solely as a measure for the special limited partner’s and its affiliates’ incentive compensation.   Not determinable at this time. There is no maximum amount of this distribution.

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Type of Compensation and Recipient   Determination of Amount   Estimated Amount for
Minimum Offering
(80,000 shares)/Maximum Offering (80,000,000 shares)
Subordinated Distribution upon Termination of the Advisory Agreement — Advisor, Sub-advisor and their Affiliates   Upon termination or non-renewal of the advisory agreement with or without cause, the special limited partner or its assignees will be entitled to receive distributions from our operating partnership equal to 15.0% of the amount by which the sum of our market value plus distributions exceeds the sum of the aggregate capital contributed by investors plus an amount equal to an annual 6.0% cumulative, pre-tax, non-compounded return to investors. We cannot assure you that we will provide this 6.0% return, which we have disclosed solely as a measure for the special limited partner’s incentive compensation. In addition, the special limited partner may elect to defer its right to receive a subordinated distribution upon termination until either a listing on a national securities exchange or other liquidity event occurs.   Not determinable at this time. There is no maximum amount of this distribution

(1) Until the NAV pricing date, the per share purchase price for shares in our primary offering will be up to $25.00 (which includes the maximum allowed to be charged for commissions and fees, subject to certain discounts as described in the prospectus). In determining the amount of selling commissions and dealer manager fees, we have assumed the sale of 80,000,000 shares at a purchase price of $25.00 per share.
(2) For example, if the cost of assets (cost will include the purchase price, acquisition expenses, capital expenditures and other customarily capitalized costs, but will exclude acquisition fees) with respect to a quarter equals $50,000,000 and the value of one share of our common stock as of the last day of such quarter equals $22.50, 5,555.56 Class B Units would be issuable to our Advisor Entities (($50,000,000 × 0.25%) ÷ $22.50 = 5,555.56). This example assumes, for periods following the NAV pricing date, that our quarterly NAV exceeds the cost of assets.

Historically, due to the apparent preference of the public markets for self-managed companies, non-traded REITs have engaged in internalization transactions (an acquisition of management functions by the REIT from its advisor) pursuant to which they became self-managed prior to listing their securities on national securities exchanges. These internalization transactions can result in significant payments to affiliates of the advisor irrespective of the returns stockholders have received. Our charter and advisory agreement provide that no compensation or remuneration will be payable by us or our operating partnership to our Advisor Entities, the special limited partner or any of their affiliates in connection with any internalization transaction (an acquisition of management functions by us from our advisor and/or sub-advisor) in the future.

How many real estate investments do you currently own?

We currently do not own any properties or other real estate investments. Because we have not yet identified any specific assets to acquire, we are considered a blind pool. Because we do not and have not owned any properties or real estate investments, you do not need to be concerned about possible “legacy issues” related to assets acquired before the commencement of this offering. As specific investments become probable, we will supplement this prospectus to provide information regarding the probable investment to the extent it is material to an investment decision with respect to our common stock. We also will describe material changes to our portfolio, including the closing of property acquisitions, by means of a supplement to this prospectus.

May I reinvest my distribution in shares of Phillips Edison-ARC Grocery Center REIT II, Inc.?

Pursuant to our DRIP, you may elect to have the distributions you receive from us reinvested, in whole or in part, in additional shares of our common stock. Until the NAV pricing date, the purchase price per share under our DRIP will be $23.75 per share, which is 95% of the primary offering price. Beginning with the

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NAV pricing date, the price per share under our DRIP will vary quarterly and will be equal to our per share NAV for the quarter in which the distribution is payable. No selling commissions or dealer manager fees will be paid on shares sold under our DRIP.

How do I subscribe for shares?

If you choose to purchase shares in this offering and you are not already a stockholder, you will need to complete and sign a subscription agreement, like the one contained in this prospectus as Appendix C, for a specific number of shares and pay for the shares at the time you subscribe.

If I buy shares in this offering, how may I sell them later?

Our common stock is currently not listed on a national securities exchange and we will not seek to list our stock until the time our independent directors believe that the listing of our stock would be in the best interest of our stockholders. In order to provide stockholders with the benefit of some interim liquidity, our board of directors has adopted a share repurchase program that enables our stockholders to sell their shares back to us subject to the significant conditions and limitations in our share repurchase program. Our sponsors, advisor, sub-advisor, directors and affiliates are prohibited from receiving a fee on any share repurchases. The terms of our share repurchase program are more flexible in cases involving the death or disability of a stockholder.

Repurchases of shares of our common stock, when requested, are at our sole discretion and generally will be made quarterly until our advisor begins calculating NAV. Prior to the time our advisor begins calculating NAV, we will limit the number of shares repurchased during any calendar year to 5% of the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the prior calendar year. In addition, funds available for our share repurchase program may not be sufficient to accommodate all requests. Due to these limitations, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to accommodate all repurchase requests. Funding for the share repurchase program will be derived from proceeds we maintain from the sale of shares under the DRIP and other operating funds, if any, as our board of directors, in its sole discretion, may reserve for this purpose.

Unless the shares of our common stock are being repurchased in connection with a stockholder’s death or disability, the purchase price for shares repurchased under our share repurchase program will be as set forth below until our advisor begins calculating NAV. We do not currently anticipate obtaining appraisals for our investments (other than investments in transactions with our sponsors, advisor, sub-advisor, directors or their respective affiliates) prior to the NAV pricing date and, accordingly, the estimated value of our investments should not be viewed as an accurate reflection of the fair market value of our investments nor will they represent the amount of net proceeds that would result from an immediate sale of our assets. Commencing with the NAV pricing date, each of our properties will be appraised annually and our sub-advisor will be responsible for calculating our quarterly NAV at the end of the day on which we file our quarterly financial report. Our board of directors will review the NAV calculation quarterly.

Only those stockholders who purchased their shares from us or received their shares from us (directly or indirectly) through one or more non-cash transactions may be able to participate in the share repurchase program. In other words, once our shares are transferred for value by a stockholder, the transferee and all subsequent holders of the shares are not eligible to participate in the share repurchase program. Prior to the time our sub-advisor begins calculating NAV, we will repurchase shares on the last business day of each quarter (and in all events on a date other than a dividend payment date). Prior to the time our sub-advisor begins calculating NAV, the price per share that we will pay to repurchase shares of our common stock will be as follows:

for stockholders who have continuously held their shares of our common stock for at least one year, the price will be the lower of $23.13 and 92.5% of the amount paid for each such share;
for stockholders who have continuously held their shares of our common stock for at least two years, the price will be the lower of $23.75 and 95.0% of the amount paid for each such share;
for stockholders who have continuously held their shares of our common stock for at least three years, the price will be the lower of $24.78 and 97.5% of the amount paid for each such share; and

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for stockholders who have held their shares of our common stock for at least four years, the price will be the lower of $25.00 and 100.0% of the amount you paid for each share;

in each case, as adjusted for any stock dividends, combinations, splits, recapitalizations and the like with respect to our common stock.

Upon the death or disability of a stockholder, upon request, we will waive the one-year holding requirement that otherwise will apply to redemption requests made prior to the NAV pricing date. Shares repurchased in connection with the death or disability of a stockholder will be repurchased at a purchase price equal to the price actually paid for the shares during the offering, or if not engaged in the offering, the per share purchase price will be based on the greater of $25.00 or the then-current NAV of the shares as determined by our board of directors (as adjusted for any stock dividends, combinations, splits, recapitalizations and the like with respect to our common stock). In addition, we may waive the holding period in the event of a stockholder’s bankruptcy or other exigent circumstances.

After the NAV pricing date, stockholders may make daily requests that we repurchase all or a portion (but generally at least 25% of a stockholder’s shares) of their shares pursuant to our share repurchase program. At such time as our NAV is calculated, we will continue to limit the number of shares repurchased during any calendar year to 5% of the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the prior calendar year. In addition, you will only be able to have your shares repurchased to the extent that we have sufficient liquid assets. Most of our assets will consist of properties which cannot generally be readily liquidated without impacting our ability to realize full value upon their disposition. Therefore, we may not always have sufficient liquid resources to satisfy all repurchase requests. Following the NAV pricing date, in order to provide liquidity for repurchases, we intend to maintain 5.0% of our NAV in excess of $1.0 billion in cash, cash equivalents and other short-term investments and certain types of real estate related assets that can be liquidated more readily than properties, or collectively, liquid assets. However, our stockholders should not expect that we will maintain liquid assets at or above these levels. To the extent that we maintain borrowing capacity under a line of credit, such available amount will be included in calculating our liquid assets.

Whether our sub-advisor has begun NAV calculations or not, the share repurchase program immediately will terminate if our shares are listed on any national securities exchange. In addition, our board of directors may amend, suspend (in whole or in part) or terminate the share repurchase program at any time upon 30 days’ notice. Further, our board of directors reserves the right, in its sole discretion, to reject any requests for repurchases. For additional information on our share repurchase program refer to the section entitled “Share Repurchase Program” elsewhere in this prospectus.

What are my voting rights?

We hold annual meetings of our stockholders for the purpose of electing our directors and conducting other business matters that may be presented at such meetings. We also may call special meetings of stockholders from time to time and such special meetings may be called by stockholders, in certain circumstances. You are entitled to one vote for each share of common stock you own at any of these meetings.

Are there any special restrictions on the ownership or transfer of shares?

Our charter contains restrictions on ownership and transfer of our shares that, among other restrictions, prevent any one person from owning more than 9.8% in value of the aggregate of our outstanding shares of stock or more than 9.8% (in value or in number of shares, whichever is more restrictive) of any class or series of shares of our stock, unless exempted by our board of directors. For a more complete description of the shares, including this and other restrictions on the ownership and transfer of our shares, please see the section entitled “Description of Securities — Restrictions on Ownership and Transfer” in this prospectus. Our charter also limits your ability to transfer your shares to prospective stockholders unless (a) they meet the minimum suitability standards regarding income or net worth, which are described in the “Investor Suitability Standards” section of this prospectus, and (b) the transfer complies with minimum purchase requirements, which are described in the sections entitled “Investor Suitability Standards” and “How to Subscribe.”

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Are there any special considerations that apply to employee benefit plans subject to ERISA or other retirement plans that are investing in shares?

Prospective investors with investment discretion over the assets of an individual retirement account, employee benefit plan or other retirement plan or arrangement that is covered by ERISA or Code Section 4975 should carefully review the information in the section of this prospectus entitled “Investment by Tax-Exempt Entities and ERISA Considerations” and are required to consult their own legal and tax advisors on these matters.

May I make an investment through my IRA, SEP or other tax-deferred account?

Yes. You may make an investment through your individual retirement account, or an IRA, a simplified employee pension, or a SEP, plan or other tax-deferred account. In making these investment decisions, you should consider, at a minimum, (a) whether the investment is in accordance with the documents and instruments governing your IRA, plan or other account, (b) whether the investment satisfies the fiduciary requirements associated with your IRA, plan or other account, (c) whether the investment will generate unrelated business taxable income, or UBTI, to your IRA, plan or other account, (d) whether there is sufficient liquidity for that investment under your IRA, plan or other account, (e) the need to value the assets of your IRA, plan or other account annually or more frequently, and (f) whether the investment would constitute a non-exempt prohibited transaction under applicable law.

Are there any Investment Company Act of 1940 considerations?

We intend to conduct our operations so that the company and each of its subsidiaries are exempt from registration as an investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, or the Investment Company Act. Under Section 3(a)(1)(A) of the Investment Company Act, a company is an “investment company” if it is, or holds itself out as being, engaged primarily, or proposes to engage primarily, in the business of investing, reinvesting or trading in securities. Under Section 3(a)(1)(C) of the Investment Company Act, a company is deemed to be an “investment company” if under the following test, or the 40% test, it is engaged, or proposes to engage, in the business of investing, reinvesting, owning, holding or trading in securities and owns or proposes to acquire “investment securities” having a value exceeding 40% of the value of its total assets on an unconsolidated basis. “Investment securities” excludes U.S. Government securities and securities of majority-owned subsidiaries that are not themselves investment companies and are not relying on the exception from the definition of investment company set forth in Section 3(c)(1) or Section 3(c)(7) of the Investment Company Act.

We intend to acquire real estate and real estate-related assets directly, for example, by acquiring fee interests in real property, or by purchasing interests, including controlling interests, in REITs or other “real estate operating companies,” such as real estate management companies and real estate development companies, that own real property. We also may acquire real estate assets through investments in joint venture entities, including joint venture entities in which we may not own a controlling interest. We anticipate that our assets generally will be held in wholly and majority-owned subsidiaries of the company, each formed to hold a particular asset. Subject to certain conditions we may also invest in mortgage related securities or mortgage related loans. See the section entitled “Investment Strategy, Objectives and Policies — Investment Company Act Considerations” in this prospectus.

We intend to conduct our operations so that the company and most, if not all, of its wholly owned and majority-owned subsidiaries owns or proposes to acquire “investment securities” having a value of not more than 40% of the value of its total assets (exclusive of government securities and cash items) on an unconsolidated basis. “Investment securities” excludes (A) government securities, (B) securities issued by employees’ securities companies, and (C) securities issued by majority-owned subsidiaries which (i) are not investment companies, and (ii) are not relying on the exception from the definition of investment company under Section 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of the Investment Company Act. We will continuously monitor our holdings on an ongoing basis to determine the compliance of the company and each wholly owned and majority-owned subsidiary with this test. We expect that most, if not all, of the company’s wholly owned and majority-owned subsidiaries will not be relying on exemptions under either Section 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of the Investment Company Act. Consequently, interests in these subsidiaries (which are expected to constitute most, if not all, of our assets) generally will not constitute “investment securities.” Accordingly, we believe that the company

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and most, if not all, of its wholly owned and majority-owned subsidiaries will not be considered investment companies under Section 3(a)(1)(C) of the Investment Company Act.

In addition, we believe that neither the company nor any of its wholly or majority-owned subsidiaries will be considered investment companies under Section 3(a)(1)(A) of the Investment Company Act because they will not engage primarily or hold themselves out as being engaged primarily in the business of investing, reinvesting or trading in securities. Rather, the company and its subsidiaries will be primarily engaged in non-investment company businesses related to real estate. Consequently, the company and its subsidiaries expect to be able to conduct their respective operations such that none of them will be required to register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act. If the company or any of its wholly or majority-owned subsidiaries inadvertently falls within one of the definitions of “investment company,” we intend to rely on the exclusion provided by Section 3(c)(5)(C) of the Investment Company Act. For a more detailed discussion on the requirements of this exemption and how we will classify our assets in order to comply with this exemption, see the section of this prospectus captioned “Investment Strategy, Objectives and Policies — Investment Company Act Considerations.” The method we use to classify our assets for purposes of the Investment Company Act will be based in large measure upon no-action positions taken by the SEC staff in the past. No assurance can be given that the SEC staff will concur with our classification of our assets or that the SEC staff will not, in the future, issue further guidance that may require us to reclassify our assets for purposes of qualifying for an exclusion from regulation under the Investment Company Act.

The determination of whether an entity is a majority-owned subsidiary of our company is made by us. The Investment Company Act defines a majority-owned subsidiary of a person as a company of which 50% or more of the outstanding voting securities are owned by that person, or by another company which is a majority-owned subsidiary of that person. The Investment Company Act further defines voting securities as any security presently entitling the owner or holder thereof to vote for the election of directors of a company. We treat companies in which we own at least a majority of the outstanding voting securities as majority-owned subsidiaries for purposes of the 40% test. We have not requested that the SEC staff approve our treatment of any entity as a majority-owned subsidiary and the SEC staff has not done so. If the SEC staff were to disagree with our treatment of one or more companies as majority-owned subsidiaries, we would need to adjust our strategy and our assets in order to continue to comply with the 40% test. Any adjustment in our strategy could have a material adverse effect on us.

We intend to conduct our operations so that neither we nor any of our wholly or majority-owned subsidiaries is an “investment company” under the Investment Company Act.

Qualification for exemption from the definition of “investment company” under the Investment Company Act will limit our ability to make certain investments. Although we intend to monitor our portfolio, there can be no assurance that we will be able to maintain this exemption from registration for our company or each of our subsidiaries.

To the extent that the SEC staff provides more specific guidance regarding any of the matters bearing upon the definition of investment company and the exceptions to that definition, we may be required to adjust our investment strategy accordingly. Additional guidance from the SEC staff could provide additional flexibility to us, or it could further inhibit our ability to pursue the investment strategy we have chosen.

Are there any JOBS Act considerations?

In April 2012, President Obama signed into law the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act, or the JOBS Act. We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the JOBS Act, and are eligible to take advantage of certain exemptions from, or reduced disclosure obligations relating to, various reporting requirements that are normally applicable to public companies. Such exemptions include, among other things, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, reduced disclosure obligations relating to executive compensation in proxy statements and periodic reports, and exemptions from the requirement to hold a non-binding advisory vote on executive compensation and obtain shareholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. We have not yet made a decision whether to take advantage of any or all of such exemptions. If we decide to take advantage of any of these exemptions, some investors may find our common stock a less attractive investment as a result.

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Additionally, under Section 107 of the JOBS Act, an “emerging growth company” may take advantage of the extended transition period provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act for complying with new or revised accounting standards. This means an “emerging growth company” can delay adopting certain accounting standards until such standards are otherwise applicable to private companies. However, we are electing to “opt out” of such extended transition period, and will therefore comply with new or revised accounting standards on the applicable dates on which the adoption of such standards is required for non-emerging growth companies. Section 107 of the JOBS Act provides that our decision to opt out of such extended transition period for compliance with new or revised accounting standards is irrevocable.

We could remain an “emerging growth company” for up to five years, or until the earliest of (i) the last day of the first fiscal year in which we have total annual gross revenue of $1 billion or more, (ii) the date that we become a “large accelerated filer” as defined in Rule 12b-2 under the Exchange Act (which would occur if the market value of our common stock held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million, measured as of the last business day of our most recently completed second fiscal quarter), or (iii) the date on which we have, during the preceding three year period, issued more than $1 billion in non-convertible debt.

Who is the transfer agent?

The name and address of our affiliated transfer agent is as follows:

American National Stock Transfer, LLC
405 Park Avenue, 12th Floor
New York, NY 10022
Phone: (877) 373-2522
Facsimile: (646) 861-7793

American National Stock Transfer, LLC, or our transfer agent, will provide customer service to subscribers and will supervise third party vendors, including DST Systems, Inc., in its execution of your subscription agreement and other administrative forms. Our transfer agent is owned by an entity which is under common ownership with our AR Capital sponsor. For more detail about our transfer agent, see “Management — Affiliated Companies — Transfer Agent.”

What types of reports on my investment and tax information will I receive?

We will provide you with periodic updates on the performance of your investment with us, including:

following our commencement of distributions to stockholders, four quarterly or 12 monthly distribution reports;
three quarterly financial reports;
an annual report;
an annual U.S. Internal Revenue Service, or IRS, Form 1099, if applicable; and
supplements to the prospectus during the offering period, via mailings or website access (including filings via the SEC’s EDGAR system).

Who can help answer my questions about the offering?

If you have more questions about the offering or if you would like additional copies of this prospectus, you should contact your registered representative or contact:

Realty Capital Securities, LLC
Three Copley Place
Suite 3300
Boston, MA 02116
1-877-373-2522
www.rcsecurities.com

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RISK FACTORS

An investment in our common stock involves various risks and uncertainties. You should carefully consider the following risk factors in conjunction with the other information contained in this prospectus before purchasing our common stock. The risks discussed in this prospectus could adversely affect our business, operating results, prospects and financial condition. This could cause the value of our common stock to decline and could cause you to lose all or part of your investment. The risks and uncertainties that we currently believe are material to us are described below.

Risks Related to an Investment in Phillips Edison — ARC Grocery Center REIT II, Inc.

We have no prior operating history or established financing sources and will rely on our Advisor Entities to conduct our operations; each of our Advisor Entities has no operating history and no experience operating a public company.

We have no operating history and you should not rely upon the past performance of other real estate investment programs advised by our Advisor Entities or sponsored by our sponsors to predict our future results. We were incorporated on June 5, 2013. As of the date of this prospectus, we have not acquired any properties or other investments nor do we have any operations or independent financing.

Moreover, neither we nor our Advisor Entities have any established financing sources. Presently, both we and our Advisor Entities are funded by capital contributions from our sponsors, as applicable. If our capital resources, or those of our Advisor Entities, are insufficient to support our operations, we will not be successful.

Our Advisor Entities have had no operations prior to the commencement of this offering. Our executive officers have limited experience managing public companies. For these reasons, our stockholders should be especially cautious when drawing conclusions about our future performance and you should not assume that it will be similar to the prior performance of other programs sponsored by our sponsors. Our lack of an operating history, our Advisor Entities’ lack of prior experience operating a public company, the differences between us and the private programs sponsored by our Phillips Edison sponsor and our AR Capital sponsor’s limited experience in connection with investments of the type to be made by us, significantly increase the risk and uncertainty our stockholders face in making an investment in our shares.

You should consider our prospects in light of the risks, uncertainties and difficulties frequently encountered by companies that are, like us, in their early stage of development. To be successful in this market, we must, among other things:

identify and acquire investments that further our investment strategies;
increase awareness of our name within the investment products market;
expand and maintain our network of licensed securities brokers and other agents;
attract, integrate, motivate and retain qualified personnel to manage our day-to-day operations;
respond to competition for our targeted real estate properties and other investments as well as for potential investors; and
continue to build and expand our operations structure to support our business.

We cannot guarantee that we will succeed in achieving these goals, and our failure to do so could cause you to lose all or a portion of your investment. In addition, the prior public and non-public programs sponsored by our AR Capital sponsor and its affiliates did not produce net income during the years 2008 through 2011. Similarly, none of the prior public and non-public programs sponsored by our Phillips Edison sponsor produced net income during the years 2007 through 2012. There can be no assurance that we will outperform such programs. See Table III, included in Appendix A attached hereto, for more information on prior performance of these programs.

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Because no public trading market for our shares currently exists, it will be difficult for our stockholders to sell their shares and, if our stockholders are able to sell their shares, it will likely be at a substantial discount to the public offering price.

Our charter does not require our directors to seek stockholder approval to liquidate our assets by a specified date, nor does our charter require our directors to list our shares for trading on a national securities exchange by a specified date. There is no public market for our shares, and we currently have no plans to list our shares on a national securities exchange. Until our shares are listed, if ever, stockholders may not sell their shares unless the buyer meets the applicable suitability and minimum purchase standards. In addition, our charter prohibits the ownership of more than 9.8% in value of the aggregate of the outstanding shares of capital stock or more than 9.8% in value or number of shares, whichever is more restrictive, of any class or series of our stock, unless exempted by our board of directors, which may inhibit large investors from purchasing your shares. In its sole discretion, our board of directors could amend, suspend or terminate our share repurchase program upon 30 days’ notice. Further, the share repurchase program includes numerous restrictions that would limit a stockholder’s ability to sell his or her shares. We describe these restrictions in more detail under “Share Repurchase Program.” Therefore, it is difficult for our stockholders to sell their shares promptly or at all. If a stockholder is able to sell his or her shares, it would likely be at a substantial discount to the public offering price. It is also likely that our shares would not be accepted as the primary collateral for a loan. Because of the illiquid nature of our shares, investors should purchase our shares only as a long-term investment and be prepared to hold them for an indefinite period of time.

Purchases of common stock by our directors, officers, officers and employees of our dealer manager, other affiliates and Friends in this offering should not influence investment decisions of independent, unaffiliated investors.

Our directors, officers, officers and employees of our dealer manager, other affiliates and Friends may purchase shares of our common stock, and any such purchases will be included for purposes of determining whether the minimum of $2,000,000 of shares of common stock required to release funds from the escrow account has been sold. “Friends” means those individuals who have prior business and/or personal relationships with our executive officers, directors or sponsors, including, without limitation, any service provider. There are no written or other binding commitments with respect to the acquisition of shares by these parties, and there can be no assurance as to the amount, if any, of shares of common stock these parties may acquire in the offering. Any shares purchased by directors, officers, officers and employees of our dealer manager, other affiliates or Friends of ours will be purchased for investment purposes only. However, the investment decisions made by any such directors, officers, officers and employees of our dealer manager, other affiliates or Friends should not influence your decision to invest in shares of our common stock, and you should make your own independent investment decision concerning the risks and benefits of an investment in our common stock.

Because this is a blind pool offering, you will not have the opportunity to evaluate our investments before we make them, which makes an investment in us more speculative.

We have not acquired any properties or other investments and have not yet identified any investments that we may make. Additionally, we will not provide you with information to evaluate our investments prior to our acquisition of the investments and you must instead rely on our board of directors and our advisor to implement our investment strategy.

You may be more likely to sustain a loss on your investment because our sponsors do not have as strong an economic incentive to avoid losses as does a sponsor who has made significant equity investments in its company.

Our sub-advisor, which is wholly owned by our Phillips Edison sponsor, has invested only $200,000 in us through the purchase of 8,888 shares of our common stock at $22.50 per share, reflecting the fact that selling commissions and dealer manager fees were not paid on the sale. Our sub-advisor or any of its affiliates may not sell this initial investment while our sub-advisor remains our sub-advisor but may transfer such shares to other affiliates. Therefore, if we are successful in raising enough proceeds to be able to reimburse our sub-advisor for our significant organization and offering expenses, our sub-advisor (and our Phillips

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Edison sponsor) will have little exposure to loss in the value of our shares. Without this exposure, our investors may be at a greater risk of loss because our sponsors may have less to lose from a decrease in the value of our shares as does a sponsor that makes more significant equity investments in its company.

We established the offering price on an arbitrary basis; as a result, the actual value of your investment may be substantially less than what you pay.

Our board of directors has arbitrarily determined the offering price of the shares, and such price bears no relationship to our book or asset values, or to any other established criteria for valuing issued or outstanding shares. Because the offering price is not based upon any independent valuation, the offering price is not indicative of the proceeds that you would receive upon liquidation.

Our ability to implement our investment strategy is dependent, in part, upon the ability of our dealer manager to successfully conduct this offering, which makes an investment in us more speculative.

We have retained our dealer manager, an entity which is under common ownership with our advisor, to conduct this offering. The success of this offering, and our ability to implement our business strategy, is dependent upon the ability of our dealer manager to build and maintain a network of broker-dealers to sell our shares to their clients. If our dealer manager is not successful in establishing, operating and managing this network of broker-dealers, our ability to raise proceeds through this offering will be limited and we may not have adequate capital to implement our investment strategy. If we are unsuccessful in implementing our investment strategy, our stockholders could lose all or a part of their investment.

If our dealer manager terminates its dealer manager relationship with us, our ability to successfully complete this offering and implement our investment strategy would be significantly impaired.

Our dealer manager has the right to terminate its relationship with us if, among other things, any of the following occur: (1) our voluntary or involuntary bankruptcy; (2) we materially change our business; (3) we become subject to a material action, suit, proceeding or investigation; (4) we materially reduce the rate of any dividend we may pay in the future without its prior written consent; (5) we suspend or terminate our share repurchase program without its prior written consent; (6) the value of our common shares materially adversely changes; (7) a material breach of the dealer manager agreement by us (which breach has not been cured within the required timeframe); (8) our willful misconduct or a willful or grossly negligent breach of our obligations under the dealer manager agreement; (9) the issuance of a stop order suspending the effectiveness of the registration statement of which this prospectus forms a part by the SEC and not rescinded within 10 business days of its issuance; or (10) the occurrence of any event materially adverse to us and our prospects or our ability to perform our obligations under the dealer manager agreement. If our dealer manager elects to terminate its relationship with us, our ability to complete this offering and implement our investment strategy would be significantly impaired and would increase the likelihood that our stockholders could lose all or a part of their investment.

Distributions paid from sources other than our cash flows from operations will result in us having fewer funds available for the acquisition of properties and other real estate-related investments and may dilute your interests in us, which may adversely affect our ability to fund future distributions with cash flows from operations and may adversely affect your overall return.

Until we are generating operating cash flow from properties or other real estate-related investments sufficient to make distributions to our stockholders, we intend to pay all or a substantial portion of our distributions from borrowings, including possible borrowings from our Advisor Entities or their affiliates, advances from our Advisor Entities, and our Advisor Entities’ deferral, suspension or waiver of its fees and expense reimbursements. Our inability to acquire properties or other real estate-related investments may result in a lower return on your investment than you expect. Moreover, our board of directors may change our distribution policy, in its sole discretion, at any time. Distributions made from offering proceeds are a return of capital to stockholders, from which we will have already paid offering expenses in connection with this offering. Our distribution policy is not to use the proceeds of this offering to pay distributions. However, our board has the authority under our organizational documents, to the extent permitted by Maryland law, to pay distributions from any source without limit, including proceeds from this offering or the proceeds from the issuance of securities in the future, if any.

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If we fund distributions from sources other than our operating cash flow, we will have less funds available for acquiring properties or other real estate-related investments. As a result, the return you realize on your investment may be reduced. Funding distributions from borrowings could restrict the amount we can borrow for investments, which may affect our profitability. Funding distributions with the sale of assets may affect our ability to generate cash flows. Payment of distributions from the mentioned sources could restrict our ability to generate sufficient cash flows from operations, affect our profitability or affect the distributions payable to you upon a liquidity event, any or all of which may have an adverse effect on your investment.

If we are unable to find suitable investments, we may not be able to achieve our investment objectives or pay distributions.

Our ability to achieve our investment objectives and to pay distributions depends primarily upon the performance of our sub-advisor, acting on behalf of our advisor, with respect to the acquisition of our investments, including the ability to source loan origination opportunities for us. Competition from competing entities may reduce the number of suitable investment opportunities offered to us or increase the bargaining power of property owners seeking to sell. Additionally, disruptions and dislocations in the credit markets have materially impacted the cost and availability of debt to finance real estate acquisitions, which is a key component of our acquisition strategy. A period in which there is a lack of available debt could result in a further reduction of suitable investment opportunities and create a competitive advantage to other entities that have greater financial resources than we do. During such times, our ability to borrow monies to finance the purchase of, or other activities related to, real estate assets will be negatively impacted. This lack of available debt could also result in a reduction of suitable investment opportunities and create a competitive advantage for other entities that have greater financial resources than we do. In addition, if we pay fees to lock in a favorable interest rate, falling interest rates or other factors could require us to forfeit these fees. If we acquire properties and other investments at higher prices or by using less-than-ideal capital structures, our returns will be lower and the value of our assets may decrease significantly below the amount we paid for such assets.

We are also subject to competition in seeking to acquire real estate-related investments. The more shares we sell in this offering, the greater our challenge will be to invest all of the net offering proceeds on attractive terms. We can give no assurance that our sub-advisor, acting on behalf of our advisor, will be successful in obtaining suitable investments on financially attractive terms or that our objectives will be achieved. If we are unable to find suitable investments promptly, we will hold the proceeds from this offering in an interest-bearing account or invest the proceeds in short-term assets. If we would continue to be unsuccessful in locating suitable investments, we may ultimately decide to liquidate. In the event we are unable to timely locate suitable investments, we may be unable or limited in our ability to pay distributions and we may not be able to meet our investment objectives.

We may suffer from delays in locating suitable investments, which could limit our ability to make distributions and lower the overall return on your investment.

We rely upon our sponsors and the real estate professionals affiliated with our sponsors to identify suitable investments. The public and private programs sponsored by our Phillips Edison sponsor, especially those for which the offering proceeds have not been fully invested, rely on our Phillips Edison sponsor for investment opportunities. Similarly, the programs sponsored by our AR Capital sponsor rely on our AR Capital sponsor for investment opportunities. To the extent that our sponsors and the other real estate professionals employed by our Advisor Entities face competing demands upon their time at times when we have capital ready for investment, we may face delays in locating suitable investments. Further, the more money we raise in this offering, the more difficult it will be to invest the net offering proceeds promptly and on attractive terms. Therefore, the large size of this offering and the continuing high demand for the types of properties and other investments we desire to purchase increase the risk of delays in investing our net offering proceeds. Delays we encounter in the selection and acquisition or origination of income-producing assets would likely limit our ability to pay distributions to our stockholders and lower their overall returns. Further, if we acquire properties prior to the start of construction or during the early stages of construction, it will typically take several months to complete construction and rent available space. Therefore, our stockholders could suffer delays in receiving the cash distributions attributable to those particular properties.

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We may change our targeted investments without stockholder consent.

We expect to allocate at least 90.0% of our portfolio to investments in well-occupied, grocery-anchored neighborhood and community shopping centers leased to a mix of national, creditworthy retailers selling necessity-based goods and services in strong demographic markets throughout the United States. We intend to allocate no more than 10.0% of our portfolio to other real estate properties and real estate-related loans and securities such as mortgage, mezzanine, bridge and other loans; debt and derivative securities related to real estate assets, including mortgage-backed securities; and the equity securities of other REITs and real estate companies. We do not expect our non-controlling equity investments in other public companies to exceed 5.0% of the proceeds of this offering, assuming we sell the maximum offering amount. Though this is our current target portfolio, we may make adjustments to our target portfolio based on real estate market conditions and investment opportunities, and we may change our targeted investments and investment guidelines at any time without the consent of our stockholders, which could result in our making investments that are different from, and possibly riskier than, our current targeted investments. A change in our targeted investments or investment guidelines may increase our exposure to interest rate risk, default risk and real estate market fluctuations, all of which could adversely affect the value of our common stock and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

If we are unable to raise substantial funds, we will be limited in the number and type of investments we may make and the value of your investment in us will fluctuate with the performance of the specific properties we acquire.

This offering is being made on a reasonable best efforts basis, whereby the brokers participating in the offering are only required to use their reasonable best efforts to sell our shares and have no firm commitment or obligation to purchase any of the shares. As a result, the amount of proceeds we raise in this offering may be substantially less than the amount we would need to achieve a broadly diversified property portfolio. We may be unable to raise even the minimum offering amount. If we are unable to raise substantially more than the minimum offering amount, we will make fewer investments resulting in less diversification in terms of the number of investments owned, the geographic regions in which our investments are located and the types of investments that we make. In such event, the likelihood of our profitability being affected by the performance of any one of our investments will increase. For example, if we only sell 80,000 shares, we may be able to make only one investment. If we only are able to make one investment, we would not achieve any asset diversification. Additionally, we are not limited in the number or size of our investments or the percentage of net proceeds we may dedicate to a single investment. Your investment in our shares will be subject to greater risk to the extent that we lack a diversified portfolio of investments. In addition, our inability to raise substantial funds would increase our fixed operating expenses as a percentage of gross income, and our financial condition and ability to pay distributions could be adversely affected.

Because we are dependent upon our advisor, our sub-advisor and their affiliates to conduct our operations, any adverse changes in the financial health of our advisor, our sub-advisor or their affiliates or our relationship with them could hinder our operating performance and the return on our stockholders’ investments.

We are dependent on our sub-advisor, which is responsible for our day-to-day operations and is primarily responsible for the selection of our investments on behalf of our advisor, and on our advisor, which consults with our sub-advisor with respect to acquisitions to be recommended to our board of directors. We are also dependent on our property manager to manage our portfolio of real estate assets. Neither our advisor nor our sub-advisor has a prior operating history. Both our advisor and sub-advisor depend upon the fees and other compensation that they receive from us in connection with the purchase, management and sale of assets to conduct its operations. Any adverse changes in the financial condition of our advisor, our sub-advisor, our property manager or certain of their affiliates or in our relationship with them could hinder its or their ability to successfully manage our operations and our portfolio of investments.

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The loss of or the inability to obtain key real estate professionals at our advisor, our sub-advisor or our dealer manager could delay or hinder implementation of our investment strategies, which could limit our ability to make distributions and decrease the value of your investment.

Our success depends to a significant degree upon the contributions of Messrs. Schorsch and Kahane at our advisor and dealer manager, and Messrs. Phillips and Edison, John B. Bessey and R. Mark Addy, our co-presidents, and Devin Murphy, our chief financial officer, at our sub-advisor. We do not have employment agreements with these individuals, and they may not remain associated with us. If any of these persons were to cease their association with us, our operating results could suffer. We do not intend to maintain key person life insurance on any person. We believe that our future success depends, in large part, upon our Advisor Entities’ and their respective affiliates’ ability to hire and retain highly skilled managerial, operational and marketing professionals. Competition for such professionals is intense, and our Advisor Entities and their respective affiliates may be unsuccessful in attracting and retaining such skilled individuals. Further, we intend to establish strategic relationships with firms that have special expertise in certain services or detailed knowledge regarding real properties in certain geographic regions, as needed. Maintaining such relationships will be important for us to effectively compete with other investors for properties and tenants in such regions. We may be unsuccessful in establishing and retaining such relationships. If we lose or are unable to obtain the services of highly skilled professionals or do not establish or maintain appropriate strategic relationships, our ability to implement our investment strategies could be delayed or hindered, and the value of our stockholders’ investments may decline.

In the event we are able to quickly raise a substantial amount of capital, we may have difficulty investing it in properties.

If we are able to quickly raise a substantial amount of capital during this offering, we may have difficulty identifying and purchasing suitable properties on attractive terms, and there could be a delay between the time we receive net proceeds from the sale of shares of our common stock in this offering and the time we invest the net proceeds. This could cause a substantial delay in the time it takes for your investment to realize its full potential return and could adversely affect our ability to pay distributions to you. If we fail to timely invest the net proceeds of this offering or to invest in quality assets, our ability to achieve our investment objectives, including, without limitation, diversification of our portfolio by geographic area and type of tenant, could be materially adversely affected.

We may be unable to pay or maintain cash distributions or increase distributions over time.

There are many factors that can affect the availability and timing of cash distributions to stockholders. Distributions will be based principally on cash available from our operations. The amount of cash available for distributions is affected by many factors, such as our ability to buy properties as offering proceeds become available, rental income from such properties and our operating expense levels, as well as many other variables. Actual cash available for distributions may vary substantially from estimates. With no prior operating history, we cannot assure you that we will be able to pay or maintain our current level of distributions or that distributions will increase over time. We cannot give any assurance that rents from the properties will increase, that the securities we buy will increase in value or provide constant or increased distributions over time, or that future acquisitions of real properties, mortgage, bridge or mezzanine loans or any investments in securities will increase our cash available for distributions to stockholders. Our actual results may differ significantly from the assumptions used by our board of directors in establishing the distribution rate to stockholders. We may not have sufficient cash from operations to make a distribution required to qualify for or maintain our REIT status, which may materially adversely affect your investment.

Our organizational documents permit us to pay distributions from any source. Any distributions may reduce the amount of capital we invest in properties.

We may pay distributions from unlimited amounts of any source, including borrowing funds, using proceeds from this offering, issuing additional securities or selling assets. We have not established any limit on the amount of proceeds from this offering that may be used to fund distributions, except in accordance with our organizational documents and Maryland law. Distributions from the proceeds of this offering or from borrowings also could reduce the amount of capital we ultimately invest in properties and other permitted

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investments. This, in turn, would reduce the value of your investment. For a description of the factors that can affect the availability and timing of cash distributions to stockholders, see the section of this prospectus captioned “Description of Securities — Distribution Policy and Distributions.”

Our rights and the rights of our stockholders to recover claims against our independent directors are limited, which could reduce our stockholders’ recovery, as well as our recovery, against them if they negligently cause us to incur losses.

Maryland law provides that a director has no liability in that capacity if he performs his duties in good faith, in a manner he reasonably believes to be in our best interests and with the care that an ordinarily prudent person in a like position would use under similar circumstances. Our charter generally provides that no independent director shall be liable to us or our stockholders for monetary damages and that we will indemnify them for losses unless they are grossly negligent or engage in willful misconduct. As a result, we and our stockholders may have more limited rights against our independent directors than might otherwise exist under common law, which could reduce our stockholders’ and our recovery from these persons if they act in a negligent manner. In addition, we may be obligated to fund the defense costs incurred by our independent directors (as well as by our other directors, officers, employees (if we ever have employees) and agents) in some cases, which would decrease the cash otherwise available for distribution to our stockholders.

Commencing with the NAV pricing date, your purchase and the repurchase under our share repurchase program of our shares will be based on our per share NAV, which will be based upon subjective judgments, assumptions and opinions about future events, and may not be accurate. As a result, our quarterly per share NAV may not reflect the amount that you might receive for your shares in a market transaction and you will not know the per share NAV at the time of purchase.

Commencing with the NAV pricing date, NAV will be calculated by estimating the market value of our assets and liabilities, many of which may be illiquid. In calculating NAV, our sub-advisor will consider an estimate provided by an independent valuer of the market value of our real estate assets. Our sub-advisor will review such valuation for consistency with its determinations of value and our valuation guidelines and the reasonableness of the independent valuer’s conclusions. If in our sub-advisor’s opinion the appraisals are materially higher or lower than the sub-advisor’s determinations of value, our sub-advisor will discuss the appraisals with the independent valuer, and may submit the appraisals and valuations to a valuation committee comprised of our independent directors, which will review the appraisals and valuations, and make a final determination of value. Although the valuations of our real estate portfolio by the independent valuer will be approved by our board of directors, the valuations may not be precise because the valuation methodologies used to value a real estate portfolio involve subjective judgments, assumptions and opinions about future events. Any resulting disparity may benefit the selling or non-selling stockholders or purchasers. Investors may not know the per share NAV at which they will purchase shares at the time that they submit a purchase order. Furthermore, there are no rules or regulations specifically governing what components may be included in the NAV calculation to ensure there is consistency. Therefore, investors should pay close attention to the components used to calculate NAV and should be aware that the NAV calculations may not accurately reflect the value of our assets. See “Valuation Policies” for more details about how our NAV will be calculated.

It may be difficult to accurately reflect material events that may impact our quarterly NAV between valuations and accordingly we may be selling and repurchasing shares at too high or too low a price.

Our independent valuer will calculate estimates of the market value of our principal real estate and real estate-related assets, and our advisor will determine the net value of our real estate and real estate-related assets and liabilities taking into consideration such estimate provided by the independent valuer. The final determination of value may be made by a valuation committee comprised of our independent directors if our sub-advisor determines that the appraisals of the independent valuer are materially higher or lower than its valuations. Our sub-advisor is ultimately responsible for determining the quarterly per share NAV. Each property will be appraised at least annually and appraisals will be spread out over the course of a year so that approximately 25.0% of all properties are appraised each quarter. Since each property will be appraised only annually, there may be changes in the course of the year that are not fully reflected in the quarterly NAV. As a result, the published per share NAV may not fully reflect changes in value that may have occurred since the

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prior quarterly valuation. Furthermore, our independent valuer and our sub-advisor will monitor our portfolio, but it may be difficult to reflect changing market conditions or material events that may impact the value of our portfolio between quarters, or to obtain timely complete information regarding any such events. Therefore, the per share NAV published after the announcement of an extraordinary event may differ significantly from our actual NAV until such time as sufficient information is available and analyzed, the financial impact is fully evaluated, and the appropriate adjustment to be made to NAV, on a going forward basis, is determined by our sub-advisor and our independent valuer. Any resulting disparity may benefit the repurchasing or non-repurchasing stockholders or purchasers.

Risks Related to Conflicts of Interest

Our sponsors and their respective affiliates, including all of our executive officers, some of our directors and other key real estate professionals, face conflicts of interest caused by their compensation arrangements with us, which could result in actions that are not in the long-term best interests of our stockholders.

Our advisor and sub-advisor and their respective affiliates receive substantial fees from us. These fees could influence our advisor’s and sub-advisor’s advice to us as well as their judgment with respect to:

the continuation, renewal or enforcement of our agreements with affiliates of our AR Capital sponsor, including the advisory agreement and the dealer-manager agreement;
the continuation, renewal or enforcement of our agreements with affiliates of our Phillips Edison sponsor, including the property management agreement;
the continuation, renewal or enforcement of our advisor’s agreements with our sub-advisor and their respective affiliates, including the sub-advisory agreement;
public offerings of equity by us, which will likely entitle our Advisor Entities to increased acquisition fees and asset management subordinated participation interests;
sales of properties and other investments to third parties, which entitle our Advisor Entities and the special limited partner to disposition fees and possible subordinated incentive distributions, respectively;
acquisitions of properties and other investments from other programs sponsored by our sponsors, which might entitle affiliates of our sponsors to disposition fees and possible subordinated incentive fees and distributions in connection with its services for the seller;
acquisitions of properties and other investments from third parties and loan originations to third parties, which entitle our Advisor Entities to acquisition fees and asset management subordinated participation interests;
borrowings to acquire properties and other investments and to originate loans, which borrowings generate financing coordination fees and increase the acquisition fees and asset management subordinated participation interests payable to our Advisor Entities;
whether and when we seek to list our common stock on a national securities exchange, which listing could entitle the special limited partner to a subordinated incentive listing distribution; and
whether and when we seek to sell the company or its assets, which sale could entitle our Advisor Entities to a subordinated participation in net sales proceeds.

The fees our Advisor Entities receive in connection with transactions involving the acquisition of assets are based initially on the cost of the investment, including costs related to loan originations, and are not based on the quality of the investment or the quality of the services rendered to us. This may influence our Advisor Entities to recommend riskier transactions to us. In addition, because the fees are based on the cost of the investment, it may create an incentive for our Advisor Entities to recommend that we purchase assets with more debt and at higher prices.

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Because other real estate programs sponsored by our sponsors and offered through our dealer manager may conduct offerings concurrently with our offering, our sponsors and our dealer manager face potential conflicts of interest arising from competition among us and these other programs for investors and investment capital, and such conflicts may not be resolved in our favor.

Our AR Capital sponsor is the sponsor of several other non-traded REITS, for which affiliates of our advisor are also advisors, that are raising capital in ongoing public offerings of common stock. Our dealer manager, an entity which is under common ownership with our advisor, is the dealer manager or is named in the registration statement as the dealer manager in a number of ongoing public offerings by non-traded REITS, including some offerings sponsored by our AR Capital sponsor. In addition, our sponsors may decide to sponsor future programs that would seek to raise capital through public offerings conducted concurrently with this offering. As a result, our sponsors and our dealer manager may face conflicts of interest arising from potential competition with these other programs for investors and investment capital. Our sponsors generally seek to avoid simultaneous public offerings by programs that have a substantially similar mix of investment attributes, including targeted investment types. Nevertheless, there may be periods during which one or more programs sponsored by our sponsors will be raising capital and might compete with us for investment capital. Such conflicts may not be resolved in our favor, and you will not have the opportunity to evaluate the manner in which these conflicts of interest are resolved before or after making your investment.

Our sponsors face conflicts of interest relating to the acquisition of assets and leasing of properties and such conflicts may not be resolved in our favor, meaning that we could invest in less attractive assets and obtain less creditworthy tenants, which could limit our ability to make distributions and reduce our stockholders’ overall investment return.

We rely on our sponsors and the executive officers and other key real estate professionals at our advisor and sub-advisor to identify suitable investment opportunities for us, with our sub-advisor having primary responsibility for identifying suitable investments for us on our behalf of our advisor. Several of the other key real estate professionals of our advisor and sub-advisor are also the key real estate professionals at our sponsors and their other public and private programs. Many investment opportunities that are suitable for us may also be suitable for other programs sponsored by our sponsor. Generally, our advisor and sub-advisor will not pursue any opportunity to acquire any real estate properties or real estate-related loans and securities that are directly competitive with our investment strategies, unless and until the opportunity is first presented to us, subject to certain exceptions. See “Conflicts of Interest — Our Sponsor’s Interests in Other Real Estate Programs — Allocation of Investment Opportunities” and “Conflicts of Interest — Certain Conflict Resolution Matters — Restrictions on Competing Business Activities of Our Sponsors.” For so long as we are externally advised, our charter provides that it shall not be a proper purpose of the corporation for us to purchase real estate or any significant asset related to real estate unless the advisor or sub-advisor has recommended the investment to us. Thus, the executive officers and real estate professionals of our advisor and sub-advisor could direct attractive investment opportunities to other entities or investors. Such events could result in us investing in properties that provide less attractive returns, which may reduce our ability to make distributions.

We and other programs sponsored by our sponsors also rely on these real estate professionals to supervise the property management and leasing of properties. If our advisor or sub-advisor directs creditworthy prospective tenants to properties owned by another program sponsored by our sponsors when they could direct such tenants to our properties, our tenant base may have more inherent risk than might otherwise be the case. Further, our executive officers and key real estate professionals are not prohibited from engaging, directly or indirectly, in any business or from possessing interests in any other business venture or ventures, including businesses and ventures involved in the acquisition, development, ownership, leasing or sale of real estate investments. For a detailed description of the conflicts of interest that our sponsors and their respective affiliates face, see “Conflicts of Interest.”

Our advisor and sub-advisor will face conflicts of interest relating to joint ventures that we may form with affiliates of our sponsors, which conflicts could result in a disproportionate benefit to the other venture partners at our expense.

If approved by a majority of our board of directors, including a majority of our independent directors not otherwise interested in the transaction, we may enter into joint venture agreements with other

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sponsor-affiliated programs or entities for the acquisition, development or improvement of properties or other investments. All of our executive officers, some of our directors and the key real estate professionals assembled by our advisor and sub-advisor are also executive officers, directors, managers, key professionals or holders of a direct or indirect controlling interest in our advisor, our sub-advisor, our dealer manager or other sponsor-affiliated entities. These persons will face conflicts of interest in determining which sponsor-affiliated program should enter into any particular joint venture agreement. These persons may also face a conflict in structuring the terms of the relationship between our interests and the interests of the sponsor-affiliated co-venturer and in managing the joint venture. Any joint venture agreement or transaction between us and a sponsor-affiliated co-venturer will not have the benefit of arm’s-length negotiation of the type normally conducted between unrelated co-venturers. The sponsor-affiliated co-venturer may have economic or business interests or goals that are or may become inconsistent with our business interests or goals. These co-venturers may thus benefit to our and your detriment.

Our sponsors, our officers, our advisor, our sub-advisor and the real estate and other professionals assembled by our advisor and sub-advisor face competing demands relating to their time, and this may cause our operations and our stockholders’ investments to suffer.

We rely on our sub-advisor, acting on behalf of our advisor, for the day-to-day operation of our business. In addition, our sub-advisor has the primary responsibility for the selection of our investments on behalf of our advisor. Our advisor and sub-advisor work jointly to make major decisions affecting us, all under the direction of our board of directors. Our advisor and sub-advisor rely on our sponsors and their respective affiliates to conduct our business. Messrs. Phillips and Edison are principals of our Phillips Edison sponsor and the affiliates that manage the assets of the other Phillips Edison-sponsored programs. Similarly, our individual AR Capital sponsors are key executives in other AR Capital-sponsored programs. As a result of their interests in other programs sponsored by our sponsors, their obligations to other investors and the fact that they engage in and they will continue to engage in other business activities, these individuals will continue to face conflicts of interest in allocating their time among us and other programs sponsored by our sponsors and other business activities in which they are involved. Should our advisor or sub-advisor breach its fiduciary duties to us by inappropriately devoting insufficient time or resources to our business, the returns on our investments, and the value of our stockholders’ investments, may decline.

All of our executive officers, some of our directors and the key real estate and other professionals assembled by our advisor, sub-advisor and dealer manager face conflicts of interest related to their positions or interests in affiliates of our sponsors, which could hinder our ability to implement our business strategy and to generate returns to our stockholders.

All of our executive officers, some of our directors and the key real estate and other professionals assembled by our advisor, sub-advisor and dealer manager are also executive officers, directors, managers, key professionals or holders of a direct or indirect controlling interests in our advisor, the sub-advisor, our dealer manager or other sponsor-affiliated entities. Through our AR Capital sponsor’s affiliates, some of these persons work on behalf of programs sponsored by our AR Capital sponsor that are currently raising capital publicly. Through our Phillips Edison sponsor’s affiliates, some of these persons work on behalf of other public and private programs sponsored by our Phillips Edison sponsor. As a result, they have loyalties to each of these entities, which loyalties could conflict with the fiduciary duties they owe to us and could result in action or inaction detrimental to our business. Conflicts with our business and interests are most likely to arise from (a) allocation of new investments and management time and services between us and the other entities, (b) our purchase of properties from, or sale of properties to, affiliated entities, (c) development of our properties by affiliates, (d) investments with affiliates of our advisor or sub-advisor, (e) compensation to our advisor or sub-advisor, and (f) our relationship with our advisor, sub-advisor, dealer manager and property manager. If we do not successfully implement our business strategy, we may be unable to generate the cash needed to make distributions to our stockholders and to maintain or increase the value of our assets.

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The management of multiple REITs by the officers of our advisor and sub-advisor may significantly reduce the amount of time the officers of our advisor and sub-advisor are able to spend on activities related to us and may cause other conflicts of interest, which may cause our operating results to suffer.

The officers of our advisor are part of the senior management or are key personnel of several other REITs sponsored by our AR Capital sponsor and their advisors. Some of these AR Capital-sponsored REITs have registration statements that became effective in the past twelve months. Additionally, the officers of our sub-advisor are part of the senior management or are key personnel of Phillips Edison — ARC Shopping Center REIT Inc., or PE-ARC, a REIT sponsored by our sponsors. As a result, such REITs will have concurrent and/or overlapping fundraising, acquisition, operational and disposition and liquidation phases as us, which may cause conflicts of interest to arise throughout the life of our company with respect to, among other things, finding investors, locating and acquiring properties, entering into leases and disposing of properties. Additionally, based on our sponsors’ experience, a significantly greater time commitment is required of senior management during the development stage when the REIT is being organized, funds are initially being raised and funds are initially being invested, and less time is required as additional funds are raised and the offering matures. The conflicts of interest each of the officers of our advisor and sub-advisor face may delay our fundraising and the investment of our proceeds due to the competing time demands.

Our Advisor Entities and their affiliates face conflicts of interest relating to the incentive fee structure, which could result in actions that are not necessarily in the long-term best interests of our stockholders.

Under our advisory agreement and the limited partnership agreement of our operating partnership, or the partnership agreement, our special limited partner and its affiliates will be entitled to fees, distributions and other amounts that are structured in a manner intended to provide incentives to our Advisor Entities to perform in our best interests and in the best interests of our stockholders. However, because our Advisor Entities do not maintain a significant equity interest in us and are entitled to receive substantial minimum compensation regardless of performance, their interests are not wholly aligned with those of our stockholders. In that regard, our Advisor Entities could be motivated to recommend riskier or more speculative investments in order for us to generate the specified levels of performance or sales proceeds that would entitle our special limited partner to fees. In addition, our special limited partner and its affiliates’ entitlement to fees and distributions upon the sale of our assets and to participate in sale proceeds could result in our advisor recommending sales of our investments at the earliest possible time at which sales of investments would produce the level of return that would entitle the advisor and sub-advisor and their affiliates to compensation relating to such sales, even if continued ownership of those investments might be in our best long-term interest. The partnership agreement will require us to pay a performance-based termination distribution to our Advisor Entities if we terminate the advisory agreement prior to the listing of our shares for trading on an exchange or, absent such listing, in respect of its participation in net sales proceeds. To avoid paying this fee, our independent directors may decide against terminating the advisory agreement prior to our listing of our shares or disposition of our investments even if, but for the termination distribution, termination of the advisory agreement would be in our best interest. In addition, the requirement to pay the distribution to our special limited partner at termination could cause us to make different investment or disposition decisions than we would otherwise make, in order to satisfy our obligation to pay the distribution to the terminated advisor. Moreover, our Advisor Entities will have the right to terminate the advisory agreement upon a change of control of our company and thereby trigger the payment of the termination distribution, which could have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing the change of control. In addition, our special limited partner will be entitled to an annual subordinated performance fee for any year in which our total return on stockholders’ capital exceeds 6.0% per annum. Our special limited partner will be entitled to 15.0% of the amount in excess of such 6.0% per annum, provided that the amount paid to the special limited partner does not exceed 10.0% of the aggregate total return for such year. Such distributions may be paid from any source, including offering proceeds, DRIP proceeds, financing proceeds and cash flows, and any payment of distributions from sources other than cash flows could result in the dilution of your interests. For a more detailed discussion of the fees, distributions and other amounts payable to our special limited partner and its affiliates in respect of this offering and our operations, see the section entitled “Management Compensation” in this prospectus.

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We compete for REIT investors with other programs of our sponsor, which could adversely affect the amount of capital we have to invest.

Our AR Capital sponsor is currently the sponsor of eight other public offerings of non-traded REIT shares, most of which will be ongoing during a significant portion of our offering period. These programs all have filed registration statements for the offering of common stock and intend to elect to be taxed as REITs or have elected to be taxed as a REIT. The offerings are occurring concurrently with our offering, and our AR Capital sponsor is likely to sponsor other offerings during our offering period. Our dealer manager is the dealer manager for all of these other current offerings. We compete for investors with these other programs, and the overlap of these offerings with our offering could adversely affect our ability to raise all the capital we seek in this offering, the timing of sales of our shares and the amount of proceeds we have to spend on real estate investments.

There is no separate counsel for us, our advisor and its affiliates, which could result in conflicts of interest, and such conflicts may not be resolved in our favor, which could adversely affect the value of your investment.

Proskauer Rose LLP acts as legal counsel to us and also represents our advisor and some of its affiliates. There is a possibility in the future that the interests of the various parties may become adverse and, under the Code of Professional Responsibility of the legal profession, Proskauer Rose LLP may be precluded from representing any one or all such parties. If any situation arises in which our interests appear to be in conflict with those of our advisor or its affiliates, additional counsel may be retained by one or more of the parties to assure that their interests are adequately protected. Moreover, should a conflict of interest not be readily apparent, Proskauer Rose LLP may inadvertently act in derogation of the interest of the parties which could affect our ability to meet our investment objectives.

American National Stock Transfer, LLC, our affiliated transfer agent, has a limited operating history and a failure by our transfer agent to perform its functions for us effectively may adversely affect our operations.

Our transfer agent is a related party which was recently launched as a new business. The business was formed on November 2, 2012 and has not had any significant operations to date. Beginning on March 1, 2013, our transfer agent began providing certain transfer agency services for programs sponsored directly or indirectly by AR Capital, LLC. Because of its limited experience, there is no assurance that our transfer agent will be able to effectively provide transfer agency and registrar services to us. Furthermore, our transfer agent will be responsible for supervising third party service providers who may, at times, be responsible for executing certain transfer agency and registrar services. If our transfer agent fails to perform its functions for us effectively, our operations may be adversely affected.

Risks Related to This Offering and Our Corporate Structure

We intend to disclose funds from operations, funds from operations adjusted for acquisition expenses and modified funds from operations, each a non-GAAP financial measure, in future communications with investors, including documents filed with the SEC; however, funds from operations, funds from operations adjusted for acquisition expenses and modified funds from operation are not equivalent to our net income or loss as determined under GAAP, and you should consider GAAP measures to be more relevant to our operating performance.

We will use, and we intend to disclose to investors, funds from operations, or FFO, FFO adjusted for acquisition expenses and modified funds from operations, or MFFO, which are considered non-GAAP financial measures. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations — Funds from Operations, Funds from Operations Adjusted for Acquisition Expenses and Modified Funds from Operations.” FFO, FFO adjusted for acquisition expenses and MFFO are not equivalent to our net income or loss as determined in accordance with GAAP, and investors should consider GAAP measures to be more relevant to evaluating our operating performance. FFO, FFO adjusted for acquisition expenses and MFFO and GAAP net income differ because FFO, FFO adjusted for acquisition expenses and MFFO exclude gains or losses from sales of property and asset impairment write-downs, and add back depreciation and

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amortization and adjust for unconsolidated partnerships and joint ventures. MFFO further excludes acquisition-related expenses, amortization of above- and below-market leases, fair value adjustments of derivative financial instruments, deferred rent receivables and the adjustments of such items related to non-controlling interests.

Because of the differences between FFO, FFO adjusted for acquisition expenses and MFFO and GAAP net income or loss, FFO, FFO adjusted for acquisition expenses and MFFO may not be accurate indicators of our operating performance, especially during periods in which we are acquiring properties. In addition, FFO, FFO adjusted for acquisition expenses and MFFO are not necessarily indicative of cash flow available to fund cash needs and investors should not consider FFO, FFO adjusted for acquisition expenses and MFFO as alternatives to cash flows from operations or an indication of our liquidity, or indicative of funds available to fund our cash needs, including our ability to make distributions to our stockholders. Neither the SEC nor any other regulatory body has passed judgment on the acceptability of the adjustments that we use to calculate FFO, FFO adjusted for acquisition expenses and MFFO. Also, because not all companies calculate FFO, FFO adjusted for acquisition expenses and MFFO the same way, comparisons with other companies may not be meaningful.

The limit on the number of shares a person may own may discourage a takeover that could otherwise result in a premium price to our stockholders.

Our charter, with certain exceptions, authorizes our directors to take such actions as are necessary and desirable to preserve our qualification as a REIT. Unless exempted by our board of directors, no person may own more than 9.8% in value of the aggregate of our outstanding shares of stock or more than 9.8% (in value or in number of shares, whichever is more restrictive) of any class or series of shares of our stock. This restriction may have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a change in control of us, including an extraordinary transaction (such as a merger, tender offer or sale of all or substantially all our assets) that might provide a premium price for holders of our common stock. See the section entitled “Description of Securities — Restriction on Ownership and Transfer” in this prospectus.

Our charter permits our board of directors to issue stock with terms that may subordinate the rights of common stockholders or discourage a third party from acquiring us in a manner that might result in a premium price to our stockholders.

Our charter permits our board of directors to issue up to 1,010,000,000 shares of stock. In addition, our board of directors, without any action by our stockholders, may amend our charter from time to time to increase or decrease the aggregate number of shares or the number of shares of any class or series of stock that we have authority to issue. Our board of directors may classify or reclassify any unissued common stock or preferred stock into other classes or series of stock and establish the preferences, conversion or other rights, voting powers, restrictions, limitations as to dividends or other distributions, qualifications and terms or conditions of redemption of any such stock. Thus, our board of directors could authorize the issuance of preferred stock with terms and conditions that could have a priority as to distributions and amounts payable upon liquidation over the rights of the holders of our common stock. Preferred stock could also have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a change in control of us, including an extraordinary transaction (such as a merger, tender offer or sale of all or substantially all our assets) that might provide a premium price for holders of our common stock. See the section entitled “Description of Securities — Preferred Stock” in this prospectus.

Maryland law prohibits certain business combinations, which may make it more difficult for us to be acquired and may limit your ability to exit the investment.

Under Maryland law, “business combinations” between a Maryland corporation and an interested stockholder or an affiliate of an interested stockholder are prohibited for five years after the most recent date on which the interested stockholder becomes an interested stockholder. These business combinations include a merger, consolidation, share exchange or, in circumstances specified in the statute, an asset transfer or issuance or reclassification of equity securities. An interested stockholder is defined as:

any person who beneficially owns 10% or more of the voting power of the corporation’s outstanding voting stock; or

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an affiliate or associate of the corporation who, at any time within the two-year period prior to the date in question, was the beneficial owner of 10% or more of the voting power of the then outstanding stock of the corporation.

A person is not an interested stockholder under the statute if our board of directors approved in advance the transaction by which he or she otherwise would have become an interested stockholder. However, in approving a transaction, our board of directors may provide that its approval is subject to compliance, at or after the time of approval, with any terms and conditions determined by our board of directors.

After the five-year prohibition, any business combination between the Maryland corporation and an interested stockholder generally must be recommended by our board of directors of the corporation and approved by the affirmative vote of at least:

80% of the votes entitled to be cast by holders of outstanding shares of voting stock of the corporation; and
two-thirds of the votes entitled to be cast by holders of voting stock of the corporation other than shares held by the interested stockholder with whom or with whose affiliate the business combination is to be effected or held by an affiliate or associate of the interested stockholder.

These super-majority vote requirements do not apply if the corporation’s common stockholders receive a minimum price, as defined under Maryland law, for their shares in the form of cash or other consideration in the same form as previously paid by the interested stockholder for its shares. The business combination statute permits various exemptions from its provisions, including business combinations that are exempted by our board of directors prior to the time that the interested stockholder becomes an interested stockholder. Pursuant to the statute, our board of directors has exempted any business combination involving our advisor or any affiliate of our advisor. Consequently, the five-year prohibition and the super-majority vote requirements will not apply to business combinations between us and our advisor or any affiliate of our advisor. As a result, our advisor and any affiliate of our advisor may be able to enter into business combinations with us that may not be in the best interest of our stockholders, without compliance with the super-majority vote requirements and the other provisions of the statute. The business combination statute may discourage others from trying to acquire control of us and increase the difficulty of consummating any offer. For a more detailed discussion of the Maryland laws governing us and the ownership of our shares of common stock, see the section of this prospectus captioned “Description of Securities — Business Combinations.”

Maryland law limits the ability of a third-party to buy a large stake in us and exercise voting power in electing directors, which may discourage a takeover that could otherwise result in a premium price to our stockholders.

The Maryland Control Share Acquisition Act provides that “control shares” of a Maryland corporation acquired in a “control share acquisition” have no voting rights except to the extent approved by stockholders by a vote of two-thirds of the votes entitled to be cast on the matter. Shares of stock owned by the acquirer, by officers or by employees who are directors of the corporation, are excluded from shares entitled to vote on the matter. “Control shares” are voting shares of stock which, if aggregated with all other shares of stock owned by the acquirer or in respect of which the acquirer can exercise or direct the exercise of voting power (except solely by virtue of a revocable proxy), would entitle the acquirer to exercise voting power in electing directors within specified ranges of voting power. Control shares do not include shares the acquiring person is then entitled to vote as a result of having previously obtained stockholder approval. A “control share acquisition” means, subject to certain exceptions, the acquisition of issued and outstanding control shares. The control share acquisition statute does not apply (a) to shares acquired in a merger, consolidation or share exchange if the corporation is a party to the transaction, or (b) to acquisitions approved or exempted by the charter or bylaws of the corporation. Our bylaws contain a provision exempting from the Maryland Control Share Acquisition Act any and all acquisitions of our stock by any person. There can be no assurance that this provision will not be amended or eliminated at any time in the future. For a more detailed discussion on the Maryland laws governing control share acquisitions, see the section of this prospectus captioned “Description of Securities — Control Share Acquisitions.”

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Your investment return may be reduced if we are required to register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act.

The company is not registered, and does not intend to register itself or any of its subsidiaries, as an investment company under the Investment Company Act. If we become obligated to register the company or any of its subsidiaries as an investment company, the registered entity would have to comply with a variety of substantive requirements under the Investment Company Act imposing, among other things:

limitations on capital structure;
restrictions on specified investments;
prohibitions on transactions with affiliates; and
compliance with reporting, record keeping, voting, proxy disclosure and other rules and regulations that would significantly change our operations.

The company intends to conduct its operations, directly and through wholly or majority-owned subsidiaries, so that the company and each of its subsidiaries is not an investment company under the Investment Company Act. Under Section 3(a)(1)(A) of the Investment Company Act, a company is deemed to be an “investment company” if it is, or holds itself out as being, engaged primarily, or proposes to engage primarily, in the business of investing, reinvesting or trading in securities. Under Section 3(a)(1)(C) of the Investment Company Act, a company is deemed to be an “investment company” if it is engaged, or proposes to engage, in the business of investing, reinvesting, owning, holding or trading in securities and owns or proposes to acquire “investment securities” having a value exceeding 40% of the value of its total assets (exclusive of government securities and cash items) on an unconsolidated basis, which we refer to as the “40% test.” “Investment securities” excludes (A) government securities, (B) securities issued by employees’ securities companies, and (C) securities issued by majority-owned subsidiaries which (i) are not investment companies, and (ii) are not relying on the exception from the definition of investment company under Section 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of the Investment Company Act.

Since we will be primarily engaged in the business of acquiring real estate, we believe that the company and most, if not all, of its wholly and majority-owned subsidiaries will not be considered investment companies under either Section 3(a)(1)(A) or Section 3(a)(1)(C) of the Investment Company Act. If the company or any of its wholly or majority-owned subsidiaries would ever inadvertently fall within one of the definitions of “investment company,” we intend to rely on the exception provided by Section 3(c)(5)(C) of the Investment Company Act.

Under Section 3(c)(5)(C), the SEC staff generally requires the company to maintain at least 55% of its assets directly in qualifying assets and at least 80% of the entity’s assets in qualifying assets and in a broader category of real estate related assets to qualify for this exception. Mortgage-related securities may or may not constitute such qualifying assets, depending on the characteristics of the mortgage-related securities, including the rights that we have with respect to the underlying loans. The company’s ownership of mortgage-related securities, therefore, is limited by provisions of the Investment Company Act and SEC staff interpretations. See the section entitled “Investment Strategy, Objectives and Policies — Investment Company Act Considerations” in this prospectus.

The method we use to classify our assets for purposes of the Investment Company Act will be based in large measure upon no-action positions taken by the SEC staff in the past. These no-action positions were issued in accordance with factual situations that may be substantially different from the factual situations we may face, and a number of these no-action positions were issued more than ten years ago. No assurance can be given that the SEC staff will concur with our classification of our assets. In addition, the SEC staff may, in the future, issue further guidance that may require us to re-classify our assets for purposes of qualifying for an exclusion from regulation under the Investment Company Act. If we are required to re-classify our assets, we may no longer be in compliance with the exclusion from the definition of an “investment company” provided by Section 3(c)(5)(C) of the Investment Company Act.

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ability to maintain our exemption from regulation under the Investment Company Act. To avoid being required to register the company or any of its subsidiaries as an investment company under the Investment Company Act, we may be unable to sell assets we would otherwise want to sell and may need to sell assets we would otherwise wish to retain. In addition, we may have to acquire additional income- or loss-generating assets that we might not otherwise have acquired or may have to forgo opportunities to acquire interests in companies that we would otherwise want to acquire and would be important to our investment strategy.

If we were required to register the company as an investment company but failed to do so, we would be prohibited from engaging in our business, and civil actions could be brought against us. In addition, our contracts would be unenforceable unless a court required enforcement, and a court could appoint a receiver to take control of us and liquidate our business.

We are an “emerging growth company” under the federal securities laws and will be subject to reduced public company reporting requirements.

In April 2012, President Obama signed into law the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act, or the JOBS Act. We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the JOBS Act, and are eligible to take advantage of certain exemptions from, or reduced disclosure obligations relating to, various reporting requirements that are normally applicable to public companies.

We could remain an “emerging growth company” for up to five years, or until the earliest of (1) the last day of the first fiscal year in which we have total annual gross revenue of $1 billion or more, (2) December 31 of the fiscal year that we become a “large accelerated filer” as defined in Rule 12b-2 under the Exchange Act (which would occur if the market value of our common stock held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million, measured as of the last business day of our most recently completed second fiscal quarter, and we have been publicly reporting for at least 12 months) or (3) the date on which we have issued more than $1 billion in non-convertible debt during the preceding three-year period. Under the JOBS Act, emerging growth companies are not required to (1) provide an auditor’s attestation report on management’s assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, (2) comply with any new requirements adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, or the PCAOB, (3) comply with new audit rules adopted by the PCAOB after April 5, 2012 (unless the SEC determines otherwise), (4) provide certain disclosures relating to executive compensation generally required for larger public companies or (5) hold shareholder advisory votes on executive compensation. We have not yet made a decision as to whether to take advantage of any or all of the JOBS Act exemptions that are applicable to us. If we do take advantage of any of these exemptions, we do not know if some investors will find our common stock less attractive as a result.

Additionally, the JOBS Act provides that an “emerging growth company” may take advantage of an extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards that have different effective dates for public and private companies. This means an “emerging growth company” can delay adopting certain accounting standards until such standards are otherwise applicable to private companies. However, we are electing to “opt out” of such extended transition period, and will therefore comply with new or revised accounting standards on the applicable dates on which the adoption of such standards is required for non-emerging growth companies. Section 107 of the JOBS Act provides that our decision to opt out of such extended transition period for compliance with new or revised accounting standards is irrevocable.

Because our dealer manager is under common ownership with our advisor, you will not have the benefit of an independent due diligence review of us, which is customarily performed in underwritten offerings; the absence of an independent due diligence review increases the risks and uncertainty you face as a stockholder.

Our dealer manager is an entity which is under common ownership with our advisor. Because of such relationship, our dealer manager’s due diligence review and investigation of us and the prospectus cannot be considered to be an independent review. Therefore, you will not have the benefit of an independent review and investigation of this offering of the type normally performed by an unaffiliated, independent underwriter in a public securities offering.

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Our charter limits the number of shares a person may own, which may discourage a takeover that could otherwise result in a premium price to our stockholders.

Our charter, with certain exceptions, authorizes our directors to take such actions as are necessary and desirable to preserve our qualification as a REIT. To help us comply with the REIT ownership requirements of the Code, among other purposes, our charter prohibits a person from directly or constructively owning more than 9.8% in value of any class or series of shares of our outstanding stock or more than 9.8% in value or number of shares, whichever is more restrictive, of our aggregate outstanding common stock, unless exempted by our board of directors. This restriction may have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a change in control of us, including an extraordinary transaction (such as a merger, tender offer or sale of all or substantially all of our assets) that might provide a premium price for holders of our common stock.

Our stockholders’ interests in us will be diluted if we issue additional shares, which could reduce the overall value of our stockholders’ investments.

Our common stockholders do not have preemptive rights to any shares we issue in the future. Our charter authorizes us to issue 1,010,000,000 shares of capital stock, of which 1,000,000,000 shares are classified as common stock and 10,000,000 shares are classified as preferred stock. Our board may elect to (1) sell additional shares in this or future public offerings, (2) issue equity interests in private offerings, (3) issue share-based awards to our independent directors or to our officers or employees or to the officers or employees of our advisor or sub-advisor or any of their affiliates, (4) issue shares to our advisor or sub-advisor, or its successors or assigns, in payment of an outstanding fee obligation or (5) issue shares of our common stock to sellers of properties or assets we acquire in connection with an exchange of limited partnership interests of the operating partnership. To the extent we issue additional equity interests, our stockholders’ percentage ownership interest in us will be diluted. In addition, depending upon the terms and pricing of any additional offerings and the value of our real estate investments, our investors may also experience dilution in the book value and fair value of their shares.

A stockholder’s interest in us may be diluted to the extent that our operating partnership issues units to our Advisor Entities or to third-parties.

Holders of units of our operating partnership, including holders of Class B Units, will receive distributions per unit in the same amount as the distributions we pay per share to our stockholders and will generally have the right to exchange their units of our operating partnership for cash or shares of our stock (at our option), subject to certain conditions and restrictions. To the extent we issue units in our operating partnership in exchange for properties or as consideration for services rendered by our Advisor Entities, investors purchasing stock in this offering will experience potential dilution in their percentage ownership interest in us. Depending on the terms of such issuances, the value of our properties and the value of the properties we may acquire through the issuance of units of limited partnership interests in our operating partnership, investors in this offering might also experience a dilution in the book value per share of their stock.

Payment of fees to our advisor, our sub-advisor and their respective affiliates reduces cash available for investment and distribution and increases the risk that our stockholders will not be able to recover the amount of their investment in our shares.

Our advisor, our sub-advisor and their respective affiliates perform services for us in connection with the sale of shares in this offering, the selection and acquisition of our investments, the management and leasing of our properties and the administration of our other investments. We pay them substantial fees for these services, which results in immediate dilution to the value of our stockholders’ investments and reduces the amount of cash available for investment or distribution to stockholders. Depending primarily upon the number of shares we sell in this offering and assuming a $25.00 purchase price for shares sold in the primary offering (not accounting for shares sold under the DRIP) we estimate that approximately 86.7% of the gross proceeds will be available to make investments in real estate properties and other real estate-related loans and securities. We will use the remainder of the offering proceeds to pay the costs of the offering, including selling commissions and the dealer manager fee, and to pay a fee to our Advisor Entities for its services in connection with the selection, acquisition and financing of properties, and possibly to repurchase shares of our

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common stock under our share repurchase program if our board of directors determines it is appropriate and there are insufficient DRIP proceeds for this purpose. These substantial fees and other payments also increase the risk that our stockholders will not be able to resell their shares at a profit, even if our shares are listed on a national securities exchange.

If we are unable to obtain funding for future capital needs, cash distributions to our stockholders and the value of our investments could decline.

When tenants do not renew their leases or otherwise vacate their space, we will often need to expend substantial funds for improvements to the vacated space in order to attract replacement tenants. Even when tenants do renew their leases, we may agree to make improvements to their space as part of our negotiation. If we need additional capital in the future to improve or maintain our properties or for any other reason, we may have to obtain financing from sources, beyond our funds from operations, such as borrowings or future equity offerings. These sources of funding may not be available on attractive terms or at all. If we cannot procure additional funding for capital improvements, our investments may generate lower cash flows or decline in value, or both, which would limit our ability to make distributions to our stockholders and could reduce the value of your investment.

Our board of directors may change our investment policies without stockholder approval, which could alter the nature of your investments.

Our charter requires that our independent directors review our investment policies at least annually to determine that the policies we are following are in the best interest of the stockholders. These policies may change over time. The methods of implementing our investment policies also may vary, as new real estate development trends emerge and new investment techniques are developed. Our investment policies, the methods for their implementation, and our other objectives, policies and procedures may be altered by our board of directors without the approval of our stockholders. As a result, the nature of your investment could change without your consent.

We will not calculate the net asset value per share for our shares until the NAV pricing date; therefore, you will not be able to determine the net asset value of your shares on an on-going basis during this offering and possibly for a substantial period of time thereafter.

Commencing with the NAV pricing date, our sub-advisor will be responsible for calculating our quarterly NAV at the end of each business day on which we make our quarterly financial filings. Our board of directors will review the NAV calculation quarterly. To calculate our per share NAV, our sub-advisor will determine the fair value of our real estate and real estate-related assets and liabilities, based in part on the valuation by the independent valuer. We will disclose this net asset value to stockholders in our filings with the SEC. Therefore, you will not be able to determine the net asset value of your shares on an on-going basis during this offering and possibly for a substantial period of time thereafter. See the section entitled “Investment by Tax-Exempt Entities and ERISA Considerations — Annual or More Frequent Valuation Requirement” in this prospectus.

You are limited in your ability to sell your shares pursuant to our share repurchase program and may have to hold your shares for an indefinite period of time.

Our board of directors may amend the terms of our share repurchase program without stockholder approval. Our board of directors also is free to suspend or terminate the program upon 30 days’ notice or to reject any request for repurchase. In addition, the share repurchase program includes numerous restrictions that would limit your ability to sell your shares. Prior to the time our sub-advisor begins calculating NAV, unless waived by our board of directors, you must have held your shares for at least one year in order to participate in our share repurchase program. Prior to the time our sub-advisor begins calculating NAV, subject to funds being available, the purchase price for shares repurchased under our share repurchase program will be as set forth below (unless such repurchase is in connection with a stockholder’s death or disability): (a) for stockholders who have continuously held their shares of our common stock for at least one year, the price will be the lower of $23.13 and 92.5% of the amount paid for each such share; (b) for stockholders who have continuously held their shares of our common stock for at least two years, the price will be the lower of

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$23.75 and 95.0% of the amount paid for each such share; (c) for stockholders who have continuously held their shares of our common stock for at least three years, the price will be the lower of $24.78 and 97.5% of the amount paid for each such share; and (d) for stockholders who have held their shares of our common stock for at least four years, the price will be the lower of $25.00 and 100.0% of the amount you paid for each share (in each case, as adjusted for any stock dividends, combinations, splits, recapitalizations and the like with respect to our common stock). These limits might prevent us from accommodating all repurchase requests made in any year. See the section entitled “Share Repurchase Program” in this prospectus for more information about the share repurchase program. These restrictions severely limit your ability to sell your shares should you require liquidity, and limit your ability to recover the value you invested or the fair market value of your shares.

Future offerings of equity securities which are senior to our common stock for purposes of dividend distributions or upon liquidation, may adversely affect the per share trading price of our common stock.

In the future, we may attempt to increase our capital resources by making additional offerings of equity securities. Under our charter, we may issue, without stockholder approval, preferred stock or other classes of common stock with rights that could dilute the value of your shares of common stock. Any issuance of preferred stock must be approved by a majority of our independent directors not otherwise interested in the transaction, who will have access, at our expense, to our legal counsel or to independent legal counsel. Upon liquidation, holders of our shares of preferred stock will be entitled to receive our available assets prior to distribution to the holders of our common stock. Additionally, any convertible, exercisable or exchangeable securities that we issue in the future may have rights, preferences and privileges more favorable than those of our common stock and may result in dilution to owners of our common stock. Holders of our common stock are not entitled to preemptive rights or other protections against dilution. Our preferred stock, if issued, could have a preference on liquidating distributions or a preference on dividend payments that could limit our ability to pay dividends to the holders of our common stock. Because our decision to issue securities in any future offering will depend on market conditions and other factors beyond our control, we cannot predict or estimate the amount, timing or nature of our future offerings. Thus, our stockholders bear the risk of our future offerings reducing the per share trading price of our common stock and diluting their interest in us.

Because of our holding company structure, we depend on our operating partnership and its subsidiaries for cash flow and we will be structurally subordinated in right of payment to the obligations of such operating subsidiary and its subsidiaries, which could adversely affect our ability to make distributions to you.

We are a holding company with no business operations of our own. Our only significant asset is and will be the general and limited partnership interests of our operating partnership. We conduct, and intend to conduct, all of our business operations through our operating partnership. Accordingly, our only source of cash to pay our obligations is distributions from our operating partnership and its subsidiaries of their net earnings and cash flows. We cannot assure you that our operating partnership or its subsidiaries will be able to, or be permitted to, make distributions to us that will enable us to make distributions to our stockholders from cash flows from operations. Each of our operating partnership’s subsidiaries is a distinct legal entity and, under certain circumstances, legal and contractual restrictions may limit our ability to obtain cash from such entities. In addition, because we are a holding company, your claims as stockholders will be structurally subordinated to all existing and future liabilities and obligations of our operating partnership and its subsidiaries. Therefore, in the event of our bankruptcy, liquidation or reorganization, our assets and those of our operating partnership and its subsidiaries will be able to satisfy your claims as stockholders only after all of our and our operating partnerships and its subsidiaries liabilities and obligations have been paid in full.

Valuations and appraisals of our properties and valuations of our investments in real estate related assets are estimates of fair value and may not necessarily correspond to realizable value, which could adversely affect the value of your investment.

In order to calculate our quarterly NAV, our properties will initially be valued at cost, which we expect to represent fair value. After this initial valuation and commencing with the NAV pricing date, valuations of properties will be conducted in accordance with our valuation guidelines and will take into consideration appraisals performed by our independent valuer at least annually after the respective calendar quarter in which

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such property was acquired. Similarly, our real estate related asset investments will initially be valued at cost, and commencing with the NAV pricing date, will be valued at least annually (with approximately 25% of all properties being appraised each quarter), or in the case of liquid securities, quarterly, as applicable, at fair value as determined by our advisor. See “Valuation Policies.” The valuation methodologies used to value our properties will involve subjective judgments concerning factors such as comparable sales, rental and operating expense data, capitalization or discount rate, and projections of future rent and expenses. Although our valuation guidelines are designed to accurately determine the fair value of our assets, appraisals and valuations will be only estimates, and ultimate realization depends on conditions beyond our advisor’s control. Further, valuations do not necessarily represent the price at which we would be able to sell an asset, because such prices would be negotiated. We will not retroactively adjust the valuation of such assets, the price of our common stock, the price we paid to repurchase shares of our common stock or NAV-based fees we paid to our advisor and dealer manager. Because the price you will pay for shares of our common stock in this offering, and the price at which your shares may be repurchased by us pursuant to our share repurchase program, will be based on our estimated per share NAV commencing with the NAV pricing date, you may pay more than realizable value or receive less than realizable value for your investment.

Although our sub-advisor is responsible for calculating our quarterly NAV, our sub-advisor will consider independent appraisals of our properties, the accuracy of which our sub-advisor will not independently verify.

In calculating our quarterly NAV, our sub-advisor will include the net value of our real estate and real estate-related assets, taking into consideration valuations of individual properties that were obtained from our independent valuer. Our sub-advisor will review each appraisal by the independent valuer, and will compare each appraisal to its own determination of value. If in the opinion of our sub-advisor the appraisals are materially higher or lower than the advisor’s determinations of value, it will discuss the appraisals with the independent valuer. If our sub-advisor determines that the appraisals are still materially higher or lower than its valuations, a valuation committee, comprised of our independent directors, will review the appraisals and valuations, and make a final determination of value. Although our sub-advisor is responsible for the accuracy of the quarterly NAV calculation and will provide our independent valuer with our valuation guidelines, which have been approved by our board of directors, our sub-advisor will not independently verify the appraised value of our properties. As a result, the appraised value of a particular property may be greater or less than its potential realizable value, which would cause our estimated NAV to be greater or less than the potential realizable NAV.

Our per share NAV may suddenly change if the appraised values of our properties materially change or the actual operating results differ from what we originally budgeted for that quarter.

Appraisals of our properties upon which our sub-advisor’s estimate of the value of our real estate and real estate-related assets will partly be based will probably not be spread evenly throughout the calendar year. We anticipate that such appraisals will be conducted near the end of each calendar quarter. Therefore, when these appraisals are reflected in our NAV calculation, for which our sub-advisor is ultimately responsible, there may be a sudden change in our per share NAV. In addition, actual operating results for a given month may differ from our original estimate, which may affect our per share NAV of each month, and we will adjust the estimated income and expenses to reflect the income and expenses actually earned and incurred. We will make such adjustment on a going-forward basis and will not retroactively adjust the quarterly per share NAV for the previous quarter. Therefore, because the actual results from operations may be better or worse than what we previously budgeted for a particular month, the adjustment to reflect actual operating results may cause our per share NAV to change, and such change will occur on the day the adjustment is made.

The per share NAV that we publish may not necessarily reflect changes in our NAV and in the value of your shares that we cannot immediately quantify.

We may experience events affecting our investments that may have a material impact on our NAV. For example, if a material lease is unexpectedly terminated or renewed, or a property experiences an unanticipated structural or environmental event, the value of a property may materially change. Furthermore, if we cannot immediately quantify the financial impact of any extraordinary events, our per share NAV as published on any

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given quarter will not reflect such events. As a result, the per share NAV published after the announcement of a material event may differ significantly from our actual per share NAV until we are able to quantify the financial impact of such events and our NAV is appropriately adjusted on a going forward basis. The resulting potential disparity may benefit repurchasing or non-repurchasing stockholders, depending on whether NAV is overstated or understated.

General Risks Related to Investments in Real Estate

Our operating results will be affected by economic and regulatory changes that have an adverse impact on the real estate market in general, and we cannot assure you that we will be profitable or that we will realize growth in the value of our real estate properties.

Our operating results are subject to risks generally incident to the ownership of real estate, including:

changes in general economic or local conditions;
changes in supply of or demand for similar or competing properties in an area;
changes in interest rates and availability of permanent mortgage funds that may render the sale of a property difficult or unattractive;
changes in tax, real estate, environmental and zoning laws; and
periods of high interest rates and tight money supply.

These and other reasons may prevent us from being profitable or from realizing growth or maintaining the value of our real estate properties.

We depend on our tenants for revenue, and, accordingly, our revenue and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders is dependent upon the success and economic viability of our tenants.

We depend upon tenants for revenue. Rising vacancies across commercial real estate have resulted in increased pressure on real estate investors and their property managers to find new tenants and keep existing tenants. A property may incur vacancies either by the expiration of a tenant lease, the continued default of a tenant under its lease or the early termination of a lease by a tenant. If vacancies continue for a long period of time, we may suffer reduced revenues resulting in less cash available to distribute to stockholders. In order to maintain tenants, we may have to offer inducements, such as free rent and tenant improvements, to compete for attractive tenants. In addition, if we are unable to attract additional or replacement tenants, the resale value of the property could be diminished, even below our cost to acquire the property, because the market value of a particular property depends principally upon the value of the cash flow generated by the leases associated with that property. Such a reduction on the resale value of a property could also reduce the value of our stockholders’ investments.

Retail conditions may adversely affect our base rent and subsequently our income.

Some of our leases may provide for base rent plus contractual base rent increases. A number of our retail leases may also include a percentage rent clause for additional rent above the base amount based upon a specified percentage of the sales our tenants generate. Under those leases that contain percentage rent clauses, our revenue from tenants may increase as the sales of our tenants increase. Generally, retailers face declining revenues during downturns in the economy. As a result, the portion of our revenue which we may derive from percentage rent leases could decline upon a general economic downturn.

Our revenue will be affected by the success and economic viability of our anchor retail tenants. Our reliance on single or significant tenants in certain buildings may decrease our ability to lease vacated space and adversely affect the returns on our stockholders’ investments.

In the retail sector, a tenant occupying all or a large portion of the gross leasable area of a retail center, commonly referred to as an anchor tenant, may become insolvent, may suffer a downturn in business, or may decide not to renew its lease. Any of these events would result in a reduction or cessation in rental payments to us and would adversely affect our financial condition. A lease termination by an anchor tenant could result

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in lease terminations or reductions in rent by other tenants whose leases may permit cancellation or rent reduction if another tenant’s lease is terminated. In such event, we may be unable to re-lease the vacated space. Similarly, the leases of some anchor tenants may permit the anchor tenant to transfer its lease to another retailer. The transfer to a new anchor tenant could cause customer traffic in the retail center to decrease and thereby reduce the income generated by that retail center. A lease transfer to a new anchor tenant could also allow other tenants to make reduced rental payments or to terminate their leases. In the event that we are unable to re-lease the vacated space to a new anchor tenant, we may incur additional expenses in order to re-model the space to be able to re-lease the space to more than one tenant.

The economic downturn and weak recovery in the United States has had, and may continue to have, an adverse impact on the retail industry generally. Slow or negative growth in the retail industry could result in defaults by retail tenants, which could have an adverse impact on our financial operations.

The economic downturn and weak recovery in the United States has had an adverse impact on the retail industry generally. As a result, the retail industry is facing reductions in sales revenues and increased bankruptcies throughout the United States. The continuation of adverse economic conditions may result in an increase in distressed or bankrupt retail companies, which in turn would result in an increase in defaults by tenants at our commercial properties. Additionally, slow economic growth is likely to hinder new entrants into the retail market which may make it difficult for us to fully lease the real properties that we plan to acquire. Tenant defaults and decreased demand for retail space would have an adverse impact on the value of the retail properties that we plan to acquire and our results of operations. If real property or other real estate related asset values decline after we acquire them, we may have a difficult time making new acquisitions or generating returns on your investment. If the current debt market environment persists, we may modify our investment strategy in order to optimize our portfolio performance. Our options would include limiting or eliminating the use of debt and focusing on those investments that do not require the use of leverage to meet our portfolio goals.

We anticipate that our properties will consist primarily of retail properties. Our performance, therefore, is linked to the market for retail space generally.

The market for retail space has been and could be adversely affected by weaknesses in the national, regional and local economies, the adverse financial condition of some large retailing companies, the ongoing consolidation in the retail sector, excess amounts of retail space in a number of markets and competition for tenants with other shopping centers in our markets. Customer traffic to these shopping areas may be adversely affected by the closing of stores in the same shopping center, or by a reduction in traffic to such stores resulting from a regional economic downturn, a general downturn in the local area where our store is located, or a decline in the desirability of the shopping environment of a particular shopping center. Such a reduction in customer traffic could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

A high concentration of our properties in a particular geographic area, or with tenants in a similar industry, would magnify the effects of downturns in that geographic area or industry.

We expect that our properties will be diverse in terms of the geographic area and industry of our tenants. However, in the event that we have a concentration of properties in any particular geographic area, any adverse situation that disproportionately affects that geographic area would have a magnified adverse effect on our portfolio. Similarly, if tenants of our properties are concentrated in a certain industry or retail category, any adverse effect on that industry generally would have a disproportionately adverse effect on our portfolio.

Our retail tenants face competition from numerous retail channels, which may reduce our profitability and ability to pay distributions.

Retailers at our properties face continued competition from discount or value retailers, factory outlet centers, wholesale clubs, mail order catalogues and operators, television shopping networks and Internet shopping. Such competition could adversely affect our tenants and, consequently, our revenues and funds available for distribution.

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If we enter into long-term leases with retail tenants, those leases may not result in fair value over time.

Long-term leases do not allow for significant changes in rental payments and do not expire in the near term. If we do not accurately judge the potential for increases in market rental rates when negotiating these long-term leases, significant increases in future property operating costs could result in receiving less than fair value from these leases. Such circumstances would adversely affect our revenues and funds available for distribution.

The bankruptcy or insolvency of a major tenant may adversely impact our operations and our ability to pay distributions to stockholders.

The bankruptcy or insolvency of a significant tenant or a number of smaller tenants may have an adverse impact on financial condition and our ability to pay distributions to our stockholders. Generally, under bankruptcy law, a debtor tenant has 120 days to exercise the option of assuming or rejecting the obligations under any unexpired lease for nonresidential real property, which period may be extended once by the bankruptcy court. If the tenant assumes its lease, the tenant must cure all defaults under the lease and may be required to provide adequate assurance of its future performance under the lease. If the tenant rejects the lease, we will have a claim against the tenant’s bankruptcy estate. Although rent owing for the period between filing for bankruptcy and rejection of the lease may be afforded administrative expense priority and paid in full, pre-bankruptcy arrears and amounts owing under the remaining term of the lease will be afforded general unsecured claim status (absent collateral securing the claim). Moreover, amounts owing under the remaining term of the lease will be capped. Other than equity and subordinated claims, general unsecured claims are the last claims paid in a bankruptcy and therefore funds may not be available to pay such claims in full.

If a sale-leaseback transaction is re-characterized in a tenant’s bankruptcy proceeding, our financial condition could be adversely affected.

We may enter into sale-leaseback transactions, whereby we would purchase a property and then lease the same property back to the person from whom we purchased it. In the event of the bankruptcy of a tenant, a transaction structured as a sale-leaseback may be re-characterized as either a financing or a joint venture, either of which outcomes could adversely affect our financial condition, cash flow and the amount available for distributions to our stockholders.

If the sale-leaseback were re-characterized as a financing, we might not be considered the owner of the property, and as a result would have the status of a creditor in relation to the tenant. In that event, we would no longer have the right to sell or encumber our ownership interest in the property. Instead, we would have a claim against the tenant for the amounts owed under the lease, with the claim arguably secured by the property. The tenant/debtor might have the ability to propose a plan restructuring the term, interest rate and amortization schedule of its outstanding balance. If confirmed by the bankruptcy court, we could be bound by the new terms, and prevented from foreclosing our lien on the property. If the sale-leaseback were re-characterized as a joint venture, we and our lessee could be treated as co-venturers with regard to the property. As a result, we could be held liable, under some circumstances, for debts incurred by the lessee relating to the property.

Recharacterization of sale-leaseback transactions may cause us to lose our REIT status.

If we enter into sale-leaseback transactions, we will use commercially reasonable efforts to structure any such sale-leaseback transaction such that the lease will be characterized as a “true lease” for tax purposes, thereby allowing us to be treated as the owner of the property for U.S. federal income tax purposes. However, we cannot assure you that the IRS will not challenge such characterization. In the event that any such sale-leaseback transaction is challenged and recharacterized as a financing transaction or loan for U.S. federal income tax purposes, deductions for depreciation and cost recovery relating to such property would be disallowed. If a sale-leaseback transaction were so recharacterized, we might fail to satisfy the REIT qualification “asset tests” or “income tests” (as described below in the section entitled “Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations — REIT Qualification Tests” in this prospectus, and, consequently, lose our REIT status effective with the year of recharacterization. Alternatively, the amount of our REIT taxable income could be recalculated which might also cause us to fail to meet the distribution requirement for a taxable year.

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Properties that have significant vacancies could be difficult to sell, which could diminish the return on these properties.

A property may incur vacancies either by the expiration of a tenant lease, the continued default of a tenant under its lease or the early termination of a lease by a tenant. If vacancies continue for a long period of time, we may suffer reduced revenues resulting in less cash available to distribute to stockholders. In addition, the resale value of the property could be diminished because the market value of a particular property depends principally upon the value of the cash flow generated by the leases associated with that property. Such a reduction on the resale value of a property could also reduce the value of our stockholders’ investments.

We may obtain only limited warranties when we purchase a property and would have only limited recourse if our due diligence did not identify any issues that lower the value of our property, which could adversely affect our financial condition and ability to make distributions to you.

The seller of a property often sells such property in its “as is” condition on a “where is” basis and “with all faults,” without any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular use or purpose. In addition, purchase agreements may contain only limited warranties, representations and indemnifications that will only survive for a limited period after the closing. The purchase of properties with limited warranties increases the risk that we may lose some or all our invested capital in the property as well as the loss of rental income from that property.

We may be unable to secure funds for future tenant improvements or capital needs, which could adversely impact our ability to pay cash distributions to our stockholders.

When tenants do not renew their leases or otherwise vacate their space, it is usual that, in order to attract replacement tenants, we will be required to expend substantial funds for tenant improvements and tenant refurbishments to the vacated space. In addition, we will likely be responsible for any major structural repairs, such as repairs to the foundation, exterior walls and rooftops. We do not intend to reserve any specific portion of the gross proceeds from this offering for future capital needs. Accordingly, if we need additional capital in the future to improve or maintain our properties or for any other reason, we will have to obtain financing from other sources, such as cash flow from operations, borrowings, property sales or future equity offerings. These sources of funding may not be available on attractive terms or at all. If we cannot procure additional funding for capital improvements, our investments may generate lower cash flows or decline in value, or both.

Our inability to sell a property when we desire to do so could adversely impact our ability to pay cash distributions to you.

The real estate market is affected by many factors, such as general economic conditions, availability of financing, interest rates and other factors, including supply and demand, that are beyond our control. We cannot predict whether we will be able to sell any property for the price or on the terms set by us, or whether any price or other terms offered by a prospective purchaser would be acceptable to us. We cannot predict the length of time needed to find a willing purchaser and to close the sale of a property.

We may be required to expend funds to correct defects or to make improvements before a property can be sold. We cannot assure you that we will have funds available to correct such defects or to make such improvements. Moreover, in acquiring a property, we may agree to restrictions that prohibit the sale of that property for a period of time or impose other restrictions, such as a limitation on the amount of debt that can be placed or repaid on that property. These provisions would restrict our ability to sell a property.

We may not be able to sell our properties at a price equal to, or greater than, the price for which we purchased such property, which may lead to a decrease in the value of our assets.

Many of our leases will not contain rental increases over time. Therefore, the value of the property to a potential purchaser may not increase over time, which may restrict our ability to sell a property, or if we are able to sell such property, may lead to a sale price less than the price that we paid to purchase the property.

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We may acquire or finance properties with lock-out provisions, which may prohibit us from selling a property, or may require us to maintain specified debt levels for a period of years on some properties, which could have an adverse effect on your investment.

Lock-out provisions could materially restrict us from selling or otherwise disposing of or refinancing properties. These provisions would affect our ability to turn our investments into cash and thus affect cash available for distributions to you. Lock out provisions may prohibit us from reducing the outstanding indebtedness with respect to any properties, refinancing such indebtedness on a non-recourse basis at maturity, or increasing the amount of indebtedness with respect to such properties. Lock-out provisions could impair our ability to take other actions during the lock-out period that could be in the best interests of our stockholders and, therefore, may have an adverse impact on the value of the shares, relative to the value that would result if the lock-out provisions did not exist. In particular, lock-out provisions could preclude us from participating in major transactions that could result in a disposition of our assets or a change in control even though that disposition or change in control might be in the best interests of our stockholders.

Rising expenses could reduce cash flow and funds available for future acquisitions and our funds available for future acquisitions and our ability to pay cash distributions to you.

Any properties that we buy in the future will be, subject to operating risks common to real estate in general, any or all of which may negatively affect us. If any property is not fully occupied or if rents are being paid in an amount that is insufficient to cover operating expenses, we could be required to expend funds with respect to that property for operating expenses. The properties will be subject to increases in tax rates, utility costs, operating expenses, insurance costs, repairs and maintenance and administrative expenses. Renewals of leases or future leases may not be negotiated on a triple-net basis or on a basis requiring the tenants to pay all or some of such expenses, in which event we may have to pay those costs. If we are unable to lease properties on a triple-net-lease basis or on a basis requiring the tenants to pay all or some of such expenses, or if tenants fail to pay required tax, utility and other impositions, we could be required to pay those costs which could adversely affect funds available for future acquisitions or cash available for distributions.

We may be unable to adjust our portfolio in response to changes in economic or other conditions or sell a property if or when we decide to do so, limiting our ability to pay cash distributions to our stockholders.

Many factors that are beyond our control affect the real estate market and could affect our ability to sell properties for the price, on the terms or within the time frame that we desire. These factors include general economic conditions, the availability of financing, interest rates and other factors, including supply and demand. Because real estate investments are relatively illiquid, we have a limited ability to vary our portfolio in response to changes in economic or other conditions. Further, before we can sell a property on the terms we want, it may be necessary to expend funds to correct defects or to make improvements. However, we can give no assurance that we will have the funds available to correct such defects or to make such improvements. We may be unable to sell our properties at a profit. Our inability to sell properties at the time and on the terms we want could reduce our cash flow and limit our ability to make distributions to our stockholders and could reduce the value of our stockholders’ investments. Moreover, in acquiring a property, we may agree to restrictions that prohibit the sale of that property for a period of time or impose other restrictions, such as a limitation on the amount of debt that can be placed or repaid on that property. We cannot predict the length of time needed to find a willing purchaser and to close the sale of a property. Our inability to sell a property when we desire to do so may cause us to reduce our selling price for the property. Any delay in our receipt of proceeds, or diminishment of proceeds, from the sale of a property could adversely impact our ability to pay distributions to our stockholders.

If we sell a property by providing financing to the purchaser, we will bear the risk of default by the purchaser, which could delay or reduce the distributions available to our stockholders.

If we decide to sell any of our properties, we intend to use our best efforts to sell them for cash; however, in some instances, we may sell our properties by providing financing to purchasers. When we provide financing to a purchaser, we will bear the risk that the purchaser may default, which could reduce our cash distributions to stockholders. Even in the absence of a purchaser default, the distribution of the proceeds

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of the sale to our stockholders, or the reinvestment of the proceeds in other assets, will be delayed until the promissory notes or other property we may accept upon a sale are actually paid, sold, refinanced or otherwise disposed. In some cases, we may receive initial down payments in cash and other property in the year of sale in an amount less than the selling price, and subsequent payments will be spread over a number of years. If any purchaser defaults under a financing arrangement with us, it could negatively impact our ability to pay cash distributions to our stockholders.

Potential development and construction delays and resultant increased costs and risks may hinder our operating results and decrease our net income.

We may from time to time acquire unimproved real property or properties that are under development or construction. Investments in such properties are subject to the uncertainties associated with the development and construction of real property, including those related to re-zoning land for development, environmental concerns of governmental entities or community groups and our builders’ ability to build in conformity with plans, specifications, budgeted costs and timetables. If a builder fails to perform, we may resort to legal action to rescind the purchase or the construction contract or to compel performance. A builder’s performance may also be affected or delayed by conditions beyond the builder’s control. Delays in completing construction could also give tenants the right to terminate preconstruction leases. We may incur additional risks when we make periodic progress payments or other advances to builders before they complete construction. These and other factors can result in increased costs of a project or loss of our investment. In addition, we will be subject to normal lease-up risks relating to newly constructed projects. We also must rely on rental income and expense projections and estimates of the fair market value of property upon completion of construction when agreeing upon a purchase price at the time we acquire the property. If our projections are inaccurate, we may pay too much for a property, and the return on our investment could suffer.

If we contract with a development company for newly developed property, our earnest money deposit made to the development company may not be fully refunded.

We may enter into one or more contracts, either directly or indirectly through joint ventures with affiliates or others, to acquire real property from a development company that is engaged in construction and development of commercial real properties. Properties acquired from a development company may be either existing income-producing properties, properties to be developed or properties under development. We anticipate that we will be obligated to pay a substantial earnest money deposit at the time of contracting to acquire such properties. In the case of properties to be developed by a development company, we anticipate that we will be required to close the purchase of the property upon completion of the development of the property. At the time of contracting and the payment of the earnest money deposit by us, the development company typically will not have acquired title to any real property. Typically, the development company will only have a contract to acquire land, a development agreement to develop a building on the land and an agreement with one or more tenants to lease all or part of the property upon its completion. We may enter into such a contract with the development company even if at the time we enter into the contract we have not yet raised sufficient proceeds in our offering to enable us to close the purchase of such property. However, we may not be required to close a purchase from the development company, and may be entitled to a refund of our earnest money, in the following circumstances:

the development company fails to develop the property;
all or a specified portion of the pre-leased tenants fail to take possession under their leases for any reason; or
we are unable to raise sufficient proceeds from our offering to pay the purchase price at closing.

The obligation of the development company to refund our earnest money will be unsecured, and we may not be able to obtain a refund of such earnest money deposit from it under these circumstances since the development company may be an entity without substantial assets or operations.

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Joint venture investments could be adversely affected by our lack of sole decision-making authority, our reliance on the financial condition of co-venturers and disputes between us and our co-venturers.

We may enter into joint ventures, partnerships and other co-ownership arrangements (including preferred equity investments) for the purpose of making investments. In such event, we would not be in a position to exercise sole decision-making authority regarding the joint venture. Investments in joint ventures may, under certain circumstances, involve risks not present were a third party not involved, including the possibility that partners or co-venturers might become bankrupt or fail to fund their required capital contributions. Co-venturers may have economic or other business interests or goals which are inconsistent with our business interests or goals, and may be in a position to take actions contrary to our policies or objectives. Such investments may also have the potential risk of impasses on decisions, such as a sale, because neither we nor the co-venturer would have full control over the joint venture. Disputes between us and co-venturers may result in litigation or arbitration that would increase our expenses and prevent our officers and/or directors from focusing their time and effort on our business. Consequently, actions by or disputes with co-venturers might result in subjecting properties owned by the joint venture to additional risk. In addition, we may in certain circumstances be liable for the actions of our co-venturers.

Covenants, conditions and restrictions may restrict our ability to operate a property, which may adversely affect our operating costs and reduce the amount of funds available to pay distributions to you.

Some of our properties may be contiguous to other parcels of real property, comprising part of the same commercial center. In connection with such properties, there are significant covenants, conditions and restrictions, or CC&Rs, restricting the operation of such properties and any improvements on such properties, and related to granting easements on such properties. Moreover, the operation and management of the contiguous properties may impact such properties. Compliance with CC&Rs may adversely affect our operating costs and reduce the amount of funds that we have available to pay distributions.

If we set aside insufficient capital reserves, we may be required to defer necessary capital improvements.

If we do not have enough reserves for capital to supply needed funds for capital improvements throughout the life of the investment in a property and there is insufficient cash available from our operations, we may be required to defer necessary improvements to a property, which may cause that property to suffer from a greater risk of obsolescence or a decline in value, or a greater risk of decreased cash flow as a result of fewer potential tenants being attracted to the property. If this happens, we may not be able to maintain projected rental rates for affected properties, and our results of operations may be negatively impacted.

Our operating expenses may increase in the future and, to the extent such increases cannot be passed on to tenants, our cash flow and our operating results would decrease.

Operating expenses, such as expenses for fuel, utilities, labor and insurance, are not fixed and may increase in the future. There is no guarantee that we will be able to pass such increases on to our tenants. To the extent such increases cannot be passed on to tenants, any such increase would cause our cash flow and our operating results to decrease.

Our real properties are subject to property taxes that may increase in the future, which could adversely affect our cash flow.

Our real properties are subject to real property taxes that may increase as tax rates change and as the real properties are assessed or reassessed by taxing authorities. We anticipate that certain of our leases will generally provide that the property taxes, or increases therein, are charged to the lessees as an expense related to the real properties that they occupy, while other leases will generally provide that we are responsible for such taxes. In any case, as the owner of the properties, we are ultimately responsible for payment of the taxes to the applicable government authorities. If real property taxes increase, our tenants may be unable to make the required tax payments, ultimately requiring us to pay the taxes even if otherwise stated under the terms of the lease. If we fail to pay any such taxes, the applicable taxing authority may place a lien on the real property and the real property may be subject to a tax sale. In addition, we are generally responsible for real property taxes related to any vacant space.

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Uninsured losses relating to real property or excessively expensive premiums for insurance coverage could reduce our cash flows and the return on our stockholders’ investments.

We will attempt to adequately insure all of our real properties against casualty losses. There are types of losses, generally catastrophic in nature, such as losses due to wars, acts of terrorism, earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, pollution or environmental matters, that are uninsurable or not economically insurable, or may be insured subject to limitations, such as large deductibles or co-payments. Insurance risks associated with potential acts of terrorism could sharply increase the premiums we pay for coverage against property and casualty claims. Additionally, mortgage lenders in some cases have begun to insist that commercial property owners purchase coverage against terrorism as a condition for providing mortgage loans. Such insurance policies may not be available at reasonable costs, if at all, which could inhibit our ability to finance or refinance our properties. In such instances, we may be required to provide other financial support, either through financial assurances or self-insurance, to cover potential losses. We may not have adequate, or any, coverage for such losses. Changes in the cost or availability of insurance could expose us to uninsured casualty losses. If any of our properties incurs a casualty loss that is not fully insured, the value of our assets will be reduced by any such uninsured loss, which may reduce the value of our stockholders’ investments. In addition, other than any working capital reserve or other reserves we may establish, we have no source of funding to repair or reconstruct any uninsured property. Also, to the extent we must pay unexpectedly large amounts for insurance, we could suffer reduced earnings that would result in lower distributions to stockholders. The Terrorism Risk Insurance Act of 2002 is designed for a sharing of terrorism losses between insurance companies and the federal government. We cannot be certain how this act will impact us or what additional cost to us, if any, could result.

Terrorist attacks and other acts of violence or war may affect the markets in which we plan to operate, which could delay or hinder our ability to meet our investment objectives and reduce our stockholders’ overall return.

Terrorist attacks or armed conflicts may directly impact the value of our properties through damage, destruction, loss or increased security costs. We expect that we will invest in major metropolitan areas. We may not be able to obtain insurance against the risk of terrorism because it may not be available or may not be available on terms that are economically feasible. The terrorism insurance that we obtain may not be sufficient to cover loss for damages to our properties as a result of terrorist attacks. The inability to obtain sufficient terrorism insurance or any terrorism insurance at all could limit our investment options as some mortgage lenders have begun to insist that specific coverage against terrorism be purchased by commercial owners as a condition of providing loans.

Competition with third parties in acquiring properties and other investments may reduce our profitability and the return on your investment.

We compete with many other entities engaged in real estate investment activities, including individuals, corporations, bank and insurance company investment accounts, other REITs, real estate limited partnerships, and other entities engaged in real estate investment activities, many of which have greater resources than we do. Larger REITs may enjoy significant competitive advantages that result from, among other things, a lower cost of capital and enhanced operating efficiencies. In addition, the number of entities and the amount of funds competing for suitable investments may increase. Any such increase would result in increased demand for these assets and therefore increased prices paid for them. If we pay higher prices for properties and other investments, our profitability will be reduced and you may experience a lower return on your investment.

Our properties face competition that may affect tenants’ ability to pay rent and the amount of rent paid to us may affect the cash available for distributions and the amount of distributions.

Our properties face competition for tenants. The number of competitive properties could have a material effect on our ability to rent space at our properties and the amount of rents charged. We could be adversely affected if additional competitive properties are built in locations competitive with our properties, causing increased competition for customer traffic and creditworthy tenants. This could result in decreased cash flow from tenants and may require us to make capital improvements to properties that we would not have otherwise made, thus affecting cash available for distributions, and the amount available for distributions to you.

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Delays in acquisitions of properties may have an adverse effect on your investment.

There may be a substantial period of time before the proceeds of this offering are invested. Delays we encounter in the selection, acquisition and/or development of properties could adversely affect your returns. Where properties are acquired prior to the start of construction or during the early stages of construction, it will typically take several months to complete construction and rent available space. Therefore, you could suffer delays in the payment of cash distributions attributable to those particular properties.

Our recovery of an investment in a mortgage, bridge or mezzanine loan that has defaulted may be limited, resulting in losses to us and reducing the amount of funds available to pay distributions to you.

There is no guarantee that the mortgage, loan or deed of trust securing an investment will, following a default, permit us to recover the original investment and interest that would have been received absent a default. The security provided by a mortgage, deed of trust or loan is directly related to the difference between the amount owed and the appraised market value of the property. Although we intend to rely on a current real estate appraisal when we make the investment, the value of the property is affected by factors outside our control, including general fluctuations in the real estate market, rezoning, neighborhood changes, highway relocations and failure by the borrower to maintain the property. In addition, we may incur the costs of litigation in our efforts to enforce our rights under defaulted loans.

Costs of complying with governmental laws and regulations related to environmental protection and human health and safety may reduce our net income and the cash available for distributions to our stockholders.

Real property and the operations conducted on real property are subject to federal, state and local laws and regulations relating to protection of the environment and human health. We could be subject to liability in the form of fines, penalties or damages for noncompliance with these laws and regulations. These laws and regulations generally govern wastewater discharges, air emissions, the operation and removal of underground and above-ground storage tanks, the use, storage, treatment, transportation and disposal of solid and hazardous materials, the remediation of contamination associated with the release or disposal of solid and hazardous materials, the presence of toxic building materials, and other health and safety-related concerns.

Some of these laws and regulations may impose joint and several liability on the tenants, owners or operators of real property for the costs to investigate or remediate contaminated properties, regardless of fault, whether the contamination occurred prior to purchase, or whether the acts causing the contamination were legal. Our tenants’ operations, the condition of properties at the time we buy them, operations in the vicinity of our properties, such as the presence of underground storage tanks, or activities of unrelated third parties may affect our properties.

The presence of hazardous substances, or the failure to properly manage or remediate these substances, may hinder our ability to sell, rent or pledge such property as collateral for future borrowings. Environmental laws also may impose liens on property or restrictions on the manner in which property may be used or businesses may be operated, and these restrictions may require substantial expenditures or prevent us from entering into leases with prospective tenants that may be impacted by such laws. Some of these laws and regulations have been amended so as to require compliance with new or more stringent standards as of future dates. Compliance with new or more stringent laws or regulations or stricter interpretation of existing laws may require us to incur material expenditures. Future laws, ordinances or regulations may impose material environmental liability. Any material expenditures, fines, penalties, or damages we must pay will reduce our ability to make distributions and may reduce the value of our stockholders’ investments.

The costs of defending against claims of environmental liability or of paying personal injury claims could reduce the amounts available for distribution to our stockholders.

Environmental laws provide for sanctions for noncompliance and may be enforced by governmental agencies or, in certain circumstances, by private parties. Certain environmental laws and common law principles could be used to impose liability for the release of and exposure to hazardous substances, including asbestos-containing materials and lead-based paint. Third parties may seek recovery from real property owners or operators for personal injury or property damage associated with exposure to released hazardous substances. The costs of defending against claims of environmental liability or of paying personal injury

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claims could reduce the amounts available for distribution to our stockholders. Generally, we expect that the real estate properties that we acquire will have been subject to Phase I environmental assessments at the time they were acquired. A Phase I environmental assessment or site assessment is an initial environmental investigation to identify potential environmental liabilities associated with the current and past uses of a given property.

Costs associated with complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 may decrease cash available for distributions.

Our properties may be subject to the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended, or the Disabilities Act. Under the Disabilities Act, all places of public accommodation are required to comply with federal requirements related to access and use by disabled persons. The Disabilities Act has separate compliance requirements for “public accommodations” and “commercial facilities” that generally require that buildings and services be made accessible and available to people with disabilities. The Disabilities Act’s requirements could require removal of access barriers and could result in the imposition of injunctive relief, monetary penalties or, in some cases, an award of damages. We will attempt to acquire properties that comply with the Disabilities Act or place the burden on the seller or other third party, such as a tenant, to ensure compliance with the Disabilities Act. We cannot assure our stockholders that we will be able to acquire properties or allocate responsibilities in this manner. Any of our funds used for Disabilities Act compliance will reduce our net income and the amount of cash available for distributions to our stockholders.

The failure of any bank in which we deposit our funds could reduce the amount of cash we have available to pay distributions and make additional investments.

We intend to diversify our cash and cash equivalents among several banking institutions in an attempt to minimize exposure to any one of these entities. However, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, or FDIC, only insures amounts up to $250,000 per depositor per insured bank. We expect to have cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash deposited in certain financial institutions in excess of federally insured levels. If any of the banking institutions in which we have deposited funds ultimately fails, we may lose our deposits over $250,000. The loss of our deposits could reduce the amount of cash we have available to distribute or invest and could result in a decline in the value of our stockholders’ investments.

Potential changes in U.S. generally accepted accounting standards regarding operating leases may make the leasing of our properties less attractive to our potential tenants, which could reduce overall demand for our leasing services.

Under current authoritative accounting guidance for leases, a lease is classified by a tenant as a capital lease if the significant risks and rewards of ownership are considered to reside with the tenant. Under capital lease accounting for a tenant, both the leased asset and liability are reflected on their balance sheet. If the lease does not meet any of the criteria for a capital lease, the lease is considered an operating lease by the tenant, and the obligation does not appear on the tenant’s balance sheet; rather, the contractual future minimum payment obligations are only disclosed in the footnotes thereto. Thus, entering into an operating lease can appear to enhance a tenant’s balance sheet in comparison to direct ownership. The Financial Accounting Standards Board, or the FASB, and the International Accounting Standards Board, or the IASB, conducted a joint project to re-evaluate lease accounting. In August 2010, the FASB and the IASB jointly released exposure drafts of a proposed accounting model that would significantly change lease accounting. A revised exposure draft was issued on May 16, 2013; however, as of June 30, 2013, the final standards have yet to be issued. Changes to the accounting guidance could affect both our accounting for leases as well as that of our current and potential tenants. These changes may affect how the real estate leasing business is conducted. For example, if the accounting standards regarding the financial statement classification of operating leases are revised, then companies may be less willing to enter into leases in general or desire to enter into leases with shorter terms because the apparent benefits to their balance sheets could be reduced or eliminated. This in turn could cause a delay in investing our offering proceeds and make it more difficult for us to enter into leases on terms we find favorable.

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Economic conditions may adversely affect our income and we could be subject to risks associated with acquiring discounted real estate assets.

U.S. and international markets are currently experiencing increased levels of volatility due to a combination of many factors, including decreasing values of home prices, limited access to credit markets, higher fuel prices, less consumer spending and fears of a national and global recession. The effects of the current market dislocation may persist as financial institutions continue to take the necessary steps to restructure their business and capital structures. As a result, this economic downturn has reduced demand for space and removed support for rents and property values. Since we cannot predict when the real estate markets will recover, the value of our properties may decline if current market conditions persist or worsen.

In addition, we will be subject to the risks generally incident to the ownership of discounted real estate assets. Such assets may be purchased at a discount from historical cost due to, among other things, substantial deferred maintenance, abandonment, undesirable locations or markets, or poorly structured financing of the real estate or debt instruments underlying the assets, which has since lowered their value. Further, the continuing instability in the financial markets has limited the availability of lines of credit and the degree to which people and entities have access to cash to pay rents or debt service on the underlying the assets. Such illiquidity has the effect of increasing vacancies, increasing bankruptcies and weakening interest rates commercial entities can charge consumers, which can all decrease the value of already discounted real estate assets. Should conditions persist or worsen, the continued inability of the underlying real estate assets to produce income may weaken our return on our investments, which, in turn, may weaken your return on investment.

Further, irrespective of the instability the financial markets may have on the return produced by discounted real estate assets, the evolving efforts to correct the instability make the valuation of these assets highly unpredictable. The fluctuation in market conditions makes judging the future performance of these assets difficult. There is a risk that we may not purchase real estate assets at absolute discounted rates and that these assets may continue to decline in value.

Retail Industry Risks

Disruptions in the financial markets and challenging economic conditions could adversely affect our ability to secure debt financing on attractive terms, our ability to service any future indebtedness that we may incur and the values of our investments.

Despite improved access to capital for some companies, the capital and credit markets continue to be affected by extreme volatility and disruption during the past four years. The health of the global capital markets remains a concern. The banking industry has been experiencing improved earnings, but the relatively low growth economic environment has caused the markets to question whether financial institutions are truly appropriately capitalized. The downgrade of the U.S. government debt has increased these concerns, especially for the larger, money center banks. Smaller financial institutions have continued to work with borrowers to amend and extend existing loans; however, as these loans reach maturity, there is the potential for future credit losses. The FDIC’s list of troubled financial institutions is still quite large and the threat of more bank closings will weigh heavily on the financial markets. Looking forward, it is unclear whether mortgage delinquencies have peaked. Liquidity in the global credit market has been severely contracted by market disruptions, and new lending is expected to remain subdued in the near term.

If further disruptions in the financial markets occur, uncertain economic conditions could adversely affect the values of our investments. Turmoil in the capital markets has constrained equity and debt capital available for investment in commercial real estate, resulting in fewer buyers seeking to acquire commercial properties and lower property values. Furthermore, declining economic conditions could negatively impact commercial real estate fundamentals and result in lower occupancy, lower rental rates and declining values in our real estate portfolio and in the collateral securing our loan investments, which could have the following negative effects on us:

the values of our investments in grocery-anchored shopping centers could decrease below the amounts we paid for such investments;

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the value of collateral securing any loan investment that we may make could decrease below the outstanding principal amounts of such loans;
revenues from properties we acquire could decrease due to fewer tenants or lower rental rates, making it more difficult for us to pay distributions or meet our debt service obligations on future debt financings; and
revenues on the properties and other assets underlying any loan investments we may make could decrease, making it more difficult for the borrower to meet its payment obligations to us.

All of these factors could impair our ability to make distributions to our investors and decrease the value of an investment in us.

Retail conditions may adversely affect our income and our ability to make distributions to you.

A retail property’s revenues and value may be adversely affected by a number of factors, many of which apply to real estate investment generally, but which also include trends in the retail industry and perceptions by retailers or shoppers of the safety, convenience and attractiveness of the retail property. Our properties will be located in public places such as shopping centers and malls, and any incidents of crime or violence would result in a reduction of business traffic to tenant stores in our properties. Any such incidents may also expose us to civil liability. In addition, to the extent that the investing public has a negative perception of the retail sector, the value of our common stock may be negatively impacted.

Some of our leases may provide for base rent plus contractual base rent increases. A number of our retail leases also may include a percentage rent clause for additional rent above the base amount based upon a specified percentage of the sales our tenants generate. Under those leases which contain percentage rent clauses, our revenue from tenants may increase as the sales of our tenants increase. Generally, retailers face declining revenues during downturns in the economy. As a result, the portion of our revenue which we may derive from percentage rent leases could be adversely affected by a general economic downturn.

Competition with other retail channels may reduce our profitability and the return on your investment.

Our retail tenants will face potentially changing consumer preferences and increasing competition from other forms of retailing, such as discount shopping centers, outlet centers, upscale neighborhood strip centers, catalogues and other forms of direct marketing, discount shopping clubs, internet websites and telemarketing. Other retail centers within the market area of our properties will compete with our properties for customers, affecting their tenants’ cash flows and thus affecting their ability to pay rent. In addition, some of our tenants’ rent payments may be based on the amount of sales revenue that they generate. If these tenants experience competition, the amount of their rent may decrease and our cash flow will decrease.

Competition may impede our ability to renew leases or re-let space as leases expire and require us to undertake unbudgeted capital improvements, which could harm our operating results.

We expect that our properties will be located in developed areas. Any competitive properties that are developed close to our existing properties also may impact our ability to lease space to creditworthy tenants. Increased competition for tenants may require us to make capital improvements to properties that we would not have otherwise planned to make. Any unbudgeted capital improvements may negatively impact our financial position. Also, to the extent we are unable to renew leases or re-let space as leases expire, it would result in decreased cash flow from tenants and reduce the income produced by our properties. Excessive vacancies (and related reduced shopper traffic) at one of our properties may hurt sales of other tenants at that property and may discourage them from renewing leases.

A high concentration of our properties in a particular geographic area, with tenants in a similar industry, or a large number of tenants that are affiliated with a single company, would magnify the effects of downturns in that geographic area industry, or company and have a disproportionate adverse effect on the value of our investments.

In the event that we have a concentration of properties in any particular geographic area, any adverse situation that disproportionately affects that geographic area would have a magnified adverse effect on our portfolio. Similarly, if tenants of our properties are concentrated in a certain industry or retail category or if

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we have a large number of tenants that are affiliated with a single company, any adverse effect to that industry, retail category or company generally would have a disproportionately adverse effect on our portfolio.

We anticipate that our properties will consist primarily of retail properties. Our performance, therefore, is linked to the market for retail space generally and a downturn in the retail market could have an adverse effect on the value of your investment.

The market for retail space has been and could be adversely affected by weaknesses in the national, regional and local economies, the adverse financial condition of some large retailing companies, the ongoing consolidation in the retail sector, excess amounts of retail space in a number of markets and competition for tenants with other shopping centers in our markets. Customer traffic to these shopping areas may be adversely affected by the closing of stores in the same shopping center, or by a reduction in traffic to these stores resulting from a regional economic downturn, a general downturn in the local area where our store is located, or a decline in the desirability of the shopping environment of a particular shopping center. A reduction in customer traffic could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

If we enter into long-term leases with retail tenants, those leases may not result in fair value over time, which could adversely affect our revenues and ability to make distributions.

Long-term leases do not allow for significant changes in rental payments and do not expire in the near term. If we do not accurately judge the potential for increases in market rental rates when negotiating these long-term leases, significant increases in future property operating costs could result in receiving less than fair value from these leases. These circumstances would adversely affect our revenues and funds available for distribution.

Risks Related to Real Estate-Related Investments

Our investments in mortgage, mezzanine, bridge and other loans as well as our investments in mortgage-backed securities, collateralized debt obligations and other debt may be affected by unfavorable real estate market conditions, which could decrease the value of those assets and the return on your investment.

If we make or invest in mortgage, mezzanine or other real estate-related loans, we will be at risk of defaults by the borrowers on those loans. These defaults may be caused by many conditions beyond our control, including interest rate levels and local and other economic conditions affecting real estate values. We will not know whether the values of the properties ultimately securing our loans will remain at the levels existing on the dates of origination of those loans. If the values of the underlying properties drop, our risk will increase because of the lower value of the security associated with such loans. Our investments in mortgage-backed securities, collateralized debt obligations and other real estate-related debt will be similarly affected by real estate market conditions.

If we make or invest in mortgage, mezzanine, bridge or other real estate-related loans, our loans will be subject to interest rate fluctuations that will affect our returns as compared to market interest rates; accordingly, the value of your investment would be subject to fluctuations in interest rates.

If we make or invest in fixed-rate, long-term loans and interest rates rise, the loans could yield a return that is lower than then-current market rates. If interest rates decrease, we will be adversely affected to the extent that loans are prepaid because we may not be able to make new loans at the higher interest rate. If we invest in variable-rate loans and interest rates decrease, our revenues will also decrease. For these reasons, if we invest in mortgage, mezzanine, bridge or other real estate-related loans, our returns on those loans and the value of your investment will be subject to fluctuations in interest rates.

We have not established investment criteria limiting geographical concentration of our mortgage investments or requiring a minimum credit quality of borrowers.

We have not established any limit upon the geographic concentration of properties securing mortgage loans acquired or originated by us or the credit quality of borrowers of uninsured mortgage assets acquired or originated by us. As a result, properties securing our mortgage loans may be overly concentrated in certain

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geographic areas and the underlying borrowers of our uninsured mortgage assets may have low credit quality. We may experience losses due to geographic concentration or low credit quality.

Mortgage investments that are not United States government insured and non-investment-grade mortgage assets involve risk of loss.

We may originate and acquire uninsured and non-investment-grade mortgage loans and mortgage assets, including mezzanine loans, as part of our investment strategy. While holding these interests, we will be subject to risks of borrower defaults, bankruptcies, fraud and losses and special hazard losses that are not covered by standard hazard insurance. Also, the costs of financing the mortgage loans could exceed the return on the mortgage loans. In the event of any default under mortgage loans held by us, we will bear the risk of loss of principal and non-payment of interest and fees to the extent of any deficiency between the value of the mortgage collateral and the principal amount of the mortgage loan. To the extent we suffer such losses with respect to our investments in mortgage loans, the value of our stockholders’ investments may be adversely affected.

We may invest in non-recourse loans, which will limit our recovery to the value of the mortgaged property.

Our mortgage loan assets may be non-recourse loans. With respect to our non-recourse mortgage loan assets, in the event of a borrower default, the specific mortgaged property and other assets, if any, pledged to secure the relevant mortgage loan, may be less than the amount owed under the mortgage loan. As to those mortgage loan assets that provide for recourse against the borrower and its assets generally, we cannot assure our stockholders that the recourse will provide a recovery in respect of a defaulted mortgage loan greater than the liquidation value of the mortgaged property securing that mortgage loan.

Interest rate fluctuations will affect the value of our mortgage assets, net income and common stock.

Interest rates are highly sensitive to many factors, including governmental monetary and tax policies, domestic and international economic and political considerations and other factors beyond our control. Interest rate fluctuations can adversely affect our income in many ways and present a variety of risks including the risk of variances in the yield curve, a mismatch between asset yields and borrowing rates, and changing prepayment rates.

Variances in the yield curve may reduce our net income. The relationship between short-term and longer-term interest rates is often referred to as the “yield curve.” Short-term interest rates are ordinarily lower than longer-term interest rates. If short-term interest rates rise disproportionately relative to longer-term interest rates (a flattening of the yield curve), our borrowing costs may increase more rapidly than the interest income earned on our assets. Because our assets may bear interest based on longer-term rates than our borrowings, a flattening of the yield curve would tend to decrease our net income and the market value of our mortgage loan assets. Additionally, to the extent cash flows from investments that return scheduled and unscheduled principal are reinvested in mortgage loans, the spread between the yields of the new investments and available borrowing rates may decline, which would likely decrease our net income. It is also possible that short-term interest rates may exceed longer-term interest rates (a yield curve inversion), in which event our borrowing costs may exceed our interest income and we could incur operating losses.

Prepayment rates on our mortgage loans may adversely affect our yields.

The value of our mortgage loan assets may be affected by prepayment rates on investments. Prepayment rates are influenced by changes in current interest rates and a variety of economic, geographic and other factors beyond our control, and consequently, such prepayment rates cannot be predicted with certainty. To the extent we originate mortgage loans, we expect that such mortgage loans will have a measure of protection from prepayment in the form of prepayment lock-out periods or prepayment penalties. However, this protection may not be available with respect to investments that we acquire but do not originate. In periods of declining mortgage interest rates, prepayments on mortgages generally increase. If general interest rates decline as well, the proceeds of such prepayments received during such periods are likely to be reinvested by us in assets yielding less than the yields on the investments that were prepaid. In addition, the market value of mortgage investments may, because of the risk of prepayment, benefit less from declining interest rates than

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from other fixed-income securities. Conversely, in periods of rising interest rates, prepayments on mortgages generally decrease, in which case we would not have the prepayment proceeds available to invest in assets with higher yields. Under certain interest rate and prepayment scenarios we may fail to fully recoup our cost of acquisition of certain investments.

Before making any investment, we will consider the expected yield of the investment and the factors that may influence the yield actually obtained on such investment. These considerations will affect our decision whether to originate or purchase such an investment and the price offered for such an investment. No assurances can be given that we can make an accurate assessment of the yield to be produced by an investment. Many factors beyond our control are likely to influence the yield on the investments, including, but not limited to, competitive conditions in the local real estate market, local and general economic conditions and the quality of management of the underlying property. Our inability to accurately assess investment yields may result in our purchasing assets that do not perform as well as expected, which may adversely affect the value of our stockholders’ investments.

Volatility of values of mortgaged properties may adversely affect our mortgage loans.

Real estate property values and net operating income derived from real estate properties are subject to volatility and may be affected adversely by a number of factors, including the risk factors described in this prospectus relating to general economic conditions and owning real estate investments. In the event its net operating income decreases, a borrower may have difficulty paying our mortgage loan, which could result in losses to us. In addition, decreases in property values reduce the value of the collateral and the potential proceeds available to a borrower to repay our mortgage loans, which could also cause us to suffer losses.

Mezzanine loans involve greater risks of loss than senior loans secured by income producing properties.

We may make and acquire mezzanine loans. These types of mortgage loans are considered to involve a higher degree of risk than long-term senior mortgage lending secured by income-producing real property due to a variety of factors, including the loan being entirely unsecured or, if secured, becoming unsecured as a result of foreclosure by the senior lender. We may not recover some or all of our investment in these loans. In addition, mezzanine loans may have higher loan-to-value ratios than conventional mortgage loans resulting in less equity in the property and increasing the risk of loss of principal.

Our investments in subordinated loans and subordinated mortgage-backed securities may be subject to losses.

We may acquire or originate subordinated loans and invest in subordinated mortgage-backed securities. In the event a borrower defaults on a subordinated loan and lacks sufficient assets to satisfy our loan, we may suffer a loss of principal or interest. In the event a borrower declares bankruptcy, we may not have full recourse to the assets of the borrower, or the assets of the borrower may not be sufficient to satisfy the loan. If a borrower defaults on our loan or on debt senior to our loan, or in the event of a borrower bankruptcy, our loan will be satisfied only after the senior debt is paid in full. Where debt senior to our loan exists, the presence of intercreditor arrangements may limit our ability to amend our loan documents, assign our loans, accept prepayments, exercise our remedies (through “standstill periods”), and control decisions made in bankruptcy proceedings relating to borrowers.

We may invest in collateralized mortgage-backed securities, which may increase our exposure to credit and interest rate risk.

We may invest in collateralized mortgage-backed securities, or CMBS, which may increase our exposure to credit and interest rate risk. We have not adopted, and do not expect to adopt, any formal policies or procedures designed to manage risks associated with our investments in CMBS. In this context, credit risk is the risk that borrowers will default on the mortgages underlying the CMBS. While we may invest in CMBS guaranteed by U.S. government agencies, such as the Government National Mortgage Association, or GNMA, or U.S. government sponsored enterprises, such as the Federal National Mortgage Association, or FNMA, or the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, or FHLMC, there is no guarantee that such will be available or continue to be guaranteed by the U.S. government. Interest rate risk occurs as prevailing market interest

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rates change relative to the current yield on the CMBS. For example, when interest rates fall, borrowers are more likely to prepay their existing mortgages to take advantage of the lower cost of financing. As prepayments occur, principal is returned to the holders of the CMBS sooner than expected, thereby lowering the effective yield on the investment. On the other hand, when interest rates rise, borrowers are more likely to maintain their existing mortgages. As a result, prepayments decrease, thereby extending the average maturity of the mortgages underlying the CMBS. If we are unable to manage these risks effectively, our results of operations, financial condition and ability to pay distributions to you will be adversely affected.

Any real estate debt security that we originate or purchase is subject to the risks of delinquency and foreclosure.

We may originate and purchase real estate debt securities, which are subject to risks of delinquency and foreclosure and risks of loss. Typically, we will not have recourse to the personal assets of our borrowers. The ability of a borrower to repay a real estate debt security secured by an income-producing property depends primarily upon the successful operation of the property, rather than upon the existence of independent income or assets of the borrower. If the net operating income of the property is reduced, the borrower’s ability to repay the real estate debt security may be impaired. A property’s net operating income can be affected by, among other things:

increased costs, added costs imposed by franchisors for improvements or operating changes required, from time to time, under the franchise agreements;
property management decisions;
property location and condition;
competition from comparable types of properties;
changes in specific industry segments;
declines in regional or local real estate values, or occupancy rates; and
increases in interest rates, real estate tax rates and other operating expenses.

Our investments in real estate related common equity securities will be subject to specific risks relating to the particular issuer of the securities and may be subject to the general risks of investing in subordinated real estate securities, which may result in losses to us.

We may make equity investments in other REITs and other real estate companies. If we make such investments, we will target a public company that owns commercial real estate or real estate-related assets when we believe its stock is trading at a discount to that company’s net asset value. We may eventually seek to acquire or gain a controlling interest in the companies that we target. We do not expect our non-controlling equity investments in other public companies to exceed 5.0% of the proceeds of this offering, assuming we sell the maximum offering amount, or to represent a substantial portion of our assets at any one time. Our investments in real estate-related common equity securities will involve special risks relating to the particular issuer of the equity securities, including the financial condition and business outlook of the issuer. Issuers of real estate-related common equity securities generally invest in real estate or real estate-related assets and are subject to the inherent risks associated with real estate-related investments discussed in this prospectus.

Real estate-related common equity securities are generally unsecured and may also be subordinated to other obligations of the issuer. As a result, investments in real estate-related common equity securities are subject to risks of: (1) limited liquidity in the secondary trading market; (2) substantial market price volatility resulting from changes in prevailing interest rates; (3) subordination to the prior claims of banks and other senior lenders to the issuer; (4) the operation of mandatory sinking fund or call/redemption provisions during periods of declining interest rates that could cause the issuer to reinvest redemption proceeds in lower yielding assets; (5) the possibility that earnings of the issuer may be insufficient to meet its debt service and distribution obligations; and (6) the declining creditworthiness and potential for insolvency of the issuer during periods of rising interest rates and economic downturn. These risks may adversely affect the value of outstanding real estate-related common equity securities and the ability of the issuers thereof to make distribution payments.

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Risks Associated with Debt Financing

We may incur mortgage indebtedness and other borrowings, which we have broad authority to incur, that may increase our business risks and decrease the value of your investment.

We expect that in most instances, we will acquire real properties by using either existing financing or borrowing new funds. In addition, we may incur mortgage debt and pledge all or some of our real properties as security for that debt to obtain funds to acquire additional real properties. We may borrow if we need funds to satisfy the REIT tax qualification requirement that we generally distribute annually to our stockholders at least 90% of our REIT taxable income (which does not equal net income as calculated in accordance with GAAP), determined without regard to the deduction for dividends paid and excluding net capital gain. We also may borrow if we otherwise deem it necessary or advisable to assure that we maintain our qualification as a REIT.

There is no limitation on the amount we may borrow against any single improved property. Under our charter, our borrowings may not exceed 300% of our total “net assets” (as defined in our charter in accordance with the NASAA REIT Guidelines) as of the date of any borrowing, which is generally expected to be approximately 75% of the cost of our investments; however, we may exceed that limit if such excess is approved by a majority of the members of the Conflicts Committee and disclosed to stockholders in our next quarterly report following such borrowing along with justification for exceeding such limit. This charter limitation, however, does not apply to individual real estate assets or investments. In addition, it is our intention to limit our borrowings to 45% of the aggregate fair market value of our assets (calculated after the close of this offering and once we have invested substantially all the proceeds of this offering). However, subsequent events, including changes in the fair market value of our assets, could result in our exceeding these limits. We expect that during the period of this offering, we may seek independent director approval of borrowings in excess of these limitations since we will then be in the process of raising capital to acquire our portfolio. As a result, we expect that our debt levels will be higher until we have invested most of our capital. High debt levels would cause us to incur higher interest charges, would result in higher debt service payments and could be accompanied by restrictive covenants. These factors could limit the amount of cash we have available to distribute and could result in a decline in the value of your investment.

If there is a shortfall between the cash flow from a property and the cash flow needed to service mortgage debt on a property, then the amount available for distributions to stockholders may be reduced. In addition, incurring mortgage debt increases the risk of loss since defaults on indebtedness secured by a property may result in lenders initiating foreclosure actions. In that case, we could lose the property securing the loan that is in default, thus reducing the value of your investment. For U.S. federal income tax purposes, a foreclosure of any of our properties would be treated as a sale of the property for a purchase price equal to the outstanding balance of the debt secured by the mortgage. If the outstanding balance of the debt secured by the mortgage exceeds our tax basis in the property, we would recognize taxable income on foreclosure, but would not receive any cash proceeds. In such event, we may be unable to pay the amount of distributions required in order to maintain our REIT status. We may give full or partial guarantees to lenders of mortgage debt to the entities that own our properties. When we provide a guaranty on behalf of an entity that owns one of our properties, we will be responsible to the lender for satisfaction of the debt if it is not paid by such entity. If any mortgages contain cross-collateralization or cross-default provisions, a default on a single property could affect multiple properties. If any of our properties are foreclosed upon due to a default, our ability to pay cash distributions to our stockholders will be adversely affected which could result in our losing our REIT status and would result in a decrease in the value of your investment.

The current state of debt markets could have a material adverse impact on our earnings and financial condition.

The domestic and international commercial real estate debt markets are currently experiencing volatility as a result of certain factors including the tightening of underwriting standards by lenders and credit rating agencies. This is resulting in lenders increasing the cost for debt financing. Should the overall cost of borrowings increase, either by increases in the index rates or by increases in lender spreads, we will need to factor such increases into the economics of future acquisitions. This may result in future acquisitions generating lower overall economic returns and potentially reducing future cash flow available for distribution.

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If these disruptions in the debt markets persist, our ability to borrow monies to finance the purchase of, or other activities related to, real estate assets will be negatively impacted. If we are unable to borrow monies on terms and conditions that we find acceptable, we likely will have to reduce the number of properties we can purchase, and the return on the properties we do purchase may be lower. In addition, we may find it difficult, costly or impossible to refinance indebtedness which is maturing.

In addition, the state of the debt markets could have an impact on the overall amount of capital investing in real estate which may result in price or value decreases of real estate assets. Although this may benefit us for future acquisitions, it could negatively impact the current value of our existing assets.

Increases in interest rates could increase the amount of our debt payments and adversely affect our ability to pay distributions to our stockholders.

We expect that we will incur indebtedness in the future. To the extent that we incur variable rate debt, increases in interest rates would increase our interest costs, which could reduce our cash flows and our ability to pay distributions to you. In addition, if we need to repay existing debt during periods of rising interest rates, we could be required to liquidate one or more of our investments in properties at times that may not permit realization of the maximum return on such investments.

We may not be able to access financing sources on attractive terms, which could adversely affect our ability to execute our business plan.

We may finance our assets over the long-term through a variety of means, including repurchase agreements, credit facilities, issuance of commercial mortgage-backed securities, collateralized debt obligations and other structured financings. Our ability to execute this strategy will depend on various conditions in the markets for financing in this manner that are beyond our control, including lack of liquidity and greater credit spreads. We cannot be certain that these markets will remain an efficient source of long-term financing for our assets. If our strategy is not viable, we will have to find alternative forms of long-term financing for our assets, as secured revolving credit facilities and repurchase facilities may not accommodate long-term financing. This could subject us to more recourse indebtedness and the risk that debt service on less efficient forms of financing would require a larger portion of our cash flows, thereby reducing cash available for distribution to our stockholders and funds available for operations as well as for future business opportunities.

Lenders may require us to enter into restrictive covenants relating to our operations, which could limit our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

When providing financing, a lender may impose restrictions on us that affect our distribution and operating policies and our ability to incur additional debt. Loan agreements we enter may contain covenants that limit our ability to further mortgage a property, discontinue insurance coverage or replace our advisor. In addition, loan documents may limit our ability to replace a property’s property manager or terminate certain operating or lease agreements related to a property. These or other limitations would decrease our operating flexibility and our ability to achieve our operating objectives.

Our derivative financial instruments that we may use to hedge against interest rate fluctuations may not be successful in mitigating our risks associated with interest rates and could reduce the overall returns on our stockholders’ investments.

We may use derivative financial instruments to hedge exposures to changes in interest rates on loans secured by our assets, but no hedging strategy can protect us completely. We cannot assure our stockholders that our hedging strategy and the derivatives that we use will adequately offset the risk of interest rate volatility or that our hedging transactions will not result in losses. In addition, the use of such instruments may reduce the overall return on our investments. These instruments may also generate income that may not be treated as qualifying REIT income for purposes of the 75% Gross Income Test or 95% Gross Income Test (each as defined below in the section entitled “Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations — Taxation of Phillips Edison — ARC Grocery Center REIT II, Inc. — Income Tests”).

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Interest-only and adjustable rate indebtedness may increase our risk of default and ultimately may reduce our funds available for distribution to our stockholders.

We may finance our property acquisitions using interest-only mortgage indebtedness. During the interest-only period, the amount of each scheduled payment will be less than that of a traditional amortizing mortgage loan. The principal balance of the mortgage loan will not be reduced (except in the case of prepayments) because there are no scheduled monthly payments of principal during this period. After the interest-only period, we will be required either to make scheduled payments of amortized principal and interest or to make a lump-sum or “balloon” payment at maturity. These required principal or balloon payments will increase the amount of our scheduled payments and may increase our risk of default under the related mortgage loan. Our ability to make a balloon payment at maturity is uncertain and may depend upon our ability to obtain additional financing or our ability to sell the property. At the time the balloon payment is due, we may or may not be able to refinance the balloon payment on terms as favorable as the original loan or sell the property at a price sufficient to make the balloon payment. The effect of a refinancing or sale could affect the rate of return to stockholders and the projected time of disposition of our assets. In addition, payments of principal and interest made to service our debts may leave us with insufficient cash to pay the distributions that we are required to pay to maintain our qualification as a REIT. Any of these results would have a significant, negative impact on our stockholders’ investments.

Finally, if the mortgage loan has an adjustable interest rate, the amount of our scheduled payments also may increase at a time of rising interest rates. Increased payments and substantial principal or balloon maturity payments will reduce the funds available for distribution to our stockholders because cash otherwise available for distribution will be required to pay principal and interest associated with these mortgage loans.

U.S. Federal Income Tax Risks

Our failure to qualify or remain qualified as a REIT would subject us to U.S. federal income tax and potentially state and local tax, and would adversely affect our operations and the market price of our common stock.

We intend to elect and qualify to be taxed as a REIT commencing with our taxable year ending December 31, 2013 and intend to operate in a manner that would allow us to continue to qualify as a REIT. However, we may terminate our REIT qualification, if our board of directors determines that not qualifying as a REIT is in our best interests, or inadvertently. Our qualification as a REIT depends upon our satisfaction of certain asset, income, organizational, distribution, stockholder ownership and other requirements on a continuing basis. The REIT qualification requirements are extremely complex and interpretation of the U.S. federal income tax laws governing qualification as a REIT is limited. Furthermore, any opinion of our counsel, including tax counsel, as to our eligibility to qualify or remain qualified as a REIT is not binding on the IRS and is not a guarantee that we will qualify, or continue to qualify, as a REIT. Accordingly, we cannot be certain that we will be successful in operating so we can qualify or remain qualified as a REIT. Our ability to satisfy the asset tests depends on our analysis of the characterization and fair market values of our assets, some of which are not susceptible to a precise determination, and for which we will not obtain independent appraisals. Our compliance with the REIT income or quarterly asset requirements also depends on our ability to successfully manage the composition of our income and assets on an ongoing basis. Accordingly, if certain of our operations were to be recharacterized by the IRS, such recharacterization would jeopardize our ability to satisfy all requirements for qualification as a REIT. Furthermore, future legislative, judicial or administrative changes to the U.S. federal income tax laws could be applied retroactively, which could result in our disqualification as a REIT.

If we fail to qualify as a REIT for any taxable year, and we do not qualify for certain statutory relief provisions, we will be subject to U.S. federal income tax on our taxable income at corporate rates. In addition, we would generally be disqualified from treatment as a REIT for the four taxable years following the year of losing our REIT qualification. Losing our REIT qualification would reduce our net earnings available for investment or distribution to stockholders because of the additional tax liability. In addition, distributions to stockholders would no longer qualify for the dividends paid deduction, and we would no longer be required to make distributions. If this occurs, we might be required to borrow funds or liquidate some investments in order to pay the applicable tax.

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Even if we qualify as a REIT, in certain circumstances, we may incur tax liabilities that would reduce our cash available for distribution to you.

Even if we qualify and maintain our status as a REIT, we may be subject to U.S. federal, state and local income taxes. For example, net income from the sale of properties that are “dealer” properties sold by a REIT (a “prohibited transaction” under the Code) will be subject to a 100% tax. We may not make sufficient distributions to avoid excise taxes applicable to REITs. We also may decide to retain net capital gain we earn from the sale or other disposition of our property and pay U.S. federal income tax directly on such income. In that event, our stockholders would be treated as if they earned that income and paid the tax on it directly. However, stockholders that are tax-exempt, such as charities or qualified pension plans, would have no benefit from their deemed payment of such tax liability unless they file U.S. federal income tax returns and thereon seek a refund of such tax. We also will be subject to corporate tax on any undistributed REIT taxable income. We also may be subject to state and local taxes on our income or property, including franchise, payroll and transfer taxes, either directly or at the level of our operating partnership or at the level of the other companies through which we indirectly own our assets, such as our taxable REIT subsidiaries, which are subject to full U.S. federal, state, local and foreign corporate-level income taxes. Any taxes we pay directly or indirectly will reduce our cash available for distribution to you.

To qualify as a REIT we must meet annual distribution requirements, which may force us to forgo otherwise attractive opportunities or borrow funds during unfavorable market conditions. This could delay or hinder our ability to meet our investment objectives and reduce your overall return.

In order to qualify as a REIT, we must distribute annually to our stockholders at least 90% of our REIT taxable income (which does not equal net income as calculated in accordance with GAAP), determined without regard to the deduction for dividends paid and excluding net capital gain. We will be subject to U.S. federal income tax on our undistributed REIT taxable income and net capital gain and to a 4% nondeductible excise tax on any amount by which distributions we pay with respect to any calendar year are less than the sum of (a) 85% of our ordinary income, (b) 95% of our capital gain net income and (c) 100% of our undistributed income from prior years. These requirements could cause us to distribute amounts that otherwise would be spent on investments in real estate assets and it is possible that we might be required to borrow funds, possibly at unfavorable rates, or sell assets to fund these distributions. It is possible that we might not always be able to make distributions sufficient to meet the annual distribution requirements and to avoid U.S. federal income and excise taxes on our earnings while we qualify as a REIT.

Certain of our business activities are potentially subject to the prohibited transaction tax, which could reduce the return on your investment.

For so long as we qualify as a REIT, our ability to dispose of property during the first few years following acquisition may be restricted to a substantial extent as a result of our REIT qualification. Under applicable provisions of the Code regarding prohibited transactions by REITs, while we qualify as a REIT, we will be subject to a 100% penalty tax on any gain recognized on the sale or other disposition of any property (other than foreclosure property) that we own, directly or indirectly through any subsidiary entity, including our operating partnership, but generally excluding taxable REIT subsidiaries, that is deemed to be inventory or property held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of a trade or business. Whether property is inventory or otherwise held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of a trade or business depends on the particular facts and circumstances surrounding each property. During such time as we qualify as a REIT, we intend to avoid the 100% prohibited transaction tax by (a) conducting activities that may otherwise be considered prohibited transactions through a taxable REIT subsidiary (but such taxable REIT subsidiary will incur corporate rate income taxes with respect to any income or gain recognized by it), (b) conducting our operations in such a manner so that no sale or other disposition of an asset we own, directly or through any subsidiary, will be treated as a prohibited transaction, or (c) structuring certain dispositions of our properties to comply with the requirements of the prohibited transaction safe harbor available under the Code for properties that, among other requirements, have been held for at least two years. No assurance can be given that any particular property we own, directly or through any subsidiary entity, including our operating partnership, but generally excluding taxable REIT subsidiaries, will not be treated as inventory or property held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of a trade or business.

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Our taxable REIT subsidiaries are subject to corporate-level taxes and our dealings with our taxable REIT subsidiaries may be subject to 100% excise tax.

A REIT may own up to 100% of the stock of one or more taxable REIT subsidiaries. Both the subsidiary and the REIT must jointly elect to treat the subsidiary as a taxable REIT subsidiary. A corporation of which a taxable REIT subsidiary directly or indirectly owns more than 35% of the voting power or value of the stock will automatically be treated as a taxable REIT subsidiary. Overall, no more than 25% of the gross value of a REIT’s assets may consist of stock or securities of one or more taxable REIT subsidiaries. A taxable REIT subsidiary may hold assets and earn income that would not be qualifying assets or income if held or earned directly by a REIT, including gross income from operations pursuant to management contracts. Accordingly, we may use taxable REIT subsidiaries generally to hold properties for sale in the ordinary course of a trade or business or to hold assets or conduct activities that we cannot conduct directly as a REIT. A taxable REIT subsidiary will be subject to applicable U.S. federal, state, local and foreign income tax on its taxable income. In addition, the rules, which are applicable to us as a REIT, also impose a 100% excise tax on certain transactions between a taxable REIT subsidiary and its parent REIT that are not conducted on an arm’s-length basis.

If our operating partnership failed to qualify as a partnership or is not otherwise disregarded for U.S. federal income tax purposes, we would cease to qualify as a REIT.

If the IRS were to successfully challenge the status of our operating partnership as a partnership or disregarded entity for such purposes, it would be taxable as a corporation. In such event, this would reduce the amount of distributions that the operating partnership could make to us. This also would result in our failing to qualify as a REIT, and becoming subject to a corporate level tax on our income. This substantially would reduce our cash available to pay distributions and the yield on your investment. In addition, if any of the partnerships or limited liability companies through which our operating partnership owns its properties, in whole or in part, loses its characterization as a partnership and is otherwise not disregarded for U.S. federal income tax purposes, it would be subject to taxation as a corporation, thereby reducing distributions to the operating partnership. Such a recharacterization of an underlying property owner could also threaten our ability to maintain our REIT qualification.

We may choose to make distributions in our own stock, in which case you may be required to pay U.S. federal income taxes in excess of the cash dividends you receive.

In connection with our qualification as a REIT, we are required to distribute annually to our stockholders at least 90% of our REIT taxable income (which does not equal net income as calculated in accordance with GAAP), determined without regard to the deduction for dividends paid and excluding net capital gain. In order to satisfy this requirement, we may make distributions that are payable in cash and/or shares of our common stock (which could account for up to 80% of the aggregate amount of such distributions) at the election of each stockholder. Taxable stockholders receiving such distributions will be required to include the full amount of such distributions as ordinary dividend income to the extent of our current or accumulated earnings and profits, as determined for U.S. federal income tax purposes. As a result, U.S. stockholders may be required to pay U.S. federal income taxes with respect to such distributions in excess of the cash portion of the distribution received. Accordingly, U.S. stockholders receiving a distribution of our shares may be required to sell shares received in such distribution or may be required to sell other stock or assets owned by them, at a time that may be disadvantageous, in order to satisfy any tax imposed on such distribution. If a U.S. stockholder sells the stock that it receives as part of the distribution in order to pay this tax, the sales proceeds may be less than the amount included in income with respect to the distribution, depending on the market price of our stock at the time of the sale. Furthermore, with respect to certain non-U.S. stockholders, we may be required to withhold U.S. tax with respect to such distribution, including in respect of all or a portion of such distribution that is payable in stock, by withholding or disposing of part of the shares included in such distribution and using the proceeds of such disposition to satisfy the withholding tax imposed. In addition, if a significant number of our stockholders determine to sell shares of our common stock in order to pay taxes owed on dividend income, such sale may put downward pressure on the market price of our common stock.

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Various tax aspects of such a taxable cash/stock distribution are uncertain and have not yet been addressed by the IRS. No assurance can be given that the IRS will not impose requirements in the future with respect to taxable cash/stock distributions, including on a retroactive basis, or assert that the requirements for such taxable cash/stock distributions have not been met.

The taxation of distributions to our stockholders can be complex; however, distributions that we make to our stockholders generally will be taxable as ordinary income, which may reduce your anticipated return from an investment in us.

Distributions that we make to our taxable stockholders out of current and accumulated earnings and profits (and not designated as capital gain dividends or qualified dividend income) generally will be taxable as ordinary income. However, a portion of our distributions may (1) be designated by us as capital gain dividends generally taxable as long-term capital gain to the extent that they are attributable to net capital gain recognized by us, (2) be designated by us as qualified dividend income generally to the extent they are attributable to dividends we receive from our taxable REIT subsidiaries, or (3) constitute a return of capital generally to the extent that they exceed our accumulated earnings and profits as determined for U.S. federal income tax purposes. A return of capital is not taxable, but has the effect of reducing the basis of a stockholder’s investment in our common stock.

Our stockholders may have tax liability on distributions that they elect to reinvest in common stock, but they would not receive the cash from such distributions to pay such tax liability.

If our stockholders participate in our DRIP, they will be deemed to have received, and for U.S. federal income tax purposes will be taxed on, the amount reinvested in shares of our common stock to the extent the amount reinvested was not a tax-free return of capital. In addition, our stockholders will be treated for tax purposes as having received an additional distribution to the extent the shares are purchased at a discount to fair market value. As a result, unless a stockholder is a tax-exempt entity, it may have to use funds from other sources to pay its tax liability on the value of the shares of common stock received.

Dividends payable by REITs generally do not qualify for the reduced tax rates available for some dividends.

Currently, the maximum tax rate applicable to qualified dividend income payable to U.S. stockholders that are individuals, trusts and estates is 20%. Dividends payable by REITs, however, generally are not eligible for this reduced rate. Although this does not adversely affect the taxation of REITs or dividends payable by REITs, the more favorable rates applicable to regular corporate qualified dividends could cause investors who are individuals, trusts and estates to perceive investments in REITs to be relatively less attractive than investments in the stocks of non-REIT corporations that pay dividends, which could adversely affect the value of the shares of REITs, including our common stock. Tax rates could be changed in future legislation.

If we were considered to actually or constructively pay a “preferential dividend” to certain of our stockholders, our status as a REIT could be adversely affected.

In order to qualify as a REIT, we must distribute annually to our stockholders at least 90% of our REIT taxable income (which does not equal net income as calculated in accordance with GAAP), determined without regard to the deduction for dividends paid and excluding net capital gain. In order for distributions to be counted as satisfying the annual distribution requirements for REITs, and to provide us with a REIT-level tax deduction, the distributions must not be “preferential dividends.” A dividend is not a preferential dividend if the distribution is pro rata among all outstanding shares of stock within a particular class, and in accordance with the preferences among different classes of stock as set forth in our organizational documents. Currently, there is uncertainty as to the IRS’s position regarding whether certain arrangements that REITs have with their stockholders could give rise to the inadvertent payment of a preferential dividend (e.g., the pricing methodology for stock purchased under a distribution reinvestment plan inadvertently causing a greater than 5% discount on the price of such stock purchased).

Initially, the per share price for our common stock pursuant to our DRIP will be $23.75, which is 95% of the primary offering price of $25.00 (which includes the maximum selling commissions and dealer manager

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fee). After the NAV pricing date, the per share price for our common stock pursuant to our DRIP will be equal to the per share NAV for the quarter in which the distribution is payable, which, for U.S. federal income tax purposes, is intended to reflect the fair market value per share and does not include selling commissions or the dealer manager fee. If the IRS were to take a position contrary to our position that the per share NAV reflect the fair market value per share, it is possible that we may be treated as offering our stock under our DRIP at a discount greater than 5% of its fair market value resulting in the payment of a preferential dividend.

There is no de minimis exception with respect to preferential dividends. Therefore, if the IRS were to take the position that we inadvertently paid a preferential dividend, we may be deemed either to (a) have distributed less than 100% of our REIT taxable income and be subject to tax on the undistributed portion, or (b) have distributed less than 90% of our REIT taxable income and our status as a REIT could be terminated for the year in which such determination is made if we were unable to cure such failure.

Complying with REIT requirements may limit our ability to hedge our liabilities effectively and may cause us to incur tax liabilities.

The REIT provisions of the Code may limit our ability to hedge our liabilities. Any income from a hedging transaction we enter into to manage risk of interest rate changes, price changes or currency fluctuations with respect to borrowings made or to be made to acquire or carry real estate assets, if properly identified under applicable Treasury Regulations, does not constitute “gross income” for purposes of the 75% or 95% gross income tests. To the extent that we enter into other types of hedging transactions, the income from those transactions will likely be treated as non-qualifying income for purposes of both of the gross income tests. As a result of these rules, we may need to limit our use of advantageous hedging techniques or implement those hedges through a taxable REIT subsidiary. This could increase the cost of our hedging activities because our taxable REIT subsidiaries would be subject to tax on gains or expose us to greater risks associated with changes in interest rates than we would otherwise want to bear. In addition, losses in a taxable REIT subsidiary generally will not provide any tax benefit, except for being carried forward against future taxable income of such taxable REIT subsidiary.

Complying with REIT requirements may force us to forgo and/or liquidate otherwise attractive investment opportunities.

To qualify as a REIT, we must ensure that we meet the REIT gross income tests annually and that at the end of each calendar quarter, at least 75% of the value of our assets consists of cash, cash items, government securities and qualified REIT real estate assets, including certain mortgage loans and certain kinds of mortgage-related securities. The remainder of our investment in securities (other than government securities and qualified real estate assets) generally cannot include more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of any one issuer or more than 10% of the total value of the outstanding securities of any one issuer. In addition, in general, no more than 5% of the value of our assets (other than government securities and qualified real estate assets) can consist of the securities of any one issuer, and no more than 25% of the value of our total assets can be represented by securities of one or more taxable REIT subsidiaries. If we fail to comply with these requirements at the end of any calendar quarter, we must correct the failure within 30 days after the end of the calendar quarter or qualify for certain statutory relief provisions to avoid losing our REIT qualification and suffering adverse tax consequences. As a result, we may be required to liquidate assets from our portfolio or not make otherwise attractive investments in order to maintain our qualification as a REIT. These actions could have the effect of reducing our income and amounts available for distribution to our stockholders.

The ability of our board of directors to revoke our REIT qualification without stockholder approval may subject us to U.S. federal income tax and reduce distributions to our stockholders.

Our charter provides that our board of directors may revoke or otherwise terminate our REIT election, without the approval of our stockholders, if it determines that it is no longer in our best interest to continue to qualify as a REIT. While we intend to elect and qualify to be taxed as a REIT, we may not elect to be treated as a REIT or may terminate our REIT election if we determine that qualifying as a REIT is no longer in our best interests. If we cease to be a REIT, we would become subject to U.S. federal income tax on our taxable

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income and would no longer be required to distribute most of our taxable income to our stockholders, which may have adverse consequences on our total return to our stockholders and on the market price of our common stock.

We may be subject to adverse legislative or regulatory tax changes that could increase our tax liability, reduce our operating flexibility and reduce the market price of our common stock.

In recent years, numerous legislative, judicial and administrative changes have been made in the provisions of U.S. federal income tax laws applicable to investments similar to an investment in shares of our common stock. Additional changes to the tax laws are likely to continue to occur, and we cannot assure you that any such changes will not adversely affect the taxation of a stockholder. Any such changes could have an adverse effect on an investment in our shares or on the market value or the resale potential of our assets. You are urged to consult with your tax advisor with respect to the impact of recent legislation on your investment in our shares and the status of legislative, regulatory or administrative developments and proposals and their potential effect on an investment in our shares. You also should note that our counsel’s tax opinion is based upon existing law, applicable as of the date of its opinion, all of which will be subject to change, either prospectively or retroactively.

Although REITs generally receive better tax treatment than entities taxed as regular corporations, it is possible that future legislation would result in a REIT having fewer tax advantages, and it could become more advantageous for a company that invests in real estate to elect to be treated for U.S. federal income tax purposes as a corporation. As a result, our charter provides our board of directors with the power, under certain circumstances, to revoke or otherwise terminate our REIT election and cause us to be taxed as a regular corporation, without the vote of our stockholders. Our board of directors has fiduciary duties to us and our stockholders and could only cause such changes in our tax treatment if it determines in good faith that such changes are in the best interest of our stockholders.

The share ownership restrictions of the Code for REITs and the 9.8% share ownership limit in our charter may inhibit market activity in our shares of stock and restrict our business combination opportunities.

In order to qualify as a REIT, five or fewer individuals, as defined in the Code, may not own, actually or constructively, more than 50% in value of our issued and outstanding shares of stock at any time during the last half of each taxable year, other than the first year for which a REIT election is made. Attribution rules in the Code determine if any individual or entity actually or constructively owns our shares of stock under this requirement. Additionally, at least 100 persons must beneficially own our shares of stock during at least 335 days of a taxable year for each taxable year, other than the first year for which a REIT election is made. To help insure that we meet these tests, among other purposes, our charter restricts the acquisition and ownership of our shares of stock.

Our charter, with certain exceptions, authorizes our directors to take such actions as are necessary and desirable to preserve our qualification as a REIT while we so qualify. Unless exempted by our board of directors, for so long as we qualify as a REIT, our charter prohibits, among other limitations on ownership and transfer of shares of our stock, any person from beneficially or constructively owning (applying certain attribution rules under the Code) more than 9.8% in value of the aggregate of our outstanding shares of stock and more than 9.8% (in value or in number of shares, whichever is more restrictive) of any class or series of our shares of stock. Our board of directors may not grant an exemption from these restrictions to any proposed transferee whose ownership in excess of the 9.8% ownership limit would result in the termination of our qualification as a REIT. These restrictions on transferability and ownership will not apply, however, if our board of directors determines that it is no longer in our best interest to continue to qualify as a REIT or that compliance with the restrictions is no longer required in order for us to continue to so qualify as a REIT.

These ownership limits could delay or prevent a transaction or a change in control that might involve a premium price for our common stock or otherwise be in the best interest of the stockholders.

Non-U.S. stockholders will be subject to U.S. federal withholding tax and may be subject to U.S. federal income tax on distributions received from us and upon the disposition of our shares.

Subject to certain exceptions, distributions received from us will be treated as dividends of ordinary income to the extent of our current or accumulated earnings and profits. Such dividends ordinarily will be

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subject to U.S. withholding tax at a 30% rate, or such lower rate as may be specified by an applicable income tax treaty, unless the distributions are treated as “effectively connected” with the conduct by the non-U.S. stockholder of a U.S. trade or business. Pursuant to the Foreign Investment in Real Property Tax Act of 1980, or FIRPTA, capital gain distributions attributable to sales or exchanges of “U.S. real property interests,” or USRPIs, generally will be taxed to a non-U.S. stockholder as if such gain were effectively connected with a U.S. trade or business. However, a capital gain dividend will not be treated as effectively connected income if (a) the distribution is received with respect to a class of stock that is regularly traded on an established securities market located in the United States and (b) the non-U.S. stockholder does not own more than 5% of the class of our stock at any time during the one-year period ending on the date the distribution is received. We do not anticipate that our shares will be “regularly traded” on an established securities market for the foreseeable future, and therefore, this exception is not expected to apply.

Gain recognized by a non-U.S. stockholder upon the sale or exchange of our common stock generally will not be subject to U.S. federal income taxation unless such stock constitutes a USRPI under FIRPTA. Our common stock will not constitute a USRPI so long as we are a “domestically-controlled qualified investment entity.” A domestically-controlled qualified investment entity includes a REIT if at all times during a specified testing period, less than 50% in value of such REIT’s stock is held directly or indirectly by non-U.S. stockholders. We believe, but cannot assure you, that we will be a domestically-controlled qualified investment entity.

Even if we do not qualify as a domestically-controlled qualified investment entity at the time a non-U.S. stockholder sells or exchanges our common stock, gain arising from such a sale or exchange would not be subject to U.S. taxation under FIRPTA as a sale of a USRPI if: (a) our common stock is “regularly traded,” as defined by applicable Treasury regulations, on an established securities market, and (b) such non-U.S. stockholder owned, actually and constructively, 5% or less of our common stock at any time during the five-year period ending on the date of the sale. However, it is not anticipated that our common stock will be “regularly traded” on an established market. We encourage you to consult your tax advisor to determine the tax consequences applicable to you if you are a non-U.S. stockholder.

Potential characterization of distributions or gain on sale may be treated as unrelated business taxable income to tax-exempt investors.

If (a) we are a “pension-held REIT,” (b) a tax-exempt stockholder has incurred (or is deemed to have incurred) debt to purchase or hold our common stock, or (c) a holder of common stock is a certain type of tax-exempt stockholder, dividends on, and gains recognized on the sale of, common stock by such tax-exempt stockholder may be subject to U.S. federal income tax as unrelated business taxable income under the Code.

Retirement Plan Risks

If the fiduciary of an employee pension benefit plan subject to ERISA (such as a profit-sharing, Section 401(k) or pension plan) or any other retirement plan or account fails to meet the fiduciary and other standards under ERISA or the Code as a result of an investment in our stock, the fiduciary could be subject to criminal and civil penalties.

There are special considerations that apply to employee benefit plans subject to ERISA (such as profit-sharing, Section 401(k) or pension plans) and other retirement plans or accounts subject to Section 4975 of the Code (such as an IRA) that are investing in our shares. Fiduciaries investing the assets of such a plan or account in our common stock should satisfy themselves that:

the investment is consistent with their fiduciary obligations under ERISA and the Code;
the investment is made in accordance with the documents and instruments governing the plan or IRA, including the plan’s or account’s investment policy;
the investment satisfies the prudence and diversification requirements of Sections 404(a)(1)(B) and 404(a)(1)(C) of ERISA and other applicable provisions of ERISA and the Code;
the investment will not impair the liquidity of the plan or IRA;

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the investment will not produce an unacceptable amount of “unrelated business taxable income” for the plan or IRA;
the value of the assets of the plan can be established annually in accordance with ERISA requirements and applicable provisions of the plan or IRA; and
the investment will not constitute a non-exempt prohibited transaction under Section 406 of ERISA or Section 4975 of the Code.

With respect to the annual valuation requirements described above, we expect to provide an estimated value for our shares annually. From the commencement of this offering until 18 months have passed without a sale in a “public equity offering” of our common stock, we expect to use the gross offering price of a share of common stock in our most recent offering as the per share estimated value. For purposes of this definition, we will not consider “public equity offerings” to include offerings on behalf of selling stockholders or offerings related to any distribution reinvestment plan, employee benefit plan or the redemption of interests in our operating partnership.

This estimated value is not likely to reflect the proceeds you would receive upon our liquidation or upon the sale of your shares. Accordingly, we can make no assurances that such estimated value will satisfy the applicable annual valuation requirements under ERISA and the Code. The Department of Labor or the IRS may determine that a plan fiduciary or an IRA custodian is required to take further steps to determine the value of our common shares. In the absence of an appropriate determination of value, a plan fiduciary or an IRA custodian may be subject to damages, penalties or other sanctions.

Failure to satisfy the fiduciary standards of conduct and other applicable requirements of ERISA and the Code may result in the imposition of civil and criminal penalties and could subject the fiduciary to equitable remedies. In addition, if an investment in our shares constitutes a non-exempt prohibited transaction under ERISA or the Code, the fiduciary or IRA owner who authorized or directed the investment may be subject to the imposition of excise taxes with respect to the amount invested. In the case of a non-exempt prohibited transaction involving an IRA owner, the IRA may be disqualified and all of the assets of the IRA may be deemed distributed and subject to tax.

Prospective investors with investment discretion over the assets of an IRA, employee benefit plan or other retirement plan or arrangement that is covered by ERISA or Section 4975 of the Code should carefully review the information in the section of this prospectus entitled “ERISA Considerations.” Any such prospective investors are required to consult their own legal and tax advisors on these matters.

If you invest in our shares through an IRA or other retirement plan, you may be limited in your ability to withdraw required minimum distributions.

If you establish an IRA or other retirement plan through which you invest in our shares, federal law may require you to withdraw required minimum distributions, or RMDs, from such plan in the future. Our share repurchase program limits the amount of repurchases (other than those repurchases as a result of a stockholder’s death or disability) that can be made in a given year. Additionally, you will not be eligible to have your shares repurchased until you have held your shares for at least one year. As a result, you may not be able to have your shares repurchased at a time in which you need liquidity to satisfy the RMD requirements under your IRA or other retirement plan. Even if you are able to have your shares repurchased, such repurchase may be at a price less than the price at which the shares were initially purchased, depending on how long you have held your shares. If you fail to withdraw RMDs from your IRA or other retirement plan, you may be subject to certain tax penalties.

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ESTIMATED USE OF PROCEEDS

Depending primarily on the number of shares we sell in this offering, the amounts listed in the table below represent our current estimates concerning the use of the offering proceeds. Since these are estimates, they may not accurately reflect the actual receipt or application of the offering proceeds. The first scenario assumes we sell the minimum number of 80,000 shares of common stock in this offering and the second scenario assumes that we sell the maximum number of 80,000,000 shares in this offering, with both scenarios contemplating a price of $25.00 per share. We estimate that for each share sold in this offering, approximately $21.75 (assuming no shares available under the DRIP are sold) will be available for the purchase of real estate; the remainder of the offering proceeds will be used to pay the costs of the offering, the selling commissions and the dealer manager fee, and to pay a fee to our Advisor Entities for their services in connection with the selection and acquisition of properties. No selling commissions or dealer manager fee will be paid with respect to shares sold under the DRIP.

Subject to the discretion of our board of directors, our investments will be in real estate properties and real estate-related loans and securities. We do not expect investments in real estate-related loans and securities to exceed 10.0% of our portfolio. This will be the case no matter how much we raise in connection with the offering.

If we encounter delays in the selection, acquisition or development of income-producing properties, we may pay all or a substantial portion of our first or first several distributions from borrowings in anticipation of future cash flow or from advances from our Advisor Entities. Our distribution policy is not to use the proceeds of this offering to pay distributions. However, our board has the authority under our organizational documents, to the extent permitted by Maryland law, to pay distributions from any source without limit, including proceeds from this offering or the proceeds from the issuance of securities in the future.

The table does not give effect to special sales or volume discounts which could reduce selling commissions and many of the figures represent management’s best estimate because they cannot be precisely calculated at this time.

       
  Minimum Offering
(Not Including Distribution Reinvestment Plan)
  Maximum Offering
(Not Including Distribution Reinvestment Plan)
     Amount   Percent   Amount   Percent
Gross offering proceeds   $ 2,000,000       100.0 %    $ 2,000,000,000       100.0 % 
Less offering expenses:
                                   
Selling commissions and dealer manager fee(1)   $ 200,000       10.0     $ 200,000,000       10.0 (9) 
Organization and offering expenses(2)   $ 40,000       2.0     $ 40,000,000       2.0  
Amount available for investment(3)   $ 1,760,000       88.0 %    $ 1,760,000,000       88.0 % 
Acquisition:(4)
                                   
Acquisition fees(5)   $ 17,720       0.9     $ 17,720,000       0.9  
Acquisition expenses(6)   $ 8,860       0.4     $ 8,860,000       0.4  
Amount invested in properties(7)(8)*   $ 1,733,240       86.7 %    $ 1,733,240,000       86.7 % 

* This amount may be impacted by proceeds used to pay distributions, if any.
(1) Includes selling commissions equal to 7.0% of aggregate gross offering proceeds and a dealer manager fee equal to 3.0% of aggregate gross offering proceeds, both of which are payable to the dealer manager, our affiliate. No selling commissions or dealer manager fee will be paid on sales of shares under the DRIP. Our dealer manager, in its sole discretion, intends to reallow selling commissions of up to 7.0% of aggregate gross offering proceeds to unaffiliated broker-dealers participating in this offering attributable to the amount of shares sold by them. In addition, our dealer manager may reallow up to 1.5% of the gross offering proceeds it receives as its dealer manager fees to participating dealers to be paid to such participating dealers as marketing fees, based upon such factors as the volume of sales of such participating dealers, the level of marketing support provided by such participating dealers and the assistance of such participating dealers in marketing the offering, or to reimburse representatives of such participating dealers for the costs and expenses of attending our educational conferences and seminars.

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Alternatively, a participating broker-dealer may elect to receive a fee equal to 7.5% of gross proceeds from the sale of shares by such participating broker-dealer, with 2.5% thereof paid at the time of such sale and 1.0% thereof paid on each anniversary of the closing of such sale up to and including the fifth anniversary of the closing of such sale, in which event, a portion of the dealer manager fee will be reallowed such that the combined selling commission and dealer manager fee do not exceed 10.0% of gross proceeds of our primary offering. The amount of selling commissions may be reduced under certain circumstances for volume and other discounts as described in the “Plan of Distribution” section of this prospectus. Our dealer manager anticipates, based on its past experience, that, on average, it will reallow 1.0% of the dealer manager fee to participating broker-dealers. The total amount of all items of compensation from any source, payable to our dealer manager or the soliciting dealers will not exceed an amount that equals 10.0% of the gross proceeds of the offering (excluding securities purchased through the DRIP). See the section entitled “Plan of Distribution” in this prospectus for a description of such provisions.
(2) Organization and offering expenses include all expenses (other than selling commissions and the dealer manager fee) to be paid by us in connection with the offering, including our legal, accounting, printing, mailing and filing fees, charges of our escrow holder, due diligence expense reimbursements to soliciting dealers and amounts to reimburse our Advisor Entities for their portion of the salaries of the employees of their affiliates who provide services to our Advisor Entities and other costs in connection with administrative oversight of the offering and marketing process and preparing supplemental sales materials, holding educational conferences and attending retail seminars conducted by soliciting dealers. Pursuant to the terms of our advisory agreement, we have agreed to reimburse our Advisor Entities and their affiliates for organization and offering expenses up to 2.0% of the gross proceeds from our primary offering. Pursuant to the terms of the sub-advisory agreement, this organization and offering expense reimbursement of 2.0% will be allocated as follows: 1.5% to our sub-advisor and 0.5% to our advisor.
(3) Until required in connection with the acquisition and/or development of properties, substantially all of the net proceeds of this offering and, thereafter, any working capital reserves we may have, may be invested in short-term, highly-liquid investments, including government obligations, bank certificates of deposit, short-term debt obligations and interest-bearing accounts.
(4) Working capital reserves will be maintained at the property level and are typically utilized for extraordinary expenses that are not covered by revenue generation of the property, such as tenant improvements, leasing commissions and major capital expenditures. Alternatively, a lender party may require its own formula for escrow of working capital reserves.
(5) Acquisition fees are defined generally as fees and commissions paid by any party to any person in connection with identifying, reviewing, evaluating, investing in and the purchase of properties. We will pay to our Advisor Entities acquisition fees up to a maximum amount of 1.0% of the contract purchase price of each property acquired (including our pro rata share of debt attributable to such property) and up to 1.0% of the amount advanced for a loan or other investment (including our pro rata share of debt attributable to such investment). Once the proceeds from this offering have been fully invested, the aggregate amount of acquisition fees and financing coordination fees shall not exceed 1.5% of the contract purchase price and the amount advanced for a loan or other investment, as applicable, for all of the assets acquired. Assuming that we incur leverage up to 45% of the aggregate fair market value of our assets, as set forth in our investment guidelines, the minimum and maximum acquisition fees would be $32,218 and $32,218,182, respectively. Assuming we incur leverage up to 300% of our total “net assets” (as defined in our charter in accordance with the NASAA REIT Guidelines) as of the date of any borrowing, which is generally expected to be approximately 75% of the cost of our investments, the minimum and maximum acquisition fees would be $70,880 and $70,880,000, respectively.
(6) Acquisition expenses include legal fees and expenses, travel and communications expenses, costs of appraisals, accounting fees and expenses, title insurance premiums and other closing costs and miscellaneous expenses relating to the selection, evaluation and acquisition of real estate properties, whether or not acquired. For purposes of this table, we have assumed expenses of 0.5% of the purchase price of each property (including our pro rata share of debt attributable to such property) and 0.5% of the amount advanced for a loan or other investment (including our pro rata share of debt attributable to such investment); however, expenses on a particular acquisition may be higher. Acquisition fees and expenses for any particular property will not exceed 4.5% of the contract purchase price of each property (including our pro rata share of debt attributable to such property) or 4.5% of the amount advanced for a loan or other investment (including our pro rata share of debt attributable to such investment), provided, however, that a majority of the directors of our board of directors (including a majority of the members

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of the Conflicts Committee) not otherwise interested in the transaction may approve aggregate acquisition fees and expenses in excess of 4.5% of the contract purchase price of such property or investment if they find such acquisition fees and acquisition expenses to be commercially competitive, fair and reasonable to us. Assuming that we incur leverage up to 45% of the aggregate fair market value of our assets, as set forth in our investment guidelines, the minimum and maximum acquisition expenses would be $16,109 and $16,109,091, respectively. Assuming we incur leverage up to 300% of our total “net assets” (as defined in our charter in accordance with the NASAA REIT Guidelines) as of the date of any borrowing, which is generally expected to be approximately 75% of the cost of our investments, the minimum and maximum acquisition expenses would be $35,440 and $35,440,000, respectively.
(7) This table does not give effect to any leverage, the use of which would entitle our Advisor Entities or their assignees to a financing coordination fee and, as a result, would decrease the percentage of offering proceeds that would be invested in properties. If our Advisor Entities provide services in connection with the origination or refinancing of any debt that we obtain and use to finance properties or other permitted investments, or that is assumed, directly or indirectly, in connection with the acquisition of properties or other permitted investments, we will pay our Advisor Entities or their assignees a financing coordination fee equal to 0.75% of the amount available and/or outstanding under such financing or such assumed debt, subject to certain limitations. Our Advisor Entities may reallow some or all of this financing coordination fee to reimburse third parties with whom it may subcontract to procure such financing. Once the proceeds from this offering have been fully invested, the aggregate amount of acquisition fees and financing coordination fees shall not exceed 1.5% of the contract purchase price and the amount advanced for a loan or other investment, as applicable, for all the assets acquired. Assuming that we incur leverage up to 45% of the aggregate fair market value of our assets, as set forth in our investment guidelines, the minimum and maximum financing coordination fees would be $1.08 million and $10.8 million, respectively. Assuming we incur leverage up to 300% of our total “net assets” (as defined in our charter in accordance with the NASAA REIT Guidelines) as of the date of any borrowing, which is generally expected to be approximately 75% of the cost of our investments, the minimum and maximum financing coordination fees would be $3,990,000 and $39,900,000, respectively.
(8) Includes amounts anticipated to be invested in properties net of fees, expenses and initial working capital reserves. Such amounts do not reflect any distributions that may be paid to our stockholders. Our organizational documents permit us to use unlimited amounts of any source to pay distributions, including offering proceeds and financings. Any of these distributions may reduce the amount of capital we ultimately invest in properties.
(9) Until the NAV pricing date, the per share purchase price for shares in our primary offering will be up to $25.00 (including the maximum allowed to be charged for commissions and fees, subject to certain discounts as described in this prospectus). In determining the amount of selling commissions and dealer manager fees, we have assumed the sale of 80,000,000 shares at a purchase price of $25.00 per share.

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MARKET OPPORTUNITY

We seek to acquire and operate well-occupied, grocery-anchored neighborhood shopping centers leased to a mix of national and regional creditworthy retailers selling necessity-based good and services in strong demographic markets throughout the United States. We are focused on providing an investment vehicle that allows our stockholders to take advantage of the opportunity to participate in a carefully selected and professionally managed grocery-anchored real estate portfolio by utilizing the following investment and acquisition strategy:

Grocery-Anchored Retail — We are focused on acquiring well-occupied grocery-anchored shopping centers serving the day-to-day shopping needs of the community in the surrounding trade area;
National and Regional Retailers — We will acquire shopping centers that have a mix of national, regional and local retailers selling necessity-based goods and services to customers living in the local trade area;
Diversification — We will own and operate a diversified grocery-anchored portfolio based on geography, industry, tenancy, credit and lease expirations, thereby mitigating risk;
Infill Locations/Solid Markets — We will target properties in established or growing markets based on trends in population density, population growth, employment, household income, employment diversification, and other key demographic factors having higher barriers to entry, which we believe limit additional competition;
Triple-Net Leases — We will negotiate leases we enter into or acquire to provide for tenant reimbursements of operating expenses, real estate taxes and insurance, providing a level of protection against rising expenses;
Discount To Replacement Cost — We intend to acquire properties at values based on current in-place rents and at a substantial discount to replacement cost.

The Opportunity

We intend to invest primarily in well-occupied, grocery-anchored neighborhood shopping centers with a mix of national, regional, and local retailers that sell necessity-based goods and services to customers living in the local trade area. These centers will be well-located in more densely populated neighborhoods in the United States, where there are few opportunities for competing shopping centers to enter the market. We will be selective and prudent in investing capital and focus on acquiring higher quality assets with strong anchors in established or growing markets.

We expect to acquire centers where significant opportunities exist to create value through leasing and intensive property management. We believe that careful selection and institutional quality management of the shopping centers will allow us to maintain and enhance each property’s financial performance. As of the date of this filing, we own no properties.

We have a seasoned real estate team with over 20 years on average of experience in acquiring and operating retail properties through all market cycles. We believe that our team’s real estate experience and established network of owners and brokers, combined with what we believe will be an increase in the supply of available shopping center properties meeting our investment and acquisition strategy, will allow us to acquire assets at a discount to replacement cost.

Established Sourcing Network

Our Phillips Edison sponsor is nationally recognized as one of the largest private owners of grocery-anchored shopping centers in the country. Over the last 22 years, they have acquired over 300 shopping centers through their national, regional and local network of relationships with real estate brokers and existing owners of shopping centers, including individuals, REITs, insurance companies, and other institutional direct owners of real estate. We believe this direct access to a continuous source of investment opportunities, not available to smaller, regional operators, allows us to see nearly all of the marketed opportunities available for sale, as well as a substantial number of off-market deals.

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Our Phillips Edison sponsor’s reputation has been established through its acquisition history, consistent presence in the market and relationships with owners and brokers. Our Phillips Edison sponsor’s person-to-person marketing program provides continuous communication and market presence with owners and brokers. The program includes face-to-face meetings at owners’ and brokers’ offices, frequent telephone contact, networking at national and regional industry conferences, periodic e-blasts to over 30,000 shopping center professionals and e-postcards sent to our proprietary database of over 4,000 contacts.

Volume of Opportunities

We believe our investment strategy is well suited for the current real estate environment. We believe there is a window of opportunity that has been created as a result of events in the economy and the capital markets. This market dislocation is creating buying opportunities not seen since the early 1990s. As the economy and capital markets normalize, we expect a steady volume of acquisition opportunities meeting our investment criteria to appear. We believe several factors contribute to the anticipated volume of properties for acquisition, including:

We believe many owners of retail real estate are in distress as a result of debt maturities, are unable to cover their debt service obligations or are incapable of refinancing due to lender demands to resize their loans and are facing increasing pressure to sell.

There is over $142 billion in CMBS maturities over the next three years which we believe will lead to significant buying opportunities as many distressed owners may not be able to refinance their debt and will be forced to sell their assets.