485BPOS 1 tv533285_485bpos.htm 485BPOS

 

As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 26, 2019

No. 333-191019

 No. 811-22883

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM N-1A

 

  REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER
THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933
x
  Pre-Effective Amendment No. ¨
  Post-Effective Amendment No. 23 x
and/or

 

  REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER THE INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940
x
  Amendment No. 28 x
  (Check appropriate box or boxes)  

 

ARK ETF Trust

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Charter)

 

c/o ARK Investment Management LLC
3 East 28th Street, Seventh Floor
New York, NY 10016
(Address of Principal Executive Office)

 

Registrant’s Telephone Number, including Area Code:  (212) 426-7040

 

  With a copy to With a copy to:
Corporation Service Company Kellen Carter, Esq. Allison Fumai, Esq.
2711 Centerville Road, Suite 400 Chief Compliance Officer Dechert LLP
Wilmington, DE 19808 ARK Investment Management LLC

1095 Avenue of the Americas

New York, NY 10036

(Name and Address of Agent for 3 East 28th Street, Seventh Floor  
Service) New York, NY 10016  

 

IT IS PROPOSED THAT THIS FILING WILL BECOME EFFECTIVE (CHECK APPROPRIATE BOX)

 

¨ Immediately upon filing pursuant to paragraph (b)
x On November 30, 2019 pursuant to paragraph (b)
¨ 60 days after filing pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)
¨ On _______________ pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)
¨ 75 days after filing pursuant to paragraph (a)(2)
¨ On _______________ pursuant to paragraph (a)(2) of rule 485

 

IF APPROPRIATE, CHECK THE FOLLOWING BOX:

 

¨ This post-effective amendment designates a new effective date for a previously filed post-effective amendment

 

 

 

 

 

[MISSING IMAGE: logo_ark-etf.jpg]
Prospectus
November 30, 2019
ARK ETF Trust Thematic Actively-Managed ETFs
ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
Ticker Symbol
ARK Innovation ETF
ARKK
ARK Genomic Revolution ETF
ARKG
ARK Autonomous Technology & Robotics ETF
   (formerly, ARK Industrial Innovation ETF)
ARKQ
ARK Next Generation Internet ETF
   (formerly, ARK Web x.0 ETF)
ARKW
ARK Fintech Innovation ETF
ARKF
ARK ETF Trust Thematic Index ETFs
ETF
Cboe BZX
Exchange, Inc.
Ticker Symbol
The 3D Printing ETF
PRNT
ARK Israel Innovative Technology ETF
IZRL
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) has not approved or disapproved these securities or passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of this prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.
Beginning on January 1, 2021, as permitted by regulations adopted by the SEC, paper copies of a Fund’s shareholder reports will no longer be sent by mail, unless you specifically request paper copies of the reports from a Fund or from your financial intermediary, such as a broker-dealer or bank. Instead, shareholder reports will be made available on http://ark-funds.com/investor-resources, and you will be notified by mail each time a report is posted and provided with a website link to access the report.
If you already elected to receive shareholder reports electronically, you will not be affected by this change and you need not take any action. You may elect to receive shareholder reports and other communications from a Fund electronically anytime by contacting your financial intermediary or, if you are a direct investor, by calling (212) 426-7040.
You may elect to receive all future shareholder reports in paper free of charge. If you invest through a financial intermediary, you can contact your financial intermediary to request that you continue to receive paper copies of your shareholder reports. If you invest directly with a Fund, you can call (212) 426-7040 to let the Fund know you wish to continue receiving paper copies of your shareholder reports. Your election to receive shareholder reports in paper will apply to all funds held in your account if you invest through your financial intermediary or all funds held with the fund complex if you invest directly with a Fund.

 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1
1
11
18
26
35
43
51
60
61
61
61
61
66
67
69
70
72
72
72
73
73
74
76
77
77
79
87
87
89
 

 
SUMMARY INFORMATION
ARK Innovation ETF (ARKK)
Investment Objective
The ARK Innovation ETF’s (“Fund”) investment objective is long-term growth of capital.
Fund Fees and Expenses
The table below describes the fees and expenses that you pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund (“Shares”). Investors may pay brokerage commissions on their purchases and sales of Shares.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fee
0.75%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.00%
Other Expenses(a)
0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.75%
(a)
Pursuant to a Supervision Agreement, ARK Investment Management LLC (“ARK” or “Adviser”) pays all other expenses of the Fund (other than taxes and governmental fees, brokerage fees, commissions and other transaction expenses, certain foreign custodial fees and expenses, costs of borrowing money, including interest expenses, and extraordinary expenses (such as litigation and indemnification expenses)).
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. This example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares.
The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% annual return and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:
Year
Expenses
1 $ 77
3 $ 240
5 $ 417
10 $ 930
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it purchases and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may result in higher transaction costs and higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, may affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 80% of the average value of its portfolio.
 
1

 
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is an actively-managed exchange-traded fund (“ETF”) that will invest under normal circumstances primarily (at least 65% of its assets) in domestic and foreign equity securities of companies that are relevant to the Fund’s investment theme of disruptive innovation. The Adviser defines “disruptive innovation” as the introduction of a technologically enabled new product or service that potentially changes the way the world works. The Adviser believes that companies relevant to this theme are those that rely on or benefit from the development of new products or services, technological improvements and advancements in scientific research relating to the areas of genomics* (“Genomic Revolution Companies”); innovation in automation and manufacturing (“Automation Transformation Companies”), transportation, energy (“Energy Transformation Companies”), artificial intelligence (“Artificial Intelligence Companies”) and materials; the increased use of shared technology, infrastructure and services (“Next Generation Internet Companies”); and technologies that make financial services more efficient (“FinTech Innovation Companies”).
In selecting companies that the Adviser believes are relevant to a particular investment theme, the Adviser seeks to identify, using its own internal research and analysis, companies capitalizing on disruptive innovation or that are enabling the further development of a theme in the markets in which they operate. The Adviser’s internal research and analysis leverages insights from diverse sources, including external research, to develop and refine its investment themes and identify and take advantage of trends that have ramifications for individual companies or entire industries. The types of companies that the Adviser believes are Genomic Revolution Companies, Automation Transformation Companies, Energy Transformation Companies, Artificial Intelligence Companies, Next Generation Internet Companies or FinTech Innovation Companies are described below:

Genomic Revolution Companies.   Companies that the Adviser believes are substantially focused on and are expected to substantially benefit from extending and enhancing the quality of human and other life by incorporating technological and scientific developments, improvements and advancements in genomics into their business, such as by offering new products or services that rely on genomic sequencing,** analysis, synthesis or instrumentation. These companies may include ones across multiple sectors, such as healthcare, information technology, materials, energy and consumer discretionary. These companies may also develop, produce, manufacture or significantly rely on or enable bionic devices, bio-inspired computing, bioinformatics,*** molecular medicine and agricultural biotechnology.

Automation Transformation Companies.   Companies that the Adviser believes are focused on man capitalizing on the productivity of machines, such as through the automation of functions, processes or activities previously performed by human labor, such as transportation through an emphasis on mobility as a service, or the use of robotics to perform other functions, activities or processes.

Energy Transformation Companies.   Companies that the Adviser believes seek to capitalize on innovations or evolutions in: (i) ways that energy is stored or used; (ii) the discovery, collection and/or implementation of new sources of energy, including unconventional sources of oil or natural gas; and/or (iii) the production or development of new materials for use in commercial applications of energy production, use or storage.
*
The Adviser defines “genomics” as the study of genes and their functions, and related techniques (e.g., genomic sequencing). See Genomics and World Health: Report of the Advisory Committee on Health Research, Geneva, WHO (2002).
**
The Adviser uses the term “genomic sequencing” to refer to the techniques that allows researchers to read and decipher the genetic information found in the DNA (i.e., the exact sequence of bases A, C, G and T in a DNA molecule), including the DNA of bacteria, plants, animals and human beings.
***
The Adviser defines “bioinformatics” as the science of collecting and analyzing complex biological data such as genetic codes.
 
2

 

Artificial Intelligence Companies.   Companies that the Adviser considers to be Artificial Intelligence (“AI”) Companies include a company that: (i) designs, creates, integrates, or delivers robotics, autonomous technology, and/or AI in the form of products, software, or systems; (ii) develops the building block components for robotics, autonomous technology, or AI, such as advanced machinery, semiconductors and databases used for machine learning; (iii) provides its own value-added services on top of such building block components, but are not core to the company’s product or service offering; and/or (iv) develops computer systems that are able to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and translation between languages.

Next Generation Internet Companies.   Companies that the Adviser believes are focused on and expected to benefit from shifting the bases of technology infrastructure from hardware and software to the cloud, enabling mobile and local services, such as companies that rely on or benefit from the increased use of shared technology, infrastructure and services. These companies may include mail order houses which generate the entirety of their business through websites and which offer internet-based products and services, such as streaming media or cloud storage in addition to traditional physical goods. These companies may also include ones that develop, use or rely on innovative payment methodologies, big data, the “internet of things*,” machine learning, and social distribution and media.

FinTech Innovation Companies.   Companies that the Adviser believes are focused on and expected to benefit from the shifting of the financial sector and economic transactions to technology infrastructure platforms, and technological intermediaries. FinTech Innovation Companies may also develop, use or rely on innovative payment platforms and methodologies, point of sale providers, transactional innovations, business analytics, fraud reduction, frictionless funding platforms, peer-to-peer lending, blockchain technologies,** intermediary exchanges, asset allocation technology, cryptocurrency,*** mobile payments, and risk pricing and pooling aggregators. The Fund may have exposure to cryptocurrency, such as bitcoin, indirectly through an investment in a grantor trust. The Fund’s exposure to cryptocurrency may change over time and, accordingly, such exposure may not always be represented in the Fund’s portfolio.
The Adviser will select investments for the Fund that represent its highest-conviction investment ideas within the theme of disruptive innovation, as described above, in constructing the Fund’s portfolio. The Adviser’s process for identifying Genomic Revolution Companies, Automation Transformation Companies, Energy Transformation Companies, Artificial Intelligence Companies, Next Generation Internet Companies and FinTech Innovation Companies uses both “top down” (thematic research sizing the potential total available market, and surfacing the prime beneficiaries) and “bottom up” (valuation, fundamental and quantitative measures) approaches. In both the Adviser’s “top down” and “bottom up” approaches, the Adviser uses the framework of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals to integrate environmental, social, and governance
*
The Adviser defines the “internet of things” as a system of interrelated computing devices, mechanical and digital machines, or physical objects that are provided unique identifiers and the ability to transfer data over a network without requiring human-to-human or human-to-computer interaction.
**
The “blockchain” is a peer-to-peer shared, distributed ledger that facilitates the process of recording transactions and tracking assets in a business network. Blockchain derives its name from the way it stores transaction data in blocks that are linked together to form a chain. As the number of transactions grow, so does the blockchain. Blocks record and confirm the time and sequence of transactions, which are then logged into the blockchain, within a discrete network governed by rules agreed on by the network participants.
***
The Adviser believes that “Cryptocurrency” (notably, bitcoin), which is often referred to as “virtual currency” or “digital currency,” operates as a decentralized, peer-to-peer financial exchange and value storage that is used like money.
 
3

 
considerations into the research and investment process. The Adviser’s highest-conviction investment ideas are those that it believes present the best risk-reward opportunities.
Under normal circumstances, substantially all of the Fund’s assets will be invested in equity securities, including common stocks, partnership interests, business trust shares and other equity investments or ownership interests in business enterprises. The Fund’s investments will include micro-, small-, medium- and large-capitalization companies. The Fund’s investments in foreign equity securities will be in both developed and emerging markets. The Fund may invest in foreign securities (including investments in American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”)) and securities listed on local foreign exchanges.
The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”), which means that it may invest a high percentage of its assets in a limited number of issuers.
Principal Risks
There is no assurance that the Fund will meet its investment objective. The value of your investment in the Fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment in the Fund, may fluctuate significantly. You may lose part or all of your investment in the Fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments. Therefore, you should consider carefully the following risks before investing in the Fund. The principal risks of investing in the Fund listed below are presented alphabetically to facilitate your ability to find particular risks and compare them with the risks of other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.
Authorized Participants Concentration Risk.   The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants (“APs”) on an agency basis (i.e., on behalf of other market participants). To the extent that those APs exit the business or are unable to process creation and/or redemption orders, and no other AP is able to step forward to create and redeem in either of these cases, Shares may possibly trade at a discount to net asset value (“NAV”). The AP risk may be heightened in the case of ETFs investing internationally because international ETFs often require APs to post collateral, which only certain APs are able to do.
Communications Sector Risk.   The Fund will be more affected by the performance of the communications sector than a fund with less exposure to such sector. Communication companies are particularly vulnerable to the potential obsolescence of products and services due to technological advancement and the innovation of competitors. Companies in the communications sector may also be affected by other competitive pressures, such as pricing competition, as well as research and development costs, substantial capital requirements and government regulation. Additionally, fluctuating domestic and international demand, shifting demographics and often unpredictable changes in consumer tastes can drastically affect a communication company’s profitability. While all companies may be susceptible to network security breaches, certain companies in the communications sector may be particular targets of hacking and potential theft of proprietary or consumer information or disruptions in service, which could have a material adverse effect on their businesses.
Consumer Discretionary Risk.   The consumer discretionary sector may be affected by changes in domestic and international economies, exchange and interest rates, competition, consumers’ disposable income and consumer preferences, social trends and marketing campaigns.
Cryptocurrency Risk.   Cryptocurrency (notably, bitcoin), often referred to as “virtual currency” or “digital currency,” operates as a decentralized, peer-to-peer financial exchange and value storage that is used like money. The Fund may have exposure to bitcoin, a cryptocurrency, indirectly through an investment in the Bitcoin Investment Trust (“GBTC”), a privately offered, open-end investment vehicle. Cryptocurrency operates without central authority or banks and is not back by any government. Even indirectly, cryptocurrencies (i.e., bitcoin) may experience very high volatility and related investment vehicles like GBTC may be affected by such volatility. As a result of holding
 
4

 
cryptocurrency, the Fund may also trade at a significant premium to NAV. Cryptocurrency is also not legal tender. Federal, state or foreign governments may restrict the use and exchange of cryptocurrency, and regulation in the U.S. is still developing. Cryptocurrency exchanges may stop operating or permanently shut down due to fraud, technical glitches, hackers or malware.
Cryptocurrency Tax Risk.   Many significant aspects of the U.S. federal income tax treatment of investments in bitcoin are uncertain and an investment in bitcoin may produce income that is not treated as qualifying income for purposes of the income test applicable to regulated investment companies, such as the Fund. GBTC is expected to be treated as a grantor trust for U.S. federal income tax purposes, and therefore an investment by the Fund in GBTC will generally be treated as a direct investment in bitcoin for such purposes. See “Taxes” in the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”) for more information.
Cyber Security Risk.   As the use of Internet technology has become more prevalent in the course of business, funds have become more susceptible to potential operational risks through breaches in cyber security. A breach in cyber security refers to both intentional and unintentional events that may cause the Fund to lose proprietary information, suffer data corruption or lose operational capacity. Such events could cause the Fund to incur regulatory penalties, reputational damage, additional compliance costs associated with corrective measures and/or financial loss. Cyber security breaches may involve unauthorized access to the Fund’s digital information systems through “hacking” or malicious software coding, but may also result from outside attacks such as denial-of-service attacks through efforts to make network services unavailable to intended users. In addition, cyber security breaches of the Fund’s third-party service providers, such as its administrator, transfer agent or custodian, or issuers in which the Fund invests, can also subject the Fund to many of the same risks associated with direct cyber security breaches. While the Fund has established business continuity plans and risk management systems designed to reduce the risks associated with cyber security, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems. Additionally, there is no guarantee that such efforts will succeed, especially because the Fund does not directly control the cyber security systems of issuers or third-party service providers.
Depositary Receipts Risk.   ADRs and GDRs are securities typically issued by a bank or trust company that evidence ownership of underlying securities issued by a foreign corporation and entitle the holder to all dividends and capital gains that are paid out on the underlying foreign securities. The issuers of certain depositary receipts are under no obligation to distribute shareholder communications to the holders of such receipts, or to pass through to them any voting rights with respect to the deposited securities. Investment in depositary receipts may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market. Depositary receipts may not necessarily be denominated in the same currency as the underlying securities into which they may be converted. In addition, the issuers of the stock underlying unsponsored depositary receipts are not obligated to disclose material information in the United States.
Disruptive Innovation Risk.   Companies that the Adviser believes are capitalizing on disruptive innovation and developing technologies to displace older technologies or create new markets may not in fact do so. Companies that initially develop a novel technology may not be able to capitalize on the technology. Companies that develop disruptive technologies may face political or legal attacks from competitors, industry groups or local and national governments. These companies may also be exposed to risks applicable to sectors other than the disruptive innovation theme for which they are chosen, and the securities issued by these companies may underperform the securities of other companies that are primarily focused on a particular theme. The Fund may invest in a company that does not currently derive any revenue from disruptive innovations or technologies, and there is no assurance that a company will derive any revenue from disruptive innovations or technologies in the future. A disruptive innovation or technology may constitute a small portion of a company’s overall business. As a result, the success of a disruptive innovation or technology may not affect the value of the equity securities issued by the company.
Emerging Market Securities Risk.   Investment in securities of emerging market issuers may present risks that are greater than or different from those associated with foreign securities due to less developed and liquid markets and such factors as increased economic, political, regulatory, or other uncertainties.
 
5

 
Equity Securities Risk.   The value of the equity securities the Fund holds may fall due to general market and economic conditions, perceptions regarding the industries in which the issuers of securities the Fund holds participate or factors relating to specific companies in which the Fund invests. These can include stock movements, purchases or sales of securities by the Fund, government policies, litigation and changes in interest rates, inflation, the financial condition of the securities’ issuer or perceptions of the issuer, or economic conditions in general or specific to the issuer. Equity securities may also be particularly sensitive to general movements in the stock market, and a decline in the broader market may affect the value of the Fund’s equity investments.
Financial Technology Risk.   Companies that are developing financial technologies that seek to disrupt or displace established financial institutions generally face competition from much larger and more established firms. FinTech Innovation Companies may not be able to capitalize on their disruptive technologies if they face political and/or legal attacks from competitors, industry groups or local and national governments. Laws generally vary by country, creating some challenges to achieving scale. A FinTech Innovation Company may not currently derive any revenue, and there is no assurance that such company will derive any revenue from innovative technologies in the future. Additionally, Fintech Innovation Companies may be adversely impacted by potential rapid product obsolescence, cybersecurity attacks, increased regulatory oversight and disruptions in the technology they depend on.
Foreign Securities Risk.   The Fund’s investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. The Fund normally will not hedge any foreign currency exposure.
Future Expected Genomic Business Risk.   The Adviser may invest some of the Fund’s assets in Genomics Revolution Companies that do not currently derive a substantial portion of their current revenues from genomic-focused businesses and there is no assurance that any company will do so in the future, which may adversely affect the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
Health Care Sector Risk.   The health care sector may be affected by government regulations and government health care programs, restrictions on government reimbursement for medical expenses, increases or decreases in the cost of medical products and services and product liability claims, among other factors. Many health care companies are: (i) heavily dependent on patent protection and intellectual property rights and the expiration of a patent may adversely affect their profitability; (ii) subject to extensive litigation based on product liability and similar claims; and (iii) subject to competitive forces that may make it difficult to raise prices and, in fact, may result in price discounting. Many health care products and services may be subject to regulatory approvals. The process of obtaining such approvals may be long and costly, and delays or failure to receive such approvals may negatively impact the business of such companies. Additional or more stringent laws and regulations enacted in the future could have a material adverse effect on such companies in the health care sector. In addition, issuers in the health care sector include issuers having their principal activities in the biotechnology industry, medical laboratories and research, drug laboratories and research and drug manufacturers, which have the additional risks described below.

Biotechnology Company Risk.   A biotechnology company’s valuation can often be based largely on the potential or actual performance of a limited number of products and can accordingly be greatly affected if one of its products proves, among other things, unsafe, ineffective or unprofitable. Biotechnology companies are subject to regulation by, and the
 
6

 
restrictions of, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, state and local governments, and foreign regulatory authorities.

Pharmaceutical Company Risk.   Companies in the pharmaceutical industry can be significantly affected by, among other things, government approval of products and services, government regulation and reimbursement rates, product liability claims, patent expirations and protection and intense competition.
Information Technology Sector Risk.   The information technology sector includes companies engaged in internet software and services, technology hardware and storage peripherals, electronic equipment instruments and components, and semiconductors and semiconductor equipment. Information technology companies face intense competition, both domestically and internationally, which may have an adverse effect on profit margins. Information technology companies may have limited product lines, markets, financial resources or personnel. The products of information technology companies may face rapid product obsolescence due to technological developments and frequent new product introduction, unpredictable changes in growth rates and competition for the services of qualified personnel. Failure to introduce new products, develop and maintain a loyal customer base, or achieve general market acceptance for their products could have a material adverse effect on a company’s business. Companies in the information technology sector are heavily dependent on intellectual property and the loss of patent, copyright and trademark protections may adversely affect the profitability of these companies.

Internet Company Risk.   Many Internet-related companies have incurred large losses since their inception and may continue to incur large losses in the hope of capturing market share and generating future revenues. Accordingly, many such companies expect to incur significant operating losses for the foreseeable future, and may never be profitable. The markets in which many Internet companies compete face rapidly evolving industry standards, frequent new service and product announcements, introductions and enhancements, and changing customer demands. The failure of an Internet company to adapt to such changes could have a material adverse effect on the company’s business. Additionally, the widespread adoption of new Internet, networking, telecommunications technologies, or other technological changes could require substantial expenditures by an Internet company to modify or adapt its services or infrastructure, which could have a material adverse effect on an Internet company’s business.

Semiconductor Company Risk.   Competitive pressures may have a significant effect on the financial condition of semiconductor companies and, as product cycles shorten and manufacturing capacity increases, these companies may become increasingly subject to aggressive pricing, which hampers profitability. Reduced demand for end-user products, under-utilization of manufacturing capacity, and other factors could adversely impact the operating results of companies in the semiconductor sector. Semiconductor companies typically face high capital costs and may be heavily dependent on intellectual property rights. The semiconductor sector is highly cyclical, which may cause the operating results of many semiconductor companies to vary significantly. The stock prices of companies in the semiconductor sector have been and likely will continue to be extremely volatile.

Software Industry Risk.   The software industry can be significantly affected by intense competition, aggressive pricing, technological innovations, and product obsolescence. Companies in the software industry are subject to significant competitive pressures, such as aggressive pricing, new market entrants, competition for market share, short product cycles due to an accelerated rate of technological developments and the potential for limited earnings and/or falling profit margins. These companies also face the risks that new services, equipment or technologies will not be accepted by consumers and businesses or will become rapidly obsolete. These factors can affect the profitability of these companies and, as a result, the value of their securities. Also, patent protection is integral to the success of many companies in this industry, and profitability can be affected materially by, among other things, the cost of obtaining (or failing to obtain) patent approvals, the cost
 
7

 
of litigating patent infringement and the loss of patent protection for products (which significantly increases pricing pressures and can materially reduce profitability with respect to such products). In addition, many software companies have limited operating histories. Prices of these companies’ securities historically have been more volatile than other securities, especially over the short term.
International Closed-Market Trading Risk.   Because certain of the Fund’s underlying securities trade on an exchange that is closed when the securities exchange on which Fund Shares list and trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current pricing of an underlying security and stale security pricing (i.e., the last quote from its closed foreign market), likely resulting in premiums or discounts to NAV that may be greater than those experienced by ETFs that do not invest in foreign securities.
Issuer Risk.   Because the Fund may invest in approximately 40 to 50 issuers, it is subject to the risk that the value of the Fund’s portfolio may decline due to a decline in value of the equity securities of particular issuers. The value of an issuer’s equity securities may decline for reasons directly related to the issuer, such as management performance and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services.
Large-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Large-capitalization companies are generally less volatile than companies with smaller market capitalizations. In exchange for this potentially lower risk, the value of large-capitalization companies may not rise as much as that of companies with smaller market capitalizations.
Management Risk.   As an actively-managed ETF, the Fund is subject to management risk. The ability of the Adviser to successfully implement the Fund’s investment strategies will significantly influence the Fund’s performance.
Market Risk.   The value of the Fund’s assets will fluctuate as the markets in which the Fund invests fluctuate. The value of the Fund’s investments may decline, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, simply because of economic changes or other events, such as inflation (or expectations for inflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters or events, terrorism, regulatory events and government controls, that affect large portions of the market.
Market Trading Risk.   The Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including disruptions to the creation and redemption processes of the Fund, losses from trading in secondary markets, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for Shares due to market stress, which may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to their NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses.
Micro-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Micro-capitalization companies are subject to substantially greater risks of loss and price fluctuations because their earnings and revenues tend to be less predictable (and some companies may be experiencing significant losses). Their share prices tend to be more volatile and their markets less liquid than companies with larger market capitalizations. The shares of micro-capitalization companies tend to trade less frequently than those of larger, more established companies, which can adversely affect the pricing of these securities and the future ability to sell these securities.
Next Generation Internet Companies Risk.   The risks described below apply, in particular, to the Fund’s investment in Next Generation Internet Companies.

Internet Information Provider Company Risk.   Internet information provider companies provide Internet navigation services and reference guide information and publish, provide or present proprietary advertising and/or third party content. Such companies often derive a large portion of their revenues from advertising, and a reduction in spending by or loss of advertisers could seriously harm their business. This business is rapidly evolving and intensely competitive, and is subject to changing technologies, shifting user needs, and
 
8

 
frequent introductions of new products and services. The research and development of new, technologically advanced products is a complex and uncertain process requiring high levels of innovation and investment, as well as the accurate anticipation of technology, market trends and consumer needs. The number of people who access the Internet is increasing dramatically and a failure to attract and retain a substantial number of such users to a company’s products and services or to develop products and technologies that are more compatible with alternative devices, could adversely affect operating results. Concerns regarding a company’s products, services or processes that may compromise the privacy of users or other privacy related matters, even if unfounded, could damage a company’s reputation and adversely affect operating results.

Catalog and Mail Order House Company Risk.   Catalog and mail order house companies may be exposed to significant inventory risks that may adversely affect operating results due to, among other factors: seasonality, new product launches, rapid changes in product cycles and pricing, defective merchandise, changes in consumer demand and consumer spending patterns, or changes in consumer tastes with respect to products. Demand for products can change significantly between the time inventory or components are ordered and the date of sale. The acquisition of certain types of inventory or components may require significant lead-time and prepayment and they may not be returnable. Failure to adequately predict customer demand or otherwise optimize and operate distribution centers could result in excess or insufficient inventory or distribution capacity, result in increased costs, impairment charges, or both. The business of catalog and mail order house companies can be highly seasonal and failure to stock or restock popular products in sufficient amounts during high demand periods could significantly affect revenue and future growth. Increased website traffic during peak periods could cause system interruptions which may reduce the volume of goods sold and the attractiveness of a company’s products and services.
Non-Diversified Risk.   The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the 1940 Act. Therefore, the Fund may invest a relatively higher percentage of its assets in a relatively smaller number of issuers or may invest a larger proportion of its assets in a single issuer. As a result, the gains and losses on a single investment may have a greater impact on the Fund’s NAV and may make the Fund more volatile than more diversified funds.
Small- and Medium-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Small- and medium-capitalization companies may be more volatile and more likely than large-capitalization companies to have narrower product lines, fewer financial resources, less management depth and experience and less competitive strength. Returns on investments in securities of small- and medium-capitalization companies could trail the returns on investments in securities of large-capitalization companies.
Performance
The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year. The table shows how the Fund’s average annual returns for 1 year and since the Fund’s inception compare with those of the S&P 500 Index and the MSCI World Index. The S&P 500 Index is a widely recognized capitalization-weighted index that measures the performance of the large-capitalization sector of the U.S. stock market. The MSCI World Index represents large and mid-cap equity performance across 23 developed markets countries. Returns shown for the MSCI World Index are net of foreign withholding taxes applicable to U.S. investors. The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance
 
9

 
information is available at no cost by visiting http://ark-funds.com or by calling (212) 426-7040.
[MISSING IMAGE: tv533285-bc_arkkbw.jpg]
The Fund’s year-to-date total return as of October 31, 2019 was 18.90%.
Best and Worst Quarter Returns (for the period reflected in the bar chart above)
Return
Quarter/Year
Highest Return
20.93% 06/30/2017
Lowest Return
-18.95% 12/31/2018
Average Annual Total Returns as of December 31, 2018
1 Year
Since
Inception(1)
Returns Before Taxes
3.58% 17.90%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions(2)
2.32% 17.15%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares(2)
2.16% 14.01%
S&P 500 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-4.38% 7.85%
MSCI World Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-8.71% 4.65%
(1)
The Fund commenced operations on October 31, 2014.
(2)
After-tax returns are calculated using the highest historical individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on your tax situation and may differ from those shown and are not relevant if you hold your shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. In some cases the return after taxes may exceed the return before taxes due to an assumed tax benefit from any losses on a sale of Shares at the end of the measurement period.
Management of the Fund
Investment Adviser.   ARK Investment Management LLC.
Portfolio Manager.   The following individual has been primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund’s portfolio since the inception of the Fund: Catherine D. Wood.
Purchase and Sale of Shares and Tax Information
For important information about the purchase and sale of Shares, tax information and financial intermediary compensation, please turn to “Summary Information About Purchases and Sales of Fund Shares, Tax Information and Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries” in this prospectus.
[REMAINDER OF PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
 
10

 
ARK Genomic Revolution ETF (ARKG)
Investment Objective
The ARK Genomic Revolution ETF’s (“Fund”) investment objective is long-term growth of capital.
Fund Fees and Expenses
The table below describes the fees and expenses that you pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund (“Shares”). Investors may pay brokerage commissions on their purchases and sales of Shares.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fee
0.75%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.00%
Other Expenses(a)
0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.75%
(a)
Pursuant to a Supervision Agreement, ARK Investment Management LLC (“Adviser”) pays all other expenses of the Fund (other than taxes and governmental fees, brokerage fees, commissions and other transaction expenses, certain foreign custodial fees and expenses, costs of borrowing money, including interest expenses, and extraordinary expenses (such as litigation and indemnification expenses)).
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. This example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares.
The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% annual return and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:
Year
Expenses
1 $ 77
3 $ 240
5 $ 417
10 $ 930
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it purchases and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may result in higher transaction costs and higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, may affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 64% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is an actively-managed exchange-traded fund (“ETF”) that will invest under normal circumstances primarily (at least 80% of its assets) in domestic and foreign equity securities of
 
11

 
companies across multiple sectors, including healthcare, information technology, materials, energy and consumer discretionary, that are relevant to the Fund’s investment theme of the genomics* revolution (“Genomics Revolution Companies”), which is described below:

Genomic Revolution Companies.   Companies that the Adviser believes are substantially focused on and are expected to substantially benefit from extending and enhancing the quality of human and other life by incorporating technological and scientific developments, improvements and advancements in genomics into their business, such as by offering new products or services that rely on genomic sequencing,** analysis, synthesis or instrumentation. These companies may include ones across multiple sectors, such as healthcare, information technology, materials, energy and consumer discretionary. These companies may also develop, produce, manufacture or significantly rely on or enable bionic devices, bio-inspired computing, bioinformatics,*** molecular medicine and agricultural biotechnology.
In selecting companies that the Adviser believes are relevant to a particular investment theme, the Adviser seeks to identify, using its own internal research and analysis, companies capitalizing on disruptive innovation or that are enabling the further development of a theme in the markets in which they operate. The Adviser’s internal research and analysis leverages insights from diverse sources, including external research, to develop and refine its investment themes and identify and take advantage of trends that have ramifications for individual companies or entire industries. The Adviser will use “top down” (thematic research sizing the potential total available market, and surfacing the prime beneficiaries) approaches to select investments for the Fund. In both the Adviser’s “top down” and “bottom up” approaches, the Adviser uses the framework of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals to integrate environmental, social, and governance considerations into the research and investment process. The Fund may invest in certain companies that the Adviser believes are well-positioned to capitalize on and expected to devote substantial efforts to business lines enabled by disruptive genomic innovation, even if such companies do not currently derive a substantial portion of their revenues from genomics related activities.
Under normal circumstances, substantially all of the Fund’s assets will be invested in equity securities, including common stocks, partnership interests, business trust shares and other equity investments or ownership interests in business enterprises. The Fund’s investments will include micro-, small-, medium- and large-capitalization companies. The Fund’s investments in foreign equity securities will be in both developed and emerging markets. The Fund currently intends to use only American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) when purchasing foreign securities.
The Fund will be concentrated (i.e., more than 25% of the value of the Fund’s assets) in securities of issuers having their principal business activities in any industry or group of industries in the health care sector, including issuers having their principal business activities in the biotechnology industry. Other industries in the health care sector include medical laboratories and research and drug manufacturers. The Fund may invest in foreign securities (including investments in American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”)) and securities listed on local foreign exchanges.
The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”), which means that it may invest a high percentage of its assets in a limited number of issuers.
*
The Adviser defines “genomics” as the study of genes and their functions, and related techniques (e.g., genomic sequencing). See Genomics and World Health: Report of the Advisory Committee on Health Research, Geneva, WHO (2002).
**
The Adviser uses the term “genomic sequencing” to refer to the techniques that allows researchers to read and decipher the genetic information found in the DNA (i.e., the exact sequence of bases A, C, G and T in a DNA molecule), including the DNA of bacteria, plants, animals and human beings.
***
The Adviser defines “bioinformatics” as the science of collecting and analyzing complex biological data such as genetic codes.
 
12

 
Principal Risks
There is no assurance that the Fund will meet its investment objective. The value of your investment in the Fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment in the Fund, may fluctuate significantly. You may lose part or all of your investment in the Fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments. Therefore, you should consider carefully the following risks before investing in the Fund. The principal risks of investing in the Fund listed below are presented alphabetically to facilitate your ability to find particular risks and compare them with the risks of other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.
Authorized Participants Concentration Risk.   The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants (“APs”) on an agency basis (i.e., on behalf of other market participants). To the extent that those APs exit the business or are unable to process creation and/or redemption orders, and no other AP is able to step forward to create and redeem in either of these cases, Shares may possibly trade at a discount to net asset value (“NAV”). The AP risk may be heightened in the case of ETFs investing internationally because international ETFs often require APs to post collateral, which only certain APs are able to do.
Concentration Risk.   The Fund’s assets will be concentrated in securities of issuers having their principal business activities in any industry or group of industries in the health care sector, including issuers having their principal business activities in the biotechnology industry. To the extent that the Fund continues to be concentrated in the health care sector or biotechnology industry (or any other related health care sector or industry), the Fund will be subject to the risk that economic, political or other conditions that have a negative effect on that sector will negatively impact the Fund to a greater extent than if the Fund’s assets were invested in a wider variety of sectors or industries. Please see also the “Health Care Sector Risk” disclosures below.
Cyber Security Risk.   As the use of Internet technology has become more prevalent in the course of business, funds have become more susceptible to potential operational risks through breaches in cyber security. A breach in cyber security refers to both intentional and unintentional events that may cause the Fund to lose proprietary information, suffer data corruption or lose operational capacity. Such events could cause the Fund to incur regulatory penalties, reputational damage, additional compliance costs associated with corrective measures and/or financial loss. Cyber security breaches may involve unauthorized access to the Fund’s digital information systems through “hacking” or malicious software coding, but may also result from outside attacks such as denial-of-service attacks through efforts to make network services unavailable to intended users. In addition, cyber security breaches of the Fund’s third-party service providers, such as its administrator, transfer agent or custodian, or issuers in which the Fund invests, can also subject the Fund to many of the same risks associated with direct cyber security breaches. While the Fund has established business continuity plans and risk management systems designed to reduce the risks associated with cyber security, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems. Additionally, there is no guarantee that such efforts will succeed, especially because the Fund does not directly control the cyber security systems of issuers or third-party service providers.
Depositary Receipts Risk.   ADRs and GDRs are securities typically issued by a bank or trust company that evidence ownership of underlying securities issued by a foreign corporation and entitle the holder to all dividends and capital gains that are paid out on the underlying foreign securities. The issuers of certain depositary receipts are under no obligation to distribute shareholder communications to the holders of such receipts, or to pass through to them any voting rights with respect to the deposited securities. Investment in depositary receipts may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market. Depositary receipts may not necessarily be denominated in the same currency as the underlying securities into which they may be converted. In addition, the issuers of the stock underlying unsponsored depositary receipts are not obligated to disclose material information in the United States.
Disruptive Innovation Risk.   Companies that the Adviser believes are capitalizing on disruptive innovation and developing technologies to displace older technologies or create new markets may
 
13

 
not in fact do so. Companies that initially develop a novel technology may not be able to capitalize on the technology. Companies that develop disruptive technologies may face political or legal attacks from competitors, industry groups or local and national governments. These companies may also be exposed to risks applicable to sectors other than the disruptive innovation theme for which they are chosen, and the securities issued by these companies may underperform the securities of other companies that are primarily focused on a particular theme. The Fund may invest in a company that does not currently derive any revenue from disruptive innovations or technologies, and there is no assurance that a company will derive any revenue from disruptive innovations or technologies in the future. A disruptive innovation or technology may constitute a small portion of a company’s overall business. As a result, the success of a disruptive innovation or technology may not affect the value of the equity securities issued by the company.
Emerging Market Securities Risk.   Investment in securities of emerging market issuers may present risks that are greater than or different from those associated with foreign securities due to less developed and liquid markets and such factors as increased economic, political, regulatory, or other uncertainties.
Equity Securities Risk.   The value of the equity securities the Fund holds may fall due to general market and economic conditions, perceptions regarding the industries in which the issuers of securities the Fund holds participate or factors relating to specific companies in which the Fund invests. These can include stock movements, purchases or sales of securities by the Fund, government policies, litigation and changes in interest rates, inflation, the financial condition of the securities’ issuer or perceptions of the issuer, or economic conditions in general or specific to the issuer. Equity securities may also be particularly sensitive to general movements in the stock market, and a decline in the broader market may affect the value of the Fund’s equity investments.
Foreign Securities Risk.   The Fund’s investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. The Fund normally will not hedge any foreign currency exposure.
Future Expected Genomic Business Risk.   The Adviser expects to invest at least 80% of the Fund’s assets in Genomics Revolution Companies. However, certain of these companies do not currently derive a substantial portion of their current revenues from genomic-focused businesses and there is no assurance that any company will do so in the future, which may adversely affect the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
Health Care Sector Risk.   The health care sector may be affected by government regulations and government health care programs, restrictions on government reimbursement for medical expenses, increases or decreases in the cost of medical products and services and product liability claims, among other factors. Many health care companies are: (i) heavily dependent on patent protection and intellectual property rights and the expiration of a patent may adversely affect their profitability; (ii) subject to extensive litigation based on product liability and similar claims; and (iii) subject to competitive forces that may make it difficult to raise prices and, in fact, may result in price discounting. Many health care products and services may be subject to regulatory approvals. The process of obtaining such approvals may be long and costly, and delays or failure to receive such approvals may negatively impact the business of such companies. Additional or more stringent laws and regulations enacted in the future could have a material adverse effect on such companies in the health care sector. In addition, issuers in the health care sector include issuers having their
 
14

 
principal activities in the biotechnology industry, medical laboratories and research, drug laboratories and research and drug manufacturers, which have the additional risks described below.

Biotechnology Company Risk.   A biotechnology company’s valuation can often be based largely on the potential or actual performance of a limited number of products and can accordingly be greatly affected if one of its products proves, among other things, unsafe, ineffective or unprofitable. Biotechnology companies are subject to regulation by, and the restrictions of, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, state and local governments, and foreign regulatory authorities.

Pharmaceutical Company Risk.   Companies in the pharmaceutical industry can be significantly affected by, among other things, government approval of products and services, government regulation and reimbursement rates, product liability claims, patent expirations and protection and intense competition.
International Closed-Market Trading Risk.   Because certain of the Fund’s underlying securities trade on an exchange that is closed when the securities exchange on which Fund Shares list and trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current pricing of an underlying security and stale security pricing (i.e., the last quote from its closed foreign market), likely resulting in premiums or discounts to NAV that may be greater than those experienced by ETFs that do not invest in foreign securities.
Issuer Risk.   Because the Fund may invest in approximately 35 to 50 issuers, it is subject to the risk that the value of the Fund’s portfolio may decline due to a decline in value of the equity securities of particular issuers. The value of an issuer’s equity securities may decline for reasons directly related to the issuer, such as management performance and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services.
Large-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Large-capitalization companies are generally less volatile than companies with smaller market capitalizations. In exchange for this potentially lower risk, the value of large-capitalization companies may not rise as much as that of companies with smaller market capitalizations.
Management Risk.   As an actively-managed ETF, the Fund is subject to management risk. The ability of the Adviser to successfully implement the Fund’s investment strategies will significantly influence the Fund’s performance.
Market Risk.   The value of the Fund’s assets will fluctuate as the markets in which the Fund invests fluctuate. The value of the Fund’s investments may decline, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, simply because of economic changes or other events, such as inflation (or expectations for inflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters or events, terrorism, regulatory events and government controls, that affect large portions of the market.
Market Trading Risk.   The Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including disruptions to the creation and redemption processes of the Fund, losses from trading in secondary markets, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for Shares due to market stress, which may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to their NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses.
Micro-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Micro-capitalization companies are subject to substantially greater risks of loss and price fluctuations because their earnings and revenues tend to be less predictable (and some companies may be experiencing significant losses). Their share prices tend to be more volatile and their markets less liquid than companies with larger market capitalizations. The shares of micro-capitalization companies tend to trade less frequently than those of larger, more established companies, which can adversely affect the pricing of these securities and the future ability to sell these securities.
 
15

 
Non-Diversified Risk.   The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the 1940 Act. Therefore, the Fund may invest a relatively higher percentage of its assets in a relatively smaller number of issuers or may invest a larger proportion of its assets in a single issuer. As a result, the gains and losses on a single investment may have a greater impact on the Fund’s NAV and may make the Fund more volatile than more diversified funds.
Small- and Medium-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Small- and medium-capitalization companies may be more volatile and more likely than large-capitalization companies to have narrower product lines, fewer financial resources, less management depth and experience and less competitive strength. Returns on investments in securities of small- and medium-capitalization companies could trail the returns on investments in securities of large-capitalization companies.
Performance
The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year. The table shows how the Fund’s average annual returns for 1 year and since the Fund’s inception compare with those of the NASDAQ Healthcare Index, the S&P 500 Index and the MSCI World Index. The NASDAQ Healthcare Index contains securities of NASDAQ-listed companies classified according to the Industry Classification Benchmark as Health Care. They include health care providers, medical equipment, medical supply companies, biotechnology companies, and pharmaceutical companies. The S&P 500 Index is a widely recognized capitalization-weighted index that measures the performance of the large-capitalization sector of the U.S. stock market. The MSCI World Index represents large and mid-cap equity performance across 23 developed markets countries. Returns shown for the MSCI World Index are net of foreign withholding taxes applicable to U.S. investors. The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available at no cost by visiting http://ark-funds.com or by calling (212) 426-7040.
[MISSING IMAGE: tv533285-bc_arkgbw.jpg]
The Fund’s year-to-date total return as of October 31, 2019 was 24.56%.
Best and Worst Quarter Returns (for the period reflected in the bar chart above)
Return
Quarter/Year
Highest Return
21.34% 03/31/2017
Lowest Return
-26.51% 12/31/2018
 
16

 
Average Annual Total Returns as of December 31, 2018
1 Year
Since
Inception(1)
Returns Before Taxes
0.58% 5.34%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions(2)
-0.03% 5.07%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares(2)
0.53% 4.07%
NASDAQ Healthcare Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-4.17% 1.15%
S&P 500 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-4.38% 7.85%
MSCI World Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-8.71% 4.65%
(1)
The Fund commenced operations on October 31, 2014.
(2)
After-tax returns are calculated using the highest historical individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on your tax situation and may differ from those shown and are not relevant if you hold your shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. In some cases the return after taxes may exceed the return before taxes due to an assumed tax benefit from any losses on a sale of Shares at the end of the measurement period.
Management of the Fund
Investment Adviser.   ARK Investment Management LLC.
Portfolio Manager.   The following individual has been primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund’s portfolio since the Fund’s inception: Catherine D. Wood.
Purchase and Sale of Shares and Tax Information
For important information about the purchase and sale of Shares, tax information and financial intermediary compensation, please turn to “Summary Information About Purchases and Sales of Fund Shares, Tax Information and Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries” in this prospectus.
[REMAINDER OF PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
 
17

 
ARK Autonomous Technology & Robotics ETF (ARKQ)
(formerly, ARK Industrial Innovation ETF)
Investment Objective
The ARK Autonomous Technology & Robotics ETF’s (“Fund”) investment objective is long-term growth of capital.
Fund Fees and Expenses
The table below describes the fees and expenses that you pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund (“Shares”). Investors may pay brokerage commissions on their purchases and sales of Shares.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fee
0.75%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.00%
Other Expenses(a)
0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.75%
(a)
Pursuant to a Supervision Agreement, ARK Investment Management LLC (“Adviser”) pays all other expenses of the Fund (other than taxes and governmental fees, brokerage fees, commissions and other transaction expenses, certain foreign custodial fees and expenses, costs of borrowing money, including interest expenses, and extraordinary expenses (such as litigation and indemnification expenses)).
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. This example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares.
The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% annual return and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:
Year
Expenses
1 $ 77
3 $ 240
5 $ 417
10 $ 930
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it purchases and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may result in higher transaction costs and higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, may affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 54% of the average value of its portfolio.
 
18

 
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is an actively-managed exchange-traded fund (“ETF”) that will invest under normal circumstances primarily (at least 80% of its assets) in domestic and foreign equity securities of autonomous technology and robotics companies that are relevant to the Fund’s investment theme of disruptive innovation.
Autonomous technology and robotics companies are companies that the Adviser believes are expected to focus on and benefit from the development of new products or services, technological improvements and advancements in scientific research related to, among other things, disruptive innovation in automation and manufacturing (“Automation Transformation Companies”), transportation, energy (“Energy Transformation Companies”), artificial intelligence (“Artificial Intelligence Companies”) and materials. These types of companies are described below:

Automation Transformation Companies.   Companies that the Adviser believes are focused on man capitalizing on the productivity of machines, such as through the automation of functions, processes or activities previously performed by human labor, such as transportation through an emphasis on mobility as a service, or the use of robotics to perform other functions, activities or processes.

Energy Transformation Companies.   Companies that the Adviser believes seek to capitalize on innovations or evolutions in: (i) ways that energy is stored or used; (ii) the discovery, collection and/or implementation of new sources of energy, including unconventional sources of oil or natural gas; and/or (iii) the production or development of new materials for use in commercial applications of energy production, use or storage.

Artificial Intelligence Companies.   Companies that the Adviser considers to be Artificial Intelligence (“AI”) Companies include a company that: (i) designs, creates, integrates, or delivers robotics, autonomous technology, and/or AI in the form of products, software, or systems; (ii) develops the building block components for robotics, autonomous technology, or AI, such as advanced machinery, semiconductors and databases used for machine learning; (iii) provides its own value-added services on top of such building block components, but are not core to the company’s product or service offering; and/or (iv) develops computer systems that are able to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and translation between languages.
In selecting companies that the Adviser believes are relevant to a particular investment theme, the Adviser seeks to identify, using its own internal research and analysis, companies capitalizing on disruptive innovation or that are enabling the further development of a theme in the markets in which they operate. The Adviser’s internal research and analysis leverages insights from diverse sources, including external research, to develop and refine its investment themes and identify and take advantage of trends that have ramifications for individual companies or entire industries. The Adviser will use “top down” (thematic research sizing the potential total available market, and surfacing the prime beneficiaries) approaches to select investments for the Fund. In both the Adviser’s “top down” and “bottom up” approaches, the Adviser uses the framework of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals to integrate environmental, social, and governance considerations into the research and investment process.
Under normal circumstances, substantially all of the Fund’s assets will be invested in equity securities, including common stocks, partnership interests, business trust shares and other equity investments or ownership interests in business enterprises. The Fund’s investments will include micro-, small-, medium- and large-capitalization companies. The Fund’s investments in foreign equity securities will be in both developed and emerging markets. The Fund currently intends to use only American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) when purchasing foreign securities.
The Fund will be concentrated (i.e., more than 25% of the value of the Fund’s assets) in securities of issuers having their principal business activities in groups of industries in the industrials or
 
19

 
information technology sectors, although it will not concentrate in any specific industry. The Fund may invest in foreign securities (including investments in American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”)) and securities listed on local foreign exchanges.
The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”), which means that it may invest a high percentage of its assets in a limited number of issuers.
Principal Risks
There is no assurance that the Fund will meet its investment objective. The value of your investment in the Fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment in the Fund, may fluctuate significantly. You may lose part or all of your investment in the Fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments. Therefore, you should consider carefully the following risks before investing in the Fund. The principal risks of investing in the Fund listed below are presented alphabetically to facilitate your ability to find particular risks and compare them with the risks of other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.
Authorized Participants Concentration Risk.   The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants (“APs”) on an agency basis (i.e., on behalf of other market participants). To the extent that those APs exit the business or are unable to process creation and/or redemption orders, and no other AP is able to step forward to create and redeem in either of these cases, Shares may possibly trade at a discount to net asset value (“NAV”). The AP risk may be heightened in the case of ETFs investing internationally because international ETFs often require APs to post collateral, which only certain APs are able to do.
Concentration Risk.   The Fund’s assets will be concentrated in securities of issuers having their principal business activities in groups of industries in the (i) industrials sector or (ii) information technology sector. However, the Fund will not concentrate in any specific industry. To the extent that the Fund continues to be concentrated in groups of industries in the industrials sector or the information technology sector, the Fund will be subject to the risk that economic, political, business or other conditions that have a negative effect on such industry groups will negatively impact the Fund to a greater extent than if the Fund’s assets were invested in a wider variety of sectors or industries. Please see also the “Industrials Sector Risk” and “Information Technology Sector Risk” disclosures below.
Consumer Discretionary Risk.   The consumer discretionary sector may be affected by changes in domestic and international economies, exchange and interest rates, competition, consumers’ disposable income and consumer preferences, social trends and marketing campaigns.
Cyber Security Risk.   As the use of Internet technology has become more prevalent in the course of business, funds have become more susceptible to potential operational risks through breaches in cyber security. A breach in cyber security refers to both intentional and unintentional events that may cause the Fund to lose proprietary information, suffer data corruption or lose operational capacity. Such events could cause the Fund to incur regulatory penalties, reputational damage, additional compliance costs associated with corrective measures and/or financial loss. Cyber security breaches may involve unauthorized access to the Fund’s digital information systems through “hacking” or malicious software coding, but may also result from outside attacks such as denial-of-service attacks through efforts to make network services unavailable to intended users. In addition, cyber security breaches of the Fund’s third-party service providers, such as its administrator, transfer agent or custodian, or issuers in which the Fund invests, can also subject the Fund to many of the same risks associated with direct cyber security breaches. While the Fund has established business continuity plans and risk management systems designed to reduce the risks associated with cyber security, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems. Additionally, there is no guarantee that such efforts will succeed, especially because the Fund does not directly control the cyber security systems of issuers or third-party service providers.
 
20

 
Depositary Receipts Risk.   ADRs and GDRs are securities typically issued by a bank or trust company that evidence ownership of underlying securities issued by a foreign corporation and entitle the holder to all dividends and capital gains that are paid out on the underlying foreign securities. The issuers of certain depositary receipts are under no obligation to distribute shareholder communications to the holders of such receipts, or to pass through to them any voting rights with respect to the deposited securities. Investment in depositary receipts may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market. Depositary receipts may not necessarily be denominated in the same currency as the underlying securities into which they may be converted. In addition, the issuers of the stock underlying unsponsored depositary receipts are not obligated to disclose material information in the United States.
Disruptive Innovation Risk.   Companies that the Adviser believes are capitalizing on disruptive innovation and developing technologies to displace older technologies or create new markets may not in fact do so. Companies that initially develop a novel technology may not be able to capitalize on the technology. Companies that develop disruptive technologies may face political or legal attacks from competitors, industry groups or local and national governments. These companies may also be exposed to risks applicable to sectors other than the disruptive innovation theme for which they are chosen, and the securities issued by these companies may underperform the securities of other companies that are primarily focused on a particular theme. The Fund may invest in a company that does not currently derive any revenue from disruptive innovations or technologies, and there is no assurance that a company will derive any revenue from disruptive innovations or technologies in the future. A disruptive innovation or technology may constitute a small portion of a company’s overall business. As a result, the success of a disruptive innovation or technology may not affect the value of the equity securities issued by the company.
Emerging Market Securities Risk.   Investment in securities of emerging market issuers may present risks that are greater than or different from those associated with foreign securities due to less developed and liquid markets and such factors as increased economic, political, regulatory, or other uncertainties.
Equity Securities Risk.   The value of the equity securities the Fund holds may fall due to general market and economic conditions, perceptions regarding the industries in which the issuers of securities the Fund holds participate or factors relating to specific companies in which the Fund invests. These can include stock movements, purchases or sales of securities by the Fund, government policies, litigation and changes in interest rates, inflation, the financial condition of the securities’ issuer or perceptions of the issuer, or economic conditions in general or specific to the issuer. Equity securities may also be particularly sensitive to general movements in the stock market, and a decline in the broader market may affect the value of the Fund’s equity investments.
Foreign Securities Risk.   The Fund’s investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. The Fund normally will not hedge any foreign currency exposure.
Industrials Sector Risk.   The industrials sector includes companies engaged in aerospace and defense, electrical engineering, machinery, and professional services. Companies in the industrials sector may be adversely affected by changes in government regulation, world events and economic conditions. In addition, companies in the industrials sector may be adversely affected by environmental damages, product liability claims and exchange rates.
 
21

 

Aerospace and Defense Company Risk.   Companies in the aerospace and defense industry rely to a large extent on U.S. (and other) Government demand for their products and services and may be significantly affected by changes in government regulations and spending, as well as economic conditions and industry consolidation.

Professional Services Company Risk.   Professional services companies may be materially impacted by economic conditions and related fluctuations in client demand for marketing, business, technology and other consulting services. Professional services companies’ success depends in large part on attracting and retaining key employees and a failure to do so could adversely affect a company’s business. There are relatively few barriers to entry into the professional services market, and new competitors could readily seek to compete in one or more market segments, which could adversely affect a professional services company’s operating results through pricing pressure and loss of market share.
Information Technology Sector Risk.   The information technology sector includes companies engaged in internet software and services, technology hardware and storage peripherals, electronic equipment instruments and components, and semiconductors and semiconductor equipment. Information technology companies face intense competition, both domestically and internationally, which may have an adverse effect on profit margins. Information technology companies may have limited product lines, markets, financial resources or personnel. The products of information technology companies may face rapid product obsolescence due to technological developments and frequent new product introduction, unpredictable changes in growth rates and competition for the services of qualified personnel. Failure to introduce new products, develop and maintain a loyal customer base, or achieve general market acceptance for their products could have a material adverse effect on a company’s business. Companies in the information technology sector are heavily dependent on intellectual property and the loss of patent, copyright and trademark protections may adversely affect the profitability of these companies.

Internet Company Risk.   Many Internet-related companies have incurred large losses since their inception and may continue to incur large losses in the hope of capturing market share and generating future revenues. Accordingly, many such companies expect to incur significant operating losses for the foreseeable future, and may never be profitable. The markets in which many Internet companies compete face rapidly evolving industry standards, frequent new service and product announcements, introductions and enhancements, and changing customer demands. The failure of an Internet company to adapt to such changes could have a material adverse effect on the company’s business. Additionally, the widespread adoption of new Internet, networking, telecommunications technologies, or other technological changes could require substantial expenditures by an Internet company to modify or adapt its services or infrastructure, which could have a material adverse effect on an Internet company’s business.

Semiconductor Company Risk.   Competitive pressures may have a significant effect on the financial condition of semiconductor companies and, as product cycles shorten and manufacturing capacity increases, these companies may become increasingly subject to aggressive pricing, which hampers profitability. Reduced demand for end-user products, under-utilization of manufacturing capacity, and other factors could adversely impact the operating results of companies in the semiconductor sector. Semiconductor companies typically face high capital costs and may be heavily dependent on intellectual property rights. The semiconductor sector is highly cyclical, which may cause the operating results of many semiconductor companies to vary significantly. The stock prices of companies in the semiconductor sector have been and likely will continue to be extremely volatile.

Software Industry Risk.   The software industry can be significantly affected by intense competition, aggressive pricing, technological innovations, and product obsolescence. Companies in the software industry are subject to significant competitive pressures, such as aggressive pricing, new market entrants, competition for market share, short product cycles
 
22

 
due to an accelerated rate of technological developments and the potential for limited earnings and/or falling profit margins. These companies also face the risks that new services, equipment or technologies will not be accepted by consumers and businesses or will become rapidly obsolete. These factors can affect the profitability of these companies and, as a result, the value of their securities. Also, patent protection is integral to the success of many companies in this industry, and profitability can be affected materially by, among other things, the cost of obtaining (or failing to obtain) patent approvals, the cost of litigating patent infringement and the loss of patent protection for products (which significantly increases pricing pressures and can materially reduce profitability with respect to such products). In addition, many software companies have limited operating histories. Prices of these companies’ securities historically have been more volatile than other securities, especially over the short term.
International Closed-Market Trading Risk.   Because certain of the Fund’s underlying securities trade on an exchange that is closed when the securities exchange on which Fund Shares list and trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current pricing of an underlying security and stale security pricing (i.e., the last quote from its closed foreign market), likely resulting in premiums or discounts to NAV that may be greater than those experienced by ETFs that do not invest in foreign securities.
Issuer Risk.   Because the Fund may invest in approximately 35 to 50 issuers, it is subject to the risk that the value of the Fund’s portfolio may decline due to a decline in value of the equity securities of particular issuers. The value of an issuer’s equity securities may decline for reasons directly related to the issuer, such as management performance and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services.
Large-Capitalization Companies Risk.    Large-capitalization companies are generally less volatile than companies with smaller market capitalizations. In exchange for this potentially lower risk, the value of large-capitalization companies may not rise as much as that of companies with smaller market capitalizations.
Management Risk.   As an actively-managed ETF, the Fund is subject to management risk. The ability of the Adviser to successfully implement the Fund’s investment strategies will significantly influence the Fund’s performance.
Market Risk.   The value of the Fund’s assets will fluctuate as the markets in which the Fund invests fluctuate. The value of the Fund’s investments may decline, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, simply because of economic changes or other events, such as inflation (or expectations for inflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters or events, terrorism, regulatory events and government controls, that affect large portions of the market.
Market Trading Risk.   The Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including disruptions to the creation and redemption processes of the Fund, losses from trading in secondary markets, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for Shares due to market stress, which may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to their NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses.
Micro-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Micro-capitalization companies are subject to substantially greater risks of loss and price fluctuations because their earnings and revenues tend to be less predictable (and some companies may be experiencing significant losses). Their share prices tend to be more volatile and their markets less liquid than companies with larger market capitalizations. The shares of micro-capitalization companies tend to trade less frequently than those of larger, more established companies, which can adversely affect the pricing of these securities and the future ability to sell these securities.
Non-Diversified Risk.   The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the 1940 Act. Therefore, the Fund may invest a relatively higher percentage of its assets in a relatively
 
23

 
smaller number of issuers or may invest a larger proportion of its assets in a single issuer. As a result, the gains and losses on a single investment may have a greater impact on the Fund’s NAV and may make the Fund more volatile than more diversified funds.
Small- and Medium-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Small- and medium-capitalization companies may be more volatile and more likely than large-capitalization companies to have narrower product lines, fewer financial resources, less management depth and experience and less competitive strength. Returns on investments in securities of small- and medium-capitalization companies could trail the returns on investments in securities of large-capitalization companies.
Performance
The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year. The table shows how the Fund’s average annual returns for 1 year and since the Fund’s inception compare with those of the S&P 500 Index and the MSCI World Index. The S&P 500 Index is a widely recognized capitalization-weighted index that measures the performance of the large-capitalization sector of the U.S. stock market. The MSCI World Index represents large and mid-cap equity performance across 23 developed markets countries. Returns shown for the MSCI World Index are net of foreign withholding taxes applicable to U.S. investors. The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available at no cost by visiting http://ark-funds.com or by calling (212) 426-7040.
[MISSING IMAGE: tv533285-bc_arkqbw.jpg]
The Fund’s year-to-date total return as of October 31, 2019 was 13.19%.
Best and Worst Quarter Returns (for the period reflected in the bar chart above)
Return
Quarter/Year
Highest Return
15.79% 09/30/2016
Lowest Return
-15.76% 12/31/2018
Average Annual Total Returns as of December 31, 2018
1 Year
Since
Inception(1)
Returns Before Taxes
-7.57% 10.96%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions(2)
-8.28% 10.55%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares(2)
-4.14% 8.56%
S&P 500 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-4.38% 7.93%
MSCI World Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-8.71% 4.38%
(1)
The Fund commenced operations on September 30, 2014.
(2)
After-tax returns are calculated using the highest historical individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on your tax situation
 
24

 
and may differ from those shown and are not relevant if you hold your shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. In some cases the return after taxes may exceed the return before taxes due to an assumed tax benefit from any losses on a sale of Shares at the end of the measurement period.
Management of the Fund
Investment Adviser.   ARK Investment Management LLC.
Portfolio Manager.   The following individual has been primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund’s portfolio since the inception of the Fund: Catherine D. Wood.
Purchase and Sale of Shares and Tax Information
For important information about the purchase and sale of Shares, tax information and financial intermediary compensation, please turn to “Summary Information About Purchases and Sales of Fund Shares, Tax Information and Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries” in this prospectus.
[REMAINDER OF PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
 
25

 
ARK Next Generation Internet ETF (ARKW)
(formerly, ARK Web x.0 ETF)
Investment Objective
The ARK Next Generation Internet ETF’s (“Fund”) investment objective is long-term growth of capital.
Fund Fees and Expenses
The table below describes the fees and expenses that you pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund (“Shares”). Investors may pay brokerage commissions on their purchases and sales of Shares.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fee
0.75%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.00%
Other Expenses(a)
0.00%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses(b)
0.01%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses(b)
0.76%
(a)
Pursuant to a Supervision Agreement, ARK Investment Management LLC (“Adviser”) pays all other expenses of the Fund (other than taxes and governmental fees, brokerage fees, commissions and other transaction expenses, certain foreign custodial fees and expenses, costs of borrowing money, including interest expenses, and extraordinary expenses (such as litigation and indemnification expenses)).
(b)
The Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses may not correlate to the ratio of expenses to average net assets as reported in the “Financial Highlights” section of the Prospectus, which reflects the operating expenses of the Fund and does not include Acquired Fund Fees & Expenses. Acquired Fund Fees & Expenses represent the Fund’s pro rata share of fees and expenses incurred indirectly as a result of investing in other funds, including ETFs and money market funds.
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. This example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares.
The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% annual return and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:
Year
Expenses
1 $ 77
3 $ 242
5 $ 421
10 $ 941
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it purchases and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may result in higher transaction costs and higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in
 
26

 
annual fund operating expenses or in the example, may affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 92% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is an actively-managed exchange-traded fund (“ETF”) that will invest under normal circumstances primarily (at least 80% of its assets) in domestic and foreign equity securities of companies that are relevant to the Fund’s investment theme of next generation internet.
Next generation internet companies are companies that the Adviser believes are focused on and expected to benefit from shifting the bases of technology infrastructure from hardware and software to the cloud, enabling mobile and local services, such as companies that rely on or benefit from the increased use of shared technology, infrastructure and services. These companies may include mail order houses which generate the entirety of their business through websites and which offer internet-based products and services, such as streaming media or cloud storage in addition to traditional physical goods. These companies may also include ones that develop, use or rely on innovative payment methodologies, big data, the “internet of things*,” social distribution and media, and technologies that make financial services more efficient (“FinTech Innovation Companies”).
In selecting companies that the Adviser believes are relevant to a particular investment theme, the Adviser seeks to identify, using its own internal research and analysis, companies capitalizing on disruptive innovation or that are enabling the further development of a theme in the markets in which they operate. The Adviser’s internal research and analysis leverages insights from diverse sources, including internal and external research, to develop and refine its investment themes and identify and take advantage of trends that have ramifications for individual companies or entire industries. The types of companies that the Adviser believes are relevant to this theme are those that are focused on shifting the bases of technology infrastructure from hardware and software to the cloud, enabling mobile and local services, among others. The Adviser believes FinTech Innovation Companies are companies that are focused on and expected to benefit from the shifting of the financial sector and economic transactions to technology infrastructure platforms, and technological intermediaries. FinTech Innovation Companies may also develop, use or rely on innovative payment platforms and methodologies, point of sale providers, transactional innovations, business analytics, fraud reduction, frictionless funding platforms, peer-to-peer lending, blockchain technologies,** intermediary exchanges, asset allocation technology, cryptocurrency,*** mobile payments, and risk pricing and pooling aggregators. The Fund may have exposure to cryptocurrency, such as bitcoin, indirectly through an investment in a grantor trust. The Fund’s exposure to cryptocurrency may change over time and, accordingly, such exposure may not always be represented in the Fund’s portfolio.
The Adviser will use both “top down” (thematic research sizing the potential total available market, and surfacing the prime beneficiaries) and “bottom up” (valuation, fundamental and quantitative measures) approaches to select investments for the Fund. In both the Adviser’s “top down” and
*
The Adviser defines the “internet of things” as a system of interrelated computing devices, mechanical and digital machines, or physical objects that are provided unique identifiers and the ability to transfer data over a network without requiring human-to-human or human-to-computer interaction.
**
The “blockchain” is a peer-to-peer shared, distributed ledger that facilitates the process of recording transactions and tracking assets in a business network. Blockchain derives its name from the way it stores transaction data in blocks that are linked together to form a chain. As the number of transactions grow, so does the blockchain. Blocks record and confirm the time and sequence of transactions, which are then logged into the blockchain, within a discrete network governed by rules agreed on by the network participants.
***
The Adviser believes that “Cryptocurrency” (notably, bitcoin), which is often referred to as “virtual currency” or “digital currency,” operates as a decentralized, peer-to-peer financial exchange and value storage that is used like money.
 
27

 
“bottom up” approaches, the Adviser uses the framework of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals to integrate environmental, social, and governance considerations into the research and investment process.
Under normal circumstances, substantially all of the Fund’s assets will be invested in equity securities, including common stocks, partnership interests, business trust shares and other equity investments or ownership interests in business enterprises. The Fund’s investments will include issuers of micro-, small-, medium- and large-capitalizations. The Fund’s investments in foreign equity securities will be in both developed and emerging markets. The Fund currently intends to use only American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) when purchasing foreign securities.
The Fund will be concentrated (i.e., more than 25% of the value of the Fund’s assets) in securities of issuers having their principal business activities in the Internet information provider and catalog and mail order house industry. This concentration limit does not apply to securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities. The Fund may invest in foreign securities (including investments in American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”)) and securities listed on local foreign exchanges.
The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”), which means that it may invest a high percentage of its assets in a limited number of issuers.
Principal Risks
There is no assurance that the Fund will meet its investment objective. The value of your investment in the Fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment in the Fund, may fluctuate significantly. You may lose part or all of your investment in the Fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments. Therefore, you should consider carefully the following risks before investing in the Fund. The principal risks of investing in the Fund listed below are presented alphabetically to facilitate your ability to find particular risks and compare them with the risks of other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.
Authorized Participants Concentration Risk.   The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants (“APs”) on an agency basis (i.e., on behalf of other market participants). To the extent that those APs exit the business or are unable to process creation and/or redemption orders, and no other AP is able to step forward to create and redeem in either of these cases, Shares may possibly trade at a discount to net asset value (“NAV”). The AP risk may be heightened in the case of ETFs investing internationally because international ETFs often require APs to post collateral, which only certain APs are able to do.
Communications Sector Risk.   The Fund will be more affected by the performance of the communications sector than a fund with less exposure to such sector. Communication companies are particularly vulnerable to the potential obsolescence of products and services due to technological advancement and the innovation of competitors. Companies in the communications sector may also be affected by other competitive pressures, such as pricing competition, as well as research and development costs, substantial capital requirements and government regulation. Additionally, fluctuating domestic and international demand, shifting demographics and often unpredictable changes in consumer tastes can drastically affect a communication company’s profitability. While all companies may be susceptible to network security breaches, certain companies in the communications sector may be particular targets of hacking and potential theft of proprietary or consumer information or disruptions in service, which could have a material adverse effect on their businesses.
Concentration Risk.   The Fund’s assets will be concentrated in securities of issuers having their principal business activities in the Internet information provider and catalog and mail order house industry. To the extent that the Fund continues to be concentrated in the Internet information provider and catalog and mail order house industry, the Fund will be subject to the risk that
 
28

 
economic, political, or other conditions that have a negative effect on such industry, and likely will negatively impact the Fund to a greater extent than if the Fund’s assets were invested in a wider variety of sectors or industries. Please see also the “Internet Information Provider Company Risk” and “Catalog and Mail Order House Company Risk” disclosures below.
Consumer Discretionary Risk.   The consumer discretionary sector may be affected by changes in domestic and international economies, exchange and interest rates, competition, consumers’ disposable income and consumer preferences, social trends and marketing campaigns.
Cryptocurrency Risk.   Cryptocurrency (notably, bitcoin), often referred to as “virtual currency” or “digital currency,” operates as a decentralized, peer-to-peer financial exchange and value storage that is used like money. The Fund may have exposure to bitcoin, a cryptocurrency, indirectly through an investment in the Bitcoin Investment Trust (“GBTC”), a privately offered, open-end investment vehicle. Cryptocurrency operates without central authority or banks and is not back by any government. Even indirectly, cryptocurrencies (i.e., bitcoin) may experience very high volatility and related investment vehicles like GBTC may be affected by such volatility. As a result of holding cryptocurrency, the Fund may also trade at a significant premium to NAV. Cryptocurrency is also not legal tender. Federal, state or foreign governments may restrict the use and exchange of cryptocurrency, and regulation in the U.S. is still developing. Cryptocurrency exchanges may stop operating or permanently shut down due to fraud, technical glitches, hackers or malware.
Cryptocurrency Tax Risk.   Many significant aspects of the U.S. federal income tax treatment of investments in bitcoin are uncertain and an investment in bitcoin may produce income that is not treated as qualifying income for purposes of the income test applicable to regulated investment companies, such as the Fund. GBTC is expected to be treated as a grantor trust for U.S. federal income tax purposes, and therefore an investment by the Fund in GBTC will generally be treated as a direct investment in bitcoin for such purposes. See “Taxes” in the Fund’s SAI for more information.
Cyber Security Risk.   As the use of Internet technology has become more prevalent in the course of business, funds have become more susceptible to potential operational risks through breaches in cyber security. A breach in cyber security refers to both intentional and unintentional events that may cause the Fund to lose proprietary information, suffer data corruption or lose operational capacity. Such events could cause the Fund to incur regulatory penalties, reputational damage, additional compliance costs associated with corrective measures and/or financial loss. Cyber security breaches may involve unauthorized access to the Fund’s digital information systems through “hacking” or malicious software coding, but may also result from outside attacks such as denial-of-service attacks through efforts to make network services unavailable to intended users. In addition, cyber security breaches of the Fund’s third-party service providers, such as its administrator, transfer agent or custodian, or issuers in which the Fund invests, can also subject the Fund to many of the same risks associated with direct cyber security breaches. While the Fund has established business continuity plans and risk management systems designed to reduce the risks associated with cyber security, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems. Additionally, there is no guarantee that such efforts will succeed, especially because the Fund does not directly control the cyber security systems of issuers or third-party service providers.
Depositary Receipts Risk.   ADRs and GDRs are securities typically issued by a bank or trust company that evidence ownership of underlying securities issued by a foreign corporation and entitle the holder to all dividends and capital gains that are paid out on the underlying foreign securities. The issuers of certain depositary receipts are under no obligation to distribute shareholder communications to the holders of such receipts, or to pass through to them any voting rights with respect to the deposited securities. Investment in depositary receipts may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market. Depositary receipts may not necessarily be denominated in the same currency as the underlying securities into which they may be converted. In addition, the issuers of the stock underlying unsponsored depositary receipts are not obligated to disclose material information in the United States.
Disruptive Innovation Risk.   Companies that the Adviser believes are capitalizing on disruptive innovation and developing technologies to displace older technologies or create new markets may
 
29

 
not in fact do so. Companies that initially develop a novel technology may not be able to capitalize on the technology. Companies that develop disruptive technologies may face political or legal attacks from competitors, industry groups or local and national governments. These companies may also be exposed to risks applicable to sectors other than the disruptive innovation theme for which they are chosen, and the securities issued by these companies may underperform the securities of other companies that are primarily focused on a particular theme. The Fund may invest in a company that does not currently derive any revenue from disruptive innovations or technologies, and there is no assurance that a company will derive any revenue from disruptive innovations or technologies in the future. A disruptive innovation or technology may constitute a small portion of a company’s overall business. As a result, the success of a disruptive innovation or technology may not affect the value of the equity securities issued by the company.
Emerging Market Securities Risk.   Investment in securities of emerging market issuers may present risks that are greater than or different from those associated with foreign securities due to less developed and liquid markets and such factors as increased economic, political, regulatory, or other uncertainties.
Equity Securities Risk.   The value of the equity securities the Fund holds may fall due to general market and economic conditions, perceptions regarding the industries in which the issuers of securities the Fund holds participate or factors relating to specific companies in which the Fund invests. These can include stock movements, purchases or sales of securities by the Fund, government policies, litigation and changes in interest rates, inflation, the financial condition of the securities’ issuer or perceptions of the issuer, or economic conditions in general or specific to the issuer. Equity securities may also be particularly sensitive to general movements in the stock market, and a decline in the broader market may affect the value of the Fund’s equity investments.
Financial Technology Risk.   Companies that are developing financial technologies that seek to disrupt or displace established financial institutions generally face competition from much larger and more established firms. FinTech Innovation Companies may not be able to capitalize on their disruptive technologies if they face political and/or legal attacks from competitors, industry groups or local and national governments. Laws generally vary by country, creating some challenges to achieving scale. A FinTech Innovation Company may not currently derive any revenue, and there is no assurance that such company will derive any revenue from innovative technologies in the future. Additionally, Fintech Innovation Companies may be adversely impacted by potential rapid product obsolescence, cybersecurity attacks, increased regulatory oversight and disruptions in the technology they depend on.
Foreign Securities Risk.   The Fund’s investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. The Fund normally will not hedge any foreign currency exposure.
Information Technology Sector Risk.   The information technology sector includes companies engaged in internet software and services, technology hardware and storage peripherals, electronic equipment instruments and components, and semiconductors and semiconductor equipment. Information technology companies face intense competition, both domestically and internationally, which may have an adverse effect on profit margins. Information technology companies may have limited product lines, markets, financial resources or personnel. The products of information technology companies may face rapid product obsolescence due to technological developments
 
30

 
and frequent new product introduction, unpredictable changes in growth rates and competition for the services of qualified personnel. Failure to introduce new products, develop and maintain a loyal customer base, or achieve general market acceptance for their products could have a material adverse effect on a company’s business. Companies in the information technology sector are heavily dependent on intellectual property and the loss of patent, copyright and trademark protections may adversely affect the profitability of these companies.

Internet Company Risk.   Many Internet-related companies have incurred large losses since their inception and may continue to incur large losses in the hope of capturing market share and generating future revenues. Accordingly, many such companies expect to incur significant operating losses for the foreseeable future, and may never be profitable. The markets in which many Internet companies compete face rapidly evolving industry standards, frequent new service and product announcements, introductions and enhancements, and changing customer demands. The failure of an Internet company to adapt to such changes could have a material adverse effect on the company’s business. Additionally, the widespread adoption of new Internet, networking, telecommunications technologies, or other technological changes could require substantial expenditures by an Internet company to modify or adapt its services or infrastructure, which could have a material adverse effect on an Internet company’s business.

Semiconductor Company Risk.   Competitive pressures may have a significant effect on the financial condition of semiconductor companies and, as product cycles shorten and manufacturing capacity increases, these companies may become increasingly subject to aggressive pricing, which hampers profitability. Reduced demand for end-user products, under-utilization of manufacturing capacity, and other factors could adversely impact the operating results of companies in the semiconductor sector. Semiconductor companies typically face high capital costs and may be heavily dependent on intellectual property rights. The semiconductor sector is highly cyclical, which may cause the operating results of many semiconductor companies to vary significantly. The stock prices of companies in the semiconductor sector have been and likely will continue to be extremely volatile.

Software Industry Risk.   The software industry can be significantly affected by intense competition, aggressive pricing, technological innovations, and product obsolescence. Companies in the software industry are subject to significant competitive pressures, such as aggressive pricing, new market entrants, competition for market share, short product cycles due to an accelerated rate of technological developments and the potential for limited earnings and/or falling profit margins. These companies also face the risks that new services, equipment or technologies will not be accepted by consumers and businesses or will become rapidly obsolete. These factors can affect the profitability of these companies and, as a result, the value of their securities. Also, patent protection is integral to the success of many companies in this industry, and profitability can be affected materially by, among other things, the cost of obtaining (or failing to obtain) patent approvals, the cost of litigating patent infringement and the loss of patent protection for products (which significantly increases pricing pressures and can materially reduce profitability with respect to such products). In addition, many software companies have limited operating histories. Prices of these companies’ securities historically have been more volatile than other securities, especially over the short term.
International Closed-Market Trading Risk.   Because certain of the Fund’s underlying securities trade on an exchange that is closed when the securities exchange on which Fund Shares list and trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current pricing of an underlying security and stale security pricing (i.e., the last quote from its closed foreign market), likely resulting in premiums or discounts to NAV that may be greater than those experienced by ETFs that do not invest in foreign securities.
Issuer Risk.   Because the Fund may invest in between 40 and 50 issuers, it is subject to the risk that the value of the Fund’s portfolio may decline due to a decline in value of the equity securities of
 
31

 
particular issuers. The value of an issuer’s equity securities may decline for reasons directly related to the issuer, such as management performance and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services.
Large-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Large-capitalization companies are generally less volatile than companies with smaller market capitalizations. In exchange for this potentially lower risk, the value of large-capitalization companies may not rise as much as that of companies with smaller market capitalizations.
Management Risk.   As an actively-managed ETF, the Fund is subject to management risk. The ability of the Adviser to successfully implement the Fund’s investment strategies will significantly influence the Fund’s performance.
Market Risk.   The value of the Fund’s assets will fluctuate as the markets in which the Fund invests fluctuate. The value of the Fund’s investments may decline, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, simply because of economic changes or other events, such as inflation (or expectations for inflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters or events, terrorism, regulatory events and government controls, that affect large portions of the market.
Market Trading Risk.   The Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including disruptions to the creation and redemption processes of the Fund, losses from trading in secondary markets, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for Shares due to market stress, which may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to their NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses.
Micro-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Micro-capitalization companies are subject to substantially greater risks of loss and price fluctuations because their earnings and revenues tend to be less predictable (and some companies may be experiencing significant losses). Their share prices tend to be more volatile and their markets less liquid than companies with larger market capitalizations. The shares of micro-capitalization companies tend to trade less frequently than those of larger, more established companies, which can adversely affect the pricing of these securities and the future ability to sell these securities.
Next Generation Internet Companies Risk.   The risks described below apply, in particular, to the Fund’s investment in Next Generation Internet Companies.

Internet Information Provider Company Risk.   Internet information provider companies provide Internet navigation services and reference guide information and publish, provide or present proprietary advertising and/or third party content. Such companies often derive a large portion of their revenues from advertising, and a reduction in spending by or loss of advertisers could seriously harm their business. This business is rapidly evolving and intensely competitive, and is subject to changing technologies, shifting user needs, and frequent introductions of new products and services. The research and development of new, technologically advanced products is a complex and uncertain process requiring high levels of innovation and investment, as well as the accurate anticipation of technology, market trends and consumer needs. The number of people who access the Internet is increasing dramatically and a failure to attract and retain a substantial number of such users to a company’s products and services or to develop products and technologies that are more compatible with alternative devices, could adversely affect operating results. Concerns regarding a company’s products, services or processes that may compromise the privacy of users or other privacy related matters, even if unfounded, could damage a company’s reputation and adversely affect operating results.

Catalog and Mail Order House Company Risk.   Catalog and mail order house companies may be exposed to significant inventory risks that may adversely affect operating results due to, among other factors: seasonality, new product launches, rapid changes in product
 
32

 
cycles and pricing, defective merchandise, changes in consumer demand and consumer spending patterns, or changes in consumer tastes with respect to products. Demand for products can change significantly between the time inventory or components are ordered and the date of sale. The acquisition of certain types of inventory or components may require significant lead-time and prepayment and they may not be returnable. Failure to adequately predict customer demand or otherwise optimize and operate distribution centers could result in excess or insufficient inventory or distribution capacity, result in increased costs, impairment charges, or both. The business of catalog and mail order house companies can be highly seasonal and failure to stock or restock popular products in sufficient amounts during high demand periods could significantly affect revenue and future growth. Increased website traffic during peak periods could cause system interruptions which may reduce the volume of goods sold and the attractiveness of a company’s products and services.
Non-Diversified Risk.   The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the 1940 Act. Therefore, the Fund may invest a relatively higher percentage of its assets in a relatively smaller number of issuers or may invest a larger proportion of its assets in a single issuer. As a result, the gains and losses on a single investment may have a greater impact on the Fund’s NAV and may make the Fund more volatile than more diversified funds.
Small- and Medium-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Small- and medium-capitalization companies may be more volatile and more likely than large-capitalization companies to have narrower product lines, fewer financial resources, less management depth and experience and less competitive strength. Returns on investments in securities of small- and medium-capitalization companies could trail the returns on investments in securities of large-capitalization companies.
Performance
The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year. The table shows how the Fund’s average annual returns for 1 year and since the Fund’s inception compare with those of the S&P 500 Index and the MSCI World Index. The S&P 500 Index is a widely recognized capitalization-weighted index that measures the performance of the large-capitalization sector of the U.S. stock market. The MSCI World Index represents large and mid-cap equity performance across 23 developed markets countries. Returns shown for the MSCI World Index are net of foreign withholding taxes applicable to U.S. investors. The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available at no cost by visiting http://ark-funds.com or by calling (212) 426-7040.
[MISSING IMAGE: tv533285-bc_arkwbw.jpg]
The Fund’s year-to-date total return as of October 31, 2019 was 21.04%.
 
33

 
Best and Worst Quarter Returns (for the period reflected in the bar chart above)
Return
Quarter/Year
Highest Return
21.60% 06/30/2017
Lowest Return
-16.62% 12/31/2018
Average Annual Total Returns as of December 31, 2018
1 Year
Since
Inception(1)
Returns Before Taxes
4.54% 24.12%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions(2)
-0.16% 22.34%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares(2)
2.93% 18.89%
S&P 500 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-4.38% 7.93%
MSCI World Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-8.71% 4.38%
(1)
The Fund commenced operations on September 30, 2014.
(2)
After-tax returns are calculated using the highest historical individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on your tax situation and may differ from those shown and are not relevant if you hold your shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. In some cases the return after taxes may exceed the return before taxes due to an assumed tax benefit from any losses on a sale of Shares at the end of the measurement period.
Management of the Fund
Investment Adviser.   ARK Investment Management LLC.
Portfolio Manager.   The following individual has been primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund’s portfolio since the Fund’s inception: Catherine D. Wood.
Purchase and Sale of Shares and Tax Information
For important information about the purchase and sale of Shares, tax information and financial intermediary compensation, please turn to “Summary Information About Purchases and Sales of Fund Shares, Tax Information and Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries” in this prospectus.
[REMAINDER OF PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
 
34

 
ARK Fintech Innovation ETF (ARKF)
Investment Objective
The ARK Fintech Innovation ETF’s (“Fund”) investment objective is long-term growth of capital.
Fund Fees and Expenses
The table below describes the fees and expenses that you pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund (“Shares”). Investors may pay brokerage commissions on their purchases and sales of Shares.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fee
0.75%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.00%
Other Expenses(a)(b)
0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses(b)
0.75%
(a)
Pursuant to a Supervision Agreement, ARK Investment Management LLC (“Adviser”) pays all other expenses of the Fund (other than taxes and governmental fees, brokerage fees, commissions and other transaction expenses, certain foreign custodial fees and expenses, costs of borrowing money, including interest expenses, and extraordinary expenses (such as litigation and indemnification expenses)).
(b)
Other Expenses and Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses are based on estimated expenses for the current fiscal year.
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. This example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares.
The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% annual return and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:
Year
Expenses
1 $ 77
3 $ 240
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it purchases and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may result in higher transaction costs and higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, may affect the Fund’s performance. This Fund is newly offered. Therefore, it does not have a turnover rate to report for the most recent fiscal year. The Fund’s portfolio turnover rate for the period from commencement of operation on February 4, 2019 through July 31, 2019 was 22%.
 
35

 
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is an actively-managed exchange-traded fund (“ETF”) that will invest under normal circumstances primarily (at least 80% of its assets) in domestic and foreign equity securities of companies that are engaged in the Fund’s investment theme of financial technology (“Fintech”) innovation. A company is deemed to be engaged in the theme of Fintech innovation if  (i) it derives a significant portion of its revenue or market value from the theme of Fintech innovation or (ii) it has stated its primary business to be in products and services focused on the theme of Fintech innovation. The Adviser defines “Fintech innovation” as the introduction of a technologically enabled new product or service that potentially changes the way the financial sector works.
In selecting companies that the Adviser believes are engaged in the theme of Fintech innovation (“Fintech Innovation Companies”), the Adviser seeks to identify, using its own internal research and analysis, companies capitalizing on disruptive innovation. Disruptive innovation occurs when a new product or service substantially alters the way a market or industry functions. The Adviser’s internal research and analysis leverages insights from diverse sources, including external research, to develop and refine its investment themes and identify and take advantage of trends that have ramifications for individual companies or entire industries.
Fintech Innovation Companies are companies that may develop, use or rely on innovative payment platforms and methodologies, point of sale providers, e-commerce, transactional innovations, business analytics, fraud reduction, frictionless funding platforms, peer-to-peer lending, blockchain1 technologies, intermediary exchanges, asset allocation technology, mobile payments, and risk pricing and pooling aggregators (insurance). A Fintech Innovation Company may not currently derive any revenue, and there is no assurance that such company will derive any revenue from innovative technologies in the future.
The Adviser will select investments for the Fund that represent the Adviser’s highest-conviction investment ideas within the theme of Fintech innovation, i.e., investment decisions regarded with confidence, in constructing the Fund’s portfolio. The Adviser will analyze potential investments by using both “top down” information (e.g., economy-wide analysis of facts such as rate of growth, cost declines, unit economics, sizing of markets, and price levels as well as business and technology cycle trends) and “bottom up” criteria (e.g., fundamental and quantitative metrics for individual companies such as their revenue growth, profitability and return on invested capital). In both the Adviser’s “top down” and “bottom up” approaches, the Adviser uses the framework of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals to integrate environmental, social, and governance considerations into the research and investment process. Based upon its research and analysis, the Adviser will select a portfolio company that it believes presents the best risk-reward opportunities.
Under normal circumstances, substantially all of the Fund’s assets will be invested in equity securities, including common stocks, partnership interests, business trust shares and other equity investments or ownership interests in business enterprises. The Fund’s investments will include micro-, small-, medium- and large-capitalization companies. The Fund’s investments in foreign equity securities will be in both developed and emerging markets. The Fund may invest in foreign securities (including investments in American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”)) and securities listed on local foreign exchanges.
The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”), which means that it may invest a high percentage of its assets in a limited number of issuers. The Fund’s portfolio is expected to contain 40 to 55 common stocks (domestic and ADRs) that are conviction weighted. The Fund will concentrate (i.e., more than
1
The “blockchain” is a peer-to-peer shared, distributed ledger that facilitates the process of recording transactions and tracking assets in a business network. Blockchain derives its name from the way it stores transaction data in blocks that are linked together to form a chain. As the number of transactions grow, so does the blockchain. Blocks record and confirm the time and sequence of transactions, which are then logged into the blockchain, within a discrete network governed by rules agreed on by the network participants.
 
36

 
25% of the value of the Fund’s assets) in securities of issuers having their principal business activities in the communication, technology and financials group of industries. This concentration limit does not apply to securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities.
Principal Risks
There is no assurance that the Fund will meet its investment objective. The value of your investment in the Fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment in the Fund, may fluctuate significantly. You may lose part or all of your investment in the Fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments. Therefore, you should consider carefully the following risks before investing in the Fund. The principal risks of investing in the Fund listed below are presented alphabetically to facilitate your ability to find particular risks and compare them with the risks of other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.
Authorized Participants Concentration Risk.   The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants (“APs”) on an agency basis (i.e., on behalf of other market participants). To the extent that those APs exit the business or are unable to process creation and/or redemption orders, and no other AP is able to step forward to create and redeem in either of these cases, Shares may possibly trade at a discount to net asset value (“NAV”). The AP risk may be heightened in the case of ETFs investing internationally because international ETFs often require APs to post collateral, which only certain APs are able to do.
Blockchain Investments Risk.   An investment in companies actively engaged in blockchain technology may be subject to the following risks:

The technology is new and many of its uses may be untested.   The mechanics of using distributed ledger technology to transact in other types of assets, such as securities or derivatives, is less clear. There is no assurance that widespread adoption will occur. A lack of expansion in the usage of blockchain technology could adversely affect an investment in the Fund.

Theft, loss or destruction.   Transacting on a blockchain depends in part specifically on the use of cryptographic keys that are required to access a user’s account (or “wallet”). The theft, loss or destruction of these keys impairs the value of ownership claims users have over the relevant assets being represented by the ledger (whether “smart contracts,” securities, currency or other digital assets). The theft, loss or destruction of private or public keys needed to transact on a blockchain could also adversely affect a company’s business or operations if it were dependent on the ledger.

Competing platforms and technologies.   The development and acceptance of competing platforms or technologies may cause consumers or investors to use an alternative to blockchains.

Cyber security incidents.   Cyber security incidents may compromise an issuer, its operations or its business. Cyber security incidents may also specifically target a user’s transaction history, digital assets, or identity, thereby leading to privacy concerns. In addition, certain features of blockchain technology, such as decentralization, open source protocol, and reliance on peer-to-peer connectivity, may increase the risk of fraud or cyber-attack by potentially reducing the likelihood of a coordinated response.

Developmental risk.   Blockchain technology may never develop optimized transactional processes that lead to realized economic returns for any company in which the Fund invests. Companies that are developing applications of blockchain technology applications may not in fact do so or may not be able to capitalize on those blockchain technologies. The development of new or competing platforms may cause consumers and investors to use alternatives to blockchains.
 
37

 

Intellectual property claims.   A proliferation of recent startups attempting to apply blockchain technology in different contexts means the possibility of conflicting intellectual property claims could be a risk to an issuer, its operations or its business. This could also pose a risk to blockchain platforms that permit transactions in digital securities. Regardless of the merit of any intellectual property or other legal action, any threatened action that reduces confidence in the viability of blockchain may adversely affect an investment in the Fund.

Lack of liquid markets, and possible manipulation of blockchain-based assets.   Digital assets that are represented and trade on a blockchain may not necessarily benefit from viable trading markets. Stock exchanges have listing requirements and vet issuers, and perhaps users. These conditions may not necessarily be replicated on a blockchain, depending on the platform’s controls and other policies. The more lenient a blockchain is about vetting issuers of digital assets or users that transact on the platform, the higher the potential risk for fraud or the manipulation of digital assets. These factors may decrease liquidity or volume, or increase volatility of digital securities or other assets trading on a blockchain.

Lack of regulation.   Digital commodities and their associated platforms are largely unregulated, and the regulatory environment is rapidly evolving. Because blockchain works by having every transaction build on every other transaction, participants can self-police any corruption, which can mitigate the need to depend on the current level of legal or government safeguards to monitor and control the flow of business transactions. As a result, companies engaged in such blockchain activities may be exposed to adverse regulatory action, fraudulent activity or even failure.

Third party product defects or vulnerabilities.   Where blockchain systems are built using third party products, those products may contain technical defects or vulnerabilities beyond a company’s control. Open-source technologies that are used to build a blockchain application may also introduce defects and vulnerabilities.

Reliance on the Internet.   Blockchain functionality relies on the Internet. A significant disruption of Internet connectivity affecting large numbers of users or geographic areas could impede the functionality of blockchain technologies and adversely affect the Fund. In addition, certain features of blockchain technology, such as decentralization, open source protocol, and reliance on peer-to-peer connectivity, may increase the risk of fraud or cyber-attack by potentially reducing the likelihood of a coordinated response.

Line of business risk.   Some of the companies in which the Fund may invest are engaged in other lines of business unrelated to blockchain and these lines of business could adversely affect their operating results. The operating results of these companies may fluctuate as a result of these additional risks and events in the other lines of business. In addition, a company’s ability to engage in new activities may expose it to business risks with which it has less experience than it has with the business risks associated with its traditional businesses. Despite a company’s possible success in activities linked to its use of blockchain, there can be no assurance that the other lines of business in which these companies are engaged will not have an adverse effect on a company’s business or financial condition.
Communications Sector Risk.   The Fund will be more affected by the performance of the communications sector than a fund with less exposure to such sector. Communication companies are particularly vulnerable to the potential obsolescence of products and services due to technological advancement and the innovation of competitors. Companies in the communications sector may also be affected by other competitive pressures, such as pricing competition, as well as research and development costs, substantial capital requirements and government regulation. Additionally, fluctuating domestic and international demand, shifting demographics and often unpredictable changes in consumer tastes can drastically affect a communication company’s profitability. While all companies may be susceptible to network security breaches, certain
 
38

 
companies in the communications sector may be particular targets of hacking and potential theft of proprietary or consumer information or disruptions in service, which could have a material adverse effect on their businesses.
Cybersecurity Risk.   As the use of Internet technology has become more prevalent in the course of business, funds have become more susceptible to potential operational risks through breaches in cyber security. A breach in cyber security refers to both intentional and unintentional events that may cause the Fund to lose proprietary information, suffer data corruption or lose operational capacity. Such events could cause the Fund to incur regulatory penalties, reputational damage, additional compliance costs associated with corrective measures and/or financial loss. Cyber security breaches may involve unauthorized access to the Fund’s digital information systems through “hacking” or malicious software coding, but may also result from outside attacks such as denial-of-service attacks through efforts to make network services unavailable to intended users. In addition, cyber security breaches of the Fund’s third-party service providers, such as its administrator, transfer agent or custodian, or issuers in which the Fund invests, can also subject the Fund to many of the same risks associated with direct cyber security breaches. While the Fund has established business continuity plans and risk management systems designed to reduce the risks associated with cyber security, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems. Additionally, there is no guarantee that such efforts will succeed, especially because the Fund does not directly control the cyber security systems of issuers or third-party service providers.
Currency Risk.   Changes in currency exchange rates will affect the value of non-U.S. dollar denominated securities, the value of dividends and interest earned from such securities, gains and losses realized on the sale of such securities, and derivative transactions tied to such securities. A strong U.S. dollar relative to these other currencies will adversely affect the value of the Fund’s portfolio.
Depositary Receipts Risk.   ADRs and GDRs are securities typically issued by a bank or trust company that evidence ownership of underlying securities issued by a foreign corporation and entitle the holder to all dividends and capital gains that are paid out on the underlying foreign securities. The issuers of certain depositary receipts are under no obligation to distribute shareholder communications to the holders of such receipts, or to pass through to them any voting rights with respect to the deposited securities. Investment in depositary receipts may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market. Depositary receipts may not necessarily be denominated in the same currency as the underlying securities into which they may be converted. In addition, the issuers of the stock underlying unsponsored depositary receipts are not obligated to disclose material information in the United States.
Emerging Market Securities Risk.   Investment in securities of emerging market issuers may present risks that are greater than or different from those associated with foreign securities due to less developed and liquid markets and such factors as increased economic, political, regulatory, or other uncertainties.
Equity Securities Risk.   The value of the equity securities the Fund holds may fall due to general market and economic conditions, perceptions regarding the industries in which the issuers of securities the Fund holds participate or factors relating to specific companies in which the Fund invests. These can include stock movements, purchases or sales of securities by the Fund, government policies, litigation and changes in interest rates, inflation, the financial condition of the securities’ issuer or perceptions of the issuer, or economic conditions in general or specific to the issuer. Equity securities may also be particularly sensitive to general movements in the stock market, and a decline in the broader market may affect the value of the Fund’s equity investments.
Financial Sector Risk.   The factors that impact the financial sector will likely have a greater effect on this Fund than on a fund with less exposure to such sector. Companies in the financial sector are especially subject to the adverse effects of economic recession, decreases in the availability of capital, volatile interest rates, portfolio concentrations in geographic markets and in commercial and residential real estate loans, and competition from new entrants in their fields of business. These
 
39

 
industries are still extensively regulated at both the federal and state level and may be adversely affected by increased regulations.
Financial Technology Risk.   Companies that are developing financial technologies that seek to disrupt or displace established financial institutions generally face competition from much larger and more established firms. Fintech Innovation Companies may not be able to capitalize on their disruptive technologies if they face political and/or legal attacks from competitors, industry groups or local and national governments. Laws generally vary by country, creating some challenges to achieving scale. A Fintech Innovation Company may not currently derive any revenue, and there is no assurance that such company will derive any revenue from innovative technologies in the future. Additionally, Fintech Innovation Companies may be adversely impacted by potential rapid product obsolescence, cybersecurity attacks, increased regulatory oversight and disruptions in the technology they depend on.
Foreign Securities Risk.   The Fund’s investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. The Fund normally will not hedge any foreign currency exposure.
Information Technology Sector Risk.   The information technology sector includes companies engaged in internet software and services, technology hardware and storage peripherals, electronic equipment instruments and components, and semiconductors and semiconductor equipment. Information technology companies face intense competition, both domestically and internationally, which may have an adverse effect on profit margins. Information technology companies may have limited product lines, markets, financial resources or personnel. The products of information technology companies may face rapid product obsolescence due to technological developments and frequent new product introduction, unpredictable changes in growth rates and competition for the services of qualified personnel. Failure to introduce new products, develop and maintain a loyal customer base, or achieve general market acceptance for their products could have a material adverse effect on a company’s business. Companies in the information technology sector are heavily dependent on intellectual property and the loss of patent, copyright and trademark protections may adversely affect the profitability of these companies.

Internet Company Risk.   Many Internet-related companies have incurred large losses since their inception and may continue to incur large losses in the hope of capturing market share and generating future revenues. Accordingly, many such companies expect to incur significant operating losses for the foreseeable future, and may never be profitable. The markets in which many Internet companies compete face rapidly evolving industry standards, frequent new service and product announcements, introductions and enhancements, and changing customer demands. The failure of an Internet company to adapt to such changes could have a material adverse effect on the company’s business. Additionally, the widespread adoption of new Internet, networking, telecommunications technologies, or other technological changes could require substantial expenditures by an Internet company to modify or adapt its services or infrastructure, which could have a material adverse effect on an Internet company’s business.

Semiconductor Company Risk.   Competitive pressures may have a significant effect on the financial condition of semiconductor companies and, as product cycles shorten and manufacturing capacity increases, these companies may become increasingly subject to
 
40

 
aggressive pricing, which hampers profitability. Reduced demand for end-user products, under-utilization of manufacturing capacity, and other factors could adversely impact the operating results of companies in the semiconductor sector. Semiconductor companies typically face high capital costs and may be heavily dependent on intellectual property rights. The semiconductor sector is highly cyclical, which may cause the operating results of many semiconductor companies to vary significantly. The stock prices of companies in the semiconductor sector have been and likely will continue to be extremely volatile.

Software Industry Risk.   The software industry can be significantly affected by intense competition, aggressive pricing, technological innovations, and product obsolescence. Companies in the software industry are subject to significant competitive pressures, such as aggressive pricing, new market entrants, competition for market share, short product cycles due to an accelerated rate of technological developments and the potential for limited earnings and/or falling profit margins. These companies also face the risks that new services, equipment or technologies will not be accepted by consumers and businesses or will become rapidly obsolete. These factors can affect the profitability of these companies and, as a result, the value of their securities. Also, patent protection is integral to the success of many companies in this industry, and profitability can be affected materially by, among other things, the cost of obtaining (or failing to obtain) patent approvals, the cost of litigating patent infringement and the loss of patent protection for products (which significantly increases pricing pressures and can materially reduce profitability with respect to such products). In addition, many software companies have limited operating histories. Prices of these companies’ securities historically have been more volatile than other securities, especially over the short term.
International Closed-Market Trading Risk.   Because certain of the Fund’s underlying securities trade on an exchange that is closed when the securities exchange on which Fund Shares list and trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current pricing of an underlying security and stale security pricing (i.e., the last quote from its closed foreign market), likely resulting in premiums or discounts to NAV that may be greater than those experienced by ETFs that do not invest in foreign securities.
Issuer Risk.   Because the Fund may invest in approximately 40 to 55 issuers, it is subject to the risk that the value of the Fund’s portfolio may decline due to a decline in value of the equity securities of particular issuers. The value of an issuer’s equity securities may decline for reasons directly related to the issuer, such as management performance and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services.
Large-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Large-capitalization companies are generally less volatile than companies with smaller market capitalizations. In exchange for this potentially lower risk, the value of large-capitalization companies may not rise as much as that of companies with smaller market capitalizations.
Limited Operating History Risk.   The Fund has limited operating history for investors to evaluate. There can be no assurance that the Fund will grow to or maintain an economically viable size. The Fund may liquidate and terminate at any time without shareholder approval.
Management Risk.   As an actively-managed ETF, the Fund is subject to management risk. The ability of the Adviser to successfully implement the Fund’s investment strategies will significantly influence the Fund’s performance.
Market Risk.   The value of the Fund’s assets will fluctuate as the markets in which the Fund invests fluctuate. The value of the Fund’s investments may decline, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, simply because of economic changes or other events, such as inflation (or expectations for inflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters or events, terrorism, regulatory events and government controls, that affect large portions of the market.
Market Trading Risk.   The Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including disruptions to the creation and redemption processes of the Fund, losses from trading in secondary markets, the
 
41

 
existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for Shares due to market stress, which may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to their NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses.
Micro-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Micro-capitalization companies are subject to substantially greater risks of loss and price fluctuations because their earnings and revenues tend to be less predictable (and some companies may be experiencing significant losses). Their share prices tend to be more volatile and their markets less liquid than companies with larger market capitalizations. The shares of micro-capitalization companies tend to trade less frequently than those of larger, more established companies, which can adversely affect the pricing of these securities and the future ability to sell these securities.
Non-Diversified Risk.   The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the 1940 Act. Therefore, the Fund may invest a relatively higher percentage of its assets in a relatively smaller number of issuers or may invest a larger proportion of its assets in a single issuer. As a result, the gains and losses on a single investment may have a greater impact on the Fund’s NAV and may make the Fund more volatile than more diversified funds.
Small- and Medium-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Small- and medium-capitalization companies may be more volatile and more likely than large-capitalization companies to have narrower product lines, fewer financial resources, less management depth and experience and less competitive strength. Returns on investments in securities of small- and medium-capitalization companies could trail the returns on investments in securities of large-capitalization companies.
Performance
The Fund commenced operations on February 4, 2019. Performance history will be available for the Fund after it has been in operation for a full calendar year. Once available, the Fund’s performance information will be accessible on the Fund’s website at http://ark-funds.com.
Management of the Fund
Investment Adviser.   ARK Investment Management LLC.
Portfolio Manager.   The following individual has been primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund’s portfolio since the inception of the Fund: Catherine D. Wood.
Purchase and Sale of Shares and Tax Information
For important information about the purchase and sale of Shares, tax information and financial intermediary compensation, please turn to “Summary Information About Purchases and Sales of Fund Shares, Tax Information and Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries” in this prospectus.
[REMAINDER OF PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
 
42

 
The 3D Printing ETF (PRNT)
Investment Objective
The 3D Printing ETF (“Fund”) seeks to provide investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the Total 3D-Printing Index (“Index”).
Fund Fees and Expenses
The table below describes the fees and expenses that you pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund (“Shares”). Investors may pay brokerage commissions on their purchases and sales of Shares.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fee
0.65%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.00%
Other Expenses(a)
0.01%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.66%
(a)
Pursuant to a Supervision Agreement, ARK Investment Management LLC (“Adviser”) pays all other expenses of the Fund (other than taxes and governmental fees, brokerage fees, commissions and other transaction expenses, certain foreign custodial fees and expenses, costs of borrowing money, including interest expenses, and extraordinary expenses (such as litigation and indemnification expenses)).
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. This example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares.
The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% annual return and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:
Year
Expenses
1 $ 67
3 $ 211
5 $ 368
10 $ 822
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it purchases and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may result in higher transaction costs and higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, may affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 51% of the average value of its portfolio.
 
43

 
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund normally invests at least 80% of its total assets in securities that are included in the Fund’s benchmark Index, depositary receipts representing securities included in the Index or underlying stocks in respect of depositary receipts included in the Index. This 80% investment policy is non-fundamental and may be changed without shareholder approval upon 60 days’ prior written notice to shareholders.
The Index is designed to track the price movements of stocks of companies involved in the 3D printing industry. The Index has been created and licensed to the Fund by ARK’s Index Products Group and is calculated, published and distributed by Solactive AG (“Solactive”). Information regarding the Index is available at http://www.solactive.com. The Index is composed of equity securities and depositary receipts of exchange listed companies from the U.S., non-U.S. developed markets and Taiwan that are engaged in 3D printing related businesses within the following business lines: (i) 3D printing hardware, (ii) computer aided design (“CAD”) and 3D printing simulation software, (iii) 3D printing centers, (iv) scanning and measurement and (v) 3D printing materials. The Index assigns a pre-determined weighting to each business line and all companies within each business line are equally weighted within the business line. As of November 18, 2019, the Index included 52 securities of companies with a market capitalization range of between approximately $108 million and $149 billion and a weighted average market capitalization of $49 billion.
At least 80% of the companies in the Index derive at least 50% of their earnings or revenues or at least 50% of their assets are devoted to the development or distribution of equipment, materials and software primarily used in 3D printing or 3D printed products. In addition, at least 80% of the assets of the Fund will be comprised of companies that derive at least 50% of their earnings or revenues or at least 50% of their assets are devoted to the development or distribution of equipment, materials and software primarily used in 3D printing or 3D printed products.
The Fund, using an indexing investment approach, attempts to approximate, before fees and expenses, the investment performance of the Index by investing in a portfolio of securities that generally replicates the Index. The Fund generally will use a replication strategy. A replication strategy is an indexing strategy that involves investing in the securities of the Index in approximately the same proportions as in the Index. However, the Fund may utilize a representative sampling strategy with respect to the Index when it might not be possible or practicable to purchase all of the securities of the Index in approximately the same proportions as in the Index, such as when there are practical difficulties or substantial costs involved in compiling a portfolio of securities to replicate the Index, in instances in which a security in the Index becomes temporarily illiquid, unavailable or less liquid, or as a result of legal restrictions or limitations (such as tax diversification requirements) that apply to the Fund but not the Index. There also may be instances in which the Adviser may choose to underweight or overweight a security in the Index, purchase securities not in the Index that the Adviser believes are appropriate to substitute for certain securities in the Index or utilize various combinations of other available investment techniques in seeking to replicate as closely as possible, before fees and expenses, the performance of the Index. The Fund may sell securities that are represented in the Index in anticipation of their removal from the Index or purchase securities not represented in the Index in anticipation of their addition to the Index. The Fund does not take temporary defensive positions when markets decline or appear overvalued.
If the Fund uses a replication strategy, it can be expected to have greater correlation to the Index than if it uses a representative sampling strategy.
The Fund may concentrate its investments in a particular industry or group of industries to the extent that the Index concentrates in an industry or group of industries. Based on the composition of the Index as of November 18, 2019, the Technology Hardware, Storage & Peripherals, Software, and Machinery industries represented a significant portion of the Index. The Fund may invest in foreign securities (including investments in American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”)) and securities listed on local foreign exchanges.
 
44

 
The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”), which means that it may invest a high percentage of its assets in a limited number of issuers.
Principal Risks
There is no assurance that the Fund will meet its investment objective. The value of your investment in the Fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment in the Fund, may fluctuate significantly. You may lose part or all of your investment in the Fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments. Therefore, you should consider carefully the following risks before investing in the Fund. The principal risks of investing in the Fund listed below are presented alphabetically to facilitate your ability to find particular risks and compare them with the risks of other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.
Authorized Participants Concentration Risk.   The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants (“APs”) on an agency basis (i.e., on behalf of other market participants). To the extent that those APs exit the business or are unable to process creation and/or redemption orders, and no other AP is able to step forward to create and redeem in either of these cases, Shares may possibly trade at a discount to net asset value (“NAV”). The AP risk may be heightened in the case of exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) investing internationally because international ETFs often require APs to post collateral, which only certain APs are able to do.
Concentration/Focused Risk.   The Fund’s assets may be concentrated in a particular industry or group of industries to the extent the Index concentrates in a particular industry or group of industries. Based on the composition of the Index as of November 18, 2019, the Technology Hardware, Storage & Peripherals, Software, and Machinery industries represented a significant portion of the Index. Therefore, the Fund will be subject to the risk that economic, political or other conditions that have a negative effect on one or more of those identified industries or sectors may negatively impact the Fund to a greater extent than if the Fund’s assets were invested in a wider variety of industries or sectors.
Cyber Security Risk.   As the use of Internet technology has become more prevalent in the course of business, funds have become more susceptible to potential operational risks through breaches in cyber security. A breach in cyber security refers to both intentional and unintentional events that may cause the Fund to lose proprietary information, suffer data corruption or lose operational capacity. Such events could cause the Fund to incur regulatory penalties, reputational damage, additional compliance costs associated with corrective measures and/or financial loss. Cyber security breaches may involve unauthorized access to the Fund’s digital information systems through “hacking” or malicious software coding, but may also result from outside attacks such as denial-of-service attacks through efforts to make network services unavailable to intended users. In addition, cyber security breaches of the Fund’s third-party service providers, such as its administrator, transfer agent or custodian, or issuers in which the Fund invests, can also subject the Fund to many of the same risks associated with direct cyber security breaches. While the Fund has established business continuity plans and risk management systems designed to reduce the risks associated with cyber security, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems. Additionally, there is no guarantee that such efforts will succeed, especially because the Fund does not directly control the cyber security systems of issuers or third-party service providers.
Depositary Receipts Risk.   The Fund may invest in depositary receipts, which involve similar risks to those associated with investments in foreign securities. Depositary receipts are receipts listed on U.S. or foreign exchanges issued by banks or trust companies that entitle the holder to all dividends and capital gains that are paid out on the underlying foreign shares. Investments in depositary receipts may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market and, if not included in the Index, may negatively affect the Fund’s ability to replicate the performance of the Index.
 
45

 
Equity Securities Risk.   The value of the equity securities the Fund holds may fall due to general market and economic conditions, perceptions regarding the industries in which the issuers of securities the Fund holds participate or factors relating to specific companies in which the Fund invests. These can include stock movements, purchases or sales of securities by the Fund, government policies, litigation and changes in interest rates, inflation, the financial condition of the securities’ issuer or perceptions of the issuer, or economic conditions in general or specific to the issuer. Equity securities may also be particularly sensitive to general movements in the stock market, and a decline in the broader market may affect the value of the Fund’s equity investments.
Foreign Securities Risk.   The Fund’s investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. The Fund normally will not hedge any foreign currency exposure.
Index Tracking Risk.   The Fund’s return may not track the performance of the Index for a number of reasons. For example, the Fund incurs a number of operating expenses not applicable to the Index and incurs costs associated with buying and selling securities, especially when rebalancing the Fund’s securities holdings to reflect changes in the composition of the Index. The Fund also bears the costs and risks associated with buying and selling securities while such costs and risks are not factored into the return of the Index. In addition, the Fund may not be able to invest in certain securities included in the Index or may not be able to invest in them in the exact proportions in which they are represented in the Index, due to legal restrictions or limitations imposed by the governments of certain countries, potential adverse tax consequences or other regulatory reasons. The risk that the Fund may not track the performance of the Index may be magnified during times of heightened market volatility or other unusual market conditions. To the extent the Fund calculates its NAV based on “fair value” prices for certain securities and the value of the Index is based on securities’ closing prices (i.e., the value of the Index is not based on “fair value” prices), the Fund’s ability to track the Index may be adversely affected. For tax efficiency purposes, the Fund may sell certain securities to realize losses causing it to deviate from the Index. Errors in the construction or calculation of the Index may occur from time to time and any such errors may not be immediately identified and corrected by Solactive, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders.
Industrials Sector Risk.   The industrials sector includes companies engaged in aerospace and defense, electrical engineering, machinery, and professional services. Companies in the industrials sector may be adversely affected by changes in government regulation, world events and economic conditions. In addition, companies in the industrials sector may be adversely affected by environmental damages, product liability claims and exchange rates.

Machinery Industry Risk.   The machinery industry can be significantly affected by general economic trends, including employment, economic growth, and interest rates; changes in consumer sentiment and spending; overall capital spending levels, which are influenced by an individual company’s profitability and broader factors such as interest rates and foreign competition; commodity prices; technical obsolescence; labor relations legislation; government regulation and spending; import controls; and worldwide competition. Companies in this industry also can be adversely affected by liability for environmental damage, depletion of resources, and mandated expenditures for safety and pollution control.
 
46

 
Information Technology Sector Risk.   The information technology sector includes companies engaged in Internet software and services, technology hardware and storage peripherals, electronic equipment instruments and components, and semiconductors and semiconductor equipment. Information technology companies face intense competition, both domestically and internationally, which may have an adverse effect on profit margins. Information technology companies may have limited product lines, markets, financial resources or personnel. The products of information technology companies may face product rapid obsolescence due to technological developments and frequent new product introduction, unpredictable changes in growth rates and competition for the services of qualified personnel. Failure to introduce new products, develop and maintain a loyal customer base, or achieve general market acceptance for their products could have a material adverse effect on a company’s business. Companies in the information technology sector are heavily dependent on intellectual property and the loss of patent, copyright and trademark protections may adversely affect the profitability of these companies.

Software Industry Risk.   The software industry can be significantly affected by intense competition, aggressive pricing, technological innovations, and product obsolescence. Companies in the software industry are subject to significant competitive pressures, such as aggressive pricing, new market entrants, competition for market share, short product cycles due to an accelerated rate of technological developments and the potential for limited earnings and/or falling profit margins. These companies also face the risks that new services, equipment or technologies will not be accepted by consumers and businesses or will become rapidly obsolete. These factors can affect the profitability of these companies and, as a result, the value of their securities. Also, patent protection is integral to the success of many companies in this industry, and profitability can be affected materially by, among other things, the cost of obtaining (or failing to obtain) patent approvals, the cost of litigating patent infringement and the loss of patent protection for products (which significantly increases pricing pressures and can materially reduce profitability with respect to such products). In addition, many software companies have limited operating histories. Prices of these companies’ securities historically have been more volatile than other securities, especially over the short term.
International Closed-Market Trading Risk.   Because certain of the Fund’s underlying securities trade on an exchange that is closed when the securities exchange on which Fund Shares list and trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current pricing of an underlying security and stale security pricing (i.e., the last quote from its closed foreign market), likely resulting in premiums or discounts to NAV that may be greater than those experienced by ETFs that do not invest in foreign securities.
Investable Universe of Companies Risk.   The investable universe of companies in which the Fund may invest may be limited. If a company no longer meets the criteria for inclusion in the Index, the Fund may need to reduce or eliminate its holdings in that company from the Fund. The reduction or elimination of the Fund’s holdings in the company may have an adverse impact on the liquidity of the Fund’s underlying portfolio holdings and on Fund performance.
Issuer Risk.   The Fund is subject to the risk that the value of the Fund’s portfolio may decline due to a decline in value of the equity securities of particular issuers. The value of an issuer’s equity securities may decline for reasons directly related to the issuer, such as management performance and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services.
Large-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Large-capitalization companies are generally less volatile than companies with smaller market capitalizations. In exchange for this potentially lower risk, the value of large-capitalization companies may not rise as much as that of companies with smaller market capitalizations.
Market Risk.   The value of the Fund’s assets will fluctuate as the markets in which the Fund invests fluctuate. The value of the Fund’s investments may decline, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, simply because of economic changes or other events, such as inflation (or expectations for inflation),
 
47

 
interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters or events, terrorism, regulatory events and government controls, that affect large portions of the market.
Market Trading Risk.   The Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including disruptions to the creation and redemption processes of the Fund, losses from trading in secondary markets, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for Shares due to market stress, which may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to their NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses.
Micro-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Micro-capitalization companies are subject to substantially greater risks of loss and price fluctuations because their earnings and revenues tend to be less predictable (and some companies may be experiencing significant losses). Their share prices tend to be more volatile and their markets less liquid than companies with larger market capitalizations. The shares of micro-capitalization companies tend to trade less frequently than those of larger, more established companies, which can adversely affect the pricing of these securities and the future ability to sell these securities.
Non-Diversified Risk.   The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the 1940 Act. Therefore, the Fund may invest a relatively higher percentage of its assets in a relatively smaller number of issuers or may invest a larger proportion of its assets in a single issuer. As a result, the gains and losses on a single investment may have a greater impact on the Fund’s NAV and may make the Fund more volatile than more diversified funds.
Portfolio Turnover Risk.   The Index is adjusted to add or remove companies once per quarter and upon certain extraordinary events or corporate actions affecting a company that is included in the Index. As companies leave and enter the Index, the Fund’s portfolio will be adjusted to match the current Index composition. This process can result in the realization of capital gains or losses and can have adverse tax consequences for you as an investor. Because the Fund will buy and sell securities as needed to maintain its correlation to the Index, portfolio turnover in the Fund may be substantial.
Replication Management Risk.   An investment in the Fund involves risks similar to those of investing in any fund of equity securities traded on an exchange, such as market fluctuations caused by such factors as economic and political developments, changes in interest rates and perceived trends in security prices. However, because the Fund is not “actively” managed, unless a specific security is removed from the Index through quarterly rebalancing or otherwise because it no longer qualifies to be included in the Index, the Fund generally will not sell a security because the security’s issuer is in financial trouble. Therefore, the Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that may actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or to lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers.
Sampling Risk.   The Fund’s use of a representative sampling approach may result in it holding a smaller number of securities than are in the Index. As a result, an adverse development respecting an issuer of securities held by the Fund could result in a greater decline in NAV than would be the case if the Fund held all of the securities in the Index. Conversely, a positive development relating to an issuer of securities in the Index that is not held by the Fund could cause the Fund to underperform the Index. To the extent the assets in the Fund are smaller, these risks will be greater. A representative sampling strategy may increase the Fund’s susceptibility to Index Tracking Risk.
Small- and Medium-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Small- and medium-capitalization companies may be more volatile and more likely than large-capitalization companies to have narrower product lines, fewer financial resources, less management depth and experience and less competitive strength. Returns on investments in securities of small- and medium-capitalization companies could trail the returns on investments in securities of large-capitalization companies.
 
48

 
Performance
The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year. The table shows how the Fund’s average annual returns for 1 year and since the Fund’s inception compare with those of the Index, the S&P 500 Index and the MSCI World Index. The S&P 500 Index is a widely recognized capitalization-weighted index that measures the performance of the large-capitalization sector of the U.S. stock market. The MSCI World Index represents large and mid-cap equity performance across 23 developed markets countries. Returns shown for the MSCI World Index are net of foreign withholding taxes applicable to U.S. investors. The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available at no cost by visiting http://ark-funds.com or by calling (212) 426-7040.
[MISSING IMAGE: tv533285-bc_prntbw.jpg]
The Fund’s year-to-date total return as of October 31, 2019 was 5.86%.
Best and Worst Quarter Returns (for the period reflected in the bar chart above)
Return
Quarter/Year
Highest Return
9.48% 06/30/2017
Lowest Return
-22.86% 12/31/2018
Average Annual Total Returns as of December 31, 2018
1 Year
Since
Inception(1)
Returns Before Taxes
-17.22% 1.12%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions(2)
-17.49% 0.66%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares(2)
-10.20% 0.71%
The Total 3-D Printing Index
-16.40% 2.24%
S&P 500 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-4.38% 8.28%
MSCI World Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-8.71% 6.14%
(1)
The Fund commenced operations on July 19, 2016.
(2)
After-tax returns are calculated using the highest historical individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on your tax situation and may differ from those shown and are not relevant if you hold your shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. In some cases the return after taxes may exceed the return before taxes due to an assumed tax benefit from any losses on a sale of Shares at the end of the measurement period.
Management of the Fund
Investment Adviser.   ARK Investment Management LLC.
Portfolio Manager.   The following individual has been primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund’s portfolio since the Fund’s inception: Catherine D. Wood.
 
49

 
Purchase and Sale of Shares and Tax Information
For important information about the purchase and sale of Shares, tax information and financial intermediary compensation, please turn to “Summary Information About Purchases and Sales of Fund Shares, Tax Information and Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries” in this prospectus.
[REMAINDER OF PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
 
50

 
ARK Israel Innovative Technology ETF (IZRL)
Investment Objective
The ARK Israel Innovative Technology ETF (“Fund”) seeks to provide investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the ARK Israeli Innovation Index (“Index”).
Fund Fees and Expenses
The table below describes the fees and expenses that you pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund (“Shares”). Investors may pay brokerage commissions on their purchases and sales of Shares.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fee
0.48%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.00%
Other Expenses(a)
0.01%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses(b)
0.49%
(a)
Pursuant to a Supervision Agreement, ARK Investment Management LLC (“ARK” or “Adviser”) pays all other expenses of the Fund (other than taxes and governmental fees, brokerage fees, commissions and other transaction expenses, certain foreign custodial fees and expenses, costs of borrowing money, including interest expenses, and extraordinary expenses (such as litigation and indemnification expenses)).
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. This example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares.
The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% annual return and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:
Year
Expenses
1 $ 50
3 $ 157
5 $ 274
10 $ 616
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it purchases and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may result in higher transaction costs and higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, may affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 57% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund normally invests at least 80% of its total assets in securities that are included in the Fund’s benchmark Index, depositary receipts representing securities included in the Index or underlying
 
51

 
stocks in respect of depositary receipts included in the Index. This 80% investment policy is non-fundamental and may be changed without shareholder approval upon 60 days’ prior written notice to shareholders.
The Index is designed to track the price movements of exchange listed Israeli Companies (as defined herein) whose main business operations are causing disruptive innovation in the areas of genomics, health care, biotechnology, industrials, manufacturing, the Internet or information technology. The Index has been created and licensed to the Fund by ARK’s Index Products Group and is calculated, published and distributed by Solactive AG (“Solactive”). Information regarding the Index is available at http://www.solactive.com. The Index includes equity securities and depositary receipts of exchange listed companies that are incorporated and/or domiciled in Israel (“Israeli Companies”) and are included in one of the following economic sectors as defined by FactSet Research Systems: (i) health technology, (ii) communications, (iii) technology services, (iv) electronic technology, (v) consumer services or (vi) producer manufacturing. Securities in the Index are equally weighted and weightings are rebalanced quarterly. As of November 18, 2019, the Index included 45 securities of companies with a market capitalization range of between approximately $89 million and $18 billion and a weighted average market capitalization of  $2.2 billion.
The Fund, using an indexing investment approach, attempts to approximate, before fees and expenses, the investment performance of the Index by investing in a portfolio of securities that generally replicates the Index. The Fund generally will use a replication strategy. A replication strategy is an indexing strategy that involves investing in the securities of the Index in approximately the same proportions as in the Index. However, the Fund may utilize a representative sampling strategy with respect to the Index when it might not be possible or practicable to purchase all of the securities of the Index in approximately the same proportions as in the Index. Such instances may include when there are practical difficulties or substantial costs involved in compiling a portfolio of securities to replicate the Index, in instances in which a security in the Index becomes temporarily illiquid, unavailable or less liquid, or as a result of legal restrictions or limitations (such as tax diversification requirements) that apply to the Fund but not the Index. There also may be instances in which the Adviser may choose to underweight or overweight a security in the Index, purchase securities not in the Index that the Adviser believes are appropriate to substitute for certain securities in the Index or utilize various combinations of other available investment techniques in seeking to replicate as closely as possible, before fees and expenses, the performance of the Index. The Fund may sell securities that are represented in the Index in anticipation of their removal from the Index or purchase securities not represented in the Index in anticipation of their addition to the Index. The Fund does not seek temporary defensive positions when markets decline or appear overvalued.
If the Fund uses a replication strategy, it can be expected to have greater correlation to the Index than if it uses a representative sampling strategy.
The Fund may concentrate its investments in a particular industry or group of industries to the extent that the Index concentrates in an industry or group of industries. Based on the composition of the Index as of November 18, 2019, the health care sector and information technology sector represented a significant portion of the Index. The Fund may invest in foreign securities (including investments in American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”)) and securities listed on local foreign exchanges.
The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”), which means that it may invest a high percentage of its assets in a limited number of issuers.
 
52

 
Principal Risks
There is no assurance that the Fund will meet its investment objective. The value of your investment in the Fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment in the Fund, may fluctuate significantly. You may lose part or all of your investment in the Fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments. Therefore, you should consider carefully the following risks before investing in the Fund. The principal risks of investing in the Fund listed below are presented alphabetically to facilitate your ability to find particular risks and compare them with the risks of other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.
Authorized Participants Concentration Risk.   The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants (“APs”) on an agency basis (i.e., on behalf of other market participants). To the extent that those APs exit the business or are unable to process creation and/or redemption orders, and no other AP is able to step forward to create and redeem in either of these cases, Shares may possibly trade at a discount to net asset value (“NAV”). The AP risk may be heightened in the case of exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) investing internationally because international ETFs often require APs to post collateral, which only certain APs are able to do.
Cyber Security Risk.   As the use of Internet technology has become more prevalent in the course of business, funds have become more susceptible to potential operational risks through breaches in cyber security. A breach in cyber security refers to both intentional and unintentional events that may cause the Fund to lose proprietary information, suffer data corruption or lose operational capacity. Such events could cause the Fund to incur regulatory penalties, reputational damage, additional compliance costs associated with corrective measures and/or financial loss. Cyber security breaches may involve unauthorized access to the Fund’s digital information systems through “hacking” or malicious software coding, but may also result from outside attacks such as denial-of-service attacks through efforts to make network services unavailable to intended users. In addition, cyber security breaches of the Fund’s third-party service providers, such as its administrator, transfer agent or custodian, or issuers in which the Fund invests, can also subject the Fund to many of the same risks associated with direct cyber security breaches. While the Fund has established business continuity plans and risk management systems designed to reduce the risks associated with cyber security, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems. Additionally, there is no guarantee that such efforts will succeed, especially because the Fund does not directly control the cyber security systems of issuers or third-party service providers.
Depositary Receipts Risk.   The Fund may invest in depositary receipts, which involve similar risks to those associated with investments in foreign securities. Depositary receipts are receipts listed on U.S. or foreign exchanges issued by banks or trust companies that entitle the holder to all dividends and capital gains that are paid out on the underlying foreign shares. Investments in depositary receipts may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market and, if not included in the Index, may negatively affect the Fund’s ability to replicate the performance of the Index.
Equity Securities Risk.   The value of the equity securities the Fund holds may fall due to general market and economic conditions, perceptions regarding the industries in which the issuers of securities the Fund holds participate or factors relating to specific companies in which the Fund invests. These can include stock movements, purchases or sales of securities by the Fund, government policies, litigation and changes in interest rates, inflation, the financial condition of the securities’ issuer or perceptions of the issuer, or economic conditions in general or specific to the issuer. Equity securities may also be particularly sensitive to general movements in the stock market, and a decline in the broader market may affect the value of the Fund’s equity investments.
Focused Investment Risk.   The Fund’s assets will be focused on Israeli Companies. Therefore, the Fund will be subject to the risk that certain economic, political or other conditions may have a negative effect on Israeli securities or companies. The Fund’s assets may be concentrated in a particular industry or group of industries to the extent the Index concentrates in a particular industry
 
53

 
or group of industries. The Fund’s assets also may be focused in a particular sector or sectors to the extent the Index focuses in a certain sector or sectors. Based on the composition of the Index as of November 18, 2019, the health care sector and information technology sector represented a significant portion of the Index. Thus, adverse consequences to companies within the health care sector and information technology sector may negatively impact the Fund to a greater extent than if the Fund’s assets were invested in a wider variety of sectors.
Foreign Securities Risk.   The Fund’s investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. The Fund normally will not hedge any foreign currency exposure.
Health Care Sector Risk.   The health care sector may be affected by government regulations and government health care programs, restrictions on government reimbursement for medical expenses, increases or decreases in the cost of medical products and services and product liability claims, among other factors. Many health care companies are (i) heavily dependent on patent protection and intellectual property rights and the expiration of a patent may adversely affect their profitability, (ii) subject to extensive litigation based on product liability and similar claims and (iii) subject to competitive forces that may make it difficult to raise prices and, in fact, may result in price discounting. Many health care products and services may be subject to regulatory approvals. The process of obtaining such approvals may be long and costly, and delays or failure to receive such approvals may negatively impact the business of such companies. Additional or more stringent laws and regulations enacted in the future could have a material adverse effect on such companies in the health care sector. In addition, issuers in the health care sector include issuers having their principal activities in the biotechnology industry, medical laboratories and research, drug laboratories and research and drug manufacturers, which have the additional risks described below.

Biotechnology Company Risk.   A biotechnology company’s valuation can often be based largely on the potential or actual performance of a limited number of products and can accordingly be greatly affected if one of its products proves, among other things, unsafe, ineffective or unprofitable. Biotechnology companies are subject to regulation by, and the restrictions of, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, state and local governments, and foreign regulatory authorities.

Pharmaceutical Company Risk.   Companies in the pharmaceutical industry can be significantly affected by, among other things, government approval of products and services, government regulation and reimbursement rates, product liability claims, patent expirations and protection and intense competition.
Index Tracking Risk.   The Fund’s return may not track the performance of the Index for a number of reasons. For example, the Fund incurs a number of operating expenses not applicable to the Index and incurs costs associated with buying and selling securities, especially when rebalancing the Fund’s securities holdings to reflect changes in the composition of the Index. The Fund also bears the costs and risks associated with buying and selling securities while such costs and risks are not factored into the return of the Index. In addition, the Fund may not be able to invest in certain securities included in the Index, or may not be able to invest in them in the exact proportions in which they are represented in the Index, due to legal restrictions or limitations imposed by the governments of certain countries, potential adverse tax consequences or other regulatory reasons. The risk that the Fund may not track the performance of the Index may be magnified during times
 
54

 
of heightened market volatility or other unusual market conditions. To the extent the Fund calculates its NAV based on “fair value” prices for certain securities and the value of the Index is based on securities’ closing prices (i.e., the value of the Index is not based on “fair value” prices), the Fund’s ability to track the Index may be adversely affected. For tax efficiency purposes, the Fund may sell certain securities to realize losses causing it to deviate from the Index. Errors in the construction or calculation of the Index may occur from time to time and any such errors may not be immediately identified and corrected by Solactive, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders.
Industrials Sector Risk.   The industrials sector includes companies engaged in the aerospace and defense industry, electrical engineering, machinery, and professional services. Companies in the industrials sector may be adversely affected by changes in government regulation, world events and economic conditions. In addition, companies in the industrials sector may be adversely affected by environmental damages, product liability claims and exchange rates.

Aerospace and Defense Company Risk.   Companies in the aerospace and defense industry rely to a large extent on U.S. and Israel (and other) Government demand for their products and services and may be significantly affected by changes in government regulations and spending, as well as economic conditions and industry consolidation.

Professional Services Company Risk.   Professional services companies may be materially impacted by economic conditions and related fluctuations in client demand for marketing, business, technology and other consulting services. Professional services companies’ success depends in large part on attracting and retaining key employees and a failure to do so could adversely affect a company’s business. There are relatively few barriers to entry into the professional services market, and new competitors could readily seek to compete in one or more market segments, which could adversely affect a professional services company’s operating results through pricing pressure and loss of market share.
Information Technology Sector Risk.   The information technology sector includes companies engaged in internet software and services, technology hardware and storage peripherals, electronic equipment instruments and components, and semiconductors and semiconductor equipment. Information technology companies face intense competition, both domestically and internationally, which may have an adverse effect on profit margins. Information technology companies may have limited product lines, markets, financial resources or personnel. The products of information technology companies may face rapid product obsolescence due to technological developments and frequent new product introduction, unpredictable changes in growth rates and competition for the services of qualified personnel. Failure to introduce new products, develop and maintain a loyal customer base or achieve general market acceptance for their products could have a material adverse effect on a company’s business. Companies in the information technology sector are heavily dependent on intellectual property and the loss of patent, copyright and trademark protections may adversely affect the profitability of these companies.

Internet Company Risk.   Many Internet-related companies have incurred large losses since their inception and may continue to incur large losses in the hope of capturing market share and generating future revenues. Accordingly, many such companies expect to incur significant operating losses for the foreseeable future, and may never be profitable. The markets in which many Internet companies compete face rapidly evolving industry standards, frequent new service and product announcements, introductions and enhancements, and changing customer demands. The failure of an Internet company to adapt to such changes could have a material adverse effect on the company’s business. Additionally, the widespread adoption of new Internet, networking, telecommunications technologies, or other technological changes could require substantial expenditures by an Internet company to modify or adapt its services or infrastructure, which could have a material adverse effect on an Internet company’s business.

Semiconductor Company Risk.   Competitive pressures may have a significant effect on the financial condition of semiconductor companies and, as product cycles shorten and
 
55

 
manufacturing capacity increases, these companies may become increasingly subject to aggressive pricing, which hampers profitability. Reduced demand for end-user products, under-utilization of manufacturing capacity, and other factors could adversely impact the operating results of companies in the semiconductor sector. Semiconductor companies typically face high capital costs and may be heavily dependent on intellectual property rights. The semiconductor sector is highly cyclical, which may cause the operating results of many semiconductor companies to vary significantly. The stock prices of companies in the semiconductor sector have been and likely will continue to be extremely volatile.

Software Industry Risk.   The software industry can be significantly affected by intense competition, aggressive pricing, technological innovations, and product obsolescence. Companies in the software industry are subject to significant competitive pressures, such as aggressive pricing, new market entrants, competition for market share, short product cycles due to an accelerated rate of technological developments and the potential for limited earnings and/or falling profit margins. These companies also face the risks that new services, equipment or technologies will not be accepted by consumers and businesses or will become rapidly obsolete. These factors can affect the profitability of these companies and, as a result, the value of their securities. Also, patent protection is integral to the success of many companies in this industry, and profitability can be affected materially by, among other things, the cost of obtaining (or failing to obtain) patent approvals, the cost of litigating patent infringement and the loss of patent protection for products (which significantly increases pricing pressures and can materially reduce profitability with respect to such products). In addition, many software companies have limited operating histories. Prices of these companies’ securities historically have been more volatile than other securities, especially over the short term.
International Closed-Market Trading Risk.   Because certain of the Fund’s underlying securities trade on an exchange that is closed when the securities exchange on which Fund Shares list and trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current pricing of an underlying security and stale security pricing (i.e., the last quote from its closed foreign market), likely resulting in premiums or discounts to NAV that may be greater than those experienced by ETFs that do not invest in foreign securities.
Innovative Technology Risk.   Companies that are developing technologies to displace older technologies or create new markets may not in fact do so. Companies that initially develop a novel technology may not be able to capitalize on the technology. Companies that develop disruptive technologies may face political or legal attacks from competitors, industry groups or local and national governments. A company may not currently derive any revenue from innovative technologies, and there is no assurance that a company will derive any revenue from innovative technologies in the future. An innovative technology may constitute a small portion of a company’s overall business. As a result, the success of an innovative technology may not affect the value of the equity securities issued by the company.
Investable Universe of Companies Risk.   The investable universe of companies in which the Fund may invest is limited. If a company no longer meets the criteria for inclusion in the Index, the Fund may need to reduce or eliminate its holdings in that company from the Fund. The reduction or elimination of the Fund’s holdings in the company may have an adverse impact on the liquidity of the Fund’s underlying portfolio holdings and on Fund performance.
Israel Risk.   Because the Fund invests in securities of Israeli Companies, the Fund may be exposed to special risks and considerations. There may be less information concerning the securities of Israeli Companies available to the public than the securities of U.S. companies. There is also potential difficulty in obtaining or enforcing a court judgment, and the unique characteristics of securities of Israeli Companies and the Israel stock market may have a negative impact on the Fund. Any major hostilities involving Israel, including hostilities with neighboring countries, or the interruption or curtailment of trade between Israel and its present trading partners, could have a negative impact on the Fund. Shares and dividends of Israeli Companies are often Israeli new shekel (“ILS”)
 
56

 
denominated. Changes in the relationship of the ILS to the U.S. dollar and other currencies could have a negative impact on the Fund. The government of Israel may change the way in which Israeli Companies are taxed, or may impose taxes on foreign investment. Such actions could have an adverse impact on the overall market for securities of Israeli Companies and on the Fund.
Issuer Risk.   The Fund is subject to the risk that the value of the Fund’s portfolio may decline due to a decline in value of the equity securities of particular issuers. The value of an issuer’s equity securities may decline for reasons directly related to the issuer, such as management performance and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services.
Large-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Large-capitalization companies are generally less volatile than companies with smaller market capitalizations. In exchange for this potentially lower risk, the value of large-capitalization companies may not rise as much as that of companies with smaller market capitalizations.
Market Risk.   The value of the Fund’s assets will fluctuate as the markets in which the Fund invests fluctuate. The value of the Fund’s investments may decline, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, simply because of economic changes or other events, such as inflation (or expectations for inflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters or events, terrorism, regulatory events and government controls, that affect large portions of the market.
Market Trading Risk.   The Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including disruptions to the creation and redemption processes of the Fund, losses from trading in secondary markets, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for Shares due to market stress, which may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to their NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses.
Micro-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Micro-capitalization companies are subject to substantially greater risks of loss and price fluctuations because their earnings and revenues tend to be less predictable (and some companies may be experiencing significant losses). Their share prices tend to be more volatile and their markets less liquid than companies with larger market capitalizations. The shares of micro-capitalization companies tend to trade less frequently than those of larger, more established companies, can adversely affect the pricing of these securities and the future ability to sell these securities.
Non-Diversified Risk.   The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the 1940 Act. Therefore, the Fund may invest a relatively higher percentage of its assets in a relatively smaller number of issuers or may invest a larger proportion of its assets in a single issuer. As a result, the gains and losses on a single investment may have a greater impact on the Fund’s NAV and may make the Fund more volatile than more diversified funds.
Portfolio Turnover Risk.   The Index is adjusted to add or remove companies once per quarter and upon certain extraordinary events or corporate actions affecting a company that is included in the Index. As companies leave and enter the Index, the Fund’s portfolio will be adjusted to match the current Index composition. This practice can result in the realization of capital gains or losses and can have adverse tax consequences for you as an investor. Because the Fund will buy and sell securities as needed to maintain its correlation to the Index, portfolio turnover in the Fund may be substantial.
Replication Management Risk.   An investment in the Fund involves risks similar to those of investing in any fund of equity securities traded on an exchange, such as market fluctuations caused by such factors as economic and political developments, changes in interest rates and perceived trends in security prices. However, because the Fund is not “actively” managed, unless a specific security is removed from the Index through quarterly rebalancing or otherwise because it no longer qualifies to be included in the Index, the Fund generally will not sell a security because the security’s issuer is in financial trouble. Therefore, the Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that may
 
57

 
actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or to lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers.
Sampling Risk.   The Fund’s use of a representative sampling approach may result in it holding a smaller number of securities than are in the Index. As a result, an adverse development respecting an issuer of securities held by the Fund could result in a greater decline in NAV than would be the case if the Fund held all of the securities in the Index. Conversely, a positive development relating to an issuer of securities in the Index that is not held by the Fund could cause the Fund to underperform the Index. To the extent the assets in the Fund are smaller, these risks will be greater. A representative sampling strategy may increase the Fund’s susceptibility to Index Tracking Risk.
Small- and Medium-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Small- and medium-capitalization companies may be more volatile and more likely than large-capitalization companies to have narrower product lines, fewer financial resources, less management depth and experience and less competitive strength. Returns on investments in securities of small- and medium-capitalization companies could trail the returns on investments in securities of large-capitalization companies.
Performance
The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year. The table shows how the Fund’s average annual returns for 1 year and since the Fund’s inception compare with those of the Index, the S&P 500 Index, the MSCI World Index and the MSCI Israeli Index. The S&P 500 Index is a widely recognized capitalization-weighted index that measures the performance of the large-capitalization sector of the U.S. stock market. The MSCI World Index represents large and mid-cap equity performance across 23 developed markets countries. Returns shown for the MSCI World Index are net of foreign withholding taxes applicable to U.S. investors. The MSCI Israeli Index is designed to measure the performance of the large and mid-cap segments of the Israeli equity market. Returns shown for the MSCI Israeli Index are net of foreign withholding taxes applicable to U.S. Investors. The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available at no cost by visiting http://ark-funds.com or by calling (212) 426-7040.
[MISSING IMAGE: tv533285-bc_performancebw.jpg]
The Fund’s year-to-date total return as of October 31, 2019 was 13.31%.
Best and Worst Quarter Returns (for the period reflected in the bar chart above)
Return
Quarter/Year
Highest Return
7.98%
09/30/2018
Lowest Return
-12.24%
12/31/2018
 
58

 
Average Annual Total Returns as of December 31, 2018
1 Year
Since
Inception(1)
Returns Before Taxes
-5.00% -3.40%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions(2)
-5.95% -4.31%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares(2)
-2.75% -2.86%
ARK Israeli Innovation Index
-5.08% -3.47%
S&P 500 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-4.38% -2.82%
MSCI World Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-8.71% -6.67%
MSCI Israeli Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-5.49% 1.84%
(1)
The Fund commenced operations on December 5, 2017.
(2)
After-tax returns are calculated using the highest historical individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on your tax situation and may differ from those shown and are not relevant if you hold your shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. In some cases the return after taxes may exceed the return before taxes due to an assumed tax benefit from any losses on a sale of Shares at the end of the measurement period.
Management of the Fund
Investment Adviser.   ARK Investment Management LLC.
Portfolio Manager.   The following individual has been primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund’s portfolio since the inception of the Fund: Catherine D. Wood.
Purchase and Sale of Shares and Tax Information
For important information about the purchase and sale of Shares, tax information and financial intermediary compensation, please turn to “Summary Information About Purchases and Sales of Fund Shares, Tax Information and Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries” in this prospectus.
[REMAINDER OF PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
 
59

 
Summary Information About Purchases and Sales of Fund Shares, Tax Information and Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
Each Fund issues and redeems Shares at their NAV only in a large specified number of Shares each called a “Creation Unit,” or multiples thereof, and only with Authorized Participants (“APs”) who have entered into contractual arrangements with the Fund’s distributor (“Distributor”). A Creation Unit consists of 50,000 Shares except for ARK Israel Innovative Technology ETF, for which a Creation Unit consists of 25,000 Shares.
Individual Shares (rather than Creation Units) of a Fund may only be purchased and sold on a national securities exchange through brokers. The prices at which individual Shares may be purchased and sold on a national securities exchange through brokers are based on market prices and, because Shares will trade at market prices rather than at NAV, individual Shares of a Fund may trade at a price greater than or less than NAV. Shares of ARK Innovation ETF, ARK Genomic Revolution ETF, ARK Autonomous Technology & Robotics ETF, ARK Next Generation Internet ETF and ARK Fintech Innovation ETF (together, the “Actively-Managed Funds”) are listed on NYSE Arca, Inc. (“Arca”). Shares of The 3D Printing ETF and of ARK Israel Innovative Technology ETF (together, the “Index Funds”) are listed on the Cboe BZX Exchange (“Cboe,” and together with Arca, an “Exchange”).
Tax Information
Each Fund’s distributions are taxable and generally will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
The Adviser and its related companies may pay broker/dealers or other financial intermediaries (such as a bank) for the sale of the Fund Shares and related services. These payments create a conflict of interest by influencing your broker/dealer, sales persons or other intermediary or its employees or associated persons to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial adviser or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
 
60

 
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE FUNDS’ INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RISKS
Investment Objective of each Fund
Each Fund’s investment objective is non-fundamental and may be changed by the Board of Trustees (“Board”) of ARK ETF Trust (“Trust”) without shareholder approval. There is no assurance that a Fund will meet its investment objective.
Principal Investment Strategies
Actively-Managed Funds
The Adviser may cause an Actively-Managed Fund to sell a security when the Adviser believes the issuer is no longer relevant to the applicable investment theme, or the security is overvalued or ceases to be an attractive investment due to, among other reasons, unfavorable sector-, industry- or issuer-specific developments.
Index Funds
The Adviser anticipates that, generally, each Index Fund will hold or gain exposure to all of the securities that constitute that Index Fund’s respective Index in proportion to that Index Fund’s weightings in its Index. However, under various circumstances, it may not be possible or practicable to purchase all of those securities in those weightings. In these circumstances, an Index Fund may purchase a sample of securities in its Index. There also may be instances in which the Adviser may choose to underweight or overweight a security in an Index, purchase securities not in the Index that the Adviser believes are appropriate to substitute for certain securities in the Index or utilize various combinations of other available investment techniques in seeking to replicate as closely as possible, before fees and expenses, the performance of the Index. An Index Fund may sell securities that are represented in its Index in anticipation of their removal from its Index or purchase securities not represented in its Index in anticipation of their addition to its Index. An Index Fund may also, in order to comply with the tax diversification requirements of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (“Internal Revenue Code”), temporarily invest in securities not included in its Index that are expected to be highly correlated with the securities included in its Index.
Principal Risks
The value of your investment in a Fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment in the Fund, may fluctuate significantly. You may lose part or all of your investment in a Fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments. Therefore, you should consider carefully the following risks before investing in a Fund.
Biotechnology Company Risk.   A biotechnology company’s valuation can often be based largely on the potential or actual performance of a limited number of products and can accordingly be greatly affected if one of its products proves, among other things, unsafe, ineffective or unprofitable. Biotechnology companies are subject to regulation by, and the restrictions of, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, state and local governments, and foreign regulatory authorities.
Currency Risk.   Fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates may affect the value of a Fund’s investments in securities traded in foreign markets and held in foreign currencies. Foreign currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly. They are determined by supply and demand in the foreign exchange markets, the relative merits of investments in different countries, actual or perceived changes in interest rates, and other complex factors. Currency exchange rates also can be affected unpredictably by intervention (or the failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments or central banks or by currency controls or political developments.
 
61

 
Equity Risk.   The value of the equity securities that a Fund holds will fall due to general market and economic conditions, perceptions regarding the industries in which the issuers of such securities participate or factors relating to specific companies in which a Fund invests. An unfavorable earnings report or a failure to make anticipated dividend payments by an issuer whose securities are held by the Fund may affect the value of the Fund’s investment. Equity securities may also be particularly sensitive to general movements in the stock market, and a decline in the broader market may affect the value of the Fund’s equity investments.
Foreign Securities Risk.   Investment in the securities of foreign issuers involves risks beyond those associated with investments in U.S. securities. These additional risks include greater market volatility, the availability of less reliable financial information, higher transactional and custody costs, taxation by foreign governments, decreased market liquidity and political instability. Because many foreign securities markets may be limited in size, the prices of securities that trade in such markets may be influenced by large traders. Certain foreign markets that have historically been considered relatively stable may become volatile in response to changed conditions or new developments. Increased interconnectivity of world economies and financial markets increases the possibility that adverse developments and conditions in one country or region will affect the stability of economies and financial markets in other countries or regions. Foreign issuers are often subject to less stringent requirements regarding accounting, auditing, financial reporting and record keeping than are U.S. issuers, and therefore, not all material information may be available or reliable. Securities exchanges or foreign governments may adopt rules or regulations that may negatively impact a Fund’s ability to invest in foreign securities or may prevent the Fund from repatriating its investments. In addition, a Fund may not receive shareholder communications or be permitted to vote the securities that it holds, as the issuers may be under no legal obligation to distribute shareholder communications.
Certain issuers located in foreign countries in which a Fund invests may operate in, or have dealings with, countries subject to sanctions and/or embargoes imposed by the U.S. Government and the United Nations and/or countries identified by the U.S. Government as state sponsors of terrorism. As a result, an issuer may sustain damage to its reputation if it is identified as an issuer which operates in, or has dealings with, such countries. A Fund, as an investor in such issuers, will be indirectly subject to those risks.
Issuer Risk.   Because a Fund may invest in a limited number of issuers, it is subject to the risk that the value of the Fund’s portfolio may decline due to a decline in value of the equity securities of particular issuers. The value of an issuer’s equity securities may decline for reasons directly related to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services. The value of an individual security or particular type of security can be more volatile than the market as a whole and can perform differently from the value of the market as a whole. The value of securities of smaller issuers can be more volatile than that of larger issuers. A change in the financial condition, market perception or credit rating of an issuer of securities included in a Fund’s portfolio may cause the value of its securities to decline.
Large-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Large-capitalization companies tend to go in and out of favor based on market and economic conditions. Large-capitalization companies generally are less volatile than companies with smaller market capitalizations. In exchange for this potentially lower risk, the value of large capitalization companies may not rise as much as that of smaller-capitalization companies.
Limited Operating History Risk.   The ARK Fintech Innovation ETF has limited operating history for investors to evaluate. There can be no assurance that the ARK Fintech Innovation ETF will grow to or maintain an economically viable size. The ARK Fintech Innovation ETF may liquidate and terminate at any time without shareholder approval.
Management Risk.   As actively-managed ETFs, the Actively-Managed Funds are subject to management risk. In managing the Actively-Managed Funds, the Adviser applies investment strategies, techniques and analyses in making investment decisions for the Actively-Managed Funds, but there can be no guarantee that these actions will produce the intended results. The ability of
 
62

 
the Adviser to successfully implement an Actively-Managed Fund’s investment strategies will significantly influence the Actively-Managed Fund’s performance.
Market Risk.   The value of a Fund’s assets will fluctuate as the markets in which the Fund invests fluctuate. Market fluctuations may result from economic, political, regulatory or market developments, changes in interest rates and perceived trends in securities prices. The value of a Fund’s investments may decline, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, simply because of economic changes or other events, such as inflation (or expectations for inflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters or events, terrorism, regulatory events and government controls, that affect large portions of the market.
Market Trading Risk.   Each Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including disruptions to the creation and redemption processes of the Fund, losses from trading in secondary markets, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for Shares due to market stress that may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to NAV. The NAV of Shares will fluctuate with changes in the market value of a Fund’s securities holdings. The market prices of Shares will fluctuate in accordance with changes in their NAV and supply and demand on an Exchange. The Adviser cannot predict whether Shares will trade below, at or above their NAV. Price differences may be due, in large part, to the fact that supply and demand forces at work in the secondary trading market for Shares will be closely related to, but not identical to, the same forces influencing the prices of the securities in a Fund’s portfolio trading individually or in the aggregate at any point in time. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses. Any of these factors, discussed above and further below, may lead to Shares trading at a premium or discount to a Fund’s NAV.
Trading Issues.   Trading in Shares on an Exchange may be halted due to market conditions or for reasons that, in the view of the Exchange, make trading in Shares inadvisable. In addition, trading in Shares on an Exchange is subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility pursuant to the Exchange’s “circuit breaker” rules. If a trading halt or unanticipated early closing of the Exchange occurs, a shareholder may be unable to purchase or sell Shares of a Fund. There can be no assurance that the requirements of an Exchange necessary to maintain the listing of a Fund will continue to be met or will remain unchanged.
Micro-Capitalization Companies Risk.   Micro-capitalization companies are subject to substantially greater risks of loss and price fluctuations because their earnings and revenues tend to be less predictable (and some companies may be experiencing significant losses). Their share prices tend to be more volatile and their markets less liquid than companies with larger market capitalizations. The shares of micro-capitalization companies tend to trade less frequently than those of larger, more established companies, which can adversely affect the pricing of these securities and the future ability to sell these securities. In addition, because these companies are not well-known to the investing public, do not have significant institutional ownership and are followed by relatively few security analysts, there will normally be less publicly available information concerning their securities compared to what is available for the securities of larger companies. Adverse publicity and investor perceptions, regardless of whether the perceptions are based on fundamental analysis, can decrease the value and liquidity of securities held by a Fund.
Non-Diversified Risk.   Investment companies are classified as either “diversified” or “non-diversified” under the 1940 Act. Each Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the 1940 Act, although each is diversified for Internal Revenue Code purposes. An investment company classified as “diversified” under the 1940 Act is subject to certain limitations with respect to the value of the company’s assets invested in particular issuers. As a non-diversified investment company, each Fund is subject to the risk that it will be more volatile than a diversified fund because the Fund may invest a relatively higher proportion of its assets in a relatively smaller number of issuers or may invest a larger proportion of its assets in a single issuer. As a result, the gains and losses on a single investment may have a greater impact on a Fund’s NAV and may make the Fund more volatile than more diversified funds.
 
63

 
Small- and Medium-Capitalization Companies Risk.   A Fund may invest in small- and medium-capitalization companies and, therefore, will be subject to certain risks associated with small- and medium-capitalization companies. These companies are often subject to less analyst coverage and may be in early and less predictable periods of their corporate existences, with little or no record of profitability. In addition, these companies often have greater price volatility, lower trading volume and less liquidity than larger more established companies. Small- and medium-capitalization companies tend to have smaller revenues, narrower product lines, less management depth and experience, smaller shares of their product or service markets, fewer financial resources and less competitive strength than large-capitalization companies. Returns on investments in securities of small- and medium-capitalization companies could trail the returns on investments in securities of larger capitalization companies.
Sector Risk.   Each Fund may, from time to time, invest more heavily in companies in a particular economic sector or sectors. Economic or regulatory changes adversely affecting such sectors may have more of an impact on a Fund’s performance than if the Fund held a broader range of investments.
Additional Principal Risks Applicable to ARK Innovation ETF and ARK Next Generation Internet ETF:
Cryptocurrency Risk.   Cryptocurrency (notably, bitcoin), often referred to as “virtual currency” or “digital currency,” operates as a decentralized, peer-to-peer financial exchange and value storage that is used like money. ARKK and ARKW may have exposure to bitcoin, a cryptocurrency, indirectly through an investment in the Bitcoin Investment Trust (“GBTC”), a privately offered, open-end investment vehicle. Cryptocurrency operates without central authority or banks and is not back by any government. Even indirectly, cryptocurrencies (i.e., bitcoin) may experience very high volatility and related investment vehicles like GBTC may be affected by such volatility. Funds holding cryptocurrency may also trade at a significant premium to NAV. Cryptocurrency is also not legal tender. Federal, state or foreign governments may restrict the use and exchange of cryptocurrency, and regulation in the U.S. is still developing. Cryptocurrency exchanges may stop operating or permanently shut down due to fraud, technical glitches, hackers or malware.
Cryptocurrency Tax Risk.   Many significant aspects of the U.S. federal income tax treatment of investments in bitcoin are uncertain and an investment in bitcoin may produce income that is not treated as qualifying income for purposes of the income test applicable to regulated investment companies. GBTC is expected to be treated as a grantor trust for U.S. federal income tax purposes, and an investment by ARKK or ARKW in GBTC will generally be treated as a direct investment in bitcoin for such purposes. See “Taxes” in the Funds’ SAI for more information.
Additional Principal Risk Applicable to ARK Innovation ETF and ARK Genomic Revolution ETF:
Health Care Sector Risk.   The profitability of companies in the health care sector may be affected by extensive government regulations, restrictions on government reimbursement for medical expenses, rising costs of medical products and services, pricing pressure, an increased emphasis on outpatient services, limited number of products, product obsolescence due to industry innovation, changes in technologies and other market developments. A major source of revenue for certain companies in the health care sector is payments from the Medicare and Medicaid programs. As a result, such companies are sensitive to legislative changes and reductions in governmental spending for such programs. Failure of health care companies to comply with applicable laws and regulations can result in the imposition of civil and/or criminal fines, penalties and, in some instances, exclusion of participation in government sponsored programs such as Medicare and Medicaid. State or local health care reform measures may also adversely affect health care companies. Health care companies will continue to be affected by the efforts of governments and third-party payors to contain or reduce health care costs. Many health care companies are heavily dependent on patent protection. The expiration of patents may adversely affect the profitability of these companies. Many health care companies are subject to extensive litigation based on product liability and similar
 
64

 
claims. Health care companies are subject to competitive forces that may make it difficult to raise prices and, in fact, may result in price discounting. Many new products in the health care sector may be subject to regulatory approvals. The process of obtaining such approvals may be long and costly, and delays or failure to receive such approvals may negatively impact the business of such companies. Companies in the health care sector may be thinly capitalized.
Additional Principal Risks Applicable to the Index Funds:
Depositary Receipts Risk.   An Index Fund may invest in depositary receipts which involve similar risks to those associated with investments in foreign securities. Depositary receipts are receipts listed on U.S. or foreign exchanges issued by banks or trust companies that entitle the holder to all dividends and capital gains that are paid out on the underlying foreign shares. The issuers of certain depositary receipts are under no obligation to distribute shareholder communications to the holders of such receipts, or to pass through to them any voting rights with respect to the deposited securities. Depositary receipts may not necessarily be denominated in the same currency as the underlying securities into which they may be converted. In addition, the issuers of the stock underlying unsponsored depositary receipts are not obligated to disclose material information in the U.S. Investments in depositary receipts may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market and, if not included in an Index, may negatively affect an Index Fund’s ability to replicate the performance of the Index. In addition, investments in depositary receipts that are not included in the Index may increase tracking error.
Index Tracking Risk.   An Index Fund’s return may not track the performance of an Index for a number of reasons. For example, each Index Fund incurs a number of operating fees and expenses not applicable to its respective Index and incurs costs and risks associated with buying and selling securities, especially when rebalancing its securities holdings to reflect changes in the composition of the Index, that are not factored into the return of the Index. An Index Fund may not be fully invested at times as a result of reserves of cash it holds to pay expenses. In addition, an Index Fund may not be able to invest in certain foreign securities included in its Index, or invest in them in the exact proportions they represent of the Index, due to legal restrictions or limitations imposed by the governments of certain countries, a lack of liquidity on stock exchanges in which such securities trade, potential adverse tax consequences or other regulatory reasons. The risk that an Index Fund may not track the performance of its Index may be magnified during times of heightened market volatility or other unusual market conditions. Moreover, an Index Fund may be delayed in purchasing or selling securities included in its Index. Any issues an Index Fund encounters regarding foreign securities with regard to currency convertibility (including the cost of borrowing funds, if any) and repatriation may also increase the index tracking risk. For tax efficiency purposes, each Index Fund may sell certain securities to realize losses causing it to deviate from its Index. It is also possible that an Index Fund may need to “fair value” certain of the securities it holds. To the extent an Index Fund calculates its NAV based on “fair value” prices and the value of its Index is based on securities’ closing prices on local foreign markets (i.e., the value of the Index is not based on “fair value” prices) or if an Index Fund otherwise calculates its NAV based on prices that differ from those used in calculating its Index, an Index Fund’s ability to track its Index may be adversely affected. Moreover, the need to comply with the tax diversification and other requirements of the Internal Revenue Code may also impact an Index Fund’s ability to replicate the performance of its Index. In addition, if an Index Fund utilizes derivative instruments that are not included in its Index, its return may not correlate as well with the returns of its Index as would be the case if an Index Fund purchased all the securities in its Index directly. Errors in the construction or calculation of an Index may occur from time to time and any such errors may not be immediately identified and corrected by Solactive, which may have an adverse impact on an Index Fund and its shareholders.
Replication Management Risk.   An Index Fund is managed to replicate, before fees and expenses, the performance of its Index. Therefore, unless a specific security is removed from an Index on a quarterly basis or otherwise removed from an Index because it no longer qualifies to be included in the Index, an Index Fund generally would not sell a security because the security’s issuer is in financial trouble. If a specific security is removed from an Index, it is possible that an Index Fund
 
65

 
may be forced to sell such security at an inopportune time or for prices other than at current market values, which could have a negative effect on the Index Fund’s performance. In addition, an Index may not contain an appropriate or a diversified mix of securities for any particular economic cycle. Because the Index Funds seek to replicate the performance of their respective Indices, the Adviser will not use techniques or defensive strategies designed to lessen the effects of market volatility or to reduce the impact of periods of market decline. Thus, based on market and economic conditions, an Index Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or to lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers. Further, the Index Funds will not invest in money market instruments as part of a temporary defensive strategy to protect against potential securities market declines.
Additional Investment Strategies
Actively-Managed Funds
As non-principal investment strategies, each Actively-Managed Fund may invest no more than 35% of its assets in depositary receipts (including sponsored ADRs), rights, warrants, preferred securities and convertible securities. An Actively-Managed Fund may invest up to 10% of its total assets in unsponsored ADRs traded over-the-counter. In addition, an Actively-Managed Fund may use derivative instruments for hedging or risk management purposes or as part of its investment practices. Derivative instruments are contracts whose value depends on, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index. These underlying assets, reference rates or indices may include stocks, interest rates, currency exchange rates and stock indices.
The ARK Fintech Innovation ETF will not directly invest in cryptocurrency and does not currently intend to invest in any entity whose primary business purpose is to provide exposure to cryptocurrency.
The ARK Fintech Innovation ETF will not invest in the loans of peer-to-peer lending platforms, but may invest in the equity securities of companies that facilitate peer-to-peer lending platforms.
Each Actively-Managed Fund may take a temporary defensive position (investments in cash or cash equivalents) in response to adverse market, economic, political or other conditions. Cash equivalents include short-term high quality debt securities and money market instruments such as commercial paper, certificates of deposit, bankers’ acceptances, U.S. Government securities, repurchase agreements and shares of short-term fixed income or money market funds.
Index Funds
Each Index Fund is permitted to invest in securities not included in its respective Index but which the Adviser believes will help the Index Fund track the performance of its respective Index, including (i) certain stock index futures, options, options on stock index futures, swap contracts or other derivatives that relate to the Index and component securities, (ii) cash and cash equivalents and (iii) other investment companies.

Certain derivatives not included in an Index are permitted to be used by an Index Fund in seeking performance that corresponds to the Index, and in managing cash flows, and may count towards compliance with the Index Fund’s 80% policy.

An Index Fund is permitted to invest, to the extent permitted by the 1940 Act, in other affiliated and unaffiliated funds, such as open-end or closed-end management investment companies, including other exchange traded funds.
All Funds
Each Fund is permitted to lend its portfolio securities to brokers, dealers and other financial institutions desiring to borrow securities to complete transactions, in pursuing arbitrage
 
66

 
opportunities or hedging strategies or for other similar purposes. In connection with such loans, each Fund receives liquid collateral equal to at least 102% of the value of the portfolio securities being lent. This collateral is marked to market on a daily basis. Each Fund may lend its portfolio securities in an amount up to 33 13% of its assets.
Each Fund will not borrow money, except to the extent permitted by the 1940 Act to meet redemptions and only up to 10% of each Fund’s net assets.
Each Fund will not invest more than 30% of its total assets in securities issued by a single company, fund or of short-term financial products of such company.
Each Fund will not invest in more than 20% of the total number of outstanding shares issued by a single company or fund.
Additional Risks
Derivatives Risk.   (Except for ARK Israel Innovative Technology ETF) Derivatives involve risks different from, and, in certain cases, greater than, the risks presented by more traditional investments. These include credit risk, liquidity risk, management risk and leverage risk. Derivative products are highly specialized instruments that require an understanding not only of the underlying instrument but also of the derivative itself, without the benefit of observing the performance of the derivative under all possible market conditions. In particular, the use and complexity of derivatives require the maintenance of adequate controls to monitor the transactions entered into, the ability to assess the risk that a derivative adds to a Fund’s investment portfolio, and the ability to forecast price, interest rate or currency exchange rate movements correctly. The failure of another party to a derivative to comply with the terms may cause a Fund to incur a loss. The credit risk for exchange-traded or centrally cleared derivatives is generally less than for privately negotiated derivatives through the interposition of a clearinghouse to the exchange-traded or centrally-cleared derivative trade, which provides a guarantee of performance. If a derivative transaction is particularly large or if the relevant market is illiquid (as is the case with many privately negotiated derivatives), it may not be possible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position at an advantageous price. Adverse changes in the value or level of the underlying asset, rate or index can result in a loss substantially greater than the amount invested in the derivative itself.
Recent legislation and regulatory developments will eventually require the clearing and exchange trading of most over-the-counter derivatives investments. It is possible that new regulation of various types of derivative instruments, including futures and swaps, may affect an Actively-Managed Fund’s ability to use such instruments as a part of its investment strategy.
Leverage Risk.   To the extent that a Fund borrows money in the limited circumstances described above under “Additional Investment Strategies,” it may be leveraged. Additionally, certain transactions in which a Fund is permitted to engage may present leverage risk. A Fund may segregate or “earmark” liquid assets or otherwise cover such transactions in an effort to mitigate the leverage risk such transactions present. Leveraging generally exaggerates the effect on NAV of any increase or decrease in the market value of a Fund’s portfolio securities. Leveraging may cause a Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations or to meet segregation requirements when it may not be advantageous to do so. Leveraging, including borrowing, may cause a Fund to be more volatile than if the Fund had not been leveraged.
Securities Lending Risk.   (Except for ARK Israel Innovative Technology ETF) Although a Fund will receive collateral in connection with all loans of its securities holdings, the Fund would be exposed to a risk of loss should a borrower default on its obligation to return the borrowed securities (e.g., the loaned securities may have appreciated beyond the value of the collateral held by the Fund). In addition, the Funds will bear the risk of loss of any cash collateral that they invest.
Short Selling Risk.   Fund Shares, similar to shares of other issuers listed on a stock exchange, may be sold short and are therefore subject to the risk of increased volatility and price decreases associated with short selling.
 
67

 
Additional Risks Applicable to Actively Managed ETFs
Convertible Securities Risk.   Prior to conversion, convertible securities have the same general characteristics as non-convertible debt securities, which generally provide a stable stream of income with generally higher yields than those of equity securities of the same or similar issuers. The price of a convertible security will normally vary with changes in the price of the underlying equity security, although the higher yield tends to make the convertible security less volatile than the underlying equity security. As with debt securities, the market value of convertible securities tends to decrease as interest rates rise and increase as interest rates decline. While convertible securities generally offer lower interest or dividend yields than non-convertible debt securities of similar quality, they offer investors the potential to benefit from increases in the market prices of the underlying common stock.
Emerging Market Securities Risk.   Investment in securities of emerging market issuers may present risks that are greater than or different from those associated with foreign securities due to less developed and liquid markets and such factors as increased economic, political, regulatory, or other uncertainties. These risks include: smaller market capitalization of and less liquidity in securities markets, significant price volatility, restrictions on foreign investment and repatriation, greater social, economic and political uncertainty and instability, more substantial governmental involvement in the economy, less governmental supervision and regulation, unavailability of currency hedging techniques, differences in auditing and financial reporting standards, which may result in unavailability of material information about issuers and less developed legal systems. In addition, emerging markets may be particularly sensitive to future economic or political crises could lead to or exacerbate existing price controls, forced mergers, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, seizure, nationalization or creation of government monopolies. Emerging market currencies may experience significant declines against the U.S. dollar. Inflation and rapid fluctuations in inflation rates have had, and may continue to have, negative effects on the economies and securities markets of certain emerging market countries. In addition, emerging securities markets may have different clearance and settlement procedures, which may be unable to keep pace with the volume of securities transactions or otherwise make it difficult to engage in such transactions. Settlement problems may cause an Actively-Managed Fund to miss attractive investment opportunities, hold a portion of its assets in cash pending investment, or be delayed in disposing of a portfolio security. Such a delay could result in possible liability to a purchaser of the security.
Rights and Warrants Risk.   Rights and warrants are option securities permitting their holders to subscribe for other securities. Rights and warrants do not represent an ownership interest in an issuer or carry with them dividend or voting rights with respect to the underlying securities. Investment in rights and warrants may thus be considered more speculative than certain other types of investments. In addition, the value of a right or a warrant does not necessarily change with the value of the underlying securities, and ceases to have value if it is not exercised prior to expiration.
Preferred Securities Risk.   Preferred securities are contractual obligations that entail rights to distributions declared by the issuer’s board of directors but may permit the issuer to defer or suspend distributions for a certain period of time. Preferred securities may be subject to more fluctuations in market value due to changes in market perceptions of the issuer’s ability to continue to pay dividends. If an Actively-Managed Fund owns a preferred security whose issuer has deferred or suspended distributions, the Actively-Managed Fund may be required to account for the distribution that has been deferred or suspended for tax purposes, even though it may not have received this income. Preferred securities are subordinated to any debt the issuer has outstanding. Accordingly, preferred stock dividends are not paid until all debt obligations are first met. Preferred securities may lose substantial value if distributions are deferred, suspended or not declared. Preferred securities may also permit the issuer to convert preferred securities into the issuer’s common stock. Preferred Securities that are convertible into common stock may decline in value if the common stock to which preferred securities may be converted declines in value. Preferred securities may be less liquid than equity securities.
 
68

 
Temporary Defensive Strategy Risk.   When an Actively-Managed Fund pursues a temporary defensive strategy inconsistent with its principal investment strategies, it may not achieve its investment objective.
Additional Risk Applicable to ARK Israel Innovative Technology ETF
Investing in Other Funds Risk.   The Fund may invest in shares of other funds, including ETFs that track the Index. As a result, the Fund will indirectly be exposed to the risks of an investment in the underlying funds. Shares of other funds have many of the same risks as direct investments in common stocks or bonds. In addition, the market value of a fund’s shares is expected to rise and fall as the value of the underlying index or bond rises and falls. The market value of such funds’ shares may differ from the net asset value of the particular fund. As a shareholder in the Fund (as with ETFs), the Fund would bear its ratable share of that entity’s expenses. At the same time, the Fund would continue to pay its own investment management fees and other expenses. As a result, the Fund and its shareholders will be absorbing additional fees with respect to investments in other funds, including ETFs. Such fees will not, however, be counted towards the Fund’s expense cap.
Portfolio Holdings
A description of the Funds’ policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the Funds’ portfolio securities is available in the Funds’ SAI.
 
69

 
MANAGEMENT OF THE FUNDS
Investment Adviser.   ARK Investment Management LLC, located at 3 East 28th, Seventh Floor, New York, NY 10016, serves as the Funds’ investment adviser. The Adviser was formed in June 2013 and registered with the SEC in January 2014. Under the terms of an investment advisory agreement between the Trust and the Adviser with respect to each Fund (“Advisory Agreement”), the Adviser serves as the adviser to each Fund, subject to the general supervision of the Board, and is responsible for the day-to-day investment management of each Fund.
The Adviser’s duties as adviser to each Actively-Managed Fund include furnishing a continuous investment program for the Actively-Managed Funds and determining what investments or securities will be purchased, held or sold.
Pursuant to a supervision agreement between the Trust and the Adviser with respect to each Fund (“Supervision Agreement”), and subject to the general supervision of the Board, the Adviser provides or causes to be furnished, all supervisory and other services reasonably necessary for the operation of each Fund and also bears the costs of various third-party services required by the Funds, including administration, certain custody, audit, legal, transfer agency, and printing costs. The Supervision Agreement also requires the Adviser to provide investment advisory services to the Funds pursuant to the Advisory Agreement.
Each Fund pays the Adviser a fee (“Management Fee”) in return for providing investment advisory and supervisory services under a comprehensive structure. Each Fund will pay a monthly Management Fee to the Adviser at an annual rate (stated as a percentage of the average daily net assets of the Fund) as follows:
Fund
Management Fee
ARK Innovation ETF
0.75%
ARK Genomic Revolution ETF
0.75%
ARK Autonomous Technology & Robotics ETF
0.75%
ARK Next Generation Internet ETF
0.75%
ARK Fintech Innovation ETF
0.75%
The 3D Printing ETF
0.65%
ARK Israel Innovative Technology ETF
0.48%
In addition, each Fund bears other fees and expenses that are not covered by the Supervision Agreement, which may vary and will affect the total expense ratio of the Fund, such as taxes and governmental fees, brokerage fees, commissions and other transaction expenses, certain foreign custodial fees and expenses, costs of borrowing money, including interest expenses, and extraordinary expenses (such as litigation and indemnification expenses).
A discussion regarding the Board’s approval of the Advisory Agreement with respect to each Fund is available in the Trust’s annual shareholder report for each Fund for the fiscal year ended July 31.
Administrator, Custodian and Transfer Agent.   The Bank of New York Mellon is the administrator for the Funds (“Administrator”), is the custodian of the Funds’ assets and provides transfer agency, fund accounting and various administrative services to the Funds. The Administrator is responsible for providing certain operational, clerical, recordkeeping and/or bookkeeping services for the Funds.
Distributor.   Foreside Fund Services, LLC is the distributor of the Shares of the Funds. The Distributor will not distribute Shares in less than Creation Units, and does not maintain a secondary market in Shares. The Shares are expected to be traded in the secondary market.
 
70

 
Portfolio Manager.   Catherine D. Wood serves as Chief Investment Officer of the Funds. Having completed 12 years at AllianceBernstein LP, Ms. Wood founded ARK Investment Management LLC and registered the firm with the SEC in January 2014. At AllianceBernstein LP, Ms. Wood was Chief Investment Officer of Global Thematic Strategies, with $5 billion in assets under management. Ms. Wood joined Alliance Capital in 2001 from Tupelo Capital Management. Prior to that, Ms. Wood worked for 18 years with Jennison Associates as Chief Economist, Equity Research Analyst, Portfolio Manager and Director. Ms. Wood received her B.S., summa cum laude, in Finance and Economics from the University of Southern California in 1981.
The SAI provides additional information about the portfolio manager’s compensation, other accounts managed by the portfolio manager and the portfolio manager’s ownership of securities.
 
71

 
SHAREHOLDER INFORMATION
Pricing of Fund Shares
The NAV per Share for a Fund is computed by dividing the value of the net assets of the Fund (i.e., the value of its total assets less total liabilities) by the total number of Shares outstanding. Expenses and fees, including the Management Fee, are accrued daily and taken into account for purposes of determining NAV. The NAV of each Fund is determined each business day as of the close of trading (ordinarily 4:00 p.m., Eastern time) on the New York Stock Exchange. Any assets or liabilities denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar are converted into U.S. dollars at the current market rates on the date of valuation as quoted by one or more sources.
The values of each Fund’s portfolio securities will be based on market prices. Price information on listed securities and assets will be taken from the exchange where the security or asset is primarily traded. Due to the time difference between the United States and certain countries in which the Funds invest, securities on foreign exchanges may not trade at times when Shares of the Funds will trade. In the absence of a last reported sales price, or if no sales were reported, and for other assets for which market quotes are not readily available, values may be based on quotes obtained from a quotation reporting system, established market makers or by an outside independent pricing service. Prices obtained by an outside independent pricing service will use information provided by market makers or estimates of market values obtained from data related to investments or securities with similar characteristics and may use a computerized grid matrix of securities and its evaluations in determining what it believes is the fair value of the portfolio securities.
If a market quotation for a security is not readily available or the Adviser believes it does not otherwise accurately reflect the market value of the security at the time a Fund calculates its NAV, the security will be fair valued by the Adviser in accordance with the Trust’s valuation policies and procedures approved by the Board. Each Fund may also use fair value pricing in a variety of circumstances, including but not limited to, situations where the value of a security in the Fund’s portfolio has been materially affected by events occurring after the close of the market on which the security is principally traded (such as a corporate action or other news that may materially affect the price of a security) or when trading in a security has been suspended or halted. In addition, each Fund may fair value certain of the foreign equity securities it holds each day it calculates its NAV. Accordingly, a Fund’s NAV may reflect certain portfolio securities’ fair values rather than their market prices at the time the Exchanges on which they principally trade close. Fair value pricing involves subjective judgments and it is possible that a fair value determination for a security may be materially different than the value that could be realized upon the sale of the security. In addition, fair value pricing could result in a difference between the prices used to calculate a Fund’s NAV and the prices used by the Index. This may adversely affect each Fund’s ability to track the Index. With respect to securities that are traded in foreign markets, the value of a Fund’s portfolio securities may change on days when you will not be able to purchase or sell your Shares.
Buying and Selling Shares
The Shares of the Funds have been approved for listing on the Arca and the Cboe, as applicable. If you buy or sell Shares in the secondary market, you will incur customary brokerage commissions and charges and may pay some or all of the spread between the bid and the offered price in the secondary market on each leg of a round trip (purchase and sale) transaction. In times of severe market disruption or low trading volume in a Fund’s Shares, this spread can increase significantly. It is anticipated that Shares will trade in the secondary market at prices that may differ to varying degrees from the NAV of Shares. During periods of disruptions to creations and redemptions or the existence of extreme market volatility, the market prices of Shares are more likely to differ significantly from Shares’ NAV.
The Depository Trust Company (“DTC”) serves as securities depository for Shares. The Shares may be held only in book-entry form; stock certificates will not be issued. DTC, or its nominee, is the record or registered owner of all outstanding Shares. Beneficial ownership of Shares will be shown on the
 
72

 
records of DTC or its participants. Beneficial owners of Shares are not considered the registered holder thereof and are subject to the same restrictions and procedures as any beneficial owner of stocks held in book-entry or “street name” form. For more information, see the section entitled “Book Entry Only System” in the Funds’ SAI.
The Exchanges are open for trading Monday through Friday and are closed on weekends and the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents’ Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. Because non-U.S. exchanges may be open on days when a Fund does not price its Shares, the value of the securities in a Fund’s portfolio may change on days when shareholders will not be able to purchase or sell the Fund’s Shares.
Distribution and Service Plan
The Board has adopted a distribution and service plan (“Plan”) pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act. Under the Plan, the Funds are authorized to pay distribution fees in connection with the sale and distribution of their Shares and pay service fees in connection with the provision of ongoing services to shareholders.
No Rule 12b-1 fees are currently paid by any Fund, and there are no current plans to impose these fees. In addition, no such fees may be paid in the future without further approval by the Board. However, in the event Rule 12b-1 fees are charged in the future, because these fees are paid out of a Fund’s assets on an ongoing basis, these fees will increase the cost of your investment in the Fund. By purchasing shares subject to distribution and service fees, you may pay more over time than you would by purchasing shares with other types of sales charge arrangements. Long-term shareholders may pay more than the economic equivalent of the maximum front-end sales charge permitted by the rules of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority. The net income attributable to the shares of a Fund will be reduced by the amount of distribution and service fees and other expenses of the Fund.
Dividends and Distributions
Each Fund intends to qualify each year as a regulated investment company under the Internal Revenue Code. As a regulated investment company, each Fund generally pays no federal income tax on the income and gains it distributes. Each shareholder of a Fund is entitled to its share of the Fund’s distributions of net investment income and net realized capital gains on its investments. Each Fund pays out substantially all of its net earnings to its shareholders as “distributions.”
A Fund typically earns income dividends from stocks and interest from debt securities. These amounts, net of expenses, are typically passed along to Fund shareholders as dividends from net investment income. A Fund realizes capital gains or losses whenever it sells securities. Net realized capital gains are distributed to shareholders as “capital gain distributions.” Distributions from a Fund’s net investment income, including net short-term capital gains, if any, are taxable to shareholders as ordinary income. Any long-term capital gains distributions a shareholder receives from the Fund are taxable as long-term capital gain.
Net investment income, if any, and net capital gains, if any, are typically distributed to shareholders at least annually. Dividends may be declared and paid more frequently to improve index tracking or to comply with the distribution requirements of the Internal Revenue Code. In addition, a Fund may determine to distribute at least annually amounts representing the full dividend yield net of expenses on the underlying investment securities, as if the Fund owned the underlying investment securities for the entire dividend period. If a Fund so elects, some portion of each distribution may result in a return of capital, which, for tax purposes, is treated as a return of a shareholder’s investment in Shares.
Distributions in cash may be reinvested automatically in additional Shares of a Fund only if the broker through whom you purchased Shares makes such option available.
 
73

 
Each year, you will receive an annual statement (Form 1099) of your account activity to assist you in completing your federal, state and local tax returns. Distributions declared in December to shareholders of record in such month, but paid in January, are taxable as if they were paid in December. A Fund makes every effort to search for reclassified income to reduce the number of corrected forms mailed to you. However, when necessary, you will receive a corrected Form 1099 to reflect reclassified information.
At the time you purchase your Fund Shares, the price of Shares may reflect undistributed income, undistributed capital gains, or net unrealized appreciation in value of portfolio securities held by a Fund. For taxable investors, a subsequent distribution to you of such amounts, although constituting a return of your investment, would be taxable. Buying Shares in a Fund just before it declares an income dividend or capital gains distribution is sometimes known as “buying a dividend.”
Tax Consequences
General.   As with any investment, you should consider how your Fund investment will be taxed. The tax information in this prospectus is provided as general information. You should consult your own tax professional about the tax consequences of an investment in the Fund, including the possible application of foreign, state and local taxes. Unless your investment in the Fund is through a tax-exempt entity or tax-deferred retirement account, such as a 401(k) plan, you need to be aware of the possible tax consequences when: (i) a Fund makes distributions, (ii) you sell Shares in the secondary market or (iii) you create or redeem Creation Units.
Taxes on Distributions.   As noted above, each Fund expects to distribute net investment income, if any, at least annually, and any net realized long-term or short-term capital gains, if any, annually. A Fund may also pay a special distribution at any time to comply with U.S. federal tax requirements.
Distributions from a Fund’s net investment income, including any net short-term gains, are taxable to you as ordinary income. In general, your distributions are subject to U.S. federal income tax when they are paid, whether you take them in cash or reinvest them in a Fund. Distributions of net investment income are generally taxable as ordinary income. Whether distributions of capital gains represent long-term or short-term capital gains is determined by how long a Fund owned the investments that generated them, rather than how long you have owned your Shares. Distributions of net short-term capital gains in excess of net long-term capital losses, if any, are generally taxable as ordinary income. Distributions of net long-term capital gains in excess of net short-term capital losses, if any, that are properly reported as capital gain dividends are generally taxable as long-term capital gains. Long-term capital gains of non-corporate shareholders are generally taxable at a maximum rate of 15% or 20%, depending on whether the shareholder’s income exceeds certain threshold amounts.
A Fund may receive dividends, the distribution of which a Fund may designate as qualified dividends. In the event that a Fund receives such a dividend and designates the distribution of such dividend as a qualified dividend, the dividend may be taxed at the maximum capital gains rates, provided holding period and other requirements are met at both the shareholder and the Fund level. Substitute dividends received by the Fund with respect to dividends paid on securities lent out will not be qualified dividend income. There can be no assurance what portion of the Fund’s distributions will be eligible for qualified dividend treatment.
Distributions in excess of a Fund’s current and accumulated earnings and profits are treated as a tax-free return of your investment to the extent of your basis in Shares, and generally as capital gain thereafter. A return of capital, which for tax purposes is treated as a return of your investment, reduces your basis in Shares, thus reducing any loss or increasing any gain on a subsequent taxable disposition of Shares. A distribution will reduce a Fund’s NAV per Share and may be taxable to you as ordinary income or capital gain even though, from an economic standpoint, the distribution may constitute a return of capital.
The use of derivatives by a Fund may cause the Fund to realize higher amounts of ordinary income or short-term capital gain, distributions from which are taxable to individual shareholders at ordinary income tax rates rather than at the more favorable tax rates for long-term capital gain.
 
74

 
Dividends, interest and gains from non-U.S. investments of a Fund may give rise to withholding and other taxes imposed by foreign countries. Tax conventions between certain countries and the United States may, in some cases, reduce or eliminate such taxes.
If more than 50% of a Fund’s total assets at the end of its taxable year consist of foreign securities, the Fund may elect (the “Election”) to “pass through” to its investors certain foreign income taxes paid by the Fund, with the result that each investor will (i) include in gross income, as an additional dividend, even though not actually received, the investor’s pro rata share of the Fund’s foreign income taxes, and (ii) either deduct (in calculating U.S. taxable income) or credit (in calculating U.S. federal income), subject to certain holding period and other limitations, the investor’s pro rata share of the Fund’s foreign income taxes. It is expected that more than 50% of the ARK Israel Innovative Technology ETF’s assets will consist of foreign securities, although there can be no assurance that ARK Israel Innovative Technology ETF will make the Election.
Non-U.S. Investors.   Non-U.S. investors may be subject to U.S. withholding tax at a 30% or lower treaty rate and U.S. estate tax and are subject to special U.S. tax certification requirements to avoid backup withholding and claim any treaty benefits. Exemptions from U.S. withholding tax are provided for certain capital gain dividends paid by a Fund from net long-term capital gains, interest-related dividends and short-term capital gain dividends, if such amounts are reported by a Fund. However, notwithstanding such exemptions from U.S. withholding at the source, any such dividends and distributions of income and capital gains will be subject to backup withholding at a rate of 24% if you fail to properly certify that you are not a U.S. person.
Under the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (“FATCA”), a 30% withholding tax on income dividends paid by a Fund to certain foreign entities, referred to as foreign financial institutions or nonfinancial foreign entities, that fail to comply (or be deemed compliant) with extensive reporting and withholding requirements designed to inform the U.S. Department of the Treasury of U.S.-owned foreign investment accounts. Information about a shareholder in a Fund may be disclosed to the IRS, non-U.S. taxing authorities or other parties as necessary to comply with FATCA or similar laws. Withholding also may be required if a foreign entity that is a shareholder of a Fund fails to provide appropriate certifications or other documentation concerning its status under FATCA.
Non-U.S. shareholders are advised to consult their tax advisors with respect to the particular tax consequences to them of an investment in the Funds, including the possible applicability of the U.S. estate tax.
Backup Withholding.   Each Fund may be required to withhold a percentage of your distributions and proceeds if you have not provided a taxpayer identification number or social security number or otherwise established a basis for exemption from backup withholding. The backup withholding rate for individuals is currently 24%. This is not an additional tax and may be refunded, or credited against your U.S. federal income tax liability, provided certain required information is furnished to the Internal Revenue Service.
Taxes on the Sale or Cash Redemption of Exchange Listed Shares.   Currently, any capital gain or loss realized upon a sale of Shares is generally treated as long term capital gain or loss if Shares have been held for more than one year and as a short term capital gain or loss if held for one year or less. However, any capital loss on a sale of Shares held for six months or less is treated as long-term capital loss to the extent that capital gain dividends were paid with respect to such Shares. The ability to deduct capital losses may be limited. To the extent that a Fund shareholder’s Shares are redeemed for cash, this is normally treated as a sale for tax purposes.
Taxes on Creations and Redemptions of Creation Units.   A person who exchanges securities for Creation Units generally will recognize a gain or loss. The gain or loss will be equal to the difference between the market value of the Creation Units at the time of exchange and the sum of the exchanger’s aggregate basis in the securities surrendered and the amount of any cash paid for such Creation Units. A person who exchanges Creation Units for securities will generally recognize a gain or loss equal to the difference between the exchanger’s basis in the Creation Units and the sum of
 
75

 
the aggregate market value of the securities received. The Internal Revenue Service, however, may assert that a loss realized upon an exchange of primarily securities for Creation Units cannot be deducted currently under the rules governing “wash sales,” or on the basis that there has been no significant change in economic position. Persons exchanging securities for Creation Units or redeeming Creation Units should consult their own tax advisor with respect to whether wash sale rules apply and when a loss might be deductible and the tax treatment of any creation or redemption transaction.
Under current U.S. federal income tax laws, any capital gain or loss realized upon a redemption (or creation) of Creation Units is generally treated as long-term capital gain or loss if Shares (or securities surrendered) have been held for more than one year and as a short-term capital gain or loss if Shares (or securities surrendered) have been held for one year or less.
If you create or redeem Creation Units, you will be sent a confirmation statement showing how many Shares you created or sold and at what price.
Medicare Tax.   An additional 3.8% Medicare tax will be imposed on certain net investment income (including ordinary dividends and capital gain distributions received from a Fund and net gains from redemptions or other taxable dispositions of Fund Shares) of U.S. individuals, estates and trusts to the extent that such person’s “modified adjusted gross income” (in the case of an individual) or “adjusted gross income” (in the case of an estate or trust) exceeds certain threshold amounts.
The foregoing discussion summarizes some of the consequences under current U.S. federal income tax law of an investment in a Fund. It is not a substitute for personal tax advice. Consult your own tax advisor about the potential tax consequences of an investment in a Fund under all applicable tax laws.
Frequent Purchases and Redemptions of Fund Shares
The Board has evaluated the risks of frequent purchases and redemptions of Fund shares (“market timing”) activities by a Fund’s shareholders. The Board noted that Shares can only be purchased and redeemed directly from a Fund in Creation Units by APs and that the vast majority of trading in Shares occurs on the secondary market. Because the secondary market trades do not involve a Fund directly, it is unlikely those trades would cause many of the harmful effects of market timing, including dilution, disruption of portfolio management, increases in the Fund’s trading costs and the realization of capital gains.
With respect to trades directly with a Fund, to the extent effected in-kind, those trades do not cause any of the harmful effects (as previously noted) that may result from frequent cash trades. To the extent that the Trust allows or requires trades to be effected in whole or in part in cash, the Board noted that those trades could result in dilution to a Fund and increased transaction costs, which could negatively impact the Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective. However, the Board noted that direct trading by APs is critical to ensuring that Shares trade at or close to NAV. Each Fund also employs fair valuation pricing to minimize potential dilution from market timing. Each Fund imposes transaction fees on in-kind purchases and redemptions of Shares to cover the custodial and other costs incurred by the Fund in effecting in-kind trades, these fees increase if an investor substitutes cash in part or in whole for securities, reflecting the fact that the Fund’s trading costs increase in those circumstances. Given this structure, the Board determined that it is not necessary to adopt policies and procedures to detect and deter market timing of Shares.
 
76

 
TAX-ADVANTAGED PRODUCT STRUCTURE
Unlike many conventional mutual funds which are only bought and sold at closing NAVs, Shares of each Fund have been designed to be tradable in a secondary market on an intra-day basis and to be created and redeemed principally or partially in-kind in Creation Units at each day’s market close. These in-kind arrangements are designed to mitigate adverse effects on a Fund’s portfolio that could arise from frequent cash purchase and redemption transactions that affect the NAV of the Fund. Moreover, in contrast to conventional mutual funds, where frequent redemptions can have an adverse tax impact on taxable shareholders because of the need to sell portfolio securities which, in turn, may generate taxable gain, the in-kind redemption mechanism of a Fund, to the extent used, generally is not expected to lead to a tax event for a Fund or its ongoing shareholders.
INDEX PROVIDER AND INDEX DESCRIPTIONS
ARK’s Index Products Group, which does not include any of the Adviser’s investment personnel, created each Index. ARK has entered into an agreement with Solactive AG (“Solactive”) to calculate, publish and distribute each Index. Solactive is a leading company in the structuring and indexing business for institutional clients. Solactive indices are used by issuers worldwide as underlying indices for financial products. Solactive does not sponsor, endorse or promote the Index Funds and is not in any way connected to them and does not accept any liability in relation to their issue, operation and trading.
Each Index Fund is entitled to use its Index pursuant to a sub-licensing arrangement with the Adviser.
Total 3D-Printing Index
The Total 3D-Printing Index is designed to track the price movements of stocks of companies involved in the 3D printing industry. The Index universe includes companies from the U.S., non-U.S. developed markets and Taiwan that are engaged in 3D printing related businesses within the following business lines: (i) 3D printing hardware; (ii) CAD and 3D printing simulation software; (iii) 3D printing centers; (iv) scanning and measurement; and (v) 3D printing materials.
The Index includes companies from the universe that meet both of the following criteria on the Selection Day (as defined below): (i) the company has a market capitalization of at least 80,000,000 USD and (ii) the average daily value of the company’s securities traded over the three (3) months prior to and including the Selection Day is at least 200,000 USD. Eligible companies that meet the criteria for inclusion in the Index as of the Selection Day will be included in the Index and will be assigned by the ARK Index Product Group to a business line category based on the company’s primary business activity in the 3D printing space.
On each Selection Day (as defined below), the components of the Index are weighted equally within their respective business line category and the business line categories are target weighted as follows:
i.
3D printing hardware 50%;
ii.
CAD and 3D printing simulation software 30%;
iii.
3D printing centers 13%;
iv.
scanning and measurement 5%; and
v.
3D printing materials 2%.
The weights will vary with market prices until the next reconstitution date.
The Index is reconstituted and rebalanced quarterly. Index components are selected on the tenth (10th) business day before the Adjustment Day (“Selection Day”). The “Adjustment Day” is the close of the third Friday of January, April, July and October. If the Friday is not a business day, reconstitution and rebalancing occurs on the following business day. Reconstitution is carried out
 
77

 
after the day’s closing Index values have been determined. Target weights of the constituents are not otherwise adjusted between Adjustment Days except in the event of certain types of extraordinary events or corporate actions.
The Index began with an initial value of 100 as of the close on October 17, 2014. As of November 18, 2019, the Index included 52 securities of companies with a market capitalization range of between approximately $108 million and $149 billion and a weighted average market capitalization of $49 billion.
Because the Index is unmanaged, the criteria for inclusion of companies in the Index are objective and not subject to arbitrary change, so that any company that is eligible for inclusion in the Index must be included, and any company that ceases to qualify for inclusion in the Index must be deleted.
ARK Israeli Innovation Index
The ARK Israeli Innovation Index is designed to track the price movements of exchange listed Israeli companies whose main business operations are causing disruptive innovation in the areas of genomics, health care, biotechnology, industrials, manufacturing, the Internet or information technology. The Index includes all companies that meet all of the following criteria on the Selection Day (as defined below): (i) the company is incorporated in Israel and/or domiciled in Israel; (ii) the company’s securities are listed on a regulated stock exchange in the U.S. or Israel; (iii) the company has a market capitalization of at least 80,000,000 USD; (iv) the average daily value of the company’s securities traded over the three (3) months prior to and including the Selection Day is at least 200,000 USD; and (v) the company is included in one of the following economic sectors as defined by FactSet Research Systems: (a) health technology, (b) communications, (c) technology services, (d) electronic technology, (e) consumer services or (f) producer manufacturing. In the event that a company has more than one share class that meets the criteria for inclusion in the Index, the more liquid share class according to subsection (iv) above, will be selected as the Index component. Index components are weighted equally on each Selection Day, and the weights will vary with market prices until the next reconstitution date.
The Index is reconstituted and rebalanced quarterly. Index components are selected on the tenth (10th) business day before the Adjustment Day (“Selection Day”). The “Adjustment Day” is the close of the third Thursday of January, April, July and October. If the Thursday is not a business day, reconstitution and rebalancing occurs on the following business day. Reconstitution is carried out after the day’s closing Index values have been determined. Target weights of the constituents are not otherwise adjusted between Adjustment Days except in the event of certain types of extraordinary events or corporate actions.
The Index began with an initial value of 100 as of the close on October 21, 2014. As of November 18, 2019, the Index included 45 securities of companies with a market capitalization range of between approximately $89 million and $18 billion and a weighted average market capitalization of $2.2 billion. These amounts are subject to change.
Because the Index is unmanaged, the criteria for inclusion of companies in the Index are objective and not subject to arbitrary change, so that any company that is eligible for inclusion in the Index must be included, and any company that ceases to qualify for inclusion in the Index must be deleted.
 
78

 
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
The financial highlights tables are intended to help you understand a Fund’s financial performance for the life of the Fund’s operations. Certain information reflects financial results for a single Fund share. The total returns in the tables represent the rate that an investor would have earned (or lost) on an investment in a particular Fund (assuming reinvestment of all dividends and distributions). This information has been audited by Tait, Weller & Baker LLP, independent registered public accounting firm, whose report along with the Funds’ financial statements, are included in the annual report of the Funds, and are incorporated by reference into the SAI. Our website, http://ark-funds.com, contains the Funds’ most recent annual and semi-annual reports. You may also obtain the annual and semi-annual reports and SAI without charge by calling (212) 426-7040 collect.
 
79

 
Financial Highlights
ARK Innovation ETF
For a share outstanding throughout each period presented.
Year Ended
July 31, 2019
Year Ended
July 31, 2018
For the
Period Ended
July 31, 2017(1)
Year Ended
August 31, 2016
For the Period
October 31, 2014(2)
through
August 31, 2015
Per Share Data:
Net asset value, beginning of period
$ 44.51 $ 29.59 $ 20.60 $ 20.06 $ 20.00
Net investment loss(3)
(0.30) (0.13) (0.15) (0.15) (0.12)
Net realized and unrealized gain on    investments
5.32 15.54(4) 9.14 1.16 0.18
Total gain from investment
   operations
5.02 15.41 8.99 1.01 0.06
Distributions to shareholders:
Net investment income
(0.09)
Net realized gains
(1.17) (0.40) (0.47)
Total distributions
(1.17) (0.49) (0.47)
Net asset value, end of period
$ 48.36 $ 44.51 $ 29.59 $ 20.60 $ 20.06
Market value, end of period
$ 48.46 $ 44.55 $ 29.62 $ 20.61 $ 20.10
Total Return at Net Asset Value(5)
12.14% 52.38%(4) 43.64% 4.98% 0.30%
Total Return at Market Value(5)
12.27% 52.38%(4) 43.72% 4.90% 0.50%
Ratios/Supplemental Data:
Net assets, end of period
   (000’s omitted)
$ 1,731,253 $ 1,170,588 $ 85,813 $ 9,271 $ 7,020
Ratio to average net assets of:
Expenses
0.75% 0.75% 0.75%(6) 0.89% 0.95%(6)
Net investment loss(7)
(0.67)% (0.33)% (0.67)%(6) (0.76)% (0.69)%(6)
Portfolio turnover rate(8)
80% 89% 70% 110% 108%
(1)
The Trust changed its fiscal and tax reporting period from August 31 to July 31.
(2)
Commencement of operations.
(3)
Based on average daily shares outstanding.
(4)
The Adviser has reimbursed the Fund $15,999 for a procedural error. The impact was deemed immaterial to net realized and unrealized gain on investments and the Fund’s total return, representing less than $0.005 per share.
(5)
Net asset value total return is calculated assuming an initial investment made at the net asset value at the beginning of the period, reinvestment of all dividends and distributions at net asset value during the period and redemption on the last day of the period at net asset value. Market value total return is calculated assuming an initial investment made at the market value at the beginning of the period, reinvestment of all dividends, and distributions at market value during the period, and sale at the market value on the last day of the period. Market returns are based on the trade price at which shares are bought and sold on the NYSE Arca, Inc. using the last share trade. Total return calculated for a period of less than one year is not annualized.
(6)
Annualized.
(7)
Net investment income (loss) represents dividends received by the Fund from its underlying investments less expenses paid by the Fund during the period.
(8)
Portfolio turnover rate is not annualized and excludes the value of portfolio securities received or delivered as a result of in-kind creations or redemptions of the Fund’s capital shares.
 
80

 
Financial Highlights (continued)
ARK Genomic Revolution ETF
For a share outstanding throughout each period presented.
Year Ended
July 31, 2019
Year Ended
July 31, 2018
For the
Period Ended
July 31, 2017(1)
Year Ended
August 31, 2016
For the Period
October 31, 2014(2)
through
August 31, 2015
Per Share Data:
Net asset value, beginning of period
$ 29.36 $ 22.24 $ 18.03 $ 20.85 $ 20.00
Net investment loss(3)
(0.19) (0.18) (0.12) (0.12) (0.09)
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investments
5.80 7.63 4.33 (2.70) 0.94
Total gain (loss) from investment
   operations
5.61 7.45 4.21 (2.82) 0.85
Distributions to shareholders:
Net realized gains
(0.47) (0.33)
Total distributions
(0.47) (0.33)
Net asset value, end of period
$ 34.50 $ 29.36 $ 22.24 $ 18.03 $ 20.85
Market value, end of period
$ 34.58 $ 29.40 $ 22.29 $ 18.01 $ 21.13
Total Return at Net Asset Value(4)
19.87% 33.80% 23.34% (13.52)% 4.25%
Total Return at Market Value(4)
20.00% 33.66% 23.77% (14.77)% 5.65%
Ratios/Supplemental Data:
Net assets, end of period (000’s omitted)
$ 465,966 $ 232,115 $ 23,460 $ 7,302 $ 8,444
Ratio to average net assets of:
Expenses
0.75% 0.75% 0.75%(5) 0.90% 0.95%(5)
Net investment loss(6)
(0.63)% (0.64)% (0.67)%(5) (0.67)% (0.47)%(5)
Portfolio turnover rate(7)
64% 80% 65% 77% 65%
(1)
The Trust changed its fiscal and tax reporting period from August 31 to July 31.
(2)
Commencement of operations.
(3)
Based on average daily shares outstanding.
(4)
Net asset value total return is calculated assuming an initial investment made at the net asset value at the beginning of the period, reinvestment of all dividends and distributions at net asset value during the period and redemption on the last day of the period at net asset value. Market value total return is calculated assuming an initial investment made at the market value at the beginning of the period, reinvestment of all dividends, and distributions at market value during the period, and sale at the market value on the last day of the period. Market returns are based on the trade price at which shares are bought and sold on the NYSE Arca, Inc. using the last share trade. Total return calculated for a period of less than one year is not annualized.
(5)
Annualized.
(6)
Net investment income (loss) represents dividends received by the Fund from its underlying investments less expenses paid by the Fund during the period.
(7)
Portfolio turnover rate is not annualized and excludes the value of portfolio securities received or delivered as a result of in-kind creations or redemptions of the Fund’s capital shares.
 
81

 
Financial Highlights (continued)
ARK Autonomous Technology & Robotics ETF
(formerly, ARK Industrial Innovation ETF)
For a share outstanding throughout each period presented.
Year Ended
July 31, 2019
Year Ended
July 31, 2018
For the
Period Ended
July 31, 2017(1)
Year Ended
August 31, 2016
For the Period
September 30, 2014(2)
through
August 31, 2015
Per Share Data:
Net asset value, beginning of period
$ 34.93 $ 29.59 $ 21.14 $ 18.33 $ 20.00
Net investment loss(3)
(0.13) (0.05) (0.07) (0.07) (0.07)
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss)
   on investments
(0.91) 5.89 8.52 3.07 (1.60)
Total gain (loss) from investment    operations
(1.04) 5.84 8.45 3.00 (1.67)
Distributions to shareholders:
Net investment income
(0.02)
Net realized gains
(0.84) (0.48) (0.19)
Total distributions
(0.84) (0.50) (0.19)
Net asset value, end of period
$ 33.05 $ 34.93 $ 29.59 $ 21.14 $ 18.33
Market value, end of period
$ 33.06 $ 35.01 $ 29.63 $ 21.14 $ 18.43
Total Return at Net Asset Value(4)
(2.66)% 19.86% 39.97% 16.43% (8.35)%
Total Return at Market Value(4)
(2.84)% 19.98% 40.16% 15.84% (7.85)%
Ratios/Supplemental Data:
Net assets, end of period
   (000’s omitted)
$ 166,897 $ 155,448 $ 66,578 $ 15,853 $ 12,829
Ratio to average net assets of:
Expenses
0.75% 0.75% 0.75%(5) 0.89% 0.95%(5)
Net investment loss(6)
(0.39)% (0.15)% (0.31)%(5) (0.38)% (0.40)%(5)
Portfolio turnover rate(7)
54% 57% 44% 67% 86%
(1)
The Trust changed its fiscal and tax reporting period from August 31 to July 31.
(2)
Commencement of operations.
(3)
Based on average daily shares outstanding.
(4)
Net asset value total return is calculated assuming an initial investment made at the net asset value at the beginning of the period, reinvestment of all dividends and distributions at net asset value during the period and redemption on the last day of the period at net asset value. Market value total return is calculated assuming an initial investment made at the market value at the beginning of the period, reinvestment of all dividends, and distributions at market value during the period, and sale at the market value on the last day of the period. Market returns are based on the trade price at which shares are bought and sold on the NYSE Arca, Inc. using the last share trade. Total return calculated for a period of less than one year is not annualized.
(5)
Annualized.
(6)
Net investment income (loss) represents dividends received by the Fund from its underlying investments less expenses paid by the Fund during the period.
(7)
Portfolio turnover rate is not annualized and excludes the value of portfolio securities received or delivered as a result of in-kind creations or redemptions of the Fund’s capital shares.
 
82

 
Financial Highlights (continued)
ARK Next Generation Internet ETF
(formerly, ARK Web x.0 ETF)
For a share outstanding throughout each period presented.
Year Ended
July 31, 2019
Year Ended
July 31, 2018
For the
Period Ended
July 31, 2017(1)
Year Ended
August 31, 2016
For the Period
September 30, 2014(2)
through
August 31, 2015
Per Share Data:
Net asset value, beginning of period
$ 55.10 $ 36.82 $ 24.42 $ 22.02 $ 20.00
Net investment loss(3)
(0.33) (0.09) (0.17) (0.17) (0.13)
Net realized and unrealized gain on    investments
3.09 19.32(4) 12.57 3.10 2.15
Total gain from investment operations
2.76 19.23 12.40 2.93 2.02
Distributions to shareholders:
Net investment income
(0.13)
Net realized gains
(5.54) (0.82) (0.53)
Total distributions
(5.54) (0.95) (0.53)
Net asset value, end of period
$ 52.32 $ 55.10 $ 36.82 $ 24.42 $ 22.02
Market value, end of period
$ 52.48 $ 55.08 $ 36.85 $ 24.38 $ 21.92
Total Return at Net Asset Value(5)
7.49% 52.71%(4) 50.77% 13.43% 10.10%
Total Return at Market Value(5)
7.80% 52.53%(4) 51.15% 13.83% 9.60%
Ratios/Supplemental Data:
Net assets, end of period
   (000’s omitted)
$ 431,660 $ 672,276 $ 68,109 $ 14,654 $ 12,111
Ratio to average net assets of:
Expenses
0.75% 0.75%