10-Q 1 psx-2016930_10q.htm 10-Q Document

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-Q
(Mark One)
[X]
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the quarterly period ended
September 30, 2016
 

 
 
or
 
 

[    ]
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the transition period from
 
to
 
 
Commission file number:
001-35349
 
Phillips 66
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
Delaware
 
45-3779385
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

2331 CityWest Blvd., Houston, Texas 77042
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)
281-293-6600
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.     Yes  [X]    No  [    ]
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).     Yes  [X]    No  [    ]
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer   [X]        Accelerated filer  [    ]        Non-accelerated filer   [    ]        Smaller reporting company  [    ]
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  Yes  [    ]    No  [X]
The registrant had 520,850,205 shares of common stock, $.01 par value, outstanding as of September 30, 2016.



PHILLIPS 66

TABLE OF CONTENTS
 





PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Item 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
Consolidated Statement of Income
Phillips 66
 
Millions of Dollars
 
Three Months Ended
September 30
 
Nine Months Ended
September 30
 
2016

2015

 
2016

2015

Revenues and Other Income
 
 
 
 
 
Sales and other operating revenues*
$
21,624

25,792

 
60,882

77,082

Equity in earnings of affiliates
391

583

 
1,159

1,446

Net gain on dispositions
3

22

 
9

283

Other income
24

20

 
59

109

Total Revenues and Other Income
22,042

26,417

 
62,109

78,920

 
 
 
 
 
 
Costs and Expenses
 
 
 
 
 
Purchased crude oil and products
15,961

18,580

 
44,089

57,528

Operating expenses
1,061

1,083

 
3,078

3,220

Selling, general and administrative expenses
411

437

 
1,218

1,237

Depreciation and amortization
293

270

 
863

797

Impairments
2

1

 
4

3

Taxes other than income taxes*
3,424

3,610

 
10,479

10,621

Accretion on discounted liabilities
5

5

 
15

16

Interest and debt expense
81

71

 
250

236

Foreign currency transaction (gains) losses
(9
)
1

 
(16
)
50

Total Costs and Expenses
21,229

24,058

 
59,980

73,708

Income before income taxes
813

2,359

 
2,129

5,212

Provision for income taxes
277

767

 
679

1,598

Net Income
536

1,592

 
1,450

3,614

Less: net income attributable to noncontrolling interests
25

14

 
58

37

Net Income Attributable to Phillips 66
$
511

1,578

 
1,392

3,577

 
 
 
 
 
 
Net Income Attributable to Phillips 66 Per Share of Common Stock (dollars)
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
$
0.97

2.92

 
2.62

6.56

Diluted
0.96

2.90

 
2.61

6.52

 
 
 
 
 
 
Dividends Paid Per Share of Common Stock (dollars)
$
0.63

0.56

 
1.82

1.62

 
 
 
 
 
 
Average Common Shares Outstanding (in thousands)
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
525,991

540,357

 
528,650

544,362

Diluted
528,798

544,696

 
531,650

549,034

* Includes excise taxes on petroleum products sales:
$
3,357

3,513

 
10,225

10,338

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
 
 
 
 

1


Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income
Phillips 66
 
 
Millions of Dollars
 
Three Months Ended
September 30
 
Nine Months Ended
September 30
 
2016

2015

 
2016

2015

 
 
 
 
 
 
Net Income
$
536

1,592

 
1,450

3,614

Other comprehensive income (loss)
 
 
 
 
 
Defined benefit plans
 
 
 
 
 
Actuarial gain (loss):
 
 
 
 
 
Actuarial loss arising during the period
(28
)
(116
)
 
(28
)
(116
)
Amortization to net income of net actuarial loss and settlements
23

98

 
70

147

Curtailment gain
31


 
31


Plans sponsored by equity affiliates
2

4

 
11

14

Income taxes on defined benefit plans
(9
)
6

 
(29
)
(14
)
Defined benefit plans, net of tax
19

(8
)
 
55

31

Foreign currency translation adjustments
(61
)
(106
)
 
(183
)
(91
)
Income taxes on foreign currency translation adjustments
(1
)
(5
)
 
(4
)
3

Foreign currency translation adjustments, net of tax
(62
)
(111
)
 
(187
)
(88
)
Cash flow hedges
4


 
(12
)

Income taxes on hedging activities
(1
)

 
5


Hedging activities, net of tax
3


 
(7
)

Other Comprehensive Loss, Net of Tax
(40
)
(119
)
 
(139
)
(57
)
Comprehensive Income
496

1,473

 
1,311

3,557

Less: comprehensive income attributable to noncontrolling interests
25

14

 
58

37

Comprehensive Income Attributable to Phillips 66
$
471

1,459

 
1,253

3,520

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

2


Consolidated Balance Sheet
Phillips 66
 
 
Millions of Dollars
 
September 30
2016

 
December 31
2015

Assets
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
2,337

 
3,074

Accounts and notes receivable (net of allowances of $38 million in 2016 and $55 million in 2015)
4,101

 
4,411

Accounts and notes receivable—related parties
900

 
762

Inventories
3,905

 
3,477

Prepaid expenses and other current assets
721

 
532

Total Current Assets
11,964

 
12,256

Investments and long-term receivables
13,277

 
12,143

Net properties, plants and equipment
20,447

 
19,721

Goodwill
3,267

 
3,275

Intangibles
892

 
906

Other assets
407

 
279

Total Assets
$
50,254

 
48,580

 
 
 
 
Liabilities
 
 
 
Accounts payable
$
5,767

 
5,155

Accounts payable—related parties
795

 
500

Short-term debt
1,583

 
44

Accrued income and other taxes
869

 
878

Employee benefit obligations
453

 
576

Other accruals
633

 
378

Total Current Liabilities
10,100

 
7,531

Long-term debt
7,275

 
8,843

Asset retirement obligations and accrued environmental costs
654

 
665

Deferred income taxes
6,568

 
6,041

Employee benefit obligations
1,061

 
1,285

Other liabilities and deferred credits
285

 
277

Total Liabilities
25,943

 
24,642

 
 
 
 
Equity
 
 
 
Common stock (2,500,000,000 shares authorized at $.01 par value)
Issued (2016—640,916,732 shares; 2015—639,336,287 shares)
 
 
 
Par value
6

 
6

Capital in excess of par
19,474

 
19,145

Treasury stock (at cost: 2016—120,066,527 shares; 2015—109,925,907 shares)
(8,558
)
 
(7,746
)
Retained earnings
12,775

 
12,348

Accumulated other comprehensive loss
(792
)
 
(653
)
Total Stockholders’ Equity
22,905

 
23,100

Noncontrolling interests
1,406

 
838

Total Equity
24,311

 
23,938

Total Liabilities and Equity
$
50,254

 
48,580

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

3


Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows
Phillips 66
 
Millions of Dollars
 
Nine Months Ended
September 30
 
2016

 
2015

Cash Flows From Operating Activities
 
 
 
Net income
$
1,450

 
3,614

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
863

 
797

Impairments
4

 
3

Accretion on discounted liabilities
15

 
16

Deferred taxes
467

 
(125
)
Undistributed equity earnings
(772
)
 
17

Net gain on dispositions
(9
)
 
(283
)
Other
(192
)
 
70

Working capital adjustments
 
 
 
Decrease (increase) in accounts and notes receivable
185

 
2,158

Decrease (increase) in inventories
(510
)
 
(1,047
)
Decrease (increase) in prepaid expenses and other current assets
(453
)
 
165

Increase (decrease) in accounts payable
1,025

 
(1,136
)
Increase (decrease) in taxes and other accruals
223

 
(33
)
Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities
2,296

 
4,216

 
 
 
 
Cash Flows From Investing Activities
 
 
 
Capital expenditures and investments
(2,031
)
 
(3,286
)
Proceeds from asset dispositions*
159

 
68

Advances/loans—related parties
(266
)
 
(50
)
Collection of advances/loans—related parties
107

 
50

Other
(132
)
 
2

Net Cash Used in Investing Activities
(2,163
)
 
(3,216
)
 
 
 
 
Cash Flows From Financing Activities
 
 
 
Issuance of debt
400

 
1,169

Repayment of debt
(418
)
 
(918
)
Issuance of common stock
(30
)
 
(27
)
Repurchase of common stock
(812
)
 
(1,106
)
Dividends paid on common stock
(954
)
 
(874
)
Distributions to noncontrolling interests
(45
)
 
(30
)
Net proceeds from issuance of Phillips 66 Partners LP common units
972

 
384

Other
6

 
2

Net Cash Used in Financing Activities
(881
)
 
(1,400
)
 
 
 
 
Effect of Exchange Rate Changes on Cash and Cash Equivalents
11

 
15

 
 
 
 
Net Change in Cash and Cash Equivalents
(737
)
 
(385
)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
3,074

 
5,207

Cash and Cash Equivalents at End of Period
$
2,337

 
4,822

* Includes return of investments in equity affiliates and working capital true-ups on dispositions.
See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

4


Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity
Phillips 66
 
 
Millions of Dollars
 
Attributable to Phillips 66
 
 
 
Common Stock
 
 
 
 
 
Par
Value

Capital in Excess of Par

Treasury Stock

Retained
Earnings

Accum. Other
Comprehensive Income (Loss)

Noncontrolling
Interests

Total

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
December 31, 2014
$
6

19,040

(6,234
)
9,309

(531
)
447

22,037

Net income



3,577


37

3,614

Other comprehensive loss




(57
)

(57
)
Cash dividends paid on common stock



(874
)


(874
)
Repurchase of common stock


(1,106
)



(1,106
)
Benefit plan activity

76


(12
)


64

Issuance of Phillips 66 Partners LP common units





384

384

Distributions to noncontrolling interests and other





(30
)
(30
)
September 30, 2015
$
6

19,116

(7,340
)
12,000

(588
)
838

24,032

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
December 31, 2015
$
6

19,145

(7,746
)
12,348

(653
)
838

23,938

Net income



1,392


58

1,450

Other comprehensive loss




(139
)

(139
)
Cash dividends paid on common stock



(954
)


(954
)
Repurchase of common stock


(812
)



(812
)
Benefit plan activity

66


(11
)


55

Issuance of Phillips 66 Partners LP common units

263




555

818

Distributions to noncontrolling interests and other





(45
)
(45
)
September 30, 2016
$
6

19,474

(8,558
)
12,775

(792
)
1,406

24,311

 

 
Shares in Thousands
 
Common Stock Issued

Treasury Stock

December 31, 2014
637,032

90,650

Repurchase of common stock

14,544

Shares issued—share-based compensation
1,602


September 30, 2015
638,634

105,194

 
 
 
December 31, 2015
639,336

109,926

Repurchase of common stock

10,141

Shares issued—share-based compensation
1,581


September 30, 2016
640,917

120,067

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

5


Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
Phillips 66
 
Note 1—Interim Financial Information

The interim financial information presented in the financial statements included in this report is unaudited and includes all known accruals and adjustments necessary, in the opinion of management, for a fair presentation of the consolidated financial position of Phillips 66 and its results of operations and cash flows for the periods presented. Unless otherwise specified, all such adjustments are of a normal and recurring nature. Certain notes and other information have been condensed or omitted from the interim financial statements included in this report. Therefore, these interim financial statements should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes included in our 2015 Annual Report on Form 10-K. The results of operations for the three- and nine-month periods ended September 30, 2016, are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full year.


Note 2—Changes in Accounting Principles

Effective January 1, 2016, we early adopted the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2015-17, “Income Taxes (Topic 740): Balance Sheet Classification of Deferred Taxes.” The new update simplified the presentation of deferred income taxes and required deferred tax liabilities and assets be classified as noncurrent in a classified statement of financial position. The classification was made at the taxpaying component level of an entity, after reflecting any offset of deferred tax liabilities, deferred tax assets and any related valuation allowances. We applied this ASU prospectively to all deferred tax liabilities and assets.

In June 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-10, “Development Stage Entities (Topic 915): Elimination of Certain Financial Reporting Requirements, Including an Amendment to Variable Interest Entities (VIE) Guidance in Topic 810, Consolidation.” The new update removes the definition of a development stage entity from the Master Glossary of the Accounting Standard Codification (ASC) and the related financial reporting requirements specific to development stage entities. This ASU is intended to reduce cost and complexity of financial reporting for entities that have not commenced planned principal operations. For financial reporting requirements other than the VIE guidance in ASC Topic 810, ASU No. 2014-10 was effective for annual and quarterly reporting periods of public entities beginning after December 15, 2014. For the financial reporting requirements related to VIEs in ASC Topic 810, ASU No. 2014-10 was effective for annual and quarterly reporting periods of public entities beginning after December 15, 2015. We adopted the provisions of this ASU related to the financial reporting requirements other than the VIE guidance effective January 1, 2015. We adopted the remaining provisions effective January 1, 2016, and updated our disclosures about the risks and uncertainties related to our joint venture entities that have not commenced their principal operations.


Note 3—Variable Interest Entities

In 2013, we formed Phillips 66 Partners LP, a master limited partnership, to own, operate, develop and acquire primarily fee-based crude oil, refined petroleum product and natural gas liquids (NGL) pipelines and terminals, as well as other transportation and midstream assets. We consolidate Phillips 66 Partners as we determined that Phillips 66 Partners is a VIE and we are the primary beneficiary. As general partner of Phillips 66 Partners, we have the ability to control its financial interests, as well as the ability to direct the activities that most significantly impact its economic performance. See Note 19—Phillips 66 Partners LP, for additional information.

We hold variable interests in VIEs that have not been consolidated because we are not considered the primary beneficiary. Information on our significant non-consolidated VIEs follows.

Merey Sweeny, L.P. (MSLP) is a limited partnership that owns a delayed coker and related facilities at the Sweeny Refinery. As discussed more fully in Note 6—Investments, Loans and Long-Term Receivables, in August 2009, a call right was exercised to acquire the 50 percent ownership interest in MSLP of the co-venturer, Petróleos de Venezuela S.A. (PDVSA). That exercise was challenged, and the dispute has been arbitrated. Until current legal challenges are resolved, we will continue to use the equity method of accounting for MSLP, and the VIE analysis below is based on the ownership and governance structure in place prior to the exercise of the call right. MSLP is a VIE because, in securing lender consents in connection with our separation from ConocoPhillips in 2012 (the Separation), we provided a 100 percent debt

6


guarantee to the lender of MSLP’s 8.85% senior notes (MSLP Senior Notes). PDVSA did not participate in the debt guarantee. In our VIE assessment, this disproportionate debt guarantee, plus other liquidity support provided jointly by us and PDVSA independently of equity ownership, results in MSLP not being exposed to all potential losses. We have determined we are not the primary beneficiary while our call exercise award is subject to being vacated, because under the partnership agreement, the co-venturers jointly direct the activities of MSLP that most significantly impact economic performance. At September 30, 2016, our maximum exposure to loss was $325 million, which represents the outstanding principal balance of the MSLP Senior Notes of $140 million and our investment in MSLP of $185 million.

We have a 25 percent ownership interest in Dakota Access, LLC (DAPL) and Energy Transfer Crude Oil Company, LLC (ETCOP), whose planned principal operations have not commenced. Until the planned principal operations have commenced, these entities do not have sufficient equity at risk to fully fund the construction of all assets required for principal operations, and thus represent VIEs. We have determined we are not the primary beneficiary because we and our co-venturer jointly direct the activities of DAPL and ETCOP that most significantly impact economic performance. We use the equity method of accounting for these investments. At September 30, 2016, our maximum exposure to loss was $884 million, which represents the aggregate book value of our equity investments of $525 million, our loans to DAPL and ETCOP for an aggregated balance of $84 million and our share of borrowings under the project financing facility of $275 million.


Note 4—Inventories

Inventories consisted of the following:

 
Millions of Dollars
 
September 30
2016

 
December 31
2015

 
 
 
 
Crude oil and petroleum products
$
3,643

 
3,214

Materials and supplies
262

 
263

 
$
3,905

 
3,477



Inventories valued on the last-in, first-out (LIFO) basis totaled $3,537 million and $3,085 million at September 30, 2016, and December 31, 2015, respectively. The estimated excess of current replacement cost over LIFO cost of inventories amounted to approximately $3.0 billion and $1.3 billion at September 30, 2016, and December 31, 2015, respectively.

Excluding the disposition of the Whitegate Refinery, certain planned year-to-date reductions in inventory caused liquidations of LIFO inventory values that are not expected to be replaced by the end of the year. These liquidations decreased net income by approximately $13 million and $71 million during the three- and nine-month periods ended September 30, 2016, and $37 million for the nine-month period ended September 30, 2015.

In conjunction with the Whitegate Refinery disposition, the refinery’s LIFO inventory values were liquidated causing a decrease in net income of $62 million during the three- and nine-month periods ended September 30, 2016. This LIFO liquidation impact was included in the gain recognized on the disposition.


Note 5—Assets Held for Sale or Sold

In September 2016, we sold the Whitegate Refinery and related marketing assets, which were included primarily in our Refining segment. The net carrying value of the assets was $135 million, which related to $127 million of inventory, other working capital, and properties, plants and equipment (PP&E); and $8 million of allocated goodwill. An immaterial gain was recognized on the disposition.


7


In July 2013, we completed the sale of the Immingham Combined Heat and Power Plant (ICHP), which was included in our Marketing and Specialties (M&S) segment. A gain on this disposition was deferred at the time of sale due to an indemnity provided to the buyer. We recognized the deferred gain in earnings as our exposure under the indemnity declined, beginning in the third quarter of 2014 and ending in the second quarter of 2015 when the indemnity expired. We recognized $242 million of the deferred gain in the nine-month period ended September 30, 2015, and this amount is included in the “Net gain on dispositions” line of our consolidated statement of income.


Note 6—Investments, Loans and Long-Term Receivables

Equity Investments
Summarized 100 percent financial information for WRB Refining LP (WRB) and Chevron Phillips Chemical Company LLC (CPChem) was as follows:
 
 
Millions of Dollars
 
Three Months Ended
September 30
 
Nine Months Ended
September 30
 
2016

2015

 
2016

2015

 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenues
$
4,647

5,266

 
13,115

16,092

Income before income taxes
403

881

 
1,347

2,611

Net income
386

860

 
1,290

2,556



Dakota Access, LLC/Energy Transfer Crude Oil Company, LLC
We own a 25 percent interest in the DAPL and ETCOP joint ventures, which are constructing pipelines to deliver crude oil produced in the Bakken area of North Dakota to market centers in the Midwest and the Gulf Coast.  In May 2016, we and our co-venturer executed agreements under which we and our co-venturer would loan DAPL and ETCOP up to a maximum of $2,256 million and $227 million, respectively, with the amounts loaned by us and our co-venturer being proportionate to our ownership interests (Sponsor Loans). In August 2016, DAPL and ETCOP secured a $2.5 billion facility (Facility) with a syndicate of financial institutions on a limited recourse basis with certain guarantees, and the outstanding Sponsor Loans were repaid. Allowable draws under the Facility were initially reduced and finally suspended in September 2016 pending resolution of permitting delays. As a result, DAPL and ETCOP have resumed making draws under the Sponsor Loans. The maximum amounts that could be loaned under the Sponsor Loans were reduced on September 22, 2016, to $1,411 million for DAPL and $76 million for ETCOP. As of September 30, 2016, DAPL and ETCOP have $312 million and $22 million, respectively, outstanding under the Sponsor Loans.  Our 25 percent share of those loans was $78 million and $6 million, respectively. The book values of our investments in DAPL and ETCOP at September 30, 2016 were $396 million and $129 million, respectively.

Other
MSLP owns a delayed coker and related facilities at the Sweeny Refinery. MSLP processes long residue, which is produced from heavy sour crude oil, for a processing fee. Fuel-grade petroleum coke is produced as a by-product and becomes the property of MSLP. Prior to August 28, 2009, MSLP was owned 50/50 by ConocoPhillips and PDVSA. Under the agreements that govern the relationships between the partners, certain defaults by PDVSA with respect to supply of crude oil to the Sweeny Refinery triggered the right to acquire PDVSA’s 50 percent ownership interest in MSLP, which was exercised on August 28, 2009. PDVSA initiated arbitration with the International Chamber of Commerce challenging the exercise of the call right and claiming it was invalid. The arbitral tribunal held hearings on the merits of the dispute in December 2012, and post-hearing briefs were exchanged in March 2013. The arbitral tribunal issued its ruling in April 2014, which upheld the exercise of the call right and the acquisition of the 50 percent ownership interest. In July 2014, PDVSA filed a petition in U.S. district court to vacate the tribunal’s ruling, and in September 2015, the petition was denied. In January 2016, PDVSA filed an appeal in the appellate court to vacate this ruling. Following the Separation, Phillips 66 generally indemnifies ConocoPhillips for liabilities, if any, arising out of the exercise of the call right or otherwise with respect to the joint venture or the refinery. Until current legal challenges are resolved, we will continue to use the equity method of accounting for our investment in MSLP.

8


Note 7—Properties, Plants and Equipment

Our investment in PP&E, with the associated accumulated depreciation and amortization (Accum. D&A), was:

 
Millions of Dollars
 
September 30, 2016
 
December 31, 2015
 
Gross
PP&E

 
Accum.
D&A

 
Net
PP&E

 
Gross
PP&E

 
Accum.
D&A

 
Net
PP&E

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Midstream
$
7,851

 
1,523

 
6,328

 
6,978

 
1,293

 
5,685

Chemicals

 

 

 

 

 

Refining
20,902

 
8,040

 
12,862

 
20,850

 
8,046

 
12,804

Marketing and Specialties
1,455

 
790

 
665

 
1,422

 
746

 
676

Corporate and Other
1,154

 
562

 
592

 
1,060

 
504

 
556

 
$
31,362

 
10,915

 
20,447

 
30,310

 
10,589

 
19,721



Note 8—Earnings Per Share

The numerator of basic earnings per share (EPS) is net income attributable to Phillips 66, reduced by noncancelable dividends paid on unvested share-based employee awards during the vesting period (participating securities). The denominator of basic EPS is the sum of the daily weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the periods presented and fully vested stock and unit awards that have not yet been issued as common stock. The numerator of diluted EPS is also based on net income attributable to Phillips 66, which is reduced only by dividend equivalents paid on participating securities for which the dividends are more dilutive than the participation of the awards in the earnings of the periods presented. To the extent unvested stock, unit or option awards and vested unexercised stock options are dilutive, they are included with the weighted-average common shares outstanding in the denominator. Treasury stock is excluded from the denominator in both basic and diluted EPS.
  
 
Three Months Ended
September 30
 
Nine Months Ended
September 30
 
2016
 
2015
 
2016
 
2015
 
Basic

Diluted

 
Basic

Diluted

 
Basic

Diluted

 
Basic

Diluted

Amounts attributed to Phillips 66 Common Stockholders (millions):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income attributable to Phillips 66
$
511

511

 
1,578

1,578

 
1,392

1,392

 
3,577

3,577

Income allocated to participating securities
(2
)
(1
)
 
(1
)

 
(5
)
(3
)
 
(5
)

Net Income available to common stockholders
$
509

510


1,577

1,578

 
1,387

1,389


3,572

3,577

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Weighted-average common shares outstanding (thousands):
521,815

525,991

 
535,618

540,357

 
524,365

528,650

 
539,616

544,362

Effect of stock-based compensation
4,176

2,807

 
4,739

4,339

 
4,285

3,000

 
4,746

4,672

Weighted-average common shares outstanding—EPS
525,991

528,798

 
540,357

544,696

 
528,650

531,650

 
544,362

549,034

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Earnings Per Share of Common Stock (dollars)
$
0.97

0.96

 
2.92

2.90

 
2.62

2.61

 
6.56

6.52




9


Note 9—Debt

In early October 2016, we amended our Phillips 66 revolving credit facility, primarily to extend the term from December 2019 to October 2021. Borrowing capacity under the Phillips 66 facility remained at $5 billion. Phillips 66 Partners LP also amended its revolving credit facility in early October, primarily to increase its borrowing capacity to $750 million and to extend the term from November 2019 to October 2021.

At both September 30, 2016, and December 31, 2015, we had no direct outstanding borrowings under our $5 billion revolving credit agreement, while $51 million in letters of credit had been issued that were supported by it. At September 30, 2016, $50 million was outstanding under the revolving credit agreement of Phillips 66 Partners, compared with no borrowings outstanding under the facility at December 31, 2015. Accordingly, as of September 30, 2016, an aggregate $5.4 billion of total capacity was available under these facilities.

During the second quarter of 2016, we reclassified $1.5 billion of 2.95% Senior Notes due 2017 from long-term debt to short-term debt on our consolidated balance sheet, due to the notes maturing within the next twelve months.

In October 2016, Phillips 66 Partners closed on a public debt offering pursuant to its effective shelf registration statement and issued the following unsecured senior notes:

$500 million aggregate principal amount of 3.55% Senior Notes due 2026.
$625 million aggregate principal amount of 4.90% Senior Notes due 2046.

Interest on each series of senior notes is payable semi-annually in arrears on April 1 and October 1 of each year, commencing on April 1, 2017.


Note 10—Guarantees

At September 30, 2016, we were liable for certain contingent obligations under various contractual arrangements as described below. We recognize a liability, at inception, for the fair value of our obligation as a guarantor for newly issued or modified guarantees. Unless the carrying amount of the liability is noted below, we have not recognized a liability either because the guarantees were issued prior to December 31, 2002, or because the fair value of the obligation is immaterial. In addition, unless otherwise stated, we are not currently performing with any significance under the guarantee and expect future performance to be either immaterial or have only a remote chance of occurrence.

Guarantees of Joint Venture Debt
In 2012, in connection with the Separation, we issued a guarantee for 100 percent of the MSLP Senior Notes issued in July 1999. At September 30, 2016, the maximum potential amount of future payments to third parties under the guarantee was estimated to be $140 million, which could become payable if MSLP fails to meet its obligations under the senior notes agreement. The MSLP Senior Notes mature in 2019.

Other Guarantees
In the second quarter of 2016, the operating lease commenced on our new headquarters facility in Houston, Texas, after construction was deemed substantially complete. Under this lease agreement, we have a residual value guarantee with a maximum future exposure of $554 million. The operating lease has a term of five years and provides us the option, at the end of the lease term, to request to renew the lease, purchase the facility, or assist the lessor in marketing it for resale.

We have residual value guarantees associated with railcar and airplane leases with maximum future exposures totaling $369 million. We have other guarantees with maximum future exposures totaling $110 million, which consist primarily of guarantees to fund the short-term cash liquidity deficits of certain joint ventures and guarantees of the lease payment obligations of a joint venture. These guarantees generally extend up to eight years or the life of the venture.

Indemnifications
Over the years, we have entered into various agreements to sell ownership interests in certain corporations, joint ventures and assets that gave rise to qualifying indemnifications. Agreements associated with these sales include indemnifications for taxes, litigation, environmental liabilities, permits and licenses, and employee claims; and real estate indemnity

10


against tenant defaults. The provisions of these indemnifications vary greatly. The majority of these indemnifications are related to environmental issues with generally indefinite terms, and the maximum amount of future payments is generally unlimited. The carrying amount recorded for indemnifications at September 30, 2016, was $195 million.

We amortize the indemnification liability over the relevant time period, if one exists, based on the facts and circumstances surrounding each type of indemnity. In cases where the indemnification term is indefinite, we will reverse the liability when we have information the liability is essentially relieved or amortize the liability over an appropriate time period as the fair value of our indemnification exposure declines. Although it is reasonably possible future payments may exceed amounts recorded, due to the nature of the indemnifications, it is not possible to make a reasonable estimate of the maximum potential amount of future payments. Included in the recorded carrying amount were $100 million of environmental accruals for known contamination that were primarily included in “Asset retirement obligations and accrued environmental costs” at September 30, 2016. For additional information about environmental liabilities, see Note 11—Contingencies and Commitments.

Indemnification and Release Agreement
In 2012, we entered into the Indemnification and Release Agreement with ConocoPhillips. This agreement governs the treatment between ConocoPhillips and us of matters relating to indemnification, insurance, litigation responsibility and management, and litigation document sharing and cooperation arising in connection with the Separation. Generally, the agreement provides for cross-indemnities principally designed to place financial responsibility for the obligations and liabilities of our business with us and financial responsibility for the obligations and liabilities of ConocoPhillips’ business with ConocoPhillips. The agreement also establishes procedures for handling claims subject to indemnification and related matters.


Note 11—Contingencies and Commitments

A number of lawsuits involving a variety of claims that arose in the ordinary course of business have been filed against us or are subject to indemnifications provided by us. We also may be required to remove or mitigate the effects on the environment of the placement, storage, disposal or release of certain chemical, mineral and petroleum substances at various active and inactive sites. We regularly assess the need for financial recognition or disclosure of these contingencies. In the case of all known contingencies (other than those related to income taxes), we accrue a liability when the loss is probable and the amount is reasonably estimable. If a range of amounts can be reasonably estimated and no amount within the range is a better estimate than any other amount, then the minimum of the range is accrued. We do not reduce these liabilities for potential insurance or third-party recoveries. If applicable, we accrue receivables for probable insurance or other third-party recoveries. In the case of income-tax-related contingencies, we use a cumulative probability-weighted loss accrual in cases where sustaining a tax position is less than certain.

Based on currently available information, we believe it is remote that future costs related to known contingent liability exposures will exceed current accruals by an amount that would have a material adverse impact on our consolidated financial statements. As we learn new facts concerning contingencies, we reassess our position both with respect to accrued liabilities and other potential exposures. Estimates particularly sensitive to future changes include contingent liabilities recorded for environmental remediation, tax and legal matters. Estimated future environmental remediation costs are subject to change due to such factors as the uncertain magnitude of cleanup costs, the unknown time and extent of such remedial actions that may be required, and the determination of our liability in proportion to that of other potentially responsible parties. Estimated future costs related to tax and legal matters are subject to change as events evolve and as additional information becomes available during the administrative and litigation processes.

Environmental
We are subject to international, federal, state and local environmental laws and regulations. When we prepare our consolidated financial statements, we record accruals for environmental liabilities based on management’s best estimates, using all information available at the time. We measure estimates and base contingent liabilities on currently available facts, existing technology, and presently enacted laws and regulations, taking into account stakeholder and business considerations. When measuring contingent environmental liabilities, we also consider our prior experience in remediation of contaminated sites, other companies’ cleanup experience, and data released by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or other organizations. We consider unasserted claims in our determination of environmental liabilities, and we accrue them in the period they are both probable and reasonably estimable.

11


Although liability of those potentially responsible for environmental remediation costs is generally joint and several for federal sites and frequently so for state sites, we are usually only one of many companies alleged to have liability at a particular site. Due to such joint and several liabilities, we could be responsible for all cleanup costs related to any site at which we have been designated as a potentially responsible party. We have been successful to date in sharing cleanup costs with other financially sound companies. Many of the sites at which we are potentially responsible are still under investigation by the EPA or the state agencies concerned. Prior to actual cleanup, those potentially responsible normally assess the site conditions, apportion responsibility and determine the appropriate remediation. In some instances, we may have no liability or may attain a settlement of liability. Where it appears that other potentially responsible parties may be financially unable to bear their proportional share, we consider this inability in estimating our potential liability, and we adjust our accruals accordingly. As a result of various acquisitions in the past, we assumed certain environmental obligations. Some of these environmental obligations are mitigated by indemnifications made by others for our benefit and some of the indemnifications are subject to dollar and time limits.

We are currently participating in environmental assessments and cleanups at numerous federal Superfund and comparable state sites. After an assessment of environmental exposures for cleanup and other costs, we make accruals on an undiscounted basis (except those pertaining to sites acquired in a purchase business combination, which we record on a discounted basis) for planned investigation and remediation activities for sites where it is probable future costs will be incurred and these costs can be reasonably estimated. At September 30, 2016, our total environmental accrual was $484 million, compared with $485 million at December 31, 2015. We expect to incur a substantial amount of these expenditures within the next 30 years. We have not reduced these accruals for possible insurance recoveries. In the future, we may be involved in additional environmental assessments, cleanups and proceedings.

Legal Proceedings
Our legal organization applies its knowledge, experience and professional judgment to the specific characteristics of our cases, employing a litigation management process to manage and monitor the legal proceedings against us. Our process facilitates the early evaluation and quantification of potential exposures in individual cases and enables the tracking of those cases that have been scheduled for trial and/or mediation. Based on professional judgment and experience in using these litigation management tools and available information about current developments in all our cases, our legal organization regularly assesses the adequacy of current accruals and determines if adjustment of existing accruals, or establishment of new accruals, is required.

Other Contingencies
We have contingent liabilities resulting from throughput agreements with pipeline and processing companies not associated with financing arrangements. Under these agreements, we may be required to provide any such company with additional funds through advances and penalties for fees related to throughput capacity not utilized.

At September 30, 2016, we had performance obligations secured by letters of credit and bank guarantees of $582 million (of which $51 million was issued under the provisions of our revolving credit facility, and the remainder was issued as direct bank letters of credit and bank guarantees) related to various purchase and other commitments incident to the ordinary conduct of business.


Note 12—Derivatives and Financial Instruments

Derivative Instruments
We use financial and commodity-based derivative contracts to manage exposures to fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates, interest rates and commodity prices or to capture market opportunities. Because we have not used cash-flow hedge accounting for commodity derivative contracts, all gains and losses, realized or unrealized, from these contracts have been recognized in the consolidated statement of income. Gains and losses from derivative contracts held for trading not directly related to our physical business, whether realized or unrealized, have been reported net in “Other income” on our consolidated statement of income. Cash flows from all our derivative activity for the periods presented appear in the operating section of the consolidated statement of cash flows.

Purchase and sales contracts with fixed minimum notional volumes for commodities that are readily convertible to cash (e.g., crude oil and gasoline) are recorded on the balance sheet as derivatives unless the contracts are eligible for, and we elect, the normal purchases and normal sales exception (i.e., contracts to purchase or sell quantities we expect to use or

12


sell over a reasonable period in the normal course of business). We generally apply this normal purchases and normal sales exception to eligible crude oil, refined product, NGL, natural gas and power commodity purchase and sales contracts; however, we may elect not to apply this exception (e.g., when another derivative instrument will be used to mitigate the risk of the purchase or sales contract but hedge accounting will not be applied, in which case both the purchase or sales contract and the derivative contract mitigating the resulting risk will be recorded on the balance sheet at fair value). Our derivative instruments are held at fair value on our consolidated balance sheet. For further information on the fair value of derivatives, see Note 13—Fair Value Measurements.

Commodity Derivative Contracts—We sell into or receive supply from the worldwide crude oil, refined products, natural gas, NGL, and electric power markets, exposing our revenues, purchases, cost of operating activities, and cash flows to fluctuations in the prices for these commodities. Generally, our policy is to remain exposed to the market prices of commodities; however, we use futures, forwards, swaps and options in various markets to balance physical systems, meet customer needs, manage price exposures on specific transactions, and do a limited, immaterial amount of trading not directly related to our physical business, all of which may reduce our exposure to fluctuations in market prices. We also use the market knowledge gained from these activities to capture market opportunities such as moving physical commodities to more profitable locations, storing commodities to capture seasonal or time premiums, and blending commodities to capture quality upgrades.

The following table indicates the balance sheet line items that include the fair values of commodity derivative assets and liabilities presented net (i.e., commodity derivative assets and liabilities with the same counterparty are netted where the right of setoff exists); however, the balances in the following table are presented gross. For information on the impact of counterparty netting and collateral netting, see Note 13—Fair Value Measurements.

 
Millions of Dollars
 
September 30
2016

 
December 31
2015

Assets
 
 
 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
$
553

 
2,607

Other assets
18

 
5

Liabilities
 
 
 
Other accruals
618

 
2,425

Other liabilities and deferred credits
18

 
5

Hedge accounting has not been used for any item in the table.


The recognized gains (losses) incurred from commodity derivatives, and the line items where they appear on our consolidated statement of income, were:
 
 
Millions of Dollars
 
Three Months Ended
September 30
 
Nine Months Ended
September 30
 
2016

2015

 
2016

2015

 
 
 
 
 
 
Sales and other operating revenues
$
(6
)
195

 
(274
)
21

Other income
8

12

 
24

59

Purchased crude oil and products
36

117

 
(89
)
66

Hedge accounting has not been used for any item in the table.



13


The following table summarizes our material net exposures resulting from outstanding commodity derivative contracts. These financial and physical derivative contracts are primarily used to manage price exposure on our underlying operations. The underlying exposures may be from non-derivative positions such as inventory volumes. Financial derivative contracts may also offset physical derivative contracts, such as forward sales contracts. The percentage of our derivative contract volumes expiring within the next 12 months was approximately 97 percent and 99 percent at September 30, 2016, and December 31, 2015, respectively.

 
Open Position
Long/(Short)
 
September 30
2016

 
December 31
2015

Commodity
 
 
 
Crude oil, refined products and NGL (millions of barrels)
(37
)
 
(17
)


Credit Risk
Financial instruments potentially exposed to concentrations of credit risk consist primarily of over-the-counter (OTC) derivative contracts and trade receivables.

The credit risk from our OTC derivative contracts, such as forwards and swaps, derives from the counterparty to the transaction. Individual counterparty exposure is managed within predetermined credit limits and includes the use of cash-call margins when appropriate, thereby reducing the risk of significant nonperformance. We also use futures, swaps and option contracts that have a negligible credit risk because these trades are cleared with an exchange clearinghouse and subject to mandatory margin requirements until settled; however, we are exposed to the credit risk of those exchange brokers for receivables arising from daily margin cash calls, as well as for cash deposited to meet initial margin requirements.

Our trade receivables result primarily from the sale of products from, or related to, our refinery operations and reflect a broad national and international customer base, which limits our exposure to concentrations of credit risk. The majority of these receivables have payment terms of 30 days or less. We continually monitor this exposure and the creditworthiness of the counterparties and recognize bad debt expense based on historical write-off experience or specific counterparty collectability. Generally, we do not require collateral to limit the exposure to loss; however, we will sometimes use letters of credit, prepayments, and master netting arrangements to mitigate credit risk with counterparties that both buy from and sell to us, as these agreements permit the amounts owed by us or owed to others to be offset against amounts due to us.

Certain of our derivative instruments contain provisions that require us to post collateral if the derivative exposure exceeds a threshold amount. We have contracts with fixed threshold amounts and other contracts with variable threshold amounts that are contingent on our credit rating. The variable threshold amounts typically decline for lower credit ratings, while both the variable and fixed threshold amounts typically revert to zero if our credit ratings fall below investment grade. Cash is the primary collateral in all contracts; however, many contracts also permit us to post letters of credit as collateral.

The aggregate fair values of all derivative instruments with such credit-risk-related contingent features that were in a liability position were not material at September 30, 2016, or December 31, 2015.



14


Note 13—Fair Value Measurements

Fair Values of Financial Instruments
We used the following methods and assumptions to estimate the fair value of financial instruments:

Cash and cash equivalents: The carrying amount reported on the consolidated balance sheet approximates fair value.
Accounts and notes receivable: The carrying amount reported on the consolidated balance sheet approximates fair value.
Debt: The carrying amount of our floating-rate debt approximates fair value. The fair value of our fixed-rate debt is estimated based on quoted market prices.
Commodity swaps and forward purchases and sales: Fair value is estimated based on forward market prices and approximates the exit price at period end. When forward market prices are not available, we estimate fair value using the forward price of a similar commodity, adjusted for the difference in quality or location.
Futures: Fair values are based on quoted market prices obtained from the New York Mercantile Exchange, the Intercontinental Exchange, or other traded exchanges.
Forward-exchange contracts: Fair value is estimated by comparing the contract rate to the forward rate in effect at the end of the reporting period, which approximates the exit price at that date.

We carry certain assets and liabilities at fair value, which we measure at the reporting date using an exit price (i.e., the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability), and disclose the quality of these fair values based on the valuation inputs used in these measurements under the following hierarchy:

Level 1: Fair value measured with unadjusted quoted prices from an active market for identical assets or liabilities.
Level 2: Fair value measured either with: (1) adjusted quoted prices from an active market for similar assets or liabilities; or (2) other valuation inputs that are directly or indirectly observable.
Level 3: Fair value measured with unobservable inputs that are significant to the measurement.

We classify the fair value of an asset or liability based on the lowest level of input significant to its measurement; however, the fair value of an asset or liability initially reported as Level 3 will be subsequently reported as Level 2 if the unobservable inputs become inconsequential to its measurement or corroborating market data becomes available. Conversely, an asset or liability initially reported as Level 2 will be subsequently reported as Level 3 if corroborating market data becomes unavailable. For the nine-month period ended September 30, 2016, derivative assets with an aggregate value of $180 million and derivative liabilities with an aggregate value of $149 million were transferred into Level 1 from Level 2, as measured from the beginning of the reporting period. The measurements were reclassified within the fair value hierarchy due to the availability of unadjusted quoted prices from an active market.

Recurring Fair Value Measurements
Financial assets and liabilities recorded at fair value on a recurring basis consist primarily of investments to support nonqualified deferred compensation plans and derivative instruments. The deferred compensation investments are measured at fair value using unadjusted prices available from national securities exchanges; therefore, these assets are categorized as Level 1 in the fair value hierarchy. We value our exchange-traded commodity derivatives using closing prices provided by the exchange as of the balance sheet date, and these are also classified as Level 1 in the fair value hierarchy. When exchange-cleared contracts lack sufficient liquidity or are valued using either adjusted exchange-provided prices or non-exchange quotes, we classify those contracts as Level 2. OTC financial swaps and physical commodity forward purchase and sales contracts are generally valued using quotes provided by brokers and price index developers such as Platts and Oil Price Information Service. We corroborate these quotes with market data and classify the resulting fair values as Level 2. In certain less liquid markets or for longer-term contracts, forward prices are not as readily available. In these circumstances, OTC swaps and physical commodity purchase and sales contracts are valued using internally developed methodologies that consider historical relationships among various commodities that result in management’s best estimate of fair value. We classify these contracts as Level 3. Financial OTC and physical commodity options are valued using industry-standard models that consider various assumptions, including quoted

15


forward prices for commodities, time value, volatility factors, and contractual prices for the underlying instruments, as well as other relevant economic measures. The degree to which these inputs are observable in the forward markets determines whether the options are classified as Level 2 or 3. We use a mid-market pricing convention (the mid-point between bid and ask prices). When appropriate, valuations are adjusted to reflect credit considerations, generally based on available market evidence.

The following tables display the fair value hierarchy for our material financial assets and liabilities either accounted for or disclosed at fair value on a recurring basis. These values are determined by treating each contract as the fundamental unit of account; therefore, derivative assets and liabilities with the same counterparty are shown gross (i.e., without the effect of netting where the legal right of setoff exists) in the hierarchy sections of these tables. These tables also show that our Level 3 activity was not material.

We have master netting agreements for all of our exchange-cleared derivative instruments, the majority of our OTC derivative instruments, and certain physical commodity forward contracts (primarily pipeline crude oil deliveries). The following tables show the fair value of these contracts on a net basis in the column “Effect of Counterparty Netting,” which is how these also appear on the consolidated balance sheet.

The carrying values and fair values by hierarchy of our material financial instruments and commodity forward contracts, either carried or disclosed at fair value, including any effects of netting derivative assets with liabilities and netting collateral due to right of setoff or master netting agreements, were:

 
Millions of Dollars
 
September 30, 2016
 
Fair Value Hierarchy
 
Total Fair Value of Gross Assets & Liabilities

Effect of Counterparty Netting

Effect of Collateral Netting

Difference in Carrying Value and Fair Value

Net Carrying Value Presented on the Balance Sheet

Cash Collateral Received or Paid, Not Offset on Balance Sheet

 
Level 1

 
Level 2

 
Level 3

Commodity Derivative Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Exchange-cleared instruments
$
292

 
213

 

 
505

(505
)




OTC instruments

 
1

 

 
1




1


Physical forward contracts*

 
62

 
3

 
65




65


Rabbi trust assets
96

 

 

 
96

N/A

N/A


96

N/A

 
$
388

 
276

 
3

 
667

(505
)


162

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Commodity Derivative Liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Exchange-cleared instruments
$
328

 
271

 

 
599

(505
)
(94
)



OTC instruments

 
1

 

 
1




1


Physical forward contracts*

 
35

 
1

 
36




36


Interest-rate derivatives


13




13




13


Floating-rate debt
100

 

 

 
100

N/A

N/A


100

N/A

Fixed-rate debt, excluding capital leases**

 
9,517

 

 
9,517

N/A

N/A

(935
)
8,582

N/A

 
$
428

 
9,837

 
1

 
10,266

(505
)
(94
)
(935
)
8,732


* Physical forward contracts may have a larger value on the balance sheet than disclosed in the fair value hierarchy when the remaining contract term at the reporting date is greater than 12 months and the short-term portion is an asset while the long-term portion is a liability, or vice versa.
** We carry fixed-rate debt on the balance sheet at amortized cost.



16


 
Millions of Dollars
 
December 31, 2015
 
Fair Value Hierarchy
 
Total Fair Value of Gross Assets & Liabilities

Effect of Counterparty Netting

Effect of Collateral Netting

Difference in Carrying Value and Fair Value

Net Carrying Value Presented on the Balance Sheet

Cash Collateral Received or Paid, Not Offset on Balance Sheet

 
Level 1

 
Level 2

 
Level 3

 
Commodity Derivative Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Exchange-cleared instruments
$
1,851

 
703

 

 
2,554

(2,389
)
(100
)

65


OTC instruments

 
13

 

 
13

(12
)


1


Physical forward contracts*
3

 
40

 
2

 
45




45


Rabbi trust assets
83

 

 

 
83

N/A

N/A


83

N/A

 
$
1,937

 
756

 
2

 
2,695

(2,401
)
(100
)

194



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Commodity Derivative Liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Exchange-cleared instruments
$
1,745

 
646

 

 
2,391

(2,389
)


2


OTC instruments

 
17

 

 
17

(12
)


5


Physical forward contracts*

 
22

 

 
22




22


Floating-rate debt
50

 

 

 
50

N/A

N/A


50

N/A

Fixed-rate debt, excluding capital leases**

 
8,434

 

 
8,434

N/A

N/A

195

8,629

N/A

 
$
1,795

 
9,119

 

 
10,914

(2,401
)

195

8,708


* Physical forward contracts may have a larger value on the balance sheet than disclosed in the fair value hierarchy when the remaining contract term at the reporting date is greater than 12 months and the short-term portion is an asset while the long-term portion is a liability, or vice versa.
** We carry fixed-rate debt on the balance sheet at amortized cost.


The rabbi trust assets appear on our consolidated balance sheet in the “Investments and long-term receivables” line, while the floating-rate and fixed-rate debt appear in the “Short-term debt” and “Long-term debt” lines. For information regarding where our commodity derivative assets and liabilities appear on the balance sheet, see the first table in Note 12—Derivatives and Financial Instruments.



17


Note 14—Employee Benefit Plans

Pension and Postretirement Plans
The components of net periodic benefit cost for the three- and nine-month periods ended September 30, 2016 and 2015, were as follows:
 
Millions of Dollars
 
Pension Benefits
 
Other Benefits
 
2016
 
2015
 
2016

 
2015

 
U.S.

 
Int’l.

 
U.S.

 
Int’l.

 
 
 
 
Components of Net Periodic Benefit Cost
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Three Months Ended September 30
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Service cost
$
32

 
8

 
32

 
9

 
1

 
1

Interest cost
29

 
7

 
27

 
7

 
2

 
2

Expected return on plan assets
(32
)
 
(9
)
 
(35
)
 
(9
)
 

 

Amortization of prior service cost
1

 

 

 

 

 

Recognized net actuarial loss
18

 
4

 
19

 
4

 

 

Settlements
2

 

 
75

 

 

 

Net periodic benefit cost
$
50


10


118


11


3


3

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Nine Months Ended September 30
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Service cost
$
96

 
26

 
94

 
29

 
5

 
5

Interest cost
87

 
22

 
81

 
21

 
6

 
6

Expected return on plan assets
(96
)
 
(29
)
 
(105
)
 
(28
)
 

 

Amortization of prior service cost (credit)
2

 
(1
)
 
2

 
(1
)
 
(1
)
 
(1
)
Recognized net actuarial loss (gain)
54

 
11

 
56

 
12

 

 
(1
)
Settlements
5

 

 
76

 

 

 

Net periodic benefit cost
$
148

 
29

 
204

 
33

 
10

 
9



During the first nine months of 2016, we contributed $333 million to our U.S. benefit plans and $30 million to our international benefit plans. We currently expect to make additional contributions of approximately $5 million to our U.S. benefit plans and $10 million to our international benefit plans during the remainder of 2016.

In conjunction with the Whitegate Refinery disposition, the fair market value of plan assets was updated and the pension benefit obligation was remeasured for the Ireland Pension Plan as of August 31, 2016. At the measurement date, the pension liability had a net decrease of $3 million, which resulted in an increase to other comprehensive income, due to the following two components: 1) a curtailment gain (decrease in projected benefit obligation) of $31 million, as all future benefit accruals were eliminated from projected benefit obligation, and 2) an actuarial loss (increase in projected benefit obligation) of $28 million, which was primarily related to a decline in the discount rate from 2.3 percent at December 31, 2015, to 1.3 percent at August 31, 2016.


18


Note 15—Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)

The following table depicts changes in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) by component, as well as detail on reclassifications out of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss):

 
Millions of Dollars
 
Defined Benefit Plans

 
Foreign Currency Translation

 
Hedging

 
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
December 31, 2014
$
(696
)
 
167

 
(2
)
 
(531
)
Other comprehensive loss before reclassifications
(63
)
 
(88
)
 

 
(151
)
Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)*
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Amortization of defined benefit plan items**
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Actuarial losses and settlements
94

 

 

 
94

Net current period other comprehensive income (loss)
31

 
(88
)
 

 
(57
)
September 30, 2015
$
(665
)
 
79

 
(2
)
 
(588
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
December 31, 2015
$
(662
)
 
11

 
(2
)
 
(653
)
Other comprehensive income (loss) before reclassifications
10

 
(187
)
 
(7
)
 
(184
)
Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)*
 
 
 
 
 
 


Amortization of defined benefit plan items**
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Actuarial losses and settlements
45

 

 

 
45

Net current period other comprehensive income (loss)
55

 
(187
)
 
(7
)
 
(139
)
September 30, 2016
$
(607
)
 
(176
)
 
(9
)
 
(792
)
* There were no significant reclassifications related to foreign currency translation or hedging.
** These accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) components are included in the computation of net periodic benefit cost (see Note 14—Employee Benefit Plans, for additional information).



19


Note 16—Related Party Transactions

Significant transactions with related parties were:

 
Millions of Dollars
 
Three Months Ended
September 30
 
Nine Months Ended
September 30
 
2016

2015

 
2016

2015

 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating revenues and other income (a)
$
588

581

 
1,544

1,872

Purchases (b)
2,118

1,927

 
5,769

6,281

Operating expenses and selling, general and administrative expenses (c)
31

29

 
92

91



(a)
We sold NGL and other petrochemical feedstocks, along with solvents, to CPChem, and we sold gas oil and hydrogen feedstocks to Excel Paralubes. We sold certain feedstocks and intermediate products to WRB and also acted as agent for WRB in supplying crude oil and other feedstocks for a fee. We also sold refined products to our OnCue Holdings, LLC joint venture. In addition, we charged several of our affiliates, including CPChem, for the use of common facilities, such as steam generators, waste and water treaters, and warehouse facilities.

(b)
We purchased crude oil and refined products from WRB. We also acted as agent for WRB in distributing asphalt and solvents for a fee. We purchased natural gas and NGL from DCP Midstream, LLC (DCP Midstream) and CPChem, as well as other feedstocks from various affiliates, for use in our refinery and fractionation processes. We paid NGL fractionation fees to CPChem. We also paid fees to various pipeline equity companies for transporting finished refined products and NGL. We purchased base oils and fuel products from Excel for use in our refining and specialty businesses.
 
(c)
We paid utility and processing fees to various affiliates.



20


Note 17—Segment Disclosures and Related Information

Our operating segments are:

1)
Midstream—Gathers, processes, transports and markets natural gas; and transports, fractionates and markets NGL in the United States. In addition, this segment transports crude oil and other feedstocks to our refineries and other locations, delivers refined and specialty products to market, and provides terminaling and storage services for crude oil and petroleum products. The Midstream segment includes our master limited partnership, Phillips 66 Partners LP, as well as our 50 percent equity investment in DCP Midstream.

2)
Chemicals—Manufactures and markets petrochemicals and plastics on a worldwide basis. The Chemicals segment consists of our 50 percent equity investment in CPChem.

3)
Refining—Buys, sells and refines crude oil and other feedstocks at 13 refineries, mainly in the United States and Europe.

4)
Marketing and Specialties—Purchases for resale and markets refined products, mainly in the United States and Europe. In addition, this segment includes the manufacturing and marketing of specialty products (such as base oils and lubricants), as well as power generation operations.

Corporate and Other includes general corporate overhead, interest expense, our investments in new technologies and various other corporate activities. Corporate assets include all cash and cash equivalents.

We evaluate performance and allocate resources based on net income attributable to Phillips 66. Intersegment sales are at prices that approximate market.




21


Analysis of Results by Operating Segment

 
Millions of Dollars
 
Three Months Ended
September 30
 
Nine Months Ended
September 30
 
2016

2015

 
2016

2015

Sales and Other Operating Revenues
 
 
 
 
 
Midstream
 
 
 
 
 
Total sales
$
934

821

 
2,784

2,703

Intersegment eliminations
(296
)
(250
)
 
(866
)
(747
)
Total Midstream
638

571

 
1,918

1,956

Chemicals
1

1

 
3

4

Refining
 
 
 
 
 
Total sales
13,465

16,511

 
37,242

49,737

Intersegment eliminations
(9,035
)
(10,758
)
 
(24,840
)
(31,434
)
Total Refining
4,430

5,753

 
12,402

18,303

Marketing and Specialties
 
 
 
 
 
Total sales
16,799

19,852

 
47,327

57,943

Intersegment eliminations
(252
)
(386
)
 
(792
)
(1,146
)
Total Marketing and Specialties
16,547

19,466

 
46,535

56,797

Corporate and Other
8

1

 
24

22

Consolidated sales and other operating revenues
$
21,624

25,792

 
60,882

77,082

 
 
 
 
 
 
Net Income (Loss) Attributable to Phillips 66
 
 
 
 
 
Midstream
$
75

101

 
179

90

Chemicals
101

252

 
447

750

Refining
177

1,003

 
412

2,145

Marketing and Specialties
267

338

 
701

956

Corporate and Other
(109
)
(116
)
 
(347
)
(364
)
Consolidated net income attributable to Phillips 66
$
511

1,578

 
1,392

3,577



 
Millions of Dollars
 
September 30
2016

 
December 31
2015

Total Assets
 
 
 
Midstream
$
12,186

 
11,043

Chemicals
5,746

 
5,237

Refining
22,939

 
21,993

Marketing and Specialties
6,056

 
5,631

Corporate and Other
3,327

 
4,676

Consolidated total assets
$
50,254

 
48,580




22


Note 18—Income Taxes

Our effective tax rates for the third quarter and the first nine months of 2016 were 34 percent and 32 percent, respectively, compared with 33 percent and 31 percent for the corresponding periods of 2015. The effective tax rate varies from the federal statutory tax rate of 35 percent primarily as a result of foreign operations, partially offset by state tax expense.


Note 19—Phillips 66 Partners LP

In 2013, we formed Phillips 66 Partners, a master limited partnership, to own, operate, develop and acquire primarily fee-based crude oil, refined petroleum product and NGL pipelines and terminals, as well as other transportation and midstream assets.

In March 2016, we contributed to Phillips 66 Partners a 25 percent interest in our then wholly owned subsidiary, Phillips 66 Sweeny Frac LLC, which owns the Sweeny Fractionator, an NGL fractionator located within our Sweeny Refinery complex in Old Ocean, Texas, and the Clemens Caverns, an NGL salt dome storage facility located near Brazoria, Texas. Total consideration for the transaction was $236 million, which consisted of Phillips 66 Partners’ assumption of a $212 million note payable to us and the issuance of common units and general partner units to us with an aggregate fair value of $24 million.

In May 2016, we contributed to Phillips 66 Partners the remaining 75 percent interest in Phillips 66 Sweeny Frac LLC and a 100 percent interest in our wholly owned subsidiary, Phillips 66 Plymouth LLC, which owned the Standish Pipeline, a refined petroleum product pipeline system extending from the Ponca City Refinery in Ponca City, Oklahoma, and terminating at the North Wichita Terminal in Wichita, Kansas. Total consideration for the transaction was $775 million, consisting of Phillips 66 Partners’ assumption of $675 million of notes payable to us and the issuance of common units and general units to us with an aggregate fair value of $100 million.

On May 10, 2016, Phillips 66 Partners completed a public offering of 12,650,000 common units representing limited partner interests, at a price of $52.40 per unit. The net proceeds at closing were $656 million. Phillips 66 Partners used these net proceeds to repay a portion of the assumed notes discussed above.

In June 2016, Phillips 66 Partners began issuing common units under a continuous offering program, which allows for the issuance of up to an aggregate of $250 million of Phillips 66 Partners’ common units, in amounts, at prices and on terms to be determined by market conditions and other factors at the time of the offerings. We refer to this as an at-the-market, or ATM, program. Through September 30, 2016, on a settlement-date basis, Phillips 66 Partners issued an aggregate of 346,152 common units under the ATM program, generating net proceeds of approximately $19 million.

On August 12, 2016, Phillips 66 Partners completed a public offering of 6,000,000 common units representing limited partner interests, at a price of $50.22 per unit. The net proceeds at closing were $299 million. The net proceeds from the offering were used to repay the note assumed in the March transaction discussed above, as well as short-term borrowings incurred to fund Phillips 66 Partners’ acquisition of an additional interest in Explorer Pipeline Company and its contribution to the recently formed STACK pipeline joint venture.

On October 11, 2016, we contributed to Phillips 66 Partners certain crude oil, refined product and NGL pipeline and terminal assets supporting four of our refineries. The transaction closed on October 14, 2016, at which time Phillips 66 Partners paid Phillips 66 total consideration of approximately $1.3 billion, consisting of $1,109 million in cash and the issuance of common and general partner units to us with a fair value of $196 million. Phillips 66 Partners funded the cash portion of the transaction with proceeds from a public debt offering of unsecured senior notes of $1,125 million in the aggregate. See Note 9—Debt for additional information on the notes offering.

At September 30, 2016, we owned a 57 percent limited partner interest and a 2 percent general partner interest in Phillips 66 Partners, while the public owned a 41 percent limited partner interest. We consolidate Phillips 66 Partners because we control the partnership through our general partner interest (see Note 3—Variable Interest Entities, for additional information). The public’s ownership interest in Phillips 66 Partners is reflected as a noncontrolling interest in our

23


financial statements. The most significant assets of Phillips 66 Partners that are available to settle only its obligations at September 30, 2016, were equity investments of $1,103 million and net PP&E of $1,674 million.


Note 20—New Accounting Standards

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-15, “Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments,” which clarifies the treatment of several cash flow categories. In addition, ASU No. 2016-15 clarifies that when cash receipts and cash payments have aspects of more than one class of cash flows and cannot be separated, classification will depend on the predominant source or use. Public business entities should apply the guidance in ASU No. 2016-15 for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those annual periods, with early adoption permitted. We are currently evaluating the provisions of ASU No. 2016-15 and assessing the impact on our financial statements.

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-13, “Financial Instruments—Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments.” The new standard amends the impairment model to utilize an expected loss methodology in place of the currently used incurred loss methodology, which will result in the more timely recognition of losses. Public business entities should apply the guidance in ASU No. 2016-13 for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2019, including interim periods within those annual periods. Early adoption will be permitted for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018. We are currently evaluating the provisions of ASU No. 2016-13 and assessing the impact on our financial statements.

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-09, “Compensation-Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting,” which simplifies several aspects of the accounting for share-based payment award transactions including accounting for income taxes and classification of excess tax benefits on the statement of cash flows, forfeitures and minimum statutory tax withholding requirements. Public business entities should apply the guidance in ASU No. 2016-09 for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim periods within those annual periods. Early adoption is permitted. We are currently evaluating the provisions of ASU No. 2016-09 and assessing the impact on our financial statements.

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, “Leases (Topic 842).” In the new standard, the FASB modified its determination of whether a contract is a lease rather than whether a lease is a capital or operating lease under the previous accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (GAAP). A contract represents a lease if a transfer of control occurs over an identified property, plant and equipment for a period of time in exchange for consideration. Control over the use of the identified asset includes the right to obtain substantially all of the economic benefits from the use of the asset and the right to direct its use. The FASB continued to maintain two classifications of leases financing and operating which are substantially similar to capital and operating leases in the previous lease guidance. Under the new standard, recognition of assets and liabilities arising from operating leases will require recognition on the balance sheet. The effect of all leases in the statement of comprehensive income and the statement of cash flows will be largely unchanged. Lessor accounting will also be largely unchanged. Additional disclosures will be required for financing and operating leases for both lessors and lessees. Public business entities should apply the guidance in ASU No. 2016-02 for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those annual periods. Early adoption is permitted. We are currently evaluating the provisions of ASU No. 2016-02 and assessing its impact on our financial statements.

In January 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-01, “Financial Instruments-Overall (Subtopic 825-10): Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities,” to meet its objective of providing more decision-useful information about financial instruments. The majority of this ASU’s provisions amend only the presentation or disclosures of financial instruments; however, one provision will also affect net income. Equity investments carried under the cost method or lower of cost or fair value method of accounting, in accordance with current GAAP, will have to be carried at fair value upon adoption of ASU No. 2016-01, with changes in fair value recorded in net income. For equity investments that do not have readily determinable fair values, a company may elect to carry such investments at cost less impairments, if any, adjusted up or down for price changes in similar financial instruments issued by the investee, when and if observed. Public business entities should apply the guidance in ASU No. 2016-01 for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those annual periods, with early adoption prohibited. We are

24


currently evaluating the provisions of ASU No. 2016-01. Our initial review indicates that ASU No. 2016-01 will have a limited impact on our financial statements.

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606).” The new standard converged guidance on recognizing revenues in contracts with customers under GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards. This ASU is intended to improve comparability of revenue recognition practices across entities, industries, jurisdictions and capital markets. In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-14, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Deferral of the Effective Date.” The amendment in this ASU defers the effective date of ASU No. 2014-09 for all entities for one year. Public business entities should apply the guidance in ASU No. 2014-09 to annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim reporting periods within that reporting period. Earlier adoption is permitted only as of annual reporting periods beginning after December 31, 2016, including interim reporting periods within that reporting period. Retrospective or modified retrospective application of the accounting standard is required. We are currently evaluating the provisions of ASU No. 2014-09 and assessing the impact on our financial statements. As part of our assessment work to-date, we have formed an implementation work team, completed training on the new ASU’s revenue recognition model and are continuing our contract review and documentation.


Note 21—Condensed Consolidating Financial Information

$7.5 billion of our senior notes were issued by Phillips 66, and are guaranteed by Phillips 66 Company, a 100-percent-owned subsidiary. Phillips 66 Company has fully and unconditionally guaranteed the payment obligations of Phillips 66 with respect to these debt securities. The following condensed consolidating financial information presents the results of operations, financial position and cash flows for:

Phillips 66 and Phillips 66 Company (in each case, reflecting investments in subsidiaries utilizing the equity method of accounting).
All other nonguarantor subsidiaries.
The consolidating adjustments necessary to present Phillips 66’s results on a consolidated basis.

This condensed consolidating financial information should be read in conjunction with the accompanying consolidated financial statements and notes.

25


 
Millions of Dollars
 
Three Months Ended September 30, 2016
Statement of Income
Phillips 66

Phillips 66 Company

All Other Subsidiaries

Consolidating Adjustments

Total Consolidated

Revenues and Other Income
 
 
 
 
 
Sales and other operating revenues
$

15,264

6,360


21,624

Equity in earnings of affiliates
571

521

108

(809
)
391

Net gain (loss) on dispositions

(11
)
14


3

Other income

10

14


24

Intercompany revenues

173

2,685

(2,858
)

Total Revenues and Other Income
571

15,957

9,181

(3,667
)
22,042

 
 
 
 
 
 
Costs and Expenses
 
 
 
 
 
Purchased crude oil and products

12,377

6,388

(2,804
)
15,961

Operating expenses

864

206

(9
)
1,061

Selling, general and administrative expenses
1

314

99

(3
)
411

Depreciation and amortization

206

87


293

Impairments

1

1