10-K 1 ck0001528985-10k_20191231.htm 10-K ck0001528985-10k_20191231.htm

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 FOR THE TRANSITION PERIOD FROM          TO          

COMMISSION FILE NUMBER: 000-55146

 

Inland Real Estate Income Trust, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

Maryland

 

45-3079597

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

 

 

2901 Butterfield Road, Oak Brook, Illinois

 

60523

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

630-218-8000

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of each class

 

Trading

Symbol(s)

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

None

 

None

 

None

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

Common Stock, $0.001 par value per share

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

 

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer

 

Smaller reporting company

Emerging growth company

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes      No  

There is no established public market for the registrant’s shares of common stock. As of March 11, 2020, there were 36,024,249 shares of the registrant’s common stock outstanding.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

The registrant incorporates by reference portions of its Definitive Proxy Statement for the 2020 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, which is expected to be filed no later than 120 days after the end of the fiscal year, into Part III of this Form 10-K to the extent stated herein.

 

 

 

 


INLAND REAL ESTATE INCOME TRUST, INC.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

 

 

Page

 

 

Part I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

 

Business

 

1

Item 1A.

 

Risk Factors

 

5

Item 1B.

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

 

29

Item 2.

 

Properties

 

29

Item 3.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

32

Item 4.

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

 

32

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part II

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 5.

 

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

33

Item 6.

 

Selected Financial Data

 

38

Item 7.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

39

Item 7A.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

51

Item 8.

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

53

Item 9.

 

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

 

84

Item 9A.

 

Controls and Procedures

 

84

Item 9B.

 

Other Information

 

84

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part III

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 10.

 

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

 

85

Item 11.

 

Executive Compensation

 

85

Item 12.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

 

85

Item 13.

  

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

 

85

Item 14.

  

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

 

85

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Part IV

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 15.

  

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

 

86

Item 16.

  

Form 10-K Summary

 

86

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Signatures

 

90

 

 

 


PART I

Item 1.

Business

General

Inland Real Estate Income Trust, Inc. (which we refer to herein as the “Company”, “we”, “our” or “us”) was incorporated on August 24, 2011 to acquire and manage a portfolio of commercial real estate investments located in the United States. We have primarily focused on acquiring retail properties and intend to target a portfolio of 100% grocery-anchored properties as described below.  We have invested in joint ventures and may continue to invest in additional joint ventures or acquire other real estate assets such as office and medical office buildings, multi-family properties and industrial/distribution and warehouse facilities if our management believes the expected returns from those investments exceed that of retail properties. We also may invest in real estate-related equity securities of both publicly traded and private real estate companies, as well as commercial mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”). Our sponsor, Inland Real Estate Investment Corporation, referred to herein as our “Sponsor” or “IREIC,” is an indirect subsidiary of The Inland Group, LLC.  Various affiliates of our Sponsor provide services to us. We are externally managed and advised by IREIT Business Manager & Advisor, Inc., referred to herein as our “Business Manager,” an indirect wholly owned subsidiary of our Sponsor. Our Business Manager is responsible for overseeing and managing our day-to-day operations.  Our properties are managed by Inland Commercial Real Estate Services LLC, referred to herein as our “Real Estate Manager,” an indirect wholly owned subsidiary of our Sponsor.

We commenced an initial public “best efforts” offering (the “Offering”) on October 18, 2012, which concluded on October 16, 2015.  We sold 33,534,022 shares of common stock generating gross proceeds of $834.4 million from the Offering.  On March 3, 2020, our board of directors determined an estimated per share net asset value (the “Estimated Per Share NAV”) of our common stock as of December 31, 2019 of $18.15. The previously estimated per share net asset value of $20.12 as of December 31, 2018 was established on March 5, 2019.

On January 16, 2018, we effected a 1-for-2.5 reverse stock split of our issued and outstanding common stock whereby every 2.5 shares of our issued and outstanding common stock were converted into one share of our common stock (the “Reverse Stock Split”). In accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”), all share information presented has been retroactively adjusted to reflect the Reverse Stock Split.

At December 31, 2019, we owned 47 retail properties, totaling 6.8 million square feet. A majority of our properties are multi-tenant, necessity-based retail shopping centers primarily located in major regional markets and growing secondary markets throughout the United States. At December 31, 2019, 83% of our annualized base rental income was generated from grocery-anchored or grocery shadow-anchored shopping center. A grocery shadow-anchored shopping center is a shopping center near a grocery store that generates traffic for the shopping center but is not a part of the shopping center.  At December 31, 2019, our portfolio had weighted average physical and economic occupancy of 94.0% and 94.4%, respectively. As of December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017, annualized base rent (“ABR”) per square foot averaged $17.54, $17.30 and $17.16, respectively, for all properties owned. ABR is calculated by annualizing the monthly base rent for leases in-place as of the applicable date, including any tenant concessions, such as rent abatement or allowances, which may have been granted and excluding ground leases. ABR including ground leases averaged $15.08, $14.94 and $14.81 as of December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

On February 11, 2019, the Company’s board of directors approved a strategic plan (the “Strategic Plan”) with the goals of providing future liquidity to investors and creating long-term stockholder value. The Strategic Plan centers around owning a portfolio of 100% grocery-anchored properties with lower exposure to big box retailers. Consistent with the Strategic Plan, we sold 12 properties during the year ended December 31, 2019 for aggregate net proceeds of $14.9 million and sold three additional properties in January 2020 for aggregate net proceeds of approximately $37.2 million. We used the proceeds to pay down the revolving credit facility. We intend to draw on the revolving credit facility to redeploy the net proceeds from these sales to, among other things, purchase additional assets or redevelop select centers within the current portfolio in the future pursuant to our Strategic Plan. For discussions of these sales, see Note 5 – “Dispositions” and Note 18 – “Subsequent Events” included in our December 31, 2019 Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8.

Our management team and our board are considering the opportunistic sale of other assets with the goal of redeploying capital into the acquisition of strategically located grocery-anchored centers, as well as the redevelopment of select centers within the current portfolio. We plan to consider a liquidity event in approximately two years, market conditions permitting, most likely through a listing on a public securities exchange.

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In connection with the Strategic Plan, our share repurchase program was amended and restated, effective March 21, 2019, and the business management agreement with the Business Manager was amended and restated on February 11, 2019 to, among other things, eliminate all future acquisition and disposition fees. On March 3, 2020, our board adopted a third amended and restated share repurchase program, which will become effective on April 10, 2020, as further described below under “Share Repurchase Program. The Strategic Plan may evolve or change over time. For example, we may decide to focus more on redeveloping existing properties relative to investing in new grocery-anchored centers, depending on such factors, including, but not limited to, market prices for our properties, availability of capital for redevelopment and construction costs. There is no assurance we will be able to successfully implement the Strategic Plan, including listing our common stock.

We provide the following programs to facilitate additional investment in our shares and to provide limited liquidity for stockholders.

Distribution Reinvestment Plan

 

Through the distribution reinvestment plan (“DRP”), we provide stockholders with the option to purchase additional shares from us by automatically reinvesting distributions, subject to certain share ownership restrictions. We do not pay any selling commissions or a marketing contribution and due diligence expense allowance in connection with the DRP. The price per share for shares of common stock purchased under the DRP is equal to the Estimated Per Share NAV unless and until the shares become listed for trading. On March 11, 2019, we reported an estimated per share NAV of $20.12 and on March 3, 2020, we reported a new Estimated Per Share NAV of $18.15.  Beginning with the first quarter 2020 distributions payable in April, shares sold through the DRP will be issued at a price equal to $18.15 until we update the Estimated Per Share NAV in 2021.

Distributions reinvested through the DRP were $19.6 million, $19.3 million and $27.1 million for the years ended December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

Share Repurchase Program

We adopted a share repurchase program (as amended, “SRP”) effective October 18, 2012, under which we are authorized to purchase shares from stockholders who purchased their shares from us or received their shares through a non-cash transfer and who have held their shares for at least one year. Purchases are in our sole discretion. In the case of repurchases made upon the death of a stockholder or qualifying disability (“Exceptional Repurchases”), the one year holding period does not apply. The SRP was amended and restated effective January 1, 2018 to change the processing of repurchase requests from a monthly to a quarterly basis to align with the move to quarterly distributions. On February 11, 2019, our board adopted a second amended and restated SRP, which became effective on March 21, 2019. On March 3, 2020, our board adopted a third amended and restated SRP (the “Third A&R SRP”), which will become effective on April 10, 2020.

Under the Third A&R SRP, we are authorized to make ordinary repurchases and Exceptional Repurchases at a price equal to 80.0% of the “share price,” which is defined in the Third A&R SRP as an amount equal to the lesser of: (A) $25, as adjusted under certain circumstances, including, among other things, if the applicable shares were purchased from the Company at a discounted price; or (B) the most recently disclosed estimated value per share. Prior to the amendment, we were authorized to make Exceptional Repurchases at a price equal to 100% of the “share price.” Beginning with repurchases in April 2020, the “share price” will be equal to $18.15 per share until we announce a new Estimated Per Share NAV. Accordingly, ordinary repurchases and Exceptional Repurchases will be at $14.52 per share.

The Third A&R SRP provides our board of directors with the discretion to reduce the funding limit for share repurchases.  The Third A&R SRP limits the dollar amount for any repurchases made by us each calendar quarter to an amount equal to a percentage determined in the sole discretion of our board on a quarterly basis that will not be less than 50% of the net proceeds from the DRP during the applicable quarter.  For the quarter ended December 31, 2019, our board limited funding for repurchases to 50% of the net proceeds from the DRP. We continue to limit the number of shares repurchased during any calendar year to 5% of the number of shares outstanding on December 31st of the previous calendar year, as adjusted for any stock splits or other combinations.

If either or both of the repurchase limitations prevent us from repurchasing all of the shares offered for repurchase during a calendar quarter, we will repurchase shares, on a pro rata basis within each category below, in accordance with the repurchase limitations in the following order: (a) first, all Exceptional Repurchases and (b) second, all ordinary repurchases. For any quarter ended, unfulfilled repurchase requests will be included in the list of requests for the following quarter unless the request is withdrawn in accordance with the SRP. However, each stockholder who has submitted a repurchase request must submit an acknowledgment annually after we publish a new estimated value per share acknowledging, among other things, that the stockholder wishes to maintain the request. If we do not receive the acknowledgment prior to the repurchase date, we will deem the request to have been withdrawn.

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The SRP will immediately terminate if our shares are listed on any national securities exchange. In addition, our board of directors, in its sole discretion, may, at any time, amend, suspend or terminate the SRP. In the event that we amend, suspend or terminate the SRP, however, we will send stockholders notice of the change at least thirty days prior to the change, and we will disclose the change in a report filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) on either Form 8-K, Form 10-Q or Form 10-K, as appropriate. Further, our board reserves the right in its sole discretion, at any time, and from time to time to reject any requests for repurchases.

Repurchases through the SRP were $9.4 million, $22.5 million and $21.1 million for the years ended December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively. At December 31, 2019 and 2018, our liability related to the SRP was $2.3 million and $5.5 million, respectively, recorded in other liabilities on our consolidated balance sheets.

Segment Data

We currently view our real estate portfolio as one reportable segment in accordance with U.S. GAAP.  Accordingly, we did not report any other segment disclosure for the years ended December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017.  For information related to our business segment, reference is made to Note 13 – “Segment Reporting” which is included in our December 31, 2019 Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8.

Tax Status

We elected to be taxed as a real estate investment trust for U.S. federal income tax purposes (“REIT”) under Sections 856 through 860 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (“Internal Revenue Code”), commencing with the tax year ended December 31, 2013. Commencing with such taxable year, we were organized and began operating in such a manner as to qualify for taxation as a REIT under the Internal Revenue Code and believe we have so qualified. As a result, we generally will not be subject to federal income tax on taxable income that is distributed to stockholders. A REIT is subject to a number of organizational and operational requirements, including a requirement that it currently distributes at least 90% of its REIT taxable income (subject to certain adjustments and excluding any net capital gain) to its stockholders. We will monitor the business and transactions that may potentially impact our REIT status. If we fail to qualify as a REIT in any taxable year, without the benefit of certain statutory relief provisions, we will be subject to federal and state income tax on our taxable income as a “C corporation.” Even if we qualify for taxation as a REIT, we may be subject to certain state and local taxes on our income, property or net worth and federal income and excise taxes. The earnings of any taxable REIT subsidiaries generally will be subject to U.S. federal corporate income tax applicable to “C corporations.”

Competition

The commercial real estate market is highly competitive. We compete in all of our markets with other owners and operators of commercial properties. We compete based on a number of factors that include location, rental rates, security, suitability of the property’s design to tenants’ needs and the manner in which the property is operated and marketed. The number of competing properties in a particular market could have a material effect on a property’s occupancy levels, rental rates and operating expenses.

We are subject to significant competition in seeking real estate investments and tenants. We compete with many third parties engaged in real estate investment activities including other REITs, specialty finance companies, savings and loan associations, banks, mortgage bankers, insurance companies, mutual funds, institutional investors, investment banking firms, lenders, hedge funds, governmental bodies and other entities. Some of these competitors, including larger REITs, have substantially greater financial resources than we do and generally enjoy significant competitive advantages that result from, among other things, a lower cost of capital and enhanced operating efficiencies.

Employees

We do not have any employees. In addition, all of our executive officers are officers of IREIC or one or more of its affiliates and are compensated by those entities, in part, for their services rendered to us. We neither separately compensate our executive officers for their service as officers, nor do we reimburse either our Business Manager or Real Estate Manager for any compensation paid to individuals who also serve as our executive officers, or the executive officers of our Business Manager or its affiliates or our Real Estate Manager; provided that, for these purposes, the corporate secretaries of our Company and our Business Manager are not considered “executive officers.”

3


Conflicts of Interest

Certain persons performing services for our Business Manager and Real Estate Manager are employees of IREIC or its affiliates, and may also perform services for its affiliates and other IREIC-sponsored entities. These individuals face competing demands for their time and services and may have conflicts in allocating their time between our business and assets and the business and assets of these other entities. IREIC also may face a conflict of interest in allocating personnel and resources among these entities. In addition, conflicts exist to the extent that we acquire properties in the same geographic areas where properties owned by other IREIC-sponsored programs are located. In these cases, a conflict may arise in the acquisition or leasing of properties if we and another IREIC-sponsored program are competing for the same properties or tenants in negotiating leases, or a conflict may arise in connection with the resale of properties if we and another IREIC-sponsored program are selling similar properties at the same time.

Our charter contains provisions setting forth our ability to engage in certain related party transactions. Our board of directors reviews all of these transactions and, as a general rule, any related party transactions must be approved by a majority of the directors, including a majority of the independent directors, not otherwise interested in the transaction. Further, we may not engage in certain transactions with entities sponsored by, or affiliated with, IREIC unless a majority of our board of directors, including a majority of our independent directors, finds the transaction to be fair and reasonable and on terms no less favorable to us than those from an unaffiliated party under the same circumstances. Our board has adopted a conflicts of interest policy prohibiting us from engaging in the following types of transactions with IREIC-affiliated entities:

 

purchasing real estate assets from, or selling real estate assets to, any IREIC-affiliated entities (excluding circumstances where an entity affiliated with IREIC, such as Inland Real Estate Acquisitions, LLC (“IREA”), from time to time may enter into a purchase agreement to acquire a property and then assign the purchase agreement to us);

 

making loans to, or borrowing money from, any IREIC-affiliated entities (this excludes expense advancements under existing agreements and the deposit of monies in any banking institution affiliated with IREIC); and

 

investing in joint ventures with any IREIC-affiliated entities.

This policy does not impact agreements or relationships between us and IREIC and its affiliates, including, for example, agreements with our Business Manager or Real Estate Manager that relate to the day-to-day management of our business.

Environmental Matters

As an owner of real estate, we are subject to various environmental laws, rules and regulations adopted by various governmental bodies or agencies. Compliance with these laws, rules and regulations has not had a material adverse effect on our business, assets, or results of operations, financial condition and ability to pay distributions. We do not believe that our existing portfolio as of December 31, 2019 will require us to incur material expenditures to comply with these laws and regulations.

Access to Company Information

We electronically file our Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and all amendments to those reports with the SEC. The public may read and copy any of the reports that are filed with the SEC at the SEC’s Internet address located at www.sec.gov. The website contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding issuers that file electronically.

We make available, free of charge, on our website, inland-investments.com/inland-income-trust, or by responding to requests addressed to our investor services group, the Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and all amendments to those reports. These reports are available as soon as reasonably practicable after such material is electronically filed or furnished to the SEC. We routinely post important information about us and our business, including financial and other information for investors, on our website. We encourage investors to visit our website from time to time, as information is updated and new information is posted.

Certifications

We have filed with the SEC the certifications required pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, which are attached as Exhibits 31.1 and 31.2 to this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

 

4


Item 1A.

Risk Factors

The factors described below represent our principal risks. Other factors may exist that we do not consider significant based on information that is currently available or that we are not currently able to anticipate. The occurrence of any of the risks discussed below could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and ability to pay distributions to our stockholders.

Risks Related to Our Business

We have incurred net losses on a basis in accordance with U.S. GAAP for the years ended December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017 and may incur such net losses in the future, which could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition, operations, cash flow, and our ability to service our indebtedness and pay distributions to our stockholders.

We have incurred net losses on a U.S. GAAP basis for the years ended December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017 of $11.4 million, $23.3 million and $19.1 million, respectively.  Our losses can be attributed, in part, to non-cash expenses, such as depreciation and amortization, acquisition related expenses and impairment charges. We may incur net losses in the future, which could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition, operations, cash flow, and our ability to service our indebtedness and pay distributions to our stockholders. We are subject to all of the business risks and uncertainties associated with any business. We cannot assure our stockholders that, in the future, we will be profitable or that we will realize growth in the value of our assets.

The amount and timing of distributions, if any, may vary.  We have paid and may continue to pay distributions from sources other than cash flow from operations, including the proceeds of our DRP.

There are many factors that can affect the availability and timing of distributions paid to our stockholders. We may not generate sufficient cash flow from operations to fund any distributions to our stockholders. The actual amount and timing of distributions, if any, is determined by our board of directors in its discretion, based on its analysis of our actual and expected cash flow, capital expenditures and investments, as well as general financial conditions. Actual cash available for distribution may vary substantially from estimates made by our board. The sale of assets and delayed reinvestment or reinvestment at lower yields will negatively impact the amount available to pay distributions. In addition, to the extent we invest in development or redevelopment projects that do not immediately generate cash flow, or in real estate assets that have significant capital requirements, our ability to make distributions will be negatively impacted. Our board will continue to review our distribution policy as our Strategic Plan evolves. There is no assurance we will continue to pay distributions at the existing amount.

Historically, we have not consistently generated sufficient cash flow from operations to fund distribution payments. Our organizational documents permit us to pay distributions from sources other than cash flow from operations. Specifically, some or all of our distributions may be paid from retained cash flow (if any), borrowings, cash flow from investing activities, the net proceeds from the sale of our assets, or from the proceeds of our DRP. Accordingly, if we cannot generate sufficient cash flow from operations to fully fund distributions, some or all of our distributions may be paid from the other sources described above. We have not established any limit on the extent to which we may use such alternate sources.

Funding distributions from the proceeds of our DRP, borrowings or asset sales will result in us having fewer funds available to acquire properties or other real estate-related investments. Likewise, funding distributions from the sale of additional securities, including shares issued under the DRP, will dilute our stockholders interest in us on a percentage basis and may impact the value of the investment, especially if we sell these securities at prices less than the price our stockholders paid for their shares. As a result, the return our stockholders realize on their investment may be reduced. Doing so may also negatively impact our ability to generate cash flows. A decrease in the level of stockholder participation in the DRP could have an adverse impact on our ability to fund distributions and other operating and capital needs. There is no assurance we will continue to generate sufficient cash flow from operations to cover distributions. If these sources are not available or are not adequate, our board may have to consider reducing or eliminating distributions.

There is no established public trading market for our shares, and our stockholders may not be able to sell their shares under our SRP and, if our stockholders are able to sell their shares under the SRP, or otherwise, they may not be able to recover the amount of their investment in our shares.

There is no established public trading market for our shares and no assurance that one may develop. This may inhibit the transferability of our shares.  Our charter does not require our directors to seek stockholder approval to liquidate our assets by a specified date, nor does our charter require our directors to list our shares for trading by a specified date.  There is no assurance the board will pursue a listing or other liquidity event at any time in the future.  In addition, even if our board decides to seek a listing of our shares of common stock, there is no assurance that we will satisfy the listing requirements or that our shares will be approved for listing. Even if our shares of common stock are approved for listing, we can provide no assurance regarding the price at which our shares may trade.  Thus, holders of our common stock should be prepared to hold their shares for an unlimited period of time. Our

5


charter also prohibits the ownership of more than 9.8% in value of the aggregate of the outstanding shares of our stock or more than 9.8% (in value or number whichever is more restrictive) of the aggregate of the outstanding shares of our common stock by any single investor unless exempted by our board.  

Moreover, our SRP contains numerous restrictions that limit our stockholders' ability to sell their shares, including those relating to the number of shares of our common stock that we can repurchase at any time and the type and amount of funds we may use to repurchase shares pursuant to the program. For example, for each of the quarters in 2019, pursuant to our board’s discretion to reduce the funding limit under our SRP, our board limited funding for repurchases to 50% of the net proceeds from the DRP, and our board may continue to limit the amount of repurchases under the SRP. Because of the funding limit, we have not been able to satisfy all properly submitted repurchase requests and have been satisfying requests for ordinary repurchases on a pro rata basis and will continue to be unable to satisfy all repurchase requests. Also, under the SRP, we are only authorized to purchase shares from stockholders who purchased their shares from us or received their shares through a non-cash transfer and who have held their shares for at least one year. Purchases are in our sole discretion.

Our board of directors, in its sole discretion, may amend, suspend (in whole or in part), or terminate our SRP. The SRP will immediately terminate if our shares become listed for trading on a national securities exchange. Further, our board reserves the right in its sole discretion to change the repurchase prices or reject any requests for repurchases. Any amendments to, or suspension or termination of, the SRP may restrict or eliminate our stockholders’ ability to have us repurchase their shares and otherwise prevent our stockholders from liquidating their investment. Therefore, our stockholders may not have the opportunity to make a repurchase request prior to a potential termination of the SRP and our stockholders may not be able to sell any of their shares of common stock back to us. As a result of these restrictions and circumstances, the ability of our stockholders to sell their shares should they require liquidity is significantly restricted. Moreover, under the SRP, any shares accepted for “ordinary repurchases” or “exceptional repurchases” are repurchased at a discount to the then-current estimated per share NAV. Therefore, even if our stockholders are able to sell their shares of common stock back to us pursuant to the SRP, they may be forced to do so at a discount to the purchase price such stockholders paid for their shares.

The Estimated Per Share NAV of our common stock is based on a number of assumptions and estimates that may not be accurate or complete and is also subject to a number of limitations.

On March 3, 2020, we announced an Estimated Per Share NAV of our common stock as of December 31, 2019 equal to $18.15 per share. To assist our board of directors in establishing the Estimated Per Share NAV, we engaged a third party specializing in providing real estate financial services. As with any methodology used to estimate value, the methodology employed by this third party was based upon a number of estimates and assumptions that may not have been accurate or complete. Further, different parties using different assumptions and estimates could have derived a different estimated per share net asset value, which could be significantly different from our Estimated Per Share NAV. The Estimated Per Share NAV will fluctuate over time and does not represent: (i) the price at which our shares would trade on a national securities exchange, (ii) the amount per share a stockholder would obtain if he, she or it tried to sell his, her or its shares, (iii) the amount per share stockholders would receive if we liquidated our assets and distributed the proceeds after paying all our expenses and liabilities or (iv) the price a third party would pay to acquire our Company.

There is also no assurance that the methodology used to estimate our value per share will be acceptable to broker dealers for customer account purposes or to the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (“FINRA”) or that the estimated value per share will satisfy the applicable annual valuation requirements under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended (“ERISA”), and the Internal Revenue Code with respect to employee benefit plans subject to ERISA and other retirement plans or accounts subject to Section 4975 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

Our charter authorizes us to issue additional shares of stock, which may reduce the percentage of our common stock owned by our other stockholders, subordinate stockholders’ rights or discourage a third party from acquiring us.

Existing stockholders do not have preemptive rights to purchase any shares issued by us in the future. Our charter authorizes us to issue up to 1,500,000,000 shares of capital stock, of which 1,460,000,000 shares are classified as common stock and 40,000,000 shares are classified as preferred stock.  We may, in the sole discretion of our board and without approval of our common stockholders:

 

sell additional shares in any future offerings, including as awards under our Employee and Director Restricted Share Plan and pursuant to the DRP;

 

issue equity interests in a private offering of securities;

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classify or reclassify any unissued shares of common or preferred stock by setting or changing the preferences, conversion or other rights, voting powers, restrictions, limitations as to dividends or other distributions, qualifications, or terms or conditions of redemption of the stock;

 

amend our charter from time to time to increase or decrease the aggregate number of shares or the number of shares of any class or series that we have authority to issue; or

 

issue shares of our capital stock in exchange for properties.

Future issuances of common stock will reduce the percentage of our outstanding shares owned by our other stockholders.  Further, our board of directors could authorize the issuance of stock with terms and conditions that could subordinate the rights of the holders of our current common stock, adversely affect the Estimated Per Share NAV or have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a change in control of us, including an extraordinary transaction (such as a merger, tender offer or sale of all or substantially all of our assets) that might provide a premium price for our stockholders.

Market disruptions may adversely impact many aspects of our operating results and operating condition.

The availability of debt financing secured by commercial real estate is subject to underwriting standards that can be tightened in response to adverse changes in real estate or credit market conditions.  Further, interest rates may increase in response to changing economic conditions, which may negatively affect U.S. economic conditions as a whole, or real estate industry conditions such as:  

 

the number of bankruptcies or insolvency proceedings of our tenants and lease guarantors, which could increase and delay our efforts to collect rent and any past balances due under the relevant leases and ultimately could preclude collection of these sums;

 

our ability to borrow on terms and conditions that we find acceptable, which may be limited and could result in our investment operations (real estate assets) generating lower overall economic returns and a reduced level of cash flow from what was anticipated at the time we acquired the asset, and could potentially impact our ability to make distributions to our stockholders, or pursue acquisition opportunities, among other things, and increase our interest expense;

 

the amount of capital that is available to finance real estate, which could be reduced, and, in turn, could lead to a decline in real estate values generally, slow real estate transaction activity, and reduce the loan-to-value ratio upon which lenders are willing to lend;

 

the value of certain of our real estate assets, which may decrease below the amounts we pay for them and limit our ability to dispose them at attractive prices or to obtain debt financing secured by these assets and could reduce the availability of unsecured loans;

 

the value and liquidity of short-term investments, if any, could be reduced as a result of the dislocation of the markets for our short-term investments and increased volatility in market rates for these investments or other factors; and

 

defaults or bankruptcies by counterparties to derivative financial instruments could occur, increasing the risk that we may not realize the benefits of these instruments that we have entered into or may enter into.

For these and other reasons, we cannot assure our stockholders that we will be profitable or that we will realize growth in the value of our investments.

Our board of directors may change our investment policies without stockholder approval, which could alter the nature of our stockholders’ investment.

Our charter requires our independent directors to review our investment policies at least annually to determine that the policies we are following are in the best interest of our stockholders. These policies may change over time. The methods of implementing our investment policies may also vary, as new investment techniques are developed.  Our investment policies, including the Strategic Plan, the methods for implementing them, and our other objectives, policies and procedures may be altered by a majority of the directors (which must include a majority of the independent directors), without the approval of our stockholders.  As a result, the nature of our stockholders’ investment could change without their consent.  A change in our investment strategy may, among other things, increase our exposure to interest rate risk, default risk and commercial real property market fluctuations, all of which could materially adversely affect our ability to achieve our investment objectives.

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We may not be able to successfully implement the Strategic Plan adopted by our board of directors on February 11, 2019.

As part of the Strategic Plan, we sold 12 properties during the year ended December 31, 2019 and three additional properties in January 2020. There is no assurance that we will be able to redeploy the proceeds from the properties sold to acquire suitable investments on financially attractive terms, if at all, or that we will be able to sell any additional assets at acceptable prices. We also expect to evaluate the redevelopment of certain of our assets as part of the Strategic Plan. As described herein, redeveloping assets presents additional uncertainties including, among other things, the cost to redevelop and the amount and timing of returns generated by redevelopment.  There can be no assurance that we will be able to successfully implement the Strategic Plan or that the execution of the Strategic Plan will positively impact the value of our common stock.

Development or redevelopments may expose us to additional risks.

As part of our Strategic Plan, we plan to further analyze and potentially pursue redevelopment of certain assets. Development and redevelopment activities are subject to a number of risks, including, but not limited to:

 

ceasing development or redevelopment activities after expending resources to determine the feasibility of the project or projects;

 

construction delays or cost overruns that increase project costs;

 

the failure to meet anticipated occupancy or rent levels within the projected time frame, if at all;

 

exposure to fluctuations in the general economy due to the significant time lag between commencing and completing the project;

 

inability to achieve necessary zoning or other governmental permits; and

 

difficulty or inability to obtain any required consents of third parties, such as tenants and, mortgage lenders.

Further, during the period of time we are developing or redeveloping an asset or assets, our rental income from such properties may be reduced. Delays in completing development may also impact leases with existing tenants or our ability to secure new tenants. Occurrence of any of these events would likely have a material adverse effect on the estimated value of our common stock, our cash flow from operations, ability to pay distributions and ability to pursue a liquidity event for our stockholders. In addition, development costs for a project may increase, which may result in reduced returns, or even losses. In deciding whether to develop or redevelop a particular property, we make certain assumptions regarding the expected future performance of that property. If the property does not perform as expected, our financial performance may be materially and adversely affected, or an impairment charge could occur.

Competition with other non-traditional grocery retailers may reduce our profitability.

Tenants in the grocery industry will face potentially changing consumer preferences and increasing competition from other forms of retailing, such as online grocery retailers and non-traditional grocery retailers such as prepared meal and fresh food delivery services, mass merchandisers, super-centers, warehouse club stores and drug stores. Other retail centers within the market area of our properties and meal and food delivery services both inside and outside these market areas will compete with our properties for customers, affecting our tenants’ cash flows and thus affecting their ability to pay rent.

 

Actions of our joint venture partners could negatively impact our performance.

We have entered into, may continue to enter into, joint ventures with third parties. Our organizational documents do not limit the amount of funds that we may invest in these joint ventures.  We intend to develop and acquire properties through joint ventures with other persons or entities when warranted by the circumstances. The venture partners may share certain approval rights over major decisions and these investments may involve risks not otherwise present with other methods of investment in real estate, including, but not limited to:

 

economic conditions make it more likely that our partner in an investment may become bankrupt, which would mean that we and any other remaining partner would generally remain liable for the entity’s liabilities;

 

that our partner may at any time have economic or business interests or goals which are or which become inconsistent with our business interests or goals, and we may not agree on all proposed actions to certain aspects of the venture;

 

that our partner may be in a position to take action contrary to our instructions or requests or contrary to our policies or objectives, including our objective to qualify as a REIT;

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that, if our partners fail to fund their share of any required capital contributions, we may be required to contribute that capital;

 

that venture agreements often restrict the transfer of a partner’s interest or may otherwise restrict our ability to sell the interest when we desire or on advantageous terms;

 

that our relationships with our partners are contractual in nature and may be terminated or dissolved under the terms of the agreements and, in each event, we may not continue to own or operate the interests or assets underlying the relationship or may need to purchase these interests or assets at an above-market price to continue ownership;

 

that disputes between us and our partners may result in litigation or arbitration that would increase our expenses and prevent our officers and directors from focusing their time and effort on our business; and

 

that we may in certain circumstances be liable for our partner’s actions.

The failure of any bank in which we deposit our funds could reduce the amount of cash we have available to fund our capital and operating needs and distributions.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, or “FDIC,” generally only insures limited amounts per depositor per insured bank.  The FDIC insures up to $250,000 per depositor per insured bank account.  At December 31, 2019, we had cash and cash equivalents exceeding these federally insured levels.  If any of the banking institutions in which we have deposited funds ultimately fail, we may lose our deposits over the federally insured levels.  The loss of our deposits would reduce the amount of cash we have available to fund our capital and operating needs and distributions.

We rely on IREIC and its affiliates and subsidiaries to manage and conduct our operations. Any material adverse change in IREIC’s financial condition or our relationship with IREIC could have a material adverse effect on our business and ability to achieve our investment objectives.

We depend on IREIC and its affiliates and subsidiaries to manage and conduct our operations. IREIC, through one or more of its subsidiaries, owns and controls our Business Manager and Real Estate Manager.  IREIC has sponsored numerous public and private programs and through its affiliates or subsidiaries has provided offering, asset, property and other management and ancillary services to these entities. From time to time, IREIC or the applicable affiliate or subsidiary has waived or deferred fees or made capital contributions to support these public or private programs. IREIC or its applicable affiliates or subsidiaries may waive or defer fees or make capital contributions in the future. Further, IREIC and its affiliates or subsidiaries may from time to time be parties to litigation or other claims arising from sponsoring these entities or providing these services. As such, IREIC and these other entities may incur costs, liabilities or other expenses arising from litigation or claims that are either not reimbursable or not covered by insurance. Future waivers or deferrals of fees, additional capital contributions or costs, liabilities or other expenses arising from litigation or claims could have a material adverse effect on IREIC’s financial condition and ability to fund our Business Manager or Real Estate Manager to the extent necessary.

If our Business Manager or Real Estate Manager lose or are unable to obtain key personnel, our ability to implement our investment strategies could be hindered.

Our success depends to a significant degree upon the contributions of certain of our executive officers and other key personnel of our Business Manager and Real Estate Manager.  Neither we nor our Business Manager or Real Estate Manager has employment agreements with these persons, and we cannot guarantee that all, or any particular one, will continue to be available to provide services to us. If any of the key personnel of our Business Manager or Real Estate Manager were to cease their employment or other relationship with our Business Manager or Real Estate Manager, respectively, our results and ability to pursue our business plan could suffer.  Further, we do not intend to separately maintain “key person” life insurance that would provide us with proceeds in the event of death or disability of these persons. We believe our future success depends, in part, upon the ability of our Business Manager and Real Estate Manager to hire and retain highly skilled managerial, operational and marketing personnel. Competition for such personnel is intense, and we cannot assure our stockholders that our Business Manager or Real Estate Manager will be successful in attracting and retaining skilled personnel. If our Business Manager or Real Estate Manager lose or are unable to obtain the services of key personnel, our ability to implement our investment strategies could be delayed or hindered, and the value of our stockholders’ investment could decline.

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If we become self-managed by internalizing our management functions, we may be unable to retain key personnel, and our ability to achieve our investment objectives could be delayed or hindered, which could adversely affect our ability to pay distributions to our stockholders and the value of their investments.

At some point in the future, we may consider becoming self-managed by internalizing the functions performed for us by our Business Manager. Even if we become self-managed, we may not be able to hire certain key employees of the Business Manager and its affiliates, even if we are allowed to offer them positions with our Company. Although we are generally restricted from soliciting these persons pursuant to certain provisions set forth in the business management agreement, during the one-year period after the Business Manager’s receipt of an internalization notice the Business Manager will permit us to solicit for hire the “key” employees of the Business Manager and its affiliates, including all of the persons serving as the executive officers of our Company or the Business Manager who do not also serve as directors or officers of any other IREIC-sponsored REITs. However, at any given moment, many or all of the executive officers of the Company and the Business Manager may also be serving as a director or officer of one or more other IREIC-sponsored REITs. Failure to hire or retain key personnel could result in increased costs and deficiencies in our disclosure controls and procedures or our internal control over financial reporting. These deficiencies could cause us to incur additional costs and divert management’s attention from most effectively managing our investments, which could result in us being sued and incurring litigation-associated costs in connection with the internalization transaction.

If we seek to internalize our management functions other than as provided for under our business management agreement, we could incur greater costs and lose key personnel.

Our board may decide that we should pursue an internalization by hiring our own group of executives and other employees or entering into an agreement with a third party, such as a merger, instead of by transitioning the services performed by, and hiring the persons providing services for, our Business Manager. The costs that we would incur in this case are uncertain and may be substantial and we would lose the benefit of the experience of our Business Manager.

Further, if we seek to internalize the functions performed for us by our Real Estate Manager, the purchase price will be separately negotiated by our independent directors, or a committee thereof, and will not be subject to the transition procedures described in our business management agreement.

Our stockholders’ return on investment in our common stock may be reduced if we are required to register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act.

The Company is not registered, and does not intend to register itself or any of its subsidiaries, as an investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “Investment Company Act”).  If we become obligated to register the Company or any of its subsidiaries as an investment company, the registered entity would have to comply with regulation under the Investment Company Act with respect to capital structure (including the registered entity’s ability to use leverage), management, operations, transactions with affiliated persons (as defined in the Investment Company Act) and portfolio composition, including disclosure requirements and restrictions with respect to diversification and industry concentration, and other matters.  Compliance with the Investment Company Act would limit our ability to make certain investments and require us to significantly restructure our operations and business plan.  The costs we would incur and the limitations that would be imposed on us as a result of such compliance and restructuring would negatively affect the value of our common stock, our ability to make distributions and the sustainability of our business and investment strategies.

We intend to conduct our operations, directly and through wholly or majority-owned subsidiaries, so that neither we nor our subsidiaries are registered or will be required to register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act.  Section 3(a)(1) of the Investment Company Act, in relevant part, defines an investment company as (i) any issuer that is, or holds itself out as being, engaged primarily in the business of investing, reinvesting or trading in securities, or (ii) any issuer that is engaged, or proposes to engage, in the business of investing, reinvesting, owning, holding or trading in securities and owns, or proposes to acquire, “investment securities” having a value exceeding 40% of the value of its total assets (exclusive of government securities and cash items) on an unconsolidated basis, which we refer to as the “40% test.”  The term “investment securities” generally includes all securities except government securities and securities of majority-owned subsidiaries that are not themselves investment companies and are not relying on the exemption from the definition of investment company under Section 3(c)(1) or Section 3(c)(7) of the Investment Company Act.  We believe we are not considered an investment company under Section 3(a)(1)(A) of the Investment Company Act because we do not engage primarily or hold ourselves out as being engaged primarily in the business of investing, reinvesting or trading in securities.  Rather, we and our subsidiaries are primarily engaged in the business of investing in real property.  We also conduct our operations and the operations of our subsidiaries in a manner designed so that we do not come within the definition of an investment company under Section 3(a)(1)(C) because less than 40% of the value of our adjusted total assets on an unconsolidated basis consist of “investment securities.”  This requirement limits the types of businesses in which we may engage through our subsidiaries.  Furthermore, the assets we and our subsidiaries may originate or acquire are limited by the provisions of the Investment Company Act and the rules and regulations promulgated under the Investment Company Act, which may adversely affect our business.  

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If we or any of our wholly or majority-owned subsidiaries would ever inadvertently fall within one of the definitions of “investment company,” we intend to rely on the exemption from registration as an investment company pursuant to Section 3(c)(5)(C) of the Investment Company Act, which is available for entities “primarily engaged” in the business of “purchasing or otherwise acquiring mortgages and other liens on and interests in real estate.”  As reflected in no-action letters, the SEC staff's position on Section 3(c)(5)(C) generally requires that at least 55% of an entity’s assets comprise qualifying real estate assets and that at least 80% of its assets must comprise qualifying real estate assets and real estate-related assets under the Investment Company Act.  Specifically, we expect any of our subsidiaries relying on Section 3(c)(5)(C) to invest at least 55% of its assets in mortgage loans, certain mezzanine loans and other interests in real estate that constitute qualifying real estate assets in accordance with SEC staff guidance, and an additional 25% of its assets in other types of mortgages, securities of REITs and other real estate-related assets such as debt and equity securities of companies primarily engaged in real estate businesses and securities issued by pass-through entities of which substantially all of the assets consist of qualifying real estate assets and/or real estate-related assets.  The remaining 20% of the entity’s assets can consist of miscellaneous assets.  These criteria may limit what we buy, sell and hold.

We will classify our assets for purposes of Section 3(c)(5)(C) based in large measure upon no-action letters issued by the SEC staff and other interpretive guidance provided by the SEC and its staff or on our analysis of such guidance published with respect to other types of assets to determine which assets are qualifying real estate assets and real estate-related assets.  However, the SEC’s guidance was issued in accordance with factual situations that may be substantially different from the factual situations we may encounter.  No assurance can be given that the SEC will concur with how we classify our assets or the assets of our subsidiaries.  The SEC may in the future take a view different than or contrary to our analysis with respect to the types of assets we have determined to be qualifying real estate assets or real estate-related assets.  For example, on August 31, 2011 the SEC issued a concept release and request for comments regarding the Section 3(c)(5)(C) exemption (Release No. IC-29778) in which it contemplated the possibility of issuing new rules or providing new interpretations of the exemption that might, among other things, define the phrase “liens on and other interests in real estate” or consider sources of income in determining a company’s “primary business.”  To the extent that the SEC or its staff provides more specific or different guidance, we may be required to adjust our strategy accordingly. Any additional guidance from the SEC or its staff could provide additional flexibility to us, or it could further inhibit our ability to pursue the strategies we have chosen.  If we are required to re-classify our assets, we may no longer be in compliance with the exclusion from the definition of an “investment company” provided by Section 3(c)(5)(C) of the Investment Company Act.  There can be no assurance that the laws and regulations governing the Investment Company Act status of REITs, including the SEC or its staff providing more specific or different guidance regarding these exemptions, will not change in a manner that adversely affects our operations.

Certain of our subsidiaries may rely on the exemption provided by Section 3(c)(6) to the extent that they hold mortgage assets through majority-owned subsidiaries that rely on the exemption provided by Section 3(c)(5)(C).  The SEC staff has issued little interpretive guidance with respect to Section 3(c)(6) and any guidance published by the staff could require us to adjust our strategy accordingly.

A change in the value of any of our assets could cause us to fall within the definition of “investment company” and negatively affect our ability to be free from registration and regulation under the Investment Company Act.   To avoid being required to register the Company or any of its subsidiaries as an investment company under the Investment Company Act, we may be unable to sell assets we would otherwise want to sell and may need to sell assets we would otherwise wish to retain.  Sales may be required during adverse market conditions, and we could be forced to accept a price below that which we would otherwise consider appropriate.  In addition, we may have to acquire additional income- or loss-generating assets that we might not otherwise have acquired or may have to forgo opportunities to acquire interests in companies that we would otherwise want to acquire and would be important to our investment strategy.  Furthermore, if the value of securities issued by our subsidiaries that are exempted from the definition of “investment company” by Sections 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of the Investment Company Act, together with any other investment securities we own, exceeds 40% of our adjusted total assets on an unconsolidated basis, or if one or more of such subsidiaries fail to maintain an exemption from registration under the Investment Company Act, we could, among other things, be required to substantially change the manner in which we conduct our operations to avoid being required to register as an investment company, effect sales of our assets in a manner that, or at a time when, we would not otherwise choose to do so or register as an investment company.  Any of these activities could negatively affect the value of our common stock, our ability to make distributions and the sustainability of our business and investment strategies, which may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

If we were required to register the Company or any of its subsidiaries as an investment company but failed to do so, we or the applicable subsidiary would be prohibited from engaging in our or its business, and criminal and civil actions could be brought against us or the applicable subsidiary. In addition, our contracts would be unenforceable unless a court required enforcement, and a court could appoint a receiver to take control of us and liquidate our business.

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The occurrence of cyber incidents, or a deficiency in our cybersecurity, could negatively impact our business by causing a disruption to our operations, a compromise or corruption of our confidential information, and/or damage to our business relationships, all of which could negatively impact our financial results.

A cyber incident is considered to be any adverse event that threatens the confidentiality, integrity, or availability of our information resources. More specifically, a cyber incident is an intentional attack or an unintentional event that can include gaining unauthorized access to systems to disrupt operations, corrupt data, or steal confidential information. As our reliance on technology has increased, so have the risks posed to our systems, both internal and those we have outsourced. Our three primary risks that could directly result from the occurrence of a cyber incident include operational interruption, damage to our relationship with our tenants, and private data exposure. We have implemented processes, procedures and controls to help mitigate these risks, but these measures, as well as our increased awareness of a risk of a cyber incident, do not guarantee that our financial results will not be negatively impacted by such an incident.

A failure of our Business Manager’s information technology (IT) infrastructure could adversely impact our business and operations.

We rely upon the capacity, reliability and security of our Business Manager’s information technology infrastructure and its ability to expand and continually update this infrastructure in response to changing needs of our business. Our Business Manager faces the challenge of supporting older systems and hardware and implementing necessary upgrades to its IT infrastructure.  Our Business Manager may not be able to successfully implement these upgrades in an effective manner, which could adversely affect our operations.  In addition, our Business Manager may incur significant increases in costs and extensive delays in the implementation and rollout of any upgrades or new systems.  If there are technological impediments, unforeseen complications, errors or breakdowns in implementation, the disruptions could have an adverse effect on our business and financial condition.

Risks Related to Investments in Real Estate

There are inherent risks with real estate investments.

Investments in real estate assets are subject to varying degrees of risk. For example, an investment in real estate cannot generally be quickly sold, limiting our ability to promptly vary our portfolio in response to changing economic, financial and investment conditions. Investments in real estate assets also are subject to adverse changes in general economic conditions which, for example, reduce the demand for rental space.

Among the factors that could impact our real estate assets and the value of an investment in us are:

 

local conditions such as an oversupply of space or reduced demand for properties of the type that we acquire;

 

inability to collect rent from tenants;

 

vacancies or inability to rent space on favorable terms;

 

inflation and other increases in operating costs, including insurance premiums, utilities and real estate taxes;

 

adverse changes in the federal, state or local laws and regulations applicable to us, including those affecting rents, zoning, prices of goods, fuel and energy consumption, water and environmental restrictions;

 

the relative illiquidity of real estate investments;

 

changing market demographics;

 

an inability to acquire and finance real estate assets on favorable terms, if at all;

 

the impact of the coronavirus on the U.S. economy and, in particular, on business and consumer demand that may diminish the demand and rents for our properties and impact our tenant’s ability to pay rent;

 

acts of God, such as earthquakes, floods or other uninsured losses; and

 

changes or increases in interest rates and availability of financing.

In addition, periods of economic slowdown or recession, or declining demand for real estate, or the public perception that any of these events may occur, could result in a general decline in rents or increased defaults under existing leases.

 


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The outbreak of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is growing and its impacts are uncertain and hard to measure but may cause a material adverse effect on our business.

In December 2019, a novel strain of coronavirus emerged in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. While initially the outbreak was largely concentrated in China and caused significant disruptions to its economy, it has now spread to other countries and locations, including the United States. The continued spread of the coronavirus globally has had, and could have a significantly greater, material adverse effect on the global and U.S. economies as a whole, as well as the states and cities where we own properties in particular. The extent to which the coronavirus impacts our operations and those of our tenants will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted with confidence, including the scope, severity and duration of the outbreak, the actions taken to contain the coronavirus or mitigate its impact, and the direct and indirect economic effects of the illness and containment measures, among others.

The coronavirus outbreak is negatively impacting almost every industry directly or indirectly, particularly the travel, hotel and retail industries, and businesses that rely on or require close personal contact, such as live entertainment venues, gyms and exercise facilities, health and wellness service providers and beauty salons, restaurants and bars. Due to the scope of the outbreak and the related uncertainties, many other industries and businesses may be directly or indirectly impacted. Our retail tenants rely on customers and many of their businesses require close personal contact.  A reduction in customer foot traffic could reduce demand for our tenants’ products and services, diminish the demand and rents for our properties and harm our tenants’ ability or willingness to pay us rent.  Moreover, our tenants may be required by the local, state or federal authorities to cease operations thereby preventing them from generating revenue.  Enforcing our rights as landlord against tenants who fail to pay rent or otherwise do not comply with the terms of their leases may be costly and may consume valuable time and resources, and even if we obtain a judgment, tenants that have been severely impacted may not be able to pay us what we are owed.

Additionally, many manufacturers of goods in China and other countries have seen a downturn in production due to the suspension of business and temporary closure of factories in an attempt to curb the spread of the illness. This may lead to a disruption in the supply chain and a decline in imported goods, which may negatively impact the business of our tenants.  

The business and operating results of our tenants may also be negatively impacted if the outbreak of the coronavirus occurs within the workforce or otherwise disrupts their management and other personnel, their supply chains or their ability to operate their respective businesses. Many companies have implemented policies and procedures designed to protect against the introduction of the coronavirus to the workforce, including permitting or requiring personnel to work offsite, among others. These changes in the work processes of our tenants could lead to disruptions, such as a reduced ability to effectively transact with customers and colleagues and a loss of IT system functionality due to unusual or excess burdens on IT infrastructures.

We rely on the Business Manager to manage our day to day operations.  The business and operations of our Business Manager and its affiliates may also be adversely impacted by the coronavirus outbreak, including illness or quarantine of members of its workforce, which may negatively impact on its ability to provide us services to the same degree as it had prior to the outbreak.  

Any of these developments, and others, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our real estate assets and other investments may be subject to impairment charges.

Periodically, including in connection with taking actions under our Strategic Plan, we assess whether there are any indicators that the value of our real estate properties and other investments may be impaired. Under U.S. GAAP, a property’s value is impaired only if the estimate of the aggregate future cash flows to be generated by the property is less than the carrying value of the property. The valuation and possible subsequent impairment of real estate properties and other investments is a significant estimate that can change based on our continuous process of analyzing each property and reviewing assumptions about inherently uncertain factors, as well as the economic condition of the property at a particular point in time. We are required to make subjective assessments as to whether there are impairments in the value of our real estate properties and other investments.

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Determining whether a property is impaired and, if impaired, the amount of write-down to fair value requires a significant amount of judgment by management and is based on the best information available to management at the time of evaluation. There can be no assurance that we will not take charges in the future related to the impairment of our assets. Because the Strategic Plan contemplates asset sales, we have recognized, and may continue to recognize, greater impairment charges than if we were to continue to hold and operate these properties. Any future impairment could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations in the period in which the charge is taken. For the year ended December 31, 2019, we recognized impairment charges totaling $4.4 million related to three investment properties held for sale as of December 31, 2019, each of which had a carrying value that exceeded their fair value less selling costs. For the year ended December 31, 2018, we recognized an impairment charge to fully impair our investment in Mainstreet Texas Development Fund, LLC a joint venture to develop three transitional care/rapid recovery centers (“Mainstreet JV”), equal to $9.9 million and an impairment charge of $5.5 million to fully impair our note receivable from Mainstreet JV. For the year ended December 31, 2017, we recognized an impairment charge related to an investment property of $8.5 million. For further information related to impairment provision, reference is made to Note 16 “Fair Value Measurements” which is included in our December 31, 2019 Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8.

An economic downturn could have an adverse impact on the retail industry generally. Slow or negative growth in the retail industry could result in defaults by retail tenants which could have an adverse impact on our financial operations.

An economic downturn could have an adverse impact on the real estate industry generally.  As a result, the retail industry could face reductions in sales revenues and increased bankruptcies. The continuation of adverse economic conditions may result in an increase in distressed or bankrupt retail companies, which in turn would result in an increase in defaults by tenants at our commercial properties. Additionally, slow economic growth is likely to hinder new entrants into the retail market which may make it difficult for us to fully lease space at our retail properties or retail properties we plan to acquire. Tenant defaults and decreased demand for retail space would have an adverse impact on the value of our retail properties and any additional retail properties we acquire and our results of operations.

E-commerce can continue to have an impact on our business.

The use of the internet by consumers to shop is expected to continue to expand. This increase in internet sales could result in a downturn in the business of our current tenants in their “brick and mortar” locations and could affect the way future tenants lease space. While we devote considerable effort and resources to analyze and respond to tenant trends, preferences and consumer spending patterns, we cannot predict with certainty what future tenants will want, what future retail spaces will look like and how much revenue will be generated at traditional “brick and mortar” locations. If we are unable to anticipate and respond promptly to trends in the market, our occupancy levels and rental amounts may decline.  

We face significant competition in the leasing market, which may decrease or prevent increases in the occupancy and rental rates of our properties.

As of December 31, 2019, we owned 47 properties located in 23 states. We compete with numerous developers, owners and operators of commercial properties, many of which own properties similar to, and in the same market areas as, our properties. If our competitors offer space at rental rates below current market rates, or below the rental rates we currently charge our tenants, we may lose existing or potential tenants and we may be pressured to reduce our rental rates below those we currently charge in order to attract new tenants or retain existing tenants when their leases expire. To the extent we are unable to renew leases or re-let space as leases expire, it would result in decreased cash flow from tenants and reduce the income produced by our properties. Excessive vacancies (and related reduced shopper traffic) at one of our properties may hurt sales of other tenants at that property and may discourage them from renewing leases. Also, if our competitors develop additional properties in locations near our properties, there may be increased competition for creditworthy tenants, which may require us to make capital improvements to properties that we would not have otherwise made.

 

We depend on tenants for our revenue, and accordingly lease terminations, tenant default, and bankruptcies could adversely affect the income produced by our properties.

The success of our investments depends on the financial stability of our tenants. Certain economic conditions may adversely affect one or more of our tenants. For example, business failures and downsizings may contribute to reduced consumer demand for retail products and services which would impact tenants of our retail properties. In addition, our retail shopping center properties typically are anchored by large, nationally recognized tenants, any of which may experience a downturn in their business that may weaken significantly their financial condition. Further, mergers or consolidations among large retail establishments could result in the closure of existing stores or duplicate or geographically overlapping store locations, which could include tenants at our retail properties.

As a result of these factors, our tenants may delay lease commencements, decline to extend or renew their leases upon expiration, fail to make rental payments, or declare bankruptcy. Any of these actions could result in the termination of the tenants' leases, the

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expiration of existing leases without renewal, or the loss of rental income attributable to the terminated or expired leases. In the event of a tenant default or bankruptcy, we may experience delays in enforcing our rights as a landlord and may incur substantial costs in protecting our investment and re-leasing our property.

Our revenue is impacted by the success and economic viability of our anchor retail tenants. Our reliance on single or significant tenants in certain buildings may decrease our ability to lease vacated space and adversely affect the returns on our stockholders’ investment.

In the retail sector, a tenant occupying all or a large portion of the gross leasable area of a retail center, commonly referred to as an anchor tenant, may become insolvent, may suffer a downturn in business, or may decide not to renew its lease. Any of these events would result in a reduction or cessation in rental payments to us and would adversely affect our financial condition. A lease termination by an anchor tenant could result in lease terminations or reductions in rent by other tenants whose leases may permit cancellation or rent reduction if another tenant’s lease is terminated. Similarly, the leases of some anchor tenants may permit the anchor tenant to transfer its lease to another retailer. The transfer to a new anchor tenant could cause customer traffic in the retail center to decrease and thereby reduce the income generated by that retail center. A lease transfer to a new anchor tenant could also allow other tenants to make reduced rental payments or to terminate their leases in accordance with lease terms. In the event that we are unable to re-lease the vacated space to a new anchor tenant, we may incur additional expenses in order to remodel the space to be able to re-lease the space to more than one tenant.

We face potential adverse effects from tenant bankruptcies.

Bankruptcy filings by our tenants or any guarantor of a tenant’s lease obligation can occur in the course of operations, and in recent years, a number of companies in the retail industry, including certain of our tenants, have declared bankruptcy.  A bankruptcy filing of our tenants or any guarantor of a tenant’s lease obligations would bar all efforts to collect pre-bankruptcy debts from these entities or their properties, unless we receive an enabling order from the bankruptcy court.  Post-bankruptcy debts would be paid currently.  If a lease is assumed, all pre-bankruptcy balances owing under it must be paid in full.  If a lease is rejected by a tenant in bankruptcy, we would only have a general unsecured claim for damages.  If a lease is rejected, it is unlikely we would receive any payments from the tenant because our claim is capped at the rent reserved under the lease, without acceleration, for the greater of one year or 15% of the remaining term of the lease, but not greater than three years, plus rent already due but unpaid.  This claim could be paid only if the funds were available, and then only in the same percentages as that realized on other unsecured claims.

A tenant or lease guarantor bankruptcy could delay efforts to collect past due balances under the relevant leases, and could ultimately preclude full collection of these sums.  A tenant or lease guarantor bankruptcy could cause a decrease or cessation of rental payments that would mean a reduction in our cash flow and the amount available for distributions to our stockholders.  In the event of a bankruptcy there can be no assurance that the tenant or its trustee will assume our lease.  If a given lease or guaranty of a lease is not assumed, our cash flow and the amounts available for distributions to our stockholders may be adversely affected.

Inflation may adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Increases in the rate of inflation may adversely affect our net operating income from leases with stated rent increases or limits on the tenant’s obligation to pay its share of operating expenses, which could be lower than the increase in inflation at any given time.  Inflation could also have an adverse effect on consumer spending, which may impact our tenants’ sales and, with respect to those leases including percentage rent clauses, our average rents.

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We may be restricted from re-leasing space at our retail properties.

Leases with retail tenants may contain provisions giving the particular tenant the exclusive right to sell particular types of merchandise or provide specific types of services within the particular retail center. These provisions may limit the number and types of prospective tenants interested in leasing space in a particular retail property.

We have entered into long-term leases with some of our retail tenants, and those leases may not result in fair value over time, which could adversely affect our revenues and ability to make distributions.

We have entered into long-term leases with some of our retail tenants. Long-term leases do not allow for significant changes in rental payments and do not expire in the near term. If we do not accurately judge the potential for increases in market rental rates when negotiating these long-term leases, significant increases in future property operating costs could result in receiving less than fair value from these leases. These circumstances would adversely affect our revenues and funds available for distribution.

Retail conditions may adversely affect our income.

A retail property’s revenues and value may be adversely affected by a number of factors, many of which apply to real estate investment generally, but which also include trends in the retail industry and perceptions by retailers or shoppers of the safety, convenience and attractiveness of the retail property. Our properties are located in public places, and any incidents of crime or violence, including acts of terrorism, would result in a reduction of business traffic to tenant stores in our properties. Any such incidents may also expose us to civil liability. In addition, to the extent that the investing public has a negative perception of the retail sector, the value of our retail properties may be negatively impacted.

A number of our retail leases are based on tenant gross sales.  Under those leases, our revenue from tenants increases as the sales of our tenants increase.  Generally, retailers face declining revenues during downturns in the economy.  As a result, the portion of our revenue which may derive from percentage rent leases could be adversely affected by a general economic downturn.  

Acquiring or attempting to acquire multiple properties in a single transaction may adversely affect our operations.

From time to time, we have acquired multiple properties in a single transaction. Portfolio acquisitions typically are more complex and expensive than single property acquisitions, and the risk that a multiple-property acquisition does not close may be greater than in a single-property acquisition. Portfolio acquisitions may also result in us owning investments in geographically dispersed markets, placing additional demands on our Business Manager and Real Estate Manager in managing the properties in the portfolio. In addition, a seller may require that a group of properties be purchased as a package even though we may not want to purchase one or more properties in the portfolio. In these situations, if we are unable to identify another person or entity to acquire the unwanted properties, we may be required to operate or attempt to dispose of these properties.  We also may be required to accumulate a large amount of cash to fund such acquisitions. We would expect the returns that we earn on such cash to be less than the returns on real property.  Therefore, acquiring multiple properties in a single transaction may reduce the overall yield on our portfolio.

Short-term leases may expose us to the effects of declining market rent.

Some of our properties have short-term leases with tenants.  There is no assurance that we will be able to renew these leases as they expire or attract replacement tenants on comparable terms, if at all.  Therefore, the returns we earn on this type of investment may be more volatile than the returns generated by properties with longer term leases.

We do not own the land when we are the lessee under a ground lease, so properties that we operate pursuant to a ground lease are subject to unique risks.

We have and may continue to acquire long-term leaseholds commonly known as ground leases to operate properties that are on land owned by third parties. Although we have a right to use the property on land leased to us pursuant to a ground lease, we do not own the underlying land. Accordingly, we will have no economic interest in the land at the expiration of the ground lease and will not share in any increase in value of the land or the improvements once our ground lease ends. If we are found to be in breach of a ground lease, and that breach cannot be cured, we could lose our interest in the improvements and the right to operate the property. Further, because we do not own the underlying land, the lessor could take certain actions to disrupt our use of the property or our tenant’s operation of the property.

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We may be unable to sell assets if or when we decide to do so.

Maintaining our REIT qualification and continuing to avoid registration under the Investment Company Act as well as many other factors, such as general economic conditions, the availability of financing, interest rates and the supply and demand for the particular asset type, may limit our ability to sell real estate assets. Many of these factors are beyond our control. We cannot predict whether we will be able to sell any real estate asset on favorable terms and conditions, if at all, or the length of time needed to sell an asset.

Sale leaseback transactions may be re-characterized in a manner unfavorable to us.

We may from time to time enter into a sale leaseback transaction where we purchase a property and then lease the property to the seller. The transaction may, however, be characterized as a financing instead of a sale in the case of the seller’s bankruptcy. In this case, we would not be treated as the owner of the property but rather as a creditor with no interest in the property itself. The seller may have the ability in a bankruptcy proceeding to restructure the financing by imposing new terms and conditions. The transaction also may be re-characterized as a joint venture. In this case, we would be treated as a joint venture with liability, under some circumstances, for debts incurred by the seller relating to the property.

Operating expenses may increase in the future and to the extent these increases cannot be passed on to our tenants, our cash flow and our operating results would decrease.

Operating expenses, such as expenses for fuel, utilities, labor, building materials and insurance, are not fixed and may fluctuate from time to time.  Unless specifically provided for in a lease, there is no guarantee that we will be able to pass increases on to our tenants. To the extent these increases cannot be passed on to our tenants, any increases would cause our cash flow and our operating results to decrease, which could have a material adverse effect on our ability to pay or sustain distributions.

We depend on the availability of public utilities and services, especially for water and electric power. Any reduction, interruption or cancellation of these services may adversely affect us.

Public utilities, especially those that provide water and electric power, are fundamental for the operation of our assets. The delayed delivery or any material reduction or prolonged interruption of these services could allow certain tenants to terminate their leases or result in an increase in our costs, as we may be forced to use backup generators, which also could be insufficient to fully operate our facilities and could result in our inability to provide services.  Accordingly, any interruption or limitation in the provision of these essential services may adversely affect us.

An increase in real estate taxes may decrease our income from properties.

Some local real property tax assessors may seek to reassess some of our properties as a result of our acquisition of the property. Generally, from time to time our property taxes will increase as property values or assessment rates change or for other reasons deemed relevant by the assessors.  In fact, property taxes may increase even if the value of the underlying property declines.  An increase in the assessed valuation of a property for real estate tax purposes will result in an increase in the related real estate taxes on that property. Although some tenant leases may permit us to pass through the tax increases to the tenants for payment, there is no assurance that renewal leases or future leases will be negotiated on the same basis. Increases not passed through to tenants will adversely affect our cash flow from operations and our ability to pay distributions.

Potential development and construction delays and resulting increased costs and risks may reduce cash flow from operations.

We have acquired, and may continue to acquire, unimproved real property or properties that are under development or construction. Investments in these properties are subject to the uncertainties generally associated with real estate development and construction, including those related to re-zoning land for development, environmental concerns of governmental entities or community groups and the developers’ ability to complete the property in conformity with plans, specifications, budgeted costs and timetables. If a developer fails to perform, we may resort to legal action to rescind the purchase or the construction contract or to compel performance. A developer’s performance may also be affected or delayed by conditions beyond the developer’s control. Delays in completing construction could also give tenants the right to terminate leases. We may incur additional risks when we make periodic progress payments or other advances to developers before they complete construction. These and other factors can result in increased costs of a project or loss of our investment. In addition, we will be subject to lease-up risks associated with newly constructed projects. We also must rely on rental income and expense projections and estimates of the fair market value of property upon completion of construction when agreeing upon a purchase price at the time we acquire the property. If our projections are inaccurate, we may pay too much for a property, and the return on our investment could suffer.

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If we contract with a development company for newly developed property, our earnest money deposit made to the development company may not be fully refunded.

We may enter into one or more contracts, either directly or indirectly through joint ventures with third parties, to acquire real property from a development company that is engaged in construction and development of commercial real estate. We may be required to pay a substantial earnest money deposit at the time of contracting with a development entity. At the time of contracting and the payment of the earnest money deposit by us, the development company typically will have only a contract to acquire land, a development agreement to develop a building on the land and an agreement with one or more tenants to lease all or part of the property upon its completion. If the development company fails to develop the property or all or a specified portion of the pre-leased tenants fail to take possession under their leases for any reason, we may not be able to obtain a refund of our earnest money deposit.

We may obtain only limited warranties when we purchase a property and therefore have only limited recourse in the event our due diligence did not identify any issues that lower the value of our property.

We have acquired, and may continue to acquire, properties in “as is” condition on a “where is” basis and “with all faults,” without any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular use or purpose. In addition, purchase agreements may contain only limited warranties, representations and indemnifications that will only survive for a limited period after the closing. The purchase of properties with limited warranties increases the risk that we may lose some or all of our invested capital in the property, as well as the loss of rental income from that property.

Uninsured losses or premiums for insurance coverage may adversely affect our returns.

The nature of the activities at certain properties may expose us and our tenants or operators to potential liability for personal injuries and, in certain instances, property damage claims. In addition, there are types of losses, generally catastrophic in nature, such as losses due to wars, acts of terrorism, earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, pollution or environmental matters that are uninsurable or not economically insurable, or may be insured subject to limitations, such as large deductibles or co-payments. Insurance risks associated with potential terrorist acts or increasingly severe weather could sharply increase the premiums we pay for coverage against property and casualty claims.  These policies may or may not be available at a reasonable cost, if at all, which could inhibit our ability to finance or refinance our properties. In such instances, we may be required to provide other financial support, either through financial assurances or self-insurance, to cover potential losses. We cannot provide any assurance that we will have adequate coverage for these losses. In the event that any of our properties incurs a casualty loss that is not fully covered by insurance, the value of the particular asset will likely be reduced by the uninsured loss. In addition, we cannot provide any assurance that we will be able to fund any uninsured losses.

The costs of complying with environmental laws and other governmental laws and regulations may adversely affect us.

All real property and the operations conducted on real property are subject to federal, state and local laws and regulations relating to environmental protection and human health and safety. These laws and regulations generally govern wastewater discharges, air emissions, the operation and removal of underground and above-ground storage tanks, the use, storage, treatment, transportation and disposal of solid and hazardous materials, and the remediation of contamination associated with disposals. We also are required to comply with various local, state and federal fire, health, life-safety and similar regulations.  Some of these laws and regulations may impose joint and several liability on tenants, owners or operators for the costs of investigating or remediating contaminated properties.  These laws and regulations often impose liability whether or not the owner or operator knew of, or was responsible for, the presence of the hazardous or toxic substances.  The cost of removing or remediating could be substantial.  In addition, the presence of these substances, or the failure to properly remediate these substances, may adversely affect our ability to sell or rent a property or to use the property as collateral for borrowing.

Environmental laws and regulations also may impose restrictions on the manner in which property may be used or businesses may be operated, and these restrictions may require substantial expenditures by us.  Environmental laws and regulations provide for sanctions in the event of noncompliance and may be enforced by governmental agencies or, in certain circumstances, by private parties.  Third parties may seek recovery from owners or operators of real properties for personal injury or property damage associated with exposure to released hazardous substances.  Compliance with new or more stringent laws or regulations or stricter interpretations of existing laws may require material expenditures by us.  For example, various federal, regional and state laws and regulations have been implemented or are under consideration to mitigate the effects of climate change caused by greenhouse gas emissions.  Among other things, “green” building codes may seek to reduce emissions through the imposition of standards for design, construction materials, water and energy usage and efficiency, and waste management.  These requirements could increase the costs of maintaining or improving our existing properties or developing new properties.

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We may acquire properties in regions that are particularly susceptible to natural disasters, which may make us susceptible to the effects of these natural disasters in those areas from adverse climate developments or other causes.

Our properties are located in certain geographical areas that may be impacted by adverse events such as hurricanes, floods, wildfires, earthquakes, blizzards or other natural disasters, which could cause a loss of revenues at our real estate properties.  In addition, according to some experts, global climate change could result in heightened severe weather, thus further impacting these geographical areas.  Natural disasters in these areas may cause damage to our properties beyond the scope of our insurance coverage, thus requiring us to make substantial expenditures to repair these properties and resulting in a loss of revenues from these properties.  Any properties located near either coast will be exposed to more severe weather than properties located inland.  These losses may not be insured or insurable at an acceptable cost.  Elements such as water, wind, hail, fire damage and humidity in these areas can increase or accelerate wear on the properties’ weatherproofing and mechanical, electrical and other systems, and cause mold issues over time. As a result, we may incur additional operating costs and expenditures for capital improvements at properties in these areas.

Our properties may contain or develop harmful mold, which could lead to liability for adverse health effects and costs of remediating the problem.

The presence of mold at any of our properties could require us to undertake a costly program to remediate, contain or remove the mold. Mold growth may occur when moisture accumulates in buildings or on building materials. Some molds may produce airborne toxins or irritants. Concern about indoor exposure to mold has been increasing because exposure to mold may cause a variety of adverse health effects and symptoms, including allergic or other reactions. The presence of mold could expose us to liability from our tenants, their employees and others if property damage or health concerns arise.

We may incur significant costs to comply with the Americans With Disabilities Act or similar laws.

Our properties generally are subject to the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended, which we refer to as the Disabilities Act. Under the Disabilities Act, all places of public accommodation are required to comply with federal requirements related to access and use by disabled persons. The Disabilities Act has separate compliance requirements for “public accommodations” and “commercial facilities” that generally require that buildings and services be made accessible and available to people with disabilities.

The requirements of the Disabilities Act could require removal of access barriers and could result in the imposition of injunctive relief, monetary penalties or, in some cases, an award of damages. We attempt to acquire properties that comply with the Disabilities Act or place the burden on the seller or other third party, such as a tenant, to ensure compliance with these laws. However, we cannot assure our stockholders that we will be able to acquire properties or allocate responsibilities in this manner. We may incur significant costs to comply with these laws.

Terrorist attacks and other acts of violence or war may affect the markets in which we operate our operations and our profitability.

We may acquire properties located in areas that are susceptible to attack. These attacks may directly impact the value of our assets through damage, destruction, loss or increased security costs. Although we may obtain terrorism insurance, we may not be able to obtain sufficient coverage to fund any losses we may incur. Risks associated with potential acts of terrorism could sharply increase the premiums we pay for coverage against property and casualty claims. Further, certain losses resulting from these types of events are uninsurable or not insurable at reasonable costs.

More generally, any terrorist attack, other act of violence or war, including armed conflicts, could result in increased volatility in, or damage to, the United States and worldwide financial markets and economy.

Risks Associated with Investments in Securities

Through owning real estate-related equity securities, we will be subject to the risks impacting each entity’s assets.

We may invest in real estate-related securities. Equity securities are always unsecured and subordinated to other obligations of the issuer. Investments in real estate-related equity securities are subject to the risks associated with investing directly in real estate assets and numerous additional risks including: (1) limited liquidity in the secondary trading market in the case of unlisted or thinly traded securities; (2) substantial market price volatility resulting from, among other things, changes in prevailing interest rates in the overall market or related to a specific issuer, as well as changing investor perceptions of the market as a whole, REIT or real estate securities in particular or the specific issuer in question; (3) subordination to the liabilities of the issuer; (4) the possibility that earnings of the issuer may be insufficient to meet its debt service obligations or to pay distributions; and (5) with respect to investments in real estate-related preferred equity securities, the operation of mandatory sinking fund or call/redemption provisions during periods of declining interest rates that could cause the issuer to redeem the securities. In addition, investments in real estate-related securities involve special risks relating to the particular issuer of the securities, including the financial condition and business outlook of the issuer. Investing in real estate-related securities will expose our results of operations and financial condition to the factors impacting the trading prices of publicly-traded entities.

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Investments in CMBS are subject to all of the risks of the underlying mortgage loans and the risks of the securitization process.

CMBS are securities that evidence interests in, or are secured by, a single commercial mortgage loan or a pool of commercial mortgage loans. Accordingly, these securities are subject to all of the risks of the underlying mortgage loans. In a changing interest rate environment, the value of CMBS may be adversely affected when payments on underlying mortgages do not occur as anticipated, resulting in the extension of the security’s effective maturity and the related increase in interest rate sensitivity of a longer-term instrument. The value of CMBS may also change due to shifts in the market’s perception of issuers and regulatory or tax changes adversely affecting the mortgage securities market as a whole. In addition, CMBS are subject to the credit risk associated with the performance of the underlying mortgage properties. In certain instances, third-party guarantees or other forms of credit support designed to reduce credit risk may not be effective due, for example, to defaults by third party guarantors.

CMBS are also subject to several risks created through the securitization process. Generally, CMBS are issued in classes or tranches. To the extent that we invest in a subordinate class or tranche, we will be paid interest only to the extent that there are funds available after paying the senior class. To the extent the collateral pool includes delinquent loans, subordinate classes will likely not be fully paid. Subordinate CMBS are also subject to greater credit risk than those CMBS that are more highly rated. Further, the ratings assigned to any particular class of CMBS may prove to be inaccurate. Thus, any particular class of CMBS may be riskier and more volatile than the rating may suggest, all of which may cause the returns on any CMBS investment to be less than anticipated.

Risks Associated with Debt Financing

Volatility in the financial markets and challenging economic conditions could adversely affect our ability to secure debt financing on attractive terms and our ability to service any future indebtedness that we may incur.

The domestic and international commercial real estate debt markets are subject to volatility, resulting in, from time to time, the tightening of underwriting standards by lenders and credit rating agencies, which could limit the availability of credit and increase costs for what is available.  The recent coronavirus outbreak has also adversely affected credit and capital market conditions resulting in extreme volatility and a tightening of credit standards. This may impact our ability to access capital on favorable terms, in a timely manner, or at all, which could make obtaining funding for our capital needs, such as future acquisition and distributions to our stockholders, more challenging or expensive. On March 16, 2020, the U.S. Federal Reserve’s Federal Open Market Committee lowered the target range for the federal funds rate to 0% to 0.25%, but there is no guarantee that this will lower our cost of capital.  If the overall cost of borrowing increases, either by increases in the index rates or by increases in lender spreads, the increased costs may result in existing or future acquisitions generating lower overall economic returns and potentially reducing future cash flow available for distribution. If these disruptions in the debt markets persist, our ability to borrow monies to finance the purchase of, or other activities related to, real estate assets will be negatively impacted.  In addition, we may find it difficult, costly or impossible to refinance indebtedness which is maturing.  If we are unable to borrow monies on terms and conditions that we find acceptable, the return on our properties may be lower.

Further, economic conditions could negatively impact commercial real estate fundamentals and result in lower occupancy, lower rental rates and declining values in our real estate portfolio and in the collateral securing any loan investments we may make.

Borrowings may reduce the funds available for distribution and increase the risk of loss since defaults may cause us to lose the properties securing the loans.

We have acquired properties by either borrowing monies or, in some instances, by assuming existing financing.  We typically borrow money to finance a portion of the purchase price of assets we acquire.  In some instances, we have acquired properties by borrowing monies in an amount equal to the purchase price of the acquired properties. We may also borrow money for other purposes to, among other things, satisfy the requirement that we distribute at least 90% of our “REIT annual taxable income,” subject to certain adjustments and excluding any net capital gain, or as is otherwise necessary or advisable to assure that we continue to qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes. Over the long term, however, payments required on any amounts we borrow reduce the funds available for, among other things, acquisitions, capital expenditures for existing properties or distributions to our stockholders because cash otherwise available for these purposes is used to pay principal and interest on this debt.

If there is a shortfall between the cash flow from a property and the cash flow needed to service mortgage debt secured by a property, then the amount of cash flow from operations available for distributions to stockholders may be reduced. In addition, incurring mortgage debt increases the risk of loss since defaults on indebtedness secured by a property may result in lenders initiating foreclosure actions. In such a case, we could lose the property securing the loan that is in default, thus reducing the value of our stockholders’ investment. For federal income tax purposes, a foreclosure is treated as a sale of the property or properties for a purchase price equal to the outstanding balance of the debt secured by the property or properties. If the outstanding balance of the debt exceeds our tax basis in the property or properties, we would recognize taxable gain on the foreclosure action and we would not receive any cash proceeds. In this event, we may be unable to pay the amount of distributions required in order to maintain our REIT status. We also may fully or partially guarantee any monies that subsidiaries borrow to purchase or operate properties. In these cases,

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we will likely be responsible to the lender for repaying the loans if the subsidiary is unable to do so. If any mortgage contains cross-collateralization or cross-default provisions, more than one property may be affected by a default.

If we are unable to borrow at favorable rates, we may not be able to acquire new properties.

If we are unable to borrow money at favorable rates, we may be unable to acquire additional real estate assets or refinance existing loans at maturity. Further, we have obtained and may continue to enter into loan agreements or other credit arrangements that require us to pay interest on amounts we borrow at variable or “adjustable” rates. Increases in interest rates will increase our interest costs. If interest rates are higher when we refinance our loans, our expenses will increase and we may not be able to pass on this added cost in the form of increased rents, thereby reducing our cash flow and the amount available for distribution to our stockholders.  Further, during periods of rising interest rates, we may be forced to sell one or more of our properties in order to repay existing loans, which may not permit us to maximize the return on the particular properties being sold. At December 31, 2019, we had $117.7 million or 17.2% of our total debt that bore interest at variable rates and not fixed by swap agreements with a weighted average interest rate equal to 3.45%. We had variable rate debt subject to swap agreements fixing the rate of $402.2 million or 58.8% of our total debt at December 31, 2019.

Interest-only indebtedness may increase our risk of default and ultimately may reduce our funds available for distribution to our stockholders.

We have obtained, and may continue to enter into, mortgage indebtedness that does not require us to pay principal for all or a portion of the life of the debt instrument. During the period when no principal payments are required, the amount of each scheduled payment is less than that of a traditional amortizing mortgage loan. The principal balance of the mortgage loan is not reduced (except in the case of prepayments) because there are no scheduled monthly payments of principal required during this period. After the interest-only period, we may be required either to make scheduled payments of principal and interest or to make a lump-sum or “balloon” payment at or prior to maturity. These required principal or balloon payments will increase the amount of our scheduled payments and may increase our risk of default under the related mortgage loan if we do not have funds available or are unable to refinance the obligation.

The financial covenants under our credit agreement may restrict our ability to make distributions and our operating and acquisition activities. If we breach the financial covenants we could be held in default under the credit agreement, which could accelerate our repayment date and materially adversely affect our liquidity and financial condition.

We entered into a credit agreement, as amended, for a $350.0 million credit facility (the “Credit Facility”) consisting of a revolving credit facility providing initial revolving credit commitments in an aggregate amount of $200.0 million (the “Revolving Credit Facility”) and a term loan facility providing initial term loan commitments in an aggregate amount of $150.0 million (the “Term Loan”).  The credit agreement provides us with the ability from time to time to increase the size of the Credit Facility, subject to certain conditions. Our performance of the obligations under the credit agreement, including the payment of any outstanding indebtedness, is secured by a minimum pool of ten unencumbered properties with an unencumbered pool value of $200.0 million or above and by a guaranty by certain of our subsidiaries. At December 31, 2019, we had $267.0 million outstanding of the $350 million available under the Credit Facility. Our availability under the Credit Facility was $83.0 million as of December 31, 2019.

The credit agreement requires compliance with certain financial covenants, including, among other conditions, a minimum tangible net worth requirement, restrictions on indebtedness, a distribution limitation and other material covenants. These covenants could inhibit our ability to make distributions to our stockholders and to pursue certain business initiatives or effect certain transactions that might otherwise be beneficial to us. For example, without lender consent, we may not declare and pay distributions or honor any redemption requests if any default under the agreement then exists or if distributions, excluding any distributions reinvested through our DRP, for the then-current quarter and the three immediately preceding quarters would exceed 95% of our Funds from Operations, or “FFO,” excluding acquisition expenses, or “adjusted FFO,” for that period. For the year ended December 31, 2019, distributions did not exceed 95% of our adjusted FFO.

The credit agreement also provides for several customary events of default, including, among other things, the failure to comply with our covenants and the failure to pay when amounts outstanding under the credit agreement become due. Declaration of a default by the lenders under the credit agreement could restrict our ability to borrow additional monies and could cause all amounts to become immediately due and payable, which would materially adversely affect our liquidity and financial condition.

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Investing in subordinated debt involves greater risks of loss than senior loans secured by the same properties.

 

We have invested in, and may continue to invest in, mezzanine debt and other subordinated debt. These types of investments carry a higher degree of risk of loss than senior secured debt investments because in the event of default and foreclosure, holders of senior liens will be paid in full before subordinated investors and, depending on the value of the underlying collateral, there may not be sufficient assets to pay all or any part of amounts owed to subordinated investors. Moreover, mezzanine debt and other subordinated debt investments may have higher loan-to-value ratios than conventional senior lien financing, resulting in less equity in the collateral and increasing the risk of loss of principal. If a borrower defaults or declares bankruptcy, we may be subject to agreements restricting or eliminating our rights as a creditor, including rights to call a default, foreclose on collateral, accelerate maturity or control decisions made in bankruptcy proceedings. In addition, senior lenders may limit the amount or timing of interest and principal payments while the senior secured debt is outstanding.

We may acquire or finance properties with lock-out provisions, which may prohibit us from selling a property, or may require us to maintain specified debt levels for a period of years on some properties.

The terms and conditions contained in certain of our loan documents preclude us from pre-paying the principal amount of the loan or could restrict us from selling or otherwise disposing of or refinancing properties. For example, lock-out provisions prohibit us from reducing the outstanding indebtedness secured by certain of our properties, refinancing this indebtedness on a non-recourse basis at maturity, or increasing the amount of indebtedness secured by our properties. Lock-out provisions could impair our ability to take other actions during the lock-out period. In particular, lock-out provisions could preclude us from participating in major transactions that could result in a disposition of our assets or a change in control even though that disposition or change in control might be in the best interests of our stockholders.

Increasing interest rates could increase the amount of our debt payments and adversely affect our ability to pay distributions. We may also be adversely affected by uncertainty surrounding LIBOR.

At December 31, 2019, we had $117.7 million of debt or 17.2% of our total debt bearing interest at variable rates indexed to the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) and not fixed by a swap with a weighted average interest rate equal to 3.45% per annum. We had variable rate debt indexed to LIBOR and subject to swap agreements fixing the rate of $402.2 million or 58.8% of our total debt at December 31, 2019. If interest rates on all debt which bears interest at variable rates as of December 31, 2019 increased by 1% (100 basis points), the increase in interest expense on all debt would decrease earnings and cash flows by $1.2 million annually. If interest rates on all debt which bears interest at variable rates as of December 31, 2019 decreased by 1% (100 basis points), the decrease in interest expense would increase earnings and cash flows by the same amount.

In July 2017, the Financial Conduct Authority, the authority which regulates LIBOR, announced it intends to stop compelling banks to submit rates for the calculation of LIBOR after 2021. As a result, the Federal Reserve Board and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York organized the Alternative Reference Rates Committee, which identified the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (“SOFR”) as its preferred alternative to LIBOR in derivatives and other financial contracts. We are not able to predict when LIBOR may be limited or discontinued or when there will be sufficient liquidity in the SOFR market. We are monitoring and evaluating the risks related to potential changes in LIBOR availability, which include potential changes in interest paid on debt and amounts received and paid on interest rate swaps. In addition, the value of debt or derivative instruments tied to LIBOR could also be impacted when LIBOR is limited or discontinued, and contracts must be transitioned to a new alternative rate. In some instances, transitioning to an alternative rate may require negotiation with lenders and other counterparties and could present challenges. The consequences of these developments cannot be entirely predicted and could include an increase in the cost of our variable rate debt.

While we expect LIBOR to be available in substantially its current form until the end of 2021, it is possible that LIBOR will become unavailable prior to that time. This could occur, for example, if a sufficient number of banks decline to make submissions to the LIBOR administrator. In that case, the risks associated with the transition to an alternative reference rate would be accelerated or magnified. Any of these events, as well as the other uncertainty surrounding the transition to LIBOR, could adversely affect us.

To hedge against interest rate fluctuations, we may use derivative financial instruments that may be costly and ineffective.

From time to time, we have used, and may continue to use, derivative financial instruments to hedge exposures to changes in interest rates on loans secured by our assets. Derivative instruments may include interest rate swap contracts, interest rate cap or floor contracts, futures or forward contracts, options or repurchase agreements. Our actual hedging decisions will be determined in light of the facts and circumstances existing at the time of the hedge and may differ from our current hedging strategy.  There is no assurance that our hedging strategy will achieve our objectives.  We may be subject to costs, such as transaction fees or breakage costs, if we terminate these arrangements.

22


We use derivative financial instruments to hedge against interest rate fluctuations and are exposed to credit risk, basis risk and legal enforceability risks. In this context, credit risk is the failure of the counterparty to perform under the terms of the derivative contract. If the fair value of a derivative contract is positive, the counterparty owes us, which creates credit risk for us. Basis risk occurs when the index upon which the contract is based is more or less variable than the index upon which the hedged asset or liability is based, thereby making the hedge less effective. Finally, legal enforceability risks encompass general contractual risks including the risk that the counterparty will breach the terms of, or fail to perform its obligations under, the derivative contract, increasing the risk that we may not realize the benefits of these instruments.  There is a risk that counterparties could fail, shut down, file for bankruptcy or be unable to pay out contracts. The failure of a counterparty that holds collateral that we post in connection with an interest rate swap agreement could result in the loss of that collateral.

We may be contractually obligated to purchase property even if we are unable to secure financing for the acquisition.

We expect to finance a portion of the purchase price for each property that we acquire. However, to ensure that our offers are as competitive as possible, we do not expect to enter into contracts to purchase property that include financing contingencies. Thus, we may be contractually obligated to purchase a property even if we are unable to secure financing for the acquisition. In this event, we may choose to close on the property by using cash on hand, which would result in less cash available for our operations and distributions to stockholders. Alternatively, we may choose not to close on the acquisition of the property and default on the purchase contract. If we default on any purchase contract, we could lose our earnest money and become subject to liquidated or other contractual damages and remedies.

The total amount we may borrow is limited by our charter.

We may borrow up to 300% of our net assets, equivalent to 75% of the cost of our assets. We may exceed this limit only if our board of directors (including a majority of our independent directors) determines that a higher level is appropriate. This limit could adversely affect our business, including:

 

limiting our ability to purchase real estate assets;

 

causing us to lose our REIT status if we cannot borrow to fund the monies needed to satisfy the REIT distribution requirements;

 

causing operational problems if there are cash flow shortfalls for working capital purposes; and

 

causing the loss of a property if, for example, financing is necessary to cure a default on a mortgage.

Risks Related to Conflicts of Interest

IREIC may face a conflict of interest in allocating personnel and resources between its affiliates, our Business Manager and our Real Estate Manager.

We do not have any employees.  We rely on persons performing services for our Business Manager and Real Estate Manager and their affiliates to manage our day-to-day operations. Some of these persons also provide services to one or more investment programs currently or previously sponsored by IREIC. These individuals face competing demands for their time and service, and are required to allocate their time between our business and assets and the business and assets of IREIC, its affiliates and the other programs formed and organized by IREIC.  Certain of these individuals have fiduciary duties to both us and our stockholders.  If these persons are unable to devote sufficient time or resources to our business due to the competing demands of the other programs, they may violate their fiduciary duties to us and our stockholders, which could harm our business and cause us to be unable to maintain or increase the value of our assets, and our operating cash flows and ability to pay distributions could be adversely affected.

In addition, if another investment program sponsored by IREIC decides to internalize its management functions in the future, it may do so by hiring and retaining certain of the persons currently performing services for our Business Manager and Real Estate Manager, and if it did so, it would not allow these persons to perform services for us.

We do not have arm’s-length agreements with our Business Manager, our Real Estate Manager or any other affiliates of IREIC.

The agreements and arrangements with our Business Manager, our Real Estate Manager and any other affiliates of IREIC were not negotiated at arm’s-length.  These agreements may contain terms and conditions that are not in our best interest or would not be present if we entered into arm’s-length agreements with third parties.

23


Our Business Manager, our Real Estate Manager and other affiliates of IREIC face conflicts of interest caused by their compensation arrangements with us, which could result in actions that are not in the long-term best interests of our stockholders.

We pay fees, which may be significant, to our Business Manager, Real Estate Manager and other affiliates of IREIC for services provided to us.  Our Business Manager receives fees based on the aggregate book value, including acquired intangibles, of our invested assets. Further, our Real Estate Manager receives fees based on the gross income from properties under management and may also receive leasing and construction management fees.  Other parties related to, or affiliated with, our Business Manager or Real Estate Manager may also receive fees or cost reimbursements from us.  These compensation arrangements may cause these entities to take or not take certain actions.  For example, these arrangements may provide an incentive for our Business Manager to: (1) borrow more money than prudent to increase the amount we can invest; or (2) retain instead of sell assets, even if our stockholders may be better served by a sale or other disposition of the assets.  The interests of these parties in receiving fees may conflict with the interest of our stockholders in earning income on their investment in our common stock.

We rely on entities affiliated with IREIC to identify real estate assets.

We rely on the real estate professionals employed by IREA and other affiliates of our Sponsor to source potential investments in properties, real estate-related assets and other investments in which we may be interested. Our Sponsor and its affiliates maintain an investment committee (“Investment Committee”) that reviews each potential investment and determines whether an investment is acceptable for acquisition. In determining whether an investment is suitable, the Investment Committee considers investment objectives, portfolio and criteria of all programs currently advised by our Sponsor or its affiliates (collectively referred to as the “Programs”). Other factors considered by the Investment Committee may include cash flow, the effect of the acquisition on portfolio diversification, the estimated income or unrelated business tax effects of the purchase, policies relating to leverage, regulatory restrictions and the capital available for investment. Our Business Manager will not recommend any investments for us unless the investment is approved for consideration in advance by the Investment Committee. Once an investment has been approved for consideration by the Investment Committee, the Programs are advised and provided an opportunity to elect to acquire the investment. If more than one Program is interested in acquiring an investment, then the Program that has had the longest period of time elapse since it was allocated and invested in a contested investment is awarded the investment by the allocation committee. We may not, therefore, be able to acquire properties that we otherwise would be interested in acquiring.

Our properties may compete with the properties owned by other programs sponsored by IREIC or IPCC.

Certain programs sponsored by IREIC or Inland Private Capital Corporation (“IPCC”) own and manage the type of properties that we own or seek to acquire, including in the same geographical areas. Therefore, our properties, especially those located in the same geographical area, may compete for tenants or purchasers with other properties owned and managed by other IREIC- or IPCC-sponsored programs. Persons performing services for our Real Estate Manager may face conflicts of interest when evaluating tenant leasing opportunities for our properties and other properties owned and managed by IREIC- or IPCC-sponsored programs, and these conflicts of interest may have an adverse impact on our ability to attract and retain tenants.  In addition, a conflict could arise in connection with the resale of properties in the event that we and another IREIC- or IPCC-sponsored program were to attempt to sell similar properties at the same time, including in particular in the event another IREIC- or IPCC-sponsored program engages in a liquidity event at approximately the same time as us, thus impacting our ability to sell the property or complete a proposed liquidity event.

Risks Related to Our Corporate Structure

Our rights, and the rights of our stockholders, to recover claims against our officers, directors, Business Manager and Real Estate Manager are limited.

Under our charter, no director or officer will be liable to us or to any stockholder for money damages to the extent that Maryland law permits the limitation of the liability of directors and officers of a corporation.  We may generally indemnify our directors, officers, employees, if any, Business Manager, Real Estate Manager and their respective affiliates for any losses or liabilities suffered by any of them as long as: (1) the directors have determined in good faith that the course of conduct that caused the loss or liability was in our best interest; (2) these persons or entities were acting on our behalf or performing services for us; (3) the loss or liability was not the result of the negligence or misconduct of the directors (gross negligence or willful misconduct with respect to the independent directors), officers, employees, Business Manager, Real Estate Manager or their respective affiliates; and (4) the indemnity or agreement to hold harmless is recoverable only out of our net assets and not from our stockholders.  As a result, we and our stockholders may have more limited rights against our directors, officers and employees, our Business Manager, the Real Estate Manager and their respective affiliates, than might otherwise exist under common law.  In addition, we may be obligated to fund the defense costs incurred by our directors, officers and employees or our Business Manager and the Real Estate Manager and their respective affiliates in some cases.

24


Our board of directors may, in the future, adopt certain measures under Maryland law without stockholder approval that may have the effect of making it less likely that a stockholder would receive a “control premium” for his or her shares.

Corporations organized under Maryland law with a class of registered securities and at least three independent directors are permitted to protect themselves from unsolicited proposals or offers to acquire the company by electing to be subject, by a charter or bylaw provision or a board of directors resolution and notwithstanding any contrary charter or bylaw provision, to any or all of five provisions:

 

staggering the board of directors into three classes;

 

requiring a two-thirds vote of stockholders to remove directors;

 

providing that only the board can fix the size of the board;

 

providing that all vacancies on the board, regardless of how the vacancy was created, may be filled only by the affirmative vote of a majority of the remaining directors in office and for the remainder of the full term of the class of directors in which the vacancy occurred; and

 

requiring that special stockholders meetings be called only by holders of shares entitled to cast a majority of the votes entitled to be cast at the meeting.

These provisions may discourage an extraordinary transaction, such as a merger, tender offer or sale of all or substantially all of our assets, all of which might provide a premium price for stockholders’ shares.  Our charter does not prohibit our board from opting into any of the above provisions.

Further, under the Maryland Business Combination Act, we may not engage in any merger or other business combination with an “interested stockholder” or any affiliate of that interested stockholder for a period of five years after the most recent date on which the interested stockholder became an interested stockholder. After the five-year period ends, any merger or other business combination with the interested stockholder must be recommended by our board of directors and approved by the affirmative vote of at least:

 

80% of all votes entitled to be cast by holders of outstanding shares of our voting stock; and

 

two-thirds of all of the votes entitled to be cast by holders of outstanding shares of our voting stock other than those shares owned or held by the interested stockholder with whom or with whose affiliate the business combination is to be effected or held by an affiliate or associate of the interested stockholder unless, among other things, our stockholders receive a minimum payment for their common stock equal to the highest price paid by the interested stockholder for its common stock.

Our directors have adopted a resolution exempting any business combination involving us and The Inland Group or any affiliate of The Inland Group, including our Business Manager and Real Estate Manager, from the provisions of this law.

Our charter places limits on the amount of common stock that any person may own without the prior approval of our board of directors.

No more than 50% of the outstanding shares of our common stock may be beneficially owned, directly or indirectly, by five or fewer individuals at any time during the last half of each taxable year (other than the first taxable year for which an election to be a REIT has been made). Our charter prohibits any persons or groups from owning more than 9.8% in value of our outstanding stock or more than 9.8% in value or in number of shares, whichever is more restrictive, of our outstanding common stock without the prior approval of our board of directors. These provisions may have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a change in control of us, including an extraordinary transaction such as a merger, tender offer or sale of all or substantially all of our assets that might involve a premium price for holders of our common stock. Further, any person or group attempting to purchase shares exceeding these limits could be compelled to sell the additional shares and, as a result, to forfeit the benefits of owning the additional shares.

25


Maryland law limits, in some cases, the ability of a third party to vote shares acquired in a “control share acquisition.”

The Maryland Control Share Acquisition Act provides that “control shares” of a Maryland corporation acquired in a “control share acquisition” have no voting rights except to the extent approved by stockholders by a vote of two-thirds of the votes entitled to be cast on the matter. Shares of stock owned by the acquirer, by officers of the acquirer or by employees who are directors of the acquirer, are excluded from shares entitled to vote on the matter. “Control shares” are voting shares of stock which, if aggregated with all other shares of stock owned by the acquirer or in respect of which the acquirer can exercise or direct the exercise of voting power (except solely by virtue of a revocable proxy), would entitle the acquirer to exercise voting power in electing directors within specified ranges of voting power. Control shares do not include shares the acquiring person is then entitled to vote as a result of having previously obtained stockholder approval. A “control share acquisition” means the acquisition of issued and outstanding control shares. The control share acquisition statute does not apply: (1) to shares acquired in a merger, consolidation or share exchange if the Maryland corporation is a party to the transaction; or (2) to acquisitions approved or exempted by the charter or bylaws of the Maryland corporation. Our bylaws contain a provision exempting from the Control Share Acquisition Act any and all acquisitions of our stock by any person. There can be no assurance that this provision will not be amended or eliminated at any time in the future.

Federal Income Tax Risks

If we fail to remain qualified as a REIT, our operations and distributions to stockholders will be adversely affected.

We elected to be taxed as a REIT, commencing with our taxable year ended December 31, 2013 and intend to operate in a manner that would allow us to continue to qualify as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes. However, we may terminate our REIT qualification, if our board of directors determines that not qualifying as a REIT is in the best interests of our stockholders, or inadvertently. Our qualification as a REIT depends upon our satisfaction of certain asset, income, organizational, distribution, stockholder ownership and other requirements on a continuing basis. We have structured and intend to continue structuring our activities in a manner designed to satisfy all the requirements for qualification as a REIT. However, the REIT qualification requirements are extremely complex and interpretation of the U.S. federal income tax laws governing qualification as a REIT is limited. Furthermore, any opinion of our counsel, including tax counsel, as to our eligibility to remain qualified as a REIT is not binding on the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) and is not a guarantee that we will continue to qualify as a REIT. Accordingly, we cannot be certain that we will be successful in operating so we can remain qualified as a REIT. Our ability to satisfy the asset tests depends on our analysis of the characterization and fair market values of our assets, some of which are not susceptible to a precise determination, and for which we will not obtain independent appraisals. Our compliance with the REIT income or quarterly asset requirements also depends on our ability to successfully manage the composition of our income and assets on an ongoing basis. Accordingly, if certain of our operations were to be recharacterized by the IRS, such recharacterization would jeopardize our ability to satisfy all requirements for qualification as a REIT. Furthermore, future legislative, judicial or administrative changes to the U.S. federal income tax laws could be applied retroactively, which could result in our disqualification as a REIT.

If we were to fail to remain qualified as a REIT, without the benefit of certain statutory relief provisions, in any taxable year:

 

we would not be allowed to deduct dividends paid to stockholders when computing our taxable income;

 

we would be subject to federal and state income tax on our taxable income as a regular “C corporation” and may be subject to additional state and local taxes;

 

we would be disqualified from being taxed as a REIT for the four taxable years following the year during which we failed to qualify, unless entitled to relief under certain statutory provisions;

 

we would have less cash to pay distributions to stockholders; and

 

we may be required to borrow additional funds or sell some of our assets in order to pay corporate tax obligations we may incur as a result of being disqualified.

In addition, if we were to fail to qualify as a REIT, we would not be required to pay distributions to stockholders, and all distributions to stockholders that we did pay would be subject to tax as regular corporate dividends to the extent of our current and accumulated earnings and profits.  This means that our U.S. stockholders who are taxed as individuals generally would be taxed on our dividends at capital gains rates and that our corporate stockholders would be entitled to the dividends received deduction with respect to such dividends, subject, in each case, to applicable limitations under the Internal Revenue Code.

26


In certain circumstances, we may be subject to federal, state and local income taxes as a REIT, which would reduce our cash available to pay distributions.

Even as a REIT, we may be subject to federal, state and local income taxes. For example, if we have net income from a “prohibited transaction,” we will incur taxes equal to the full amount of the net income from the prohibited transaction. We may not be able to make sufficient distributions to avoid excise taxes applicable to REITs. We also may decide to retain income we earn from the sale or other disposition of our property and pay income tax directly on this income. In that event, our stockholders would be treated as if they earned that income and paid the tax on it directly. However, stockholders that are tax-exempt, such as charities or qualified pension plans, would have to file income tax returns to receive a refund of the income tax paid on their behalf. We also may be subject to state and local taxes on our income, property or net worth, either directly or at the level of the other companies through which we indirectly own our assets. Any taxes we pay directly or indirectly will reduce our cash available to pay distributions.

The taxation of distributions to our stockholders can be complex; however, distributions that we make to our stockholders generally will be taxable as ordinary income.

Distributions that we make to our taxable stockholders out of current and accumulated earnings and profits (and not designated as capital gain dividends or qualified dividend income) generally will be taxable as ordinary income. Noncorporate stockholders are entitled to a 20% deduction with respect to these ordinary REIT dividends which would result in a maximum effective federal income tax rate of 29.6% (or 33.4% including the 3.8% surtax on net investment income); however, the 20% deduction will end after December 31, 2025. However, a portion of our distributions may: (1) be designated by us as capital gain dividends generally taxable as long-term capital gain to the extent that they are attributable to net capital gain recognized by us; (2) be designated by us as qualified dividend income, taxable at capital gains rates, generally to the extent they are attributable to dividends we receive from any taxable REIT subsidiaries or certain other taxable “C corporations” in which we own shares of stock; or (3) constitute a return of capital generally to the extent that they exceed our current and accumulated earnings and profits as determined for U.S. federal income tax purposes. A return of capital is not taxable but has the effect of reducing the tax basis of a stockholder’s investment in our common stock.  Distributions that exceed our current and accumulated earnings and profits and a stockholder’s tax basis in our common stock generally will be taxable as capital gain.

To maintain our REIT status, we must meet annual distribution requirements, which may force us to forgo otherwise attractive opportunities or borrow funds during unfavorable market conditions. This could delay or hinder our ability to meet our investment objectives and reduce our stockholders’ overall return.

To qualify as a REIT, we must distribute to our stockholders each year at least 90% of our REIT taxable income, determined without regard to the deduction for dividends paid and excluding any net capital gain. We will be subject to U.S. federal income tax on our undistributed REIT taxable income and net capital gain and to a 4% nondeductible excise tax on any amount by which distributions we make with respect to any calendar year are less than the sum of (a) 85% of our ordinary income, (b) 95% of our capital gain net income and (c) 100% of our undistributed income from prior years. At times, we may not have sufficient funds to satisfy these distribution requirements and may need to borrow funds or sell assets to fund these distributions, maintain our REIT status and avoid the payment of income and excise taxes.

Certain of our business activities are potentially subject to the prohibited transaction tax.

Our ability to dispose of property during the first two years following acquisition is restricted to a substantial extent as a result of our REIT status. Under applicable provisions of the Internal Revenue Code regarding prohibited transactions by REITs, while we qualify as a REIT and provided we do not meet a safe harbor available under the Internal Revenue Code, we will be subject to a 100% penalty tax on the net income from the sale or other disposition of any property (other than foreclosure property) that we own, directly or indirectly through any subsidiary entity, but generally excluding taxable REIT subsidiaries, that is deemed to be inventory or property held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of a trade or business. Whether property is inventory or otherwise held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of a trade or business depends on the particular facts and circumstances surrounding each property. We intend to avoid the 100% prohibited transaction tax by (1) conducting activities that may otherwise be considered prohibited transactions through a taxable REIT subsidiary (but such taxable REIT subsidiary will incur corporate rate income taxes with respect to any income or gain recognized by it), (2) conducting our operations in such a manner so that no sale or other disposition of an asset we own, directly or indirectly through any subsidiary, will be treated as a prohibited transaction or (3) structuring certain dispositions of our properties to comply with the requirements of the prohibited transaction safe harbor available under the Internal Revenue Code for properties that, among other requirements, have been held for at least two years. Despite our present intention, no assurance can be given that any particular property we own, directly or indirectly through any subsidiary entity, but generally excluding taxable REIT subsidiaries, will not be treated as inventory or property held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of a trade or business. 

27


Complying with the REIT requirements may force us to liquidate otherwise attractive investments.

To continue to qualify as a REIT, we must ensure that at the end of each calendar quarter, at least 75% of the value of our assets consists of cash, cash items, certain government securities and qualified real estate assets, including shares of stock in other REITs, certain mortgage loans and mortgage-backed securities. The remainder of our investment in securities (other than securities that qualify for the 75% asset test and securities of qualified REIT subsidiaries and taxable REIT subsidiaries) generally cannot exceed 10% of the outstanding voting securities of any one issuer, 10% of the total value of the outstanding securities of any one issuer, or 5% of the value of our assets as to any one issuer.  In addition, no more than 25% of the value of our total assets may be securities (other than securities that qualify for the 75% asset test and securities of qualified REIT subsidiaries), no more than 20% of the value of our total assets may consist of stock or securities of one or more taxable REIT subsidiaries and no more than 25% of our assets may be represented by publicly offered REIT debt instruments that do not otherwise qualify under the 75% asset test. In order to meet these tests, we may be required to forego investments we might otherwise make. Thus, compliance with the REIT requirements may hinder our performance.

If we fail to comply with these requirements at the end of any calendar quarter, we must correct the failure within thirty days after the end of the calendar quarter, or otherwise qualify to cure the failure under a relief provision, to avoid losing our REIT status and suffering adverse tax consequences. As a result, we may be required to liquidate otherwise attractive investments.

Our stockholders may have tax liability on distributions that they elect to reinvest in our common stock.

If our stockholders participate in our DRP, they will be deemed to have received, and for income tax purposes will be taxed on, the fair market value of the share of our common stock that they receive in lieu of cash distributions. As a result, unless a stockholder is a tax-exempt entity, it will have to use funds from other sources to pay its tax liability.

Complying with REIT requirements may limit our ability to hedge effectively.

The REIT provisions of the Internal Revenue Code may limit our ability to hedge the risks inherent to our operations. Under current law, any income that we generate from derivatives or other transactions intended to hedge risk of interest rate changes, price changes or currency fluctuations with respect to borrowings made, or to be made, to acquire or carry real estate assets or in certain cases to hedge previously acquired hedges entered into to manage risks associated with property that has been disposed of or liabilities that have been extinguished, if properly identified under applicable Treasury Regulations, generally will not constitute gross income for purposes of the 75% and 95% income requirements applicable to REITs. To the extent that we enter into other types of hedging transactions, the income from those transactions will likely be treated as non-qualifying income for purposes of both of the gross income tests. As a result of these rules, we may need to limit our use of advantageous hedging techniques or implement those hedges through a taxable REIT subsidiary. This could increase the cost of our hedging activities because taxable REIT subsidiaries would be subject to tax on gains or expose us to greater risks associated with changes in interest rates than we would otherwise want to bear. In addition, losses in a taxable REIT subsidiary generally will not provide any tax benefit, except for being carried forward against future taxable income of such taxable REIT subsidiary.

Legislative or regulatory action could adversely affect investors.

Changes to the tax laws may occur, and any such changes could have an adverse effect on an investment in our shares or on the market value or the resale potential of our assets. Our stockholders are urged to consult with an independent tax advisor with respect to the status of legislative, regulatory or administrative developments and proposals and their potential effect on an investment in our shares. 

Although REITs generally receive more favorable tax treatment than entities taxed as “C corporations,” it is possible that future legislation would result in a REIT having fewer tax advantages, and it could become more advantageous for a company that invests in real estate to elect to be treated for federal income tax purposes as a “C corporation.” As a result, our charter provides our board of directors with the power, under certain circumstances, to revoke or otherwise terminate our REIT election and cause us to be taxed as a “C corporation,” without the vote of our stockholders. Our board of directors has fiduciary duties to us and our stockholders and could only cause such changes in our tax treatment if it determines in good faith that such changes are in the best interest of our stockholders.

28


Dividends payable by REITs generally do not qualify for the reduced tax rates available for some dividends.

Currently, the maximum tax rate applicable to qualified dividend income payable to U.S. stockholders that are individuals, trusts and estates is 23.8%, including the 3.8% surtax on net investment income. Dividends payable by REITs, however, generally are not eligible for this reduced rate and, as described above, through December 31, 2025, will be subject to an effective rate of 33.4%, including the 3.8% surtax on net investment income. Although this does not adversely affect the taxation of REITs or dividends payable by REITs, the more favorable rates applicable to regular corporate qualified dividends could cause investors who are individuals, trusts and estates to perceive investments in REITs to be relatively less attractive than investments in the stocks of non-REIT corporations that pay dividends, which could adversely affect the value of the shares of REITs, including our shares. Tax rates could be changed in future legislation.

 

Item 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

None.

Item 2.

Properties

(Dollar amounts in thousands, except per square foot amounts)

The table below presents a summary of our investment properties as of December 31, 2019 and 2018.

 

 

 

As of December 31,

2019

 

 

As of December 31,

2018

 

Number of properties

 

 

47

 

 

 

59

 

Purchase price

 

$

1,399,289

 

 

$

1,414,253

 

Total square footage

 

 

6,758,359

 

 

 

6,870,124

 

Weighted average physical occupancy

 

 

94.0

%

 

 

94.1

%

Weighted average economic occupancy

 

 

94.4

%

 

 

94.7

%

Weighted average remaining lease term (years)

 

 

5.5

 

 

 

6.0

 

 

As of December 31, 2019 and 2018, ABR per square foot averaged $17.54 and $17.30, respectively, for all properties owned. ABR is calculated by annualizing the monthly base rent for leases in-place as of the applicable date, including any tenant concessions, such as rent abatement or allowances, which may have been granted and excluding ground leases. ABR per square foot including ground leases averaged $15.08 and $14.94, as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

During the year ended December 31, 2019, we sold 12 properties and recognized a gain of $3,279 included in gain on sale of investment properties on the consolidated statement of operations and comprehensive loss.

29


The table below presents information for each of our investment properties as of December 31, 2019.

 

Property

 

Location

 

Square

Footage

 

 

Physical

Occupancy

 

 

Economic

Occupancy

 

 

Mortgage

Balance

 

 

Interest

Rate (b)

 

Newington Fair (a)

 

Newington, CT

 

 

186,205

 

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wedgewood Commons (a)

 

Olive Branch, MS

 

 

159,258

 

 

 

98.1

%

 

 

98.1

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Park Avenue (a)

 

Little Rock, AR

 

 

79,131

 

 

 

59.7

%

 

 

82.8

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

North Hills Square (a)

 

Coral Springs, FL

 

 

63,829

 

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mansfield Shopping Center (a)

 

Mansfield, TX

 

 

148,529

 

 

 

96.3

%

 

 

96.3

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lakeside Crossing (a)

 

Lynchburg, VA

 

 

67,034

 

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

MidTowne Shopping Center (a)

 

Little Rock, AR

 

 

126,288

 

 

 

88.6

%

 

 

88.6

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dogwood Festival (a)

 

Flowood, MS

 

 

187,610

 

 

 

90.9

%

 

 

90.9

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pick N Save Center (a)

 

West Bend, WI

 

 

94,000

 

 

 

91.9

%

 

 

91.9

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harris Plaza (a)

 

Layton, UT

 

 

125,965

 

 

 

80.4

%

 

 

80.4

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dixie Valley

 

Louisville, KY

 

 

119,981

 

 

 

92.5

%

 

 

92.5

%

 

 

6,798

 

 

 

3.57

%

The Landings at Ocean Isle (a)

 

Ocean Isle, NC

 

 

53,203

 

 

 

94.6

%

 

 

94.6

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shoppes at Prairie Ridge (a)

 

Pleasant Prairie, WI

 

 

232,606

 

 

 

91.9

%

 

 

91.9

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harvest Square

 

Harvest, AL

 

 

70,590

 

 

 

92.1

%

 

 

92.1

%

 

 

6,487

 

 

 

4.65

%

Heritage Square

 

Conyers, GA

 

 

22,510

 

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

4,460

 

 

 

5.10

%

The Shoppes at Branson Hills (a)

 

Branson, MO

 

 

256,329

 

 

 

80.2

%

 

 

80.2

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Branson Hills Plaza (a)

 

Branson, MO

 

 

210,201

 

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copps Grocery Store (a)

 

Stevens Point, WI

 

 

69,911

 

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fox Point Plaza (a)

 

Neenah, WI

 

 

171,121

 

 

 

84.3

%

 

 

84.3

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shoppes at Lake Park (a)

 

West Valley City, UT

 

 

52,997

 

 

 

96.1

%

 

 

96.1

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plaza at Prairie Ridge (a)

 

Pleasant Prairie, WI

 

 

9,035

 

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Green Tree Shopping Center

 

Katy, TX

 

 

147,621

 

 

 

98.3

%

 

 

98.3

%

 

 

13,100

 

 

 

3.24

%

Eastside Junction

 

Athens, AL

 

 

79,700

 

 

 

87.7

%

 

 

87.7

%

 

 

6,024

 

 

 

4.60

%

Fairgrounds Crossing

 

Hot Springs, AR

 

 

155,127

 

 

 

97.4

%

 

 

97.4

%

 

 

13,453

 

 

 

5.21

%

Prattville Town Center

 

Prattville, AL

 

 

168,842

 

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

15,930

 

 

 

5.48

%

Regal Court

 

Shreveport, LA

 

 

363,061

 

 

 

96.1

%

 

 

96.1

%

 

 

26,000

 

 

 

4.50

%

Shops at Hawk Ridge (a)

 

St. Louis, MO

 

 

75,951

 

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Walgreens Plaza

 

Jacksonville, NC

 

 

42,219

 

 

 

83.5

%

 

 

83.5

%

 

 

4,650

 

 

 

5.30

%

Whispering Ridge (a)

 

Omaha, NE

 

 

69,676

 

 

 

95.7

%

 

 

95.7

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frisco Marketplace (a)

 

Frisco, TX

 

 

112,024

 

 

 

94.9

%

 

 

94.9

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

White City

 

Shrewsbury, MA

 

 

257,121

 

 

 

88.8

%

 

 

90.1

%

 

 

49,400

 

 

 

3.24

%

Treasure Valley (a)

 

Nampa, ID

 

 

133,292

 

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yorkville Marketplace (a)

 

Yorkville, IL

 

 

111,591

 

 

 

91.3

%

 

 

91.3

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shoppes at Market Pointe

 

Papillion, NE

 

 

253,903

 

 

 

98.2

%

 

 

98.2

%

 

 

13,700

 

 

 

3.28

%

2727 Iowa Street (a)

 

Lawrence, KS

 

 

85,044

 

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Settlers Ridge

 

Pittsburgh, PA

 

 

473,821

 

 

 

99.1

%

 

 

99.1

%

 

 

76,532

 

 

 

3.70

%

Milford Marketplace

 

Milford, CT

 

 

111,720

 

 

 

89.4

%

 

 

89.4

%

 

 

18,727

 

 

 

4.02

%

Marketplace at El Paseo

 

Fresno, CA

 

 

224,683

 

 

 

98.8

%

 

 

98.8

%

 

 

38,000

 

 

 

2.95

%

Blossom Valley Plaza (a)

 

Turlock, CA

 

 

111,435

 

 

 

98.9

%

 

 

98.9

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Village at Burlington Creek

 

Kansas City, MO

 

 

158,049

 

 

 

75.5

%

 

 

76.2

%

 

 

17,723

 

 

 

4.25

%

Oquirrh Mountain Marketplace (a)

 

South Jordan, UT

 

 

75,950

 

 

 

97.2

%

 

 

97.2

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marketplace at Tech Center

 

Newport News, VA

 

 

210,297

 

 

 

93.7

%

 

 

95.0

%

 

 

47,550

 

 

 

3.15

%

Coastal North Town Center

 

Myrtle Beach, SC

 

 

304,662

 

 

 

95.6

%

 

 

95.6

%

 

 

43,680

 

 

 

3.17

%

Oquirrh Mountain Marketplace II (a)

 

South Jordan, UT

 

 

10,150

 

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wilson Marketplace (a)

 

Wilson, NC

 

 

311,030

 

 

 

99.1

%

 

 

99.1

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pentucket Shopping Center

 

Plaistow, NH

 

 

198,469

 

 

 

98.0

%

 

 

98.0

%

 

 

14,700

 

 

 

3.65

%

Coastal North Town Center - Phase II

 

Myrtle Beach, SC

 

 

6,588

 

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Portfolio total

 

 

 

 

6,758,359

 

 

 

94.0

%

 

 

94.4

%

 

$

416,914

 

 

 

3.69

%

 

(a)

Property is included in the pool of unencumbered properties under our Credit Facility.

(b)

Portfolio total is equal to the weighted average interest rate.

30


Tenancy Highlights

The following table presents information regarding the top ten tenants in our portfolio based on annualized base rent for leases in-place as of December 31, 2019.

 

Tenant Name

 

Number of

Leases

 

 

Annualized

Base Rent

 

 

Percent of

Total

Portfolio

Annualized

Base Rent

 

 

Annualized

Base Rent

Per Square

Foot

 

 

Square

Footage

 

 

Percent

of Total

Portfolio

Square

Footage

 

The Kroger Co

 

 

4

 

 

$

3,374

 

 

 

3.5

%

 

$

13.52

 

 

 

249,493

 

 

 

3.7

%

Dicks Sporting Goods, Inc

 

 

6

 

 

 

3,269

 

 

 

3.4

%

 

 

11.84

 

 

 

276,038

 

 

 

4.1

%

TJ Maxx/HomeGoods/Marshalls

 

 

13

 

 

 

3,219

 

 

 

3.3

%

 

 

9.78

 

 

 

329,253

 

 

 

4.9

%

PetSmart

 

 

10

 

 

 

2,926

 

 

 

3.0

%

 

 

15.08

 

 

 

194,077

 

 

 

2.9

%

Ross Dress for Less, Inc

 

 

10

 

 

 

2,633

 

 

 

2.7

%

 

 

10.15

 

 

 

259,487

 

 

 

3.8

%

Albertsons/Jewel/Shaw’s

 

 

2

 

 

 

2,304

 

 

 

2.4

%

 

 

18.02

 

 

 

127,892

 

 

 

1.9

%

Ulta Salon, Cosmetics & Fragrance

 

 

10

 

 

 

2,281

 

 

 

2.4

%

 

 

21.87

 

 

 

104,276

 

 

 

1.6

%

LA Fitness (Fitness International)

 

 

2

 

 

 

1,890

 

 

 

2.0

%

 

 

21.09

 

 

 

89,600

 

 

 

1.3

%

Kohl's Department Stores

 

 

4

 

 

 

1,888

 

 

 

2.0

%

 

 

5.68

 

 

 

332,461

 

 

 

4.9

%

Giant Eagle

 

 

1

 

 

 

1,805

 

 

 

1.9

%

 

 

13.96

 

 

 

129,340

 

 

 

1.9

%

Top ten tenants

 

 

62

 

 

$

25,589

 

 

 

26.6

%

 

$

12.23

 

 

 

2,091,917

 

 

 

31.0

%

 

The following table sets forth a summary of our tenant diversity for our entire portfolio and is based on leases in-place at December 31, 2019.

 

Tenant Type

 

Gross Leasable

Area – Square

Footage

 

 

Percent of

Total Gross

Leasable Area

 

 

Percent of

Total Annualized

Base Rent

 

Discount and Department Stores

 

 

1,478,583

 

 

 

23.2

%

 

 

11.6

%

Home Goods

 

 

1,002,550

 

 

 

15.7

%

 

 

9.2

%

Grocery

 

 

950,042

 

 

 

14.9

%

 

 

14.1

%

Lifestyle, Health Clubs, Books & Phones

 

 

801,688

 

 

 

12.6

%

 

 

15.9

%

Restaurant

 

 

538,790

 

 

 

8.4

%

 

 

16.1

%

Apparel & Accessories

 

 

429,711

 

 

 

6.7

%

 

 

9.7

%

Sporting Goods

 

 

333,719

 

 

 

5.2

%

 

 

4.7

%

Pet Supplies

 

 

288,642

 

 

 

4.5

%

 

 

4.7

%

Consumer Services, Salons, Cleaners, Banks

 

 

253,689

 

 

 

4.0

%

 

 

7.2

%

Health, Doctors & Health Foods

 

 

159,091

 

 

 

2.5

%

 

 

4.7

%

Other

 

 

143,437

 

 

 

2.3

%

 

 

2.1

%

Total

 

 

6,379,942

 

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

The following table sets forth a summary of our property type based on annualized base rent in-place for leases as of December 31, 2019.

 

Property Type

 

Percent of Total

Annualized Base Rent

 

Grocery

 

 

52

%

Grocery Shadow-Anchored

 

 

31

%

Community Center

 

 

10

%

Power Center

 

 

7

%

Total

 

 

100

%

 

31


The following table sets forth a summary, as of December 31, 2019, of the percent of total annualized base rent and the weighted average lease expiration by size of tenant.

 

Size of Tenant

 

Description -

Square

Footage

 

Percent of

Total

Annualized

Base Rent