10-K 1 d658284d10k.htm 10-K 10-K
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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-K

 

 

(Mark One)

 

x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended February 1, 2014

or

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                     to                    

Commission file number: 001-35720

 

 

RESTORATION HARDWARE HOLDINGS, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Delaware   45-3052669

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification Number)

15 Koch Road, Suite J

Corte Madera, CA

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

94925

(Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (415) 924-1005

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Common Stock, $0.0001 par value   New York Stock Exchange, Inc.
(Title of class)   (Name of each exchange on which registered)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

 

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer   x    Accelerated filer   ¨
Non-accelerated filer   ¨  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)    Smaller reporting company   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ¨    No  x

As of August 3, 2013, the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second quarter, the approximate market value of the registrant’s common stock held by non-affiliates was $1,696,344,000. Solely for purposes of this disclosure, shares of common stock held by executive officers and directors of the registrant as of such date have been excluded because such persons may be deemed to be affiliates.

As of March 21, 2014, 38,887,454 shares of registrant’s common stock were outstanding.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the registrant’s Proxy Statement for its 2013 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated by reference in Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K where indicated. Such proxy statement will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days of the registrant’s fiscal year ended February 1, 2014.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

RESTORATION HARDWARE HOLDINGS, INC.

INDEX TO FORM 10-K

 

          

Page

 
  PART I.   

Item 1.

  Business      1   

Item 1A.

  Risk Factors      10   

Item 1B.

  Unresolved Staff Comments      31   

Item 2.

  Properties      31   

Item 3.

  Legal Proceedings      32   

Item 4.

  Mine Safety Disclosures      32   
  PART II.   

Item 5.

 

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

     33   

Item 6.

  Selected Consolidated Financial Data      35   

Item 7.

  Management’s Discussion And Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations      41   

Item 7A.

  Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk      65   

Item 8.

  Financial Statements and Supplementary Data      66   

Item 9.

  Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure      102   

Item 9A.

  Controls and Procedures      102   

Item 9B.

  Other Information      102   
  PART III.   

Item 10.

  Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance      103   

Item 11.

  Executive Compensation      103   

Item 12.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

     103   

Item 13.

  Certain Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence      103   

Item 14.

  Principal Accountant Fees and Services      103   
  PART IV.   

Item 15.

  Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules      104   

 

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SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS AND MARKET DATA

This annual report contains forward-looking statements that are subject to risks and uncertainties. Forward-looking statements give our current expectations and projections relating to our financial condition, results of operations, plans, objectives, future performance and business. You can identify forward-looking statements by the fact that they do not relate strictly to historical or current facts. These statements may include words such as “anticipate,” “estimate,” “expect,” “project,” “plan,” “intend,” “believe,” “may,” “will,” “should,” “likely” and other words and terms of similar meaning in connection with any discussion of the timing or nature of future operating or financial performance or other events.

Forward-looking statements are subject to risk and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from those that we expected. We derive many of our forward-looking statements from our operating budgets and forecasts, which are based upon many detailed assumptions. While we believe that our assumptions are reasonable, we caution that it is very difficult to predict the impact of known factors and it is impossible for us to anticipate all factors that could affect our actual results. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from our expectations, or cautionary statements, are disclosed in Item 1ARisk Factors, Item 7Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, and elsewhere in this annual report. All forward-looking statements attributable to us, or persons acting on our behalf, are expressly qualified in their entirety by these cautionary statements, as well as other cautionary statements. You should evaluate all forward-looking statements made in this annual report in the context of these risks and uncertainties.

We cannot assure you that we will realize the results or developments we expect or anticipate or, even if substantially realized, that they will result in the consequences or affect us or our operations in the way we expect. The forward-looking statements included in this annual report are made only as of the date hereof. We undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statement as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as otherwise required by law.

 

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PART I

 

Item 1. Business

Overview

Restoration Hardware Holdings, Inc. (“RH” or the “Company”) is a leading luxury retailer in the home furnishings marketplace. Our collections of timeless, updated classics and reproductions are presented consistently across our sales channels in sophisticated and unique lifestyle settings that we believe are on par with world-class interior designers. We offer dominant merchandise assortments across a growing number of categories, including furniture, lighting, textiles, bathware, décor, outdoor and garden, tableware and children’s furnishings. Our ability to innovate, curate and integrate products, categories, services and businesses with a completely authentic and distinctive point of view, then rapidly scale them across our fully integrated multi-channel infrastructure is a powerful platform for continued long-term growth. We evolved our brand to become RH, positioning our Company to curate a lifestyle beyond the four walls of the home. Our unique product development, go-to-market and supply chain capabilities, together with our significant scale, enable us to offer a compelling combination of design, quality and value that we believe is unparalleled in the marketplace.

Our business is fully integrated across our multiple channels of distribution, consisting of our stores, catalogs and websites. As of February 1, 2014, we operated a total of 70 retail stores, consisting of 62 Galleries, 5 Full Line Design Galleries and 3 Baby & Child Galleries, as well as 17 outlet stores throughout the United States and Canada. In fiscal 2013, we distributed approximately 12.3 million Source Books, and our websites logged approximately 22.2 million unique visits.

We have achieved strong growth in sales and profitability, as illustrated by the following:

 

   

Net revenues increased 30% to $1.6 billion in fiscal 2013, on top of a 25% increase in fiscal 2012 and a 24% increase in fiscal 2011.

 

   

The fourth quarter of fiscal 2013 marked our 16th consecutive quarter of double-digit net revenue growth.

 

   

Our net income increased to $18.2 million in fiscal 2013 from a net loss of $12.8 million in fiscal 2012.

 

   

Our adjusted net income increased 83% to $69.1 million in fiscal 2013 from fiscal 2012.

Growth Strategy

Key elements of our growth strategy are to:

Transform Our Real Estate Platform. We believe we have an opportunity to significantly increase our sales by transforming our real estate platform from our existing retail footprint to a portfolio focused on Full Line Design Galleries. Our Full Line Design Galleries are sized based on the market potential and the size of our assortment. Based on our analysis, we believe we have opportunities to operate Full Line Design Galleries in 60 to 70 locations in the United States and Canada.

Expand Our Offering and Increase Our Market Share. We believe we have a significant opportunity to increase our market share by growing our merchandise assortment, introducing new products and categories, expanding our service offerings and exploring and testing new business opportunities complementary to our core business.

Increase Brand Awareness. We will continue to increase our brand awareness and customer loyalty through our real estate transformation, our circulation strategy, our digital marketing initiatives, and our advertising and public relations activities and events.

 

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Pursue International Expansion. We plan to strategically expand our business into select countries outside of the United States and Canada over the next several years. We believe that our luxury brand positioning and unique aesthetic will have strong international appeal.

Increase Operating Margins. We have the opportunity to continue to improve our operating margins by leveraging our fixed occupancy costs and scalable infrastructure. We believe that our real estate transformation, specifically consolidating multiple Galleries into single Full Line Design Galleries, will allow us to better leverage our fixed occupancy costs.

Products

We are merchants of luxury home furnishings offering collections of timeless, updated classics and reproductions. We operate as a curator of products that we regard as the finest historical design. Our luxury products embody our design aesthetic and reflect inspiration from across the centuries and around the globe. Our objective is to position RH as a lifestyle brand and design authority by offering dominant merchandise assortments across a growing number of categories, including furniture, lighting, textiles, bathware, décor, outdoor and garden, tableware and children’s furnishings.

Product Development

We have architected a proprietary product development platform that is fully integrated from ideation to presentation. We have streamlined our product development organization and process to shorten product lead times and enhance our ability to introduce more new products with each collection. Key aspects of our product development platform are:

 

   

Organization—We have established a collaborative, cross-functional organization centered on product leadership and coordinated across our product development, sourcing, merchandising, inventory and creative teams. Our product teams are focused on maximizing the sales potential of each product category across all channels, which eliminates the channel conflicts and functional redundancies often found in other retail organizations.

 

   

Process—For many of our products, we work closely with our network of artisan partners who possess specialized product development and manufacturing capabilities and who we consider an extension of our product development team. We collaborate with our global network of specialty vendors and manufacturers to produce artisanal pieces on a large scale with a high level of quality and value, including both distinctive original designs and reinterpretations of antiques.

 

   

Facility—We have built the RH Center of Innovation and Product Leadership, a facility which supports the entire product development process, from product ideation to presentation for all channels.

As a result of our proprietary organization, process and facility, our typical product lead times are 3 – 9 months, which enhances our ability to introduce more new products with each collection. In addition, our product development platform, sourcing capabilities and significant scale have enabled us to reduce our product costs.

Sales Channels

We distribute our products through a fully integrated sales platform comprised of our stores, catalogs and websites. We believe the level of integration among all of our channels and our approach to the market distinguishes us from most other retailers. For fiscal 2013, sales of products originating in our stores represented 53% of our net revenues, while sales from our direct business represented 47% of our net revenues. We believe our channels complement each other and our customers’ buying decisions are influenced by their experiences across more than one of our sales channels. We encourage our customers to shop across our channels and have aligned our business and internal organization to be channel agnostic. Our integrated distribution and product delivery network serves all of our channels.

 

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We believe the key advantage of our multiple sales channels is our ability to leverage the unique attributes of each channel in our approach to the market. Our catalog mailings serve as a key driver of sales through both our websites and retail stores. Through our Source Book strategy, we have expanded the page count and circulation of our catalogs to expose more customers to a broader product assortment. Our customers respond to the Source Books across all of our channels, with sales trends closely correlating to the assortments that we emphasize and feature prominently both in our Source Books and in our stores. Our retail stores reinforce our luxury brand aesthetic and showcase product collections in lifestyle settings consistent with the presentation in our direct channels. In addition, our store associates use iPads and other devices to allow customers to shop our entire merchandise assortment while in the store.

We maintain a database of customer information, which include sales patterns, detailed purchasing information, certain demographic information, geographic locations and email addresses of our customers. As of February 1, 2014, our customer database contained approximately 15.0 million names. This database supports our ability to analyze our customers’ buying behaviors across sales channels and facilitates the development of targeted marketing strategies. We segment our customer files based on multiple variables, and we tailor our catalog mailings and emails in response to the purchasing patterns and product needs of our customers. We focus on continually improving the segmentation of customer files and the expansion of our customer database.

In addition to our core channels, we are also expanding into professional services channels, including Trade and Contract. In the Trade channel, we work directly with independent interior designers purchasing for their businesses. Separately, we sell directly to customers who make purchases with the assistance of their own interior designers or decorators, which we refer to as “designer-assisted sales.” We are also expanding our Contract business, which services hospitality, real estate development, and other business clients. These channels offer additional avenues for reaching new customers, including both businesses and individuals.

Stores

Retail Stores

As of February 1, 2014, we operated a total of 70 retail stores throughout the United States and Canada, consisting of 62 Galleries, 5 Full Line Design Galleries and 3 Baby & Child Galleries. Our retail stores are located primarily in upscale malls and street locations. We believe situating our stores in desirable locations with high visibility is critical to the success of our business, and we identify store locations based on several store specific aspects including geographic location, demographics, and proximity to other high-end specialty retail stores. We pursue a market based sales strategy, whereby we assess each market’s overall sales potential and how best to approach the market across all of our channels. We customize square footage and catalog circulation to maximize each market’s sales potential and increase our return on invested capital.

We currently operate three distinct store types with the following selling square footage as of February 1, 2014: (1) our Full Line Design Gallery format, which averaged approximately 21,600 selling square feet, (2) our Gallery format, which averaged approximately 7,400 selling square feet, and (3) our Baby & Child Gallery format. We are in the process of introducing larger versions of our Full Line Design Gallery format, as discussed further below. We anticipate that our Full Line Design Galleries will include dedicated Baby & Child retail space and we will continue to evaluate potential opportunities for stand-alone Baby & Child Galleries in other markets.

Our store formats convey a design aesthetic and shopping environment that is highly differentiated from other home furnishings retailers. We have reconceptualized the customer experience by showcasing products in a sophisticated lifestyle setting that we believe is on par with world-class interior designers, consistent with the imagery and product presentation featured in our catalogs and on our websites. Products in our stores are presented in fully appointed rooms, emphasizing collections over individual pieces. This presentation encourages a higher average order value as customers are inspired to purchase a full collection of products to replicate the design aesthetic found in our stores. Our goal is to optimize our selling space to display a greater number of products, which should result in higher sales productivity and profitability. On average, our retail stores display

 

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less than 20% of our current product assortment. Based on our historical performance, when a product is presented on the selling floor, we experience a significant increase in sales for that product across all of our channels. Our newer, larger store model, the Full Line Design Gallery, significantly enhances our merchandise presentation and customer experience to capitalize on this opportunity for sales growth.

Full Line Design Galleries are shopping destinations in iconic or high-profile locations with high customer visibility that enhance the RH brand. Our strategy is to size these new Full Line Design Galleries based on the potential of each market and the size of our assortment. Based on recent trends and our plans for product assortment expansion and new businesses, we are generally targeting a range of 25,000 to 60,000 square feet for new locations. Our goal is to accommodate a dominant presentation of certain core product categories such as hardware, bathware, rugs and flooring, windows, bed and bath linens, our expanded living, dining, bed and bath assortment, Baby & Child, Small Spaces, RH Design Services, and in many markets, a year-round Outdoor & Garden assortment. This increased size will also support other brand-enhancing offerings such as cafés and wine bars.

The table below highlights certain information regarding our retail stores open during the three years ended February 1, 2014.

 

     Fiscal Year  
     2013     2012     2011  

Stores open at beginning of period

     71        74        91   

Stores opened

     2        5        5   

Stores closed

     (3     (8     (22
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Stores open at end of period

     70        71        74   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

We continually analyze opportunities to selectively consolidate stores in connection with openings of our Full Line Design Galleries or close stores which have been under-performing or are no longer consistent with our brand positioning. In many cases, we continue to operate a store until its lease has expired in order to effect the closure in a cost-efficient manner. In fiscal 2011, we recorded a charge of $3.2 million, relating primarily to closing stores prior to lease expiration.

The following list shows the number of retail stores in each U.S. state and each Canadian province where we operate as of February 1, 2014:

 

Location

   Store     

Location

   Store     

Location

   Store  

Alabama

     1       Massachusetts      1       Rhode Island      1   

Arizona

     1       Michigan      1       Tennessee      1   

California

     17       Minnesota      1       Texas      6   

Colorado

     1       Missouri      2       Utah      1   

Connecticut

     2       New Jersey      2       Virginia      2   

Florida

     4       New York      3       Washington      1   

Georgia

     1       North Carolina      2       District of Columbia      1   

Illinois

     3       Ohio      3       Alberta      2   

Indiana

     1       Oklahoma      1       British Columbia      1   

Louisiana

     1       Oregon      1       Ontario      2   

Maryland

     1       Pennsylvania      2         
              

 

 

 
            Total      70   
              

 

 

 

 

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Outlet Stores

As of February 1, 2014, we operated 16 outlet stores in 13 states in the United States and 1 outlet store in Canada. Our outlet stores are branded as Restoration Hardware Outlet or RH Outlet and located primarily in large outlet malls. Our outlet stores serve as an efficient means to sell discontinued or irregular inventory outside of our core sales channels.

Source Books

We produce a series of catalogs, that we refer to as Source Books, to showcase our merchandise assortment. In 2013, these included our Interiors, Outdoor, Baby & Child, Objects of Curiosity, Small Spaces and Tableware Source Books. Our catalogs are one of our primary branding and advertising vehicles. We have been expanding the page counts of our Source Books, which allow us to showcase nearly our entire product assortment. For example, our Spring 2013 Source Books presented over 80% of our product assortment at the time of publication. We have found that when we display a greater merchandise assortment in our Source Books, we experience increased sales across all of our channels. As in our retail stores, our Source Books present our merchandise in lifestyle settings that represent our unique design aesthetic. Our Source Books also feature profiles of select artisan vendors and other compelling editorial content regarding home décor. All creative work on our catalogs is coordinated by our in-house personnel in our RH Center of Innovation & Product Leadership, providing us greater control over the brand image presented to our customers, while also reducing our catalog production costs.

We use our catalogs to drive sales across all of our channels, and we generally experience increased sales of the products featured in our catalogs. We mail our catalogs to addresses from our proprietary customer database, as well as to addresses provided to us by third parties. We also use customer data that we collect to determine which prospective customers are most likely to respond to our catalogs.

Our catalogs, in concert with our e-commerce channel, are a cost-effective means of testing new products, and allow us to launch categories in a disciplined, expeditious and cost-effective manner.

E-Commerce

Our primary websites, www.restorationhardware.com and www.rh.com, provide our customers with the ability to purchase our merchandise online. In May 2008, we launched www.rhbabyandchild.com, an e-commerce enabled website devoted to our children’s furnishings category. In May 2011, we launched apps for smartphones and tablets that enable customers to browse our growing product assortment.

Our e-commerce platform provides simplicity and ease of use while allowing customers to experience the RH lifestyle reflected in our catalogs and throughout our stores. We update our websites on a regular basis to reflect product availability and special offers. In fiscal 2013, our websites logged approximately 22.2 million unique visits, an increase of 17% over fiscal 2012.

We display substantially all of our current product assortment on our websites. The websites also offer a room-based navigation, which allows the customer to envision and shop items by room or by product, expanding on the richness of the online experience. For example, customers can search our websites for products by size or color, browse through our extensive product categories and see detailed information about each item and collection, such as dimensions, materials and care instructions. Additionally, customers can select color swatches and view merchandise displayed with different color and fabric options.

Marketing and Advertising

We employ a variety of marketing and advertising vehicles to drive customer traffic across all our channels, strengthen and reinforce our brand image and acquire new customers. These include targeted catalog circulation,

 

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promotional mailings, email communications, online and print advertisements and public relations activities and events. We maintain a database of approximately 15.0 million customers, which includes sales patterns, detailed purchasing information, demographic data, geographic locations and postal and email addresses. We use this information to tailor our programs and increase productivity of our marketing and promotion initiatives. We leverage our marketing and advertising expenses across all our channels as we seek to optimize the efficiency of our investment.

Our stores and our Source Books are the primary branding and advertising vehicles for the RH brands. The highly-differentiated design aesthetic and shopping environment of our stores drive customer traffic not only to our stores but also to our direct channels. Our Source Books and targeted emails further reinforce the RH brand image and drive sales across all of our sales channels. We also engage in a wide range of other marketing, promotional and public relations activities to promote our brands. These campaigns include media coverage in design, lifestyle, culture/society and specialty publications, as well as in-store events related to new store openings and product launches. We also engage print advertising in brand-relevant publications such as Architectural Digest, Elle Décor, Town and Country, Veranda, DuJour and others, and from time to time have also engaged in online advertising. We believe that these efforts will drive increased brand awareness, leading to higher sales in our stores and our direct business over time.

Sourcing

We do not own or operate any manufacturing facilities; instead, we contract with third-party vendors for the manufacture of our merchandise. Our sourcing strategy focuses on identifying and using vendors that can provide the quality materials and fine craftsmanship that our customers expect of our brand. To ensure that our high standards of quality and timely delivery of merchandise are met, we work closely with vendors and manufacturers. We seek to ensure the consistent quality of our manufacturers’ products by selectively inspecting pre-production samples, conducting periodic site visits to certain of our vendors’ production facilities and by selectively inspecting inbound shipments at our distribution facilities. In fiscal 2013, we sourced approximately 75% of our purchase dollar volume from approximately 33 vendors. In fiscal 2013, one vendor accounted for approximately 12% of our purchase dollar volume. Based on total dollar volume of purchases for fiscal 2013, approximately 69% of our products were sourced in Asia, the majority of which originated from China, 26% from the United States and the remainder from other regions.

We have a limited number of long-term merchandise supply contracts but we believe that we generally have strong relationships with our product vendors. Although we transact business primarily on an order by order basis, we typically work with many of our vendors over extended periods of time, and many vendors are making long-term capacity investments to serve our increasing demands. Over the last several years, we engaged in a sourcing initiative to develop closer relationships with our vendors in order to achieve better efficiencies and further improve our product development process. Through this process, we have eliminated the use of most third party purchasing agents in favor of a model in which we directly manage our vendors. We have achieved significant cost savings and other efficiencies from this initiative.

Distribution and Delivery

We manage the distribution and delivery of our products through nine facilities, each of which serves all of our sales channels:

 

   

Our West Jefferson, Ohio facility is approximately 1,224,000 square feet. It serves as our distribution center for all of our small parcel direct-to-customer orders and retail store replenishment. It is also the site of one of our three customer service centers.

 

   

Our North East, Maryland facility is approximately 1,195,000 square feet and is located near our Baltimore facility. It serves as our primary furniture distribution center for the Eastern regions of the United States and Canada.

 

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Our Mira Loma, California facility is approximately 886,000 square feet. It serves as a furniture distribution center for the Western regions of the United States and Canada, as well as the furniture home delivery hub for the greater Los Angeles metropolitan area.

 

   

Our Grand Prairie, Texas facility is approximately 859,000 square feet. It supports our furniture distribution for the Central and Southern regions within the United States and houses our newest customer service center. This facility also serves as the furniture delivery hub for the greater Dallas metropolitan area and central Texas region.

 

   

Our Baltimore, Maryland facility is approximately 508,000 square feet. It serves as a secondary furniture distribution center for the Eastern regions of the United States and Canada, as well as a furniture home delivery hub for the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. metropolitan areas.

 

   

Our Tracy, California facility is approximately 284,000 square feet. It serves as the furniture home delivery hub for the San Francisco Bay Area region and as a supplemental storage facility for our furniture distribution network. This location also houses our largest customer service center.

 

   

Our Avenel, New Jersey facility is approximately 114,000 square feet. It serves as the furniture delivery hub for the greater New York/New Jersey metropolitan area.

 

   

Our Pompano Beach, Florida facility is approximately 101,000 square feet. It services as the furniture delivery hub for the greater Miami metropolitan area and southern Florida region.

 

   

Our Houston, Texas facility is approximately 71,000 square feet. It serves as the furniture delivery hub for the greater Houston metropolitan area and eastern Texas region.

We offer a white glove home delivery service for our larger merchandise and furniture categories, where our delivery personnel assist our customers by delivering fully assembled items to the location of their choice. We operate portions of our home delivery services in seven key markets to leverage operating costs and improve our customers’ delivery experience, while reducing returns and damage to our products. We plan to continue this trend of in-sourcing these services in additional markets over time, including in 2014, while managing deliveries in other markets through third-party vendors.

Through expansions and upgrades to our warehousing, distribution and delivery operations over the last seven years, we have improved our supply chain and fulfillment capabilities, and have built a scalable infrastructure with significant capacity to support our future growth. We believe our enhanced supply chain and fulfillment operations allow us to manage customer orders and distribute merchandise to stores and customers in an efficient and cost-effective manner. We also believe that these upgrades have improved customer satisfaction by reducing delivery times, reducing damage to merchandise, and improving our customer’s overall buying experience.

We intend to continue to strengthen our supply chain operations through a number of key initiatives in 2014 designed to improve our fulfillment and delivery logistics performance and to achieve greater efficiencies in the management of our inventories.

Management and Information Technology

We use industry-standard information technology systems to provide customer service, business process support, and business intelligence across our sales channels. Our technology team continues to systematically upgraded several of our core systems, including:

 

   

Implementing new inventory management capabilities to improve inventory productivity and service levels across our supply chain;

 

   

Implementing enhanced special order capabilities optimizing processes to support our increasingly expanding product assortment;

 

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Enhancing our in-store and web commerce capabilities with state-of-the art technology to optimize performance and improve the customer shopping experience;

 

   

Implementing supply chain technology and enhancements to support our expanding supply chain network improving operating efficiencies, accuracy, and service levels; and

 

   

Implementing a new enterprise data warehouse platform upgrade enhancing performance to equip management with more timely analysis of the current business trends, results, and comparisons to our historical performance.

We believe these substantial upgrades to our information technology systems provide management with the ability to drive ongoing improvement in our operating model, focus on efficiency opportunities, and increase management control. New access to results through our technology tools also equips management to more timely identify, analyze and respond to business trends.

Over the next several years, we intend to further enhance our IT capabilities to support our growth. Key initiatives include:

 

   

Further enhancing our delivery, order orchestration, inventory optimization solutions and order management to maximize operating efficiencies focused on enhancing the end-to-end customer experience;

 

   

Implementing enhanced in-store, web, and care center customer service and commerce technology to provide enhanced customer insight and capabilities to support our luxury customer experience; and

 

   

Continuing our expansion and redefinition of business intelligence capabilities to optimize information for timely decision making.

We are committed to a high level of integration in technology across our business. We believe our approach to technology demonstrates an appropriate balance of strategic planning and innovation to support both today’s business and tomorrow’s growth.

Competition

The home furnishings industry is highly competitive. We primarily compete against a large number of independent retailers that provide unique items and custom-designed product offerings at high price points, including antique dealers and home furnishings retailers who market to the interior design community. We also compete with national and regional home furnishings retailers and department stores, as well as with mail order catalogs and online retailers focused on home furnishings.

We believe we compete primarily on the basis of design, quality, value and customer service. We believe our distinct combination of design, quality and value allows us to compete effectively and we believe we differentiate ourselves from competitors based on the strength of our brand, products and our fully integrated multi-channel business model. We compete with the interior design trade and specialty merchants by providing a broader product assortment at an exceptional value based both upon the price and quality of our products. We compete against certain other home furnishings retailers primarily by offering what we believe is superior quality, highly distinctive design styles and a sophisticated lifestyle presentation in our product offering.

We also believe that our success depends in substantial part on our ability to originate and define product trends, as well as to timely anticipate, gauge and react to changing consumer demands. Certain of our competitors are larger and have greater financial, marketing and other resources than us. However, many smaller specialty retailers may lack the financial resources, infrastructure, scale and national brand identity necessary to compete effectively with us.

 

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Employees

As of February 1, 2014, we had approximately 3,600 employees, of which approximately 1,000 were part-time employees. As of that date, approximately 1,900 of our employees were based in our stores. None of our employees is represented by a union, and we have had no labor-related work stoppages. We believe our relations with our employees are good.

Intellectual Property

The “RH”, “Restoration Hardware” and “Baby & Child” trademarks, among others, are registered or are the subject of pending trademark applications with the United States Patent and Trademark Office and with the trademark registries of several foreign countries. Each of our trademark registrations is perpetually renewable provided that we use or continue to use the trademarks in commerce in the particular geographic market and for the goods or services covered by the registration. In addition, we own many domain names, including “restorationhardware.com,” “rh.com,” “rhbabyandchild.com,” and others that include our trademarks. These domain names are perpetually renewable. We own design patents or pending applications to protect the ornamental appearance of several of our products. These design patents are valid for 14 years from the date of issuance. We own copyrights, including copyright registrations or pending applications, for several of our catalogs. We believe that our trademarks, design patents, and copyrights have significant value and we will vigorously protect them against infringement.

Fluctuation in Quarterly Results

Our quarterly results have historically varied depending upon a variety of factors, including our product offerings, promotional events, store openings, shifts in the timing of holidays and timing of catalog releases, among other things. As a result of these factors, our working capital requirements and demands on our product distribution and delivery network may fluctuate during the year.

Regulation and Legislation

We are subject to labor and employment laws, laws governing truth-in-advertising, privacy laws, safety regulations and other laws, including consumer protection regulations that regulate retailers and govern the promotion and sale of merchandise and the operation of stores and warehouse facilities. We monitor changes in these laws and believe that we are in material compliance with applicable laws.

Where You Can Find More Information

We are required to file annual, quarterly and current reports, proxy statements and other information required by the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, with the SEC. You may read and copy the reports and other information we file with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, N.E., Room 1580, Washington, D.C. 20549. You may also obtain copies of this information by mail from the public reference section of the SEC, 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549, at prescribed rates. You may obtain information regarding the operation of the public reference room by calling 1-800-SEC-0330. The SEC also maintains a website that contains reports, proxy statements and other information about issuers, like us, who file electronically with the SEC. The address of that website is http://www.sec.gov.

We maintain public internet sites at www.restorationhardware.com and www.rh.com and make available, free of charge, through these sites our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, Proxy Statements and Forms 3, 4 and 5 filed on behalf of directors and executive officers, as well as any amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to the Exchange Act as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the SEC. We also put on our websites the charters for our Board of Directors’ Audit Committee, Compensation Committee and Nominating

 

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Committee, as well as our Code of Business Conduct, our Corporate Governance Guidelines and Code of Ethics governing our chief executive and senior financial officers and other related materials. The information on our websites is not part of this annual report.

Our Investor Relations Department can be contacted at Restoration Hardware, Inc., 15 Koch Road, Suite J, Corte Madera, CA 94925, Attention: Investor Relations; telephone: 415-945-3500; e-mail: investorrelations@rh.com.

Item 1A. Risk Factors

Certain factors may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations. You should consider carefully the risks and uncertainties described below, in addition to other information contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including our consolidated financial statements and related notes. The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones we face. Additional risks and uncertainties that we are unaware of, or that we currently believe are not material, may also become important factors that adversely affect our business. If any of the following risks actually occurs, our business, financial condition, results of operations, and future prospects could be materially and adversely affected. In that event, the trading price of our common stock could decline, and you could lose part or all of your investment.

Risks Related to Our Business

Growth in our business may not be sustained and may not generate a corresponding improvement in our results of operations.

We may not be able to maintain or improve the levels of growth that we have experienced in the recent past. In addition, although we have recently experienced strong comparable brand revenue growth and comparable store sales, if our future comparable brand revenue growth and comparable store sales fail to meet market expectations or decline, the price of our common stock could decline. Various factors affect these measures, including the number, size and location of stores we open, close, remodel or expand in any period, the overall economic and general retail sales environment, consumer preferences and demand, our ability to efficiently source and distribute products, changes in our product offerings, competition, current local and global economic conditions, changes in catalog circulation and the success of marketing programs. These factors may cause our comparable brand revenue growth and comparable store sales results to be materially lower than recent periods and our expectations, which could harm our results of operations and result in a decline in the price of our common stock.

Although we have recently experienced sales growth as a result of a number of new business initiatives, this sales growth may not continue and the level of our sales could decrease if customer response to our product offerings is not sustained. Many factors can influence customer response to our product offerings and store formats including responses from our competitors, who may introduce similar products or merchandise formats. In addition, sales levels for particular merchandise or product categories may not continue over time if customer demand levels are not sustained. The level of customer response to our Full Line Design Galleries may vary in different markets and store locations. Similarly, the level of customer response to our Source Book catalog format, in which we display a greater percentage of our product assortment, may vary in different markets. In addition, there can be no assurance that we will be able to migrate customer demand successfully when we choose to close a store in a particular location in favor of a Full Line Design Gallery in the same or an adjacent market location. While our objective is to retain a high percentage of customer demand from store locations that we close, there can be no assurance that we will retain a high percentage of sales from stores closed in the future or that we will continue to retain a high percentage of sales from stores previously closed.

In addition, these developments in our business could result in material changes in our operating costs, including increased merchandise inventory costs and costs for paper and postage associated with the mailing and

 

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shipping of catalogs and products. We cannot assure you that we will succeed in offsetting these expenses with increased efficiency or that cost increases associated with our business will not have an adverse effect on our financial results.

If we fail to successfully anticipate consumer preferences and demand, or to manage our inventory commensurate with demand, our results of operations may be adversely affected.

Our success depends in large part on our ability to originate and define home product trends, as well as to anticipate, gauge and react to changing consumer demands in a timely manner. Our products must appeal to a range of consumers whose preferences cannot always be predicted with certainty. We cannot assure you that we will be able to continue to develop products that customers positively respond to or that we will successfully meet consumer demands in the future. Any failure on our part to anticipate, identify or respond effectively to consumer preferences and demand could adversely affect sales of our products. If this occurs, our sales may decline significantly, and we may be required to mark down certain products to sell the resulting excess inventory or to sell such inventory through our outlet stores, either of which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

In addition, we must manage our merchandise in stock and inventory levels to track consumer demand. Much of our merchandise requires that we provide vendors with significant ordering lead time, frequently before market factors are known. In addition, the seasonal nature of some of our products requires us to carry a significant amount of inventory prior to certain selling seasons. If we are not able to anticipate consumer demand for our different product offerings, or successfully manage inventory levels for products that are in demand, we may experience:

 

   

back orders, order cancellations and lost sales for products that are in high demand for which we did not stock adequate inventory; and

 

   

overstock inventory levels for products that have lower consumer demand, requiring us to take markdowns or other steps to sell slower-moving merchandise.

As a result of these and other factors, we are vulnerable to demand and pricing shifts and to misjudgments in the selection and timing of merchandise purchases.

Changes in consumer spending or the housing market may significantly harm our revenue and results of operations.

Our business depends on consumer demand for our products and, consequently, is sensitive to a number of factors that influence consumer spending in the retail home furnishings sector, including, among other things, the general state of the economy, capital and credit markets, consumer confidence, general business conditions, the availability and cost of consumer credit, the level of consumer debt, interest rates, level of taxes affecting consumers, housing prices, new construction and other activity in the housing sector and the state of the mortgage industry and other aspects of consumer credit tied to housing, including the availability and pricing of mortgage refinancings and home equity lines of credit. We believe that a number of these factors have had, and may continue to have, an adverse impact on the retail home furnishings sector, and have also affected our business and results, and these factors may make it difficult for us to accurately predict our operating and financial results for future periods. We believe that the housing market has been experiencing a recovery after a prolonged downtrend, and rising levels of home purchases and remodelings, in turn, have increased consumer spending on home furnishings. However, the overall economic outlook remains uncertain and there can be no assurance that any economic or housing recovery will be sustained or that our business will continue to perform well even in a stronger housing market.

 

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We are undertaking a large number of business initiatives at the same time and if these new initiatives are not successful, they may have a negative impact on our operating results.

We are experiencing rapid growth and undertaking a large number of new business initiatives. For example, we have developed and continue to refine and enhance our Full Line Design Gallery format which involves larger store square footage. We plan to continue to open Full Line Design Galleries in select major metropolitan markets and we expect to close a number of our older stores and replace them with the Full Line Design Gallery format. We also continue to add new product categories and to expand product assortments. For example, we introduced our new Tableware category in Spring 2013. We are currently contemplating other new product lines and extensions and complementary brand-enhancing businesses, as well as expanding sales to international markets. In addition, we are continuing a number of new initiatives in other areas of our business, including product sourcing and distribution and management information systems. For example, we have reduced the use of third-party buying agents in most foreign locations. Further, our Source Book strategy continues to evolve. We may incur costs for these new initiatives before we realize any corresponding revenue.

The number of current business initiatives could strain our financial, operational and management resources. In addition, these initiatives may not be successful. If we are not successful in managing our current growth and the large number of new initiatives that are underway, we might experience an adverse impact on our financial performance and results of operations. All of the foregoing risks may be compounded in any economic downturn. If we fail to achieve the intended results of our current business initiatives, or if the implementation of these initiatives is delayed or abandoned, diverts management’s attention or resources from other aspects of our business or costs more than anticipated, we may experience inadequate return on investment for some of our business initiatives, which would have a negative effect on our operating results.

Our growth strategy and performance depend on our ability to purchase our merchandise in sufficient quantities at competitive prices, including our products that are produced by artisans and specialty vendors, and any disruptions we experience in our ability to obtain our products in a timely fashion or in the quantities required could have a material adverse effect on our business.

We do not own or operate any manufacturing facilities. We instead purchase all of our merchandise from a large number of vendors, many of which are the sole sources for particular products. Our growth strategy includes expanding the amount of products we sell, and our performance depends on our ability to purchase our merchandise in sufficient quantities at competitive prices. However, many of our key products are produced by artisans, specialty vendors and other vendors that may have limited production capacity. In addition, some of our vendors are small and undercapitalized firms. A number of our vendors, particularly our artisan vendors, may have limited resources, production capacities and operating histories. As a result, the capacity of some of our vendors to meet our supply requirements has been, and may in the future be, constrained at various times and our vendors may be susceptible to production difficulties or other factors that negatively affect the quantity or quality of their production during future periods. A disruption in the ability of our significant vendors to access liquidity could also cause serious disruptions or an overall deterioration of their businesses, which could lead to a significant reduction in their ability to manufacture or ship products to us.

Any difficulties that we experience in our ability to obtain products in sufficient quality and quantity from our vendors could have a material adverse effect on our business. In fiscal 2013, we purchased approximately 74% of our merchandise from vendors that are located abroad. Our ability to obtain desired merchandise in sufficient quantities could be impaired by events that adversely affect our vendors or the locations in which they operate, such as difficulties or problems associated with our vendors’ operations, business, finances, labor, economic environment, importation of products, costs, production, insurance and reputation. Failure of vendors to produce adequate quantities of merchandise in a timely manner has resulted in back orders and lower revenue in certain periods of our business operation. While we believe our vendors have the capacity to meet our demand, we cannot assure you that our vendors will be able to produce adequate quantities of merchandise in a timely manner in the future.

 

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We also do not have long-term contracts or other contractual assurances of continued supply, pricing or access to new products with our vendors, and generally we transact business with our vendors on an order-by-order basis. Therefore, any vendor could discontinue selling to us at any time. Any disruptions we experience in our ability to obtain our products in a timely fashion or in the quantities required could have a material adverse effect on our business.

We may not be able to locate and develop relationships with a sufficient number of new vendors, which could lead to product shortages and customer backorders, which could harm our business.

In the event that one or more of our vendors is unable to meet the quantity or quality of our product requirements, we may not be able to develop relationships with new vendors in a manner that is sufficient to supply the shortfall. Even if we do identify such new vendors, we may experience product shortages and customer backorders as we transition our product requirements to incorporate the alternative suppliers. In addition, we cannot assure you that any new vendor with which we do business, particularly any new vendor abroad, would not be subject to the same or similar quality and quantity risks as our existing suppliers.

We do not have exclusive relationships with most of our vendors, and there is a risk that our vendors may sell similar or identical products to our competitors, which could harm our business.

Our arrangements with our vendors are generally not exclusive. As a result, most of our vendors might be able to sell similar or identical products to certain of our competitors, some of which purchase products in significantly greater volume. Our competitors may enter into arrangements with suppliers that could impair our ability to sell those suppliers’ products, including by requiring suppliers to enter into exclusive arrangements, which could limit our access to such arrangements or products. Our vendors could also initiate or expand sales of their products through their own stores or through the Internet to the retail market and therefore compete with us directly or sell their products through outlet centers or discount stores, increasing the competitive pricing pressure we face.

We may not have adequate remedies with our vendors for defective merchandise, which could damage our reputation and brand image and harm our business.

If products that we purchase from vendors are damaged or prove to be defective, we may not be able to return products to these vendors and obtain refunds of our purchase price or obtain other indemnification from them. Our vendors’ limited capacities may result in a vendor’s inability to replace any defective merchandise in a timely manner. In addition, our vendors’ limited capitalization or liquidity may mean that a vendor that has supplied defective merchandise will not be able to refund the purchase price to us or pay us any penalties or damages associated with any defects.

In addition, our vendors may not adhere to our quality control standards, and we might not identify a quality deficiency before merchandise ships to our stores or customers. Our vendors’ failure to manufacture or import quality merchandise in a timely and effective manner could damage our reputation and brand image, and could lead to an increase in product returns or exchanges or customer litigation against us and a corresponding increase in our routine and non-routine litigation costs. Further, any merchandise that does not meet our quality standards or other government requirements could become subject to a recall, which could damage our reputation and brand image and harm our business.

If we lose key personnel or are unable to hire additional qualified personnel, our business may be harmed.

The success of our business depends upon the continued service of our key personnel, including our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Gary Friedman. The loss of the services of our key personnel could make it more difficult to successfully operate our business and achieve our business goals. In addition, we do not maintain key man life insurance policies on any of our key personnel. As a result, we may not be able to cover the financial loss we may incur in losing the services of any of our key personnel.

 

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Mr. Friedman’s equity ownership in our Company has given him a substantial amount of personal wealth. As a result, it may be difficult for us to continue to retain and motivate him, and this wealth could affect his decisions about whether or not he will continue to perform services for us. If we do not succeed in retaining and motivating Mr. Friedman, we may be unable to achieve our historical growth rates.

Competition for qualified employees and personnel in the retail industry is intense. We may be unable to retain other existing personnel that are important to our business or hire additional qualified personnel. The process of locating personnel with the combination of skills and attributes required to carry out our goals is often lengthy. Our success depends to a significant degree upon our ability to attract, retain and motivate qualified management, marketing and sales personnel, and store managers, and upon the continued contributions of these people. We cannot assure you that we will be successful in attracting and retaining qualified executives and personnel.

In addition, our success depends in part upon our ability to attract, motivate and retain a sufficient number of store employees who understand and appreciate our corporate culture and customers. Turnover in the retail industry is generally high. Excessive store employee turnover will result in higher employee costs associated with finding, hiring and training new store employees. If we are unable to hire and retain store personnel capable of consistently providing a high level of customer service, our ability to open new stores may be impaired, the performance of our existing and new stores could be materially adversely affected and our brand image may be negatively impacted.

Our former Co-Chief Executive Officer recently resigned from this position, which may divert management’s attention and harm our operations.

Our Co-Chief Executive Officer, Carlos Alberini, resigned from this position effective January 31, 2014. Mr. Alberini continues to serve as a member of our Board of Directors. Mr. Alberini has been a key contributor to the Company’s recent success. While we have implemented a transition plan and are in the process of determining our future leadership structure in light of the departure of Mr. Alberini, the Company faces a variety of risks and uncertainties due to his resignation. Our business may experience adverse consequences as a result of his resignation and the resulting changes we make to our management organizational structure. If we determine a need to fill in the position of Co-Chief Executive Officer and to identify a suitable candidate, the process of implementing such leadership changes may be long, costly and may divert the board of directors’ and management’s attention from other business concerns. There can be no assurances that we will not experience other disruptions in our management structure arising from transitions in our leadership, or changes in our management structure, including as a result of the resignation of Mr. Alberini or the retention, in the future, of new executives to assist Mr. Friedman in his role as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer.

Mr. Alberini currently beneficially owns a substantial number of shares of the Company’s common stock, and any sales by Mr. Alberini of these shares could adversely impact our stock price.

Mr. Alberini currently beneficially owns a total of 2,014,748 shares of common stock, which includes stock options to purchase 992,275 shares of the Company’s common stock with an exercise price of $46.50 per share that are vested and not subject to repurchase by the Company. Mr. Alberini has not yet exercised these options but can exercise them at any time during a 120-day post-termination exercise period on a cashless “net exercise” basis or through payment of the exercise price in cash or by such other means as permitted under the applicable option plan. If Mr. Alberini had fully exercised these options on a net exercise basis on March 10, 2014, the Company would have issued approximately 283,000 shares to him in full settlement of these options based on the closing stock price that day. If Mr. Alberini decides to sell all or some of his shares (including any shares received upon the exercise of his stock options), such transactions could adversely impact the market price of our common stock.

 

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Gary Friedman was recently re-appointed as our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. There can be no assurance that this transition will not have an adverse impact on us.

Effective July 2, 2013, Gary Friedman was appointed to serve as our Co-Chief Executive Officer along with Carlos Alberini, and Mr. Friedman is now serving as our Chief Executive Officer. Mr. Friedman also serves as Chairman of our Board of Directors. Mr. Friedman previously served as Chairman and as Co-Chief Executive Officer with Mr. Alberini from June 2010 through October 2012. Prior to June 2010, Mr. Friedman was our Chief Executive Officer and Chairman. In October 2012, Mr. Friedman resigned as Co-Chief Executive Officer and as a director and agreed to serve in an advisory capacity as our Creator and Curator following an investigation by a special committee of non-management directors of the board assisted by independent counsel prompted by disclosure that Mr. Friedman and a Company employee were engaged in a personal relationship, described by the parties as consensual. The investigation concluded that Mr. Friedman engaged in activities that were inconsistent with the board of directors’ expectations for executive conduct as previously communicated by the board of directors and failed to comply with certain Company policies. We incurred $4.8 million of expenses related to the investigation in fiscal 2012. There can be no assurance that we will not incur expenses or claims in the future related to the conduct that was the subject of the investigation or similar conduct that has occurred in the past or, given Mr. Friedman’s continued involvement with the Company, may occur in the future.

Our operations have significant liquidity and capital requirements and depend on the availability of adequate financing on reasonable terms, and if we are unable to borrow sufficient capital, it could have a significant negative effect on our business.

Our operations have significant liquidity and capital requirements. Among other things, we have invested significant capital expenditures in remodeling and opening new Galleries and these capital expenditures have increased and will continue to increase in fiscal 2014 and succeeding fiscal periods as we open additional Full Line Design Galleries, which may require us to undertake upgrades to historical buildings or construction of new buildings. During fiscal 2013, we spent $93.9 million for capital expenditures. We anticipate our capital expenditure requirements to be approximately $115 million to $125 million for fiscal 2014. We plan to continue our growth and expansion, including opening Full Line Design Galleries in select major metropolitan markets, pursuing category extensions of our brand, and exploring new business areas. We own the building and land for our Gallery in San Francisco, but to date we have principally relied upon leases with landlords for our other locations. As we develop new Galleries in the future, we may explore other models for our real estate which could include joint ventures or other forms of equity ownership in the real estate interests associated with new sites and buildings. These approaches might require greater capital investment than a traditional store lease with a landlord.

We depend on our ability to generate cash flows from operating activities, as well as revolving borrowings under the Restoration Hardware, Inc. revolving line of credit, to finance the carrying costs of our inventory, to pay for capital expenditures and operating expenses and to support our growth strategy. As of February 1, 2014, we had borrowed $85.4 million under the revolving line of credit and had $261.7 million available for borrowing. Various factors may impact our lenders’ willingness to provide funds to us, including:

 

   

our continuing compliance with the terms of our revolving line of credit;

 

   

the amount of availability under the revolving line of credit, which depends on various factors, including the amount of collateral available under the revolving line of credit, which relies on a borrowing base formula tied principally to the value of our assets, including our inventory; and

 

   

our lenders’ financial strength and ability to perform under the revolving line of credit.

If the cash flows from our operating activities are not sufficient to finance the carrying costs of inventory and to pay for capital expenditures and operating costs, and if we are unable to borrow a sufficient amount under the revolving line of credit to finance or pay for such expenditures and costs, it could have a significant negative effect on our business.

 

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We currently believe that our cash flow from operations and funds available under the revolving line of credit will satisfy our capital and operating requirements for the next twelve months. However, any weakening of, or other adverse developments concerning our sales performance or adverse developments concerning the availability of credit under the revolving line of credit, could limit the overall amount of funds available to us.

In addition, we may experience cash flow shortfalls in the future, and we may otherwise require additional external funding, or we may need to raise funds to take advantage of unanticipated opportunities, to make acquisitions of other businesses or companies or to respond to changing business conditions or unanticipated competitive pressures. However, we cannot assure you that we will be able to raise funds on favorable terms, if at all, or that future financing requirements would not be dilutive to holders of our capital stock. If we fail to raise sufficient additional funds, we may be required to delay or abandon some of our planned future expenditures or aspects of our current operations.

A number of factors that affect our ability to successfully open new stores within the time frames we initially target or optimize our store footprint are beyond our control, and these factors may harm our ability to execute our strategy of sizing stores to the potential of the market, which may negatively affect our results of operations.

We are focused on sizing our assortments and our stores to the potential of the market by adjusting the square footage and number of stores on a geographic market-by-market basis. We plan to optimize our real estate by continuing to open larger square footage Full Line Design Galleries in key markets and relocating or closing selected stores in these or adjacent markets. When we address the introduction of new stores in a particular market or changes to, or closure of, existing stores, we must make a series of decisions regarding the size and location of new stores (or the existing stores slated to undergo changes or closure) and the impact on our other existing stores in the area.

Our ability to maximize the productivity of our retail store base, depends on many factors, including, among others, our ability to:

 

   

identify suitable locations, the availability of which is largely outside of our control;

 

   

size the store locations to the market opportunity;

 

   

retain customers in certain geographic markets when we close stores in that market;

 

   

negotiate acceptable new lease terms or lease renewals, modifications or terminations;

 

   

efficiently build and equip new stores or further remodel existing locations;

 

   

source sufficient levels of inventory to meet the needs of changes in our store footprint on a timely basis;

 

   

successfully integrate changes in our store base into our existing operations and information technology systems;

 

   

obtain or maintain adequate capital resources on acceptable terms;

 

   

avoid construction or local permit delays and cost overruns in connection with the opening of new stores or the expansion or further remodeling of existing stores;

 

   

maintain adequate distribution facilities, information systems and other operational systems to serve our new stores and remodeled stores; and

 

   

address competitive, merchandising, marketing, distribution and other challenges encountered in connection with expansion into new geographic areas and markets.

 

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We have experienced delays in opening some new stores within the time frames we initially targeted, and may continue to experience such delays in the future. Any of these challenges could delay or prevent us from completing store openings or the additional remodeling of existing stores or hinder the operations of stores we open or remodel. If any of these challenges delays the opening of a store, our results of operations will be negatively affected as we will incur leasing and other costs during the delay without associated store revenue at such location. New or remodeled stores may not be profitable or achieve our target return on investment. Unfavorable economic and business conditions and other events could also interfere with our plans to expand or modify store footprints. Our failure to effectively address challenges such as those listed above could adversely affect our ability to successfully open new stores or change our store footprint in a timely and cost-effective manner and could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Our operating results are subject to quarterly fluctuations, and results for any quarter may not necessarily be indicative of the results that may be achieved for the full fiscal year.

Our quarterly results have historically varied depending upon a variety of factors, including our product offerings, promotional events, store openings, shifts in the timing of holidays and timing of catalog releases, among other things. As a result of these factors, our working capital requirements and demands on our product distribution and delivery network may fluctuate during the year.

Our results of operation vary relative to corresponding periods in prior years. We may take certain pricing, merchandising or marketing actions that could have a disproportionate effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations in a particular quarter or selling season. For example, we periodically engage in sales promotional activities that may disproportionately impact results in a particular quarter and we believe that period to period comparisons of our operating results are not necessarily meaningful and cannot be relied upon as indicators of future performance.

Our business depends in part on a strong brand image. We continue to invest in the development of our brand and the marketing of our business, and if we are not able to maintain and enhance our brand or market our product offerings, we may be unable to attract a sufficient number of customers or sell sufficient quantities of our products.

We believe that the brand image we have developed, and the lifestyle image associated with our brand, have contributed significantly to the success of our business to date. We also believe that maintaining and enhancing our brand is integral to our business and to the implementation of our strategies for expanding our business. This will require us to continue to make investments in areas such as marketing and advertising, as well as the day-to-day investments required for store operations, catalog mailings, website operations and employee training. Our brand image may be diminished if new products, services or other businesses fail to maintain or enhance our distinctive brand image. Furthermore, our reputation could be jeopardized if we fail to maintain high standards for merchandise and service quality, if we fail to maintain high ethical, social and environmental standards for all of our operations and activities, if we fail to comply with local laws and regulations or if we experience other negative events that affect our image or reputation. Any failure to maintain a strong brand image could have an adverse effect on our sales and results of operations.

We are exploring opportunities to expand into new categories or complementary businesses. If we are not successful in these new categories or business areas, it may have an adverse effect on our results of operations and our reputation.

We are engaged in ongoing efforts to explore new business opportunities that we believe can leverage our current business platform. We have developed a number of new product categories and extensions over the last several years, including Contemporary Art, Outdoor & Garden, Baby & Child and Small Spaces. We also have introduced other merchandise categories that enhance the customer experience in our Full Line Design Galleries, including fresh cut flowers, magazines and tea and a wine bar. We plan further brand-enhancing offerings, such

 

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as a café or restaurant adjacent to, or inside of, select Full Line Design Galleries. We are incubating a number of other new ideas for potential expansion of our business, some of which may become new core categories or new store concepts and others of which may be primarily offered as enrichment of the customer experience.

Developing and testing new business opportunities will involve us in business operations and areas of expertise that would be new to our organization and may require management time and resources. We may not achieve wide market acceptance or generate revenue sufficient to recoup the cost of developing and operating such new concepts, which in turn could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations. Any new businesses we enter may expose us to additional laws, regulations and risks, including the risk that we may incur ongoing operating expenses in such businesses in excess of revenues, which could harm our results of operations and financial condition. The financial profile of any such new businesses may be different than our current financial profile, which could affect our financial performance and the market price for our common stock.

Competition in the home furnishings sector of the retail market may adversely affect our future financial performance.

The home furnishings sector within the retail market is highly competitive. We compete with the interior design trade and specialty stores, as well as antique dealers and other merchants that provide unique items and custom-designed product offerings at higher price points. We also compete with national and regional home furnishing retailers and department stores. In addition, we compete with mail order catalogs and online retailers focused on home furnishings. We compete with these and other retailers for customers, suitable retail locations, vendors, qualified employees and management personnel. Many of our competitors have significantly greater financial, marketing and other resources than we do and therefore may be able to adapt to changes in customer preferences more quickly, devote greater resources to the marketing and sale of their products, generate greater national brand recognition or adopt more aggressive pricing policies than we can. In addition, increased catalog mailings by our competitors may adversely affect response rates to our own catalog mailings. Moreover, increased competition may result, and has resulted in the past, in potential or actual litigation between us and our competitors relating to such activities as competitive sales, hiring practices and other matters. As a result, increased competition may adversely affect our future financial performance, and we cannot assure you that we will be able to compete successfully in the future.

We believe that our ability to compete successfully is determined by several factors, including, among other things, the quality of our product selection, our brand, our merchandise presentation and value proposition, customer service, pricing and store locations. We may not ultimately succeed in competing with other retailers in our market.

Disruptions in the global financial markets may make it difficult for us to borrow a sufficient amount of capital to finance the carrying costs of inventory and to pay for capital expenditures and operating costs, which could negatively affect our business.

Disruptions in the global financial markets and banking systems have made credit and capital markets more difficult for companies to access, even for some companies with established revolving or other credit facilities. Under the credit agreement governing the Restoration Hardware, Inc. revolving line of credit, each financial institution that is part of the syndicate for the revolving line of credit is responsible for providing a portion of the loans to be made under the revolving line of credit. Factors that have previously affected our borrowing ability under the revolving line of credit have included the borrowing base formula limitations, adjustments in the appraised value of our inventory used to calculate the borrowing base and the availability of each of our lenders to advance its portion of requested borrowing drawdowns under the facility. If, in connection with a disruption in the global financial markets or otherwise, any participant, or group of participants, with a significant portion of the commitments in the revolving line of credit fails to satisfy its obligations to extend credit under the facility, and if we are unable to find a replacement for such participant or group of participants on a timely basis (if at all), then our liquidity and our business may be materially adversely affected.

 

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Reductions in the volume of mall traffic or closing of shopping malls as a result of unfavorable economic conditions or changing demographic patterns could significantly reduce our sales and leave us with unsold inventory.

Most of our stores are currently located in shopping malls. Sales at these stores are derived, in part, from the volume of traffic in those malls. These stores benefit from the ability of the malls’ “anchor” tenants, generally large department stores and other area attractions, to generate consumer traffic in the vicinity of our stores and the continuing popularity of the malls as shopping destinations. Unfavorable economic conditions, particularly in certain regions, have adversely affected mall traffic and resulted in the closing of certain anchor stores and have threatened the viability of certain commercial real estate firms which operate major shopping malls. A continuation of this trend, including failure of a large commercial landlord or continued declines in the popularity of mall shopping generally among our customers, could reduce our sales and leave us with excess inventory. We may respond by increasing markdowns or initiating marketing promotions to reduce excess inventory, which would further adversely impact our results of operations.

Our business depends upon the successful operation of our distribution facilities, furniture home delivery hubs and customer service center, as well as our ability to fulfill orders and to deliver our merchandise to our customers in a timely manner.

Our business depends upon the successful operation of our distribution centers, furniture home delivery hubs and customer service center, as well as our order management and fulfillment services and the re-stocking of inventories within our stores. The efficient flow of our merchandise requires that our facilities have adequate capacity to support our current level of operations, and any anticipated increased levels that may follow from any growth of our business.

If we encounter difficulties associated with any of our facilities or if any of our facilities were to shut down for any reason, including as a result of fire, earthquakes (to which our California-based distribution and home delivery facilities in Tracy and Mira Loma and our corporate headquarters in Corte Madera are particularly vulnerable), power outages or other natural disasters, we could face shortages of inventory resulting in “out of stock” conditions in our stores, significantly higher costs and longer lead times associated with distributing our products to both our stores and online customers and the inability to process orders in a timely manner or ship goods to our customers. Further, any significant interruption in the operation of our customer service center could also reduce our ability to receive and process orders and provide products and services to our stores and customers, which could result in lost sales, cancelled sales and a loss of loyalty to our brand.

In January 2012, we opened a furniture home delivery hub in Avenel, New Jersey and, in February 2012, we opened a furniture distribution center in North East, Maryland. Further, we expanded into an additional 400,000 square feet at our West Jefferson, Ohio distribution center in May 2013, opened a furniture distribution center in Grand Prairie, Texas in September 2013 and in-sourced three home furniture delivery facilities in 2013. As a result of these and other efforts with respect to our distribution facilities, we may encounter operational difficulties with respect to our facilities, such as disruptions in transitioning fulfillment orders to the new distribution facilities and problems associated with operating new facilities or reducing the size and changing functions of existing facilities, and any such difficulties could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our results may be adversely affected by fluctuations in raw materials and energy costs.

Increases in the prices of the components and raw materials used in our products could negatively affect the sales of our merchandise and our product margins. These prices may fluctuate based on a number of factors beyond our control, including: commodity prices including prices for oil, lumber and cotton, changes in supply and demand, general economic conditions, labor costs, competition, import duties, tariffs, anti-dumping duties, currency exchange rates and government regulation. In addition, energy costs have fluctuated dramatically in the

 

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past. These fluctuations may result in an increase in our transportation costs for freight and distribution, utility costs for our retail stores and overall costs to purchase products from our vendors. Accordingly, changes in the value of the U.S. dollar relative to foreign currencies may increase our vendors’ cost of business and ultimately our cost of goods sold and our selling, general and administrative costs. If we are unable to pass such cost increases on to our customers or the higher cost of the products results in decreased demand for our products, our results of operations would be harmed. Any such cost increase could reduce our earnings to the extent we are unable to adjust the prices of our products.

We are subject to risks associated with our dependence on foreign imports for our merchandise.

Based on total volume dollar purchases, in fiscal 2013 we purchased approximately 74% of our merchandise from vendors located outside the United States, including 69% from Asia, the majority of which originated from China. In addition, some of the merchandise we purchase from vendors in the United States also depends, in whole or in part, on vendors located outside the United States. As a result, our business highly depends on global trade, as well as trade and cost factors that impact the specific countries where our vendors are located, including Asia. Our future success will depend in large part upon our ability to maintain our existing foreign vendor relationships and to develop new ones. While we rely on our long-term relationships with our foreign vendors, we have no long-term contracts with them and transact business on an order by order basis. Additionally, many of our imported products are subject to existing duties, tariffs, anti-dumping duties and quotas that may limit the quantity of some types of goods which we may import into the United States. Our dependence on foreign imports also makes us vulnerable to risks associated with products manufactured abroad, including, among other things, risks of damage, destruction or confiscation of products while in transit to our distribution centers located in the United States, charges on or assessment of additional import duties, tariffs, anti-dumping duties and quotas, loss of “most favored nation” trading status by the United States in relation to a particular foreign country, work stoppages, including without limitation as a result of events such as longshoremen strikes, transportation and other delays in shipments, including without limitation as a result of heightened security screening and inspection processes or other port-of-entry limitations or restrictions in the United States, freight cost increases, economic uncertainties, including inflation, foreign government regulations, trade restrictions, including the United States retaliating against protectionist foreign trade practices and political unrest, increased labor costs and other similar factors that might affect the operations of our vendors in specific countries such as China.

An interruption or delay in supply from our foreign sources, or the imposition of additional duties, taxes or other charges on these imports, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations unless and until alternative supply arrangements are secured.

In addition, there is a risk that compliance lapses by our vendors could occur which could lead to investigations by U.S. government agencies responsible for international trade compliance. Resulting penalties or enforcement actions could delay future imports/exports or otherwise negatively impact our business. In addition, there remains a risk that one or more of our foreign vendors will not adhere to applicable legal requirements or our global compliance standards such as fair labor standards, the prohibition on child labor and other product safety or manufacturing safety standards. The violation of applicable legal requirements by any of our vendors or the failure to adhere to labor, manufacturing safety and other laws by any of our vendors, or the divergence of the labor practices followed by any of our vendors from those generally accepted in the United States, could disrupt our supply of products from our vendors or the shipment of products to us, result in potential liability to us and harm our reputation and brand and subject us to boycotts by our customers or activist groups, any of which could negatively affect our business and operating results.

We extend unsecured credit to our vendors.

Some of our vendors have limited cash flows and/or access to capital and require us to advance payments in order for them to be able to meet our supply requirements. We typically advance a portion of the payments to be made to such vendors under our purchase orders prior to the delivery of the ordered products. These advance payments are unsecured. These vendors may become insolvent and their failure to repay our advances, and any related failure to deliver products to us, could have a material adverse impact on our results of operations.

 

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We rely upon independent third-party transportation providers for the majority of our product shipments.

We currently rely upon independent third-party transportation providers for our product shipments to our stores and to our customers outside of certain areas. Our utilization of their delivery services for shipments, or those of any other shipping companies we may elect to use, is subject to risks, including increases in fuel prices, which would increase our shipping costs, and strikes, work stoppages and inclement weather, which may impact the shipping companies’ abilities to provide delivery services that adequately meet our shipping needs. If we change shipping companies, we could face logistical difficulties that could adversely affect deliveries and we would incur costs and expend resources in connection with such change. Moreover, we may not be able to obtain terms as favorable as those received from the third-party transportation providers we currently use, which in turn would increase our costs.

We may be exposed to risks and costs associated with protecting the integrity and security of our customers’ information.

A significant number of customer purchases across all of our channels are made using credit cards. Additionally, a significant number of our customer orders are placed through our websites, and we process, store, and transmit large amounts of data, including personal information, for our customers. Also, we depend in part throughout our operations on the secure transmission of confidential information over public networks. Our information systems are subject to damage or interruption from power outages, computer and telecommunications failures, computer viruses, security breaches including credit card breaches, vandalism, catastrophic events, and human error. Our operations may further be impacted by security breaches that occur at third party vendors.

In order for our business to function successfully, we and other market participants must be able to handle and transmit confidential information, including credit card information, securely. We are not fully compliant with Payment Card Industry, or PCI, Data Security Standards and there can be no assurance that in the future we will be able to operate our facilities and our customer service and sales operations in accordance with PCI or other industry recommended practices. We intend to obtain compliance with PCI Data Security Standards and will incur additional expenses to attain and maintain PCI compliance. Further, there is increased litigation over personally identifiable information and we may be subject to one or more claims or lawsuits related to intentional or unintentional exposure of our customer’s personally identifiable information. Even if we are compliant with such standards, we still may not be able to prevent security breaches involving customer transaction data.

Any breach could cause consumers to lose confidence in the security of our website and choose not to purchase from us. If a computer hacker or other criminal is able to circumvent our security measures, he or she could destroy or steal valuable information or disrupt our operations. Because techniques used to obtain unauthorized access or to sabotage systems change frequently and often are not recognized until launched against a target, we may be unable to anticipate these techniques or to implement adequate preventative measures. Any security breach could expose us to risks of data loss, fines, litigation and liability and could seriously disrupt our operations and harm our reputation, any of which could adversely affect our business. In addition to the possibility of fines, lawsuits and other claims, we could be required to expend significant resources to change our business practices or modify our service offerings in connection with the protection of personally identifiable information, which could have a material adverse effect on our business.

In addition, states and the federal government have enacted additional laws and regulations to protect consumers against identity theft, including laws governing treatment of personally identifiable information. We collect and store personal information from consumers in the course of doing business. These laws have increased the costs of doing business and, if we fail to implement appropriate safeguards or we fail to detect and provide prompt notice of unauthorized access as required by some of these laws, we could be subject to potential claims for damages and other remedies. If we were required to pay any significant amounts in satisfaction of claims under these laws, or if we were forced to cease our business operations for any length of time as a result

 

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of our inability to comply fully with any such law, our business, operating results and financial condition could be adversely affected. We may also incur legal costs if we are required to defend our methods of collection, processing, and storage of personal data. Investigations, lawsuits, or adverse publicity relating to our methods of handling personal data could result in increased costs and negative market reaction.

Furthermore, data security breaches suffered by well-known companies and institutions have attracted a substantial amount of media attention, prompting additional state and federal proposals addressing data privacy and security. If any of the current proposals are adopted, we may be subject to more extensive requirements to protect the customer information that we process in connection with the purchases of our products.

Material damage to, or interruptions in, our information systems as a result of external factors, staffing shortages and difficulties in updating our existing software or developing or implementing new software could have a material adverse effect on our business or results of operations.

We depend largely upon our information technology systems in the conduct of all aspects of our operations, many of which we have only adopted and implemented within the past several years in connection with rebuilding our supply chain and infrastructure. Such systems are subject to damage or interruption from power outages, computer and telecommunications failures, computer viruses, security breaches and natural disasters. Damage or interruption to our information systems may require a significant investment to fix or replace them, and we may suffer interruptions in our operations in the interim. Management information system failures or telecommunications system problems may disrupt operations. In addition, costs and potential problems and interruptions associated with the implementation of new or upgraded systems and technology or with maintenance or adequate support of existing systems could also disrupt or reduce the efficiency of our operations. Any material interruptions or failures in our systems may have a material adverse effect on our business or results of operations.

We also rely heavily on our information technology staff. If we cannot meet our staffing needs in this area, we may not be able to fulfill our technology initiatives while continuing to provide maintenance on existing systems.

We rely on certain software vendors to maintain and periodically upgrade many of these systems so that they can continue to support our business. The software programs supporting many of our systems were licensed to us by independent software developers. The inability of these developers or us to continue to maintain and upgrade these information systems and software programs would disrupt or reduce the efficiency of our operations if we were unable to convert to alternate systems in an efficient and timely manner.

We are vulnerable to various risks and uncertainties associated with our websites, including changes in required technology interfaces, website downtime and other technical failures, costs and technical issues as we upgrade our website software, computer viruses, changes in applicable federal and state regulation, security breaches, legal claims related to our website operations and e-commerce fulfillment and other consumer privacy concerns. Our failure to successfully respond to these risks and uncertainties could reduce website sales and have a material adverse effect on our business or results of operations.

Our failure to successfully manage the costs of our catalog and promotional mailings could have a negative impact on our business.

Catalog mailings are an important component of our business. Increases in costs relating to paper, printing, shipping rates and other catalog distribution costs would affect the cost of our catalog mailings. In 2013, we continued expanding the page counts of our catalogs. In 2013, we also reduced the frequency of Source Books circulated to one mailing per year. We rely on customary discounts from the basic shipping rate structure that are available for our catalog mailings, which could be changed or discontinued at any time. The market price for paper has fluctuated significantly during the past three fiscal years and may continue to fluctuate in the future.

 

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Future increases in shipping rates, paper costs or printing costs would have a negative impact on our operating results to the extent that we are unable to offset such increases by raising prices, by implementing more efficient printing, mailing, delivery and order fulfillment systems or by using alternative direct-mail formats.

We have historically experienced fluctuations in customer response to our catalogs. Customer response to our catalogs depends substantially on product assortment, product availability and creative presentation, the selection of customers to whom the catalogs are mailed, changes in mailing strategies, the page size, page count, frequency and timing of delivery of the catalogs, as well as the general retail sales environment and current domestic and global economic conditions. The failure to effectively produce or distribute our catalogs could affect the timing of catalog delivery. The timing of catalog delivery has been and can be affected by shipping service delays. Any delays in the timing of catalog delivery could cause customers to forgo or defer purchases. If the performance of our catalogs declines, if we misjudge the correlation between our catalog circulation and net sales, or if our catalog circulation optimization strategy is not successful, our results of operations could be negatively impacted.

Our failure to successfully anticipate merchandise returns might have a negative impact on our business.

We record a reserve for merchandise returns based on historical return trends together with current product sales performance in each reporting period. If actual returns are greater than those projected and reserved for by management, additional sales returns might be recorded in future periods. In addition, to the extent that returned merchandise is damaged, we often do not receive full retail value from the resale or liquidation of the merchandise. Further, the introduction of new merchandise, changes in merchandise mix, changes in consumer confidence or other competitive and general economic conditions may cause actual returns to exceed merchandise return reserves. Adverse economic conditions in the past have resulted in an increase in our merchandise returns. Any significant increase in merchandise returns that exceeds our reserves could harm our business and operating results.

Certain of our products may be subject to recalls or other actions by regulatory authorities, and any such recalls or similar actions could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Certain of the products we sell are subject to regulation by the federal Consumer Product Safety Commission and similar state and international regulatory authorities, which require certification and testing of certain regulated substances, among other requirements. For example, in August 2008, the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008, or CPSIA, was signed into law. In general, the CPSIA bans the sale of children’s products containing lead in excess of certain maximum standards, and imposes other restrictions and requirements on the sale of children’s products, including importing, testing and labeling requirements. Our products have, from time to time, been subject to recall for product safety reasons, and issues of product safety could result in future product recalls, other actions by applicable government authorities or product liability claims. Product safety concerns may also require us, whether on a voluntary or involuntary basis, to remove selected products from our stores, particularly with respect to our Baby & Child brand. Product recalls and removal of products and defending such product liability claims can result in, among other things, lost sales, diverted resources, potential harm to our reputation and increased customer service costs, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

There are claims made against us and/or our management from time to time that can result in litigation or regulatory proceedings which could distract management from our business activities and result in significant liability.

From time to time we and/or our management are involved in litigation, claims and other proceedings relating to the conduct of our business, including purported class action litigation. Such legal proceedings may include claims related to our employment practices, claims of intellectual property infringement, including with respect to trademarks and trade dress, claims asserting unfair competition and unfair business practices, claims

 

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with respect to our collection and sale of reproduction products, and consumer class action claims relating to our consumer practices including the collection of zip code or other information from customers. In addition, from time to time, we are subject to product liability and personal injury claims for the products that we sell and the stores we operate. Subject to certain exceptions, our purchase orders generally require the vendor to indemnify us against any product liability claims; however, if the vendor does not have insurance or becomes insolvent, we may not be indemnified. In addition, we could face a wide variety of employee claims against us, including general discrimination, privacy, labor and employment, ERISA and disability claims. Any claims could result in litigation against us and could also result in regulatory proceedings being brought against us by various federal and state agencies that regulate our business, including the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Often these cases raise complex factual and legal issues, which are subject to risks and uncertainties and which could require significant management time. Litigation and other claims and regulatory proceedings against us or our management could result in unexpected expenses and liability and could also materially adversely affect our operations and our reputation.

Labor activities could cause labor relations difficulties for us.

Currently none of our employees is represented by a union. However, our employees have the right at any time to form or affiliate with a union, and union organizational activities have occurred previously at our Baltimore distribution center. We cannot predict the negative effects that any future organizational activities will have on our business and operations. If we were to become subject to work stoppages, we could experience disruption in our operations and increases in our labor costs, either of which could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations.

Intellectual property claims by third parties or our failure or inability to protect our intellectual property rights could diminish the value of our brand and weaken our competitive position.

Third parties have and may in the future assert intellectual property claims against us, particularly as we expand our business to include new products and product categories and move into other geographic markets. Our defense of any claim, regardless of its merit, could be expensive and time consuming and could divert management resources. Successful infringement claims against us could result in significant monetary liability and prevent us from selling some of our products. In addition, resolution of claims may require us to redesign our products, license rights from third parties or cease using those rights altogether, which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

We currently rely on a combination of copyright, trademark, trade dress and unfair competition laws, as well as confidentiality procedures and licensing arrangements, to establish and protect our intellectual property rights. We believe that our trademarks and other proprietary rights have significant value and are important to identifying and differentiating certain of our products and brand from those of our competitors and creating and sustaining demand for certain of our products. We also cannot assure you that the steps taken by us to protect our intellectual property rights will be adequate to prevent infringement of such rights by others, including imitation of our products and misappropriation of our brand. If we are unable to protect and maintain our intellectual property rights, the value of our brand could be diminished and our competitive position could suffer.

We are subject to risks associated with occupying substantial amounts of space, including future increases in occupancy costs. We may choose in the future to acquire some of our store locations, which will subject us to additional risks.

We lease all but one of our retail store locations and we also lease our outlet stores, our corporate headquarters and our nine distribution and home delivery facilities. The initial lease term of our retail stores generally ranges from ten to fifteen years, and certain leases contain renewal options for up to fifteen years. Most leases for our retail stores provide for a minimum rent, typically including escalating rent increases, plus a percentage rent based upon sales after certain minimum thresholds are achieved, as well as common area

 

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maintenance charges, real property insurance and real estate taxes. We purchased the building and land for our store in San Francisco, but to date we have principally relied upon leases with landlords for our other locations. As we develop new stores in the future, we may explore other models for our real estate which could include joint ventures or other forms of equity ownership in the real estate interests associated with new sites and buildings. These approaches might require additional capital investment and could present different risks than a traditional store lease with a landlord, including greater financial exposure if a new store location is not as successful as we originally target in our plans.

If we decide to close an existing or future store, we may nonetheless have continuing obligations with respect to that property pursuant to the applicable lease or ownership arrangements, including, among other things, paying the base rent for the balance of the lease term. Our ability to re-negotiate favorable terms on an expiring lease, to arrange for the sale of an owned property or to negotiate favorable terms for a suitable alternate location could depend on conditions in the real estate market, competition for desirable properties, our relationships with current and prospective landlords and other factors that are not within our control. Our inability to enter into new leases or renew existing leases on terms acceptable to us or be released from our obligations under leases or other obligations for stores that we close could materially adversely affect our business and results of operations.

Compliance with laws may be costly, and changes in laws could make conducting our business more expensive or otherwise change the way we do business.

We are subject to numerous regulations, including labor and employment, customs, truth-in-advertising, consumer protection, privacy, safety, environmental and zoning and occupancy laws and other laws, including consumer protection regulations that regulate retailers generally or govern our business. If these regulations were to change or were violated by us or our vendors or buying agents, the costs of certain goods could increase, or we could experience delays in shipments of our goods, be subject to fines or penalties, or suffer reputational harm, which could reduce demand for our products and harm our business and results of operations.

In addition to increased regulatory compliance requirements, changes in laws could make ordinary conduct of our business more expensive or require us to change the way we do business. For example, as a retail business, changes in laws related to employee benefits and treatment of employees, including laws related to limitations on employee hours, supervisory status, leaves of absence, mandated health benefits or overtime pay, could negatively impact us by increasing compensation and benefits costs for overtime and medical expenses. In addition, newly enacted United States health care laws and potential global and domestic greenhouse gas emission requirements and other environmental legislation and regulations could result in increased direct compliance costs for us (or may cause our vendors to raise the prices they charge us in order to maintain profitable operations because of increased compliance costs), increased transportation costs or reduced availability of raw materials.

Because of our international operations, we could be adversely affected by violations of applicable U.S. federal and state or foreign laws and regulations, such as the United States Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and similar worldwide anti-bribery, anti-corruption and anti-kickback laws.

We source substantially all of our products abroad, and we are increasing the level of our international sourcing activities in an effort to obtain more of our products directly from vendors located abroad. Additionally, we have expanded our business-to-business sales. The foreign and U.S. laws and regulations that are applicable to our operations are complex and may increase the costs of regulatory compliance, or limit or restrict the products or services we sell or subject our business to the possibility of regulatory actions or proceedings. The United States Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, and other similar laws and regulations, generally prohibit companies and their intermediaries from making improper payments to foreign governmental officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. While our policies mandate compliance with applicable laws and regulations, including anti-bribery laws and other anti-corruption laws, we cannot assure you that we will be

 

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successful in preventing our employees or other agents from taking actions in violation of these laws or regulations. Such violations, or allegations of such violations, could disrupt our business and result in a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Our operations are subject to risks of natural disasters, acts of war, terrorism or widespread illness, any one of which could result in a business stoppage and negatively affect our operating results.

Our business operations depend on our ability to maintain and protect our facilities, computer systems and personnel. Our operations and consumer spending may be affected by natural disasters or other similar events, including floods, hurricanes, earthquakes, widespread illness or fires. In particular, our corporate headquarters is located in Northern California, and other parts of our operations including distribution facilities are located in Northern and Southern California, each of which is in a seismically active region susceptible to earthquakes that could disrupt our operations and affect our operating results. Many of our vendors are also located in areas that may be affected by such events. Moreover, geopolitical or public safety conditions which affect consumer behavior and spending may impact our business. Terrorist attacks in the United States or threats of terrorist attacks in the United States in the future, as well as future events occurring in response to or in connection with them, could again result in reduced levels of consumer spending. Any of these occurrences could have a significant impact on our operating results, revenue and costs.

We have experienced net losses in the past and we may experience net losses in the future.

We experienced a net loss of $7.1 million in fiscal 2010. We achieved profitability in fiscal 2011 with net income of $20.6 million. We experienced a GAAP net loss of $12.8 million in fiscal 2012 as a result of certain non-recurring and other items. We may experience net losses in the future, and we cannot assure you that we will return to profitability in future periods.

Fluctuations in our tax obligations and effective tax rate and realization of our deferred tax assets, including net operating loss carryforwards, may result in volatility of our operating results.

We are subject to income taxes in the United States and certain foreign jurisdictions. We record income tax expense based on our estimates of future payments, which include reserves for uncertain tax positions in multiple tax jurisdictions, and valuation allowances related to certain net deferred tax assets, including net operating loss carryforwards. At any one time, many tax years are subject to audit by various taxing jurisdictions. The results of these audits and negotiations with taxing authorities may affect the ultimate settlement of these issues. Under United States federal and state income tax laws, if over a rolling three-year period, the cumulative change in our ownership exceeds 50%, our ability to utilize our net operating loss carryforwards to offset future taxable income may be limited. Changes in ownership can occur due to transactions in our stock or the issuance of additional shares of our common stock or, in certain circumstances, securities convertible into our common stock. Certain transactions we have completed, including our going private transaction in June 2008, and the sale of shares contemplated in our initial public offering may impact the timing of the utilization of our net operating loss carryforwards. Furthermore, it is possible that transactions in our stock that may not be within our control may cause us to exceed the 50% cumulative change threshold and may impose a limitation on the utilization of our net operating loss carryforwards in the future. Any such limitation on the timing of utilizing our net operating loss carryforwards would increase the use of cash to settle our tax obligations. We expect that throughout the year there could be ongoing variability in our quarterly tax rates as events occur and exposures are evaluated.

In addition, our effective tax rate in a given financial statement period may be materially impacted by changes in the mix and level of earnings, timing of the utilization of net operating loss carryforwards, changes in the valuation allowance for deferred taxes or by changes to existing accounting rules or regulations. Further, tax legislation may be enacted in the future that could negatively impact our current or future tax structure and effective tax rates.

 

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Changes to accounting rules or regulations may adversely affect our results of operations.

New accounting rules or regulations and varying interpretations of existing accounting rules or regulations have occurred and may occur in the future. A change in accounting rules or regulations may even affect our reporting of transactions completed before the change is effective, and future changes to accounting rules or regulations or the questioning of current accounting practices may adversely affect our results of operations. For example, in May 2013, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued an exposure draft outlining proposed changes to current lease accounting in FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 840 – Leases. The proposed new accounting pronouncement, if ultimately adopted in its proposed form, could result in significant changes to current accounting, including the capitalization of leases on the balance sheet that currently are recorded off balance sheet as operating leases. While this change would not impact the cash flow related to our store leases, it could adversely impact our balance sheet and could therefore impact our ability to raise financing from banks or other sources.

Our total assets include intangible assets with an indefinite life, goodwill and trademarks, and substantial amounts of long lived assets, principally property and equipment. Changes to estimates or projections used to assess the fair value of these assets, or operating results that are lower than our current estimates at certain store locations, may cause us to incur impairment charges that could adversely affect our results of operations.

Our total assets include intangible assets with an indefinite life, goodwill and trademarks, and substantial amounts of property and equipment. We make certain estimates and projections in connection with impairment analyses for these long lived assets. We also review the carrying value of these assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value of the asset may not be recoverable. We will record an impairment loss when the carrying value of the underlying asset, asset group or reporting unit exceeds its fair value. These calculations require us to make a number of estimates and projections of future results. If these estimates or projections change, we may be required to record additional impairment charges on certain of these assets. If these impairment charges are significant, our results of operations would be adversely affected. In that regard, we recorded $1.4 million and $2.1 million impairment charges on long-lived assets of certain underperforming stores in fiscal 2013 and fiscal 2010, respectively, and we recorded charges amounting to $3.2 million related to retail store closures in fiscal 2011. No such related charges were recorded in fiscal 2012.

If we are unable to implement and maintain effective internal control over financial reporting in the future, the accuracy and timeliness of our financial reporting may be adversely affected.

We are subject to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”), which requires us to maintain internal control over financial reporting and to report any material weaknesses in such internal control. Our first assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting since becoming a public company in 2012 is included within this Form 10-K. Management concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of February 1, 2014. However, if we identify in the future one or more material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting, we will be unable to assert that our internal control over financial reporting is effective. In addition, our independent registered public accounting firm is required to attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. Therefore, even if our management concludes in the future that our internal control over financial reporting is effective, our independent registered public accounting firm may issue a report that is qualified if they are not satisfied with our controls or the level at which our controls are documented, designed, operated, or reviewed, or if they interpret the relevant requirements differently from us. Material weaknesses and significant deficiencies may be identified during the audit process or at other times.

Our reporting obligations as a public company place a significant strain on our management and our operational and financial resources and systems and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. If we fail to timely achieve and maintain the adequacy of our internal control over financial reporting, we may not be able to

 

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produce reliable financial reports. Our failure to achieve and maintain effective internal control over financial reporting could prevent us from filing our periodic reports on a timely basis, which could result in the loss of investor confidence in the reliability of our financial statements, harm our business, and negatively impact the trading price of our common stock.

We incur costs as a public company, and our management is required to devote substantial time to compliance matters.

As a public company, we incur significant legal, accounting, and other expenses, including costs resulting from public company reporting obligations under the Exchange Act and the rules and regulations regarding corporate governance practices, including those under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, the Dodd-Frank Act, and the listing requirements of the stock exchange on which our securities are listed. Our management and other personnel need to devote a substantial amount of time to ensure that we comply with all of these requirements. The reporting requirements, rules, and regulations increase our legal and financial compliance costs and make some activities more time-consuming and costly.

These rules and regulations make it more difficult and more expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance, and we may be required to accept reduced policy limits and coverage or incur substantially higher costs to obtain the same or similar coverage. These factors could also make it more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified persons to serve on our board of directors, particularly to serve on our audit and compensation committees, or as executive officers.

New regulations related to “conflict minerals” may force us to incur additional expenses, may make the sourcing of our products more complex and may result in damage to our reputation with customers.

On August 22, 2012, under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (“Dodd-Frank”), the SEC adopted new requirements for companies that use certain minerals and metals in their products, known as “conflict minerals,” whether or not these products are manufactured by third parties. Some of these minerals are commonly used in many products and may be used in some of the products we offer. These requirements require companies to diligence, disclose, and report whether such minerals, if used in the products of the company, originate from the Democratic Republic of Congo and adjoining countries. The implementation of these new requirements could adversely affect the sourcing, availability, and pricing of such minerals if they are found to be used in our products and necessary for their functionality. Since we source substantially all of our products abroad, we may not be able to sufficiently verify the origins of these minerals and metals used in our products through the due diligence procedures that we implement, which may harm our reputation and affect our compliance with the SEC regulations. The first report is due on May 31, 2014 for the 2013 calendar year.

Risks Related to Ownership of Our Common Stock

Our common stock price may be volatile or may decline regardless of our operating performance.

The market price for our common stock may be volatile. As a retailer, our results are significantly affected by factors outside our control, particularly consumer spending and consumer confidence, which can significantly affect our stock price. In addition, the market price of our common stock may fluctuate significantly in response to a number of other factors, including those described elsewhere in this “Risk Factors” section, as well as the following:

 

   

quarterly variations in our operating results compared to market expectations;

 

   

changes in preferences of our customers;

 

   

announcements of new products or significant price reductions by us or our competitors;

 

   

size of the public float;

 

   

stock price performance of our competitors;

 

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fluctuations in stock market prices and volumes;

 

   

default on our indebtedness;

 

   

actions by competitors or other shopping center tenants;

 

   

changes in senior management or key personnel;

 

   

changes in financial estimates by securities analysts or failure to meet their expectations;

 

   

actual or anticipated negative earnings or other announcements by us or other retail companies;

 

   

downgrades in our credit ratings or the credit ratings of our competitors;

 

   

natural disasters or other similar events;

 

   

issuances or expected issuances of capital stock; and

 

   

global economic, legal and regulatory changes unrelated to our performance.

In addition, stock markets have experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations that have affected and continue to affect the market prices of equity securities of many retail companies. In the past, stockholders have instituted securities class action litigation following periods of market volatility. If we were involved in securities litigation, we could incur substantial costs and our resources and the attention of management could be diverted from our business.

Our filings and public disclosures have attracted the attention of a hedge fund manager whose investment strategies we believe include making investments that increase in value when stock prices decline. The fund manager has informed us of the fund’s negative view of our Company and business and has threatened to publicize those views. There can be no assurance that this fund manager will not attempt to influence the broader investment community or otherwise attempt to disparage our Company or our brand, which could negatively affect our stock price.

Substantial future sales of our common stock, or the perception in the public markets that these sales may occur, may depress our stock price.

In the future, we may also issue our securities in connection with a capital raise or acquisitions. The amount of shares of our common stock issued in connection with a capital raise or acquisition could constitute a material portion of our then-outstanding shares of our common stock, which would result in dilution.

In addition, sales of substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market, or the perception that these sales could occur, could adversely affect the price of our common stock and could impair our ability to raise capital through the sale of additional shares. All of our outstanding shares of common stock are freely tradable, except for (i) 76,983 shares as of March 21, 2014 issued under our 2012 Equity Replacement Plan that are subject to additional time-based resale restrictions and (ii) certain other shares of our common stock that are held or acquired by our directors, executive officers and other affiliates, as that term is defined in the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), which are restricted securities under the Securities Act.

Anti-takeover provisions in our charter documents and Delaware law might discourage or delay acquisition attempts for us that you might consider favorable.

Our certificate of incorporation and bylaws contain provisions that may make the acquisition of our Company more difficult without the approval of our board of directors. These provisions:

 

   

establish a classified board of directors so that not all members of our board of directors are elected at one time;

 

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authorize the issuance of undesignated preferred stock, the terms of which may be established and the shares of which may be issued without stockholder approval, and which may include super voting, special approval, dividend or other rights or preferences superior to the rights of the holders of common stock;

 

   

prohibit stockholder action by written consent, which requires all stockholder actions to be taken at a meeting of our stockholders;

 

   

provide that our board of directors is expressly authorized to make, alter or repeal our bylaws; and

 

   

establish advance notice requirements for nominations for elections to our board of directors or for proposing matters that can be acted upon by stockholders at stockholder meetings.

Our certificate of incorporation also contains a provision that provides us with protections similar to Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law (“DGCL”), and prevents us from engaging in a business combination with a person who acquires at least 15% of our common stock for a period of three years from the date such person acquired such common stock unless board or stockholder approval is obtained prior to the acquisition, subject to certain exceptions. These anti-takeover provisions and other provisions under Delaware law could discourage, delay or prevent a transaction involving a change in control of our Company, even if doing so would benefit our stockholders. These provisions could also discourage proxy contests and make it more difficult for you and other stockholders to elect directors of your choosing and to cause us to take other corporate actions you desire.

We do not expect to pay any cash dividends for the foreseeable future.

We do not anticipate that we will pay any cash dividends on shares of our common stock for the foreseeable future. Any determination to pay dividends in the future will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend upon results of operations, financial condition, contractual restrictions, restrictions imposed by applicable law and other factors our board of directors deems relevant. Accordingly, realization of a gain on your investment will depend on the appreciation of the price of our common stock, which may never occur. Investors seeking cash dividends in the foreseeable future should not purchase our common stock.

Effective May 20, 2013, we ceased to be a “controlled company” within the meaning of the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) rules upon completion of our May 2013 offering. However, we may continue to rely on exemptions from certain corporate governance requirements during a one-year transition period until May 20, 2014.

Effective May 20, 2013, Home Holdings LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (“Home Holdings”), ceased to control a majority of our voting common stock. As a result, we ceased to be a “controlled company” within the meaning of the NYSE corporate governance standards. In accordance with NYSE requirements, before we ceased to be a “controlled company,” we appointed at least one independent member to each of the compensation and nominating and governance committees. NYSE rules also require that we appoint at least a majority of independent members to such committees within 90 days of the date we ceased to be a “controlled company,” or August 18, 2013. We complied with this requirement within the period prescribed by the rules. Our audit committee is fully independent.

NYSE rules also require that we appoint compensation, and nominating and governance committees composed entirely of independent directors and appoint a majority of independent directors to our board of directors within one year of such date, or May 20, 2014. Although we expect that our board and committees will meet these independence requirements by the May 20, 2014 deadline, we do not currently have compensation, and nominating and governance committees composed entirely of independent directors or a majority of independent directors on our board of directors. Accordingly, until such time that our board and committees meet these independence, stockholders will not have the same protections afforded to stockholders of companies that are currently required to comply with such corporate governance requirements.

 

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Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

None.

 

Item 2. Properties

We leased approximately 1,030,000 gross square feet for 61 Galleries, 5 Full Line Design Galleries, 3 Baby & Child Galleries and 17 outlet stores that were open as of February 1, 2014. The initial lease term of our retail stores is generally 10 –15 years. Certain leases contain renewal options for up to 20 years.

Most leases for our retail stores provide for a minimum rent, typically including escalating rent increases. In addition, certain leases have a percentage rent based upon sales after minimum thresholds are achieved. Leases generally require us to pay insurance, utilities, real estate taxes and repair and maintenance expenses. We also lease approximately 20,000 square feet for offsite storage.

Leased Properties

The following table summarizes the location and size of our leased distribution centers and corporate facilities occupied as of February 1, 2014:

 

Location      Purpose    Lease Expiration   Occupied Square Footage (Approximate)  

Distribution Centers

         

West Jefferson, Ohio

     Distribution center    April 2028     1,224,000   

North East, Maryland

     Distribution center    February 2028     1,195,000   

Mira Loma, California

     Distribution center / Home delivery    June 2020     886,000   

Grand Prairie, Texas

     Distribution center / Home delivery    August 2028     859,000   

Baltimore, Maryland

     Distribution center / Home delivery    June 2014     508,000   

Tracy, California

     Home delivery    September 2016     284,000   

Avenel, New Jersey

     Home delivery    November 2016     114,000   

Pompano Beach, Florida

     Home delivery    October 2020     101,000   

Houston, Texas

     Home delivery    August 2018     71,000   

Corporate Facilities

         

Corte Madera, California (1)

     Corporate headquarters    (2)     267,000   

Richmond, California

     Warehouse    September 2022     259,000   

San Rafael, California

     Warehouse    July 2014     10,000   

Pleasanton, California

     Corporate office    June 2020     8,000   

 

(1) Includes approximately 15,000 square feet of warehouse space.
(2) Lease agreements for our corporate headquarters expire between May 2020 and May 2028.

Owned Properties

We currently own one store, our approximately 8,000 square foot Gallery in San Francisco’s Design District.

We believe that our current offices and facilities are in good condition, are being used productively and are adequate to meet our requirements for the foreseeable future.

 

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Item 3. Legal Proceedings

From time to time we and/or our management are involved in litigation, claims and other proceedings relating to the conduct of our business, including purported class action litigation. Such legal proceedings may include claims related to our employment practices, claims of intellectual property infringement, including with respect to trademarks and trade dress, claims asserting unfair competition and unfair business practices, claims with respect to our collection and sale of reproduction products, and consumer class action claims relating to our consumer practices including the collection of zip code or other information from customers. In addition, from time to time, we are subject to product liability and personal injury claims for the products that we sell and the stores we operate. Subject to certain exceptions, our purchase orders generally require the vendor to indemnify us against any product liability claims; however, if the vendor does not have insurance or becomes insolvent, we may not be indemnified. In addition, we could face a wide variety of employee claims against us, including general discrimination, privacy, labor and employment, ERISA and disability claims. Any claims could result in litigation against us and could also result in regulatory proceedings being brought against us by various federal and state agencies that regulate our business, including the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Often these cases raise complex factual and legal issues, which are subject to risks and uncertainties and which could require significant management time. Litigation and other claims and regulatory proceedings against us could result in unexpected expenses and liability and could also materially adversely affect our operations and our reputation.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

Not applicable.

 

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PART II

 

Item 5. Market For Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Market Information and Dividend Policy

Our common stock began trading on the NYSE, under the symbol “RH” on November 2, 2012. The following table sets forth the highest and lowest closing prices for our common stock on the NYSE for the periods indicated since our initial public offering.

 

     Highest      Lowest  

Fiscal 2012

     

Fourth Quarter (from November 2, 2012)

   $ 37.99       $ 31.10   

Fiscal 2013

     

First Quarter

   $ 39.58       $ 32.75   

Second Quarter

   $ 77.18       $ 39.55   

Third Quarter

   $ 76.80       $ 60.52   

Fourth Quarter

   $ 76.25       $ 54.96   

The number of stockholders of record of our common stock as of February 1, 2014 was 58. This number excludes stockholders whose stock is held in nominee or street name by brokers.

No dividends have been declared or paid on our common stock. We do not currently anticipate that we will pay any cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future.

 

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Stock Performance Graph

This performance graph shall not be deemed “soliciting material” or to be “filed” with the SEC for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), or otherwise subject to the liabilities under that Section, and shall not be deemed to be incorporated by reference into any filing of Restoration Hardware Holdings, Inc. under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Exchange Act.

The following graph and table compare the cumulative total stockholder return for our common stock during the period from November 2, 2012 (the date our common stock commenced trading on the NYSE) through February 1, 2014 in comparison to the NYSE Composite Index and the S&P Retailing Select Index, our peer group index. The graph and the table below assume that $100 was invested at the market close on November 2, 2012 in the common stock of Restoration Hardware Holdings, Inc., the NYSE Composite Index and the S&P Retailing Select Index. Data for the NYSE Composite Index and the S&P Retailing Select Index assumes reinvestments of dividends. The comparisons in the graph and table are required by the SEC and are not intended to be indicative of possible future performance of our common stock.

 

LOGO

 

     11/2/2012      2/1/2013      5/3/2013      8/2/2013      11/1/2013      1/31/2014  

Restoration Hardware Holdings, Inc.

     100.00         116.50         124.73         221.41         220.55         182.44   

NYSE Composite Index

     100.00         108.87         113.43         117.67         121.65         121.04   

S&P Retailing Select Index

     100.00         107.88         119.60         133.46         135.93         128.22   

 

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Repurchases of Common Stock during the Three Months Ended February 1, 2014

The following table provides information with respect to shares of common stock we repurchased during the three months ended February 1, 2014. For additional information, please see Note 12—Share Repurchases to our audited consolidated financial statements. These repurchases are related to certain options and awards granted under the Company’s equity plans that contain a repurchase right.

 

     Number of
Shares
     Average
Purchase
Price Per
Share
 

November 3, 2013 to November 30, 2013

     

Employee transactions

     2,470       $ 75.11   

December 1, 2013 to January 4, 2013

     

No activity

     —           —     

January 5, 2014 to February 1, 2014

     

No activity

     —           —     
  

 

 

    

Total

     2,470       $ 75.11   
  

 

 

    

On March 10, 2014, we repurchased 238,290 shares of common stock from Carlos Alberini, our former Co-Chief Executive Officer, for a purchase price of $65.06 per share, which was the closing sale price per share of our common stock on the New York Stock Exchange on that date, payable through the issuance of a promissory note. The shares repurchased were issued to Mr. Alberini under the Company’s 2012 Equity Replacement Plan. For additional information, please see Note 20—Subsequent Events.

 

Item 6. Selected Consolidated Financial Data

The following tables present Restoration Hardware Holdings, Inc.’s consolidated financial and operating data as of the dates and for the periods indicated.

Restoration Hardware Holdings, Inc. was formed as a Delaware corporation on August 18, 2011. On November 7, 2012, Restoration Hardware Holdings, Inc. completed an initial public offering and acquired all of the outstanding shares of capital stock of Restoration Hardware, Inc. In connection with the initial public offering, common stock of Restoration Hardware Holdings, Inc. was issued in replacement of prior unit awards under the Team Resto Ownership Plan. These transactions are referred to as the “Reorganization.” Restoration Hardware Holdings, Inc. has not engaged in any business or other activities except in connection with its formation and the Reorganization. Accordingly, all financial and other information herein relating to periods prior to the completion of the Reorganization is that of Restoration Hardware, Inc.

The selected consolidated financial data as of February 1, 2014 and February 2, 2013 and for the fiscal years ended February 1, 2014, February 2, 2013 and January 28, 2012, were derived from consolidated financial statements included in Item 8Financial Statements and Supplementary Data. The selected consolidated financial data as of January 28, 2012 and as of and for the periods ended January 29, 2011 and January 30, 2010 were derived from consolidated financial statements for such years not included herein.

 

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The selected historical consolidated data presented below should be read in conjunction with Item 1ARisk Factors, Item 7Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, our consolidated financial statements and the notes to our consolidated financial statements.

 

    Year Ended  
  February 1,
2014
    February 2,
2013
    January 28,
2012
    January 29,
2011
    January 30,
2010
 
    (dollars in thousands, excluding per square foot store data)  

Statement of Operations Data:

         

Net revenues

  $ 1,550,961      $ 1,193,046      $ 958,084      $ 772,752      $ 625,685   

Cost of goods sold

    994,081        756,597        601,735        501,132        412,629   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross profit

    556,880        436,449        356,349        271,620        213,056   

Selling, general and administrative expenses

    502,029        505,485        329,506        274,836        238,889   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) from operations

    54,851        (69,036     26,843        (3,216     (25,833

Interest expense

    (5,733     (5,776     (5,134     (3,150     (3,241
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) before income taxes

    49,118        (74,812     21,709        (6,366     (29,074

Income tax expense (benefit) (1)

    30,923        (62,023     1,121        685        (423
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income (loss)

  $ 18,195      $ (12,789   $ 20,588      $ (7,051   $ (28,651
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted-average number of basic shares outstanding

    38,671,564        9,428,828        468        100        100   

Basic net income (loss) per share

  $ 0.47      $ (1.36   $ 43,991      $ (70,510   $ (286,510

Weighted-average number of diluted shares outstanding

    40,416,630        9,428,828        468        100        100   

Diluted net income (loss) per share

  $ 0.45      $ (1.36   $ 43,991      $ (70,510   $ (286,510

Other Financial and Operating Data:

         

Growth in net revenues:

         

Stores (2)

    27     20     22     15     (6 )% 

Direct

    33     30     27     37     (15 )% 

Total

    30     25     24     24     (10 )% 

Comparable brand revenue growth (3)

    31     28     26     26     (10 )% 

Retail: (4)

         

Comparable store sales change (5)

    27     28     25     19     (7 )% 

Retail stores open at end of period

    70        71        74        91        95   

Retail sales per leased selling square foot (6)

  $ 1,395      $ 1,143      $ 846      $ 635      $ 525   

Total leased square footage at end of period (in thousands)

    798        768        808        970        1,015   

Total leased selling square footage at end of period (in thousands) (7)

    554        501        516        613        642   

Average leased square footage (in thousands) (8)

    793        784        913        1,014        1,042   

Average leased selling square footage (in thousands) (8)

    522        504        580        641        660   

Direct:

         

Catalogs circulated (in thousands) (9)

    12,325        32,712        26,052        46,507        31,336   

Catalog pages circulated (in millions) (9)

    6,583        16,029        8,848        6,260        4,418   

Direct as a percentage of net revenues (10)

    47     46     44     43     39

Capital expenditures

  $ 93,868      $ 49,058      $ 25,593      $ 39,907      $ 2,024   

Adjusted net income (loss) (11)

  $ 69,101      $ 37,739      $ 26,451      $ 3,025      $ (18,483

Adjusted EBITDA (12)

  $ 148,555      $ 96,571      $ 80,154      $ 41,097      $ 17,596   

 

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     February 1,
2014
     February 2,
2013
     January 28,
2012
     January 29,
2011
     January 30,
2010
 
     (in thousands)  

Balance Sheet Data:

              

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 13,389       $ 8,354       $ 8,512       $ 13,364       $ 13,186   

Working capital (excluding cash and cash equivalents) (13)

     284,785         267,905         156,506         103,894         57,058   

Total assets

     1,025,103         789,613         586,810         501,991         431,528   

Line of credit

     85,425         82,501         107,502         111,837         57,442   

Term loan

     —           —           14,798         —           —     

Total debt (including current portion) (14)

     87,621         87,029         131,040         116,995         61,652   

Total stockholders’ equity

     545,272         451,611         250,463         215,804         221,079   

 

(1) As of the end of fiscal 2012, our U.S. operations achieved a position of cumulative profits (adjusted for permanent differences) for the most recent three-year period. We concluded that this record of cumulative profitability in recent years, coupled with our business plan for profitability in future periods, provided assurance that our future tax benefits more likely than not would be realized. Accordingly, in the three and twelve months ended February 2, 2013, we released all of our U.S. valuation allowance of $57.2 million against net deferred tax assets.
(2) Stores data represents retail stores plus outlet stores.
(3) Comparable brand revenue growth includes retail comparable store sales, including Baby & Child Galleries, and direct net revenues. Comparable brand revenue growth excludes retail non-comparable store sales and outlet store net revenues. Refer to footnote (5) below for a definition of comparable store sales. Because fiscal 2012 was a 53-week year, comparable brand revenue growth percentage for fiscal 2012 excludes the extra week of revenue.
(4) Retail data has been calculated based upon retail stores, which includes our Baby & Child Galleries and excludes outlet stores.
(5) Comparable store sales have been calculated based upon retail stores that were open at least fourteen full months as of the end of the reporting period and did not change square footage by more than 20% between periods. If a store is closed for seven days during a month, that month will be excluded from comparable store sales. Comparable store net revenues exclude revenues from outlet stores. Because fiscal 2012 was a 53-week year, comparable store sales change percentage for fiscal 2012 excludes the extra week of sales.
(6) Retail sales per leased selling square foot is calculated by dividing total net revenues for all retail stores, comparable and non-comparable, by the average leased selling square footage for the period.
(7) Leased selling square footage is retail space at our stores used to sell our products. Leased selling square footage excludes backrooms at retail stores used for storage, office space or similar matters. Leased selling square footage excludes exterior sales space located outside a store, such as courtyards, gardens and rooftops. Leased selling square footage for fiscal 2013, fiscal 2012 and fiscal 2011 includes approximately 4,500 square feet related to one owned store location.
(8) Average square footage (leased or leased selling, as applicable) is calculated for each quarter by taking the total applicable square footage at the beginning of the quarter plus the total applicable square footage at the end of the quarter and dividing by two. Average square footage for periods of six, nine and twelve months is calculated by averaging the average square footage for the quarters within such periods.
(9) The catalogs and catalog pages circulated from period to period do not take into account different page sizes per catalog distributed. Page sizes and page counts vary for different catalog mailings and we sometimes mail different versions of a catalog at the same time. Accordingly, period to period comparisons of catalogs circulated and catalog pages circulated do not take these variations into account.
(10) Direct revenues include sales through our catalogs and websites.
(11)

Adjusted net income (loss) is a supplemental measure of financial performance that is not required by, or presented in accordance with, generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”). We define adjusted net income (loss) as consolidated net income (loss), adjusted for the impact of certain non-recurring and other items that we do not consider representative of our ongoing operating performance. Adjusted net income (loss) is included in this filing because management believes that adjusted net income (loss) provides

 

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  meaningful supplemental information for investors regarding the performance of our business and facilitates a meaningful evaluation of actual results on a comparable basis with historical results. Our management uses this non-GAAP financial measure in order to have comparable financial results to analyze changes in our underlying business from quarter to quarter. The following table presents a reconciliation of net income (loss), the most directly comparable GAAP financial measure, to adjusted net income for the periods indicated below.

 

     Year Ended  
   February 1,
2014
    February 2,
2013
    January 28,
2012
    January 29,
2011
    January 30,
2010
 
     (in thousands)  

Statement of Operations Data:

          

Net income (loss)

   $ 18,195      $ (12,789   $ 20,588      $ (7,051   $ (28,651

Adjustments pre-tax:

          

Management and pre-IPO board fees (a)

     —          4,258        10,715        4,793        4,620   

Non-cash and other one-time compensation (b)

     63,155        115,055        6,350        —          —     

Terminated operations (c)

     —          —          1,580        352        2,604   

Severance and other transaction costs (d)

     —          —          621        1,797        1,521   

Impairment of long-lived assets (e)

     —          —          —          2,115        2,304   

Lease termination costs (f)

     —          (386     3,110        —          —     

Inventory write-down amortization (g)

     —          —          —          —          (12,780

Special committee investigation and remediation (h)

     —          4,778        —          —          —     

Initial public offering costs (i)

     —          10,755        —          —          —     

Anti-dumping exposure (j)

     —          3,250        —          —          —     

Non-capitalized IPO costs (k)

     —          —          —          2,351        —     

Follow-on offering fees (l)

     2,895        —          —          —          —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Subtotal adjusted items

     66,050        137,710        22,376        11,408        (1,731

Impact of income tax items (m)

     (15,144     (87,182     (16,513     (1,332     11,899   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted net income (loss)

   $ 69,101      $ 37,739      $ 26,451      $ 3,025      $ (18,483
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
  (a) Includes fees and expenses paid in accordance with our management services agreement with Home Holdings, as well as fees and expense reimbursements paid to our board of directors prior to the initial public offering.
  (b) Fiscal 2013 includes a $33.7 million non-cash compensation charge related to the one-time, fully vested option granted to Mr. Friedman upon his reappointment as Chairman and Co-Chief Executive Officer in July 2013 and a $29.5 million non-cash compensation charge related to the performance-based vesting of certain shares granted to Mr. Friedman. Fiscal 2012 includes a $92.0 million non-cash compensation charge related to equity grants at the time of the Reorganization, as well as a non-cash compensation charge of $23.1 million related to the performance-based vesting of certain shares granted to Mr. Alberini and Mr. Friedman. Fiscal 2011 includes a $6.4 million compensation charge related to the repayment of loans owed to Home Holdings by Gary Friedman, through the reclassification by Home Holdings of Mr. Friedman’s Class A and Class A-1 ownership units into an equal number of Class A Prime and Class A-1 Prime ownership units. Mr. Friedman served as our Chairman and Co-Chief Executive Officer at the time of such loan repayment.
  (c) Includes costs related to the restructuring of our Shanghai office location.
  (d) Generally includes executive severance and other related costs.
  (e) Includes costs related to impairment of long-lived assets related to our retail store operations.
  (f) Includes lease termination costs for retail stores that were closed prior to their respective lease termination dates. The lease termination amount in fiscal 2012 includes changes in estimates regarding liabilities for future lease payments for closed stores.

 

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  (g) Represents non-cash impact of amortizing, over the period of the inventory turn, the net fair value adjustment to inventory recorded in connection with the purchase price allocation for the acquisition of all of the outstanding capital stock of Restoration Hardware, Inc. by Home Holdings on June 16, 2008.
  (h) Represents legal and other professional fees incurred in connection with the investigation conducted by the special committee of the board of directors relating to our Chief Executive Officer, Gary Friedman, and our subsequent remedial actions.
  (i) Represents costs incurred in connection with our initial public offering, including a fee of $7.0 million to Catterton Management Company, LLC (“Catterton”), Tower Three Partners LLC (“Tower Three”) and GJK Capital Advisors, LLC (“Glenhill”) in accordance with our management services agreement, payments of $2.2 million to certain former executives and bonus payments to employees of $1.3 million.
  (j) Represents expense incurred as a result of increased tariff obligations of one of our foreign suppliers following the U.S. Department of Commerce’s review of the anti-dumping duty order on wooden bedroom furniture from China for the period from January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011.
  (k) Represents costs related to our initial public offering.
  (l) Represents legal and other professional fees incurred in connection with our follow-on offerings in May 2013 and July 2013.
  (m) As of the end of fiscal 2012, our U.S. operations achieved a position of cumulative profits for the most recent three-year period. We concluded that this record of cumulative profitability in recent years, coupled with our business plan for profitability in future periods provided assurance that our future tax benefits more likely than not would be realized. Accordingly, in fiscal 2012, we released all of our U.S. valuation allowance against net deferred tax assets. In addition, income tax items exclude the tax benefit related to the resolution of our Canada Revenue Agency examination in fiscal 2012, exclude the tax benefit from the utilization of federal and state net operating losses, and assume a normalized tax rate of 40% for all periods.
(12) EBITDA and adjusted EBITDA are supplemental measures of financial performance that are not required by, or presented in accordance with, GAAP. We define EBITDA as consolidated net income (loss) before depreciation and amortization, interest expense and provision for income taxes. We define adjusted EBITDA as consolidated net income (loss) before depreciation and amortization, interest expense and provision for income taxes, adjusted for the impact of certain non-recurring and other items that we do not consider representative of our ongoing operating performance.

 

     We believe that EBITDA and adjusted EBITDA are useful measures of operating performance, as they eliminate expenses that are not reflective of the underlying business performance, facilitate a comparison of our operating performance on a consistent basis from period-to-period and provide for a more complete understanding of factors and trends affecting our business. We also use adjusted EBITDA as one of the primary methods for planning and forecasting overall expected performance and for evaluating on a quarterly and annual basis actual results against such expectations, and as the basis of our Management Incentive Plan (“MIP”), which is our cash based-incentive compensation program designed to motivate and reward annual performance for eligible employees. Additionally, EBITDA is frequently used by analysts, investors and other interested parties to evaluate companies in our industry. We use EBITDA and adjusted EBITDA, alongside other GAAP measures such as gross profit, operating income (loss) and net income (loss), to measure profitability, as a key profitability target in our annual and other budgets, and to compare our performance against that of peer companies.

EBITDA and adjusted EBITDA are not GAAP measures of our financial performance or liquidity and should not be considered as alternatives to net income (loss) or net income (loss) per share as a measure of financial performance, cash flows from operating activities as a measure of liquidity, or any other performance measure derived in accordance with GAAP and they should not be construed as an inference that our future results will be unaffected by unusual or non-recurring items. Additionally, EBITDA and adjusted EBITDA are not intended to be measures of free cash flow for management’s discretionary use, as they do not consider certain cash requirements such as tax payments and debt service requirements and certain other cash costs that may recur in the future. EBITDA and adjusted EBITDA contain certain other

 

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limitations, including the failure to reflect our cash expenditures, cash requirements for working capital needs and cash costs to replace assets being depreciated and amortized. In addition, these non-GAAP measures exclude certain non-recurring and other charges.

In evaluating these non-GAAP measures, you should be aware that in the future we may incur expenses that are the same as or similar to some of the adjustments in these non-GAAP measures. Our presentation of these non-GAAP measures should not be construed to imply that our future results will be unaffected by any such adjustments. Management compensates for these limitations by relying primarily on our GAAP results and by using these non-GAAP only supplementally. These non-GAAP measures are not necessarily comparable to other similarly titled captions of other companies due to different methods of calculation.

 

     Year Ended  
   February 1,
2014
     February 2,
2013
    January 28,
2012
     January 29,
2011
    January 30,
2010
 
     (in thousands)  

Statement of Operations Data:

            

Net income (loss)

   $ 18,195       $ (12,789   $ 20,588       $ (7,051   $ (28,651

Depreciation and amortization

     27,654         26,748        29,186         31,263        43,065   

Interest expense

     5,733         5,776        5,134         3,150        3,241   

Income tax expense (benefit)

     30,923         (62,023     1,121         685        (423
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

EBITDA

     82,505         (42,288     56,029         28,047        17,232   

Management and pre-IPO board fees (n)

     —           4,258        10,715         4,793        4,620   

Non-cash and other one-time compensation (o)

     63,155         116,157        7,907         1,119        592   

Terminated operations (p)

     —           —          1,580         352        2,604   

Severance and other transaction costs (q)

     —           —          621         1,797        1,521   

Impairment of long-lived assets (r)

     —           —          —           2,115        2,304   

Lease termination costs (s)

     —           (386     3,110         —          —     

Inventory write-down amortization (t)

     —           —          —           —          (12,780

Special committee investigation and remediation (u)

     —           4,778        —           —          —     

Initial public offering costs (v)

     —           10,755        —           —          —     

Anti-dumping exposure (w)

     —           3,250        —           —          —     

Non-capitalized IPO costs (x)

     —           —          —           2,351        —     

Follow-on offering fees (y)

     2,895         —          —           —          —     

Other (z)

     —           47        192         523        1,503   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

   $ 148,555       $ 96,571      $ 80,154       $ 41,097      $ 17,596   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 
  (n) Includes fees and expenses paid in accordance with our management services agreement with Home Holdings, as well as fees and expense reimbursements paid to our board of directors prior to the initial public offering.
  (o) Fiscal 2013 includes a $33.7 million non-cash compensation charge related to the one-time, fully vested option granted to Mr. Friedman upon his reappointment as Chairman and Co-Chief Executive Officer in July 2013 and a $29.5 million non-cash compensation charge related to the performance-based vesting of certain shares granted to Mr. Friedman. Fiscal 2012 includes a $92.0 million non-cash compensation charge related to equity grants at the time of the Reorganization, as well as a non-cash compensation charge of $23.1 million related to the performance-based vesting of certain shares granted to Mr. Alberini and Mr. Friedman. Fiscal 2011 includes a $6.4 million compensation charge related to the repayment of loans owed to Home Holdings by Mr. Friedman, through the reclassification by Home Holdings of Mr. Friedman’s Class A and Class A-1 ownership units into an equal number of Class A Prime and Class A-1 Prime ownership units. Mr. Friedman served as our Chairman and Co-Chief Executive Officer at the time of such loan repayment. In addition, amounts include stock-based compensation expense incurred prior to our initial public offering.

 

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  (p) Includes the impact of divesting our Brocade Home brand, closing four temporary clearance centers operated from October 2008 to March 2010, costs related to closing The Michaels Furniture Company and costs related to the restructuring of our Shanghai office location.
  (q) Generally includes executive severance and other related costs.
  (r) Includes costs related to impairment of long-lived assets related to our retail store operations prior to our initial public offering.
  (s) Includes lease termination costs for retail stores that were closed prior to their respective lease termination dates. The lease termination amount in fiscal 2012 includes changes in estimates regarding liabilities for future lease payments for closed stores.
  (t) Represents non-cash impact of amortizing, over the period of the inventory turn, the net fair value adjustment to inventory recorded in connection with the purchase price allocation for the acquisition of all of the outstanding capital stock of Restoration Hardware, Inc. by Home Holdings on June 16, 2008.
  (u) Represents legal and other professional fees incurred in connection with the investigation conducted by the special committee of the board of directors relating to Mr. Friedman and our subsequent remedial actions.
  (v) Represents costs incurred in connection with our initial public offering, including a fee of $7.0 million to Catterton, Tower Three and Glenhill in accordance with our management services agreement, payments of $2.2 million to certain former executives and bonus payments to employees of $1.3 million.
  (w) Represents expense incurred as a result of increased tariff obligations of one of our foreign suppliers following the U.S. Department of Commerce’s review of the anti-dumping duty order on wooden bedroom furniture from China for the period from January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011.
  (x) Represents costs related to our efforts to pursue an initial public offering.
  (y) Represents legal and other professional fees incurred in connection with our follow-on offerings in May 2013 and July 2013.
  (z) Represents items which management believes are not indicative of our ongoing operating performance. Fiscal 2009 includes one-time start-up costs associated with Baby& Child, occupancy costs for corporate office space exited by us as part of the acquisition of all of the outstanding capital stock of Restoration Hardware, Inc. by Home Holdings on June 16, 2008, and foreign exchange gains and losses. Fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2011 include consulting fees related to organizational matters, state franchise tax amounts and foreign exchange gains and losses.
(13) Working capital is defined as current assets, excluding cash and cash equivalents, less current liabilities, excluding the current portion of long-term debt.
(14) Total debt (including current portion) includes the revolving line of credit, term loan, and capital lease obligations.

 

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Overview

We are a leading luxury retailer in the home furnishings marketplace. Our collections of timeless, updated classics and reproductions are presented consistently across our sales channels in sophisticated and unique lifestyle settings that we believe are on par with world-class interior designers. We offer dominant merchandise assortments across a growing number of categories, including furniture, lighting, textiles, bathware, décor, outdoor and garden, tableware and children’s furnishings. Our business is fully integrated across our multiple channels of distribution, consisting of our stores, catalogs and websites. We position our stores as showrooms for our brand, while our Source Books and websites act as virtual extensions of our stores. As of February 1, 2014, we operated 62 Galleries, 5 Full Line Design Galleries and 3 Baby & Child Galleries, as well as 17 outlet stores throughout the United States and Canada.

 

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In order to drive growth across our business, we are focused on the following key strategies:

 

   

Transform Our Real Estate Platform. We believe we have an opportunity to significantly increase our sales by transforming our real estate platform from our existing retail footprint to a portfolio focused on Full Line Design Galleries. Our Full Line Design Galleries are sized based on the market potential and the size of our assortment. Based on our analysis, we believe we have opportunities to operate Full Line Design Galleries in 60 to 70 locations in the United States and Canada.

 

   

Expand Our Offering and Increase Our Market Share. We believe we have a significant opportunity to increase our market share by:

 

   

Growing our merchandise assortment;

 

   

Introducing new products and categories;

 

   

Expanding our service offerings; and

 

   

Exploring and testing new business opportunities complementary to our core business.

 

   

Increase Brand Awareness. We will continue to increase our brand awareness and customer loyalty through our real estate transformation, our Source Book circulation strategy, our digital marketing initiatives, and our increased advertising and public relations activities and events.

 

   

Pursue International Expansion. We plan to strategically expand our business into select countries outside of the United States and Canada over the next several years. We believe that our luxury brand positioning and unique aesthetic will have strong international appeal.

 

   

Increase Operating Margins. We have the opportunity to continue to improve our operating margins by leveraging our fixed occupancy costs and scalable infrastructure.

Our fiscal 2013 results reflect the ongoing strength of our business. We have continued to increase market share, and at the same time invested in our infrastructure and supply chain to support future growth. Key financial achievements of fiscal 2013 include:

 

   

Net revenues increased 30% to $1.6 billion in fiscal 2013, on top of a 25% increase in fiscal 2012 and a 24% increase in fiscal 2011.

 

   

The fourth quarter of fiscal 2013 marked our 16th consecutive quarter of double-digit net revenue growth.

 

   

Net income increased to $18.2 million in fiscal 2013 from a net loss of $12.8 million in fiscal 2012.

Factors Affecting Our Operating Results

Various factors affected our results for the periods presented in this “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” including the following:

Overall Economic Trends. The industry in which we operate is cyclical, and consequently our revenues are affected by general economic conditions. For example, reduced consumer confidence and lower availability and higher cost of consumer credit reduces demand for our products and limits our ability to increase prices or sustain price increases. We expect that some of the economic factors that have been in place for the last several years, including the continuing economic uncertainty (particularly in the housing market in the United States) may continue in future periods. For more information, see “Risk Factors—Changes in consumer spending or the housing market may significantly harm our revenue and results of operations.”

Our Strategic Initiatives. We are in the process of implementing a number of significant business initiatives that have had and will continue to have an impact on our results of operations, including the development of new larger Full Line Design Galleries in a number of new locations, the optimization of our store sizes to better fit

 

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anticipated demand in a given market, the expansion of our product categories and services and changes in the ways in which we market with our catalogs. Although these initiatives are designed to create growth in our business and continuing improvement in our operating results, the timing of expenditures related to these initiatives, as well as the achievement of returns on our investments, may affect our results of operation in future periods, and we may not achieve the desired benefits. Opening Full Line Design Galleries will require significant capital expenditures, and retail store closures may lead to charges including lease termination and other exit costs. These changes could affect our results of operation in future periods. In addition, the investments required to continue our strategic initiatives may have a negative impact on cash flows in future periods and could create pressure on our liquidity if we do not achieve the desired results from these initiatives in a timely manner. We expect that we will continue to incur significant capital expenditures as part of our initiative to open more Full Line Design Galleries over the next several years, and that these expenditures will have an impact on our cash flows during this time. For fiscal 2013, we incurred total capital expenditures of $93.9 million and we anticipate our capital expenditure requirements to be approximately $115 million to $125 million for fiscal 2014.

Consumer Preferences and Demand. Our ability to maintain our appeal to existing customers and attract new customers depends on our ability to originate, develop and offer a compelling product assortment responsive to customer preferences and design trends. We have successfully introduced a large number of new products during recent periods, which we believe has been a contributing factor in our sales and operating results. Periods in which our products have achieved strong customer acceptance generally have had more favorable results. If we misjudge the market for our products, we may be faced with excess inventories for some products and may be required to become more promotional in our selling activities, which would impact our net revenues and gross profit.

Our Ability to Source and Distribute Products Effectively. Our net revenues and gross profit are affected by our ability to purchase our merchandise in sufficient quantities at competitive prices. While we believe our vendors have adequate capacity to meet our current and anticipated demand, our level of net revenues have been adversely affected in prior periods by constraints in our supply chain, including the inability of our vendors to produce sufficient quantities of some merchandise in a manner that was able to match market demand from our customers, leading to higher levels of customer back orders and lost sales.

Fluctuation in Quarterly Results. Our quarterly results have historically varied depending upon a variety of factors, including our product offerings, promotional events, store openings, shifts in the timing of holidays and timing of catalog releases, among other things. As a result of these factors, our working capital requirements and demands on our product distribution and delivery network may fluctuate during the year. See “Risk Factors—Our operating results are subject to quarterly fluctuations, and results for any quarter may not necessarily be indicative of the results that may be achieved for the full fiscal year.”

How We Assess the Performance of Our Business

In assessing the performance of our business, we consider a variety of financial and operating measures that affect our operating results, including net revenues, gross profit, selling, general and administrative expenses and adjusted EBITDA and adjusted net income.

Net Revenues. Net revenues reflect our sale of merchandise plus shipping and handling revenue collected from our customers, less returns and discounts. Revenues are recognized upon receipt of product by our customers.

Gross Profit. Gross profit is equal to our net revenues less cost of goods sold. Gross profit as a percentage of our net revenues is referred to as gross margin. Cost of goods sold include the direct cost of purchased merchandise; inventory shrinkage; inventory adjustments due to obsolescence, including excess and slow-moving inventory and lower of cost or market reserves; inbound freight; all freight costs to get merchandise to our stores; design, buying and allocation costs; occupancy costs related to store operations, such as rent and

 

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common area maintenance; depreciation and amortization of leasehold improvements, equipment and other assets in our stores and distribution centers; and all logistics costs associated with shipping product to our customers, which are only partially offset by shipping income collected from customers. We expect gross profit to increase to the extent that we successfully grow our net revenues and leverage the fixed portion of cost of goods sold.

Our gross profit can be favorably impacted by sales volume increases, as occupancy and certain other costs that are largely fixed do not necessarily increase proportionally with volume increases. Changes in the mix of our products may also impact our gross profit. We review our inventory levels on an ongoing basis in order to identify slow-moving merchandise and use product markdowns and our outlet stores to efficiently sell these products. The timing and level of markdowns are driven primarily by customer acceptance of our merchandise. The primary drivers of the costs of individual goods are raw materials costs, which fluctuate based on a number of factors beyond our control, including commodity prices, changes in supply and demand, general economic conditions, competition, import duties, tariffs and government regulation, logistics costs (which may increase in the event of, for example, expansions of or interruptions in the operation of our distribution centers, furniture home delivery hubs and customer service center or damage or interruption to our information systems) and labor costs in the countries where we source our merchandise. We place orders with merchandise vendors primarily in United States dollars and, as a result, are not exposed to significant foreign currency exchange risk.

Our gross profit may not be comparable to other specialty retailers, as some companies may not include all or a portion of the costs related to their distribution network and store occupancy in calculating gross profit as we and many other retailers do, but instead may include them in selling, general and administrative expenses.

Selling, General and Administrative Expenses. Selling, general and administrative expenses include all operating costs not included in cost of goods sold. These expenses include all payroll and payroll related expenses, store expenses other than occupancy and expenses related to many of our operations at our headquarters, including utilities, depreciation and amortization, credit card fees and marketing expense, which primarily includes catalog production, mailing and print advertising costs. All store pre-opening costs are included in selling, general and administrative expenses and are expensed as incurred. Selling, general and administrative expenses as a percentage of net revenues is usually higher in lower-volume quarters and lower in higher-volume quarters because a significant portion of the costs are relatively fixed.

Our recent revenue growth has been accompanied by increased selling, general and administrative expenses, excluding certain one-time and non-cash items discussed in “Basis of Presentation and Results of Operations” below. The most significant components of these increases are payroll costs, as well as credit card fees due to increased revenue. We expect these expenses to continue to increase as we continue to open new stores, develop new product categories and otherwise grow our business. These increases were partially offset by a decrease in advertising and marketing costs as a result of modifying our Source Book strategy for fiscal 2013 and eliminating our Fall Source Book.

Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted Net Income. We believe that adjusted EBITDA and adjusted net income are useful measures of operating performance, as the adjustments eliminate non-recurring and other items that are not reflective of underlying business performance, facilitate a comparison of our operating performance on a consistent basis from period-to-period and provide for a more complete understanding of factors and trends affecting our business. We also use adjusted EBITDA as one of the primary methods for planning and forecasting overall expected performance and for evaluating on a quarterly and annual basis actual results against such expectations, and as the basis of our MIP.

We define adjusted EBITDA as consolidated net income (loss) before depreciation and amortization, interest expense and provision for income taxes, adjusted for the impact of certain non-recurring and other items that we do not consider representative of our ongoing operating performance. Because adjusted EBITDA omits non-cash items, we feel that it is less susceptible to variances in actual performance resulting from depreciation, amortization and other non-cash charges and is more reflective of other factors that affect our operating performance.

 

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We define adjusted net income as consolidated net income (loss), adjusted for the impact of certain non-recurring and other items that we do not consider representative of our ongoing operating performance.

Basis of Presentation and Results of Operations

On November 7, 2012, Restoration Hardware Holdings, Inc. completed an initial public offering and acquired all of the outstanding shares of capital stock of Restoration Hardware, Inc. In connection with the initial public offering, common stock of Restoration Hardware Holdings, Inc. was issued in replacement of prior unit awards under the Team Resto Ownership Plan. These transactions are referred to as the “Reorganization.” Prior to the Reorganization, Restoration Hardware Holdings, Inc. had not engaged in any business or other activities except in connection with its formation and the Reorganization. Accordingly, all financial and other information herein relating to periods prior to the completion of the Reorganization is that of Restoration Hardware, Inc.

The following table sets forth our statement of operations and other financial and operating data.

 

    Year Ended  
    February 1,
2014
    February 2,
2013
    January 28,
2012
 
    (dollars in thousands, excluding per square foot store data)  

Statement of Operations Data:

     

Net revenues

  $ 1,550,961      $ 1,193,046      $ 958,084   

Cost of goods sold

    994,081        756,597        601,735   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross profit

    556,880        436,449        356,349   

Selling, general and administrative expenses

    502,029        505,485        329,506   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) from operations

    54,851        (69,036     26,843   

Interest expense

    (5,733     (5,776     (5,134
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) before income taxes

    49,118        (74,812     21,709   

Income tax expense (benefit)

    30,923        (62,023     1,121   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income (loss)

  $ 18,195      $ (12,789   $ 20,588   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other Financial and Operating Data:

     

Growth in net revenues:

     

Stores (1)

    27     20     22

Direct

    33     30     27

Total

    30     25     24

Comparable brand revenue growth (2)

    31     28     26

Retail: (3)

     

Comparable store sales change (4)

    27     28     25

Retail stores open at beginning of period

    71        74        91   

Stores opened

    2        5        5   

Stores closed

    3        8        22   

Retail stores open at end of period

    70        71        74   

Retail sales per leased selling square foot (5)

  $ 1,395      $ 1,143      $ 846   

Total leased square footage at end of period (in thousands)

    798        768        808   

Total leased selling square footage at end of period (in thousands) (6)

    554        501        516   

Average leased square footage (in thousands) (7)

    793        784        913   

Average leased selling square footage (in thousands) (7)

    522        504        580   

 

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    Year Ended  
    February 1,
2014
    February 2,
2013
    January 28,
2012
 
    (dollars in thousands, excluding per square foot store data)  

Direct:

     

Catalogs circulated (in thousands) (8)

    12,325        32,712        26,052   

Catalog pages circulated (in millions) (8)

    6,583        16,029        8,848   

Direct as a percentage of net revenues (9)

    47     46     44

Capital expenditures

  $ 93,868      $ 49,058      $ 25,593   

 

(1) Stores data represents retail stores plus outlet stores. Net revenues for outlet stores for fiscal 2013, fiscal 2012 and fiscal 2011 were $89.6 million, $54.3 million and $43.9 million, respectively.
(2) Comparable brand revenue growth includes retail comparable store sales, including Baby & Child Galleries, and direct net revenues. Comparable brand revenue growth excludes retail non-comparable store sales and outlet store net revenues. Refer to footnote (4) below for a definition of comparable store sales. Because fiscal 2012 was a 53-week year, comparable brand revenue growth percentage for fiscal 2012 excludes the extra week of revenue.
(3) Retail data has been calculated based upon retail stores, which includes our Baby & Child Galleries and excludes outlet stores.
(4) Comparable store sales have been calculated based upon retail stores that were open at least fourteen full months as of the end of the reporting period and did not change square footage by more than 20% between periods. If a store is closed for seven days during a month, that month will be excluded from comparable store sales. Comparable store net revenues exclude revenues from outlet stores. Because fiscal 2012 was a 53-week year, comparable store sales change percentage for fiscal 2012 excludes that extra week of sales.
(5) Retail sales per leased selling square foot is calculated by dividing total net revenues for all retail stores, comparable and non-comparable, by the average leased selling square footage for the period.
(6) Leased selling square footage is retail space at our stores used to sell our products. Leased selling square footage excludes backrooms at retail stores used for storage, office space or similar matters. Leased selling square footage excludes exterior sales space located outside a store, such as courtyards, gardens and rooftops. Leased selling square footage includes approximately 4,500 square feet related to one owned store location.
(7) Average square footage (leased or leased selling, as applicable) is calculated for each quarter by taking the total applicable square footage at the beginning of the quarter plus the total applicable square footage at the end of the quarter and dividing by two. Average square footage for periods of six, nine and twelve months is calculated by averaging the average square footage for the quarters within such periods.
(8) The catalogs and catalog pages circulated from period to period do not take into account different page sizes per catalog distributed. Page sizes and page counts vary for different catalog mailings and we sometimes mail different versions of a catalog at the same time. Accordingly, period to period comparisons of catalogs circulated and catalog pages circulated do not take these variations into account.
(9) Direct revenues include sales through our catalogs and websites.

 

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The following table sets forth our consolidated statement of operations data as a percentage of total revenues.

 

     Year Ended  
     February 1,
2014
    February 2,
2013
    January 28,
2012
 

Statement of Operations Data:

      

Net revenues

     100.0     100.0     100.0

Cost of goods sold

     64.1        63.4        62.8   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross profit

     35.9        36.6        37.2   

Selling, general and administrative expenses

     32.4        42.4        34.4   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) from operations

     3.5        (5.8     2.8   

Interest expense

     (0.3     (0.5     (0.5
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) before income taxes

     3.2        (6.3     2.3   

Income tax expense (benefit)

     2.0        (5.2     0.1   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income (loss)

     1.2     (1.1 )%      2.2
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

We operate a fully integrated distribution model through our stores, catalogs and websites. The following table shows a summary of our Stores net revenues, which include all sales for orders placed in retail stores as well as sales through outlet stores, and our Direct net revenues which include sales through our catalogs and websites.

 

     Year Ended  
     February 1,
2014
     February 2,
2013
     January 28,
2012
 
     (in thousands)  

Stores

   $ 818,372       $ 643,306       $ 534,411   

Direct

     732,589         549,740         423,673   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net revenues

   $ 1,550,961       $ 1,193,046       $ 958,084   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Fiscal 2013 Compared to Fiscal 2012

Net revenues

Net revenues increased $357.9 million, or 30.0%, to $1,551.0 million in fiscal 2013 compared to $1,193.0 million in fiscal 2012. We had 70 and 71 retail stores open at February 1, 2014 and February 2, 2013, respectively. Stores sales increased $175.1 million, or 27.2%, to $818.4 million in fiscal 2013 compared to $643.3 million in fiscal 2012 due in large part to our comparable store sales increase of 27% in fiscal 2013 compared to fiscal 2012. Direct sales increased $182.8 million, or 33.3%, to $732.6 million in fiscal 2013 compared to $549.7 million in fiscal 2012. Our comparable brand revenue growth increased by 31% in fiscal 2013 compared to fiscal 2012. We believe that the increase in comparable brand revenue, comparable store sales and direct sales was due primarily to our customers’ favorable reaction to our merchandise assortment, including the expansion of existing product categories, and the introduction of new product categories.

Gross profit

Gross profit increased $120.4 million, or 27.6%, to $556.9 million in fiscal 2013 from $436.4 million in fiscal 2012. As a percentage of net revenues, gross margin decreased 0.7% to 35.9% of net revenues in fiscal 2013 from 36.6% of net revenues in fiscal 2012.

 

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In fiscal 2012, we incurred a $3.3 million charge related to increased tariff obligations of one of our foreign suppliers following the U.S. Department of Commerce’s review of the anti-dumping duty order on wooden bedroom furniture from China for the period from January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011. Excluding the impact associated with this obligation, gross margin decreased 1.0% to 35.9% of net revenues in fiscal 2013 from 36.9% in fiscal 2012. This decrease was primarily driven by strategic pricing on new product introductions and changes in product mix. In addition, gross profit as a percentage of net revenues decreased due to increased freight costs resulting from a larger percentage of furniture sales during the period, which incur higher shipping costs than our other products. These decreases in gross profit as a percentage of net revenues were partially offset by improvement in store occupancy costs from improved leverage on the fixed portion of such costs.

Selling, general and administrative expenses

Selling, general and administrative expenses decreased $3.5 million, or 0.7%, to $502.0 million in fiscal 2013 compared to $505.5 million in fiscal 2012.

Selling, general and administrative expenses in fiscal 2013 included: (i) a $33.7 million non-cash compensation charge related to the one-time, fully vested option to Mr. Friedman upon his reappointment as Chairman and Co-Chief Executive Officer, (ii) a $29.5 million non-cash compensation charge related to the performance-based vesting of certain shares granted to Mr. Friedman in connection with the Reorganization and initial public offering, and (iii) $2.9 million of costs incurred in connection with our follow-on offerings in May 2013 and July 2013.

Selling, general and administrative expenses for fiscal 2012 included (i) a $92.0 million non-cash compensation charge related to equity grants at the time of the Reorganization and initial public offering, (ii) a $23.1 million non-cash compensation charge related to the performance-based vesting of certain shares granted to Mr. Alberini and Mr. Friedman in connection with the Reorganization and initial public offering, (iii) $10.8 million of costs incurred in connection with our initial public offering, including a fee of $7.0 million to Catterton, Tower Three and Glenhill in accordance with our management services agreement, payments of $2.2 million to certain former executives and bonus payments to employees of $1.3 million, and (iv) $4.8 million of legal and other professional fees incurred in connection with the investigation conducted by the special committee of the board of directors relating to Mr. Friedman and our subsequent remedial actions.

The increase in selling, general and administrative expenses, excluding the one-time and non-cash compensation items mentioned above, was primarily related to an increase in employment costs, an increase in credit card fees due to increased revenues and an increase in corporate occupancy costs. These increases were partially offset by a decrease in advertising and marketing costs as a result of modifying our Source Book strategy in fiscal 2013 to eliminate the Fall Source Book.

Excluding the one-time and non-cash compensations items in fiscal 2013 and fiscal 2012 mentioned above, selling, general and administrative expenses were 28.1% of net revenues in fiscal 2013 compared to 31.4% of net revenues in fiscal 2012. The improvement in selling, general and administrative expenses as a percentage of net revenues was primarily driven by a decrease in advertising and marketing costs due to the change in the Source Book strategy.

Interest expense

Interest expense was $5.7 million in fiscal 2013 compared to $5.8 million in fiscal 2012. This decrease was primarily due to a decrease in the average borrowings under the revolving line of credit in fiscal 2013 compared to fiscal 2012 partially offset by interest expense of $1.1 million in fiscal 2013 related to accounting for build-to-suit transactions under ASC 840 for certain of our Full Line Design Galleries.

 

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Income tax expense (benefit)

Income tax expense increased $92.9 million to a $30.9 million expense in fiscal 2013 compared to a benefit of $62.0 million in fiscal 2012. Our effective tax rate was 63.0% in fiscal 2013 compared to 82.9% in fiscal 2012. The fiscal 2013 effective tax rate was significantly impacted by (i) non-deductible stock-based compensation and (ii) other non-deductible expenses. The fiscal 2012 effective tax rate was significantly impacted by (i) our reporting a loss before income taxes, (ii) the release of the U.S. valuation allowance against our net deferred tax assets, and (iii) non-deductible stock-based compensation. By the end of fiscal 2012, our U.S. operations achieved a position of cumulative profits (adjusted for permanent differences) for the most recent three-year period, and this coupled with our business plan for profitability in future periods, provided assurance that our future tax benefits are more likely than not to be realized. Accordingly, in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2012 we released $57.2 million of our U.S. valuation allowance against net deferred tax assets.

Fiscal 2012 Compared to Fiscal 2011

Net revenues

Net revenues increased $234.9 million, or 24.5%, to $1,193.0 million in fiscal 2012 compared to $958.1 million in fiscal 2011. We had 71 and 74 retail stores open at February 1, 2014 and January 28, 2012, respectively. Stores sales increased $108.9 million, or 20.4%, to $643.3 million in fiscal 2012 compared to $534.4 million in fiscal 2011 due in large part to our comparable store sales increase of 28% in fiscal 2012 compared to fiscal 2011, partially offset by having fewer stores open during fiscal 2012 compared to fiscal 2011. Direct sales increased $126.0 million, or 29.8%, to $549.7 million in fiscal 2012 compared to $423.7 million in fiscal 2011. Our comparable brand revenue growth increased by 28% in fiscal 2012 compared to fiscal 2011. We believe that the increase in comparable brand revenue, comparable store sales and direct sales was due primarily to our customers’ favorable reaction to our merchandise assortment, including the expansion of existing product categories, new product categories, and an increase in catalog pages circulated.

Gross profit

Gross profit increased $80.1 million, or 22.5%, to $436.4 million in fiscal 2012 from $356.3 million in fiscal 2011. As a percentage of net revenues, gross margin decreased 0.6% to 36.6% of net revenues in fiscal 2012 from 37.2% of net revenues in fiscal 2011.

In fiscal 2012, we incurred a $3.3 million charge related to increased tariff obligations of one of our foreign suppliers following the U.S. Department of Commerce’s review of the anti-dumping duty order on wooden bedroom furniture from China for the period from January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011. Excluding the impact associated with this obligation, gross margin decreased 0.3% to 36.9% of net revenues in fiscal 2012 from 37.2% in fiscal 2011. This decrease was primarily driven by changes in product mix, strategic pricing on new product introductions and increased promotional activity. In addition, gross margin decreased due to increased freight costs resulting from a higher percentage of furniture sales during the period, as furniture deliveries require greater shipping costs than our other products. These decreases in gross margins as a percentage of net revenues were partially offset by improvement in occupancy costs from improved leverage on the fixed portion of our store and distribution center occupancy costs.

Selling, general and administrative expenses

Selling, general and administrative expenses increased $176.0 million, or 53.4%, to $505.5 million in fiscal 2012 compared to $329.5 million in fiscal 2011.

Selling, general and administrative expenses for fiscal 2012 included (i) a $92.0 million non-cash compensation charge related to equity grants at the time of the Reorganization and initial public offering, (ii) a $23.1 million non-cash compensation charge related to the performance-based vesting of certain shares granted

 

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to Mr. Alberini and Mr. Friedman in connection with the Reorganization and initial public offering, (iii) $10.8 million of costs incurred in connection with our initial public offering, including a fee of $7.0 million to Catterton, Tower Three and Glenhill in accordance with our management services agreement, payments of $2.2 million to certain former executives and bonus payments to employees of $1.3 million, and (iv) $4.8 million of legal and other professional fees incurred in connection with the investigation conducted by the special committee of the board of directors relating to Mr. Friedman and our subsequent remedial actions.

Selling, general and administrative expenses for fiscal 2011 included a $6.4 million non-cash compensation charge related to the repayment of loans to Mr. Friedman from Home Holdings through the reclassification by Home Holdings of certain pre-Reorganization ownership units in Home Holdings held by Mr. Friedman at that time.

The increase in selling, general and administrative expenses, excluding the one-time and non-cash compensation items mentioned above, was primarily related to advertising and marketing costs associated with increased catalog circulation, an increase in employment costs, an increase in credit card fees increased due to growth in revenues and an increase in occupancy costs.

Excluding the one-time and non-cash compensations items mentioned above, selling, general and administrative expenses were 31.8% of net revenues in fiscal 2012 compared to 33.7% of net revenues in fiscal 2011. The improvement in selling, general and administrative expenses as a percentage of net revenues was primarily driven by reductions in employment costs, professional fees and occupancy costs, in each case as a percentage of net revenues, due to leverage on the fixed portion of these expenses. These reductions were partially offset by an increase in advertising and marketing costs associated with increased catalog circulation.

Interest expense

Interest expense was $5.8 million in fiscal 2012 compared to $5.1 million in fiscal 2011. This increase was primarily due to the higher interest rate under the modified revolving line of credit agreement entered into in August 2011, higher borrowings under the revolving line of credit, as well as interest related to the term loan entered into in January 2012.

Income tax expense (benefit)

Income tax benefit increased $63.1 million to a $62.0 million benefit in fiscal 2012 compared to an expense of $1.1 million in fiscal 2011. Our effective tax rate was 82.9% in fiscal 2012 compared to 5.2% in fiscal 2011. The increase in the tax benefit was primarily attributable to the reversal of the U.S. valuation allowance against our net deferred tax assets, resulting in a $57.2 million benefit in our provision for income taxes. By the end of fiscal 2012, our U.S. operations achieved a position of cumulative profits (adjusted for permanent differences) for the most recent three-year period. We concluded that this record of cumulative profitability in recent years, coupled with our business plan for profitability in future periods, provided assurance that our future tax benefits are more likely than not to be realized. Accordingly, in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2012, we released all of our U.S. valuation allowance against net deferred tax assets.

Quarterly Results

The following table sets forth our historical quarterly consolidated statements of income for each of the last eight fiscal quarters ended through February 1, 2014. This quarterly information has been prepared on the same basis as our annual audited financial statements and includes all adjustments that we consider necessary to present fairly the financial information for the fiscal quarters presented. The quarterly data should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and the related notes included in Item 8Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.

 

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Our quarterly results have historically varied depending upon a variety of factors, including our product offerings, promotional events, store openings, shifts in the timing of holidays and timing of catalog releases, among other things. As a result of these factors, our working capital requirements and demands on our product distribution and delivery network may fluctuate during the year. During these peak periods of working capital requirements, we have historically increased our borrowings under the Restoration Hardware, Inc. revolving line of credit. As such, results of a period shorter than a full year may not be indicative of results expected for the entire year.

 

     Fiscal 2012     Fiscal 2013  
     First
Quarter
    Second
Quarter  (1)
    Third
Quarter  (1)
    Fourth
Quarter  (2)
    First
Quarter  (3)
    Second
Quarter  (4)
    Third
Quarter
    Fourth
Quarter
 
     (dollars in thousands)  

Net revenues

   $ 217,914      $ 292,906      $ 284,171      $ 398,055      $ 301,337      $ 382,098      $ 395,832      $ 471,694   

Cost of goods sold

     142,646        178,779        182,291        252,881        199,460        242,872        255,032        296,717   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross profit

     75,268        114,127        101,880        145,174        101,877        139,226        140,800        174,977   

Selling, general, and administrative expenses

     77,365        94,465        99,886        233,769        101,366        167,006        116,940        116,717   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) from operations

     (2,097     19,662        1,994        (88,595     511        (27,780     23,860        58,260   

Interest expense

     (1,575     (1,479     (1,544     (1,178     (840     (1,191     (2,165     (1,537
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) before income taxes

     (3,672     18,183        450        (89,773     (329     (28,971     21,695        56,723   

Income tax expense (benefit)

     56        567        (1,235     (61,411     (168     (11,136     12,146        30,081   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income (loss)

   $ (3,728   $ 17,616      $ 1,685      $ (28,362   $ (161   $ (17,835   $ 9,549      $ 26,642   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted net income (loss) (5)

   $ (1,324   $ 12,245      $ 2,662      $ 24,156      $ 2,257      $ 19,793      $ 13,017      $ 34,034   

Adjusted EBITDA (6)

   $ 6,159      $ 28,738      $ 12,973      $ 48,701      $ 11,231      $ 40,778      $ 30,591      $ 65,955   

Comparable brand revenue growth (7)

     23     30     27     29     39     30     38     24

Comparable store sales (8)

     26     31     29     26     41     26     29     17

 

(1) The second and third quarters of fiscal 2012 include $2.0 million and $2.8 million, respectively, of legal and other professional fees incurred in connection with the investigation conducted by the special committee of the board of directors relating to our Chief Executive Officer, Gary Friedman, and our subsequent remedial actions.
(2) The fourth quarter of fiscal 2012 includes (i) a $92.0 million non-cash compensation charge related to equity grants at the time of the Reorganization, (ii) a non-cash compensation charge of $23.1 million related to the performance-based vesting of certain shares granted to Mr. Alberini and Mr. Friedman, (iii) costs incurred in connection with our initial public offering, including a fee of $7.0 million to Catterton, Tower Three and Glenhill in accordance with our management services agreement, payments of $2.2 million to certain former executives and bonus payments to employees of $1.3 million and (iv) $3.3 million incurred as a result of increased tariff obligations of one of our foreign suppliers following the U.S. Department of Commerce’s review of the anti-dumping duty order on wooden bedroom furniture from China for the period from January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011. In addition, as of the end of fiscal 2012, our U.S. operations achieved a position of cumulative profits (adjusted for permanent differences) for the most recent three-year period. We concluded that this record of cumulative profitability in recent years, coupled with our business plan for profitability in future periods, provided assurance that our future tax benefits more likely than not would be realized. Accordingly, in the fourth fiscal quarter of 2012, we released all of our U.S. valuation allowance of $57.2 million against net deferred tax assets.

 

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(3) The first quarter of fiscal 2013 includes (i) a $3.3 million non-cash compensation charge related to the performance-based vesting of certain shares granted to Mr. Friedman and (ii) $0.8 million of costs incurred in connection with our follow-on offering in May 2013.
(4) The second quarter of fiscal 2013 includes (i) a $33.7 million non-cash compensation charge related to the one-time, fully vested option granted to Mr. Friedman upon his reappointment as Chairman and Co-Chief Executive Officer in July 2013, (ii) a $26.2 million non-cash compensation charge related to the performance-based vesting of certain shares granted to Mr. Friedman and (iii) $2.1 million of legal and other professional fees incurred in connection with our follow-on offerings in May 2013 and July 2013.
(5) Adjusted net income (loss) is a supplemental measure of financial performance that is not required by, or presented in accordance with, GAAP. We define adjusted net income (loss) as consolidated net income (loss), adjusted for the impact of certain non-recurring and other items that we do not consider representative of our ongoing operating performance. Adjusted net income (loss) is included in this filing because management believes that adjusted net income (loss) provides meaningful supplemental information for investors regarding the performance of our business and facilitates a meaningful evaluation of actual results on a comparable basis with historical results. Our management uses this non-GAAP financial measure in order to have comparable financial results to analyze changes in our underlying business from quarter to quarter. The following table presents a reconciliation of net income (loss), the most directly comparable GAAP financial measure, to adjusted net income (loss) for the periods indicated below.

 

    Fiscal 2012     Fiscal 2013  
    First
Quarter
    Second
Quarter
    Third
Quarter
    Fourth
Quarter
    First
Quarter
    Second
Quarter
    Third
Quarter
    Fourth
Quarter
 
    (in thousands)  

Net income (loss)

  $ (3,728   $ 17,616      $ 1,685      $ (28,362   $ (161   $ (17,835   $ 9,549      $ 26,642   

Adjustments pre-tax:

               

Management and board fees (a)

    889        1,198        1,198        973        —          —          —          —     

Non-cash and other one-time compensation (b)

    —         —          —          115,055        3,323        59,832        —          —     

Lease termination costs (c)

    575        (961     —          —          —          —          —          —     

Special committee investigation (d)

    —          1,989        2,789        —          —          —          —          —     

Initial public offering costs (e)

    —          —          —          10,755        —          —          —          —     

Anti-dumping exposure (f)

    —          —          —          3,250        —          —          —          —     

Follow-on offering fees (g)

    —          —          —          —          767        2,128        —          —     
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Subtotal adjusted items

    1,464        2,226        3,987        130,033        4,090        61,960        —          —     

Impact of income tax items (h)

    940        (7,597     (3,010     (77,515     (1,672     (24,332     3,468        7,392   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted net income (loss)

  $ (1,324   $ 12,245      $ 2,662      $ 24,156      $ 2,257      $ 19,793      $ 13,017      $ 34,034   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

  (a) Includes fees and expenses paid in accordance with our management services agreement with Home Holdings, as well as fees and expense reimbursements paid to our board of directors prior to the initial public offering.
  (b)

The fourth quarter of fiscal 2012 includes a $92.0 million non-cash compensation charge related to equity grants at the time of the Reorganization, as well as a non-cash compensation charge of $23.1 million related to the performance-based vesting of certain shares granted to Mr. Alberini and Mr. Friedman. The first quarter of fiscal 2013 includes a non-cash compensation charge of $3.3 million related to the performance-based vesting of certain shares granted to Mr. Friedman. The second quarter of fiscal 2013 includes a $33.7 million non-cash compensation charge related to the one-time, fully vested option granted to Mr. Friedman upon his reappointment as Chairman and Co-Chief Executive

 

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  Officer in July 2013 and a $26.2 million non-cash compensation charge related to the performance-based vesting of certain shares granted to Mr. Friedman.
  (c) Represents changes in estimates of future lease payments related to lease termination cost liabilities for retail stores that were closed prior to their respective lease termination dates.
  (d) Represents legal and other professional fees incurred in connection with the investigation conducted by the special committee of the board of directors relating to our Chief Executive Officer, Gary Friedman, and our subsequent remedial actions.
  (e) Represents costs incurred in connection with our initial public offering, including a fee of $7.0 million to Catterton, Tower Three and Glenhill in accordance with our management services agreement, payments of $2.2 million to certain former executives and bonus payments to employees of $1.3 million.
  (f) Represents expense incurred as a result of increased tariff obligations of one of our foreign suppliers following the U.S. Department of Commerce’s review of the anti-dumping duty order on wooden bedroom furniture from China for the period from January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011.
  (g) Represents legal and other professional fees incurred in connection with our follow-on offerings in May 2013 and July 2013.
  (h) As of the end of fiscal 2012, our U.S. operations achieved a position of cumulative profits for the most recent three-year period. We concluded that this record of cumulative profitability in recent years, coupled with our business plan for profitability in future periods provided assurance that our future tax benefits more likely than not would be realized. Accordingly, in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2012, we released all of our U.S. valuation allowance against net deferred tax assets. In addition, income tax items exclude the tax benefit related to the resolution of our Canada Revenue Agency examination in the third quarter of fiscal 2012, exclude the tax benefit from the utilization of federal and state net operating losses, and assume a normalized tax rate of 40% for all periods.

 

(6) The following table presents a reconciliation of net income (loss), the most directly comparable GAAP financial measure, to EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA for the periods indicated below. For further discussion of the use of EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA, see footnote 12 to the table included in “Selected Consolidated Financial Data”.

 

    Fiscal 2012     Fiscal 2013  
    First
Quarter
    Second
Quarter
    Third
Quarter
    Fourth
Quarter
    First
Quarter
    Second
Quarter
    Third
Quarter
    Fourth
Quarter
 
    (in thousands)  

Net income (loss)

  $ (3,728   $ 17,616      $ 1,685      $ (28,362   $ (161   $ (17,835   $ 9,549      $ 26,642   

Depreciation and amortization

    6,424        6,468        6,593        7,263        6,630        6,598        6,731        7,695   

Interest expense

    1,575        1,479        1,544        1,178        840        1,191        2,165        1,537   

Income tax expense (benefit)

    56        567        (1,235     (61,411     (168     (11,136     12,146        30,081   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

EBITDA

    4,327        26,130        8,587        (81,332     7,141        (21,182     30,591        65,955   

Management and board fees (i)

    889        1,198        1,198        973        —          —          —          —     

Non-cash and other one-time compensation (j)

    387        351        364        115,055        3,323        59,832        —          —     

Lease termination costs (k)

    575        (961     —          —          —          —          —          —     

Special committee investigation (l)

    —          1,989        2,789        —          —          —          —          —     

Initial public offering costs (m)

    —          —          —          10,755        —          —          —          —     

Anti-dumping exposure (n)

    —          —          —          3,250        —          —          —          —     

Follow-on offering fees (o)

    —          —          —          —          767        2,128        —          —     

Other (p)

    (19     31        35        —          —          —          —          —     
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

  $ 6,159      $ 28,738      $ 12,973      $ 48,701      $ 11,231      $ 40,778      $ 30,591      $ 65,955   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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  (i) Includes fees and expenses paid in accordance with our management services agreement with Home Holdings, as well as fees and expense reimbursements paid to our board of directors prior to the initial public offering.
  (j) The fourth quarter of fiscal 2012 includes a $92.0 million non-cash compensation charge related to equity grants at the time of the Reorganization, as well as a non-cash compensation charge of $23.1 million related to the performance-based vesting of certain shares granted to Mr. Alberini and Mr. Friedman. The first quarter of fiscal 2013 includes a non-cash compensation charge of $3.3 million related to the performance-based vesting of certain shares granted to Mr. Friedman. The second quarter of fiscal 2013 includes a $33.7 million non-cash compensation charged related to the one-time, fully vested option granted to Mr. Friedman upon his reappointment as Chairman and Co-Chief Executive Officer in July 2013 and a $26.2 million non-cash compensation charge related to the performance-based vesting of certain shares granted to Mr. Friedman. In addition, amounts include stock-based compensation expense incurred prior to our initial public offering.
  (k) Represents changes in estimates of future lease payments related to lease termination cost liabilities for retail stores that were closed prior to their respective lease termination dates.
  (l) Represents legal and other professional fees incurred in connection with the investigation conducted by the special committee of the board of directors relating to Mr. Friedman and our subsequent remedial actions.
  (m) Represents costs incurred in connection with our initial public offering, including a fee of $7.0 million to Catterton, Tower Three and Glenhill in accordance with our management services agreement, payments of $2.2 million to certain former executives and bonus payments to employees of $1.3 million.
  (n) Represents expense incurred as a result of increased tariff obligations of one of our foreign suppliers following the U.S. Department of Commerce’s review of the anti-dumping duty order on wooden bedroom furniture from China for the period from January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011.
  (o) Represents legal and other professional fees incurred in connection with our follow-on offerings in May 2013 and July 2013.
  (p) Represents items which management believes are not indicative of our ongoing operating performance which includes foreign exchange gains and losses.

 

(7) Comparable brand revenue growth includes retail comparable store sales, including Baby & Child Galleries, and direct net revenues. Comparable brand revenue growth excludes retail non-comparable store sales and outlet store net revenues. Refer to footnote (8) below for a definition of comparable store sales. Because the fourth quarter of fiscal 2012 was a 14-week quarter, comparable brand revenue growth percentage for fourth quarter of fiscal 2012 excludes the extra week of revenue.
(8) Comparable store sales have been calculated based upon retail stores that were open at least fourteen full months as of the end of the reporting period and did not change square footage by more than 20% between periods. If a store is closed for seven days during a month, that month will be excluded from comparable store sales. Comparable store net revenues exclude revenues from outlet stores. Because the fourth quarter of fiscal 2012 was a 14-week quarter, comparable store sales change percentage for fourth quarter of fiscal 2012 excludes the extra week of sales.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

General

Our business relies on cash flows from operations and the revolving line of credit as our primary sources of liquidity. Our primary cash needs are for merchandise inventories, payroll, Source Books and other catalogs, store rent, capital expenditures associated with opening new stores and updating existing stores, as well as infrastructure and information technology. The most significant components of our working capital are cash and cash equivalents, merchandise inventories, accounts receivable, accounts payable and other current liabilities. Our working capital varies as a result of increases in our inventory levels and costs related to our catalogs and our borrowings have generally increased as a result of the growth of our business and ongoing transformation of

 

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our retail stores. We believe that cash expected to be generated from operations, and borrowing availability under the revolving line of credit or other financing arrangements, will be sufficient to meet working capital requirements, anticipated capital expenditures and payments due under our revolving line of credit for at least the next 12 – 24 months. Our investments in capital expenditures for fiscal 2013 totaled $93.9 million. We expect to have capital expenditures of approximately $115 million to $125 million in fiscal 2014, primarily related to our efforts to continue our growth and expansion, including construction of Full Line Design Galleries and infrastructure investments.

Cash Flow Analysis

A summary of operating, investing, and financing activities is shown in the following table:

 

     Year Ended  
     February 1,
2014
    February 2,
2013
    January 28,
2012
 
     (in thousands)  

Provided by (used in) operating activities

   $ 87,521      $ (3,864   $ 17,121   

Used in investing activities

     (93,868     (49,368     (25,593

Provided by financing activities

     11,505        53,052        3,371   

Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

     5,035        (158     (4,852

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period

     13,389        8,354        8,512   

Net Cash Used In Operating Activities

Cash from operating activities consists primarily of net income (loss) adjusted for non-cash items including depreciation and amortization, stock-based compensation and the effect of changes in working capital and other activities.

For fiscal 2013, net cash provided by operating activities was $87.5 million and consisted of net income of $18.2 million and non-cash items of $99.2 million, offset by a decrease in working capital and other activities of $29.9 million. Non-cash items of $99.2 million include stock-based compensation expense of $67.6 million, depreciation and amortization of $27.7 million, and an increase in our deferred income tax of $5.6 million. The decrease in working capital and other activities consisted primarily of increases in inventory of $100.9 million to support our growth, increases in prepaid expenses of $22.8 million primarily due to an increase in vendor deposits and capitalized catalog costs, and increases in accounts receivable of $5.0 million due to revenue growth and tenant improvements. These uses of cash from working capital components were partially offset by increases in accrued liabilities and accounts payable of $57.3 million primarily due to timing of payments, increases in other current liabilities of $30.4 million due to federal and state tax liabilities and an increase in our customer return reserve, increases in deferred revenue and customer deposits of $7.3 million due to the timing of shipments made at fiscal year end, as well as increases in deferred rent and lease incentives of $7.2 million primarily due to entering into new lease agreements for Full Line Design Gallery and new distribution center locations.

For fiscal 2012, net cash used in operating activities was $3.9 million and consisted of an increase in working capital and other activities of $73.0 million and a net loss of $12.8 million, offset by non-cash items of $81.9 million. Non-cash items of $81.9 million include a $92.0 million compensation charge related to equity activity at the time of the Reorganization, a compensation charge of $23.1 million related to the performance-based vesting of certain shares granted to Mr. Alberini and Mr. Friedman subsequent to the Reorganization and depreciation and amortization of $26.7 million, offset by the release of our U.S. valuation allowance in fiscal 2012 of $57.2 million and a decrease in our non-cash income tax adjustments of $4.7 million. The increase in working capital and other activities consisted primarily of increases in inventory of $107.5 million as part of our strategy to improve our inventory position to meet demand levels, prepaid expenses of $24.5 million primarily

 

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due to an increase in catalog costs associated with the Source Book strategy and accounts receivable of $5.3 million due to timing of payments received related to our credit card receivables. These uses of cash from working capital components were partially offset by increases in accrued liabilities and accounts payable of $36.2 million primarily due to timing of payments, increases in deferred revenue and customer deposits of $16.2 million due to the timing of shipments made at fiscal year end, as well as increases in deferred rent and lease incentives of $10.9 million primarily due to entering into new lease agreements for Full Line Design Gallery locations.

For fiscal 2011, net cash provided by operating activities was $17.1 million and consisted of net income of $20.6 million and non-cash items of $48.6 million, offset by an increase in working capital and other activities of $52.1 million. Non-cash items of $48.6 million include expenses of $6.4 million related to the repayment of the executive loan by Mr. Friedman and $6.0 million for the management fee to Catterton, Tower Three and Glenhill, both incurred by Home Holdings on our behalf and reflected as capital contributions. The increase in working capital and other activities consisted primarily of increases in inventory of $39.5 million in anticipation of future demand and as a result of the increased capacity due to opening a new distribution center in fiscal 2011, prepaid expenses of $36.4 million primarily due to an increase in catalog costs associated with the Source Book strategy and accounts receivable of $7.3 million due to timing of payments received related to our credit card receivables. These uses of cash from working capital components were offset by sources of cash from increases in accrued liabilities and accounts payable of $14.4 million primarily due to timing of payments, increases in deferred revenue and customer deposits of $11.4 million due to the timing of shipments made at fiscal year end, as well as increases in other current liabilities of $3.9 million primarily due to an increase in gift certificate-related liabilities.

Net Cash Used In Investing Activities

Investing activities consist primarily of investments in capital expenditures related to new store openings and improvements and in supply chain and systems infrastructure.

For fiscal 2013, net cash used in investing activities was $93.9 million primarily as a result of investments in new stores, investment in supply chain and systems infrastructure, renovations to our corporate headquarters and investment in information technology.

For fiscal 2012, net cash used in investing activities was $49.4 million primarily as a result of investments in new stores, investment in supply chain and systems infrastructure and the purchase of a new domain name.

For fiscal 2011, capital expenditures were $25.6 million as a result of investments in new stores and investment in supply chain and systems infrastructure.

Net Cash Provided By Financing Activities

Financing activities consist primarily of borrowings and repayments related to the revolving line of credit, term loan and capital contributions.

For fiscal 2013, net cash provided by financing activities was $11.5 million primarily due to net proceeds from the exercise of stock options of $7.6 million, excess tax benefits from the exercise of stock options of $3.7 million and net borrowings under the revolving line of credit of $2.9 million, partially offset by payments on capital lease obligations of $2.6 million.

For fiscal 2012, net cash provided by financing activities was $53.1 million primarily due to the issuance of common stock which generated proceeds of $106.8 million, partially offset by issuance costs of $9.1 million. This overall increase in cash provided by the initial public offering was partially offset by net repayments under the revolving line of credit of $25.0 million, the repayment in full of the term loan of $15.0 million and payments on capital lease obligations of $4.2 million.

 

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For fiscal 2011, net cash provided by financing activities was $3.4 million primarily due to entering into an amendment to Restoration Hardware, Inc.’s credit agreement, for the purpose of incorporating a term loan facility for $15.0 million in January 2012. This increase is offset by net repayments under the revolving line of credit of $4.6 million, debt issuance costs related to the amended credit agreement and term loan of $2.8 million, as well as payments on capital lease obligations of $4.2 million.

Revolving Line of Credit

In August 2011, Restoration Hardware, Inc., along with its Canadian subsidiary, Restoration Hardware Canada, Inc., entered into a credit agreement with Bank of America, N.A., as administrative agent, and certain other lenders. This credit agreement modified a previous facility under which Restoration Hardware, Inc. had a revolving line of credit for up to $190.0 million. Under the credit agreement, which has a maturity date of August 3, 2016, Restoration Hardware, Inc. has a revolving line of credit available of up to $417.5 million (following Restoration Hardware, Inc.’s exercise of the commitment increase option on November 1, 2012, as described below), of which $10.0 million is available to Restoration Hardware Canada, Inc. The credit agreement was further amended in January 2012 to add a $15.0 million term loan facility with a maturity date of July 6, 2015, which was repaid in full on November 7, 2012, as described below.

Under the credit agreement’s commitment increase provision, Restoration Hardware, Inc. had the option to increase the amount of the revolving line of credit by up to an additional $100.0 million, provided that, among other things, the existing lenders or additional lenders agreed to participate in the increased loan commitments under the revolving line of credit, no default under the credit agreement then existed or would result from such increase and sufficient borrowing base collateral was available to support increased loan amounts. On November 1, 2012, Restoration Hardware, Inc. increased the amount of the revolving line of credit by $100.0 million pursuant to this commitment increase provision.

On November 7, 2012, Restoration Hardware, Inc. made payments of $75.7 million on its revolving line of credit and repaid its outstanding term loan of $15.0 million in full. Such payments were funded from the proceeds received as a result of our initial public offering.

The availability of credit at any given time under the revolving line of credit is limited by reference to a borrowing base formula based upon numerous factors, including the value of eligible inventory, eligible accounts receivable, eligible real estate, and, in the case of the term loan, registered trade names and reserves established by the administrative agent. As a result of the borrowing base formula, the actual borrowing availability under the revolving line of credit could be less than the stated amount of the revolving line of credit (as reduced by the actual borrowings and outstanding letters of credit under the revolving line of credit). All obligations under the credit agreement are secured by substantially all of Restoration Hardware, Inc.’s assets, including accounts receivable, inventory, intangible assets, property, equipment, goods and fixtures.

Borrowings under the revolving line of credit are subject to interest, at the borrowers’ option, at either the bank’s reference rate or LIBOR (or the BA Rate or the Canadian Prime Rate, as such terms are defined in the credit agreement, for Canadian borrowings denominated in Canadian dollars or the United States Index Rate or LIBOR for Canadian borrowings denominated in United States dollars) plus an applicable margin rate, in each case. The weighted-average interest rate for the revolving line of credit was 2.80% as of February 1, 2014.

As of February 1, 2014, $85.4 million was outstanding under the revolving line of credit. As of February 1, 2014, Restoration Hardware, Inc.’s undrawn borrowing availability under the revolving line of credit was $261.7 million and there were $18.9 million in outstanding letters of credit.

The credit agreement contains various restrictive covenants, including, among others, limitations on the ability to incur liens, make loans or other investments, incur additional debt, issue additional equity, merge or consolidate with or into another person, sell assets, pay dividends or make other distributions or enter into

 

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transactions with affiliates, along with other restrictions and limitations typical to credit agreements of this type and size. The credit agreement does not contain any significant financial or coverage ratio covenants unless the availability under the revolving line of credit is less than the greater of (i) $17.5 million and (ii) 10% of the lesser of (A) the aggregate maximum commitments under the revolving line of credit and (B) the domestic borrowing base. If the availability under the revolving line of credit is less than the foregoing amount, then Restoration Hardware, Inc. is required to maintain a consolidated fixed charge coverage ratio of at least one to one. Such ratio is approximately the ratio on the last day of each month on a trailing twelve-month basis of (a) (i) consolidated EBITDA (as defined in the agreement) minus (ii) capital expenditures, minus (iii) the income taxes paid in cash to (b) the sum of (i) debt service charges plus (ii) certain dividends and distributions paid. As of February 1, 2014, Restoration Hardware, Inc. was in compliance with all covenants, and if the availability under the revolving line of credit were less than the amount described above, Restoration Hardware, Inc. would have been in compliance with the consolidated fixed charge coverage ratio described in the previous sentence. The credit agreement requires a daily sweep of cash to prepay the loans under the credit agreement while (i) an event of default exists or (ii) the availability under the revolving line of credit for extensions of credit to Restoration Hardware, Inc. is less than the greater of (A) $20.0 million and (B) 15% of the lesser of the aggregate maximum commitments and the domestic borrowing base.

Contractual Obligations

We enter into long term contractual obligations and commitments, primarily debt obligations and non-cancelable operating leases, in the normal course of business. As of February 1, 2014, our contractual cash obligations over the next several periods were as follows:

 

     Payments Due by Period  
     Total      2014      2015–2016      2017–2018      Thereafter  
     (in thousands)  

Revolving line of credit (1)

   $ 85,425       $ —         $ 85,425       $ —         $ —     

Capital lease obligations

     2,256         1,844         341         71         —     

Operating leases (2)

     612,667         68,709         119,368         100,599         323,991   

Other long-term obligations (3)

     143,001         48,352         17,510         16,659         60,480   

Letters of credit

     18,862         18,862         —           —           —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 862,211       $ 137,767       $ 222,644       $ 117,329       $ 384,471   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1) Excludes estimated interest under the revolving line of credit. Interest costs for the revolving line of credit have been estimated based on interest rates in effect for our indebtedness as of February 1, 2014, as well as estimated borrowing levels in the future based upon planned inventory purchases. Actual borrowing levels and interest costs may differ. The revolving line of credit has a maturity date of August 3, 2016.
(2) We enter into operating leases in the normal course of business. Most lease arrangements provide us with the option to renew the leases at defined terms. The future operating lease obligations would change if we were to exercise these options, or if we were to enter into additional new operating leases. Amounts above do not include estimated contingent rent due under operating leases of $2.0 million at February 1, 2014.
(3) Other long-term obligations include estimated timing and amounts of payments for rent and tenant improvements associated with build-to-suit lease arrangements.

The liability of $1.4 million as of February 1, 2014, for unrecognized tax benefits associated with uncertain tax positions (see Note 10—Income Taxes to our audited consolidated financial statements) has not been included in the contractual obligations table above because we are not able to reasonably estimate when cash payments for these liabilities will occur or the amount by which these liabilities will increase or decrease over time.

Off Balance Sheet Arrangements

We have no material off balance sheet arrangements as of February 1, 2014.

 

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Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect amounts reported in our consolidated financial statements and related notes, as well as the related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Management evaluates its accounting policies, estimates, and judgments on an on-going basis. Management bases its estimates and judgments on historical experience and various other factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions and conditions and such differences could be material to the consolidated financial statements.

Management evaluated the development and selection of its critical accounting policies and estimates and believes that the following involve a higher degree of judgment or complexity and are most significant to reporting our results of operations and financial position, and are therefore discussed as critical. The following critical accounting policies reflect the significant estimates and judgments used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements. With respect to critical accounting policies, even a relatively minor variance between actual and expected experience can potentially have a materially favorable or unfavorable impact on subsequent results of operations. However, our historical results for the periods presented in the consolidated financial statements have not been materially impacted by such variances. More information on all of our significant accounting policies can be found in Note 3—Significant Accounting Policies to our audited consolidated financial statements.

Revenue Recognition

We recognize revenues and the related cost of goods sold when merchandise is received by our customers. Revenues from “cash-and-carry” store sales are recognized at the point of sale in the store. Revenues from direct-to-customer and home-delivered sales are recognized when the merchandise is delivered to the customer. Discounts provided to customers are accounted for as a reduction of sales.

We recognize shipping and handling fees as revenue when the merchandise is received by our customers. Costs of shipping and handling are included in cost of goods sold.

Sales tax collected is not recognized as revenue as it is ultimately remitted to governmental authorities.

We reserve for projected merchandise returns based on actual, historical experience and various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable. Actual merchandise returns are monitored regularly and have not been materially different from the estimates recorded. Merchandise returns are granted for various reasons, including delays in product delivery, product quality issues, customer preference and other similar matters. Product returned often represents merchandise that can be resold. Amounts refunded to customers are generally made by issuing the same payment tender as used in the original purchase. Merchandise exchanges of the same product and price are not considered merchandise returns and, therefore, are excluded when calculating the sales returns reserve.

Merchandise Inventories

Our merchandise inventories are composed of finished goods and are carried at the lower of cost or market, with cost determined on a weighted-average cost method and market determined based on the estimated net realizable value. To determine if the value of inventory should be marked down below original cost, we consider current and anticipated demand, customer preference and the merchandise age. The inventory value is adjusted periodically to reflect current market conditions, which requires management judgments that may significantly affect the ending inventory valuation, as well as gross margin. The significant estimates used in inventory valuation are obsolescence (including excess and slow-moving inventory and lower of cost or market reserves)

 

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and estimates of inventory shrinkage. We adjust our inventory for obsolescence based on historical trends, aging reports, specific identification and our estimates of future retail sales prices.

Reserves for shrinkage are estimated and recorded throughout the period as a percentage of net sales based on historical shrinkage results and current inventory levels. Actual shrinkage is recorded throughout the year based upon periodic cycle counts and the results of our annual physical inventory count. Actual inventory shrinkage and obsolescence can vary from estimates due to factors including the mix of our inventory (which ranges from large furniture to decorative accessories) and execution against loss prevention initiatives in our stores, distribution centers, off-site storage locations and with third-party transportation providers.

Due to these factors, our obsolescence and shrinkage reserves contain uncertainties. Both estimates have calculations that require management to make assumptions and to apply judgment regarding a number of factors, including market conditions, the selling environment, historical results and current inventory trends. If actual observed obsolescence or periodic updates of our shrinkage estimates differ from our original estimates, we adjust our inventory reserves accordingly throughout the period. Management does not believe that changes in the assumptions used in these estimates would have a significant effect on our net income or inventory balances. We have not made any material changes to our assumptions included in the calculations of the obsolescence and shrinkage reserves during the periods presented or recorded significant adjustments related to the physical inventory process.

Advertising Expenses

Advertising expenses primarily represent the costs associated with our catalog mailings, as well as print and website marketing.

Capitalized Catalog Costs

Capitalized catalog costs consist primarily of third-party incremental direct costs to prepare, print and distribute our Source Books. Such costs are capitalized and amortized over their expected period of future benefit. Such amortization is based upon the ratio of actual revenues to the total of actual and estimated future revenues on an individual Source Book basis. Estimated future revenues are based upon various factors such as the total number of Source Books and pages circulated, the probability and magnitude of consumer response and the merchandise assortment offered. Each Source Book is generally fully amortized within a twelve-month period and the majority of the amortization occurs within the first six to ten months, with the exception of the Holiday Source Books, which are generally fully amortized within a four-month period. Capitalized catalog costs are evaluated for realizability on a regular basis by comparing the carrying amount associated with each Source Book to the estimated probable remaining future sales associated with that Source Book.

Our catalog amortization calculation requires management to make assumptions and to apply judgment regarding a number of factors, including market conditions, the selling environment and the probability and magnitude of consumer response to certain Source Books and merchandise assortment offered. If actual revenues associated with our Source Books differ from our original estimates, we adjust our catalog amortization schedules accordingly. Changes in the expected period of benefit could impact the timing of the catalog amortization expense recorded to the consolidated statement of operations.

During fiscal 2013, we modified our Source Book strategy and eliminated our Fall Source Book. We therefore made changes to our assumptions regarding the estimated future revenues and the period over which such revenues would be earned related to our Spring 2013 Source Books. As a result, the amortization period for the Spring 2013 Source Books increased from an eight- to nine-month period to a twelve-month period.

 

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Website and Print Advertising

Website and print advertising expenses, which include e-commerce advertising, web creative content and direct marketing activities such as print media, radio and other media advertising, are expensed as incurred or upon the release of the content or the initial advertisement.

Impairment of Goodwill and Long-Lived Assets

Goodwill

We evaluate goodwill annually to determine whether it is impaired. Goodwill is also tested between annual impairment tests if an event occurs or circumstances change that would indicate that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount. Conditions that may indicate impairment include, but are not limited to, a significant adverse change in customer demand or business climate that could affect the value of an asset; general economic conditions, such as increasing Treasury rates or unexpected changes in gross domestic product growth; a change in our market share; budget-to-actual performance and consistency of operating margins and capital expenditures; a product recall or an adverse action or assessment by a regulator; or changes in management or key personnel. If an impairment indicator exists, we test the intangible asset for recoverability. We have identified only one single reporting unit. We selected the fourth fiscal quarter to perform our annual goodwill impairment testing.

We qualitatively assess goodwill impairment to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount. During fiscal 2013, we performed a qualitative analysis examining key events and circumstances affecting fair value and determined it is more likely than not that the reporting unit’s fair value is greater than its carrying amount. As such, no further analysis was required for purposes of testing of our goodwill for impairment.

For goodwill not qualitatively assessed or if goodwill is qualitatively assessed and it is determined it is not more likely than not that the reporting unit’s fair value is greater than its carrying amount, a two-step quantitative approach is used. In the first step, we compare the fair value of the reporting unit, generally defined as the same level as or one level below an operating segment, to its carrying value. If the fair value of the reporting unit exceeds the carrying value of the net assets assigned to that unit, goodwill is considered not impaired and we are not required to perform further testing. If the carrying value of the net assets assigned to the reporting unit exceeds the fair value of the reporting unit, then we must perform the second step of the impairment test in order to determine the implied fair value of the reporting unit’s goodwill. If the carrying value of a reporting unit’s goodwill exceeds its implied fair value, then we would record an impairment loss equal to the difference. The assumptions used in such valuations are subject to volatility and may differ from actual results.

Our tests for impairment of goodwill resulted in a determination that the fair value of the Company substantially exceeded the carrying value of our net assets as of February 1, 2014. We do not anticipate any material impairment charges in the near term.

Long-Lived Assets

Long-lived assets, such as property and equipment and intangible assets subject to amortization, are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. Conditions that may indicate impairment include, but are not limited to, a significant adverse change in customer demand or business climate that could affect the value of an asset, a product recall or an adverse action or assessment by a regulator. If the sum of the estimated undiscounted future cash flows related to the asset are less than the carrying value, we recognize a loss equal to the difference between the carrying value and the fair value, usually determined by the estimated discounted cash flow analysis of the asset.

 

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We evaluate long-lived tangible assets at an individual store level, which is the lowest level at which independent cash flows can be identified. We evaluate corporate assets or other long-lived assets that are not store-specific at the consolidated level.

Since there is typically no active market for our long-lived tangible assets, we estimate fair values based on the expected future cash flows. We estimate future cash flows based on store-level historical results, current trends, and operating and cash flow projections. Our estimates are subject to uncertainty and may be affected by a number of factors outside our control, including general economic conditions and the competitive environment. While we believe our estimates and judgments about future cash flows are reasonable, future impairment charges may be required if the expected cash flow estimates, as projected, do not occur or if events change requiring us to revise our estimates.

Lease Accounting

We lease stores, distribution facilities, office space and certain equipment under various leases. We classify leases at the inception of the lease as a build-to-suit lease, a capital lease or an operating lease.

We are sometimes involved in the construction of leased stores. As a result of this involvement, we are deemed the “owner” for accounting purposes during the construction period, and are required to capitalize the construction costs on our consolidated balance sheets (referred to as build-to-suit leases). We establish assets and liabilities for the estimated construction costs incurred under build-to-suit lease arrangements to the extent we are involved in the construction of structural improvements or take construction risk prior to commencement of a lease. Upon completion of the project, we perform a sale-leaseback analysis pursuant to Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 840 – Leases, to determine if we can remove the assets from our consolidated balance sheets. In many of our leases, we are reimbursed a portion of the construction costs via adjusted rental payments and/or cash payments or have terms which fix the rental payments for a significant percentage of the leased asset’s economic life. These items generally are considered “continuing involvement,” which precludes us from derecognizing the assets from our consolidated balance sheets when construction is complete. In conjunction with these leases, we also record financing obligations equal to the cash proceeds or fair market value of the assets received from the landlord. At the end of the lease term, including exercise of any renewal options, the net remaining financing obligation over the net carrying value of the fixed asset will be recognized as a non-cash gain on sale of the property. We do not report rent expense for the properties which are owned for accounting purposes. Rather, rental payments under the lease are recognized as a reduction of the financing obligation and interest expense.

In a capital or an operating lease, the expected lease term begins with the date that we take possession of the equipment or the leased space for construction and other purposes. The expected lease term may also include the exercise of renewal options if the exercise of the option is determined to be reasonably assured. The expected term is also used in the determination of whether a store is a capital or operating lease.

Some of our equipment is held under capital leases. These assets are included in property and equipment and depreciated over the term of the lease. We do not report rent expense for capital leases. Rather, rental payments under the lease are recognized as a reduction of the capital lease obligation and interest expense.

All other leases are considered operating leases in accordance with ASC 840. Assets subject to an operating lease and the related lease payments are not recorded on our consolidated balance sheets. For leases that contain lease incentives, premiums and minimum rental expenses, we recognize rental expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term, including the construction period. We record rental expense during the construction period. Tenant improvement allowances received from landlords are recorded as deferred rent, reported as a long-term liability on the consolidated balance sheets, and are amortized on a straight-line basis over the lease term, including the construction period.

 

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Stock-Based Compensation

We use the straight-line method of accounting for stock-based compensation, which we believe is the predominant method used in our industry. We recognize the fair value of stock-based compensation in the consolidated financial statements as compensation expense over the requisite service period. In addition, excess tax benefits related to stock-based compensation awards are reflected as financing cash flows. For service-only awards, compensation expense is recognized on a straight-line basis, net of forfeitures, over the requisite service period for the fair value of awards that actually vest. Fair value for restricted stock units is valued using the closing price of our stock on the date of grant. The fair value of each option award granted under our award plans subsequent to our initial public offering is estimated on the date of grant using a Black-Scholes Merton option pricing model with the following assumptions:

 

   

Expected volatility—Based on the lack of historical data for our own shares, we base our expected volatility on a representative peer group that takes into account industry, market capitalization, stage of life cycle and capital structure.

 

   

Expected term—Represents the period of time that options granted are expected to be outstanding. We elected to calculate the expected term of the option awards using the “simplified method”. This election was made based on the lack of sufficient historical exercise data to provide a reasonable basis upon which to estimate expected term. Under the “simplified” calculation method, the expected term is calculated as an average of the vesting period and the contractual life of the options.

 

   

Risk-free interest rate—Based on the U.S. Treasury zero-coupon bond rate with a remaining term approximate of the expected term of the option.

 

   

Dividend yield—As we have not paid dividends, nor do we currently plan to pay dividends in the future, the assumed dividend yield is zero.

Prior to the Reorganization, Home Holdings had granted performance-based units that vested and became deliverable upon achievement or satisfaction of performance conditions specified in the performance agreement or upon the return on investment attained by certain of the equity investors in Home Holdings at defined liquidity events, including an initial public offering or certain sale or merger transactions. We estimated the fair value of performance-based units awarded to employees at the grant date based on the fair value of the Company on such date. We also considered the probability of achieving the established performance targets in determining our stock-based compensation with respect to these awards. We recognize compensation cost over the performance period. When the performance is related to a specific event occurring in the future, we recognize the full expense at the time of the event. In connection with the initial public offering, shares of our common stock with substantially similar restrictions, terms and conditions were issued in replacement of these performance-based units.

Income Taxes

We account for income taxes under an asset and liability approach that requires the recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been recognized in our consolidated financial statements or tax returns. In estimating future tax consequences, we generally take into account all expected future events then known to us, other than changes in the tax law or rates which have not yet been enacted and which are not permitted to be considered. Accordingly, we may record a valuation allowance to reduce our net deferred tax assets to the amount that is more-likely-than-not to be realized. The determination as to whether a deferred tax asset will be realized is made on a jurisdictional basis and is based upon management’s best estimate of the recoverability of our net deferred tax assets. Future taxable income and ongoing prudent and feasible tax planning are considered in determining the amount of the valuation allowance, and the amount of the allowance is subject to adjustment in the future. Specifically, in the event we are to determine that we are not more-likely-than-not able to realize our net deferred tax assets in the future, an adjustment to the valuation allowance would decrease income in the period such determination is made. This allowance does not alter our

 

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ability to utilize the underlying tax net operating loss and credit carryforwards in the future, the utilization of which is limited to achieving future taxable income.

In assessing the need for a valuation allowance, we consider both positive and negative evidence related to the likelihood of realization of the deferred tax assets. If, based on the weight of available evidence, it is more-likely-than-not the deferred tax assets will not be realized, we record a valuation allowance. The weight given to the positive and negative evidence is commensurate with the extent to which the evidence may be objectively verified. As such, it is generally difficult for positive evidence regarding projected future taxable income exclusive of reversing taxable temporary differences to outweigh objective negative evidence of recent financial reporting losses. United States GAAP states that cumulative losses in recent years are a significant piece of negative evidence that is difficult to overcome in determining that a valuation allowance is not needed against deferred tax assets.

Due to the historical losses incurred, we had recorded a full valuation allowance against the U.S. net deferred tax assets, excluding deferred tax liabilities related to indefinite lived intangibles, as well as against the net deferred tax assets in Shanghai.

A sustained period of profitability in our operations was required before we would change our judgment regarding the need for a full valuation allowance against our net deferred tax assets. Although we were profitable for the full fiscal 2011, the seasonality of our business continued to result in losses during certain quarters. We recorded a net loss of $3.7 million in the first quarter of fiscal 2012, compared to a net loss of $6.2 million in the same quarter of fiscal 2011, and net income of $17.6 million in the second quarter of fiscal 2012, compared to net income of $7.6 million in the same quarter of fiscal 2011. Due to the seasonality that was then affecting our business, historically our full year results substantially depended on the results from operations in the fourth quarter.

By the end of fiscal 2012, our U.S. operations achieved a position of cumulative profits (adjusted for permanent items) for the most recent three-year period. We concluded that this record of cumulative profitability in recent years, coupled with our business plan for profitability in future periods, provided assurance that our future tax benefits are more likely than not to be realized. Accordingly, in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2012, we released all of our U.S. valuation allowance against net deferred tax assets, resulting in a $57.2 million benefit in our provision for income taxes. At February 1, 2014, we have retained a valuation allowance totaling $0.2 million against deferred tax assets for our Shanghai operations.

The accounting standard for uncertainty in income taxes prescribes a recognition threshold that a tax position is required to meet before being recognized in the financial statements and provides guidance on derecognition, measurement, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure and transition issues. Differences between tax positions taken in a tax return and amounts recognized in the financial statements generally result in an increase in a liability for income taxes payable or a reduction of an income tax refund receivable, or a reduction in a deferred tax asset or an increase in a deferred tax liability, or both. We recognize interest and penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits in tax expense.

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

Accounting for Leases

The Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) is currently working on amendments to existing accounting standards governing a number of areas including, but not limited to, accounting for leases. In May 2013, the FASB issued a new exposure draft, Leases (the “Exposure Draft”), which would replace the existing guidance in ASC 840. Under the Exposure Draft, among other changes in practice, a lessee’s rights and obligations under most leases, including existing and new arrangements, would be recognized as assets and liabilities, respectively, on the balance sheet. Other significant provisions of the Exposure Draft include (i) defining the “lease term” to include the noncancellable period together with periods for which there is a

 

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significant economic incentive for the lessee to extend or not terminate the lease; (ii) defining the initial lease liability to be recorded on the balance sheet to contemplate only those variable lease payments that depend on an index or that are in substance “fixed”; and (iii) a dual approach for determining whether lease expense is recognized on a straight-line or accelerated basis, depending on whether the lessee is expected to consume more than an insignificant portion of the leased asset’s economic benefits. The comment period for the Exposure Draft ended on September 13, 2013. If and when effective, this Exposure Draft will likely have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements. However, as the standard-setting process is still ongoing, we are unable to determine the impact this proposed change in accounting standards will have on our consolidated financial statements.

Presentation of Unrecognized Tax Benefits

In July 2013, the FASB issued an Accounting Standards Update, which requires that an unrecognized tax benefit, or a portion of an unrecognized tax benefit, should be presented in the financial statements as a reduction to a deferred tax asset for a net operating loss carryforward, a similar tax loss, or a tax credit carryforward, with certain exceptions. This guidance is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2013, with early adoption permitted. We believe the adoption of this pronouncement will not have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosure of Market Risks

Interest Rate Risk

We are subject to interest rate risk in connection with borrowings under our revolving line of credit which bears interest at variable rates. At February 1, 2014, $85.4 million was outstanding under the revolving line of credit. As of February 1, 2014, the undrawn borrowing availability under the revolving line of credit was $261.7 million, and there were $18.9 million in outstanding letters of credit. We currently do not engage in any interest rate hedging activity and we have no intention to do so in the foreseeable future. Based on the average interest rate on the revolving line of credit during the year ended February 1, 2014, and to the extent that borrowings were outstanding, we do not believe that a 10% change in the interest rate would have a material effect on our consolidated results of operations or financial condition.

Impact of Inflation

Our results of operations and financial condition are presented based on historical cost. While it is difficult to accurately measure the impact of inflation due to the imprecise nature of the estimates required, we believe the effects of inflation, if any, on our results of operations and financial condition have been immaterial.

 

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Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

RESTORATION HARDWARE HOLDINGS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(In thousands, except share amounts)

 

     February 1,
2014
    February 2,
2013
 

ASSETS

    

Current assets:

    

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 13,389      $ 8,354   

Accounts receivable—net

     22,028        17,040   

Merchandise inventories

     453,845        353,329   

Current deferred tax assets

     21,400        37,006   

Prepaid expense and other current assets

     103,153        77,029   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

     613,815        492,758   

Property and equipment—net

     214,909        111,406   

Goodwill

     122,424        122,601   

Trademarks

     47,410        47,410   

Other intangible assets—net

     1,298        2,713   

Non-current deferred tax assets

     16,980        6,873   

Other assets

     8,267        5,852   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 1,025,103      $ 789,613   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

    

Current liabilities:

    

Accounts payable and accrued expenses

   $ 206,778      $ 145,353   

Deferred revenue and customer deposits

     48,927        41,643   

Current deferred tax liabilities

     145        —     

Other current liabilities

     61,598        32,428   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

     317,448        219,424   

Revolving line of credit

     85,425        82,501   

Deferred rent and lease incentives

     37,727        30,784   

Other long-term obligations

     39,231        5,293   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

     479,831        338,002   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Commitments and contingencies (See Note 16 to the consolidated financial statements)

     —          —     

Stockholders’ equity:

    

Common stock, $0.0001 par value per share, 180,000,000 shares authorized, 39,124,764 shares issued and outstanding as of February 1, 2014; 38,856,251 shares issued and 37,967,635 shares outstanding as of February 2, 2013

     4        4   

Additional paid-in capital

     584,641        505,883   

Accumulated other comprehensive income

     629        1,211   

Accumulated deficit

     (37,292     (55,487

Treasury stock—at cost, 40,353 and zero shares, respectively

     (2,710     —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total stockholders’ equity

     545,272        451,611   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

   $ 1,025,103      $ 789,613   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

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RESTORATION HARDWARE HOLDINGS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(In thousands, except share and per share amounts)

 

     Year Ended  
     February 1,
2014
    February 2,
2013
    January 28,
2012
 

Net revenues

   $ 1,550,961      $ 1,193,046      $ 958,084   

Cost of goods sold

     994,081        756,597        601,735   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross profit

     556,880        436,449        356,349   

Selling, general and administrative expenses

     502,029        505,485        329,506   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) from operations

     54,851        (69,036     26,843   

Interest expense

     (5,733     (5,776     (5,134
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) before income taxes

     49,118        (74,812     21,709   

Income tax expense (benefit)

     30,923        (62,023     1,121   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income (loss)

   $ 18,195      $ (12,789   $ 20,588   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted-average shares used in computing basic net income (loss) per share

     38,671,564        9,428,828        468   

Basic net income (loss) per share

   $ 0.47      $ (1.36   $ 43,991   

Weighted-average shares used in computing diluted net income (loss) per share

     40,416,630        9,428,828        468   

Basic and diluted net income (loss) per share

   $ 0.45      $ (1.36   $ 43,991   

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

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RESTORATION HARDWARE HOLDINGS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)

(In thousands)

 

     Year Ended  
     February 1,
2014
    February 2,
2013
    January 28,
2012
 

Net income (loss)

   $ 18,195      $ (12,789   $ 20,588   

Foreign currency translation adjustment—net of tax

     (582     61        163   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total comprehensive income (loss)

   $ 17,613      $ (12,728   $ 20,751   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

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RESTORATION HARDWARE HOLDINGS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

(In thousands, except share amounts)

 

    Common Stock     Additional
Paid-In
Capital
    Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
    Accumulated
Deficit
    Treasury Stock     Total
Stockholders’
Equity
 
    Shares     Amount           Shares     Amount    

Balances—January 29, 2011

    100      $  —        $ 278,103      $ 987      $ (63,286     —        $  —        $ 215,804   

Stock-based compensation

    —          —          1,557        —          —          —          —          1,557   

Capital contribution—executive compensation

    —          —          6,350        —          —          —          —          6,350   

Capital contribution—management fee

    —          —          6,000        —          —          —          —          6,000   

Net income

    —          —          —          —          20,588        —          —          20,588   

Foreign currency translation adjustment—net of tax

    —          —          —          163        —          —          —          163   

Capitalization of Restoration Hardware Holdings, Inc.

    900        —          1        —          —          —          —          1   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balances—January 28, 2012

    1,000        —          292,011        1,150        (42,698     —          —          250,463   

Stock-based compensation

    —          —          116,183        —          —          —          —          116,183   

Conversion of Restoration Hardware Holdings, Inc. common stock upon Reorganization

    (1,000     —          —          —          —          —          —          —     

Issuance of common stock upon Reorganization

    32,188,891        3        (3     —          —          —          —          —     

Issuance of common stock—net of issuance costs

    4,782,609        1        97,692        —          —          —          —          97,693   

Vesting of stock awards

    996,135        —          —          —          —          —          —          —     

Net loss

    —          —          —          —          (12,789     —          —          (12,789

Foreign currency translation adjustment— net of tax

    —          —          —          61        —          —          —          61   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balances—February 2, 2013

    37,967,635        4       505,883        1,211        (55,487     —          —          451,611   

Stock-based compensation

    —          —          67,622        —          —          —          —          67,622   

Issuance of restricted stock

    6,667        —          —          —          —          —          —          —     

Vested and delivered restricted stock units

    4,161        —          (178     —