10-K 1 v435165_10k.htm FORM 10-K

 

United States

Securities and Exchange Commission

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

xANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2015

 

¨TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from __________ to __________

 

Commission File Number: 001-35739

 

POLONIA BANCORP, INC.

(Name of small business issuer in its charter)

 

Maryland   45-3181577
(State or other jurisdiction of   (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
incorporation or organization)    
     
3993 Huntingdon Pike, 3rd Floor,    
Huntingdon Valley, Pennsylvania   19006
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

 

Issuer’s telephone number: (215) 938-8800

Securities registered under Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act:

 

Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share

(Title of class)

 

Securities registered under Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act: None

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes  ¨   No  x

 

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes  ¨   No  x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes  x   No  ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Date File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes  x   No  ¨

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this Chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of Registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “non-accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer  ¨ Accelerated filer  o Non-accelerated filer  o Smaller Reporting Company  x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

Yes  ¨   No  x

 

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the Registrant upon the closing price of such common equity as of last business day of most recently completed second fiscal quarter was $29,870,479. For purposes of this calculation, officers and directors of the Registrant are considered affiliates.

 

At April 6, 2016, the Registrant had 3,348,827 shares of $0.01 par value common stock outstanding.

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE:

 

Portions of the Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K.

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

    Page
     
PART I    
     
Item 1. Business 2
Item 1A. Risk Factors 13
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments 16
Item 2. Properties 16
Item 3. Legal Proceedings 16
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosure 16
     
PART II    
     
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities 17
Item 6. Selected Financial Data 18
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 19
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 40
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data 40
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure 40
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures 40
Item 9B. Other Information 40
     
PART III    
     
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance 41
Item 11. Executive Compensation 41
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters 41
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence 42
Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services 42
     
PART IV    
     
Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules 43
     
Signatures.   46

 

 i

 

 

This report contains certain “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the federal securities laws that are based on assumptions and may describe future plans, strategies and expectations of Polonia Bancorp, Inc. (“Polonia Bancorp” or the “Company”) and Polonia Bank (the “Bank”). These forward-looking statements are generally identified by terms such as “expects,” “believes,” “anticipates,” “intends,” “estimates,” “projects” and similar expressions.

 

Management’s ability to predict results or the actual effect of future plans or strategies is inherently uncertain. Factors which could have a material adverse effect on the operations of Polonia Bancorp and its subsidiaries include, but are not limited to, the following: interest rate trends; the general economic climate in the market area in which we operate, as well as nationwide; our ability to control costs and expenses; competitive products and pricing; loan delinquency rates and changes in federal and state legislation and regulation. Additional factors that may affect our results are discussed in this Annual Report on Form 10-K under “Item 1A – Risk Factors.” These risks and uncertainties should be considered in evaluating the forward-looking statements and undue reliance should not be placed on such statements. We assume no obligation to update any forward-looking statements.

 

Unless the context indicates otherwise, all references in this annual report to “Company,” “we,” “us” and “our” refer to Polonia Bancorp, Inc. and its subsidiaries.

 

PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

 

General

 

Polonia Bancorp, Inc. is a Maryland corporation that was incorporated in August 2011 to be the successor corporation to old Polonia Bancorp (“Old Polonia Bancorp”), the former stock holding company for Polonia Bank (the “Bank”), upon completion of the mutual-to-stock conversion of Polonia MHC, the former mutual holding company for Polonia Bank.

 

The mutual-to-stock conversion was completed on November 9, 2012.  In connection with the conversion, the Company sold a total of 2,025,078 shares of common stock at $8.00 per share in a related public offering.  Concurrent with the completion of the offering, each share of Old Polonia Bancorp’s common stock owned by public stockholders was exchanged for 1.1136 shares of Company common stock.  Additionally, as part of the mutual-to-stock conversion, the Bank’s Employee Stock Ownership Plan (the “ESOP”) acquired 136,693 shares, or 6.75% of the Company’s issued shares, at $8.00 per share. Net proceeds from the conversion and offering, after the loan made to the ESOP, were approximately $14.0 million.

 

Financial information presented in this Annual Report on Form 10-K is derived in part from the consolidated financial statements of Polonia Bancorp, Inc. and subsidiaries on and after November 9, 2012 and from the consolidated financial statements of Old Polonia Bancorp and subsidiaries prior to November 9, 2012.

 

The Company does not engage in any business activities apart from the ownership of the Bank’s capital stock. Accordingly, the information set forth in this annual report, including the consolidated financial statements and related financial data, relates primarily to the Bank. As a savings and loan holding company, the Company is subject to the regulation of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the “FRB”).

 

The Bank is headquartered in Huntingdon Valley and operates as a community-oriented financial institution dedicated to serving the financial services needs of consumers and businesses within our market areas. The Bank is engaged primarily in the business of attracting deposits from the general public and using such funds to originate loans. Polonia Bank also maintains an investment portfolio. Polonia Bank’s primary federal regulator is the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (“OCC”).

 

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the “FDIC”), through the Deposit Insurance Fund, insures the Bank’s deposit accounts up to the applicable legal limits. The Bank is a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank (“FHLB”) System.

 

Polonia Bank’s website address is www.poloniabank.com. Information on our website should not be considered a part of this annual report.

 

 - 2 -

 

  

Agreements with Regulators

 

Effective October 21, 2014, Polonia Bank and the OCC entered into a formal written agreement (the “Agreement”). The Agreement relates to the findings of the OCC following its regularly scheduled examination of the Bank that began in the second quarter of 2014.

 

The Agreement provides, among other things, that within specified time frames, the Bank will:

 

·establish a Compliance Committee of its Board of Directors to monitor and coordinate the Bank’s adherence to the Agreement and to prepare periodic reports describing the Bank’s progress in complying with the Agreement;

 

·ensure that it has competent management in place, undertake periodic reviews of the Bank’s management, implement a program to enhance and improve the skills of the Bank’s management team, where necessary, act to fill any vacancies among the Bank’s senior executive officers within prescribed timeframes and in accordance with regulations of the OCC;

 

·revise its written strategic plan and submit such revised plan to the OCC for review, with such strategic plan establishing objectives for the Bank’s overall risk profile, earnings performance, growth, balance sheet mix, off-balance sheet activities, liability structure, capital and liquidity adequacy, product line development, outsourcing and market segments, together with strategies to achieve the Bank’s objectives;

 

·implement a revised asset liability management program to address the Bank’s interest rate risk tolerance;

 

·implement a mortgage banking operations risk management program;

 

·confirm the terms of the Bank’s current outstanding obligation to fund third party obligations and implement a program for oversight of the Bank’s mortgage origination funding activities;

 

·implement a revised internal audit program;

 

·implement a program relating to the compensation payable to the Bank’s executive officers, employees and directors to ensure that such compensation is reasonable and not excessive; and

 

·implement a revised third party risk management program that is consistent with OCC guidance.

 

On November 10, 2015, the Bank and the OCC entered into an amendment (the “Amendment”) to the Agreement. The Amendment relates to the findings of the OCC following its regularly scheduled examination of the Bank that began in the second quarter of 2015.

 

The Amendment provides, among other things, that within specified time frames, the Bank will:

 

·Submit to the OCC a revised written compliance management program and, upon receipt of no supervisory objection, adopt and implement such program; and

 

·Engage an independent consultant to review all loans originated by the Bank’s FHA department for the calendar years 2012, 2013 and 2014 to determine compliance with the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act of 1974 and regulations thereunder; submit to the OCC the results of the consultant’s review and a remediation plan for resolving any violations found in such review; and, upon receipt of no supervisory objection, adopt and implement the remediation plan.

 

Articles II through X of the Agreement, which imposed substantive requirements on the Bank, remain in effect without modification. The Agreement and the Amendment and each of their provisions will remain in effect unless and until the provisions are amended, suspended, waived, or terminated in writing by the OCC.

 

 - 3 -

 

  

As a result of entering into the Agreement, the Bank is deemed to be in “troubled condition” and is not considered an “eligible institution” under applicable regulations. As a result, the Bank remains ineligible for expedited processing of any applications that it might file and must obtain the approval of the OCC prior to effecting any change in its directors or senior executive officers. In addition, the Bank is restricted from paying any capital distributions without prior approval of the OCC.

 

In addition, the OCC imposed individual minimum capital requirements (“IMCRs”) on the Bank effective January 20, 2015. The IMCRs require the Bank to maintain a leverage ratio (equal to Tier 1 capital to average total consolidated assets) of at least 10.00% and a total capital ratio (equal to total capital to total risk-weighted assets) of at least 15.00%. Absent the IMCRs, we must maintain a leverage ratio of at least 5.00% and a total capital ratio of at least 10.00% to be considered well-capitalized. At December 31, 2015, the Bank had a Tier 1 leverage ratio of 10.75% and a total risk-based capital ratio of 25.03%.

 

On February 17, 2015, the Company entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (“MOU”) with the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. Among other things, the MOU prohibits the Company from paying dividends, repurchasing its stock or making other capital distributions without prior written approval of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.

 

Market Areas

 

We are headquartered in Huntingdon Valley, Pennsylvania, which is located in the northwest suburban area of metropolitan Philadelphia and is situated between Montgomery and Bucks Counties. In addition to our main office in Montgomery County, we operate from four additional locations in Philadelphia County. We generate deposits through our five offices and conduct lending activities throughout the Greater Philadelphia metropolitan area, as well as in southeastern Pennsylvania and southern New Jersey. The Philadelphia metropolitan area is the fifth largest in the United States (based on United States Census data for 2010) with an estimated population of 6.0 million. The city of Philadelphia is the fifth most populous city in the United States and the largest in population and area in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

 

The Greater Philadelphia metropolitan area’s economy is heavily based upon manufacturing, refining, food and financial services. The city is home to many Fortune 500 companies, including cable television and internet provider Comcast; insurance companies CIGNA and Lincoln Financial Group; energy company Sunoco; food services company Aramark; paper and packaging company Crown Holdings Incorporated; diversified producer Rohm and Haas Company; the pharmaceutical company Glaxo SmithKline; the helicopter division of Boeing Co.; and automotive parts retailer Pep Boys. The city is also home to many universities and colleges.

 

Competition

 

We face significant competition for the attraction of deposits and origination of loans. Our most direct competition for deposits has historically come from the several financial institutions operating in our market areas and, to a lesser extent, from other financial service companies such as brokerage firms, credit unions and insurance companies. We also face competition for investors’ funds from money market funds, mutual funds and other corporate and government securities. At June 30, 2015, the most recent date for which deposit market share information is available, we held less than 1% of the deposits in the Philadelphia metropolitan area. In addition, banks owned by large bank holding companies such as PNC Financial Services Group, Inc., Wells Fargo & Company, TD Bank and Citizens Financial Group, Inc. also operate in our market areas. These institutions are significantly larger than us and, therefore, have significantly greater resources.

 

Our competition for loans comes primarily from financial institutions in our market areas, and, to a lesser extent, from other financial service providers such as mortgage companies and mortgage brokers. Competition for loans also comes from the increasing number of non-depository financial service companies entering the mortgage market such as insurance companies, securities companies and specialty finance companies.

 

We expect competition to remain intense in the future as a result of legislative, regulatory and technological changes and the continuing trend of consolidation in the financial services industry. Technological advances, for example, have lowered the barriers to market entry, allowed banks and other lenders to expand their geographic reach by providing services over the Internet and made it possible for non-depository institutions to offer products and services that traditionally have been provided by banks. Competition for deposits and the origination of loans could limit our future growth.

 

 - 4 -

 

  

Lending Activities

 

General. Our loan portfolio consists primarily of one- to four-family residential real estate loans. To a much lesser extent, our loan portfolio includes multi-family and nonresidential real estate loans, home equity loans, commercial loans and consumer loans. Currently, we offer only fixed-rate mortgage products.

 

One- to Four-Family Residential Real Estate Loans. Our primary lending activity is the origination of mortgage loans to enable borrowers to purchase or refinance existing homes. We offer fixed-rate mortgage loans with terms up to 30 years. The loan fees, interest rates and other provisions of mortgage loans are determined by us on the basis of our own pricing criteria and competitive market conditions.

 

During the past several years the origination of Federal Housing Administration (FHA) insured loan products loans has been a primary source of business for the Company. In 2015 the Company exited this line of business. FHA loans are made up to 96.5% of the lesser of the appraised value or purchase price and are originated and underwritten manually according to private investor and FHA guidelines. FHA loans were originated by Polonia Bank with the intention of selling the loans on a flow basis to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (“HUD”) and other private investors with servicing released. During the year ended December 31, 2015 we generated $46.7 million in loans for sale to various investors. Generally, FHA loans are sold with recourse. Loan repurchase commitments are agreements to repurchase loans previously sold upon the occurrence of conditions established in the contract, including default by the borrower. This repurchase obligation triggered by the default of the underlying borrower for the FHA loans that we sell usually expires 90-120 days from the date the loans are sold.

 

While one- to four-family residential real estate loans are normally originated with up to 30-year terms, such loans typically remain outstanding for substantially shorter periods because borrowers often prepay their loans in full upon sale of the property pledged as security or upon refinancing the original loan. Therefore, average loan maturity is a function of, among other factors, the level of purchase and sale activity in the real estate market, prevailing interest rates and the interest rates payable on outstanding loans.

 

We generally do not make conventional loans with loan-to-value ratios exceeding 80% at the time the loan is originated. Conventional loans with loan-to-value ratios in excess of 80% generally require private mortgage insurance or additional collateral. We require all properties securing mortgage loans to be appraised by a board-approved independent appraiser. We generally require title insurance on all first mortgage loans. All borrowers must obtain hazard insurance, and flood insurance is required for loans on properties located in a flood zone, before closing the loan. Generally, all loans are subject to the same stringent underwriting standards with the intention to hold in portfolio. In addition to the FHA loans that we sell, we occasionally sell loans to (1) limit the Bank’s exposure to a single borrower or (2) in specific circumstances to manage the interest rate risk. All loans subject to sale are identified at the time of origination. Until mid-2015, our online loans division generated loans through the Internet for sale to the FHLB of Pittsburgh through its Mortgage Partnership Finance program. During the year ended December 31, 2015, we generated $1.6 million in online loans for sale to the FHLB of Pittsburgh.

 

Multi-Family and Nonresidential Real Estate Loans. We offer fixed-rate mortgage loans secured by multi-family and nonresidential real estate. Our multi-family and nonresidential real estate loans are generally secured by owner-occupied properties, small office and apartment buildings. In addition to originating these loans, we also participate in loans with other financial institutions located primarily in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Such participations include adjustable-rate mortgage loans originated by other institutions.

 

We originate fixed-rate multi-family and nonresidential real estate loans with terms up to 30 years. These loans are secured by first mortgages, and amounts generally do not exceed 80% of the property’s appraised value at the time the loan is originated.

 

Commercial Loans. We offer commercial business loans. In 2015 we originated $10,000 in commercial loans. We acquired commercial business loans with a fair value of $28,000 as of December 31, 2015 as a result of the Earthstar Bank acquisition.

 

 - 5 -

 

  

Home Equity Loans and Lines of Credit. We currently offer home equity loans with fixed interest rates for terms up to 15 years and maximum combined loan-to-value ratios of 80%. We offer loans with adjustable interest rates tied to a market index in our market area.

 

Consumer Loans. We currently offer consumer loans in the form of loans secured by savings accounts or time deposits.

 

The procedures for underwriting consumer loans include an assessment of the applicant’s payment history on other debts and ability to meet existing obligations and payments on the proposed loan. Although the applicant’s creditworthiness is a primary consideration, the underwriting process also includes a comparison of the value of the collateral, if any, to the proposed loan amount.

 

We offer consumer loans secured by deposit accounts with fixed interest rates and terms up to five years.

 

Loan Underwriting Risks

 

Multi-Family and Nonresidential Real Estate Loans. Loans secured by multi-family and nonresidential real estate generally have larger balances and involve a greater degree of risk than one- to four-family residential mortgage loans. Of primary concern in multi-family and nonresidential real estate lending is the borrower’s creditworthiness and the feasibility and cash flow potential of the project. Payments on loans secured by income properties often depend on successful operation and management of the properties. As a result, repayment of such loans may be subject to a greater extent than residential real estate loans to adverse conditions in the real estate market or the economy. To monitor cash flows on income properties, we generally require borrowers and loan guarantors, if any, to provide annual financial statements on multi-family and nonresidential real estate loans. In reaching a decision on whether to make a multi-family and nonresidential real estate loan, we consider the net operating income of the property, the borrower’s expertise, credit history and profitability and the value of the underlying property. We have generally required that the properties securing these real estate loans have debt service coverage ratios (the ratio of earnings before debt service to debt service) of at least 1.20x. Environmental surveys are obtained when circumstances suggest the possibility of the presence of hazardous materials.

 

We underwrite all loan participations to our own underwriting standards. In addition, we also consider the financial strength and reputation of the lead lender. To monitor cash flows on loan participations, we require the lead lender to provide annual financial statements for the borrower. We also conduct an annual internal loan review for all loan participations.

 

Commercial Loans. Unlike residential mortgage loans, which generally are made on the basis of the borrower’s ability to make repayment from his or her employment or other income, and which are secured by real property the value of which tends to be more easily ascertainable, commercial loans are of higher risk and typically are made on the basis of the borrower’s ability to make repayment from the cash flow of the borrower’s underlying business. As a result, the availability of funds for the repayment of commercial loans may depend substantially on the success of the business itself. Further, any collateral securing such loans may depreciate over time, may be difficult to appraise and may fluctuate in value.

 

Loan Originations, Purchases and Sales. Loan originations come from a number of sources. The primary sources of loan originations are existing customers, walk-in traffic, advertising and referrals from customers. We advertise in newspapers that are widely circulated in Montgomery, Bucks and Philadelphia Counties. Accordingly, when our rates are competitive, we attract loans from throughout Montgomery, Bucks and Philadelphia Counties. We occasionally purchase loans and participation interests in loans. Generally, all loans are subject to the same stringent underwriting standards with the intention to hold in portfolio. In addition to the FHA loans that we sell, we occasionally sell loans to (1) limit the Bank’s exposure to a single borrower or (2) in specific circumstances to manage the interest rate risk. All loans subject to sale are identified at the time of origination.  

 

Loan Approval Procedures and Authority. Our lending activities follow written, non-discriminatory, underwriting standards and loan origination procedures established by our board of directors and management. A loan committee consisting of officers of Polonia Bank has authority to approve all conforming one- to four-family loans and education loans. Designated loan officers have the authority to approve savings account loans. All other loans, generally consisting of non-conforming one- to four-family loans, jumbo loans, commercial real estate and employee loans must be approved by the board of directors.

 

 - 6 -

 

  

Loans to One Borrower. The maximum amount that we may lend to one borrower and the borrower’s related entities generally is limited, by regulation, to 15% of our stated capital and reserves. At December 31, 2015, our general regulatory limit on loans to one borrower was $5.2 million. At that date, our largest lending relationship was $2.5 million. These, which were made to or guaranteed by a director of the Company or affiliated entities, and was secured by three one- to four-family properties and two commercial real estate properties. These loans were performing in accordance with their original terms at December 31, 2015.

 

Loan Commitments. We issue commitments for fixed-rate mortgage loans conditioned upon the occurrence of certain events. Commitments to originate mortgage loans are legally binding agreements to lend to our customers. Generally, our mortgage loan commitments expire after 60 days.

 

Investment Activities

 

We have legal authority to invest in various types of liquid assets, including U.S. Treasury obligations, securities of various federal agencies and municipal governments, corporate securities, mortgage-backed securities, deposits at the FHLB of Pittsburgh and time deposits of federally insured institutions. Within certain regulatory limits, we also may invest a portion of our assets in mutual funds. We also are required to maintain an investment in FHLB of Pittsburgh stock. While we have the authority under applicable law to invest in derivative securities, our investment policy does not permit this investment. We had no investments in derivative securities at December 31, 2015.

 

At December 31, 2015 our investment portfolio totaled $54.9 million and consisted primarily of mortgage-backed securities. We also held $16.0 million in certificates of deposit with federally insured institutions.

 

Our investment objectives are to provide and maintain liquidity, to establish an acceptable level of interest rate and credit risk, to provide an alternate source of low-risk investments when demand for loans is weak and to generate a favorable return. Our board of directors has the overall responsibility for the investment portfolio, including approval of our investment policy and appointment of the Asset/Liability and Investment Committee. Individual investment transactions are reviewed and ratified by our board of directors monthly.

 

Deposit Activities and Other Sources of Funds

 

General. Deposits, borrowings and loan repayments are the major sources of our funds for lending and other investment purposes. Loan repayments are a relatively stable source of funds, while deposit inflows and outflows and loan prepayments are significantly influenced by general interest rates and money market conditions.

 

Deposit Accounts. Substantially all of our depositors are residents of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Deposits are attracted, by advertising and through our website, from within our market areas through the offering of a broad selection of deposit instruments, including non-interest-bearing demand accounts (such as checking accounts), interest-bearing accounts (such as NOW and money market accounts), regular savings accounts and time deposits. Generally, we do not utilize brokered funds. Deposit account terms vary according to the minimum balance required, the time periods the funds must remain on deposit and the interest rate, among other factors. In determining the terms of our deposit accounts, we consider the rates offered by our competition, our liquidity needs, profitability to us, matching deposit and loan products and customer preferences and concerns. We generally review our deposit mix and pricing weekly. Our current strategy is to offer competitive rates and to be in the middle to high-end of the market for rates on all types of deposit products.

 

Borrowings. We utilize advances from the FHLB of Pittsburgh to supplement our supply of funds for lending and investment. The FHLB functions as a central reserve bank providing credit for its member financial institutions. As a member, we are required to own capital stock in the FHLB and are authorized to apply for advances on the security of such stock and certain of our whole first mortgage loans and other assets (principally securities which are obligations of, or guaranteed by, the United States), provided certain standards related to creditworthiness have been met. Advances are made under several different programs, each having its own interest rate and range of maturities. Depending on the program, limitations on the amount of advances are based either on a fixed percentage of an institution’s net worth or on the FHLB’s assessment of the institution’s creditworthiness.  

 

Personnel

 

As of December 31, 2015, we had 49 full-time employees and 10 part-time employees, none of whom is represented by a collective bargaining unit. We believe our relationship with our employees is good.

 

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Subsidiaries

 

Polonia Bank has two wholly-owned subsidiaries, PBMHC Company (“PBMHC”), a Delaware corporation, and Community Abstract Agency LLC, a Pennsylvania limited liability company. PBMHC was formed in 1997 to hold certain assets and conduct certain investment activities of Polonia Bank. Community Abstract Agency LLC was formed in 1999 to provide title insurance services.

 

REGULATION AND SUPERVISION

 

General

 

Polonia Bank, as a federal savings association, is currently subject to extensive regulation, examination and supervision by the OCC, as its primary federal regulator, and by the FDIC as the insurer of its deposits. Polonia Bank is a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank System and its deposit accounts are insured up to applicable limits by the Deposit Insurance Fund of the FDIC. Polonia Bank must file reports with the OCC concerning its activities and financial condition in addition to obtaining regulatory approvals before entering into certain transactions such as mergers with, or acquisitions of, other financial institutions. There are periodic examinations by the OCC to evaluate Polonia Bank’s safety and soundness and compliance with various regulatory requirements. This regulatory structure is intended primarily for the protection of the insurance fund and depositors. The regulatory structure also gives the regulatory authorities extensive discretion in connection with their supervisory and enforcement activities and examination policies, including policies with respect to the classification of assets and the establishment of an adequate allowance for loan losses for regulatory purposes. Any change in such policies, whether by the OCC, the FDIC or Congress, could have a material adverse impact on Polonia Bancorp and Polonia Bank and their operations.

 

The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (the “Dodd-Frank Act”) made extensive changes to the regulation of Polonia Bank. Under the Dodd-Frank Act, the Office of Thrift Supervision was eliminated and responsibility for the supervision and regulation of federal savings associations such as Polonia Bank was transferred to the OCC on July 21, 2011. The OCC is the agency that is primarily responsible for the regulation and supervision of national banks. Additionally, the Dodd-Frank Act created a new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau as an independent bureau of the Federal Reserve Board. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau assumed responsibility for the implementation of the federal financial consumer protection and fair lending laws and regulations and has authority to impose new requirements. However, institutions of less than $10 billion in assets, such as Polonia Bank, will continue to be examined for compliance with consumer protection and fair lending laws and regulations by, and be subject to the enforcement authority of, their prudential regulators.

 

Certain of the regulatory requirements that are or will be applicable to Polonia Bank and Polonia Bancorp are described below. This description of statutes and regulations is not intended to be a complete explanation of such statutes and regulations and their effects on Polonia Bank and Polonia Bancorp.

 

Federal Banking Regulation

 

Business Activities. The activities of federal savings banks, such as Polonia Bank, are governed by federal laws and regulations. Those laws and regulations delineate the nature and extent of the business activities in which federal savings banks may engage. In particular, certain lending authority for federal savings banks, e.g., commercial, non-residential real property loans and consumer loans, is limited to a specified percentage of the institution’s capital or assets.

 

Capital Requirements. On July 9, 2013, the federal bank regulatory agencies issued a final rule that revised their risk-based capital requirements and the method for calculating risk-weighted assets to make them consistent with agreements that were reached by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (“Basel III”) and certain provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act. The final rule applies to all depository institutions and top-tier bank and savings and loan holding companies with total consolidated assets of $1 billion or more.

 

The rule established a new common equity Tier 1 minimum capital requirement (4.5% of risk-weighted assets), increases the minimum Tier 1 capital to risk-based assets requirement (from 4.0% to 6.0% of risk-weighted assets) and assigned a higher risk weight (150%) to exposures that are more than 90 days past due or are on nonaccrual status and to certain commercial real estate facilities that finance the acquisition, development or construction of real property.

 

 - 8 -

 

  

The rule also included changes in what constitutes regulatory capital, some of which are subject to a two-year transition period. These changes include the phasing-out of certain instruments as qualifying capital. In addition, Tier 2 capital is no longer limited to the amount of Tier 1 capital included in total capital. Mortgage servicing rights, certain deferred tax assets and investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries over designated percentages of common stock are required to be deducted from capital, subject to a two-year transition period. Finally, Tier 1 capital includes accumulated other comprehensive income (which includes all unrealized gains and losses on available for sale debt and equity securities), subject to a two-year transition period.

 

The new capital requirements also include changes in the risk weights of assets to better reflect credit risk and other risk exposures. These include a 150% risk weight (up from 100%) for certain high volatility commercial real estate acquisition, development and construction loans and nonresidential mortgage loans that are 90 days past due or otherwise on nonaccrual status; a 20% (up from 0%) credit conversion factor for the unused portion of a commitment with an original maturity of one year or less that is not unconditionally cancellable; a 250% risk weight (up from 100%) for mortgage servicing rights and deferred tax assets that are not deducted from capital; and increased risk-weights (from 0% to up to 600%) for equity exposures.

 

Finally, the rule limits capital distributions and certain discretionary bonus payments if the banking organization does not hold a “capital conservation buffer” consisting of 2.5% of common equity Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets in addition to the amount necessary to meet its minimum risk-based capital requirements.

 

The final rule became effective on January 1, 2015. The capital conservation buffer requirement is being phased in beginning January 1, 2016, at 0.625% of risk-weighted assets, increasing each year until fully implemented at 2.5% on January 1, 2019.

 

As of December 31, 2015, the Bank met all capital adequacy requirements.

 

Prompt Corrective Regulatory Action. The OCC is required to take certain supervisory actions against undercapitalized institutions, the severity of which depends upon the institution’s degree of undercapitalization. Generally, a savings association that has a ratio of total capital to risk weighted assets of less than 8%, a ratio of Tier 1 (core) capital to risk-weighted assets of less than 4% or a ratio of core capital to total assets of less than 4% (3% or less for institutions with the highest examination rating) is considered to be “undercapitalized.” A savings association that has a total risk-based capital ratio of less than 6%, a Tier 1 capital ratio of less than 3% or a leverage ratio that is less than 3% is considered to be “significantly undercapitalized” and a savings association that has a tangible capital to assets ratio equal to or less than 2% is deemed to be “critically undercapitalized.” Subject to a narrow exception, the OCC is required to appoint a receiver or conservator within specified time frames for an institution that is “critically undercapitalized.” The regulation also provides that a capital restoration plan must be filed with the OCC within 45 days of the date a savings association is deemed to have received notice that it is “undercapitalized,” “significantly undercapitalized” or “critically undercapitalized.” Compliance with the plan must be guaranteed by any parent holding company up to the lesser of 5% of the savings association’s total assets when it was deemed to be undercapitalized or the amount necessary to achieve compliance with applicable capital requirements. In addition, numerous mandatory supervisory actions become immediately applicable to an undercapitalized institution, including, but not limited to, increased monitoring by regulators and restrictions on growth, capital distributions and expansion. The OCC could also take any one of a number of discretionary supervisory actions, including the issuance of a capital directive and the replacement of senior executive officers and directors. Significantly and critically undercapitalized institutions are subject to additional mandatory and discretionary measures.

 

Insurance of Deposit Accounts. Polonia Bank’s deposits are insured up to applicable limits ($250,000 per account) by the Deposit Insurance Fund of the FDIC. Under the FDIC’s existing risk-based assessment system, insured institutions are assigned to one of four risk categories based on supervisory evaluations, regulatory capital levels and certain other factors, with less risky institutions paying lower assessments. An institution’s assessment rate depends upon the category to which it is assigned.

 

The Dodd-Frank Act increased the minimum target Deposit Insurance Fund ratio from 1.15% of estimated insured deposits to 1.35% of estimated insured deposits. The FDIC must seek to achieve the 1.35% ratio by September 30, 2020. Insured institutions with assets of $10 billion or more are supposed to fund the increase. The Dodd-Frank Act eliminated the 1.5% maximum fund ratio, instead leaving it to the discretion of the FDIC.

 

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The FDIC has authority to increase insurance assessments. A significant increase in insurance premiums would likely have an adverse effect on the operating expenses and results of operations of Polonia Bank. Insurance of deposits may be terminated by the FDIC upon a finding that the institution has engaged in unsafe or unsound practices, is in an unsafe or unsound condition to continue operations or has violated any applicable law, regulation, rule, order or condition imposed by the FDIC or the OCC. The management of Polonia Bank does not know of any practice, condition or violation that might lead to termination of deposit insurance.

 

Loans to One Borrower. Federal law provides that savings associations are generally subject to the limits on loans to one borrower applicable to national banks. Generally, subject to certain exceptions, a savings association may not make a loan or extend credit to a single or related group of borrowers in excess of 15% of its unimpaired capital and surplus. An additional amount may be lent, equal to 10% of unimpaired capital and surplus, if secured by specified readily-marketable collateral.

 

Qualified Thrift Lender Test. Federal law requires savings associations to meet a qualified thrift lender test. Under the test, a savings association is required to either qualify as a “domestic building and loan association” under the Internal Revenue Code or maintain at least 65% of its “portfolio assets” (total assets less: (i) specified liquid assets up to 20% of total assets; (ii) intangibles, including goodwill; and (iii) the value of property used to conduct business) in certain “qualified thrift investments” (primarily residential mortgages and related investments, including certain mortgage-backed securities but also including education, credit card and small business loans) in at least nine months out of each 12-month period.

 

A savings association that fails the qualified thrift lender test is subject to certain operating restrictions and the Dodd-Frank Act also specifies that failing the qualified thrift lender test is a violation of law that could result in an enforcement action and dividend limitations. As of December 31, 2015, Polonia Bank maintained 86.5% of its portfolio assets in qualified thrift investments and, therefore, met the qualified thrift lender test.

 

Limitation on Capital Distributions. Federal regulations impose limitations upon all capital distributions by a savings association, including cash dividends, payments to repurchase its shares and payments to shareholders of another institution in a cash-out merger. Under the regulations, an application to and the prior approval of the OCC is required before any capital distribution if the institution does not meet the criteria for “expedited treatment” of applications under OCC regulations (i.e., generally, examination and Community Reinvestment Act ratings in the two top categories), the total capital distributions for the calendar year exceed net income for that year plus the amount of retained net income for the preceding two years, the institution would be undercapitalized following the distribution or the distribution would otherwise be contrary to a statute, regulation or agreement with the OCC. If an application is not required, the institution must still provide 30 days prior written notice to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System of the capital distribution if, like Polonia Bank, it is a subsidiary of a holding company, as well as an informational notice filing to the OCC. If Polonia Bank’s capital ever fell below its regulatory requirements or the OCC notified it that it was in need of increased supervision, its ability to make capital distributions could be restricted. In addition, the OCC could prohibit a proposed capital distribution by any institution, which would otherwise be permitted by the regulation, if the OCC determines that such distribution would constitute an unsafe or unsound practice.  

 

Standards for Safety and Soundness. The federal banking agencies have adopted Interagency Guidelines prescribing Standards for Safety and Soundness in various areas such as internal controls and information systems, internal audit, loan documentation and credit underwriting, interest rate exposure, asset growth and quality, earnings and compensation, fees and benefits. The guidelines set forth the safety and soundness standards that the federal banking agencies use to identify and address problems at insured depository institutions before capital becomes impaired. If the OCC determines that a savings association fails to meet any standard prescribed by the guidelines, the OCC may require the institution to submit an acceptable plan to achieve compliance with the standard.

 

Community Reinvestment Act. All federal savings associations have a responsibility under the Community Reinvestment Act and related regulations to help meet the credit needs of their communities, including low- and moderate-income neighborhoods. An institution’s failure to satisfactorily comply with the provisions of the Community Reinvestment Act could result in denials of regulatory applications. Responsibility for administering the Community Reinvestment Act, unlike other fair lending laws, is not being transferred to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Polonia Bank received a “satisfactory” Community Reinvestment Act rating in its most recently completed examination.

 

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Transactions with Related Parties. Federal law limits Polonia Bank’s authority to engage in transactions with “affiliates” (e.g., any entity that controls or is under common control with Polonia Bank, including Polonia Bancorp and their other subsidiaries). The aggregate amount of covered transactions with any individual affiliate is limited to 10% of the capital and surplus of the savings association. The aggregate amount of covered transactions with all affiliates is limited to 20% of the savings association’s capital and surplus. Certain transactions with affiliates are required to be secured by collateral in an amount and of a type specified by federal law. The purchase of low quality assets from affiliates is generally prohibited. Transactions with affiliates must generally be on terms and under circumstances that are at least as favorable to the institution as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with non-affiliated companies. In addition, savings associations are prohibited from lending to any affiliate that is engaged in activities that are not permissible for bank holding companies and no savings association may purchase the securities of any affiliate other than a subsidiary.

 

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 generally prohibits loans by Polonia Bancorp to its executive officers and directors. However, the law contains a specific exception for loans by a depository institution to its executive officers and directors in compliance with federal banking laws. Under such laws, Polonia Bank’s authority to extend credit to executive officers, directors and 10% shareholders (“insiders”), as well as entities such persons control, is limited. The laws limit both the individual and aggregate amount of loans that Polonia Bank may make to insiders based, in part, on Polonia Bank’s capital level and requires that certain board approval procedures be followed. Such loans are required to be made on terms substantially the same as those offered to unaffiliated individuals and not involve more than the normal risk of repayment. There is an exception for loans made pursuant to a benefit or compensation program that is widely available to all employees of the institution and does not give preference to insiders over other employees. Loans to executive officers are subject to additional limitations based on the type of loan involved.

 

Enforcement. The OCC currently has primary enforcement responsibility over savings associations and has authority to bring actions against the institution and all institution-affiliated parties, including shareholders, and any attorneys, appraisers and accountants who knowingly or recklessly participate in wrongful actions likely to have an adverse effect on an insured institution. Formal enforcement action may range from the issuance of a capital directive or cease and desist order to removal of officers and/or directors to institution of receivership, conservatorship or termination of deposit insurance. Civil penalties cover a wide range of violations and can amount to $25,000 per day, or even $1 million per day in especially egregious cases. The FDIC has the authority to recommend to the OCC that enforcement action be taken with respect to a particular savings association. If action is not taken by the OCC, the FDIC has authority to take such action under certain circumstances. Federal law also establishes criminal penalties for certain violations.

 

Assessments. The OCC assessments paid by Polonia Bank for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2015 totaled $146,000.

 

Federal Home Loan Bank System. Polonia Bank is a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank System, which consists of 12 regional Federal Home Loan Banks. The Federal Home Loan Bank provides a central credit facility primarily for member institutions. Polonia Bank, as a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank of Pittsburgh, is required to acquire and hold shares of capital stock in that Federal Home Loan Bank. Polonia Bank was in compliance with this requirement with an investment in Federal Home Loan Bank stock at December 31, 2015 of $3.7 million.

 

Federal Reserve Board System. The Federal Reserve Board regulations require savings associations to maintain noninterest earning reserves against their transaction accounts (primarily Negotiable Order of Withdrawal (NOW) and regular checking accounts). The regulations generally provide that reserves be maintained against aggregate transaction accounts. The Bank is required to maintain average daily reserves equal to 3% on aggregate transaction accounts of up to $89.0 million, plus 10% on the remainder, and the first $13.3 million of otherwise reservable balances will be exempt. These reserve requirements are subject to adjustment by the FRB. The Bank is in compliance with the foregoing requirements.

 

Other Regulations

 

Polonia Bank’s operations are also subject to federal laws applicable to credit transactions, including the:

 

Truth-In-Lending Act, governing disclosures of credit terms to consumer borrowers;

 

Home Mortgage Disclosure Act of 1975, requiring financial institutions to provide information to enable the public and public officials to determine whether a financial institution is fulfilling its obligation to help meet the housing needs of the community it serves;

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Equal Credit Opportunity Act, prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, creed or other prohibited factors in extending credit;

 

Fair Credit Reporting Act of 1978, governing the use and provision of information to credit reporting agencies;

 

Fair Debt Collection Act, governing the manner in which consumer debts may be collected by collection agencies; and

 

rules and regulations of the various federal agencies charged with the responsibility of implementing such federal laws.

 

The operations of Polonia Bank also are subject to laws such as the:

 

Right to Financial Privacy Act, which imposes a duty to maintain confidentiality of consumer financial records and prescribes procedures for complying with administrative subpoenas of financial records;

 

Electronic Funds Transfer Act and Regulation E promulgated thereunder, which govern automatic deposits to and withdrawals from deposit accounts and customers’ rights and liabilities arising from the use of automated teller machines and other electronic banking services; and

 

Check Clearing for the 21st Century Act (also known as “Check 21”), which gives “substitute checks,” such as digital check images and copies made from that image, the same legal standing as the original paper check.

 

Holding Company Regulation

 

General. As a savings and loan holding company, Polonia Bancorp is subject to Federal Reserve Board regulations, examinations, supervision, reporting requirements and regulations regarding its activities. Among other things, this authority permits the Federal Reserve Board to restrict or prohibit activities that are determined to be a serious risk to Polonia Bank.

 

Pursuant to federal law and regulations and policy, a savings and loan holding company such as Polonia Bancorp may generally engage in the activities permitted for financial holding companies under Section 4(k) of the Bank Holding Company Act and certain other activities that have been authorized for savings and loan holding companies by regulation.

 

Federal law prohibits a savings and loan holding company from, directly or indirectly or through one or more subsidiaries, acquiring more than 5% of the voting stock of another savings association, or savings and loan holding company thereof, without prior written approval of the Federal Reserve Board or from acquiring or retaining, with certain exceptions, more than 5% of a non-subsidiary holding company or savings association. A savings and loan holding company is also prohibited from acquiring more than 5% of a company engaged in activities other than those authorized by federal law or acquiring or retaining control of a depository institution that is not insured by the FDIC. In evaluating applications by holding companies to acquire savings associations, the Federal Reserve Board must consider the financial and managerial resources and future prospects of the company and institution involved, the effect of the acquisition on the risk to the insurance funds, the convenience and needs of the community and competitive factors.

 

The Federal Reserve Board is prohibited from approving any acquisition that would result in a multiple savings and loan holding company controlling savings associations in more than one state, except: (i) the approval of interstate supervisory acquisitions by savings and loan holding companies; and (ii) the acquisition of a savings association in another state if the laws of the state of the target savings association specifically permit such acquisitions. The states vary in the extent to which they permit interstate savings and loan holding company acquisitions.

 

Source of Strength. The Dodd-Frank Act also extends the “source of strength” doctrine to savings and loan holding companies. The regulatory agencies must promulgate regulations implementing the “source of strength” policy that holding companies act as a source of strength to their subsidiary depository institutions by providing capital, liquidity and other support in times of financial stress.

 

Polonia Bank must notify the Federal Reserve Board prior to paying a dividend to Polonia Bancorp. The Federal Reserve Board may disapprove a dividend if, among other things, the Federal Reserve Board determines that the federal savings bank would be undercapitalized on a pro forma basis or the dividend is determined to raise safety or soundness concerns.

 

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Acquisition of Polonia Bancorp. Under the Federal Change in Bank Control Act, a notice must be submitted to the Federal Reserve Board if any person (including a company), or group acting in concert, seeks to acquire direct or indirect “control” of a savings and loan holding company or savings association. Under certain circumstances, a change of control may occur, and prior notice is required, upon the acquisition of 10% or more of the outstanding voting stock of the company or institution, unless the Federal Reserve Board has found that the acquisition will not result in a change of control. Under the Change in Control Act, the Federal Reserve Board generally has 60 days from the filing of a complete notice to act, taking into consideration certain factors, including the financial and managerial resources of the acquirer and the anti-trust effects of the acquisition. Any company that acquires control would then be subject to regulation as a savings and loan holding company.

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

Compliance with the formal written agreement entered into with the OCC will increase our noninterest expense and failure to comply with the agreement could result in monetary penalties and/or additional regulatory actions.

 

Polonia Bank entered into a formal written agreement with the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency on October 21, 2014, which was subsequently amended on November 10, 2015. See “Business – Agreements with Regulators” for further information. The requirements of the Agreement will remain in effect until the OCC suspends or terminates the Agreement. We expect that additional compliance efforts related to the Agreement will result in an elevated level of noninterest expense while we revise and/or implement the various policies, procedures and reports required by the Agreement.

 

The IMCRs imposed by the OCC require the Bank to maintain a leverage ratio (equal to Tier 1 capital to average total consolidated assets) of at least 10.00% and a total capital ratio (equal to total capital to total risk-weighted assets) of at least 15.00%. While the Bank currently exceeds these capital requirements, higher minimum capital ratios may limit the Bank’s ability to grow.

 

If we fail to comply with the formal written agreement or the IMCRs, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency may pursue the assessment of civil money penalties against the Bank and its officers and directors and may seek to enforce the terms of the formal written agreement through a more restrictive enforcement order such as a cease and desist order or through court proceedings.

 

A return of recessionary conditions could result in increases in our level of nonperforming loans and/or reduce demand for our products and services, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations.

 

Although the U.S. economy has emerged from the severe recession that occurred in 2008 and 2009, economic growth has been slow and uneven, and unemployment levels remain high. Recovery by many businesses has been impaired by lower consumer spending. A return to prolonged deteriorating economic conditions and/or continued negative developments in the domestic and international credit markets could significantly affect the markets in which we do business, the value of our loans and investments, and our ongoing operations, costs and profitability. These events may cause us to incur losses and may adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

 

Changes in interest rates may hurt our profits and asset value.

 

Our net interest income is the interest we earn on loans and investments less the interest we pay on our deposits and borrowings. Our interest rate spread is the difference between the yield we earn on our assets and the interest rate we pay for deposits and our borrowings. Changes in interest rates could adversely affect our interest rate spread and, as a result, our net interest income. Although the yield we earn on our assets and our funding costs tend to move in the same direction in response to changes in interest rates, one can rise or fall faster than the other, causing our interest rate spread to expand or contract. Our liabilities are shorter in duration than our assets, so they will re-price faster in response to changes in interest rates. As a result, when interest rates rise, our funding costs will rise faster than the yield we earn on our assets, causing our interest rate spread to contract – and our net interest income to decline – until the yield catches up. Additionally, an increase in interest rates may, among other things, reduce the demand for loans and our ability to originate loans and decrease loan repayment rates. We have benefited in recent periods from a favorable interest rate environment, but we believe that this environment cannot be sustained indefinitely and interest rates would be expected to rise as the economy improves.

 

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Our policy is to originate for retention in our portfolio fixed-rate mortgage loans with maturities of up to 30 years. At December 31, 2015, $154.8 million, or 90.6% of our total loan portfolio maturing in more than one year, consisted of fixed-rate mortgage loans. This investment in fixed-rate mortgage loans exposes us to increased levels of interest rate risk.

 

Our cost of operations is high relative to our assets and our income.

 

Our operating expenses, which consist primarily of salaries and employee benefits, occupancy and equipment expense, data processing expense, professional fees, federal deposit insurance premiums and other noninterest expenses totaled $11.2 million and $12.5 million for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively. Our ratio of noninterest expense to average total assets was 3.80% and 4.16% for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively. Our efficiency ratio was 99.96% for 2015 compared to 97.81% for 2014.  

 

If we conclude that the decline in value of any of our investment securities is other than temporary, we are required to write down the value of that security through a charge to earnings.

 

We review our investment securities portfolio at each quarter-end reporting period to determine whether the fair value is below the current carrying value. When the fair value of any of our investment securities has declined below its carrying value, we are required to assess whether the decline is other than temporary. If we conclude that the decline is other than temporary, we are required to write down the value of that security through a charge to earnings. As of December 31, 2015, our investment portfolio included securities with an amortized cost of $54.3 million and an estimated fair value of $54.9 million. Changes in the expected cash flows of these securities and/or prolonged price declines may result in our concluding in future periods that the impairment of these securities is other than temporary, which would require a charge to earnings to write down these securities to their fair value. Any charges for other than temporary impairment would not impact cash flow, tangible capital or liquidity.

 

A significant percentage of our assets are invested in securities which typically have a lower yield than our loan portfolio.

 

Our results of operations are substantially dependent on our net interest income, which is the difference between the interest income earned on our interest-earning assets and the interest expense paid on our interest-bearing liabilities. At December 31, 2015, 18.8% of our assets were invested in investment and mortgage-backed securities. These investments yield substantially less than the loans we hold in our portfolio. While we have recently restructured our investment portfolio to increase our investment in higher yielding securities and, depending on market conditions, intend to invest a greater proportion of our assets in loans with the goal of increasing our net interest income, we may be unable to increase the origination or purchase of loans acceptable to us.

 

We are dependent upon the services of key executives.

 

The loss of our senior executive officers could have a material adverse impact on our operations because, as a small company, we have fewer management-level personnel that have the experience and expertise to readily replace these individuals. Changes in key personnel and their responsibilities may be disruptive to our business and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

Strong competition within our market areas could hurt our profits and slow growth.

 

We face intense competition both in making loans and attracting deposits. This competition has made it more difficult for us to make new loans and at times has forced us to offer higher deposit rates. Price competition for loans and deposits might result in us earning less on our loans and paying more on our deposits, which would reduce net interest income. Competition also makes it more difficult to grow loans and deposits. As of June 30, 2015, we held less than 1.0% of the deposits in the Philadelphia metropolitan area. Competition also makes it more difficult to hire and retain experienced employees. Some of the institutions with which we compete have substantially greater resources and lending limits than we have and may offer services that we do not provide. We expect competition to increase in the future as a result of legislative, regulatory and technological changes and the continuing trend of consolidation in the financial services industry. Our profitability depends upon our continued ability to compete successfully in our market areas.

 

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We are dependent on our information technology and telecommunications systems and third-party service providers; systems failures, interruptions and security breaches could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

Our business is dependent on the successful and uninterrupted functioning of our information technology and telecommunications systems and third-party service providers. The failure of these systems, or the termination of a third-party software license or service agreement on which any of these systems is based, could interrupt our operations. Because our information technology and telecommunications systems interface with and depend on third-party systems, we could experience service denials if demand for such services exceeds capacity or such third-party systems fail or experience interruptions. If significant, sustained or repeated, a system failure or service denial could compromise our ability to operate effectively, damage our reputation, result in a loss of customer business, and/or subject us to additional regulatory scrutiny and possible financial liability, any of which could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

Our third-party service providers may be vulnerable to unauthorized access, computer viruses, phishing schemes and other security breaches. We may be required to expend significant additional resources to protect against the threat of such security breaches and computer viruses, or to alleviate problems caused by such security breaches or viruses. To the extent that the activities of our third-party service providers or the activities of our customers involve the storage and transmission of confidential information, security breaches and viruses could expose us to claims, regulatory scrutiny, litigation and other possible liabilities.

 

Security breaches and other disruptions could compromise our information and expose us to liability, which would cause our business and reputation to suffer.

 

In the ordinary course of our business, we collect and store sensitive data, including our proprietary business information and that of our customers, suppliers and business partners; and personally identifiable information of our customers and employees. The secure processing, maintenance and transmission of this information is critical to our operations and business strategy. We, our customers, and other financial institutions with which we interact, are subject to ongoing, continuous attempts to penetrate key systems by individual hackers, organized criminals, and in some cases, state-sponsored organizations. Despite our security measures, our information technology and infrastructure may be vulnerable to attacks by hackers or breached due to employee error, malfeasance or other disruptions. Any such breach could compromise our networks and the information stored there could be accessed, publicly disclosed, lost or stolen. Any such unauthorized access, disclosure or other loss of information could result in legal claims or proceedings, liability under laws that protect the privacy of personal information, and regulatory penalties; disrupt our operations and the services we provide to customers; damage our reputation; and cause a loss of confidence in our products and services, all of which could adversely affect our business, revenues and competitive position. We may be required to spend significant capital and other resources to protect against the threat of security breaches and computer viruses, or to alleviate problems caused by security breaches or viruses.

 

To remain competitive, we must keep pace with technological change.

 

Financial products and services have become increasingly technology-driven. Our ability to meet the needs of our customers competitively, and in a cost-efficient manner, is dependent on the ability to keep pace with technological advances and to invest in new technology as it becomes available. Many of our competitors have greater resources to invest in technology than we do and may be better equipped to market new technology-driven products and services. The ability to keep pace with technological change is important, and the failure to do so could have a material adverse impact on our business and therefore on our financial condition and results of operations.

 

We operate in a highly regulated environment and we may be adversely affected by changes in laws and regulations.

 

We are subject to extensive regulation, supervision and examination by the Federal Reserve Board and the OCC, our primary federal regulators, and by the FDIC, as insurer of our deposits. Such regulation and supervision governs the activities in which an institution and its holding company may engage, and are intended primarily for the protection of the insurance fund and the depositors and borrowers of Polonia Bank rather than for holders of Polonia Bancorp common stock. Regulatory authorities have extensive discretion in their supervisory and enforcement activities, including the imposition of restrictions on our operations, the classification of our assets and determination of the level of our allowance for loan losses. Any change in such regulation and oversight, whether in the form of regulatory policy, regulations, legislation or supervisory action, may have a material impact on our operations.

 

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In addition to the enactment of the Dodd-Frank Act, the federal regulatory agencies recently have begun to take stronger supervisory actions against financial institutions that have experienced increased loan losses and other weaknesses as a result of the current economic crisis. The actions include the entering into of written agreements and cease and desist orders that place certain limitations on their operations. Federal bank regulators recently have also been using with more frequency their ability to impose individual minimal capital requirements on banks, which requirements may be higher than those imposed under the Dodd-Frank Act or which would otherwise qualify the bank as being “well capitalized” under the OCC’s prompt corrective action regulations. If we were to become subject to a supervisory agreement or higher individual capital requirements, such action may have a negative impact on our ability to execute our business plans, as well as our ability to grow, pay dividends or engage in mergers and acquisitions and may result in restrictions in our operations.  

 

Our risk management framework may not be effective in mitigating risks and/or losses to us.

 

We have implemented a risk management framework to manage our risk exposure. This framework is comprised of various processes, systems and strategies, and is designed to manage the types of risk to which we are subject, including, among others, credit, market, liquidity, interest rate and compliance. Our framework also includes financial or other modeling methodologies which involve management assumptions and judgment. There is no assurance that our risk management framework will be effective under all circumstances or that it will adequately mitigate any risk or loss to us. If our framework is not effective, we could suffer unexpected losses and our business, financial condition, results of operations or prospects could be materially and adversely affected. We may also be subject to potentially adverse regulatory consequences.

 

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

 

We conduct our business through our main office and four branch offices in Montgomery and Philadelphia counties, Pennsylvania.  We currently own all of our branch offices.

  

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

On August 5, 2015, Lane Brennen, a former employee of the Bank, filed a complaint in state court naming the Bank, the Bank’s former chief executive officer, the Bank’s chief financial offer, the Bank’s former chief lending officer and an employee of the Bank as defendants (Lane Brennen v Polonia Bank et al., Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas, Case ID 150800526). The complaint alleges claims for breach of his employment contract, violation of Pennsylvania’s Wage Payment and Collection Law, and for unlawful retaliation and demands an accounting. Mr. Brennan seeks compensation that he alleges is owed to him under the terms of his employment agreement, as well as other compensatory and punitive damages. Under the terms of Mr. Brennen’s employment agreement, he received a portion of the net income from the Bank’s FHA lending operations, which he managed. The Bank intends to vigorously defend against these claims. However, the defense may not be successful and insurance may not be available or adequate to fund any judgment, settlement or costs of defense of this action. The individual defendants may be entitled to indemnification from the Bank, for which there may be no insurance coverage. The Bank has asserted claims against Mr. Brennen for breach of contract and breach of fiduciary duties.

 

From time to time, we may be party to various legal proceedings incident to our business. In the opinion of management, the resolution of these legal actions is not expected to have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE

 

Not applicable.

 

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PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

Until December 28, 2015, the common stock of Polonia Bancorp, Inc. was traded on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “PBCP.” Commencing December 29, 2015, Polonia Bancorp common stock has been quoted on the OTC Pink marketplace. The following table sets forth the quarterly high and low sales prices of Polonia Bancorp’s common stock for the two most recently completed fiscal years.

 

   High   Low      High   Low 
2015          2014        
                    
First Quarter  $13.14   $10.28   First Quarter  $10.15   $9.25 
Second Quarter   13.75    12.25   Second Quarter   10.34    9.50 
Third Quarter   15.43    11.49   Third Quarter   10.90    9.96 
Fourth Quarter   13.48    11.50   Fourth Quarter   10.50    9.50 

 

As of December 31, 2015, there were approximately 156 holders of record of the Company’s common stock.

 

Polonia Bancorp’s Memorandum of Understanding with the FRB prohibits Polonia Bancorp from paying dividends, repurchasing its stock or making other capital distributions without prior written approval of the FRB.

 

Our ability to pay dividends to shareholders may depend, in part, upon capital distributions we receive from Polonia Bank, earnings, if any, from our lending and investment portfolios and other assets and earnings from the investment of the net proceeds from the offering that we retain. OCC and Federal Reserve Board regulations limit dividends and other distributions from Polonia Bank to us. No insured depository institution may make a capital distribution if, after making the distribution, the institution would be undercapitalized or if the proposed distribution raises safety and soundness concerns.

 

As of December 31, 2015, Polonia Bancorp satisfied all prescribed capital requirements. Future dividend payments will depend on the Company’s profitability, approval by its Board of Directors and prevailing regulations. To date, we have not declared any cash dividends.

 

The Company did not purchase any of its common stock during the fourth quarter of 2015 and has no outstanding stock repurchase programs.

 

 - 17 -

 

  

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

The following tables set forth selected financial and other data of the Company and, where indicated, the Bank for the periods and at the dates indicated.

 

   2015   2014   2013 
   (Dollars in thousands, except per share data) 
Financial Condition Data:               
Total assets  $291,611   $308,350   $306,176 
Certificates of deposit   15,980    -    - 
Securities available-for-sale   54,872    11,712    15,271 
Securities held-to-maturity   -    44,742    51,320 
Loans held for sale   -    4,221    6,143 
Loans receivable, net   160,493    197,679    182,050 
Covered loans   11,686    14,457    16,523 
Cash and cash equivalents   31,137    12,174    15,764 
Deposits   188,222    199,554    201,322 
FHLB Advances – long-term   56,000    59,000    59,000 
Stockholders’ equity   37,501    36,940    38,417 
Book value per common share   11.20    11.08    10.94 
                
Operating Data:               
Interest income  $10,213   $11,342   $10,732 
Interest expense   3,153    3,210    2,589 
Net interest income   7,060    8,132    8,143 
Provision for loan losses   73    210    574 
Net interest income after provision for loan losses   6,987    7,922    7,569 
Noninterest income   4,130    4,654    5,577 
Noninterest expense   11,185    12,506    13,512 
Income (Loss) before income taxes   (68)   70    (366)
Provision for income taxes   70    53    (120)
Net income (loss)  $(138)  $17   $(246)
Basic and diluted earnings per share   (0.04)   0.01    (0.07)
                
Performance Ratios:               
Return on average assets   (0.05)%   0.01%   0.09%
Return on average equity   (0.35)   0.04    (0.60)
Interest rate spread (1)   2.36    2.70    2.98 
Net interest margin (2)   2.52    2.84    3.13 
Noninterest expense to average assets   3.80    4.16    4.90 
Efficiency ratio (3)   99.96    97.81    98.48 
Average interest-earning assets to average interest-bearing liabilities   114.53    113.24    115.70 
Average equity to average assets   13.39    13.17    14.94 
                
Capital Ratios (4):               
Tangible capital   10.75    10.66    10.51 
Core capital   10.75    10.66    10.51 
Common equity tier 1   24.08    N/A    N/A 
Total risk-based capital   25.03    20.99    21.27 

 

 - 18 -

 

  

   2015   2014   2013 
             
Asset Quality Ratios (5):               
Allowance for loan losses as a percent of total loans   0.79%   0.71%   0.75%
Allowance for loan losses as a percent of non-performing loans   56.26    63.36    71.40 
Net (charge-offs) recoveries to average outstanding loans during the period   (0.11)   (0.08)   (0.49)
Non-performing loans as a percent of total loans   1.40    1.12    1.05 
                
Other Data:               
Number of:               
Real estate loans outstanding   1,028    1,276    1,313 
Deposit accounts   7,111    7,716    8,248 
Full-service offices   5    5    6 

 

 

 

(1) Represents the difference between the weighted average yield on average interest-earning assets and the weighted average cost of interest-bearing liabilities.
(2) Represents net interest income as a percent of average interest-earning assets.
(3) Represents non-interest expense divided by the sum of net interest income and non-interest income.
(4) Ratios are for Polonia Bank.
(5) Ratios exclude covered loans.

 

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

The objective of this section is to help potential investors understand our views on our results of operations and financial condition. You should read this discussion in conjunction with the consolidated balance sheets as of December 31, 2015 and 2014, and the related consolidated statements of income, changes in stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for the years then ended.

 

Overview

 

FDIC-Assisted Acquisition. On December 10, 2010, Polonia Bank acquired certain assets and assumed certain liabilities of Earthstar Bank from the FDIC, as receiver of Earthstar Bank. Earthstar Bank operated four community banking branches within Chester and Philadelphia counties, Pennsylvania. Polonia Bank’s bid to purchase Earthstar Bank included the purchase of certain Earthstar assets at a discount of $7.0 million in exchange for assuming certain Earthstar Bank deposits and certain other liabilities. Based on the terms of this transaction, the FDIC paid Polonia Bank $30.5 million ($30.8 million less a settlement of approximately $324,000), resulting in a pre-tax gain of $4.6 million. No cash or other consideration was paid by Polonia Bank. Polonia Bank and the FDIC entered into loss sharing agreements regarding future losses incurred on loans existing at the acquisition date. Under the terms of the loss sharing agreements, the FDIC will reimburse Polonia Bank for 80 percent of net losses on covered assets during the term of the agreements.

 

Under the terms of the loss sharing agreements, the FDIC will reimburse the Bank for 80 percent of net losses on covered assets. The term for loss sharing on residential real estate loans is ten years, while the term for loss sharing on nonresidential real estate loans is five years in respect to losses and eight years in respect to loss recoveries. The loss sharing agreements include clawback provisions should losses not meet the specified thresholds and other conditions not be met. As a result of the loss sharing agreements with the FDIC, Polonia Bank recorded an indemnification asset, net of estimated clawback provisions, of $5.4 million at the time of acquisition. For additional information regarding the FDIC indemnification asset See Note 1 “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies – FDIC Indemnification Asset” in the consolidated financial statements included in this prospectus.

 

At December 31, 2015, covered loans were comprised of $5.5 million of one- to four-family mortgage loans, $6.2 million of multi-family and commercial real estate loans and $28,000 of commercial loans. The loss share arrangement on all covered loans with the exception of one-to four-family loans expired as of December 31, 2015.

 

 - 19 -

 

 

Income. Our primary source of pre-tax income is net interest income. Net interest income is the difference between interest income, which is the income that we earn on our loans and securities, and interest expense, which is the interest that we pay on our deposits and FHLB borrowings. Other significant sources of pre-tax income are service charges on deposit accounts and other loan fees (including loan brokerage fees and late charges). In addition, we recognize gains or losses from the sale of loans and investments in years that we have such sales.

 

Allowance for Loan Losses. The allowance for loan losses is a valuation allowance for probable incurred credit losses. Loan losses are charged against the allowance when management believes the uncollectibility of a loan balance is confirmed. Subsequent recoveries, if any, are credited to the allowance. Management estimates the allowance balance required using past loan loss experience, the nature and value of the portfolio, information about specific borrower situations, and estimated collateral values, economic conditions, and other factors. Allocation of the allowance may be made for specific loans, but the entire allowance is available for any loan that, in management’s judgment, should be charged off.

 

Expenses. The non-interest expenses we incur in operating our business consist of salaries and employee benefits expenses, occupancy and equipment expenses, marketing expenses and various other miscellaneous expenses.

 

Salaries and employee benefits consist primarily of: salaries and wages paid to our employees; payroll taxes; and expenses for health insurance and other employee benefits.

 

Occupancy and equipment expenses, which are the fixed and variable costs of buildings and equipment, consist primarily of depreciation charges, furniture and equipment expenses, maintenance, real estate taxes and costs of utilities. Depreciation of premises and equipment is computed using the straight-line method based on the useful lives of the related assets, which range from three to 40 years.

 

Marketing expenses include expenses for advertisements, promotions, third-party marketing services and premium items.

 

Other expenses include expenses for supplies, telephone and postage, data processing, contributions and donations, director and committee fees, insurance and surety bond premiums and other fees and expenses.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

We consider accounting policies involving significant judgments and assumptions by management that have, or could have, a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets or on income to be critical accounting policies. We consider the following to be our critical accounting policies: allowance for loan losses, deferred income taxes and other-than-temporary impairment of securities.

 

Allowance for Loan Losses. The allowance for loan losses is the amount estimated by management as necessary to cover probable incurred credit losses in the loan portfolio at the statement of financial condition date. The allowance is established through the provision for loan losses, which is charged to income. Determining the amount of the allowance for loan losses necessarily involves a high degree of judgment. Among the material estimates required to establish the allowance are: loss exposure at default; the amount and timing of future cash flows on impacted loans; the value of collateral; and the determination of loss factors to be applied to the various elements of the portfolio. All of these estimates are susceptible to significant change. Management reviews the level of the allowance on a quarterly basis and establishes the provision for loan losses based upon an evaluation of the portfolio, past loss experience, current economic conditions and other factors related to the collectibility of the loan portfolio. Although we believe that we use the best information available to establish the allowance for loan losses, future adjustments to the allowance may be necessary if economic conditions differ substantially from the assumptions used in making the evaluation. In addition, the OCC, as an integral part of its examination process, periodically reviews our allowance for loan losses. Such agency may require us to recognize adjustments to the allowance based on its judgments about information available to it at the time of its examination. A large loss could deplete the allowance and require increased provisions to replenish the allowance, which would negatively affect earnings. For additional discussion, see note 5 of the notes to the consolidated financial statements included in this annual report on Form 10-K.

 

 - 20 -

 

  

Deferred Income Taxes. We use the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes as prescribed by United States Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (U.S. GAAP). Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. If current available information raises doubt as to the realization of the deferred tax assets, a valuation allowance is established. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. We exercise significant judgment in evaluating the amount and timing of recognition of the resulting tax liabilities and assets. These judgments require us to make projections of future taxable income. The judgments and estimates we make in determining our deferred tax assets, which are inherently subjective, are reviewed on a continual basis as regulatory and business factors change. Any reduction in estimated future taxable income may require us to record a valuation allowance against our deferred tax assets. A valuation allowance would result in additional income tax expense in the period, which would negatively affect earnings.

 

Other-Than-Temporary Impairment of Securities. U.S. GAAP requires companies to perform periodic reviews of individual securities in their investment portfolios to determine whether a decline in the value of a security is other than temporary. Securities are periodically reviewed for other-than-temporary impairment based upon a number of factors, including, but not limited to, the length of time and extent to which the market value has been less than cost, the financial condition of the underlying issuer, the ability of the issuer to meet contractual obligations, the likelihood of the security’s ability to recover any decline in its market value, management’s intent and ability to hold the security for a period of time sufficient to allow for a recovery in market value and whether or not we intend to sell the security or whether it is more likely than not that we would be required to sell the security before its anticipated recovery in market value. Among the factors that are considered in determining management’s intent and ability is a review of our capital adequacy, interest rate risk position, and liquidity. The assessment of a security’s ability to recover any decline in market value, the ability of the issuer to meet contractual obligations, and management’s intent and ability requires considerable judgment. A decline in value that is considered to be other than temporary is recorded as a loss within noninterest income.

 

Fair value of assets acquired and liabilities assumed pursuant to business combination transactions. Assets acquired and liabilities assumed in business combinations are recorded at estimated fair value on their purchase date. Purchased loans acquired in a business combination, including covered loans, are recorded at estimated fair value with no carryover of the related allowance for loan and lease losses. In determining the estimated fair value of purchased loans, management considers a number of factors including, among other things, the remaining life of the acquired loans, estimated prepayments, estimated loss ratios, estimated value of the underlying collateral, estimated holding periods, and net present value of cash flows expected to be received.

 

The estimated fair value of the FDIC indemnification asset is based on the net present value of expected future cash proceeds. See note 1 “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies – FDIC Indemnification Asset” in the consolidated financial statements included in this annual report on Form 10-K. The discount rates used are derived from current market rates and reflect the level of inherent risk in the assets. The expected cash flows are determined based on contractual terms, expected performance, default timing assumptions, property appraisals and other factors.

 

The fair values of investment securities acquired in business combinations are generally based on quoted market prices, broker quotes, comprehensive interest rate tables or pricing matrices or a combination thereof.

 

The fair value of assumed liabilities in business combinations on their date of purchase is generally the amount payable by the Company necessary to completely satisfy the assumed obligation.

 

 - 21 -

 

  

Financial Condition

 

Total assets at December 31, 2015 were $291.6 million, a decrease of $16.7 million, or 5.4%, from total assets of $308.3 million at December 31, 2014. The decrease in assets resulted primarily from a $40.1 million decrease in total loans, a $4.5 million decrease in other assets and a $4.2 million decrease in loans held for sale, partially offset by an $18.9 million increase in cash and cash equivalents and a $16.0 million increase in certificates of deposit. Total liabilities at December 31, 2015 were $254.1 million compared to $271.4 million at December 31, 2014, a decrease of $17.3 million, or 6.4%. Total stockholders’ equity increased to $37.5 million at December 31, 2015 from $36.9 million at December 31, 2014, an increase of $600,000, or 1.6%, primarily as a result of our operating income, the exercise of 15,580 options, a reduction in unallocated ESOP shares and an increase in accumulated other comprehensive income.

 

Cash and cash equivalents increased to $31.1 million from $12.2 million during the year ended December 31, 2015, an increase of $18.9 million, or 154.9%. The increase in cash and cash equivalents was attributable, in part, to the decrease of $40.1 million in total loans. The decrease in loans was partially due to the sale of $26.6 million in loans held for investment. Also contributing to the increase in cash and cash equivalents was a $4.2 million decrease in the loans held for sale and a $1.6 million decrease in investment securities, partially offset by a $16.0 increase in certificates of deposit.

 

Investment securities available for sale increased to $54.9 million from $11.7 million during the year ended December 31, 2015, an increase of $43.2 million, or 369.2%. The increase in investment securities available for sale was attributable to a transfer of $40.1 million of investment securities held to maturity and the purchase of $17.6 million in securities, partially offset by $8.1 million in sales of securities, $3.5 million in payments received and $3.3 million in calls or maturities.

 

Investment securities held to maturity decreased to $0 from $44.7 million during the year ended December 31, 2015, a decrease of $44.7 million, or 100.0%. The decrease in investment securities held to maturity was attributable, in part, to the transfer of $40.1 million of securities to available for sale and $4.6 million in payments received. The transfer of securities was undertaken as part of our strategy to mitigate interest rate risk.

 

Loans held for sale decreased to $0 from $4.2 million during the year ended December 31, 2015. The decrease in loans held for sale was due to the elimination of the Retail Mortgage Banking Group. Loans originated for sale during 2015 were $48.3 million and loans sold were $52.5 million compared to originations of $75.3 million and loans sold of $77.1 million in 2014. The Retail Mortgage Banking Group was eliminated in mid-2015 in order to reduce costs and mitigate compliance risks associated with this type of mortgage lending.

 

Total loans decreased to $173.5 million from $213.6 million during the year ended December 31, 2015, a decrease of $40.1 million or 18.8%. The decrease in total loans was primarily the result of the sale of $26.1 million in 30-year fixed-rate jumbo loans. The loan sale was undertaken as part of our strategy to mitigate interest rate risk.

 

Other assets decreased to $4.4 million from $8.8 million during the year ended December 31, 2015. The decrease in other assets is primarily related to a $4.7 million distribution of the Company’s non-qualified deferred compensation plan assets held in a Rabbi Trust.

 

Total deposits decreased to $188.2 million from $199.6 million during the year ended December 31, 2015, a decrease of $11.4 million, or 5.7%. The decrease in deposits was attributable, in part, to the outflow of $11.0 million in time deposits, a $3.5 million decrease in money market accounts and a $400,000 decrease in noninterest bearing demand account, partially offset by a $2.1 million increase in NOW accounts and a $1.3 million increase in savings accounts. The decrease in time deposits was based on our loan demand and liquidity needs, as we opted not to match competitors’ rates.

 

FHLB advances decreased to $56.0 million from $59.0 million during the year ended December 31, 2015, a decrease of $3.0 million or 5.1%. The decrease in FHLB advances was due to the maturity of a $3.0 million advance during the year. We utilize borrowings from the FHLB of Pittsburgh to supplement our supply of funds for loans and investments.

 

Other liabilities decreased to $8.8 million from $11.5 million during the year ended December 31, 2015 a decrease of $2.7 million or 23.5%. The decrease in other liabilities is related to a reduction of $4.7 million in the Company’s non-qualified deferred compensation plan liability partially offset by the liability of $2.0 million established for securities trades settling in January 2016.

 

 - 22 -

 

 

The following table sets forth the composition of our loan portfolio at the dates indicated.

 

   At December 31, 
   2015   2014   2013   2012   2011 
   Amount   Percent   Amount   Percent   Amount   Percent   Amount   Percent   Amount   Percent 
   (Dollars in thousands) 
Real estate loans:                                                  
One-to-four-family  $144,242    83.21%  $182,272    85.46%  $167,233    83.69%  $101,793    73.22%  $111,272    71.82%
Multi-family and  commercial real estate   10,414    6.01    10,783    5.06    10,564    5.29    8,501    6.11    9,439    6.09 
Home equity loans   2,828    1.63    2,040    0.96    2,365    1.18    2,489    1.79    2,818    1.82 
Home equity lines of credit   2,460    1.42    1,521    0.71    513    0.26    1,853    1.33    1,767    1.14 
Total real estate loans:   159,944    92.27    196,617    92.19    180,675    90.42    114,636    82.45    125,296    80.87 
                                                   
Commercial   7    0.01    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    - 
Consumer:                                                  
Education   1,234    0.71    1,558    0.73    1,806    0.90    2,228    1.60    2,885    1.86 
Other consumer   467    0.27    641    0.30    830    0.42    901    0.65    1,032    0.67 
Total consumer loans   1,701    0.98    2,199    1.03    2,636    1.32    3,129    2.25    3,917    2.53 
Total loans excluding covered loans   161,652    93.26    198,816    93.22    183,311    91.74    117,765    84.70    129,213    83.40 
Covered loans   11,686    6.74    14,457    6.78    16,523    8.26    21,260    15.30    25,708    16.60 
Total loans   173,338    100.00%   213,273    100.00%   199,834    100.00%   139,025    100.00%   154,921    100.00%
Net deferred loan (costs) fees   113         279         117         (222)        (290)     
Allowance for loan losses on non-covered loans   (1,272)        (1,416)        (1,378)        (1,508)        (1,206)     
Allowance for loan losses on covered loans   -         -         -         -         (73)     
Loans, net  $172,179        $212,136        $198,573        $137,295        $153,352      

 

 - 23 -

 

 

The following table sets forth certain information at December 31, 2015 regarding the dollar amount of loan principal repayments becoming due during the periods indicated. The table does not include any estimate of prepayments, which significantly shorten the average life of all loans and may cause our actual repayment experience to differ from that shown below. Demand loans having no stated schedule of repayments and no stated maturity are reported as due in one year or less.

 

   One-to-Four-
Family
Real Estate
Loans
   Multi-
Family and
Commercial
Real Estate
Loans
   Commercial
Loans
   Home
Equity
Loans and
Lines of
Credit
   Consumer
Loans
   Covered
Loans
   Total
Loans
 
   (Dollars in thousands) 
Amounts due in:                                   
One year or less  $839   $10   $-   $149   $262   $1,222   $2,482 
More than one to five years   2,649    2,621    7    251    401    2,371    8,300 
More than five years   140,754    7,783    -    4,888    1,038    8,093    162,556 
Total  $144,242   $10,414   $7   $5,288   $1,701   $11,686   $173,338 

 

The following table sets forth the dollar amount of all loans at December 31, 2015 that are due after December 31, 2016 and that have either fixed interest rates or adjustable interest rates. The amounts shown below exclude unearned interest on consumer loans and deferred loan fees.

 

   Fixed Rate   Adjustable
Rate
   Total 
   (Dollars in thousands) 
Real Estate Loans:               
One-to-four-family  $143,403   $-   $143,403 
Multi-family and commercial real estate   4,275    6,129    10,404 
Home equity loans and lines of credit   2,720    2,419    5,139 
Commercial Loans   7    -    7 
Consumer Loans   1,439    -    1,439 
Covered Loans   2,975    7,489    10,464 
Total  $154,819   $16,037   $170,856 

 

 - 24 -

 

  

Securities. The following table sets forth the amortized cost and fair values of our securities portfolio at the dates indicated.

 

   At December 31, 
   2015   2014   2013 
   Amortized
Cost
   Fair
Value
   Amortized
Cost
   Fair
Value
   Amortized
Cost
   Fair
Value
 
   (Dollars in thousands) 
Securities available-for-sale:                              
Fannie Mae  $25,168   $25,690   $1,446   $1,541   $2,090   $2,235 
Freddie Mac   10,162    10,123    39    42    66    70 
Government National Mortgage Association   400    449    469    528    556    619 
Collateralized mortgage obligations – Government-sponsored entities   984    992    1,136    1,151    1,457    1,470 
Total mortgage-backed securities   36,714    37,254    3,090    3,262    4,169    4,394 
Corporate securities   16,921    16,958    8,293    8,450    10,701    10,877 
Municipal securities   500    500    -    -    -    - 
Total debt securities   54,135    54,712    11,383    11,712    14,870    15,271 
Common Stock   160    160    -    -    -    - 
Total  $54,295   $54,872   $11,383   $11,712   $14,870   $15,271 

 

   At December 31, 
   2015   2014   2013 
   Amortized
Cost
   Fair
Value
   Amortized
Cost
   Fair
Value
   Amortized
Cost
   Fair
Value
 
   (Dollars in thousands) 
Securities held-to-maturity:                              
Fannie Mae  $-   $-   $33,122   $34,438   $37,615   $38,375 
Freddie Mac   -    -    11,620    11,755    13,705    13,502 
Total mortgage-backed securities  $-   $-   $44,742   $46,193   $51,320   $51,877 

 

At December 31, 2015, we had no investments in a single company or entity (other than U.S. Government-sponsored entity securities) that had an aggregate book value in excess of 10% of our equity at those dates.

 

Federal law requires a member institution of the FHLB System to hold stock of its district Federal Home Loan Bank according to a predetermined formula. This stock is carried at cost and was $3.7 million at December 31, 2015. The FHLB of Pittsburgh is permitted to increase the amount of capital stock owned by a member company to 6.0% of a member’s advances, plus 1.50% of the unused borrowing capacity.

 

 - 25 -

 

 

The following table sets forth the stated maturities and weighted average yields of securities at December 31, 2015. Certain mortgage-backed securities have adjustable interest rates and will reprice annually within the various maturity ranges. These repricing schedules are not reflected in the table below. Yields are not presented on a tax-equivalent basis. Any adjustments necessary to present yields on a tax-equivalent basis are insignificant.

 

   One Year or Less   More than One
Year to Five Years
   More than Five
Years to Ten Years
   More than
Ten Years
   Total 
   Amortized
Cost
   Weighted
Average
Yield
   Amortized
Cost
   Weighted
Average
Yield
   Amortized
Cost
   Weighted
Average
Yield
   Amortized
Cost
   Weighted
Average
Yield
   Amortized
Cost
   Weighted
Average
Yield
 
   (Dollars in thousands) 
Securities available-for-sale:                                                  
Fannie Mae  $24    5.30%  $1,390    2.85%  $5,299    2.66%  $18,455    2.63%  $25,168    2.65%
                                                   
Freddie Mac   -    -    429    2.83    -    -    9,733    2.06    10,162    2.09 
Government National Mortgage Association securities   -    -    3    7.55    62    7.09    335    6.63    400    6.71 
Collateralized mortgage obligations – Government- sponsored entities   -    -    10    4.38    488    2.89    486    2.11    984    2.52 
Corporate securities   6,431    1.40    9,583    1.71    907    2.34    -    -    16,921    1.63 
Municipal securities   500    1.25    -    -    -    -    -    -    500    1.25 
Total  $6,955    1.40%  $11,415    1.90%  $6,756    2.67%  $29,009    2.48%  $54,135    2.24%

 

 - 26 -

 

 

Deposits. Our primary source of funds is our deposit accounts, which are comprised of noninterest-bearing accounts, interest-bearing demand accounts, money market accounts, savings accounts and time deposits. These deposits are provided primarily by individuals who live or work within our market areas. We have not used brokered deposits as a source of funding. Deposits decreased $11.4 million, or 5.7% for the year ended December 31, 2015.

 

The following table sets forth the balances of our deposit products at the dates indicated.

 

   At December 31, 
   2015   2014   2013 
   Amount   Percent   Amount   Percent   Amount   Percent 
   (Dollars in thousands) 
                         
Noninterest-bearing Accounts  $6,137    3.26%  $6,483    3.25%  $5,725    2.84%
Interest-bearing Accounts   15,712    8.35    13,562    6.80    14,685    7.30 
Money market   33,809    17.96    37,260    18.67    36,771    18.27 
Savings accounts   29,879    15.87    28,590    14.33    30,385    15.09 
Time deposits   102,685    54.56    113,659    56.95    113,756    56.50 
Total  $188,222    100.00%  $199,554    100.00%  $201,322    100.00%

 

The following table indicates the amount of jumbo time deposits by time remaining until maturity as of December 31, 2015. Jumbo time deposits require minimum deposits of $100,000.

 

Maturity Period  Time Deposits 
   (Dollars in thousands) 
3 Months or less  $2,918 
Over 3 Through 6 Months   4,232 
Over 6 Through 12 Months   11,857 
Over 12 Months   32,858 
Total  $51,865 

 

The following table sets forth our time deposits classified by rates at the dates indicated.

 

   At December 31, 
   2015   2014   2013 
   (Dollars in thousands) 
0.01 - 0.99%  $25,476   $35,133   $36,560 
1.00 - 1.99%   47,048    45,936    46,621 
2.00 - 3.99%   30,161    32,590    30,575 
Total  $102,685   $113,659   $113,756 

 

 - 27 -

 

 

The following table sets forth the amount and maturities of time deposits classified by rates at December 31, 2015.

 

   Amount Due     
   Less Than
One Year
   More Than
One Year
to Two
Years
   More Than
Two Years
to Three
Years
   More Than
Three
Years to
Four Years
   More Than
Four Years
   Total   Percent of
Total Time
Deposits
 
   (Dollars in thousands)     
0.01 - 0.99%  $22,751   $2,552   $173   $-   $-   $25,476    24.81%
1.00 - 1.99%   10,231    12,606    9,195    3,118    11,898    47,048    45.82 
2.00 - 3.99%   6,651    11,088    7,736    3,263    1,423    30,161    29.37 
Total  $39,633   $26,246   $17,104   $6,381   $13,321   $102,685    100.00%

 

The following table sets forth deposit activity for the periods indicated.

 

   Year Ended December 31, 
   2015   2014   2013 
   (Dollars in thousands) 
Beginning balance  $199,554   $201,322   $196,723 
Increase (decrease) before interest credited   (13,021)   (3,483)   2,944 
Interest credited   1,689    1,715    1,655 
Net increase (decrease) in deposits   (11,332)   (1,768)   4,599 
Ending balance  $188,222   $199,554   $201,322 

 

Borrowings. We utilize borrowings from the FHLB of Pittsburgh to supplement our supply of funds for loans and investments. All borrowings from the FHLB are secured by a blanket security agreement on qualifying residential mortgage loans, certain pledged investment securities and our investment in FHLB stock.

 

   Year Ended December 31, 
   2015   2014   2013 
   (Dollars in thousands) 
Maximum amount of advances outstanding at any month end during the period:               
FHLB Advances  $59,000   $59,000   $59,000 
Average advances outstanding during the period:               
FHLB Advances  $57,241   $59,000   $35,160 
Weighted average interest rate during the period:               
FHLB Advances   2.55%   2.53%   2.64%
Balance outstanding at end of period:               
FHLB Advances  $56,000   $59,000   $59,000 
Weighted average interest rate at end of period:               
FHLB Advances   2.53%   2.49%   2.49%

 

Comparison of Results of Operations for the Years Ended December 31, 2015 and 2014

 

Overview. We recorded a net loss of $138,000 during the year ended December 31, 2015, compared to net income of $17,000 during the year ended December 31, 2014.

 

 - 28 -

 

 

Average Balances and Yields. The following table presents information regarding average balances of assets and liabilities, as well as the total dollar amounts of interest income and dividends from average interest-earning assets and interest expense on average interest-bearing liabilities and the resulting average yields and costs. The yields and costs for the periods indicated are derived by dividing income or expense by the average balances of assets or liabilities, respectively, for the periods presented. For purposes of this table, nonaccrual loans are included in average balances only. Loan fees are included in interest income on loans and are insignificant. Yields are not presented on a tax-equivalent basis. Any adjustments necessary to present yields on a tax-equivalent basis are insignificant.

 

   Years Ended December 31, 
   2015   2014 
   Average
Balance
   Interest
and
Dividends
   Yield/
Cost
   Average
Balance
   Interest
and
Dividends
   Yield/
Cost
 
     
Assets:                              
Interest-earning assets:                              
Loans  $192,731   $8,605    4.46%  $209,915   $9,520    4.54%
Investment securities   50,822    1,272    2.50    62,040    1,641    2.65 
Other interest-earning assets   36,284    336    0.93    14,022    181    1.29 
Total interest-earning assets   279,837    10,213    3.65%   285,977    11,342    3.97%
Noninterest-earning assets   16,121              16,168           
Allowance for Loan Losses   (1,369)             (1,400)          
Total assets  $294,589             $300,745           
                               
Liabilities and equity:                              
Interest-bearing liabilities:                              
                               
Interest-bearing demand deposits  $13,842   $23    0.17%  $15,239   $26    0.17%
Money market deposits   35,456    132    0.37    34,939    128    0.37 
Savings accounts   28,582    43    0.15    30,322    69    0.23 
Time deposits   108,141    1,491    1.38    111,967    1,492    1.33 
Total interest-bearing deposits   186,021    1,689    0.91    192,467    1,715    0.89 
FHLB advances - long-term   57,241    1,461    2.55    59,000    1,492    2.53 
Advances by borrowers for taxes and insurance   1,077    3    0.28    1,083    3    0.28 
Total interest-bearing liabilities   244,339    3,153    1.29%   252,550    3,210    1.27%
Noninterest-bearing liabilities:   10,807              8,586           
Total liabilities   255,146              261,136           
Retained earning   39,443              39,609           
Total liabilities and retained earnings  $294,589             $300,745           
                               
Net interest income       $7,060             $8,132      
Interest rate spread             2.36%             2.70%
Net yield on interest-bearing assets             2.52%             2.84%
Ratio of average interest-earning  assets to average interest-bearing liabilities             114.53%             113.24%

 

Net interest income for the year ended December 31, 2015 decreased to $7.1 million or 12.4% from $8.1 million at December 31, 2014. The decrease in net interest income for the year ended December 31, 2015 reflects a lower average balance of loans and investment securities, partially offset by an increase in other interest earning assets, including certificates of deposit, a lower average balance of deposits and FHLB advances. Also, contributing to lower net interest income was a lower average yield earned on loans, investment securities and other interest earning assets including certificates of deposit and a higher average rate paid on deposits and FHLB advances. The average balance of loans decreased during the year ended December 31, 2015 primarily as a result of the sale of $26.1 million in 30-year fixed-rate jumbo loans. The lower average interest rate earned on loans reflects the current low rate environment on new loans. Interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2015 remained stable at $3.2 million. Our net interest rate spread decreased to 2.36% for the year ended December 31, 2015 from 2.70% in 2014 and our net interest margin decreased to 2.52% from 2.84%.

 

 - 29 -

 

 

Rate/Volume Analysis. The following table sets forth the effects of changing rates and volumes on our net interest income. The rate column shows the effects attributable to changes in rate (changes in rate multiplied by prior volume). The volume column shows the effects attributable to changes in volume (changes in volume multiplied by prior rate). The net column represents the sum of the prior columns. For purposes of this table, changes attributable to changes in both rate and volume that cannot be segregated have been allocated proportionately based on the changes due to rate and the changes due to volume.

 

   For the Year Ended
December 31, 2015
Compared to Year Ended
December 31, 2014
   For the Year Ended
December 31, 2014
Compared to Year Ended
December 31, 2013
 
   Increase (Decrease)
Due to
       Increase (Decrease)
Due to
     
   Volume   Rate   Net   Volume   Rate   Net 
   (Dollars in thousands) 
Interest and dividend income:                              
Loans receivable  $(769)  $(146)  $(915)  $1,425   $(704)  $721 
Investment securities   (284)   (85)   (369)   (199)   (66)   (265)
Other   189    (34)   155    (3)   157    154 
Total interest-earning assets  $(864)  $(265)  $(1,129)  $1,223   $(613)  $610 
                               
Interest expense:                              
Interest-bearing demand deposits  $(2)  $(1)  $(3)  $3   $(7)  $(4)
Money market accounts   2    2    4    (14)   (11)   (25)
Savings accounts   (4)   (22)   (26)   -    (12)   (12)
Certificates of deposit   66    (67)   (1)   85    16    101 
Total deposits   62    (88)   (26)   74    (14)   60 
FHLB Advances - short-term   -    -    -    -    -    - 
FHLB Advances - long-term   (45)   14    (31)   601    (38)   563 
Advances by borrowers for taxes and insurance   -    -    -    -    (2)   (2)
Total interest-bearing liabilities  $17   $(74)  $(57)  $675   $(54)  $621 
Change in net interest income  $(881)  $(191)  $(1,072)  $548   $(559)  $(11)

 

Provision for Loan Losses. For the year ended December 31, 2015 we recorded a provision for loan losses of $73,000 as compared to $210,000 for the year ended December 31, 2014. The smaller provision for loan losses in 2015 was deemed appropriate due to the decline in the loan portfolio combined with the stability in the level of classified assets. Management also reviews and adjusts the qualitative factors used to calculate the allowance for loan losses for all loans based on historical losses in our portfolio as well as the current levels of nonperforming loans in our portfolio. Management makes adjustments on a quarterly basis or more frequently as necessary. Management made changes to the qualitative factors during 2015 based on historical losses in our portfolio as well as the current levels of nonperforming loans in our portfolio.

 

The provisions for the loan portfolio reflect management’s assessment of lending activities, decreased non-performing loans, levels of current delinquencies and current economic conditions. Provisions for loan losses are charged to earnings to maintain the total allowance for loan losses at a level believed by management sufficient to cover all known and inherent losses in the loan portfolio which are both probable and reasonably estimable. Management’s analysis includes consideration of our historical experience, the volume and type of lending conducted by us, the amount of our classified and criticized assets, the status of past due principal and interest payments, general economic conditions, particularly as they relate to our market area, and other factors related to the collectability of our loan portfolio.

 

An analysis of the changes in the allowance for loan losses is presented under “—Risk Management—Analysis and Determination of the Allowance for Loan Losses.”

 

 - 30 -

 

 

NonInterest Income. The following table shows the components of noninterest income for the year ended December 31, 2015 and 2014.

 

   Year Ended December 31, 
   2015   2014 
   (Dollars in thousands) 
Service fees on deposit accounts  $105   $116 
Earnings on bank-owned life insurance   (11)   4 
Investment securities gains, net   560    - 
Gain on sale of loans   2,776    3,861 
Rental income   270    271 
Other   430    402 
Total  $4,130   $4,654 

 

The $524,000 decrease in noninterest income during the year ended December 31, 2015 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2014 was primarily due to a $1.1 million decrease in the gain on sale of loans, partially offset by a $560,000 increase in investment securities gains.

 

NonInterest Expense.   The following table shows the components of noninterest expense for the year ended December 31, 2015 and 2014.

 

   Year Ended December 31, 
   2015   2014 
   (Dollars in thousands) 
Compensation and employee benefits  $5,571   $7,142 
Occupancy and equipment   1,315    1,449 
Federal deposit insurance premiums   537    361 
Data processing expense   410    428 
Professional fees   800    660 
Other   2,551    2,466 
Total  $11,185   $12,506 
Efficiency ratio   99.96%   97.81%

 

Total noninterest expense decreased $1.3 million, or 10.4%, to $11.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2015 from the prior year period. The decrease in noninterest expense for the year ended December 31, 2015 as compared to the prior year period was primarily the result of a $1.5 million decrease in compensation and employee benefits, a $134,000 decrease in occupancy and equipment and a $17,000 decrease in data processing expense, partially offset by a $176,000 increase in federal deposit insurance premiums, a $140,000 increase in professional fees and an $85,000 increase in other expense. The decrease in compensation and employee benefits expense is primarily the result of the elimination of the Retail Mortgage Banking Group which accounted for $1.1 million of the decrease.

 

Income Taxes. We recorded tax expense of $70,000 for the year ended December 31, 2015 compared to a tax expense of $53,000 during the year ended December 31, 2014.

 

 - 31 -

 

 

Risk Management

 

Overview. Managing risk is an essential part of successfully managing a financial institution. Our most prominent risk exposures are credit risk, interest rate risk and market risk. Credit risk is the risk of not collecting the interest and/or the principal balance of a loan or investment when it is due. Interest rate risk is the potential reduction of interest income as a result of changes in interest rates. Market risk arises from fluctuations in interest rates that may result in changes in the values of financial instruments, such as available-for-sale securities that are accounted for on a mark-to-market basis. Other risks that we encounter are operational risks, liquidity risks and reputation risk. Operational risks include risks related to fraud, regulatory compliance, processing errors, technology and disaster recovery. Liquidity risk is the possible inability to fund obligations to depositors, lenders or borrowers. Reputation risk is the risk that negative publicity or press, whether true or not, could cause a decline in our customer base or revenue.

 

Credit Risk Management. Our strategy for credit risk management focuses on having well-defined credit policies and uniform underwriting criteria and providing prompt attention to potential problem loans. Our strategy also emphasizes the origination of one- to four-family mortgage loans, which typically have lower default rates than other types of loans and are secured by collateral that generally tends to appreciate in value.

 

When a borrower fails to make a required loan payment, we take a number of steps to attempt to have the borrower cure the delinquency and restore the loan to current status. When the loan becomes 15 days past due, a past due notice is generated and sent to the borrower and phone calls are made. If payment is not then received by the 30th day of delinquency, a further notification is sent to the borrower. If payment is not received by the 60th day of delinquency, a further notification is sent to the borrowers giving notice of possible foreclosure actions. If no successful workout can be achieved by the 90th day of delinquency, we will commence foreclosure proceedings. If a foreclosure action is instituted and the loan is not brought current, paid in full, or refinanced before the foreclosure sale, the real property securing the loan generally is sold at foreclosure. Generally, when a consumer loan becomes 90 days past due, we institute collection proceedings and attempt to repossess any personal property that secures the loan. We may consider loan workout arrangements with certain borrowers under certain circumstances.

 

Management reports to the board of directors monthly regarding the amount of loans delinquent more than 30 days, all loans in foreclosure and all foreclosed and repossessed property that we own.

 

Analysis of Non-Performing and Classified Assets. We consider repossessed assets and loans that are 90 days or more past due to be non-performing assets. Loans are generally placed on nonaccrual status when they become 90 days delinquent at which time the accrual of interest ceases and the allowance for any uncollectible accrued interest is established and charged against operations. Typically, payments received on a nonaccrual loan are applied to the outstanding principal and interest as determined at the time of collection of the loan.

 

Real estate that we acquire as a result of foreclosure or by deed-in-lieu of foreclosure is classified as foreclosed assets until it is sold. When property is acquired, it is recorded at the lower of its cost, which is the unpaid balance of the loan plus foreclosure costs, or fair market value at the date of foreclosure. Holding costs and declines in fair value after acquisition of the property result in charges against income.

 

 - 32 -

 

 

The following table provides information with respect to our non-performing assets at the dates indicated.  There are no troubled debt restructurings that are 90 days past due and no accruing loans that are 90 days past due or more at the dates presented.

 

   At December 31, 
   2015   2014   2013   2012   2011 
   (Dollars in thousands) 
Non-accrual non-covered loans:                         
Real estate loans:                         
One-to-four-family  $1,915   $1,930   $1,344   $370   $314 
Multi-family and commercial real estate   138    151    -    1,485    649 
Home equity loans and lines of credit   53    60    -    10    55 
Consumer   155    94    110    252    296 
Total non-accrual non-covered loans   2,261    2,235    1,454    2,117    1,314 
Restructured loans   -    -    476    578    650 
Total non-performing non-covered loans   2,261    2,235    1,930    2,695    1,964 
Real estate owned   182    451    240    108    83 
Total non-performing non-covered assets   2,443    2,686    2,170    2,803    2,047 
                          
Non-accrual covered loans:                         
Real estate loans:                         
One- to four-family   70    142    822    880    501 
Multi-family and commercial real estate   82    367    111    -    179 
Commercial   -    -    -    -    - 
Total non-performing covered loans   152    509    933    880    680 
Real estate owned   -    39    28    64    - 
Total non-performing covered assets   152    548    961    944    680 
Total non-performing assets (including                         
covered loans)  $2,595   $3,234   $3,131   $3,747   $2,727 
                          
Total non-performing non-covered loans to total                         
non-covered loans   1.40%   1.12%   1.02%   2.08%   1.52%
Total non-performing non-covered assets to total                         
non-covered assets   0.87%   0.92%   0.75%   1.05%   0.86%
Total non-performing loans to total loans   1.39%   1.28%   1.39%   2.58%   1.71%
Total non-performing assets to total assets   0.89%   1.05%   1.02%   1.40%   1.03%

 

For a discussion of the specific allowance related to these assets, see “Analysis and Determination of the Allowance for Loan Losses—Allowance on Impaired Loans.”

 

Interest income that would have been recorded for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 had nonaccruing loans been current according to their original terms was approximately $92,000 and $111,000, respectively.

 

Federal regulations require us to review and classify our assets on a regular basis. In addition, the OCC has the authority to identify problem assets and, if appropriate, require them to be classified. There are three classifications for problem assets: substandard, doubtful and loss. “Substandard assets” must have one or more defined weaknesses and are characterized by the distinct possibility that we will sustain some loss if the deficiencies are not corrected. “Doubtful assets” have the weaknesses of substandard assets with the additional characteristic that the weaknesses make collection or liquidation in full on the basis of currently existing facts, conditions and values questionable, and there is a high possibility of loss. An asset classified “loss” is considered uncollectible and of such little value that continuance as an asset of the institution is not warranted. The regulations also provide for a “special mention” category, described as assets which do not currently expose us to a sufficient degree of risk to warrant classification but do possess credit deficiencies or potential weaknesses deserving our close attention. When we classify an asset as special mention, substandard or doubtful we establish a specific allowance for loan losses. If we classify an asset as loss, we allocate an amount equal to 100% of the portion of the asset classified loss.

 

 - 33 -

 

 

The following table shows the aggregate amounts of our non-covered classified assets at the dates indicated.

 

   At December 31, 
   2015   2014   2013 
   (Dollars in thousands) 
Special mention assets  $2,147   $1,573   $1,710 
Substandard assets   3,617    4,410    4,320 
Doubtful assets   -    -    - 
Loss assets   -    -    - 
Total classified assets  $5,764   $5,983   $6,030 

 

Other than disclosed in the above tables, there are no other loans at December 31, 2015 that management has serious doubts about the ability of the borrowers to comply with the present loan repayment terms.

 

Delinquencies.  The following table provides information about delinquencies in our loan portfolio at the dates indicated. Loans past due 90 days or more are placed on non-accrual status.

 

   At December 31, 
   2015   2014   2013 
   30-59
Days
Past
Due
   60-89
Days
Past
Due
   30-59
Days
Past
Due
   60-89
Days
Past
Due
   30-59
Days
Past
Due
   60-89
Days
Past
Due
 
   (Dollars in thousands) 
Real estate loans:                              
One-to-four-family  $75   $99   $32   $1,034   $877   $197 
Multi-family and commercial real estate   -    -    -    -    277    - 
Home equity loans and lines of credit   53    -    60    -    -    - 
Consumer   17    -    108    17    20    56 
Covered loans   154    205    113    -    331    309 
Total  $299   $304   $313   $1,051   $1,505   $562 

 

Analysis and Determination of the Allowance for Loan Losses. The allowance for loan losses is a valuation allowance for probable incurred credit losses in the loan portfolio. We evaluate the need to establish allowances against losses on loans on a quarterly basis. When additional allowances are necessary, a provision for loan losses is charged to earnings.

 

Our methodology for assessing the appropriateness of the allowance for loan losses consists of: (1) a specific allowance on identified problem loans; and (2) a general valuation allowance on the remainder of the loan portfolio. Although we determine the amount of each element of the allowance separately, the entire allowance for loan losses is available for the entire portfolio.

 

Specific Allowance Required for Identified Problem Loans. We establish an allowance on certain identified problem loans where the loan balance exceeds the fair market value, when collection of the full amount outstanding becomes improbable and when an accurate estimate of the loss can be documented.

 

General Valuation Allowance on the Remainder of the Loan Portfolio. We establish a general allowance for loans that are not delinquent to recognize the inherent losses associated with lending activities. This general valuation allowance is determined by segregating the loans by loan category and assigning percentages to each category. The percentages are adjusted for significant factors that, in management’s judgment, affect the collectibility of the portfolio as of the evaluation date. These significant factors may include changes in existing general economic and business conditions affecting our primary lending areas and the national economy, staff lending experience, recent loss experience in particular segments of the portfolio, specific reserve and classified asset trends, delinquency trends and risk rating trends. The applied loss factors are reevaluated periodically to ensure their relevance in the current economic environment.

 

 - 34 -

 

 

We identify loans that may need to be charged off as a loss by reviewing all delinquent loans, classified loans and other loans that management may have concerns about collectibility. For individually reviewed loans, the borrower’s inability to make payments under the terms of the loan or a shortfall in collateral value would result in our allocating a portion of the allowance to the loan that was impaired.

 

The OCC, as an integral part of its examination process, periodically reviews our allowance for loan losses. The OCC may require us to make additional provisions for loan losses based on judgments different from ours.

 

Our historical loss experience and qualitative and environmental factors are reviewed on a quarterly basis to ensure they are reflective of current conditions in our loan portfolio and economy. In 2015, the loss factors were reviewed and adjusted as necessary.

 

The following table sets forth the breakdown of the allowance for loan losses on non-covered loans by loan category at the dates indicated.

 

 - 35 -

 

 

   At December 31, 
   2015   2014   2013   2012   2011 
   Amount   % of
Allowance
to Total
Allowance
   % of
Loans in
Category
to Total
Loans
   Amount   % of
Allowance
to Total
Allowance
   % of
Loans in
Category
to Total
Loans
   Amount   % of
Allowance
to Total
Allowance
   % of
Loans in
Category
to Total
Loans
   Amount   % of
Allowance
to Total
Allowance
   % of
Loans in
Category
to Total
Loans
   Amount   % of
Allowance
to Total
Allowance
   % of
Loans in
Category
to Total
Loans
 
   (Dollars in thousands) 
Real estate loans:                                                                           
One-to-four-family  $774    61%   89%  $963    68%   90%  $908    65%   91%  $678    45%   86%  $544    45%   86%
Multi-family and commercial real estate   307    24    7    428    30    7    445    32    5    772    51    7    613    51    7 
Home equity loans  and lines of credit   28    2    3    18    1    2    8    1    2    47    3    4    28    2    4 
Consumer   5    1    1    7    1    1    8    1    2    11    1    3    21    2    3 
Unallocated.   158    12    -    -    -    -    9    1    -    -    -    -    -    -    - 
Total allowance for loan losses  $1,272    100%   100%  $1,416    100%   100%  $1,378    100%   100%  $1,508    100%   100%  $1,206    100%   100%

 

Although we believe that we use the best information available to establish the allowance for loan losses, future adjustments to the allowance for loan losses may be necessary and our results of operations could be adversely affected if circumstances differ substantially from the assumptions used in making the determinations. Furthermore, while we believe we have established our allowance for loan losses in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles, there can be no assurance that regulators, in reviewing our loan portfolio, will not request us to increase our allowance for loan losses. In addition, because future events affecting borrowers and collateral cannot be predicted with certainty, there can be no assurance that increases will not be necessary should the quality of any loans deteriorate as a result of the factors discussed above. Any material increase in the allowance for loan losses may adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

 

 - 36 -

 

 

Analysis of Loan Loss Experience. The following table sets forth an analysis of the allowance for loan losses at December 31, for the periods indicated.

 

   2015   2014   2013   2012   2011 
  

Non-

Covered

Loans

  

Non-

Covered

Loans

  

Non-

Covered

Loans

  

Non-

Covered

Loans

  

Covered

Loans

   Totals  

Non-

Covered

Loans

  

Covered

Loans

   Totals 
   (Dollars in thousands) 
Allowance for loan losses at beginning of period  $1,416   $1,378   $1,508   $1,206   $73   $1,279   $834    $-   $834 
Provision (credit) for loan losses   73    210    574    1,018    (21)   997    367    73    440 
Charge-offs:                                             
One-to-four family   (217)   (172)   (440)   (336)   (33)   (369)   -    -    - 
Multi-family and commercial   -    -    (111)   (388)   (19)   (407)   -    -    - 
Home equity loans and lines of credit   -    -    (153)   -    -    -    -    -    - 
Consumer   -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    - 
Total   (217)   (172)   (704)   (724)   (52)   (776)   -    -    - 
Recoveries:   -    -    -    2    -    2    5    -    5 
One-to-four family                                             
Multi-family and commercial   -    -    -    6    -    6    -    -    - 
Home equity loans and lines of credit   -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    - 
Consumer   -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    - 
Total   -    -    -    8    -    8    5    -    5 
Net recoveries (charge-offs)   (217)   (172)   (704)   (716)   (52)   (768)   5    -    5 
Allowance for loan losses  at end of period  $1,272   $1,416   $1,378   $1,508   $-   $1,508   $1,206   $73   $1,279 
Allowance for loan losses to non-performing loans   56.26%   63.36%   71.40%   55.96%   -%   42.18%   61.41%   10.74%   48.37
Allowance for loan losses to total loans outstanding at the end of the period   0.79%   0.71%   0.75%   1.28%   -%   1.08%   0.93%   0.28%   0.83 %
Net (charge-offs) recoveries to average loans outstanding during the period   (0.11)%   (0.08)%   (0.49)%   (0.06)%   (0.02)%   (0.05)%   0.01%   -%   0.01%

 

 - 37 -

 

 

Interest Rate Risk Management. We manage the interest rate sensitivity of our interest-bearing liabilities and interest-earning assets in an effort to minimize the adverse effects of changes in the interest rate environment. Deposit accounts typically react more quickly to changes in market interest rates than mortgage loans because of the shorter maturities of deposits. As a result, increases in interest rates will adversely affect our earnings. To reduce the potential volatility of our earnings, we have sought to improve the match between asset and liability maturities and rates, while maintaining an acceptable interest rate spread. Our strategy for managing interest rate risk emphasizes: adjusting the maturities of borrowings; adjusting the investment portfolio mix and duration; and periodically selling fixed-rate mortgage loans and available-for-sale securities. We currently do not participate in hedging programs, interest rate swaps or other activities involving the use of derivative financial instruments.

 

We have an Asset/Liability Committee, which includes members of management and the board of directors, to communicate, coordinate and control all aspects involving asset/liability management. The committee establishes and monitors the volume, maturities, pricing and mix of assets and funding sources with the objective of managing assets and funding sources to provide results that are consistent with liquidity, growth, risk limits and profitability goals.

 

We prepare an interest rate sensitivity analysis to review our level of interest rate risk. This analysis measures interest rate risk by computing changes in net portfolio value of our cash flows from assets, liabilities and off-balance sheet items in the event of a range of assumed changes in market interest rates. Net portfolio value represents the market value of portfolio equity and is equal to the market value of assets minus the market value of liabilities, with adjustments made for off-balance sheet items. This analysis assesses the risk of loss in market risk sensitive instruments in the event of a sudden and sustained 100 to 400 basis point increase or a 100 basis point decrease in market interest rates with no effect given to any steps that we might take to counter the effect of that interest rate movement. Because of the low level of market interest rates, this analysis is not performed for decreases of more than 100 basis points. We measure interest rate risk by modeling the changes in net portfolio value over a variety of interest rate scenarios.

 

The following table, which is based on information that we provide to the OCC, presents the change in our net portfolio value at December 31, 2015, that would occur in the event of an immediate change in interest rates based on assumptions, with no effect given to any steps that we might take to counteract that change.

 

Basis Point (“bp”)  Estimated Net Portfolio Value   Net Portfolio Value as % of
Portfolio Value of Assets
 
Change in Rates  $ Amount   $ Change   % Change   NPV Ratio   Change (bp) 
   (Dollars in thousands)             
                     
400  $27,276   $(17,519)   (39.11)%   10.49%   (462)%
300   31,932    (12,863)   (28.72)   11.91    (321)
200   36,401    (8,394)   (18.74)   13.14    (198)
100   41,001    (3,794)   (8.47)   14.31    (80)
0   44,795    -    -    15.12    - 
(100)   49,326    4,531    10.12    16.14    103 

 

The decrease in our net portfolio value shown in the preceding table that would occur reflects: (1) that a substantial portion of our interest-earning assets are fixed-rate residential loans and fixed-rate investment securities; and (2) the shorter duration of deposits, which reprice more frequently in response to changes in market interest rates.

 

We use various assumptions in assessing interest rate risk. These assumptions relate to interest rates, loan prepayment rates, deposit decay rates and the market values of certain assets under differing interest rate scenarios, among others. As with any method of measuring interest rate risk, certain shortcomings are inherent in the methods of analyses presented in the foregoing table. For example, although certain assets and liabilities may have similar maturities or periods to repricing, they may react in different degrees to changes in market interest rates. Also, the interest rates on certain types of assets and liabilities may fluctuate in advance of changes in market interest rates, while interest rates on other types may lag behind changes in market rates. Additionally, certain assets, such as adjustable-rate mortgage loans, have features that restrict changes in interest rates on a short-term basis and over the life of the asset. Further, in the event of a change in interest rates, expected rates of prepayments on loans and early withdrawals from certificates could deviate significantly from those assumed in calculating the table. Prepayment rates can have a significant impact on interest income. Because of the large percentage of loans and mortgage-backed securities we hold, rising or falling interest rates have a significant impact on the prepayment speeds of our earning assets that in turn affect the rate sensitivity position. When interest rates rise, prepayments tend to slow. When interest rates fall, prepayments tend to rise. Our asset sensitivity would be reduced if prepayments slow and vice versa. While we believe these assumptions to be reasonable, there can be no assurance that assumed prepayment rates will approximate actual future mortgage-backed security and loan repayment activity.

 

 - 38 -

 

 

Liquidity Management. Liquidity is the ability to meet current and future financial obligations of a short-term nature. Our primary sources of funds consist of deposit inflows, loan repayments, maturities and sales of securities and borrowings from the FHLB of Pittsburgh. While maturities and scheduled amortization of loans and securities are predictable sources of funds, deposit flows and loan prepayments are greatly influenced by general interest rates, economic conditions and competition.

 

We regularly adjust our investments in liquid assets based upon our assessment of (1) expected loan demand, (2) expected deposit flows, (3) yields available on interest-earning deposits and securities and (4) the objectives of our asset/liability management policy.

 

Our most liquid assets are cash and cash equivalents. The levels of these assets depend on our operating, financing, lending and investing activities during any given period. At December 31, 2015, cash and cash equivalents totaled $31.1 million. Securities classified as available-for-sale, which provide additional sources of liquidity, totaled $54.9 million at December 31, 2015. In addition, at December 31, 2015, we had the ability to borrow a total of approximately $119.5 million from the FHLB of Pittsburgh. On December 31, 2015, we had $56.0 million of borrowings outstanding. Any growth of our loan portfolio may require us to borrow additional funds.  

 

At December 31, 2015, we had $268,000 in mortgage loan commitments outstanding and $4.4 million in unused lines of credit. Time deposits due within one year of December 31, 2016 totaled $39.6 million of time deposits. If these maturing deposits do not remain with us, we will be required to seek other sources of funds, including other time deposits and borrowings. Depending on market conditions, we may be required to pay higher rates on such deposits or other borrowings than we currently pay on the time deposits due on or before December 31, 2015. We believe, however, based on past experience that a significant portion of our time deposits will remain with us. We have the ability to attract and retain deposits by adjusting the interest rates offered.

 

Our primary investing activities are the origination of loans and the purchase of securities. Our primary financing activities consist of activity in deposit accounts and FHLB advances. Deposit flows are affected by the overall level of interest rates, the interest rates and products offered by us and our local competitors and other factors. We generally manage the pricing of our deposits to be competitive and to increase core deposit relationships. Occasionally, we offer promotional rates on certain deposit products to attract deposits.

 

The Company is a separate entity from the Bank and must provide for its own liquidity. In addition to its operating expenses, the Company may utilize its cash position for the payment of dividends or to repurchase common stock, subject to applicable restrictions. The Company’s primary source of funds is dividends from the Bank. Payment of such dividends to the Company by the Bank is limited under federal law. The amount that can be paid in any calendar year, without prior regulatory approval, cannot exceed the retained net earnings (as defined) for the year plus the preceding two calendar years. The Company believes that such restriction will not have an impact on the Company’s ability to meet its ongoing cash obligations.

 

We are subject to various regulatory capital requirements administered by the Office of the Comptroller of Currency, including a risk-based capital measure. The risk-based capital guidelines include both a definition of capital and a framework for calculating risk-weighted assets by assigning balance sheet assets and off-balance sheet items to broad risk categories. At December 31, 2015, we exceeded all of our regulatory capital requirements.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements. In the normal course of operations, we engage in a variety of financial transactions that, in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, are not recorded in our financial statements. These transactions involve, to varying degrees, elements of credit, interest rate and liquidity risk. Such transactions are used primarily to manage customers’ requests for funding and take the form of loan commitments.

 

 - 39 -

 

 

For the year ended December 31, 2015 we engaged in no off-balance sheet transactions reasonably likely to have a material effect on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

 

Effect of Inflation and Changing Prices

 

The financial statements and related financial data presented in this annual report on Form 10-K have been prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, which require the measurement of financial position and operating results in terms of historical dollars without considering the change in the relative purchasing power of money over time due to inflation. The primary impact of inflation on our operations is reflected in increased operating costs. Unlike most industrial companies, virtually all the assets and liabilities of a financial institution are monetary in nature. As a result, interest rates generally have a more significant impact on a financial institution’s performance than do general levels of inflation. Interest rates do not necessarily move in the same direction or to the same extent as the prices of goods and services.

 

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

Not applicable as the Company is a smaller reporting company.

 

ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

Information required by this item is included herein beginning on page F-1.

 

ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

 

None.

 

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

The Company’s management, including the Company’s principal executive officer and principal financial officer, have evaluated the effectiveness of the Company’s “disclosure controls and procedures,” as such term is defined in Rule 13a-15(e) promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, (the “Exchange Act”). Based upon their evaluation, and in light of material weakness in internal control over financial reporting that existed throughout this period as described in management’s report on internal control over financial reporting, the principal executive officer and principal financial officer concluded that, as of the end of the period covered by this report, the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were not effective for the purpose of ensuring that the information required to be disclosed in the reports that the Company files or submits under the Exchange Act with the Securities and Exchange Commission (1) is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms and (2) is accumulated and communicated to the Company’s management, including its principal executive officer and principal financial officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. In response to the material weakness identified above, the Company is in the process of implementing changes to its internal control over financial reporting with respect to the identification of post-retirement benefit obligations. Except for the foregoing, there was no change in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting during the quarter ended December 31, 2015 that materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

Management’s report on internal control over financial reporting is incorporated herein by reference to the section captioned “Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting” immediately preceding the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements beginning on page F-1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION

 

None.

 

 - 40 -

 

 

PART III

 

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

Board of Directors

 

For information relating to the directors of the Company, the section captioned “Item 1 – Election of Directors” in the Company’s Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Stockholders is incorporated by reference.

 

Executive Officers

 

For information relating to the executive officers of the Company, the section captioned “Item 1 – Election of Directors” in the Company’s Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Stockholders is incorporated by reference.

 

Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance

 

For information regarding compliance with Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act, the cover page to this Annual Report on Form 10-K and the section captioned “Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Compliance” in the Company’s Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated by reference.

 

Code of Ethics and Business Conduct

 

The Company has adopted a Code of Ethics and Business Conduct. A copy of the Code of Ethics and Business Conduct is available, without charge, upon written request to Paul D. Rutkowski, Corporate Secretary, Polonia Bancorp, Inc., 3993 Huntingdon Pike, Suite 300, Huntingdon Valley, Pennsylvania 19006.

 

Audit Committee of the Board of Directors

 

For information regarding the audit committee and its composition and the audit committee financial expert, the section captioned “Item 1 – Election of Directors” in the Company’s Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Stockholders is incorporated by reference.

 

ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

For information regarding executive compensation the sections entitled “Executive Compensation” and “Directors’ Compensation” in the Company’s Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated by reference.

 

ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

 

(a)        Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners

 

The information required by this item is incorporated herein by reference to the section captioned “Stock Ownership” in the Company’s Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Stockholders.

 

(b)        Security Ownership of Management

 

The information required by this item is incorporated herein by reference to the section captioned “Stock Ownership” in the Company’s Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Stockholders.

 

(c)        Changes in Control

 

Management of Polonia Bancorp knows of no arrangements, including any pledge by any person of securities of Polonia Bancorp, the operation of which may at a subsequent date result in a change in control of the registrant.

 

 - 41 -

 

 

(d)        Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

 

The following table sets forth information about the Company common stock that may be issued upon the exercise of stock options, warrants and rights under all of the Company’s equity compensation plans as of December 31, 2015.

 

Plan category  Number of
securities
to be issued
upon
the exercise of
outstanding
options,
warrants and
rights
   Weighted-average
exercise price of
outstanding
options,
warrants and
rights
   Number of
securities
remaining
available
for future
issuance under
equity
compensation
plans (excluding
securities
reflected in the
first
column)
 
             
Equity compensation plan approved by security holders   316,510   $9.27    - 
                
Total   316,510   $9.27    - 

 

ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions

 

For information regarding certain relationships and related transactions, the section captioned “Transactions with Related Persons” in the Company’s Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Stockholders is incorporated by reference.

 

Corporate Governance

 

For information regarding director independence, the section captioned “Corporate Governance – Director Independence” in the Company’s Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Stockholders is incorporated by reference.

 

ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

 

For information regarding the principal accountant fees and expenses, the section captioned “Proposal 2 – Ratification of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm” in the Company’s Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Stockholders is incorporated by reference.

 

 - 42 -

 

 

ITEM 15. EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

 

Exhibit No.   Description   Incorporated by reference to
3.1   Articles of Incorporation of Polonia Bancorp, Inc.   Exhibit 3.1 to the Registration Statement on Form S-1 (File No. 333-176759).
         
3.2   Bylaws of Polonia Bancorp, Inc.   Exhibit 3.2 to the Registration Statement on Form S-1 (File No. 333-176759).
         
10.1*   Amended and Restated Polonia Bancorp Employment Agreement with Paul D. Rutkowski   Exhibit 10.3 to Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2008 (File No. 000-52267).
         
10.2*   Amended and Restated Polonia Bank Employment Agreement with Paul D. Rutkowski   Exhibit 10.4 to Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2008 (File No. 000-52267).
         
10.3*   Amended and Restated Polonia Bank Employee Severance Compensation Plan   Exhibit 10.7 to Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2008 (File No. 000-52267).
         
10.4*   Amended and Restated Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan   Exhibit 10.8 on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2008 (File No. 000-52267).
         
10.5*   Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan   Exhibit 10.7 to the Registration Statement on Form SB-2 (File No. 333-135643).
         
10.6*   Non-Qualified Deferred Compensation Plan   Exhibit 10.10 to the Registration Statement on Form SB-2 (File No. 333-135643).
         
10.7*   Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan for Paul D. Rutkowski   Exhibit 10.11 to the Registration Statement on Form SB-2 (File No. 333-135643).
         
10.8*   Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan for Kenneth J. Maliszewski   Exhibit 10.12 to the Registration Statement on Form SB-2 (File No. 333-135643).
         
10.9*   Split Dollar Life Insurance Agreement with Paul D. Rutkowski   Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K, filed on January 25, 2007 (File No. 000-52267).
         
10.10*   Polonia Bancorp 2007 Equity Incentive Plan   Appendix D to the definitive proxy statement filed on June 12, 2007 (File No. 000-52267).
         
10.11*   Form of Restricted Stock Award Agreement for the Polonia Bancorp 2007 Equity Incentive Plan   Exhibit 10.2 to the Registration Statement on Form S-8 (File No. 333-149433).
         
10.12*   Form of Incentive Stock Option Award Agreement for the Polonia Bancorp 2007 Equity Incentive Plan   Exhibit 10.3 to the Registration Statement on Form S-8 (File No. 333-149433).
         
10.13*   Form of Non-Statutory Stock Option Award Agreement for the Polonia Bancorp 2007 Equity Incentive Plan   Exhibit 10.4 to the Registration Statement on Form S-8 (File No. 333-149433).

 

 - 43 -

 

 

Exhibit No.   Description   Incorporated by reference to
10.14*   Polonia Bancorp, Inc. 2013 Equity Incentive Plan  

Appendix A in the definitive proxy statement filed with the SEC on April 15, 2013 (File No. 001-35739). 

         
10.15*   Form of equity award agreements for the Polonia Bancorp, Inc. 2013 Equity Incentive Plan   Exhibit 99.1 to the Registration Statement on Form S-8 (333-190760).
         
10.16*   Form of Amendment to the Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan Participation Agreement   Exhibit to Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2008 (File No. 000-52267).
         
10.17*   Amendment to Polonia Bank Non-Qualified Deferred Compensation Plan   Exhibit 10.17 to Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2008 (File No. 000-52267).
         
10.18*   First Amendment to Amended and Restated Polonia Bancorp Employment Agreement for Paul D. Rutkowski   Exhibit 10.19 to Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2011 (File No. 000-52267).
         
10.19*  

First Amendment to Amended and Restated Polonia Bank Employment Agreement for Paul D. Rutkowski 

  Exhibit 10.22 to Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2011 (File No. 000-52267).
         
10.20   Agreement by and between Polonia Bank and the Comptroller of the Currency   Exhibit 10.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K filed on October 27, 2014 (File No. 001-35739).
         
10.21   Employment Agreement by and between Polonia Bank and Joseph T. Svetik   Exhibit 10.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K filed on May 20, 2015 (File No. 001-35739).
         
10.22   Amendment to the October 21, 2014 Agreement by and between Polonia Bank and the Comptroller of the Currency   Exhibit 10.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K filed on November 13, 2015 (File No. 001-35739).
         
21.0   Subsidiaries of the Registrant    
         
31.1   Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) Certification of Chief Executive Officer    
         
31.2   Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) Certification of Chief Financial Officer    
         
32.0   Section 1350 Certification    

 

 - 44 -

 

 

Exhibit No.   Description   Incorporated by reference to
101   The following materials from the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the period ended December 31, 2015, formatted in XBRL (Extensible Business Reporting Language): (i) the Consolidated Balance Sheet, (ii) the Consolidated Statements of Income (Loss), (iii) the Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income (Loss), (iv) the Consolidated Statement of Changes in Stockholder’s Equity, (v) the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows and (vi) related notes.    

 

* Management Contract or Compensatory Plan or Arrangement filed pursuant to Item 15(b) of this Report.

 

 - 45 -

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

In accordance with Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act, the registrant caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

    POLONIA BANCORP, INC.
     
Date: April 6, 2016 By: /s/ Joseph T. Svetik
    Joseph T. Svetik
    President and Chief Executive Officer

 

In accordance with the Exchange Act, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

Name   Title   Date
         
/s/ Joseph T. Svetik   President, Chief Executive Officer and Director   April 6, 2016
Joseph T. Svetik   (principal executive officer)    
         
/s/ Paul D. Rutkowski   Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer   April 6, 2016
Paul D. Rutkowski   (principal accounting and financial officer)    
         
/s/ Dr. Eugene Andruczyk   Director   April 6, 2016
Dr. Eugene Andruczyk        
         
/s/ Frank J. Byrne   Director   April 6, 2016
Frank J. Byrne        
         
/s/ Joseph M. Callahan   Director   April 6, 2016
Joseph M. Callahan        
         
/s/ Robert J. Woltjen   Director   April 6, 2016
Robert J. Woltjen        

 

 - 46 -

 

 

MANAGEMENT’S REPORT ON

INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING

 

 

 

The Company’s management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. Our internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of our financial reporting and of the preparation of our consolidated financial statements for external purposes in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles.

 

A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of consolidated financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the consolidated financial statements.

 

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

 

The Company’s management assessed the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2015, using the criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework, issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (“COSO”) in 2013.

 

A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the Company's annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.

 

During the first quarter of 2016, in connection with the preparation of the consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2015, management identified deficiencies in the operating effectiveness of certain controls relating to identifying and accounting for post-retirement benefits that were determined to be a material weakness. This material weakness resulted in the misstatement of the Company’s consolidated financial statements, which was corrected through a restatement of the Company’s consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2014.

 

Based on management’s assessment, and as a result of the material weakness discussed above, management concluded that, as of December 31, 2015, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting was not effective based on the criteria set forth by COSO.

 

This annual report does not include an attestation report of the Company’s registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting.  Management’s report was not subject to attestation by the Company’s registered public accounting firm pursuant to rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission that permit the Company to provide only management’s report in this annual report.

 

 - 47 -

 

  

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

Audit Committee

Polonia Bancorp, Inc.

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheet of Polonia Bancorp, Inc. and subsidiary as of December 31, 2015 and 2014, and the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income (loss), changes in stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for the years then ended. These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of Polonia Bancorp, Inc.’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. Polonia Bancorp, Inc. is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audit included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of Polonia Bancorp, Inc.’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Polonia Bancorp, Inc. and subsidiary as of December 31, 2015 and 2014, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the years then ended, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

 

/s/ S.R. Snodgrass, P.C.

Wexford, Pennsylvania

April 6, 2016

 

S.R. Snodgrass, P.C. * 2100 Corporate Drive, Suite 400 * Wexford, Pennsylvania 15090-8399 * Phone: (724) 934-0344 * Facsimile: (724) 934-0345

 

 F - 1 

 

 

POLONIA BANCORP, INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET

 

   December 31, 
   2015   2014 
ASSETS        (as restated) 
Cash and due from banks  $1,785,566   $1,624,482 
Interest-bearing deposits with other institutions   29,351,650    10,549,748 
           
Cash and cash equivalents   31,137,216    12,174,230 
           
Certificates of deposit   15,980,000    - 
Investment securities available for sale   54,871,523    11,711,533 
Investment securities held to maturity (fair value $46,193,447)   -    44,741,534 
Loans held for sale   -    4,221,438 
Loans receivable   161,765,015    199,094,306 
Covered loans   11,686,062    14,457,364 
Total loans   173,451,077    213,551,670 
Less:  Allowance for loan losses   1,272,072    1,415,983 
Net loans   172,179,005    212,135,687 
Accrued interest receivable   671,994    788,684 
Federal Home Loan Bank stock   3,659,700    3,843,500 
Premises and equipment, net   3,998,409    4,257,726 
Bank-owned life insurance   4,257,456    4,268,181 
FDIC indemnification asset   473,951    1,417,355 
Other assets   4,381,552    8,789,803 
           
TOTAL ASSETS  $291,610,806   $308,349,671 
           
LIABILITIES          
Deposits  $188,222,282   $199,553,997 
FHLB advances - long-term   56,000,000    59,000,000 
Advances by borrowers for taxes and insurance   988,906    1,208,824 
Accrued interest payable   139,397    143,798 
Other liabilities   8,759,648    11,503,396 
           
TOTAL LIABILITIES   254,110,233    271,410,015 
           
Commitments and contingencies (Note 11)   -    - 
           
STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY          
Preferred stock ($.01 par value; 1,000,000 shares authorized; none issued or outstanding)   -    - 
Common stock ($.01 par value; 14,000,000 shares authorized; 3,348,827 and 3,334,130 shares issued and outstanding)   33,488    33,341 
Additional paid-in-capital   25,591,969    25,219,224 
Retained earnings   12,849,370    12,987,593 
Unallocated shares held by Employee Stock Ownership Plan ("ESOP") (162,288 and 181,415 shares, respectively)   (1,354,858)   (1,517,302)
Accumulated other comprehensive income   380,604    216,800 
           
TOTAL STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY   37,500,573    36,939,656 
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY  $291,610,806   $308,349,671 

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

 

 F - 2 

 

 

POLONIA BANCORP, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME (LOSS)

 

   Year Ended December 31, 
   2015   2014 
INTEREST AND DIVIDEND INCOME          
Loans receivable  $8,605,072   $9,520,329 
Investment securities   1,271,441    1,640,580 
Interest-bearing deposits and other dividends   336,151    181,571 
Total interest and dividend income   10,212,664    11,342,480 
           
INTEREST EXPENSE          
Deposits   1,689,064    1,714,909 
FHLB advances - long-term   1,460,619    1,492,006 
Advances by borrowers for taxes and insurance   3,122    3,303 
Total interest expense   3,152,805    3,210,218 
           
NET INTEREST INCOME BEFORE PROVISION FOR          
LOAN LOSSES   7,059,859    8,132,262 
Provision for loan losses   73,150    209,713 
           
NET INTEREST INCOME AFTER PROVISION FOR          
LOAN LOSSES   6,986,709    7,922,549 
           
NONINTEREST INCOME          
Service fees on deposit accounts   104,476    116,366 
Earnings on bank-owned life insurance   (10,725)   3,937 
Investment securities gains, net   560,367    - 
Gain on sale of loans   2,775,907    3,861,049 
Rental income   270,140    271,258 
Other   430,070    401,861 
Total noninterest income   4,130,235    4,654,471 
           
NONINTEREST EXPENSE          
Compensation and employee benefits   5,571,435    7,142,493 
Occupancy and equipment   1,315,243    1,449,082 
Federal deposit insurance premiums   536,979    360,665 
Data processing expense   410,514    428,192 
Professional fees   799,835    659,992 
Other   2,550,702    2,466,013 
Total noninterest expense   11,184,708    12,506,437 
           
Income (loss) before income tax expense   (67,764)   70,583 
Income tax expense   70,459    53,547 
           
NET INCOME (LOSS)  $(138,223)  $17,036 
           
EARNINGS PER SHARE - BASIC AND DILUTED  $(0.04)  $0.01 
           
Weighted-average common shares outstanding:          
Basic   3,141,611    3,168,335 
Diluted   3,141,611    3,197,496 

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

 

 F - 3 

 

 

POLONIA BANCORP, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)

 

   Year Ended December 31, 
   2015   2014 
         
Net income (loss)  $(138,223)  $17,036 
           
Changes in net unrealized gain (loss) on investment securities available for sale   808,555    (72,060)
           
Tax effect   (274,909)   24,500 
           
Reclassification adjustment for gains on sale of investment securities included in net income   (560,367)   - 
           
Tax effect   190,525    - 
           
Total other comprehensive income (loss)   163,804    (47,560)
           
Total comprehensive income (loss)  $25,581   $(30,524)

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

 

 F - 4 

 

 

POLONIA BANCORP, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY

 

                       Accumulated 
                   Unallocated   Other 
   Common Stock   Additional   Retained   Shares Held   Comprehensive 
   Shares   Amount   Paid-In Capital   Earnings   by ESOP   Income (Loss)   Total 
                             
Balance, December 31, 2013, as previously reported   3,511,276   $35,113   $26,795,498   $14,853,884   $(1,648,366)  $264,360   $40,300,489 
                                    
Restatement                  (1,883,327)             (1,883,327)
                                    
Balance, December 31, 2013, as restated   3,511,276    35,113    26,795,498    12,970,557    (1,648,366)   264,360    38,417,162 
                                    
Net income                  17,036              17,036 
Other comprehensive loss, net                            (47,560)   (47,560)
Stock options compensation expense             81,628                   81,628 
Allocation of unearned ESOP shares             30,547         131,064         161,611 
Allocation of unearned restricted stock             115,501                   115,501 
Repurchase of stock   (177,146)   (1,772)   (1,803,950)                  (1,805,722)
                                    
Balance, December 31, 2014, as restated   3,334,130    33,341    25,219,224    12,987,593    (1,517,302)   216,800    36,939,656 
                                    
Net income (loss)                  (138,223)             (138,223)
Other comprehensive income, net                            163,804    163,804 
Stock options compensation expense             90,650                   90,650 
Allocation of unearned ESOP shares             73,582         162,444         236,026 
Allocation of unearned restricted stock             84,936                   84,936 
Exercise of option shares   15,580    156    134,429                   134,585 
Repurchase of stock   (883)   (9)   (10,852)                  (10,861)
                                    
Balance, December 31, 2015   3,348,827   $33,488   $25,591,969   $12,849,370   $(1,354,858)  $380,604   $37,500,573 

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

 

 F - 5 

 

 

POLONIA BANCORP, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

 

   Year Ended December 31, 
   2015   2014 
OPERATING ACTIVITIES          
Net income (loss)  $(138,223)  $17,036 
Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash provided by operating activities:          
Provision for loan losses   73,150    209,713 
Depreciation, amortization, and accretion   1,122,763    1,052,214 
Investment securities, gains   (560,367)   - 
Proceeds from sale of loans   55,063,409    81,104,217 
Net gain on sale of loans   (2,533,541)   (3,861,049)
Loans originated for sale   (48,308,430)   (75,321,638)
Net gain on sale of loans held for investment   (242,366)   - 
(Gain) loss on the sale of other real estate owned   (42,160)   96,626 
Earnings on bank-owned life insurance   10,725    (3,937)
Deferred federal income taxes   102,768    (466,242)
Decrease in accrued interest receivable   116,690    7,610 
Decrease in accrued interest payable   (4,401)   (1,636)
Decrease in accrued payroll and commissions   (255,172)   (159,200)
Compensation expense for stock options, ESOP, and restricted stock   411,612    358,740 
Other, net   (523,342)   693,420 
Net cash provided by operating activities   4,293,115    3,725,874 
INVESTING ACTIVITIES          
Investment securities available for sale:          
Proceeds from principal repayments and maturities   6,808,781    3,528,225 
Purchases   (15,648,402)   - 
Proceeds from sales   8,616,069    - 
Investment securities held to maturity:          
Proceeds from principal repayments and maturities   4,569,283    7,813,259 
Purchases   -    (1,383,038)
Maturities of certificates of deposit in other institutions   11,937,000    - 
Purchases of certificates of deposit in other institutions   (27,917,000)   - 
Proceeds from sale of loans   26,366,649    - 
Decrease (increase) in loans receivable, net   10,969,083    (16,318,842)
Decrease in covered loans   2,834,560    2,135,178 
Purchase of Federal Home Loan Bank stock   (66,300)   (683,200)
Redemptions of Federal Home Loan Bank stock   250,100    515,200 
Proceeds from the sale of other real estate owned   349,637    470,276 
Payments received from FDIC under loss share agreement   122,270    396,156 
Purchase of premises and equipment   (93,950)   (117,115)
Net cash provided by (used for) investing activities   29,097,780    (3,643,901)
FINANCING ACTIVITIES          
Decrease in deposits, net   (11,331,715)   (1,768,342)
Repayment of Federal Home Loan Bank advances - long-term   (3,000,000)   - 
Decrease in advances by borrowers for taxes and insurance, net   (219,918)   (97,999)
Exercised options   134,585    - 
Repurchase of stock   (10,861)   (1,805,722)
Net cash used for financing activities   (14,427,909)   (3,672,063)
           
Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents   18,962,986    (3,590,090)
           
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS AT BEGINNING OF PERIOD   12,174,230    15,764,320 
           
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS AT END OF PERIOD  $31,137,216   $12,174,230 
           
SUPPLEMENTAL CASH FLOW DISCLOSURES          
Cash paid:          
Interest  $3,157,206   $3,211,854 
Income taxes   455,000    775,000 
Non-cash transactions:          
Loans transferred to other real estate owned   -    514,829 
Transfers from premises and equipment to other real estate owned   -    213,805 
Transfer of investment securities held to maturity to available for sale   40,103,961    - 
Investment securities purchased not yet settled   2,012,836    - 

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

 

 F - 6 

 

 

POLONIA BANCORP, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

1.SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

A summary of significant accounting and reporting policies applied in the presentation of the accompanying consolidated financial statements follows:

 

Nature of Operations and Basis of Presentation

 

Polonia Bancorp, Inc. (the “Company”), a Maryland corporation, was incorporated in 2011 and is a 100 percent publicly owned stock holding company of Polonia Bank (the “Bank”). The Bank was incorporated under Pennsylvania law in 1923. The Bank is a federally chartered savings bank located in Huntingdon Valley, Pennsylvania, whose principal sources of revenue emanate from its investment securities portfolio and its portfolio of residential real estate, commercial real estate, and consumer loans, as well as a variety of deposit services offered to its customers through five offices located in the Greater Philadelphia area. The Bank is subject to regulation by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (“OCC”) and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”).

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Bank and the Bank’s wholly owned subsidiaries, PBMHC (“PBMHC”), a Delaware investment company, and Community Abstract Agency, LLC (“CAA”). CAA provides title insurance on loans secured by real estate. All significant intercompany transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. The investment in subsidiaries on the parent company’s financial statements is carried at the parent company’s equity in the underlying net assets.

 

Use of Estimates in the Preparation of Financial Statements

 

The accounting principles followed by the Company and the methods of applying these principles conform to U.S. generally accepted accounting principles and to general practice within the banking industry. In preparing the consolidated financial statements, management is required to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities as of the Consolidated Balance Sheet date and reported amounts of revenues and expenses for the period. Actual results could differ significantly from those estimates. Material estimates that are particularly susceptible to significant changes in the near term relate to the determination of the allowance for loan losses, the valuation of deferred tax assets, and the fair value of financial instruments.

 

Investment Securities

 

Investment securities are classified at the time of purchase, based on management’s intention and ability, as securities held to maturity or securities available for sale. Debt securities acquired with the intent and ability to hold to maturity are stated at cost, adjusted for amortization of premium and accretion of discount, which are computed using the interest method and recognized as adjustments of interest income. Certain other debt securities have been classified as available for sale to serve principally as a source of liquidity. Unrealized holding gains and losses for available-for-sale securities are reported as a separate component of stockholders’ equity, net of tax, until realized. Realized security gains and losses are computed using the specific identification method for debt securities and the average cost method for marketable equity securities. Interest and dividends on investment securities are recognized as income when earned.

 

Securities are periodically reviewed for other-than-temporary impairment based upon a number of factors, including, but not limited to, the length of time and extent to which the market value has been less than cost, the financial condition of the underlying issuer, the ability of the issuer to meet contractual obligations, the likelihood of the security’s ability to recover any decline in its market value, and whether or not the Company intends to sell the security or whether it’s more likely than not that the Company would be required to sell the security before its anticipated recovery in market value. A decline in value that is considered to be other than temporary is recorded as a loss within noninterest income in the Consolidated Statement of Income. 

 

 F - 7 

 

 

1.SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

 

Investment Securities (Continued)

 

The Bank is a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank (“FHLB”) of Pittsburgh and as such is required to maintain a minimum investment in stock of the FHLB that varies with the level of advances outstanding with the FHLB. The stock is bought from and sold to the FHLB based upon its $100 par value. The stock does not have a readily determinable fair value and as such is classified as restricted stock, carried at cost and evaluated for impairment as necessary. The stock’s value is determined by the ultimate recoverability of the par value rather than by recognizing temporary declines. The determination of whether the par value will ultimately be recovered is influenced by criteria such as the following: (a) the significance of the decline in net assets of the FHLB as compared to the capital stock amount and the length of time this situation has persisted; (b) commitments by the FHLB to make payments required by law or regulation and the level of such payments in relation to the operating performance; (c) the impact of legislative and regulatory changes on the customer base of the FHLB; and (d) the liquidity position of the FHLB. With consideration given to these factors, management concluded that the stock was not impaired at December 31, 2015 or 2014.

 

Loans Held for Sale

 

Loans originated and intended for sale in the secondary market are carried at the lower of cost or fair value. Net unrealized losses, if any, are recognized through a valuation allowance by a charge against income. Gains and losses on sales of loans held for sale are included in noninterest income. There were no loans held for sale at December 31, 2015, as compared to $4,221,438 at December 31, 2014.

 

Loans Receivable

 

Loans that management has the intent and ability to hold for the foreseeable future or until maturity or payoff generally are stated at the principal amount outstanding less the allowance for loan losses and net of deferred loan origination fees and costs. Interest on loans is recognized as income when earned on the accrual method.

 

The accrual of interest is generally discontinued when the contractual payment of principal or interest has become 90 days past due or management has serious doubts about further collectability of principal or interest, even though the loan is currently performing. A loan may remain on accrual status if it is in the process of collection and is either guaranteed or well secured. When a loan is placed on nonaccrual status, unpaid interest credited to income is reversed. Interest received on nonaccrual loans generally is either applied against principal or reported as interest income, according to management’s judgment as to the collectability of principal. Generally, loans are restored to accrual status when the obligation is brought current and has performed in accordance with the contractual terms for a reasonable period of time and the ultimate collectability of the total contractual principal and interest is no longer in doubt.

 

Loan origination fees and certain direct loan origination costs are being deferred and the net amount amortized as an adjustment of the related loan’s yield. The Company is amortizing these amounts over the contractual life of the related loans using the interest method.

 

 F - 8 

 

 

1.SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

 

Acquired Loans

 

All loans acquired by the Company, excluding acquired consumer loans, are subject to loss share agreements with the FDIC whereby the Bank is indemnified against a portion of the losses on those loans (“covered loans”). Purchased loans acquired in a business combination, are recorded at fair value on their purchase date with no carryover of the related allowance for loan losses. In determining the fair value of purchased loans, management considers a number of factors including, among other things, the remaining life of the acquired loans, estimated prepayments, estimated loss ratios, estimated value of the underlying collateral, estimated holding periods, and net present value of cash flows expected to be received. Purchased credit-impaired loans are accounted for in accordance with guidance for certain loans or debt securities acquired in a transfer when the loans have evidence of credit deterioration since origination and it is probable at the date of acquisition that the acquirer will not collect all contractually required principal and interest payments. For evidence of credit deterioration since origination, the Company considered loans on a loan-by-loan basis by primarily focusing on past-due status, frequency of late payments, internal loan classification, as well as interviews with current loan officers and collection employees for other evidence that may be indicative of deterioration of credit quality. Once these loans were segregated, the Company evaluated each of these loans on a loan-by-loan basis to determine the probability of collecting all contractually required payments.

 

The Company deemed it appropriate to analogize the accounting guidance under Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 310-30 to all other loans since: (i) the discount recognized for these loans was attributable at least in part to credit quality, and (ii) the Company was unable to identify specific loans within this portfolio for which it was probable at acquisition that the Company would be unable to collect all contractually required payments receivable. The Company has aggregated all other loans into loan pools by common risk characteristics, which generally conform to loan type.

 

The Company evaluates expected future cash flows on all acquired loans on a quarterly basis. The difference between contractually required payments and the cash flows expected to be collected is referred to as the nonaccretable difference. Decreases to the expected cash flows will generally result in a provision for loan losses. Increases in cash flows will result in a reversal of the provision for loan losses to the extent of prior charges and then an adjustment to accretable yield, which would have a positive impact on interest income.

 

The accretable difference on purchased loans is the difference between the expected cash flows and the net present value of expected cash flows. Such difference is accreted into earnings using the effective yield method over the term of the loans.

 

FDIC Indemnification Asset

 

In connection with the Company’s FDIC-assisted acquisition, the Company has recorded an FDIC indemnification asset to reflect the loss-share arrangement provided by the FDIC. Since the indemnified items are covered loans, which are measured at fair value at the date of acquisition, the FDIC indemnification asset is also measured at fair value at the date of acquisition, and is calculated by discounting the cash flows expected to be received from the FDIC.

 

The FDIC indemnification asset is measured separately from the related covered assets because it is not contractually embedded in the assets and is not transferable if the assets are sold. The fair value of the FDIC indemnification asset is estimated using the present value of cash flows related to the loss-share agreements based on the expected reimbursements for losses and the applicable loss-share percentages.

 

 F - 9 

 

 

1.SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

 

FDIC Indemnification Asset (Continued)

 

The Company reviews and updates the fair value of the asset prospectively, on a quarterly basis, as loss estimates related to covered loans change. Decreases in the amount expected to be collected result in a provision for loan losses, an increase in the allowance for loan losses, and a proportional adjustment to the FDIC indemnification asset for the estimated amount to be reimbursed. Increases in the amount expected to be collected result in the reversal of any previously recorded provision for loan losses and related allowance for loan losses and adjustments to the FDIC indemnification asset, or prospective adjustment to the accretable discount if no provision for loan losses had been recorded.

 

The ultimate realization of the FDIC indemnification asset depends on the performance of the underlying covered assets, the passage of time, and claims paid by the FDIC. The accretion of the FDIC receivable discount is recorded in noninterest expense using the level yield method over the estimated life of the receivable.

 

Pursuant to the clawback provisions of the loss-share agreement for the Company’s FDIC-assisted acquisition, the Company may be required to reimburse the FDIC should actual losses be less than certain thresholds established in the loss-share agreement. The amount of the clawback provision for the acquisition is included in the FDIC indemnification asset in the accompanying Consolidated Balance Sheet and is measured at fair value. It is calculated as the difference between management’s estimated losses on covered loans and the loss threshold contained in the loss-share agreement, multiplied by the applicable clawback provisions contained in the loss-share agreement. This clawback amount which is payable to the FDIC upon termination of the applicable loss-share agreement is discounted back to net present value. To the extent that actual losses on covered loans are less than estimated losses, the applicable clawback payable to the FDIC upon termination of the loss-share agreements will increase. To the extent that actual losses on covered loans are more than estimated losses, the applicable clawback payable to the FDIC upon termination of the loss-share agreements will decrease.

 

Changes in the FDIC indemnification asset during the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, are as follows:

 

   Year Ended December 31, 
   2015   2014 
         
Balance at the beginning of year  $1,417,355   $2,515,287 
Cash payments received or receivable due from the FDIC   (122,270)   (396,156)
Increase in FDIC share of estimated losses   -    - 
Net amortization   (821,134)   (701,776)
           
Balance at the end of year  $473,951   $1,417,355 

 

Troubled Debt Restructurings

 

A loan is considered to be a troubled debt restructuring (“TDR”) loan when the Company grants a concession to the borrower because of the borrower’s financial condition that it would not otherwise consider. Such concessions include the reduction of interest rates, deferment of principal or interest, or other modifications of interest rates that are less than the current market rate for new obligations with similar risk.

 

Allowance for Loan Losses

 

The allowance for loan losses represents the amount which management estimates is adequate to provide for probable losses inherent in its loan portfolio. The allowance method is used in providing for loan losses. Accordingly, all loan losses are charged to the allowance, and all recoveries are credited to it. The allowance for loan losses is established through a provision for loan losses that is charged to operations. The provision is based on management’s evaluation of the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses which encompasses the overall risk characteristics of the various portfolio segments, past experience with losses, the impact of economic conditions on borrowers, and other relevant factors. The estimates used in determining the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses, including the amounts and timing of future cash flows expected on impaired loans, are particularly susceptible to significant changes in the near term.

 

 F - 10 

 

 

1.SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

 

Allowance for Loan Losses (Continued)

 

Impaired loans are typically commercial, multi-family, and commercial real estate loans for which it is probable the Company will not be able to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement. Troubled debt restructurings are also considered impaired. The Company individually evaluates such loans for impairment and does not aggregate loans by major risk classifications. The definition of “impaired loans” is not the same as the definition of “nonaccrual loans,” although the two categories overlap. The Company may choose to place a loan on nonaccrual status due to payment delinquency or uncertain collectability while not classifying the loan as impaired, provided the loan is not a commercial or commercial real estate classification. Factors considered by management in determining impairment include payment status and collateral value. The amount of impairment for these types of loans is determined by the difference between the present value of the expected cash flows related to the loan, using the original interest rate, and its recorded value or, as a practical expedient in the case of collateralized loans, the difference between the fair value of the collateral and the recorded amount of the loans. When foreclosure is probable, impairment is measured based on the fair value of the collateral.

 

Mortgage loans secured by one-to-four family properties and all consumer loans are large groups of smaller-balance homogeneous loans and are measured for impairment collectively. Loans that experience insignificant payment delays, which are defined as 90 days or less, generally are not classified as impaired. Management determines the significance of payment delays on a case-by-case basis taking into consideration all circumstances concerning the loan, the creditworthiness and payment history of the borrower, the length of the payment delay, and the amount of shortfall in relation to the principal and interest owed.

 

Management establishes the allowance for loan losses based upon its evaluation of the pertinent factors underlying the types and quality of loans in the portfolio. Commercial, multi-family, and commercial real estate loans are reviewed on a regular basis with a focus on larger loans along with loans which have experienced past payment or financial deficiencies. Larger commercial, multi-family, and commercial real estate loans which are 90 days or more past due are selected for impairment testing. These loans are analyzed to determine whether they are “impaired,” which means that it is probable that all amounts will not be collected according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement. All commercial, multi-family, and commercial real estate loans that are delinquent 90 days are placed on nonaccrual status are classified on an individual basis. The remaining loans are evaluated and classified as groups of loans with similar risk characteristics. The Company allocates allowances based on the factors described below, which conform to the Company’s asset classification policy. In reviewing risk within the Bank’s loan portfolio, management has determined there to be several different risk categories within the loan portfolio. The allowance for loan losses consists of amounts applicable to: (i) one-to-four family real estate loans; (ii) multi-family and commercial real estate loans; (iii) commercial loans, (iv) home equity loans; (v) home equity lines of credit; and (vi) education and other consumer loans. Factors considered in this process included general loan terms, collateral, and availability of historical data to support the analysis. Historical loss percentages for each risk category are calculated and used as the basis for calculating allowance allocations. Certain qualitative factors are then added to the historical allocation percentage to get the total factor to be applied to nonclassified loans. The following qualitative factors are analyzed:

 

·Levels of and trends in delinquencies and classification
·Trends in volume and terms
·Changes in collateral
·Changes in management and lending staff
·Economic trends
·Concentrations of credit
·Changes in lending policies
·Changes in loan review
·External factors

 

The Company analyzes its loan portfolio each quarter to determine the appropriateness of its allowance for loan losses.

 

 F - 11 

 

 

1.SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

 

Loan Charge-Off Policies

 

Consumer loans are generally charged down to the fair value of collateral securing the asset when the loan is 120 days past due. Loans secured by real estate are generally charged down to the fair value of real estate securing the asset when the loan is 180 days past due. All other loans are generally charged down to the net realizable value when the loan is 90 days past due.

 

Premises and Equipment

 

Land is carried at cost. Premises and equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and amortization. Depreciation is calculated using the straight-line method over the useful lives of the related assets, which range from 3 to 20 years for furniture, fixtures, and equipment and 40 years for buildings. Expenditures for maintenance and repairs are charged to operations as incurred. Costs of major additions and improvements are capitalized.

 

Bank-Owned Life Insurance

 

The Company owns insurance on the lives of a certain group of key employees. The policies were purchased to help offset the increase in the costs of various fringe benefit plans including healthcare. The cash surrender value of these policies is included as an asset on the Consolidated Balance Sheet, and any increases in the cash surrender value are recorded as noninterest income on the Consolidated Statement of Income (Loss). In the event of the death of an insured individual under these policies, the Company would receive a death benefit, which would be recorded as noninterest income.

 

Mortgage Servicing Rights (“MSRs”)

 

The Company has agreements for the express purpose of selling loans in the secondary market. The Company maintains servicing rights for most of these loans. Originated MSRs are recorded by allocating total costs incurred between the loan and servicing rights based on their relative fair values. MSRs are amortized in proportion to the estimated servicing income over the estimated life of the servicing portfolio. MSRs are a component of other assets on the Consolidated Balance Sheet.

 

Transfers of Financial Assets

 

Transfers of financial assets are accounted for as sales when control over the assets has been surrendered.  Control over transferred assets is deemed to be surrendered when: (1) the assets have been isolated from the Company; (2) the transferee obtains the right (free of conditions that constrain it from taking advantage of that right) to pledge or exchange the transferred assets; and (3) the Company does not maintain effective control over the transferred assets through an agreement to repurchase them before their maturity or the ability to unilaterally cause the holder to return specific assets.

 

Other Real Estate Owned

 

Other real estate owned is carried at the lower of cost or fair value minus estimated costs to sell. Valuation allowances for estimated losses are provided when the carrying value of the real estate acquired exceeds fair value minus estimated costs to sell. Operating expenses of such properties, net of related income, are expensed in the period incurred.

 

Federal Income Taxes

 

The Company and subsidiaries file a consolidated federal income tax return. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are reflected based on the differences between the financial statement and the income tax basis of assets and liabilities using the enacted marginal tax rates. Deferred income tax expense and benefit are based on the changes in the deferred tax assets or liabilities from period to period.

 

 F - 12 

 

 

1.SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company has defined cash and cash equivalents as cash and due from banks and interest-bearing deposits with other institutions that have original maturities of less than 90 days.

 

Comprehensive Income (Loss)

 

The Company is required to present comprehensive income (loss) and its components in a full set of general-purpose financial statements for all periods presented. Other comprehensive income (loss) is composed exclusively of changes in the net unrealized holding gains on its available-for-sale securities portfolio. The Company has reported the effects of other comprehensive income on the Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income (Loss) for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014.

 

Stock Options

 

The Company accounts for stock options based on the grant-date fair value of all share-based payment awards that are expected to vest, including employee share options, to be recognized as expense over the requisite service period. The fair value of each option is amortized into expense on a straight-line basis between the grant date for the option and each vesting date. For the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, the Bank recorded $90,650 and $81,628 respectively, in expense related to share-based awards.

 

For purposes of computing compensation expense, the Bank estimated the fair values of stock options using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. The model requires the use of subjective assumptions that can materially affect fair value estimates. The fair value of each option is amortized into compensation expense on a straight-line basis between the grant date for the option and each vesting date. The fair value of each stock option granted was estimated using the following weighted-average assumptions for grants in 2015: (1) no dividends were expected; (2) risk-free interest rates of 2.310 percent; (3) expected volatility ranging from 19.3 to 20 percent; and (4) expected lives of options of ten years.

 

There were 68,295 stock options granted during 2015 and no stock options granted during 2014. The weighted-average fair value of stock options granted for 2015 was $13.26. There were 15,580 options exercised during 2015 at a weighted-average exercise price of $8.64 and no options exercised during 2014.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In January 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-01, Income Statement – Extraordinary and Unusual Items, as part of its initiative to reduce complexity in accounting standards. This Update eliminates from U.S. GAAP the concept of extraordinary items. The amendments in this Update are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2015. A reporting entity may apply the amendments prospectively. A reporting entity may also apply the amendments retrospectively to all prior periods presented in the financial statements. Early adoption is permitted provided that the guidance is applied from the beginning of the fiscal year of adoption. This Update is not expected to have a significant impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 

 F - 13 

 

 

1.SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements (Continued)

 

In February 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-02, Consolidation (Topic 810). The amendments in this Update affect reporting entities that are required to evaluate whether they should consolidate certain legal entities. All legal entities are subject to reevaluation under the revised consolidation model. Specifically, the amendments (1) modify the evaluation of whether limited partnerships and similar legal entities are variable interest entities (“VIEs”) or voting interest entities; (2) eliminate the presumption that a general partner should consolidate a limited partnership; (3) affect the consolidation analysis of reporting entities that are involved with VIEs, particularly those that have fee arrangements and related-party relationships; and (4) provide a scope exception from consolidation guidance for reporting entities with interests in legal entities that are required to comply with or operate in accordance with requirements that are similar to those in Rule 2a-7 of the Investment Company Act of 1940 for registered money market funds. The amendments in this Update are effective for public business entities for fiscal years, and for interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2015. For all other entities, the amendments in this Update are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016, and for interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017. This Update is not expected to have a significant impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 

In April 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-03, Interest – Imputation of Interest (Subtopic 835-30), as part of its initiative to reduce complexity in accounting standards. To simplify presentation of debt issuance costs, the amendments in this Update require that debt issuance costs related to a recognized debt liability be presented in the balance sheet as a direct deduction from the carrying amount of that debt liability, consistent with debt discounts. The recognition and measurement guidance for debt issuance costs are not affected by the amendments in this Update. For public business entities, the amendments in this Update are effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2015, and interim periods within those fiscal years. For all other entities, the amendments in this Update are effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2015, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016. An entity should apply the new guidance on a retrospective basis, wherein the balance sheet of each individual period presented should be adjusted to reflect the period-specific effects of applying the new guidance. This Update is not expected to have a significant impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 

In April 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-04, Compensation – Retirement Benefits (Topic 715), as part of its initiative to reduce complexity in accounting standards. For an entity with a fiscal year-end that does not coincide with a month-end, the amendments in this Update provide a practical expedient that permits the entity to measure defined benefit plan assets and obligations using the month-end that is closest to the entity's fiscal year-end and apply that practical expedient consistently from year to year. The practical expedient should be applied consistently to all plans if an entity has more than one plan. The amendments in this Update are effective for public business entities for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2015, and interim periods within those fiscal years. For all other entities, the amendments in this Update are effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017. Earlier application is permitted. This Update is not expected to have a significant impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 

 F - 14 

 

 

1.SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements (Continued)

 

In April 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-05, Intangibles – Goodwill and Other – Internal-Use Software (Subtopic 350-40), as part of its initiative to reduce complexity in accounting standards. This guidance will help entities evaluate the accounting for fees paid by a customer in a cloud computing arrangement. The amendments in this Update provide guidance to customers about whether a cloud computing arrangement includes a software license. If a cloud computing arrangement includes a software license, then the customer should account for the software license element of the arrangement consistent with the acquisition of other software licenses. If a cloud computing arrangement does not include a software license, the customer should account for the arrangement as a service contract. For public business entities, the FASB decided that the amendments will be effective for annual periods, including interim periods within those annual periods, beginning after December 15, 2015. For all other entities, the amendments will be effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2015, and interim periods in annual periods beginning after December 15, 2016. Early adoption is permitted for all entities. This Update is not expected to have a significant impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 

In April 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-06, Earnings Per Share (Topic 260): Effects on Historical Earnings per Unit of Master Limited Partnership Dropdown Transactions. Topic 260, Earnings Per Share, contains guidance that addresses master limited partnerships that originated from Emerging Issues Task Force (“EITF”) Issue No. 07-4, Application of the Two-Class Method Under FASB Statement No. 128 to Master Limited Partnerships. Under Topic 260, master limited partnerships apply the two-class method of calculating earnings per unit because the general partner, limited partners, and incentive distribution rights holders each participate differently in the distribution of available cash in accordance with the contractual rights contained in the partnership agreement. The amendments in this Update specify that for purposes of calculating historical earnings per unit under the two-class method, the earnings (losses) of a transferred business before the date of a dropdown transaction should be allocated entirely to the general partner. In that circumstance, the previously reported earnings per unit of the limited partners (which is typically the earnings per unit measure presented in the financial statements) would not change as a result of the dropdown transaction. Qualitative disclosures about how the rights to the earnings (losses) differ before and after the dropdown transaction occurs for purposes of computing earnings per unit under the two-class method are also required. The amendments in this Update are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2015, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Earlier application is permitted. This Update is not expected to have a significant impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 

 F - 15 

 

 

1.SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements (Continued)

 

In May 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-07, Disclosures for Investments in Certain Entities that Calculate Net Asset Value per Share (or Its Equivalent). The Update applies to reporting entities that elect to measure the fair value of an investment using the net asset value per share (or its equivalent) practical expedient. Under the amendments in this Update, investments for which fair value is measured at net asset value per share (or its equivalent) using the practical expedient should not be categorized in the fair value hierarchy. Removing those investments from the fair value hierarchy not only eliminates the diversity in practice resulting from the way in which investments measured at net asset value per share (or its equivalent) with future redemption dates are classified, but also ensures that all investments categorized in the fair value hierarchy are classified using a consistent approach. Investments that calculate net asset value per share (or its equivalent), but for which the practical expedient is not applied will continue to be included in the fair value hierarchy. A reporting entity should continue to disclose information on investments for which fair value is measured at net asset value (or its equivalent) as a practical expedient to help users understand the nature and risks of the investments and whether the investments, if sold, are probable of being sold at amounts different from net asset value. The amendments in this Update are effective for public business entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2015, and interim periods within those fiscal years. For all other entities, the amendments in this Update are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016, and interim periods within those fiscal years. A reporting entity should apply the amendments retrospectively to all periods presented. The retrospective approach requires that an investment for which fair value is measured using the net asset value per share practical expedient be removed from the fair value hierarchy in all periods presented in an entity's financial statements. Earlier application is permitted. This Update is not expected to have a significant impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 

In May 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-08, Business Combinations – Pushdown Accounting – Amendment to SEC Paragraphs Pursuant to Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 115. This Update was issued to amend various SEC paragraphs pursuant to the issuance of Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 115. This Update is not expected to have a significant impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 

In May 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-09, Financial Services – Insurance (Topic 944): Disclosure About Short-Duration Contracts. The amendments apply to all insurance entities that issue short-duration contracts as defined in Topic 944, Financial Services – Insurance. The amendments require insurance entities to disclose for annual reporting periods certain information about the liability for unpaid claims and claim adjustment expenses. The amendments also require insurance entities to disclose information about significant changes in methodologies and assumptions used to calculate the liability for unpaid claims and claim adjustment expenses, including reasons for the change and the effects on the financial statements. Additionally, the amendments require insurance entities to disclose for annual and interim reporting periods a rollforward of the liability for unpaid claims and claim adjustment expenses, described in Topic 944. For health insurance claims, the amendments require the disclosure of the total of incurred-but-not-reported liabilities plus expected development on reported claims included in the liability for unpaid claims and claim adjustment expenses. For public business entities, the amendments in this Update are effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2015, and interim periods within annual periods beginning after December 15, 2016. For all other entities, the amendments in this Update are effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2016, and interim periods within annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017. This Update is not expected to have a significant impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 

 F - 16 

 

 

1.SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements (Continued)

 

In June 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-10, Technical Corrections and Improvements. The amendments in this Update represent changes to clarify the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“Codification”), correct unintended application of guidance, or make minor improvements to the Codification that are not expected to have a significant effect on current accounting practice or create a significant administrative cost to most entities. Transition guidance varies based on the amendments in this Update. The amendments in this Update that require transition guidance are effective for all entities for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2015. Early adoption is permitted, including adoption in an interim period. All other amendments will be effective upon the issuance of this Update. This Update is not expected to have a significant impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 

In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-14, Revenue from Contract with Customers (Topic 606). The amendments in this Update defer the effective date of ASU 2014-09 for all entities by one year. Public business entities, certain not-for-profit entities, and certain employee benefit plans should apply the guidance in ASU 2014-09 to annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim reporting periods within that reporting period. All other entities should apply the guidance in ASU 2014-09 to annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim reporting periods within annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019. The Company is evaluating the effect of adopting this new accounting Update.

 

In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-15, Interest – Imputation of Interest (Subtopic 835-30): Presentation and Subsequent Measurement of Debt Issuance Costs Associated with Line-of-Credit Arrangements Amendments to SEC Paragraphs Pursuant to Staff Announcement at June 18, 2015 EITF Meeting. This Update adds SEC paragraphs pursuant to the SEC Staff Announcement at the June 18, 2015 Emerging Issues Task Force meeting about the presentation and subsequent measurement of debt issuance costs associated with line-of-credit arrangements. This Update is not expected to have a significant impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 

In September 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-16, Business Combinations (Topic 805). The amendments in this Update require that an acquirer recognizes adjustments to provisional amounts that are identified during the measurement period in the reporting period in which the adjustment amounts are determined. The amendments in this Update require that the acquirer record, in the same period's financial statements, the effect on earnings of changes in depreciation, amortization, or other income effects, if any, as a result of the change to the provisional amounts, calculated as if the accounting had been completed at the acquisition date. The amendments in this Update require an entity to present separately on the face of the income statement or disclose in the notes the portion of the amount recorded in current-period earnings by line item that would have been recorded in previous reporting periods if the adjustment to the provisional amounts had been recognized as of the acquisition date. For public business entities, the amendments in this Update are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2015, including interim periods within those fiscal years. For all other entities, the amendments in this Update are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017. This Update is not expected to have a significant impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 

 F - 17 

 

 

1.SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements (Continued)

 

In November 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-17, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Balance Sheet Classification of Deferred Taxes. The amendments in this Update require that deferred tax liabilities and assets be classified as noncurrent in a classified statement of financial position. The amendments in this Update apply to all entities that present a classified statement of financial position. For public business entities, the amendments in this Update are effective for financial statements issued for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2016, and interim periods within those annual periods. For all other entities, the amendments in this Update are effective for financial statements issued for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018. Earlier application is permitted for all entities as of the beginning of an interim or annual reporting period. The amendments in this Update may be applied either prospectively to all deferred tax liabilities and assets or retrospectively to all periods presented. This Update is not expected to have a significant impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 

In January 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-01, Financial Instruments – Overall (Subtopic 825-10): Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities. This Update applies to all entities that hold financial assets or owe financial liabilities and is intended to provide more useful information on the recognition, measurement, presentation, and disclosure of financial instruments. Among other things, this Update (a) requires equity investments (except those accounted for under the equity method of accounting or those that result in consolidation of the investee) to be measured at fair value with changes in fair value recognized in net income; (b) simplifies the impairment assessment of equity investments without readily determinable fair values by requiring a qualitative assessment to identify impairment; (c) eliminates the requirement to disclose the fair value of financial instruments measured at amortized cost for entities that are not public business entities; (d) eliminates the requirement for public business entities to disclose the method(s) and significant assumptions used to estimate the fair value that is required to be disclosed for financial instruments measured at amortized cost on the balance sheet; (e) requires public business entities to use the exit price notion when measuring the fair value of financial instruments for disclosure purposes; (f) requires an entity to present separately in other comprehensive income the portion of the total change in the fair value of a liability resulting from a change in the instrument-specific credit risk when the entity has elected to measure the liability at fair value in accordance with the fair value option for financial instruments; (g) requires separate presentation of financial assets and financial liabilities by measurement category and form of financial asset (that is, securities or loans and receivables) on the balance sheet or the accompanying notes to the financial statements; and (h) clarifies that an entity should evaluate the need for a valuation allowance on a deferred tax asset related to available-for-sale securities in combination with the entity’s other deferred tax assets. For public business entities, the amendments in this Update are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. For all other entities including not-for-profit entities and employee benefit plans within the scope of Topics 960 through 965 on plan accounting, the amendments in this Update are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019. All entities that are not public business entities may adopt the amendments in this Update earlier as of the fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company is currently evaluating the impact the adoption of the standard will have on the Company’s financial position or results of operations.

 

 F - 18 

 

 

1.SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements (Continued)

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842).  The standard requires lessees to recognize the assets and liabilities that arise from leases on the balance sheet.  A lessee should recognize in the statement of financial position a liability to make lease payments (the lease liability) and a right-of-use asset representing its right to use the underlying asset for the lease term.  A short-term lease id defined as one in which: (a) the lease term is 12 months or less, and (b) there is not an option to purchase the underlying asset that the lessee is reasonably certain to exercise.  For short-term leases, lessees may elect to recognize lease payments over the lease term on a straight-line basis.  For public business entities, the amendments in this Update are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within those years.  For all other entities, the amendments in this Update are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and for interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020.  The amendments should be applied at the beginning of the earliest period presented using a modified retrospective approach with earlier application permitted as of the beginning of an interim or annual reporting period.

 

Reclassification of Comparative Amounts

 

Certain items previously reported have been reclassified to conform to the current year’s reporting format. Such reclassifications did not affect net income or stockholders’ equity.

 

2.RESTATEMENT

 

The Company determined there was an unrecorded liability related to the post retirement deferred compensation and split dollar arrangement with the previous president of the Bank which was entered into in 1997. The obligation is funded by an insurance policy described in Footnote 12. As a result the Company recorded a combined liability of $2,476,087, a related deferred tax asset of $592,760, and a reduction to retained earnings of $1,883,327.

 

   As of December 31, 2014 
   As Previously         
   Reported   Adjustment   As Restated 
             
Other Assets  $8,197,043   $592,760   $8,789,803 
Total Assets   307,756,911    592,760    308,349,671 
                
Other Liabilities   9,027,309    2,476,087    11,503,396