10-K 1 mg_10k.htm FORM 10-K UNITED STATES

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549


FORM 10-K


[ X ]  ANNUAL REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(D) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2014


[  ]  TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE

SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from ____________ to ____________


Commission file number 333-174287


             MAGELLAN GOLD CORPORATION             
(Name of Registrant in its Charter)


         Nevada       
(State or other jurisdiction
of incorporation or organization)

        27-3566922         
I.R.S. Employer
Identification Number


2010A Harbison Drive # 312, Vacaville, CA  95687
(Address of principal executive offices)                    (Zip Code)


Registrant's telephone number, including area code:   (707) 884-3766


Securities registered under Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act: None


Securities registered under Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act: None


Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act

Yes [   ] No [ X ]


Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act. Yes [   ] No [ X ]


Note – Checking the box above will not relieve any registrant required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act from their obligations under those Sections.


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes [ X  ] No [   ]


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of



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Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes [ X  ] No [  ]


Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant  to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained,  to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.   [  X  ]


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See definition of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act (check one):


Large accelerated filer [   ] Accelerated filer [   ] Non-accelerated filer [   ] (Do not check if a smaller reporting company) Smaller reporting company [ X ]


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes [   ] No [ X ]


The aggregate market value of the 2,498,090 shares of voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the Company calculated by taking the last sales price of the Company's common stock of $0.03 on March 13, 2015 was $1,466,073.


The number of shares outstanding of the registrant’s common stock, as of March 17, 2015 is 48,869,091.


List hereunder the following documents if incorporated by reference and the Part of the Form 10-K (e.g., Part I, Part II, etc.) into which the document is incorporated: (1) Any annual report to security holders; (2) Any proxy or information statement; and (3) Any prospectus filed pursuant to Rule 424(b) or (c) under the Securities Act of 1933.  The listed documents should be clearly described for identification purposes:


None.





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Forward-looking Statements

In General


This report contains statements that plan for or anticipate the future.  In this report, forward-looking statements are generally identified by the words "anticipate," "plan," "believe," "expect," "estimate," and the like.  


With respect to our mineral exploration business, these forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements regarding the following:


 

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the risk factors set forth below under “Risk Factors”;

 

 

 

 

*

risks and hazards inherent in the mining business (including environmental hazards, industrial accidents, weather or geologically related conditions);

 

 

 

 

*

uncertainties inherent in our exploratory and developmental activities, including risks relating to permitting and regulatory delays;

 

 

 

 

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our future business plans and strategies;

 

 

 

 

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our ability to commercially develop our mining interests.;

 

 

 

 

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changes that could result from our future acquisition of new mining properties or businesses;

 

 

 

 

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expectations regarding competition from other companies;

 

 

 

 

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effects of environmental and other governmental regulations;

 

 

 

 

*

the worldwide economic downturn and difficult conditions in the global capital and credit markets; and

 

 

 

 

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our ability to raise additional financing necessary to conduct our business.


Forward looking statements may include estimated mineral reserves and resources which could differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements. The factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements include:


 

*

the risk factors set forth below under “Risk Factors”;

 

 

 

 

*

changes in the market prices of precious minerals, including gold; and

 

 

 

 

*

uncertainties inherent in the estimation of ore reserves.


Readers are cautioned not to put undue reliance on forward-looking statements. We disclaim any intent or obligation to update publicly these forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


In light of the significant uncertainties inherent in the forward-looking statements made in this Report, the inclusion of this information should not be regarded as a representation by us or any other person that our objectives and plans will be achieved.



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PART I


ITEM 1.       DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS


INTRODUCTION


About Our Company


Magellan Gold Corporation was formed and organized effective September 28, 2010, under the laws of the State of Nevada.  We are an exploration stage company and our principal business is the acquisition and exploration of mineral resources in Arizona, California and Nevada. We have not presently determined whether the properties to which we have mining rights contain mineral deposits that are economically recoverable.


We were formed and organized by Athena Silver Corporation (“Athena”), a Delaware corporation, and by John C. Power and John D. Gibbs, two of the control persons and principal shareholders of Athena. Effective September 2010, we issued an aggregate of 33 million shares of common stock to our founders in consideration of $.0025 per share:  30 million shares were issued to Messrs. Power and Gibbs and 3 million shares were issued to Athena. During 2011, the majority of the shares issued to Athena were distributed, in the nature of a spin-off dividend of such shares, to the shareholders of Athena, as of a Record Date of December 31, 2010, pro rata.


Our initial focus was on two mining leases secured in 2010 to explore 70 unpatented lode claims known as the “Secret Claims” in Washoe County, Nevada and 10 unpatented lode claims known as the “Randall Claims” in Churchill County, Nevada.


During 2011, we hired consulting geologists to review our exploration opportunities and recommend work programs.  In March 2011, we also secured an option to lease 9 patented mining claims as part of the “Secret Claims” project area.  During 2011 and 2012, on advice from our consulting geologist, we hired an outside firm to collect soil samples over our Secret claims in a standardized grid.   In November 2011 and May 2012, we collected and assayed 85 and 217 soil samples, respectively, in the project area.  After consideration of the results from our soil survey, the costs of our annual lease obligations to maintain these claims, the remote location of the project and our other opportunities that Magellan had secured that were deemed more attractive by management, we dropped our option to lease the 9 patented claims in June 2012 and did not renew our mining lease in September 2012 for the 70 unpatented lode claims.


In May 2012, we filed a notice with the BLM for permission to drill and trench on our Randall claims.  The BLM notified us that our proposed project area conflicted with lands that were held by the State of Nevada under Federal Aid Highway Material Site Rights-of-Way and that a material site is not open to entry or location under the general mining laws.   As a result, we did not renew our Randall Claims lease in August of 2012.


In August 2012, we entered into an Option Agreement with Columbus Silver (US) Corporation (“Columbus”) to purchase  “The Silver District Claims” consisting of 85 unpatented lode mining claims, 4 patented lode claims, an Arizona mining lease of 154.66 acres and 23 unpatented mill site claims, totaling over 2,000 acres in Lap Paz County, Arizona.   In addition, Magellan staked 9



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unpatented claims in 2013 in the Silver District adjacent to the land package then under option from Columbus.  Magellan renewed in 2014 only 2 of the 9 claims staked in 2013.   

Effective September 29, 2014, we entered into a Purchase Agreement  with Columbus Silver (US) Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Columbus Exploration Corporation (TSXV:CLX) to purchase the patented and unpatented mining claims that had been covered by the Option Agreement.   The Purchase Agreement superseded the Option Agreement and conveyed the Silver District Claims to the Company.  In consideration of the Silver District Claims, we made a one time payment to Columbus in the amount of $100,000.  Following our purchase of the Silver District Claims, we formed a new wholly-owned subsidiary “Gulf + Western Industries, Inc.” (“Gulf + Western”) and transferred our interest in the Silver District Claims to Gulf + Western.


Magellan also staked fifty (50) unpatented lode mining claims known as the “Sacramento Mountains” project totaling approximately 1,000 acres, in which they have a 100% unencumbered interest, on Federal (BLM) land in October 2012 and filed the claims with the BLM in January 2013.    The Project is located in the northwest corner of the Sacramento Mountains approximately 10 miles WNW of Needles, California.

Our primary focus during the next twelve months will be to further explore, and, if warranted and feasible, permit and pursue exploration drilling on these mineral properties subject to available funding.  

We have only had limited operations to date and we rely upon the sale of our securities and borrowings from significant investors to fund our operations, as we have not generated any revenue.

Our principal executive offices are currently located at 2010A Harbison Drive # 312, Vacaville, CA  95687.  Our telephone number is (707) 884-3766, and our Internet website is www.magellangoldcorp.com.


Conflicts of Interests

Athena Silver Corporation is a company under common control. Mr. Power is our President and director and is also a director and CEO of Athena. Mr. Power and Mr. Gibbs are significant investors in both Magellan and Athena.

Silver Saddle Resources, LLC (“Silver Saddle”) is a private company under common control. Mr. Power and Mr. Gibbs are significant investors and managing members of Silver Saddle.


Magellan, Athena and Silver Saddle are each is involved in the business of acquisition and exploration of mineral resources.


The existence of common ownership and common management could result in significantly different operating results or financial position from those that could have resulted had Magellan, Athena and Silver Saddle been autonomous.  In addition, the common ownership could result in significant conflicts of interest both in terms of the allocation of working capital as well as under the doctrine of corporate opportunity, inasmuch as all three entities are engaged in mineral exploration in the United States.  Messrs. Power and Gibbs have not adopted any policy or guidelines to mitigate the potential adverse effects of their conflicting interests between and among, Magellan, Athena and Silver Saddle.



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  Investors in Magellan should be cognizant that the interests of Magellan may, in the future, be in conflict with the other activities of Magellan’s control persons.


Our Properties

Our primary focus during the next twelve months, and depending on available resources, will be to acquire, explore, and if warranted and feasible, permit and develop our remaining mineral properties.

We have two material mineral properties that we currently intend to engage in exploration activities and, if commercially recoverable deposits are found, mineral development activities.  To date, we have only begun preliminary exploration work.  


The following map illustrates the location of our significant properties in the States of Arizona and California:



[f10k2014v13clean001.jpg]





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SILVER DISTRICT, LA PAZ COUNTY, ARIZONA


Effective August 28, 2012, Magellan entered into an Option Agreement  with Columbus Silver  Corporation, a Nevada corporation (“Columbus”), which Option Agreement grants the Company the right to acquire all of Columbus’ interest in its Silver District properties located in La Paz County, Arizona. Magellan paid Columbus an initial $63,200 on signing the Option and an additional $50,000 before December 31, 2012.   An amendment was signed in August 2013 extending the payments to exercise the option.


Effective September 29, 2014, we entered into a Purchase Agreement  with Columbus Silver (US) Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Columbus Exploration Corporation (TSXV:CLX) to purchase the patented and unpatented mining claims that had been covered by the Option Agreement.   The Purchase Agreement superseded the Option Agreement and conveyed the Silver District Claims to the Company.  In consideration of the Silver District Claims, we made a one-time payment to Columbus in the amount of $100,000.   Following our purchase of the Silver District Claims, we formed a new wholly-owned subsidiary “Gulf + Western Industries, Inc.” (“Gulf + Western”) and transferred our interest in the Silver District Claims to Gulf + Western.

A Notice of Intent to Operate was submitted to the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Field Office in Yuma, AZ on March 15, 2013. It was accepted as complete and approved for bonding by BLM on April 4, 2013. The Notice comprises a program of up to twelve (12) exploratory drill holes on twelve (12) drill pads on Magellan’s unpatented claims near the Papago and Red Cloud mines in the Silver District.  Magellan submitted a personal (cash) bond in the amount of $21,457 to the State BLM office in Phoenix on December 20, 2013 and the bond was accepted by BLM on December 26, 2013.  Magellan also applied for a State of Arizona permit to drill for all twelve drill holes on November 6, 2013.  A Drilling Authorization Certificate was issued to Magellan and its drilling contractor by the Arizona Department of Water Resources on February 5, 2014.  Our initial drill program was completed in May 2014 as described below.


Upon completion of the drill program and site reclamation, our NOI was completed and our bond of $21,457 was refunded in 2014.    


Magellan drilled two (PA-01 / 336 total depth & PA-02 / 380 total depth) core holes to test its Papago target and one (RC-01/ 244 total depth) to test its Red Cloud target.  Our consulting geologist selected 52 samples that were delivered to ALS Labs in Reno, NV for analysis.


The highlights of the assay results include the following:


·

Excellent comparison of our core hole PA-01 with historic RC hole with S242P.   Magellan PA-01 intercept of 90 feet grading 6.05 OPT Ag, (including 10 feet of 17.06 OPT Ag), compare very favorably to the historic result of 90 feet grading 5.78 OPT Ag (including 10 feet averaging 14.60 OPT Ag).

·

Previously unreported significant zinc and lead assays from the mineralization in PA-01 4.71% Zn and 1.56% Pb over 90 feet, including 10 feet averaging 8.35% Zn and 4.02% Pb.  

·

PA-01 intercepted a previously unknown vein structure, about 15 feet wide and approximately 50 feet below the known mineralized structure, that includes 3 feet grading 3.64% Zn, 0.62% Pb and 0.15 OPT Ag. The significance of this occurrence relative to the Papago resource area is unknown at this time.



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·

PA-02 was drilled 250 feet east of PA-01 to test for the down plunge extension of that intercept, but did not encounter any mineralization due to offset by a late fault.

·

RC-01 was drilled just north of the Red Cloud open pit to intersect the extension of the Red Cloud vein beneath the Red Cloud Fault.  Although the vein was known to be partly cut off by that fault, the hole intersected over 10 feet of the footwall of the vein, which has never been mined, including five feet grading 3.2% Pb, 7.47% Zn, 0.6 OPT Ag and Trace Au. The granodiorite in the footwall of the vein was extensively altered with stockwork veins for over 50 feet, containing anomalous levels of Pb, Zn, Ag and Au.


The new drill results will be incorporated into the existing historic drill database for use in planning additional drilling of the immediate project area.  Geologic evaluation of the entire district continues as Magellan develops additional drill targets in and around the multiple satellite deposits in the Silver District land package.   We have not filed a new Notice of Intent to Operate with the BLM for follow up drilling.


The Silver District project area  consists of  87 unpatented lode mining claims, 4 patented lode claims, an Arizona mining lease of 154.66 acres and 23 unpatented mill site claims, totaling over 2,000 acres is approximately 80 kilometers (50 miles) north of Yuma in southwest Arizona.  


PATENTED CLAIMS UNDER SILVER DISTRICT PURCHASE AGREEMENT


Red Cloud Patented Mining Claim – MS 749; Parcel #301-34-003 La Paz Co. Assessor

(Subject to lease agreement)

JAMES G. BLAINE Patented Mining Claim – MS 1258-A   Parcel #301-31-001 La Paz Co. Assessor

BLACK ROCK;  Patented Mining Claim – MS 291 Parcel #301-34-002 La Paz Co. Assessor


PACIFIC; Patented Mining Claim – MS 292 Parcel #301-34-002 La Paz Co. Assessor




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ARIZONA STATE MINING LEASE UNDER SILVER DISTRICT PURCHASE

 AGREEMENT


MINERAL EXPLORATION PERMIT #08-114891 - ARIZONA STATE LEASE SIGNED: Sept. 24, 2010   154.66 ACRES


UNPATENTED CLAIMS HELD UNDER SILVER DISTRICT PURCHASE AGREEMENT


Plata No. 1(3rd am)

AMC# 44189 (subject to lease agreement)

Plata No. 2  (2nd Am.)  

AMC# 44190 (subject to lease agreement)

POP #1 (2dAm.)

AMC# 43990

POP #2 (2d Am.)

AMC# 43991

POP #3 (2d Am)

AMC# 43992

POP #4 (2d Am)

AMC# 43993

POP #5 (2d Am)

AMC# 43994

POP #6 (2d Am)

AMC# 43995

POP #7 (2d Am)

AMC# 43996

POP #8 (2d Am)

AMC# 43997

POP #9 (2d Am)

AMC# 43998

POP #10 (2d Am)

AMC# 43999

POP #11 (2d Am)

AMC# 44000

POP #13 (2dAm)

AMC# 44002

POP #14 (2dAm)

AMC# 44003

POP #15 (2dAm)

AMC# 44004

POP #16 (2dAm)

AMC# 44005

POP #17 (Am)

AMC# 44006

POP #19 (Am)

AMC# 44008

POP #21 (Am)

AMC# 44010

POP #22 (Am)

AMC# 44011

POP #24 (2d Am

AMC# 44013

POP #25 (2d Am

AMC# 44014

POP #26 (2d Am

AMC# 44015

POP #27 (2d Am

AMC# 44016

POP #28 (2d Am

AMC# 44017

POP #29 (2d Am

AMC# 44018

POP #30 (Am)

AMC# 44019

POP #31 (Am)

AMC# 44020

POP #32 (Am)

AMC# 44021

POP #37 (2d Am)

AMC# 44026

POP #38 (2d Am)

AMC# 44027

POP #43 (Am)

AMC# 44032

POP #50 – POP #51

AMC# 207723-207724

POP #53 – POP #57

AMC# 207725-207729

POP #62

AMC# 207734

RUF #1

AMC # 129269

RUF #2

AMC # 129270

RUF #5

AMC # 129273

RUF #9

AMC # 129277

RUF #10

AMC# 129278

RUF #12

AMC# 129280

RUF #13

AMC# 129281

RUF #14

AMC# 129282

RUF #15

AMC# 129283

RUF #17

AMC# 129285

RUF #18

AMC# 129286

RUF #22

AMC# 129290

RUF #23

AMC# 129291

RUF #24

AMC# 129292

MIL #1

AMC # 129261

MIL #2

AMC# 129262

MIL #3

AMC# 129263

MIL #4

AMC# 129264

MIL #5

AMC# 129265

MIL #6

AMC# 129266

G + W #2

AMC # 129255

G + W #3

AMC # 129256

G + W #4

AMC # 129257

PL-1 – PL-2

AMC # 366944-366945

Arch

AMC # 366937

RU 1 – RU 3

AMC # 366947-366949

CH-1 – CH-6

AMC # 366938-366943

POP 39

AMC # 366946

A-1

AMC # 369924

RIHO

AMC # 369925

MAX 13-26

AMC # 386562-386575

Ruth #1 Amended

AMC # 42216

Ruth #3 Amended

AMC# 44218

Ruth #5 Amended

AMC# 44220

Ruth #7 Amended

AMC# 44222

Plata No. 3 Amended

AMC# 44191

Plata No. 5 Amended

AMC# 44193

Plata No. 6 Amended

AMC# 44194

Plata No.10 Amended

AMC# 44195

Plata No.11 Amended

AMC# 44196

Plata No.12 Amended

AMC# 44197

Plata No.14

AMC# 44199

Plata No.15 Amended

AMC# 44200

Chuck No.5

AMC# 44208

Chuck No.7

AMC# 44210

Chuck No.9

AMC# 44212

STAKED & MAINTAINED BY MAGELLAN IN SILVER DISTRICT

UNPATENTED BLM CLAIMS

SD 30

AMC424398

SD 37

AMC424404


The Silver District Claims are subject to third party lease and/or net smelter royalties of varying percentages.



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SACRAMENTO MOUNTAINS PROJECT

The Sacramento Project is located approximately 10 miles WNW of Needles, California in the northwest corner of the Sacramento Mountains.

Magellan staked fifty (50) unpatented lode mining claims (SMF 1-50), in which they have a 100% unencumbered interest, on Federal (BLM) land in October 2012.  

BLM Claim No.                                                    

 

 Claim Name

CAMC 0305871 – CAMC 0305920

 

SMF 1 – 50


This property is currently without known reserves and our proposed program is exploratory in nature.


A Notice of Intent to Operate was submitted to the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Field Office in Needles, CA on February 11, 2013. It was accepted as complete and approved for bonding by BLM on February 11, 2013. The Notice comprises a program of up to six (6) exploratory drill holes on six (6) drill pads on Magellan’s SMF claim group.  Magellan submitted a personal (cash) bond in the amount of $8,639.00 to the Needles BLM office on August 30, 2013; at which time Magellan was authorized to commence exploratory drilling.  The Notice was good for two (2) years from date of acceptance and has been extended until February 2017.


Discontinued Mineral Interests


Pony Express Claims


On November 18, 2010, we staked two unpatented lode mining claims (the “Pony Express Claims”) giving us the right to explore, develop and conduct mining operations on these claims located in Churchill County, Nevada.    We did not renew these claims in 2014.   


BLM Claim No.

Claim Name

 BLM# NMC1036374

Pony Express #1

 BLM# NMC1036375

Pony Express #10


Unpatented Mining Claims:  The Mining Law of 1872


Except for the Arizona State Mineral Lease and patented claims held within the Silver District Claims, our mineral rights consist of leases covering "unpatented" mining claims created and maintained in accordance with the U.S. General Mining Law of 1872, or the “General Mining Law.” Unpatented mining claims are unique U.S. property interests, and are generally considered to be subject to greater title risk than other real property interests because the validity of unpatented mining claims is often uncertain. The validity of an unpatented mining claim, in terms of both its location and its maintenance, is dependent on strict compliance with a complex body of federal and state statutory and decisional law that supplement the General Mining Law. Also, unpatented mining claims and related rights, including rights to use the surface, are subject to possible challenges by third parties or contests by the federal government. In addition, there are few public records that definitively control the issues of validity and ownership of unpatented mining claims. We have not filed a patent application for any of our unpatented mining claims that are located on federal public lands in the United States and, under possible future legislation to change the General Mining Law, patents may be difficult to obtain.




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Our exploration, development and mining rights relate to patented and unpatented mining claims covering federal and State lands in Arizona, California and Nevada.  Some of our patented and unpatented claims are held under the Silver District Option with Columbus Silver.  


Location of mining claims under the General Mining Law, is a self-initiation system under which a person physically stakes an unpatented mining claim on public land that is open to location, posts a location notice and monuments the boundaries of the claim in compliance with federal laws and regulations and with state location laws, and files notice of that location in the county records and with the Bureau of Land Management (“BLM”). Mining claims can be located on land as to which the surface was patented into private ownership under the Stockraising Homestead Act of 1916, 43 U.S.C. §299, but the mining claimant cannot injure, damage or destroy the surface owner's permanent improvements and must pay for damage to crops caused by prospecting. Discovery of a valuable mineral deposit, as defined under federal law, is essential to the validity of an unpatented mining claim and is required on each mining claim individually. The location is made as a lode claim for mineral deposits found as veins or rock in place, or as a placer claim for other deposits. While the maximum size and shape of lode claims and placer claims are established by statute, there are no limits on the number of claims one person may locate or own. The General Mining Law also contains provision for acquiring five-acre claims of non-mineral land for mill site purposes. A mining operation typically is comprised of many mining claims.


The holder of a valid unpatented mining claim has possessory title to the land covered thereby, which gives the claimant exclusive possession of the surface for mining purposes and the right to mine and remove minerals from the claim. Legal title to land encompassed by an unpatented mining claim remains in the United States, and the government can contest the validity of a mining claim. The General Mining Law requires the performance of annual assessment work for each claim, and subsequent to enactment of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976, 43 U.S.C. §1201  et seq., mining claims are invalidated if evidence of assessment work is not timely filed with BLM. However, in 1993 Congress enacted a provision requiring payment of $140 per year claim maintenance fee in lieu of performing assessment work, subject to an exception for small miners having less than 10 claims. No royalty is paid to the United States with respect to minerals mined and sold from a mining claim.  In addition, in Nevada, holders of unpatented mining claims are required to pay the county recorder of the county in which the claim is situated an annual fee of $10.50 per claim.


The General Mining Law provides a procedure for a qualified claimant to obtain a mineral patent   (i.e., fee simple title to the mining claim) under certain conditions. It has become much more difficult in recent years to obtain a patent. Beginning in 1994, Congress imposed a funding moratorium on the processing of mineral patent applications which had not reached a designated stage in the patent process at the time the moratorium went into effect. Additionally, Congress has considered several bills in recent years to repeal the General Mining Law or to amend it to provide for the payment of royalties to the United States and to eliminate or substantially limit the patent provisions of the law.


Mining claims are conveyed by deed, or leased by the claimant to the party seeking to develop the property. Such a deed or lease (or memorandum of it) needs to be recorded in the real property records of the county where the property is located, and evidence of such transfer needs to be filed with BLM. It is not unusual for the grantor or lessor to reserve a royalty, which as to precious metals often is expressed as a percentage of net smelter returns.




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Patented Mining Claims


Patented mining claims, such as the ones included in our Silver District Option, are mining claims on federal lands that are held in fee simple by the owner.  No maintenance fees or royalties are payable to the BLM; however lease payments and royalties are payable under the operative leases.


LOCATION, HISTORY AND GEOLOGY OF OUR PROPERTIES


SILVER DISTRICT


The property covers the heart of the historic Silver District in La Paz County, approximately 80 kilometers (50 miles) north of Yuma in southwest Arizona.  


This property is currently without known reserves and our proposed program is exploratory in nature.



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[f10k2014v13clean002.jpg]



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Location, Access and Composition


The Silver District is located approximately 50 miles by road north of Yuma, Arizona on the southeast flank of the Trigo Mountains. Access to the property via a 4WD vehicle from Yuma is seasonally good, with 34 miles of paved or well maintained gravel road and another 14 miles of seasonally maintained two track roads to the Red Cloud Mine, in the southwestern corner of the district.  

North on US 95 from Yuma. Turn on the road to Martinez Lake approximately 2 1/2 miles north of the Imperial Dam turn-off (from US 95N); after turning west, you travel through the Yuma Proving Grounds about 6 or 7 miles. There is a trailer park-type settlement on the east side of the lake and a sign to Martinez Lake, turn right (North) towards Wildlife Refuge and that road is known as the Red Cloud mine Road. Stay on Red Cloud Mine road along the wash and actually passes back through a corner of the Yuma Proving Grounds and leads to the Red Cloud Mine.



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[f10k2014v13clean003.jpg]




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The “Silver District” project consists of 87 unpatented lode mining claims, 4 patented lode claims, an Arizona mining lease of 154.66 acres and 23 unpatented mill site claims, totaling over 2,000 acres in Lap Paz County, Arizona.   

The underlying claims are also subject to third party lease and net smelter royalties of varying percentages.


History


The Silver District was discovered in 1862 and supported small but significant silver-lead production, largely from underground operations at the Red Cloud and Clip (Blaine patented claim) mines, during the ten year period from 1883 to 1893.  Recorded production is estimated at 1.56 million ounces silver and 2.33 million pounds lead.  There have been occasional small scale development activities since that time and the area remains a site for collection of high value, specimen wulfenite crystals.


Modern exploration, principally shallow drilling, metallurgical test work and a number of scoping studies to evaluate development of the silver and fluorspar deposits of the District, was carried out intermittently from 1973 through 1992 by Gulf + Western Industries (no relation to our recently-formed subsidiary) through its New Jersey Zinc subsidiary, Orbex Resources and its successor companies, Silver Glance Resources and Silverspar Minerals.  A total of 465 holes for an aggregate length of 62,866 feet were drilled during this period.  The project has been largely inactive since that time.


Columbus Silver acquired the project in 2004 and has focused its efforts largely on re-consolidation of the property position, organization and compilation of technical records and limited field mapping and sampling.


Power and Water


There are no modern mine developments or equipment on the property. The Red Cloud Mine property has a covered shop and full time watchman with living facilities. It also has a water well and a small diesel generator.   There is no commercial water or power available at the site and no work has been done to date to access what sources may be available for a commercial operation.

Geology


The Silver District deposits, consisting of variable silver and lead-zinc mineralization in massive quartz-calcite-fluorspar-barite veins and breccia zones, occur within three major north to north-northwest trending vein systems with a collective strike length of about eight miles.  The veins are hosted by Tertiary volcanic and volcaniclastic rock formations, which overly an older, possibly Pre-Cambrian crystalline to metamorphic basement.  Potential ore-grade silver (lead-zinc), fluorspar and barite deposits occur as pod-like bodies within all three vein systems.  Various historic resource estimates, all pre-dating NI 43-101 reporting standards, have been carried out by past operators in the District.




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EXPLORATION PLANS


Subject to available funding, the following is our exploration plans for the Silver District.


Past explorers in the District identified a number of outcropping ore bodies (some of which saw production in the late 19th and early 20th centuries) and defined new and larger resources to moderate depths with drilling.  These known occurrences are the exposed portions of three long, through going fault trends in the District.  Potential for the discovery of additional mineralization is likely to be at depth below known ore bodies and along the fault trends in between known ore bodies. The best methods for pursuing this objective are drilling at depth below known ore bodies, using geology as a targeting tool and remote sensing tools such as geophysics to look for blind (non-outcropping) mineralization in the unexplored areas described.  Positive results from geophysical surveys would likely require testing with a drill.  Both of these approaches will need to be progressive, with drilling and geophysical orientation over the best known mineralization on one fault or vein trend, as defined by geological review.  Currently, the known mineralization at the historic Red Cloud and Papago mines would be our initial exploration targets.


Geological mapping, with rock sampling and assaying, will help guide the drilling and geophysical surveying. The geophysical survey will be designed to test for sulfide mineralization within the vein structure below the currently known resources at Red Cloud and Papago and, if successful, will be used in future campaigns to test for similar mineralization under other historic resource areas in the district and the unexplored areas between them. Drilling of geologically and geophysically defined targets will initially be done by coring to provide control on the geology of the vein system and to help in characterizing the mineralization and grades therein.


The geological survey will cost approximately $100,000 for this phase of work and subsequent computer modeling of the new mineralization and known resources. The orientation geophysical surveying will cost approximately $50,000.  Drilling and assaying of approximately 6000 feet of core to test the current geological and expected geophysical targets will cost approximately $350,000.  


This program is progressive in that drilling is dependent on successful targeting by geology or geophysics and follow-up drilling is dependent on success in the initial holes.


The exploration program will be supervised by Douglas R Bowden, a consulting geologist based in Sparks, Nevada. Mr. Bowden has over 35 years of experience in mining exploration in the United States, Canada and Mexico and is a licensed geologist in the State of Utah.


SACRAMENTO MOUNTAINS PROJECT


This property is currently without known reserves and our proposed program is exploratory in nature.


Location, Access and Composition


The Sacramento Project is located approximately 10 miles WNW of Needles, California in the northwest corner of the Sacramento Mountains. The northern end of the Project is immediately south of I-40 and existing utility service roads and 4WD roads provide access to the entirety of the project area.




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Magellan staked fifty (50) unpatented lode mining claims (SMF 1-50) or approximately 1,000 acres, in which they have a 100% unencumbered interest, on Federal (BLM) land in October 2012.  The claims were properly recorded in the San Bernardino County and with the Bureau of Land Management. The claims are currently in good standing until September 1, 2015, by which time Federal maintenance fees of $155 per claim must be paid to the BLM in Sacramento. In addition, a Notice of Intent to Hold must be recorded in San Bernardino County.





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Power and Water


Commercial power is available on U.S. Highway 40. The availability of water is unknown at this time.


Geology


The Company’s claim block consists of a sequence of Mid-Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks series that unconformably overlie a much older, possibly Pre-Cambrian metamorphic and crystalline complex that also dominates the central core of the Sacramento Mountains.  The entire sequence has been eroded and much of the flanks of the mountains, including the Company’s property, is covered by a gravel pediment or active gravel washes. A number of epithermal veins of quartz-calcite-barite composition cut the volcanic and sedimentary rocks and, in some places, have historically been explored for copper, silver and gold.  The veins occur as swarms of discrete thinner veins within wider zones that may be tens of feet wide and several hundred feet long.  The veins dip moderately to steeply and strike directions vary. There is some evidence in other parts of the Sacramento Mountains that the unconformity between the Tertiary and basement rocks may be mineralized, but the unconformity is not exposed on the Property and lies at an unknown depth below surface outcroppings of Tertiary rocks. The Company intends to identify and target those veins that might likely continue to depth and also the unconformity below those projections


History


There are a number of historic pits, trenches, shafts and adits on various outcroppings within the claim block that probably date to the 1890s, and some may have been reopened in the 1920s. Modern exploration began in the early to mid 1980s by such mining companies as Duval, AMAX, Goldfields (London) and Fischer-Watt Mining. Further work was completed in the area by Fischer-Watt in the mid 1990’s. Exploration activities by these mining companies included surface mapping and geochemical sampling and limited programs of localized drilling near some of the historic workings.  There is only limited anecdotal record of these activities in the Public Domain.


Current State of Exploration


All activities to date have been and those proposed will be entirely exploratory in nature.

The claim group comprises a “green fields” or “grass roots” exploration target. Only the historic diggings of over 100 years ago remain from past activities.  Exploration to date has been limited to land acquisition and preliminary field examination of old workings as shown on USGS Quadrangle maps. AMAX reportedly drilled one RC hole near one of the historic workings within the Company’s current claim block that may have encountered anomalous gold values.  The Company intends to examine all outcroppings within the claim block and sample those that may be associated with mineralization. This work may also include sampling stream sediments, soils and vegetation. The workings that AMAX may have targeted with drilling in the past will be examined with an eye to some initial core drilling by the Company.  The property has no known reserves.

Silver-gold mineralization is contained in quartz-calcite veins that cut Tertiary volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks in the Sacramento Mountains.   This epithermal system comprises numerous vein outcroppings throughout the claim block controlled by the Company.  Evidence of past prospecting activities dating from the 1890s to the 1930s include historic pits, trenches, shallow shafts and adits on outcropping vein sets.  Limited exploration by Fischer-Watt Gold and AMAX in the 1980s included



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an RC hole drilled by AMAX in the northern part of the claim block that reportedly encountered anomalous gold values adjacent to exposed veining in outcrop. The vein has been intermittently traced for over 3000 feet along strike.  Exploration of the exposed vein system and extensions under cover will initially entail core drilling to test down dip from mineralization exposed in the largest adit and to twin the AMAX RC hole. Minor geologic mapping with rock sampling and assaying will be needed to put the drilling into geological context. A geophysical survey of the immediate drill area may be useful in tracing the vein to depth and a possible intersection of it at depth with the regional unconformity between the Tertiary section and the underlying metamorphic basement, a second target for mineralization.


Subject to available funding or finding industry partners, the following is our exploration plans for the Sacramento Mountains.


The proposed exploration program can be accomplished within a six month period, with summer months being difficult for exploration due to high temperatures.  Drilling and assaying 1500’ of core in two holes will cost approximately $90,000.  A geophysical orientation survey and interpretation will cost approximately $15,000. Geologic supervision and mapping plus assaying will cost an additional $25,000. Subsequent drilling will depend on positive results from the initial drilling and the geophysics.  The project includes outcroppings of other vein sets that have not been mapped and sampled by the Company that may represent targets in their own right.


The exploration program will be supervised by Douglas R Bowden, a consulting geologist based in Sparks, Nevada. Mr. Bowden has over 35 years of experience in mining exploration in the United States, Canada and Mexico and is a licensed geologist in the State of Utah.



OUR EXPLORATION PROCESS


Our exploration program is designed to acquire, explore and evaluate exploration properties in an economically efficient manner. We have not at this time identified or delineated any mineral reserves on any of our properties. 


Our current focus is primarily on the exploration of our Silver District (Arizona) and Sacramento Mountains Project. Currently, our contract geologists collect samples and deliver them to third party labs for analysis. We plan to develop a more formal sample collection and analysis process in the near future; this process will include appropriate quality assurance and quality control procedures.



We expect our exploration work on a given property to proceed generally in three phases. Decisions about proceeding to each successive phase will take into consideration the completion of the previous phases and our analysis of the results of those phases.




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The first phase is intended to determine whether a prospect warrants further exploration and involves:


·

researching the available geologic literature;

·

interviewing geologists, mining engineers and others familiar with the prospect sites;

·

conducting geologic mapping, geophysical testing and geochemical testing;

·

examining any existing workings, such as trenches, prospect pits, shafts or tunnels;

·

digging trenches that allow for an examination of surface vein structures as well as for efficient reclamation, re-contouring and re-seeding of disturbed areas; and,

·

analyzing samples for minerals that are known to have occurred in the test area.


Subject to obtaining the necessary permits in a timely manner, the first phase can typically be completed on an individual property in several months at a cost of less than $200,000.


The second phase is intended to identify any mineral deposits of potential economic importance and would involve:


·

examining underground characteristics of mineralization that were previously identified;

·

conducting more detailed geologic mapping;

·

conducting more advanced geochemical and geophysical surveys;

·

conducting more extensive trenching; and

·

conducting exploratory drilling.


Subject to obtaining the necessary permits in a timely manner, the second phase can typically be completed on an individual property in nine to twelve months at a cost of less than $1 million. None of our properties has reached the second phase.


The third phase is intended to precisely define depth, width, length, tonnage and value per ton of any deposit that has been identified and would involve:


·

drilling to develop the mining site;

·

conducting metallurgical testing; and

·

obtaining other pertinent technical information required to define an ore reserve and complete a feasibility study.


Depending upon the nature of the particular deposit, the third phase on any one property could take one to five years or more and cost well in excess of $1 million.  None of our properties has reached the third phase. 


We intend to explore and develop our properties ourselves, although our plans could change depending on the terms and availability of financing and the terms or merits of any joint venture proposals.


PLAN OF EXPLORATION


The further exploration on our Silver District (Arizona) and Sacramento Mountains Project (California) during 2015 in the manner previously described is contingent upon securing additional loans or equity funding.



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GOLD PRICES

  

Our operating results are substantially dependent upon the world market prices of gold. We have no control over gold prices, which can fluctuate widely. The volatility of such prices is illustrated by the following table, which sets forth the high and low prices of gold (as reported by www.kitco.com) per ounce during the periods indicated:

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

2014

2013

2012

 

HIGH

LOW

HIGH

LOW

HIGH

LOW

GOLD

$1,385.00

$1,142.00

$1,693.75

$1,192.00

$1,791.75

$1,540.00


These historical prices are not indicative of future gold prices. 


MARKETING

  

All of our mining operations, if successful, will produce precious metals in doré form or a concentrate that contains precious metals.


We plan to refine and market our precious metals doré and concentrates using a geographically diverse group of third party smelters and refiners. The loss of any one smelter or refiner may have a material adverse effect if alternate smelters and refiners are not available. We believe there is sufficient global capacity available to address the loss of any one smelter or refiner.


HEDGING ACTIVITES


Our strategy is to provide shareholders with leverage to changes in gold prices by selling gold production at market prices. We may sell gold from our future mines, if any, both pursuant to forward contracts and at spot prices prevailing at the time of sale. We may also enter into derivative contracts to protect the selling price for certain anticipated gold production and to manage risks associated with commodities and foreign currencies.


GOVERNMENT REGULATION


General


Our activities are and will be subject to extensive federal, state and local laws governing the protection of the environment, prospecting, mine development, production, taxes, labor standards, occupational health, mine safety, toxic substances and other matters. The costs associated with compliance with such regulatory requirements are substantial and possible future legislation and regulations could cause additional expense, capital expenditures, restrictions and delays in the development and continued operation of our properties, the extent of which cannot be predicted. In the context of environmental permitting, including the approval of reclamation plans, we must comply with known standards and regulations which may entail significant costs and delays. Although we are committed to environmental responsibility and believe we are in substantial compliance with applicable laws and regulations, amendments to current laws and regulations, more stringent implementation of these laws and regulations through judicial review or administrative action or the adoption of new laws could have a materially adverse effect upon our results of operations.



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Federal Environmental Laws


Certain mining wastes from extraction and beneficiation of ores are currently exempt from the extensive set of Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) regulations governing hazardous waste, although such wastes may be subject to regulation under state law as a solid or hazardous waste. The EPA has worked on a program to regulate these mining wastes pursuant to its solid waste management authority under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (“RCRA”). Certain ore processing and other wastes are currently regulated as hazardous wastes by the EPA under RCRA. If our future mine wastes, if any, were treated as hazardous waste or such wastes resulted in operations being designated as a “Superfund” site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (“CERCLA” or “Superfund”) for cleanup, material expenditures would be required for the construction of additional waste disposal facilities or for other remediation expenditures. Under CERCLA, any present owner or operator of a Superfund site or an owner or operator at the time of its contamination generally may be held liable and may be forced to undertake remedial cleanup action or to pay for the government’s cleanup efforts. Such owner or operator may also be liable to governmental entities for the cost of damages to natural resources, which may be substantial. Additional regulations or requirements may also be imposed upon our future tailings and waste disposal, if any, in Nevada under the Federal Clean Water Act (“CWA”) and state law counterparts. We have reviewed and considered current federal legislation relating to climate change and we do not believe it to have a material effect on our operations. Additional regulation or requirements under any of these laws and regulations could have a materially adverse effect upon our results of operations.


EMPLOYEES AND CONSULTANTS


We have only one part-time employee, Mr. Power, who devotes approximately 25% of his time and attention to our business.  We have agreed to pay Mr. Power $2,500 per month for his services.


We rely heavily on the services of our consulting geologist and other technical consultants.    



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ITEM 1A – RISK FACTORS.


An investment in our securities is speculative and involves a high degree of risk.  Please carefully consider the following risk factors, as well as the possibility of the loss of your entire investment, before deciding to invest in our securities.


Risks Related to our Business


Due to our history of operating losses our auditors are uncertain that we will be able to continue as a going concern.

Our financial statements have been prepared assuming that we will continue as a going concern. Due to our continuing operating losses and negative cash flows from our operations, the reports of our auditors issued in connection with our financial statements for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2014, contain explanatory paragraphs indicating that the foregoing matters raised substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. We cannot provide any assurance that we will be able to continue as a going concern.


We have no history of or experience in mineral production.


We have no history of or experience in producing gold or other metals. In addition, our management lacks technical training and experience with exploring for, starting and/or operating a mine. With no direct training or experience in these areas, our management may not be fully aware of many of the specific requirements related to working within this industry. Their decisions and choices may not take into account standard engineering or managerial approaches mineral exploration companies commonly use.  Our operations, earnings and ultimate financial success could suffer due to our management’s lack of experience in this industry.  As a result, we would be subject to all of the risks associated with establishing a new mining operation and business enterprise. We may never successfully establish mining operations, and any such operations may not achieve profitability.


Our principal shareholders and control persons are also principal shareholders and control persons of Athena and Silver Saddle, which could result in conflicts with the interests of minority stockholders.


Messrs. Gibbs and Power are control persons and principal shareholders of Magellan, Athena and Silver Saddle.  Magellan, Athena and Silver Saddle are engaged in mineral exploration activities, although in different geographical regions. While the geographical focus of the companies is different, numerous conflicts could arise in the future.  For example, Messrs. Gibbs and Power have provided the majority of working capital for all three companies to date, and in the likely event that these companies require additional capital in the future their resources may be inadequate to finance the activities of all. In addition, if new prospects become available, a conflict may exist with respect to which company to offer those opportunities. Messrs. Gibbs and Power have not developed a conflict of interest policy to mitigate the potential adverse effects of these conflicts and as a result these conflicts represent a significant risk to the shareholders of the Company. Conflicts for access to limited resources and opportunities cannot be eliminated completely, and investors should be aware of their potential.






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Our principal executive officer intends to devote only a limited amount of his time and attention to our business.


Mr. Power is the principal executive officer of both Magellan and Athena.  He anticipates that he will only devote approximately 25% of his time and attention to our business.  This limited focus could result in significant delays in our exploration activities and ability to generate revenues and profits, if any, in the future.


We have no proven or probable reserves.


We are currently in the exploration stage and have no proven or probable reserves, as those terms are defined by the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) on any of our properties.   


In order to demonstrate the existence of proven or probable reserves under SEC guidelines, it would be necessary for us to advance the exploration of our Properties by significant additional delineation drilling to demonstrate the existence of sufficient mineralized material with satisfactory continuity which would provide the basis for a feasibility study which would demonstrate with reasonable certainty that the mineralized material can be economically extracted and produced. We do not have sufficient data to support a feasibility study with regard to the Properties, and in order to perform the drill work to support such feasibility study, we must obtain the necessary permits and funds to continue our exploration efforts. It is possible that, even after we have obtained sufficient geologic data to support a feasibility study on the Properties, such study will conclude that none of the identified mineral deposits can be economically and legally extracted or produced. If we cannot adequately confirm or discover any mineral reserves of precious metals on the Properties, we may not be able to generate any revenues. Even if we discover mineral reserves on the Properties in the future that can be economically developed, the initial capital costs associated with development and production of any reserves found is such that we might not be profitable for a significant time after the initiation of any development or production. The commercial viability of a mineral deposit once discovered is dependent on a number of factors beyond our control, including particular attributes of the deposit such as size, grade and proximity to infrastructure, as well as metal prices. In addition, development of a project as significant as the ones we might be planning will likely require significant debt financing, the terms of which could contribute to a delay of profitability.


The exploration of mineral properties is highly speculative in nature, involves substantial expenditures and is frequently non-productive.


Mineral exploration is highly speculative in nature and is frequently non-productive. Substantial expenditures are required to:


•  establish ore reserves through drilling and metallurgical and other testing techniques;

•  determine metal content and metallurgical recovery processes to extract metal from the ore;  and,

•  design mining and processing facilities.


If we discover ore at the Properties, we expect that it would be several additional years from the initial phases of exploration until production is possible. During this time, the economic feasibility of production could change. As a result of these uncertainties, there can be no assurance that our exploration programs will result in proven and probable reserves in sufficient quantities to justify commercial operations.



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Even if our exploration efforts at the Properties are successful, we may not be able to raise the funds necessary to develop the Properties.


If our exploration efforts at the Properties are successful, our current estimates indicate that we would be required to raise approximately $50 million in external financing to develop and construct the mines. Sources of external financing could include bank borrowings and debt and equity offerings, but financing has become significantly more difficult to obtain in the current market environment. The failure to obtain financing would have a material adverse effect on our growth strategy and our results of operations and financial condition. We currently have no specific plan to obtain the necessary funding and there exist no agreements, commitments or arrangements to provide us with the financing that we will need. There can be no assurance that we will commence production at any of our Properties or generate sufficient revenues to meet our obligations as they become due or obtain necessary financing on acceptable terms, if at all, and we may not be able to secure the financing necessary to begin or sustain production at the Properties. Our failure to raise needed funding could also result in our inability to meet our future royalty and work commitments under our mineral leases, which could result in a forfeiture of our mineral interest altogether and a default under other financial commitments. In addition, should we incur significant losses in future periods, we may be unable to continue as a going concern, and we may not be able to realize our assets and settle our liabilities in the normal course of business at amounts reflected in our financial statements included or incorporated herein by reference.


We may not be able to obtain permits required for development of the Properties.


In the ordinary course of business, mining companies are required to seek governmental permits for expansion of existing operations or for the commencement of new operations. We will be required to obtain numerous permits for our Properties. Obtaining the necessary governmental permits is a complex and time-consuming process involving numerous jurisdictions and often involving public hearings and costly undertakings.  Our efforts to develop the Properties may also be opposed by environmental groups.   In addition, mining projects require the evaluation of environmental impacts for air, water, vegetation, wildlife, cultural, historical, geological, geotechnical, geochemical, soil and socioeconomic conditions. An Environmental Impact Statement would be required before we could commence mine development or mining activities. Baseline environmental conditions are the basis on which direct and indirect impacts of the Properties are evaluated and based on which potential mitigation measures would be proposed. If the Properties were found to significantly adversely impact the baseline conditions, we could incur significant additional costs to avoid or mitigate the adverse impact, and delays in the development of Properties could result.


Permits would also be required for, among other things, storm-water discharge; air quality; wetland disturbance; dam safety (for water storage and/or tailing storage); septic and sewage; and water rights appropriation. In addition, compliance must be demonstrated with the Endangered Species Act and the National Historical Preservation Act.


The mining industry is intensely competitive.


The mining industry is intensely competitive. We may be at a competitive disadvantage because we must compete with other individuals and companies, many of which have greater financial resources, operational experience and technical capabilities than we do. Increased competition could adversely



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affect our ability to attract necessary capital funding or acquire suitable producing properties or prospects for mineral exploration in the future. We may also encounter increasing competition from other mining companies in our efforts to locate acquisition targets, hire experienced mining professionals and acquire exploration resources.


Our future success is subject to risks inherent in the mining industry.


Our future mining operations, if any, would be subject to all of the hazards and risks normally incident to developing and operating mining properties. These risks include:


•  insufficient ore reserves;

•  fluctuations in metal prices and increase in production costs that may make mining of reserves uneconomic;

•  significant environmental and other regulatory restrictions;

•  labor disputes; geological problems;

•  failure of underground stopes and/or surface dams;

•  force majeure events; and

•  the risk of injury to persons, property or the environment.


Our future profitability will be affected by changes in the prices of metals.


If we establish reserves, and complete development of a mine, our profitability and long-term viability will depend, in large part, on the market price of gold. The market prices for metals are volatile and are affected by numerous factors beyond our control, including:


• global or regional consumption patterns;

• supply of, and demand for, gold and other metals;

• speculative activities;

• expectations for inflation; and,

• political and economic conditions.


The aggregate effect of these factors on metals prices is impossible for us to predict. Decreases in metals prices could adversely affect our ability to finance the exploration and development of our properties, which would have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations and cash flows. There can be no assurance that metals prices will not decline. As reported on the website www.kitco.com, during the year  ended December 31, 2014, the high and low settlement prices for gold were $1,385.00 and $1,142.00 per ounce, respectively.


The price of gold may decline in the future. If the price of gold is depressed for a sustained period, we may be forced to suspend operations until the prices increase, and to record asset impairment write-downs. Any continued or increased net losses or asset impairments would adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. 


 We are subject to significant governmental regulations.


Our operations and exploration and development activities are subject to extensive federal, state, and local laws and regulations governing various matters, including:


•  environmental protection;



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•  management and use of toxic substances and explosives;

•  management of natural resources;

•  exploration and development of mines, production and post-closure reclamation;

•  taxation;

•  labor standards and occupational health and safety, including mine safety; and

•  historic and cultural preservation.


Failure to comply with applicable laws and regulations may result in civil or criminal fines or penalties or enforcement actions, including orders issued by regulatory or judicial authorities enjoining or curtailing operations or requiring corrective measures, installation of additional equipment or remedial actions, any of which could result in us incurring significant expenditures. We may also be required to compensate private parties suffering loss or damage by reason of a breach of such laws, regulations or permitting requirements. It is also possible that future laws and regulations, or a more stringent enforcement of current laws and regulations by governmental authorities, could cause additional expense, capital expenditures, restrictions on or suspensions of any future operations and delays in the exploration of our properties.


Changes in mining or environmental laws could increase costs and impair our ability to develop our properties.


From time to time the U.S. Congress may consider revisions in its mining and environmental laws. It remains unclear to what extent new legislation may affect existing mining claims or operations. The effect of any such revisions on our operations cannot be determined conclusively until such revision is enacted; however, such legislation could materially increase costs on properties located on federal lands, such as ours, and such revision could also impair our ability to develop the Properties and to explore and develop other mineral projects.


Mineral exploration and development inherently involves significant and irreducible financial risks. We may suffer from the failure to find and develop profitable mineral deposits.

  

The exploration for and development of mineral deposits involves significant financial risks, which even a combination of careful evaluation, experience and knowledge may not eliminate. Unprofitable efforts may result from the failure to discover mineral deposits. Even if mineral deposits are found, such deposits may be insufficient in quantity and quality to return a profit from production, or it may take a number of years until production is possible, during which time the economic viability of the project may change. Few properties which are explored are ultimately developed into producing mines. Mining companies rely on consultants and others for exploration, development, construction and operating expertise.

  

Substantial expenditures are required to establish ore reserves, extract metals from ores and, in the case of new properties, to construct mining and processing facilities. The economic feasibility of any development project is based upon, among other things, estimates of the size and grade of ore reserves, proximity to infrastructures and other resources (such as water and power), metallurgical recoveries, production rates and capital and operating costs of such development projects, and metals prices. Development projects are also subject to the completion of favorable feasibility studies, issuance and maintenance of necessary permits and receipt of adequate financing.

  

Once a mineral deposit is developed, whether it will be commercially viable depends on a number of factors, including: the particular attributes of the deposit, such as size, grade and proximity to



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infrastructure; government regulations including taxes, royalties and land tenure; land use, importing and exporting of minerals and environmental protection; and mineral prices. Factors that affect adequacy of infrastructure include: reliability of roads, bridges, power sources and water supply; unusual or infrequent weather phenomena; sabotage; and government or other interference in the maintenance or provision of such infrastructure. All of these factors are highly cyclical. The exact effect of these factors cannot be accurately predicted, but the combination may result in not receiving an adequate return on invested capital.

  

Significant investment risks and operational costs are associated with our exploration activities. These risks and costs may result in lower economic returns and may adversely affect our business.


Mineral exploration, particularly for gold, involves many risks and is frequently unproductive. If mineralization is discovered, it may take a number of years until production is possible, during which time the economic viability of the project may change.

  

Development projects may have no operating history upon which to base estimates of future operating costs and capital requirements. Development project items such as estimates of reserves, metal recoveries and cash operating costs are to a large extent based upon the interpretation of geologic data, obtained from a limited number of drill holes and other sampling techniques, and feasibility studies. Estimates of cash operating costs are then derived based upon anticipated tonnage and grades of ore to be mined and processed, the configuration of the ore body, expected recovery rates of metals from the ore, comparable facility and equipment costs, anticipated climate conditions and other factors. As a result, actual cash operating costs and economic returns of any and all development projects may materially differ from the costs and returns estimated, and accordingly, our financial condition and results of operations may be negatively affected.


Our failure to satisfy the financial commitments under the agreements controlling our rights to explore on our current prospects could result in our loss of those potential opportunities.


We hold all of our mineral interests under agreements and commitments that require ongoing financial obligations, including work commitments.  Our failure to satisfy those obligations could result in a loss of those interests.    In such an event, we would be required to recognize an impairment of the assets currently reported in our financial statements.


We are required to obtain government permits to begin new operations. The acquisition of such permits can be materially impacted by third party litigation seeking to prevent the issuance of such permits. The costs and delays associated with such approvals could affect our operations, reduce our revenues, and negatively affect our business as a whole.

  

Mining companies are required to seek governmental permits for the commencement of new operations. Obtaining the necessary governmental permits is a complex and time-consuming process involving numerous jurisdictions and often involving public hearings and costly undertakings. The duration and success of permitting efforts are contingent on many factors that are out of our control. The governmental approval process may increase costs and cause delays depending on the nature of the activity to be permitted, and could cause us to not proceed with the development of a mine. Accordingly, this approval process could harm our results of operations.

  



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Any of our future acquisitions may result in significant risks, which may adversely affect our business.

  

An important element of our business strategy is the opportunistic acquisition of operating mines, properties and businesses or interests therein within our geographical area of interest. While it is our practice to engage independent mining consultants to assist in evaluating and making acquisitions, any mining properties or interests therein we may acquire may not be developed profitably or, if profitable when acquired, that profitability might not be sustained. In connection with any future acquisitions, we may incur indebtedness or issue equity securities, resulting in increased interest expense, or dilution of the percentage ownership of existing shareholders. We cannot predict the impact of future acquisitions on the price of our business or our common stock. Unprofitable acquisitions, or additional indebtedness or issuances of securities in connection with such acquisitions, may impact the price of our common stock and negatively affect our results of operations.

  

Our ability to find and acquire new mineral properties is uncertain. Accordingly, our prospects are uncertain for the future growth of our business.

  

Because mines have limited lives based on proven and probable ore reserves, we may seek to replace and expand our future ore reserves, if any. Identifying promising mining properties is difficult and speculative. Furthermore, we encounter strong competition from other mining companies in connection with the acquisition of properties producing or capable of producing gold.  Many of these companies have greater financial resources than we do. Consequently, we may be unable to replace and expand future ore reserves through the acquisition of new mining properties or interests therein on terms we consider acceptable. As a result, our future revenues from the sale of gold or other precious metals, if any, may decline, resulting in lower income and reduced growth.


Changes in the corporate and securities laws and regulations are likely to increase our costs.

      

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (“SOX”), which became law in July 2002, has required changes that affect our corporate governance, securities disclosure and compliance practices. In response to the requirements of SOX, the SEC and major stock exchanges have promulgated new rules and listing standards covering a variety of subjects. Compliance with these new rules and listing standards are likely to increase our general and administrative costs, and we expect these to continue to increase in the future. In particular, we are required to include the management report on internal control as part of this and future annual reports pursuant to Section 404 of SOX. We have evaluated our internal control systems in order (i) to allow management to report on our internal controls, as required by these laws, rules and regulations, (ii) to provide reasonable assurance that our public disclosure will be accurate and complete, and (iii) to comply with the other provisions of Section 404 of SOX.  We cannot be certain as to the timing of the completion of our evaluation, testing and remediation actions or the impact these may have on our operations.  Furthermore, there is no precedent available by which to measure compliance adequacy.  If we are not able to implement the requirements relating to internal controls and all other provisions of Section 404 in a timely fashion or achieve adequate compliance with these requirements or other requirements of SOX, we might become subject to sanctions or investigation by regulatory authorities such as the SEC or FINRA. Any such action may materially adversely affect our reputation, financial condition and the value of our securities, including our common stock. We expect that SOX and these other laws, rules and regulations will increase legal and financial compliance costs and will make our corporate governance activities more difficult, time-consuming and costly. We also expect that these new requirements will make it more difficult and expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance.



32



If we fail to maintain an effective system of internal controls, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results or prevent fraud. As a result, current and potential shareholders could lose confidence in our financial reporting, this would harm our business and the trading price of our stock.

 

Effective internal controls are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports and effectively prevent fraud. If we cannot provide financial reports or prevent fraud, our business reputation and operating results could be harmed. Inferior internal controls could also cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, which could have a negative effect on the trading price of our stock.


Nevada law and our by-laws protect our directors from certain types of lawsuits.


Nevada law provides that our directors will not be liable to us or our stockholders for monetary damages for all but certain types of conduct as directors.  Our by-laws require us to indemnify our directors and officers against all damages incurred in connection with our business to the fullest extent provided or allowed by law.  The exculpation provisions may have the effect of preventing shareholders from recovering damages against our directors caused by their negligence, poor judgment or other circumstances.  The indemnification provisions may require us to use our assets to defend our directors and officers against claims, including claims arising out of their negligence, poor judgment, or other circumstances.  


Risks Related to Our Stock


Future issuances of our common stock could dilute current shareholders and adversely affect the market if it develops.


We have the authority to issue up to 100 million shares of common stock and 25 million shares of preferred stock and to issue options and warrants to purchase shares of our common stock, without shareholder approval. Future share issuances are likely due to our need to raise additional working capital in the future.  Those future issuances will likely result in dilution to our shareholders.  In addition, we could issue large blocks of our common stock to fend off unwanted tender offers or hostile takeovers without further shareholder approval, which would not only result in further dilution to investors in this offering but could also depress the market value of our common stock, if a public trading market develops.


We may issue preferred stock that would have rights that are preferential to the rights of our common stock that could discourage potentially beneficial transactions to our common shareholders.


An issuance of shares of preferred stock could result in a class of outstanding securities that would have preferences with respect to voting rights and dividends and in liquidation over our common stock and could, upon conversion or otherwise, have all of the rights of our common stock.  Our Board of Directors' authority to issue preferred stock could discourage potential takeover attempts or could delay or prevent a change in control through merger, tender offer, proxy contest or otherwise by making these attempts more difficult or costly to achieve.  The issuance of preferred stock could impair the voting, dividend and liquidation rights of common stockholders without their approval.




33



There is currently an illiquid market for our common shares, and shareholders may be unable to sell their shares for an indefinite period of time.


There is presently an illiquid market for our common shares.  There is no assurance that a liquid market for our common shares will ever develop in the United States or elsewhere, or that if such a market does develop that it will continue.  


Over-the-counter stocks are subject to risks of high volatility and price fluctuation.


We have not applied to have our shares listed on any stock exchange or on the NASDAQ Capital Market, and we do not plan to do so in the foreseeable future.    The OTC market for securities has experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations during certain periods.  These broad market fluctuations and other factors, such as commodity prices and the investment markets generally, as well as economic conditions and quarterly variations in our results of operations, may adversely affect the market price of our common stock and make it more difficult for investors to sell their shares.


Trading in our securities is on an electronic bulletin board established for securities that do not meet NASDAQ listing requirements.  As a result, investors will find it substantially more difficult to dispose of our securities.  Investors may also find it difficult to obtain accurate information and quotations as to the price of, our common stock.  


Our stock price may be volatile and as a result, shareholders could lose all or part of their investment. The value of our shares could decline due to the impact of any of the following factors upon the market price of our common stock:


·

failure to meet operating budget;

·

decline in demand for our common stock;

·

operating results failing to meet the expectations of securities analysts or investors in any quarter;

·

downward revisions in securities analysts' estimates or changes in general market conditions;

·

investor perception of the mining industry or our prospects; and

·

general economic trends.


In addition, stock markets have experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations and the market prices of securities have been highly volatile.  These fluctuations are often unrelated to operating performance and may adversely affect the market price of our common stock.


Outstanding shares that are eligible for future sale could adversely impact a public trading market for our common stock, if a public trading market develops.


All of the shares of common stock that were distributed under the Athena spin-off dividend are free-trading shares.  In addition, in the future, we may offer and sell shares without registration under the Securities Act. All of such shares will be "restricted securities" as defined by Rule 144 ("Rule 144") under the Securities Act and cannot be resold without registration except in reliance on Rule 144 or another applicable exemption from registration.  Under Rule 144, our non-affiliates can sell restricted shares held for at least six months, subject only to the restriction that we made available public information as required by Rule 144.  Our affiliates can sell restricted securities after six months,



34



subject to compliance with the volume limitation, manner of sale, Form 144 filing and current public information requirements.  No shares of our common stock are currently eligible for resale under Rule 144.  


No prediction can be made as to the effect, if any, that future sales of restricted shares of common stock, or the availability of such common stock for sale, will have on the market price of the common stock prevailing from time to time. Sales of substantial amounts of such common stock in the public market, or the perception that such sales may occur, could adversely affect the then prevailing market price of the common stock.


Owners of our common stock are subject to the “penny stock” rules.  


Since our shares are not listed on a national stock exchange or quoted on the Nasdaq Market within the United States, trading in our shares on the OTC market is subject, to the extent the market price for our shares is less than $5.00 per share, to a number of regulations known as the "penny stock rules".  The penny stock rules require a broker-dealer to deliver a standardized risk disclosure document prepared by the SEC, to provide the customer with additional information including current bid and offer quotations for the penny stock, the compensation of the broker-dealer and its salesperson in the transaction, monthly account statements showing the market value of each penny stock held in the customer's account, and to make a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the investor and receive the investor’s written agreement to the transaction.  To the extent these requirements may be applicable they will reduce the level of trading activity in the secondary market for our shares and may severely and adversely affect the ability of broker-dealers to sell our shares, if a publicly traded market develops.


We do not expect to pay cash dividends in the foreseeable future.  Any return on investment may be limited to the value of our stock.


We have never paid any cash dividends on any shares of our capital stock, and we do not anticipate that we will pay any dividends in the foreseeable future.  Our current business plan is to retain any future earnings to finance the expansion of our business.  Any future determination to pay cash dividends will be at the discretion of our Board of Directors, and will be dependent upon our financial condition, results of operations, capital requirements and other factors as our board of directors may deem relevant at that time.  If we do not pay cash dividends, our stock may be less valuable because a return on your investment will only occur if our stock price appreciates.


Nevada law and our by-laws protect our directors from certain types of lawsuits.


Nevada law provides that our directors will not be liable to us or our stockholders for monetary damages for all but certain types of conduct as directors.  Our by-laws require us to indemnify our directors and officers against all damages incurred in connection with our business to the fullest extent provided or allowed by law.  The exculpation provisions may have the effect of preventing stockholders from recovering damages against our directors caused by their negligence, poor judgment or other circumstances.  The indemnification provisions may require us to use our assets to defend our directors and officers against claims, including claims arising out of their negligence, poor judgment, or other circumstances.  






35



ITEM 1B. – UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS.


None.

 

ITEM 2.        PROPERTIES


Mining Properties


Descriptions of our mining properties are contained in the Business discussion in this Report.


ITEM 3.        LEGAL PROCEEDINGS


None

ITEM 4.

REMOVED AND RESERVED




36



PART II


ITEM 5.

MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS


Effective May 2012, our common stock was approved for quotation on the OTC Bulletin Board under the ticker symbol “MAGE.”  The following sets forth the high and low trading prices for the periods shown:


 

2014

 

 

 

High

 

 

Low

 

First quarter ended March 31

$

0.050

 

$

0.040

 

Second quarter ended June 30

$

0.510

 

$

0.020

 

Third quarter ended September 30

$

0.049

 

$

0.031

 

Fourth quarter ended December 31

$

0.040

 

$

0.035

 


The bid and ask prices of the Company's common stock as of December 31, 2014 were $0.036 and $0.050 respectively, as reported on the OTCBB.  The OTCBB prices are bid and ask prices which represent prices between broker-dealers and do not include retail mark-ups and mark-downs or any commissions to the broker-dealer.  The prices do not reflect prices in actual transactions.  As of February 11, 2015 there were approximately 51 record owners of the Company's common stock.


The OTC Bulletin Board is a registered quotation service that displays real-time quotes, last sale prices and volume information in over-the-counter (OTC) securities.  An OTC equity security generally is any equity that is not listed or traded on NASDAQ or a national securities exchange.  The OTCBB is not an issuer listing service, market or exchange.  Although the OTCBB does not have any listing requirements, per se, to be eligible for quotation on the OTCBB, issuers must remain current in their filings with the SEC or applicable regulatory authority.


Our Board of Directors may declare and pay dividends on outstanding shares of common stock out of funds legally available therefore in its sole discretion; however, to date, no dividends have been paid on common stock and we do not anticipate the payment of dividends in the foreseeable future.


Trading in our common stock is subject to rules adopted by the SEC regulating broker dealer practices in connection with transactions in "penny stocks."  Those disclosure rules applicable to penny stocks require a broker dealer, prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from the rules, to deliver a standardized risk disclosure document prepared by the SEC.  That disclosure document advises an investor that investment in penny stocks can be very risky and that the investor's salesperson or broker is not an impartial advisor but rather paid to sell the shares.  The disclosure contains further warnings for the investor to exercise caution in connection with an investment in penny stocks, to independently investigate the security, as well as the salesperson with whom the investor is working and to understand the risky nature of an investment in this security.  The broker dealer must also provide the customer with certain other information and must make a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser and receive the purchaser's written agreement to the transaction.  Further, the rules require that, following the proposed transaction, the broker provide the customer with monthly account statements containing market information about the prices of the securities.




37



Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities


None, except as previously reported.



EQUITY COMPENSATION PLAN INFORMATION


We have not adopted any equity compensation plans.  


 


Number of

securities to be

issued upon

exercise of

outstanding

options,

warrants and

rights

Weighted

average

exercise

price of

outstanding

options,

warrants

and rights


Number of securities

 remaining available

for future issuances

under equity

compensation plans

(excluding securities

reflected in column

Equity compensation plans approved by

     security holders


-0-


$0.00


-0-

Equity compensation plans not approved

     by security holders(1)


0


$0.00


      -0-      

               Total

0

$0.00

      -0-      




ITEM 6.

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA


We are a smaller reporting company as defined by the Exchange Act and are not required to provide the information required under this item.




38



ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

We use the terms “Magellan,” “we,” “our,” and “us” to refer to Magellan Gold Corporation.

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements, including the notes thereto, appearing elsewhere in this Report. The discussion of results, causes and trends should not be construed to imply any conclusion that these results or trends will necessarily continue into the future.

Forward-Looking Statements

Some of the information presented in this Form 10-K constitutes “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995.  These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements that include terms such as “may,” “will,” “intend,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “expect,” “continue,” “believe,” “plan,” or the like, as well as all statements that are not historical facts.  Forward-looking statements are inherently subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from current expectations.  Although we believe our expectations are based on reasonable assumptions within the bounds of our knowledge of our business and operations, there can be no assurance that actual results will not differ materially from expectations.

All forward-looking statements speak only as of the date on which they are made.  We undertake no obligation to update such statements to reflect events that occur or circumstances that exist after the date on which they are made.

Overview

We were incorporated on September 28, 2010, in Nevada. Our principal business is the acquisition and exploration of mineral resources. We have not presently determined whether the properties to which we have mineral rights contain mineral reserves that are economically recoverable.

We have only had limited operations to date and we rely upon the sale of our securities and borrowings from significant investors to fund our operations, as we have not generated any revenue.

In August 2012, we entered into an option agreement to purchase  “The Silver District” project consisting of 85 unpatented lode mining claims, 4 patented lode claims, an Arizona mining lease of 154.66 acres and 23 unpatented mill site claims, totaling over 2,000 acres in La Paz County, Arizona.   In 2013, we added 9 unpatented lode mining claims to the claim block, which we subsequently reduced by 7 claims resulting in a net addition of 2 claims.   In September 2014, we renegotiated our option agreement and purchased the Silver District claims from Columbus Exploration.   In addition, all our ownership interests in the Silver District properties have been pledged as security for amounts outstanding under the credit agreement we have with Mr. John D. Gibbs.  As of December 31, 2014, the total amount owed under the credit agreement was $783,231, which includes $53,627 of accrued interest.




39



We also have staked fifty (50) unpatented lode mining claims known as the “Sacramento Mountains” project totaling approximately 1,000 acres, in which we have a 100% unencumbered interest, on Federal (BLM) land in October 2012 and filed the claims with the BLM in January 2013 which were renewed with the BLM in 2013 and 2014.  The Project is located in the northwest corner of the Sacramento Mountains approximately 10 miles WNW of Needles, California.

Our primary focus during the next twelve months, and depending on available resources, will be to further explore our mineral properties.

Results of Operations

Results of Operations for the Years Ended December 31, 2014 and 2013

 

 

 

 

Years Ended December 31,

 

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

Exploration costs

 

 $   134,697

 

 $    97,740

 

General and administrative expenses

 

 92,234

 

 83,816

 

Impairment of mineral rights

 

 

-

 

14,821

 

     Total operating expenses

 

 

 226,931

 

 196,377

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating loss

 

 (226,931)

 

 (196,377)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other income (expense):

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense

 

 (68,118)

 

 (17,024)

 

Loss on change in fair value of derivative

 

 (580)

 

 -

Net loss

 

 

 $ (295,629)

 

 $ (213,401)

Operating expenses

During the year ended December 31, 2014, our total operating expenses were $226,931 as compared to $196,377 during the year ended December 31, 2013.

During the year ended December 31, 2014 we incurred $134,697 of exploration costs as compared to $97,740 in 2013.  Exploration costs for the year ended December 31, 2014 are primarily comprised of drilling expenses, geologist fees and other related costs totaling approximately $93,000 associated with our exploratory drilling program on our Silver District project during April 2014.  We drilled three core holes totaling 990 feet.  One hole was a confirmation hole intended to verify results reported by a prior operator and the other two holes were more exploratory in nature.  Our geologist selected 52 samples from the three holes that were submitted to an independent assay lab for analysis.  The new drill results will be incorporated into the existing historic drill database for use in planning additional drilling of the immediate project area.  Geologic evaluation of the entire district continues as we develop additional drill targets in and around the multiple satellite deposits in the Silver District land package.  The results from the drilling program were previously reported in our Form 8-K and related press release dated May 15, 2014.



40



Other exploration costs totaling approximately $42,000 primarily consist of various geologic, geochemical, lease maintenance and other exploration related costs associated with our projects.

During the year ended December 31, 2013 we incurred $97,740 of exploration costs.  Exploration costs totaling approximately $89,000 are primarily comprised of consulting geologist fees and related expenses associated with the review of the Silver District and Sacramento Mountains projects and claim maintenance and renewal fees with the Bureau of Land Management and the State of Arizona and one private party.   The primary objective was to develop drill targets on both projects and file applications with the BLM to conduct exploratory drilling subject to available working capital.  Other exploration costs totaling approximately $9,000 primarily consist of geologic fees and various other fees and licenses.

General and administrative expenses for the year ended December 31, 2014 totaling $92,234 were comprised professional fees including accounting and audit fees of $27,503, legal fees totaling $20,532, management fees to Mr. Power totaling $30,000, other professional fees of $4,443, and other expenses totaling $9,756 mainly comprised of travel expenses, fees, licenses and other office related expenses.

General and administrative expenses for the year ended December 31, 2013 totaling $83,816 were mainly comprised professional fees including accounting and audit fees of $28,540, legal fees totaling $10,090, management fees to Mr. Power totaling $30,000, and investor relations and other professional fees totaling $5,727.  The remaining general and administrative expenses totaling $9,459 were generally comprised of travel expenses, office expenses and other operating costs.

During the fourth quarter of 2013, and due to a decline in precious metals prices and the absence of currently available funds to further develop these early stage projects, we recorded impairment charges equal to the amount of our capitalized mineral rights for our Sacramento Mountains and the Pony Express projects at December 31, 2013 in the amount of $14,821.

Interest expense for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013 totaled $68,118 and $17,024, respectively, and is partially attributable to our related party line of credit, which accrues interest at the rate of 6.0% per year, and our related party notes payable which accrue interest at a weighted average interest rate of 6.58%.

In addition, in October 2014 we converted certain amounts payable to a legal services provider into a Convertible Note Payable (“Note”).  Interest accrues quarterly on the outstanding principal and interest balances of the Note at 6% per annum.

The Note contains certain anti-dilution provisions that would reduce the conversion price should the Company issue common stock equivalents at a price less than the Note conversion price.  Accordingly, the conversion features of the Note are considered a discount to the Note.  However, since the Note is payable upon demand by the note holder, the value of the discount is considered interest expense at the time of its inception.  The Note shall be evaluated quarterly, and upon any quarterly valuations in which the value of the discount increases, we will recognize a loss due to an increase in the fair value of the derivative liability.  Therefore, we recorded a derivative liability at the Note inception, and adjusted the liability at December 31, 2014.  As a result of these valuations, $29,940 of interest expense was incurred during the quarter ended December 31, 2014 and $580 was recorded as a loss due to change in fair value of derivative.



41



We estimate the fair value of this derivative at each balance sheet date until such time the Note is paid or converted.


We estimated the fair value of the derivative on the date of issuance and at December 31, 2014 using the Black-Scholes option pricing model, which includes assumptions for expected dividends, expected share price volatility, risk-free interest rate, and expected life of the Note.  Our expected volatility assumption is based on our historical weekly closing price of our stock over a period equivalent to the expected remaining life of the Note.


The following table summarizes the assumptions used to value the derivative Note discount at inception on October 1, 2014:


Fair value assumptions – derivative:

 

Inception: October 31, 2014

 

Risk free interest rate

 

0.11%

 

Expected term (years)

 

1.0

 

Expected volatility

 

146%

 

Expected dividends

 

0%

 








The following table summarizes the assumptions used to value the derivative Note discount at December 31, 2014:

Fair value assumptions – derivative:

 

December 31, 2014

 

Risk free interest rate

 

0.25%

 

Expected term (years)

 

1.0

 

Expected volatility

 

162%

 

Expected dividends

 

0%

 





Liquidity and Capital Resources:

We intend to meet our cash requirements for the next 12 months primarily through the utilization of our line of credit, as amended, established in December 2012, as well as the private placement of debt or equity instruments. We currently do not have any arrangements in place to complete private placement financings and there is no assurance that we will be successful in completing any such financings on terms that will be acceptable to us.

On December 31, 2012, we entered into a line of credit arrangement with John D. Gibbs, a significant investor, to facilitate timely cash flows for the Company’s operations.  The line of credit initially provided for a maximum balance of $250,000, and accrues interest at 6%, which is payable from time to time and due at maturity.  On December 31, 2013 we amended our credit agreement with Mr. Gibbs to increase the borrowing limit under the line of credit to $750,000.  And on December 31, 2014 the agreement was again amended to increase the borrowing limit under the line of credit to $900,000 and extend the maturity date to December 31, 2015.  In addition, on December 31, 2014 we pledged all our ownership interests in the Silver District properties as security for all outstanding amounts under the credit agreement.  All other terms of the credit agreement, including the interest rate remained unchanged. The Company evaluated the amended for significant modification and concluded that



42



there were no discounts recorded on the line of credit or fees and as such there is no accounting for the modification.


Our primary priority is to retain our reporting status with the SEC, which means that we will first ensure that we have sufficient capital to cover our legal and accounting expenses. Once these costs are accounted for, in accordance with how much financing we are able to secure, we will focus on further exploration and development of our mineral properties. We will likely not expend funds on the remainder of our planned activities unless we have the required capital.


Cash Flows


A summary of our cash provided by and used in operating, investing and financing activities is as follows:


 

 

Years Ended December 31,

 

 

2014

 

2013

Net cash used in operating activities

 

 $  (199,884)

 

 $   (240,885)

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 (180,000)

 

 (40,350)

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

 377,850

 

 278,954

Net decrease in cash

 

 (2,034)

 

 (2,281)

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period

 

  2,128

 

 4,409

Cash and cash equivalents, end of period

 

 $            94

 

 $         2,128


At December 31, 2014, we had $94 in cash and a $958,440 working capital deficit. This compares to cash of $2,128 and a working capital deficit of $504,088 at December 31, 2013.

Net cash used in operating activities during the year ended December 31, 2014 was $199,884 and was mainly comprised of our $(295,629) net loss during the period, which was partially offset with interest expense and the change in our derivative liability as discussed above in Results of Operations, and a decrease in prepaid expenses and other assets totaling $21,457 representing a refund of a deposit we paid in November 2013 to the Bureau of Land Management for potential reclamation of proposed drilling sites should we decide to drill exploratory holes on our Silver District project.  In April 2014 we completed an exploratory drilling program, and upon its completion requested the return of the deposited funds from the BLM, and in July 2014 those funds were received.  We also had increases in accounts payable and accrued expenses totaling $5,590, as well as increases in accrued interest totaling $38,178 representing accrued interest on our related party line of credit and notes payable.


Net cash used in operating activities during the year ended December 31, 2013, was $240,885 and was mainly comprised of our $(213,401) net loss during the period as well as increases in prepaid expenses and other current assets totaling $30,096.  During 2013, we paid $30,096 to the Bureau of Land Management representing deposits for potential reclamation of proposed drilling sites should the Company decide to drill exploratory holes on its Sacramento Mountains and Silver District projects. We also had decreases in accounts payable and accrued expenses totaling $28,036, as well as increases in accrued interest totaling $15,827 representing accrued interest on our related party line of



43



credit and notes payable.  In addition, we recorded impairments of certain mineral rights as discussed above totaling $14,821.  


During the year ended December 31, 2014 we used $180,000 of cash in investing activities, of which $80,000 represented a payment under our option agreement to make the final installment on the purchase of a patented claim and $100,000 payment to Columbus Exploration to complete the purchase of the Silver District properties as described more fully below.  Effective September 29, 2014, we entered into a purchase agreement with Columbus Silver Corporation and its wholly-owned subsidiary of Columbus Exploration Corporation.  Under the terms of the agreement, we purchased certain patented and unpatented mining claims, an Arizona State minerals lease and a mining lease with a third-party in La Paz County, Arizona known as the Silver District which were the subject of the Option Agreement-Silver District dated August 28, 2012 between the Company and Columbus.  The Agreement supersedes the Option Agreement and conveys the Silver District Claims to the Company.


The consideration for the Silver District Claims was a one-time payment of $100,000, which we obtained through a draw against our credit agreement with Mr. Gibbs. There are no additional future payments required under the Agreement to Columbus, however, there are certain ongoing obligations under the mineral leases to maintain them in good standing.  All of the underlying obligations under the claims, and leases have been met for 2014.  

During the year ended December 31, 2013 we used $40,350 of cash in investing activities, which is comprised of a $30,000 payment on an underlying patented claim purchase contract to maintain our option agreement associated with our Silver District claims, and $10,350 for the acquisition of our Sacramento Mountains claims.

During the year ended December 31, 2014, cash provided by financing activities was $377,850.  In December 2012, we entered into a line of credit arrangement with John D. Gibbs, a significant investor, to facilitate timely cash flows for the Company’s operations. On December 31, 2013 we amended our credit agreement with Mr. Gibbs to increase the borrowing limit under the line of credit to $750,000.  On December 31, 2014 we again amended the agreement to increase the borrowing limit to $900,000 and extended the maturity date to December 31, 2015.  During 2014, we drew an additional $330,000 on this credit line.  In addition, we received an additional $50,000 in funding from Mr. Power in the form of a demand note, which accrues interest at 6.75%.  During the second quarter of 2014, the Company paid $5,000 representing a reduction of principal on Mr. Power’s $20,000 demand note, which accrues interest at 6%.  Also, during 2014, Mr. Power advanced the Company $42,350, of which $39,500 has been repaid.

During the year ended December 31, 2013, cash provided by financing activities was $278,954.  During 2013 we drew $284,604 on the credit line funded by Mr. Gibbs as noted above, which was used primarily to pay for geological consultant, claim staking, claim maintenance and renewal costs and to fund our general corporate expenses. Also, during 2013, Mr. Power advanced the Company $31,450, all of which has been repaid.





44



Off Balance Sheet Arrangements

We do not have and have never had any off-balance sheet arrangements.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements:

During the year ended December 31, 2014, the Company elected to early adopt Accounting Standards Update No. 2014-10, Development Stage Entities (Topic 915): Elimination of Certain Financial Reporting Requirements. The adoption of this ASU allowed the company to remove the inception to date information and all references to development stage.

Other recently issued Financial Accounting Standards Board Accounting Standards Codification guidance has either been implemented or is not significant to us.


Critical Accounting Policies


The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires us to make estimates, assumptions and judgments that affect the amounts reported in our financial statements.  The accounting positions described below are significantly affected by critical accounting estimates.


We believe that the significant estimates, assumptions and judgments used when accounting for items and matters such as capitalized mineral rights, asset valuations, recoverability of assets, asset impairments, taxes, and other provisions were reasonable, based upon information available at the time they were made. Actual results could differ from these estimates, making it possible that a change in these estimates could occur in the near term.


Mineral Rights


We have determined that our mining rights meet the definition of mineral rights, as defined by accounting standards, and are tangible assets. As a result, our direct costs to acquire or lease mineral rights are initially capitalized as tangible assets. Mineral rights include costs associated with: leasing or acquiring patented and unpatented mining claims; leasing mining rights including lease signature bonuses, lease rental payments and advance minimum royalty payments; and options to purchase or lease mineral properties.


If we establish proven and probable reserves for a mineral property and establish that the mineral property can be economically developed, mineral rights will be amortized over the estimated useful life of the property following the commencement of commercial production or expensed if it is determined that the mineral property has no future economic value or if the property is sold or abandoned. For mineral rights in which proven and probable reserves have not yet been established, we assess the carrying values for impairment at the end of each reporting period and whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may not be recoverable.


The net carrying value of our mineral rights represents the fair value at the time the mineral rights were acquired less accumulated depletion and any impairment losses. Proven and probable reserves have not been established for mineral rights as of December 31, 2014. During 2013, and due to a decline in precious metals prices and the absence of currently available funds to further develop these early stage projects, we recorded impairment charges equal to the amount of our capitalized mineral



45



rights for our Sacramento Mountains and the Pony Express projects in the amount of $14,821. No impairment loss was recognized during the year ended December 31, 2014.



Impairment of Long-lived Assets


We continually monitor events and changes in circumstances that could indicate that our carrying amounts of long-lived assets, including mineral rights, may not be recoverable. When such events or changes in circumstances occur, we assess the recoverability of long-lived assets by determining whether the carrying value of such assets will be recovered through their undiscounted expected future cash flows. If the future undiscounted cash flows are less than the carrying amount of these assets, we recognize an impairment loss based on the excess of the carrying amount over the fair value of the assets.


Exploration Costs    


Mineral exploration costs are expensed as incurred. When it has been determined that it is economically feasible to extract minerals and the permitting process has been initiated, exploration costs incurred to further delineate and develop the property are considered pre-commercial production costs and will be capitalized and included as mine development costs in our consolidated balance sheets.


Share-based Payments

 

We measure and recognize compensation expense or professional services expense for all share-based payment awards made to employees, directors and non-employee consultants based on estimated fair values. We estimate the fair value of stock options on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing model, which includes assumptions for expected dividends, expected share price volatility, risk-free interest rate, and expected life of the options. Our expected volatility assumption is based on our historical weekly closing price of our stock over a period equivalent to the expected life of the options.


We expense share-based compensation, adjusted for estimated forfeitures, using the straight-line method over the vesting term of the award for our employees and directors and over the expected service term for our non-employee consultants. We estimate forfeitures at the time of grant and revise those estimates in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from our estimates. Our excess tax benefits, if any, cannot be credited to stockholders’ equity until the deduction reduces cash taxes payable; accordingly, we realized no excess tax benefits during any of the periods presented in the accompanying consolidated financial statements.


Income Taxes


We account for income taxes through the use of the asset and liability method. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax basis, and for income tax carry-forwards. A valuation allowance is recorded to the extent that we cannot conclude that realization of deferred tax assets is more likely than not. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax



46



assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in operations in the period that includes the enactment date.


We follow a two-step approach to recognizing and measuring tax benefits associated with uncertain tax positions taken, or expected to be taken in a tax return. The first step is to determine if, based on the technical merits, it is more likely than not that the tax position will be sustained upon examination by a taxing authority, including resolution of any related appeals or litigation processes. The second step is to measure the tax benefit as the largest amount that is more than 50% likely to be realized upon ultimate settlement with a taxing authority. We recognize interest and penalties, if any, related to uncertain tax positions in our provision for income taxes in the consolidated statements of operations. To date, we have not recognized any tax benefits from uncertain tax positions.


ITEM 8.       

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA


The financial statements required by this item are located in Item 15 beginning on page F-1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K and are incorporated herein by reference.


ITEM 9.

CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE


None.


ITEM 9A.

CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

The SEC, as required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, adopted rules requiring every company that files reports with the SEC to include a management report on the effectiveness of disclosure controls and procedures in its periodic reports and an annual assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting in its annual report.

Disclosure Controls and Procedures


Disclosure controls and procedures are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in the reports filed or submitted under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time period specified in the SEC's rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to management, including the CEO and CFO, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosures. Our management necessarily applied its judgment in assessing the costs and benefits of such controls and procedures, which, by their nature, can provide only reasonable assurance regarding management's control objectives.


Our management, with the participation of our CEO, evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this Report. Based upon this evaluation, our CEO concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective because of the identification of a material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting which is described below.


Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting


Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in Exchange Rule 13a-15(f). Our internal control over



47



financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance to our management and board of directors regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of the financial statements for external purposes in accordance with U.S. GAAP.


Our internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of our assets; (ii) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP and our receipts and expenditures are being made only in accordance with authorizations of our management and directors; and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of our assets that could have a material effect on our consolidated financial statements.


Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. All internal control systems, no matter how well designed, have inherent limitations, including the possibility of human error and the circumvention of overriding controls. Accordingly, even effective internal control over financial reporting can provide only reasonable assurance with respect to financial statement preparation. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.


Our management assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2014. In making this assessment, it used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (“COSO”) in Internal Control-Integrated Framework. Based on this evaluation, management concluded that that our internal control over financial reporting was not effective as of December 31, 2014. Our CEO concluded we have a material weakness due to lack of segregation of duties and a limited corporate governance structure. A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of control deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.


Our size has prevented us from being able to employ sufficient resources to enable us to have an adequate level of supervision and segregation of duties within our system of internal control. Therefore while there are some compensating controls in place, it is difficult to ensure effective segregation of accounting and financial reporting duties. Management reported a material weakness resulting from the combination of the following significant deficiencies:


·

Lack of segregation of duties in certain accounting and financial reporting processes including the initiation, processing, recording and approval of disbursements;


·

Lack of a formal review process that includes multiple levels of review.

While we strive to segregate duties as much as practicable, there is an insufficient volume of transactions at this point in time to justify additional full time staff. We believe that this is typical in many exploration stage companies. We may not be able to fully remediate the material weakness until we commence mining operations at which time we would expect to hire more staff. We will continue to monitor and assess the costs and benefits of additional staffing.




48



This Annual Report does not include an attestation report of our registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management's report was not subject to attestation by our registered public accounting firm pursuant to the SEC rules that permit us to provide only management's report in this Annual Report.


Conclusion Regarding the Effectiveness of Disclosure Controls and Procedures:


We maintain disclosure controls and procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our Exchange Act reports is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to management, including John C. Power, our President who is also our Principal Accounting Officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Management necessarily applied its judgment in assessing the costs and benefits of such controls and procedures, which, by their nature, can provide only reasonable assurance regarding management’s control objectives.


Our management, including Mr. Power, evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) under the Exchange Act) as of the end of the period covered by this report. Based on this evaluation, Mr. Power concluded that the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of such date to provide assurance that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the rules and forms of the SEC, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to management as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding disclosures.


Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting


There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the quarter ended December 31, 2014, that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.


ITEM 9B.

OTHER INFORMATION


None.



49



PART III


ITEM 10.

DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE


Directors and Executive Officers


 Our current executive officers and directors are:


Name

Age

Position

John C. Power

52

President, Secretary and Director


John C. Power has served as President, Secretary and director since our inception in September 2010.


Mr. Power has also served as a director of Athena Silver Corporation since its inception in December 2003 and has served as Athena’s President from December 2005 to December 2007 and from January 2009 to the present and has served as Athena’s Secretary since January 2007.


Mr. Power is also a co-managing member since 2011 of Silver Saddle Resources, LLC that owns mining claims in Nevada.


From March 2010 to present, Mr. Power has severed as co-Managing Member of Ryan Air Exposition, LLC, a private California holding company that invests in antique airplanes. Mr. Power has served as President and director of Alta California Broadcasting, Inc., which operated radio stations, from December 1993 to March 2007; and President and director of Four Rivers Broadcasting, Inc., also a radio broadcaster, from May 1997 to March 2005 and Vice President from March 2005 until December 2013. Mr. Power has served as Co-Managing Member of Wyoming Resorts, LLC, which owns and operates an historic hotel in Thermopolis, Wyoming, since June 1997; and Mr. Power has served as President of Power Curve, Inc., a private investment company, since 1986.   Mr. Power has also been the managing member of Best of Sea Ranch, LLC since December 2004 which operated through a joint venture a vacation home rental business in The Sea Ranch California.   Mr. Power has been a general partner of Power Vacaville, LP a real estate investment firm since January 2008.  Mr. Power also serves as the vice-president and director of The Tide Community Broadcasting, Inc. since July 2012.


From September 2008 to March 2012, Mr. Power served as an officer and director of Hungry Hunter, Inc., a private California-based restaurant enterprise.  From March 2008 until February 2010, Mr. Power served as a director of Reserve Energy Corporation, a small private oil and gas exploration and production company; and was Managing Member of Montana Resorts, LLC, which is a holding company for Yellowstone Gateway Resorts, LLC, (from May 2002 until May 2008; and was Managing Member of Yellowstone Gateway Resorts, LLC, which owned and operated the Gallatin Gateway Inn, from May 2002 until May 2008. On November 16, 2004, Yellowstone Gateway Resorts, LLC filed a voluntary petition in bankruptcy under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code in response to an adverse arbitration award in favor of a former employee.  Yellowstone Gateway Resorts, LLC was successfully reorganized under Chapter 11.


Mr. Power attended, but did not receive a degree from, Occidental College and University of California at Davis.  




50



Involvement in Certain Legal Proceedings


During the last 10 years, except as disclosed herein, none of our directors or officers has:


a.

had any bankruptcy petition filed by or against any business of which such person was a general partner or executive officer either at the time of the bankruptcy or within two years prior to that time;


b.

been convicted in a criminal proceeding or subject to a pending criminal proceeding;


c.

been subject to any order, judgment, or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any court of competent jurisdiction, permanently or temporarily enjoining, barring, suspending or otherwise limiting his involvement in any type of business, securities or banking activities; or


d.

been found by a court of competent jurisdiction in a civil action, the Commission or the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to have violated a federal or state securities or commodities law, and the judgment has not been reversed, suspended, or vacated.


On June 1, 1998, the SEC issued an Order instituting proceedings alleging, among other things, that Mr. Power violated Section 10(b) of the Exchange Act and Rule 10(b)(5) promulgated thereunder by participating in a manipulation through his personal account of the public trading market for the stock of Premier Concepts, Inc., from approximately June 1994 through December 1994.  On November 15, 2005, the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit issued an Opinion and Order dismissing the matter.


Family Relationships


No family relationships exist among our directors.  Additionally, there do not exist any arrangements or understandings between any director and any other person pursuant to which any director was elected as such.


Conflicts of Interest

Athena Silver Corporation is a company under common control. Mr. Power is our President and director and is also a director and CEO of Athena. Mr. Power and Mr. Gibbs are significant investors in both Magellan and Athena.

Silver Saddle Resources, LLC (“Silver Saddle”) is a private company under common control. Mr. Power and Mr. Gibbs are significant investors and managing members of Silver Saddle.


Magellan, Athena and Silver Saddle are exploration stage companies and each is involved in the business of acquisition and exploration of mineral resources.


The existence of common ownership and common management could result in significantly different operating results or financial position from those that could have resulted had Magellan, Athena and Silver Saddle been autonomous.  In addition, the common ownership could result in significant



51



conflicts of interest both in terms of the allocation of working capital as well as under the doctrine of corporate opportunity, inasmuch as all three entities are engaged in mineral exploration in the United States.  Messr. Power and Gibbs have not adopted any policy or guidelines to mitigate the potential adverse effects of their conflicting interests between and among, Magellan, Athena and Silver Saddle.


While the foregoing may mitigate the conflicts of interest inherent in the interlocking interests, it will not eliminate all potential future conflicts.  Investors in Magellan should be cognizant that the interests of Magellan may, in the future, be in conflict with the other activities of Magellan’s control persons.


Director Independence


Our common stock is listed on the OTC Bulletin Board’s inter-dealer quotation systems, which does not have director independence requirements. Nevertheless, for purposes of determining director independence, we have applied the definition set forth in NASDAQ Rule 4200(a)(15). John C. Power, our sole director would not be considered “independent” under the NASDAQ rule due to the fact that John C. Power is an officer and sole director.


Board Meetings


During the year ended December 31, 2014, our Board held no meetings and has taken numerous actions by unanimous written consent.


Committees of the Board of Directors


We currently do not have standing audit, compensation or nominating committees of the Board of Directors.  We plan to form audit, compensation and nominating committees when it is necessary to do so to comply with federal securities laws or to meet listing requirements of a stock exchange or the Nasdaq Capital Market.


Compliance with Section 16(a), Beneficial Ownership


Under the Securities Laws of the United States, our directors, executive (and certain other) officers, and any persons holding more than ten percent (10%) of our common stock during any part of our most recent fiscal year are required to report their ownership of common stock and any changes in that ownership to the SEC.  Specific due dates for these reports have been established and we are required to report in this Report any failure to file by these dates.  During the year ended December 31, 2014, all of these filing requirements were satisfied by our officers, directors, and ten- percent holders.   In making these statements, we have relied on the written representation of our directors and officers or copies of the reports that they have filed with the Commission.


Code of Ethics


We have adopted a Code of Ethics that apples to, among other persons, our company’s principal executive officer, as well as persons performing similar functions. As adopted, our Code of Ethics sets forth written guidelines to promote:


·

honest and ethical conduct, including the ethical handling of actual or apparent conflicts of interest between personal and professional relationships;



52



·

full, fair, accurate, timely and understandable disclosure in all reports and documents that we file with, or submit to, the SEC and in other public communications made by us that are within the executive officer’s area of responsibility;

·

compliance with applicable governmental laws, rules and regulations;

·

the prompt internal reporting of violations of the Code; and

·

accountability for adherence to the Code.


Our Code of Ethics is on file with the SEC.  We will provide a copy of the Code of Ethics to any person without charge, upon request. Requests can be sent to: Magellan Gold Corporation, 2010A Harbison Drive # 312, Vacaville, CA  95687.



ITEM 11.        EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION


Director Compensation


Our sole director, Mr. Power, receives no compensation for his services as director.


Executive Compensation


The following table sets forth all compensation paid to Mr. Power for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2014. :


 

SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE

Name

and

Principal

Position




Year



Salary

($)




Bonus ($)



Stock

Awards

($)



Options

Awards ($)


Non equity

Incentive Plan

Compensation  ($)

Nonqualified

Deferred

Compensation

Earnings

($)



All Other

Compensation  ($)




Total

($)

John C. Power, President

2014

2013

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

30,000

30,000

30,000

30,000


Mr. Power is our only executive officer.  We entered into a consulting agreement with Mr. Power at the rate of $30,000 per year for his part-time service as our President. Mr. Power devotes approximately 25% of his time and attention to our business.


We did not have outstanding equity awards at December 31, 2013 and 2014.



Employment Agreements


We do not have any written employment agreements other than the above-referenced consulting agreement with any of our executive officers; nor do we have or maintain key man life insurance on Mr. Power.



53




Equity Incentive Plan


We have not adopted any stock option, equity or other incentive equity plan and have no immediate plans to do so.


Indemnification of Directors and Officers


Nevada Revised Statutes provide that a corporation may indemnify any person who was or is a party or is threatened to be made a party to any threatened, pending or completed action, suit or proceeding, whether civil, criminal, administrative or investigative, except an action by or in the right of the corporation, by reason of the fact that he is or was a director, officer, employee or agent of the corporation, or is or was serving at the request of the corporation as a director, officer, employee or agent of another corporation, partnership, joint venture, trust or other enterprise, against expenses, including attorneys' fees, judgments, fines and amounts paid in settlement actually and reasonably incurred by him in connection with the action, suit or proceeding if he acted in good faith and in a manner which he reasonably believed to be in or not opposed to the best interests of the corporation, and, with respect to any criminal action or proceeding, had no reasonable cause to believe his conduct was unlawful.


Nevada Revised Statutes also provide that to the extent that a director, officer, employee or agent of a corporation has been successful on the merits or otherwise in defense of any action, suit or proceeding, or in defense of any claim, issue or matter therein, the corporation shall indemnify him against expenses, including attorneys' fees, actually and reasonably incurred by him in connection with the defense.

 

Our Articles of Incorporation authorize us to indemnify our directors and officers to the fullest extent permitted under Nevada Revised Statutes.  Our bylaws set forth the procedures that must be followed in order for directors and officers to receive indemnity payments from us.




54



ITEM 12.

SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS


The following table sets forth information with respect to beneficial ownership of our common stock by:


 

*

each person who beneficially owns more than 5% of our common stock;

 

*

each of our executive officers named in the Management section;

 

*

each of our directors; and

 

*

all executive officers and directors as a group.  


The following table shows the number of shares owned and the percentage of outstanding common stock owned as of February 11, 2015.  Each person has sole voting and investment power with respect to the shares shown, except as noted.




Name and Address of

Beneficial Owner(1)

Amount

and Nature of

Beneficial

Ownership (2)

 

Ownership as a

Percentage of

Outstanding

Common Shares(3)

 

 

 

 

John Gibbs

807 Wood N Creek

Ardmore, OK  73041

36,976,291

(4)

75.66

 

 

 

 

John C. Power

9,394,710

 

19.22%

 

 

 

 

All officers and directors as a group

(one person)

46,371,001

 

94.89%




(1)

Unless otherwise stated, address is 2010A Harbison Drive # 312, Vacaville, CA  95687.

 

 

(2)

Under SEC Rules, we include in the number of shares owned by each person the number of shares issuable under outstanding options or warrants if those options or warrants are exercisable within 60 days of the date of this Annual Report.  In calculating percentage ownership, we calculate the ownership of each person who owns exercisable options by adding (i) the number of exercisable options for that person only to (ii) the number of total shares outstanding and dividing that result into (iii) the total number of shares and exercisable options owned by that person.

 

 

(3)

Shares and percentages beneficially owned are based upon 48,869,091 shares outstanding on February 11, 2015.

 

 

(4)

Includes 516,500 shares owned by TriPower Resources, Inc., of which John D. Gibbs is President and controlling shareholder.

 

 




55



ITEM 13.

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS

AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE


Except as disclosed herein, there have been no transactions or proposed transactions in which the amount involved exceeds the lesser of $120,000 or one percent of the average of our total assets at year-end for the last two completed fiscal years in which any of our directors, executive officers or beneficial holders of more than 5% of the outstanding shares of our common stock, or any of their respective relatives, spouses, associates or affiliates, has had or will have any direct or material indirect interest.


Related Parties


Athena Silver Corporation is a company under common control. Mr. Power is also a director and CEO of Athena. Mr. Gibbs is a significant investor in both Magellan and Athena. Magellan and Athena are both exploration stage companies involved in the business of acquisition and exploration of mineral resources.


Silver Saddle Resources, LLC is a private company under common control. Mr. Power and Mr. Gibbs are significant investors and managing members of Silver Saddle. Magellan and Silver Saddle are both exploration stage companies involved in the business of acquisition and exploration of mineral resources.


The existence of common ownership and common management could result in significantly different operating results or financial position from those that could have resulted had Magellan, Athena and Silver Saddle been autonomous.


Management Fees


On January 1, 2011, we entered into a month-to-month management agreement with Mr. Power requiring a monthly payment, in advance, of $2,500 as consideration for the day-to-day management of Magellan. The agreement has been renewed on an annual basis effective January 1st each year since its inception.  During the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2014, we incurred $30,000 of management fees to Mr. Power and these costs are included in general and administrative expenses in our statements of operations.  All management fees due Mr. Power through December 31, 2014 have been paid.


Advances to Related Parties


During the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2014, no non-interest bearing advances to related parties were made.  


Line of Credit – Related Parties


Effective December 31, 2012, we entered into an unsecured credit agreement with Mr. Gibbs with a maximum line balance of $250,000.  The promissory notes bear interest at 6% per annum and the principal plus all accrued interest are due December 31, 2014.  At the effective date of the line of credit, Mr. Gibbs was owed a total of $65,000 from previous loans.  These amounts were converted to the line of credit at December 31, 2012 and are included in the line of credit balance at December 31, 2013 and 2014.  On December 31, 2013 we amended our credit agreement with Mr. Gibbs to increase



56



the borrowing limit under the line of credit to $750,000.  On December 31, 2014, we again amended the credit agreement to increase the borrowing limit to $900,000 and extend the maturity date to December 31, 2015.  Also, effective December 31, 2014 the Company pledged all its ownership interest in the Company’s wholly-owned subsidiary, Gulf+Western Industries, Inc. as security for amounts outstanding under the credit agreement.  All other terms of the credit agreement, including the interest rate and maturity date remained unchanged.  The outstanding line balance at December 31, 2014 is evidenced by $729,604 in credit notes.


Notes Payable - Related Parties


In August 2011, we entered into an unsecured loan from John Power, the Company’s sole executive officer, evidenced by a $20,000 promissory note. The promissory note bears interest at 6% per annum and is payable on demand with thirty days’ notice from the lender.  In July 2013, the Company paid Mr. Power $1,198 representing accrued interest on this note at June 30, 2013.  During the second quarter of 2014, the Company made payments totaling $5,000 to pay down the principal balance of the Note.  At December 31, 2014 the Note balance was $15,000.


In January 2014, we entered into an unsecured loan from John Power, the Company’s sole executive officer, evidenced by a $50,000 promissory note. The promissory note bears interest at 6.75% per annum and is payable on demand with thirty days’ notice from the lender.


Accrued Interest - Related Parties


Accrued interest due to related parties resulting from our related party line of credit and other related party debt is as follows:


 

 

December 31, 2014

 

December 31, 2013

Accrued interest payable - Mr. Power

 $     4,750

 

 $       585

Accrued interest payable - Mr. Gibbs

 

 53,627

 

 20,385

 

 

 $   58,377

 

 $  20,970


Advances Payable – Related Parties


We borrowed and repaid non-interest bearing advances from/to related parties as follows:

 

 

Year Ended December 31, 2014

 

 

Advances

 

Repayments

Mr. Power

 

 $   42,350

 

 $   39,500

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31, 2013

 

 

Advances

 

Repayments

Mr. Power

 

 $   31,450

 

 $   37,100


At December 31, 2014 and 2013, $2,850 and $-0-, respectively, of advances from related parties were outstanding.



57




The Company also utilizes a credit card owned by Mr. Power to pay various obligations when the availability of cash is limited or the timing of the payments is considered critical.  A total of $650 of Company charges was outstanding on this credit card and is included in the accounts payable balance at December 31, 2014.  No such amounts were outstanding at December 31, 2013.


Subsequent Events


Subsequent to December 31, 2014, additional advances totaling $30,000 were made on the Company’s credit agreement with Mr. Gibbs.  


Director Independence


Our common stock is not listed on a national securities exchange or inter-dealer quotation system. Under NASDAQ Rule 5605(a)(2) and Item 407(a) of Regulation S-K, a director is not considered to be independent if he or she is also an executive officer of the corporation. Our director is considered an executive officer under Rule 3b-7 of the Exchange Act. Therefore, our director is not independent.


As a result of our limited operating history and minimal resources, we believe that we will have difficulty in attracting independent directors. In addition, we would likely be required to obtain directors’ and officers’ insurance coverage in order to attract and retain independent directors. We believe that the costs associated with maintaining such insurance is prohibitive at this time.






58



ITEM 14.

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANTING FEES AND SERVICES


We understand the need for our principal accountants to maintain objectivity and independence in their audit of our financial statements. To minimize relationships that could appear to impair the objectivity of our principal accountants, our Board of Directors has restricted the non-audit services that our principal accountants may provide to us primarily to tax services and audit-related services. We are only to obtain non-audit services from our principal accountants when the services offered by our principal accountants are more effective or economical than services available from other service providers, and, to the extent possible, only after competitive bidding. These determinations are among the key practices adopted by the Board of Directors. Our Board has adopted policies and procedures for pre-approving work performed by our principal accountants.


The aggregate fees billed for the fiscal years 2014 and 2013 for professional services rendered by our principal accountants for the audit of our annual financial statements and review of the financial statements included in our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and services that are normally provided by our accountants in connection with statutory and regulatory filings or engagements for these fiscal periods were as follows:



 

 

2014

 

2013

Audit fees - audit of annual financial statements and review of financial statements included in our quarterly reports, services normally provided by the accountant in connection with statutory and regulatory filings

   

$ 14,200

 

$14,200


Audit-related fees - related to the performance of audit or review of financial statements not reported under "audit fees"

 

0

 

0


Tax fees - tax compliance, tax advice and tax planning

 

0

 

0


All other fees - services provided by our principal accountants other than those identified above

 

0

 

0


Total fees

 

$ 14,200

 

$14,200


After careful consideration, the Board of Directors has determined that payment of the audit fees is in conformance with the independent status of our principal independent accountants.  



59



PART IV


ITEM15 – EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES



 

Ex. No.

Title

(1)

3.1

Certificate of Incorporation filed September 28, 2010

(1)

3.2

Bylaws

(4)

3.3

Amended and Restated Bylaws

(6)

3.4

Second Amended and Restated Bylaws

(1)

4.1

Specimen Common Stock Certificate

(1)

10.1

Cowles’ Option and Mining Lease

(1)

10.2

Mining Lease – Randall Claims

(1)

10.3

Assignment of Randall Mining Lease Agreement

(1)

10.4

Mining Lease – Secret Claims

(1)

10.5

Consulting Agreement

(2)

10.6

Promissory Note Dated August 23, 2011, in favor of John C. Power

(2)

10.7

Promissory Note Dated August 23, 2011, in favor of John D. Gibbs

(3)

10.8

First Amendment to Mining Lease – Secret Claims

(3)

10.9

Second Amendment to Mining Lease – Randall Claims

(5)

10.10

Promissory Note Dated February 28,2012, in favor of John D. Gibbs

(7)

10.11

Third Amendment to Mining Lease – Randall Claims

(8)

10.12

Option Agreement – Columbus Silver

(9)

10.13

Amendment No. 1 to Promissory Note in favor of John C. Power

(10)

10.14

Credit Agreement dated December 31, 2012 in favor of John D. Gibbs

(11)

10.15

Amendment No. 1 to Silver District Option Agreement

(12)

10.16

Allonge and Modification Agreement with John D. Gibbs

(13)

10.17

Promissory Note in favor of John Power

(14)

10.18

Silver District / Columbus Silver Purchase Agreement

(14)

10.19

Promissory Note in favor of Clifford Neuman

(15)

10.20

Second Allonge and Modification Agreement with John D. Gibbs

(16)

10.21

Amendment No. 1 to Promissory Note in favor of Clifford Neuman

(7)

14.1

Code of Ethics

*

31

Certification Pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) or 15d-14(a) of the Exchange Act, as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

*

32

Certification Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

 

 

 

 

101.INS

101.SCH

101.CAL

101.DEF

101.LAB

101.PRE

XBRL Instance*

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema**

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation**

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition**

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Labels**

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation**


(1)

Incorporated by reference as an Exhibit to Form S-1 as filed with the Commission on May 18, 2011.

(2)

Incorporated by reference to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K, as filed with the Commission on August 23, 2011.



60



(3)

Incorporated by reference as an Exhibit to Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q as filed with the Commission on November 14, 2011.

(4)

Incorporated by reference as an Exhibit to Current Report on Form 8-K as filed with the Commission on February 7, 2012.

(5)

Incorporated by reference as an Exhibit to Current Report on Form 8-K/A-1 as filed with the Commission on March 29, 2012.

(6)

Incorporated by reference as an Exhibit to Current Report on Form 8-K as filed with the Commission on March 30, 2012.

(7)

Incorporated by reference as an Exhibit to Annual Report on Form 10-K as filed with the Commission on March 30, 2012.

(8)

Incorporated by reference as an Exhibit to Current Report on Form 8-K as filed with the Commission on August 30, 2012.

(9)

Incorporated by reference as an Exhibit to Current Report on Form 8-K as filed with the Commission on February 4, 2013.

(10)

Incorporated by reference as an Exhibit to Current Report on Form 8-K as filed with the Commission on February 4, 2013.

(11)

Incorporated by reference as an Exhibit to Current Report on Form 8-K as filed with the Commission on August 23, 2013.

(12)

Incorporated by reference as an Exhibit to Current Report on Form 8-K as filed with the Commission on January 2, 2014.  

(13)

Incorporated by reference as an Exhibit to Current Report on Form 8-K as filed with the Commission on April 29, 2014.

(14)

Incorporated by reference as an Exhibit to Current Report on Form 8-K as filed with the Commission on October 2, 2014.

(15)

Incorporated by reference as an Exhibit to Current Report on Form 8-K as filed with the Commission on February 3, 2015.

(16)

Incorporated by reference as an Exhibit to Current Report on Form 8-K as filed with the Commission on March 18, 2015


*

Filed herewith

**

Furnished, not filed.





61




MAGELLAN GOLD CORPORATION


TABLE OF CONTENTS


 

 

Page

 

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

1

 

 

Consolidated Balance Sheets

2

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Operations

3

 

 

Consolidated Statement of Shareholders’ Deficit  

4

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

5

 

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

6




62





REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM


To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of

Magellan Gold Corporation

Vacaville, California


We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Magellan Gold Corporation and its subsidiary (collectively the “Company”) as of December 31, 2014 and 2013, and the related consolidated statements of operations, stockholders’ deficit and cash flows for each of the years then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.  


We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform an audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audit included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.


In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Magellan Gold Corporation and its subsidiary as of December 31, 2014 and 2013 and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the years then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.


The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 1 to the financial statements, the Company has not generated any revenue and further losses are anticipated. These conditions raise significant doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans in this regard are described in Note 1. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.


/s/ MaloneBailey, LLP

www.malonebailey.com

Houston, Texas

March 19, 2015





F-1





MAGELLAN GOLD CORPORATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 31, 2014

 

December 31, 2013

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

Current Assets

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 $                          94

 

 $                      2,128

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total current assets

                             94

 

                         2,128

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mineral rights, net of impairment

                   323,200

 

                     143,200

Deposits with BLM

                        8,639

 

                       30,096

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 $                331,933

 

 $                 175,424

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' DEFICIT

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 $                  19,700

 

 $                    65,642

 

Line of credit - related party

                   729,604

 

                     399,604

 

Accrued interest - related parties

                      58,377

 

                       20,970

 

Accrued interest

                           771

 

                                -   

 

Advances payable - related party

                        2,850

 

                                -   

 

Notes payable - related parties

                      65,000

 

                       20,000

 

Convertible note payable

                      51,532

 

                                -   

 

Derivative liability

30,520

 

                                -

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

                   958,354

 

                     506,216

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shareholders' deficit:

 

 

 

Preferred shares, $.001 par value, 25,000,000 shares

authorized, no shares issued and outstanding

 

 

 

                              -   

 

                                -   

Common shares - $0.001 par value; 100,000,000

shares authorized, 48,869,091 shares issued and

outstanding

 

 

 

                      48,869

 

                       48,869

 

Additional paid-in capital

                   419,831

 

                     419,831

 

Accumulated deficit

              (1,095,121)

 

                   (799,492)

Total shareholders' deficit

                 (626,421)

 

                   (330,792)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total liabilities and shareholders'  deficit

 $                331,933

 

 $                 175,424



The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.



F-2





MAGELLAN GOLD CORPORATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

 

 

 

 

 

Years Ended December 31,

 

 

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exploration costs

 

 $       134,697

 

 $        97,740

 

 

General and administrative expenses

 

           92,234

 

           83,816

 

 

Impairment of mineral rights

 

                  -   

 

           14,821

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total operating expenses

 

         226,931

 

         196,377

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating loss

 

        (226,931)

 

        (196,377)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other income (expense):

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense

 

          (68,118)

 

          (17,024)

 

 

Loss on change in derivative

 

          (580)

 

-

 

Net loss

 

 $     (295,629)

 

 $     (213,401)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic and diluted net loss per common

 

 

 

 

 

 

share

 

 $           (0.01)

 

 $           (0.00)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic and diluted weighted-average

 

 

 

 

 

 

common shares outstanding

 

     48,869,091

 

     48,869,091

 




The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.



F-3






MAGELLAN GOLD CORPORATION

Consolidated Statement of Shareholders' Deficit

For the years ended December 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred Stock

 

Common Stock

 

Paid-in

 

Accumulated

 

 

 

Shares

 

Amount

 

Shares

 

Par Value

 

Capital

 

Deficit

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance, December 31, 2012

    -   

 

-   

 

     48,869,091

 

48,869

 

           419,831

 

          (586,091)

 

          (117,391)

Net loss

-   

 

-   

 

                  -   

 

             -   

 

                   -   

 

          (213,401)

 

          (213,401)

Balance, December 31, 2013

  -   

 

 $      -   

 

     48,869,091

 

 $  48,869

 

 $        419,831

 

 $     (799,492)

 

 $     (330,792)

Net loss

             -   

 

             -   

 

                  -   

 

             -   

 

                   -   

 

          (295,629)

 

          (295,629)

Balance, December 31, 2014

  -   

 

 $      -   

 

     48,869,091

 

 $ 48,869

 

 $        419,831

 

 $   (1,095,121)

 

 $     (626,421)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 








The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.








F-4






MAGELLAN GOLD CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

 

 

 

 

Years Ended December 31,

 

 

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

 Operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 $    (295,629)

 

 $    (213,401)

 

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash

used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

             Change in derivative liability

580

 

-

 

 

 

 

Amortization of debt discount

29,940

 

 

 

 

 

 

Impairment of mineral rights

                 -   

 

          14,821

 

 

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prepaid expenses and other assets

          21,457

 

         (30,096)

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable and accrued expenses

            5,590

 

         (28,036)

 

 

 

 

Accrued interest

          38,178

 

          15,827

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash used in operating activities

       (199,884)

 

       (240,885)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Investing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Acquisition of mineral rights

       (180,000)

 

         (40,350)

 

 

 

Net cash used in investing activities

       (180,000)

 

         (40,350)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Advances on line of credit - related party

        330,000

 

        284,604

 

 

Proceeds from advances from related parties

          42,350

 

          31,450

 

 

Payments on advances from related parties

         (39,500)

 

         (37,100)

 

 

Proceeds from notes payable - related parties

          50,000

 

                 -   

 

 

Payments on notes payable from related parties

          (5,000)

 

                 -   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash provided by financing activities

        377,850

 

        278,954

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net decrease in cash

          (2,034)

 

          (2,281)

 

Cash at beginning of period

            2,128

 

            4,409

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash at end of period

 $              94

 

 $         2,128

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information

 

 

 

 

 

Cash paid for interest

 $              -   

 

 $         1,197

 

 

Cash paid for income taxes

 $              -   

 

 $              -   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-cash financing and investing activities:

 

 

 

 

Conversion of accounts payable to convertible note payable

 $       51,532

 

 $              -   

 

Debt Discount due to derivative liability

$      29,940

 

$              -   

 


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.



F-5



MAGELLAN GOLD CORPORATION

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


We use the terms “Magellan,” “we,” “our,” and “us” to refer to Magellan Gold Corporation.

Note 1 – Nature and Continuance of Operations


Nature of Operations


Magellan Gold Corporation (“we” “our”, “us” or Magellan”) was incorporated on September 28, 2010, under the laws of the State of Nevada. Our principal business is the acquisition and exploration of mineral resources. We have not presently determined whether the properties to which we have mining rights contain mineral reserves that are economically recoverable.


On September 30, 2014, we formed and organized a new wholly-owned subsidiary, Gulf + Western Industries, Inc., a Nevada corporation (“Gulf+Western” or “G+W”), to own and operate our Silver District mining interests.  On October 1, 2014 we completed the transfer of those assets from Magellan to G+W.  Magellan owns all the outstanding common stock of G+W.   Effective December 31, 2014 Magellan pledged all its ownership interest in G+W to Mr. John D. Gibbs, a significant shareholder in the Company, as security for outstanding amounts under a line of credit agreement between Magellan and Mr. Gibbs.


We rely upon the sale of our securities as well as advances and loans from our President and significant shareholders to fund our operations as we have not generated any revenue.


Liquidity and Going Concern


Our consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which assumes that we will be able to meet our obligations and continue our operations during the next fiscal year. Asset realization values may be significantly different from carrying values as shown in our consolidated financial statements and do not give effect to adjustments that would be necessary to the carrying values of assets and liabilities should we be unable to continue as a going concern. At December 31, 2014, we had not yet generated any revenues or achieved profitable operations and we have accumulated losses of $1,095,121. We expect to incur further losses in the development of our business, all of which casts substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.  Our ability to continue as a going concern depends on our ability to generate future profits and/or to obtain the necessary financing to meet our obligations arising from normal business operations when they come due.  On December 31, 2013 we amended our credit agreement with Mr. John Gibbs, a related party, to increase the borrowing limit under the line of credit to $750,000.  Then on December 31, 2014 we again amended the credit agreement to increase the borrowing limit to $900,000, which provides the Company an additional $170,396 available under the credit line at December 31, 2014.  As part of the 2014 amendment, we pledged 100% of our newly-formed subsidiary, G+W, which owns all our ownership interests in the Silver District properties as security for all amounts outstanding under the credit agreement.  We anticipate that additional funding will be in the form of additional loans from officers, directors or significant shareholders, or equity financing from the sale of our common stock.



F-6




Note 2 – Summary of Significant Accounting Policies


Basis of Presentation and Principles of Consolidation


Our consolidated financial statements include our accounts and the accounts of our wholly-owned subsidiary, Gulf+Western Industries, Inc. All intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated.  Our consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”).


Use of Estimates


The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires us to make estimates, assumptions and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities as of the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of expenses during the period presented.


We make our estimate of the ultimate outcome for these items based on historical trends and other information available when the financial statements are prepared. Changes in estimates are recognized in accordance with the accounting rules for the estimate, which is typically in the period when new information becomes available. We believe that our significant estimates, assumptions and judgments are reasonable, based upon information available at the time they were made. Actual results could differ from these estimates, making it possible that a change in these estimates could occur in the near term.


Reclassifications


Certain reclassifications may have been made to our prior years’ financial statements to conform to our current year presentation. These reclassifications have no effect on our previously reported results of operations or retained earnings.


Fair Value of Financial Instruments


We value our financial assets and liabilities using fair value measurements. Our financial instruments primarily consist of cash and cash equivalents, accounts payable, accrued liabilities, amounts due to related parties and notes payable to related parties.  Fair value is based on the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. The carrying amount of cash and cash equivalents, accounts payable, accrued liabilities, notes payable to related parties and other amounts due to related parties approximates fair value because of the short-term nature of these financial instruments.


Concentrations of Credit Risk


Our financial instruments which potentially subject us to credit risk are our cash and cash equivalents. We maintain our cash and cash equivalents at reputable financial institutions and currently, we are not exposed to significant credit risk.






F-7



Cash and Cash Equivalents


We consider all amounts on deposit with financial institutions and highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents.


Mineral Rights


We have determined that our mineral rights meet the definition of mineral rights, as defined by accounting standards, and are tangible assets. As a result, our direct costs to acquire or lease mineral rights are initially capitalized as tangible assets. Mineral rights include costs associated with: leasing or acquiring patented and unpatented mining claims; leasing mining rights including lease signature bonuses, lease rental payments and advance minimum royalty payments; and options to purchase or lease mineral properties.


If we establish proven and probable reserves for a mineral property and establish that the mineral property can be economically developed, mineral rights will be amortized over the estimated useful life of the property following the commencement of commercial production or expensed if it is determined that the mineral property has no future economic value or if the property is sold or abandoned. For mineral rights in which proven and probable reserves have not yet been established, we assess the carrying values for impairment at the end of each reporting period and whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may not be recoverable.


The net carrying value of our mineral rights represents the fair value at the time the mineral rights were acquired less accumulated depletion and any abandonment or impairment losses. Proven and probable reserves have not been established for mineral rights as of December 31, 2014.  At December 31, 2014 mineral rights totaling $323,200 were net of $117,857 of impairment and abandonment charges.  See Note 3 for discussion of impairment.


Impairment of Long-lived Assets and Mining Rights


We continually monitor events and changes in circumstances that could indicate that our carrying amounts of long-lived assets, including mineral rights, may not be recoverable. When such events or changes in circumstances occur, we assess the recoverability of long-lived assets by determining whether the carrying value of such assets will be recovered through their undiscounted expected future cash flow. If the future undiscounted cash flow is less than the carrying amount of these assets, we recognize an impairment loss based on the excess of the carrying amount over the fair value of the assets.


Notes Payable – Related Parties


Notes payable to related parties are classified as current liabilities as the note holders have the ability to control the repayment dates of the notes.


Exploration Costs    


Mineral exploration costs are expensed as incurred. When it has been determined that it is economically feasible to extract minerals and the permitting process has been initiated, exploration costs incurred to further delineate and develop the property are considered pre-commercial production costs and will be capitalized and included as mine development costs in our balance sheets.



F-8




Income Taxes


We recognize deferred tax assets and liabilities for temporary differences between the tax basis of assets and liabilities and the amounts at which they are carried in the financial statements and the effect of net operating losses based upon the enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which the differences are expected to reverse. A valuation allowance is established when necessary to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount expected to be realized. 


Net Loss per Common Share


We compute basic net loss per common share by dividing our net loss attributable to common shareholders by our weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Computation of diluted net loss per common share adds the weighted-average number of potential common shares outstanding to the weighted-average common shares outstanding, as calculated for basic net loss per share, except for instances in which there is a net loss. For the year ended December 31, 2014, potential common shares associated with convertible notes payable have been omitted from the net loss per common share computation as they are anti-dilutive due to the net loss for the year.  For the year ended December 31, 2013, there were no potential common shares outstanding.


Stock-based Compensation 


The Company determines the fair value of stock option awards granted to employees in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718 – 10 and to non-employees in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 505 – 50.


New Accounting Standards


From time to time, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) or other standards setting bodies issue new accounting pronouncements. Updates to the FASB Accounting Standards Codification are communicated through issuance of an Accounting Standards Update. Unless otherwise discussed, we believe that the impact of recently issued guidance, whether adopted or to be adopted in the future, is not expected to have a material impact on our financial statements upon adoption.


Recently Adopted Accounting Standards

During the year ended December 31, 2014, the Company elected to early adopt Accounting Standards Update No. 2014-10, Development Stage Entities (Topic 915): Elimination of Certain Financial Reporting Requirements. The adoption of this ASU allowed the company to remove the inception to date information and all references to development stage.

We do not expect the adoption of recently issued accounting pronouncements to have a significant impact on our results of operations, financial position or cash flow.






F-9



Note 3 – Mineral Rights and Properties:  

As of December 31, 2014 and 2013, our mineral rights and properties consist of the following:

 

 

December 31, 2014

 

December 31, 2013

Silver District Claims

 

 $   323,200

 

 $   143,200

Sacramento Mountains Project

 

 -   

 

 -   

Pony Express Claims

 

-

 

-

 

 

 $   323,200

 

 $   143,200

Silver District Claims

In August 2012, we entered into an option agreement with Columbus Exploration f/k/a Columbus Silver Corporation, which granted us the right to acquire all of Columbus’ interest in its Silver District properties located in La Paz County, Arizona.  We paid Columbus an initial $63,200 on signing of the option and a further $50,000 in December 2012.  During February 2014 and January 2013, we paid the final two payments of $80,000 and $30,000, respectively, towards the purchase of the James Blaine-patented claim purchase obligation entered into between Columbus and a third party.  We also paid all of the costs to maintain all of the claims and leases during 2013 and 2014.  On September 30, 2014, we paid an additional $100,000 to Columbus Exploration and acquired all of Columbus’ interest in its Silver District properties located in La Paz County, Arizona.   See also Note 6 regarding certain commitments for future payments for these claims.

The Silver District property consists of 110 unpatented lode and millsite mining claims, four patented lode claims held directly or under lease agreements, and one Arizona state lease, totaling over 2,000 acres.  The various claims are subject to third party net smelter royalties and/or net profits of varying percentages.

In August 2014, we renewed the BLM lode and mill site claims with the Bureau of Land Management and recorded a notice of intent to hold mining claims with La Paz County, Arizona and these claims remain in good standing through August 31, 2015.   In July 2013, we staked and filed with the Bureau of Land Management and recorded with La Paz County an additional 9 lode claims or approximately 180 acres to our Silver District land holdings.   We renewed two of those claims with the Bureau of Land Management in August 2014 and they remain in good standing through August 31, 2015.

During August 2014, we made an advance minimum royalty payment of $7,500 to a third party landowner on the Red Cloud lease which includes the Red Cloud Patented claim and two BLM lode claims under the Columbus option agreement and in September 2014 successfully renewed the exploration permit on portions of the Arizona State section that comprises part of our Silver District land package.

In November 2013, we paid $21,457 to the Bureau of Land Management (“BLM”) representing a deposit for potential reclamation of proposed drilling sites should the Company decide to drill exploratory holes on its Silver District project.  In April 2014 the Company completed an exploratory drilling program, and upon its completion requested the return of the deposited funds from the BLM, and in July 2014 those funds were received.



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Sacramento Mountains Project

Magellan staked fifty (50) unpatented lode mining claims known as the “Sacramento Mountains Project” totaling approximately 1,000 acres, in which they have a 100% unencumbered interest, on Federal (BLM) land in October 2012 and filed the claims with the BLM in January 2013.    The Project is located in the northwest corner of the Sacramento Mountains approximately 10 miles WNW of Needles, California.  In August 2014, we renewed these claims with the Bureau of Land Management and our claims remain in good standing through August 31, 2015.  

During 2013, we paid $8,639 to the Bureau of Land Management (“BLM”) representing a deposit for potential reclamation of proposed drilling sites should the Company decide to drill exploratory holes on its Sacramento Mountains project.  The deposit is included in other non-current assets in the accompanying balance sheets at December 31, 2014 and 2013 as Deposits with BLM.

A plan of operation for a small exploration drill program was submitted and approved by the Bureau of Land Management in 2013.  As of the date of this report no decision to drill within the project has been made.   Our permit expires February 2017.    Due to the decline in precious metals prices and the absence of currently available funds to further develop this early stage project, we recorded an impairment charge equal to the amount of our capitalized mineral rights at December 31, 2013 in the amount of $10,350. We intend to leave our deposit in place for the Sacramento Mountains project with the BLM and maintain our claims so that the project is available for further exploration should capital formation conditions improve.

Pony Express Claims

On November 18, 2010, we filed two unpatented lode mining claims giving us the right to explore, develop and conduct mining operations on these claims located in Churchill County, Nevada.    

In August 2013, we renewed these claims with the Bureau of Land Management.  However, due to the decline in precious metals prices and the absence of currently available funds to further develop this project, we recorded an impairment charge equal to the amount of our capitalized mineral rights at December 31, 2013 in the amount of $4,471.  During 2014 we allowed the claims to lapse without renewal, and the Company no longer intends to pursue those claims.

Note 4 - Fair Value of Financial Instruments


Financial assets and liabilities recorded at fair value in our condensed consolidated balance sheets are categorized based upon a fair value hierarchy established by GAAP, which prioritizes the inputs used to measure fair value into the following levels:


Level 1— Quoted market prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities at the measurement date.


Level 2— Quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets; quoted prices for identical or similar assets and liabilities in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable and can be corroborated by observable market data.




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Level 3— Inputs reflecting management’s best estimates and assumptions of what market participants would use in pricing assets or liabilities at the measurement date. The inputs are unobservable in the market and significant to the valuation of the instruments.

        

A financial instrument's categorization within the valuation hierarchy is based upon the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement.


Financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis are summarized below:


 

 

Carrying Value at December 31, 2014

 

Fair Value Measurement at December 31, 2014

 

 

 

 

Level 1

 

Level 2

 

Level 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Derivative warrant liability

 

$

30,520

 

$

 

$

 

$

30,520

 


The carrying amount of cash and cash equivalents, prepaid expenses, accounts payable, and accrued liabilities, approximates fair value because of the short-term nature of these financial instruments. We are unable to estimate the fair value of amounts due to related parties, including notes and advances payable and our credit facility to related parties, without incurring excessive costs because quoted market prices are not available, we have not developed the valuation model necessary to make these estimates, and the cost of obtaining independent valuations would be excessive.

Note 5 – Line of Credit – Related Parties:

Effective December 31, 2012, we entered into a line of credit arrangement with John D. Gibbs, a significant investor, to facilitate timely cash flows for the Company’s operations.  The line of credit originally provided for a maximum balance of $250,000, accrued interest at 6% annually, and matured on December 31, 2014.


On December 31, 2013 we amended our credit agreement with Mr. Gibbs to increase the borrowing limit under the line of credit to $750,000.  All other terms of the credit agreement, including the interest rate and maturity date remained unchanged.  On December 31, 2014, we again amended the credit agreement to increase the borrowing limit to $900,000 and extend the maturity date to December 31, 2015.  Also, effective December 31, 2014 the Company pledged all its ownership interest in the Company’s wholly-owned subsidiary, Gulf+Western Industries, Inc. as security for amounts outstanding under the credit agreement.


During the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013, draws totaling $330,000 and $284,604 were made, respectively, and were primarily used to fund working capital and obligations to maintain and expand our mining rights and properties.  At December 31, 2014 a total of $729,604 was outstanding under this line of credit.  In addition, a total of $53,627 of interest has been accrued on this obligation and is included in Accrued interest - related parties on the accompanying balance sheet at December 31, 2014.  The Company evaluated the amendment for significant modification and concluded that there were no discounts recorded on the line of credit or fees and as such there is no accounting for the modification.




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Note 6 – Notes Payable – Related Parties:


In August 2011, we entered into an unsecured loan from John Power, the Company’s sole executive officer, evidenced by a $20,000 promissory note. The promissory note bears interest at 6% per annum and is payable on demand with thirty days’ notice from the lender.  In July 2013, the Company paid Mr. Power $1,198 representing accrued interest on this note at June 30, 2013.  During the second quarter of 2014, the Company made payments totaling $5,000 to pay down the principal balance of the Note.  At December 31, 2014 the Note balance was $15,000.


In January 2014, we entered into an unsecured loan from John Power, the Company’s sole executive officer, evidenced by a $50,000 promissory note. The promissory note bears interest at 6.75% per annum and is payable on demand with thirty days’ notice from the lender.


A total of $4,750 of interest was accrued on these two promissory notes and is included in Accrued interest - related parties on the accompanying balance sheet at December 31, 2014.


Note 7 – Convertible Notes Payable:


On October 1, 2014, we issued a Convertible Promissory Note (“Note”) to a provider of legal services in the original principal amount of approximately $51,532.  The Note was issued to evidence the Company’s indebtedness for legal services previously rendered.   Interest accrues quarterly on the outstanding principal and interest balance of the Note at 6% per annum. Furthermore, any additional past due billings shall be added to the principal of the Note as they occur.  The note holder has agreed to waive inclusion of $3,328 of fourth quarter billings as these amounts are to be paid in cash to the service provider.  The principal plus accrued and unpaid interest is due upon five days’ written demand of the Note holder.  The Note is unsecured.


The Note is convertible at any time into shares of common stock at a conversion price of $0.039, which represented the closing bid price of the common stock on the OTC Bulletin Board on the date of issuance.


The Note contains certain anti-dilution provisions that would reduce the conversion price should the Company issue common stock equivalents at a price less than the Note conversion price.  Accordingly, the conversion features of the Note are considered a discount to the Note.  However, since the Note is payable upon demand by the note holder, the value of the discount is considered interest expense at the time of its inception.  The Note shall be evaluated quarterly, and upon any quarterly valuations in which the value of the discount increases, we will recognize a loss due to an increase in the fair value of the derivative liability.  Therefore, we recorded a derivative liability at the Note inception, and adjusted the liability at December 31, 2014.  As a result of these valuations, $29,940 of interest expense was incurred during the quarter ended December 31, 2014 and $580 was recorded as a loss due to change in fair value of derivative.


We estimate the fair value of this derivative at each balance sheet date until such time the Note is paid or converted.


We estimated the fair value of the derivative on the date of issuance and at December 31, 2014 using the Black-Scholes option pricing model, which includes assumptions for expected dividends, expected share price volatility, risk-free interest rate, and expected life of the Note.  Our expected volatility



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assumption is based on our historical weekly closing price of our stock over a period equivalent to the expected remaining life of the Note.


The following table summarizes the assumptions used to value the derivative Note discount at inception on October 1, 2014:


Fair value assumptions – derivative:

 

Inception: October 31, 2014

 

Risk free interest rate

 

0.11%

 

Expected term (years)

 

1.0

 

Expected volatility

 

146%

 

Expected dividends

 

0%

 









The following table summarizes the assumptions used to value the derivative Note discount at December 31, 2014:


Fair value assumptions – derivative:

 

December 31, 2014

 

Risk free interest rate

 

0.25%

 

Expected term (years)

 

1.0

 

Expected volatility

 

162%

 

Expected dividends

 

0%

 

 








A total of $771 of interest has accrued on the Note and is included in Accrued interest on the accompanying balance sheet at December 31, 2014.


Note 8 - Commitments and Contingencies:


As part of our acquisition of the Silver District properties from Columbus Exploration, we assumed the Red Cloud lease whose initial term expires in August 2026.  The lease requires annual advance minimum royalty payments of $10,000 through the term of the lease due on the annual anniversary of the agreement.  The lease is also subject to a 2% net production royalty to be paid to the lessor from the sale of precious metals extracted from the leased property.   In order to maintain the BLM lode and mill site claims, annual payments are required before the end of August of each year.


Note 9 – Related Party Transactions:

Conflicts of Interests

Athena Silver Corporation is a company under common control. Mr. Power is also a director and CEO of Athena. Mr. Gibbs is a significant investor in both Magellan and Athena. Magellan and Athena are both exploration stage companies involved in the business of acquisition and exploration of mineral resources.




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Silver Saddle Resources, LLC is also a company under common control. Mr. Power and Mr. Gibbs are significant investors and managing members of Silver Saddle. Magellan and Silver Saddle are both exploration stage companies involved in the business of acquisition and exploration of mineral resources.

 

The existence of common ownership and common management could result in significantly different operating results or financial position from those that could have resulted had Magellan, Athena and Silver Saddle been autonomous.


Management Fees


On January 1, 2014, we extended, for one year, our month-to-month management agreement with Mr. Power requiring a monthly payment, in advance, of $2,500 as consideration for the day-to-day management of Magellan.


Management fees to Mr. Power totaling $30,000 for both the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013 are included in general and administrative expenses in our statement of operations.  All management fees due Mr. Power through December 31, 2014 have been paid.


Accrued Interest - Related Parties


Accrued interest due to related parties is included in our balance sheets as follows:


 

 

December 31, 2014

 

December 31, 2013

Accrued interest payable - Mr. Power

 $     4,750

 

 $       585

Accrued interest payable - Mr. Gibbs

 

 53,627

 

 20,385

 

 

 $   58,377

 

 $  20,970


Advances Payable – Related Parties


We borrowed and repaid non-interest bearing advances from/to related parties as follows:

 

 

Year Ended December 31, 2014

 

 

Advances

 

Repayments

Mr. Power

 

 $   42,350

 

 $   39,500

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31, 2013

 

 

Advances

 

Repayments

Mr. Power

 

 $   31,450

 

 $   37,100


At December 31, 2014 and 2013, $2,850 and $-0-, respectively, of advances from related parties were outstanding.


The Company also utilizes a credit card owned by Mr. Power to pay various obligations when the availability of cash is limited or the timing of the payments is considered critical.  A total of $650 of



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Company charges was outstanding on this credit card and is included in the accounts payable balance at December 31, 2014.  No such amounts were outstanding at December 31, 2013.



Note 10 - Income Taxes


Our reconciliation between the expected federal income tax benefit computed by applying the federal statutory rate to our net loss and the actual benefit for taxes on net loss for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013 are as follows:


 

 

Period Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

Expected federal income tax benefit at statutory rate

 

$

410,669 

 

$

279,822 

 

Change in valuation allowance

 

 

(410,669)

 

 

(279,822)

 

Income tax benefit

 

$

 

$

 


Our gross net operating loss carry-forwards available to offset future income for federal tax purposes are $1,095,128 as of December 31, 2014. These NOLs expire on various dates through 2034.


Note 11 – Subsequent Events


Subsequent to December 31, 2014, additional advances totaling $30,000 were made on the Company’s credit agreement with Mr. Gibbs.  






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SIGNATURES


Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this annual report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.



 

MAGELLAN GOLD CORPORATION

 

 

Date:  March 23, 2015

By__/s/ John C. Power

John C. Power, President, Principal Executive Officer, Principal Accounting Officer, Secretary & Director



Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the Registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.


SIGNATURE

TITLE

DATE

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ John C. Power  __

John C. Power

President, Principal Executive Officer, Principal Accounting Officer, Secretary & Director

March 23, 2015