10-K 1 wmgi-12252016x10k.htm 10-K Document

 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, DC 20549
FORM 10-K
(Mark One)
þ
 
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 25, 2016
OR
o
 
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from                      to                     
Commission file number: 001-35065
WRIGHT MEDICAL GROUP N.V.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
The Netherlands
 
98-0509600
(State or other jurisdiction
of incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
Prins Bernhardplein 200
1097 JB Amsterdam, The Netherlands
 
None
(Zip code)
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)
 
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (+31) 20 521 4777
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Ordinary shares, par value €0.03 per share
 
NASDAQ Global Select Market
Contingent Value Rights
 
NASDAQ Stock Market LLC
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. þ Yes o No
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. o Yes þ No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.     þ Yes o No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). þ Yes o No
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. þ
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
Large accelerated filer þ
 
Accelerated filer o
 
Non-accelerated filer o
 
Smaller reporting company o
 
 
 
 
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). o Yes þ No
The aggregate market value of the ordinary shares held by non-affiliates of the registrant on June 26, 2016 was $1.7 billion based on the closing sale price of the ordinary shares on that date, as reported by the NASDAQ Global Select Market. For purposes of the foregoing calculation only, the registrant has assumed that all executive officers and directors of the registrant, and their affiliated entities, are affiliates.
As of February 17, 2017, there were 103,625,395 ordinary shares outstanding.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
None.
 




WRIGHT MEDICAL GROUP N.V.
ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K
Table of Contents
 
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 EX-10.31
 
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 EX-10.34
 
 EX-10.35
 
 EX-10.36
 
 EX-10.37
 
 EX-10.38
 
 EX-10.67
 
 EX-10.68
 
 EX-10.69
 
 EX-12.1
 
 EX-21.1
 
 EX-23.1
 
 EX-31.1
 
 EX-31.2
 
 EX-32.1
 
 EX-101 INSTANCE DOCUMENT
 EX-101 SCHEMA DOCUMENT
 EX-101 CALCULATION LINKBASE DOCUMENT
 EX-101 LABELS LINKBASE DOCUMENT
 EX-101 PRESENTATION LINKBASE DOCUMENT
 EX-101 DEFINITION LINKBASE DOCUMENT




SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (Securities Act), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (Exchange Act), and that are subject to the safe harbor created by those sections. These statements reflect management's current knowledge, assumptions, beliefs, estimates, and expectations and express management's current view of future performance, results, and trends. Forward looking statements may be identified by their use of terms such as anticipate, believe, could, estimate, expect, intend, may, plan, predict, project, will, and other similar terms. Forward-looking statements are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to materially differ from those described in the forward-looking statements. The reader should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. Such statements are made as of the date of this report, and we undertake no obligation to update such statements after this date. Risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to materially differ from those described in forward-looking statements are discussed in our filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) (including those described in "Part I. Item 1A. Risk Factors" of this report). By way of example and without implied limitation, such risks and uncertainties include:
future actions of the SEC, the United States Attorney’s office, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Department of Health and Human Services, or other U.S. or foreign government authorities, including those resulting from increased scrutiny under the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and similar laws, that could delay, limit, or suspend our development, manufacturing, commercialization, and sale of products, or result in seizures, injunctions, monetary sanctions, or criminal or civil liabilities;
risks associated with the merger between Tornier N.V. (Tornier or legacy Tornier) and Wright Medical Group, Inc. (WMG or legacy Wright), including the failure to realize intended benefits and anticipated synergies and cost-savings from the transaction or delay in realization thereof; our businesses may not be combined successfully, or such combination may take longer, be more difficult, time-consuming or costly to accomplish than expected; and business disruption after the transaction, including adverse effects on employee retention, our sales and distribution channel, especially in light of territory transitions, and business relationships with third parties;
risks associated with the divestiture of the U.S. rights to certain of legacy Tornier's ankle and silastic toe replacement products;
liability for product liability claims on hip/knee (OrthoRecon) products sold by Wright Medical Technology, Inc. (WMT) prior to the divestiture of the OrthoRecon business;
risks and uncertainties associated with the recent metal-on-metal master settlement agreement and the settlement agreement with the three insurance companies, including without limitation, the final settlement amount and the final number of claims settled under the master settlement agreement, the resolution of the remaining unresolved claims, the effect of the broad release of certain insurance coverage for present and future claims, and the resolution of WMT’s dispute with the remaining carriers;
failure to realize the anticipated benefits from previous acquisitions and dispositions;
adverse outcomes in existing product liability litigation;
new product liability claims;
inadequate insurance coverage;
copycat claims against our modular hip systems resulting from a competitor’s recall of its modular hip product;
the ability of a creditor of any one particular entity within our corporate structure to reach the assets of the other entities within our corporate structure not liable for the underlying claims of the one particular entity, despite our corporate structure which is intended to ring-fence liabilities;
failure to obtain anticipated commercial sales of our AUGMENT® Bone Graft in the United States;
challenges to our intellectual property rights or inability to defend our products against the intellectual property rights of others;
adverse effects of diverting resources and attention to transition services provided to the purchaser of our Large Joints business;
failures of, interruptions to, or unauthorized tampering with, our information technology systems;
failure or delay in obtaining FDA or other regulatory approvals for our products;
the potentially negative effect of our ongoing compliance efforts on our relationships with customers and on our ability to deliver timely and effective medical education, clinical studies, and new products;
the possibility of private securities litigation or shareholder derivative suits;
insufficient demand for and market acceptance of our new and existing products;
recently enacted healthcare laws and changes in product reimbursements, which could generate downward pressure on our product pricing;
potentially burdensome tax measures;
lack of suitable business development opportunities;
inability to capitalize on business development opportunities;

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product quality or patient safety issues;
geographic and product mix impact on our sales;
inability to retain key sales representatives, independent distributors, and other personnel or to attract new talent;
inventory reductions or fluctuations in buying patterns by wholesalers or distributors;
inability to generate sufficient cash flow to satisfy our capital requirements, including future milestone payments, and existing debt, including the conversion features of our convertible senior notes, or refinance our existing debt as it matures;
risks associated with our credit, security and guaranty agreement for our senior secured asset based line of credit;
inability to raise additional financing when needed and on favorable terms;
the negative impact of the commercial and credit environment on us, our customers, and our suppliers;
deriving a significant portion of our revenues from operations in certain geographic markets that are subject to political, economic, and social instability, including in particular France, and risks and uncertainties involved in launching our products in certain new geographic markets;
fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates;
not successfully developing and marketing new products and technologies and implementing our business strategy;
not successfully competing against our existing or potential competitors and the effect of significant recent consolidations amongst our competitors;
the reliance of our business plan on certain market assumptions;
our private label manufacturers failing to provide us with sufficient supply of their products, or failing to meet appropriate quality requirements;
our inability to timely manufacture products or instrument sets to meet demand;
our plans to bring the manufacturing of certain of our products in-house and possible disruptions we may experience in connection with such transition;
our plans to increase our gross margins by taking certain actions designed to do so;
the loss of key suppliers, which may result in our inability to meet customer orders for our products in a timely manner or within our budget;
the incurrence of significant expenditures of resources to maintain relatively high levels of inventory, which could reduce our cash flows and increase the risk of inventory obsolescence, which could harm our operating results;
consolidation in the healthcare industry that could lead to demands for price concessions or the exclusion of some suppliers from certain of our markets, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or operating results;
our clinical trials and their results and our reliance on third parties to conduct them;
the compliance of our products and activities with the laws and regulations of the countries in which they are marketed, which compliance may be costly and time-consuming;
the use, misuse or off-label use of our products that may harm our image in the marketplace or result in injuries that may lead to product liability suits, which could be costly to our business or result in governmental sanctions;
pending and future other litigation, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or operating results; and
risks in light of the material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting that we have recently identified.
For more information regarding these and other uncertainties and factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from what we have anticipated in our forward-looking statements or otherwise could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, or operating results, see “Part I. Item 1A. Risk Factors” of this report. The risks and uncertainties described above and in “Part I. Item 1A. Risk Factors” of this report are not exclusive and further information concerning us and our business, including factors that potentially could materially affect our financial results or condition, may emerge from time to time. We assume no obligation to update, amend, or clarify forward-looking statements to reflect actual results or changes in factors or assumptions affecting such forward-looking statements. We advise you, however, to consult any further disclosures we make on related subjects in our future Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and Current Reports on Form 8-K we file with or furnish to the SEC.


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PART I
Item 1. Business.
Overview
Wright Medical Group N.V. (Wright or we) is a global medical device company focused on extremities and biologics products. We are committed to delivering innovative, value-added solutions improving quality of life for patients worldwide and are a recognized leader of surgical solutions for the upper extremities (shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand), lower extremities (foot and ankle) and biologics markets, three of the fastest growing segments in orthopaedics. We market our products in over 50 countries worldwide. We believe we are differentiated in the marketplace by our strategic focus on extremities and biologics, our full portfolio of upper and lower extremities and biologics products, and our specialized and focused sales organization.
Our product portfolio consists of the following product categories:
Upper extremities, which include joint implants and bone fixation devices for the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hand;
Lower extremities, which include joint implants and bone fixation devices for the foot and ankle;
Biologics, which include products used to support treatment of damaged or diseased bone, tendons, and soft tissues or to stimulate bone growth; and
Sports medicine and other, which include products used across several anatomic sites to mechanically repair tissue-to-tissue or tissue-to-bone injuries and other ancillary products.
Our global corporate headquarters are located in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. We also have significant operations located in Memphis, Tennessee (U.S. headquarters, research and development, sales and marketing administration, and administrative activities); Bloomington, Minnesota (upper extremities sales and marketing and warehousing operations); Arlington, Tennessee (manufacturing and warehousing operations); Franklin, Tennessee (manufacturing and warehousing operations); Montbonnot, France (manufacturing and warehousing operations); and Macroom, Ireland (manufacturing). In addition, we have local sales and distribution offices in Canada, Australia, Asia, Latin America, and throughout Europe. For purposes of this report, references to "international" or "foreign" relate to non-U.S. matters while references to "domestic" relate to U.S. matters.
On October 1, 2015, we became Wright Medical Group N.V. following the merger (the Wright/Tornier merger or the merger) of Wright Medical Group, Inc. (WMG or legacy Wright) with Tornier N.V. (Tornier or legacy Tornier). Because of the structure of the merger and the governance of the combined company immediately post-merger, the merger was accounted for as a "reverse acquisition" under generally accepted accounting principles in the United States (US GAAP), and as such, legacy Wright was considered the acquiring entity for accounting purposes. Therefore, legacy Wright’s historical results of operations replaced legacy Tornier’s historical results of operations for all periods prior to the merger. References in this section and certain other sections of Part I of this report to "we," "our" and "us" refer to Wright Medical Group N.V. and its subsidiaries after the Wright/Tornier merger and Wright Medical Group, Inc. and its subsidiaries before the merger.
On October 21, 2016, we sold legacy Tornier’s Large Joints business to Corin Orthopaedics Holdings Limited (Corin) allowing us to devote our full resources and attention on accelerating growth opportunities in the high-growth extremities and biologics markets. Legacy Wright sold its hip and knee (OrthoRecon) business to MicroPort Scientific Corporation (MicroPort) on January 9, 2014. The financial results of legacy Tornier’s Large Joints business and the OrthoRecon business are reflected within discontinued operations for all periods presented.
For the year ended December 25, 2016, we had net sales of $690.4 million and a net loss from continuing operations of $164.9 million. As of December 25, 2016, we had total assets of $2,291 million. During the first quarter of 2016, our management began managing our operations as four operating business segments: U.S. Lower Extremities & Biologics, U.S. Upper Extremities, International Extremities & Biologics, and Large Joints, based on management's change to the way it monitors performance, aligns strategies, and allocates resources. As a result of the sale of our Large Joints business to Corin, the Large Joints reportable segment is presented in our consolidated statements of operations as discontinued operations and is not included in segment results for all periods presented. U.S. Lower Extremities & Biologics, U.S. Upper Extremities, and International Extremities & Biologics are our remaining three reportable segments as of December 25, 2016. Detailed information on our net sales by product category and operating business segment and our net sales and long-lived assets by segment and geographic region can be found in Note 20 to our consolidated financial statements contained in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.”
Orthopaedic Industry
The total worldwide orthopaedic industry is estimated at approximately $47.3 billion in 2016. Five multinational companies currently dominate the orthopaedic industry, each with approximately $2 billion or more in annual sales. The size of these companies often allows them to concentrate their marketing and research and development efforts on products they believe will have a relatively high minimum threshold level of sales. As a result, there is an opportunity for a mid-sized orthopaedic company, such as us, to focus on less contested, higher-growth sectors of the orthopaedic market.

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We have focused our efforts into growing our position in the high-growth extremities and biologics markets. We believe a more active and aging patient population with higher expectations regarding “quality of life,” an increasing global awareness of extremities and biologics solutions, improved clinical outcomes as a result of the use of such products, and technological advances resulting in specific designs for such products that simplify procedures and address unmet needs for early interventions, and the growing need for revisions and revision related solutions will drive the market for extremities and biologics products.
The extremities market is one of the fastest growing market segments within orthopaedics, with annual growth rates of 7-10%. We believe the extremities market will continue to grow by approximately 7-10% annually. We currently estimate the market for all surgical products used by extremities-focused surgeons to be approximately $3 billion in the United States. We believe major trends in the extremities market include procedure-specific and anatomy-specific devices, locking plates, and an increase in total ankle replacement or arthroplasty procedures.
Upper extremities reconstruction involves implanting devices to replace, reconstruct, or fixate injured or diseased joints and bones in the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hand. It is estimated that approximately 60% of the upper extremities market is in total shoulder replacement or arthroplasty implants. We believe major trends in the upper extremities market include next-generation joint arthroplasty systems, bone preserving solutions, virtual planning systems, and revision of failed previous shoulder replacements in older patients.
Lower extremities reconstruction involves implanting devices to replace, reconstruct, or fixate injured or diseased joints and bones in the foot and ankle. A large segment of the lower extremities market is comprised of plating and screw systems for reconstructing and fusing joints or repairing bones after traumatic injury. We believe major trends in the lower extremities market include the use of external fixation devices in diabetic patients, total ankle arthroplasty, advanced tissue fixation devices, and biologics. According to various customer and market surveys, we are a market leader in foot and ankle surgical products. New technologies have been introduced into the lower extremities market in recent years, including next-generation total ankle replacement systems. Many of these technologies currently have low levels of market penetration. We believe that market adoption of total ankle replacement, which currently represents approximately 8% of the U.S. foot and ankle device market, will result in significant future growth in the lower extremities market.
The field of biologics employs tissue engineering and regenerative medicine technologies focused on remodeling and regeneration of tendons, ligaments, bone, and cartilage. Biologic products use both biological tissue-based and synthetic materials to allow the body to regenerate damaged or diseased bone and to repair damaged or diseased soft tissue. These products aid the body’s natural regenerative capabilities to heal itself. Biologic products provide a lower morbidity solution to “autografting,” a procedure that involves harvesting a patient’s own bone or soft tissue and transplanting it to a different site. Following an autografting procedure, the patient typically has pain, and at times, complications result at the harvest site after surgery. Biologically or synthetically derived soft tissue grafts and scaffolds are used to treat soft tissue injuries and are complementary to many sports medicine applications, including rotator cuff tendon repair and Achilles tendon repair. Hard tissue biologics products are used in many bone fusion or trauma cases where healing potential may be compromised and additional biologic factors are desired to enhance healing, where the surgeon needs additional bone, or in cases where the surgeon wishes to use materials that are naturally incorporated by the body over time. We estimate that the worldwide orthobiologics market to be over $3.5 billion, and with annual growth rates of 3-5%. Three multinational companies currently dominate the orthobiologics industry.
The newest addition to our biologics product portfolio is AUGMENT® Bone Graft, which is based on recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor (rhPDGF-BB), a synthetic copy of one of the body’s principal healing agents. We obtained FDA approval of AUGMENT® Bone Graft in the United States for ankle and/or hindfoot fusion indications during the third quarter of 2015. We estimate the U.S. market opportunity for AUGMENT® Bone Graft for ankle and/or hindfoot fusion indications to be approximately $300 million. The main competitors for AUGMENT® Bone Graft are autologous bone grafts, allograft, and synthetic bone growth substitutes. Autologous bone grafts, which account for a significant portion of total graft volume, are taken directly from the patient. This generally necessitates an additional procedure to obtain the graft, which in turn creates added expense, and increased pain and recovery time. Allografts, which are currently the second most commonly used bone grafts, are taken from human cadavers and processed by either bone banks or commercial firms. Although an obvious advantage to allografts is the fact that a second-site harvesting operation is not required, they carry a slight risk of transmitting pathogens and can also cause immune system reactions. Synthetic grafts are derived from numerous materials, including polymers, calcium sulfate, calcium phosphate, bovine collagen, and coral.
Product Portfolio
We offer a broad product portfolio of approximately 180 extremities products and over 20 biologics products that are designed to provide solutions to our surgeon customers, with the goal of improving clinical outcomes and the “quality of life” for their patients. Our product portfolio consists of the following product categories:
Upper extremities, which include joint implants and bone fixation devices for the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hand;
Lower extremities, which include joint implants and bone fixation devices for the foot and ankle;

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Biologics, which include products used to support treatment of damaged or diseased bone, tendons, and soft tissues or to stimulate bone growth; and
Sports medicine and other, which include products used across several anatomic sites to mechanically repair tissue-to-tissue or tissue-to-bone injuries and other ancillary products.
Upper Extremities
The upper extremities product category includes joint implants and bone fixation devices for the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hand. Our global net sales from this product category was $288.1 million, or 41.7% of total net sales, for the year ended December 25, 2016, as compared to $83.5 million, or 20.6% of total net sales, for the year ended December 27, 2015. Our net sales in upper extremities increased significantly as a result of the Wright/Tornier merger.
Our shoulder products are used to treat painful shoulder conditions due to arthritis, irreparable rotator cuff tendon tears, bone disease, fractured humeral heads, or failed previous shoulder replacement surgery. Our shoulder products include the following:
Total Shoulder Joint Replacement. Our total shoulder joint replacement products have two components-a humeral implant consisting of a metal stem or base attached to a metal head, and a plastic implant for the glenoid (shoulder socket). Together, these two components mimic the function of a natural shoulder joint. Our total shoulder joint replacement products include the AEQUALIS ASCEND®, AEQUALIS® PRIMARY™, AEQUALIS® PERFORM™ and SIMPLICITI® shoulder systems. Our recently introduced BLUEPRINT™ 3D Planning Software can be used with our AEQUALIS® PERFORM™ Glenoid System to assist surgeons in accurately positioning the glenoid implant and replicating the pre-operative surgical plan. In addition, we received FDA 510(k) clearance in June 2016 of our AEQUALIS® PERFORM™+ Glenoid System, the first anatomic augmented glenoid. This system was designed to specifically address posterior glenoid deficiencies and deliver bone preservation.
Hemi Shoulder Joint Replacement. Our hemi shoulder joint replacement products replace only the humeral head and allow it to articulate against the native glenoid. These products include our PYC HUMERAL HEAD™ and INSPYRE™. PYC stands for pyrocarbon, which is a biocompatible material that has low joint surface friction and a high resistance to wear. The PYC HUMERAL HEAD™ is currently available in certain international markets. The product received FDA approval in 2015 for its investigational device exemption to conduct a clinical trial in the United States. We anticipate that this single arm study will enroll and implant 157 patients from up to 20 centers across the United States and will evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the device in patients with a primary diagnosis of partial shoulder replacement or hemi-arthroplasty. The study design uses a primary endpoint that is measured at two years.
Reversed Shoulder Joint Replacement. Our reversed shoulder joint replacement products are used in arthritic patients lacking rotator cuff function. The components are different from a traditional “total” shoulder in that the humeral implant has the plastic socket and the glenoid has the metal head. This design has the biomechanical impact of shifting the pivot point of the joint away from the body centerline and recruiting the deltoid muscles to enable the patient to elevate the arm. Our reversed joint replacement products include the AEQUALIS® REVERSED II™ shoulder. We received FDA 510(k) clearance in December 2016 of our AEQUALIS® PERFORM™ REVERSED Glenoid System, our first reverse augmented glenoid. This system was designed to specifically address posterior glenoid deficiencies and deliver bone preservation.
Convertible Shoulder Joint Replacement. Our convertible shoulder joint replacement products are modular implants that can be converted from a total or hemi shoulder implant to a reversed implant at a later date if the patient requires it. Our convertible joint replacement products include the AEQUALIS ASCEND® FLEX™ convertible shoulder system, which provides anatomic and reversed options within a single system and is designed to offer precise intra-operative implant-to-patient fit and easy conversion to reversed if necessary.
Shoulder Resurfacing Implants. An option for some patients is shoulder resurfacing where the damaged humeral head is sculpted to receive a metal “cap” that fits onto the bone, functioning as a new, smooth humeral head. This procedure can be less invasive than a total shoulder replacement. Our shoulder resurfacing implants are designed to preserve bone, which may benefit more active or younger patients with shoulder arthritis. Our resurfacing implants include the AEQUALIS® RESURFACING HEAD™.
Shoulder Trauma Devices. Our shoulder trauma devices, such as plates, pins, screws, and nails, are non-articulating implants used to help stabilize fractures of the humerus. Our shoulder trauma products include the AEQUALIS® IM NAIL™, AEQUALIS® PROXMILA HUMERAL PLATE™, AEQUALIS® FRACTURE™ shoulder and AEQUALIS® REVERSED FRACTURE™ shoulder.
In addition to our shoulder products, our upper extremities product portfolio consist of implants, plates, pins, screws, and nails that are used to treat the elbow, wrist, and hand, and include the following:

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Total Elbow and Radial Head Replacement. Our total elbow and radial head replacement products address the need for modularity in the anatomically highly-variable joint of the elbow and give surgeons the ability to reproduce the natural flexion/extension axis and restore natural kinematics of the elbow. Our total elbow replacement products include our LATITUDE® EV™ total elbow prosthesis. Our radial head replacement products include our EVOLVE® modular radial head device, which is a market leading radial head prosthesis that provides different combinations of heads and stems allowing the surgeon to choose implant heads and stems to accommodate the unpredictable anatomy of each patient.
Elbow Fracture Repair. We have several plating and screw products designed to repair a fractured elbow. Our radial head plating systems and screws are for surgeons who wish to repair rather than replace a damaged radial head and include our EVOLVE® TRIAD™ fixation system. Our EVOLVE® Elbow Plating System addresses fractures of the distal humerus and proximal ulna. Composed of polished stainless steel, this system was designed to accurately match the patient anatomy to reduce the need for intra-operative bending while providing a low profile design to minimize post-operative irritation. Both of these products and several of our other products incorporate our ORTHOLOC® 3Di Polyaxial Locking Technology to enable optimal screw placement and stability.
Wrist Fracture Repair. We have several plating and screw products designed to repair a fractured wrist. Our MICRONAIL® II Intramedullary Distal Radius System is a next-generation minimally invasive treatment for distal radius fractures that is designed to provide immediate fracture stabilization with minimal soft tissue disruption. Also, as the nail is implanted within the bone, it has no external profile on top of the bone, thereby reducing the potential for tendon irritation or rupture, which is an appreciable problem with conventional plates designed to lie on top of the bone. In addition, our RAYHACK® system is comprised of a series of precision cutting guides and procedure-specific plates for ulnar and radial shortening procedures and the surgical treatment of radial malunions and Keinbock’s Disease.
Hand Fixation. Our hand fixation products include our FUSEFORCE® Hand Fixation System, which is a shape-memory compression-ready fixation system that can be used in fixation for fractures, fusions, or osteotomies of the bones in the hand.
Thumb and Finger Joint Replacement. Our Swanson finger joints are used in finger joint replacement for patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis of the hand. With nearly 45 years of clinical success, Swanson digit implants are a foundation in our upper extremities business and are used by a loyal base of hand surgeons worldwide. Our ORTHOSPHERE® implants are used in thumb joint replacement procedures.
Lower Extremities
The lower extremities product category includes joint implants and bone fusion and fixation devices, including plates, pins, screws, and nails, for the foot and ankle. Our global net sales from this product category for the year ended December 25, 2016 was $285.6 million, or 41.4% of total net sales, as compared to $238.3 million, or 58.8% of total net sales, for the year ended December 27, 2015.
We are a recognized leader in the United States for foot and ankle surgical products. Our lower extremities product portfolio includes:
Total Ankle Joint Replacement. Total ankle joint replacement, also known as total ankle arthroplasty, is a surgical procedure that orthopaedic surgeons use to treat ankle arthritis. Our total ankle joint replacement products include implants for the ankle that involve replacing the joint with an articulating multi-component implant. These joint implants may be mobile bearing, in which the plastic component is free to slide relative to the metal bearing surfaces, or fixed bearing, in which this component is constrained. Our INBONE® Total Ankle Systems, including our third-generation INBONE® II Total Ankle System, are modular prostheses that allow the surgeon to tailor the fixation stems for the tibial and talar components in order to maximize stability of the implant. The INBONE® II Total Ankle System is the only ankle replacement that offers surgeons multiple implant options with different articular geometry. Our INFINITY® Total Ankle System is the newest addition to our total ankle replacement portfolio and features a distinctive talar resurfacing option for preservation of talar bone. The combination and interchangeability of both the INBONE® and INFINITY® systems provide the surgeon with an implant continuum of care concept, allowing the surgeon to address a more bone conserving implant option with INFINITY® all the way to addressing a more complex ankle deformity with INBONE®. Our INBONE® and INFINITY® Total Ankle Systems can be used with our PROPHECY® Preoperative Navigation Guides, which combine computer imaging with a patient’s CT scan, and are designed to provide alignment accuracy while reducing surgical steps. Physician testing of our most recent total ankle replacement product, the INVISIONTM Total Ankle Revision System, began in 2016 and is expected to reach full commercial launch in the third quarter of 2017.

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Ankle Fusion. We have several products used in ankle fusion procedures, which fuse together the tibia, fibula, and talus bones into one bone, and are intended to treat painful, end-stage arthritis in the ankle joint. These products include our ORTHOLOC® 3Di Ankle Fusion System, which legacy Wright launched successfully in July 2013, VALOR® TTC fusion nail, and the legacy Tornier Maxlock ExtremeTM Plate and Screws System.
Ankle Fixation and Fracture Repair. We sell a broad range of anatomically designed plates, screws, and nails used to stabilize and heal fractured ankle bones, including our ORTHOLOC® 3Di Ankle Fracture System, which is a comprehensive single-tray ankle fracture solution designed to address a wide range of fracture types by providing the surgeon with multiple anatomically-contoured plates and a comprehensive set of instrumentation.
Foot Fusion. We have several products used in foot fusion procedures, which fuse together three bones in the back of the foot into one bone and are used to treat a wide range of conditions, including arthritis, flat feet, rheumatoid arthritis, and previous injuries, such as fractures caused by wear and tear to bones and cartilage. Our foot fusion products include our ORTHOLOC® 3Di Midfoot Plating System, VALOR® TTC fusion nail and the legacy Tornier Maxlock ExtremeTM Plate and Screws System.
Foot Fixation and Fracture Repair. Our foot fixation and fracture repair products include plates, screws, and nails used to stabilize and heal foot deformities and fractures. Our CHARLOTTE® CLAW® Compression Plate is the first ever locking compression plate designed for corrective foot surgeries. Our next-generation CLAW® II Compression Plating System expands our plate and screw offering by introducing anatomic plates specifically designed for fusions of the midfoot, and the CLAW® II Polyaxial Compression Plating System incorporates variable-angle locking screw technology and our ORTHOLOC® 3Di Reconstruction Plating System utilizes our 3Di polyaxial locking technology. In April 2016, we further expanded the ORTHOLOC® 3Di portfolio with the launch of the ORTHOLOC® 3Di CROSSCHECK® Plating System. This modular addition is comprised of five uniquely designed plates which offer an inter-fragmentary solution. Our SALVATION™ limb salvage portfolio, which is designed to address the unique demands of advanced midfoot reconstruction, was also commercially launched in the first half of 2016. Other foot products include the MAXLOCK®, MINIMAX LOCK™ and MINIMAX LOCK EXTREME™ plate and screw systems, BIOFOAM® Wedge System, BIOARCH® Subtalar Arthroereisis Implant, MDI Metatarsal Resurfacing Implant, and TENFUSE® Nail Allograft.
Hammertoe Correction. Hammertoe is a contracture (bending) of one or both joints of the second, third, fourth, or fifth (little) toes. Our hammertoe correction products include the PRO-TOE® VO Hammertoe Fixation System, PRO-TOE® C2 Hammertoe Implant, PHALINX® Hammertoe Fixation System, Cannulink Intraosseous Fixation System (IFS), and TENFUSE® PIP Hammertoe Allograft.
Toe Joint Replacement. We also sell our Swanson line of toe joint replacement products.
Biologics
The biologics product category includes a broad line of biologic products that are used to support treatment of damaged or diseased bone, tendons, and soft tissues and other biological solutions for surgeons and their patients or to stimulate bone growth. These products focus on supporting biological musculoskeletal repair by utilizing synthetic and human tissue-based materials. Our biologic products are primarily used in extremities-related procedures as well as in trauma-induced voids of the long bones and some spine procedures. Internationally, we offer a bone graft product incorporating antibiotic delivery. Our global net sales from this product category for the year ended December 25, 2016 was $93.5 million, or 13.5% of total net sales, compared to $70.2 million, or 17.3% of total net sales, for the year ended December 27, 2015.
Our biologics products include the following:
AUGMENT® Bone Graft. The newest addition to our biologics product portfolio is AUGMENT® Bone Graft. Our AUGMENT® Bone Graft product line is based on recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor (rhPDGF-BB), a synthetic copy of one of the body’s principal healing agents. We obtained FDA approval of AUGMENT® Bone Graft for ankle and/or hindfoot fusion indications in the United States during third quarter of 2015. Prior to FDA approval, this product was available for sale in Canada for foot and ankle fusion indications and in Australia and New Zealand for hindfoot and ankle fusion indications. We acquired the AUGMENT® Bone Graft product line from BioMimetic Therapeutics, Inc. (BioMimetic) in March 2013.
Hard Tissue Repair. Our other bone or hard tissue repair products include our PRO-DENSE® Injectable Regenerative Graft. PRO-DENSE® is a composite graft composed of surgical grade calcium sulfate and calcium phosphate, and in animal studies, has demonstrated excellent bone regenerative characteristics, forming new bone that is over three times stronger than the natural surrounding bone at the 13-week time point. Beyond 13 weeks, the regenerated bone gradually remodels to natural bone strength. Our PRO-STIM® Injectable Inductive Graft is built on the PRO-DENSE® material platform, but adds demineralized bone matrix (DBM), and has demonstrated accelerated healing compared to autograft in pre-clinical testing. Our other hard tissue repair products, including our IGNITE® Power

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Mix Injectable Stimulus, FUSIONFLEX™ Demineralized Moldable Scaffold, ALLOMATRIX® Injectable Putty, OSTEOSET® Resorbable Bead Kit, MIIG® Injectable Graft, CANCELLO-PURE® bone wedge line, and ALLOPURE® Allograft Bone Wedges.
Soft Tissue Repair. Our soft tissue repair products include our GRAFTJACKET® Regenerative Tissue Matrix, which is a human-derived soft tissue graft designed for augmentation of tendon and ligament repairs, such as those of the rotator cuff in the shoulder and Achilles tendon in the foot and ankle. GRAFTJACKET® Maxforce Extreme is our thickest GRAFTJACKET® matrix, which provides excellent suture holding power for augmenting challenging tendon and ligament repairs. We procure our GRAFTJACKET® product through an exclusive distribution agreement that expires December 31, 2018. Other soft tissue repair products include our CONEXA™ Reconstructive Tissue Matrix, ACTISHIELD™ and ACTISHIELD™ CF Amniotic Barrier Membranes, VIAFLOW™ and VIAFLOW™ C Flowable Placental Tissue Matrices, BIOFIBER® biologic absorbable scaffold products, and PHANTOM FIBER™ high strength, resorbable suture products.
Sports Medicine and Other
The sports medicine and other product category includes products used across several anatomic sites to mechanically repair tissue-to-tissue or tissue-to-bone injuries and other ancillary products. Because of its close relationship to extremities joint replacement and bone fixation, our sports medicine portfolio is comprised of products used to complement our upper and lower extremities product portfolios, providing surgeons a variety of products that may be used in upper and lower extremities surgical procedures. Our global net sales from this product category for the year ended December 25, 2016 was $23.2 million, or 3.4% of total net sales, compared to $13.3 million, or 3.3% of total net sales, for the year ended December 27, 2015.
Sales, Marketing, and Medical Education
Our sales and marketing efforts are focused primarily on orthopaedic, trauma, and podiatric surgeons. Orthopaedic surgeons focused on the extremities in many instances have completed upper or lower extremities fellowship programs. We offer surgeon-to-surgeon education on our products using surgeon advisors in an instructional capacity. We have contractual relationships with these surgeon advisors, who help us train other surgeons in the safe and effective use of our products and help other surgeons perfect new surgical techniques. Together with these surgeon advisors, we provide surgeons extensive “hands on” orthopaedic training and education, including upper and lower extremities fellowships and masters courses that are not easily accessible through traditional medical training programs. We also offer clinical symposia and seminars, and publish advertisements and the results of clinical studies in industry publications. We believe that our history of innovation and focus on quality and improving clinical outcomes and “quality of life” for patients, along with our training programs, allow us to reach surgeons early in their careers and provide on-going value, which includes experiencing the clinical benefits of our products.
Due to the nature of specialized training surrounding podiatric and orthopaedic surgeons focused on extremities and biologics, our target market is well defined. Historically, surgeons are the primary decision-makers in orthopaedic device purchases. While we market our broad portfolio of products to surgeons, our revenue is generated from sales of our products to healthcare institutions and stocking distributors.
United States
As of December 25, 2016, our sales and distribution system in the United States consisted of 68 geographic sales territories that are staffed by approximately 500 direct sales representatives and 24 independent sales agencies or distributors. These sales representatives and independent sales agencies and distributors are generally aligned to selling either our upper extremities products or lower extremities products, but, in some cases, certain agencies or direct sales representatives sell products from both our upper and lower extremities product portfolios in their territories. Our direct sales representatives and independent sales agencies and distributors are provided opportunities for product training throughout the year. We also have working relationships with healthcare dealers, including group purchasing organizations, healthcare organizations, and integrated distribution networks. We believe our success in every market sector is dependent upon having a robust and compelling product offering, and equally as important, a dedicated, highly trained, focused sales organization to service our customers. We plan to continue to strategically focus on and invest in building a competitively superior U.S. sales organization by training and certifying our sales representatives on our innovative product portfolio, continuing to develop and implement strong performance management practices, and enhancing sales productivity. Further, we intend to selectively expand our U.S. sales force by adding about 85 new direct quota-carrying sales representatives, primarily weighted toward the lower extremities business.
International
Internationally, we utilize several distribution approaches that are tailored to the needs and requirements of each individual market. Our international sales and distribution system currently consists of 15 direct sales offices and approximately 90 distributors that sell our products in over 50 countries. We have subsidiaries with direct sales offices in the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Denmark, Netherlands, Canada, Japan, Australia, Switzerland, and Norway that employ direct sales employees, and in some cases, use independent sales representatives to sell our products in their respective markets. Our products are sold in other countries

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in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America using stocking distribution partners. Stocking distributors purchase products directly from us for resale to their local customers, with product ownership generally passing to the distributor upon shipment.
Manufacturing, Facilities, and Quality
We utilize a combination of internal manufacturing and a network of qualified outsourced manufacturing partners to produce our products and surgical instrumentation. We manufacture our internally-sourced products in six locations: Arlington, Tennessee; Franklin, Tennessee; Montbonnot, France; Grenoble, France; Nogent, France; and Macroom, Ireland. We lease the manufacturing facility in Arlington, Tennessee from the Industrial Development Board of the Town of Arlington. Our internal manufacturing operations are focused on product quality, continuous improvement, and efficient production. Our internal manufacturing operations have been practicing lean manufacturing concepts for many years with a philosophy focused on high productivity, flexibility, and capacity optimization. Our operations in France have a long history and deep experience with orthopaedic manufacturing and process innovation. Additionally, we believe we are the only company to have vertically integrated operations for the manufacturing of pyrocarbon orthopaedic products. We believe that this capability gives us a competitive advantage in design for manufacturing and prototyping of this innovative material.
We outsource products to our manufacturing partners when it provides us with cost efficiency, expertise, flexibility, and instances where we need additional capacity. A significant portion of our lower extremities products and surgical instrumentation is produced to our specifications by qualified subcontractors who serve medical device companies. We continuously look for opportunities to optimize our internal manufacturing capacity and insource manufacturing where we believe it makes sense to do so.
We maintain a comprehensive quality system that is certified to the European standards ISO 9001 and ISO 13485 and to the Canadian Medical Devices Conformity Assessment System (CMDCAS). We are accredited by the American Association of Tissue Banks (AATB) and have registrations with the FDA as a medical device establishment and as a tissue establishment. These certifications and registrations require periodic audits and inspections by various global regulatory entities to determine if we have systems in place to ensure our products are safe and effective for their intended use and that we are compliant with applicable regulatory requirements. Our quality system exists so that management has the proper oversight, designs are evaluated and tested, production processes are established and maintained, and monitoring activities are in place to ensure products are safe, effective, and manufactured according to our specifications. Consequently, our quality system provides the way for us to ensure we design and build quality into our products while meeting global requirements. We are committed to meet or exceed customer needs as we strive to improve patient outcomes.
Supply
We use a diverse and broad range of raw materials in the manufacturing of our products. We purchase all of our raw materials and select components used in the manufacturing of our products from external suppliers. In addition, we purchase some supplies from single or limited number of sources for reasons of proprietary know-how, quality assurance, sole source, cost-effectiveness, or constraints resulting from regulatory requirements. We work closely with our suppliers to ensure continuity of supply while maintaining high quality and reliability.
We rely on one supplier for the silicone elastomer used in certain number of our extremities products. We are aware of only two suppliers of silicone elastomer to the medical device industry for permanent implant usage. For certain biologic products, we depend on one supplier of demineralized bone matrix and cancellous bone matrix. We rely on one supplier for our GRAFTJACKET® family of soft tissue repair and graft containment products. We believe we maintain adequate stock from these suppliers to meet market demand. We rely on one supplier for a key component of our AUGMENT® Bone Graft. In December 2013, our supplier notified us of its intent to terminate the supply agreement in December 2015. This supplier was contractually required to meet our supply requirements until the termination date, and to use commercially reasonable efforts to assist us in identifying a new supplier and support the transfer of technology and supporting documentation to produce this component. In April 2016, we entered into a commercial supply agreement with FUJIFILM Diosynth Biotechnologies U.S.A., Inc. pursuant to which Fujifilm agreed to manufacture and sell to us and we agreed to purchase the key component of our AUGMENT® Bone Graft.  Pursuant to our supply agreement with Fujifilm, commercial production of the key component is expected to begin in 2019. Although we believe that our current supply of the key component from our former supplier should be sufficient to last until after the component becomes available under the new agreement, no assurance can be provided that it will be sufficient.
Some of our products are provided by suppliers under private-label distribution agreements. Under these agreements, the supplier generally retains the intellectual property and exclusive manufacturing rights. The supplier private labels the products under our brands for sale in certain fields of use and geographic territories. These agreements may be subject to minimum purchase or sales obligations and are terminable by either party upon notice. Our private-label distribution agreements do not, individually or in the aggregate, represent a material portion of our business and we are not substantially dependent on them.
Our business, and the orthopaedic industry in general, is capital intensive, particularly as it relates to inventory levels and surgical instrumentation. Our business requires a significant level of inventory driven by our global footprint, the requirement to provide products within a short period of time, and the number of different sizes of many of our products. In addition, we must maintain

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a significant investment in surgical instrumentation as we provide these instruments to healthcare facilities and surgeons for their use to facilitate the implantation of our products.
Competition
Competition in the orthopaedic device industry is intense and is characterized by extensive research efforts and rapid technological progress. Competitors include major and mid-sized companies in the orthopaedic and biologics industries, as well as academic institutions and other public and private research organizations that continue to conduct research, seek patent protection, and establish arrangements for commercializing products that will compete with our products.
The primary competitive factors facing us include price, quality, innovative design and technical capability, clinical results, breadth of product line, scale of operations, distribution capabilities, brand reputation, and strong customer service. Our ability to compete is affected by our ability to accomplish the following:
Develop new products and innovative technologies;
Obtain and maintain regulatory clearances or approvals and reimbursement for our products;
Manufacture and sell our products cost-effectively;
Meet all relevant quality standards for our products and their markets;
Respond to competitive pressures specific to each of our geographic markets, including our ability to enforce non-compete agreements;
Protect the proprietary technology of our products and manufacturing processes;
Market and promote our products;
Continue to maintain a high level of medical education for our surgeons on our products;
Attract and retain qualified scientific, management and sales employees and focused sales representatives; and
Support our technology with clinically relevant studies.
Research and Development
Realizing that new product offerings are a key to our future success, we are committed to a strong research and development program. The intent of our program is to develop new extremities and biologics products and expand our current product offerings and the markets in which they are offered. Our research and development teams are organized and aligned with our product marketing teams and are focused on improving clinical outcomes by designing innovative, clinically differentiated products with improved ease-of-use and by developing new product features and enhanced surgical techniques that can be leveraged across a broader base of surgeon customers. Our internal research and development teams work closely with external research and development consultants and a global network of physicians and medical personnel in hospitals and universities to ensure we have broad access to best-in-class ideas and technologies to drive our product development pipeline. We also have an active business development team that actively evaluates novel technologies and development stage products. In addition, our clinical and regulatory departments are devoted to verifying the safety and efficacy of our products according to regulatory standards enforced by the FDA and other international regulatory bodies. Our research and development expenses totaled $50.5 million, $39.3 million and $25.0 million in 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively. Our research and development activities are principally located in Memphis, Tennessee; Montbonnot, France; and Warsaw, Indiana, with additional staff in Grenoble, France; and Bloomington, Minnesota.
In the extremities area, our research and development activities focus on building upon our already comprehensive portfolio of surgical solutions for extremities focused surgeons, including procedure and anatomy specific products. With the ultimate goal of addressing unmet clinical needs, we often pursue multiple product solutions for a particular application in order to offer surgeons the ability either to use their preferred procedural technique or to provide options and flexibility in the surgical setting with the understanding that one solution does not work for every case.
In the biologics area, we have research and development projects underway that are designed to provide differentiation of our advanced materials in the marketplace. We are particularly focused on the integration of our biologic product platforms into extremities procedures and potential new applications for our AUGMENT® Bone Graft.
Intellectual Property
Patents, trade secrets, know-how, and other proprietary rights are important to the continued success of our business. We currently own more than 1,500 patents and pending patents throughout the world. We currently have licenses to use approximately 800 patents. We seek to aggressively protect technology, inventions, and improvements that we consider important through the use of patents and trade secrets in the United States and significant foreign markets. We manufacture and market products under both

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patents and license agreements with other parties. These patents and license agreements have a defined life and expire from time to time. We are not materially dependent on any one or more of our patents. In addition to patents, our knowledge and experience, creative product development, marketing staff and trade secret information, with respect to manufacturing processes, materials and product design, are as important as our patents in maintaining our proprietary product lines.
Although we believe that, in the aggregate, our patents are valuable, and patent protection is beneficial to our business and competitive positioning, our patent protection will not necessarily deter or prevent competitors from attempting to develop similar products. There can be no assurances that our patents will provide competitive advantages for our products or that competitors will not challenge or circumvent these rights. In addition, there can be no assurances that the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) or foreign patent offices will issue any of our pending patent applications. The USPTO and foreign patent offices may deny or require a significant narrowing of the claims in our pending patent applications and the patents issuing from such applications. Any patents issuing from the pending patent applications may not provide us with significant commercial protection. We could incur substantial costs in proceedings before the USPTO or foreign patent offices, including opposition and other post-grant proceedings. These proceedings could result in adverse decisions as to the patentability, priority of our inventions, and the narrowing or invalidation of claims in issued patents. Additionally, the laws of some of the countries in which our products are or may be sold may not protect our intellectual property to the same extent as the laws in the United States or at all.
While we do not believe that any of our products infringe any valid claims of patents or other proprietary rights held by others, we are currently subject to patent infringement litigation and there can be no assurances that we do not infringe any patents or other proprietary rights held by them. If our products were found to infringe any proprietary right of another party, we could be required to pay significant damages or license fees to such party and/or cease production, marketing, and distribution of those products. Litigation also may be necessary to defend infringement claims of third parties or to enforce patent rights we hold or to protect trade secrets or techniques we own.
We rely on trade secrets and other unpatented proprietary technology. There can be no assurances that we can meaningfully protect our rights in our unpatented proprietary technology or that others will not independently develop substantially equivalent proprietary products or processes or otherwise gain access to our proprietary technology.
We protect our proprietary rights through a variety of methods. As a condition of employment, we generally require employees to execute an agreement relating to the confidential nature of and company ownership of proprietary information and assigning intellectual property rights to us. We generally require confidentiality agreements with vendors, consultants, and others who may have access to proprietary information. We generally limit access to our facilities and review the release of company information in advance of public disclosure. There can be no assurances, however, that confidentiality agreements with employees, vendors, and consultants will not be breached, adequate remedies for any breach would be available, or competitors will not discover or independently develop our trade secrets. Litigation also may be necessary to protect trade secrets or techniques we own.
Government Regulation
We are subject to varying degrees of government regulation in the countries in which we conduct business. In some countries, such as the United States, Europe, Canada, and Japan, government regulation is significant and, we believe there is a general trend toward increased and more stringent regulation throughout the world. As a manufacturer and marketer of medical devices, we are subject to extensive regulation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, other federal governmental agencies, and state agencies in the United States and similar foreign governmental authorities in countries located outside the United States. These regulations generally govern the introduction of new medical devices; the observance of certain standards with respect to the design, manufacture, testing, labeling, promotion, and sales of the devices; the maintenance of certain records; the ability to track devices; the reporting of potential product defects; the import and export of devices; as well as other matters. In addition, as a participant in the healthcare industry, we are also subject to various other U.S. federal, state, and foreign laws.
On September 29, 2010, Wright Medical Technology, Inc. (WMT) entered into a five-year Corporate Integrity Agreement (CIA) with the Office of the Inspector General of the United States Department of Health and Human Services (OIG-HHS). The CIA expired on September 29, 2015 and on January 27, 2016, we received notification from the OIG-HHS that the term of the CIA has concluded. While the term of the CIA has concluded, our failure to continue to maintain compliance with U.S. healthcare laws, regulations and other requirements in the future could expose us to significant liability, including, but not limited to, exclusion from federal healthcare program participation, including Medicaid and Medicare, potential prosecution, civil and criminal fines or penalties, as well as additional litigation cost and expense.
We strive to comply with regulatory requirements governing our products and operations and to conduct our affairs in an ethical manner. This practice is reflected in our Code of Business Conduct, various other compliance policies and through the responsibility of the nominating, corporate governance and compliance committee of our board of directors, which oversees our corporate compliance program and compliance with legal and regulatory requirements as well as our ethical standards and policies. We devote significant time, effort, and expense to addressing the extensive government and regulatory requirements applicable to our business. Such regulatory requirements are subject to change and we cannot predict the effect, if any, that these changes might have on our business, financial condition, and results of operations. Governmental regulatory actions against us could result in

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warning letters, delays in approving or refusal to approve a product, the recall or seizure of our products, suspension or revocation of the authority necessary for the production or sale of our products, litigation expense, and civil and criminal penalties against us and our officers and employees. If we fail to comply with these regulatory requirements, our business, financial condition, and results of operations could be harmed.
United States
In the United States, our products are strictly regulated by the FDA under the U.S. Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FDC Act). Some of our products are also regulated by state agencies. FDA regulations and the requirements of the FDC Act affect the pre-clinical and clinical testing, design, manufacture, safety, efficacy, labeling, storage, recordkeeping, advertising, and promotion of our medical device products. Our tissue-based products are subject to FDA regulations, the National Organ Transplant Act (NOTA), and various state agency regulations. We are an accredited member of the American Association of Tissue Banks and an FDA-registered tissue establishment, which includes the packaging, processing, storage, labeling, and distribution of tissue products regulated as medical devices and the storage and distribution of tissue products regulated solely as human cell and tissue products. In addition, we maintain tissue bank licenses in Florida, Maryland, New York, California, Illinois, Delaware, and Oregon.
Generally, before we can market a new medical device, marketing clearance from the FDA must be obtained through either a premarket notification under Section 510(k) of the FDC Act or the approval of a de novo or premarket approval (PMA) application. Most of our products are FDA cleared through the 510(k) premarket notification process. The FDA typically grants a 510(k) clearance if the applicant can establish that the device is substantially equivalent to a predicate device. It usually takes about three months from the date of a 510(k) submission to obtain clearance, but it may take longer, particularly if a clinical trial is required. The FDA may find that a 510(k) is not appropriate or that substantial equivalence has not been shown and, as a result, require a de novo or PMA application.
PMA applications must be supported by valid scientific evidence to demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of the device, typically including the results of human clinical trials, bench tests, and laboratory and animal studies. The PMA application must also contain a complete description of the device and its components, and a detailed description of the methods, facilities, and controls used to manufacture the device. In addition, the submission must include the proposed labeling and any training materials. The PMA application process is expensive and generally takes significantly longer than the 510(k) process. Additionally, the FDA may never approve the PMA application. As part of the PMA application review process, the FDA generally will conduct an inspection of the manufacturer’s facilities to ensure compliance with applicable quality system regulatory requirements, which include quality control testing, documentation control, and other quality assurance procedures. A PMA can include post-approval conditions including, among other things, restrictions on labeling, promotion, sale and distribution, data reporting (surveillance), or requirements to do additional clinical studies post-approval. Even after approval of a PMA, the FDA must grant subsequent approvals for a new PMA or a PMA supplement to authorize certain modifications to the device, its labeling, or its manufacturing process.
One or more clinical trials may be required to support a 510(k) application or a de novo submission and almost always are required to support a PMA application. Clinical trials of unapproved or uncleared medical devices or devices being studied for uses for which they are not approved or cleared (investigational devices) must be conducted in compliance with FDA requirements. If human clinical trials of a medical device are required and the device presents a significant risk, the sponsor of the trial must file an investigational device exemption (IDE) application prior to commencing human clinical trials. The IDE application must be supported by data, typically including the results of animal and/or laboratory testing. If the IDE application is approved by the FDA and one or more institutional review boards (IRBs), human clinical trials may begin at a specific number of institutional investigational sites with the specific number of patients approved by the FDA. If the device presents a non-significant risk to the patient, a sponsor may begin the clinical trial after obtaining approval for the trial by one or more IRBs without separate approval from the FDA. Submission of an IDE does not give assurance that the FDA will approve the IDE. If an IDE is approved, there can be no assurance the FDA will determine that the data derived from the trials support the safety and effectiveness of the device or warrant the continuation of clinical trials. An IDE supplement must be submitted to and approved by the FDA before a sponsor or investigator may make a change to the investigational plan in such a way that may affect its scientific soundness, study indication, or the rights, safety or welfare of human subjects. During the trial, the sponsor must comply with the FDA’s IDE requirements including, for example, investigator selection, trial monitoring, adverse event reporting, and recordkeeping. The investigators must obtain patient informed consent, rigorously follow the investigational plan and trial protocol, control the disposition of investigational devices, and comply with reporting and recordkeeping requirements. We, the FDA and the IRB at each institution at which a clinical trial is being conducted may suspend a clinical trial at any time for various reasons, including a belief that the subjects are being exposed to an unacceptable risk. We are currently conducting a few clinical trials.
After a device is cleared or approved for marketing, numerous and pervasive regulatory requirements continue to apply and we continue to be subject to inspection by the FDA to determine our compliance with these requirements, as do our suppliers, contract manufacturers, and contract testing laboratories. These requirements include, among others, the following:

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Quality System regulations, which govern, among other things, how manufacturers design, test, manufacture, modify, label, exercise quality control over and document manufacturing of their products;
labeling and claims regulations, which require that promotion is truthful, not misleading, fairly balanced and provide adequate directions for use and that all claims are substantiated, and also prohibit the promotion of products for unapproved or “off-label” uses and impose other restrictions on labeling;
FDA guidance of off-label dissemination of information and responding to unsolicited requests for information;
Medical Device Reporting (MDR) regulation, which requires reporting to the FDA certain adverse experiences associated with use of our products;
complaint handling regulations designed to track, monitor, and resolve complaints related to our products;
Part 806 reporting of certain corrections, removals, enhancements, and recalls of products;
complying with federal law and regulations requiring Unique Device Identifiers (UDI) on devices and also requiring the submission of certain information about each device to FDA’s Global Unique Device Identification Database (GUDID); and
in some cases, ongoing monitoring and tracking of our products’ performance and periodic reporting to the FDA of such performance results.
The FDA has statutory authority to regulate allograft-based products, processing, and materials. The FDA and other international regulatory agencies have been working to establish more comprehensive regulatory frameworks for allograft-based tissue-containing products, which are principally derived from human cadaveric tissue. The framework developed by the FDA establishes risk-based criteria for determining whether a particular human tissue-based product will be classified as human tissue, a medical device, or a biologic drug requiring premarket clearance or approval. All tissue-based products are subject to extensive FDA regulation, including establishment registration requirements, product listing requirements, good tissue practice requirements for manufacturing, and screening requirements that ensure that diseases are not transmitted to tissue recipients. The FDA has also proposed extensive additional requirements that address sub-contracted tissue services, tracking to the recipient/patient, and donor records review. If a tissue-based product is considered human tissue, the FDA requirements focus on preventing the introduction, transmission, and spread of communicable diseases to recipients. Neither clinical data nor review of safety and efficacy is required before the tissue can be marketed. However, if the tissue is considered a medical device or a biologic drug, then FDA clearance or approval is required.
The FDA and international regulatory authorities periodically inspect us and our third-party manufacturers for compliance with applicable regulatory requirements. These requirements include labeling regulations, manufacturing regulations, quality system regulations, regulations governing unapproved or off-label uses, and medical device regulations. Medical device regulations require a manufacturer to report to the FDA serious adverse events or certain types of malfunctions involving its products.
We are subject to various U.S. federal and state laws concerning healthcare fraud and abuse, including anti-kickback and false claims laws, and other matters. The U.S. federal Anti-Kickback Statute (and similar state laws) prohibits certain illegal remuneration to physicians and other health care providers that may financially bias prescription decisions and result in an over-utilization of goods and services reimbursed by the federal government. The U.S. federal False Claims Act (and similar state laws) prohibits conduct on the part of a manufacturer which may cause or induce an inappropriate reimbursement for devices reimbursed by the federal government. We are also subject to the U.S. federal Physician Payments Sunshine Act and various state laws on reporting remunerative relationships with healthcare providers. These laws impact the kinds of financial arrangements we may have with hospitals, surgeons or other potential purchasers of our products. They particularly impact how we structure our sales offerings, including discount practices, customer support, education and training programs, physician consulting, research grants and other arrangements. These laws are administered by, among others, the U.S. Department of Justice, the Office of Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human Services and state attorneys general. Many of these agencies have increased their enforcement activities with respect to medical device manufacturers in recent years. If our operations are found to be in violation of these laws, we may be subject to penalties, including potentially significant criminal, civil and/or administrative penalties, damages, fines, disgorgement, exclusion from participation in government healthcare programs, contractual damages, reputational harm, administrative burdens, diminished profits and future earnings, and the curtailment or restructuring of our operations.
We are also subject to data privacy and security regulation by both the U.S. federal government and the states in which we conduct our business. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), as amended by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH), and their respective implementing regulations, imposes specified requirements relating to the privacy, security and transmission of individually identifiable health information. Among other things, HITECH makes HIPAA’s security standards directly applicable to business associates, defined as service providers of covered entities that create, receive, maintain, or transmit protected health information in connection with providing a service for or on behalf of a covered entity. HITECH also created four new tiers of civil monetary penalties and gave state attorneys general new

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authority to file civil actions for damages or injunctions in federal courts to enforce the federal HIPAA laws and seek attorneys’ fees and costs associated with pursuing federal civil actions. In addition, many state laws govern the privacy and security of health information in certain circumstances, many of which differ from HIPAA and each other in significant ways and may not have the same effect.
The FDA, in cooperation with U.S. Customs and Border Protection, administers controls over the import of medical devices into the United States. The U.S. Customs and Border Protection imposes its own regulatory requirements on the import of our products, including inspection and possible sanctions for noncompliance. We are also subject to foreign trade controls administered by certain U.S. government agencies, including the Bureau of Industry and Security within the Commerce Department and the Office of Foreign Assets Control within the Treasury Department.
International
Outside the United States, we are subject to government regulation in the countries in which we operate and sell our products. We must comply with extensive regulations governing product approvals, product safety, quality, manufacturing, and reimbursement processes in order to market our products in all major foreign markets. Although many of the regulations applicable to our products in these countries are similar to those of the FDA, these regulations vary significantly from country to country and with respect to the nature of the particular medical device. The time required to obtain foreign approvals to market our products may be longer or shorter than the time required in the United States, and requirements for such approvals may differ from FDA requirements.
To market our product devices in the member countries of the European Union, we are required to comply with the European Medical Device Directives and to obtain CE mark certification. CE mark certification is the European symbol of adherence to quality assurance standards and compliance with applicable European Medical Device Directives. Under the European Medical Device Directives, all medical devices must qualify for CE marking. To obtain authorization to affix the CE mark to one of our products, a recognized European Notified Body must assess our quality systems and the product’s conformity to the requirements of the European Medical Device Directives. We are subject to inspection by the Notified Bodies for compliance with these requirements. We also are required to comply with regulations of other countries in which our products are sold, such as obtaining Ministry of Health Labor and Welfare approval in Japan, Health Protection Branch approval in Canada and Therapeutic Goods Administration approval in Australia.
Our manufacturing facilities are subject to environmental health and safety laws and regulations, including those relating to the use, registration, handling, storage, disposal, recycling and human exposure to hazardous materials and discharges of substances in the air, water and land. For example, in France, requirements known as the Installations Classées pour la Protection de l’Environnement regime provide for specific environmental standards related to industrial operations such as noise, water treatment, air quality, and energy consumption. In Ireland, our manufacturing facilities are likewise subject to local environmental regulations, such as related to water pollution and water quality, which are administered by the Environmental Protection Agency.
Our operations in countries outside the United States are subject to various other laws such as those regarding recordkeeping and privacy; laws regarding sanctioned countries, entities and persons; customs and import-export, and laws regarding transactions in foreign countries. We are also subject to the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which generally prohibits covered entities and their intermediaries from engaging in bribery or making other prohibited payments to foreign officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business or other benefits, as well as similar anti-corruption laws of other countries, such as the UK Bribery Act.
Third-Party Reimbursement
Sales volumes and prices of our products depend in large part on the availability of coverage and reimbursement from third-party payors. Third-party payors may include governmental programs such as the U.S. Medicare and Medicaid programs, private insurance plans, and workers’ compensation plans. These third-party payors may deny coverage or reimbursement for a product or procedure if they determine that the product or procedure is investigational or was not medically appropriate or necessary. Third-party payors also may place limitations for coverage on products or procedures such as the types of conditions for which a procedure will be covered, the types of physicians that can perform specific types of procedures or the care setting in which the procedure may be performed, e.g., out-patient or in-hospital. Also, third-party payors are increasingly auditing and challenging the prices charged for medical products and services with concern for upcoding, miscoding, using inappropriate modifiers, or billing for inappropriate care settings. Some third-party payors may require prior-authorization, pre-determination, and/or prior approval in a determination of coverage for new or innovative devices or procedures before they will reimburse healthcare providers who use the products or therapies. Even though a new product may have been approved or cleared for commercial distribution by the FDA, we may find limited demand for the product should any reimbursement barriers arise from governmental and/or private third-party payors. In the United States, a uniform policy of coverage does not exist across all third-party payors relative to payment of claims for all products. Therefore, coverage and payment can be quite different from payor to payor, and from one region of the country to another. This is also true for foreign countries in that coverage and payment systems vary from country to country. Coverage also depends on our ability to demonstrate the short-term and long-term clinical effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of our products. These supportive data are obtained from surgeon clinical experience, clinical trials, and literature

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reviews. We pursue and present these results at major scientific and medical meetings, and publish them in respected, peer-reviewed medical journals because data and evidence that can support coverage and payment are important to the successful commercialization and market access of our products.
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), the U.S. agency responsible for administering the Medicare program, sets coverage and reimbursement policies for the Medicare program in the United States. CMS policies may alter coverage and payment related to our products in the future. These changes may occur as the result of national coverage determinations issued by CMS or as the result of local coverage determinations by contractors under contract with CMS to review and make coverage and payment decisions. Medicaid programs are funded by both U.S. federal and state governments, may vary from state to state and from year to year and will likely play an even larger role in healthcare funding under recently enacted, and potentially newly enacted, healthcare legislation. A key component in ensuring whether the appropriate payment amount is received for physician and other services, including procedures using our products, is the existence of a Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) code. To receive payment, healthcare practitioners must submit claims to insurers using these codes for payment for medical services. CPT codes are assigned, maintained and annually updated by the American Medical Association and its CPT Editorial Board. If the CPT codes that apply to procedures performed using our products are changed, reimbursement for performances of these procedures may be adversely affected.
We believe that the overall escalating cost of medical products and services being paid for by governments and private health insurance has led to, and will continue to lead to, increased pressures on the healthcare and medical device industry to reduce the costs of products and services. Third-party payors are developing increasingly sophisticated methods of controlling healthcare costs through healthcare reform legislation and measures including, but not limited to, government-managed healthcare systems, bundled payments, episode of care risk sharing methodologies, health technology assessments, coverage with evidence development processes, quality initiatives, pay-for-performance, comparative effectiveness research, prospective reimbursement, capitation programs, group purchasing, redesign of benefit offerings, requiring pre-approvals and second opinions prior to procedures, careful review of bills, encouragement of healthier lifestyles and other preventative services, and exploration of more cost-effective methods of delivering healthcare. All of these types of health care reform measures and any others could potentially impact market access for, and pricing structures of our products, which in turn, can impact our future sales. There can be no assurance that third-party reimbursement will be available or adequate, or that current and future legislation, regulation or reimbursement policies of third-party payors will not adversely affect the demand for our products or our ability to sell our products on a profitable basis. The unavailability or inadequacy of third-party payor reimbursement could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition.
Outside the United States, reimbursement and healthcare payment systems vary significantly by country, and many countries have instituted price ceilings on specific product lines and procedures. We believe we have received increased requests for clinical data for the support of registration and reimbursement outside the United States. We have increasingly experienced local, product specific reimbursement law being applied as an overlay to medical device regulation, which has provided an additional layer of clearance requirement. Specifically, Australia requires that clinical data for clearance and reimbursement be in the form of prospective, multi-center studies, a high bar not previously applied. In addition, in France, certain innovative devices (such as some of our products made from pyrolytic carbon), have been identified as needing to provide clinical evidence to support a “mark-specific” reimbursement. There can be no assurances that procedures using our products will be considered medically reasonable and necessary for a specific indication, that our products will be considered cost-effective by third-party payors, that an adequate level of reimbursement will be available, or that the third-party payors’ reimbursement policies will not adversely affect our ability to sell our products profitably.
Environmental
Our operations and properties are subject to extensive U.S. federal, state, local, and foreign environmental protection and health and safety laws and regulations. These laws and regulations govern, among other things, the generation, storage, handling, use, and transportation of hazardous materials and the handling and disposal of hazardous waste generated at our facilities. Under such laws and regulations, we are required to obtain permits from governmental authorities for some of our operations. If we violate or fail to comply with these laws, regulations or permits, we could be fined or otherwise sanctioned by regulators. Under some environmental laws and regulations, we could also be held responsible for all of the costs relating to any contamination at our past or present facilities and at third-party waste disposal sites. We believe our costs of complying with current and future environmental laws, regulations and permits and our liabilities arising from past or future releases of, or exposure to, hazardous substances will not materially adversely affect our business, results of operations, or financial condition, although there can be no assurances of this.
Seasonality
We traditionally experience lower sales volumes in the third quarter than throughout the rest of the year as many of our products are used in elective procedures, which generally decline during June, July, and August. This typically results in our selling, general and administrative expenses and research and development expenses as a percentage of our net sales that are higher during third

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quarter than throughout the rest of the year. In addition, our first quarter selling, general and administrative expenses include additional expenses that we incur in connection with the annual meeting held by the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). During these three-day events, we display our most recent and innovative products.
Backlog
The time period between the placement of an order for our products and shipment is generally short. As such, we do not consider our backlog of firm orders to be material to an understanding of our business.
Employees
As of December 25, 2016, we had 2,394 employees. We believe that we have a good relationship with our employees.
Available Information
We are a public company with limited liability (naamloze vennootschap) organized under the laws of the Netherlands. We were initially formed as a private company with limited liability (besloten vennootschap) in June 2006. Our principal executive offices are located at Prins Bernhardplein 200, 1097 JB Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Our telephone number at this address is (+31) 20 521 4777. Our agent for service of process in the United States is CT Corporation, 1209 Orange Street, Wilmington, Delaware 19801. Our corporate website is located at www.wright.com. The information contained on our website or connected to our website is not incorporated by reference into and should not be considered part of this report.
We make available, free of charge and through our Internet corporate website, our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, and any amendments to any such reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, as soon as reasonably practicable after they are electronically filed with or furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission.


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Item 1A. Risk Factors.
We are affected by risks specific to us as well as factors that affect all businesses operating in a global market. In addition to the other information set forth in this report, careful consideration should be taken of the factors described below, which could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition or operating results. The risk factors described below may relate solely to one or more of the legal entities contained in our corporate structure and may not necessarily apply to Wright Medical Group N.V. or one or more of the other legal entities contained in our corporate structure.
Risks Related to the Wright/Tornier Merger
We may be unable to successfully integrate our operations or realize the anticipated cost savings, net sales and other potential benefits of the Wright/Tornier merger in a timely manner or at all. As a result, the value of our ordinary shares may be adversely affected.
The success of the merger between legacy Wright and legacy Tornier will depend, in part, on our ability to achieve the anticipated cost savings, net sales, and other potential benefits of the merger. Achieving the anticipated potential benefits of the merger will depend in part upon whether we are able to integrate our operations in an efficient and effective manner and whether we are able to effectively coordinate sales and marketing efforts to communicate our capabilities and coordinate our sales organizations to sell our combined products. While we have successfully completed a substantial number of integration activities since the merger, the remainder of our integration activities may not be completed smoothly or successfully. The necessity of coordinating geographically separated organizations, systems, and facilities and addressing possible differences in business backgrounds, corporate cultures, and management philosophies may increase the difficulties of integration. We operate numerous systems, including those involving management information, purchasing, accounting and finance, sales, billing, payroll, employee benefits, and regulatory compliance. We still have numerous systems which remain to be integrated, including those involving management information, purchasing, accounting and finance, sales, billing, payroll, employee benefits, and regulatory compliance. We may still have inconsistencies in standards, controls, procedures or policies that could affect our ability to maintain relationships with customers and employees or to achieve the anticipated benefits of the merger. We may also have difficulty in completing the integration of our commercial organizations, including in particular distribution and sales representative arrangements, some of which will undergo territory transitions during the next several quarters. The integration of certain operations requires the dedication of significant management resources, which may temporarily distract management’s attention from our day-to-day business. Employee uncertainty and lack of focus during the integration process may also disrupt our business. Any inability of our management to integrate successfully our operations or to do so within a longer time frame than expected could have a material adverse effect on our business and operating results. The integration also may result in material unanticipated problems, expenses, liabilities, competitive responses, and loss of customer relationships. Even if the operations of our businesses are integrated successfully, we may not be able to realize the full benefits of the merger, including the anticipated operating and cost synergies, sales and growth opportunities or long-term strategic benefits of the merger, within the expected timeframe or at all. In addition, we expect to continue to incur significant integration and restructuring expenses to realize synergies. However, many of the expenses that remain to be incurred are, by their nature, difficult to estimate accurately. These expenses could, particularly in the near term, exceed the savings that we expect to achieve from elimination of duplicative expenses and the realization of economies of scale and cost savings. Although we expect that the realization of efficiencies related to the integration of the businesses may offset incremental transaction, merger-related, and restructuring costs over time, we cannot give any assurance that this net benefit will be achieved in the near term, or at all. An inability to realize the full extent of, or any of, the anticipated benefits of the merger, as well as any delays encountered in the integration process, could have an adverse effect on our business and operating results, which may affect the value of our ordinary shares.
Our future success also will depend in part upon our ability to retain key employees. Competition for qualified personnel can be very intense. In addition, key employees may depart because of issues relating to the uncertainty or difficulty of integration or a desire not to remain with our company. Accordingly, no assurances can be given that we will retain key employees.
Our future results will suffer if we do not effectively manage our expanded operations as a result of the merger.
As a result of the merger, the size of our business has increased significantly. Our future success depends, in part, upon our ability to manage this expanded business, which may pose substantial challenges for our management, including challenges related to the management and monitoring of new operations and associated increased costs and complexity. There can be no assurances that we will be successful or that we will realize the expected operating efficiencies, cost savings, and other benefits currently anticipated from the merger.
Efforts to integrate our Corporate Compliance Programs require the cooperation of many individuals and will likely require substantial investment and divert a significant amount of future time and resources from our other business activities.
We are committed to a robust Corporate Compliance Program. In furtherance of this strategic objective, we have devoted a significant amount of time and resources since the completion of the merger to integrate the Corporate Compliance Programs of legacy Wright and legacy Tornier. This has required, and will continue to require, a significant amount of time and resources from

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our financial, human resources, and compliance personnel, as well as all of our employees. Successful integration of our Corporate Compliance Programs requires the full and sustained cooperation of all of our employees, distributors, and sales agents, as well as the healthcare professionals with whom we interact. These efforts require significant expenses and investments. We also may encounter inefficiencies in the integration of our compliance programs, including delays in medical education, research and development projects, and clinical studies, which may unfavorably impact our business and relationships with customers. If we fail to integrate successfully the Corporate Compliance Programs of legacy Wright and legacy Tornier, our business and operating results may be adversely affected.
In connection with the accounting for the merger, we recorded a significant amount of goodwill and other intangible assets, which if the acquired business does not perform well, may be subject to future impairment, which would harm our operating results.
In connection with the accounting for the merger, we recorded a significant amount of goodwill and other intangible assets within each of our reporting units. As of December 25, 2016, we had $851.0 million in goodwill and $231.8 million in intangible assets. As part of the Wright/Tornier merger, we recorded $667.3 million in goodwill and $213.6 million in other intangible assets. Under US GAAP, we must assess, at least annually and potentially more frequently, whether the value of our goodwill and intangible assets have been impaired. A decrease in the long-term economic outlook and future cash flows of the legacy Tornier business that we acquired could significantly impact asset values and potentially result in the impairment of intangible assets, including goodwill. If the operating performance of the legacy Tornier business significantly decreases, competing or alternative technologies emerge, or if market conditions or future cash flow estimates decline, we could be required, under current US GAAP, to record a non-cash charge to operating earnings for the amount of the impairment. Any write-off of a material portion of our unamortized intangible assets would negatively affect our results of operations.
We have incurred and expect to continue to incur significant transaction and integration-related costs in connection with the merger and the integration of our operations.
We have incurred and expect to continue to incur a number of non-recurring costs associated with the merger and integrating our operations. The substantial majority of non-recurring expenses resulting from the merger will be comprised of transaction costs related to the merger, employment-related costs, and facilities and systems consolidation costs. Although we expect that the elimination of duplicative costs, as well as the realization of other efficiencies related to the integration of our businesses should allow us to offset incremental transaction and integration-related costs over time, this net benefit may not be achieved in the near term, or at all.
Risks Related to our Business
We have a history of operating losses and may never achieve or sustain profitability.
We have a history of operating losses and at December 25, 2016, we had an accumulated deficit of $1,206 million. Our ability to achieve profitability will be influenced by many factors, including, among others, the success of the Wright/Tornier merger; the level and timing of future net sales and expenditures; development, commercialization and market acceptance of new products; the results and scope of ongoing research and development projects; competing technologies and market developments; regulatory requirements and delays; and pending litigation. As a result, we may continue to incur operating losses for the foreseeable future. These losses will continue to have an adverse impact on our shareholders’ equity, and we may never achieve or sustain profitability.
We anticipate significant sales during 2017 and in future years from our AUGMENT® Bone Graft product. If we are wrong, our future operating results, cash flows, and prospects could be adversely affected.
The newest addition to our biologics product portfolio is AUGMENT® Bone Graft, which is based on recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor (rhPDGF-BB), a synthetic copy of one of the body’s principal healing agents. We obtained FDA approval of AUGMENT® Bone Graft in the United States for ankle and/or hindfoot fusion indications during third quarter of 2015. AUGMENT® Bone Graft is currently available for sale as an alternative to autograft in the United States for ankle and/or hindfoot fusion indications, in Canada for foot and ankle fusion indications and in Australia and New Zealand for hindfoot and ankle fusion indications. We anticipate significant sales during 2017 and in future years from our AUGMENT® Bone Graft product. If we are wrong, our future operating results, cash flows, and prospects could be adversely affected. We acquired the AUGMENT® Bone Graft product line from BioMimetic Therapeutics, Inc. (BioMimetic) in March 2013 and are subject to future milestone payments to the holders of the contingent value rights issued in connection with that transaction. If, prior to March 1, 2019, sales of AUGMENT® Bone Graft reach $40 million over 12 consecutive months, a cash payment would be required at $1.50 per share, or $42 million. Further, if, prior to March 1, 2019, sales of AUGMENT® Bone Graft reach $70 million over 12 consecutive months, an additional cash payment would be required at $1.50 per share, or $42 million. Therefore, even if we achieve significant sales of AUGMENT® Bone Graft, cash proceeds from these sales will be offset in part by these milestone payment obligations.

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We are subject to substantial government regulation that could have a material adverse effect on our business.
The production and marketing of our products and our ongoing research and development, pre-clinical testing, and clinical trial activities are subject to extensive regulation and review by numerous governmental authorities both in the United States and abroad. U.S. and foreign regulations govern the testing, marketing, and registration of new medical devices, in addition to regulating manufacturing practices, reporting, labeling, relationships with healthcare professionals, and recordkeeping procedures. The regulatory process requires significant time, effort, and expenditures to bring our products to market, and we cannot be assured that any of our products will be approved. Our failure to comply with applicable regulatory requirements could result in governmental authorities:
imposing fines and penalties on us;
preventing us from manufacturing or selling our products;
bringing civil or criminal charges against us and our officers and employees;
delaying the introduction of our new products into the market;
recalling or seizing our products; or
withdrawing or denying approvals or clearances for our products.
Even if regulatory approval or clearance of a product is granted, this could result in limitations on the uses for which the product may be labeled and promoted. Further, for a marketed product, its manufacturer, such manufacturer’s suppliers, and manufacturing facilities are subject to periodic review and inspection. Subsequent discovery of problems with a product, manufacturer, or facility may result in restrictions on the product, manufacturer or facility, including withdrawal of the product from the market or other enforcement actions. Our products can only be marketed in accordance with their approved labeling. If we were to promote the use of our products in an “off-label” manner, we and our directors, officers and employees, would be subject to civil and criminal sanctions.
We are subject to various U.S. federal and state and foreign laws concerning healthcare fraud and abuse, including false claims laws, anti-kickback laws and physician self-referral laws. Violations of these laws can result in criminal and/or civil punishment, including fines, imprisonment and, in the United States, exclusion from participation in government healthcare programs. Greater scrutiny of marketing practices in our industry has resulted in numerous government investigations by various government authorities and this industry-wide enforcement activity is expected to continue. If a governmental authority were to determine that we do not comply with these laws and regulations, then we and our directors, officers and employees could be subject to criminal and civil penalties, including exclusion from participation in U.S. federal healthcare reimbursement programs.
In order to market our devices in the member countries of the European Union, we are required to comply with the European Medical Devices Directive and obtain CE mark certification. CE mark certification is the European symbol of adherence to quality assurance standards and compliance with applicable European Medical Device Directives. Under the European Medical Devices Directive, all medical devices including active implants must qualify for CE marking. Our failure to comply with the European Medical Devices Directive could result in our loss of CE mark certification which would harm our business.
Although legacy Wright divested the hip/knee (OrthoRecon) business, legacy Wright remains responsible, as between it and MicroPort, for liability claims on OrthoRecon products sold prior to closing, and might still be sued on products sold after closing.
Although OrthoRecon product liability expenses are accounted for under our discontinued operations, the agreement between Wright Medical Group, Inc. (WMG) and MicroPort requires that legacy Wright, as between it and MicroPort, retain responsibility for product liability claims on OrthoRecon products sold prior to closing, and for any resulting settlements, judgments, or other costs. Moreover, even though MicroPort, as between it and legacy Wright, is responsible for liability claims on post-closing sales, there can be no assurance we will not be named as a defendant in a lawsuit relating to such post-closing sales, or that MicroPort will have adequate resources to exonerate legacy Wright from any resulting expenses or liabilities.
We may never realize the expected benefits from the Wright/Tornier merger, the divestiture of the OrthoRecon business, and our strategy to become a profitable, high-growth, pure-play medical technology company, and command the market valuation typically accorded such companies.
The Wright/Tornier merger and the divestiture of the OrthoRecon business are part of our strategy to transform ourselves into a profitable, high-growth, pure-play medical technology company, and command the market valuation typically accorded such companies. If we are unable to achieve our growth and profitability objectives due to competition, lack of acceptance of our products, failure to gain regulatory approvals, or other risks as described in this section or other sections of this report, or due to other events, we will not be successful in transforming our business and will not be accorded the market valuation we seek. Moreover, the OrthoRecon business generated substantial revenue and cash flow, which we have not replaced. While over time we expect to replace the OrthoRecon revenue and cash flow by accelerating higher margin revenue streams from extremities and biologic products, especially in light of the Wright/Tornier merger, there is still a risk we will be unable to replace the revenue

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and cash flow that the OrthoRecon business generated, or that the cost of such will be higher than expected. If we are unable to achieve our profit and growth objectives, such failure will be exacerbated by the loss of revenue and cash flow generated by the OrthoRecon business, and could result in a decline in our stock price.
We may never realize the expected benefits of our strategic business combinations or acquisition transactions.
In addition to developing new products and growing our business internally, we have sought to grow through business combinations and acquisitions of complementary businesses. Examples include, in addition to the Wright/Tornier merger, legacy Wright's acquisition of BioMimetic in early 2013, as well as its more recent acquisitions of Biotech International in November 2013, Solana Surgical, LLC (Solana) in January 2014, and OrthoPro, L.L.C. (OrthoPro) in February 2014, and legacy Tornier’s acquisition of OrthoHelix Surgical Designs, Inc. in 2012. Business combinations and acquiring new businesses involve a myriad of risks. Whenever new businesses are combined or acquired, there is a risk we may fail to realize some or all of the anticipated benefits of the transaction. This can occur if integration of the businesses proves to be more complicated than planned, resulting in failure to realize operational synergies and/or failure to mitigate operational dis-synergies, diversion of management attention, and loss of key personnel. It can also occur if the combined or acquired business fails to meet our net sales projections, exposes us to unexpected liabilities, or if our pre-acquisition due diligence fails to uncover issues that negatively affect the value or cost structure of the acquired enterprise. Although we carefully plan our business combinations and acquisitions, there can be no assurances that these and other risks will not prevent us from realizing the expected benefits of these transactions.
Product liability lawsuits could harm our business and adversely affect our operating results or results from discontinued operations and financial condition if adverse outcomes exceed our product liability insurance coverage.
The manufacture and sale of medical devices expose us to significant risk of product liability claims. We are currently defendants in a number of product liability matters, including those relating to the OrthoRecon business, which legacy Wright divested to MicroPort in 2014. Legacy Wright remains responsible, as between it and MicroPort, for claims associated with products sold before divesting the OrthoRecon business to MicroPort.
We have been named as a defendant, in some cases with multiple other defendants, in lawsuits in which it is alleged that as yet unspecified defects in the design, manufacture, or labeling of certain metal-on-metal hip replacement products rendered the products defective. The pre-trial management of certain of these claims has been consolidated in the federal court system, in the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia under multi-district litigation and certain other claims by the Judicial Counsel Coordinated Proceedings in state court in Los Angeles County, California. As of December 25, 2016, there were approximately 1,200 lawsuits pending in the multi-district federal court proceeding and consolidated California state court proceeding, and an additional 30 cases pending in various state courts. As of that date, we have also entered into approximately 950 so called "tolling agreements" with potential claimants who have not yet filed suit. As of December 25, 2016, there were also approximately 50 non-U.S. lawsuits presently pending. We believe we have data that supports the efficacy and safety of the metal-on-metal hip replacement systems, and have been vigorously defending these cases.
While continuing to dispute liability, on November 1, 2016, WMT entered into a Master Settlement Agreement (MSA) with Court-appointed attorneys representing plaintiffs in the MDL and JCCP. Under the terms of the MSA, the parties agreed to settle 1,292 specifically identified claims associated with CONSERVE®, DYNASTY® and LINEAGE® products that meet the eligibility requirements of the MSA and are either pending in the MDL or JCCP, or subject to court-approved tolling agreements in the MDL or JCCP, for a settlement amount of $240 million.
Claims for personal injury have also been made against us associated with fractures of legacy Wright's PROFEMUR® long titanium modular neck product. We believe that the overall fracture rate for the product is low and the fractures appear, at least in part, to relate to patient demographics, and have been vigorously defending these matters. While continuing to dispute liability, we have been open to settling these claims in circumstances where we believe the settlement amount is reasonable relative to the risk and expense of litigation.
Our material product liability litigation is discussed in Note 16 to our consolidated financial statements in "Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" of this report. These matters are subject to many uncertainties and outcomes are not predictable. Regardless of the outcome of these matters, legal defenses are costly. We have incurred and expect to continue to incur substantial legal expenses in connection with the defense of these matters. We could incur significant liabilities associated with adverse outcomes that exceed our products liability insurance coverage, which could adversely affect our operating results or results from discontinued operations and financial condition. The ultimate cost to us with respect to product liability claims could be materially different than the amount of the current estimates and accruals and could have a material adverse effect on our financial position, operating results or results from discontinued operations, and cash flows.
In the future, we may be subject to additional product liability claims. We also could experience a material design or manufacturing failure in our products, a quality system failure, other safety issues, or heightened regulatory scrutiny that would warrant a recall of some of our products. Product liability lawsuits and claims, safety alerts and product recalls, regardless of their ultimate outcome, could result in decreased demand for our products, injury to our reputation, significant litigation and other costs, substantial

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monetary awards to or costly settlements with patients, product recalls, loss of revenue, and the inability to commercialize new products or product candidates, and otherwise have a material adverse effect on our business and reputation and on our ability to attract and retain customers.
Our agreement to settle a substantial portion of our metal-on-metal hip litigation claims is limited to approximately 1,292 qualifying revision claims and will leave a substantial number of metal-on-metal hip claims unresolved.
On November 1, 2016, our subsidiary Wright Medical Technology, Inc. (WMT) entered into a Master Settlement Agreement (MSA) with Court-appointed attorneys representing plaintiffs in the previously disclosed metal-on-metal hip litigation known as In Re: Wright Medical Technology, Inc., CONSERVE® Hip Implant Products Liability Litigation, MDL No. 2329 (MDL) and In re: Wright Hip System Cases, Judicial Council Coordination Proceeding No. 4710 (JCCP). Under the terms of the MSA, the parties agreed, without admission of fault, to settle 1,292 specifically identified CONSERVE, DYNASTY or LINEAGE revision claims which meet the eligibility requirements of the MSA and are either pending in the MDL or JCCP, or are subject to tolling agreements approved in the MDL or JCCP, for a total settlement amount of $240 million. While the minimum opt-in requirement for the MSA has been satisfied, the final MSA settlement amount (not to exceed $240 million), and the final number of claims settled under the MSA, will depend on, among other things, the mix of products implanted in the settling claimant group. Claims which do not meet the eligibility requirements of the MSA, new claims, and claims which have opted-out of the settlement will not be settled under the MSA. We will continue to defend these claims, and the previously disclosed risks, uncertainties and contingencies associated with these claims will remain unresolved. As of December 25, 2016, we estimate there were approximately 630 existing revision claims that are ineligible to participate in the MSA. For additional information regarding the MSA, see Note 16 to our consolidated financial statements.
Our agreement with three insurance carriers to settle pending coverage litigation includes broad releases of coverage for present and future claims of personal injury alleged to be caused by metal-on-metal hip components or the release of metal ions, which could result in inadequate insurance coverage to defend and resolve these claims. In addition, our settlement with the three carriers does not resolve previously disclosed disputes with the remaining carriers concerning the extent of coverage available for metal-on-metal hip claims.
On October 28, 2016, our WMT and WMG subsidiaries entered into a Settlement Agreement with a subgroup of three insurance carriers, Columbia Casualty Company, St. Paul Surplus Lines Insurance Company and AXIS Surplus Lines Insurance Company (Three Settling Insurers), pursuant to which the Three Settling Insurers paid $60 million (in addition to $10 million previously paid) in full settlement of all potential liability of the Three Settling Insurers for metal ion and metal-on-metal hip claims, including but not limited to all claims in the MDL and the JCCP. As part of the settlement, the Three Settling Insurers repurchased their policies in the five policy years beginning with the 2007-2008 policy year. Consequently, we have no further coverage from the Three Settling Insurers for present or future metal-on-metal or metal ion claims falling in these five policy periods, or any other period in which a specifically released claim is asserted.
Our existing product liability insurance coverage may be inadequate to protect us from any liabilities we might incur.
If the product liability claims brought against us involve uninsured liabilities or result in liabilities that exceed our insurance coverage, our business, financial condition, and operating results could be materially and adversely affected. Further, such product liability matters may negatively impact our ability to obtain insurance coverage or cost-effective insurance coverage in future periods. We remain in litigation with certain insurance carriers other than the Three Settling Insurers, concerning the amount of coverage available to satisfy potential liabilities associated with the metal-on-metal hip claims against us. An unfavorable outcome in this litigation could have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results from discontinued operations if we ultimately are subject to liabilities associated with these claims that exceed coverage amounts not in dispute.
In addition, on September 29, 2015, we received notice that the third insurance carrier in the tower for product liability insurance coverage relating to personal injury claims associated with fractures of legacy Wright's PROFEMUR® long titanium modular neck product (Modular Neck Claims) has asserted that the terms and conditions identified in its reservation of rights will preclude coverage for the Modular Neck Claims. We strongly dispute the carrier’s position and, in accordance with the dispute resolution provisions of the policy, have initiated an arbitration proceeding in London, England seeking payment of these funds. We continue to believe our contracts with our insurance carriers are enforceable for these claims; however, we would be responsible for any amounts that our insurance carriers do not cover or for the amount by which ultimate losses exceed the amount of our third-party insurance coverage. An unfavorable outcome in this matter could have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results from discontinued operations if we ultimately are subject to liabilities associated with these claims that exceed coverage amounts not in dispute.
MicroPort’s recall of certain sizes of its cobalt chrome modular neck devices due to alleged fractures could result in additional product liability claims against us. Although we have contested these claims, adverse outcomes could harm our business and adversely affect our results from discontinued operations and financial condition.

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In August 2015, MicroPort announced the voluntary recall of certain sizes of its PROFEMUR® Long Cobalt Chrome Modular Neck devices manufactured from June 15, 2009 to July 22, 2015. Because MicroPort did not acquire the OrthoRecon business until January 2014, many of the recalled devices were sold by legacy Wright prior to the acquisition by MicroPort. Under the asset purchase agreement with MicroPort, legacy Wright retained responsibility, as between it and MicroPort, for claims for personal injury relating to sales of these products prior to the acquisition. We were not consulted by MicroPort in connection with its recall, and we presently are aware of only eight lawsuits alleging personal injury related to cobalt chrome neck fractures (three in the United States and five outside the United States). However, if the number of product liability claims alleging personal injury from fractures of cobalt chrome modular necks we sold prior to the MicroPort transaction were to become significant, this could have an adverse effect on our results from discontinued operations and financial condition.
A competitor’s recall of its modular hip systems, and the liability claims and adverse publicity which ensued, could generate copycat claims against modular hip systems legacy Wright sold.
On July 6, 2012, Stryker Corporation announced the voluntary recall of its Rejuvenate Modular and ABG II modular neck hip stems citing risks including the potential for fretting and/or corrosion at or about the modular neck junction. Although Stryker’s recalled modular neck hip stems differ in design and material from the PROFEMUR® modular neck systems legacy Wright sold before divestiture of the OrthoRecon business, we have previously noted the risk that Stryker’s recall and the resultant publicity could negatively impact sales of modular neck systems of other manufacturers, including the PROFEMUR® system, and that Stryker’s action has increased industry focus on the safety of cobalt chrome modular neck products. We have carefully monitored the clinical performance of the PROFEMUR® modular neck hip system, which combine a cobalt chrome modular neck and a titanium stem. With over 33,000 units sold since this version was introduced in 2009, and an extremely low complaint rate, we remain confident in the safety and efficacy of this product. Nevertheless, in light of Stryker’s recall, the resulting product liability claims to which it has been subject, and the general negative publicity surrounding “metal-on-metal” articulating surfaces (which do not involve modular hip stems), there remains a risk that, even in the absence of clinical evidence, claims for personal injury relating to sales of these products before divestiture of the OrthoRecon business could increase, which could have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results from discontinued operations since legacy Wright retained responsibility, as between it and MicroPort, for these claims.
Although we believe the use of corporate entities in our corporate structure will preclude creditors of any one particular entity within our corporate structure from reaching the assets of the other entities within our corporate structure not liable for the underlying claims of the one particular entity, there is a risk that, despite our corporate structure, creditors could be successful in piercing the corporate veil and reaching the assets of such other entities, which could have an adverse effect on us and our operating results, results from discontinued operations, and financial condition.
We maintain separate legal entities within our overall corporate structure. We believe our ring-fenced structure with separate legal entities should preclude any corporate veil-piercing, alter ego, control person, or other similar claims by creditors of any one particular entity within our corporate structure from reaching the assets of the other entities within our corporate structure to satisfy claims of the one particular entity. However, if a court were to disagree and allow a creditor to pierce the corporate veil and reach the assets of such other entities within our corporate structure, despite such entities not being liable for the underlying claims, it could have a material adverse effect on us and our operating results, results from discontinued operations, and financial condition.
Failure to comply with the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act or other anticorruption laws could subject us to, among other things, penalties and legal expenses that could harm our reputation and have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results and financial condition.
Our international operations expose us to legal and regulatory risks. These risks include the risk that our international distributors could engage in conduct violative of U.S. or local laws, including the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA). Our U.S. operations, including those of our U.S. operating subsidiaries, are subject to the FCPA, which generally prohibits covered entities and their intermediaries from engaging in bribery or making other prohibited payments to foreign officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business or other benefits. In addition, the FCPA imposes accounting standards and requirements on publicly-traded U.S. corporations and their foreign affiliates, which are intended to prevent the diversion of corporate funds to the payment of bribes and other improper payments, and to prevent the establishment of “off books” slush funds from which such improper payments can be made. We also are subject to similar anti-corruption legislation implemented in Europe under the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development’s Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions. We either operate or plan to operate in a number of jurisdictions that pose a high risk of potential violations of the FCPA and other anti-corruption laws, and we utilize a number of third-party sales representatives for whose actions we could be held liable under the FCPA. We inform our personnel and third-party sales representatives of the requirements of the FCPA and other anti-corruption laws, including, but not limited to their reporting requirements. We also have developed and will continue to develop and implement systems for formalizing contracting processes, performing due diligence on agents, and improving our recordkeeping and auditing practices regarding these regulations. However, there is no guarantee that our employees, third-party sales representatives, or other agents have not or will not engage in conduct undetected by our processes and for which we might be held responsible under the FCPA or other anti-corruption laws. Failure to comply with the FCPA or other anti-

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corruption laws could subject us to, among other things, penalties and legal expenses that could harm our reputation and have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and operating results.
If our employees, third-party sales representatives, or other agents are found to have engaged in such practices, we could suffer severe penalties, including criminal and civil penalties, disgorgement, and other remedial measures, including further changes or enhancements to our procedures, policies and controls, as well as potential personnel changes and disciplinary actions. Recent investigations of companies in our industry by the SEC and the U.S. Department of Justice have focused on potential FCPA violations in connection with the sale of medical devices in foreign countries. We believe we have compliance systems, which enable us to prevent these behaviors. However, if despite our efforts we are not successful in mitigating these risks, we could become the target of enforcement actions by U.S. or local authorities. Any investigation of any potential violations of the FCPA or other anti-corruption laws by U.S. or foreign authorities could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition.
Certain foreign companies, including some of our competitors, are not subject to prohibitions as strict as those under the FCPA or, even if subjected to strict prohibitions, such prohibitions may be laxly enforced in practice. If our competitors engage in corruption, extortion, bribery, pay-offs, theft, or other fraudulent practices, they may receive preferential treatment from personnel of some companies, giving our competitors an advantage in securing business, or from government officials, who might give them priority in obtaining new licenses, which would put us at a disadvantage.
A significant portion of our product sales are made through independent distributors and sales agents who we do not control.
A significant portion of our product sales are made through independent sales representatives and distributors. Because the independent distributor often controls the customer relationships within its territory (and, in certain countries outside the United States, the regulatory relationship), there is a risk that if our relationship with the distributor ends, our relationship with the customer will be lost (and, in certain countries outside the United States, that we could experience delays in amending or transferring our product registrations). Also, because we do not control a distributor’s field sales agents, there is a risk we will be unable to ensure that our sales processes, compliance, and other priorities will be consistently communicated and executed by the distributor. If we fail to maintain relationships with our key distributors, or fail to ensure that our distributors adhere to our sales processes, compliance, and other priorities, this could have an adverse effect on our operations. In the past, we have experienced turnover within our independent distributor organization. This adversely affected our short-term financial results as we transitioned to direct sales employees or new independent representatives. In addition, prior to the merger, legacy Tornier transitioned to direct selling models in certain geographies and transitioned its U.S. sales channel towards focusing separately on upper and lower extremities products. While we believe these transitions were managed effectively and position us to leverage our sales force and broad product portfolio, there is a risk that these or future transitions could have a greater adverse effect on our operations than we have previously experienced or anticipate. Further, the legacy independent distributors and sales agents of Wright and Tornier may decide not to renew or may decide to seek to terminate, change and/or renegotiate their relationships with us. A loss of a significant number of our distributors or agents could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
In addition, our success is partially dependent upon our ability to retain and motivate our distributors, independent sales agencies, and their representatives to sell our products in certain territories. They may not be successful in implementing our marketing plans. Some of our distributors and independent sales agencies do not sell our products exclusively and may offer similar products from other orthopaedic companies. Our distributors and independent sales agencies may terminate their contracts with us, may devote insufficient sales efforts to our products, or may focus their sales efforts on other products that produce greater commissions for them, which could have an adverse effect on our operations and operating results.
Allegations of wrongdoing by the United States Department of Justice and Office of the Inspector General of the United States Department of Health and Human Services and related publicity could lead to further governmental investigations or actions by other third parties.
As a result of the allegations of wrongdoing made by the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of New Jersey and the publicity surrounding legacy Wright's settlement with the United States Department of Justice and OIG-HHS, and amendments to the Deferred Prosecution Agreement and Corporate Integrity Agreement, other governmental agencies, including state authorities, could conduct investigations or institute proceedings that are not precluded by the terms of settlements reflected in the Deferred Prosecution Agreement and the CIA. In August 2012, legacy Wright received a subpoena from the United States Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Tennessee requesting records and documentation relating to the PROFEMUR® series of hip replacement devices for the period from January 1, 2000 to August 2, 2012. These interactions with the authorities could increase our exposure to lawsuits by potential whistleblowers, including under the U.S. Federal False Claims Act, based on new theories or allegations arising from the allegations made by the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of New Jersey. The costs of defending or resolving any such investigations or proceedings could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, operating results and cash flows.
If we lose any existing or future intellectual property lawsuits, a court could require us to pay significant damages or prevent us from selling our products.

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The medical device industry is litigious with respect to patents and other intellectual property rights. Companies in the medical device industry have used intellectual property litigation to gain a competitive advantage.
We are party to claims and lawsuits involving patents or other intellectual property. Legal proceedings, regardless of the outcome, could drain our financial resources and divert the time and effort of our management. If we lose one of these proceedings, a court, or a similar foreign governing body, could require us to pay significant damages to third parties, indemnify third parties from loss, require us to seek licenses from third parties, pay ongoing royalties, redesign our products, or prevent us from manufacturing, using or selling our products. In addition to being costly, protracted litigation to defend or prosecute our intellectual property rights could result in our customers or potential customers deferring or limiting their purchase or use of the affected products until resolution of the litigation.
If our patents and other intellectual property rights do not adequately protect our products, we may lose market share to our competitors and be unable to operate our business profitably.
We rely on patents, trade secrets, copyrights, know-how, trademarks, license agreements, and contractual provisions to establish our intellectual property rights and protect our products. These legal means, however, afford only limited protection and may not completely protect our rights. In addition, we cannot be assured that any of our pending patent applications will issue. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office may deny or require a significant narrowing of the claims in its pending patent applications and the patents issuing from such applications. Any patents issuing from the pending patent applications may not provide us with significant commercial protection. We could incur substantial costs in proceedings before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. These proceedings could result in adverse decisions as to the priority of our inventions and the narrowing or invalidation of claims in issued patents. In addition, the laws of some of the countries in which our products are or may be sold may not protect our intellectual property to the same extent as U.S. laws or at all. We also may be unable to protect our rights in trade secrets and unpatented proprietary technology in these countries.
In addition, we hold licenses from third parties that are necessary to utilize certain technologies used in the design and manufacturing of some of our products. The loss of such licenses would prevent us from manufacturing, marketing, and selling these products, which could harm our business. If we, or the other parties from whom we would license intellectual property, fail to obtain and maintain adequate patent or other intellectual property protection for intellectual property used in our products, or if any protection is reduced or eliminated, others could use the intellectual property used in our products, resulting in harm to our competitive business position.
We seek to protect our trade secrets, know-how, and other unpatented proprietary technology, in part, with confidentiality agreements with our employees, independent distributors, and consultants. We cannot be assured, however, that the agreements will not be breached, adequate remedies for any breach would be available, or our trade secrets, know-how, and other unpatented proprietary technology will not otherwise become known to or independently developed by our competitors.
If we lose one of our key suppliers, we may be unable to meet customer orders for our products in a timely manner or within our budget, which could adversely affect our sales and operating results.
We rely on a limited number of suppliers for certain of the components and materials used in our products. Our reconstructive joint devices are produced from various surgical grades of titanium, cobalt chrome, stainless steel, various grades of high-density polyethylenes and ceramics. We rely on one source to supply us with a certain grade of cobalt chrome alloy, one supplier for the silicone elastomer used in some of our extremities products, and one supplier for our pyrocarbon products, and one supplier to provide a key ingredient of AUGMENT® Bone Graft. The manufacture of our products is highly exacting and complex, and our business could suffer if a sole source supply arrangement is unexpectedly terminated or interrupted, and we are unable to obtain an acceptable new source of supply in a timely fashion.
In April 2016, we entered into a commercial supply agreement with FUJIFILM Diosynth Biotechnologies U.S.A., Inc. pursuant to which Fujifilm agreed to manufacture and sell to us and we agreed to purchase recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor (rhPDGF-BB) for use in AUGMENT® Bone Graft. The agreement reflects the culmination of a technology transfer from our former supplier to Fujifilm which began in December 2013 when we were notified that our former supplier was exiting the rhPDGF-BB business. Pursuant to our supply agreement with Fujifilm, commercial production of rhPDGF-BB is expected to begin in 2019. Although we believe that our current supply of rhPDGF-BB from our former supplier should be sufficient to last until after rhPDGF-BB becomes available under the new agreement, no assurance can be provided that it will be sufficient. In addition, since Fujifilm has not previously manufactured rhPDGF-BB, its ability to do so and perform its obligations under the agreement are not yet fully proven.
Our biologic product line includes a single sourced supplier for our GRAFTJACKET® family of soft tissue repair and graft containment products. In addition, certain biologic products depend upon a single supplier as our source for demineralized bone matrix (DBM) and cancellous bone matrix (CBM), and any failure to obtain DBM and CBM from this source in a timely manner will deplete levels of on-hand raw materials inventory and could interfere with our ability to process and distribute allograft products. We rely on a single not-for-profit tissue bank to meet all of our DBM and CBM order requirements, a key component

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in the allograft products we currently produce, market, and distribute. In addition, we rely on a single supplier of soft tissue graft for BIOTAPE® XM.
We cannot be sure that our supply of DBM, CBM and soft tissue graft for BIOTAPE® XM will continue to be available at current levels or will be sufficient to meet our needs, or that future suppliers of DBM, CBM, and soft tissue graft for BIOTAPE® XM will be free from FDA regulatory action impacting their sale of DBM, CBM and soft tissue graft for BIOTAPE® XM. As there are a small number of suppliers, if we cannot continue to obtain DBM, CBM, and soft tissue graft for BIOTAPE® XM from our current sources in volumes sufficient to meet our needs, we may not be able to locate replacement sources of DBM, CBM, and soft tissue graft for BIOTAPE® XM on commercially reasonable terms, if at all. This could interrupt our business, which could adversely affect our sales.
Suppliers of raw materials and components may decide, or be required, for reasons beyond our control to cease supplying raw materials and components to us. FDA regulations may require additional testing of any raw materials or components from new suppliers prior to our use of these materials or components, and in the case of a device with a PMA application, we may be required to obtain prior FDA permission, either of which could delay or prevent our access to or use of such raw materials or components.
We are dependent on various information technology systems, and failures of, interruptions to, or unauthorized tampering of those systems could have a material adverse effect on our business.
We rely extensively on information technology systems to conduct business. These systems include, but are not limited to, ordering and managing materials from suppliers, converting materials to finished products, shipping products to customers, processing transactions, summarizing and reporting results of operations, complying with regulatory, legal or tax requirements, and providing data security and other processes necessary to manage our business. Since the merger and through the end of 2016, we have consolidated into one enterprise resource planning (ERP) system in three of our top five international markets, and we plan to continue our ERP system roll-outs during 2017. We may experience difficulties in our business operations, or difficulties in operating our business under the ERP, either of which could disrupt our operations, including our ability to timely ship and track product orders, project inventory requirements, manage our supply chain, and otherwise adequately service our customers, and lead to increased costs and other difficulties. In the event we experience significant disruptions as a result of the ERP implementation or otherwise, we may not be able to fix our systems in an efficient and timely manner. Accordingly, such events may disrupt or reduce the efficiency of our entire operations and have a material adverse effect on our operating results and cash flows. In addition, if our systems are damaged or cease to function properly due to any number of causes, ranging from catastrophic events to power outages to security breaches, and our business continuity plans do not effectively compensate timely, we may suffer interruptions in our ability to manage operations.
Fluctuations in insurance cost and availability could adversely affect our profitability or our risk management profile.
We hold a number of insurance policies, including product liability insurance, directors’ and officers’ liability insurance, property insurance, and workers’ compensation insurance. If the costs of maintaining adequate insurance coverage should increase significantly in the future, our operating results could be materially adversely impacted. Likewise, if any of our current insurance coverage should become unavailable to us or become economically impractical, we would be required to operate our business without indemnity from commercial insurance providers.
Modifications to our marketed devices may require FDA regulatory clearances or approvals or require us to cease marketing or recall the modified devices until such additional clearances or approvals are obtained.
The FDA requires device manufacturers to make a determination of whether or not a modification to a cleared and commercialized medical device requires a new approval or clearance. However, the FDA can review a manufacturer’s decision not to submit for additional approvals or clearances. Any modification to an FDA approved or cleared device that would significantly affect its safety or efficacy or that would constitute a major change in its intended use would require a new PMA or 510(k) clearance and could be considered misbranded if the modified device is commercialized and such additional approval or clearance was not obtained. We cannot assure you that the FDA will agree with our decisions not to seek approvals or clearances for particular device modifications or that we will be successful in obtaining additional approvals or 510(k) clearances for modifications.
We obtained 510(k) premarket clearance for certain devices we market or marketed in the United States. We have subsequently modified some of those devices or device labeling since obtaining 510(k) clearance under the view that these modifications did not significantly affect the safety or efficacy of the device, and did not require new approvals or clearances. If the FDA disagrees with our decisions and requires us to obtain additional premarket approvals or 510(k) clearances for any modifications to our products and we fail to obtain such approvals or clearances or fail to secure approvals or clearances in a timely manner, we may be required to cease manufacturing and marketing the modified device or to recall such modified device until we obtain FDA approval or clearance and we may be subject to significant regulatory fines or penalties.
Although our Corporate Integrity Agreement expired, if we were found to have breached it, we may be subject to criminal prosecution and/or exclusion from U.S. federal healthcare programs.

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On September 29, 2010, Wright Medical Technology, Inc. entered into a 12-month Deferred Prosecution Agreement with the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of New Jersey (USAO). On September 15, 2011, WMT reached an agreement with the USAO and the OIG-HHS under which WMT voluntarily agreed to extend the term of its the Deferred Prosecution Agreement for 12 months. On October 4, 2012, the USAO issued a press release announcing that the amended Deferred Prosecution Agreement expired on September 29, 2012, that the USAO had moved to dismiss the criminal complaint against WMT because WMT had fully complied with the terms of the Deferred Prosecution Agreement, and that the court had ordered dismissal of the complaint on October 4, 2012. On September 29, 2010, WMT also entered into a five-year Corporate Integrity Agreement with the Office of the Inspector General of the United States Department of Health and Human Services. The CIA was filed as Exhibit 10.2 to legacy Wright's Current Report on Form 8-K filed on September 30, 2010. The CIA expired on September 29, 2015 and on January 27, 2016, we received notification from the OIG-HHS that the term of the CIA has concluded. While the term of the CIA has concluded, our failure to continue to maintain compliance with U.S. healthcare laws, regulations and other requirements in the future could expose us to significant liability, including, but not limited to, exclusion from federal healthcare program participation, including Medicaid and Medicare, potential prosecution, civil and criminal fines or penalties, as well as additional litigation cost and expense, which would have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, operating results and cash flows.
The European Union and many of its world markets rely on the CE-Mark as the path to market our products.
The European Medical Device Directive requires that many of our products that bear the CE-Mark be supported by post-market clinical data. We are in the process of implementing systems and procedures to control this activity in order to comply with these requirements, including establishing contractual relationships with the healthcare provider clinical study sites in accordance with our internal compliance requirements. We intend to obtain the needed clinical data to support our marketed products, but there can be no assurance that European regulators will accept the results. This could potentially impact business performance. In addition, changes to the certification and oversight responsibilities of notified bodies presently under consideration by the European Commission, if implemented, could result in more stringent notified body oversight requirements, require additional resources to maintain compliance, and increase the risk of negative audit observations.
Our biologics business is subject to emerging governmental regulations that can significantly impact our business.
The FDA has statutory authority to regulate allograft-based products, processing, and materials. The FDA, European Union and Health Canada have been working to establish more comprehensive regulatory frameworks for allograft-based, tissue-containing products, which are principally derived from cadaveric tissue. The framework developed by the FDA establishes risk-based criteria for determining whether a particular human tissue-based product will be classified as human tissue, a medical device, or biologic drug requiring 510(k) clearance or PMA approval. All tissue-based products are subject to extensive FDA regulation, including establishment of registration requirements, product listing requirements, good tissue practice requirements for manufacturing, and screening requirements that ensure that diseases are not transmitted to tissue recipients. The FDA has also proposed extensive additional requirements addressing sub-contracted tissue services, traceability to the recipient/patient, and donor records review. If a tissue-based product is considered human tissue, FDA requirements focus on preventing the introduction, transmission, and spread of communicable diseases to recipients. Clinical data or review of safety and efficacy is not required before the tissue can be marketed. However, if tissue is considered a medical device or biologic drug, then FDA clearance or approval is required.
Additionally, our biologics business involves the procurement and transplantation of allograft tissue, which is subject to federal regulation under the National Organ Transplant Act (NOTA). NOTA prohibits the sale of human organs, including bone and other human tissue, for valuable consideration within the meaning of NOTA. NOTA permits the payment of reasonable expenses associated with the transportation, processing, preservation, quality control, and storage of human tissue. We currently charge our customers for these expenses. In the future, if NOTA is amended or reinterpreted, we may not be able to charge these expenses to our customers, and, as a result, our business could be adversely affected.
Our principal allograft-based biologics offerings include ALLOMATRIX®, GRAFTJACKET® and IGNITE® products.
The results of our clinical trials may not support our product claims or may result in the discovery of adverse side effects.
Our ongoing research and development, pre-clinical testing, and clinical trial activities are subject to extensive regulation and review by numerous governmental authorities both in the United States and abroad. We are currently conducting post-market clinical studies of some of our products to gather additional information about these products’ safety, efficacy, or optimal use. In the future we may conduct additional clinical trials to support approval of new products. Clinical studies must be conducted in compliance with FDA regulations or the FDA may take enforcement action. The data collected from these clinical trials may ultimately be used to support market approval or clearance for these products or gather additional information about approved or cleared products. Even if our clinical trials are completed as planned, we cannot be certain that their results will support our product claims or that the FDA or foreign authorities will agree with our conclusions regarding them. Success in pre-clinical testing and early clinical trials does not always ensure that later clinical trials will be successful, and we cannot be sure that the later trials will replicate the results of prior trials and studies. The clinical trial process may fail to demonstrate that our products are safe and effective for the proposed indicated uses, which could cause us to abandon a product and may delay development of others.

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Any delay or termination of our clinical trials will delay the filing of our product submissions and, ultimately, our ability to commercialize our products and generate revenue. It is also possible that patients enrolled in clinical trials will experience adverse side effects that are not currently part of the product’s profile.
If the third parties on which we rely to conduct our clinical trials and to assist us with clinical development do not perform as contractually required or expected, we may not be able to obtain, or in some cases, maintain regulatory clearance or approval for or commercialize our products.
We often must rely on third parties, such as contract research organizations, medical institutions, clinical investigators, and contract laboratories to conduct our clinical trials. If these third parties do not successfully carry out their contractual duties or regulatory obligations or meet expected deadlines, if these third parties need to be replaced, or if the quality or accuracy of the data they obtain is compromised due to their failure to adhere to our clinical protocols or regulatory requirements, or for other reasons, our pre-clinical and clinical development activities or clinical trials may be extended, delayed, suspended, or terminated, and we may not be able to obtain or, in some cases maintain, regulatory clearance or approval for, or successfully commercialize, our products on a timely basis, if at all, and our business, operating results, and prospects may be adversely affected. Furthermore, our third-party clinical trial investigators may be delayed in conducting our clinical trials for reasons outside of their control.
If we fail to compete successfully in the future against our existing or potential competitors, our sales and operating results may be negatively affected, and we may not achieve future growth.
The markets for our products are highly competitive and subject to rapid and profound technological change. Our success depends, in part, on our ability to maintain a competitive position in the development of technologies and products for use by our customers. Many of the companies developing or marketing competitive products enjoy several competitive advantages over us, including greater financial and human resources for product development and sales and marketing; greater name recognition; established relationships with surgeons, hospitals and third-party payors; broader product lines and the ability to offer rebates or bundle products to offer greater discounts or incentives to gain a competitive advantage; and established sales and marketing and distribution networks. Some of our competitors have indicated an increased focus on the extremities and biologics markets, which are our primary strategic focus. Our competitors may develop and patent processes or products earlier than us, obtain regulatory clearances or approvals for competing products more rapidly than us, develop more effective or less expensive products or technologies that render our technology or products obsolete or non-competitive or acquire technologies and technology licenses complementary to our products or advantageous to our business, which could adversely affect our business and operating results. Not all of our sales and other personnel have non-compete agreements. We also compete with other organizations in recruiting and retaining qualified scientific, sales, and management personnel. If our competitors are more successful than us in these matters, we may be unable to compete successfully against our existing or future competitors. In addition, the orthopaedic industry has been subject to increasing consolidation recently and over the last few years. Consolidation in our industry not involving our company could result in existing competitors increasing their market share through business combinations and result in stronger competitors, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and operating results. We may be unable to compete successfully in an increasingly consolidated industry and cannot predict with certainty how industry consolidation will affect our competitors or us.
We operate in markets outside the United States that are subject to political, economic, and social instability and expose us to additional risks.
Operations in countries outside of the United States accounted for approximately 26% of our net sales for our fiscal year ended December 25, 2016. Our operations outside of the United States are accompanied by certain financial and other risks. We intend to continue to pursue growth opportunities in sales outside the United States, especially in emerging markets, which could expose us to greater risks associated with international sales operations. Our international sales operations expose us and our representatives, agents, and distributors to risks inherent in operating in foreign jurisdictions. These risks include:
the imposition of additional U.S. and foreign governmental controls or regulations on orthopaedic implants and biologic products;
withdrawal from or revision to international trade agreements and the imposition or increases in import and export licensing and other compliance requirements, customs duties and tariffs, import and export quotas and other trade restrictions, license obligations, and other non-tariff barriers to trade;
unexpected changes in tariffs, trade barriers and regulatory requirements;
the imposition of U.S. or international sanctions against a country, company, person, or entity with whom we do business that would restrict or prohibit continued business with that country, company, person, or entity;
economic instability, including currency risk between the U.S. dollar and foreign currencies, in our target markets;
economic weakness, including inflation, or political instability in particular foreign economies and markets;

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the imposition of restrictions on the activities of foreign agents, representatives, and distributors;
scrutiny of foreign tax authorities, which could result in significant fines, penalties, and additional taxes being imposed upon us;
a shortage of high-quality international salespeople and distributors;
loss of any key personnel who possess proprietary knowledge or are otherwise important to our success in international markets;
changes in third-party reimbursement policy that may require some of the patients who receive our products to directly absorb medical costs or that may necessitate our reducing selling prices for our products;
unexpected changes in foreign regulatory requirements;
differing local product preferences and product requirements;
changes in tariffs and other trade restrictions, particularly related to the exportation of our biologic products;
work stoppages or strikes in the healthcare industry, such as those that have affected our operations in France, Canada, South Korea, and Finland in the past;
difficulties in enforcing and defending intellectual property rights;
foreign currency exchange controls that might prevent us from repatriating cash earned in countries outside the Netherlands;
complex data privacy requirements and labor relations laws; and
exposure to different legal and political standards due to our conducting business in over 50 countries.
In addition, on June 23, 2016, the United Kingdom held a referendum in which voters approved an exit from the European Union, commonly referred to as “Brexit.” As a result of the referendum, negotiations will determine the future terms of the United Kingdom’s relationship with the European Union, including the terms of trade between the United Kingdom and the European Union. Although it is unknown what those terms will be, it is possible that there will be greater restrictions on the movement of goods and people between the United Kingdom and European Union countries and increased regulatory complexities, which could affect our ability to sell our products in certain European Union countries. Brexit could adversely affect European and worldwide economic and market conditions and could contribute to instability in global financial and foreign exchange markets, including volatility in the value of the British pound and Euro. In addition, other European countries may seek to conduct referenda with respect to continuing membership with the European Union. We do not know to what extent these changes will impact our business. Any of these effects of Brexit, and others that we cannot anticipate, could adversely affect our business, operations and financial results.
Since we conduct operations through U.S. operating subsidiaries, not only are we subject to the laws of non-U.S. jurisdictions, but we also are subject to U.S. laws governing our activities in foreign countries, such as the FCPA, as well as various import-export laws, regulations, and embargoes. If our business activities were determined to violate these laws, regulations, or rules, we could suffer serious consequences.
Healthcare regulation and reimbursement for medical devices vary significantly from country to country. This changing environment could adversely affect our ability to sell our products in some jurisdictions.
We have a significant amount of indebtedness. We may not be able to generate enough cash flow from our operations to service our indebtedness, and we may incur additional indebtedness in the future, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition, and operating results.
We have a significant amount of indebtedness, including $395.0 million in aggregate principal with additional accrued interest under our 2.25% cash convertible senior notes due 2021 (2021 Notes), $587.5 million in aggregate principal with additional accrued interest under WMG’s 2.00% cash convertible senior notes due 2020, which Wright Medical Group N.V. has guaranteed (2020 Notes), and $2.0 million in aggregate principal with additional accrued interest under WMG’s 2.00% cash convertible senior notes due 2017 (2017 Notes, together with the 2020 and 2021 Notes, the Notes) as of December 25, 2016. In addition, in December 2016, we entered into a credit, security and guaranty agreement (ABL Credit Agreement) with Midcap Financial Trust and the additional lenders from time to time party thereto (ABL Lenders) which provides WMG and certain of our other wholly-owned U.S. subsidiaries with a $150.0 million senior secured asset based line of credit, subject to the satisfaction of a borrowing base requirement, and which may be increased by up to $100.0 million upon our request, subject to the consent of the ABL Lenders (ABL Facility). As of December 25, 2016, $30.0 million in aggregate principal plus additional accrued interest was outstanding under the ABL Facility.

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Our ability to make payments on, and to refinance, our indebtedness, including the Notes and amounts borrowed under the ABL Facility, and our ability to fund planned capital expenditures, contractual cash obligations, research and development efforts, working capital, acquisitions, and other general corporate purposes depends on our ability to generate cash in the future. This, to a certain extent, is subject to general economic, financial, competitive, legislative, regulatory, and other factors, some of which are beyond our control. If we do not generate sufficient cash flow from operations or if future borrowings are not available to us in an amount sufficient to pay our indebtedness, including payments of principal upon conversion of outstanding Notes or on their respective maturity dates or in connection with a transaction involving us that constitutes a fundamental change under the respective indenture governing the Notes, or to fund our liquidity needs, we may be forced to refinance all or a portion of our indebtedness on or before the maturity dates thereof, sell assets, reduce or delay capital expenditures, seek to raise additional capital, or take other similar actions. We may not be able to execute any of these actions on commercially reasonable terms or at all. Our ability to refinance our indebtedness will depend on our financial condition at the time, the restrictions in the instruments governing our indebtedness, and other factors, including market conditions. In addition, in the event of a default under the Notes or under the ABL Facility, the holders and/or the trustee under the indentures governing the Notes or the lenders under the ABL Facility may accelerate payment obligations under the Notes and/or the amounts borrowed under the ABL Facility, respectfully, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and operating results. In addition, the Notes and ABL Facility contain cross default provisions. Our inability to generate sufficient cash flow to satisfy our debt service obligations, or to refinance or restructure our obligations on commercially reasonable terms or at all, would likely have an adverse effect, which could be material, on our business, financial condition, and operating results.
In addition, our significant indebtedness, combined with our other financial obligations and contractual commitments, could have other important consequences. For example, it could:
make us more vulnerable to adverse changes in general U.S. and worldwide economic, industry, and competitive conditions and adverse changes in government regulation;
limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and our industry;
restrict our ability to make strategic acquisitions or dispositions or to exploit business opportunities;
place us at a competitive disadvantage compared to our competitors who have less debt; and
limit our ability to borrow additional amounts for working capital, capital expenditures, contractual obligations, research and development efforts, acquisitions, debt service requirements, execution of our business strategy, or other purposes.
Any of these factors could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and operating results. In addition, we may incur additional indebtedness, and if we do, the risks related to our business and our ability to service our indebtedness would increase.
In addition, under our Notes, we are required to offer to repurchase the Notes upon the occurrence of a fundamental change, which could include, among other things, any acquisition of ours for consideration other than publicly traded securities. The repurchase price must be paid in cash, and this obligation may have the effect of discouraging, delaying, or preventing an acquisition of ours that would otherwise be beneficial to our security holders.
With respect to the 2021 Notes which have been issued by Wright Medical Group N.V., we are dependent on the cash flow of, and dividends and distributions to us from, our subsidiaries in order to service our indebtedness under these Notes. Our subsidiaries are separate and distinct legal entities and have no obligation, contingent or otherwise, to pay any amounts due pursuant to any indebtedness of ours or to make any funds available therefor, except for those subsidiaries that have guaranteed our obligations under our outstanding indebtedness. The ability of our subsidiaries to pay any dividends and distributions will be subject to, among other things, the terms of any debt instruments of our subsidiaries then in effect as well as among other things, the availability of profits or funds and requirements of applicable laws, including surplus, solvency and other limits imposed on the ability of companies to pay dividends. There can be no assurance that our subsidiaries will generate cash flow sufficient to pay dividends or distributions to us that enable us to pay interest or principal on our existing indebtedness.
A failure to comply with the covenants and other provisions of the indentures governing the Notes or the ABL Credit Agreement could result in events of default under such indentures or ABL Credit Agreement, especially in light of the cross default provisions, which could require the immediate repayment of our outstanding indebtedness. If we are at any time unable to generate sufficient cash flows from operations to service our indebtedness when payment is due, we may be required to attempt to renegotiate the terms of the indentures, the ABL Credit Agreement and other agreements relating to the indebtedness, seek to refinance all or a portion of the indebtedness, or obtain additional financing. There can be no assurance that we will be able to successfully renegotiate such terms, that any such refinancing would be possible, or that any additional financing could be obtained on terms that are favorable or acceptable to us.

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Hedge and warrant transactions entered into in connection with the issuance of our Notes may affect the value of our ordinary shares.
In connection with the issuance of the Notes, we entered into hedge transactions with various financial institutions with the objective of reducing the potential dilutive effect of issuing our ordinary shares upon conversion of the Notes and the potential cash outlay from the cash conversion of the Notes. We also entered into separate warrant transactions with the same financial institutions.
In connection with the hedge and warrant transactions associated with the Notes, these financial institutions purchased our ordinary shares in secondary market transactions and entered into various over-the-counter derivative transactions with respect to our ordinary shares. These entities or their affiliates are likely to modify their hedge positions from time to time prior to conversion or maturity of the Notes by purchasing and selling our ordinary shares, other of our securities, or other instruments they may wish to use in connection with such hedging. Any of these transactions and activities could adversely affect the value of our ordinary shares and, as a result, the number and value of the ordinary shares holders will receive upon conversion of the Notes. In addition, subject to movement in the price of our ordinary shares, if the hedge transactions settle in our favor, we could be exposed to credit risk related to the other party with respect to the payment we are owed from such other party. If any of the participants in the hedge transactions is unwilling or unable to perform its obligations for any reason, we would not be able to receive the benefit of such transaction. We cannot provide any assurances as to the financial stability or viability of any of the participants in the hedge transactions.
Rating agencies may provide unsolicited ratings on the Notes or the ABL Credit Agreement that could reduce the market value or liquidity of our ordinary shares.
We have not requested a rating of the Notes or the ABL Credit Agreement from any rating agency and we do not anticipate that the Notes or the ABL Credit Agreement will be rated. However, if one or more rating agencies independently elects to rate the Notes or the ABL Credit Agreement and assigns the Notes or the ABL Credit Agreement a rating lower than the rating expected by investors, or reduces such rating in the future, the market price or liquidity of the Notes or the ABL Credit Agreement and our ordinary shares could be harmed. Should a decline in the market price of the Notes, as compared to the price of our ordinary shares occur, this may trigger the right of the holders of the Notes to convert such notes into cash and our ordinary shares, as applicable.
The terms of the ABL Credit Agreement could limit our ability to conduct our business, take advantage of business opportunities and respond to changing business, market, and economic conditions.
Our ABL Credit Agreement includes a number of significant financial and operating restrictions. For example, the ABL Credit Agreement contains financial covenants that, among other things, require us to maintain minimum liquidity and achieve certain revenue thresholds and contains provisions that restrict our ability, subject to specified exceptions, to, among other things:
make loans and investments, including acquisitions and transactions with affiliates;
create liens or other encumbrances on our assets;
dispose of assets;
enter into contingent obligations;
engage in mergers or consolidations; and
pay dividends.
Due to the terms of the ABL Credit Agreement, we may be unable to comply with these covenants, which could result in a default under the ABL Facility. In addition, these provisions may limit our ability to conduct our business, take advantage of business opportunities, and respond to changing business, market, and economic conditions. In addition, they may place us at a competitive disadvantage relative to other companies that may be subject to fewer, if any, restrictions or may otherwise adversely affect our business. Transactions that we may view as important opportunities, such as significant acquisitions, may be subject to the consent of the ABL Lenders, which consent may be withheld or granted subject to conditions specified at the time that may affect the attractiveness or viability of the transaction.
The ABL Facility involves additional risks that may adversely affect our liquidity, results of operations, and financial condition.
Availability under the ABL Credit Agreement is based on the amount of certain eligible receivables, eligible equipment, eligible inventory and eligible surgical instrumentation less specified reserves as described in Note 9 to our consolidated financial statements. As a result, our access to credit under the ABL Facility is potentially subject to fluctuations depending on the value of the eligible assets in the borrowing base as of any valuation date. Our inability to borrow additional amounts under the ABL Facility may adversely affect our liquidity, results of operations, and financial condition. In addition, all payments on our accounts receivable are required under the ABL Credit Agreement to be directed to deposit accounts under the control of the ABL Facility

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lenders for application to amounts outstanding under the ABL Facility. The lenders may exercise control over such amounts when they are entitled to exercise default remedies, which may adversely affect our ability to fund our operations.
Our outstanding indebtedness under the ABL Facility bears interest at variable rates, which subjects us to interest rate risk and could increase the cost of servicing our indebtedness. The impact of increases in interest rates could be more significant for us than it would be for some other companies because of our indebtedness, thereby affecting our profitability. In the event of a default under any of our debt instruments, the lenders under the ABL Facility may terminate their commitments to lend additional money and declare all amounts outstanding thereunder to be immediately due and payable. Additionally, a default under the ABL Facility could result in a cross-default under the Notes. While an event of default is continuing under the ABL Credit Agreement the lenders thereunder may elect to increase the rates at which interest accrues. Subject to certain exceptions, amounts outstanding under the ABL Facility are secured by a senior first priority security interest in substantially all existing and after-acquired assets of our company and each borrower. Accordingly, under certain circumstances, the lenders under the ABL Facility could seek to enforce security interests in our assets securing our indebtedness under the ABL Facility, including restricting our access to collections on our accounts receivable. Any acceleration of amounts due under our ABL Credit Agreement or the exercise by the lenders thereto of their rights under the security documents, would have a material adverse effect on us. In addition, the ABL Facility is subject to market deterioration or other factors that could jeopardize the counterparty obligations of one or more of the ABL Lenders, which could have an adverse effect on our business if we are not able to replace such ABL Facility or find other sources of liquidity on acceptable terms.
We likely will need additional financing to satisfy our anticipated future liquidity requirements, which may not be available on favorable terms at the time it is needed and which could reduce our operational and strategic flexibility.
Although it is difficult for us to predict our future liquidity requirements, we believe that our cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash balance of approximately $412.3 million, together with $120.0 million in availability under our ABL Facility, as of December 25, 2016 will be sufficient for at least the next 12 months to fund our working capital requirements and operations, permit anticipated capital expenditures in 2017, pay retained liabilities of the OrthoRecon business, including without limitation amounts under the MSA, and meet our anticipated contractual cash obligations in 2017. We may face liquidity challenges during the next few years in light of anticipated significant contingent liabilities and financial obligations and commitments, including among others, acquisition-related contingent consideration payments, payments related to our outstanding indebtedness, and costs and payments related to pending litigation.
In the event that we would require additional working capital to fund future operations, we could seek to acquire that through borrowings under the additional $100.0 million that may be available under the ABL Facility or additional equity or debt financing arrangements which may or may not be available on favorable terms at such time. If we raise additional funds by issuing equity securities, our shareholders may experience dilution. Additional debt financing, if available, may involve additional covenants restricting our operations or our ability to incur additional debt, in addition to those under our existing indentures and the ABL Credit Agreement. Any additional debt financing or additional equity that we raise may contain terms that are not favorable to us or our shareholders. If we do not have, or are not able to obtain, sufficient funds, we may not be able to develop or enhance our products, execute our business plan, take advantage of future opportunities, or respond to competitive pressures or unanticipated customer requirements or we may have to delay development or commercialization of our products or scale back our operations.
Worldwide economic instability could adversely affect our net sales, financial condition, or results of operations.
The health of the global economy, and the credit markets and the financial services industry in particular, affects our business and operating results. While the health of the credit markets and the financial services industry appears to have stabilized, there is no assurance that it will remain stable and there can be no assurance that there will not be deterioration in the global economy. If the credit markets are not favorable, we may be unable to raise additional financing when needed or on favorable terms. Our customers may experience financial difficulties or be unable to borrow money to fund their operations which may adversely impact their ability to purchase our products or to pay for our products on a timely basis, if at all. In addition, any economic crisis could also adversely impact our suppliers’ ability to provide us with materials and components, either of which may negatively impact our business. As with our customers and vendors, these economic conditions make it more difficult for us to accurately forecast and plan our future business activities. Further, there are concerns for the overall stability and suitability of the Euro as a single currency, given the economic and political challenges facing individual Eurozone countries and Brexit. Continuing deterioration in the creditworthiness of the Eurozone countries, the withdrawal of one or more member countries from the European Union, or the failure of the Euro as a common European currency could adversely affect our sales, financial condition, or operating results.
The collectability of our accounts receivable may be affected by general economic conditions.
Our liquidity is dependent on, among other things, the collection of our accounts receivable. Collections of our receivables may be affected by general economic conditions. Although current economic conditions have not had a material adverse effect on our ability to collect such receivables, we can make no assurances regarding future economic conditions or their effect on our ability to collect our receivables, particularly from our international stocking distributors. In addition, some of our trade receivables are with national health care systems in many countries (including, but not limited to, Greece, Ireland, Portugal, and Spain). Repayment

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of these receivables is dependent upon the financial stability of the economies of those countries. In light of these global economic fluctuations, we continue to monitor the creditworthiness of customers located outside of the United States. Failure to receive payment of all or a significant portion of these receivables could adversely affect our operating results.
If we are unable to continue to develop and market new products and technologies, we may experience a decrease in demand for our products, or our products could become obsolete, and our business would suffer.
We are continually engaged in product development and improvement programs, and new products represent a significant component of our sales growth rate. We may be unable to compete effectively with our competitors unless we can keep up with existing or new products and technologies in the orthopaedic market. If we do not continue to introduce new products and technologies, or if those products and technologies are not accepted, we may not be successful. Moreover, research and development efforts may require a substantial investment of time and resources before we are adequately able to determine the commercial viability of a new product, technology, material, or innovation. Demand for our products also could change in ways we may not anticipate due to evolving customer needs, changing demographics, slow industry growth rates, declines in the extremities and biologics market, the introduction of new products and technologies, evolving surgical philosophies, and evolving industry standards, among others. Additionally, our competitors’ new products and technologies may beat our products to market, may be more effective or less expensive than our products, or may render our products obsolete. Our new products and technologies also could render our existing products obsolete and thus adversely affect sales of our existing products and lead to increased expense for excess and obsolete inventory.
Our inability to maintain contractual relationships with healthcare professionals could have a negative impact on our research and development and medical education programs.
We maintain contractual relationships with respected surgeons and medical personnel in hospitals and universities who assist in product research and development and in the training of surgeons on the safe and effective use of our products. We continue to place emphasis on the development of proprietary products and product improvements to complement and expand our existing product lines as well as providing high quality training on those products. If we are unable to maintain these relationships, our ability to develop and market new and improved products and train on the use of those products could decrease, and our future operating results could be unfavorably affected. In addition, it is possible that U.S. federal and state and international laws requiring us to disclose payments or other transfers of value, such as free gifts or meals, to surgeons and other healthcare providers could have a chilling effect on these relationships with individuals or entities that may, among other things, want to avoid public scrutiny of their financial relationships with us.
Our business could suffer if the medical community does not continue to accept allograft technology.
New allograft products, technologies, and enhancements may never achieve broad market acceptance due to numerous factors, including:
lack of clinical acceptance of allograft products and related technologies;
the introduction of competitive tissue repair treatment options that render allograft products and technologies too expensive and obsolete;
lack of available third-party reimbursement;
the inability to train surgeons in the use of allograft products and technologies;
the risk of disease transmission; and
ethical concerns about the commercial aspects of harvesting cadaveric tissue.
Market acceptance also will depend on the ability to demonstrate that existing and new allograft products and technologies are attractive alternatives to existing tissue repair treatment options. To demonstrate this, we rely upon surgeon evaluations of the clinical safety, efficacy, ease of use, reliability, and cost effectiveness of our tissue repair options and technologies. Recommendations and endorsements by influential surgeons are important to the commercial success of allograft products and technologies. In addition, several countries, notably Japan, prohibit the use of allografts. If allograft products and technologies are not broadly accepted in the marketplace, we may not achieve a competitive position in the market.
If adequate levels of reimbursement from third-party payors for our products are not obtained, surgeons and patients may be reluctant to use our products and our sales may decline.
In the United States, healthcare providers who purchase our products generally rely on third-party payors, principally U.S. federally-funded Medicare, state-funded Medicaid, and private health insurance plans, to pay for all or a portion of the cost of joint reconstructive procedures and products utilized in those procedures. We may be unable to sell our products on a profitable basis if third-party payors deny coverage or reduce their current levels of reimbursement. Our sales depend largely on governmental healthcare programs and private health insurers reimbursing patients’ medical expenses. Surgeons, hospitals, and other healthcare

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providers may not purchase our products if they do not receive appropriate reimbursement from third-party payors for procedures using our products. In light of healthcare reform measures, payors continue to review their coverage policies for existing and new therapies and may deny coverage for treatments that include the use of our products.
In addition, some healthcare providers in the United States have adopted or are considering bundled payment methodologies and/or managed care systems in which the providers contract to provide comprehensive healthcare for a fixed cost per person. Healthcare providers may attempt to control costs by authorizing fewer elective surgical procedures, including joint reconstructive surgeries, or by requiring the use of the least expensive implant available. Changes in reimbursement policies or healthcare cost containment initiatives that limit or restrict reimbursement for our products may cause our sales to decline.
If adequate levels of reimbursement from third-party payors outside of the United States are not obtained, international sales of our products may decline. Outside of the United States, reimbursement systems vary significantly by country. Many foreign markets have government-managed healthcare systems that govern reimbursement for medical devices and procedures. Canada, and some European and Asian countries, in particular France, Japan, Taiwan, and South Korea, have tightened reimbursement rates. Additionally, Brazil, China, Russia, and the United Kingdom have recently begun landmark reforms that will significantly alter their healthcare systems. Finally, some foreign reimbursement systems provide for limited payments in a given period and therefore result in extended payment periods.
Our business could be significantly and adversely impacted by healthcare reform legislation.
Comprehensive healthcare reform legislation has significantly and adversely impacted our business. For example, the Affordable Care Act imposed a 2.3% excise tax on U.S. sales of medical devices. Although the medical device excise tax is currently suspended until December 31, 2017, it is possible that the suspension may be lifted or expire. The Affordable Care Act also includes numerous provisions to limit Medicare spending through reductions in various fee schedule payments and by instituting more sweeping payment reforms, such as bundled payments for episodes of care and the establishment of “accountable care organizations” under which hospitals and physicians will be able to share savings that result from cost control efforts. Many of these provisions will be implemented through the regulatory process, and policy details have not yet been finalized. Various healthcare reform proposals have also emerged at the state level. We cannot predict with certainty the impact that these U.S. federal and state health reforms will have on us. However, an expansion in government’s role in the U.S. healthcare industry may lower reimbursements for products, reduce medical procedure volumes, and adversely affect our business and operating results, possibly materially.
There is an increasing trend for more criminal prosecutions and compliance enforcement activities for noncompliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) as well as for data breaches involving protected health information (PHI). In the ordinary course of our business, we may receive PHI. If we are unable to comply with HIPAA or experiences a data breach involving PHI, we could be subject to criminal and civil sanctions.
If we cannot retain our key personnel, we may be unable to manage and operate our business successfully and meet our strategic objectives.
Our future success depends, in part, upon our ability to retain and motivate key managerial, scientific, sales, and technical personnel, as well as our ability to continue to attract and retain additional highly qualified personnel. We compete for such personnel with other companies, academic institutions, governmental entities, and other organizations. There can be no assurance that we will be successful in retaining our current personnel or in hiring or retaining qualified personnel in the future. Key personnel may depart because of difficulties with change or a desire not to remain with our company, especially in light of the Wright/Tornier merger. Any unanticipated loss or interruption of services of our management team and our key personnel could significantly reduce our ability to meet our strategic objectives because it may not be possible for us to find appropriate replacement personnel should the need arise. Loss of key personnel or the inability to hire or retain qualified personnel in the future could have a material adverse effect on our ability to operate successfully. Further, any inability on our part to enforce non-compete or non-solicitation arrangements related to key personnel who have left the business could have a material adverse effect on our business.
If a natural or man-made disaster adversely affects our manufacturing facilities or distribution channels, we could be unable to manufacture or distribute our products for a substantial amount of time, and our sales could be disrupted.
We principally rely on four manufacturing facilities, two of which are in France, one of which is in Ireland and one of which is in Arlington, Tennessee. The facilities and the manufacturing equipment we use to produce our products would be difficult to replace and could require substantial lead-time to repair or replace. For example, the machinery associated with our manufacturing of pyrocarbon in one of our French facilities is highly specialized and would take substantial lead-time and resources to replace. We also maintain a facility in Bloomington, Minnesota, a facility in Arlington, Tennessee, and a warehouse in Montbonnot, France, which contain large amounts of our inventory. Our facilities, warehouses, or distribution channels may be affected by natural or man-made disasters. For example, in the event of a natural or man-made disaster at one of our warehouses, we may lose substantial amounts of inventory that would be difficult to replace. Our manufacturing facility in Arlington, Tennessee is located near the New Madrid fault line. In the event our facilities, warehouses, or distribution channels are affected by a disaster, we would be forced to rely on, among others, third-party manufacturers and alternative warehouse space and distribution channels, which may

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or may not be available, and our sales could decline. Although we believe we have adequate disaster recovery plans in place and possess adequate insurance for damage to our property and the disruption of our business from casualties, such plans and insurance may not cover such disasters or be sufficient to cover all of our potential losses and may not continue to be available to us on acceptable terms or at all.
To the extent transition activities related to the sale of our Large Joints business divert management attention or manufacturing resources from our ongoing operations, or add additional costs to these operations, this could have an adverse effect on our business.
On October 21, 2016, we sold our Large Joints business to Corin Orthopaedics Holdings Limited (Corin). In connection with the transaction, we entered into a transitional services agreement pursuant to which we agreed to provide Corin certain support services and a supply agreement pursuant to which we agreed to manufacture certain of the large joints products for Corin, in each case for a transitional period of time. Our post-closing obligations under the transitional services agreement and supply agreement require us to dedicate substantial resources, personnel and manufacturing capacity that may add costs to our ongoing business, cause us to incur unanticipated costs and liabilities or result in manufacturing delays with respect to the production and delivery of our own products.
Our business plan relies on certain assumptions about the markets for our products, which, if incorrect, may adversely affect our business and operating results.
We believe that the aging of the general population and increasingly active lifestyles will continue and that these trends will increase the need for our extremities and biologics products. The projected demand for our products could materially differ from actual demand if our assumptions regarding these trends and acceptance of our products by the medical community prove to be incorrect or do not materialize, or if non-surgical treatments gain more widespread acceptance as a viable alternative to orthopaedic implants.
Fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates could result in declines in our reported net sales and earnings.
Because a majority of our international sales are denominated in local currencies and not in U.S. dollars, our reported net sales and earnings are subject to fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates. Foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations negatively impacted our net sales by $4.7 million during 2016. Operating costs related to these sales are largely denominated in the same respective currencies, thereby partially limiting our transaction risk exposure. However, cost of sales related to these sales are primarily denominated in U.S. dollars; therefore, as the U.S. dollar strengthens, the gross margin associated with our sales denominated in foreign currencies experience declines.
We have employed a derivative program using foreign currency forward contracts to mitigate the risk of currency fluctuations on our intercompany receivable and payable balances that are denominated in foreign currencies. These forward contracts are expected to offset the transactional gains and losses on the related intercompany balances. These forward contracts are not designated as hedging instruments under Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Accounting Standard Codification (ASC) Section 815, Derivatives and Hedging Activities. Accordingly, the changes in the fair value and the settlement of the contracts are recognized in the period incurred. Although we address currency risk management through regular operating and financing activities, and more recently through hedging activities, these actions may not prove to be fully effective, and hedging activities involve additional risks.
We incur significant expenditures of resources to maintain relatively high levels of instruments and we historically have had a high level of inventory, which can adversely affect our operating results and reduce our cash flows.
The nature of our business requires us to maintain a certain level of instruments since in order to market effectively we often must maintain and bring our customers instrument kits. In addition, we historically have maintained extra inventory in the form of back-up products and products of different size in order to ensure that our customers have the right products when they need them. This practice has resulted in us maintaining a relatively high level of inventory, which can adversely affect our operating results and reduce our cash flows. In addition, to the extent that a substantial portion of our inventory becomes obsolete, it could have a material adverse effect on our earnings and cash flows due to the resulting costs associated with inventory impairment charges and costs required to replace such inventory.
Our quarterly operating results are subject to substantial fluctuations, and you should not rely on them as an indication of our future results.
Our quarterly operating results may vary significantly due to a combination of factors, many of which are beyond our control. These factors include:
demand for products, which historically has been lowest in the third quarter;
our ability to meet the demand for our products;
the level of competition;

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the number, timing, and significance of new products and product introductions and enhancements by us and our competitors;
our ability to develop, introduce, and market new and enhanced versions of our products on a timely basis;
the timing of or failure to obtain regulatory clearances or approvals for products;
changes in pricing policies by us and our competitors;
changes in the treatment practices of orthopaedic surgeons;
changes in distributor relationships and sales force size and composition;
the timing of material expense- or income-generating events and the related recognition of their associated financial impact;
the number and mix of products sold in the quarter and the geographies in which they are sold;
the number of selling days;
the availability and cost of components and materials;
prevailing interest rates on our excess cash investments;
fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates;
the timing of significant orders and shipments;
ability to obtain reimbursement for our products and the timing of patients’ use of their calendar year medical insurance deductibles;
work stoppages or strikes in the healthcare industry;
changes in FDA and foreign governmental regulatory policies, requirements, and enforcement practices;
changes in accounting policies, estimates, and treatments;
restructuring, impairment, and other special charges, costs associated with our pending litigation and U.S. governmental inquiries, and other charges;
variations in cost of sales due to the amount and timing of excess and obsolete inventory charges, commodity prices, and manufacturing variances;
income tax fluctuations;
general economic factors; and
increases of interest rates, which can increase the cost of borrowings under our ABL Credit Agreement, and generally affect the level of economic activity.
We believe our quarterly sales and operating results may vary significantly in the future and period-to-period comparisons of our results of operations are not necessarily meaningful and should not be relied upon as indications of future performance. We cannot assure you that our sales will increase or be sustained in future periods or that we will be profitable in any future period. Any shortfalls in sales or earnings from levels expected by securities or orthopaedic industry analysts could have an immediate and significant adverse effect on the trading price of our ordinary shares in any given period.
We may not achieve our financial guidance or projected goals and objectives in the time periods that we anticipate or announce publicly, which could have an adverse effect on our business and could cause the market price of our ordinary shares to decline.
We typically provide projected financial information, such as our anticipated annual net sales, adjusted earnings and adjusted earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization. These financial projections are based on management’s then current expectations and typically do not contain any significant margin of error or cushion for any specific uncertainties or for the uncertainties inherent in all financial forecasting. The failure to achieve our financial projections or the projections of analysts and investors could have an adverse effect on our business, disappoint analysts and investors, and cause the market price of our ordinary shares to decline. Our net sales performance has been outside of our guidance range in certain quarters, which negatively impacted the market price of our ordinary shares, and could do so in the future should our results fall below our guidance range and the expectations of analysts and investors.
We also set goals and objectives for, and make public statements regarding, the timing of certain accomplishments and milestones regarding our business or operating results, such as the timing of financial objectives, new products, regulatory actions, pending litigation, and anticipated distributor and sales representative transitions. The actual timing of these events can vary dramatically

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due to a number of factors, including the risk factors described in this report. As a result, there can be no assurance that we will succeed in achieving our projected goals and objectives in the time periods that we anticipate or announce publicly. The failure to achieve such projected goals and objectives in the time periods that we anticipate or announce publicly could have an adverse effect on our business, disappoint investors and analysts, and cause the market price of our ordinary shares to decline.
We are subject to additional risks in light of the material weakness that we have recently identified.
Effective internal controls are necessary for us to provide reliable and accurate financial reports and to effectively prevent fraud. The integration of combined or acquired businesses is likely to result in our systems and controls becoming increasingly complex and more difficult to manage. We devote significant resources and time to comply with the internal control over financial reporting requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. However, we cannot be certain that these measures will ensure that we design, implement, and maintain adequate control over our financial processes and reporting in the future, especially in the context of acquisitions of other businesses.
As further described in Item 9A of this report, in the course of completing our assessment of internal control over financial reporting as of December 25, 2016, management identified a material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting related to information technology general controls. A “material weakness” is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the annual or interim financial statements would not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. As a result, management has concluded that, because of this material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting, our internal control over financial reporting and our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of December 25, 2016. If we fail to complete the remediation of this material weakness in our internal control, or after having remediated such material weakness, thereafter fail to maintain the adequacy of our internal control over financial reporting or our disclosure controls and procedures, we could be subjected to regulatory scrutiny, civil or criminal penalties or shareholder litigation, the defense of any of which could cause the diversion of management’s attention and resources, we could incur significant legal and other expenses, and we could be required to pay damages to settle such actions if any such actions were not resolved in our favor. Continued or future failure to maintain adequate internal control over financial reporting could also result in financial statements that do not accurately reflect our financial condition or results of operations. There can be no assurance that we will not conclude in the future that this material weakness continues to exist or that we will not identify any significant deficiencies or other material weaknesses that will impair our ability to report our financial condition and results of operations accurately or on a timely basis. Inferior internal controls could also cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, which could have a negative effect on the trading price of our ordinary shares and our access to capital.
We may be unable to maintain competitive global cash management and a competitive effective corporate tax rate.
We cannot give any assurance as to our future effective tax rate because of, among other things, uncertainty regarding the tax policies of the jurisdictions where we operate and uncertainty regarding the level of net income that we will earn in those jurisdictions in the future. Our actual effective tax rate may vary from this expectation and that variance may be material. Additionally, the tax laws of the Netherlands and other jurisdictions in which we operate could change in the future, and such changes could cause a material change in our effective tax rate.
Our provision for income taxes will be based on certain estimates and assumptions made by management in consultation with our tax and other advisors. Our group income tax rate will be affected by, among other factors, the amount of net income earned in our various operating jurisdictions, the availability of benefits under tax treaties, the rates of taxes payable in respect of that income, and withholding taxes on dividends paid from one jurisdiction to the next. We will enter into many transactions and arrangements in the ordinary course of business in respect of which the tax treatment is not entirely certain. We will, therefore, make estimates and judgments based on our knowledge and understanding of applicable tax laws and tax treaties, and the application of those tax laws and tax treaties to our business, in determining our consolidated tax provision. For example, certain countries could seek to tax a greater share of income than will be provided for by us. The final outcome of any audits by taxation authorities may differ from the estimates and assumptions we may use in determining our consolidated tax provisions and accruals. This could result in a material adverse effect on our consolidated income tax provision, financial condition, and the net income for the period in which such determinations are made.
In particular, dividends, distributions, and other intra-group payments from our U.S. affiliates to certain of our non-U.S. subsidiaries may be subject to U.S. withholding tax at a rate of 30% unless the entity receiving such payments can demonstrate that it qualifies for reduction or elimination of the U.S. withholding tax under the income tax treaty (if any) between the United States and the jurisdiction in which the entity is organized or is a tax resident. In certain cases, treaty qualification may depend on whether at least 50% of our ultimate beneficial owners are qualified residents of the United States or the treaty jurisdiction within the meaning of the applicable treaty. There can be no assurance that we will satisfy this beneficial ownership requirement at the time when such dividends, distributions, or other payments are made. Moreover, the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) may challenge our determination that the beneficial ownership requirement is satisfied. If we do not satisfy the beneficial ownership requirement, such dividends, distributions, or other payments may be subject to 30% U.S. withholding tax.

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We may face potential limitations on the utilization of our U.S. tax attributes.
Following the acquisition of a U.S. corporation by a non-U.S. corporation, Section 7874 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (Code) can limit the ability of the acquired U.S. corporation and its U.S. affiliates to utilize U.S. tax attributes such as net operating losses and certain tax credits to offset U.S. taxable income resulting from certain transactions. Based on the limited guidance available, we currently expect that this limitation likely will not apply to us and as a result, our U.S. affiliates likely will not be limited by Section 7874 of the Code in their ability to utilize their U.S. tax attributes to offset their U.S. taxable income, if any, resulting from certain specified taxable transactions. However, no assurances can be given in this regard. If, however, Section 7874 of the Code were to apply to the Wright/Tornier merger and if our U.S. affiliates engage in transactions that would generate U.S. taxable income subject to this limitation in the future, it could take us longer to use our net operating losses and tax credits and, thus, we could pay U.S. federal income tax sooner than we otherwise would have. Additionally, if the limitation were to apply and if we do not generate taxable income consistent with our expectations, it is possible that the limitation under Section 7874 on the utilization of U.S. tax attributes could prevent our U.S. affiliates from fully utilizing their U.S. tax attributes prior to their expiration.
Future changes to U.S. tax laws could materially affect us, including our status as a non-U.S. corporation.
Under current U.S. federal income tax law, a corporation generally will be considered to be resident for U.S. federal income tax purposes in its place of organization or incorporation. Accordingly, under the generally applicable U.S. federal income tax rules, we, as a Netherlands incorporated entity, would be classified as a non-U.S. corporation (and, therefore, not a U.S. tax resident). Section 7874 of Code, however, contains specific rules (more fully discussed below) that can cause a non-U.S. corporation to be treated as a U.S. corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes. These rules are complex and there is little or no guidance as to their application.
We currently expect we should continue to be treated as a foreign corporation for U.S. federal tax purposes, however, it is possible that the IRS could disagree with that position and assert that Section 7874 applies to treat us as a U.S. corporation. In addition, new statutory or regulatory provisions under Section 7874 or otherwise could be enacted or promulgated that adversely affect our status as a foreign corporation for U.S. federal tax purposes, and any such provisions could have retroactive application. If we were to be treated as a U.S. corporation for federal tax purposes, we would be subject to U.S. corporate income tax on our worldwide income, and the income of our foreign subsidiaries would be subject to U.S. tax when repatriated or when deemed recognized under the U.S. tax rules for controlled foreign subsidiaries. In such a case, we would be subject to substantially greater U.S. tax liability than currently contemplated. Moreover, in such a case, a non-U.S. shareholder of our company would be subject to U.S. withholding tax on the gross amount of any dividends paid by us to such shareholder.
Any such U.S. corporate income or withholding tax could be imposed in addition to, rather than in lieu of, any Dutch corporate income tax or withholding tax that may apply.
Our tax position may be adversely affected by changes in tax law relating to multinational corporations, or by increased scrutiny by tax authorities.
Recent legislative proposals have aimed to expand the scope of U.S. corporate tax residence, limit the ability of foreign-owned corporations to deduct interest expense, and make other changes in the taxation of multinational corporations.
Additionally, the U.S. Congress, government agencies in jurisdictions where we and our affiliates do business, and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development have focused on issues related to the taxation of multinational corporations. One example is in the area of “base erosion and profit shifting,” where payments are made between affiliates from a jurisdiction with high tax rates to a jurisdiction with lower tax rates. As a result, the tax laws in the United States, the Netherlands and other countries in which we and our affiliates do business could change on a prospective or retroactive basis, and any such changes could impact the expected tax treatment for us and adversely affect our financial results.
Moreover, U.S. and non-U.S. tax authorities may carefully scrutinize companies involved or recently involved in cross-border business combinations, such as us, which may lead such authorities to assert that we owe additional taxes.
Our exposure to several tax jurisdictions may have an adverse effect on us and this may increase the aggregate tax burden on us and our shareholders.
We are subject to a large number of different tax laws and regulations in the various jurisdictions in which we operate. These laws and regulations are often complex and are subject to varying interpretations. The combined effect of the application of tax laws, including the application or disapplication of tax treaties of one or more of these jurisdictions and their interpretation by the relevant tax authorities could, under certain circumstances, produce contradictory results. We often rely on generally available interpretations of tax laws and regulations to determine the existence, scope, and level of our liability to tax in the jurisdictions in which we operate. In addition, we take positions in the course of our business with respect to various tax matters, including the compliance with the arm’s length principles in respect of transactions with related parties, the tax deductibility of interest and other costs, and the amount of depreciation or write-down of our assets that we can recognize for tax purposes. There is no

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assurance that the tax authorities in the relevant jurisdictions will agree with such interpretation of these laws and regulations or with the positions taken by us. If such tax positions are challenged by relevant tax authorities, the imposition of additional taxes could increase our effective tax rate and cost of operations.
Furthermore, because we are incorporated under Dutch law, we are treated for Dutch corporate income tax purposes as a resident of the Netherlands. Based on our management structure and the current tax laws of the United States and the Netherlands, as well as applicable income tax treaties and current interpretations thereof, we expect to remain a tax resident solely of the Netherlands. If we were to be treated as a tax resident of a jurisdiction other than or in addition to the Netherlands, we could be subject to corporate income tax in that other jurisdiction, and could be required to withhold tax on any dividends paid by us to our shareholders under the applicable laws of that jurisdiction.
Risks Relating to Our Ordinary Shares and Jurisdiction of Incorporation
The trading volume and prices of our ordinary shares have been and may continue to be volatile, which could result in substantial losses to our shareholders.
The trading volume and prices of our ordinary shares have been and may continue to be volatile and could fluctuate widely due to factors beyond our control. During 2016, the sale price of our ordinary shares ranged from $15.02 to $25.50. Such volatility may be the result of broad market and industry factors. In addition to market and industry factors, the price and trading volume for our ordinary shares may be highly volatile for factors specific to our own operations, including the following:
variations in our net sales, earnings, and cash flow, and in particular variations that deviate from our projected financial information;
announcements of new investments, acquisitions, strategic partnerships, or joint ventures;
announcements of new products by us or our competitors;
announcements of divestitures or discontinuance of products or assets;
changes in financial estimates by securities analysts;
additions or departures of key personnel;
sales of our equity securities by our significant shareholders or management or sales of additional equity securities by our company;
pending and potential litigation or regulatory investigations; and
fluctuations in market prices for our products.
Any of these factors may result in large and sudden changes in the volume and price at which our ordinary shares trade. Shareholders of a public company sometimes bring securities class action suits against the company following periods of instability in the market price of that company’s securities. If we were involved in a class action suit, it could divert a significant amount of our management’s attention and other resources from our business and operations, which could harm our operating results and require us to incur significant expenses to defend the suit. Any such class action suit, whether or not successful, could harm our reputation and restrict our ability to raise capital in the future. In addition, if a claim is successfully made against us, we may be required to pay significant damages, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and operating results.
If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or reports about our business, or if they adversely change their recommendations regarding our ordinary shares, the market price for our ordinary shares and trading volume could decline.
The trading market for our ordinary shares is influenced by research or reports that industry or securities analysts publish about us or our business. If one or more analysts who cover us downgrade our ordinary shares, the market price for our ordinary shares likely would decline. If one or more of these analysts cease coverage of us or fail to regularly publish reports on us, we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which, in turn, could cause the market price or trading volume for our ordinary shares to decline.
The sale or availability for sale of substantial amounts of our ordinary shares could adversely affect their market price.
Sales of substantial amounts of our ordinary shares in the public market, or the perception that these sales could occur, could adversely affect the market price of our ordinary shares and could materially impair our ability to raise capital through equity offerings in the future. We cannot predict what effect, if any, market sales of securities held by our significant shareholders or any other shareholder or the availability of these securities for future sale will have on the market price of our ordinary shares.
Rights of a holder of ordinary shares are governed by Dutch law and differ from the rights of shareholders under U.S. law.
We are a Dutch public company with limited liability (naamloze vennootschap). Our corporate affairs and the rights of holders of our ordinary shares are governed by Dutch law and our articles of association. The rights of our shareholders and the responsibilities of members of our board of directors may be different from those in companies governed by the laws of U.S.

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jurisdictions. For example, Dutch law does not provide for a shareholder derivative action. In addition, in the performance of its duties, our board of directors is required by Dutch law to act in the interest of our company and our affiliated business, and to consider the interests of our company, our shareholders, our employees, and other stakeholders, in all cases with reasonableness and fairness. It is possible that some of these parties will have interests that are different from, or in addition to, interests of our shareholders.
U.S. investors may not be able to enforce judgments obtained in U.S. courts in civil and commercial matters against us or members of our board of directors or officers.
We are organized under the laws of the Netherlands, and, as such, the rights of holders of our ordinary shares and the civil liability of our directors are governed by the laws of the Netherlands and our articles of association. The rights of shareholders under the laws of the Netherlands may differ from the rights of shareholders of companies incorporated in other jurisdictions. A substantial portion of our assets are located outside of the United States. As a result, it may be difficult for investors to effect service of process within the United States on us, or to enforce outside the United States any judgments obtained against us in U.S. courts in any action, including actions predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the U.S. federal securities laws. In addition, it may be difficult for investors to enforce rights predicated upon the U.S. federal securities laws in original actions brought in courts in jurisdictions located outside the United States (including the Netherlands) or enforce claims for punitive damages.
The United States and the Netherlands currently do not have a treaty providing for the reciprocal recognition and enforcement of judgments in civil and commercial matters (other than arbitral awards). A final judgment for the payment of money rendered by any federal or state court in the United States which is enforceable in the United States, whether or not predicated solely upon U.S. federal securities laws, would not automatically be recognized or enforceable in the Netherlands. In order to obtain a judgment which is enforceable in the Netherlands, the party in whose favor a final and conclusive judgment of the U.S. court has been rendered will be required to file its claim with a court of competent jurisdiction in the Netherlands. Such party may submit to a Dutch court the final judgment rendered by the U.S. court. If and to the extent that the Dutch court finds that the jurisdiction of the U.S. court has been based on grounds which are internationally acceptable and that proper legal procedures have been observed, the Dutch court will generally tend to give binding effect to the judgment of the court of the United States without substantive re-examination or re-litigation on the merits of the subject matter, unless the judgment contravenes principles of public policy of the Netherlands.
There can be no assurance that U.S. investors will be able to enforce against us or members of our board of directors or officers who are residents of the Netherlands or countries other than the United States any judgments obtained in U.S. courts in civil and commercial matters, including judgments under the U.S. federal securities laws.
We do not anticipate paying dividends on our ordinary shares.
Our articles of association prescribe that profits or reserves appearing from our annual accounts adopted by the general meeting shall be at the disposal of the general meeting. We have power to make distributions to shareholders and other persons entitled to distributable profits only to the extent that our equity exceeds the sum of the paid and called-up portion of the ordinary share capital and the reserves that must be maintained in accordance with provisions of Dutch law or our articles of association. The profits must first be used to set up and maintain reserves required by law and must then be set off against certain financial losses. We may not make any distribution of profits on ordinary shares that we hold. The general meeting, whether or not upon the proposal of our board of directors, determines whether and how much of the remaining profit they will reserve and the manner and date of such distribution. All calculations to determine the amounts available for dividends will be based on our Dutch annual accounts, which may be different from our consolidated financial statements prepared in accordance with US GAAP. Beginning with our fiscal year 2015, our statutory accounts have been prepared and we expect will continue to be prepared under International Financial Reporting Standards and are deposited with the Trade Register in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. We have not previously declared or paid cash dividends and we have no plan to declare or pay any dividends in the near future on our ordinary shares. We currently intend to retain most, if not all, of our available funds and any future earnings to operate and expand our business.

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Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.
None.
Item 2. Properties.
Our global corporate headquarters are located in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
Our U.S. headquarters are located in Memphis, Tennessee, where we conduct our principal executive, research and development, sales and marketing, and administrative activities. We lease 121,000 square feet of office space with research and development facilities under a lease agreement that is renewable through 2034. Our upper extremities sales and marketing, U.S. distribution and customer service operations are located in a 54,000 square foot facility in Bloomington, Minnesota that we lease through 2022. Our U.S. manufacturing operations consist of a 100,000 square foot state of the art manufacturing facility in Arlington, Tennessee. We lease the manufacturing facility from the Industrial Development Board of the Town of Arlington. At this facility, we produce primarily orthopaedic implants and some related surgical instrumentation while utilizing lean manufacturing philosophies. We also lease a 31,000 square foot manufacturing and warehousing facility in Franklin, Tennessee and conduct research and development operations in an 11,000 square foot leased facility in Warsaw, Indiana.
Outside the United States, our primary manufacturing facilities are located in Montbonnot and Grenoble, France; and Macroom, Ireland. In the 92,000 square foot Montbonnot campus, we conduct manufacturing and manufacturing support activities, sales and marketing, research and development, quality and regulatory assurance, distribution and administrative functions. In our 73,000 square foot Macroom facility, we conduct manufacturing operations and manufacturing support, such as purchasing, engineering, and quality assurance functions. Our pyrocarbon manufacturing is performed at our 9,900 square foot facility in Grenoble, France. In addition, we maintain subsidiary sales offices and distribution warehouses in various countries, including France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Denmark, Switzerland, United Kingdom, Belgium, Japan, Canada, and Australia. We have an international research and development facility in Costa Rica.
We believe that our facilities are adequate and suitable for their use.
Below is a summary of our material facilities. All of our reportable segments use the facilities described below except as otherwise indicated:
City
 
State/Country
 
Owned or
Leased
 
Occupancy
Memphis
 
Tennessee,
United States
 
Leased
 
Offices/R&D
Arlington
 
Tennessee,
United States
 
Leased
 
U.S. Lower Extremities & Biologics
Manufacturing/Warehouse/Distribution
Bloomington
 
Minnesota,
United States
 
Leased
 
U.S. Upper Extremities
Offices/Warehouse/Distribution
Warsaw
 
Indiana,
United States
 
Leased
 
Offices/R&D
Franklin
 
Tennessee,
United States
 
Leased
 
U.S. Lower Extremities & Biologics
Offices/Manufacturing/Warehouse
Montbonnot
 
France
 
Leased
 
International Extremities & Biologics;
U.S. Upper Extremities
Warehouse/Distribution/Offices/R&D
Montbonnot
 
France
 
Owned 51%
 
International Extremities & Biologics;
U.S. Upper Extremities
Manufacturing/Offices
Grenoble
 
France
 
Leased
 
International Extremities & Biologics
Manufacturing/Offices/R&D
Macroom
 
Ireland
 
Leased
 
International Extremities & Biologics Manufacturing/Offices
Item 3. Legal Proceedings.
From time to time, we or our subsidiaries are subject to various pending or threatened legal actions and proceedings, including those that arise in the ordinary course of our business and some of which involve claims for damages that are substantial in amount. These actions and proceedings may relate to, among other things, product liability, intellectual property, distributor, commercial, and other matters. These actions and proceedings could result in losses, including damages, fines, or penalties, any of which could be substantial, as well as criminal charges. Although such matters are inherently unpredictable, and negative outcomes or verdicts

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can occur, we believe we have significant defenses in all of them, are vigorously defending all of them, and do not believe any of them will have a material adverse effect on our financial position. However, we could incur judgments, pay settlements, or revise our expectations regarding the outcome of any matter. Such developments, if any, could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations in the period in which applicable amounts are accrued, or on our cash flows in the period in which amounts are paid.
The actions and proceedings described in this section relate primarily to Wright Medical Technology, Inc. (WMT), an indirect subsidiary of Wright Medical Group N.V., and are not necessarily applicable to Wright Medical Group N.V. or other affiliated entities. Maintaining separate legal entities within our corporate structure is intended to ring-fence liabilities.  We believe our ring-fenced structure should preclude corporate veil-piercing efforts against entities whose assets are not associated with particular claims.
Governmental Inquiries
On August 3, 2012, we received a subpoena from the United States Attorney's Office for the Western District of Tennessee requesting records and documentation relating to our PROFEMUR® series of hip replacement devices. The subpoena covers the period from January 1, 2000 to August 2, 2012. We continue to cooperate with the investigation.
Patent Litigation
On June 11, 2013, Anglefix, LLC filed suit in the United States District Court for the Western District of Tennessee, alleging that our ORTHOLOC® products infringe Anglefix’s asserted patent. The lawsuit seeks monetary damages, costs and attorneys' fees. On April 14, 2014, we filed a request for Inter Partes Review (IPR) with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. In October 2014, the Court stayed the case pending outcome of the IPR. On June 30, 2015, the Patent Office Board entered judgment in our favor as to all patent claims at issue in the IPR. Following the conclusion of the IPR, the District Court lifted the stay, and we have been continuing with our defense as to remaining patent claims asserted by Anglefix. On June 27, 2016, the Court granted in part our motion for summary judgment on Anglefix’s lack of standing and gave Anglefix 30 days to join the University of North Carolina (UNC) as a co-plaintiff in the lawsuit. On July 25, 2016, Anglefix filed a motion asking the Court to accept a waiver of claims by UNC as a substitute for joining UNC as a co-plaintiff in the lawsuit. The Court denied Anglefix’s motion, but granted leave for additional time to properly join UNC as co-plaintiff. Anglefix moved to add UNC as co-plaintiff on September 15, 2016. We opposed the motion and, on November 15, 2016, the Court allowed the motion, and subsequently directed Anglefix and UNC to file an amended complaint by January 18, 2017. We have filed motions for summary judgment of non-infringement and invalidity of the remaining patent claims asserted by Anglefix and a motion to exclude testimony by Anglefix’s technical expert. Anglefix has filed a motion for summary judgment of infringement of certain of the remaining asserted patent claims. The Court heard oral argument on those motions on January 31, 2017.
On September 23, 2014, Spineology filed a patent infringement lawsuit, Case No. 0:14-cv-03767, in the United States District Court in Minnesota, alleging that our X-REAM® bone reamer infringes U.S. Patent No. RE42,757 entitled “EXPANDABLE REAMER.”  The lawsuit seeks injunctive relief, monetary damages, costs and attorneys' fees. In January 2015, on the deadline for service of its complaint, Spineology dismissed its complaint without prejudice and filed a new, identical complaint. We filed an answer to the new complaint with the Court on April 27, 2015. The Court conducted a Markman hearing on March 23, 2016. Mediation was held on August 11, 2016, but no agreement could be reached. The Court issued a Markman decision on August 30, 2016, in which it found all asserted product claims invalid as indefinite under applicable patent laws and construed several additional claim terms. The parties have completed fact and expert discovery with respect to the remaining asserted method claims. We have filed a motion for summary judgment of non-infringement of the remaining asserted patent claims and motions to exclude testimony from Spineology’s technical and damages experts. Spineology has filed a motion for summary judgment of infringement. The Court will hear oral argument on those motions on February 28, 2017.
On September 13, 2016, we filed a civil action, Case No. 2:16-cv-02737-JPM, against Spineology in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee alleging breach of contract, breach of implied warranty against infringement, and seeking a judicial declaration of indemnification from Spineology for patent infringement claims brought against us stemming from our sale and/or use of certain expandable reamers purchased from Spineology. Spineology filed a motion to dismiss on October 17, 2016, but withdrew the motion on November 28, 2016. On December 7, 2016, Spineology filed an answer to our complaint and counterclaims, including counterclaims relating to a 2004 non-disclosure agreement between Spineology and WMT. On December 28, 2016, we filed a motion to dismiss the counterclaims relating to that 2004 agreement. On January 4, 2017, Spineology filed a motion for summary judgment on certain claims set forth in our complaint. We intend to oppose this motion.
On March 1, 2016, Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation (MTF) filed suit against Solana and WMT in the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey alleging that the TenFUSE PIP product infringes U.S. Patent No. 6,432,436 entitled “Partially Demineralized Cortical Bone Constructs.” The lawsuit seeks monetary damages, costs and attorneys' fees. On May 25, 2016, we agreed to waive service of MTF’s complaint. Following a series of court-ordered extensions of time, we filed our answer to MTF’s complaint and counterclaims on December 5, 2016. We have reached a settlement in principle with MTF for an immaterial amount, which is in the process of being documented.

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Subject to the provisions of the asset purchase agreement with MicroPort for the sale of the OrthoRecon business, we, as between us and MicroPort, would continue to be responsible for defense of pre-existing patent infringement cases relating to the OrthoRecon business, and for resulting liabilities, if any. All such pre-existing cases have been resolved.
Product Liability
We have been named as a defendant, in some cases with multiple other defendants, in lawsuits in which it is alleged that as yet unspecified defects in the design, manufacture, or labeling of certain metal-on-metal hip replacement products rendered the products defective. The lawsuits generally employ similar allegations that use of the products resulted in excessive metal ions and particulate in the patients into whom the devices were implanted, in most cases resulting in revision surgery (collectively, the CONSERVE® Claims) and generally seek monetary damages. We anticipate that additional lawsuits relating to metal-on-metal hip replacement products may be brought.
Because of the similar nature of the allegations made by several plaintiffs whose cases were pending in federal courts, upon motion of one plaintiff, Danny L. James, Sr., the United States Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation on February 8, 2012 transferred certain actions pending in the federal court system related to metal-on-metal hip replacement products to the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia, for consolidated pre-trial management of the cases before a single United States District Court Judge (the MDL). The consolidated matter is known as In re: Wright Medical Technology, Inc. Conserve Hip Implant Products Liability Litigation.
Certain plaintiffs have elected to file their lawsuits in state courts in California. In doing so, most of those plaintiffs have named a surgeon involved in the design of the allegedly defective products as a defendant in the actions, along with his personal corporation. Pursuant to contractual obligations, we have agreed to indemnify and defend the surgeon in those actions. Similar to the MDL proceeding in federal court, because the lawsuits generally employ similar allegations, certain of those pending lawsuits in California were consolidated for pre-trial handling on May 14, 2012 pursuant to procedures of California State Judicial Counsel Coordinated Proceedings (the JCCP). The consolidated matter is known as In re: Wright Hip Systems Cases, Judicial Counsel Coordination Proceeding No. 4710.
Every metal-on-metal hip case involves fundamental issues of law, science and medicine that often are uncertain, that continue to evolve, and which present contested facts and issues that can differ significantly from case to case. Such contested facts and issues include medical causation, individual patient characteristics, surgery specific factors, statutes of limitation, and the existence of actual, provable injury.
The first bellwether trial in the MDL commenced on November 9, 2015 in Atlanta, Georgia. On November 24, 2015, the jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff and awarded the plaintiff $1 million in compensatory damages and $10 million in punitive damages. We believe there were significant trial irregularities and vigorously contested the trial result. On December 28, 2015, we filed a post-trial motion for judgment as a matter of law or, in the alternative, for a new trial or a reduction of damages awarded. On April 5, 2016, the trial judge issued an order reducing the punitive damage award from $10 million to $1.1 million, but otherwise denied our motion. On May 4, 2016, we filed a notice of appeal with the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit. The United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit heard oral arguments on January 26, 2017 and we are awaiting a decision of the Court.
The first bellwether trial in the JCCP, which was scheduled to commence on October 31, 2016, and subsequently rescheduled to January 9, 2017, was settled for an immaterial amount.
The first state court metal-on-metal hip trial not part of the MDL or JCCP, Donald Deline v. Wright Medical Technology, Inc., et al, commenced on October 24, 2016 in the Circuit Court of St. Louis County, Missouri. On November 3, 2016, the jury returned a verdict in our favor. The plaintiff has appealed.
As of December 25, 2016, there were approximately 1,200 lawsuits pending in the MDL and JCCP, and an additional 30 cases pending in various state courts. As of that date, we have also entered into approximately 950 so called "tolling agreements" with potential claimants who have not yet filed suit. Based on presently available information, we believe at least 350 of these lawsuits allege claims involving bilateral implants. As of December 25, 2016, there were also approximately 50 non-U.S. lawsuits pending. We believe we have data that supports the efficacy and safety of our metal-on-metal hip products. While continuing to dispute liability, we have participated in court supervised non-binding mediation in the MDL and expect to begin similar mediation in the JCCP.
On November 1, 2016, WMT entered into a Master Settlement Agreement (MSA) with Court-appointed attorneys representing plaintiffs in the MDL and JCCP. Under the terms of the MSA, the parties agreed to settle 1,292 specifically identified CONSERVE, DYNASTY and LINEAGE claims that meet the eligibility requirements of the MSA and are either pending in the MDL or JCCP, or subject to court-approved tolling agreements in the MDL or JCCP, for a settlement amount of $240 million.

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We have received claims for personal injury against us associated with fractures of our PROFEMUR® long titanium modular neck product (Titanium Modular Neck Claims). As of December 25, 2016, there were 26 pending U.S. lawsuits and 48 pending non-U.S. lawsuits alleging such claims. These lawsuits generally seek monetary damages.
We are aware that MicroPort has recalled certain sizes of its cobalt chrome modular neck products as a result of alleged fractures. As of December 25, 2016, there were three pending U.S. lawsuits and five pending non-U.S. lawsuits against us alleging personal injury resulting from the fracture of a cobalt chrome modular neck. These lawsuits generally seek monetary damages.
In June 2015, a jury returned a $4.4 million verdict against us in a case involving a fractured hip implant stem sold prior to the MicroPort closing. This was a one-of-a-kind case unrelated to the modular neck fracture cases we have previously reported. There are no other cases pending related to this component, nor are we aware of other instances where this component has fractured. The case, Alan Warner et al. vs. Wright Medical Technology, Inc. et al., case no. BC 475958, which was filed on December 27, 2011, was tried in the Superior Court of the State of California for the County of Los Angeles, Central District. In September 2015, the trial judge reduced the jury verdict to $1.025 million and indicated that if the plaintiff did not accept the reduced award he would schedule a new trial solely on the issue of damages. The plaintiff elected not to accept the reduced damage award, and both parties have appealed. The Court has not set a date for a new trial on the issue of damages and we do not expect it will do so until the appeals are adjudicated.
Insurance Litigation
On June 10, 2014, St. Paul Surplus Lines Insurance Company (Travelers), which was an excess carrier in our coverage towers across multiple policy years, filed a declaratory judgment action in the Chancery Court of Shelby County, Tennessee naming us and certain of our other insurance carriers as defendants and asking the Court to rule on the rights and responsibilities of the parties with regard to the CONSERVE® Claims. This case is known as St. Paul Surplus Lines Insurance Company v. Wright Medical Group, Inc., et al. Among other things, Travelers appeared to dispute our contention that the CONSERVE® Claims arise out of more than a single occurrence thereby triggering multiple policy periods of coverage.  Travelers further sought a determination as to the applicable policy period triggered by the alleged single occurrence.  On June 17, 2014, we filed a separate lawsuit in the Superior Court of the State of California, County of San Francisco for declaratory judgment against certain carriers and breach of contract against the primary carrier, and moved to dismiss or stay the Tennessee action on a number of grounds, including that California is the most appropriate jurisdiction. This case is known as Wright Medical Group, Inc. et al. v. Federal Insurance Company, et al. On September 9, 2014, the California Court granted Travelers' motion to stay our California action. On April 29, 2016, we filed a dispositive motion seeking partial judgment in our favor in the Tennessee action. That motion is pending, and will be decided after the parties complete discovery regarding certain issues relating to the pending motion. On June 10, 2016, Travelers withdrew its motion for summary judgment in the Tennessee action. One of the other insurance companies in the Tennessee action has stated that it will re-file a similar motion in the future.
On October 28, 2016, WMT and Wright Medical Group, Inc. (WMG) entered into a Settlement Agreement, Indemnity and Hold Harmless Agreement and Policy Buyback Agreement (Insurance Settlement Agreement) with a subgroup of three insurance carriers, namely Columbia Casualty Company (Columbia), Travelers and AXIS Surplus Lines Insurance Company (collectively, the Three Settling Insurers), pursuant to which the Three Settling Insurers agreed to pay WMT an aggregate of $60 million (in addition to $10 million previously paid by Columbia) in a lump sum on or before the 30th business day after execution of the Insurance Settlement Agreement. This amount is in full satisfaction of all potential liability of the Three Settling Insurers relating to metal-on-metal hip and similar metal ion release claims, including but not limited to all claims in the MDL and the JCCP, and all claims asserted by WMT against the Three Settling Insurers in the Tennessee action described above. The amount due under the Insurance Settlement Agreement was paid in the fourth quarter of 2016.
On December 13, 2016, we filed a motion in the Tennessee action described above to include allegations of bad faith against the primary insurance carrier. The motion was subsequently amended on February 8, 2017 to add similar bad faith claims against the remaining excess carriers. That motion is pending.
On September 29, 2015, Markel International Insurance Company Ltd., as successor to Max Insurance Europe Ltd. (Max Insurance), which is the third insurance carrier in our coverage towers across multiple policy years, asserted that the terms and conditions identified in its reservation of rights will preclude coverage for the Titanium Modular Neck Claims. We strongly dispute the carrier's position, and in accordance with the dispute resolution provisions of the policy, on January 18, 2016, we filed a Notice of Arbitration against Max Insurance in London, England pursuant to the provisions of the Arbitration Act of 1996.  We are seeking reimbursement, up to the policy limits of $25 million, of costs incurred in the defense and settlement of the Titanium Modular Neck Claims.
Wright/Tornier Merger Related Litigation
On November 26, 2014, a class action complaint was filed in the Circuit Court of Tennessee, for the Thirtieth Judicial District, at Memphis (Tennessee Circuit Court), by a purported shareholder of WMG under the caption City of Warwick Retirement System v. Gary D. Blackford et al., CT-005015-14. An amended complaint in the action was filed on January 5, 2015. The amended complaint names as defendants WMG, Tornier, Trooper Holdings Inc. (Holdco), Trooper Merger Sub Inc. (Merger Sub), and the

43


members of the WMG board of directors. The amended complaint asserts various causes of action, including, among other things, that the members of the WMG board of directors breached their fiduciary duties owed to the WMG shareholders in connection with entering into the merger agreement, approving the merger, and causing WMG to issue a preliminary Form S-4 that allegedly fails to disclose material information about the merger. The amended complaint further alleges that Tornier, Holdco, and Merger Sub aided and abetted the alleged breaches of fiduciary duties by the WMG board of directors. The plaintiff is seeking, among other things, injunctive relief enjoining or rescinding the merger and an award of attorneys’ fees and costs.
On December 2, 2014, a separate class action complaint was filed in the Tennessee Chancery Court by a purported shareholder of WMG under the caption Paulette Jacques v. Wright Medical Group, Inc., et al., CH-14-1736-1. An amended complaint in the action was filed on January 27, 2015. The amended complaint names as defendants WMG, Tornier, Holdco, Merger Sub, Warburg Pincus LLC and the members of the WMG board of directors. The amended complaint asserts various causes of action, including, among other things, that the members of the WMG board of directors breached their fiduciary duties owed to the WMG shareholders in connection with entering into the merger agreement, approving the merger, and causing WMG to issue a preliminary Form S-4 that allegedly fails to disclose material information about the merger. The amended complaint further alleges that WMG, Tornier, Warburg Pincus LLC, Holdco and Merger Sub aided and abetted the alleged breaches of fiduciary duties by the WMG board of directors. The plaintiff is seeking, among other things, injunctive relief enjoining or rescinding the merger and an award of attorneys’ fees and costs.
In an order dated March 31, 2015, the Tennessee Circuit Court transferred City of Warwick Retirement System v. Gary D. Blackford et al., CT-005015-14 to the Tennessee Chancery Court for consolidation with Paulette Jacques v. Wright Medical Group, Inc., et al., CH-14-1736-1 (Consolidated Tennessee Action). In an order dated April 9, 2015, the Tennessee Chancery Court stayed the Consolidated Tennessee Action; that stay expired upon completion of the Wright/Tornier merger. On September 19, 2016, the Tennessee Chancery Court entered an agreed order, dismissing the Jacques case without prejudice.
Other
In addition to those noted above, we are subject to various other legal proceedings, product liability claims, corporate governance, and other matters which arise in the ordinary course of business.
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.
Not applicable.

44


PART II

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Shareholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.
Market Information
Our ordinary shares are traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol "WMGI." Prior to the completion of the Wright/Tornier merger on October 1, 2015, legacy Tornier ordinary shares traded under the symbol "TRNX" while legacy Wright ordinary shares traded under the symbol "WMGI." Due to the "reverse acquisition" nature of the Wright/Tornier merger, historical information below reflects the high and low sales prices of legacy Tornier.
The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, the high and low per share sales prices for our ordinary shares as reported by the NASDAQ Global Select Market.
 
High
 
Low
Fiscal Year 2016
 
 
 
First Quarter
$
24.43

 
$
15.02

Second Quarter
$
20.75

 
$
15.52

Third Quarter
$
25.50

 
$
15.85

Fourth Quarter
$
25.15

 
$
20.50

Fiscal Year 2015
 
 
 
First Quarter
$
26.98

 
$
23.32

Second Quarter
$
27.06

 
$
24.45

Third Quarter
$
26.13

 
$
21.43

Fourth Quarter
$
23.86

 
$
18.03

Holders
As of February 17, 2017, there were 357 holders of record of our ordinary shares.
Dividends
We have not previously declared or paid cash dividends on our ordinary shares. We currently intend to retain all future earnings for the operation and expansion of our business. We do not anticipate declaring or paying cash dividends on our ordinary shares in the foreseeable future. Any payment of cash dividends on our ordinary shares will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend upon our results of operations, earnings, capital requirements, contractual restrictions, and other factors deemed relevant by our board of directors. Additionally, our ABL Credit Agreement restricts our ability to pay dividends.
Purchases of Equity Securities by the Company
We did not purchase any ordinary shares or other equity securities of our company during the fourth fiscal quarter ended December 25, 2016.
Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities
We did not issue any ordinary shares or other equity securities of our company that were not registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, during the fourth fiscal quarter ended December 25, 2016.
Comparison of Total Shareholder Returns
The graph below compares the cumulative total shareholder returns for legacy Tornier ordinary shares from the period from December 31, 2011 to October 1, 2015, the date of the Wright/Tornier merger, and our combined company ordinary shares from October 1, 2015 to December 25, 2016 (our fiscal year-end). The graph also reflects cumulative total shareholder returns from an index composed of U.S. companies whose stock is listed on the NASDAQ Global Select Market ( NASDAQ U.S. Composite Index) and an index consisting of NASDAQ-listed companies in the surgical, medical and dental instruments and supplies industry (NASDAQ Medical Equipment Subsector), as well as an index of companies with the SIC Code 384 - Surgical, Medical, and Dental Instruments Supplies (Surgical, Medical, and Dental Instruments Index). Total returns for the indices are weighted based on the market capitalization of the companies included therein. In addition, due to the "reverse acquisition" nature of the Wright/Tornier merger and the fact that the historical financial statements of legacy Wright have replaced the historical financial statements of legacy Tornier, the graph below also includes the cumulative total shareholder returns for WMG common stock from December 31, 2011 to October 1, 2015, the date of the Wright/Tornier merger.
The graph assumes that $100.00 was invested on December 31, 2011, in legacy Tornier/Wright Medical Group N.V. ordinary shares, legacy Wright common stock, the NASDAQ U.S. Composite Index, the NASDAQ Medical Equipment Subsector, and the

45


Surgical, Medical, and Dental Instruments Supplies Index, and that all dividends were reinvested. Total returns for the NASDAQ indices are weighted based on the market capitalization of the companies included therein.
Historical price performance of our ordinary shares is not indicative of future share price performance. We do not make or endorse any prediction as to future share price performance.
 
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
Legacy Tornier / Wright Medical Group N.V.
$
100.00

$
90.50

$
101.61

$
141.44

$
130.89

$
129.50

Legacy Wright
100.00

122.73

182.55

161.03

127.39


NASDAQ Stock Market (US Companies)
100.00

116.00

164.10

192.92

206.33

228.06

NASDAQ Medical Equipment Index
100.00

109.20

129.79

152.37

178.84

197.55

SIC Code 384 - Surgical, Medical, and Dental Instruments and Supplies
100.00

85.44

114.04

149.90

128.33

159.24

wmgigraph2016.jpg
Prepared by Zacks Investment Research, Inc. Used with permission. All rights reserved. Copyright 1980-2017


46


Item 6. Selected Financial Data.
The following tables set forth certain of our selected consolidated financial data as of the dates and for the years indicated. Due to the "reverse acquisition" nature of the Wright/Tornier merger, the historical financial statements of legacy Wright replaced the historical financial statements of legacy Tornier. Historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for any future period. These tables are presented in thousands, except per share data.
 
Fiscal year ended
 
December 25, 2016
 
December 27, 2015 8
 
December 31, 2014
 
December 31, 2013
 
December 31, 2012
Consolidated Statement of Operations:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net sales
$
690,362

 
$
405,326

 
$
298,027

 
$
242,330

 
$
214,105

Cost of sales 1
192,407

 
113,622

 
73,223

 
59,721

 
48,239

Gross profit
497,955

 
291,704

 
224,804

 
182,609

 
165,866

Operating expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Selling, general and administrative 1
541,558

 
424,377

 
289,620

 
230,785

 
150,296

Research and development 1
50,514

 
39,339

 
24,963

 
20,305

 
13,905

  Amortization of intangible assets
28,841

 
16,754

 
10,027

 
7,476

 
4,417

BioMimetic impairment charges

 

 

 
206,249

 

Gain on sale of intellectual property 2

 

 

 

 
(15,000
)
Restructuring charges 3

 

 

 

 
431

Total operating expenses
620,913

 
480,470

 
324,610

 
464,815

 
154,049

Operating (loss) income 4
(122,958
)
 
(188,766
)
 
(99,806
)
 
(282,206
)
 
11,817

Interest expense, net
58,530

 
41,358

 
17,398

 
16,040

 
10,113

Other (income) expense, net 5
(3,148
)
 
10,884

 
129,626

 
(67,843
)
 
5,089

Loss before income taxes
(178,340
)
 
(241,008
)
 
(246,830
)
 
(230,403
)
 
(3,385
)
(Benefit) provision for income taxes 6
(13,406
)
 
(3,652
)
 
(6,334
)
 
49,765

 
2

Net loss from continuing operations
$
(164,934
)
 
$
(237,356
)
 
$
(240,496
)
 
$
(280,168
)
 
$
(3,387
)
(Loss) income from discontinued operations,
net of tax 1
$
(267,439
)
 
$
(61,345
)
 
$
(19,187
)
 
$
6,223

 
$
8,671

Net (loss) income
$
(432,373
)
 
$
(298,701
)
 
$
(259,683
)
 
$
(273,945
)
 
$
5,284

Net loss from continuing operations per share basic and diluted 7:
$
(1.60
)
 
$
(3.66
)
 
$
(4.69
)
 
$
(5.82
)
 
$
(0.08
)
Weighted-average number of ordinary shares outstanding —
basic and diluted 7
102,968

 
64,808

 
51,293

 
48,103

 
39,967




47


 
December 25, 2016
 
December 27, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
 
December 31, 2013
 
December 31, 2012
Consolidated Balance Sheet Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
262,265

 
$
139,804

 
$
227,326

 
$
168,534

 
$
320,360

Restricted cash
150,000

 

 

 

 

Marketable securities

 

 
2,575

 
14,548

 
12,646

Working capital 9, 10
285,107

 
352,946

 
249,958

 
375,901

 
545,611

Total assets 9, 10, 11
2,290,586

 
2,073,494

 
885,068

 
990,090

 
937,014

Long-term liabilities 9, 11
1,129,204

 
811,530

 
419,204

 
411,711

 
337,184

Shareholders’ equity
686,864

 
1,055,026

 
278,803

 
459,714

 
523,441

 
Fiscal year ended
 
December 25, 2016
 
December 27, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
 
December 31, 2013
 
December 31, 2012
Other Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash flow provided by (used in) operating activities
$
37,824

 
$
(195,870
)
 
$
(116,002
)
 
$
(36,601
)
 
$
68,822

Cash flow provided by (used in) investing activities
(34,241
)
 
(15,970
)
 
145,630

 
(121,317
)
 
(1,048
)
Cash flow provided by (used in) financing activities
270,417

 
126,862

 
33,051

 
6,257

 
98,721

Depreciation8
55,830

 
28,390

 
18,582

 
26,296

 
38,275

Share-based compensation expense
14,416

 
24,964

 
11,487

 
15,368

 
10,974

Capital expenditures 12
50,099

 
43,666

 
48,603

 
37,530

 
19,323

______________________________________
1 
These line items include the following amounts of non-cash, share-based compensation expense for the periods indicated:
 
Fiscal year ended
 
December 25, 2016
 
December 27, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
 
December 31, 2013
 
December 31, 2012
Cost of sales
$
414

 
$
287

 
$
254

 
$
503

 
$
704

Selling, general and administrative
13,216

 
22,777

 
10,149

 
10,675

 
6,767

Research and development
786

 
1,900

 
1,084

 
780

 
368

Discontinued operations

 

 

 
3,410

 
3,135

2 
During the year ended December 31, 2012, we recorded income of $15 million related to a sale and license back transaction for intellectual property.
3 
During the year ended December 31, 2012, we recorded pre-tax charges associated with the cost improvement restructuring efforts totaling $0.4 million.
4 
During the year ended December 25, 2016, we recognized: (a) $32.3 million in costs for transaction and transition costs related to the Wright/Tornier merger; (b) $37.7 million of inventory step-up amortization; (c) $4.1 million of non-cash inventory provisions associated with a product rationalization initiative; (d) $1.8 million of costs related to a legal settlement; (e) $1.3 million of costs associated with executive management changes; and (f) $0.2 million costs associated with debt refinancing. During the year ended December 27, 2015, we recognized: (a) $82.2 million in costs for due diligence, transaction, and transition costs related to the Wright/Tornier merger; (b) $14.2 million of share-based compensation acceleration; and (c) $10.3 million of inventory step-up amortization. During the year ended December 31, 2014, we recognized: (a) $2.1 million in costs associated with distributor conversions and non-competes; (b) $14.1 million in costs for due diligence, transaction, and transition costs related to the Biotech, Solana, and OrthoPro acquisitions; (c) $11.9 million in charges related to the Wright/Tornier merger; (d) $5.9 million in transition costs related to the OrthoRecon divestiture; (e) $1.2 million in costs associated with management changes; and (f) $0.9 million in costs associated with a patent dispute settlement. During the year ended December 31, 2013, we recognized: (a) $3.7 million in costs associated with distributor conversions and non-competes; (b) $12.9 million in due diligence and transaction costs related to the BioMimetic and Biotech acquisitions; (c) $21.6 million in transaction costs for the OrthoRecon divestiture; and (d) $206.2 million in BioMimetic impairment charges.
5 
During the year ended December 25, 2016, we recognized: (a) a $8.7 million loss from mark-to-market adjustments on the Contingent Value Rights (CVRs) issued in connection with the BioMimetic acquisition; (b) $28.3 million gain for the mark-to-market adjustment of our derivative instruments; (c) a $12.3 million non-cash loss on extinguishment of debt to write-off unamortized debt discount and deferred financing fees associated with the partial settlement of 2017 and 2020 convertible

48


notes; (d) $36.6 million of non-cash interest expense related to the amortization of the debt discount on our 2017, 2020 and 2021 convertible notes; and (e) $0.5 million of charges due to the fair value adjustment to contingent consideration. During the year ended December 27, 2015, we recognized: (a) a $7.6 million gain from mark-to-market adjustments on the CVRs issued in connection with the BioMimetic acquisition and (b) $9.8 million gain for the mark-to-market adjustment of our derivative instruments. During the year ended December 31, 2014, we recognized: (a) approximately $125 million from mark-to-market adjustments on the CVRs issued in connection with the BioMimetic acquisition; (b) $2.0 million of charges for the mark-to-market adjustment of our derivative instruments; and (c) $1.8 million of charges due to the fair value adjustment to contingent consideration associated with our acquisition of WG Healthcare. During the year ended December 31, 2013, we recognized a $7.8 million gain related to the previously held investment in BioMimetic. During the year ended December 31, 2012, we recognized: (a) $2.7 million for the write-off of unamortized deferred financing fees associated with the termination of our senior credit facility; (b) the redemption of approximately $25 million of our 2014 convertible notes; and (c) a $1.1 million of charges for the mark-to-market adjustment of our derivative instruments. During the year ended December 31, 2011, we recognized $4.1 million for the write-off of pro-rata unamortized deferred financing fees and transaction costs associated with the tender offer for our convertible notes completed during 2011.
6 
During the year ended December 25, 2016, we recognized a $3.1 million interest and income tax benefit related to the settlement of an IRS audit. During the year ended December 31, 2013, we recognized a $119.6 million tax valuation allowance recorded against deferred tax assets in our U.S. jurisdiction due to recent operating losses.
7 
The 2014, 2013, and 2012 weighted-average shares outstanding and net loss per share amounts were converted in 2015 to meet post-merger valuations as described within Note 13. The 2015 weighted-average shares outstanding includes additional shares issued on October 1, 2015 as part of the Wright/Tornier merger as described in Note 13.
8 
The 2015 results were restated for the divestiture of our Large Joints business. (See Note 4).
9 
The prior year deferred tax balances were reclassified to account for early adoption of ASU 2015-17.
10 
The prior period amounts have been adjusted to reflect balances associated with our Large Joints business, as these amounts were classified as held for sale at December 27, 2015 (See Note 4).
11 
The prior period debt issuance costs were reclassified to account for adoptions of ASU 2015-03 and ASU 2015-15 (See Note 2).
12 
During the year ended December 31, 2014, our capital expenditures included $9.4 million related to the expansion of our manufacturing facility in Arlington, Tennessee.


49


Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
The following management's discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations describes the principal factors affecting the results of our operations, financial condition, and changes in financial condition, as well as our critical accounting estimates.
On October 1, 2015, we became Wright Medical Group N.V. following the merger of Wright Medical Group, Inc. with Tornier N.V. Because of the structure of the merger and the governance of the combined company immediately post-merger, the merger was accounted for as a "reverse acquisition" under US GAAP, and as such, legacy Wright was considered the acquiring entity for accounting purposes. Therefore, legacy Wright’s historical results of operations replaced legacy Tornier’s historical results of operations for all periods prior to the merger. More specifically, the accompanying consolidated financial statements for periods prior to the merger are those of legacy Wright and its subsidiaries, and for periods subsequent to the merger also include legacy Tornier and its subsidiaries.
During the first quarter of 2016, our management, including our chief executive officer, who is our chief operating decision maker, began managing our operations as four operating business segments: U.S. Lower Extremities and Biologics, U.S. Upper Extremities, International Extremities and Biologics, and Large Joints. We determined that each of these operating segments represented a reportable segment.
On October 21, 2016, pursuant to a binding offer letter dated as of July 8, 2016, we, Corin Orthopaedics Holdings Limited (Corin), and certain other entities related to us entered into a business sale agreement and simultaneously completed and closed the sale of our Large Joints business. The financial results of our Large Joints business, including costs associated with corporate employees and infrastructure transferred as a part of the sale, are reflected within discontinued operations for all periods presented, unless otherwise noted. Further, all assets and associated liabilities transferred to Corin were classified as assets and liabilities held for sale in our consolidated balance sheet as of December 27, 2015.
On January 9, 2014, legacy Wright completed the sale of its hip and knee (OrthoRecon) business to MicroPort Scientific Corporation (MicroPort). The financial results of the OrthoRecon business are also reflected within discontinued operations for all periods presented, unless otherwise noted.
References in this section to "we," "our" and "us" refer to Wright Medical Group N.V. and its subsidiaries after the Wright/Tornier merger and Wright Medical Group, Inc. and its subsidiaries before the merger. Beginning in 2015 as a result of the Wright/Tornier merger, our fiscal year-end is generally determined on a 52-week basis and runs from the Monday nearest to the 31st of December of a year, and ends on the Sunday nearest to the 31st of December of the following year. Every few years, it is necessary to add an extra week to the year making it a 53-week period. References in this report to a particular year generally refer to the applicable fiscal year. Accordingly, references to “2016” or “the year ended December 25, 2016” mean the fiscal year ended December 25, 2016.
Executive Overview
Company Description. We are a global medical device company focused on extremities and biologics products. We are committed to delivering innovative, value-added solutions improving quality of life for patients worldwide, and are a recognized leader of surgical solutions for the upper extremities (shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand), lower extremities (foot and ankle) and biologics markets, three of the fastest growing segments in orthopaedics.
Our global corporate headquarters are located in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. We also have significant operations located in Memphis, Tennessee (U.S. headquarters, research and development, sales and marketing administration, and administrative activities); Bloomington, Minnesota (upper extremities sales and marketing and warehousing operations); Arlington, Tennessee (manufacturing and warehousing operations); Franklin, Tennessee (manufacturing and warehousing operations); Montbonnot, France (manufacturing and warehousing operations); and Macroom, Ireland (manufacturing). In addition, we have local sales and distribution offices in Canada, Australia, Asia, Latin America, and throughout Europe.
We offer a broad product portfolio of approximately 180 extremities products and over 20 biologics products that are designed to provide solutions to our surgeon customers, with the goal of improving clinical outcomes and the “quality of life” for their patients. Our product portfolio consists of the following product categories:
Upper extremities, which include joint implants and bone fixation devices for the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hand;
Lower extremities, which include joint implants and bone fixation devices for the foot and ankle;
Biologics, which include products used to support treatment of damaged or diseased bone, tendons, and soft tissues or to stimulate bone growth; and
Sports medicine and other, which include products used across several anatomic sites to mechanically repair tissue-to-tissue or tissue-to-bone injuries and other ancillary products.

50


Our sales and distribution system in the United States currently consists of 68 geographic sales territories that are staffed by approximately 500 direct sales representatives and 24 independent sales agencies or distributors. These sales representatives and independent sales agencies and distributors are generally aligned to selling either our upper extremities products or lower extremities products, but, in some cases, certain agencies or direct sales representatives sell products from both our upper and lower extremities product portfolios in their territories. Internationally, we utilize several distribution approaches that are tailored to the needs and requirements of each individual market. Our international sales and distribution system currently consists of 15 direct sales offices and approximately 90 distributors that sell our products in over 50 countries, with principal markets outside the United States in Europe, Asia, Canada, Australia, and Latin America. Our U.S. sales accounted for 73.5% of total net sales in 2016.
Principal Products. We have focused our efforts into growing our position in the high-growth extremities and biologics markets. We believe a more active and aging patient population with higher expectations regarding “quality of life,” an increasing global awareness of extremities and biologics solutions, improved clinical outcomes as a result of the use of such products, and technological advances resulting in specific designs for such products that simplify procedures and address unmet needs for early interventions, and the growing need for revisions and revision related solutions will drive the market for extremities and biologics products.
The extremities market is one of the fastest growing market segments within orthopaedics, with annual growth rates of 7-10%. We believe major trends in the extremities market include procedure-specific and anatomy-specific devices, locking plates, and an increase in total ankle replacement or arthroplasty procedures. Upper extremities reconstruction involves implanting devices to replace, reconstruct, or fixate injured or diseased joints and bones in the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hand. It is estimated that approximately 60% of the upper extremities market is in total shoulder replacement or arthroplasty implants. We believe major trends in the upper extremities market include next-generation joint arthroplasty systems, bone preserving solutions, virtual planning systems, and revision of failed previous shoulder replacements in older patients. Lower extremities reconstruction involves implanting devices to replace, reconstruct, or fixate injured or diseased joints and bones in the foot and ankle. A large segment of the lower extremities market is comprised of plating and screw systems for reconstructing and fusing joints or repairing bones after traumatic injury. We believe major trends in the lower extremities market include the use of external fixation devices in diabetic patients, total ankle arthroplasty, advanced tissue fixation devices, and biologics. New technologies have been introduced into the lower extremities market in recent years, including next-generation total ankle replacement systems. We believe that market adoption of total ankle replacement, which currently represents approximately 8% of the U.S. foot and ankle device market, will result in significant future growth in the lower extremities market.
Our principal lower extremities products include the INBONE® and INFINITY® Total Ankle Replacement Systems, both of which can be used with our PROPHECY® Preoperative Navigation Guides, which combine computer imaging with a patient’s CT scan, and are designed to provide alignment accuracy while reducing surgical steps. Our lower extremities products also include the CLAW® II Polyaxial Compression Plating System, the ORTHOLOC® 3Di Reconstruction Plating System, the PhaLinx® System used for hammertoe indications, PRO-TOE® VO Hammertoe System, the DARCO® family of locked plating systems, the VALOR® ankle fusion nail system, and the Swanson line of toe joint replacement products. We expect to commercially launch our most recent total ankle replacement product, the INVISION™ Total Ankle Revision System, in the third quarter of 2017.
Our principal upper extremities products include the AEQUALIS ASCEND® and SIMPLICITI® total shoulder replacement systems, the AEQUALIS® REVERSED II™ reversed shoulder system, and the AEQUALIS ASCEND® FLEX™ convertible shoulder system. SIMPLICITI® is the first minimally invasive, ultra-short stem total shoulder available in the United States. We believe SIMPLICITI® allows us to expand the market to include younger patients that historically have deferred these procedures.  In December 2016, we received FDA 510(k) clearance of our AEQUALIS® PERFORM™ REVERSED Glenoid System, our first reverse augmented glenoid. Other principal upper extremities products include the EVOLVE® radial head prosthesis for elbow fractures, the EVOLVE® Elbow Plating System, RAYHACK® osteotomy system, and the MICRONAIL® intramedullary wrist fracture repair system.
Our biologic products use both biological tissue-based and synthetic materials to allow the body to regenerate damaged or diseased bone and to repair damaged or diseased soft tissue. The newest addition to our biologics product portfolio is AUGMENT® Bone Graft, which is based on recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor (rhPDGF-BB), a synthetic copy of one of the body’s principal healing agents.  FDA approval of AUGMENT® Bone Graft in the United States for ankle and/or hindfoot fusion indications occurred during the third quarter of 2015.  Prior to FDA approval, this product was available for sale in Canada for foot and ankle fusion indications and in Australia and New Zealand for hindfoot and ankle fusion indications.  The AUGMENT® Bone Graft product line was acquired from BioMimetic Therapeutics, Inc. (BioMimetic) in March 2013. Our other principal biologics products include the GRAFTJACKET® line of soft tissue repair and containment membranes, the ALLOMATRIX® line of injectable tissue-based bone graft substitutes, the PRO-DENSE® Injectable Graft, the OSTEOSET® synthetic bone graft substitute, and the PRO-STIM® Injectable Inductive Graft.
Supplemental Non-GAAP Pro Forma Information. Due to the significance of the legacy Tornier business that is not included in our results of operations for the majority of the year ended December 27, 2015 and to supplement our consolidated financial statements prepared in accordance with US GAAP, we use certain non-GAAP financial measures, including combined pro forma

51


net sales. Our non-GAAP financial measures are not in accordance with, or an alternative for, GAAP measures and may be different from non-GAAP financial measures used by other companies. In addition, our non-GAAP financial measures are not based on any comprehensive or standard set of accounting rules or principles. Accordingly, the calculation of our non-GAAP financial measures may differ from the definitions of other companies using the same or similar names limiting, to some extent, the usefulness of such measures for comparison purposes. We believe that non-GAAP financial measures have limitations in that they do not reflect all of the amounts associated with our results of operations as determined in accordance with GAAP and that these measures should only be used to evaluate our results of operations in conjunction with the corresponding GAAP measures. See table under "Results of Operations" for a reconciliation of our non-GAAP combined pro forma net sales for the year ended December 27, 2015 to our net sales for such period as calculated in accordance with US GAAP.
Significant Business Developments. On December 23, 2016, we, together with WMG and certain of our other wholly-owned U.S. subsidiaries, entered into a Credit, Security and Guaranty Agreement (ABL Agreement) with Midcap Financial Trust, as administrative agent (Agent) and a lender and the additional lenders from time to time party thereto. The ABL Agreement provides for a $150.0 million senior secured asset based line of credit, subject to the satisfaction of a borrowing base requirement (ABL Facility). The ABL Facility may be increased by up to $100.0 million upon our request, subject to the consent of the Agent and each of the other lenders providing such increase and the satisfaction of customary conditions. As of December 25, 2016, we had $30 million in borrowings outstanding under the ABL Facility. See Note 9 to our consolidated financial statements for additional discussion related to the ABL Facility and our other debt.
On November 1, 2016, WMT entered into a Master Settlement Agreement (MSA) with Court-appointed attorneys representing plaintiffs in the metal-on-metal hip replacement product liability litigation pending before the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia (the MDL) and the California State Judicial Counsel Coordinated Proceedings (the JCCP). Under the terms of the MSA, the parties agreed to settle 1,292 specifically identified claims associated with CONSERVE®, DYNASTY® and LINEAGE® products that meet the eligibility requirements of the MSA and are either pending in the MDL or JCCP, or subject to court-approved tolling agreements in the MDL or JCCP, for a settlement amount of $240 million.  As of December 25, 2016, our accrual for metal-on-metal claims totaled $256.7 million, of which $242.8 million is included in our consolidated balance sheet within “Accrued expenses and other current liabilities” and $13.9 million is included within “Other liabilities.”  See Note 16 to our consolidated financial statements for additional discussion regarding the MSA and our accrual methodologies for the metal-on-metal hip replacement product liability claims.
During the fourth quarter of 2016, WMT deposited $150.0 million into a restricted escrow account to secure its obligations under the MSA. All individual settlements under the MSA will be funded first from the escrow account and then, if all funds held in the escrow account have been exhausted, directly by WMT. As of December 25, 2016, $150.0 million was in the restricted escrow account, and therefore, considered restricted cash under U.S. GAAP. See Note 16 and Note 17 to the consolidated financial statements for further discussion regarding the MSA, the metal-on-metal hip litigation and the funding for such claims.
On October 28, 2016, WMT and Wright Medical Group, Inc. (Wright Entities) entered into a Settlement Agreement, Indemnity and Hold Harmless Agreement and Policy Buyback Agreement (Insurance Settlement Agreement) with a subgroup of three insurance carriers, namely Columbia Casualty Company (Columbia), Travelers and AXIS Surplus Lines Insurance Company (collectively, the Three Settling Insurers), pursuant to which the Three Settling Insurers agreed to pay WMT an aggregate of $60 million (in addition to $10 million previously paid by Columbia) in a lump sum on or before the 30th business day after execution of the Insurance Settlement Agreement. This amount is in full satisfaction of all potential liability of the Three Settling Insurers relating to metal-on-metal hip and similar metal ion release claims, including but not limited to all claims in the MDL and the JCCP, and all claims asserted by WMT against the Three Settling Insurers in the Tennessee action described in the section entitled “Legal Proceedings.”  The amount due to the Wright Entities under the Insurance Settlement Agreement was paid in the fourth quarter of 2016. During the year ended December 25, 2016 and December 27, 2015, we received insurance proceeds of $65.6 million and $6.1 million, respectively, related to metal-on-metal hip and similar metal ion release claims. Additionally, during the year ended December 25, 2016 and December 27, 2015, our insurance carriers paid $1.3 million and $3.3 million, respectively, directly to claimants in connection with various metal-on-metal settlements.  Management has recorded an insurance receivable of $8.7 million for the probable recovery of spending from the remaining carriers (other than the Three Settling Carriers) in excess of our retention for a single occurrence. See Note 16 to our consolidated financial statements for additional discussion regarding the Insurance Settlement Agreement.
On October 21, 2016, pursuant to a binding offer letter, dated as of July 8, 2016, we completed and closed the sale of our business operations operating under the Large Joints operating segment (the Large Joints business) to Corin for approximately €29.7 million in cash, less approximately €10.7 million for net working capital adjustments. All historical operating results for the Large Joints business, including costs associated with corporate employees and infrastructure transferred as a part of the sale, are reflected within discontinued operations in our consolidated statements of operations. Further, all assets and associated liabilities transferred to Corin were classified as assets and liabilities held for sale in our consolidated balance sheet as of December 27, 2015. See Note 4 to our consolidated financial statements for additional discussion related to our discontinued operations.

52


In May 2016, we issued new convertible debt, resulting in net cash proceeds of approximately $237.5 million (including the settlement and issuance of associated hedging transactions, and the exchange of certain previously outstanding convertible debt). See Note 6 and Note 9 to our consolidated financial statements for additional information regarding these transactions.
On September 29, 2015, legacy Wright's five-year Corporate Integrity Agreement with the Office of the Inspector General of the United States Department of Health and Human Services expired, and on January 27, 2016, we received notification from the OIG-HHS that the term of the CIA has concluded.
On September 1, 2015, FDA approval of AUGMENT® Bone Graft in the United States for ankle and/or hindfoot fusion indications was obtained, and we commercially launched the product in the United States shortly thereafter.
On June 16, 2014, legacy Wright announced the full U.S. commercial launch of the INFINITY® Total Ankle Replacement System, which complements our ankle portfolio and allows us to offer a total ankle replacement system that addresses the continuum of care for end-stage ankle arthritis patients.
On January 30, 2014, legacy Wright completed the acquisition of Solana Surgical, LLC, and on February 5, 2014, completed the acquisition of OrthoPro, L.L.C., both privately-held, high-growth extremities companies. These acquisitions added complementary extremities product portfolios to further accelerate growth opportunities in our global extremities business. Legacy Wright acquired 100% of the outstanding equity of Solana for approximately $48 million in cash and $41.4 million of WMG common stock. Legacy Wright acquired 100% of OrthoPro's outstanding equity for approximately $32.5 million in cash.
On January 9, 2014, legacy Wright completed the sale of its OrthoRecon business to MicroPort. The financial results of the OrthoRecon business have been reflected within discontinued operations for all periods presented, unless otherwise noted.
Financial Highlights. Net sales increased 70.3% totaling $690.4 million in 2016, compared to $405.3 million in 2015, primarily due to the impact of the Wright/Tornier merger. Net sales in 2016 increased 12.2% as compared to 2015 non-GAAP combined pro forma net sales (pro forma net sales), primarily driven by 14.3% growth in our U.S. businesses.
Our U.S. net sales increased by $207.7 million, or 69.3%, in 2016 as compared to 2015, primarily due to the impact of the Wright/Tornier merger. Our U.S. sales in 2016 increased 14.3% as compared to 2015 combined pro forma net sales, driven primarily by the continued success of our INFINITY® total ankle replacement system, and the ongoing rollouts of the SIMPLICITI® shoulder system, AEQUALIS ASCEND® FLEXTM convertible shoulder system and AUGMENT® Bone Graft product. 
Our international net sales increased $77.3 million, or 73.3%, in 2016 as compared to 2015, primarily due to the impact of the Wright/Tornier merger. Our international net sales in 2016 increased 6.6% as compared to 2015 combined pro forma net sales, driven primarily by 20.1% combined pro forma net sales growth in Australia and 13.7% combined pro forma net sales growth in Canada, which was partially offset by a $4.7 million unfavorable impact from foreign currency exchange rates.
In 2016, our net loss from continuing operations totaled $164.9 million, compared to a net loss from continuing operations of $237.4 million in 2015. This decrease in net loss from continuing operations was primarily driven by the following:
$64.1 million decrease in transaction and transition expenses, including the $14.2 million charge in 2015 for share-based compensation acceleration due to the Wright/Tornier merger;
$46.6 million increase in profitability of our U.S. Lower Extremities and Biologics segment driven by leverage on increased sales, as operating expenses grew at a lower rate than net sales;
$43.8 million increase in profitability of our U.S. Upper Extremities segment driven almost entirely by the acquired Tornier business;
$11.4 million increase in profitability of our International Extremities and Biologics segment driven almost entirely by the acquired Tornier business; and
$14.0 million decrease in other (income) expense, net, primarily driven by a $12.3 million charge in 2016 as compared to a $25.1 million charge in 2015 for the write-off of pro-rata unamortized deferred financing fees and debt discount.
The favorable changes in net loss from continuing operations were partially offset by:
$65.4 million of incremental corporate expenses, primarily due to expenses from the acquired Tornier business;
$27.4 million of incremental cost of sales for the non-cash amortization of the inventory step-up fair value adjustment associated with the Wright/Tornier merger; and
$17.2 million of incremental interest expense, primarily due to cash interest and non-cash amortization of debt discount and deferred financing charges associated with the 2021 Notes that were issued in the second quarter of 2016.
Opportunities and Challenges. With the sale of our Large Joints business to Corin, we believe we are now well positioned and completely focused on accelerating growth in our extremities and biologics business. We intend to continue to leverage the global

53


strengths of both our legacy Wright and legacy Tornier product brands as a pure-play extremities and biologics business. We believe our leadership has been and will continue to be further enhanced by the FDA approval of AUGMENT® Bone Graft, a biologic solution that adds additional depth to one of the most comprehensive extremities product portfolios in the industry, as well as provides a platform technology for future new product development. We believe the highly complementary nature of legacy Wright’s and legacy Tornier’s businesses gives significant diversity and scale across a range of geographies and product categories. We believe we are differentiated in the marketplace by our strategic focus on extremities and biologics, our full portfolio of upper and lower extremities and biologics products, and our specialized and focused sales organization.
We are highly focused on ensuring that no business momentum is lost as we continue to integrate legacy Wright and legacy Tornier. Since the merger and through the end of 2016, we have completed the integration of our global sales force, co-located and consolidated into one enterprise resource planning (ERP) system in three of our top five international markets and completed a substantial number of other integration activities, while incurring more cost synergies earlier and less sales dis-synergies than we originally anticipated. Although we recognize that we will continue to have revenue dis-synergies during the remaining integration period, we believe we have an excellent opportunity to improve efficiency and leverage fixed costs in our business going forward. We also believe we have significant opportunity at the same time to advance certain balance sheet initiatives, such as improving our inventory, instrument set utilization and days sales outstanding (DSO).
While our ultimate financial goal is to achieve sustained profitability in the short-term, we anticipate continuing operating losses until we are able to grow our sales to a sufficient level to support our cost structure, including the inherent infrastructure costs of our industry.
Significant Industry Factors. Our industry is affected by numerous competitive, regulatory, and other significant factors. The growth of our business relies on our ability to continue to develop new products and innovative technologies, obtain regulatory clearance and maintain compliance for our products, protect the proprietary technology of our products and our manufacturing processes, manufacture our products cost-effectively, respond to competitive pressures specific to each of our geographic markets, including our ability to enforce non-compete agreements, and successfully market and distribute our products in a profitable manner. We, and the entire industry, are subject to extensive governmental regulation, primarily by the FDA. Failure to comply with regulatory requirements could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition. We, as well as other participants in our industry, are subject to product liability claims, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition.
Results of Operations
On October 21, 2016, pursuant to a binding offer letter dated as of July 8, 2016, we closed the sale of our Large Joints business to Corin. The financial results of our Large Joints business are reflected within discontinued operations for all periods presented.
On January 9, 2014, legacy Wright completed the sale of its hip and knee (OrthoRecon) business to MicroPort. The financial results of the OrthoRecon business are also reflected within discontinued operations for all periods presented.
The discussion below is on a continuing operations basis, unless otherwise noted.

54


Comparison of the year ended December 25, 2016 to the year ended December 27, 2015
The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, our results of operations expressed as dollar amounts (in thousands) and as percentages of net sales:
 
Fiscal year ended
 
December 25, 2016
 
December 27, 2015 3
 
Amount
% of net sales
 
Amount
% of net sales
Net sales
$
690,362

100.0
 %
 
$
405,326

100.0
 %
Cost of sales 1, 2
192,407

27.9
 %
 
113,622

28.0
 %
Gross profit
497,955

72.1
 %
 
291,704

72.0
 %
Operating expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
Selling, general and administrative 1
541,558

78.4
 %
 
424,377

104.7
 %
Research and development 1
50,514

7.3
 %
 
39,339

9.7
 %
Amortization of intangible assets
28,841

4.2
 %
 
16,754

4.1
 %
Total operating expenses
620,913

89.9
 %
 
480,470

118.5
 %
Operating loss
(122,958
)
(17.8
)%
 
(188,766
)
(46.6
)%
Interest expense, net
58,530

8.5
 %
 
41,358

10.2
 %
Other (income) expense, net
(3,148
)
(0.5
)%
 
10,884

2.7
 %
Loss from continuing operations before income taxes
(178,340
)
(25.8
)%
 
(241,008
)
(59.5
)%
Benefit for income taxes
(13,406
)
(1.9
)%
 
(3,652
)
(0.9
)%
Net loss from continuing operations
$
(164,934
)
(23.9
)%
 
$
(237,356
)
(58.6
)%
Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax
(267,439
)
 
 
(61,345
)
 
Net loss
$
(432,373
)
 
 
$
(298,701
)
 
___________________________
1 
These line items include the following amounts of non-cash, share-based compensation expense for the periods indicated:
 
Fiscal year ended
 
December 25, 2016
% of net sales
 
December 27, 2015
% of net sales
Cost of sales
$
414

0.1
%
 
$
287

0.1
%
Selling, general and administrative
13,216

1.9
%
 
22,777

5.6
%
Research and development
786

0.1
%
 
1,900

0.5
%
2 
Cost of sales includes amortization of inventory step-up adjustment of $37.7 million and $10.3 million for the years ended December 25, 2016 and December 27, 2015, respectively.
3 
The 2015 results were restated for the divestiture of our Large Joints business.


55


The following table sets forth our net sales by product line for our U.S. and International businesses for the periods indicated (in thousands) and the percentage of year-over-year change:
 
 
Fiscal year ended
U.S.
 
December 25, 2016
 
December 27, 2015 1
 
% change
Lower extremities
 
$
222,936

 
$
187,096

 
19.2
 %
Upper extremities
 
201,579

 
58,756

 
243.1
 %
Biologics
 
74,603

 
50,583

 
47.5
 %
Sports med & other
 
8,429

 
3,388

 
148.8
 %
Total U.S.
 
$
507,547

 
$
299,823

 
69.3
 %
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
International
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lower extremities
 
$
62,701

 
$
51,200

 
22.5
 %
Upper extremities
 
86,502

 
24,789

 
249.0
 %
Biologics
 
18,883

 
19,652

 
(3.9
)%
Sports med & other
 
14,729

 
9,862

 
49.4
 %
Total International
 
$
182,815

 
$
105,503

 
73.3
 %
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total net sales
 
$
690,362

 
$
405,326

 
70.3
 %
___________________________
1 
The 2015 results were restated for the divestiture of our Large Joints business.
The results of operations discussion that appears below has been presented utilizing a combination of historical unaudited and, where relevant, non-GAAP combined pro forma unaudited information to include the effects on our consolidated financial statements of our acquisition of Tornier, as if we had acquired Tornier as of January 1, 2014. The combined pro forma net sales have been adjusted to reflect a combination of the historical results of operations of Tornier, as adjusted to reflect the effect on our combined net sales of incremental revenues that would have been recognized had Tornier been acquired on January 1, 2014. The combined pro forma net sales have been developed based on available information and upon assumptions that our management believes are reasonable in order to reflect, on a pro forma basis, the impact of the Wright/Tornier merger.
The pro forma financial data is not necessarily indicative of results of operations that would have occurred had the Wright/Tornier merger been consummated at the beginning of the period presented or which might be attained in the future.

56


The following table reconciles our non-GAAP combined pro forma net sales by product line for the year ended December 27, 2015 (in thousands):
 
Fiscal year ended December 27, 2015
 
Net sales as reported 1
 
Legacy Tornier N.V. standalone nine months ended September 27, 2015 2
 
Legacy Tornier Stub Period (September 28, 2015 - September 30, 2015) 3
 
Legacy Tornier
net sales divested 4
 
Non-GAAP
combined pro forma
net sales
U.S.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lower extremities
$
187,096

 
$
29,637

 
$
279

 
$
(9,733
)
 
$
207,279

Upper extremities
58,756

 
115,846

 
1,773

 

 
176,375

Biologics
50,583

 
1,290

 
66

 

 
51,939

Sports med & other
3,388

 
5,021

 
4

 

 
8,413

Total extremities & biologics
299,823

 
151,794

 
2,122

 
(9,733
)
 
444,006

Large joint

 
119

 

 
(119
)
 

Total U.S.
$
299,823

 
$
151,913

 
$
2,122

 
$
(9,852
)
 
$
444,006

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
International
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lower extremities
$
51,200

 
$
7,402

 
$
152

 
$

 
$
58,754

Upper extremities
24,789

 
51,293

 
1,260

 

 
77,342

Biologics
19,652

 
357

 
13

 

 
20,022

Sports med & other
9,862

 
5,372

 
132

 

 
15,366

Total extremities & biologics
105,503

 
64,424

 
1,557

 

 
171,484

Large joint

 
29,921

 
753

 
(30,674
)
 

Total International
$
105,503

 
$
94,345

 
$
2,310

 
$
(30,674
)
 
$
171,484

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Global
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lower extremities
$
238,296

 
$
37,039

 
$
431

 
$
(9,733
)
 
$
266,033

Upper extremities
83,545

 
167,139

 
3,033

 

 
253,717

Biologics
70,235

 
1,647

 
79

 

 
71,961

Sports med & other
13,250

 
10,393

 
136

 

 
23,779

Total extremities & biologics
405,326

 
216,218

 
3,679

 
(9,733
)
 
615,490

Large joint

 
30,040

 
753

 
(30,793
)
 

Total net sales
$
405,326

 
$
246,258

 
$
4,432

 
$
(40,526
)
 
$
615,490

___________________________
1 
The 2015 results were restated for the divestiture of our Large Joints business.
2 
Legacy Tornier product line sales have been recast to reflect the reclassification of cement, instruments and freight from the historical Tornier product line "Large Joints and Other" to the product line associated with those revenues that will be utilized for future revenue reporting.
3 
To add revenues from Legacy Tornier's fourth quarter for the period prior to the merger closing date when operations became consolidated.
4 
To reduce from Tornier’s historical sales the U.S. sales associated with Tornier’s Salto Talaris and Salto XT ankle replacement products and silastic toe replacement products that were divested prior to the merger and the global sales associated with Tornier's Large Joints business that have been reflected in discontinued operations.

57


The following table sets forth our 2016 net sales growth rates by product line as compared to our 2015 non-GAAP combined pro forma net sales for the periods indicated (in thousands) and the percentage of year-over-year change:
 
Net sales
 
Non-GAAP combined pro forma net sales
 
%
change
Fiscal year ended December 25, 2016
 
Fiscal year ended December 27, 2015
 
U.S.
 
 
 
 
 
Lower extremities
$
222,936

 
$
207,279

 
7.6
 %
Upper extremities
201,579

 
176,375

 
14.3
 %
Biologics
74,603

 
51,939

 
43.6
 %
Sports med & other
8,429

 
8,413

 
0.2
 %
Total U.S.
$
507,547

 
$
444,006

 
14.3
 %
 
 
 
 
 
 
International
 
 
 
 
 
Lower extremities
$
62,701

 
$
58,754

 
6.7
 %
Upper extremities
86,502

 
77,342

 
11.8
 %
Biologics
18,883

 
20,022

 
(5.7
)%
Sports med & other
14,729

 
15,366

 
(4.1
)%
Total International
$
182,815

 
$
171,484

 
6.6
 %
 
 
 
 
 
 
Global
 
 
 
 
 
Lower extremities
$
285,637

 
$
266,033

 
7.4
 %
Upper extremities
288,081

 
253,717

 
13.5
 %
Biologics
93,486

 
71,961

 
29.9
 %
Sports med & other
23,158

 
23,779

 
(2.6
)%
Total net sales
$
690,362

 
$
615,490