10-K 1 f10k2020_livexlivemedia.htm ANNUAL REPORT

 

  

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

(Mark One)

☒  ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020

 

or

 

☐  TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from __________ to __________

 

Commission file number: 001-38249

 

LIVEXLIVE MEDIA, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware   98-0657263

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

   

9200 Sunset Boulevard, Suite #1201

West Hollywood, California

  90069
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (310) 601-2500

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class   Trading Symbol(s)   Name of each exchange on which registered
Common stock, $0.001 par value per share   LIVX   The NASDAQ Capital Market

  

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ☐     No ☒

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ☐     No ☒

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes ☒     No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§223.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ☒     No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

  Large accelerated filer Accelerated filer
  Non-accelerated filer Smaller reporting company
  Emerging Growth Company    

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes ☐     No ☒

  

The aggregate market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant, computed by reference to the closing price as of the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter ended September 30, 2019, was approximately $84.9 million. For the sole purpose of making this calculation, the term “non-affiliate” has been interpreted to exclude directors, executive officers, affiliated holders of 10% or more of the registrant’s common stock and their affiliates.

 

As of June 12, 2020, the registrant had 59,356,730 shares of common stock outstanding.

 

 

 

 

 

   

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

  PART I  
Item 1. Business 1
Item 1A. Risk Factors 11
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments 57
Item 2. Properties 57
Item 3. Legal Proceedings 57
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 57
     
  PART II  
     
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities 58
Item 6. Selected Financial Data 59
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 59
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 82
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data 83
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure 84
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures 84
Item 9B. Other Information 85
     
  PART III  
     
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance 86
Item 11. Executive Compensation 86
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters 86
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence 86
Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services 86
     
  PART IV  
     
Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules 87
  Signatures 90

 

i

 

  

Use of Market and Industry Data

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K (this “Annual Report”) includes market and industry data that we have obtained from third party sources, including industry publications, as well as industry data prepared by our management on the basis of its knowledge of and experience in the industries in which we operate (including our management’s estimates and assumptions relating to such industries based on that knowledge). Management has developed its knowledge of such industries through its experience and participation in these industries. While our management believes the third-party sources referred to in this Annual Report are reliable, neither we nor our management have independently verified any of the data from such sources referred to in this Annual Report or ascertained the underlying economic assumptions relied upon by such sources. Furthermore, references in this Annual Report to any publications, reports, surveys or articles prepared by third parties should not be construed as depicting the complete findings of the entire publication, report, survey or article. The information in any such publication, report, survey or article is not incorporated by reference in this Annual Report.

 

Forecasts and other forward-looking information obtained from these sources involve risks and uncertainties and are subject to change based on various factors, including those discussed in sections entitled “Forward-Looking Statements,” “Item 1A. Risk Factors” and “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in this Annual Report.

 

Trademarks, Service Marks and Trade Names

 

This Annual Report contains references to our trademarks, service marks and trade names and to trademarks, service marks and trade names belonging to other entities. Solely for convenience, trademarks, service marks and trade names referred to in this Annual Report, including logos, artwork and other visual displays, may appear without the ® or TM symbols, but such references are not intended to indicate, in any way, that their respective owners will not assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, their rights thereto. We do not intend our use or display of other companies’ trade names, service marks or trademarks or any artists’ or other individuals’ names to imply a relationship with, or endorsement or sponsorship of us by, any other companies or persons.

 

ii

 

  

PART I

 

Item 1. Business

 

Overview

 

LiveXLive Media, Inc. (the “Company,” “LXL,” “we,” “us,” or “our”) is a pioneer in the acquisition, distribution and monetization of live music, Internet radio, podcasting and music-related streaming and video content. Through our comprehensive service offerings and innovative content platform, we provide music fans the ability to watch, listen, experience, discuss, deliberate and enjoy live music and entertainment 24/7/365. Serving a global audience, our mission is to bring the experience of live music and entertainment to consumers wherever music and entertainment is watched, listened to, discussed, deliberated or performed around the world. Through March 31, 2020, we operated three core integrated services - (1) one of the industry’s leading online live music streaming platforms, (2) a fully integrated streaming music service Slacker, Inc. (“Slacker”) operating as LiveXLive powered by Slacker, and (3) producer of original music-related content, including live music festivals, concerts and events through our recently acquired wholly owned subsidiary React Presents LLC (“React Presents”).  In May 2020, we agreed to acquire Courtside Group, Inc., operating as PodcastOne (“PodcastOne”). PodcastOne is one of the leading podcasting platforms in the world today, generating over 300 podcasts per week and over 2.0 billion podcast downloads annually. LiveXLive is the first ‘live social music network’, delivering premium live-streamed, digital audio and on-demand music experiences from the world’s top music festivals, concerts and events, including Rock in Rio, EDC Las Vegas, iHeartRadio’s Wango Tango and many more. LiveXLive also gives audiences access to premium original content, artist exclusives and industry interviews. During the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020, we livestreamed 42 major music festivals and live music events to approximately 70 million fans worldwide, and our subscription service eclipsed 850,000 paid subscribers and approximately 1.0 million monthly active users across our audio services. Through our music audio services, our users have access to millions of songs and hundreds of expert-curated radio platforms and stations. In 2019, we combined Slacker’s pioneering personalization and LiveXLive’s industry-leading livestreaming expertise into a new application offering access to live events, audio streams, original episodic content, podcasts, video on demand, real-time livestreams, and social sharing of content. Today, our business is comprised of a single operating segment (hereon referred to as our “music services”).

 

We generate revenue primarily through the sale of subscription-based services and advertising from our music offerings, and secondarily from the licensing, advertising and sponsorship of our live music and podcast content rights and services. We are also expanding our pay-per-view offerings and expect to generate revenue from ticket sales and other revenue streams.

 

Music Services

 

Our music services provide our music fans the ability to experience, engage in and listen to live music, digital Internet radio, podcasts, vodcasts and music streaming services on any connected device and screen 24/7/365, including desk-top, tablets, mobile applications (iOS and Android) and automobile music play interfaces. Today, we provide our music services through a dedicated over-the-top application (“Apps”) called LiveXLive. Our music services are delivered through digital streaming transmissions over the Internet and/or through satellite transmissions. Our users can also access our music platform from our websites, including www.livexlive.com and www.slacker.com, and through our digital App. In conjunction with the expected closing of the PodcastOne acquisition in July 2020, our users will also be able to access premium podcasts on www.podcastone.com.

 

Historically, we acquired the rights to stream our live and recorded music and broadcasts from a combination of festival owners, such as Anschutz Entertainment Group (“AEG”) and Live Nation Entertainment, Inc. (“Live Nation”), music labels, including Universal Music, Warner Music and Sony Music, and through individual music publishers and rights holders. Beginning mid-March 2020, the current pandemic associated with COVID-19 temporarily shut down the production of all on-ground, live music festivals and events. As a result, we pivoted our production to 100% digital, and began producing, curating, and broadcasting digital music festivals, concerts and events across our platform. From April 1, 2020 to May 31, 2020, we livestreamed over 20 digital festivals and events across our platform, including “Music Lives,” a 48-hour live broadcast sponsored by TikTok and Oculus Venues, featuring over 100 artists and generating over 50 million livestreams and 5.0 billion video views across the hashtag #musiclives on TikTok. In May 2020, we also launched our first pay-per-view (“PPV”) performances across our platform, allowing artists and fans to access a new digital compliment to live festivals, concerts and events.

 

Today, the majority of our content acquisition agreements provide us the exclusive rights to produce, license, broadcast and distribute live broadcast streams of these festivals and events throughout the world and across any digital platform, including cable, Internet, video, audio, video-on-demand (“VOD”) and virtual reality (“VR”). Our license rights to provide recorded music licenses and broadcasts principally cover North America today. Through March 31, 2020, we held the streaming rights to over 40 festivals and live music events under long-term contracts that range from two to seven years in duration. Today, we have increased these live streaming festival rights and are working to expand our VOD, PPV, content catalog and content capabilities.

 

1

 

 

Our music services commenced operations through LiveXLive in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2015, when we streamed our first music festival. During the fiscal year ended March 31, 2018, we acquired Slacker and deployed our subscription-based music services. After the Slacker acquisition, we launched our LXL App across Apple, Roku and Amazon Fire platforms. In February 2018, we entered into a multi-year agreement with Insomniac Holdings LLC (“Insomniac”), a partner with Live Nation and the owner of EDC (“Electronic Daisy Carnival”) festival and other dance music festivals and events, to produce and stream up to 20 major festivals around the world and over 100 events annually across our music platform. In December 2018, we launched LiveZone, a traveling studio originating from live music events and festivals all over the world. LiveZone will mix music news, commentary, festival updates and artist interviews, and provide context to premiere events by showcasing exotic locales, unique venues, and artist backstories, adding “pre-show” and “post-show” segments to livestreamed artist performances and original festival-based content. In March 2019, we entered into a multi-year agreement with iHeartMedia that combines content, production, distribution and promotion. The iHeartMedia partnership was extended in March 2020, giving us exclusive global livestreaming rights to over 20 events per year. In February 2020, we acquired React Presents, giving us the capability to produce and stream over 200 events annually, including React Presents’ tent pole festival Spring Awakening. Today, we have access and capabilities to produce, edit, curate, and livestream live festivals, concerts and music events daily, 850,000 paid subscribers and approximately 1.0 million monthly active users (“MAUs”), making us online one of the largest music platforms capable of streaming live and recorded music and broadcasts globally. We use MAUs, which is a non-GAAP financial measure, as a measure of our performance and define a MAU as a user of one of our platforms who has logged in and visited our music subscription platform, as a unique user, on the day of measurement.

 

Live Music Events

 

We produce, edit, curate and stream live music events through (i) broadband transmission over the Internet and/or satellite networks to our users throughout the world, where permitted (“Digital Live Events”), (ii) physical ticket sales of on-location music events and festivals at a variety of indoor clubs and outdoor venues and arenas (“On-premise Live Events”) and (iii) PPV events. These services allow our users to access live music content in person and over the Internet through their personal cellular phones, desktops, computers, tablets, and televisions, including the ability to chat and communicate over our platform. As of March 31, 2020, LiveXLive provided Digital Live Events for free to our users; however, beginning in May 2020 we launched PPV capabilities and began charging our users to view certain Digital Live Events. Through March 31, 2020, we monetized these live events through third party advertising and sponsorship, including with brands such as Kia, Samsung and Dos Equis, and selling territorial licensing rights to Tencent in China and Ocesa in Mexico. Our cost structure varies by music event, and may include set upfront fees, the amount of which is often dependent on specific artist and/or a festival’s existing production infrastructure or lack thereof, and, in turn, our production/financial commitment to the live stream, and in some cases we may also share the associated revenue. The fees generated from any advertising, sponsored content, VOD and other services are generally subject to the aforementioned revenue sharing arrangements with certain artists, festival owners and/or music right holders, when applicable.

 

Digital Internet Radio and Music Services

 

Today, our digital Internet radio and music services are available to users online and through original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”) on a white label basis, which allow certain OEMs to customize the radio and music services with their own logos, branding and systems. Our users are able to listen to a variety of music, radio personalities, news, sports and the audio of live music events. Our fee structure for our digital Internet radio and music services varies and may be in the form of (i) a free service to the listener supported by paid advertising, (ii) paid premium subscription services, and/or (iii) a fixed fee per user. The fees generated from ad-supported and subscription services are generally subject to revenue sharing arrangements with music right holders and labels, and fees to festivals, clubs, events, concerts, artists, promoters, venues, music labels and publishers (“Content Providers”).

 

Podcast Services

 

Today, our podcasts are available to users online alongside our digital Internet radio. Our users are able to listen to a variety of podcasts, from music, radio personalities, news, entertainment, and sports. Similar to our digital Internet radio fee structure, we monetize podcasts through (i) paid advertising or (ii) paid premium subscription services. With the acquisition of PodcastOne (expected to close in July 2020, subject to customary closing conditions as described in the acquisition purchase agreement), we will own one of the largest networks of podcast content in North America, including over 300 new podcasts per week and over 2.0 billion downloads annually.

 

Ancillary Products and Services

 

We also provide our customers the following:

 

  Regulatory Support – streaming of music is generally subject to copyright protection. Whenever possible, we use our best efforts to clear music copyright licenses, artist streaming preferences and music publishing rights in advance of usage.

 

  Post-Implementation Support - once our App is live, we provide technical and network support, which includes 24/7 operational assistance and monitoring of our services and performance.

 

2

 

  

Our Industry

 

Globally, recorded music revenues increased to $20.2 billion in 2019, up 8.2%, from $18.7 billion in 2018 (IFPI Global Music Report 2020). In the U.S. alone, live music events were projected to surpass $8.0 billion in 2019 (source: Statista). Our addressable market includes streaming of live music and entertainment, Internet radio, audio downloadable music, podcasts and online VOD services. These markets are experiencing significant growth and now represent the majority of the music industry’s overall revenue, as physical and digital record sales have steadily declined. We both capitalize on these trends and provide additional earnings opportunities to industry stakeholders, including agents, managers, distributors, producers, labels, publishers, advertisers and social influencers (collectively, “Industry Stakeholders”).

 

Live Music Industry

 

The live music industry is a large, growing market that creates, manages and promotes live performances and events, ranging from festivals to concerts and events in stadiums, arenas, and other smaller venues. In the U.S. alone, pre-COVID-19, the live music industry was expected to have generated over $29.0 billion of revenue annually by 2020, representing a +1% growth rate over 2016 (IBIS World), and over $5.0 billion in live music sponsorship for the same periods. Live events and festivals have become an increasingly important cultural phenomenon as seen by more than 2,000 music festivals worldwide. Each festival can attract hundreds of thousands of people with attendance at the largest festival in the United States estimated at over 140,000 people per day. Rock in Rio, for instance, attracted a combined attendance of over 1,000,000 people in 2015 and 2016 in Lisbon and Rio. The most popular festivals based on attendance include Coachella, EDC, Glastonbury, Outside Lands Music and Arts Festival, Rock Werchter, Rock in Rio, Roskilde, Tomorrowland and Ultra Music Festival. The live event industry is a global market with only a fraction of the leading live music events located in the U.S. In addition to festivals, there are thousands of live music events and performances that occur nightly in large and small venues such as arenas, theatres, clubs, bars and lounges. As a result of the popularity of live music performances, there has been a growing interest in experiencing live events and performances via online streaming distribution. To address this growing opportunity, we acquired React Presents in February 2020, which promoted, produced and ran over 200 live events in 2019, including Spring Awakening, one of the largest music festivals in the Chicago, Illinois.

 

With the onset of COVID-19 in early calendar year 2020, substantially all major live music events to be held in calendar year 2020 were cancelled, including Coachella, EDC Vegas, Outside Lands, Rock in Rio, Summerfest and our own Spring Awakening. To address the demand for live music events, we shifted our focus to live digital concerts and festivals, and our platform experienced tremendous growth in the number of live events streamed and overall viewership. For example, in April 2020, we produced our largest digital music event, the livestream of “Music Lives,” which featured over 100 artists, generated over (i) 50 million live views, (ii) 200,000 concurrent views across 48 hours of continuous programming and (iii) 5.0 billion video views of the hashtag #musiclives across TikTok. Through the first two months of fiscal year ending March 31, 2021, we live-streamed over 20 events and approached nearly 60 million live views. By comparison, we livestreamed 42 live festival and events and generated over 69 million views for the entire fiscal year ended March 31, 2020.

 

Additionally, the growth of the live music industry benefits ancillary verticals, such as merchandise and primary/secondary ticket marketplaces. Merchandise includes the retail sales of licensed music-related goods and is estimated to be larger than $2 billion since 2014.

 

Digital Music Streaming Industry

 

The addressable market for paid digital music streaming is large and growing, representing almost half of global music revenue. In 2019, streaming revenue grew 23% from 2018 to approximately $11.4 billion (IFPI Global Music Report 2020). The 2019 growth in streaming revenue has more than surpassed the year-over-year declines in physical and download revenues of 5.3% and 15.3%, respectively (IFPI Global Music Report 2020). At the end of calendar 2019, there was over 300 million users of paid streaming services. According to Goldman Sachs, paid streaming users are expected to surpass 1.2 billion by 2030.

 

These same fans are increasingly engaging digitally on their mobile devices. With over 3.8 billion smartphone users expected globally by 2021, we expect that mobile will continue to represent a significant opportunity for streaming live music and music-related content. More than 60% of Internet users globally listened to music through direct download or live stream from services such as Apple Music and iTunes, Pandora, iHeartRadio, Deezer and Spotify (eMarketer, August 2016).

 

We believe that the demand for live music and music-related content that is optimized for Internet-connected devices will continue to grow with the further development of mobile devices and increases in mobile carrier bandwidth. We intend to continue to extend our global reach by executing deals with new partners and strengthening our business model to enable us to further monetize the content offered on our network across these devices.

 

Online Video Streaming Industry

 

The addressable market for online video streaming is large and growing. The online video streaming industry generated over $40 billion in revenue in calendar 2019, and is expected to generate $184 billion in revenue by 2027, a CAGR of over 20% growth from 2020 (Grand View Research).

 

Additionally, an important subset of the growing online video streaming market is live video streaming. According to Facebook Live, users watch live video three times longer and comment ten times more than recorded footage (Eventbrite Blog, August 22, 2016). Moreover, YouTube claims that over 35% of all videos watched are music related. We aim to capitalize on what we believe is an increasing trend in user engagement with live video content.

 

3

 

 

Technology

 

We own over 10 registered or pending patents on our streaming Internet radio services, including patents over playback of digital media content, method for providing user personalized content, systems for portable personalized radio, method for interactive distribution of digital content and systems for scoring and raking digital content based on activity of network users. Key components of this technology include:

 

  User authorization system

 

  Data Warehouse/Data Management Platform, including user preferences and behavior

 

  Enterprise Content Management and Delivery Platform for Music

 

  Relevancy and Personalization Technology

 

  Patented off-line mode

 

  Mobile and over-the-top (“OTT”) Development

 

  Development around the balance between curated and programmatically generated content

 

  Integrated carrier billing with most major carriers

 

  Service-based technology systems which allows for easier development of new products

 

While we do not currently have a trademark on the LiveXLive name, on September 23, 2017, we entered into a Co-Existence Agreement with Monday Sessions Media, Inc. d/b/a Live X (“Live X”), in which we consented to Live X’s use and registration of the name and mark Live X and agreed to not challenge, dispute or contest Live X’s rights in such mark. Pursuant to this agreement, we agreed to not offer certain production services to third party businesses in connection with our mark LIVEXLIVE and use commercially reasonable efforts to afford Live X opportunities to bid on production or streaming service opportunities. We intend to protect our trademarks, brands, copyrights, patents and other original and acquired works, ancillary goods and services. In connection with the Slacker acquisition, we acquired a trademark for the Slacker name. We believe that certain trademarks and other proprietary rights that we may apply for or otherwise obtain will have significant value and will be important to our brand-building efforts and the marketing of our services. We cannot predict, however, whether steps taken by us to protect our proprietary rights will be successful or adequate to prevent misappropriation, infringement or other violation of these rights. Upon the consummation of any future acquisitions, we may acquire additional registered trademarks, as well as applied-for trademarks potentially for worldwide use.

 

Streaming Internet Radio

 

We continuously obtain high-quality digital content and associated data from the record labels. These master files are stored in a secure database and transcoded into various audio formats that are then pushed to our production environment. The production system supports numerous streaming formats as required to serve the numerous end-user consumption devices that our service supports, including mobile handsets, connected car audio systems, smart TVs, HTML web players, etc. The production infrastructure consists of servers housed in our data center and caching servers, managed by our partners, distributed across the Internet. The caching servers temporarily store the content and related formats that are in high demand, thereby placing the most popular content closest to user endpoints, reducing latency and the number of content requests sent to our data center. When a given user makes a play request from their mobile device, the web, connected car, etc., the system sets up a secure connection to that user’s device, automatically detects the proper format and the highest quality bitrate that can be streamed, and delivers the stream to our users.

 

Live Music

 

Technology is a key component of the LiveXLive network that brings our ecosystem to life for our users and Content Providers. We currently deliver our viewer experience through an HTML-based website compatible with most major web browsers (e.g., Chrome, Safari, Internet Explorer) and operating systems (e.g., Windows, MacOS, iOS, Android). Our developers bring extensive experience building technology solutions for the leading media companies of the world, including the design of live and VOD workflows, the video content management system and delivery of content on mobile, OTT and desktop clients.

 

More recently, we built and launched a pioneering technology stack for delivering our content to users on nearly any Internet-connected device. As of May 2018, our updated version of the LXL App was available on the iOS and Android operating systems and through Apple TV, Roku and Amazon Fire platforms. We are also continuing to finalize our OTT strategy, which to date has resulted in the release of our custom OTT application the aforementioned platforms and will be ultimately be available on most OTT platforms and consoles. We believe our full-service, delivery-to-distribution back-end will allow us to capitalize on monetization opportunities and is the first step in creating a digital supply chain for live music and music-related video content.

 

4

 

 

In April 2018, we entered into an agreement with a third-party to create interactive streaming experiences around live music events which will be streamed on the LiveXLive website and our LXL App. The interactive streaming develops engagement and analytics software and offers a platform that enables a new category of live experiences that facilitates two-way interactions between streamers and their audiences. The overall platform also enables enterprise live streamers to engage their audiences and gather data insights which will help us analyze how we can increase user retention and develop and increase our monetization opportunities.

 

Users

 

We currently stream our music services for live events globally to music fans worldwide, and with users located in North America for our digital music streaming services. We are currently developing plans to expand our digital Internet radio presence internationally. Our music streaming customers include individual users and OEMs such as Tesla, Verizon, T-Mobile, and, to a lesser extent, advertisers and third-party licensees. For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, we had one single customer that represented approximately 60% and 41% of our total consolidated revenue in the period, respectively.

 

We provide live production and content curating and processing services to our festival and event partners on an exclusive basis, globally. These agreements are generally for three to seven years in duration. Our customers also include major cable networks such as MTV, where we have historically agreed to share production costs for certain festivals. As of March 31, 2020, we were the exclusive representative to over 40 festivals around the world.

 

Competitive Advantage

 

We are producers, acquirers and distributors of live and digital music and Internet radio entertainment services, and work closely with major and independent labels, music festival owners and other content producers to provide unique and compelling music content across our platform for our listeners. Accordingly, our significant operating and deal-making experience and relationships with Content Providers, OEMs such as Tesla, cable networks such as MTV, major advertisers and music publishers and distribution companies in our industry gives us a number of competitive advantages and may present us with a substantial number of additional business targets and relationships to facilitate growth going forward. We believe that we have sustainable competitive advantages due to our growing market position in live events, technology and relationships with important music labels, content suppliers and festival owners.

 

Our leadership team, consisting of our senior and executive management and our board of directors, collectively brings a wealth of industry relationships and expertise in the fields of programming, promotion, marketing, sales, distribution, web, digital, linear, mobile, legal and finance. The members of our advisory board are renowned in their respective fields, are considered thought leaders in the entertainment industry by their peers, further enhance our credibility and provide strategic guidance to our management team.

 

Many of the members of our leadership team have built businesses as entrepreneurs and/or have been executives at Fortune 500 companies. The team includes seasoned Wall Street executives that have collectively been extensively involved in mergers and acquisitions in the live event, recorded music, music publishing, fashion, technology and other media and entertainment businesses. Our leadership team provides the knowledge to source, analyze, negotiate and complete acquisition transactions, partnerships and other business combinations.

 

Strategy

 

Content

 

During the year ended March 31, 2020, we livestreamed 42 major music festivals and events. As of today, we are on pace to surpass over 40 live performance festivals and events by the end of August 2020. The majority of our agreements provide us multi-year, exclusive rights to produce and digitally stream these live festivals across any screen in most major territories around the world for periods between two to seven years. Moreover, and in most cases, we also have the exclusive rights to VOD, AR, VR, broadcast TV and audio rights from these festivals (subject to music copyright clearances). We believe there is substantial value in producing and streaming live music events.

 

Our near-term strategy is to continue aggressively producing, acquiring and aggregating live and on-demand performances (e.g., on stage sets) and non-performance (e.g., behind the scenes, interviews) music-related video content from festivals, clubs, events, concerts, artists, promoters, venues, music labels and publishers (collectively, the “Content Providers”); acquiring and producing original music-related video and audio content; and curating existing online and digital radio premium content. In addition to acquiring and/or partnering with third party Content Providers, our digital studio, LXL Studios, plans to develop and produce original music-related video content, including digital magazine-style news programming and original-concept digital pilots and documentaries.

 

With approximately 2,000 festival-like live events in the world today, we also believe there is enough live music content to acquire and fill our programming 24/7/365.

 

Over the long term, our strategy is to combine our live events with our audio music and radio services (collectively, the “Music Services”). We believe that the combination of these Music Services will serve as our user engagement platform, differentiate our Music Services from our competitors and provide us more opportunities to expand and grow our current user base and revenues from subscription fees, advertising, sponsorship and licensing. Moreover, we plan to drive more audience to our Music Services platform of as we grow our streamed live events, helping us leverage and lower our overall marketing spending and drive more user growth.

 

5

 

 

Advertising and Long-Term Revenue Opportunities

 

During the years ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, approximately 10% of our revenue was from advertising and licensing, respectively, and the remainder was from subscription revenue from our audio music services platform. More recently, and with the increase in the number of digital-only live events and live views across our platform, we’ve experienced substantial growth in paid sponsorship, and are currently on pace to generate more sponsorship in the first half of the fiscal year ending March 31, 2021 versus our entire paid sponsorship since our inception. With the acquisition of PodcastOne, we also expect our advertising and sponsorship to substantially increase the overall percentage mix of advertising and licensing versus subscription revenue. Over the long-term, our plan is to continue to grow our advertising and licensing capabilities across our entire Music Services platform. Part of our long-term strategy also includes immersing our fans into the live music experience digitally. As a result, we also plan to introduce other revenue lines of services customarily available at live events including event ticket sales and music merchandise sales. We also believe the data we generate from our platform will be valuable to Industry Stakeholders.

 

Platform Innovation

 

Our platform engagement strategy is to build a compelling online and digital experience for our users, anchored by a pioneering website and our custom LXL App. The LiveXLive platform offers access to some of the world’s leading music festivals and live events with multi-day and simultaneous multi-stage coverage, unique concerts, intimate performances and premium original programming. It is fueled by our LXL App, which we believe will drive 24/7/365 user engagement and data that we will be able to convert to earnings and cash flow through multiple potential revenue streams.

 

We have designed and developed our new custom App with interactive features that enhance the live music experience and, when combined with our platform’s functionality, unique features and underlying music service, create an immersive digital experience in and of itself. We believe the combination of the intuitive, modern LiveXLive user interface and cross-platform capabilities will be instrumental in creating a deeply engaging, personally-tailored central hub for live music, music-related video content and streaming music content, particularly for those users who are otherwise unable to attend live events in person. Our aim is to also include features for personalization, social interaction services, multiple live channels, vertical video, merchandise and other offerings to further solidify users’ affinity toward our platform and their interests.

 

 

 

LiveXLive currently runs on a responsive HTML-based website that has been developed to work across browsers on any Internet-connected screen. The website’s home page includes featured content portals used for programming the most relevant content. The remainder of the page features video content and music stations that are updated regularly and covers a full spectrum of music genres. As our content library and user data grows, the featured content portals and other aspects of the user experience will be individually personalized and tailored to a user’s preferences and interests. We have added video, display and other advertising to the website to generate additional revenue. We will work with our developers to continue to iterate, add and tweak features based on internal and external feedback.

 

Launched in May 2019, the new unified LXL App ecosystem includes live streaming video, VOD, streaming music stations, push notifications, festival-specific functionality, original content video, locally sold and programmatic ads capability, the capability to display time-shifted content and enhanced functionality that will support social media sharing and user community engagement. The main Live page of the LXL App includes a top hero carousel depicting featured performances and options for viewing concurrent programming located below the top carousel. The LXL App also include a Live Video experience tab dedicated to ongoing and past festivals. For this section, we allow users to view multiple stages of a single festival broadcasting live simultaneously when applicable. We believe this fun and simple interface layout, together with LiveZone, will highlight key content and encourage users to also discover our other content offerings.

 

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The new unified LXL App will showcase several features that we believe will encourage and facilitate user engagement and interactivity, including:

 

Artist Picker - Personalization — This feature is foundational for personalization and recommendations of content with user profile integration; artists that are picked will track to user profiles for personalization. Through our acquisition of Slacker, we are able to add their highly developed enterprise content and user management systems to the LiveXLive platform. Once they have been upgraded to work with video as well as audio, they will form the core of LiveXLive’s data management platform and personalization system.

 

Personalized & Programmed Content Carousels — Content carousels are a key feature of the new unified App with the ability to feature multiple programmed and personalized content of Live events, VOD featured content and audio streams.

 

Slacker-Powered Music Service — With the unification convergence of two content services, this integration includes the Slacker music service for streaming radio stations with data informed human curation. Slacker’s expertise and toolset for generating both human curated and programmatically generated media channels allow LiveXLive to quickly bring both audio and video channels to market for a fraction of the expense typically associated with those activities.

 

Live Video Experience — The centerpiece foundation of our digital live experience to engage music fans is the Live Video experience section in which livestream video feeds, video on-demand, set-time schedules, real-time user interface elements and community interaction come together in a single unique digital environment.

 

Dynamic Video Player — Our player supports both Live streams and VOD playback, and also supports Vertical Video, which displays video with an edge-to-edge format in portrait view. This is how younger generations consume video and is a commonly familiar format catering to Millennials and Gen Zers.

 

Multiple Live Channels — For Live video broadcasts, this video player feature allows for easily switching between multi-channel perspectives covering different performances and stages of the live event being watched.

 

Social Sharing — With this social sharing functionality, app users are able to share content to Facebook, Twitter, Gmail, by SMS text and more.

 

Chat — In our endeavor to enhance the live event experience digitally, we will feature an integrated user chat system so users can connect, share and comment regarding the live content. The integrated chat will allow users to connect, comment and share, all without leaving the LXL App.

 

Community Features — Central to the consumption of live music online is the ability for the audience to interact with each other, our hosts and influencers, and the artists themselves. We are building out the social features for our social community based around highly engaging, exclusive live music festival broadcasts that will enable us to innovate our social engagement tools beyond the competition.

 

Pay Per View (PPV) — Due to the growing demand for digital-only events post COVID-19, we created our own PPV platform, which allows artists, venues, promoters and festivals to charge users direct for digital access to live events. We also expect our PPV platform to continue to grow substantially in the long term and could represent a large mix of our revenue as early as fiscal year 2022.

 

By executing the above strategies, we are creating a platform that is dedicated to live music and has the breadth and depth of content to reach and be relevant to a global audience of all ages.

 

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Market Leader – Live Music Events and Content

 

We believe there is significant unmet demand for experiencing live music, musical performance video on demand and related content online. To become a centralized hub for live music and music-related video content, we plan to execute the following interconnected components of our business: Content Aggregation, Technology Development, Marketing and Distribution, Platform Engagement and Data Collection:

 

 

 

Competition

 

While the broader market for live entertainment remains highly competitive, the digital distribution of live and music-related video content is still a nascent market. We believe live streamed music video content is the only remaining media genre without a dominant brand. We believe there is a tremendous amount of high-quality live music content available to be captured and produced but without a singular home for distribution and access by the public at large.

 

We expect to compete for the time and attention of our users with other Content Providers based on a number of factors, including: quality of experience, relevance, acceptance and diversity of content, ease of use, price, accessibility, perceptions of advertisement load, brand awareness and reputation. We also expect to compete for the time and attention of users based on the presence and/or visibility of the LiveXLive platform as compared with other platforms and Content Providers that deliver content through Internet-connected screens.

 

Our competitors includes (i) broadcast radio providers, including terrestrial radio providers such as CBS and satellite radio providers such as Sirius XM, (ii) interactive on-demand audio content and pre-recorded entertainment, such as Apple’s iTunes Music Store and Apple Music, Rhapsody, Spotify, Pandora, Tidal and Amazon Music that allow listeners to stream music or select the audio content that they stream or purchase, (iii) other forms of entertainment, including Facebook, Twitch, Instagram, Google / YouTube, Twitter (including Periscope), and Yahoo, which offer a variety of Internet and mobile device-based products, services and content, and (iv) promoters and producers of content on mobile, online and AR/VR platforms such as Red Bull TV, Live Nation TV and independent content owners. To the extent that existing or potential users choose to watch satellite or cable television, streaming video from on demand services such as Hulu, VEVO or YouTube, or play interactive video games on their home-entertainment system, computer or mobile phone rather than use the LiveXLive service, these content services pose a competitive threat. Conversely, these content platforms can also become valuable distribution partners. For example, in 2019 we livestreamed our music festivals and events across Facebook, YouTube and Twitch, and partnered with iHeartMedia to livestream multiple iHeart-sponsored events across our music platform.

 

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We may also face direct competition from other large live music event competitors with regards to online distribution of live music and music-related video content, ticketing and sponsorship opportunities, including from Live Nation, AEG, and LiveStyle (formerly SFX). Furthermore, there are many smaller, regional companies that compete in the market as well.

 

Music Copyright and Rights Regulation

 

As a participant in the global music and radio industries, we are subject to a variety of copyright and regulatory obligations.

 

  Broadcast Music, Inc. (“BMI”) – BMI is a bridge between songwriters and the business and organizations that want to play their music publicly. BMI supports businesses and organizations that play music publicly by offering blanket music licenses that permit them to play nearly 13 million musical works.

 

  The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (“ASCAP”) – ASCAP is a membership association of more than 670,000 songwriters, composers and music publishers. ASCAP licenses over 11.5 million songs and scores to the businesses that play them publicly.

 

  SoundExchange, Inc. – SoundExchange collects and distributes digital performance royalties on behalf of more than 155,000 recording artists and master rights owners and licensees.

  

Government Regulation

 

Our operations are subject to various federal, state and local laws statutes, rules, regulations, policies and procedures, both domestically and internationally, governing matters such as:

 

  labor and employment laws;

 

  the United States Foreign Corrupt Practice Act (the “FCPA”) and similar regulations and laws in other countries;

 

  sales and other taxes and withholding of taxes;

 

  United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) requirements;

 

  privacy laws and protection of personally identifiable information;

 

  marketing activities online; and

 

  United States copyright laws.

 

We believe that we are in material compliance with these laws. We are also required to comply with the laws of the countries we operate in and anti-bribery regulations under the FCPA. Such regulations make it illegal for us to pay, promise to pay, or receive money or anything of value to, or from, any government or foreign public official for the purpose of directly or indirectly obtaining or retaining business. This ban on illegal payments and bribes also applies to agents or intermediaries who use funds for purposes prohibited by the statute.

 

From time to time, governmental bodies have proposed legislation that could have an effect on our business. For example, some legislatures have proposed laws in the past that would impose potential liability on promoters and producers of live music events for entertainment taxes and for incidents that occur at such events, particularly incidents relating to drugs and alcohol. More recently, some jurisdictions have proposed legislation that would restrict ticketing methods and mandate ticket inventory disclosure.

 

Privacy Policy

 

As a company conducting business on the Internet, we are subject to a number of foreign and domestic laws and regulations relating to information security, data protection and privacy, among others. Many of these laws and regulations are still evolving and could be interpreted in ways that could hurt our business. In the area of information security and data protection, the laws in several states require companies to implement specific information security controls to protect certain types of personally identifiable information. Likewise, all but a few states have laws in place requiring companies to notify users if there is a security breach that compromises certain categories of their personally identifiable information. Any failure on our part to comply with these laws may subject us to significant liabilities.

 

We are also subject to federal and state laws regarding privacy of listener data. Our privacy policy and terms of use describe our practices concerning the use, transmission and disclosure of listener information and are posted on our website. Any failure to comply with our posted privacy policy or privacy-related laws and regulations could result in proceedings against us by governmental authorities or others, which could harm our business. Further, any failure by us to adequately protect the privacy or security of our users’ information could result in a loss of confidence in our brand among existing and potential users, and ultimately, in a loss of users and advertising users, which could adversely affect our business.

 

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We will also collect and use certain types of information from our users in accordance with the privacy policies posted on our websites. We will collect personally identifiable information directly from our platform’s users when they register to use our service, fill out their listener profiles, post comments, use our service’s social networking features, participate in polls and contests and sign up to receive email newsletters. We may also obtain information about our platform’s users from other platform users and third parties. We also collect information from users using our other websites in order to provide ticketing services and other user support. Our policy is to use the collected information to customize and personalize our offerings for platform users and other users and to enhance the listeners’ experience when using our service.

 

The sharing, use, disclosure and protection of personally identifiable information and other user data are governed by existing and evolving federal, state and international laws. We could be adversely affected if legislation or regulations are expanded to require changes in business practices or privacy policies, or if governing jurisdictions interpret or implement their legislation or regulations in ways that negatively affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. We intend to attract users from all over the world, and as we expand into new jurisdictions, the costs associated with compliance with these regulations increases. It is possible that government or industry regulation in these markets will require us to deviate from our standard processes, which will increase operational cost and risk. We intend to commit capital resources to ensure our compliance with any such regulations.

  

Intellectual Property

 

While we do not currently have a trademark on the LiveXLive name, on September 23, 2017, we entered into a Co-Existence Agreement with Monday Sessions Media, Inc. d/b/a Live X (“Live X”), in which we consented to Live X’s use and registration of the name and mark Live X and agreed to not challenge, dispute or contest Live X’s rights in such mark. Pursuant to this agreement, we agreed to not offer certain production services to third party businesses in connection with our mark LIVEXLIVE and use commercially reasonable efforts to afford Live X opportunities to bid on production or streaming service opportunities. We intend to protect our trademarks, brands, copyrights, patents and other original and acquired works, ancillary goods and services. In connection with the Slacker acquisition, we acquired a trademark for the Slacker name. We believe that certain trademarks and other proprietary rights that we may apply for or otherwise obtain will have significant value and will be important to our brand-building efforts and the marketing of our services. We cannot predict, however, whether steps taken by us to protect our proprietary rights will be successful or adequate to prevent misappropriation, infringement or other violation of these rights. Upon the consummation of any future acquisitions, we may acquire additional registered trademarks, as well as applied-for trademarks potentially for worldwide use. See section below entitled “Item 1A. Risk Factors — We may be unable to adequately protect our intellectual property rights.”

 

Employees

 

As of March 31, 2020, we had 76 full-time employees and 33 other persons who provide to us consulting and other services, including through our subsidiaries. All of our employees are located in the United States. We are not party to any collective bargaining agreements and have not experienced any strikes or work stoppages. We believe our relationship with all of our employees is very good. In addition to our employees, we engage key consultants and utilize the services of independent contractors to perform various services on our behalf. Some of our executive officers and directors are engaged in outside business activities that we do not believe conflict with our business.

 

Going Concern

 

We are dependent upon the receipt of capital investment and other financing to fund our ongoing operations and to execute our business plan. If continued funding and capital resources are unavailable at reasonable terms, we may not be able to implement our plan of operations. We may be required to obtain alternative or additional financing, from financial institutions or otherwise, in order to maintain and expand our existing operations. The failure by us to obtain such financing would have a material adverse effect upon our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. Our independent registered public accounting firm has included an explanatory paragraph in their report in our audited consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020 to the effect that our losses from operations and our negative cash flows from operations raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. Our consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might be necessary should we be unable to continue as a going concern within one year after the date that the financial statements are issued. We may be required to cease operations which could result in our stockholders losing all or almost all of their investment.

 

Geographic Information

 

For additional information regarding our segment, including information about our financial results by geography, see Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and Note 1 – Organization and Basis of Presentation to our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report.

 

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Corporate History

 

On August 2, 2017, our name changed from “Loton, Corp” to “LiveXLive Media, Inc.”, and we reincorporated from the State of Nevada to the State of Delaware, pursuant to the reincorporation merger of Loton, Corp (“Loton”), a Nevada corporation, with and into LiveXLive Media, Inc., a Delaware corporation and Loton’s wholly owned subsidiary, effected on the same date. As a result of such reincorporation merger, Loton ceased to exist as a separate entity, with LiveXLive Media, Inc. being the surviving entity. Our principal executive offices are located at 9200 Sunset Boulevard, Suite #1201, West Hollywood, CA 90069.

 

Available Information

 

Our main corporate website address is www.livexlive.com. Copies of our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Current Reports on Form 8-K and our other reports and documents filed with or furnished to the SEC, and any amendments to the foregoing, will be provided without charge to any shareholder submitting a written request to the Secretary at our principal executive offices or by calling (310) 601-2500. All of our SEC filings are also available on our website at http://ir.livexlive.com/ir-home as soon as reasonably practicable after having been electronically filed or furnished to the SEC. All of our SEC filings are also available at the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov.

 

We began formal investor earnings calls during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2019, and certain events we participate in or host with members of the investment community on the investor relations section of our corporate website. Additionally, we provide notifications of news or announcements regarding our financial performance, including SEC filings, investor events, and press and earnings releases on the investor relations section of our corporate website. Investors can receive notifications of new press releases and SEC filings by signing up for email alerts on our website. Further corporate governance information, including our board committee charters and code of ethics, is also available on our website at http://ir.livexlive.com/ir-home. The information included on our website or social media accounts, or any of the websites of entities that we are affiliated with, is not incorporated by reference into this Annual Report or in any other report or document we file with the SEC, and any references to our website or social media accounts are intended to be inactive textual references only.

 

 Item 1A.

Risk Factors

 

You should carefully consider the risks described below, together with all of the other information included in this Annual Report, before deciding whether to invest in our common stock. The occurrence of any of the risks described below could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and future growth prospects. In these circumstances, the market price of our common stock could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment.

 

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry

 

We rely on one key customer for a substantial percentage of our revenue. The loss of our largest customer or the significant reduction of business or growth of business from our largest customer could significantly adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our business is dependent, and we believe that it will continue to depend, on our customer relationship with Tesla, which accounted for 60% of our consolidated revenue for the year ended March 31, 2020, and 41% of our consolidated revenue for the year ended March 31, 2019. Our existing agreement with Tesla governs our music services to its car user base in North America, including our audio music streaming services. If we fail to maintain certain minimum service level requirements related to our service with Tesla or other obligations related to our technology or services, Tesla may terminate our agreement to provide them with such service. Tesla may also terminate our agreement for convenience at any time. If Tesla terminates our agreement, requires us to renegotiate the terms of our existing agreement or we are unable to renew such agreement on mutually agreeable terms, no longer makes our music services available to Tesla’s car user base, becomes a native music service provider, replaces our music services with one or more of our competitors and/or we experience a significant reduction of business from Tesla, our business, financial condition and results of operations would be materially adversely affected.

 

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In addition, a significant amount of the subscription revenue we generate from Tesla is indirectly subsidized by Tesla to its customers, which Tesla is not committed to carry indefinitely, including the ability to terminate and/or change our music services for convenience at any time. Should our subscription revenue services no longer be subsidized by and/or made available by Tesla to its customers or if Tesla reclassifies or renegotiates with us the definition of a paid subscriber or demands credit for past subscribers that no longer meet such requirement, there can be no assurance that we will continue to maintain the same number of paid subscribers or receive the same levels of subscription service revenue and future period subscription revenue may substantially fluctuate accordingly. There is no assurance that we would be able to replace Tesla or lost business with Tesla with one or more customers that generate comparable revenue. Furthermore, there could be no assurance that our revenue from Tesla continues to grow at the same rate or at all. Any revenue growth will depend on our success in growing such customer’s revenues on our platform and expanding our customer base to include additional customers.

 

Tesla has also integrated Spotify Premium to the car’s in-dash touchscreen for its Model S, Model X and Model 3 vehicles. Tesla owners now have access to our music streaming services, Spotify and TuneIn natively. There is no assurance that our music streaming services will be available in every current and/or future Tesla model. Furthermore, our current and future competitors like Spotify, Apple Music, Tesla (if it becomes a native music service provider) and others may have more well-established brand recognition, more established relationships with, and superior access to content providers and other industry stakeholders, greater financial, technical and other resources, more sophisticated technologies or more experience in the markets in which we compete. If we are unable to compete successfully for users against our competitors by maintaining and increasing our presence and visibility, the number of users of our network may fail to increase as expected or decline and our advertising sales, subscription fees and other revenue streams will suffer.

 

In addition, we have derived, and we believe that we will continue to derive, a substantial portion of our revenues from a limited number of other customers. Any revenue growth will depend on our success in growing our customers’ revenues on our platform and expanding our customer base to include additional customers. If we were to lose one or more of our key customers, there is no assurance that we would be able to replace such customers or lost business with new customers that generate comparable revenue, which would significantly adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our limited operating history makes it difficult to evaluate our current business and future prospects, and we may be unsuccessful in executing our business model.

 

We began our current business operations in February 2015 and have a limited operating history related to our current business. We are now a global digital media company focused on live entertainment. As of March 31, 2020, we generated minimal revenue from the operations of our live music streaming platform. In December 2017, we acquired Slacker Radio (“Slacker”) and substantially all of our revenues as of March 31, 2020 were generated by Slacker. To date, we have devoted most of our financial resources to developing our current business model, growing Slacker’s user base and product offerings and making key acquisitions. We expect to continue to incur substantial and increased expenses as we continue to execute our business approach, including expanding and developing our content and platform and potentially making other accretive acquisitions.

 

The likelihood of our success must be considered in light of the problems, expenses, difficulties, complications and delays frequently encountered by a developing company starting a new business enterprise, the difficulties that may be encountered with integrating acquired companies and the highly competitive environment in which we operate. For example, while several companies have been successful in the digital music streaming industry and the online video streaming industry, companies have had no or limited success in operating a premium Internet network devoted to live music and music-related video content. Because we have a limited operating history, we cannot assure you that our business will be profitable or that we will ever generate sufficient revenue to fully meet our expenses and support our anticipated activities.

 

We have incurred significant operating and net losses since our inception and anticipate that we will continue to incur significant losses for the foreseeable future; our auditors have included in their audit report for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020 an explanatory paragraph as to substantial doubt as to our ability to continue as a going concern.

 

As reflected in our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere herein, we have a history of losses, incurred significant operating and net losses in each year since our inception, including net losses of $38.9 million and $37.8 million for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively, and cash used in operating activities of $4.9 million and $5.8 million for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. As of March 31, 2020, we had an accumulated deficit of $128.1 million and a working capital deficiency of $30.0 million. We anticipate incurring additional losses until such time that we can generate significant increases to our revenues, and/or reduce our operating costs and losses. To date, we have financed our operations exclusively through the sale of equity and/or debt securities (including convertible securities). The size of our future net losses will depend, in part, on the rate of future expenditures and our ability to significantly grow our business and increase our revenues. We expect to continue to incur substantial and increased expenses as we grow our business. We also expect a continued increase in our expenses associated with our operations as a publicly-traded company. We may incur significant losses in the future for a number of other reasons, including unsuccessful acquisitions, costs of integrating new businesses, expenses, difficulties, complications, delays and other unknown events. As a result of the foregoing, we expect to continue to incur significant losses for the foreseeable future and we may not be able to achieve or sustain profitability.

 

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Our auditors have included in their audit report for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020 a “going concern” explanatory paragraph raising substantial doubt as to our ability to continue as a going concern. Our ability to meet our total liabilities of $61.4 million as of March 31, 2020, and to continue as a going concern, is dependent on our ability to increase revenue, reduce costs, achieve a satisfactory level of profitable operations, obtain additional sources of suitable and adequate financing and further develop and execute on our business plan. We may never achieve profitability, and even if we do, we may not be able to sustain being profitable. As a result of the going concern uncertainty, there is an increased risk that you could lose the entire amount of your investment in our company, which assumes the realization of our assets and the satisfaction of our liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business. 

 

We may require additional capital, including to fund our current debt obligations and to fund potential acquisitions and capital expenditures, which may not be available on terms acceptable to us or at all and which depends on many factors beyond our control.

 

Historically, we have funded our business operations and capital expenditures primarily through equity and/or debt issuances (including convertible securities). To support our growing business, we must have sufficient capital to continue to make significant investments in our platform and product offerings. If we raise additional funds through the issuance of equity, equity-linked or debt securities, those securities may have rights, preferences or privileges senior to those of our common stock, and our existing stockholders may experience dilution. Any debt financing secured by us in the future could involve restrictive covenants relating to our capital-raising activities and other financial and operational matters, which may make it more difficult for us to obtain additional capital and to pursue business opportunities. Any refinancing of our indebtedness could be at significantly higher interest rates, require additional restrictive financial and operational covenants, or require us to incur significant transaction fees, issue warrants or other equity securities, or issue convertible securities. These restrictions and covenants may restrict our ability to finance our operations and engage in, expand, or otherwise pursue our business activities and strategies. Our ability to comply with these covenants and restrictions may be affected by events beyond our control, and breaches of these covenants and restrictions could result in a default and an acceleration of our obligations under a debt agreement. If we raise additional funds through collaborations and licensing arrangements, we might be required to relinquish significant rights to our technologies or our solutions under development, or grant licenses on terms that are not favorable to us, which could lower the economic value of those programs to us.

 

We evaluate financing opportunities from time to time, and our ability to obtain financing will depend, among other things, on our development efforts, business plans and operating performance and the condition of the capital markets at the time we seek financing and to an extent, subject to general economic, financial, competitive, legislative, regulatory and other factors that are beyond our control. We cannot be certain that additional financing will be available to us on favorable terms, or at all. If we are unable to obtain adequate financing or financing on terms satisfactory to us, when we require it, our ability to continue to support our business growth and to respond to business challenges could be significantly limited, and our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

 

The COVID-19 pandemic is adversely impacting our ability to produce on-premise live events, and to a lesser extent portions of our programmatic advertising revenue; the pandemic is also adversely affecting our global economy, which could adversely impact other parts of our business, including our ability to access capital markets, if and when required. Additional factors could exacerbate such negative consequences and/or cause other and potentially materially adverse effects.

 

An outbreak of a novel strain of coronavirus, COVID-19 in December 2019 subsequently became a pandemic after spreading globally, including the United States. While the COVID-19 pandemic did not materially adversely affect our financial results and business operations during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020, it did adversely impact parts of our business during the first quarter of fiscal March 31, 2021, namely our live events and programmatic advertising. Due to the global pandemic and government actions taking in response, since March 2020, all in person festivals, concerts and events have either been canceled or suspended, and it is uncertain when they will be permitted to resume. With our acquisition of React Presents in February 2020, we are presently unable to produce and promote more than 200 forecasted live events in fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, including our flagship live event Spring Awakening festival which is typically annually produced in June. Moreover, our programmatic advertising is presently adversely impacted as COVID-19 caused advertising demand to decline and as a result, overall advertising cost per thousand impressions rates across our platform were subsequently reduced. Furthermore, as of the date of this Annual Report, we are not livestreaming any fan attended live festivals, concerts or other in-person live events on our platform or channels and it is unclear when streaming of fan attended live festivals, concerts or other in-person live events will again become available to us. In addition, the outbreak and any preventative or protective actions that governments, other third parties or we may take in respect of the coronavirus may result in a period of business disruption and reduced operations. For example, Tesla was ordered to keep its main U.S. factory closed for a substantial amount of time.

 

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The extent to which the coronavirus impacts our results will depend on future developments, including new information which may emerge concerning the severity of the coronavirus and the actions taken by us and our partners to contain the coronavirus or treat its impact, among others. The impact of the suspension or cancellation of in-person live festivals, concerts or other live events, and any other continuing effects of COVID-19 on our business operations (such as general economic conditions and impacts on the advertising, sponsorship and ticketing marketplace and our partners), may result in a decrease in our revenues, and if the global COVID-19 epidemic continues for an extended period, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

 

Our new distribution agreements are dependent upon our compliance with their contractual obligations. Our distribution agreements generally require us to meet certain content criteria, such as availability of a minimum threshold for event content streaming throughout the year for our distributors. If we were unable to meet these criteria due to the suspension of in person festivals and live events, we could become subject to remedies available to the distributors. In addition, the absence of in person festivals and live events could impact our ability to renew expiring agreements on terms as attractive as our existing terms or at all. We may also be forced develop a significant number of additional digital events and festivals and/or more rapidly than we originally anticipated to fill the content requirements on our platform, including those required by our distributors. Furthermore, government actions or regulations applicable to our business or our distributors in response to COVID-19 could have an adverse effect on our revenues.

 

Our estimate of the ultimate impact of the coronavirus pandemic, including the extent of any adverse impacts on our business, revenues, results of operations, cash flows and financial condition, which will depend on, among other things, the duration and spread of coronavirus, the impact of federal and local government actions that have been and continue to be taken in response, and the effectiveness of actions taken to contain or mitigate the pandemic and economic conditions is subject to significant uncertainty.

 

Depending on the duration and severity of the current COVID-19 pandemic, it may also have the effect of heightening many of the other risks described in this Annual Report and our other filings with the SEC, such as risks relating to our ability to further develop and execute on our business plan; our ability to access capital markets to obtain additional sources of suitable and adequate financing; restricted access to capital and increased borrowing costs; our ability to fund our current debt obligations and complying with the covenants contained in the agreements that govern our existing indebtedness; our ability to fund potential acquisitions and capital expenditures; and our ability to maintain adequate internal controls in the event that our employees are restricted from accessing our regular offices for a significant period of time.

 

We cannot reasonably estimate the ultimate impact and duration of the coronavirus pandemic, including the extent of any adverse impacts on our business, revenues, results of operations, cash flows and financial condition, which cannot currently be predicted and will depend on, among other things, the duration and spread of coronavirus, the impact of federal and local government actions that have been and continue to be taken in response, and the effectiveness of actions taken to contain or mitigate the pandemic and economic conditions.

 

The ability of our employees to work may be significantly impacted by the coronavirus.

 

Our employees are being affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Operationally, all of our employees and consultants are working remotely, and we have restricted our production activities and business travel. The health of our workforce is of primary concern and we may need to enact further precautionary measures to help minimize the risk of our employees being exposed to the coronavirus. If significant portions of our workforce, including key personnel, are unable to work effectively because of illness, government actions or other restrictions in connection with the COVID-19 pandemic, any adverse impact of the pandemic on our businesses could be exacerbated. Furthermore, our management team is focused on mitigating the adverse effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has required and will continue to require a large investment of time and resources across our entire Company, thereby diverting their attention from other priorities that existed prior to the outbreak of the pandemic. If these conditions worsen, or last for an extended period of time, our ability to manage our business may be impaired, and operational risks, cybersecurity risks and other risks facing us even prior to the pandemic may be elevated.

 

We cannot predict the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our customers, suppliers, vendors, and other business partners, and the full effects of the COVID-19 pandemic are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted.

 

The COVID -19 pandemic is partially affecting our revenue, sponsorship and advertiser partners, vendors and other business partners, and we are not able to assess the full extent of the current impact nor predict the ultimate consequences that will result therefrom. For example, as a result of COVID-19 pandemic, our largest customer experienced a government ordered halt to its production in part of the quarter ended March 31, 2020 and early quarter ended June 30, 2020 related to COVID-19, but resumed its production as of the date of this Annual Report which temporary halt will in turn slow subscriber growth in the first quarter of 2021 and potentially beyond. In addition, as a result of COVID-19, certain of our advertising and sponsor partners have been forced to reduce their marketing budgets. If our revenue and/or sales channels are substantially impaired for an extended period of time, our revenues will be materially reduced.

 

We are continuously monitoring our own operations and intend to take appropriate actions to mitigate the risks arising from the COVID-19 pandemic to the best of our abilities, but there can be no assurances that we will be successful in doing so. To the extent we are able to obtain information about and maintain communications with our revenue, sponsorship and advertiser partners, vendors and other business partners, we will seek to minimize disruptions to our revenue, content and distribution channels, but many circumstances will be beyond our control. Governmental action and/or regional quarantines may further result in labor shortages and work stoppages. All of these factors may have far reaching direct and indirect impacts on our business, operations, and financial results and condition. The ultimate extent of the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on our Company is highly uncertain and will depend on future developments which cannot be predicted. Even after the COVID-19 outbreak has subsided, we may continue to experience material adverse impact on our business as a result of its global economic impact, including any related recession, as well as lingering impact on demand for our services, our customers, suppliers, vendors and other business partners.

 

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Our business is partially dependent on our ability to secure music streaming rights from Content Providers and to stream their live music and music-related video content on our platform, and we may not be able to secure such content on commercially reasonable terms or at all.

 

Our business is dependent on our ability to secure rights to stream on our platform a variety of popular content from Content Providers. Our licensing, distribution and/or production arrangements with Content Providers may be short-term and do not guarantee the continuation or renewal of these arrangements on commercially reasonable terms, if at all. For example, our agreement with Rock in Rio expires in 2021 and there is no guarantee that we will be able to renew this agreement on commercially reasonable terms or at all. Additionally, while our agreements with music festivals and other live music events and venues allow us to stream content from such events and venues, we typically require additional permission from the artists performing at such events, other rights holders and venues. While the majority of artists at music festivals and other live music events and venues that we have contracts with have in the past agreed to allow us to stream their performances, there is no guarantee that artists at an event will agree to allow us to stream their performances. Any unwillingness of such partners to supply content to us or lack of availability of popular artists to perform at such venues and events could limit our ability to enhance user experience and deepen user engagement with our platform and therefore reduce our revenue opportunities. If we are unable to secure rights to steam our content, then our business, financial condition and results of operations would be adversely affected. Additionally, to the extent any music festival or other live music event that we have rights to stream is cancelled or delayed, whether as a result of cancellation by a pandemic, artists, weather, terrorism or otherwise, we may receive little or no content from such live event.

 

In the 2019 fiscal year, we also began livestreaming our own digital live events under “LiveXLive Presents”. In the 2020 fiscal year, we acquired React Presents, a producer, promoter and manager of in person live music festivals and events. In the 2021 fiscal year, we also began livestreaming our own digital festival and live events under “Music Lives” and “Music Lives ON”. As we continue to livestream and grow our own live events, we may directly compete with our current and prospective Content Providers. This direct competition with our current and prospective Content Providers could harm our existing and future relationships with our Content Providers, and may result in a decline in the number of live events partnership, license, distribution and/or production opportunities available to us, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Some Content Providers and distributors, currently or in the future, may also take action to make it more difficult or impossible for us to partner with, license, distribute and/or produce their content, including as a result of them offering a competing product. Other content owners, providers or distributors may seek to limit our access to, increase the cost of, or otherwise restrict or prohibit our use of such content. As a result, we may be unable to offer a wide variety of content at reasonable prices with acceptable usage rules or expand our geographic reach.

 

Additionally, some content on our platform is currently provided free of digital rights management to prevent the unauthorized redistribution of digital media. If our business model changes, we may have to develop or license digital rights management technology. There is no assurance that we will be able to develop or license such technology at a reasonable cost and in a timely manner. In addition, certain countries have passed or may propose and adopt legislation that would require us to license our digital rights management, if any, which could weaken the protection of content, subject us to piracy and also negatively affect arrangements with our Content Providers.

 

We may be unable to fund any significant up-front and/or guaranteed payment cash requirements associated with our live music streaming rights, which could result in the inability to secure and retain such streaming rights and may limit our operating flexibility, which may adversely affect our business, operating results and financial condition.

 

In order to secure event and festival live music streaming rights, we may be required to fund significant up-front and/or guaranteed payment cash requirements to artists or festival or event promoters prior to the event or festival taking place. For example, our agreement with Insomniac requires us to pay Insomniac $1 million per year during the 5-year term, in addition to other payments and upfront expenses required to be paid by us under the agreement, and there is no guarantee that we will be able to make such payments on time. As of March 31, 2020, we have estimated future up-front and minimum guarantee (“MGs”) commitments of $4.0 million. While some MGs are recoupable by us as a direct cost before we share any revenue with the underlying partners, such future MGs are not tied to a number of users, active users, premium subscribers or the number of times we stream such content on our platform. Accordingly, our ability to achieve and sustain profitability and operating leverage on our services in part depends on our ability to increase our revenues through increased sales of premium services and advertising sales on terms that maintain an adequate gross margin. The duration of our content acquisition agreements that contain MGs is typically between three to seven years, but our premium subscribers may cancel their subscriptions at any time. If our forecasts for premium subscribers do not meet our expectations or the number of our premium subscribers or advertising sales do not materialize and/or decline significantly during the term of our content acquisition agreements, our margins may be materially and adversely impacted. To the extent our premium service revenue growth or advertising sales do not meet our or our partners’ collective expectations, our business, operating results and financial condition also could be adversely impacted as a result of such MGs. In addition, the fixed cost nature of these MGs may limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the market segments in which we operate.

 

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We rely on estimates of the market share of licensable content controlled by each content provider, as well as our own user growth and forecasted advertising revenue, to forecast whether such MGs could be recouped against our actual content acquisition costs incurred over the duration of each content acquisition agreement. To the extent that these revenue and/or market share estimates underperform relative to our expectations, leading to content acquisition costs that do not exceed such up-front and minimum guarantees, our margins may be materially and adversely impacted. If we do not have sufficient cash on hand or available capacity to advance the necessary cash for any given artist, event or festival, we would not be able to retain the rights for that artist, festival or event, such counter parties may be able to terminate their content acquisition agreements with us, and as a result our business, financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected.

 

If we fail to increase the number of users consuming our live music and music-related video content on our platform, and/or the number of subscribers to Slacker, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected.

 

The size of our user base is critical to our success, and we will need to develop and grow our user base to be successful. We currently generate revenue from Slacker’s operations and expect to generate additional revenue based upon subscription, VOD, PPV, advertising and sponsorship, licensing, e-commerce and data, which is dependent on the number of users we retain and attract. For example, if we are unable to retain and attract users, we may be unable to attract users to our network and/or increase the frequency of users’ engagement with our platform. In addition, if users do not perceive our content as original, entertaining or engaging, we may not be able to attract sponsorship opportunities and/or increase the resulting frequency of users’ engagement with our platform and content. If we are unable to retain and attract users, our network and services could also be less attractive to potential new users, as well as to Content Providers and other Industry Stakeholders, which could have a material and adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our ability to attract and retain users is highly sensitive to rapidly changing public tastes in music and technology.

 

Our ability to attract and retain users is highly sensitive to rapidly changing public tastes in music and technology and is dependent on our ability to maintain the attractiveness of our platform, content, technology and reputation as a place where quality online live music and music-related video content can be accessed and enjoyed. We will rely on the popularity of our Content Providers and the quality of their respective content to retain users, secure sponsorships and to facilitate growth in revenue from advertising and e-commerce. Maintaining the popularity of our content will be challenging, and our relationship with music fans could be harmed for many reasons, including the quality and diversity of our online content, quality of the experience with a particular festival, event or club, our competitors developing relationships with more popular festivals, events or clubs or attracting talent from our businesses, adverse occurrences or publicity in connection with a festival, event or club and changes to public tastes that are beyond our control and difficult to anticipate. For example, if users do not perceive our platform and services to be original, entertaining, engaging, useful, reliable or trustworthy, we may be unable to attract and retain users to our network and/or increase the frequency of users’ engagement with our platform. Additionally, any cancellation or delay in music festivals, concerts or other live music events that we have rights to stream, or are otherwise associated with, may harm our reputation and make any related content less desirable to our users. A number of consumer-oriented music and/or tech websites that achieved early popularity have since seen their user bases or levels of engagement decline, in some cases precipitously. There is no guarantee that we will not experience a similar erosion of our user base. If our platform or content become less popular with music fans, our growth strategy would be harmed, which could in turn harm our business and financial results.

 

Our ability to attract and retain users depends upon many additional factors both within and beyond our control.

 

In addition to the popularity of our content, we believe that our ability to attract and retain users depends upon many factors both within and beyond our control, including:

 

  the popularity, usefulness, ease of use, performance and reliability of our platform, products and services, including Slacker and our LiveXLive Powered by Slacker application (“LXL App” or “LiveXLive App”), compared to those of our competitors;

 

  the timing and market acceptance of our platform, products and services, including Slacker and the LXL App;

 

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  users’ willingness to pay for subscription rights to our platform;

 

  our ability to develop and monetize an effective strategy to attract advertisers and sponsor of our platform;

 

  the frequency and relative prominence of the ads displayed by us or our competitors;

 

  our ability to establish and maintain relationships with our Content Providers to provide new content for our network;

 

  user concerns related to user privacy and our ability to keep user data secure;

 

  changes mandated by, or that we elect to make to address, legislation, regulatory authorities or litigation, including settlements and consent decrees, some of which may have a disproportionate effect on us;

 

  our ability to attract, retain and motivate talented employees, particularly engineers, designers and platform and content managers;

 

  fluctuations in costs of content which we may be unwilling or unable to pass through to our users;

 

  competitors’ offerings that may include more favorable terms than we offer in order to obtain agreements for new content or venue, festival or ticketing arrangements;

 

  technological changes and innovations that we are unable to adopt or are late in adopting that offer more attractive entertainment alternatives than we or other live streamed entertainment providers currently offer;

 

  general economic conditions which could cause consumers to reduce discretionary spending;

 

  our ability to develop and monetize an effective strategy to buildout our e-commerce revenue stream;

 

  acquisitions or consolidation within our industry, which may result in more formidable competitors; and

 

  our reputation and the brand strength relative to our competitors.

  

In addition to attracting and retaining users, we will need to minimize user churn and attract lapsed users back to our platform and services, while ensuring that our user acquisition cost does not exceed user life-time value.

 

If we are unable to attract and retain users, minimize user churn, fail to attract lapsed users and/or ensure that our user acquisition cost does not exceed our user life-time value, any of these factors could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our ability to increase the number of our listeners depends in part on our ability to establish and maintain relationships with automakers, automotive suppliers and consumer electronics manufacturers with products that integrate our service.

 

A key element of our strategy to expand the reach of our service and increase the number of our users and user hours spend on our platform is to establish and maintain relationships with automakers, automotive suppliers and consumer electronics manufacturers that integrate our service into and with their products. Working with certain third-party distribution partners, we currently offer listeners the ability to access our service through a variety of consumer electronics products used in the home and devices connected to or installed in automobiles. We intend to broaden our ability to reach additional listeners, and increase current listener hours, through other platforms and partners over time, including through direct integration into connected cars. However, product design cycles in consumer products and automotive manufacturing are lengthy, and we may not be able to achieve our goals in our desired timeframe, which could adversely impact our ability to grow our business.

 

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Our existing agreements with partners in the automobile and consumer electronics industries generally do not obligate those partners to offer our service in their products. In addition, some automobile manufacturers or their supplier partners may terminate their agreements with us for convenience. Our business could be adversely affected if our automobile partners and consumer electronics partners do not continue to provide access to our service or are unwilling to do so on terms acceptable to us. If we are forced to amend the business terms of our distribution agreements as a result of competitive pressure, our ability to maintain and expand the reach of our service and increase listener hours would be adversely affected, which would reduce our revenue and harm our operating results.

 

We are a party to many content acquisition and other license agreements that are complex and impose numerous obligations upon us which may make it difficult to operate our business, and a breach of such agreements could adversely affect our business, operating results and financial condition.

 

Many of our content acquisition and other license agreements are complex and impose numerous obligations on us, including obligations to, among other things:

 

  calculate and make payments based on complex royalty structures, which requires tracking usage of content on our service that may have inaccurate or incomplete metadata necessary for such calculation;

 

  provide periodic reports on the exploitation of the content in specified formats;

 

  represent that we will obtain all necessary publishing licenses and consents and pay all associated fees, royalties, and other amounts due for the licensing of musical compositions;

 

  provide advertising inventory;

 

  comply with certain broadcasting limitations and restrictions;

 

  comply with certain marketing and advertising restrictions; and

 

  comply with certain security and technical specifications.

 

Some of our content acquisition and other license agreements grant the licensor the right to audit our compliance with the terms and conditions of such agreements. In addition, some of our content acquisition and other license agreements require consent to undertake certain business initiatives and without such consent, our ability to undertake new business initiatives may be limited. This could hurt our competitive position.

 

If we materially breach any of these obligations or any other obligations set forth in any of our content acquisition and other license agreements, or if we use content in ways that are found to exceed the scope of such agreements, we could be subject to monetary penalties and our rights under such license agreements could be terminated, either of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results and financial condition. We may enter into settlement agreements in the future requiring us to make substantial payments as a result of claims that we are in breach of certain provisions in, or have exceeded the scope of, our content acquisition and other license agreements.

 

We may be unsuccessful in developing our original content.

 

We currently produce and plan to continue to produce original music-related video content, including LiveZone, and our other digital magazine-style news programming and original-concept digital pilots, documentaries and other original content. We believe that a positive reputation with users concerning our original content is important in attracting and retaining users. To the extent our content, in particular, our original programming, is perceived as low quality, offensive or otherwise not compelling to users, our ability to establish and maintain a positive reputation may be adversely impacted. If the original content we produce does not attract new users, we may not be able to cover our expenses to produce such programs, and our business, financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected.

  

As we continue to develop our original content, we will become responsible for higher production costs and other expenses. We may also take on risks associated with production, such as completion and key talent risk. To the extent we do not accurately anticipate costs or mitigate risks, or if we become liable for content we acquire, produce, license and/or distribute, our business may suffer. Litigation to defend these claims could be costly and the expenses and damages arising from any liability or unforeseen production risks could harm our results of operations. We may not be indemnified against claims or costs of these types and we may not have insurance coverage for these types of claims.

 

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We face competition for users’ attention and time.

 

The market for entertainment video and radio content is intensively competitive and subject to rapid change. We compete against other entertainment video and radio providers, such as (i) interactive on-demand audio content and pre-recorded entertainment, (ii) broadcast radio providers, including terrestrial and Internet radio providers, (iii) cable, satellite and Internet television and movie content providers, (iv) video gaming providers and (v) other sources of entertainment for our users’ attention and time. These content and service providers pose a competitive threat to the extent existing or potential users choose to consume their content or use their services rather than our content or our services. The online marketplace for live music and music-related content may rapidly evolve and provide users with a number of alternatives or new access models, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We face intense competition from competitors, and we may not be able to increase our revenues, which could adversely impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

The music streaming industry is highly competitive. The music streaming industry competes with other forms of entertainment for consumers’ discretionary spending, and within this industry we compete with other platforms to secure rights to content. In the markets in which we promote our streaming live music and music-related content, we face competition from other promoters and streaming operators. These competitors may engage in more extensive development efforts, undertake more far-reaching marketing campaigns, adopt more aggressive pricing policies and make more attractive offers to existing and potential artists. Our competitors may also develop services, advertising options or music platforms that are equal or superior to those we provide or that achieve greater market acceptance and brand recognition than we achieve. It is possible that new competitors may emerge and rapidly acquire significant market share.

 

Our current and future competitors may have more well-established brand recognition, more established relationships with, and superior access to, Content Providers and other Industry Stakeholders, greater financial, technical and other resources, more sophisticated technologies or more experience in the markets in which we compete. These competitors may also compete with us for key employees and other individual service providers who have relationships with popular music artists or other Content Providers and that have a history of being able to book such artists or secure the rights to stream their music. If we are unable to compete successfully for users against other providers by maintaining and increasing our presence and visibility, the number of users of our network may fail to increase as expected or decline and our advertising sales, subscription fees and other revenue streams will suffer.

 

Our new platform features, services and initiatives, changes to existing features, services and initiatives and our plan to continue to increase the number of live events that we produce could fail to attract users, content partners, advertisers and platform partners or generate revenue.

 

Our new platform features, services and initiatives and changes to existing features, services and initiatives could fail to attract users, content partners, advertisers and platform partners or generate revenue. Our industry is subject to rapid and frequent changes in technology, evolving customer needs and the frequent introduction by our competitors of new and enhanced offerings. We must constantly assess the playing field and determine whether we need to improve or re-allocate resources amongst our existing platform features and services or create new products (independently or in conjunction with third parties). Our ability to increase the size and engagement of our user base, attract content partners, advertisers and platform partners and generate revenue will depend on those decisions. We may introduce significant changes to our existing platform and services or develop and introduce new and unproven products and services, including technologies with which we have little or no prior development or operating experience. If new or enhanced platform features or services fail to engage users, content partners and advertisers, we may fail to attract or retain users or to generate sufficient revenue or operating profit to justify our investments, and our business and operating results could be adversely affected.

 

In addition, in the 2020 fiscal year, we produced and expect to continue to produce live events that have not yet directly generated revenue but which we believe will enhance our attractiveness to users, content partners and advertisers. We hope to drive increased advertising to monetize our live events and our platform and services through advertising and sponsorship opportunities associated with live streaming and music-related content. In the future, we may invest in new products, product features, services and initiatives and may produce a greater number of live events to generate revenue, but there is no guarantee these approaches will be successful. We may not be successful in future efforts to generate advertising and/or sponsorship opportunities and generate revenue from or able to monetize our new products or services and live events produced by us. If such strategic initiatives do not enhance our ability to monetize our existing platform and services, enable us to develop new approaches to monetization or meet the expectations of our users or third-party business partners, we may not be able to maintain or grow our revenue or recover any associated development costs and our operating results could be adversely affected.

   

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Expansion of our content beyond live events and pre-recorded music, such as podcasts, subjects us to additional business, legal, financial and competitive risks.

 

Expansion of our operations into delivery of content beyond live events and pre-recorded music involves numerous risks and challenges, including increased capital requirements, new competitors and the need to develop new strategic relationships. Growth into these new areas may require changes to our existing business model and cost structure, modifications to our infrastructure and exposure to new regulatory and legal risks, including infringement liability, any of which may require additional expertise that we currently do not have. There is no guarantee that we will be able to generate sufficient revenue from advertising sales associated with podcasts or other non-prerecorded-music content to offset the costs of acquiring this content. Further, we have established a reputation as a live music provider and our ability to gain acceptance and listenership for podcasts or other non-music content, and thus our ability to attract advertisers to this content, is not certain. Failure to obtain or retain rights to podcasts or other non-music content on acceptable terms, or at all, to successfully monetize and generate revenues from such content, or to effectively manage the numerous risks and challenges associated with such expansion could adversely affect our business and financial condition.

 

We face significant competition for advertiser and sponsorship spend.

 

We face significant competition for advertiser spend. Substantially all of our revenue to date is generated through subscriptions to our music platform, as well as sponsorships and ads on our website and mobile app. We compete against online and mobile businesses, including those referenced above, and traditional media outlets, such as television, radio and print, for advertising budgets. We also compete with advertising networks, exchanges, demand side platforms and other platforms, such as Google AdSense, DoubleClick Ad Exchange, Oath advertising platform and Microsoft Media Network, for marketing budgets and in the development of the tools and systems for managing and optimizing advertising campaigns. Slacker competes with platforms, such as Apple’s iTunes Music Store and Apple Music, Spotify, Sirius XM Satellite Radio, YouTube, Tidal, Napster and Amazon Prime that provide interactive on-demand audio content and pre-recorded entertainment. In order to grow our revenues and improve our operating results, we will need to increase our share of spending on advertising relative to our competitors, many of which are larger companies that offer more traditional and widely accepted advertising products. In addition, some of our larger competitors have substantially broader product or service offerings and leverage their relationships based on other products or services to gain additional share of advertising budgets. If we are not able to compete effectively for users and advertisers spend, our business, financial condition and results of operations would be materially and adversely affected.

 

Emerging industry trends in digital advertising may pose challenges for our ability to forecast or optimize our advertising inventory, which may adversely impact our ad-supported revenue.

 

The digital advertising industry is introducing new ways to measure and price advertising inventory. For example, a significant portion of advertisers are in the process of moving from purchasing advertisement impressions based on the number of advertisements served by the applicable ad server to a new “viewable” impression standard (based on number of pixels in view and duration) for select products. In the absence of a uniform industry standard, agencies and advertisers have adopted several different measurement methodologies and standards. In addition, measurement services may require technological integrations, which are still being evaluated by the advertising industry without an agreed-upon industry standard metric. As these trends in the industry continue to evolve, our advertising revenue may be adversely affected by the availability, accuracy, and utility of the available analytics and measurement technologies as well as our ability to successfully implement and operationalize such technologies and standards.

 

Further, the digital advertising industry is shifting to data-driven technologies and advertising products, such as automated buying. These data-driven advertising products and automated buying technologies allow publishers and advertisers to use data to target advertising toward specific groups of users who are more likely to be interested in the advertising message delivered to them. These advertising products and programmatic technologies are currently more developed in terms of advertising technology and industry adoption on the web than they are on mobile or on other software applications, and may not integrate with our desktop software version of the ad-supported services. Because the majority of our ad-supported user hours occur on mobile devices, if we are unable to deploy effective solutions to monetize the mobile device usage by our ad-supported user base, our ability to attract advertising spend, and ultimately our advertising revenue, may be adversely affected by this shift. In addition, we rely on third-party advertising technology platforms to participate in automated buying, and if these platforms cease to operate or experience instability in their business models, it also may adversely affect our ability to capture advertising spend.

 

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Our services and software are highly technical and may contain undetected software bugs or vulnerabilities, which could manifest in ways that could seriously harm our reputation and our business.

 

Our services and software are highly technical and complex. Our services or any other products we may introduce in the future, may contain undetected software bugs, hardware errors, and other vulnerabilities. These bugs and errors can manifest in any number of ways in our products, including through diminished performance, security vulnerabilities, malfunctions, or even permanently disabled products. We have a practice of regularly updating our products and some errors in our products may be discovered only after a product has been used by users, and may in some cases be detected only under certain circumstances or after extended use. Any errors, bugs or other vulnerabilities discovered in our code or backend after release could damage our reputation, drive away users, allow third parties to manipulate or exploit our software (including, for example, providing mobile device users a means to suppress advertisements without payment and gain access to features only available to the ad-supported service), lower revenue and expose us to claims for damages, any of which could seriously harm our business. Additionally, errors, bugs, or other vulnerabilities may—either directly or if exploited by third parties—affect our ability to make accurate royalty payments.

 

We also could face claims for product liability, tort or breach of warranty. Defending a lawsuit, regardless of its merit, is costly and may divert management’s attention and seriously harm our reputation and our business. In addition, if our liability insurance coverage proves inadequate or future coverage is unavailable on acceptable terms or at all, our business could be seriously harmed.

  

Interruptions, delays or discontinuations in service arising from our own systems or from third parties could impair the delivery of our Service and harm our business.

 

We rely on systems housed in our own facilities and upon third parties, including bandwidth providers and third-party “cloud” data storage services, to enable our users to receive our content in a dependable, timely, and efficient manner. We have experienced and may in the future experience periodic service interruptions and delays involving our own systems and those of third parties that we work with. Both our own facilities and those of third parties are vulnerable to damage or interruption from earthquakes, floods, fires, power loss, telecommunications failures, and similar events. They also are subject to break-ins, sabotage, intentional acts of vandalism, the failure of physical, administrative, technical, and cyber security measures, terrorist acts, natural disasters, human error, the financial insolvency of third parties that we work with, and other unanticipated problems or events. The occurrence of any of these events could result in interruptions in our services and to unauthorized access to, or alteration of, the content and data contained on our systems and that these third parties store and deliver on our behalf.

 

Any disruption in the services provided by these third parties could materially adversely impact our business reputation, customer relations, and operating results. Upon expiration or termination of any of our agreements with third parties, we may not be able to replace the services provided to us in a timely manner or on terms and conditions, including service levels and cost, that are favorable to us, and a transition from one third party to another could subject us to operational delays and inefficiencies until the transition is complete.

 

We rely upon the Google Cloud Platform to operate certain aspects of our business and to store certain data, and any disruption of or interference with our use of the Google Cloud Platform could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition.

 

Google Cloud Platform (“GCP”) provides a distributed computing infrastructure platform for business operations, or what is commonly referred to as a cloud computing service. We have designed our software and computer systems to utilize data processing, storage capabilities, and other services provided by GCP. Currently, we are in the process of transitioning all of our data storage (including personal data of users and music data licensed from rights holders) and computing from our own servers to GCP. We cannot easily switch our GCP operations to another cloud provider, and any disruption of, or interference with, our use of GCP could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition. While the consumer side of Google competes with us, we do not believe that Google will use the GCP operation in such a manner as to gain competitive advantage against our Service. Subsequent to year end, we entered into a new service agreement with Google for the use of GCP.

 

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If we fail to accurately predict, recommend, and stream and play music that our users enjoy, we may fail to retain existing users and attract new users in sufficient numbers to meet investor expectations for growth or to operate our business profitably.

 

We believe that a key differentiating factor between our Company and other music Content Providers is our ability to predict music that our users will enjoy. Our system for predicting user content and music preferences and selecting content and music tailored to our users’ individual music tastes is based on advanced data analytics systems and our proprietary algorithms. We have invested, and will continue to invest, significant resources in refining these technologies; however, we cannot assure you that such investments will yield an attractive return or that such refinements will be effective. The effectiveness of our ability to predict user content and music preferences and select content and music tailored to our users’ individual music tastes depends in part on our ability to gather and effectively analyze large amounts of user data. In addition, our ability to offer users content and songs that they have not previously seen or heard and impart a sense of discovery depends on our ability to acquire and appropriately categorize additional content and songs that will appeal to our users’ diverse and changing tastes. While we are continuously increasing our content and have a large catalog of songs available to stream, we must continuously produce, acquire, identify and analyze additional content and songs that our users will enjoy and we may not effectively do so. Our ability to predict and select content and music that our users enjoy is critical to the perceived value of our services among users and failure to make accurate predictions could materially adversely affect our ability to adequately attract and retain users, increase hours our users spend on our platforms and sell advertising to meet investor expectations for growth or to operate the business profitably.

 

If we are unable to increase revenue from our services on mobile devices, such as smartphones, our results of operations may be materially adversely affected.

 

Our business model with respect to monetization of our services on mobile and connected devices is still evolving. As users migrate away from personal computers, there is increasing pressure to monetize mobile. In substantially all markets, we offer our ad-supported services on mobile, from which we generate advertising revenue. However, to date we primarily rely on our premium services to generate revenue on mobile and other connected devices. If we are unable to effectively monetize our services on mobile and connected devices, our business, operating results and financial condition may suffer.

  

Negative media coverage could adversely affect our business.

 

We receive sizable media coverage around the world. Unfavorable publicity regarding, for example, payments to music labels, publishers, artists and other copyright owners, our privacy practices, terms of service, service changes, service quality, litigation or regulatory activity, government surveillance, the actions of our advertisers, the actions of our developers whose services are integrated with our services, the use of our services for illicit, objectionable or illegal ends, the quality and integrity of content streamed on our services or the actions of other companies that provide similar services to us, could materially adversely affect our reputation. Such negative publicity also could have an adverse effect on the size, engagement and loyalty of our user base and result in decreased revenue, which could materially adversely affect our business, operating results and financial condition.

 

Our business depends on a strong brand, and any failure to maintain, protect and enhance our brand would hurt our ability to retain or expand our base of ad-supported users, premium subscribers and advertisers.

 

We have developed a strong “Slacker” brand and are developing what we hope to be a strong “LiveXLive” brand in the future that we believe contributes and will contribute significantly to the success of our business. Maintaining, protecting and enhancing the “LiveXLive” and “Slacker” brands is critical to expanding our base of ad-supported users, premium subscribers and advertisers, and will depend largely on our ability to continue to develop and provide an innovative and high-quality experience for our users and to attract advertisers, content owners, mobile device manufacturers, and other consumer electronic product manufacturers to work with us, which we may not do successfully. If we do not successfully maintain a strong brand, our business could be harmed.

 

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Our brands may be impaired by a number of other factors, including any failure to keep pace with technological advances on our platform or with our services, slower load times for our services, a decline in the quality or quantity of the content available on our services, a failure to protect our intellectual property rights or any alleged violations of law, regulations, or public policy. Additionally, the actions of our developers, advertisers, and content partners may affect our brand if users do not have a positive experience using third-party applications or websites integrated with us or that make use of our content. Further, if our partners fail to maintain high standards for products that are integrated into our services, fail to display our trademarks on their products in breach of our agreements with them, or use our trademarks incorrectly or in an unauthorized manner, or if we partner with manufacturers of products that our users reject, the strength of our brand could be adversely affected.

 

We have historically been required to spend significant resources to establish and maintain our brands. If we are unable to maintain the growth rate in the number of our ad-supported users and premium subscribers, we may be required to expend greater resources on advertising, marketing and other brand-building efforts to preserve and grow consumer awareness of our brand, which would adversely affect our operating results and may not be effective.

 

Our trademarks, trade dress and other designations of origin are important elements of our brand. We have registered “Slacker” as a trademark in the United States and certain other jurisdictions around the world. Nevertheless, competitors or other companies may adopt marks similar to ours, or use our marks and confusingly similar terms as keywords in Internet search engine advertising programs, thereby impeding our ability to build brand identity and possibly leading to confusion among our users. We cannot assure you that our trademark applications, even for key marks, will be approved. We may face opposition from third parties to our applications to register key trademarks in foreign jurisdictions in which we have expanded or may expand our presence. If we are unsuccessful in defending against these oppositions, our trademark applications may be denied. Whether or not our trademark applications are denied, third parties may claim that our trademarks infringe upon their rights. As a result, we could be forced to pay significant settlement costs or cease the use of these trademarks and associated elements of our brand in those or other jurisdictions. Doing so could harm our brand or brand recognition and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operation.

     

We are subject to a number of risks related to credit card and debit card payments we accept.

 

We accept payments mainly through credit and debit card transactions. For credit and debit card payments, we pay interchange and other fees, which may increase over time. An increase in those fees would require us to either increase the prices we charge for our premium service, which could cause us to lose premium subscribers and subscription revenue, or suffer an increase in our costs without a corresponding increase in the price we charge for our premium service, either of which could harm our business, operating results and financial condition.

 

Additionally, we rely on third-party service providers for payment processing services, including the processing of credit and debit cards. In particular, we rely on one third-party service provider, Cybersource, for all of our payment processing. Our business could be materially disrupted if these third-party service providers become unwilling or unable to provide these services to us.

 

If we or our service providers for payment processing services have problems with our billing software, or the billing software malfunctions, it could have a material adverse effect on our user satisfaction and could cause one or more of the major credit card companies to disallow our continued use of their payment products. In addition, if our billing software fails to work properly and, as a result, we do not automatically charge our premium subscribers’ credit cards on a timely basis or at all, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

 

We also are subject to payment card association operating rules, certification requirements, and rules governing electronic funds transfers, which could change or be reinterpreted to make it more difficult for us to comply. Currently, we are fully compliant with the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard v3.2 (“PCI DSS”), a security standard with which companies that collect, store, or transmit certain data regarding credit and debit cards, credit and debit card holders, and credit and debit card transactions are required to comply. This is an annual certification exercise, and if we fail to comply, we may violate payment card association operating rules, U.S. federal and state laws and regulations, and the terms of our contracts with payment processors and merchant banks. Such failure to comply fully also may subject us to fines, penalties, damages, and civil liability, and may result in the loss of our ability to accept credit and debit card payments. Further, there is no guarantee that, even if we are in compliance with PCI DSS, we will maintain PCI DSS compliance or that such compliance will prevent illegal or improper use of our payment systems or the theft, loss, or misuse of data pertaining to credit and debit cards, credit and debit card holders, and credit and debit card transactions.

 

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If we fail to adequately control fraudulent credit card transactions, we may face civil liability, diminished public perception of our security measures, and significantly higher credit card-related costs, each of which could adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations. If we are unable to maintain our chargeback rate or refund rates at acceptable levels, credit card and debit card companies may increase our transaction fees or terminate their relationships with us. Any increases in our credit card and debit card fees could adversely affect our results of operations, particularly if we elect not to raise our rates for our premium services to offset the increase. The termination of our ability to process payments on any major credit or debit card would significantly impair our ability to operate our business.

 

We are subject to a number of risks related to other payment solution providers.

 

We accept payments through various payment solution providers, such as telco integrated billings and third-party payment processors. These payment solution providers provide services to us in exchange for a fee, which may be subject to change. Furthermore, we rely on their accurate and timely reports on sales and redemptions. If such accurate and timely reports are not being provided, it will affect the accuracy of our reports to our licensors, and also affect the accuracy of our financial reporting.

  

Our business emphasizes rapid innovation and prioritizes long-term user engagement over short-term financial condition or results of operations. That strategy may yield results that sometimes do not align with the market’s expectations. If that happens, our stock price may be negatively affected.

 

As our business grows and becomes more complex, our success will depend on our ability to quickly develop and launch new and innovative products. We believe our culture fosters this goal. Our focus on complexity and quick reactions could result in unintended outcomes or decisions that are poorly received by our users, advertisers, or partners. Our culture also prioritizes our long-term user engagement over short-term financial condition or results of operations. We frequently make decisions that may reduce our short-term revenue or profitability if we believe that the decisions benefit the aggregate user experience and will thereby improve our financial performance over the long-term. These decisions may not produce the long-term benefits that we expect, in which case, our user growth and engagement, our relationships with advertisers and partners, as well as our business, operating results, and financial condition could be seriously harmed.

 

Streaming depends on effectively working with third-party platforms, operating systems, online platforms, hardware, networks, regulations, and standards we do not control. Changes in our services or those operating systems, hardware, networks, regulations, or standards, and our limitations on our ability to access those platforms, operating systems, hardware or networks may seriously harm our business.

 

Our services require high-bandwidth data capabilities. If the costs of data usage increase or access to data networks is limited, our business may be seriously harmed. Additionally, to deliver high-quality audio, video, and other content over networks, our services must work well with a range of technologies, systems, networks, regulations and standards that we do not control. In addition, the adoption of any laws or regulations that adversely affect the growth, popularity, or use of the Internet, including laws governing Internet neutrality, could decrease the demand for our Service and increase our cost of doing business. Previously, Federal Communications Commission (the “FCC”) “open Internet rules” prohibited mobile providers in the United States from impeding access to most content, or otherwise unfairly discriminating against Content Providers like us. These rules also prohibited mobile providers from entering into arrangements with specific Content Providers for faster or better access over their data networks. However, on December 14, 2017, the FCC voted to repeal the “open Internet rules” and as a result, broadband services are now subject to less U.S. federal regulation. A number of parties have already stated they would appeal this order, and it is possible United States Congress may adopt legislation restoring some of the “open Internet rules.” If, as a result of the repeal of “open Internet rules,” broadband providers in the United States decrease access to certain content, start entering into arrangements with specific Content Providers for faster or better access over their data networks, or otherwise unfairly discriminate against Content Providers like us, this could increase our cost of doing business and put us at a competitive disadvantage relative to larger competitors. Additionally, mobile providers may be able to limit our users’ ability to access our platforms or make them a less attractive alternative to our competitors’ applications. If that occurs, our business, operating results and financial condition would be seriously harmed.

 

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The European Union (the “EU”) currently requires equal access to Internet content. Additionally, as part of its Digital Single Market initiative, the EU may impose network security, disability access, or 911-like obligations on “over-the-top” services such as those provided by us, which could increase our costs. If the EU or the courts modify these open Internet rules, mobile providers may be able to limit our users’ ability to access our platforms or make them a less attractive alternative to our competitors’ applications. If that occurs, our business, operating results and financial condition would be seriously harmed.

 

We rely on a variety of operating systems, online platforms, hardware, and networks to reach our customers. These platforms range from desktop and mobile operating systems and application stores to wearables and intelligent voice assistants. The owners or operators of these platforms may not share our interests and may restrict our access to them or place conditions on access that would materially affect our ability to access those platforms. In particular, where the owner of a platform also is our direct competitor, the platform may attempt to use this position to affect our access to customers and ability to compete. For example, an online platform might arbitrarily remove our services from its platform, deprive us of access to business critical data, or engage in other harmful practices. Online platforms also may unilaterally impose certain requirements that negatively affect our ability to convert users to the premium service, such as conditions that limit our freedom to communicate promotions and offers to our users. Similarly, online platforms may force us to use the platform’s payment processing systems which may be inferior to and more costly than other payment processing services available in the market. 

 

Online platforms frequently change the rules and requirements for services like ours to access the platform, and such changes may adversely affect the success or desirability of our services. Online platforms may limit our access to information about users, limiting our ability to convert and retain them. Online platforms also may deny access to application programming interfaces (“API”) or documentation, limiting functionality of our services on the platform.

 

There can be no assurance that we will be able to comply with the requirements of those operating systems, online platforms, hardware, networks, regulations and standards on which our services depend, and failure to do so could result in serious harm to our business.

  

If our security systems are breached, we may face civil liability, and public perception of our security measures could be diminished, either of which would negatively affect our ability to attract and retain premium subscribers, ad-supported users, advertisers, Content Providers and other business partners.

 

Techniques used to gain unauthorized access to data and software are constantly evolving, and we may be unable to anticipate or prevent unauthorized access to data pertaining to our users, including credit card and debit card information and other personal data about our Users, business partners, and employees. Like all Internet services, our services, which are supported by our own systems and those of third parties that we work with, is vulnerable to software bugs, computer viruses, Internet worms, break-ins, phishing attacks, attempts to overload servers with denial-of-service, or other attacks and similar disruptions from unauthorized use of our and third-party computer systems, any of which could lead to system interruptions, delays, or shutdowns, causing loss of critical data or the unauthorized access to personal data. Computer malware, viruses, and computer hacking and phishing attacks have become more prevalent in our industry, have occurred on our systems in the past, and may occur on our systems in the future. As our business and brand reputation grow, we may become a particularly attractive target for such attacks. Though it is difficult to determine what, if any, harm may directly result from any specific interruption or attack, any failure to maintain performance, reliability, security, and availability of our products and technical infrastructure to the satisfaction of our users may harm our reputation and our ability to retain existing users and attract new users. Although we have developed systems and processes that are designed to protect our data and user data, to prevent data loss, to disable undesirable accounts and activities on our platform, and to prevent or detect security breaches, we cannot assure you that such measures will provide absolute security, and we may incur significant costs in protecting against or remediating cyber-attacks.

 

In addition, if an actual or perceived breach of security occurs to our systems or a third party’s systems, we may face regulatory or civil liability and public perception of our security measures could be diminished, either of which would negatively affect our ability to attract and retain Users, which in turn would harm our efforts to attract and retain advertisers, Content Providers and other business partners. We also would be required to expend significant resources to mitigate the breach of security and to address matters related to any such breach. We also may be required to notify regulators about any actual or perceived personal data breach (including the EU Lead Data Protection Authority) as well as the individuals who are affected by the incident within strict time periods.

 

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Any failure, or perceived failure, by us to maintain the security of data relating to our users, to comply with our posted privacy policy, laws and regulations, rules of self-regulatory organizations, industry standards, and contractual provisions to which we may be bound, could result in the loss of confidence in us, or result in actions against us by governmental entities or others, all of which could result in litigation and financial losses, and could potentially cause us to lose Users, advertisers, and revenues. In Europe, European Data Protection Authorities could impose fines and penalties of up to 4% of annual global turnover or €20 million, whichever is higher, for a personal data breach.

 

We are at risk of attempts at unauthorized access to our services, and failure to effectively prevent and remediate such attempts could have an adverse impact on our business, operating results, and financial condition. Unauthorized access to our services may cause us to misstate key performance indicators, which once discovered, corrected, and disclosed, could undermine investor confidence in the integrity of our key performance indicators and could cause our stock price to drop significantly.

 

We have in the past been, and continue to be, impacted by attempts by third parties to manipulate and exploit our software for the purpose of gaining unauthorized access to our service. For example, we have detected instances of third parties seeking to provide mobile device users a means to suppress advertisements without payment and gain access to features only available to the ad-supported services. If in the future we fail to successfully detect and address such issues, it may have artificial effects on our key performance indicators, such as content hours, content hours per MAU, and MAUs, which underlie, among other things, our contractual obligations with advertisers, as well as harm our relationship with them. This may impact our results of operations, particularly with respect to margins on our ad-supported segment, by increasing our ad-supported cost of revenue without a corresponding increase to our ad-supported revenue, which could seriously harm our business. Additionally, unlike our ad-supported users, individuals using unauthorized versions of our application are unlikely to convert to premium subscribers. Moreover, once we detect and correct such unauthorized access and any key performance indicators it affects, investor confidence in the integrity of our key performance indicators could be undermined. These could have a material adverse impact on our business, operating results and financial condition. 

 

We are at risk of artificial manipulation of stream counts and failure to effectively manage and remediate such fraudulent streams could have an adverse impact on our business, operating results and financial condition. Fraudulent streams and potentially associated fraudulent user accounts or artists may cause us to overstate key performance indicators, which once discovered, corrected and disclosed, could undermine investor confidence in the integrity of our key performance indicators and could cause our stock price to drop significantly.

 

We have in the past been, and continue to be, impacted by attempts by third parties to artificially manipulate stream counts. Such attempts may, for example, be designed to influence placement of content on Slacker-created playlists or industry music charts. These potentially fraudulent streams also may involve the creation of non-bona fide user accounts or artists. For example, an individual might generate fake users to stream songs repeatedly, thereby generating revenue each time the song is streamed, or might utilize fake users to stream specific content to increase its visibility on our or third-party charts. We use a combination of algorithms and manual review by employees to detect fraudulent streams. However, we may not be successful in detecting, removing and addressing all fraudulent streams (and any related user accounts). If in the future we fail to successfully detect, remove and address fraudulent streams and associated user accounts, it may result in the manipulation of our data, including the key performance indicators which underlie, among other things, our contractual obligations with advertisers (which could expose us to the risk of litigation), as well as harm our relationships with advertisers and rights holders. In addition, once we detect, correct and disclose fraudulent streams and associated user accounts and the key performance indicators they affect, investor confidence in the integrity of our key performance indicators could be undermined. These could have a material adverse impact on our business, operating results and financial condition.

  

Our User metrics and other estimates are subject to inherent challenges in measurement, and real or perceived inaccuracies in those metrics may seriously harm and negatively affect our reputation and our business.

 

We regularly review key metrics related to the operation of our business, including, but not limited to, our ad-supported MAUs, content hours, content hours per MAU, MAUs and premium subscribers, to evaluate growth trends, measure our performance and make strategic decisions. These metrics are calculated using internal company data and have not been validated by an independent third party. While these numbers are based on what we believe to be reasonable estimates of our user base for the applicable period of measurement, there are inherent challenges in measuring how our services are used across large populations globally. For example, we believe that there are individuals who have multiple Slacker accounts, which can result in an overstatement of ad-supported MAUs and MAUs.

 

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Errors or inaccuracies in our metrics or data could result in incorrect business decisions and inefficiencies. For instance, if a significant understatement or overstatement of ad-supported MAUs and MAUs were to occur, we may expend resources to implement unnecessary business measures or fail to take required actions to attract a sufficient number of users to satisfy our growth strategies.

 

In addition, advertisers generally rely on third-party measurement services to calculate our metrics, and these third-party measurement services may not reflect our true audience. Some of our demographic data also may be incomplete or inaccurate because Users self-report their names and dates of birth. Consequently, the personal data we have may differ from our users’ actual names and ages. If advertisers, partners, or investors do not perceive our user, geographic or other demographic metrics to be accurate representations of our user base, or if we discover material inaccuracies in our user, geographic or other demographic metrics, our reputation may be seriously harmed, which could have an adverse impact on our business, operating results, and financial condition.

 

Our business is subject to a variety of laws around the world. Government regulation of the Internet is evolving and any changes in government regulations relating to the Internet or other areas of our business or other unfavorable developments may adversely affect our business, operating result, and financial condition.

 

We are a U.S.-based company that is registered under the laws of the State of Delaware, and with operations in certain countries and territories around the world. As a result of the scope of our operations, we are subject to a variety of laws in different countries. The scope and interpretation of the laws that are or may be applicable to us are often uncertain and may be conflicting. It also is likely that if our business grows and evolves and our solutions are used more globally, we will become subject to laws and regulations in additional jurisdictions. It is difficult to predict how existing laws will be applied to our business and the new laws to which we may become subject.

 

We are subject to general business regulations and laws, as well as regulations and laws specific to the Internet. Such laws and regulations include, but are not limited to, labor, advertising and marketing, real estate, taxation, user privacy, data collection and protection, intellectual property, anti-corruption, anti-money laundering, foreign exchange controls, antitrust and competition, electronic contracts, telecommunications, sales procedures, automatic subscription renewals, credit card processing procedures, consumer protections, broadband Internet access and content restrictions. We cannot guarantee that we have been or will be fully compliant in every jurisdiction in which we are subject to regulation, as existing laws and regulations governing issues such as intellectual property, privacy, taxation, and consumer protection, among others, are constantly changing. The adoption or modification of laws or regulations relating to the Internet or other areas of our business could limit or otherwise adversely affect the manner in which we currently conduct our business. For example, certain jurisdictions have implemented or are contemplating implementing laws which may negatively impact our automatic renewal structure or our free or discounted trial incentives. Further, compliance with laws, regulations, and other requirements imposed upon our business may be onerous and expensive, and they may be inconsistent from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, further increasing the cost of compliance and doing business. 

  

Moreover, as Internet commerce continues to evolve, increasing regulation by U.S. federal and state agencies and other international regulators becomes more likely and may lead to more stringent consumer protection laws, which may impose additional burdens on us. The adoption of any laws or regulations that adversely affect the popularity or growth in use of the Internet, including laws limiting Internet neutrality, could decrease user demand for our services and increase our cost of doing business. Future regulations, or changes in laws and regulations or their existing interpretations or applications, also could hinder our operational flexibility, raise compliance costs, and result in additional historical or future liabilities for us, resulting in material adverse impacts on our business, operating results and financial condition.

  

We plan to expand into international markets in the 2021 fiscal year, which would subject us to risks associated with the legislative, judicial, accounting, regulatory, political and economic risks and conditions specific to such markets, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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We intend to expand the international presence of our platform into various jurisdictions abroad by offering our platform directly to international users, as well as through joint ventures and partnerships. Accordingly, we expect to face additional risks in the case of our future international operations, including:

 

  political instability, adverse changes in diplomatic relations and unfavorable economic and business conditions in the markets in which we plan to have international operations or into which we may expand, particularly in the case of emerging markets;

 

  more restrictive or otherwise unfavorable government regulation of the live streaming entertainment industries, which could result in increased compliance costs and/or otherwise restrict the manner in which we provide services and the amount of related fees charged for such services;

 

  limitations on the enforcement of our intellectual property rights;

 

  limitations on the ability of our foreign subsidiaries to repatriate profits or otherwise remit earnings;

 

  adverse tax consequences due both to the complexity of operating across multiple tax regimes as well as changes in, or new interpretations of, international tax treaties and structures;

 

  expropriations of property and risks of renegotiation or modification of existing agreements with governmental authorities;

 

  diminished ability to legally enforce our contractual rights in foreign countries;

 

  limitations on technology infrastructure, which could limit our ability to migrate international operations to a common platform;

 

  lower levels of internet usage, credit card usage and consumer spending in comparison to those in the United States; and

 

  difficulties in managing operations and adapting to consumer desires due to distance, language and cultural differences, including issues associated with (i) business practices and customs that are common in certain foreign countries but might be prohibited by United States law and our internal policies and procedures, and (ii) management and operational systems and infrastructures, including internal financial control and reporting systems and functions, staffing and managing of foreign operations, which we might not be able to do effectively or cost-efficiently.

 

As we hope to expand into new markets these risks will be intensified and will have the potential to impact a greater percentage of our business and operating results. Our ability to expand our operations into new international jurisdictions will depend, in significant part, on our ability to identify potential acquisition candidates, joint venture or other partners, and enter into arrangements with these parties on favorable terms, as well as our ability to make continued investments to maintain and grow existing international operations. If the revenue generated by international operations is insufficient to offset expenses incurred in connection with the maintenance and growth of these operations, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected. In addition, in an effort to make international operations in one or more given jurisdictions profitable over the long term, significant additional investments that are not profitable over the short term could be required over a prolonged period.

 

In foreign countries in which we operate, a risk exists that our employees, contractors or agents could, in contravention of our policies, engage in business practices prohibited by applicable United States laws and regulations, such as the United States Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, as well as the laws and regulations of other countries prohibiting corrupt payments to government officials such as the United Kingdom Bribery Act 2010. We maintain policies prohibiting such business practices. Nevertheless, the risk remains that one or more of our employees, contractors or agents, including those based in or from countries where practices that violate such United States laws and regulations or the laws and regulations of other countries may be customary, as well as those associated with newly-acquired businesses, will engage in business practices that are prohibited by our policies, circumvent our compliance programs and, by doing so, violate such laws and regulations. Any such violations, even if prohibited by our internal policies, could result in fines, criminal sanctions against us and/or our employees, prohibitions on the conduct of our business and damage to our reputation, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

   

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Taxing authorities may successfully assert that we should have collected, or in the future should collect sales and use or similar taxes, and we could be subject to liability with respect to past or future tax, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

In general, we have not historically collected state or local sales, use or other similar taxes in any jurisdictions in which we do not have a tax nexus, in reliance on court decisions or applicable exemptions that restrict or preclude the imposition of obligations to collect such taxes with respect to online sales of our products. In addition, we have not historically collected state or local sales, use or other similar taxes in certain jurisdictions in which we do have a physical presence, in reliance on applicable exemptions. On June 21, 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court decided, in South Dakota v. Wayfair, Inc., that state and local jurisdictions may, at least in certain circumstances, enforce a sales and use tax collection obligation on remote vendors that have no physical presence in such jurisdiction. A number of states have already begun, or have positioned themselves to begin, requiring sales and use tax collection by remote vendors and/or by online marketplaces. The details and effective dates of these collection requirements vary from state to state. We are in the process of determining how and when our collection practices will need to change in the relevant jurisdictions. It is possible that one or more jurisdictions may assert that we have liability for periods for which we have not collected sales, use or other similar taxes, and if such an assertion or assertions were successful it could result in substantial tax liabilities, including for past sales taxes and penalties and interest, which could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and operating results.

 

Our success depends, in significant part, on discretionary consumer and corporate spending on entertainment and factors adversely affecting such spending could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our business depends on discretionary consumer and corporate spending. Many factors related to discretionary consumer and corporate spending, including economic conditions affecting disposable consumer income such as employment, interest and tax rates and inflation can significantly impact our operating results. Business conditions, as well as various industry conditions, including corporate marketing and promotional spending and interest levels, can also significantly impact our operating results. These factors can affect user subscription sales, advertising sales, sponsorship and e-commerce spending, as well as the financial results of sponsors of our venues, events, festivals and other Content Providers and the industry as a whole. Negative factors such as challenging economic conditions, public concerns over terrorism and security incidents, particularly when combined, can impact corporate and consumer spending, and one negative factor can impact our results more than another. There can be no assurance that consumer and corporate spending will not be adversely impacted by current economic conditions, or by any further or future deterioration in economic conditions, thereby possibly impacting our operating results and growth.

 

During past economic slowdowns and recessions, many consumers reduced their discretionary spending and advertisers reduced their advertising expenditures. In addition, a decline in attendance at or reduction in the number of live entertainment and leisure events may have an adverse effect on our revenue and operating income. The impact of economic slowdowns on our business is difficult to predict, but they may result in reductions in sponsorship, advertising, ticketing and e-commerce opportunities and our ability to generate revenue. The risks associated with our businesses may become more acute in periods of a slowing economy or recession, which may be accompanied by a decrease in attendance at live entertainment and leisure events.

 

We are subject to governmental regulation, which may change from to time, and our failure to comply with these regulations could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our operations are subject to federal, state and local laws, statutes, rules, regulations, policies and procedures, both domestically and internationally, which may change from time to time. Our failure to comply with these laws and regulations could result in fines and proceedings against us by governmental agencies and consumers, which if material, could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, the promulgation of new laws, rules and regulations could restrict or unfavorably impact our business, which could decrease demand for services, reduce revenue, increase costs and subject us to additional liabilities. From time to time, federal, state and local authorities and consumers commence investigations, inquiries or litigation with respect to our compliance with applicable consumer protection, advertising, unfair business practice, antitrust (and similar or related laws) and other laws. We may be required to incur significant legal expenses in connection with the defense of future governmental investigations and litigation.

 

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Changes in laws or regulations that adversely affect the growth, popularity or use of the Internet, including regulations or decisions by the FCC impacting net neutrality, could decrease the demand for our service and increase our cost of doing business. See “— Changes in how network operators handle and charge for access to data that travel across their networks could adversely impact our business” below. Certain laws intended to prevent network operators from discriminating against the legal traffic that traverse their networks have been implemented in many countries, including the United States and the EU. In others, the laws may be nascent or non-existent. Given uncertainty around these rules, including changing interpretations, amendments or repeal, coupled with potentially significant political and economic power of local network operators, we could experience discriminatory or anti-competitive practices that could impede our growth, cause us to incur additional expense or otherwise negatively affect our business. 

  

Risks Related to Our Company

 

For the years ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, our management concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures and our internal control over financial reporting were not effective due to the existence material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting during such periods, most of which were subsequently remediated during fiscal year ended March 31, 2020. If we are unable to establish and maintain effective disclosure controls and internal control over financial reporting, our ability to produce accurate financial statements on a timely basis could be impaired, and the market price of our securities may be negatively affected.

 

For our fiscal years ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, our management conducted an assessment of our disclosure controls and procedures and our internal control over financial reporting and concluded that they were ineffective for each of such periods, due to the existence of certain material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting, most of which were subsequently remediated during fiscal year ended March 31, 2020, as described below. See Item 9A. Controls and Procedures. A material weakness is a deficiency, or combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected and corrected on a timely basis.

 

In connection with the preparation of our consolidated financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2019, management identified material weaknesses in the following: (i) management’s identification of and accounting for significant and unusual transactions; specifically over measurement period adjustments related to business combinations and the accounting for modifications of complex debt instruments, including review of valuation reports and key underlying assumptions; and (ii) revenue recognition and accounting for royalties, including the identification and testing of certain application controls within its information systems around the provisioning of accounts and tracking of related revenue and royalty expense, as well as the completeness and accuracy of key revenue and royalty reports used in the operation of certain control activities. In connection with the preparation of our consolidated financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2020, management identified a material weakness in the following: ineffective operation of financial reporting controls, specifically around the classification of current and noncurrent liabilities that resulted in a post year end adjustment.

 

For the steps we intend to take, including steps we undertook in fiscal year ended March 31, 2020 to remediate the fiscal year ended March 31, 2019 material weaknesses, see Item 9A. Controls and Procedures. We may need to expend significant financial resources to remediate these material weaknesses. Beyond fiscal year ended March 31, 2020, we may not be able to remediate any current or future material weaknesses.

 

If we are unable to establish and maintain proper and effective disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting, we may not be able to produce timely and accurate financial statements. If that were to happen, investors may lose confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports, the market price of our securities could decline, and we could be subject to sanctions or investigations by NASDAQ, the SEC or other regulatory authorities.

 

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If we fail to implement and maintain an effective system of internal control over financial reporting, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results or prevent fraud.

 

Effective internal controls over financial reporting are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports and, together with adequate disclosure controls and procedures, are designed to prevent fraud. Any failure to implement required new or improved controls, or difficulties encountered in their implementation could cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations. In addition, any testing by us conducted in connection with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”), or the subsequent testing by our independent registered public accounting firm, if and when required, may reveal additional deficiencies in our internal controls over financial reporting that are deemed to be material weaknesses or that may require prospective or retroactive changes to our consolidated financial statements or identify other areas for further attention or improvement. If in the future we identify new material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting, including at some of our acquired companies, if we are unable to comply with the requirements of Section 404 in a timely manner or assert that our internal control over financial reporting is effective, or if and when applicable, our independent registered public accounting firm is unable to express an opinion as to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting, investors may lose confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports and the market price of our common stock could be negatively affected, and we could become subject to investigations by the stock exchange on which our securities are then listed, the SEC, or other regulatory authorities, which could require additional financial and management resources. Inferior internal controls could also cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, which could have a negative effect on the trading price of our common stock.

 

Additionally, we currently utilize an outsourced internal audit group, and we may need to hire additional accounting and financial staff with appropriate public company experience and technical accounting knowledge to maintain effective internal controls for financial reporting. 

 

We will continue to incur significant increased costs as a result of operating as a public company.

 

As a public company, we will continue to incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses. Following the Public Offering, we will be subject to mandatory reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), which require, among other things, that we continue to file with the SEC annual, quarterly and current reports with respect to our business and financial condition, that we were not required to file as a voluntary reporting company (though we did file such reports with the SEC on a voluntary basis). We have incurred and will continue to incur costs associated with the preparation and filing of these SEC reports. Furthermore, we are subject to additional corporate governance and other compliance requirements as a result of our shares of common stock being listed on The Nasdaq Capital Market (“Nasdaq”). In addition, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, as well as rules subsequently implemented by the SEC, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and Nasdaq have imposed various other requirements on public companies. Stockholder activism, the current political environment and the current high level of government intervention and regulatory reform may lead to substantial new regulations and disclosure obligations, which may lead to additional compliance costs and impact (in ways we cannot currently anticipate) the manner in which we operate our business. Our management and other personnel will need to devote a substantial amount of time to these compliance initiatives. Moreover, these rules and regulations have and will continue to increase our legal and financial compliance costs and will make some activities more time-consuming and costly. For example, we will incur additional expense to increase our director and officer liability insurance.

 

We are required to furnish a report on internal control over financial reporting issued by management. Such report is provided as part of the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report. In addition, if and when we cease to be a smaller reporting company and become subject to Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, we will be required to furnish an attestation report on internal control over financial reporting issued by our independent registered public accounting firm. To remain in compliance with Section 404, we will continue to be engaged in a process to document and evaluate our internal control over financial reporting, which is both costly and challenging. In this regard, we will need to dedicate substantially greater internal resources, potentially engage outside consultants and adopt a detailed work plan to assess and document the adequacy of internal control over financial reporting, continue steps to improve control processes as appropriate, validate through testing that controls are functioning as documented and implement a continuous reporting and improvement process for internal control over financial reporting. Despite our efforts, there is a risk that our independent registered public accounting firm, when required, will not be able to conclude within the prescribed timeframe that our internal control over financial reporting is effective as required by Section 404. This could result in an adverse reaction in the financial markets due to a loss of confidence in the reliability of our financial statements. 

 

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We may not be entitled to forgiveness of our recently received Paycheck Protection Program loan, and our application for the Paycheck Protection Program loan could in the future be determined to have been impermissible or could result in damage to our reputation.

 

On April 13, 2020, we received proceeds of less than $2.0 million from a loan (the “PPP Loan”) under the Paycheck Protection Program (the “PPP”) of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (“CARES Act”), a portion of which may be forgiven, which we intend to use to retain employees and for other qualifying expenses. The PPP Loan matures on April 13, 2022 and bears annual interest at a rate of 1.0%. Commencing in November 2020, we are required to pay the lender equal monthly payments of principal and interest as required to fully amortize by April 13, 2022 any principal amount outstanding on the PPP Loan as of such date. A portion of the PPP Loan may be forgiven by the Small Business Administration (the “SBA”) upon our application beginning 60 days but not later than 120 days after loan approval and upon documentation of expenditures in accordance with the SBA requirements. Under the CARES Act, loan forgiveness is available for the sum of documented payroll costs, covered rent payments, covered mortgage interest and covered utilities during the eight week period beginning on the date of loan approval, which eight week forgiveness period was extended to be the earlier of 24 weeks after funding or December 31, 2020 under the PPP Flexibility Act of 2020 (the “PPPFA”). Borrowers who received their loan prior to the date of enactment of this bill may elect to use 8 weeks as their covered period for forgiveness. Not more than 40% of the forgiven amount may be for non-payroll costs as adjusted by the PPPFA. The amount of the PPP Loan eligible to be forgiven is reduced if our full-time headcount declines or if salaries and wages for employees with salaries of $100,000 or less annually are reduced by more than 25%. We will be required to repay any portion of the outstanding principal that is not forgiven, along with accrued interest, in accordance with the amortization schedule described above, and we cannot provide any assurance that we will be eligible for loan forgiveness or that any amount of the PPP Loan will ultimately be forgiven by the SBA.

 

In order to apply for the PPP Loan, we were required to certify, among other things, that the current economic uncertainty made the PPP Loan request necessary to support our ongoing operations. We made this certification in good faith after analyzing, among other things, our financial situation and access to alternative forms of capital, and believe that we satisfied all eligibility criteria for the PPP Loan, and that our receipt of the PPP Loan is consistent with the broad objectives of the PPP of the CARES Act. The certification described above did not contain any objective criteria and is subject to interpretation. However, on April 23, 2020, the SBA issued guidance stating that it is unlikely that a public company with substantial market value and access to capital markets will be able to make the required certification in good faith. The lack of clarity regarding loan eligibility under the PPP has resulted in significant media coverage and controversy with respect to public companies applying for and receiving loans. If, despite our good-faith belief that we satisfied all eligible requirements for the PPP Loan, we or any company that we may acquire in the future which received a loan under the PPP, are later determined to have violated any of the laws or governmental regulations that apply to us or such acquiree in connection with the PPP Loan or another loan under the PPP, respectively, such as the False Claims Act, or it is otherwise determined that we or such acquiree were ineligible to receive the PPP Loan or such other loan under the PPP, respectively, we or such acquiree may be subject to penalties, including significant civil, criminal and administrative penalties, and could be required to repay the PPP Loan or such other loan under the PPP, respectively, in its entirety. In addition, our receipt of the PPP Loan or any company that we may acquire in the future which received a loan under the PPP may result in adverse publicity and damage to our reputation, and a review or audit by the SBA or other government entity or claims under the False Claims Act could consume significant financial and management resources.

 

We heavily depend on relationships with our Content Providers and other Industry Stakeholders and adverse changes in these relationships, could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our business is particularly dependent upon personal relationships, as executives within entertainment companies such as ours leverage their network of relationships with Content Providers and other Industry Stakeholders to secure the rights to their content and develop other partnerships that are critical to our success. Due to the importance of those industry contacts, the loss of any of these relationships, and adverse changes in these relationships could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. We can give no assurance that all or any of these Content Providers or other Industry Stakeholders will retain their associations with us or our executives, directors, employees or other individual service providers. Additionally, to the extent the decision makers of our music partners are replaced with individuals with whom our executives, directors or other key personnel do not have relationships, our competitive position and financial condition could be harmed.

 

We rely on key members of management, particularly our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Robert Ellin, and the loss of their services or investor confidence in them could adversely affect our success, development and financial condition.

 

Our success depends, to a large degree, upon certain key members of our management, particularly our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Robert Ellin. Mr. Ellin has extensive knowledge about our business and our operations, and the loss of Mr. Ellin or any other key member of our senior management (including senior management of Slacker) would likely have a material adverse effect on our business and operations. We do not currently maintain a key-person insurance policy for Mr. Ellin or any other member of our management. Our executive team’s expertise and experience in acquiring, integrating and growing businesses, particularly those focused on live music and events, have been and will continue to be a significant factor in our growth and ability to execute our business strategy. The loss of any of our executive officers could slow the growth of our business or have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

  

Unfavorable outcomes in legal proceedings may adversely affect our business, financial conditions and results of operations.

 

Our results may be affected by the outcome of future litigation. Unfavorable rulings in our legal proceedings may have a negative impact on us that may be greater or smaller depending on the nature of the rulings. In addition, from time to time in the future we may be subject to various claims, investigations, legal and administrative cases and proceedings (whether civil or criminal) or lawsuits by governmental agencies or private parties, including as described in the immediately preceding risk factor. For example, see “Item 3. Legal Proceedings” regarding our ongoing litigation with Wantickets and its principal. If the results of these investigations, proceedings or suits are unfavorable to us or if we are unable to successfully defend against third party lawsuits, we may be required to pay monetary damages or may be subject to fines, penalties, injunctions or other censure that could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Even if we adequately address the issues raised by an investigation or proceeding or successfully defend a third-party lawsuit or counterclaim, we may have to devote significant financial and management resources to address these issues, which could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.      

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Our debt agreements contain restrictive and financial covenants that may limit our operating flexibility

 

As of March 31, 2020, our total indebtedness was $16.6 million indebtedness (excluding interest and unamortized debt discount and debt issuance costs). Our existing debt agreements with JGB Collateral LLC and certain of its affiliates (“JGB”) contain certain restrictive covenants that limit our ability to merge with other companies or consummate certain changes of control, acquire other companies, engage in new lines of business, make certain investments, pay dividends, transfer or dispose of assets, amend certain material agreements, incur additional indebtedness or enter into various specified transactions.  We therefore may not be able to engage in any of the foregoing transactions unless we obtain the consent of the lender or terminate our existing debt agreements.  Our debt agreements also contain certain financial covenants, including maintaining a minimum cash amount at all times and achieving certain financial covenants and are secured by substantially all of our assets.  There is no guarantee that we will be able to generate sufficient cash flow or sales to meet the financial covenants or pay the principal and interest under our debt agreements or to satisfy all of the financial covenants. We may also incur significant additional indebtedness in the future. 

 

We may not have the ability to repay the amounts then due under the Debentures and/or convertible notes at maturity or to raise the funds necessary to settle mandatory monthly redemptions of the Debentures. Payment of monthly redemptions of the Debentures in shares of our common stock will dilute the ownership interest of our existing stockholders, including holders who had previously converted their convertible notes, or may otherwise depress the price of our common stock.

 

At maturity, the entire outstanding principal amount of the Debentures and convertible notes will become due and payable by us. In addition, upon monthly redemption of the Debentures as may be required by the holders thereof, maturity of the Debentures or maturity of the convertible notes, unless we elect to deliver solely shares of our common stock to settle such monthly redemptions of the Debentures (subject to certain equity conditions, which may not be satisfied by us), we will be required to make cash payments in each such instance. However, we may not have sufficient funds or be able to obtain financing at the time we are required to repay the amounts then due under the Debentures or the convertible notes. As of March 31, 2020, $0.3 million of our total indebtedness (excluding interest and unamortized debt discount and debt issuance costs) is due in fiscal 2021, and $16.2 million is due in in fiscal 2022. See the table in Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations — Contractual Obligations and Commitments — Firm Commitments in this Annual Report for more information.

 

Our failure to repay any outstanding amount of the Debentures or convertible notes would constitute a default under such indentures. A default would increase the interest rate to the default rate under the Debentures or the maximum rate permitted by applicable law until such amount is paid in full. A default under the Debentures or the fundamental change itself could also lead to a default under agreements governing our future indebtedness. If the repayment of the related indebtedness were to be accelerated after any applicable notice or grace periods, we may not have sufficient funds to repay the indebtedness and repurchase the Debentures or convertible notes or make cash payments thereon. Furthermore, upon the occurrence and during the continuation of any event of default, the agent, for the benefit of the holders of the Debentures, shall have the right to, among other things, take possession of our and our subsidiaries’ assets and property constituting the collateral thereunder and the right to assign, sell, lease or otherwise dispose of all or any part of the collateral.

 

Commencing with the calendar month of December 2018 (subject to the following sentence), the holders of the Debentures have the right, at their option, to require us to redeem an aggregate of up to $221,000 (as amended in February 2019) of the outstanding principal amount of the Debentures per month. For the month of December 2018, the holders may not submit a redemption notice for such a redemption prior to December 28, 2018. We will be required to promptly, but in any event no more than two trading day after the holder delivers a redemption notice to us, pay the applicable redemption amount in cash or, at our election and subject to certain conditions, in shares of our common stock. If we elect to pay the redemption amount in shares of our common stock, then the shares will be delivered based on a price equal to the lowest of (a) 90% of the average of the three lowest volume weighted-average prices of our common stock over the prior 20 trading days or (b) $5.00, subject to adjustment as provided in the Debentures; provided, however, that such price will in no event be less than $2.00 per share (proportionately adjusted for any stock split, stock dividend, stock combination or other similar transaction). Any repayments made through the issuance of our common stock will result in dilution to our existing stockholders. As of the date of this Annual Report, the June 2018 Debentures holders have sent redemption notices for the months of December 2018 through June 2020 (inclusive). We have repaid $0.3 million of principal in January 2019, $0.2 million of principal in each of the months of February 2019 through January 2020 (inclusive) and $0.4 million in each of the months of February 2020 through June 2020 (inclusive).

 

In addition, subject to the satisfaction of certain conditions, at any time after June 28, 2019, we may elect to prepay all, but not less than all, of the Debentures for a prepayment amount equal to the outstanding principal balance of the Debentures plus all accrued and unpaid interest thereon, together with a prepayment premium equal to the following: (a) if the Debentures are prepaid on or after the original issuance date, but on or prior to December 31, 2019, all remaining regularly scheduled interest to be paid on the Debentures from the date of such payment of the Debentures to, but excluding, December 31, 2019, plus 10% of the entire outstanding principal balance of the Debentures, (b) if the Debentures are prepaid after December 31, 2019, but on or prior to June 30, 2020, 10% of the entire outstanding principal balance of the Debentures; (c) if the Debentures are prepaid on or after June 30, 2020, but on or prior to December 31, 2020, 8% of the entire outstanding principal balance of the Debentures; and (d) if the Debentures are prepaid on or after December 31, 2020, but prior to the maturity date, 6% of the entire outstanding principal balance of the Debentures. Subject to the satisfaction of certain conditions, we may elect to prepay all, but not less than all, of the Debentures in connection with a change of control transaction (as defined in the Debentures) for a prepayment amount equal to the prepayment amount described above.

 

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If we do not comply with the provisions of the Debentures, our lenders may terminate their obligations to us and require us to repay all outstanding amounts owed thereunder.

 

The Debentures contain provisions that limit our operating and financing activities, including financial covenants relating to liquidity, indebtedness and Adjusted EBITDA (as defined in the indenture governing the Debentures). If an event of default occurs and is continuing, the lenders may among other things, terminate their obligations thereunder and require us to repay all amounts thereunder. As of March 31, 2020, we were in full compliance with these covenants. 

 

We may incur substantially more debt or take other actions that would intensify the risks discussed above.

 

In addition to our current outstanding debt and notes, we and our subsidiaries may incur substantial additional debt, subject to restrictions contained in our existing and future debt instruments, some or all of which may be secured debt. In June 2018, we issued $10.6 million June 2018 Debentures. In February 2019, we issued $3.2 million in additional 12.75% Original Issue Discount Senior Secured Convertible Debentures due June 29, 2021. The Debentures contain certain restrictive covenants that limit our ability to merge with other companies or consummate certain changes of control, acquire other companies, engage in new lines of business, make certain investments, pay dividends, transfer or dispose of assets, amend certain material agreements, incur additional indebtedness or enter into various specified transactions.  We therefore may not be able to engage in any of the foregoing transactions unless we obtain the consent of the lender or terminate our existing debt agreements. Our debt agreements also contain certain financial covenants, including maintaining a minimum cash amount at all times and achieving certain financial covenants and are secured by substantially all of our assets. 

 

We may not have sufficient cash flow from our business operations to make payments on our indebtedness.

 

Our ability to make scheduled payments of the principal of, to pay interest on or to refinance our indebtedness depends on our performance, which is subject to economic, financial, competitive and other factors beyond our control. Our business may not generate cash flow from operations in the future sufficient to service our debt and make necessary capital expenditures. If we are unable to generate such cash flow, we may be required to adopt one or more alternatives, such as selling assets, restructuring debt and/or obtaining additional equity capital on terms that may be onerous or highly dilutive. In the event of an acceleration of amounts due under our debt instruments as a result of an event of default, including upon the occurrence of an event that would reasonably be expected to have a material adverse effect on our business, operations, properties, assets or condition or a failure to pay any amount due, we may not have sufficient funds or may be unable to arrange for additional financing to repay our indebtedness or to make any accelerated payments. There is no guarantee that we will be able to generate sufficient cash flow or sales to meet the financial covenants or pay the principal and interest under our debt agreements or to satisfy all of the financial covenants. Our ability to refinance our indebtedness will depend on the capital markets and our financial condition at such time. Capital markets have been volatile in the recent past; a downturn could negatively impact our ability to access capital should the need arise. As a result, the inability to meet our debt obligations could cause us to default on those obligations. Any such defaults could materially harm our financial condition and liquidity.

 

The conditional conversion feature of our convertible notes or the Debentures or the optional monthly redemption features of the Debentures, if triggered, may adversely affect our financial condition and operating results, particularly our earnings per share.

 

In the event the conditional conversion feature of the Debentures or convertible notes is triggered, holders, as applicable, will be entitled to convert at any time during specified periods at their option. In addition, if one or more holders elect to require us to make the monthly redemption of their Debentures, unless we elect to satisfy our conversion obligation by delivering solely shares of our common stock (subject to certain conditions), we would be required to settle a portion or all of our redemption obligation through the payment of cash, which could adversely affect our liquidity. As of the date of this Annual Report, the June 2018 Debentures holders have sent redemption notices for the months of December 2018 through June 2019. We have repaid $0.3 million of principal in January 2019, $0.2 million of principal in each of the months of February 2019 through January 2020 (inclusive) and $0.4 million in each of the months of February 2020 through June 2020 (inclusive). In addition, even if holders do not elect to convert the Debentures or convertible notes, we could be required under applicable accounting rules to reclassify all or a portion of the outstanding principal of the Debentures as a current rather than long-term liability, which may result in a material reduction of our net working capital and potential impact on our going concern status. Any conversion of the Debentures and/or convertible notes and/or any redemption of the Debentures in shares of our common stock may cause dilution to our stockholders and to our earnings per share.

 

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Our quarterly operating results may be volatile and are difficult to predict in the future, and our stock price may decline if we fail to meet the expectations of securities analysts or investors.

 

As a result of our acquisition of React Presents in February 2020, and our entry into holding, promoting and managing our live festivals and events, our revenue, margins and other operating results could vary significantly in the future from quarter-to-quarter and year-to-year and may fail to match our past performance due to a variety of factors, including many factors that are outside of our control. Factors that may contribute to the variability of our operating results and cause the market price of our common stock to fluctuate include:

 

  the entrance of new competitors or competitive products in our market, whether by established or new companies;

 

  our ability to retain and grow the number of our active user base and increase engagement among new and existing users;

 

  our ability to maintain effective pricing practices, in response to the competitive markets in which we operate or other macroeconomic factors, such as inflation or increased product taxes;

 

  our revenue mix, which drives gross profit;

 

  seasonal or other shifts in festival, event and advertising revenue;

 

  the timing of the launch of our new or updated festivals, events, products, platforms, channels or features;

 

  the addition or loss of popular content;

 

  the popularity of EDM and EDM festivals, events, concerts and clubs; and

 

  an increase in costs associated with protecting our intellectual property, defending against third-party intellectual property infringement allegations or procuring rights to third-party intellectual property.

 

Our gross margins are expected to vary across our offerings. Festival and event revenue has a lower gross margin compared to platform revenue derived through our arrangements with advertising, content distribution, billing and licensing activities. In addition, our gross margin and operating margin percentages, as well as overall profitability, may be adversely impacted as a result of a shift in music taste, geographic or sales mix, price competition, or the introduction of new technology and EDM festivals and events. We may in the future strategically reduce our Slacker gross margin in an effort to increase our active accounts and/or maintain our OEM relationships and agreements. As a result, our subscription revenue may not increase as consistently as it has historically, or at all, and, unless we are able to adequately increase our other revenues, including festival and event revenue through RP, and grow our active user base, we may be unable to maintain or grow our margins and revenues and our business will be harmed. If a reduction in margins does not result in an increase in our active user base and revenues, our financial results may suffer, and our business may be harmed.

   

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We may not be able to attract qualified personnel.

 

Our ability to expand operations to accommodate our anticipated growth will depend on our ability to attract and retain qualified personnel. However, competition for the types of employees we seek is intense. We face particular challenges in recruiting and retaining personnel who have experience in software engineering, mobile application development and other technical expertise, particularly those focused on live music and events, which is critical to our initiatives. Our ability to meet our business development objectives will depend in part on our ability to recruit, train and retain top quality personnel with advanced skills who understand our technology and business. We cannot provide any assurance that we will be able to attract qualified personnel to execute our business strategies or develop and expand our online properties. If we are unable to engage and retain the necessary personnel, our business may be materially and adversely affected.

 

Additionally, we expect to retain the existing managers and executives of certain companies we acquire to have them continue managing and operating the acquired business. We believe that these individuals will have the market expertise and network of personal relationships to best implement the growth strategies of the acquired businesses. If we are unable to retain the key personnel of the acquired businesses, we may not be able to achieve the anticipated benefits and synergies of an acquisition.

 

We engage a number of consultants to work for us. If the consultants that we utilize are characterized as employees and if we are deemed to be delinquent in our payroll taxes or incur other employment-related liabilities with respect to those consultants, we and our management team could incur significant liabilities.

 

We engage a number of consultants to work for us in various aspects of our business. Although we believe that the consultants that we utilize in our business, as is customary to do so in our business, are properly characterized as independent contractors, tax or other regulatory authorities may in the future challenge our characterization of independent contractors. We are aware of a number of judicial decisions and legislative proposals that could bring about major reforms in worker classification, including the California legislature’s recent passage of California Assembly Bill 5 (“AB 5”). AB 5 purports to codify a new test for determining worker classification that is widely viewed as expanding the scope of employee relationships and narrowing the scope of independent contractor relationships. Given AB 5’s recent passage, there is no guidance from the regulatory authorities charged with its enforcement, and there is a significant degree of uncertainty regarding its application. In addition, AB 5 has been the subject of widespread national discussion and it is possible that other jurisdictions, including New York, may enact similar laws. If such regulatory authorities or state, federal or foreign courts were to determine that our recording artists and songwriters are employees, and not independent contractors, we would be required to withhold income taxes, to withhold and pay Social Security, Medicare and similar taxes and to pay unemployment and other related payroll taxes. We would also be liable for unpaid past taxes and subject to penalties. As a result, any determination that our consultants are our employees could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition to the taxes that we would be required to pay if we were required to remit payroll taxes for our consultants, and the payments that we would be required to make for other employment-related obligations, our operations would be severely disrupted and individual officers or members of our board of directors could be personally liable for certain of any assessments made. A government entity could potentially shut down our operations until such time as the payroll taxes were brought current. Such a shutdown could effectively push us into bankruptcy and an investor could lose all his or her investment in us.

 

Slacker depends upon third-party licenses for sound recordings and musical compositions and an adverse change to, loss of, or claim that Slacker does not hold any necessary licenses may materially adversely affect Slacker’s business, operating results and financial condition.

 

To secure the rights to stream sound recordings and the musical compositions embodied therein, Slacker enters into license agreements to obtain licenses from rights holders such as record labels, music publishers, performing rights organizations, collecting societies and other copyright owners or their agents, and pays substantial royalties to such parties or their agents around the world. Though Slacker works diligently in its efforts to obtain all necessary licenses to stream sound recordings and the musical compositions embodied therein, there is no guarantee that the licenses available to Slacker now will continue to be available in the future at rates and on terms that are favorable or commercially reasonable or at all. The terms of these licenses, including the royalty rates that Slacker is required to pay pursuant to them, may change as a result of changes in its bargaining power, changes in the industry, changes in the law, or for other reasons. Increases in royalty rates or changes to other terms of these licenses may materially impact Slacker’s business, operating results, and financial condition.

 

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Slacker enters into license agreements to obtain rights to stream sound recordings, including from the major record labels that hold the rights to stream a significant number of sound recordings. If Slacker fails to obtain these licenses, the size and quality of its catalog may be materially impacted and its business, operating results and financial condition could be materially harmed.

  

Slacker generally obtains licenses for two types of rights with respect to musical compositions: mechanical rights and public performance rights. With respect to mechanical rights, for example, in the United States, the rates Slacker pays are, to a significant degree, a function of a ratemaking proceeding conducted by an administrative agency called the Copyright Royalty Board. The rates that the Copyright Royalty Board set apply both to compositions that we license under the compulsory license in Section 115 of the Copyright Act of 1976 (the “Copyright Act”), and to a number of direct licenses that we have with music publishers for U.S. rights, in which the applicable rate is generally pegged to the statutory rate set by the Copyright Royalty Board. The most recent proceeding before the Copyright Royalty Board (the “Phonorecords III Proceedings”) set the rates for the Section 115 compulsory license for calendar years 2018 to 2022. The Copyright Royalty Board issued its initial written determination on January 26, 2018. The rates set by the Copyright Royalty Board may still be modified if a party appeals the determination and are subject to further change as part of future Copyright Royalty Board proceedings. Based on management’s estimates and forecasts for the next two fiscal years, we currently believe that the proposed rates will not materially impact Slacker’s business, operating results, and financial condition. However, the proposed rates are based on a variety of factors and inputs which are difficult to predict in the long-term. If Slackers business does not perform as expected or if the rates are modified to be higher than the proposed rates, its content acquisition costs could increase and impact its ability to obtain content on pricing terms favorable to us, which could negatively harm Slacker’s business, operating results and financial condition and hinder its ability to provide interactive features in its services, or cause one or more of Slacker’s services not to be economically viable.

 

In the United States, public performance rights are generally obtained through intermediaries known as performing rights organizations (“PROs”), which negotiate blanket licenses with copyright users for the public performance of compositions in their repertory, collect royalties under such licenses, and distribute those royalties to copyright owners. The royalty rates available to Slacker today may not be available to it in the future. Licenses provided by two of these PROs, ASCAP and BMI are governed by consent decrees relating to decades-old litigations. Changes to the terms of or interpretation of these consent decrees could affect Slacker’s ability to obtain licenses from these PROs on favorable terms, which could harm its business, operating results, and financial condition. As of March 31, 2020, Slacker owed $2.7 million in aggregate royalty payments to such PROs.

 

In other parts of the world, including Europe, Asia, and Latin America, Slacker obtains mechanical and performance licenses for musical compositions either through local collecting societies representing publishers or from publishers directly, or a combination thereof. Slacker cannot guarantee that its licenses with collecting societies and its direct licenses with publishers provide full coverage for all of the musical compositions we make available to Slacker’s users in such countries. In Asia and Latin America, we are seeing a trend of movement away from blanket licenses from copyright collectives, which is leading to a fragmented copyright licensing landscape. Publishers, songwriters, and other rights holders choosing not to be represented by collecting societies could adversely impact Slacker’s ability to secure favorable licensing arrangements in connection with musical compositions that such rights holders own or control, including increasing the costs of licensing such musical compositions, or subjecting Slacker to significant liability for copyright infringement.

 

There also is no guarantee that Slacker has all of the licenses it needs to stream content, as the process of obtaining such licenses involves many rights holders, some of whom are unknown, and myriad complex legal issues across many jurisdictions, including open questions of law as to when and whether particular licenses are needed. Additionally, there is a risk that aspiring rights holders, their agents, or legislative or regulatory bodies will create or attempt to create new rights that could require Slacker to enter into license agreements with, and pay royalties to, newly defined groups of rights holders, some of which may be difficult or impossible to identify.

  

Even when Slacker is able to enter into license agreements with rights holders, it cannot guarantee that such agreements will continue to be renewed indefinitely. For example, from time to time, Slacker’s license agreements with certain rights holders and/or their agents may expire while Slacker negotiates their renewals and, per industry custom and practice, Slacker may enter into brief (for example, month-, week-, or even days-long) extensions of those agreements and/or continue to operate as if the license agreement had been extended, including by our continuing to make music available. During these periods, Slacker may not have assurance of long-term access to such rights holders’ content, which could have a material adverse effect on its business and could lead to potential copyright infringement claims.

 

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It also is possible that such agreements will never be renewed at all. The lack of renewal, or termination, of one or more of Slacker’s license agreements, or the renewal of a license agreement on less favorable terms, also could have a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition, and results of operations. 

 

Slacker has no control over the providers of its content, and its business may be adversely affected if its access to music is limited or delayed. The concentration of control of content by Slacker’s major providers means that even one entity, or a small number of entities working together, may unilaterally affect Slacker’s access to music and other content.

 

Slacker relies on music rights holders, over whom it has no control, for the content it makes available on its service. Slacker cannot guarantee that these parties will always choose to license to it.

 

The music industry has a high level of concentration, which means that one or a small number of entities may, on their own, take actions that adversely affect Slacker’s business. Slacker’s business may be adversely affected if its access to music is limited or delayed because of deterioration in its relationships with one or more of these rights holders or if they choose not to license to Slacker for any other reason. Rightsholders also may attempt to take advantage of their market power to seek onerous financial terms from Slacker, which could have a material adverse effect on its financial condition and results of operations.

 

Even if Slacker is able to secure rights to sound recordings from record labels and other copyright owners, artists and/or artist groups may object and may exert public or private pressure on third parties to discontinue licensing rights to Slacker, hold back content from it or increase royalty rates. As a result, Slacker’s ability to continue to license rights to sound recordings is subject to convincing a broad range of stakeholders of the value and quality of Slacker’s services.

 

To the extent that Slacker is unable to license a large amount of content or the content of certain popular artists, its business, operating results and financial condition could be materially harmed.

 

Difficulties in obtaining accurate and comprehensive information necessary to identify the compositions embodied in sound recordings on Slacker’s services and the ownership thereof may impact Slacker’s ability to perform its obligations under its licenses, affect the size of its catalog, impact its ability to control content acquisition costs, and lead to potential copyright infringement claims.

 

Comprehensive and accurate ownership information for the musical compositions embodied in sound recordings is often unavailable to Slacker or difficult or, in some cases, impossible for Slacker to obtain, sometimes because it is withheld by the owners or administrators of such rights. Slacker currently relies on the assistance of third parties to determine this information. If the information provided to Slacker or obtained by such third parties does not comprehensively or accurately identify the ownership of musical compositions, or if Slacker is unable to determine which musical compositions correspond to specific sound recordings, it may be difficult or impossible to identify the appropriate rights holders to whom to pay royalties. This may make it difficult to comply with the obligations of any agreements with those rights holders.

 

In the United States, Slacker also relies on the assistance of third parties to issue notices of intent (“NOIs”) to obtain a compulsory license under Section 115 of the Copyright Act to those copyright owners with whom we do not have a direct license agreement or, in the case of unknown copyright owners, to the United States Copyright Office. The lack of comprehensive and accurate ownership information or the inability to determine which musical compositions correspond to specific sound recordings can cause difficulties in issuing NOIs to the correct parties (including the United States Copyright Office) or serving NOIs in a timely manner and can otherwise cause difficulties in obtaining licenses. This could lead to a reduction of sound recordings available to be streamed on Slacker’s services, adversely impacting its ability to retain and expand its user base, and could make it difficult to ensure that Slacker is fully licensed.

 

These challenges, and others concerning the licensing of musical compositions embodied in sound recordings on Slacker’s services, may subject Slacker to significant liability for copyright infringement, breach of contract or other claims. 

 

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Risks Related to our Festival and Events Business

 

Our success relies, in part, on the strength of our live in person festivals and events, as well as our online businesses, and if any of them were to become less popular, our business could suffer.

 

With our recent acquisition of React Presents, we now also produce, promote and manage music in person live festivals and events, including Spring Awakening, Mamby on the Beach, Summer Set Music & Camping Festival, Freaky Deaky and Reaction New Year’s Eve. In 2020, we also launched in-house our new digital festival, Music Lives, and digital streaming series and events, Music Lives ON and LiveXLive Presents. Our festival and events growth strategy relies on the strength of these brands to attract customers to our in person festivals and events, both through attendance at the original festivals and markets and in new markets, as well as to our online digital properties. We also rely on the strength of these brands to secure sponsorships and marketing partners and to facilitate growth in revenue from the sale of music and other content, as well as advertising on our online properties. Maintaining the strength of our festivals, events and online businesses will be challenging, and our relationship with our fans could be harmed for many reasons, including the quality of the experience at a particular festival or event, our competitors developing more popular events or attracting talent from our businesses, adverse occurrences or publicity in connection with an event and changes to public tastes that are beyond our control and difficult to anticipate. If our key properties become less popular with consumers within the particular music community, such as electronic music culture (“EMC”), our growth strategy would be harmed, which could in turn adversely affect our business and financial results.

 

Maintaining the popularity of our festivals, events and online businesses requires that we anticipate consumer preferences and offer attractions that appeal to the music community, including EMC. Our customers’ preferences and tastes for these attractions can change and evolve rapidly, and our competitors actively seek to provide new and compelling experiences at their events. If we fail to anticipate or respond quickly to changes in public taste, our festivals and related offerings may become less attractive to consumers.

 

It is possible that the popularity of electronic music and the EMC community will not continue their current growth or even decline.

 

A substantial part of our festival and events business focuses on the broad market for electronic music and the EMC community, including electronic music festivals and events, venues, sponsorships and ecommerce. Accordingly, our growth strategy is dependent upon the continued growth of the popularity of electronic music and the EMC community, however, this growth is subject to the whims of public taste, which may change over time and may be beyond our control. While interest in electronic music has increased significantly over the past few years, this increased interest may not continue, and it is possible that the public’s current level of interest in electronic music will decline. If either were to happen, the demand for and interest in EMC festivals, events and venues and our online properties could fail to meet our expectations or even decline. This would have a material adverse effect on our business and financial results.

 

The number of EMC festivals and events may grow faster than the public’s demand, which could make it difficult for us to attract customers to our festivals and events.

 

With the growing EMC community, there has been a significant increase in the number of EMC festivals and events due to the creation of new events and the expansion of existing events, both in geography and duration. Our growth strategy includes increasing the number of EMC festivals and events we produce each year, as well as increasing the frequency of established events by bringing them to new cities and countries. It is possible that the proliferation of EMC festivals and events will outpace demand. Further, many of the largest festivals attract fans who travel great distances to attend. It is possible that an increase in the availability of local quality EMC festivals and events will make it less likely that these fans will travel to the same festivals in other locations. If either were to occur, it could make it difficult for us to achieve the increase in overall attendance that is part of our growth strategy or force us to offer tickets at reduced prices, either of which would adversely affect our business and financial results.

 

In addition, competition for advertising marketing partners, and sponsorships may lead to fewer business partners at our events or lower compensation, with a resulting decrease in revenue. Our competitors may offer increased guarantees to artists and more favorable terms and ticketing arrangements to other parties, which we may be unwilling or unable to match. Even if we are willing to match our competitors’ terms, the profitability of our events could decline.

 

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If we are forced to cancel or postpone all or part of a scheduled festival or event, our business may be adversely impacted, and our reputation may be harmed.

 

We incur a significant amount of up-front costs when we plan and prepare for a festival or event. Accordingly, if a planned festival or event is canceled, we would lose a substantial amount of sunk costs, fail to generate the anticipated revenue and may be forced to issue refunds for tickets sold. If we are forced to postpone a planned festival or event, we would incur substantial additional costs in connection with our having to stage the event on a new date, may have reduced attendance and revenue and may have to refund money to ticketholders. In addition, any cancellation or postponement could harm both our reputation and the reputation of the particular festival or event. We could be compelled to cancel or postpone all or part of an event or festival for many reasons, including such things as low attendance, adverse weather conditions, technical problems, issues with permitting or government regulation, incidents, injuries or deaths at that event or festival, as well as extraordinary incidents, such as pandemics, terrorist attacks, mass-casualty incidents and natural disasters or similar events. In 2019, we were forced to cancel Mamby on the Beach festival due to circumstances beyond our control. In 2020, due to the global COVID-19 pandemic and the government actions taken as a result such as shelter-in-place and other similar stay at home orders, we postponed React Presents’ flagship annual Spring Awakening festival to 2021. While we hope to hold Spring Awakening festival in the 2021 calendar year, there can be no assurances that we will be able to hold Spring Awakening festival or any other in-person festival or events in 2020 or thereafter, pending the developments of the COVID-19 pandemic. We often have cancellation insurance policies in place to cover a portion of our insured losses if we are compelled to cancel an event or festival, but our coverage may not be sufficient and may be subject to deductibles. The occurrence of an extraordinary condition in the geographic region or at or near the site where a festival or event will be held may make it impossible or difficult to stage the event or make it difficult for attendees to travel to the site of a festival or event. For example, as of the date of this Annual Report, U.S. and global restrictions on travel and related required quarantine times imposed as a result of COVID-19, may make it nearly impossible or very difficult to stage the event or for attendees to travel to the site of a festival or event. An extraordinary incident may also make it inappropriate to hold a festival or event at a particular site or at a particular time.

 

We must match the innovation of our competitors.

 

There is currently a tremendous amount of innovation among EMC-focused businesses, including the different experiential aspects of festivals and other live performances. These include things such as video presentations, lighting, special effects, sets and other creative elements. Businesses in the EMC industry compete, in part, based on their ability to provide experiences for their audiences that are both cutting edge and compelling. Innovation in our industry is taking place both at the companies that produce festivals and events, as well as at smaller companies that are retained by producers and performers to create artistic elements to accompany the music and enhance the experience of the fans. We must be able to match the quality and inventiveness of these competitors at our own festivals and events. If we fail to do so, it could lead to reduced demand for tickets to our festivals and events, harm our reputation or the reputation of our festivals and events and adversely affect our business and financial results.

 

Costs associated with, and our ability to obtain adequate insurance, could adversely affect our profitability and financial condition.

 

Heightened concerns and challenges regarding property, casualty, liability, artist, business interruption and other insurance coverage have resulted from security incidents, including terrorism, along with varying weather-related conditions and incidents, and are expected to be further affected by COVID-19. As a result, we may experience increased difficulty obtaining high policy limits of coverage at reasonable costs, including coverage for acts of terrorism and weather-related property damage.

 

We cannot guarantee that our insurance policy coverage limits, including insurance coverage for property, casualty, liability, artist and business interruption losses and acts of terrorism, would be adequate under the circumstances should one or multiple adverse events occur at or near any of our venues or events, or that our insurers would have adequate financial resources to pay our related claims. We cannot guarantee that adequate coverage limits will be available, offered at reasonable costs or offered by insurers with sufficient financial soundness. If adverse events that our insurance policies do not cover occur and result in a significant liability to us, our financial condition and results of operation could be adversely affected.

 

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To stage festivals in multiple locations, we may be required to transport complex sets and equipment long distances, which creates increased risk that they will be damaged.

 

Our larger festivals require complex sets and other equipment, including those that currently exist, and those we must construct or purchase from a supplier. We are often required to transport these sets and equipment long distances by land and sea, which creates the risk that they may be damaged or lost if there is an accident or other complication during transport. These sets and equipment are very costly to create, and it would be expensive and time consuming to repair or replace them. We have insurance policies in place to cover a portion of our insured losses for damaged or lost sets and equipment, but our coverage may not be sufficient and is subject to deductibles. Additionally, a supplier’s failure to timely deliver the sets and equipment to us or our loss of these sets and equipment might lead to substantial expenses and could force us to delay or cancel a festival or event. Any of these scenarios could adversely affect our business, reputation and financial results.

 

There is the risk of personal injuries and accidents occurring at our live music events, which could subject us to personal injury or other claims, increase our expenses and damage our brands.

 

There are inherent risks in live festivals and events, particularly those like ours, which involve complex staging and special effects. As a result, personal injuries and accidents have occurred in the concert industry in general, including some that have injured or killed employees and guests. Injuries and accidents occurring in connection with our festivals, events or venues could subject us to negative publicity, as well as claims and liabilities, and certain of the businesses we have acquired or plan to acquire have been subject to such claims. Injuries and accidents occurring in connection with our live festivals and events, or at any of the venues we manage, or any actual or alleged spread of COVID-19 potentially tied to our festivals could also harm our reputation with artists and fans and make it more difficult for us to obtain sponsors. News of any such incident or accident could also reduce attendance at our events or lead to the cancellation of all or part of an event or festival, in each case leading to a decrease in our revenue. While we maintain insurance policies that provide coverage within limits that are sufficient, in management’s judgment, to protect us from material financial loss for personal injuries sustained by persons at our venues or accidents in the ordinary course of business, there can be no assurance that this insurance will be adequate at all times and in all circumstances. In particular, if there were to be a major incident resulting in multiple deaths or injuries at one of our events or venues, it is unlikely our insurance would cover the full liability. We would be responsible for any liabilities not covered by our insurance policies, which would negatively impact our cash flows and results of operations.

 

In addition, we are subject to state “dram shop” laws and regulations, which generally provide that a person injured by an intoxicated person may seek to recover damages from an establishment that wrongfully served alcoholic beverages to the intoxicated person. Recent litigation of “dram shop” laws and regulations targeted at restaurant chains has resulted in significant judgments, including many recent instances of punitive damages; such laws may be extended to apply to our events and festivals. While we carry customary live events insurance as part of our existing comprehensive general liability insurance, we may still be subject to a judgment in excess of our insurance coverage, and we may not be able to obtain or continue to maintain such insurance coverage at reasonable costs, if at all. Regardless of whether any claims made against us are valid or whether we are liable, we may be adversely affected by negative publicity resulting from such laws.

 

Certain activities or conduct, such as illegal drug use, at our in person festivals or events or festival or events we produce may expose us to liability, cause us to lose business licenses or government approvals, result in the cancellation of all or a part of an event or festival or result in adverse publicity.

 

We are subject to risks associated with certain activities or conduct, such as drug use at our festivals, events or venues, that are illegal or violate the terms of our business licenses. Illegal activities or conduct at any of our events or venues may result in negative publicity, adverse consequences (including illness, injury or death) to the persons engaged in the illegal activity or others and litigation against us. We have historically instituted policies and procedures aimed at ensuring that the operation of each festival and event is conducted in conformance with local, state and federal laws.  Additionally, we have a “no tolerance” policy on illegal drug use in or around our facilities, and we continually monitor the actions of entertainers, fans and our employees to ensure that proper behavioral standards are met. However, such policies, no matter how well designed and enforced, cannot provide absolute assurance that the policies’ objectives are achieved. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems and policies, there can be no assurance that our policies will prevent deliberate acts by persons attempting to violate or circumvent them. The consequences of these acts may increase our costs, result in the loss or termination of leases for our venues by property owners (including governments and other parties that own the land at our venues), result in our inability to get the necessary permits and locations for our events or lead to the cancellation of all or part of an event or festival. These consequences may also make it more difficult for us to obtain or retain our business partners, including sponsors, lower consumer demand for our events, subject us to liability claims, divert management’s attention from our business and make an investment in our securities unattractive to current and potential investors. These outcomes could adversely affect our business, reputation and financial results.

 

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We face intense competition in the live music, media and ticketing industries, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We operate in the highly competitive live music, media and ticketing industries, and this competition may prevent us from maintaining or increasing our current revenue. The live music industry, including electronic dance music, competes with other forms of entertainment for consumers’ discretionary spending. Within the live music industry, we compete with other promoters and venue operators to attract customers and talent to events and festivals, as well as to obtain the support of sponsors and advertisers and other business partners. Our competitors include large promotion and entertainment companies, some with substantial scale, that have begun to focus on EMC, smaller promoters that focus on a single festival or event or a particular region or country, venue operators and other producers of live events. Some of our competitors are much larger than we are and have greater resources and stronger relationships with artists, venues, sponsors and advertisers than we do. Others have substantial experience in and strong relationships in the EMC community and are primarily focused on EMC. Our competitors may engage in more extensive development efforts for large-scale events, undertake more far-reaching marketing campaigns, adopt more aggressive pricing policies and make more attractive offers to existing and potential advertisers and sponsors and other business partners.

 

Our festival and events business is subject to substantial governmental regulation, and our failure to comply with these regulations could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our festival and events operations are subject to federal, state and local laws, statutes, rules, regulations, policies and procedures, which are subject to change at any time, governing matters such as:

 

operation of venues;

 

licensing, permitting and zoning, including ordinances relating to health, noise, traffic and pollution;

 

human health, safety and sanitation requirements;

 

the service of food and alcoholic beverages;

 

working conditions, labor, minimum wage and hour, citizenship and employment laws;

 

the ADA;

 

the FCPA and similar regulations in other countries;

 

sales and other taxes and withholding of taxes;

 

privacy laws and protection of personally identifiable information;

 

marketing activities via the telephone and online; and

 

primary ticketing and ticket resale services.

 

Our failure to comply with these laws and regulations could result in fines and proceedings against us by governmental agencies and consumers, which if material, could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, the promulgation of new laws, rules and regulations could restrict or unfavorably impact our business, which could decrease demand for services, reduce revenue, increase costs and subject us to additional liabilities. For example, some legislatures have proposed laws in the past that would impose potential liability on us and other promoters and producers of live music events for entertainment taxes and for incidents that occur at events, particularly those that involve drugs and alcohol. Additionally, new legislation could be passed that may negatively impact our business, such as provisions that have recently been proposed in various jurisdictions that would restrict ticketing methods, mandate ticket inventory disclosure, and attack current policies governing season tickets for sports teams.

 

From time to time, federal, state and local authorities and consumers commence investigations, inquiries or litigation with respect to our compliance with applicable consumer protection, advertising, unfair business practice, antitrust (and similar or related laws) and other laws. We may be required to incur significant legal expenses in connection with the defense of future governmental investigations and litigation.

 

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A deterioration in general economic conditions and its impact on consumer and business spending, particularly by customers in our targeted millennial generation demographic, could adversely affect our revenue and financial results.

 

Our business and financial results are influenced significantly by general economic conditions, in particular, those conditions affecting discretionary consumer spending and corporate spending. During past economic slowdowns and recessions, many consumers reduced their discretionary spending and advertisers reduced their advertising expenditures. An economic downturn can result in reduced ticket revenue, lower customer spending and more limited and less lucrative sponsorship opportunities.

 

We depend on relationships with key event promoters, sponsor and marketing partners, executives, managers and artists, and adverse changes in these relationships could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our event promotion business is particularly dependent upon personal relationships, as promoters and executives within entertainment companies such as ours leverage their network of relationships with artists, agents, managers and sponsor and marketing partners to secure the rights to the performers and events that are critical to our success. Due to the importance of those industry contacts, the loss of any of our officers or other key personnel who have relationships with these artists, agents or managers could adversely affect our venue management and event promotion businesses. While we have hiring policies and procedures and conduct background checks of our promoters, executives, managers and artists, they may engage in or may have in the past engaged in conduct we do not endorse or that is otherwise improper, which may result in reputational harm to us. Also, to the extent artists, agents and managers we have relationships with are replaced with individuals with whom our officers or other key personnel do not have relationships, our competitive position and financial condition could be adversely affected.

 

Our business is highly sensitive to public tastes and is dependent on our ability to secure popular artists and other live music events, and we and our ticketing clients may be unable to anticipate or respond to changes in consumer preferences, which may result in decreased demand for our services.

 

Our business is highly sensitive to rapidly changing public tastes and is dependent on the availability of popular artists and events. Our live entertainment business depends in part on our ability to anticipate the tastes of consumers and to offer events that appeal to them. Since we rely on unrelated parties to create and perform at live music events, any unwillingness to tour or lack of availability of popular artists could limit our ability to generate revenue. Our artist management business could be adversely affected if the artists it represents do not tour or perform as frequently as anticipated, or if such tours or performances are not as widely attended by fans as anticipated due to changing tastes, general economic conditions or otherwise. Our ticketing business relies on third parties to create and perform live entertainment, sporting and leisure events and to price tickets to such events.

 

In addition, our live entertainment business typically books our live music tours in advance of the beginning of a live event and often agrees to pay an artist a fixed guaranteed amount prior to our receiving any revenue. Therefore, if the public is not receptive to the live event, or we or an artist cancel the show, we may incur a loss for the event depending on the amount of the fixed guarantee or incurred costs relative to any revenue earned, as well as revenue we could have earned at booked venues. We do have cancellation insurance policies in place to cover a portion of our losses if an artist cancels a tour but such policies may not be sufficient and are subject to deductibles. Furthermore, consumer preferences change from time to time, and our failure to anticipate, identify or react to these changes could result in reduced demand for our services, which would adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Poor weather adversely affects attendance at our live music events, which could negatively impact our financial performance from period to period.

 

We promote many live music events. Weather conditions surrounding these events affect sales of tickets, concessions and merchandise, among other things. Poor weather conditions can have a material effect on our results of operations particularly because we promote and/or ticket a finite number of events. Increased weather variability due to climate change exacerbates weather-related issues we face. Due to weather conditions, we may be required to cancel or reschedule an event to another available day or a different venue, which would increase our costs for the event and could negatively impact the attendance at the event, as well as concession and merchandise sales. Poor weather can affect current periods as well as successive events in future periods.

 

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We depend on our ability to lease venues for our events, and if we are unable to do so on acceptable terms, or at all, our results of operations could be adversely affected.

 

Our business requires access to venues to generate revenue from live EMC events. For these events, we generally lease and operate a number of venues or locations under various agreements which include leases or licenses with third-parties or booking agreements, which are agreements where we contract to book the events at a venue or location for a specific period of time. Some of the leases we enter into may be between us and governmental entities. Our long-term success will depend in part on the availability of venues, our ability to lease these venues and our ability to enter into booking agreements upon their expiration. As many of these agreements are with third-parties over whom we have little or no control, including the government, we may be unable to renew these agreements or enter into new agreements on acceptable terms or at all. We may continue to expand our operations through the development of live music venues and the expansion of existing live music venues, which poses a number of risks, including:

 

desirable sites for live music events may be unavailable or costly;

 

the attractiveness of our venues and locations may deteriorate over time;

 

our competitors may outbid us for the use of certain venues and locations;

 

we may be unable to obtain or we may lose local government permits or approvals necessary to use a particular venue or location; and

 

a particular venue or location, including one we have used in the past, may determine that events or festivals like ours would be inappropriate for their property.

 

We may depend upon unionized labor for the provision of some services at our events and any work stoppages or labor disturbances could disrupt our business.

 

Certain of the employees at some of the venues we manage, and other independent contractors hired to assist at our festivals and events, may be subject to collective bargaining agreements. The applicable union agreements typically expire and may require negotiation in the ordinary course of business. Upon the expiration of any such collective bargaining agreements, however, our partners may be unable to negotiate new collective bargaining agreements on favorable terms, and our business operations may be interrupted as a result of labor disputes or difficulties and delays in the process of renegotiating such collective bargaining agreements. In addition, our business operations at one or more of our venues may also be interrupted as a result of labor disputes by outside unions attempting to unionize a venue even though there is not unionized labor at that venue currently. A work stoppage at one or more of our owned and/or operated venues or at our promoted events could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, and financial condition. We cannot predict the effect that a potential work stoppage would have on our business.

 

Risks Related to Our Acquisition Strategy

 

Our proposed acquisition of PodcastOne is subject to closing conditions, as well as other uncertainties, and there can be no assurances as to whether or when it may be completed. Failure to complete the proposed transaction could adversely affect our business.

 

The completion of our proposed acquisition of PodcastOne is subject to a number of closing conditions, which make the completion and timing of the completion of the proposed transaction uncertain. If the proposed acquisition of PodcastOne is not completed, our business may be adversely affected and, without realizing any of the benefits of having completed the proposed acquisition, we will be subject to a number of risks, including the following:

 

a potential decline to the market price of our common stock;

 

an inability to find another acquisition with comparable strategic and other business synergies;

 

a loss of time and resources that our management redirected to matters relating to the proposed acquisition that could otherwise have been devoted to pursuing other beneficial opportunities; and

 

potential negative reactions from the financial markets or from our customers, business partners or employees.

 

In addition, we could be subject to litigation related to any failure to complete the proposed acquisition of PodcastOne. The materialization of any of these risks could adversely impact our ongoing businesses. Similarly, delays in the completion of the proposed acquisition could, among other things, result in additional transaction costs, loss of revenue or personnel, or other negative effects associated with uncertainty about completion of the proposed acquisition

  

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We can give no assurances as to when we will consummate any other future acquisitions or whether we will consummate any of them at all.

 

We intend to continue to build our business through strategic acquisitions, such as the announced PodcastOne acquisition and pursue and consummate one or more additional acquisitions and to possibly use our remaining cash to fund any cash portion of the consideration we will pay in connection with those acquisitions. However, such additional acquisitions, such as the announced PodcastOne acquisition, may also be subject to conditions and other impediments to closing, including some that are beyond our control, and we may not be able to close any of them successfully. In addition, our future acquisitions will be required to be closed within certain timeframes as negotiated between us and the acquisition target, and if we are unable to meet the closing deadlines for a given transaction, we may be required to forfeit payments we have made, if any, be forced to renegotiate the transaction on less advantageous terms and could fail to consummate the transaction at all.

 

If we are unable to close any other future acquisition, it could significantly alter our business strategy and impede our prospects for growth. If we are unable to successfully consummate a particular acquisition, we may not be able to stream desired live music content on our network, produce and/or participate in the planned festivals or events or have ownership or licenses of the brands owned or licensed by that acquisition target. Further, we may not be able to identify suitable acquisition candidates to replace these acquisitions, and even if we were to do so, we may only be able to consummate them on less advantageous terms. In addition, some of the businesses we acquire may incur significant losses from operations, which, in turn, could have a material and adverse impact on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

As shown by our acquisition of Slacker, acquisitions have been and will continue to be an important component of our growth strategy; however, we will need to integrate these acquired businesses successfully in order for our growth strategy to succeed and for us to become profitable. We expect that the management teams of the acquired businesses will adopt our policies, procedures and best practices, and cooperate with each other in scheduling events, booking talent and in other aspects of their operations. We may face difficulty in integrating the operations of any businesses we may acquire in the future, such as coordinating geographically dispersed organizations, integrating personnel with disparate business backgrounds and combining different corporate cultures, the diversion of management’s attention from other business concerns, the inherent risks in entering markets or lines of business in which we have either limited or no direct experience; and the potential loss of key employees, individual service providers, customers and strategic partners of acquired companies. For example, as of December 31, 2017, we made the decision to shut down and discontinue the operations of LiveXLive Tickets, Inc., our wholly-owned subsidiary (“LXL Tickets”).

 

In addition, our growth strategy also includes further development of our online live streamed music network that we intend to integrate across all of our acquired businesses. This will require, among other things, the integration of the individual websites and databases of each business we currently operate or will acquire in the future. This will be a complex undertaking that may prove more difficult, expensive and time consuming than we currently expect. Even if we are able to achieve this integration, it may not achieve the benefits we anticipate. If we fail to do this properly and in a timely manner, it could harm our revenue and relationship with our fans.

 

Further, we expect that future target companies may have material weaknesses in internal controls relating to the proper application of accrual-based accounting under the accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) prior to our acquiring them. The Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (the “PCAOB”) defines a material weakness as a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. We will be relying on the proper implementation of our policies and procedures to remedy any such material weaknesses, and prevent any potential material misstatements in our financial reporting. Any such misstatement could adversely affect the trading price of our common stock, cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, and subject us to civil and criminal fines and penalties. If our acquired companies fail to integrate in these important ways, or we fail to adequately understand the business operations of our acquired companies, our growth and financial results could suffer. 

 

A number of other companies are seeking to make acquisitions in our industry, which may make our acquisition strategy more difficult or expensive to pursue.

 

The emergence and growth of live streamed music, music events, festivals and concerts has brought increased media attention, and a number of companies and investors have begun making acquisitions of such businesses or announced their intention to do so. We compete with many of these companies, and certain of them have greater financial resources than we do for pursuing and consummating acquisitions and to further develop and integrate acquired businesses. Our strategy relies on our ability to consummate important future acquisitions to foster the growth of our core business and to establish ourselves as the key provider of streamed high-quality live music content. The increased focus on acquisitions of such companies may impede our ability to acquire these companies because they choose another acquirer. It could also increase the price that we must pay for these companies. Either of these outcomes could reduce our growth, harm our business and prevent us from achieving our strategic goals.

  

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We may enter into acquisitions and take actions in connection with such transactions that could adversely affect our business and results of operations.

 

Our future growth rate depends in part on our selective acquisition of additional businesses and assets. We may be unable to identify suitable targets for acquisition or make further acquisitions at favorable prices. If we identify a suitable acquisition candidate, our ability to successfully complete the acquisition would depend on a variety of factors, and may include our ability to obtain financing on acceptable terms and requisite government approvals. In addition, any credit agreements or credit facilities that we may enter into in the future may restrict our ability to make certain acquisitions. In connection with future acquisitions, we could take certain actions that could adversely affect our business, including:

 

  using a significant portion of our available cash;

 

  issuing equity securities, which would dilute current stockholders’ percentage ownership;

 

  incurring substantial debt;

 

  incurring or assuming contingent liabilities, known or unknown;

 

  incurring amortization expenses related to intangibles; and

 

  incurring large accounting write-offs or impairments.

 

We may also enter into joint ventures, which involve certain unique risks, including, among others, risks relating to the lack of full control of the joint venture, potential disagreements with our joint venture partners about how to manage the joint venture, conflicting interests of the joint venture, requirement to fund the joint venture and its business not being profitable.

 

In addition, we cannot be certain that the due diligence investigation that we conduct with respect to any investment or acquisition opportunity will reveal or highlight all relevant facts that may be necessary or helpful in evaluating such investment opportunity. For example, instances of fraud, accounting irregularities and other deceptive practices can be difficult to detect. Executive officers, directors and employees may be named as defendants in litigation involving a company we are acquiring or have acquired. Even if we conduct extensive due diligence on a particular investment or acquisition, we may fail to uncover all material issues relating to such investment, including regarding the controls and procedures of a particular target or the full scope of its contractual arrangements. We rely on our due diligence to identify potential liabilities in the businesses we acquire, including such things as potential or actual lawsuits, contractual obligations or liabilities imposed by government regulation. However, our due diligence process may not uncover these liabilities, and where we identify a potential liability, we may incorrectly believe that we can consummate the acquisition without subjecting ourselves to that liability. Therefore, it is possible that we could be subject to litigation in respect of these acquired businesses. For example, see “Item 3. Legal Proceedings” regarding our ongoing litigation with Wantickets and its principal. If our due diligence fails to identify issues specific to an investment or acquisition, we may obtain a lower return from that transaction than the investment would return or otherwise subject ourselves to unexpected liabilities. We may also be forced to write-down or write-off assets, restructure our operations or incur impairment or other charges that could result in our reporting losses. For example, as of December 31, 2017, we made the decision to shut down the operations of LXL Tickets and as a result, we recognized a loss of $1.5 million from operations of LXL Tickets, and additionally incurred a loss of $2.8 million related to the impairment of all remaining LXL Tickets assets for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2018. Charges of this nature could contribute to negative market perceptions about us or our shares of common stock. 

   

Risks Related to Technology and Intellectual Property

 

We rely heavily on technology to stream content and manage other aspects of our operations, and the failure of this technology to operate effectively could adversely affect our business.

 

We utilize a combination of proprietary and third-party technology. Our business substantially depends on the Slacker Radio app, which offering a digital spin on the classic radio listening experience through free and subscription-based access. Our business will also be substantially dependent on our LXL App, which includes live video streaming, VOD, push notifications, festival-, venue- and original content-specific functionality, Google Ads capability, digital rights management (e.g., geo-blocking), and the capability to display time-shifted content and enhanced function. We cannot be sure that the Slacker Radio app will continue to, or that the LXL App or any enhancements or other modifications we make in the future to such apps will, perform as intended or otherwise be of value to our users. Future enhancements and modifications to our technology could consume considerable resources. If we are unable to successfully develop, maintain and enhance our technology to manage the streaming of live events in a timely and efficient manner, our ability to attract and retain users may be impaired. In addition, if our technology or that of third parties we utilize in our operations fails or otherwise operates improperly, our ability to attract and retain users may be impaired. Also, any harm to our users’ personal computers or mobile devices caused by software used in our operations could have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

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We may be unable to adequately protect our intellectual property rights.

 

We may be unable to detect unauthorized use of, or otherwise sufficiently protect, our intellectual property rights. We rely on a combination of laws and contractual restrictions with employees, individual service providers, users, artists, suppliers and others content licensors and Content Providers to establish and protect these proprietary rights. Despite these precautions, it may be possible for a third party to copy or otherwise obtain and use proprietary information, trademarks, or copyrighted material without authorization which, if discovered, might require legal action to correct. Furthermore, our recently acquired assets and the assets we may acquire in connection with any future acquisitions (including brand names and trademark rights), may have been improperly adopted or inadequately protected prior to our acquisitions of them. This could include failures to obtain assignments of ownership or confidentiality agreements from third parties, failures to clear use of trademarks, or other failures to protect trademarks and other proprietary rights. In addition, third parties may independently and lawfully develop similar intellectual property or duplicate our services.

 

We will apply to register, or secure by contract when appropriate, our trademarks and service marks as they are developed and used and reserve and register domain names as we deem appropriate. While we intend to vigorously protect our trademarks, service marks and domain names as we deem appropriate, effective trademark protection may not be available or may not be sought in every country in which we operate, and contractual disputes may affect the use of marks governed by private contract. Similarly, not every variation of a domain name may be available or be registered, even if available. Our failure to protect our intellectual property rights in a meaningful manner or challenges to related contractual rights could result in the erosion of brand names or the loss of rights to our owned or licensed marks and limit our ability to control marketing on or through the Internet using our various domain names or otherwise, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations. In addition, the loss of, or inability to otherwise obtain, rights to use third party trademarks and service marks, including the loss of exclusive rights to use third party trademarks in territories where we present festivals, could adversely affect our business or otherwise result in competitive harm. Moreover, on September 23, 2017, we entered into a Co-Existence Agreement with Monday Sessions Media, Inc. D/B/A Live X (“Live X”), in which we consented to Live X’s use and registration of the name and mark Live X and agreed to not challenge, dispute or contest Live X’s rights in such mark. Pursuant to this agreement, we agreed to not offer certain production services to third party businesses in connection with our mark LiveXLive and use commercially reasonable efforts to afford Live X opportunities to bid on production or streaming service opportunities. 

 

We currently own the www.livexlive.com and www.slacker.com Internet domain names and various other related domain names. Internet regulatory bodies generally regulate domain names. If we lose the ability to use a domain name in a particular country, we would be forced either to incur significant additional expenses to market our services within that country or, in extreme cases, to elect not to offer our services in that country. Either result could harm our business, operating results, and financial condition. The regulation of domain names in the United States and in foreign countries is subject to change. Regulatory bodies could establish additional top-level domains, appoint additional domain name registrars, or modify the requirements for holding domain names. As a result, we may not be able to acquire or maintain the domain names that utilize our brand names in the United States or other countries in which we may conduct business in the future.

  

Litigation or proceedings before governmental authorities and administrative bodies may be necessary in the future to enforce our intellectual property rights, to protect our patent rights, trademarks, trade secrets, and domain names and to determine the validity and scope of the proprietary rights of others. Our efforts to enforce or protect our proprietary rights may be ineffective and could result in substantial costs and diversion of resources and management time, each of which could substantially harm our operating results. Additionally, changes in law may be implemented, or changes in interpretation of such laws may occur, that may affect our ability to protect and enforce our patents and other intellectual property.

 

We may be accused of infringing upon intellectual property rights of third parties.

 

From time to time, we have been and may be in the future subject to legal proceedings and claims in the ordinary course of business, including claims of alleged infringement and other violations of the trademarks, copyrights, patents and other intellectual property or proprietary rights of third parties. The legal proceedings and claims include notices provided to us by content owners of users’ violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which obligate us to investigate and remove infringing user content from our website.

 

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Music contained within content we distribute may require us to obtain licenses for such distribution. In this regard, we will engage with collection management organizations (“CMOs”) that hold certain rights to music interests in connection with streaming content into various territories. If we are unable to reach mutually acceptable terms with these organizations, we could become involved in litigation and/or could be enjoined from distributing certain content, which could adversely impact our business. Additionally, pending and ongoing litigation as well as negotiations between certain CMOs and other third parties in various territories could adversely impact our negotiations with CMOs, or result in music publishers represented by certain CMOs unilaterally withdrawing rights, and thereby adversely impact our ability to reach licensing agreements reasonably acceptable to us. Failure to reach such licensing agreements could expose us to potential liability for copyright infringement or otherwise increase our costs.

 

We also face a risk that content licensors may bring claims for copyright infringement or breach of contract if our users exceed the scope of the content licenses. Certain live performance content may involve remixing and sampling of others’ music, and if our content license agreements do not grant us or our users sufficient use rights, or if we facilitate the performance of music for which we do not have a license, our distribution of such content could expose us to claims of copyright infringement. Due to the nature of our business, we could be accused of infringing on the copyrights of Content Providers or other rights holders, or such persons could attempt to prevent us from otherwise making certain content available to our users.

 

We may not be able to successfully defend against such claims, which may result in a limitation on our ability to use the intellectual property subject to these claims and also might require us to enter into settlement or license agreements, pay costly damage awards or face an injunction prohibiting us from using the affected intellectual property in connection with our services. Defending ourselves against intellectual property claims, whether they are with or without merit or are determined in our favor, results in costly litigation and may divert the attention of our management and technical personnel from the rest of our business. 

 

Our inability to obtain accurate and comprehensive information necessary to identify the musical works embodied in sound recordings used in our services and/or the rights holders of such musical works, may impact our ability to perform our obligations under our licenses from the rights holders, may require us to remove or decrease the number of recordings on our streaming music services, and/or may subject us to potential copyright infringement claims.

 

We currently rely on the assistance of third parties to determine comprehensive and accurate rights holder information for the musical works embodied in the sound recordings made available on our services. If the information provided to us or obtained by such third parties does not comprehensively or accurately identify which composers, songwriters or publishers own or administer musical works, or if we are unable to determine which musical works correspond to specific sound recordings, it may be difficult to identify the appropriate rights holders from whom a license is required, to identify the applicable rights holders to pay and/or to comply with other applicable terms and obligations of the licenses. Our failure to timely obtain licenses and/or comply with such terms or obligations may subject us to significant liability for copyright infringement (and/or result in termination of certain licenses). Further, our inability to accurately identify rights holders may prevent us from obtaining necessary licenses, which could lead to a reduction in the music available to stream on our services, adversely impacting our ability to retain and expand our listener base.

  

In addition, music, Internet, technology, and media companies are frequently subject to litigation based on allegations of infringement, misappropriation, or other violations of intellectual property rights. Many companies in these industries, including many of our competitors, have substantially larger patent and intellectual property portfolios than we do, which could make us a target for litigation as we may not be able to assert counterclaims against parties that sue us for patent, or other intellectual property infringement. In addition, various “non-practicing entities” that own patents and other intellectual property rights often attempt to aggressively assert claims in order to extract value from technology companies. Further, from time to time we may introduce new products and services, including in territories where we currently do not have an offering, which could increase our exposure to patent and other intellectual property claims from competitors and non-practicing entities. It is difficult to predict whether assertions of third-party intellectual property rights or any infringement or misappropriation claims arising from such assertions will substantially harm our business, operating results, and financial condition. If we are forced to defend against any infringement or misappropriation claims, whether they are with or without merit, are settled out of court, or are determined in our favor, we may be required to expend significant time and financial resources on the defense of such claims. Furthermore, an adverse outcome of a dispute may require us to pay significant damages, which may be even greater if we are found to have willfully infringed upon a party’s intellectual property; cease exploiting copyrighted content that we have previously had the ability to exploit; cease using solutions that are alleged to infringe or misappropriate the intellectual property of others; expend additional development resources to redesign our solutions; enter into potentially unfavorable royalty or license agreements in order to obtain the right to use necessary technologies, content, or materials; indemnify our partners and other third parties; and/or take other actions that may have material effects on our business, operating results, and financial condition.

 

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Our live music streaming network uses open source software, and we license some of our software through open source projects, which may pose particular risks to our proprietary software, products, and services in a manner that could have a negative effect on our business.

 

We use open source software in connection with our website and our live music streaming network and may use open source software in the future. The terms of many open source licenses to which we are subject have not been interpreted by U.S. or foreign courts, and there is a risk that open source software licenses could be construed in a manner that imposes unanticipated conditions or restrictions on our ability to provide or distribute our products or services. Some open source software licenses require users who distribute open source software as part of their own software product to publicly disclose all or part of the source code to such software product or make available any derivative works of the open source code on unfavorable terms or at no cost. Additionally, we may from time to time face claims from third parties claiming ownership of, or demanding release of, the open source software or derivative works that we developed using such software, which could include our proprietary source code, or otherwise seeking to enforce the terms of the applicable open source license. These claims could result in litigation and could require us to make our software source code freely available, purchase a costly license or cease offering the implicated products or services unless and until we can re-engineer them to avoid infringement. This re-engineering process could require significant additional research and development resources, and we may not be able to complete it successfully. In addition to risks related to license requirements, use of certain open source software can lead to greater risks than use of third-party commercial software, as open source licensors generally do not provide warranties or controls on the origin of software. Any of these risks could be difficult to eliminate or manage, and, if not addressed, could have a negative effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. While we have assessed the use of open source software on our website to ensure that we have not used open source software in a manner that would require us to disclose the source code to the related technology, use requiring such disclosure could inadvertently occur and any requirement to disclose our proprietary source code could be harmful to us. 

 

Changes in how network operators handle and charge for access to data that travel across their networks could adversely impact our business.

 

We will rely upon the ability of consumers to access our service through the Internet. Changes in laws or regulations that adversely affect the growth, popularity or use of the Internet, including laws impacting net neutrality, could decrease the demand for our service and increase our cost of doing business. To the extent that network operators implement usage-based pricing, including meaningful bandwidth caps, or otherwise try to monetize access to their networks by data providers, we could incur greater operating expenses and our subscriber acquisition and retention could be negatively impacted. For example, in late 2010, Comcast informed Level 3 Communications that it would require Level 3 to pay for the ability to access Comcast’s network. Furthermore, to the extent network operators were to create tiers of Internet access service and either charge us for or prohibit us from being available through these tiers, our business could be negatively impacted.

 

Most network operators that provide consumers with access to the Internet also provide these consumers with multichannel video programming. As such, companies like Comcast, Charter Spectrum and Cablevision have an incentive to use their network infrastructure in a manner adverse to our continued growth and success. For example, Comcast exempted certain of its own Internet video traffic (e.g., Streampix videos to the Xbox 360) from a bandwidth cap that applies to all unaffiliated Internet video traffic (e.g., Netflix videos to the Xbox 360). While we believe that consumer demand, regulatory oversight and competition will help check these incentives, to the extent that network operators are able to provide preferential treatment to their data as opposed to ours or otherwise implement discriminatory network management practices, our business could be negatively impacted. In international markets, especially in Latin America, these same incentives apply; however, the consumer demand, regulatory oversight and competition may not be as strong as in our domestic market.

  

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The success of our business and operations depends, in part, on the integrity of our systems and infrastructures, as well as affiliate and third-party computer systems, Wi-Fi and other communication systems. System interruption and the lack of integration and redundancy in these systems and infrastructures may have an adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

System interruption and the lack of integration and redundancy in the information systems and infrastructures, both of our own systems and other computer systems and of affiliate and third-party software, Wi-Fi and other communications systems service providers on which we rely, may adversely affect our ability to operate websites, process and fulfill transactions, respond to user inquiries and generally maintain cost-efficient operations. Such interruptions could occur by virtue of natural disaster, malicious actions such as hacking or acts of terrorism or war, or human error. In addition, the loss of some or all of certain key personnel could require us to expend additional resources to continue to maintain our software and systems and could subject us to systems interruptions.

 

Although we maintain up to date information technology systems and network infrastructures for the operation of our businesses, techniques used to gain unauthorized access to private networks are constantly evolving, and we may be unable to anticipate or prevent unauthorized access to our systems and data. 

 

Privacy concerns could limit our ability to leverage our subscriber data and compliance with privacy regulations could result in significant expense.

 

In the ordinary course of business and in particular in connection with merchandising our service to our users, we collect and utilize data supplied by our users. We currently face certain legal obligations regarding the manner in which we treat such information. Other businesses have been criticized by privacy groups and governmental bodies for attempts to link personal identities and other information to data collected on the Internet regarding users’ browsing and other habits. Increased regulation of data utilization practices, including self-regulation or findings under existing laws, that limit our ability to use collected data, could have an adverse effect on our business. As our business evolves and as we expand internationally, we may become subject to additional and/or more stringent legal obligations concerning our treatment of user information, and to the extent that we need to alter our business model or practices to adapt to these obligations, we could incur significant expenses.

 

In addition, we cannot fully control the actions of third parties who may have access to the user data we collect and the user data collected by our third-party vendors. We may be unable to monitor or control such third parties and the third parties having access to our website in their compliance with the terms of our privacy policies, terms of use, and other applicable contracts, and we may be unable to prevent unauthorized access to, or use or disclosure of, user information. Any such misuse could hinder or prevent our efforts with respect to growth opportunities and could expose us to liability or otherwise adversely affect our business. In addition, these third parties may become the victim of security breaches or have practices that may result in a breach, and we could be responsible for those third-party acts or failures to act.

 

Any failure, or perceived failure, by us or the prior owners of acquired businesses to maintain the privacy of data relating to our users (including disclosing data in a manner that was objectionable to our users), to comply with our posted privacy policies, our predecessors’ posted policies, laws and regulations, rules of self-regulatory organizations, industry standards and contractual provisions to which we or they may be bound, could result in the loss of confidence in us, or result in actions against us by governmental entities or others, all of which could result in litigation and financial losses, and could potentially cause us to lose users, advertisers, revenue and employees.

 

Our reputation and relationships with subscribers would be harmed if our subscriber data, particularly billing data, were to be accessed by unauthorized persons.

 

We will maintain personal data regarding our users, including names and, in many cases, mailing addresses. With respect to billing data, such as credit card numbers, we expect to rely on licensed encryption and authentication technology to secure such information. If we or our payment processing services experience any unauthorized intrusion into our users’ data, current and potential users may become unwilling to provide the information to us necessary for them to become subscribers, we could face legal claims, and our business could be adversely affected. Similarly, if a well-publicized breach of the consumer data security of any other major consumer website were to occur, there could be a general public loss of confidence in the use of the Internet for commerce transactions which could adversely affect our business.

 

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In addition, we do not plan to obtain signatures from subscribers in connection with the use of credit and debit cards (together, “payment cards”) by them. Under current payment card practices, to the extent we do not obtain cardholders’ signatures, we will be liable for fraudulent payment card transactions, even when the associated financial institution approves payment of the orders. From time to time, fraudulent payment cards may be used on our website to obtain service. Typically, these payment cards will not have been registered as stolen and therefore will not be rejected by any automatic authorization safeguards. We do not currently carry insurance against the risk of fraudulent credit card transactions. A failure to adequately control fraudulent credit card transactions would harm our business and results of operations.

  

Regulatory and business practice developments relating to personal information of our users and/or failure to adequately protect the personal information of our users may adversely affect our business.

 

Due to the nature of such businesses, the businesses we have acquired or intend to acquire in the future maintain, or have arrangements with third parties who maintain, information on users who or may purchase in the future our services and products electronically through their individual websites or otherwise register on the website for access to our content provided. We are in the process of evaluating the information collected to understand if we can aggregate and reuse the contact information to inform these individuals of upcoming events, offerings and other services and products that we believe enhance the user experience. Data protection laws and regulation may impair our ability to use these data in such ways, as certain uses may be prohibited. The use of such user information is an important component of our growth strategy in the future. The collection, storage and use of user information is subject to regulation in many jurisdictions, including the United States and the EU, and this regulation is becoming more prevalent and stringent. Further, there is a risk that data protection regulators may seek jurisdiction over our activities even in locations in which we do not have an operating entity. This may arise in a number of ways, either because we are conducting direct marketing activities in a particular jurisdiction and the local laws apply to and are enforceable against us, or because one of our databases is controlling the processing of information within that jurisdiction. We intend to develop a comprehensive policy aimed at ensuring adequate protection of our users’ personal information and compliance with applicable law. There is a risk that we will be unable to successfully adopt and implement this policy, which may give rise to liabilities or increased costs. 

 

Although we intend to develop systems and processes that are designed to protect customer and employee information and to prevent security breaches or incidents (which could result in data loss or other harm or loss), such measures cannot provide absolute security or certainty. It is possible that advances in computer and hacker capabilities, new variants of malware, the development of new penetration methods and tools, inadvertent violations of company policies or procedures or other developments could result in a compromise of customer or employee information or a breach of the technology and security processes that are used to protect customer and employee information. The techniques used to obtain unauthorized access, disable or degrade service, or sabotage systems may change frequently and as a result, may be difficult for our business to detect for long periods of time. In addition, despite our best efforts, we may be unable to anticipate these techniques or implement adequate preventative measures. We may need to expend in the future significant capital and other resources to protect against and remedy such potential security breaches, incidents and their consequences, including the establishment of a dedicated cybersecurity organization within our larger technology environment.

 

We also face risks associated with security breaches and incidents affecting third parties with which we are affiliated or with which we otherwise conduct business. Consumers are generally concerned with the security and privacy of the Internet, and any publicized security problems affecting our businesses and/or third parties may discourage consumers from doing business with us, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

In some countries, the use of cookies and other information placed on users’ Internet browsers or users’ computing devices is currently regulated, regardless of the information contained within or referred to by the cookie. Specifically, in the EU, this is now subject to national laws being introduced pursuant to the amended Directive 2002/58 on Privacy and Electronic Communications. The effect of these measures may require users to provide explicit consent to such a cookie being used. The laws being introduced pursuant to this measure are not finalized in every European Member State, and we have not determined what effect this could have on our business when we place the cookie on the user’s computer or when a third party does so. The effect may be to limit the amount of information we receive in relation to each use of the service and/or to limit our ability to link this information to a unique identity, which could adversely affect our business and financial condition.

 

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In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) is starting to exercise greater authority over how online consumer data is collected and maintained by businesses. Prompted by the FTC’s recommendation regarding online tracking, a number of federal legislative proposals have been introduced that would allow users to opt out of online monitoring. A number of states have passed similar legislation and some states are becoming more active in enforcing these laws to protect consumers.

 

The laws in this area are complex and developing rapidly. For instance, on April 14, 2016, the EU General Data Protection Regulation (the “GDPR”) became effective within Europe on May 25, 2018. The primary objectives of the GDPR are to give citizens of the EU back the control of their personal data and to simplify the regulatory environment for international business by unifying the regulation within the EU. We have not yet assessed the full effect of the GDPR. Failure to comply with the GDPR may result in significant monetary penalties. As we expand our operations into new jurisdictions, the costs associated with compliance with applicable local data privacy laws and regulations increases. It is possible that government or industry regulation in these markets will require us to deviate from our standard processes and/or make changes to our products, services and operations, which will increase operational cost and risk. There is a risk that Internet browsers, operating systems, or other applications might be modified by their developers in response to this regulation to limit or block our ability to access information about our users. It is possible that existing or future regulations could make it difficult or impossible for us to collect or use our user information in the way we would like which would impede our growth strategy and potentially reduce the revenue we hope to generate. It is also possible that we could be found to have violated regulations relating to user data, which could result in us being sanctioned, suffering fines or other punishment, being restricted in our activities and/or suffering reputational harm. Any of the foregoing could adversely affect our business and financial results. 

 

Risks Related to the Ownership of Our Common Stock

 

The market price of our common stock may be highly volatile, you may not be able to resell your shares at or above the public offering price and you could lose all or part of your investment.

 

The trading price of our common stock may be volatile. Our stock price could be subject to wide fluctuations in response to a variety of factors, including the following:

 

  actual or anticipated fluctuations in our revenue and other operating results;

  

  actions of securities analysts who initiate or maintain coverage of us, changes in financial estimates by any securities analysts who follow our company, or our failure to meet these estimates or the expectations of investors;

   

  issuance of our equity or debt securities, or disclosure or announcements relating thereto;

 

  the lack of a meaningful, consistent and liquid trading market for our common stock;

 

  additional shares of our common stock being sold into the market by us or our stockholders or the anticipation of such sales;

 

  our convertible debt securities being converted into equity or the anticipation of such conversion;

 

  announcements by us or our competitors of significant events or features, technical innovations, acquisitions, strategic partnerships, joint ventures or capital commitments;

 

  changes in operating performance and stock market valuations of companies in our industry;

 

  price and volume fluctuations in the overall stock market, including as a result of trends in the economy as a whole;

 

  expiration of the lock-up period, as more fully discussed below;

 

  lawsuits threatened or filed against us;

 

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  regulatory developments in the United States and foreign countries; and

 

  other events or factors, including those resulting from impact of COVID-19 epidemic, war or incidents of terrorism, other epidemics, or responses to these events.

 

In addition, the stock market in general has experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations that have often been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of these companies. Broad market and industry factors may negatively affect the market price of our common stock, regardless of our actual operating performance.

  

Our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer and stockholders affiliated with him own a significant percentage of our stock and will be able to exert significant control over matters subject to stockholder approval.

 

Mr. Ellin, our Chief Executive Officer and Chairman, and his affiliates beneficially owned approximately 28.3% of shares of our common stock issued and outstanding as of June 12, 2020 (not including Mr. Ellin’s options which have an exercise price substantially above the market price of our common stock as of the date of this Annual Report). Therefore, Mr. Ellin and stockholders affiliated with him may have the ability to influence us through their ownership positions. Mr. Ellin and these stockholders may be able to determine or significantly influence all matters requiring stockholder approval. For example, Mr. Ellin and these stockholders, acting together, may be able to control or significantly influence elections of directors, amendments of our organizational documents, or approval of any merger, sale of assets, or other major corporate transaction. This may prevent or discourage unsolicited acquisition proposals or offers for our common stock that you may believe are in your best interest as one of our stockholders.

 

Sales of a substantial number of shares of our common stock in the public market by certain of our stockholders could cause our stock price to fall.

 

Sales of a substantial number of shares of our common stock in the public market or the perception that these sales might occur, could depress the market price of our common stock and could impair our ability to raise capital through the sale of additional equity securities. We are unable to predict the effect that sales may have on the prevailing market price of our common stock.

 

As discussed above, our directors, executive officers and the entities affiliated with our directors and executive officers are subject to lock-up agreements with the underwriters of the Public Offering that restrict the stockholders’ ability to transfer shares of our common stock for 540 days from December 22, 2017. In addition, in connection with the Slacker Acquisition, participating Slacker stockholders in the transaction entered into a similar 540-day lock-up agreement (from December 22, 2017) with the underwriters with respect to the transfer or disposition of the shares of our common stock received in connection with the Slacker Acquisition, or an aggregate of approximately 7.8 million shares.

 

Subject to certain limitations, all of our outstanding shares held by our directors, executive officers and entities affiliated with our directors prior to the Public Offering, and the other shares subject to lock-up periods described above, will become eligible for sale upon expiration of the applicable lock-up period. In addition, shares issued or issuable upon exercise of warrants, if any, held by these stockholders and vested as of the expiration of the lock-up period will be eligible for sale at that time. Furthermore, the holders of JGB debentures may elect to convert their debentures into shares of our common stock, in addition to any interest under the debentures that we may have the right to pay in shares of our common stock. Sales of stock by these stockholders and/or debtholders could have a material adverse effect on the trading price of our common stock.

  

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Future sales and issuances of our common stock or rights to purchase common stock, including pursuant to our equity incentive plan and any acquisition agreement, could result in additional dilution of the percentage ownership of our stockholders and could cause our stock price to fall.

 

We expect that significant additional capital will be needed in the future to continue our planned operations. To the extent we raise additional capital by issuing equity and/or convertible securities, our stockholders may experience substantial dilution. We may sell or otherwise issue our common stock, convertible securities or other equity securities in one or more transactions at prices and in a manner we determine from time to time. If we sell or issue our common stock, convertible securities or other equity securities in more than one transaction, investors may be materially diluted by subsequent issuances. These issuances may also result in material dilution to our existing stockholders, and new investors could gain rights superior to our existing stockholders. We may pay for future acquisitions with additional issuances of shares of our common stock as well, which would result in further dilution for existing stockholders.

 

Pursuant to our 2016 Equity Incentive Plan (as amended, the “2016 Plan”), there are 12,600,000 shares of our common stock reserved for future issuance to our employees, directors and consultants, of which 408,433 shares have been issued, 5,292,288 restricted stock units have been granted, 24,675 restricted stock awards have been granted and options to purchase 4,428,334 shares of our common stock have been granted and are outstanding as of March 31, 2020. If our board of directors elects to issue additional shares of our common stock, stock options, restricted stock units and/or other equity-based awards under the 2016 Plan, as amended, our stockholders may experience additional dilution, which could cause our stock price to fall.

 

Conversion of the Debentures and/or convertible notes will dilute the ownership interest of our existing stockholders, including holders who had previously converted their convertible notes, or may otherwise depress the price of our common stock.

 

The conversion of some or all of the Debentures and/or convertible notes and/or any redemption of the Debentures in shares of our common stock will dilute the ownership interests of our existing stockholders to the extent we deliver shares of our common stock upon conversion. Any sales in the public market of the shares of our common stock issuable upon such conversion or redemption and/or any anticipated conversion or redemption of the Debentures and convertible notes into shares of our common stock could adversely affect prevailing market prices of our common stock.

 

FINRA sales practice requirements may limit a stockholder’s ability to buy and sell our stock.

 

The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”), has adopted rules requiring that, in recommending an investment to a customer, a broker-dealer must have reasonable grounds for believing that the investment is suitable for that customer. Prior to recommending speculative or low-priced securities to their non-institutional customers, broker-dealers must make reasonable efforts to obtain information about the customer’s financial status, tax status, investment objectives and other information. Under interpretations of these rules, FINRA has indicated its belief that there is a high probability that speculative or low-priced securities will not be suitable for at least some customers. If these FINRA requirements are applicable to us or our securities, they may make it more difficult for broker-dealers to recommend that at least some of their customers buy our common stock, which may limit the ability of our stockholders to buy and sell our common stock and could have an adverse effect on the market for and price of our common stock.

  

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or publish inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our share price and trading volume could decline.

 

The trading market for our shares of common stock will be influenced by the research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us. Securities and industry analysts currently provide publish limited research focused on our Company. If the current securities or industry analysts do not provide extensive coverage or commence coverage of our Company, the price and trading volume of our shares of common stock could be negatively impacted. If other securities or industry analysts initiate coverage and one or more of the analysts who cover us downgrade our shares of common stock or publish inaccurate or unfavorable research about our Company, the price of our shares of common stock would likely decline. Furthermore, if one or more of these analysts cease coverage of our Company or fail to publish reports on us regularly, demand for our shares of common stock could decrease, which might cause the price of our shares of common stock and trading volume to decline.

 

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As a smaller reporting company, we are subject to scaled disclosure requirements that may make it more challenging for investors to analyze our results of operations and financial prospects

 

Because the market value of our common stock held by non-affiliates was less than $250 million as of the last business day of our fiscal quarter ended September 30, 2019, we continue to be a “smaller reporting company” as defined by the SEC’s revised rules. As a “smaller reporting company,” we (i) are able to provide simplified executive compensation disclosures in our filings, (ii) are exempt from the provisions of Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act requiring that independent registered public accounting firms provide an attestation report on the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, and (iii) have certain other decreased disclosure obligations in our filings with the SEC, including being required to provide only two years of audited financial statements in our annual reports. Consequently, it may be more challenging for investors to analyze our results of operations and financial prospects. We will remain a smaller reporting company if we have either (i) a public float of less than $250 million held by non-affiliates as of the last business day of the second quarter of our then current fiscal year or (ii) annual revenues of less than $100 million during such recently completed fiscal year with less than $700 million in public float as of the last business day of the second quarter of such fiscal year.

  

If securities or industry analysts publish inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our stock price could decline.

 

The trading market for our common stock will depend in part on the research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us or our business. If one or more of the analysts who cover us downgrade our common stock or publish inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our common stock price would likely decline.

 

Our ability to use our net operating loss carryforwards and certain other tax attributes may be limited.

 

Section 382 and 383 (“Section 382 and 383”) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), contains rules that limit the ability of a company that undergoes an ownership change to utilize its net operating losses (“NOLs”) and tax credits existing as of the date of such ownership change. Under the rules, such an ownership change is generally any change in ownership of more than 50% of a company’s stock within a rolling three-year period. The rules generally operate by focusing on changes in ownership among stockholders considered by the rules as owning, directly or indirectly, 5% or more of the stock of a company and any change in ownership arising from new issuances of stock by the company. As a result of these Section 382 and 383 limitations, any ownership changes as defined by Section 382 and 383 may limit the amount of NOL carryforwards that could be utilized annually to offset future taxable income.

 

We do not intend to pay dividends on our common stock so any returns will be limited to the value of our stock.

 

We have never declared or paid any cash dividend on our common stock. We currently anticipate that we will retain future earnings for the development, operation and expansion of our business and do not anticipate declaring or paying any cash dividends for the foreseeable future. Additionally, any credit and security agreement that we may enter into in the future will likely contain covenants that will restrict our ability to pay dividends. Any return to stockholders will therefore be limited to the appreciation of their stock.

 

Provisions in our Certificate of Incorporation and Bylaws and provisions under Delaware law could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire us or increase the cost of acquiring us, even if doing so would benefit our stockholders, and may prevent or frustrate attempts by our stockholders to replace or remove our current management.

 

Some provisions of our charter documents may have anti-takeover effects that could discourage an acquisition of us by others, even if an acquisition would be beneficial to our stockholders, and may prevent attempts by our stockholders to replace or remove our current management. These provisions include: authorizing the issuance of “blank check” preferred stock, the terms of which may be established and shares of which may be issued without stockholder approval; and establishing advance notice requirements for nominations for election to the board of directors or for proposing matters that can be acted upon at stockholder meetings.

 

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These provisions may frustrate or prevent any attempts by our stockholders to replace or remove our current management by making it more difficult for stockholders to replace members of our board of directors, which is responsible for appointing the members of our management.

  

In addition, we are subject to the provisions of Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law (“Section 203”) regulating corporate takeovers. In general, Section 203 prohibits publicly held Delaware corporation from engaging in a business combination with an interested stockholder (generally, any entity, person or group beneficially owning 15% or more of the outstanding voting stock of the company) for a period of three years after the date of the transaction in which the person became an interested stockholder, unless:

 

  prior to the date of the transaction, the board of directors of the corporation approved either the business combination or the transaction which resulted in the stockholder becoming an interested stockholder;

  

  upon completion of the transaction that resulted in the stockholder becoming an interested stockholder, the interested stockholder owned at least 85% of the voting stock of the corporation outstanding at the time the transaction commenced, excluding for purposes of determining the voting stock outstanding, but not the outstanding voting stock owned by the interested stockholder, (1) shares owned by persons who are directors and also officers and (2) shares owned by employee stock plans in which employee participants do not have the right to determine confidentially whether shares held subject to the plan will be tendered in a tender or exchange offer; or

  

  at or subsequent to the date of the transaction, the business combination is approved by the board and authorized at an annual or special meeting of stockholders, and not by written consent, by the affirmative vote of at least 66 2/3% of the outstanding voting stock which is not owned by the interested stockholder.

 

This provision could have the effect of delaying or preventing a change of control, whether or not it is desired by or beneficial to our stockholders.

 

***

 

The risks above do not necessarily comprise of all those associated with an investment in our Company. This Annual Report contains forward looking statements that involve unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, financial condition, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward looking statements. Factors that might cause such a difference include, but are not limited to, those set out above.

 

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Item 1B.  Unresolved Staff Comments 

 

None.

 

Item 2.  Properties

 

Effective May 1, 2019, our principal executive offices are located at 9200 Sunset Boulevard, Suite #1201, West Hollywood, CA 90069. We also utilize office space for employee operations consisting of approximately 1,400 square feet of Class A office space. We lease such space from an unrelated third-party on a month-to-month basis at a rate of $40 thousand per month. We or the lessor can terminate the arrangement at any time without prior notice. We anticipate continuing to occupy such space for the foreseeable future. Rent expense for the operating leases totaled $0.5 million for the year ended March 31, 2020. Slacker leases its San Diego premises located at 16935 West Bernardo Drive, Suite #270, San Diego, CA 92127, under operating leases which expire on December 31, 2020. Slacker’s rent expense for the operating lease totaled $0.3 million for the year ended March 31, 2020. We believe that such property is in good condition and is suitable for the conduct of our business. React Presents leases its Chicago, Illinois premises under an operating lease expiring October 9, 2020. Rent expense for the operating lease totaled less than $0.1 million for the period from acquisition on February 5, 2020 through March 31, 2020. We believe that such property is in good condition and is suitable for the conduct of our business. We currently have no policy with respect to investments or interests in real estate, real estate mortgages or securities of, or interests in, persons primarily engaged in real estate activities.

 

Item 3.  Legal Proceedings

 

We are from time to time, party to various legal proceedings arising out of our business. Certain legal proceedings in which we are involved are discussed in Note 13 - Commitments and Contingencies, to the consolidated financial statements included in Item 8. Financial Statement and Supplementary Data, and are incorporated herein by reference. Litigation is subject to inherent uncertainties, and an adverse result in these or other matters may have, individually or in the aggregate, a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or operating results.

  

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

 

Not applicable.

 

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PART II

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities 

 

Market Information

 

Our Common Stock is traded publicly on The NASDAQ Capital Market (“Nasdaq”) under the symbol “LIVX”. Our common stock has been trading on The Nasdaq Capital Market since February 22, 2018.

 

Number of Holders

 

As of June 12, 2020, there were 451 stockholders of record of our common stock. This figure does not include an estimate of the indeterminate number of beneficial holders whose shares may be held of record by brokerage firms and clearing agencies. This number of holders of record also does not include stockholders whose shares may be held in trust by other entities.

 

Dividends

 

We have not paid any cash dividends on our common stock to date and do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. We intend to retain earnings, if any, for the future operation and expansion of our business. Any determination to pay cash dividends in the future will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend upon our results of operations, cash requirements, financial condition, contractual restrictions, restrictions imposed by applicable laws and other factors that our board of directors may deem relevant.

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities 

 

Other than as set forth below and as reported in our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and our Current Reports on Form 8-K, there have been no other sales or issuances of unregistered securities since April 1, 2019 were not registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”).

   

Issuances of Shares to Employees, Directors, Advisors and Consultants

 

During the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020, we issued an aggregate of 1,709,146 and 4,008,306 shares of our common stock to our employees, directors, advisors and/or consultants and restricted stock units to our employees and directors, respectively.

 

We believe the offers, sales and issuances of the securities described above were exempt from registration under the Securities Act in reliance on Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act and/or Rule 506 promulgated under Regulation D under the Securities Act as offers and sales of securities under contracts relating to compensation in compliance with Rule 701. Each of the recipients of securities in any transaction exempt from registration either received or had adequate access, through employment, business or other relationships, to information about us.

 

Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans

 

See “Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters ― Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans” of this Annual Report.

 

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Item 6.  Selected Financial Data

 

Not applicable to smaller reporting companies.

  

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

Forward-Looking Statements 

 

We make forward-looking statements in this Annual Report and the documents incorporated by reference herein within the meaning of the Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements relate to expectations or forecasts for future events, including without limitation our earnings, revenues, expenses or other future financial or business performance or strategies, or the impact of legal or regulatory matters on our business, results of operations or financial condition. These statements may be preceded by, followed by or include the words “may,” “might,” “will,” “will likely result,” “should,” “estimate,” “plan,” “project,” “forecast,” “intend,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “seek,” “continue,” “target” or similar expressions. These forward-looking statements are based on information available to us as of the date of this Annual Report and on our current expectations, forecasts and assumptions, and involve substantial risks and uncertainties. Actual results may vary materially from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements herein due to a variety of factors, including: our reliance on one key customer for a substantial percentage of its revenue; our ability to consummate the proposed acquisition of PodcastOne and the timing of the closing of the proposed transaction, including the risks that a condition to closing would not be satisfied within the expected timeframe or at all or that the closing of the proposed acquisition will not occur; our ability to continue as a going concern; if and when required, our ability to obtain additional capital, including to fund our current debt obligations and to fund potential acquisitions and capital expenditures; the effects of the global Covid-19 pandemic; our ability to attract, maintain and increase the number of its users and paid subscribers; our ability to identify, acquire, secure and develop content; our ability to integrate our acquired businesses, the ability of the combined business to grow, including through acquisitions which we are able to successfully integrate, and the ability of our executive officers to manage growth profitably; our ability to maintain compliance with certain financial and other covenants; successfully implementing our growth strategy, including relating to our technology platforms and applications; our management’s relationships with industry stakeholders; changes in economic conditions; competition; and other risks and uncertainties set forth in “Item 1A. Risk Factors” of this Annual Report. We do not undertake any obligation to update forward-looking statements as a result of as a result of new information, future events or developments or otherwise.

 

The following discussion and analysis of our business and results of operations for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020, and our financial conditions at that date, should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and the notes thereto included elsewhere in this Annual Report. As used herein, “LiveXLive,” “LXL,” the “Company,” “we,” “our” or “us” and similar terms refer collectively to LiveXLive Media, Inc. and its subsidiaries, unless the context indicates otherwise.

 

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Overview of the Company

 

We are a pioneer in the acquisition, distribution and monetization of live music, Internet radio, podcasting and music-related streaming and video content. Our principal operations and decision-making functions are located in North America. We manage and report our businesses as a single operating segment. Our chief operating decision maker regularly reviews our operating results, principally to make decisions about how we allocate our resources and to measure our segment and consolidated operating performance. We currently generate a majority of our revenue through subscription services from our streaming radio and music services, and to a lesser extent through advertising and licensing across our music platform. Beginning in the fourth quarter of our fiscal year ended March 31, 2020, we began generating ticketing, sponsorship, and promotion-related revenue from live music events through our February 2020 acquisition of React Presents, LLC (“React Presents”), a leading live entertainment and promoter of electronic dance music (“EDM”) festivals and events.

 

For the fiscal years ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, we reported revenue of $38.7 million and $33.7 million, respectively. For the years ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, one customer accounted for 60% and 41% of our consolidated revenues, respectively.

 

Fiscal 2020 Significant Transactions

 

On July 25, 2019, in a registered direct public offering, the Company entered into securities purchase agreements with certain institutional investors pursuant to which the Company sold a total of 5,000,000 shares of the its common stock at a price per share of $2.10. The gross proceeds to the Company were $10.5 million. The net proceeds of the offering to the Company were $9.5 million, after deducting placement agent fees and other offering expenses totaling $1.0 million paid by the Company. 

 

On January 31, 2020, the Company modified certain financial liquidity covenants in its Debentures. The amendment went effective retroactive to December 31, 2019. In addition, the Company issued 400,000 shares of its common stock to the holders of Debentures in exchange for the Debentures in the principal amount of $10,000, originally issued by the Company on June 29, 2018, as sole consideration for the shares, sufficient to qualify for an exemption under Section 5 of the Securities Act pursuant to Section 3(a)(9) thereof and accompanying removal of applicable restrictions under Rule 144 promulgated under the Securities Act. Any sale of such shares shall be subject to a percentage limitation of the daily trading volume.

 

In February 2020, the Company acquired React Presents for $2.0 million in subordinated convertible debt. React Presents is a leading live entertainment and promoter of EDM festivals and events, including the Spring Awakening festival and hundreds of club shows located in and around the City of Chicago, Illinois. The convertible note bears annual interest of 8%, has a conversion price of $4.50 per share and is payable in two years from the acquisition date.

 

The Company ended fiscal year March 31, 2020 with approximately 850,000 paid subscribers on the Company’s music platform, up from approximately 680,000 at March 31, 2019, representing 25% year-over-year growth since March 31, 2019, with approximately 1.0 million, MAUs. For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020, the Company successfully produced and livestreamed forty-two (42) live festivals and events, generating over 69 million views, 230 artists livestreamed and 275 hours of live programming.

 

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Basis of Presentation

 

The consolidated financial statements have been prepared on the same basis as the Company’s audited consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2019, and include all adjustments, which include only normal recurring adjustments, necessary for the fair presentation of the Company’s consolidated financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2020. The presented financial information for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020 includes the financial information and activities of LiveXLive (365 days) and React Presents for the period from February 5, 2020 to March 31, 2020 (56 days).

 

Opportunities, Challenges and Risks

 

In 2020, we derived the majority of our revenue through music subscription services, and secondarily from advertising and ticketing. For our fiscal year ended March 31, 2020 (“fiscal year 2020”), approximately 10% and 90% of our revenue was from advertising and paid customers’ subscriptions, respectively. Subsequent to March 31, 2020, we (i) agreed to acquire PodcastOne, (ii) accelerated the number of live events digitally live streamed across our platform, (iii) substantially increased our sponsorship revenue from live events when compared to prior fiscal years and (iv) successfully launched our Pay Per View (“PPV”) platform, allowing us to charge customers directly to access and watch certain live events digitally on our music platform. Conversely, the COVID-19 pandemic adversely impacted our on-premise live events, concerts and festivals through React Presents and our programmatic advertising as more fully discussed below. When we aggregate the combined impact of all of these events post March 31, 2020, we expect the percentage mix of advertising versus subscription revenue to be substantially higher beginning in the three months ended September 30, 2020 and throughout the remainder of our fiscal year ended March 31, 2021 (“fiscal year 2021”) versus fiscal year 2020. Until the impact of COVID-19 eases around the world, we do not expect to produce on-premise live music events and generate revenue through co-promotion fees, sponsorships, food and beverage and ticket sales of on-premise live events in the near term.

 

We believe there is substantial near and long-term value in our live music content. We also believe that the monetary value of broadcasting live music follows a similar evolution to sporting events such as the National Football League, Major League Baseball and the National Basketball Association, whereby sports broadcasting rights became more valuable as the demand for live sporting events increased over the past 20 years. As the thought leader in live music, we plan to acquire the broadcasting rights to as many of the top live music events and festivals that are available to us. During fiscal year ended March 31, 2020, we livestreamed 42 major festivals and live music events. Moreover, in our fiscal year ended March 31, 2018 (“fiscal year 2018”) we entered into a five-year agreement with Insomniac, the global leader in electronic dance music events, for exclusive global digital broadcast rights across all Insomniac events, including up to 20 major festivals around the world and over 100 events annually. In the near term, we will continue aggregating our digital traffic across these festivals and monetizing the live broadcasting of these events through advertising, brand sponsorships and licensing of certain broadcasting rights outside of North America. In the long term, we also plan to package, produce and broadcast our live music content on a 24/7/365 basis across our music platform and grow our paid subscribers. The long-term economics of any future agreement involving festivals, programming, production, broadcasting, streaming, advertising, sponsorships, and licensing could positively or negatively impact our liquidity, growth, margins, relationships, and ability to deploy and grow our future services with current or future customers, and are heavily dependent upon the easing and elimination of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

We believe our operating results and performance are, and will continue to be, driven by various factors that affect the music industry. Our ability to attract, grow and retain users to our platform is highly sensitive to rapidly changing public music preferences and technology and is dependent on our ability to maintain the attractiveness of our platform, content and reputation to our customers. Beyond fiscal year 2020, the future revenue and operating growth across our music platform will rely heavily on our ability to grow our subscriber base, continue to develop and deploy quality and innovative new music services such as PPV, provide unique and attractive content to our customers, continue to grow the number of listeners on our platform and live music festivals we stream, grow and retain customers and secure sponsorships to facilitate future revenue growth from advertising and e-commerce across our platform.

 

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As our music platform continues to evolve, we believe that there are opportunities to expand our services by adding more content in a greater variety of formats such as podcasts and video podcasts (“vodcasts”), extending our distribution to include pay television and social channels, deploying new services for our subscribers such as PPV, artist merchandise and live music event ticket sales, and licensing user data across our platform. In 2019 we combined our Slacker audio and LiveXLive video services into a single platform – LiveXLive Powered by Slacker, including offering a greater variety of exclusive and unique music content across our platform. For example, we acquired Slacker in December 2017 to accelerate our paid subscription platform, and secondarily to gain synergies across product development initiatives. In 2018 and more recently in 2020, we integrated resources and improved our live music streaming app across Apple TV, Samsung TV, Roku and Amazon Fire platforms. We acquired React Presents in February 2020, which gives us the ability to produce live music events and festivals along with increasing our original music content. In May 2020 we also launched our first PPV performances across our platform, allowing artists and fans to access a new digital compliment to live concerts and events. In May 2020, we announced we would acquire PodcastOne which is expected to close in July 2020 and if the acquisition is successful, we would own one of the largest networks of podcast content in North America, including over 300 new podcasts per week and over 2.0 billion downloads annually. Conversely, the evolution of technology presents an inherent risk to our business. Today, we see large opportunities to expand our music services within North America and other parts of the world where we will need to make substantial investments to improve our current service offerings. As a result, and during the fiscal year ending March 31, 2021, we will continue to invest in product and engineering to further develop our future music apps and services, and we expect to continue making significant product development investments to our existing technology solutions over the next 12 to 24 months to address these opportunities.

 

As our platform matures, we also expect our contribution margins* and AOL* to improve in the near and long term. Historically, our live events business has not generated enough direct revenue to cover the costs to produce such events, and as a result generated negative contribution margins* and operating losses. Beginning in late March 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic had an adverse impact on on-premise live music events and festivals. Major global music festivals such as Coachella, EDC Las Vegas, Rock-in-Rio, Austin City Limits were postponed to 2021 or indefinitely. Historically, we produced and digitally distributed the live music performances of many of these large global music events to fans all around the world. With the elimination of any fan-attended music events, festivals and concerts, we shifted our operating model beginning in April 2020 towards self-producing live music events that were 100% digital (e.g., artists not performing in front of live fans and solely for digital purposes). In April 2020, we also launched our first all-digital music festival, Music Lives, which aired continuously for over 48 straight hours, with over 100 artists and generated over 50 million livestreams and over 5.0 billion video views of the of hashtag #musiclives across TikTok. Music Lives was simulcast across our platform and on TikTok’s platform, who also sponsored the event. Since April 1, 2020 through June 15, 2020, we have live streamed over 35 events, accumulated over 60 million livestreams and generated 300% higher sponsorship revenue versus any quarter historically since our inception. In addition, we also introduced our PPV platform in May 2020, generating over 8,000 ticket sales at average prices of approximately $20.00 per ticket during its first 30 days of launch. Lastly, we are forecasting our cost per live event over near term to decrease substantially when compared to prior periods. When combined, the aggregate financial impact of these new events is improvements in both contribution margins* and AOL*in the near and long term.

 

Growth in our music services is also dependent upon the number of customers that use and pay for our services, the attractiveness of our music platform to sponsors and advertisers and our ability to negotiate favorable economic terms with music labels, publishers, artists and/or festival owners, and the number of passengers who use our services. Growth in our margins is heavily dependent on our ability to grow, coupled with the managing the costs associated with implementing and operating our services, including the costs of licensing music with the music labels, and producing, streaming and distributing video and audio content. Our ability to attract and retain new and existing customers will be highly dependent on our abilities to implement and continually improve upon our technology and services on a timely basis and continually improve our network and operations as technology changes and as we experience increased network capacity constraints as we continue to grow.

 

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For the majority of our agreements with festival owners, we acquire the global broadcast rights. Moreover, the digital rights we acquire principally include any format and screen, and future rights to VR and AR. For the years ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, all material amounts of our revenue was derived from customers located in the United States. Moreover, and during the year ended March 31, 2020, one of our customers accounted for 60% of our consolidated revenue. While our revenue is primarily generated through music subscription services based in the United States today, we believe that there is a substantial opportunity in the longer term for us to significantly diversify our subscriber base and expand our service offerings to customers based in countries outside of the United States. Historically, we have sold certain licensing rights to stream live music in Latin America and China to third parties. In the long term, we plan to expand our business further internationally in places such as Europe, Asia Pacific and Latin America, and as a result will continue to incur significant incremental upfront expenses associated with these growth opportunities.

 

Effects of COVID-19

 

An outbreak of a novel strain of coronavirus, COVID-19 in December 2019 subsequently became a pandemic after spreading globally, including the United States. While the COVID-19 pandemic did not materially adversely affect our financial results and business operations during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020, it did adversely impact parts of our business during the first quarter of fiscal March 31, 2021, namely our live events and programmatic advertising. Due to the global pandemic and government actions taking in response, since March 2020, all in person festivals, concerts and events have either been canceled or suspended, and it is uncertain when they will be permitted to resume, and as a result, the COVID-19 pandemic had an adverse impact on on-premise live music festivals, concerts and events. Major global music festivals such as Coachella, EDC Las Vegas, Rock-in-Rio, Austin City Limits have been postponed until 2021 or indefinitely. With our acquisition of React Presents in February 2020, we are presently unable to produce and promote more than 200 forecasted live events in fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, including our flagship live event Spring Awakening festival which is typically annually produced in June. Moreover, our programmatic advertising is presently adversely impacted as COVID-19 caused advertising demand to decline and as a result, overall advertising cost per thousand impressions/rates across our platform were subsequently reduced. Further, as of the date of this Annual Report, we are not livestreaming any fan attended live festivals, concerts or other in-person live events on our platform or channels and it is unclear when streaming of fan attended live festivals, concerts or other in-person live events will again become available to us. Conversely, while the economic and health conditions in the United States and across the globe have changed rapidly since the end of our fiscal year ended March 31, 2020, we are presently experiencing growth in certain parts of our core business, including (i) substantial growth in the number of live music events produced digitally and livestreamed since April 1, 2020 through June 10, 2020 (36 live events) as compared to fiscal year March 31, 2020 (41 live events), (ii) improvement in the monetization of these digital livestreams, which is currently on pace to exceed prior fiscal year by over 300% and (iii) new growth opportunities across our music platform, including PPV. In addition, the outbreak and any preventative or protective actions that governments, other third parties or we may take in respect of the coronavirus may result in a period of business disruption and reduced operations. For example, Tesla was ordered to keep its main U.S. factory closed for a substantial amount of time.

 

The extent to which COVID-19 impacts our results will depend on future developments, including new information which may emerge concerning the severity of the coronavirus and the actions taken by us and our partners to contain the coronavirus or treat its impact, among others. The impact of the suspension or cancellation of in-person live festivals, concerts or other live events, and any other continuing effects of COVID-19 on our business operations (such as general economic conditions and impacts on the advertising, sponsorship and ticketing marketplace and our partners), may result in a decrease in our revenues, and if the global COVID-19 epidemic continues for an extended period, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

 

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Key Components of Consolidated Statements of Operations

 

The following briefly describes certain key components of revenue and expenses as presented in our consolidated statements of operations.

 

Revenue

 

We currently generate our revenue through advertising, sponsorship of our live events, paid subscriptions across our music platform, and secondarily through the licensing of non-US broadcasting rights for our live events. With the acquisition of React Presents in the fourth quarter of our fiscal year ended March 31, 2020 and the launch of our PPV platform we now generate ticket and event revenue, and beginning in the second quarter of our fiscal year ending March 31, 2021 and with the expected acquisition of PodcastOne, we expect to generate higher advertising revenue when compared to prior periods and as a percentage mix of our consolidated revenue. Our advertising revenue is based upon the number of impressions or active listeners we deliver across our music and podcasting platform. Our subscription revenue is driven by the number of paid subscribers across our music platforms, who pay up to $9.99 per month for a premium music subscription. Licensing revenue is driven by certain broadcasting rights we own and license to third parties. Ticket/event revenue is primarily derived from the sale of tickets and promoter fees earned from venues or other co-promoters under one of several formulas, including a fixed guaranteed amount and/or a percentage of ticket sales or event profits.

 

We report revenue on a gross or net basis based on management’s assessment of whether we act as a principal or agent in the transaction. To the extent we act as the principal, revenue is reported on a gross basis net of any sales tax from customers, when applicable. The determination of whether we act as a principal or an agent in a transaction is based on an evaluation of whether we control the good or service prior to transfer to the customer. Where applicable, we have determined that we act as the principal in all of our subscription service streams and may act as principal or agent for our advertising and licensing revenue streams.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Operating expenses consist of cost of sales, sales and marketing, product development, general and administrative, and amortization of intangible assets. Included in our operating expenses are stock-based compensation and depreciation expenses associated with our capital expenditures.

 

Cost of Sales

 

Costs of sales principally consist of the costs of licensing our services across our music platform, including producing audio and live music content; music licensing costs paid to labels such as Universal Music, Warner Music and Sony Music, publishers and digital rights organizations such as SoundExchange and BMI; programming, DJ’s, hosts and streaming costs; revenue recognized by us and shared with others as a result of our revenue-sharing arrangements including podcasts, vodcasts and PPV events; platform operating expenses, including depreciation of the systems and hardware used to build and operate our platform; personnel costs related to our network operations, production teams, customer service and information technology. As we continue to grow our revenue base, build out our music services platform and expand our coverage globally, we anticipate that our service costs will increase when compared to historical periods. Our services cost of sales is dependent on a number of factors, including the amount of premium music downloaded, live festivals we stream in a given period, the amount of content and programming required to operate our services and the number of partners we share our corresponding revenue with.

 

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Sales and Marketing

 

Sales and marketing expenses consist primarily of sales and marketing personnel costs, sales support, public relations, advertising, marketing and general promotional expenditures. Fluctuations in our sales and marketing expenses are generally the result of our efforts to support the growth in our businesses, including expenses required to support the expansion of our direct sales force. We currently anticipate that our sales and marketing expenses will continue to increase throughout fiscal year 2021, most notably in the second quarter of fiscal year 2021 with the expected acquisition of PodcastOne and fluctuate as a percent of revenue when compared to 2020, as we continue to grow our advertising and sponsorship base, invest in new subscriber growth initiatives and sales and marketing organizations and invest in marketing activities to support the growth of our businesses.

 

Product Development

 

Product development expenses consist primarily of expenses incurred in our software engineering, product development and app and web portal design activities and related personnel costs. Fluctuations in our product development expenses are generally the result of hiring personnel to support and develop our music platform, new music product offerings and network operations. We currently anticipate that our product development expenses will increase in the near term and more significantly in 2021, as we also continue to hire more product development personnel and further develop our products and offerings to support the growth of our business. We expect our fiscal year 2021 product development expense as a percentage of revenue to fluctuate accordingly when compared to fiscal year 2020.

  

General and Administrative

 

General and administrative expenses consist primarily of personnel costs from our executive, legal, finance, human resources and information technology organizations and facilities related expenditures, as well as third party professional fees, insurance and bad debt expenses. Professional fees are largely comprised of outside legal, accounting, audit, information technology consulting and legal settlements. With the full year of React Presents expenses in fiscal year 2021 versus partial year in fiscal year 2020, coupled with the expected addition of new personnel from PodcastOne to support our planned growth in fiscal year 2021 and beyond, we anticipate general and administrative expenses to increase overall in fiscal year 2021 as compared to fiscal year 2020.

 

Amortization of Intangibles

 

We determine the appropriate useful life of intangible assets by performing an analysis of expected cash flows based on our historical experience of intangible assets of similar quality and value. We expect amortization expense to increase in the near term as a result of the React Presents acquisition made in the fourth quarter of fiscal year ended March 31, 2020 and PodcastOne acquisition expected to close in the second quarter of fiscal year ending March 31, 2021, respectively. Amortization as a percentage of revenue will depend upon a variety of factors, such as the amounts and mix of our identifiable intangible assets acquired in business combinations.

 

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Stock-based Compensation

 

Included in our operating expenses are expenses associated with stock-based compensation, which are allocated and included in costs of sales, sales and marketing, product development and general and administrative expenses as necessary. Stock-based compensation expense is largely comprised of costs associated with stock options and restricted stock units granted to employees and certain non-employees including directors and consultants. We record the fair value of these equity-based awards and expense at their cost ratably over related vesting periods. In addition, stock-based compensation expense includes the cost of warrants to purchase common stock issued to certain non-employees.

 

As of March 31, 2020, we had approximately $7.8 million of unrecognized employee related stock-based compensation, which we expect to recognize over a weighted-average period of approximately 2.6 years. Stock-based compensation expense is expected to increase throughout fiscal year 2021 compared to fiscal year 2020 as a result of our existing unrecognized stock-based compensation and as we issue additional stock-based awards to continue to attract and retain employees and non-employee directors.

 

Other Income (Expense)

 

Other income (expense) principally consists of changes in the fair value of our derivative financial instruments, interest on outstanding debt associated with our notes payable, convertible notes and loans, gain on bargain purchase and certain unrealized transaction gains and losses on foreign currency denominated assets and liabilities. We typically invest our available cash balances in money market funds and short-term United States Treasury obligations.

 

Provision for Income Taxes

 

Since our inception, we have been subject to income taxes principally in the United States. We anticipate that as we continue to expand our operations outside the United States, we will become subject to taxation based on the foreign statutory rates and our effective tax rate could fluctuate accordingly.

 

Income taxes are computed using the asset and liability method, under which deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on the difference between the financial statement and tax bases of assets and liabilities using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which the differences are expected to affect taxable income. Valuation allowances are established when necessary to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount expected to be realized.

 

As of March 31, 2020, we had approximately $89.0 million of federal and $72.7 million of state net operating losses (“NOLs”).  These NOL carryforwards are available to us to offset future taxable income which expire in varying amounts beginning in 2024 if unused. We obtained $136.0 million and $2.6 million of federal NOL and federal tax credit carryforwards, respectively, through the acquisition of Slacker in December 2017.  Utilization of these losses and tax credits is limited by Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code (the “Code”) in fiscal year end March 31, 2018 and each taxable year thereafter.  We have estimated a limitation and revalued the losses and credits at $22.0 million and $0 million, respectively.  It is possible that the utilization of these NOL carryforwards and tax credits may be further limited. We are undertaking a study to determine the applicable limitations, if any.  We currently believe that based on available information, it is not more likely than not that our deferred tax assets will be realized, and accordingly we have recorded a valuation allowance against our federal, state and foreign deferred tax assets.

 

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On December 22, 2017, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Act”) was signed into law, making significant changes to the taxation of U.S. business entities. The Tax Act reduced the U.S. corporate income tax rate from 35% to 21%, imposed a one-time transition tax in connection with the move from a worldwide tax system to a territorial tax system, imposed limitations on certain tax deductions such as fringe benefits including employee parking, executive compensation in future periods, and included numerous other provisions. As we have a March 31 fiscal year-end, the lower corporate income tax rate will be phased in, resulting in a U.S. statutory federal rate of approximately 31.5% for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2019, and 21% for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020 and subsequent fiscal years. Since we are not in a current U.S. federal tax paying position, our U.S. tax provision consists primarily of deferred tax benefits calculated at the 21% tax rate.

 

On March 27, 2020, the CARES Act was enacted in the United States. The CARES Act provides numerous tax provisions and other stimulus measures, including temporary changes regarding the prior and future utilization of net operating losses and technical corrections from prior tax legislation for tax depreciation of certain qualified improvement property. The Company evaluated the provisions of the CARES Act and do not anticipate the associated impacts, if any, will have a material effect on its financial position.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

Our consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. The preparation of these consolidated financial statements requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenue, expenses and related disclosures. We evaluate our estimates and assumptions on an ongoing basis. Our estimates are based on historical experience and various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. Our actual results could differ from these estimates. We believe that the assumptions and estimates associated with our revenue recognition, allowance for doubtful accounts, the assigned value of acquired tangible and intangible assets and assumed and contingent liabilities associated with business combinations, provision for legal settlements, useful lives and impairment of property and equipment, intangible assets, goodwill and other assets, the fair value of our equity-based compensation awards and convertible debt instruments, and valuation of deferred income tax assets and liabilities, have the greatest potential impact on our consolidated financial statements. Therefore, we consider these to be our critical accounting policies and estimates.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company accounts for a contract with a customer when an approved contract exists, the rights of the parties are identified, payment terms are identified, the contract has commercial substance and the collectability of substantially all of the consideration is probable. Revenue is recognized when the Company satisfies its obligation by transferring control of the goods or services to its customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the Company expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. The Company uses the expected value method to estimate the value of variable consideration on advertising and with original equipment manufacturer contracts to include in the transaction price and reflect changes to such estimates in periods in which they occur. Variable consideration for these services is allocated to and recognized over the related time period such advertising and subscription services are rendered as the amounts reflect the consideration the Company is entitled to and relate specifically to the Company’s efforts to satisfy its performance obligation. The amount of variable consideration included in revenue is limited to the extent that it is probable that the amount will not be subject to significant reversal when the uncertainty associated with the variable consideration is subsequently resolved.

 

The Company reports revenue on a gross or net basis based on management’s assessment of whether the Company acts as a principal or agent in the transaction. To the extent the Company acts as the principal, revenue is reported on a gross basis net of any sales tax from customers, when applicable. The determination of whether the Company acts as a principal or an agent in a transaction is based on an evaluation of whether the Company controls the good or service prior to transfer to the customer. Where applicable, the Company has determined that it acts as the principal in all of its subscription service streams and may act as principal or agent for its advertising and licensing revenue streams. 

 

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The Company’s revenue is principally derived from the following services:

 

Subscriptions Services

 

Subscription services revenue substantially consist of monthly to annual recurring subscription fees, which are primarily paid in advance by credit card or through direct billings arrangements. The Company defers the portions of monthly to annual recurring subscription fees collected in advance and recognizes them in the period earned. Subscription revenue is recognized in the period of services rendered. The Company’s subscription revenue consists of performance obligations that are satisfied over time. This has been determined based on the fact that the nature of services offered are subscription based where the customer simultaneously receives and consumes the benefit of the services provided regardless of whether the customer uses the services or not. As a result, the Company has concluded that the best measure of progress toward the complete satisfaction of the performance obligation over time is a time-based measure. The Company recognizes subscription revenue straight-line through the subscription period.

 

Subscription Services consist of:

 

Direct subscriber, mobile service provider and mobile app services

 

The Company generates revenue for subscription services on both a direct basis and through subscriptions sold through certain third-party mobile service providers and mobile app services (collectively the “Mobile Providers”). For subscriptions sold through the Mobile Providers, the subscriber executes an on-line agreement with Slacker outlining the terms and conditions between Slacker and the subscriber upon purchase of the subscription. The Mobile Providers promote the Slacker app through their e-store, process payments for subscriptions, and retain a percentage of revenue as a fee. The Company reports this revenue gross of the fee retained by the Mobile Providers, as the subscriber is Slacker’s customer in the contract and Slacker controls the service prior to the transfer to the subscriber. Subscription revenues from monthly subscriptions sold directly through Mobile Providers are subject to such Mobile Providers’ refund or cancellation terms. Revenues from Mobile Providers are recognized net of any such adjustments for variable consideration, including refunds and other fees. The Company’s payment terms vary based on whether the subscription is sold on a direct basis or through Mobile Providers. Subscriptions sold on a direct basis require payment before the services are delivered to the customer. The payment terms for subscriptions sold through Mobile Providers vary, but are generally payable within 30 days.

 

Third-Party Original Equipment Manufacturers

 

The Company generates revenue for subscription services through subscriptions sold through a third-party Original Equipment Manufacturer (the “OEM”). For subscriptions sold through the OEM, the OEM executes an agreement with Slacker outlining the terms and conditions between Slacker and the OEM upon purchase of the subscription. The OEM installs the Slacker app in their equipment and provides the Slacker service to the OEM’s customers. The monthly fee charged to the OEM is based upon a fixed rate per vehicle, multiplied by the variable number of total vehicles which have the Slacker application installed. The number of customers, or the variable consideration, is reported by OEMs and resolved on a monthly basis. The Company’s payment terms with OEM are up to 30 days. The OEM does not charge the car owners a fee for the Slacker service.

 

Advertising Revenue

 

Advertising revenue primarily consist of revenues generated from the sale of audio, video, and display advertising space to third-party advertising exchanges. Revenues are recognized based on delivery of impressions over the contract period to the third-party exchanges, either when an ad is placed for listening or viewing by a visitor or when the visitor “clicks through” on the advertisement. The advertising exchange companies report the variable advertising revenue on a monthly basis.

 

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Licensing Revenue

 

Licensing revenue primarily consists of sales of licensing rights to digitally stream its live music services in certain geographies (e.g. China). Licensing revenue is recognized when the Company satisfies its performance obligation by transferring control of the goods or services to its customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the Company expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services, which is typically when the live event has aired. Any license fees collected in advance of an event are deferred until the event airs. The Company reports licensing revenue on a gross basis as the Company acts as the principal in the underlying transactions.

 

Ticket/Event Revenue

 

Ticket/Event revenue is primarily from the sale of tickets and promoter fees earned from venues or other co-promoters under one of several formulas, including a fixed guaranteed amount and/or a percentage of ticket sales or event profits.

 

Revenue from the promotion or production of an event is recognized when the show occurs. Revenue collected in advance of the event is recorded as deferred revenue until the event occurs. Revenue collected from sponsorship agreements, which is not related to a single event, is classified as deferred revenue and recognized over the term of the agreement or operating season as the benefits are provided to the sponsor.

 

Revenue from our ticketing operations primarily consists of service fees charged at the time a ticket for an event is sold. For tickets sold to our festival events the revenue for the tickets and associated ticket service charges collected in advance of the event is recorded as deferred revenue until the event occurs.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

Stock-based compensation cost is measured at the grant date based on the fair value of the award and is recognized as expense over the requisite service period, which is the vesting period, on a straight-line basis. The Company uses the Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing model to determine the grant date fair value of stock options. This model requires the Company to estimate the expected volatility and the expected term of the stock options which are highly complex and subjective variables. The variables take into consideration, among other things, actual and projected employee stock option exercise behavior. The Company uses a predicted volatility of its stock price during the expected life of the options that is based on the historical performance of the Company’s stock price as well as including an estimate using guideline companies. Expected term is computed using the simplified method as the Company’s best estimate given its lack of actual exercise history. The Company has selected a risk-free rate based on the implied yield available on U.S. Treasury securities with a maturity equivalent to the expected term of the stock. Stock-based awards are comprised principally of stock options, restricted stock, restricted stock units (“RSUs”), restricted stock awards and warrant grants. Forfeitures are recognized as incurred.

 

Stock option awards issued to non-employees are accounted for at the grant date fair value determined using the Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing model. Management believes that the fair value of the stock options is more reliably measured than the fair value of the services received. The Company record the fair value of these equity-based awards and expense at their cost ratably over related vesting periods. 

 

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Business Combinations

 

The Company accounts for its business combinations using the purchase method of accounting where the cost is allocated to the underlying net tangible and intangible assets acquired, based on their respective fair values. The excess of the purchase price over the estimated fair values of the net assets acquired is recorded as goodwill. Identifiable assets acquired, liabilities assumed and any noncontrolling interest in the acquiree are recognized and measured as of the acquisition date at fair value. Additionally, any contingent consideration is recorded at fair value on the acquisition date and classified as a liability. Goodwill is recognized to the extent by which the aggregate of the acquisition-date fair value of the consideration transferred and any noncontrolling interest in the acquiree exceeds the recognized basis of the identifiable assets acquired, net of assumed liabilities. Determining the fair value of assets acquired, liabilities assumed and noncontrolling interests requires management’s judgment and often involves the use of significant estimates and assumptions, including, but not limited to, the selection of appropriate valuation methodology, projected revenue, expenses and cash flows, weighted average cost of capital, discount rates, estimates of customer turnover rates and estimates of terminal values.

  

Commitments and Contingencies

 

From time to time, we are involved in legal proceedings and other matters arising in connection with the conduct of our business activities. Many of these proceedings may be at preliminary stages and/or seek an indeterminate amount of damages. We regularly evaluate the status of our commitments and contingencies in which we are involved to (i) assess whether a material loss is probable or there is at least a reasonable possibility that a material loss or an additional material loss in excess of a recorded accrual may have been incurred and (ii) determine if financial accruals are required when appropriate. We record an expense accrual for any commitments and loss contingency when we determine that a loss is probable and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. If an expense accrual is not appropriate, we further evaluate each matter to assess whether an estimate of possible loss or range of loss can be made and whether or not any such matter requires additional disclosure. There can be no assurance that any proceeding against us will be resolved in amounts that will not differ from the amounts of estimated exposures. Legal fees and other costs of defending litigation are expensed as incurred.

 

Non-Income Tax Contingencies  

 

We do not collect and remit sales and use or similar taxes in all jurisdictions in which we have sales, based on our belief that such taxes are not applicable or legally required.

 

The June 2018 U.S. Supreme Court ruling in South Dakota v. Wayfair, Inc., No. 17-494, along with the application of existing, new or future rulings and laws, could have adverse effects on our business, prospects and operating results.

  

Long-lived Assets, Goodwill and Intangible Assets with Finite Lives

 

We perform valuations of assets acquired and liabilities assumed on each acquisition accounted for as a business combination, and allocate the purchase price of each acquired business to its respective net tangible and intangible assets. Acquired intangible assets principally comprise of customer relationships and technology. We determine the appropriate useful life by performing an analysis of expected cash flows based on historical experience of the acquired businesses. Intangible assets are amortized over their estimated useful lives using the straight-line method, which approximates the pattern in which the majority of the economic benefits is expected to be consumed.

 

Goodwill represents the excess of the purchase consideration of an acquired entity over the fair value of the acquired net assets. Goodwill is tested for impairment annually or when events or circumstances change that would indicate that goodwill might be impaired. Events or circumstances that could trigger an impairment review include, but are not limited to, a significant adverse change in legal factors or in the business climate, an adverse action or assessment by a regulator, unanticipated competition, a loss of key personnel, significant changes in the manner of our use of the acquired assets or the strategy for our overall business, significant negative industry or economic trends or significant under-performance relative to expected historical or projected future results of operations.

 

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We evaluate the recoverability of our intangible assets, and other long-lived assets with finite useful lives for impairment when events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset group may not be recoverable. These trigger events or changes in circumstances include, but are not limited to a significant decrease in the market price of a long-lived asset, a significant adverse change in the extent or manner in which a long-lived asset is being used, significant adverse changes in legal factors, including changes that could result from our inability to renew or replace material agreements with certain of our partners such as Tesla Motors on favorable terms, significant adverse changes in the business climate including changes which may result from adverse shifts in technology in our industry and the impact of competition, a significant adverse deterioration in the amount of revenue or cash flows we expect to generate from an asset group, an accumulation of costs significantly in excess of the amount originally expected for the acquisition or development of a long-lived asset, current or future operating or cash flow losses that demonstrate continuing losses associated with the use of our long-lived asset, or a current expectation that, more likely than not, a long-lived asset will be sold or otherwise disposed of significantly before the end of its previously estimated useful life. We perform impairment testing at the asset group level that represents the lowest level for which identifiable cash flows are largely independent of the cash flows of other assets and liabilities. In making this determination, we consider the specific operating characteristics of the relevant long-lived assets, including (i) the nature of the direct and any indirect revenues generated by the assets; (ii) the interdependency of the revenues generated by the assets; and (iii) the nature and extent of any shared costs necessary to operate the assets in their intended use. An impairment test would be performed when the estimated undiscounted future cash flows expected to result from the use of the asset group is less than its carrying amount. Impairment is measured by assessing the usefulness of an asset by comparing its carrying value to its fair value. If an asset is considered impaired, the impairment loss is measured as the amount by which the carrying value of the asset group exceeds its estimated fair value. Fair value is determined based upon estimated discounted future cash flows. The key estimates applied when preparing cash flow projections relate to revenue, operating margins, economic lives of assets, overheads, taxation and discount rates. To date, we have not recognized any such impairment loss associated with our long-lived assets.

 

Goodwill is tested for impairment at the reporting unit level, which is the same or one level below an operating segment. In any year we may elect to perform a qualitative assessment to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is in excess of its carrying value. If we cannot determine qualitatively that the fair value is in excess of the carrying value, or we decide to bypass the qualitative assessment, we perform a quantitative analysis. The quantitative analysis is used to identify both the existence of impairment and the amount of the impairment loss by comparing the estimated fair value of a reporting unit with its carrying value, including goodwill. The estimated fair value is based on internal projections of expected future cash flows and operating plans, as well as market conditions relative to the operations of our reporting units. If the estimated fair value of the reporting unit exceeds its carrying value, goodwill of the reporting unit is not impaired; otherwise, an impairment loss is recognized within our consolidated statements of operations in an amount equal to that excess, limited to the total amount of goodwill allocated to that reporting unit.

 

COVID-19 Consideration

 

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a reasonable possibility that actual results could differ from those estimates and such differences could be material to the financial position and results of operations, specifically in assessing when the collectability of revenue related consideration is probable, and the impairment assessment of goodwill, indefinite lived assets or long lived assets. In addition, in April 2020 and in consideration of the unknown impact COVID-19 would have on our business and industry, we enacted a three-month pay reduction across our entire organization and obtained a federal loan under the Payroll Protection Program (“PPP”) in order to ensure we keep our core employee base intact over the same period. Given the uncertainty around the near and longer-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our business, we may need to take further actions beyond June 2020, which could result in changes in such accounting estimates above having a material adverse impact on our financial position and results of operations. We will continue to monitor the COVID-19 pandemic and make necessary adjustments to our estimates when and as necessary.

 

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Non-GAAP Measures

 

Contribution margin

 

Contribution Margin is a non-GAAP financial measure defined as Revenue less Cost of Sales.

 

Reconciliation of Adjusted Operating Loss

 

Adjusted Operating Loss (“AOL”) is a non-GAAP financial measure that we define as operating income (loss) before (a) non-cash GAAP purchase accounting adjustments for certain deferred revenue and costs, (b) legal, accounting and other professional fees directly attributable to acquisition activity, (c) employee severance payments and third party professional fees directly attributable to acquisition or corporate realignment activities, (d) certain non-recurring expenses associated with legal settlements or reserves for legal settlements in the period that pertain to historical matters that existed at acquired companies prior to their purchase date, (e) any charges in the period pursuant to formal plans to shut down and abandon LXL Tickets, (f) depreciation and amortization (including goodwill impairment, if any), and (g) certain stock-based compensation expense. We use AOL to evaluate the performance of our operating segment. We believe that information about AOL assists investors by allowing them to evaluate changes in the operating results of our business separate from non-operational factors that affect net income (loss), thus providing insights into both operations and the other factors that affect reported results. AOL is not calculated or presented in accordance with GAAP. A limitation of the use of AOL as a performance measure is that it does not reflect the periodic costs of certain amortizing assets used in generating revenue in our business. Accordingly, AOL should be considered in addition to, and not as a substitute for, operating income (loss), net income (loss), and other measures of financial performance reported in accordance with GAAP. Furthermore, this measure may vary among other companies; thus, AOL as presented herein may not be comparable to similarly titled measures of other companies.

 

The following table sets forth the reconciliation of AOL to Operating Income (loss) from Continuing Operations, the most comparable GAAP financial measure (in thousands):

 

    Contribution
Margin
    Operating
Loss
    Depreciation and
Amortization
    Stock-Based
Compensation
    Non-Recurring
Acquisition and
Realignment Costs
    Other Non-
Recurring Costs
    Adjusted
Operating
Loss
 
2020                                                        
Music Operations   $ 5,873     $ (22,558 )   $ 8,017     $ 6,184     $        -     $ 387     $ (7,970 )
Corporate     -       (13,437 )     3       5,843       -       2,913       (4,678 )
Total   $ 5,873     $ (35,995 )   $ 8,020     $ 12,027     $ -     $ 3,300     $ (12,648 )
2019                                                        
Music Operations   $ 2,530     $ (19,888 )   $ 7,381     $ 4,290     $        -     $ 176     $ (8,041 )
Corporate     -       (14,006 )     6       8,482       -       929       (4,589 )
Total   $ 2,530     $ (33,894 )   $ 7,387     $ 12,772     $ -     $ 1,105     $ (12,630 )

 

Operating Results

  

Music Operations

 

Our Music Operations operating results were, and discussions of significant variances are, as follows (in thousands):

 

   Year Ended March 31,  

% Change 2020 

vs.

 
   2020   2019   2019 
Revenue  $38,659   $33,701    15%
                
Cost of Sales   32,786    31,171    5%
Sales & Marketing, Product Development and G&A   22,705    15,914    43%
Intangible Asset Amortization   5,726    6,504    -12%
Operating Loss  $(22,558)  $(19,888)   13%
Operating Margin   -58%   -59%   -1%
AOL*  $(7,970)  $(8,041)   -1%
AOL Margin*   -21%   -24%   -14%

 

* See “—Non-GAAP Measures” above for the definition and reconciliation of AOL

 

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Fiscal Year 2020 Compared to Fiscal Year 2019

 

Revenue

 

Music Operations revenue increased $5.0 million, or 15%, during the year ended March 31, 2020 as compared to the year ended March 31, 2019, primarily due to subscriber growth compared to the prior period.

 

Operating Loss

 

Music Operations operating loss increased $2.7 million, or 13%, from a ($19.9) million operating loss for the year ended March 31, 2019, to a ($22.6) million operating loss for the year ended March 31, 2020. The increase was largely due to a $2.7 million net increase in non-cash depreciation, amortization, stock based compensation and non-recurring costs, and $3.3 million increase in sales and marketing and product development costs to support the growth of our Company, offset by a $3.3 million increase in contribution margin during the year ended March 31, 2020 versus the year ended March 31, 2019.

 

Adjusted Operating Loss

 

Music Operations Adjusted Operating Loss remained flat at ($8.0) million AOL for the year ended March 31, 2020 and 2019. This was largely due to the above-discussed $3.3 million increase in operating expenses largely driven by higher sales and marketing and product development expenses, offset by an improved contribution margin of $3.3 million for the year ended March 31, 2020 compared to the same period in March 31, 2019.

 

Adjusted Operating Loss Margin

 

Music Operations AOL Margin improved for the year ended March 31, 2020 to (21%) from (24%) for the year ended March 31, 2019. The year-over-year improvement in AOL Margin was driven by the increase in revenue and related contribution margin for the year ended March 31, 2020, as compared to the year ended March 31, 2019 due to an increase in paid subscribers.

 

Corporate expense

 

Our Corporate expense results were, and discussions of significant variances are, as follows (in thousands):

 

   Year Ended March 31,   % Change 2020 vs. 
   2020   2019   2019 
G&A Expenses  $13,437   $14,006    -4%
Intangible Asset Amortization   -    -    -%
Operating Loss  $(13,437)  $(14,006)   -4%
Operating Margin   -100%   -100%   -%
AOL*  $(4,678)  $(4,589)   2%

   

* See “—Non-GAAP Measures” above for the definition and reconciliation of AOL

 

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Operating Loss

 

Operating loss decreased $0.6 million, or 4%, from ($14.0) million for the year ended March 31, 2019, to ($13.4) million for the year ended March 31, 2020 largely due to a $2.0 million increase in non-recurring legal fees pertaining to higher defense costs incurred from a matter pertaining to a prior asset acquisition, offset by a $2.6 million decrease in non-cash stock based compensation.

 

Adjusted Operating Loss

 

Corporate AOL increased $0.1 million, or 2%, in the year ended March 31, 2020 to ($4.7) million as compared to the year ended March 31, 2019 of ($4.6) million. The increase was largely due to an increase in recurring operating expenses such as professional fees, travel and rent during the period.

 

Consolidated Results of Operations

 

The following tables set forth our results of operations for the periods presented. The period-to-period comparison of financial results is not necessarily indicative of future results (in thousands):

 

   Year Ended
March 31,
   Year Ended
March 31,
 
   2020   2019 
Revenue:        
Subscription revenue  $35,904   $30,398 
Advertising, licensing and ticketing revenue   2,755    3,303 
Total revenue   38,659    33,701 
           
Operating expenses:          
Cost of sales   32,786    31,171 
Sales and marketing   6,255    4,532 
Product development   10,767    7,966 
General and administrative   19,120    17,422 
Amortization of intangible assets   5,726    6,504 
Total operating expenses   74,654    67,595 
Loss from operations   (35,995)   (33,894)
           
Other income (expense):          
Interest expense, net   (3,738)   (3,273)
Other expense   614    (377)
Total other expense   (3,124)   (3,650)
           
Loss before income tax (benefit) expense   (39,119)   (37,544)
           
Income tax (benefit) expense   (192)   218 
Net loss  $(38,927)  $(37,762)
           
Net loss per share – basic and diluted  $(0.69)  $(0.73)
           
Weighted average common shares – basic and diluted   56,206,107    51,899,231 

   

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The following table provides the depreciation expense included in the above line items (in thousands):

 

   Year Ended March 31,   % Change 2020 vs. 
   2020   2019   2019 
Depreciation expense            
Cost of sales  $-   $-    - 
Sales and marketing   185    87    113%
Product development   1,925    731    163%
General and administrative   184    65    183%
Total depreciation expense  $2,294   $883    160%

 

The following table provides the stock-based compensation expense included in the above line items (in thousands):

  

   Year Ended March 31,   % Change 2020 vs. 
   2020   2019   2019 
Stock-based compensation expense:            
Cost of sales  $106   $178    -40%
Sales and marketing   2,127    1,416    50%
Product development   2,568    2,611    -2%
General and administrative   7,226    8,567    -16%
Total stock-based compensation expense  $12,027   $12,772    -6%

 

The following table provides our results of operations, as a percentage of revenue, for the periods presented:

 

   Year Ended March 31, 
   2020   2019 
Revenue   100%   100%
Operating expenses          
Cost of sales   85%   92%
Sales and marketing   16%   13%
Product development   28%   24%
General and administrative   49%   52%
Amortization of intangible assets   15%   19%
Total operating expenses   193%   201%
Loss from operations   -93%   -101%
Other expense   -8%   -11%
Loss before income taxes   -101%   -111%
Income tax provision   -%   1%
Net loss   -101%   -112%

 

Revenue

 

Revenue was as follows (in thousands):

 

   Year Ended March 31,   % Change 2020 vs. 
   2020   2019   2019 
Advertising and Licensing  $2,468   $3,303    -25%
Ticket/Event   287    -      N/A 
Subscription   35,904    30,398    18%
Total Revenue  $38,659   $33,701    15%

 

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Advertising and Licensing Revenue

 

Advertising and licensing revenue for the year ended March 31, 2020 decreased by $0.8 million or 25% to $2.5 million as compared to $3.3 million for the year ended March 31, 2019 largely due to less listening hours across our freemium user base in the current period, therefore less opportunity to serve impressions. COVID-19 marginally impacted advertising revenue in the month of March 2020 with a larger impact expected in the first half of fiscal year ending March 31, 2021.

 

Ticket/Event

 

Ticket/Event revenue increased $0.3 million, to $0.3 million for the year ended March 31, 2020, as compared to $0 million for the year ended March 31, 2019. The increase was due to the acquisition of React Presents in the fourth quarter of fiscal year ended March 31, 2020 and did not exist in 2019.

 

Subscription Revenue

 

Subscription revenue increased $5.5 million, or 18%, to $35.9 million for the year ended March 31, 2020, as compared to $30.4 million for the year ended March 31, 2019. The increase was due to the growth in the number of paid subscribers year-over-year.

 

Cost of Sales

 

Cost of sales was as follows (in thousands):

 

   Year Ended March 31,   % Change 2020 vs. 
   2020   2019   2019 
Production  $7,339   $8,285    -11%
Ticket/Event   206    -    N/A 
Subscription and Advertising   25,241    22,886    10%
Total Cost of Sales  $32,786   $31,171    5%

 

Production

 

Production cost of sales decreased $0.9 million, or 11%, to $7.3 million for the year ended March 31, 2020, as compared to $8.3 million for the year ended March 31, 2019. The decrease was largely due to efforts to reduce the average costs per events produced during the year ended March 31, 2020, as compared to the year ended March 31, 2019.

 

Ticket/Event

 

Ticket/Event cost of sales increased $0.2 million, to $0.2 million for the year ended March 31, 2020, as compared to $0 million for the year ended March 31, 2019. The increase was due to the acquisition of React Presents in the fourth quarter of fiscal year ended March 31, 2020 and did not exist in 2019.

 

Subscription and Advertising

 

Subscription and advertising cost of sales increased $2.3 million, or 10%, to $25.2 million for the year ended March 31, 2020, as compared to $22.9 million for the year ended March 31, 2019. The increase was primarily due to an increase in the corresponding subscription revenue in the same period. With total advertising and subscription revenue for the year ended March 31, 2020 increasing by 15%, as compared to the same period in 2019, subscription and advertising cost of sales only increased 10%. This gross margin improvement is driven by the growth in a higher mix of customers in more favorable plans.

 

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Other Operating Expenses

 

Other operating expenses were as follows (in thousands):

 

    Year Ended March 31,     % Change 2020 vs.  
    2020     2019     2019  
Sales and marketing expenses   $ 6,255     $ 4,532       38 %
Product development     10,767       7,966       35 %
General and administrative     19,120       17,422       10 %
Amortization of intangible assets     5,726       6,504       -12 %
Total Other Operating Expenses   $ 41,868     $ 36,424       15 %

 

Sales and Marketing Expenses

 

Sales and marketing expenses increased $1.8 million, or 38%, to $6.3 million for the year ended March 31, 2020, as compared to $4.5 million for the year ended March 31, 2019. The $1.8 million increase was largely due to $0.7 million increased in non-cash stock-based compensation, $0.5 million in increased personnel-related and consulting expenses, $0.5 million in increased marketing spending to acquire paid subscribers and promote live events and a $0.1 million in deprecation to support growth in initiatives during the year ended March 31, 2020, as compared to the year ended March 31, 2019.

  

Product Development

 

Product development expenses increased $2.8 million, or 35%, to $10.8 million for the year ended March 31, 2020, as compared to $8.0 million for the year ended March 31, 2019. The increase of $2.8 million was largely due to $1.2 million increase in depreciation, $1.0 million in increased personnel-related and consulting expenses and $0.6 million in non-cash stock-based compensation to the support growth initiatives during the year ended March 31, 2020, as compared to the year ended March 31, 2019.

 

General and Administrative

 

General and administrative expenses increased $1.7 million, or 10%, to $19.1 million for the year ended March 31, 2020, as compared to $17.4 million for the year ended March 31, 2019. The increase was primarily due to $1.5 million increase in non-recurring legal fees, the vast majority of which is to support legal defense costs related to a prior period asset acquisition, coupled with an increase in personnel-related costs of approximately $0.5 million due to the addition of corporate personal, including our new President, appointed in fiscal year 2020, and a $0.1 million increase in depreciation to support growth initiatives.

 

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Amortization of Intangible Assets

 

Amortization of intangible assets decreased by $0.8 million, or 12%, to $5.7 million for the year ended March 31, 2020, as compared to $6.5 million for the year ended March 31, 2019. The decrease was due to the Slacker purchase price allocation being finalized in December of 2018, resulting in adjustments to the useful life with an effect of reducing monthly amortization in the prior year. Furthermore, certain customer relationships were fully amortized in prior periods thus resulting in further reductions of quarterly amortization.

 

Total Other Income (Expense)

 

   Year Ended March 31,   % Change 2020 vs. 
   2020   2019   2019 
Total other income (expense), net  $(3,124)  $(3,650)   -14%

 

Total other income (expense) decreased $0.5 million, or 14%, to $3.1 million for the year ended March 31, 2020, as compared to $3.7 million for the year ended March 31, 2019. The decrease was primarily due an increase in other income (expense) of $1.0 million as a result of a gain on bargain purchase of $0.5 million, which was offset by an increase in interest expense of $ $0.5 million largely related to higher interest expense in the year ended March 31, 2020 from additional senior secured debentures issued in February 2019, which resulted in a full year of interest expense compared to the year ended March 31, 2019.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Current Financial Condition

 

As of March 31, 2020, our principal sources of liquidity were our cash and cash equivalents, including restricted cash balances in the amount of $12.4 million, which primarily are invested in cash in banking institutions in the U.S. In July 2019, we completed a registered public offering of our common stock, selling an aggregate 5,000,000 shares of our common stock and raising net proceeds of approximately $9.5 million. In June 2018 and February 2019, we issued $10.6 million and $3.2 million, respectively of Debentures raising aggregate net proceeds of $12.5 million after issuance costs. The vast majority of our cash proceeds were received as a result of the issuance of our convertible notes since 2014, public offerings, bank debt financing in fiscal year 2018 and the Debentures financing in June 2018 and February 2019. As of March 31, 2020, we had notes payable balance of $0.3 million, $10.1 million in aggregate principal amount of Debentures and unsecured convertible notes with aggregate principal balances of $6.5 million. 

  

As reflected in our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report, we have a history of losses and incurred a net loss of $38.9 million and utilized cash of $4.9 million in operating activities for the year ended March 31, 2020 and had a working capital deficiency of $30.0 million as of March 31, 2020. These factors, among others, raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern within one year from the date that the financial statements are issued. Our consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments related to the recoverability and classification of recorded asset amounts or the amounts and classification of liabilities that might be necessary should we be unable to continue as a going concern. Our ability to continue as a going concern is dependent on our ability to execute our strategy and on our ability to raise additional funds through the sale of equity and/or debt securities via public and/or private offerings.

 

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Our long-term ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon our ability to increase revenue, reduce costs, achieve a satisfactory level of profitable operations, and obtain additional sources of suitable and adequate financing. Our ability to continue as a going concern is also dependent its ability to further develop and execute on our business plan. We may also have to reduce certain overhead costs through the reduction of salaries and other means and settle liabilities through negotiation. There can be no assurance that management’s attempts at any or all of these endeavors will be successful. 

  

In June 2018, we issued $10.6 million, 3-year June 2018 Debentures. Among other terms, the June 2018 Debentures bear annual interest at 12.75%, require us to meet certain financial covenants and are convertible into shares of our common stock at a conversion price of $10 per share (subject to adjustment). Net proceeds from the issuance of the June 2018 Debentures were $9.6 million after direct issuance costs, of which $3.5 million was used to pay off 100% of the legacy revolving line of credit with Silicon Valley Bank (assumed by us as part of the Slacker acquisition), resulting in a $3.5 million release of restricted cash collateral to us. The remaining proceeds were used primarily for general working capital. As of the date of this Annual Report, the Debentures holders have sent redemption notices for the months of December 2018 through June 2020 (inclusive). We have repaid $0.3 million of principal in January 2019 and $0.2 million of principal in each month in February 2019 through January 2020 (inclusive) and $0.4 in February 2020 through June 2020 (inclusive). In February 2019, we issued $3.2 million in additional Debentures, with net proceeds of approximately $3.0 million after direct issuance costs. The terms of the additional Debentures were substantially the same as the June 2018 Debentures. The June 2018 Debentures and the additional debentures sold in February 2019 are referred to herein as the “Debentures.”

 

On July 25, 2019, we completed a registered offering with certain institutional investors pursuant to which we sold 5,000,000 shares of our common stock at a price per share of $2.10 to such investors (the “2019 Offering”). The gross proceeds of the 2019 Offering to us were $10.5 million. The net proceeds of the 2019 Offering to us were approximately $9.5 million, after deducting placement agent fees and other estimated offering expenses payable by us. The use of these proceeds was for repayment of our Debentures, working capital needs and general corporate purposes, including without limitation future acquisitions, purchases of outstanding warrants and capital expenditures. The 2019 Offering was made pursuant to our existing shelf Registration Statement on Form S-3 (File No. 333-228909), which was filed with the SEC on December 19, 2018 and went effective on February 7, 2019, and a prospectus supplement relating to the 2019 Offering, which was filed with the SEC on July 26, 2019.

 

Our cash flows from operating activities are significantly affected by our cash-based investments in our operations, including acquiring live music events and festivals rights, our working capital, and corporate infrastructure to support our ability to generate revenue and conduct operations through cost of services, product development, sales and marketing and general and administrative activities. Cash used in investing activities has historically been, and is expected to be, impacted significantly by our investments in business combinations, our platform, our infrastructure and equipment for our business offerings, and sale of our investments. We expect to make additional strategic acquisitions to further grow our business, which may require significant investments, capital raising and/or acquisition of additional debt in the near and long term. Over the next twelve to eighteen months, our net use of our working capital could be substantially higher or lower depending on the number and timing of new live festivals and paid subscribers that we add to our businesses.

 

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As of March 31, 2020 and 2019, we had an outstanding note payable of $0.3 million issued in connection with certain professional services performed for us through March 2015, and outstanding unsecured convertible notes (the “Trinad Notes”) of $5.2 million and $4.8 million, respectively, in principal and accrued interest, issued to Trinad Capital Master Fund Ltd. (“Trinad Capital”), a fund controlled by Mr. Ellin, our Chief Executive Officer, Chairman, director and principal stockholder. As of March 31, 2020, none of the Trinad Notes were due in less than a year.

 

On March 31, 2018, we entered into an Amendment of Notes Agreement (the “Amendment Agreement”) with Trinad Capital pursuant to which the maturity dates of all Trinad Notes were extended to May 31, 2019. In consideration of the maturity date extension, the interest rate payable under the notes was increased from 6.0% to 7.5% beginning on April 1, 2018, and the aggregate amount of accrued interest due under the Trinad Notes as of March 31, 2018 of $0.3 million was paid.

 

On March 31, 2019, we entered into an additional Amendment of Notes Agreement (the “Second Amendment Agreement”) with Trinad Capital pursuant to which the maturity date of all of our Trinad Notes was extended to May 31, 2021. We may not redeem the Trinad Notes prior to May 31, 2021 without Trinad Capital’s consent.

 

In September 2019 the Company issued one of the Music Partners $0.4 million in restricted shares of the Company’s common stock, at a price of approximately $4.51 per share, as full payment of certain amounts due under such agreement. 

 

In June 2020, we entered into a new two-year license agreement with a certain Music Partner which owns and license rights to Slacker to certain sound recordings. Pursuant to this agreement, we agreed to certain minimum yearly guarantee payments and issued 264,000 shares of our common stock so such Music Partner in consideration of all payments due to the Music Partner prior the date of the agreement.

 

Subject to applicable limitations in the instruments governing our outstanding indebtedness, we may from time to time repurchase our debt, including the unsecured convertible notes, in the open market, through tender offers, through exchanges for debt or equity securities, in privately negotiated transactions or otherwise.

 

In February 2020, we acquired React Presents in exchange for $2.0 million in convertible debt. The convertible debt has a term of 2 years, bears interest at 8% per year and has a conversion price of $4.50 per share.

 

In April 2020, we received approximately $2.0 million pursuant to the Paycheck Protection Program promulgated under the CARES Act (the “PPP Loan”). The PPP Loan matures on April 13, 2022 and bears interest at a rate of 1% per annum. Commencing in November 2020, we are required to pay the lender equal monthly payments of principal and interest as required to fully amortize by the maturity date the principal amount outstanding on the PPP Loan as of such date. All or a portion of the PPP Loan may be forgiven by the U.S. Small Business Administration (“SBA”) upon our application and upon documentation of expenditures in accordance with the SBA requirements. While we intend to apply for the forgiveness of the PPP Loan, there is no assurance that we will obtain forgiveness of the PPP Loan in whole or in part. We intend to use the proceeds from the PPP Loan for qualifying expenses.

 

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In the future, we may utilize additional commercial financings, bonds, debentures, lines of credit and term loans with a syndicate of commercial banks or other bank syndicates and/or issue equity securities (publicly or privately) for general corporate purposes, including acquisitions and investing in our intangible assets, music equipment, platform and technologies. We may also use our current cash and cash equivalents to repurchase some or all of our outstanding warrants and unsecured convertible notes, and pay down our Debentures, in part or in full, subject to repayment limitation set forth in the credit agreement. Management believes we have sufficient sources of liquidity to fund our operations over the next twelve months. We may need to raise additional funds through the issuance of equity, equity-related and/or debt securities and/or through additional credit facilities to fund our growing operations, invest in new business opportunities and make potential acquisitions. We filed a universal shelf Registration Statement on Form S-3 allowing us to issue various types of securities, including common stock, preferred stock, warrants, debt securities, units, or any combination of such securities, up to an aggregate amount of $150 million, which became effective on February 7, 2019.

 

Sources and Uses of Cash

  

The following table provides information regarding our cash flows for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2020 and 2019 (in thousands):

  

   Year Ended March 31, 
   2020   2019 
Net cash used in operating activities  $(4,894)  $(5,771)
Net cash used in by investing activities   (2,437)   (2,532)
Net cash provided by financing activities   5,829    8,272 
Net change in cash and cash equivalents  $(1,502)  $(31)

 

Cash Used In Operating Activities

 

Year ended March 31, 2020

 

Net cash used in our operating activities of ($4.9) million primarily resulted from our net loss during the period of ($38.9) million, which included non-cash charges of $20.3 million largely comprised of the accretion of our debt discount on our unsecured convertible notes, depreciation and amortization, interest paid in kind, change in fair value of embedded derivatives, gain on bargain purchase, and stock-based compensation. The remainder of our sources of cash provided by operating activities of $13.7 million was from changes in our working capital, including $0.5 million from timing of accounts receivable and $13.2 million from timing of accounts payable, accrued expenses and other long-term liabilities

 

Year ended March 31, 2019

 

Net cash used in our operating activities of ($5.8) million primarily resulted from our net loss during the period of ($37.8) million, which included non-cash charges of $21.8 million largely comprised of stock-based compensation and depreciation and amortization. The remainder of our sources of cash used by operating activities of ($10.2) million was from changes in our working capital, including cash inflows of $11.0 million from timing of accounts payable and accrued expenses which were offset by cash outflows of ($1.3) million from timing of accounts receivable.

 

Cash Flows Used In Investing Activities

 

Year ended March 31, 2020

 

Net cash used in investing activities of ($2.4) million was principally due to the ($2.6) million cash used for the purchase of capitalized internally developed software costs during the year ended March 31, 2020, net of cash acquired in the acquisition of React Presents of $0.2 million.

 

Year ended March 31, 2019

 

Net cash used in investing activities of ($2.5) million was principally due to the ($2.5) million cash used for the purchase of capitalized internally developed software costs during the year ended March 31, 2019.

  

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Cash Flows Provided By Financing Activities

 

Year ended March 31, 2020

 

Net cash provided by financing activities of $5.8 million was primarily due to net proceeds of $9.5 million from the registered public offering completed in July 2019, partially offset by repayment of Debentures of $3.0 million and amendment costs of Debentures of $0.7 million.

 

Year ended March 31, 2019

 

Net cash provided by financing activities of $8.3 million was primarily due to net proceeds of $13 million from the June 2018 and February 2019 Debentures financing, partially offset by repayment of a term loan of ($3.5) million assumed as part of the Slacker acquisition.

 

Contractual Obligations

 

The following table summarizes our contractual obligations that require us to make future cash payments as of March 31, 2020. The future contractual requirements include payments required for our operating leases and contractual purchase agreements (in thousands):

 

   Total   Less than
1 year
   1-3 years   3-5 years   More than
5 years
 
Contractual Obligations                    
Operating lease obligations  $933   $705   $228   $-   $- 
Content and Festival Fees and Guarantees and Contractual Obligations (1)   5,874    3,066    2,808    -    - 
Deferred revenue arrangements (2)   949    949    -    -    - 
Long-term debt obligations (3)   17,628    3,647    13,981    -    - 
Total  $25,384   $8,367   $17,017   $-   $- 

 

(1) Amounts represent minimum guarantees and contractual obligations associated with licensing, production and/or distribution agreements for digital broadcast rights across certain events.

 

(2) Amounts represent obligations to provide service for which we have already received in cash from our customers.

 

(3) Includes amounts pertaining to the unsecured convertible notes and note payable and related interest. Interest payments were calculated based upon the interest rate in effect at March 31, 2020. See also Note 8 - Note Payable, Note 9 – Senior Secured Convertible Debentures and Note 10 – Unsecured Convertible Notes included in our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report.

   

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

  

Not applicable to smaller reporting companies.

 

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Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm (BDO USA, LLP) F-1
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 31, 2020 and 2019 F-2
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the years ended March 31, 2020 and 2019 F-3
Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ (Deficit) Equity for the years ended March 31, 2020 and 2019 F-4
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended March 31, 2020 and 2019 F-5
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements F-6

 

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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

Shareholders and Board of Directors

LiveXLive Media, Inc.

Beverly Hills, CA

 

Opinion on the Consolidated Financial Statements

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of LiveXLive Media, Inc. (the “Company”) as of March 31, 2020 and 2019, the related consolidated statements of operations, stockholders’ (deficit) equity, and cash flows for the years then ended, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the “consolidated financial statements”). In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company at March 31, 2020 and 2019, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the years then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Going Concern Uncertainty and COVID-19

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company has suffered recurring losses from operations, negative cash flows from operating activities and has a net capital deficiency that raise substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern. In addition, as discussed in Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements, the COVID-19 pandemic could have a material adverse impact on the Company’s results of operations, cash flows and liquidity. Management’s plans in regard to these matters are also described in Note 1 and Note 2. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

Change in Accounting Principle

As discussed in Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements, effective April 1, 2019, the Company adopted Accounting Standards Codification Topic 842, Leases (Topic 842).

 

Basis for Opinion

These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s consolidated financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (“PCAOB”) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

/s/ BDO USA, LLP

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2018.

Los Angeles, California

June 26, 2020

 

F-1

 

  

LiveXLive Media, Inc.

Consolidated Balance Sheets

(In thousands, except share and per share amounts)

 

   March 31,  March 31,
   2020  2019
Assets      
Current Assets      
Cash and cash equivalents  $5,702   $13,704 
Restricted cash   6,735    235 
Accounts receivable, net   3,889    4,314 
Prepaid expense and other assets   1,396    1,311 
Total Current Assets   17,722    19,564 
Property and equipment, net   3,397    2,720 
Goodwill   9,672    9,672 
Intangible assets, net   23,198    26,943 
Other assets   127    - 
Total Assets  $54,116   $58,899 
           
Liabilities and Stockholders’ (Deficit) Equity          
Current Liabilities          
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities  $30,723   $20,906 
Accrued royalties   13,071    9,921 
Note payable   331    312 
Deferred revenue   949    950 
Senior secured convertible debentures, net   2,720    2,111 
Total Current Liabilities   47,794    34,200 
Lease liabilities, noncurrent   45    - 
Senior secured convertible debentures, net   6,505    10,284 
Unsecured convertible notes, net   6,794    4,741 
Deferred income taxes   108    211 
Total Liabilities   61,246    49,436 
           
Commitments and Contingencies          
           
Stockholders’ (Deficit) Equity          
Preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 10,000,000 shares authorized; no shares issued or outstanding   -    - 
Common stock, $0.001 par value; 500,000,000 shares authorized; 58,984,382 and 52,275,236 shares issued and outstanding, respectively   59    52 
Additional paid in capital   120,932    98,605 
Accumulated deficit   (128,121)   (89,194)
Total stockholders’ (deficit) equity   (7,130)   9,463 
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ (Deficit) Equity  $54,116   $58,899 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-2

 

 

LiveXLive Media, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Operations

(In thousands, except share and per share amounts)

 

   Year Ended
March 31,
2020
   Year Ended
March 31,
2019
 
         
Revenue:  $38,659   $33,701 
           
Operating expenses:          
Cost of sales   32,786    31,171 
Sales and marketing   6,255    4,532 
Product development   10,767    7,966 
General and administrative   19,120    17,422 
Amortization of intangible assets   5,726    6,504 
Total operating expenses   74,654    67,595 
Loss from operations   (35,995)   (33,894)
           
Other income (expense):          
Interest expense, net   (3,738)   (3,273)
Other income (expense)   614    (377)
Total other income (expense)   (3,124)   (3,650)
           
Loss before income tax (benefit) expense   (39,119)   (37,544)
           
Income tax (benefit) expense   (192)   218 
Net loss  $(38,927)  $(37,762)
           
Net loss per share – basic and diluted  $(0.69)  $(0.73)
           
Weighted average common shares – basic and diluted   56,206,107    51,899,231 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-3

 

 

LiveXLive Media, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ (Deficit) Equity

For the Years Ended March 31, 2020 and 2019

(In thousands, except share and per share amounts)

 

   Common stock   Additional Paid in   Accumulated   Total
Stockholders’ (Deficit)
 
   Shares   Amount   Capital   Deficit   Equity 
                     
Balance as of April 1, 2018   51,432,292   $51   $89,778   $(51,432)  $38,397 
Fair value of shares issued for services to consultants   449,374    -    3,148    -    3,148 
Stock-based compensation   -    -    9,880    -    9,880 
Shares issued for debt conversion   393,570    1    1,180    -    1,181 
Purchase price adjustment to fair value of shares issued for Slacker acquisition   -    -    (5,744)   -    (5,744)
Conversion feature recorded as debt discount   -    -    216    -    216 
Beneficial conversion feature on paid in kind interest             147         147 
Net loss   -    -    -    (37,762)   (37,762)
Balance as of March 31, 2019   52,275,236    52    98,605    (89,194)   9,463 
Shares issued to consultants and vendors   1,709,146    2    4,668    -    4,670 
Stock-based compensation   -    -    7,982    -    7,982 
Interest paid in kind   -    -    29    -    29 
Shares issued in the public offering, net of cost   5,000,000    5    9,518    -    9,523 
Conversion feature recorded as debt discount   -    -    130    -    130 
Net loss   -    -    -    (38,927)   (38,927)
Balance as of March 31, 2020   58,984,382   $59   $120,932   $(128,121)  $(7,130)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-4

 

 

LiveXLive Media, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

(In thousands)

 

   Year Ended
March 31,
2020
   Year Ended
March 31,
2019
 
Cash Flows from Operating Activities:        
Net loss  $(38,927)  $(37,762)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:          
Depreciation and amortization   8,020    7,387 
Interest paid in kind   29    - 
Beneficial conversion feature on paid in kind interest   -    147 
Common stock issued for services   4,423    3,557 
Stock-based compensation   7,604    9,215 
Change in fair value of bifurcated embedded derivatives   14    323 
Amortization of debt discount   824    986 
Deferred income taxes   (103)   211 
Gain on bargain purchase   (511)   - 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:          
Accounts receivable   525    (1,324)
Prepaid expenses and other current assets   50    625 
Deferred revenue   (1)   (96)
    Accounts payable and accrued liabilities   13,159    10,960 
Net cash used in operating activities   (4,894)   (5,771)
           
Cash Flows from Investing Activities:          
Cash acquired in acquisition of React Presents   138    - 
Purchases of property and equipment   (2,575)   (2,532)
Net cash used in investing activities   (2,437)   (2,532)
           
Cash Flows from Financing Activities:          
Net proceeds from senior secured convertible debentures   -    13,000 
Repayment of senior secured convertible debentures payable   (2,984)   (731)
Senior secured convertible debenture issuance costs   -    (482)
Repayment of bank debt   -    (3,515)
Net proceeds from public offering   9,523    - 
Senior secured convertible debenture amendment costs   (710)   - 
Net cash provided by financing activities   5,829    8,272 
           
Net decrease in cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash   (1,502)   (31)
           
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash, beginning of period   13,939    13,970 
           
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash, end of period  $12,437   $13,939 
           
Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information:          
Cash paid for income taxes  $17   $4 
Cash paid for interest  $1,517   $981 
           
Supplemental disclosure of non-cash investing and financing activities:          
           
Conversion features recorded as debt discount  $130   $216 
Bifurcated embedded derivative recognized on issuance of senior secured convertible debentures  $-   $263 
Fair value of options issued to employees, capitalized as internally-developed software  $378   $665 
Common stock issued upon conversion of notes payable  $-   $1,181 
Common stock issued to senior secured convertible debenture holders   560    - 
Fair value of promissory note issued in React Presents acquisition  $1,541   $- 
Purchase price adjustment to fair value of shares issued for Slacker acquisition  $-    (5,744)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-5

 

 

LiveXLive Media, Inc.

Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements

For the Years Ended March 31, 2020 and 2019

  

Note 1 — Organization and Basis of Presentation

 

Organization

 

LiveXLive Media, Inc. (“LiveXLive”) together with its subsidiaries (“we,” “us,” “our” or the “Company”) is a Delaware corporation headquartered in West Hollywood, California. The Company is a global digital media company focused on live entertainment and music services.

 

The Company was reincorporated in the State of Delaware on August 2, 2017, pursuant to a reincorporation merger of Loton, Corp (“Loton”) with and into LiveXLive, Loton’s wholly owned subsidiary at the time. As a result of the reincorporation merger, Loton ceased to exist as a separate entity, with LiveXLive being the surviving entity. In addition, on December 29, 2017, LiveXLive acquired Slacker, Inc. (“Slacker”), an Internet music and radio streaming service incorporated in the state of Delaware, and it became a wholly owned subsidiary of LiveXLive. On February 5, 2020, LiveXLive’s wholly owned subsidiary, LiveXLive Events, LLC (“LiveXLive Events”), acquired (i) React Presents, LLC a Delaware limited liability company (“React Presents”), and it became a wholly owned subsidiary of LiveXLive Events, and (ii) indirectly Spring Awakening, LLC, which is a wholly owned subsidiary of React Presents, a producer, promoter and manager of in person live music festivals and events.

 

On May 7, 2020, the Company entered into a binding Stock Purchase Agreement with Courtside Group, Inc. (d/b/a PodcastOne) (“PodcastOne”), a Delaware corporation, to acquire 100% of the issued and outstanding equity interests of PodcastOne in exchange for the issuance of 5,454,545 shares of the Company’s common stock subject to customary and other closing conditions.  The acquisition of PodcastOne is expected to close in July 2020.

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The consolidated financial statements have been prepared on the same basis as the Company’s audited consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2019, and include all adjustments, which include only normal recurring adjustments, necessary for the fair presentation of the Company’s consolidated financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2020. The presented financial information for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020 includes the financial information and activities of LiveXLive (365 days) and React Presents for the period from February 5, 2020 to March 31, 2020 (56 days).

  

Principles of Consolidation

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly owned subsidiaries. Acquisitions are included in the Company’s consolidated financial statements from the date of the acquisition. The Company uses purchase accounting for its acquisitions, which results in all assets and liabilities of acquired businesses being recorded at their estimated fair values on the acquisition dates. See “Business Acquisitions and Supplemental Pro Forma Information.” All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

  

Going Concern and Liquidity

 

The Company’s consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern, which contemplates continuity of operations, realization of assets, and liquidation of liabilities in the normal course of business.

 

F-6

 

 

The Company’s principal sources of liquidity have historically been its debt and equity issuances and its cash and cash equivalents (which cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash amounted to $12.4 million as of March 31, 2020). As reflected in its consolidated financial statements included elsewhere herein, the Company has a history of losses, incurred a net loss of $38.9 million, and utilized cash of $4.9 million in operating activities for the year ended March 31, 2020, and had a working capital deficiency of $30.0 million as of March 31, 2020. The Company filed a universal shelf Registration Statement on Form S-3 which became effective in February 2019 to raise up to $150.0 million in cash from the sale of equity, debt and/or other financial instruments. During the year ended March 31, 2020, the Company sold 5,000,000 shares of its common stock to certain institutional investors for gross proceeds of $10.5 million. These factors, among others, raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern within one year from the date that these financial statements are filed. The Company’s consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments related to the recoverability and classification of recorded asset amounts or the amounts and classification of liabilities that might be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

The Company’s ability to continue as a going concern is dependent on its ability to execute its growth strategy and on its ability to raise additional funds. The continued spread of COVID-19 and uncertain market conditions may limit the Company’s ability to access capital, may reduce demand for its services, and may negatively impact its ability to retain key personnel. Management is currently seeking additional funds, primarily through the issuance of equity and/or debt securities for cash to operate the Company’s business. No assurance can be given that any future financing will be available or, if available, that it will be on terms that are satisfactory to it.  Even if the Company is able to obtain additional financing, it may contain terms that result in undue restrictions on its operations, in the case of debt financing or cause substantial dilution for its stockholders, in case of equity and/or convertible debt financing. The Company may also have to reduce certain overhead costs through the reduction of salaries and other means and settle liabilities through negotiation. There can be no assurance that management’s attempts at any or all of these endeavors will be successful.

 

Note 2 — Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

COVID-19

 

In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease (“COVID-19”) as a pandemic. The global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative effect on the global economy, disrupting the financial markets creating increasing volatility and overall uncertainty. The Company began to experience modest adverse impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic in the fourth quarter of fiscal year ended March 31, 2020 and this impact is expected to become more adverse and to continue throughout the first half of the fiscal year ending March 31, 2021, and possibly longer. The Company’s event and programmatic advertising revenues were directly impacted in the first quarter of 2021 with all on-premise in-person live music festivals and events postponed and mixed demand from historical advertising partners. Further, one of the Company’s larger customers also experienced a temporary halt to its production as a result of COVID-19, which in turn could adversely, impact the Company’s near-term subscriber growth in 2021. Subsequent to the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020, the Company has enacted several initiatives to counteract these near-term challenges, including salary reductions, obtaining a Paycheck Protection Program loan (see Note 19 – Subsequent Events) and pivoting production to 100% digital. The Company began producing, curating, and broadcasting digital music festivals and events across its platform which has resulted in the growth in the number of live events streamed, related sponsorship revenue and overall viewership. However, there is uncertainty as to the duration and overall impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, which could result in an adverse material change in a future period to the Company’s results of operations, financial position and liquidity.

 

Use of Estimates

 

 The preparation of the Company’s consolidated financial statements in conformity with the United States of America (“US”) generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) requires the Company’s management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Significant items subject to such estimates and assumptions include revenue, allowance for doubtful accounts, the assigned value of acquired assets and assumed and contingent liabilities associated with business combinations and the related purchase price allocation, useful lives and impairment of property and equipment, intangible assets, goodwill and other assets, the fair value of the Company’s equity-based compensation awards and convertible debt and debenture instruments, fair values of derivatives, and contingencies. Actual results could differ materially from those estimates. On an ongoing basis, the Company evaluates its estimates compared to historical experience and trends, which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying value of assets and liabilities. Given the overall uncertainty surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a reasonable possibility that actual results could differ from those estimates and such differences could be material to the financial position and results of operations, specifically in assessing when the collectability of revenue related consideration is probable, and the impairment assessment of goodwill, indefinite lived assets or long-lived assets that are depreciated or amortized.

 

F-7

 

 

Revenue Recognition Policy

 

In May 2014, the FASB issued a comprehensive new revenue recognition standard that superseded nearly all existing revenue recognition guidance under GAAP. The new standard provides a five-step analysis of transactions to determine when and how revenue is recognized. The core principle of the guidance is that a company should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled to receive in exchange for those goods or services. The FASB also issued important guidance clarifying certain guidelines of the standard, including (1) reframing the indicators in the principal versus agent guidance to focus on evidence that a company is acting as a principal rather than an agent and (2) identifying performance obligations and licensing. The Company accounts for a contract with a customer when an approved contract exists, the rights of the parties are identified, payment terms are identified, the contract has commercial substance and the collectability of substantially all of the consideration is probable. Revenue is recognized when the Company satisfies its obligation by transferring control of the goods or services to its customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the Company expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. The Company uses the expected value method to estimate the value of variable consideration on advertising and with original equipment manufacturer contracts to include in the transaction price and reflect changes to such estimates in periods in which they occur. Variable consideration for these services is allocated to and recognized over the related time period such advertising and subscription services are rendered as the amounts reflect the consideration the Company is entitled to and relate specifically to the Company’s efforts to satisfy its performance obligation. The amount of variable consideration included in revenue is limited to the extent that it is probable that the amount will not be subject to significant reversal when the uncertainty associated with the variable consideration is subsequently resolved.

 

Practical Expedients

 

The Company elected the practical expedient and did not restate contracts that began and were completed within the same annual reporting period.

 

The Company elected the practical expedient and recognized the incremental costs of obtaining a contract, if any, as an expense when incurred if the amortization period of the asset that would have been recognized is one year or less.

 

Gross Versus Net Revenue Recognition

 

The Company reports revenue on a gross or net basis based on management’s assessment of whether the Company acts as a principal or agent in the transaction. To the extent the Company acts as the principal, revenue is reported on a gross basis net of any sales tax from customers, when applicable. The determination of whether the Company acts as a principal or an agent in a transaction is based on an evaluation of whether the Company controls the good or service prior to transfer to the customer. Where applicable, the Company has determined that it acts as the principal in all of its subscription service streams and may act as principal or agent for its ticketing/live events, advertising and licensing revenue streams.

  

F-8

 

 

The Company’s revenue is principally derived from the following services:

  

Subscription Services

 

Subscription services revenue substantially consist of monthly to annual recurring subscription fees, which are primarily paid in advance by credit card or through direct billings arrangements. The Company defers the portions of monthly to annual recurring subscription fees collected in advance and recognizes them in the period earned. Subscription revenue is recognized in the period of services rendered. The Company’s subscription revenue consists of performance obligations that are satisfied over time. This has been determined based on the fact that the nature of services offered are subscription based where the customer simultaneously receives and consumes the benefit of the services provided regardless of whether the customer uses the services or not. As a result, the Company has concluded that the best measure of progress toward the complete satisfaction of the performance obligation over time is a time-based measure. The Company recognizes subscription revenue straight-line through the subscription period.

 

Subscription Services consist of:

 

Direct subscriber, mobile service provider and mobile app services

 

The Company generates revenue for subscription services on both a direct basis and through subscriptions sold through certain third-party mobile service providers and mobile app services (collectively the “Mobile Providers”). For subscriptions sold through the Mobile Providers, the subscriber executes an on-line agreement with Slacker outlining the terms and conditions between Slacker and the subscriber upon purchase of the subscription. The Mobile Providers promote the Slacker app through their e-store, process payments for subscriptions, and retain a percentage of revenue as a fee. The Company reports this revenue gross of the fee retained by the Mobile Providers, as the subscriber is Slacker’s customer in the contract and Slacker controls the service prior to the transfer to the subscriber. Subscription revenues from monthly subscriptions sold directly through Mobile Providers are subject to such Mobile Providers’ refund or cancellation terms. Revenues from Mobile Providers are recognized net of any such adjustments for variable consideration, including refunds and other fees. The Company’s payment terms vary based on whether the subscription is sold on a direct basis or through Mobile Providers. Subscriptions sold on a direct basis require payment before the services are delivered to the customer. The payment terms for subscriptions sold through Mobile Providers vary, but are generally payable within 30 days.

 

Third-Party Original Equipment Manufacturers

 

The Company generates revenue for subscription services through subscriptions sold through a third-party Original Equipment Manufacturer (the “OEM”). For subscriptions sold through the OEM, the OEM executes an agreement with Slacker outlining the terms and conditions between Slacker and the OEM upon purchase of the subscription. The OEM installs the Slacker app in their equipment and provides the Slacker service to the OEM’s customers. The monthly fee charged to the OEM is based upon a fixed rate per vehicle, multiplied by the variable number of total vehicles which have the Slacker application installed. The number of customers, or the variable consideration, is reported by OEMs and resolved on a monthly basis. The Company’s payment terms with OEM are up to 30 days.

 

Advertising Revenue

 

Advertising revenue primarily consist of revenues generated from the sale of audio, video, and display advertising space to third-party advertising exchanges. Revenues are recognized based on delivery of impressions over the contract period to the third-party exchanges, either when an ad is placed for listening or viewing by a visitor or when the visitor “clicks through” on the advertisement. The advertising exchange companies report the variable advertising revenue performed on a monthly basis which represents the Company’s efforts to satisfy the performance obligation.

 

F-9

 

 

Licensing Revenue

  

Licensing revenue primarily consists of sales of licensing rights to digitally stream its live music services in certain geographies (e.g. China). Licensing revenue is recognized when the Company satisfies its performance obligation by transferring control of the goods or services to its customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the Company expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services, which is typically when the live event has aired. Any license fees collected in advance of an event are deferred until the event airs. The Company reports licensing revenue on a gross basis as the Company acts as the principal in the underlying transactions.

 

Ticket/Event Revenue

 

Ticket/Event revenue is primarily from the sale of tickets and promoter fees earned from venues or other co-promoters under one of several formulas, including a fixed guaranteed amount and/or a percentage of ticket sales or event profits.

 

Revenue from the promotion or production of an event is recognized at a point in time when the show occurs. Revenue collected in advance of the event is recorded as deferred revenue until the event occurs. Revenue collected from sponsorship agreements, which is not related to a single event, is classified as deferred revenue and recognized over the term of the agreement or operating season as the benefits are provided to the sponsor.

 

Revenue from our ticketing operations primarily consists of service fees charged at the time a ticket for an event is sold in either the primary or secondary markets. For primary tickets sold to our festival events the revenue for the associated ticket service charges collected in advance of the event is recorded as deferred revenue until the event occurs.

 

Cost of Sales

 

Cost of Sales principally consist of royalties paid for the right to stream video, music and non-music content to the Company’s customers and the cost of securing the rights to produce and stream live events from venues and promoters. Royalties are calculated using negotiated and regulatory rates documented in content license agreements and are based on usage measures or revenue earned. Music royalties to record labels, professional rights organizations and music publishers relate to the consumption of music listened to on Slacker’s radio services. As of March 31, 2020, and 2019, the Company accrued $13.1 million and $9.9 million of royalties due to artists from use of Slacker’s radio services, respectively.

 

Sales and Marketing

 

Sales and Marketing include the direct and indirect costs related to the Company’s product and event advertising and marketing.

 

Product Development

 

Product development costs primarily are expenses for research and development, product and content development activities, including internal software development and improvement costs which have not been capitalized by the Company.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

Stock-based compensation cost is measured at the grant date based on the fair value of the award and is recognized as expense over the requisite service period, which is the vesting period, on an accelerated basis. The Company accounts for awards with graded vesting as if each vesting tranche is valued as a separate award. The Company uses the Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing model to determine the grant date fair value of stock options. This model requires the Company to estimate the expected volatility and the expected term of the stock options which are highly complex and subjective variables. The variables take into consideration, among other things, actual and projected employee stock option exercise behavior. The Company uses a predicted volatility of its stock price during the expected life of the options that is based on the historical performance of the Company’s stock price as well as including an estimate using guideline companies. The expected term is computed using the simplified method as the Company’s best estimate given its lack of actual exercise history. The Company has selected a risk-free rate based on the implied yield available on U.S. Treasury securities with a maturity equivalent to the expected term of the stock. Stock-based awards are comprised principally of stock options, restricted stock, restricted stock units (“RSUs”), restricted stock awards (“RSAs”) and warrant grants. Forfeitures are recognized as incurred.

 

Stock option awards issued to non-employees are accounted for at grant date fair value determined using the Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing model. Management believes that the fair value of the stock options is more reliably measured than the fair value of the services received. The Company records the fair value of these equity-based awards and expense at their cost ratably over related vesting periods.  

 

F-10

 

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes using the asset and liability method, which requires recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been included in the financial statements or tax returns. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are based on the differences between the financial statement and tax bases of assets and liabilities using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which the differences are expected to reverse. Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance to the extent management concludes it is more likely than not that the assets will not be realized. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in the Company’s Statements of Operations in the period that includes the enactment date.

 

Net Income (Loss) Per Share

 

Basic earnings (loss) per share is computed using the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted earnings (loss) per share is computed using the weighted-average number of common shares and the dilutive effect of contingent shares outstanding during the period. Potentially dilutive contingent shares, which primarily consist of stock options issued to employees, directors and consultants, restricted stock units, warrants issued to third parties and accounted for as equity instruments and convertible notes would be excluded from the diluted earnings per share calculation because their effect is anti-dilutive.

 

At March 31, 2020 and 2019, the Company had 167,363 warrants outstanding, 4,428,334 and 4,981,668 options outstanding, respectively, 4,530,705 and 1,377,391 restricted stock units outstanding, respectively, 24,675 and 0 restricted stock awards outstanding, respectively, and 4,206,437 and 2,942,391 shares of common stock issuable underlying the Company’s convertible notes and convertible debentures, respectively.

 

Business Combinations

 

The Company accounts for its business combinations using the acquisition method of accounting where the purchase consideration is allocated to the underlying net tangible and intangible assets acquired, based on their respective fair values. The excess of the purchase consideration over the estimated fair values of the net assets acquired is recorded as goodwill. Identifiable assets acquired, liabilities assumed and any noncontrolling interest in the acquiree are recognized and measured as of the acquisition date at fair value. Additionally, any contingent consideration is recorded at fair value on the acquisition date and classified as a liability. Goodwill is recognized to the extent by which the aggregate of the acquisition-date fair value of the consideration transferred and any noncontrolling interest in the acquiree exceeds the recognized basis of the identifiable assets acquired, net of assumed liabilities. Determining the fair value of assets acquired, liabilities assumed and noncontrolling interests requires management’s judgment and often involves the use of significant estimates and assumptions, including, but not limited to, the selection of appropriate valuation methodology, projected revenue, expenses and cash flows, weighted average cost of capital, discount rates, estimates of customer turnover rates and estimates of terminal values.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

Cash and cash equivalents include all highly liquid investments with original maturities, when purchased, of three months or less.

 

The following table provides amounts included in cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash presented in the consolidated statements of cash flows for the fiscal years ended March 31 (in thousands):

 

   2020   2019 
Cash and cash equivalents  $5,702   $13,704 
Restricted cash   6,735    235 
Total cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash  $12,437   $13,939 

 

F-11

 

 

Restricted Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company maintains certain letters of credit agreements with its banking provider, which are secured by the Company’s cash for periods of less than one year, as well as an account control agreement associated with the Company’s senior secured convertible debentures whereby the Company is required to have a minimum cash on hand of $6.5 million. As of March 31, 2020 and 2019, the Company had restricted cash of $6.7 million and $0.2 million, respectively.

 

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

 

The Company evaluates the collectability of its accounts receivable based on a combination of factors. Generally, it records specific reserves to reduce the amounts recorded to what it believes will be collected when a customer’s account ages beyond typical collection patterns, or the Company becomes aware of a customer’s inability to meet its financial obligations.

 

The Company believes that the credit risk with respect to trade receivables is limited due to the large and established nature of its largest customers and the short-term nature of its subscription receivables. At March 31, 2020, the Company had two customers that made up 22% and 57% of the total accounts receivable balance. At March 31, 2019, the Company had three customers that made up 10%, 26% and 36% of the total accounts receivable balance.

 

The following table provides amounts included in accounts receivable, net for the fiscal years ended March 31 (in thousands):

 

   2020   2019 
Accounts receivable, gross  $4,109   $4,318 
Less: Allowance for doubtful accounts   220    4 
Accounts receivable, net  $3,889   $4,314 

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment are recorded at cost. Costs of improvements that extend the economic life or improve service potential are also capitalized. Capitalized costs are depreciated over their estimated useful lives. Costs for normal repairs and maintenance are expensed as incurred.

 

Depreciation is recorded using the straight-line method over the assets’ estimated useful lives, which are generally as follows: buildings and improvements (5 years), furniture and equipment (3 to 5 years) and computer equipment and software (3 to 5 years). Leasehold improvements are depreciated over the shorter of the estimated useful life, based on the estimates above, or the lease term.

 

The Company evaluates the carrying value of its property and equipment if there are indicators of potential impairment. The Company performs an analysis to determine the recoverability of the asset group carrying value by comparing the expected undiscounted future cash flows to the net book value of the asset group. If it is determined that the expected undiscounted future cash flows are less than the net book value of the asset group, the excess of the net book value over the estimated fair value is recorded in the Company’s consolidated statements of operations. Fair value is generally estimated using valuation techniques that consider the discounted cash flows of the asset group using discount and capitalization rates deemed reasonable for the type of assets, as well as prevailing market conditions, appraisals, recent similar transactions in the market and, if appropriate and available, current estimated net sales proceeds from pending offers.

 

Capitalized Internal-Use Software

 

The Company capitalizes certain costs incurred to develop software for internal use. Costs incurred in the preliminary stages of development are expensed as incurred. Once software has reached the development stage, internal and external costs, if direct and incremental, are capitalized until the software is substantially complete and ready for its intended use. The Company also capitalizes costs related to specific upgrades and enhancements when it is probable the expenditures will result in additional functionality. Capitalized costs are recorded as part of property and equipment. Costs related to minor enhancements, maintenance and training are expensed as incurred.

 

Capitalized internal-use software costs are amortized on a straight-line basis over their two- to five-year estimated useful lives. The Company evaluates the useful lives of these assets and test for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances occur that could impact the recoverability of these assets. During the years ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, the Company capitalized $2.8 million and $3.1 million of internal use software, respectively.

 

F-12

 

 

Goodwill

 

Goodwill represents the excess of the purchase consideration over the fair value of the net tangible and identifiable intangible assets acquired in a business combination. The Company evaluates goodwill for impairment on an annual basis or whenever events and changes in circumstances suggest that the carrying amount may not be recoverable. The Company conducts its annual impairment analysis in the fourth quarter of each fiscal year. Impairment of goodwill is tested at the reporting unit level by comparing the reporting unit’s carrying amount, including goodwill, to the fair value of the reporting unit. Estimations and assumptions regarding the number of reporting units, future performances, results of the Company’s operations and comparability of its market capitalization and net book value will be used. If the carrying amount of the reporting unit exceeds its fair value, goodwill is considered impaired and an impairment loss is measured by the resulting amount. Because the Company has one reporting unit, as part of the Company’s qualitative assessment an entity-wide approach to assess goodwill for impairment is utilized. In the Company’s assessment for potential impairment the Company identified triggering events due to the events resulting from the global COVID-19 pandemic. No impairment losses have been recorded in the fiscal years ended March 31, 2020 and 2019. The Company’s reporting unit is the same as its operating segment and reporting segment as described in Note 17 - Business Segment and Geographic Reporting.

 

Intangible Assets with Indefinite Useful Lives

 

The Company’s indefinite-lived intangible assets consist of trademarks and trade names. The Company evaluates indefinite-lived intangible assets for impairment on an annual basis or whenever events and changes in circumstances suggest that the carrying amount may not be recoverable. The Company conducts its annual impairment analysis in the fourth quarter of each fiscal year. In our assessment for potential impairment we identified triggering events due to the events resulting from the global COVID-19 pandemic which caused the temporary halting of car production of our OEM partner as well as overall advertising spend decrease from our advertising partners. No impairment losses have been recorded in the fiscal years ended March 31, 2020 and 2019. The outbreak could have a continued adverse impact on economic