N-1A/A 1 d837615dn1aa.htm GOLDMAN SACHS ETF TRUST Goldman Sachs ETF Trust

As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 4, 2015

1933 Act Registration No. 333-200933

1940 Act Registration No. 811-23013

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D. C. 20549

 

 

FORM N-1A

REGISTRATION STATEMENT
UNDER
THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 x     
Pre-Effective Amendment No. 1 x     
Post-Effective Amendment No. ¨     
and/or
REGISTRATION STATEMENT
UNDER
THE INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 x     
Amendment No. 1 x     

(Check appropriate box or boxes)

 

 

GOLDMAN SACHS ETF TRUST

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Charter)

 

 

200 West Street

New York, New York 10282

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

Registrant’s Telephone Number, including Area Code: (212) 902-1000

CAROLINE KRAUS, ESQ.

Goldman, Sachs & Co.

200 West Street

New York, New York 10282

(Name and Address of Agent for Service)

 

 

Copies to:

STEPHEN H. BIER, ESQ.

ALLISON M. FUMAI, ESQ.

Dechert LLP

1095 Avenue of the Americas

New York, NY 10036

 

 

Approximate Date of Proposed Public Offering: As soon as practicable after the effective date of the Registration Statement

The registrant hereby amends this registration statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that the registration statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with section 8(a) of the Securities Act of 1933 or until the registration statement shall become effective on such date as the Securities and Exchange Commission, acting pursuant to said section 8(a), may determine.

 

 

 


The information in this Prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This Prospectus is not an offer to sell securities and is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.

 

Preliminary Prospectus dated May 4, 2015

Subject to Completion

 

Prospectus

 

GOLDMAN SACHS ETF TRUST

 

 

 

 

[  ], 2015

 

¢   Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Emerging Markets Equity ETF

 

  n   NYSE Arca: GEM

 

¢   Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Europe Equity ETF

 

  n   NYSE Arca: GSEU

 

¢   Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® International Equity ETF

 

  n   NYSE Arca: GSIE

 

¢   Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Japan Equity ETF

 

  n   NYSE Arca: GSJY

 

¢   Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® U.S. Large Cap Equity ETF

 

  n   NYSE Arca: GSLC

 

¢   Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® U.S. Small Cap Equity ETF

 

  n   NYSE Arca: GSSC

 

THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION HAS NOT APPROVED OR DISAPPROVED THESE SECURITIES OR PASSED UPON THE ADEQUACY OF THIS PROSPECTUS. ANY REPRESENTATION TO THE CONTRARY IS A CRIMINAL OFFENSE.

 

AN INVESTMENT IN A FUND IS NOT A BANK DEPOSIT AND IS NOT INSURED BY THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION OR ANY OTHER GOVERNMENT AGENCY. AN INVESTMENT IN A FUND INVOLVES INVESTMENT RISKS, AND YOU MAY LOSE MONEY IN A FUND.

 

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Table of Contents

 

Fund Summaries

Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Emerging Markets Equity ETF – Summary

  1   

Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Europe Equity ETF – Summary

  5   

Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® International Equity ETF – Summary

  9   

Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Japan Equity ETF – Summary

  13   

Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® U.S. Large Cap Equity ETF – Summary

  17   

Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® U.S. Small Cap Equity ETF – Summary

  20   
Investment Management Approach   23   
Risks of the Funds   27   
Tax Advantaged Product Structure   32   
Service Providers   33   
Distributions   37   
Shareholder Guide   38   

BUYING AND SELLING SHARES

  38   

PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES

  38   

NET ASSET VALUE

  39   

BOOK ENTRY

  40   

CREATIONS AND REDEMPTIONS

  40   
Taxation   41   
Index Provider   44   
Other Information   45   
Appendix A
Additional Information on Portfolio Risks, Securities and Techniques
  46   
Appendix B
Financial Highlights
  54   


LOGO

 

Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Emerging Markets Equity ETF—Summary

Ticker: GEM            Stock Exchange: NYSE Arca

Investment Objective

The Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Emerging Markets Equity ETF (the “Fund”) seeks to provide investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Emerging Markets Equity Index (the “Index”).

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

The following tables describe the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold Shares of the Fund.

 

Shareholder Fees

    None   
(fees paid directly from your investment)  

Annual Fund Operating Expenses

 
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)  

Management Fee

    [

Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fee

    0%   

Other Expenses1

    [ ]% 

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses

    [

[Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation2]

    [

[Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation]

    [

 

1  The Fund’s “Other Expenses” have been estimated to reflect expenses to be incurred in the first fiscal year.
2  The Investment Adviser has agreed to reduce or limit “Other Expenses” (acquired fund fees and expenses, offering costs, taxes, interest, brokerage fees, shareholder meeting, litigation, short sale, dividend, indemnification and extraordinary expenses) to [            ]% of the Fund’s average daily net assets through at least [            ], and prior to such date the Investment Adviser may not terminate the arrangement without the approval of the Board of Trustees.

Expense Example

This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of owning Shares of the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that the Example incorporates the fee waiver and expense limitation arrangement for only the first year). The Example does not taken into account brokerage commissions that you may pay on your purchases and sales of Shares of the Fund. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

 

1 Year

    

3 Years

$[ ]      $[ ]

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund may pay transaction costs when it buys and sells securities or instruments (i.e., “turns over” its portfolio). A high rate of portfolio turnover may result in increased transaction costs, including brokerage commissions, which must be borne by the Fund and its shareholders, and is also likely to result in higher short-term capital gains for taxable shareholders. These costs are not reflected in total annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, but are reflected in the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund has not yet commenced operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no portfolio turnover information quoted for the Fund.

Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing at least 80% of its assets (exclusive of collateral held from securities lending) in securities included in its underlying index, in depositary receipts representing securities included in its underlying index and in underlying stocks in respect of depositary receipts included in its underlying index.             

The Index is designed to deliver exposure to equity securities of emerging market issuers. The Index seeks to capture common sources of active equity returns, including value (i.e., how attractively a stock is priced relative to its “fundamentals,” such as book value and

 

1


free cash flow), momentum (i.e., whether a company’s share price is trending up or down), quality (i.e., profitability) and volatility (i.e., the degree of variability of a company’s share price over time). Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. (the “Index Provider”) constructs the Index in accordance with a rules-based methodology that seeks to capitalize on the low correlations in returns across these four factors by diversifying exposure to securities selected based on these factors.

The construction of the Index involves overweighting and underweighting securities in the MSCI Emerging Markets Index (the “Reference Index”), which is a market capitalization-weighted index. The magnitude of overweight and underweight that securities receive is made proportional to their attractiveness when evaluated based on a given factor, subject to the Index being constrained to long only positions. The Index is reconstituted and rebalanced on a quarterly basis.

[As of [ ], 2015, the Index consisted of [ ] securities with a market capitalization range of between approximately $[ ] million and $[ ] billion, and an average market capitalization of approximately $[ ] billion from issuers in the following emerging market countries: Brazil, Chile, China, Colombia, Czech Republic, Egypt, Greece, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Qatar, Russia, South Africa, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey and United Arab Emirates]. The components of the Index may change over time. The percentage of the portfolio exposed to any asset class, country or geographic region will vary from time to time as the weightings of the securities within the Index change, and the Fund may not be invested in each asset class, country or geographic region at all times. The Index Provider determines whether an issuer is located in an emerging market country by reference to the Reference Index methodology. MSCI Inc., which constructs the Reference Index, will generally deem an issuer to be located in an emerging market country if it is organized under the laws of the emerging market country and it is primarily listed in the emerging market country; in the event that these factors point to more than one country, the Reference Index methodology provides for consideration of certain additional factors.

The Index is comprised of equity securities, including American Depositary Receipts and Global Depositary Receipts. Given the Fund’s investment objective of attempting to track its Index, the Fund does not follow traditional methods of active investment management, which may involve buying and selling securities based upon analysis of economic and market factors. The Fund seeks to invest in the Index components in approximately the same weighting that such components have within the Index at the applicable time. The Fund may purchase a sample of securities in its Index. There may also be instances in which the Investment Adviser may choose to underweight or overweight a security in a Fund’s Index, purchase securities not in the Fund’s Index that the Investment Adviser believes are appropriate to substitute for certain securities in such Index or utilize various combinations of other available investment techniques.

The Fund may also invest up to 20% of its assets in securities and other instruments not included in its Index but which the Investment Adviser believes are correlated to its Index, as well as in, among other instruments, futures (including index futures), swaps, other derivatives, investment companies (including exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”)), preferred stocks, warrants and rights, cash and cash equivalents and money market instruments.

The Fund will concentrate its investments (i.e., hold more than 25% of its total assets) in a particular industry or group of industries to the extent that its Index is concentrated. The degree to which components of the Index represent certain sectors or industries may change over time.

Principal Risks of the Fund

Loss of money is a risk of investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any government agency. The Fund should not be relied upon as a complete investment program. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Investments in the Fund involve substantial risks which prospective investors should consider carefully before investing.

Cash Transactions Risk.  Unlike certain ETFs, the Fund expects to effect its creations and redemptions partially for cash, rather than in-kind securities. As such, investments in Shares may be less tax-efficient than an investment in a conventional ETF.

Depositary Receipts Risk.  Foreign securities may trade in the form of depositary receipts, which include American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) (collectively “Depositary Receipts”). To the extent the Fund acquires Depositary Receipts through banks which do not have a contractual relationship with the foreign issuer of the security underlying the Depositary Receipts to issue and service such unsponsored Depositary Receipts, there may be an increased possibility that the Fund would not become aware of and be able to respond to corporate actions such as stock splits or rights offerings involving the foreign issuer in a timely manner. In addition, the lack of information may result in inefficiencies in the valuation of such instruments. Investment in Depositary Receipts does not eliminate all the risks inherent in investing in securities of non-U.S. issuers. The market value of Depositary Receipts is dependent upon the market value of the underlying securities and fluctuations in the relative value of the currencies in which the Depositary Receipts and the underlying securities are quoted.

 

2


 

Expenses Risk.  By investing in pooled investment vehicles (including ETFs) indirectly through the Fund, the investor will incur not only a proportionate share of the expenses of the other pooled investment vehicles held by the Fund (including operating costs and investment management fees), but also expenses of the Fund.

Foreign and Emerging Countries Risk.  Foreign securities may be subject to risk of loss because of more or less foreign government regulation, less public information and less economic, political and social stability in the countries in which the Fund invests. Loss may also result from the imposition of exchange controls, confiscations and other government restrictions by the United States or other governments, or from problems in registration, settlement or custody. Foreign risk also involves the risk of negative foreign currency rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which the Fund has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. To the extent that the Fund also invests in issuers located in emerging and frontier markets, these risks may be more pronounced. The securities markets of most emerging countries are less liquid, are especially subject to greater price volatility, have smaller market capitalizations, have more or less government regulation and may not be subject to as extensive and frequent accounting, financial and other reporting requirements as the securities markets of more developed countries. Further, investment in securities of issuers located in certain emerging countries involves risk of loss resulting from problems in registration, settlement or custody and substantial economic and political disruptions. These risks are not normally associated with investments in more developed countries.

Geographic Risk.  Concentration of the investments of the Fund in issuers located in a particular country or region will subject the Fund, to a greater extent than if investments were less concentrated, to the risks of volatile economic cycles and/or conditions and developments that may be particular to that country or region, such as: adverse securities markets; adverse exchange rates; social, political, regulatory, economic or environmental developments; or natural disasters.

Index Risk.  The Fund will be negatively affected by general declines in the securities and asset classes represented in the Index. In addition, because the Fund is not “actively” managed, unless a specific security is removed from the Index, the Fund generally would not sell a security because the security’s issuer was in financial trouble. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Index. The Fund also does not attempt to take defensive positions under any market conditions, including declining markets. Therefore, the Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that may actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or to lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers. The Index Provider relies on third party data it believes to be reliable in constructing the Index, but it does not guarantee the accuracy of such third party data. The Index is new and has a limited performance history. Any new index is subject to errors in its construction.

Industry Concentration Risk.  In following its methodology, the Index from time to time may be concentrated to a significant degree in securities of issuers located in a single industry or a sector. To the extent that the Index concentrates in the securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector, the Fund also will concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent. By concentrating its investments in an industry or sector, the Fund may face more risks than if it were diversified broadly over numerous industries or sectors. If the Index is not concentrated in a particular industry or sector, the Fund will not concentrate in a particular industry or sector.

Investment Style Risk.  The Index is intended to provide exposure to certain emerging equity markets, and as a result the Index may be more volatile than a more broadly based conventional index. The Fund may outperform or underperform other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles.

Market Risk.  The value of the instruments in which the Fund invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies, particular sectors or governments and/or general economic conditions throughout the world due to increasingly interconnected global economies and financial markets.

Mid-Cap and Small-Cap Risk.  Investments in mid-capitalization and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than those associated with larger, more established companies. These securities may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and may lack sufficient market liquidity, and these issuers often face greater business risks.

Net Asset Value Risk.  The net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund and the value of your investment may fluctuate. Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for Shares may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses.

Stock Risk.  Stock prices have historically risen and fallen in periodic cycles. Foreign stock markets have experienced periods of substantial price volatility in the past and may do so again in the future.

Tracking Error Risk.  Tracking error is the divergence of the Fund’s performance from that of the Index. The performance of the Fund may diverge from that of its Index for a number of reasons. Tracking error may occur because of transaction costs, the Fund’s

 

3


holding of cash, differences in accrual of dividends, changes to the Index or the need to meet new or existing regulatory requirements. Unlike the Fund, the returns of the Index are not reduced by investment and other operating expenses, including the trading costs associated with implementing changes to its portfolio of investments. Tracking error risk may be heightened during times of market volatility or other unusual market conditions. To the extent that the Fund calculates its NAV based on fair value prices and the value of the Index is based on securities’ closing prices (i.e., the value of the Index is not based on fair value prices), the Fund’s ability to track the Index may be adversely affected. Because the Index is not subject to the tax diversification requirements to which the Fund must adhere, the Fund may be required to deviate its investments from the securities and relative weightings of the Index. For tax efficiency purposes, the Fund may sell certain securities to realize losses, which will result in a deviation from the Index.

Valuation Risk.  The sale price the Fund could receive for a security may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the security and may differ from the value used by the Index, particularly for securities that trade in low volume or volatile markets or that are valued using a fair value methodology. Because non-U.S. exchanges may be open on days when the Fund does not price its Shares, the value of the securities or assets in the Fund’s portfolio may change on days when investors will not be able to purchase or sell the Fund’s Shares. For purposes of calculating the Fund’s NAV, the value of assets denominated in non-U.S. currencies is converted into U.S. dollars using prevailing market rates on the date of valuation as quoted by one or more data service providers. This conversion may result in a difference between the prices used to calculate the Fund’s NAV and the prices used by the Index, which, in turn, could result in a difference between the Fund’s performance and the performance of the Index.

Performance

Because the Fund had not yet commenced investment operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no performance information quoted for the Fund. Once available, the Fund’s performance information will be accessible on the Fund’s website at www.gsamfunds.com.

Portfolio Management

Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. is the investment adviser for the Fund (the “Investment Adviser” or “GSAM”).

Portfolio Managers:  Steve Jeneste, CFA, Managing Director, and Raj Garigipati, Vice President, have each managed the Fund since inception.

Buying and Selling Fund Shares

The Fund will issue and redeem Shares at NAV only in a large specified number of Shares each called a “Creation Unit,” or multiples thereof. A Creation Unit consists of 50,000 Shares.

Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in secondary market transactions through brokers. Shares of the Fund are anticipated to be approved for listing and trading on the NYSE Arca, Inc. (“NYSE Arca”), subject to notice of issuance, and because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares of the Fund may trade at a price greater than or less than NAV.

Tax Information

The Fund’s distributions are taxable, and will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may become taxable upon withdrawal from such arrangements.

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

If you purchase Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), GSAM or other related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund Shares or related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

 

4


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Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Europe Equity ETF—Summary

Ticker: GSEU            Stock Exchange: NYSE Arca

Investment Objective

The Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Europe Equity ETF (the “Fund”) seeks to provide investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Europe Equity Index (the “Index”).

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

The following tables describe the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold Shares of the Fund.

 

Shareholder Fees

    None   
(fees paid directly from your investment)  

Annual Fund Operating Expenses

 
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)  

Management Fee

    [

Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fee

    0%   

Other Expenses1

    [ ]% 

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses

    [

[Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation2]

    [

[Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation]

    [

 

1  The Fund’s “Other Expenses” have been estimated to reflect expenses to be incurred in the first fiscal year.
2  The Investment Adviser has agreed to reduce or limit “Other Expenses” (acquired fund fees and expenses, offering costs, taxes, interest, brokerage fees, shareholder meeting, litigation, short sale, dividend, indemnification and extraordinary expenses) to [            ]% of the Fund’s average daily net assets through at least [            ], and prior to such date the Investment Adviser may not terminate the arrangement without the approval of the Board of Trustees.

Expense Example

This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of owning Shares of the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that the Example incorporates the fee waiver and expense limitation arrangement for only the first year). The Example does not taken into account brokerage commissions that you may pay on your purchases and sales of Shares of the Fund. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

 

1 Year

  

3 Years

$[ ]    $[ ]

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund may pay transaction costs when it buys and sells securities or instruments (i.e., “turns over” its portfolio). A high rate of portfolio turnover may result in increased transaction costs, including brokerage commissions, which must be borne by the Fund and its shareholders, and is also likely to result in higher short-term capital gains for taxable shareholders. These costs are not reflected in total annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, but are reflected in the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund has not yet commenced operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no portfolio turnover information quoted for the Fund.

Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing at least 80% of its assets (exclusive of collateral held from securities lending) in securities included in its underlying index, in depositary receipts representing securities included in its underlying index and in underlying stocks in respect of depositary receipts included in its underlying index.

The Index is designed to deliver exposure to equity securities of developed markets issuers in Europe. The Index seeks to capture common sources of active equity returns, including value (i.e., how attractively a stock is priced relative to its “fundamentals,” such as book value and free cash flow), momentum (i.e., whether a company’s share price is trending up or down), quality (i.e., profitability)

 

5


and volatility (i.e., the degree of variability of a company’s share price over time). Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. (the “Index Provider”) constructs the Index in accordance with a rules-based methodology that seeks to capitalize on the low correlations in returns across these four factors by diversifying exposure to securities selected based on these factors.

The construction of the Index involves overweighting and underweighting securities in the MSCI Europe Index (the “Reference Index”), which is a market capitalization-weighted index. The magnitude of overweight and underweight that securities receive is made proportional to their attractiveness when evaluated based on a given factor, subject to the Index being constrained to long only positions. The Index is reconstituted and rebalanced on a quarterly basis.

[As of [ ], 2015, the Index consisted of [ ] securities with a market capitalization range of between approximately $[ ] billion and $[ ] billion, and an average market capitalization of approximately $[ ] billion from issuers in the following countries: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom]. The components of the Index may change over time. The percentage of the portfolio exposed to any asset class or country will vary from time to time as the weightings of the securities within the Index change, and the Fund may not be invested in each asset class or country at all times. The Index Provider determines whether an issuer is located in a European country by reference to the Reference Index methodology. MSCI Inc., which constructs the Reference Index, will generally deem an issuer to be located in a European country if it is organized under the laws of the European country and it is primarily listed in the European country; in the event that these factors point to more than one country, the Reference Index methodology provides for consideration of certain additional factors.

The Index is comprised of equity securities, including American Depositary Receipts and Global Depositary Receipts. Given the Fund’s investment objective of attempting to track its Index, the Fund does not follow traditional methods of active investment management, which may involve buying and selling securities based upon analysis of economic and market factors. The Fund seeks to invest in the Index components in approximately the same weighting that such components have within the Index at the applicable time. The Fund may purchase a sample of securities in its Index. There may also be instances in which the Investment Adviser may choose to underweight or overweight a security in a Fund’s Index, purchase securities not in the Fund’s Index that the Investment Adviser believes are appropriate to substitute for certain securities in such Index or utilize various combinations of other available investment techniques.

The Fund may also invest up to 20% of its assets in securities and other instruments not included in its Index but which the Investment Adviser believes are correlated to its Index, as well as in, among other instruments, futures (including index futures), swaps, other derivatives, investment companies (including exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”)), preferred stocks, warrants and rights, cash and cash equivalents and money market instruments.

The Fund will concentrate its investments (i.e., hold more than 25% of its total assets) in a particular industry or group of industries to the extent that its Index is concentrated. The degree to which components of the Index represent certain sectors or industries may change over time.

Principal Risks of the Fund

Loss of money is a risk of investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any government agency. The Fund should not be relied upon as a complete investment program. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Investments in the Fund involve substantial risks which prospective investors should consider carefully before investing.

Depositary Receipts Risk.  Foreign securities may trade in the form of depositary receipts, which include American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) (collectively “Depositary Receipts”). To the extent the Fund acquires Depositary Receipts through banks which do not have a contractual relationship with the foreign issuer of the security underlying the Depositary Receipts to issue and service such unsponsored Depositary Receipts, there may be an increased possibility that the Fund would not become aware of and be able to respond to corporate actions such as stock splits or rights offerings involving the foreign issuer in a timely manner. In addition, the lack of information may result in inefficiencies in the valuation of such instruments. Investment in Depositary Receipts does not eliminate all the risks inherent in investing in securities of non-U.S. issuers. The market value of Depositary Receipts is dependent upon the market value of the underlying securities and fluctuations in the relative value of the currencies in which the Depositary Receipts and the underlying securities are quoted.

European Investment Risk.  The Fund is more exposed to the economic and political risks of Europe and of the European countries in which it invests than funds whose investments are more geographically diversified. Adverse economic and political events in Europe may cause the Fund’s investments to decline in value. The economies and markets of European countries are often closely connected and interdependent, and events in one country in Europe can have an adverse impact on other European countries. The Fund makes investments in securities of issuers that are domiciled in, or have significant operations in, member countries of the European Union that are subject to economic and monetary controls that can adversely affect the Fund’s investments. The European financial markets

 

6


have experienced volatility and adverse trends in recent years and these events have adversely affected the exchange rate of the euro and may continue to significantly affect other European countries.

Expenses Risk.  By investing in pooled investment vehicles (including ETFs) indirectly through the Fund, the investor will incur not only a proportionate share of the expenses of the other pooled investment vehicles held by the Fund (including operating costs and investment management fees), but also expenses of the Fund.

Foreign Countries Risk.  Foreign securities may be subject to risk of loss because of more or less foreign government regulation, less public information and less economic, political and social stability in the countries in which the Fund invests. Loss may also result from the imposition of exchange controls, confiscations and other government restrictions by the United States or other governments, or from problems in registration, settlement or custody. Foreign risk also involves the risk of negative foreign currency rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which the Fund has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time.

Geographic Risk.  Concentration of the investments of the Fund in issuers located in a particular country or region will subject the Fund, to a greater extent than if investments were less concentrated, to the risks of volatile economic cycles and/or conditions and developments that may be particular to that country or region, such as: adverse securities markets; adverse exchange rates; social, political, regulatory, economic or environmental developments; or natural disasters.

Index Risk.  The Fund will be negatively affected by general declines in the securities and asset classes represented in the Index. In addition, because the Fund is not “actively” managed, unless a specific security is removed from the Index, the Fund generally would not sell a security because the security’s issuer was in financial trouble. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Index. The Fund also does not attempt to take defensive positions under any market conditions, including declining markets. Therefore, the Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that may actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or to lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers. The Index Provider relies on third party data it believes to be reliable in constructing the Index, but it does not guarantee the accuracy of such third party data. The Index is new and has a limited performance history. Any new index is subject to errors in its construction.

Industry Concentration Risk.  In following its methodology, the Index from time to time may be concentrated to a significant degree in securities of issuers located in a single industry or a sector. To the extent that the Index concentrates in the securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector, the Fund also will concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent. By concentrating its investments in an industry or sector, the Fund may face more risks than if it were diversified broadly over numerous industries or sectors. If the Index is not concentrated in a particular industry or sector, the Fund will not concentrate in a particular industry or sector.

Investment Style Risk.  The Index is intended to provide exposure to certain international and developed equity markets, and as a result the Index may be more volatile than a more broadly based conventional index. The Fund may outperform or underperform other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles.

Market Risk.  The value of the instruments in which the Fund invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies, particular sectors or governments and/or general economic conditions throughout the world due to increasingly interconnected global economies and financial markets.

Mid-Cap and Small-Cap Risk.  Investments in mid-capitalization and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than those associated with larger, more established companies. These securities may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and may lack sufficient market liquidity, and these issuers often face greater business risks.

Net Asset Value Risk.  The net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund and the value of your investment may fluctuate. Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for Shares may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses.

Stock Risk.  Stock prices have historically risen and fallen in periodic cycles. Foreign stock markets have experienced periods of substantial price volatility in the past and may do so again in the future.

Tracking Error Risk.  Tracking error is the divergence of the Fund’s performance from that of the Index. The performance of the Fund may diverge from that of its Index for a number of reasons. Tracking error may occur because of transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of cash, differences in accrual of dividends, changes to the Index or the need to meet new or existing regulatory requirements. Unlike the Fund, the returns of the Index are not reduced by investment and other operating expenses, including the trading costs associated with implementing changes to its portfolio of investments. Tracking error risk may be heightened during times of market volatility or other unusual market conditions. To the extent that the Fund calculates its NAV based on fair value prices and the value

 

7


of the Index is based on securities’ closing prices (i.e., the value of the Index is not based on fair value prices), the Fund’s ability to track the Index may be adversely affected. Because the Index is not subject to the tax diversification requirements to which the Fund must adhere, the Fund may be required to deviate its investments from the securities and relative weightings of the Index. For tax efficiency purposes, the Fund may sell certain securities to realize losses, which will result in a deviation from the Index.

Valuation Risk.  The sale price the Fund could receive for a security may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the security and may differ from the value used by the Index, particularly for securities that trade in low volume or volatile markets or that are valued using a fair value methodology. Because non-U.S. exchanges may be open on days when the Fund does not price its Shares, the value of the securities or assets in the Fund’s portfolio may change on days when investors will not be able to purchase or sell the Fund’s Shares. For purposes of calculating the Fund’s NAV, the value of assets denominated in non-U.S. currencies is converted into U.S. dollars using prevailing market rates on the date of valuation as quoted by one or more data service providers. This conversion may result in a difference between the prices used to calculate the Fund’s NAV and the prices used by the Index, which, in turn, could result in a difference between the Fund’s performance and the performance of the Index.

Performance

Because the Fund had not yet commenced investment operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no performance information quoted for the Fund. Once available, the Fund’s performance information will be accessible on the Fund’s website at www.gsamfunds.com.

Portfolio Management

Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. is the investment adviser for the Fund (the “Investment Adviser” or “GSAM”).

Portfolio Managers:  Steve Jeneste, CFA, Managing Director, and Raj Garigipati, Vice President, have each managed the Fund since inception.

Buying and Selling Fund Shares

The Fund will issue and redeem Shares at NAV only in a large specified number of Shares each called a “Creation Unit,” or multiples thereof. A Creation Unit consists of 50,000 Shares.

Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in secondary market transactions through brokers. Shares of the Fund are anticipated to be approved for listing and trading on the NYSE Arca, Inc. (“NYSE Arca”), subject to notice of issuance, and because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares of the Fund may trade at a price greater than or less than NAV.

Tax Information

The Fund’s distributions are taxable, and will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may become taxable upon withdrawal from such arrangements.

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

If you purchase Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), GSAM or other related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund Shares or related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

 

8


LOGO

 

Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® International Equity ETF—Summary

Ticker: GSIE            Stock Exchange: NYSE Arca

Investment Objective

The Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® International Equity ETF (the “Fund”) seeks to provide investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® International Equity Index (the “Index”).

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

The following tables describe the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold Shares of the Fund.

 

Shareholder Fees

    None   
(fees paid directly from your investment)  

Annual Fund Operating Expenses

 
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)  

Management Fee

    [

Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fee

    0%   

Other Expenses1

    [ ]% 

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses

    [

[Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation2]

    [

[Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation]

    [

 

1 The Fund’s “Other Expenses” have been estimated to reflect expenses to be incurred in the first fiscal year.
2  The Investment Adviser has agreed to reduce or limit “Other Expenses” (acquired fund fees and expenses, offering costs, taxes, interest, brokerage fees, shareholder meeting, litigation, short sale, dividend, indemnification and extraordinary expenses) to [            ]% of the Fund’s average daily net assets through at least [            ], and prior to such date the Investment Adviser may not terminate the arrangement without the approval of the Board of Trustees.

Expense Example

This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of owning Shares of the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that the Example incorporates the fee waiver and expense limitation arrangement for only the first year). The Example does not taken into account brokerage commissions that you may pay on your purchases and sales of Shares of the Fund. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

 

1 Year

    

3 Years

$[ ]      $[ ]

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund may pay transaction costs when it buys and sells securities or instruments (i.e., “turns over” its portfolio). A high rate of portfolio turnover may result in increased transaction costs, including brokerage commissions, which must be borne by the Fund and its shareholders, and is also likely to result in higher short-term capital gains for taxable shareholders. These costs are not reflected in total annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, but are reflected in the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund has not yet commenced operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no portfolio turnover information quoted for the Fund.

Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing at least 80% of its assets (exclusive of collateral held from securities lending) in securities included in its underlying index, in depositary receipts representing securities included in its underlying index and in underlying stocks in respect of depositary receipts included in its underlying index.

The Index is designed to deliver exposure to equity securities of developed market issuers outside of the United States. The Index seeks to capture common sources of active equity returns, including value (i.e., how attractively a stock is priced relative to its “fundamentals,” such as book value and free cash flow), momentum (i.e., whether a company’s share price is trending up or down),

 

9


quality (i.e., profitability) and volatility (i.e., the degree of variability of a company’s share price over time). Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. (the “Index Provider”) constructs the Index in accordance with a rules-based methodology that seeks to capitalize on the low correlations in returns across these four factors by diversifying exposure to securities selected based on these factors.

The construction of the Index involves overweighting and underweighting securities in the MSCI World ex USA Index (the “Reference Index”), which is a market capitalization-weighted index. The magnitude of overweight and underweight that securities receive is made proportional to their attractiveness when evaluated based on a given factor, subject to the Index being constrained to long only positions. The Index is reconstituted and rebalanced on a quarterly basis.

[As of [ ], 2015, the Index consisted of [ ] securities with a market capitalization range of between approximately $[ ] billion and $[ ] billion, and an average market capitalization of approximately $[ ] billion from issuers in the following countries: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom]. The components of the Index may change over time. The percentage of the portfolio exposed to any asset class, country or geographic region will vary from time to time as the weightings of the securities within the Index change, and the Fund may not be invested in each asset class, country or geographic region at all times. The Index Provider determines whether an issuer is located in a particular country by reference to the Reference Index methodology. MSCI Inc., which constructs the Reference Index, will generally deem an issuer to be located in a particular country if it is organized under the laws of the particular country and it is primarily listed in the particular country; in the event that these factors point to more than one country, the Reference Index methodology provides for consideration of certain additional factors.

The Index is comprised of equity securities, including American Depositary Receipts and Global Depositary Receipts. Given the Fund’s investment objective of attempting to track its Index, the Fund does not follow traditional methods of active investment management, which may involve buying and selling securities based upon analysis of economic and market factors. The Fund seeks to invest in the Index components in approximately the same weighting that such components have within the Index at the applicable time. The Fund may purchase a sample of securities in its Index. There may also be instances in which the Investment Adviser may choose to underweight or overweight a security in a Fund’s Index, purchase securities not in the Fund’s Index that the Investment Adviser believes are appropriate to substitute for certain securities in such Index or utilize various combinations of other available investment techniques.

The Fund may also invest up to 20% of its assets in securities and other instruments not included in its Index but which the Investment Adviser believes are correlated to its Index, as well as in, among other instruments, futures (including index futures), swaps, other derivatives, investment companies (including exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”)), preferred stocks, warrants and rights, cash and cash equivalents and money market instruments.

The Fund will concentrate its investments (i.e., hold more than 25% of its total assets) in a particular industry or group of industries to the extent that its Index is concentrated. The degree to which components of the Index represent certain sectors or industries may change over time.

Principal Risks of the Fund

Loss of money is a risk of investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any government agency. The Fund should not be relied upon as a complete investment program. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Investments in the Fund involve substantial risks which prospective investors should consider carefully before investing.

Depositary Receipts Risk.  Foreign securities may trade in the form of depositary receipts, which include American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) (collectively “Depositary Receipts”). To the extent the Fund acquires Depositary Receipts through banks which do not have a contractual relationship with the foreign issuer of the security underlying the Depositary Receipts to issue and service such unsponsored Depositary Receipts, there may be an increased possibility that the Fund would not become aware of and be able to respond to corporate actions such as stock splits or rights offerings involving the foreign issuer in a timely manner. In addition, the lack of information may result in inefficiencies in the valuation of such instruments. Investment in Depositary Receipts does not eliminate all the risks inherent in investing in securities of non-U.S. issuers. The market value of Depositary Receipts is dependent upon the market value of the underlying securities and fluctuations in the relative value of the currencies in which the Depositary Receipts and the underlying securities are quoted.

Expenses Risk.  By investing in pooled investment vehicles (including ETFs) indirectly through the Fund, the investor will incur not only a proportionate share of the expenses of the other pooled investment vehicles held by the Fund (including operating costs and investment management fees), but also expenses of the Fund.

Foreign Countries Risk.  Foreign securities may be subject to risk of loss because of more or less foreign government regulation, less public information and less economic, political and social stability in the countries in which the Fund invests. Loss may also result from the imposition of exchange controls, confiscations and other government restrictions by the United States or other governments,

 

10


or from problems in registration, settlement or custody. Foreign risk also involves the risk of negative foreign currency rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which the Fund has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time.

Geographic Risk.  Concentration of the investments of the Fund in issuers located in a particular country or region will subject the Fund, to a greater extent than if investments were less concentrated, to the risks of volatile economic cycles and/or conditions and developments that may be particular to that country or region, such as: adverse securities markets; adverse exchange rates; social, political, regulatory, economic or environmental developments; or natural disasters.

Index Risk.  The Fund will be negatively affected by general declines in the securities and asset classes represented in the Index. In addition, because the Fund is not “actively” managed, unless a specific security is removed from the Index, the Fund generally would not sell a security because the security’s issuer was in financial trouble. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Index. The Fund also does not attempt to take defensive positions under any market conditions, including declining markets. Therefore, the Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that may actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or to lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers. The Index Provider relies on third party data it believes to be reliable in constructing the Index, but it does not guarantee the accuracy of such third party data. The Index is new and has a limited performance history. Any new index is subject to errors in its construction.

Industry Concentration Risk.  In following its methodology, the Index from time to time may be concentrated to a significant degree in securities of issuers located in a single industry or a sector. To the extent that the Index concentrates in the securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector, the Fund also will concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent. By concentrating its investments in an industry or sector, the Fund may face more risks than if it were diversified broadly over numerous industries or sectors. If the Index is not concentrated in a particular industry or sector, the Fund will not concentrate in a particular industry or sector.

Investment Style Risk.  The Index is intended to provide exposure to certain international equity markets, and as a result the Index may be more volatile than a more broadly based conventional index. The Fund may outperform or underperform other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles.

Market Risk.  The value of the instruments in which the Fund invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies, particular sectors or governments and/or general economic conditions throughout the world due to increasingly interconnected global economies and financial markets.

Mid-Cap and Small-Cap Risk.  Investments in mid-capitalization and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than those associated with larger, more established companies. These securities may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and may lack sufficient market liquidity, and these issuers often face greater business risks.

Net Asset Value Risk.  The net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund and the value of your investment may fluctuate. Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for Shares may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses.

Stock Risk.  Stock prices have historically risen and fallen in periodic cycles. Foreign stock markets have experienced periods of substantial price volatility in the past and may do so again in the future.

Tracking Error Risk.  Tracking error is the divergence of the Fund’s performance from that of the Index. The performance of the Fund may diverge from that of its Index for a number of reasons. Tracking error may occur because of transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of cash, differences in accrual of dividends, changes to the Index or the need to meet new or existing regulatory requirements. Unlike the Fund, the returns of the Index are not reduced by investment and other operating expenses, including the trading costs associated with implementing changes to its portfolio of investments. Tracking error risk may be heightened during times of market volatility or other unusual market conditions. To the extent that the Fund calculates its NAV based on fair value prices and the value of the Index is based on securities’ closing prices (i.e., the value of the Index is not based on fair value prices), the Fund’s ability to track the Index may be adversely affected. Because the Index is not subject to the tax diversification requirements to which the Fund must adhere, the Fund may be required to deviate its investments from the securities and relative weightings of the Index. For tax efficiency purposes, the Fund may sell certain securities to realize losses, which will result in a deviation from the Index.

Valuation Risk.  The sale price the Fund could receive for a security may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the security and may differ from the value used by the Index, particularly for securities that trade in low volume or volatile markets or that are valued using a fair value methodology. Because non-U.S. exchanges may be open on days when the Fund does not price its Shares, the value of the securities or assets in the Fund’s portfolio may change on days when investors will not be able to purchase or sell the Fund’s Shares. For purposes of calculating the Fund’s NAV, the value of assets denominated in non-U.S. currencies is converted into U.S. dollars

 

11


using prevailing market rates on the date of valuation as quoted by one or more data service providers. This conversion may result in a difference between the prices used to calculate the Fund’s NAV and the prices used by the Index, which, in turn, could result in a difference between the Fund’s performance and the performance of the Index.

Performance

Because the Fund had not yet commenced investment operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no performance information quoted for the Fund. Once available, the Fund’s performance information will be accessible on the Fund’s website at www.gsamfunds.com.

Portfolio Management

Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. is the investment adviser for the Fund (the “Investment Adviser” or “GSAM”).

Portfolio Managers:  Steve Jeneste, CFA, Managing Director, and Raj Garigipati, Vice President, have each managed the Fund since inception.

Buying and Selling Fund Shares

The Fund will issue and redeem Shares at NAV only in a large specified number of Shares each called a “Creation Unit,” or multiples thereof. A Creation Unit consists of 50,000 Shares.

Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in secondary market transactions through brokers. Shares of the Fund are anticipated to be approved for listing and trading on the NYSE Arca, Inc. (“NYSE Arca”), subject to notice of issuance, and because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares of the Fund may trade at a price greater than or less than NAV.

Tax Information

The Fund’s distributions are taxable, and will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may become taxable upon withdrawal from such arrangements.

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

If you purchase Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), GSAM or other related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund Shares or related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

 

12


LOGO

 

Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Japan Equity ETF—Summary

Ticker: GSJY            Stock Exchange: NYSE Arca

Investment Objective

The Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Japan Equity ETF (the “Fund”) seeks to provide investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Japan Equity Index (the “Index”).

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

The following tables describe the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold Shares of the Fund.

 

Shareholder Fees

    None   
(fees paid directly from your investment)  

Annual Fund Operating Expenses

 
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)  

Management Fee

    [    

Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fee

    0%   

Other Expenses1

    [     ]% 

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses

    [    

[Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation2]

    [    

[Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation]

    [    
1  The Fund’s “Other Expenses” have been estimated to reflect expenses to be incurred in the first fiscal year.
2  The Investment Adviser has agreed to reduce or limit “Other Expenses” (acquired fund fees and expenses, offering costs, taxes, interest, brokerage fees, shareholder meeting, litigation, short sale, dividend, indemnification and extraordinary expenses) to [            ]% of the Fund’s average daily net assets through at least [            ], and prior to such date the Investment Adviser may not terminate the arrangement without the approval of the Board of Trustees.

Expense Example

This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of owning Shares of the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that the Example incorporates the fee waiver and expense limitation arrangement for only the first year). The Example does not taken into account brokerage commissions that you may pay on your purchases and sales of Shares of the Fund. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

 

1 Year

  

3 Years

$[    ]    $[    ]

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund may pay transaction costs when it buys and sells securities or instruments (i.e., “turns over” its portfolio). A high rate of portfolio turnover may result in increased transaction costs, including brokerage commissions, which must be borne by the Fund and its shareholders, and is also likely to result in higher short-term capital gains for taxable shareholders. These costs are not reflected in total annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, but are reflected in the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund has not yet commenced operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no portfolio turnover information quoted for the Fund.

Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing at least 80% of its assets (exclusive of collateral held from securities lending) in securities included in its underlying index, in depositary receipts representing securities included in its underlying index and in underlying stocks in respect of depositary receipts included in its underlying index.

The Index is designed to deliver exposure to equity securities of Japanese issuers. The Index seeks to capture common sources of active equity returns, including value (i.e., how attractively a stock is priced relative to its “fundamentals,” such as book value and free cash flow), momentum (i.e., whether a company’s share price is trending up or down), quality (i.e., profitability) and volatility (i.e.,

 

13


the degree of variability of a company’s share price over time). Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. (the “Index Provider”) constructs the Index in accordance with a rules-based methodology that seeks to capitalize on the low correlations in returns across these four factors by diversifying exposure to securities selected based on these factors.

The construction of the Index involves overweighting and underweighting securities in the MSCI Japan Index (the “Reference Index”), which is a market capitalization-weighted index. The magnitude of overweight and underweight that securities receive is made proportional to their attractiveness when evaluated based on a given factor, subject to the Index being constrained to long only positions. The Index is reconstituted and rebalanced on a quarterly basis.

[As of [    ], 2015, the Index consisted of [    ] securities with a market capitalization range of between approximately $[    ] million and $[    ] billion, and an average market capitalization of approximately $[    ] billion]. The components of the Index may change over time. The percentage of the portfolio exposed to any asset class will vary from time to time as the weightings of the securities within the Index change, and the Fund may not be invested in each asset class at all times. The Index Provider determines whether an issuer is located in Japan by reference to the Reference Index methodology. MSCI Inc., which constructs the Reference Index, will generally deem an issuer to be located in Japan if it is organized under the laws of Japan and it is primarily listed in Japan; in the event that these factors point to a second country in addition to Japan, the Reference Index methodology provides for consideration of certain additional factors.

The Index is comprised of equity securities, including American Depositary Receipts and Global Depositary Receipts. Given the Fund’s investment objective of attempting to track its Index, the Fund does not follow traditional methods of active investment management, which may involve buying and selling securities based upon analysis of economic and market factors. The Fund seeks to invest in the Index components in approximately the same weighting that such components have within the Index at the applicable time. The Fund may purchase a sample of securities in its Index. There may also be instances in which the Investment Adviser may choose to underweight or overweight a security in a Fund’s Index, purchase securities not in the Fund’s Index that the Investment Adviser believes are appropriate to substitute for certain securities in such Index or utilize various combinations of other available investment techniques.

The Fund may also invest up to 20% of its assets in securities and other instruments not included in its Index but which the Investment Adviser believes are correlated to its Index, as well as in, among other instruments, futures (including index futures), swaps, other derivatives, investment companies (including exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”)), preferred stocks, warrants and rights, cash and cash equivalents and money market instruments.

The Fund will concentrate its investments (i.e., hold more than 25% of its total assets) in a particular industry or group of industries to the extent that its Index is concentrated. The degree to which components of the Index represent certain sectors or industries may change over time.

Principal Risks of the Fund

Loss of money is a risk of investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any government agency. The Fund should not be relied upon as a complete investment program. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Investments in the Fund involve substantial risks which prospective investors should consider carefully before investing.

Depositary Receipts Risk.  Foreign securities may trade in the form of depositary receipts, which include American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) (collectively “Depositary Receipts”). To the extent the Fund acquires Depositary Receipts through banks which do not have a contractual relationship with the foreign issuer of the security underlying the Depositary Receipts to issue and service such unsponsored Depositary Receipts, there may be an increased possibility that the Fund would not become aware of and be able to respond to corporate actions such as stock splits or rights offerings involving the foreign issuer in a timely manner. In addition, the lack of information may result in inefficiencies in the valuation of such instruments. Investment in Depositary Receipts does not eliminate all the risks inherent in investing in securities of non-U.S. issuers. The market value of Depositary Receipts is dependent upon the market value of the underlying securities and fluctuations in the relative value of the currencies in which the Depositary Receipts and the underlying securities are quoted.

Expenses Risk.  By investing in pooled investment vehicles (including ETFs) indirectly through the Fund, the investor will incur not only a proportionate share of the expenses of the other pooled investment vehicles held by the Fund (including operating costs and investment management fees), but also expenses of the Fund.

Foreign Countries Risk.  Foreign securities may be subject to risk of loss because of more or less foreign government regulation, less public information and less economic, political and social stability in the countries in which the Fund invests. Loss may also result from the imposition of exchange controls, confiscations and other government restrictions by the United States or other governments, or from problems in registration, settlement or custody. Foreign risk also involves the risk of negative foreign currency rate

 

14


fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which the Fund has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time.

Geographic Risk.  Concentration of the investments of the Fund in issuers located in a particular country or region will subject the Fund, to a greater extent than if investments were less concentrated, to the risks of volatile economic cycles and/or conditions and developments that may be particular to that country or region, such as: adverse securities markets; adverse exchange rates; social, political, regulatory, economic or environmental developments; or natural disasters.

Index Risk.  The Fund will be negatively affected by general declines in the securities and asset classes represented in the Index. In addition, because the Fund is not “actively” managed, unless a specific security is removed from the Index, the Fund generally would not sell a security because the security’s issuer was in financial trouble. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Index. The Fund also does not attempt to take defensive positions under any market conditions, including declining markets. Therefore, the Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that may actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or to lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers. The Index Provider relies on third party data it believes to be reliable in constructing the Index, but it does not guarantee the accuracy of such third party data. The Index is new and has a limited performance history. Any new index is subject to errors in its construction.

Industry Concentration Risk.   In following its methodology, the Index from time to time may be concentrated to a significant degree in securities of issuers located in a single industry or a sector. To the extent that the Index concentrates in the securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector, the Fund also will concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent. By concentrating its investments in an industry or sector, the Fund may face more risks than if it were diversified broadly over numerous industries or sectors. If the Index is not concentrated in a particular industry or sector, the Fund will not concentrate in a particular industry or sector.

Investment Style Risk.  The Index is intended to provide exposure to certain international equity markets, and as a result the Index may be more volatile than a more broadly based conventional index. The Fund may outperform or underperform other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles.

Japan Risk.  The Japanese economy is heavily dependent upon international trade and may be subject to considerable degrees of economic, political and social instability, which could negatively affect the Fund. The Japanese yen has fluctuated widely during recent periods and may be affected by currency volatility elsewhere in Asia, especially Southeast Asia. In addition, the yen has had a history of unpredictable and volatile movements against the U.S. dollar. The performance of the global economy could have a major impact upon equity returns in Japan. Since the mid-2000s, Japan’s economic growth has remained relatively low. A recent economic recession was likely compounded by an unstable financial sector, low domestic consumption, and certain corporate structural weaknesses, which remain some of the major issues facing the Japanese economy. Japan has also experienced natural disasters, such as earthquakes and tidal waves, of varying degrees of severity, which could negatively affect the Fund.

Market Risk.  The value of the instruments in which the Fund invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies, particular sectors or governments and/or general economic conditions throughout the world due to increasingly interconnected global economies and financial markets.

Mid-Cap and Small-Cap Risk.  Investments in mid-capitalization and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than those associated with larger, more established companies. These securities may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and may lack sufficient market liquidity, and these issuers often face greater business risks.

Net Asset Value Risk.  The net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund and the value of your investment may fluctuate. Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for Shares may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses.

Stock Risk.  Stock prices have historically risen and fallen in periodic cycles. Foreign stock markets have experienced periods of substantial price volatility in the past and may do so again in the future.

Tracking Error Risk.  Tracking error is the divergence of the Fund’s performance from that of the Index. The performance of the Fund may diverge from that of its Index for a number of reasons. Tracking error may occur because of transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of cash, differences in accrual of dividends, changes to the Index or the need to meet new or existing regulatory requirements. Unlike the Fund, the returns of the Index are not reduced by investment and other operating expenses, including the trading costs associated with implementing changes to its portfolio of investments. Tracking error risk may be heightened during times of market volatility or other unusual market conditions. To the extent that the Fund calculates its NAV based on fair value prices and the value of the Index is based on securities’ closing prices (i.e., the value of the Index is not based on fair value prices), the Fund’s ability to

 

15


track the Index may be adversely affected. Because the Index is not subject to the tax diversification requirements to which the Fund must adhere, the Fund may be required to deviate its investments from the securities and relative weightings of the Index. For tax efficiency purposes, the Fund may sell certain securities to realize losses, which will result in a deviation from the Index.

Valuation Risk.  The sale price the Fund could receive for a security may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the security and may differ from the value used by the Index, particularly for securities that trade in low volume or volatile markets or that are valued using a fair value methodology. Because non-U.S. exchanges may be open on days when the Fund does not price its Shares, the value of the securities or assets in the Fund’s portfolio may change on days when investors will not be able to purchase or sell the Fund’s Shares. For purposes of calculating the Fund’s NAV, the value of assets denominated in non-U.S. currencies is converted into U.S. dollars using prevailing market rates on the date of valuation as quoted by one or more data service providers. This conversion may result in a difference between the prices used to calculate the Fund’s NAV and the prices used by the Index, which, in turn, could result in a difference between the Fund’s performance and the performance of the Index.

Performance

Because the Fund had not yet commenced investment operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no performance information quoted for the Fund. Once available, the Fund’s performance information will be accessible on the Fund’s website at www.gsamfunds.com.

Portfolio Management

Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. is the investment adviser for the Fund (the “Investment Adviser” or “GSAM”).

Portfolio Managers:  Steve Jeneste, CFA, Managing Director, and Raj Garigipati, Vice President, have each managed the Fund since inception.

Buying and Selling Fund Shares

The Fund will issue and redeem Shares at NAV only in a large specified number of Shares each called a “Creation Unit,” or multiples thereof. A Creation Unit consists of 50,000 Shares.

Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in secondary market transactions through brokers. Shares of the Fund are anticipated to be approved for listing and trading on the NYSE Arca, Inc. (“NYSE Arca”), subject to notice of issuance, and because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares of the Fund may trade at a price greater than or less than NAV.

Tax Information

The Fund’s distributions are taxable, and will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may become taxable upon withdrawal from such arrangements.

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

If you purchase Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), GSAM or other related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund Shares or related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

 

16


LOGO

 

Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® U.S. Large Cap Equity ETF—Summary

Ticker: GSLC            Stock Exchange: NYSE Arca

Investment Objective

The Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® U.S. Large Cap Equity ETF (the “Fund”) seeks to provide investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® U.S. Large Cap Equity Index (the “Index”).

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

The following tables describe the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold Shares of the Fund.

 

Shareholder Fees

    None   
(fees paid directly from your investment)  

Annual Fund Operating Expenses

 
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)  

Management Fee

    [    

Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fee

    0%   

Other Expenses1

    [     ]% 

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses

    [    

[Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation2]

    [    

[Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation]

    [    
1  The Fund’s “Other Expenses” have been estimated to reflect expenses to be incurred in the first fiscal year.
2  The Investment Adviser has agreed to reduce or limit “Other Expenses” (acquired fund fees and expenses, offering costs, taxes, interest, brokerage fees, shareholder meeting, litigation, short sale, dividend, indemnification and extraordinary expenses) to [            ]% of the Fund’s average daily net assets through at least [            ], and prior to such date the Investment Adviser may not terminate the arrangement without the approval of the Board of Trustees.

Expense Example

This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of owning Shares of the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that the Example incorporates the fee waiver and expense limitation arrangement for only the first year). The Example does not taken into account brokerage commissions that you may pay on your purchases and sales of Shares of the Fund. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

 

1 Year

  

3 Years

$[    ]    $[    ]

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund may pay transaction costs when it buys and sells securities or instruments (i.e., “turns over” its portfolio). A high rate of portfolio turnover may result in increased transaction costs, including brokerage commissions, which must be borne by the Fund and its shareholders, and is also likely to result in higher short-term capital gains for taxable shareholders. These costs are not reflected in total annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, but are reflected in the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund has not yet commenced operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no portfolio turnover information quoted for the Fund.

Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing at least 80% of its assets (exclusive of collateral held from securities lending) in securities included in its underlying index.

The Index is designed to deliver exposure to equity securities of large-capitalization U.S. issuers. The Index seeks to capture common sources of active equity returns, including value (i.e., how attractively a stock is priced relative to its “fundamentals,” such as book value and free cash flow), momentum (i.e., whether a company’s share price is trending up or down), quality (i.e., profitability) and volatility (i.e., the degree of variability of a company’s share price over time). Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. (the “Index

 

17


Provider”) constructs the Index in accordance with a rules-based methodology that seeks to capitalize on the low correlations in returns across these four factors by diversifying exposure to securities selected based on these factors.

The construction of the Index involves overweighting and underweighting securities in the Solactive US Large Cap Index (the “Reference Index”), which is a market capitalization-weighted index. The magnitude of overweight and underweight that securities receive is made proportional to their attractiveness when evaluated based on a given factor, subject to the Index being constrained to long only positions. The Index is reconstituted and rebalanced on a quarterly basis.

[As of [ ], 2015, the Index consisted of [ ] securities with a market capitalization range of between approximately $[ ] billion and $[ ] billion, and an average market capitalization of approximately $[ ] billion]. The components of the Index may change over time. The percentage of the portfolio exposed to any asset class will vary from time to time as the weightings of the securities within the Index change, and the Fund may not be invested in each asset class at all times.

Given the Fund’s investment objective of attempting to track its Index, the Fund does not follow traditional methods of active investment management, which may involve buying and selling securities based upon analysis of economic and market factors. The Fund seeks to invest in the Index components in approximately the same weighting that such components have within the Index at the applicable time. The Fund may purchase a sample of securities in its Index. There may also be instances in which the Investment Adviser may choose to underweight or overweight a security in a Fund’s Index, purchase securities not in the Fund’s Index that the Investment Adviser believes are appropriate to substitute for certain securities in such Index or utilize various combinations of other available investment techniques.

The Fund will concentrate its investments (i.e., hold more than 25% of its total assets) in a particular industry or group of industries to the extent that its Index is concentrated. The degree to which components of the Index represent certain sectors or industries may change over time.

Principal Risks of the Fund

Loss of money is a risk of investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any government agency. The Fund should not be relied upon as a complete investment program. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Investments in the Fund involve substantial risks which prospective investors should consider carefully before investing.

Index Risk.  The Fund will be negatively affected by general declines in the securities and asset classes represented in the Index. In addition, because the Fund is not “actively” managed, unless a specific security is removed from the Index, the Fund generally would not sell a security because the security’s issuer was in financial trouble. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Index. The Fund also does not attempt to take defensive positions under any market conditions, including declining markets. Therefore, the Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that may actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or to lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers. The Index Provider relies on third party data it believes to be reliable in constructing the Index, but it does not guarantee the accuracy of such third party data. The Index is new and has a limited performance history. Any new index is subject to errors in its construction.

Industry Concentration Risk.  In following its methodology, the Index from time to time may be concentrated to a significant degree in securities of issuers located in a single industry or a sector. To the extent that the Index concentrates in the securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector, the Fund also will concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent. By concentrating its investments in an industry or sector, the Fund may face more risks than if it were diversified broadly over numerous industries or sectors. If the Index is not concentrated in a particular industry or sector, the Fund will not concentrate in a particular industry or sector.

Investment Style Risk.  The Index is intended to provide exposure to the U.S. equity markets, and as a result the Index may be more volatile than a more broadly based conventional index. The Fund may outperform or underperform other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles.

Market Risk.  The value of the instruments in which the Fund invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies, particular sectors or governments and/or general economic conditions throughout the world due to increasingly interconnected global economies and financial markets.

Net Asset Value Risk.  The net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund and the value of your investment may fluctuate. Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for Shares may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses.

 

18


 

Stock Risk.  Stock prices have historically risen and fallen in periodic cycles. Foreign stock markets have experienced periods of substantial price volatility in the past and may do so again in the future.

Tracking Error Risk.  Tracking error is the divergence of the Fund’s performance from that of the Index. The performance of the Fund may diverge from that of its Index for a number of reasons. Tracking error may occur because of transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of cash, differences in accrual of dividends, changes to the Index or the need to meet new or existing regulatory requirements. Unlike the Fund, the returns of the Index are not reduced by investment and other operating expenses, including the trading costs associated with implementing changes to its portfolio of investments. Tracking error risk may be heightened during times of market volatility or other unusual market conditions. To the extent that the Fund calculates its NAV based on fair value prices and the value of the Index is based on securities’ closing prices (i.e., the value of the Index is not based on fair value prices), the Fund’s ability to track the Index may be adversely affected. Because the Index is not subject to the tax diversification requirements to which the Fund must adhere, the Fund may be required to deviate its investments from the securities and relative weightings of the Index. For tax efficiency purposes, the Fund may sell certain securities to realize losses, which will result in a deviation from the Index.

Valuation Risk.  The sale price the Fund could receive for a security may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the security and may differ from the value used by the Index, particularly for securities that trade in low volume or volatile markets or that are valued using a fair value methodology.

Performance

Because the Fund had not yet commenced investment operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no performance information quoted for the Fund. Once available, the Fund’s performance information will be accessible on the Fund’s website at www.gsamfunds.com.

Portfolio Management

Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. is the investment adviser for the Fund (the “Investment Adviser” or “GSAM”).

Portfolio Managers:  Steve Jeneste, CFA, Managing Director, and Raj Garigipati, Vice President, have each managed the Fund since inception.

Buying and Selling Fund Shares

The Fund will issue and redeem Shares at NAV only in a large specified number of Shares each called a “Creation Unit,” or multiples thereof. A Creation Unit consists of 50,000 Shares.

Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in secondary market transactions through brokers. Shares of the Fund are anticipated to be approved for listing and trading on the NYSE Arca, Inc. (“NYSE Arca”), subject to notice of issuance, and because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares of the Fund may trade at a price greater than or less than NAV.

Tax Information

The Fund’s distributions are taxable, and will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may become taxable upon withdrawal from such arrangements.

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

If you purchase Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), GSAM or other related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund Shares or related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

 

19


LOGO

 

Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® U.S. Small Cap Equity ETF—Summary

Ticker: GSSC            Stock Exchange: NYSE Arca

Investment Objective

The Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® U.S. Small Cap Equity ETF (the “Fund”) seeks to provide investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® U.S. Small Cap Equity Index (the “Index”).

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

The following tables describe the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold Shares of the Fund.

 

Shareholder Fees

    None   
(fees paid directly from your investment)  

Annual Fund Operating Expenses

 
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)  

Management Fee

    [    

Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fee

    0

Other Expenses1

    [     ]% 

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses

    [    

[Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation2]

    [    

[Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation]

    [    

 

1  The Fund’s “Other Expenses” have been estimated to reflect expenses to be incurred in the first fiscal year.
2  The Investment Adviser has agreed to reduce or limit “Other Expenses” (acquired fund fees and expenses, offering costs, taxes, interest, brokerage fees, shareholder meeting, litigation, short sale, dividend, indemnification and extraordinary expenses) to [            ]% of the Fund’s average daily net assets through at least [            ], and prior to such date the Investment Adviser may not terminate the arrangement without the approval of the Board of Trustees.

Expense Example

This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of owning Shares of the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that the Example incorporates the fee waiver and expense limitation arrangement for only the first year). The Example does not taken into account brokerage commissions that you may pay on your purchases and sales of Shares of the Fund. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

 

1 Year

  

3 Years

$[    ]

   $[    ]

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund may pay transaction costs when it buys and sells securities or instruments (i.e., “turns over” its portfolio). A high rate of portfolio turnover may result in increased transaction costs, including brokerage commissions, which must be borne by the Fund and its shareholders, and is also likely to result in higher short-term capital gains for taxable shareholders. These costs are not reflected in total annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, but are reflected in the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund has not yet commenced operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no portfolio turnover information quoted for the Fund.

Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing at least 80% of its assets (exclusive of collateral held from securities lending) in securities included in its underlying index.

The Index is designed to deliver exposure to equity securities of small-capitalization U.S. issuers. The Index seeks to capture common sources of active equity returns, including value (i.e., how attractively a stock is priced relative to its “fundamentals,” such as book value and free cash flow), momentum (i.e., whether a company’s share price is trending up or down), quality (i.e., profitability) and volatility (i.e., the degree of variability of a company’s share price over time). Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. (the

 

20


“Index Provider”) constructs the Index in accordance with a rules-based methodology that seeks to capitalize on the low correlations in returns across these four factors by diversifying exposure to securities selected based on these factors.

The construction of the Index involves overweighting and underweighting securities in the Solactive US Small Cap Index (the “Reference Index”), which is a market capitalization-weighted index. The magnitude of overweight and underweight that securities receive is made proportional to their attractiveness when evaluated based on a given factor, subject to the Index being constrained to long only positions. The Index is reconstituted and rebalanced on a quarterly basis.

[As of [                ], 2015, the Index consisted of [        ] securities with a market capitalization range of between approximately $[        ] million and $[        ] billion, and an average market capitalization of approximately $[        ] billion]. The components of the Index may change over time. The percentage of the portfolio exposed to any asset class will vary from time to time as the weightings of the securities within the Index change, and the Fund may not be invested in each asset class at all times.

Given the Fund’s investment objective of attempting to track its Index, the Fund does not follow traditional methods of active investment management, which may involve buying and selling securities based upon analysis of economic and market factors. The Fund seeks to invest in the Index components in approximately the same weighting that such components have within the Index at the applicable time. The Fund may purchase a sample of securities in its Index. There may also be instances in which the Investment Adviser may choose to underweight or overweight a security in a Fund’s Index, purchase securities not in the Fund’s Index that the Investment Adviser believes are appropriate to substitute for certain securities in such Index or utilize various combinations of other available investment techniques.

The Fund will concentrate its investments (i.e., hold more than 25% of its total assets) in a particular industry or group of industries to the extent that its Index is concentrated. The degree to which components of the Index represent certain sectors or industries may change over time.

Principal Risks of the Fund

Loss of money is a risk of investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any government agency. The Fund should not be relied upon as a complete investment program. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Investments in the Fund involve substantial risks which prospective investors should consider carefully before investing.

Index Risk.  The Fund will be negatively affected by general declines in the securities and asset classes represented in the Index. In addition, because the Fund is not “actively” managed, unless a specific security is removed from the Index, the Fund generally would not sell a security because the security’s issuer was in financial trouble. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Index. The Fund also does not attempt to take defensive positions under any market conditions, including declining markets. Therefore, the Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that may actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or to lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers. The Index Provider relies on third party data it believes to be reliable in constructing the Index, but it does not guarantee the accuracy of such third party data. The Index is new and has a limited performance history. Any new index is subject to errors in its construction.

Industry Concentration Risk.  In following its methodology, the Index from time to time may be concentrated to a significant degree in securities of issuers located in a single industry or a sector. To the extent that the Index concentrates in the securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector, the Fund also will concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent. By concentrating its investments in an industry or sector, the Fund may face more risks than if it were diversified broadly over numerous industries or sectors. If the Index is not concentrated in a particular industry or sector, the Fund will not concentrate in a particular industry or sector.

Investment Style Risk.  The Index is intended to provide exposure to the U.S. equity markets, and as a result the Index may be more volatile than a more broadly based conventional index. The Fund may outperform or underperform other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles.

Market Risk.  The value of the instruments in which the Fund invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies, particular sectors or governments and/or general economic conditions throughout the world due to increasingly interconnected global economies and financial markets.

Mid-Cap and Small-Cap Risk.  Investments in mid-capitalization and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than those associated with larger, more established companies. These securities may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and may lack sufficient market liquidity, and these issuers often face greater business risks.

Net Asset Value Risk.  The net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund and the value of your investment may fluctuate. Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for Shares may

 

21


result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses.

Stock Risk.  Stock prices have historically risen and fallen in periodic cycles. U.S. stock markets have experienced periods of substantial price volatility in the past and may do so again in the future.

Tracking Error Risk.  Tracking error is the divergence of the Fund’s performance from that of the Index. The performance of the Fund may diverge from that of its Index for a number of reasons. Tracking error may occur because of transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of cash, differences in accrual of dividends, changes to the Index or the need to meet new or existing regulatory requirements. Unlike the Fund, the returns of the Index are not reduced by investment and other operating expenses, including the trading costs associated with implementing changes to its portfolio of investments. Tracking error risk may be heightened during times of market volatility or other unusual market conditions. To the extent that the Fund calculates its NAV based on fair value prices and the value of the Index is based on securities’ closing prices (i.e., the value of the Index is not based on fair value prices), the Fund’s ability to track the Index may be adversely affected. Because the Index is not subject to the tax diversification requirements to which the Fund must adhere, the Fund may be required to deviate its investments from the securities and relative weightings of the Index. For tax efficiency purposes, the Fund may sell certain securities to realize losses, which will result in a deviation from the Index.

Valuation Risk.  The sale price the Fund could receive for a security may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the security and may differ from the value used by the Index, particularly for securities that trade in low volume or volatile markets or that are valued using a fair value methodology.

Performance

Because the Fund had not yet commenced investment operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no performance information quoted for the Fund. Once available, the Fund’s performance information will be accessible on the Fund’s website at www.gsamfunds.com.

Portfolio Management

Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. is the investment adviser for the Fund (the “Investment Adviser” or “GSAM”).

Portfolio Managers:  Steve Jeneste, CFA, Managing Director, and Raj Garigipati, Vice President, have each managed the Fund since inception.

Buying and Selling Fund Shares

The Fund will issue and redeem Shares at NAV only in a large specified number of Shares each called a “Creation Unit,” or multiples thereof. A Creation Unit consists of 50,000 Shares.

Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in secondary market transactions through brokers. Shares of the Fund are anticipated to be approved for listing and trading on the NYSE Arca, Inc. (“NYSE Arca”), subject to notice of issuance, and because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares of the Fund may trade at a price greater than or less than NAV.

Tax Information

The Fund’s distributions are taxable, and will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may become taxable upon withdrawal from such arrangements.

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

If you purchase Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), GSAM or other related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund Shares or related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

 

22


 

Investment Management Approach

 

  INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE     

Each Fund seeks to provide investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of its respective Index. A Fund’s investment objective may be changed without shareholder approval.

 

  PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES     

Each of ActiveBeta® Emerging Markets Equity ETF, ActiveBeta® Europe Equity ETF, ActiveBeta® International Equity ETF and ActiveBeta® Japan Equity ETF seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing at least 80% of its assets (exclusive of collateral held from securities lending) in securities included in its underlying index, in depositary receipts representing securities included in its underlying index and in underlying stocks in respect of depositary receipts included in its underlying index. Each of ActiveBeta® U.S. Large Cap Equity ETF and ActiveBeta® U.S. Small Cap Equity ETF seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing at least 80% of its assets (exclusive of collateral held from securities lending) in securities included in its underlying index.

The Investment Adviser anticipates that, generally, each Fund will hold all of the securities that comprise its Index in proportion to their weightings in such Index. However, under various circumstances, it may not be possible or practicable to purchase all of those securities in those weightings. In these circumstances, a Fund may purchase a sample of securities in its Index. There also may be instances in which the Investment Adviser may choose to underweight or overweight a security in a Fund’s Index, purchase securities not in the Fund’s Index that the Investment Adviser believes are appropriate to substitute for certain securities in such Index or utilize various combinations of other available investment techniques. Each Fund may sell securities that are represented in its Index in anticipation of their removal from its Index or purchase securities not represented in its Index in anticipation of their addition to such Index. Each Fund may also, in order to comply with the tax diversification requirements of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), temporarily invest in securities not included in its Index that are expected to be correlated with the securities included in its Index.

Given each Fund’s investment objective of attempting to track its Index, the Funds do not follow traditional methods of active investment management, which may involve buying and selling securities based upon analysis of economic and market factors. Also, unlike many investment companies, the Funds do not attempt to outperform their respective Indices that they track and do not seek temporary defensive positions when markets decline or appear overvalued.

Securities are selected for each Index using a rules-based portfolio construction process. The construction of each Index involves the following two steps: (1) the individual common factor indexes for value, momentum, quality, and volatility are created from the applicable Reference Index, and (2) the individual common factor indexes are combined. Individual common factor indexes are constructed using a patented construction technique called the ActiveBeta® Portfolio Construction Methodology. This methodology is designed to provide an informationally efficient capture of common factor returns at targeted levels of tracking error relative to the applicable Reference Index, subject to each Index being constrained to long only positions. Informational efficiency refers to maximizing the transfer of information contained in a common factor signal into Index weights at a given level of tracking error. The magnitude of overweight and underweight that securities receive is made proportional to their attractiveness when evaluated based on a given factor, subject to the long only constraint. For example, the most attractive security on momentum generally gets the highest overweight in the ActiveBeta® Momentum Index and the least attractive security generally gets the highest underweight. Each Index is reconstituted and rebalanced on a quarterly basis.

Each Index was developed and is maintained by the Index Provider and calculated by [            ] (the “Calculation Agent”). Certain Funds may also hire an affiliate of the Fund and/or the Investment Adviser to serve as a calculation agent. The Index Provider determines the composition and relative weightings of the securities in each Index.

Each Fund may also invest up to 20% of its assets in securities and other instruments not included in its Index but which the Investment Adviser believes are correlated to its Index, as well as in, among other instruments, futures (including index futures), swaps, other derivatives, investment companies (including exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”)), preferred stocks, warrants and rights, cash and cash equivalents and money market instruments.

 

23


 

  INDEX DISCLAIMERS     

The MSCI World ex USA Index, MSCI Emerging Markets Index, MSCI Europe Index and MSCI Japan Index (the “MSCI Indices”) were used by GSAM as the reference universe for selection of the companies included in the Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® International Equity Index, Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Emerging Markets Equity Index, Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Europe Equity Index and Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Japan Equity Index (the “ActiveBeta® Indices”), respectively. MSCI Inc. does not in any way sponsor, support, promote or endorse the ActiveBeta® Indices or the Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® International Equity ETF, Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Emerging Markets Equity ETF, Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Europe Equity ETF or Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Japan Equity ETF (the “ActiveBeta® ETFs”). MSCI Inc. was not and is not involved in any way in the creation, calculation, maintenance or review of the ActiveBeta® Indices. The MSCI Indices were provided on an “as is” basis. MSCI Inc., its affiliates and any other person or entity involved in or related to compiling, computing or creating the MSCI Indices (collectively, the “MSCI Parties”) expressly disclaim all warranties (including, without limitation, any warranties of originality, accuracy, completeness, timeliness, non-infringement, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose). Without limiting any of the foregoing, in no event shall any MSCI Party have any liability for any direct, indirect, special, incidental, punitive, consequential (including without limitation lost profits) or any other damages in connection with the MSCI Indices, the ActiveBeta® ETFs or the ActiveBeta® Indices.

Each of Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® U.S. Large Cap Equity ETF and Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® U.S. Small Cap Equity ETF is not sponsored, promoted, sold or supported in any other manner by Solactive AG nor does Solactive AG offer any express or implicit guarantee or assurance either with regard to the results of using the Solactive US Large Cap Index or Solactive US Small Cap Index (each a “Solactive Index”) and/or Solactive Index trade mark or the Solactive Index Price at any time or in any other respect. Each Solactive Index is calculated and published by Solactive AG. Solactive AG uses its best efforts to ensure that each Solactive Index is calculated correctly. Irrespective of its obligations towards Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® U.S. Large Cap Equity ETF or Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® U.S. Small Cap Equity ETF, Solactive AG has no obligation to point out errors in a Solactive Index to third parties including but not limited to investors and/or financial intermediaries of Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® U.S. Large Cap Equity ETF or Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® U.S. Small Cap Equity ETF. Neither publication of a Solactive Index by Solactive AG nor the licensing of a Solactive Index or Solactive Index trade mark for the purpose of use in connection with the Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® U.S. Large Cap Equity ETF or Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® U.S. Small Cap Equity ETF constitutes a recommendation by Solactive AG to invest capital in said fund nor does it in any way represent an assurance or opinion of Solactive AG with regard to any investment in this fund.

NEITHER GSAM NOR ANY OF ITS AFFILIATES MAKES ANY REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, TO THE SHAREHOLDERS OF THE FUNDS OR ANY MEMBER OF THE PUBLIC REGARDING THE ADVISABILITY OF INVESTING IN SECURITIES GENERALLY OR IN THE FUNDS PARTICULARLY OR THE ABILITY OF EACH INDEX OR THE FUNDS TO PERFORM AS INTENDED. GSAM, IN ITS CAPACITY AS THE INDEX PROVIDER OF EACH INDEX, LICENSES CERTAIN TRADEMARKS AND TRADE NAMES TO THE FUNDS. NEITHER GSAM NOR ANY OF ITS AFFILIATES NOR AGENTS (INCLUDING ANY CALCULATION AGENT) HAS ANY OBLIGATION TO TAKE THE NEEDS OF THE FUNDS OR THE SHAREHOLDERS OF THE FUNDS INTO CONSIDERATION IN DETERMINING, COMPOSING OR CALCULATING EACH INDEX. GSAM OR ANY OF ITS AFFILIATES MAY HOLD LONG OR SHORT POSITIONS IN SECURITIES HELD BY THE FUNDS OR IN RELATED DERIVATIVES.

NEITHER GSAM NOR ANY OF ITS AFFILIATES GUARANTEES THE ACCURACY AND/OR THE COMPLETENESS OF EACH INDEX OR ANY DATA INCLUDED THEREIN OR RELATING THERETO OR THAT THE FUNDS OR THE INDEXES ARE SUITABLE FOR ANY INVESTOR, AND GSAM AND ITS AFFILIATES HEREBY EXPRESSLY DISCLAIM ANY AND ALL LIABILITY FOR ANY ERRORS, OMISSIONS, OR INTERRUPTIONS THEREIN OR IN THE CALCULATION THEREOF. NEITHER GSAM NOR ANY OF ITS AFFILIATES MAKES ANY WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, AS TO THE RESULTS TO BE OBTAINED BY THE FUNDS, THE SHAREHOLDERS, OR ANY OTHER PERSON OR ENTITY FROM USE OF EACH INDEX OR ANY DATA INCLUDED THEREIN. NEITHER GSAM NOR ANY OF ITS AFFILIATES MAKES ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, AND EACH EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE WITH RESPECT TO EACH INDEX OR ANY DATA INCLUDED THEREIN. WITHOUT LIMITING ANY OF THE FOREGOING, GSAM AND ITS AFFILIATES HEREBY EXPRESSLY DISCLAIM ANY AND ALL LIABILITY FOR ANY SPECIAL, PUNITIVE, INDIRECT, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING LOST PROFITS), EVEN IF NOTIFIED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.

 

24


INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT APPROACH

 

NOTWITHSTANDING THE FOREGOING, GSAM SERVES AS THE INVESTMENT ADVISER FOR THE FUND AND IT IS ACKNOWLEDGED THAT IT MAY BE SUBJECT TO CERTAIN LIABILITIES FOR ITS ACTIONS IN RESPECT OF THE FUNDS IN SUCH CAPACITY.

 

  OTHER INVESTMENT PRACTICES AND SECURITIES     

The following tables identify some of the investment techniques that may (but are not required to) be used by the Funds in seeking to achieve their investment objective. The Funds may be subject to additional limitations on its investments not shown here. Numbers in these tables show allowable usage only; for actual usage, consult the Funds’ annual/semi-annual reports (when available). For more information about these and other investment practices and securities, see Appendix A. On each business day, before commencement of trading in Fund Shares on the NYSE Arca, each Fund will disclose on its website (http://www.gsamfunds.com) the identities and quantities of the portfolio securities and other assets held by the Fund that will form the basis for the Fund’s calculation of net asset value at the end of the business day. In addition, a description of the Funds’ policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the Funds’ portfolio holdings is available in the Funds’ Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”).

 

25


 

10 Percent of total assets (italic type)
10 Percent of net assets (excluding borrowings for investment purposes)
No specific percentage limitation on usage;
limited only by the objective and strategies of the Fund.
A Fund may only invest up to 20% of its assets in securities and
other instruments not included in its underlying index.

 

                                                                                                                                                                 
    

ActiveBeta®
Emerging
Markets ETF

  ActiveBeta®
Europe
Equity ETF
  ActiveBeta®
International
Equity ETF
  ActiveBeta®
Japan
Equity ETF
  ActiveBeta®
U.S. Large
Cap ETF
  ActiveBeta®
U.S. Small
Cap ETF
Investment Practices            

Borrowings

  33 13   33 13   33 13   33 13   33 13   33 13

Derivatives, including futures, options and swaps

           

[Foreign Currency Transactions (including forward contracts)]

           

Illiquid Investments*

  15   15   15   15   15   15

Investment Company Securities (including ETFs)**

  10   10   10   10   10   10

Preferred Stock, Warrants and Stock Purchase Rights

           

Repurchase Agreements

           

Securities Lending

  33 13   33 13   33 13   33 13   33 13   33 13

 

  * Illiquid investments are any investments which cannot be disposed of in seven days in the ordinary course of business at approximately the price at which a Fund values the instrument.
** This percentage limitation does not apply to a Fund’s investments in other investment companies where a higher percentage limitation is permitted under the terms of an SEC exemptive order or SEC exemptive rule.
  1 Each Fund may purchase and sell call and put options on foreign currencies.
  2 Each Fund may sell call and put options and purchase call and put options on securities and securities indices in which it may invest.

 

 

10 Percent of Net Assets (including borrowings for investment purposes) (roman type)
No specific percentage limitation on usage;
limited only by the objective and strategies of the Fund

 

                                                                                                                                                                 
   ActiveBeta®
Emerging
Markets
Equity ETF
ActiveBeta®
Europe
Equity ETF
ActiveBeta®
International
Equity ETF
ActiveBeta®
Japan
Equity ETF
ActiveBeta®
U.S. Large
Cap Equity
ETF
ActiveBeta®
U.S. Small
Cap Equity
ETF
Investment Securities            

Emerging Country Securities

           

Equity Investments

           

Foreign Securities

               

 

26


 

Risks of the Funds

 

Loss of money is a risk of investing in each Fund. An investment in each Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC or any other governmental agency. The principal risks of each Fund are discussed in the Summary section of this Prospectus. The following section provides additional information on the risks that apply to the Funds, which may result in a loss of your investment. None of the Funds should be relied upon as a complete investment program. There can be no assurance that a Fund will achieve its investment objective.

 

ü Principal Risk
Additional Risk

 

                                                                                         
    

ActiveBeta®
Emerging
Markets
Equity ETF

  ActiveBeta®
Europe
Equity ETF
  ActiveBeta®
International
Equity ETF
  ActiveBeta®
Japan
Equity ETF
  ActiveBeta®
U.S. Large
Cap Equity
ETF
  ActiveBeta®
U.S. Small
Cap Equity
ETF

Absence of Prior Active Market

           

Asia

           

Cash Transactions

  ü          

Depositary Receipts

  ü   ü   ü   ü    

Derivatives

           

Emerging Countries

  ü          

European Investment

  ü          

Expenses

  ü   ü   ü   ü    

Foreign

  ü   ü   ü   ü    

Foreign Custody

           

Geographic

           

Index

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Industry Concentration

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Investment Style

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Japan

        ü    

Liquidity

           

Market

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Mid-Cap and Small-Cap

  ü     ü   ü     ü

Net Asset Value

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Secondary Listing

           

Stock

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Tracking Error

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Trading Issues

           

Valuation

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

 

¢   Absence of Prior Active Market Risk—Each Fund is a newly organized series of an investment company and thus has no operating history. While a Fund’s Shares are expected to be listed on NYSE Arca, there can be no assurance that active trading markets for the Shares will develop or be maintained. [            ], the distributor of the Shares, does not maintain a secondary market in the Shares.
¢   Asia Risk—Investing in certain Asian issuers may involve a higher degree of risk and special considerations not typically associated with investing in issuers from more established economies or securities markets. Many Asian countries can be characterized as either developing or newly industrialized economies and tend to experience more volatile economic cycles than developed countries. Some countries in the region have in the past experienced currency devaluations that resulted in high interest rate levels, sharp reductions in economic activity and significant drops in securities prices. Some countries in the region have in the past imposed restrictions on converting local currency which prevented foreign firms from selling assets and repatriating funds. Many countries in the region have historically faced political uncertainty, corruption, military intervention and social unrest. Examples include ethnic and sectarian violence in Indonesia and India, armed conflict between India and Pakistan, and insurgencies in the Philippines.

 

27


 

¢   Cash Transactions Risk—Unlike certain ETFs, the Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Emerging Markets Equity ETF effects its creations and redemptions partially for cash, rather than in-kind securities. As a result, an investment in the Fund may be less tax-efficient than an investment in a more conventional ETF. Other ETFs generally are able to make in-kind redemptions and avoid realizing gains in connection with transactions designed to raise cash to meet redemption requests. Because the Fund currently intends to effect all or a portion of redemptions, as applicable, for cash, rather than in-kind distributions, it may be required to sell portfolio securities in order to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds, which involves transaction costs. If the Fund recognizes gain on these sales, this generally will cause the Fund to recognize gain it might not otherwise have recognized if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind, or to recognize such gain sooner than would otherwise be required. The Fund generally intends to distribute these gains to shareholders to avoid being taxed on this gain at the Fund level and otherwise comply with the special tax rules that apply to it. This strategy may cause shareholders to be subject to tax on gains they would not otherwise be subject to, or at an earlier date than, if they had made an investment in a different ETF.
¢   Depositary Receipts Risk—Foreign securities may trade in the form of Depositary Receipts. To the extent a Fund acquires Depositary Receipts through banks which do not have a contractual relationship with the foreign issuer of the security underlying the Depositary Receipts to issue and service such unsponsored Depositary Receipts, there may be an increased possibility that the Fund would not become aware of and be able to respond to corporate actions such as stock splits or rights offerings involving the foreign issuer in a timely manner. In addition, the lack of information may result in inefficiencies in the valuation of such instruments. Investment in Depositary Receipts does not eliminate all the risks inherent in investing in securities of non-U.S. issuers. The market value of Depositary Receipts is dependent upon the market value of the underlying securities and fluctuations in the relative value of the currencies in which the Depositary Receipts and the underlying securities are quoted. The Funds will not invest in any Depositary Receipts that the Investment Adviser deems to be illiquid or for which pricing information is not readily available.
¢   Derivatives Risk—Loss may result from a Fund’s investments in derivative instruments. These instruments may be illiquid, difficult to price and leveraged so that small changes in the value of underlying instruments may produce disproportionate losses to a Fund. Derivatives are also subject to counterparty risk, which is the risk that the other party in the transaction will not fulfill its contractual obligations.

Losses from investments in derivatives can result from a lack of correlation between the value of those derivatives and the value of the portfolio assets (if any) being hedged. In addition, there is a risk that the performance of the derivatives or other instruments used by the Investment Adviser to replicate the performance of a particular asset class may not accurately track the performance of that asset class. Derivatives are also subject to liquidity risk and risks arising from margin requirements. Returns, and potential losses, are dependent on the Investment Adviser’s analysis and decision making capability around, but not limited to, expectations of the timing or level of fluctuations in securities prices, interest rates, currency prices or other variables. In addition, a Fund’s use of derivatives may increase or accelerate the amount of taxes payable by shareholders.

Many of the protections afforded to cleared transactions, such as the security afforded by transacting through a clearing house, might not be available in connection with over-the-counter (“OTC”) transactions. Therefore, in those instances in which a Fund enters into OTC transactions, the Fund will be subject to the risk that its direct counterparty will not perform its obligations under the transactions and that the Fund will sustain losses.

As an investment company registered with the SEC, the Funds must identify on their books (often referred to as “asset segregation”) liquid assets, or engage in other SEC or SEC-staff approved or other appropriate measures, to “cover” open positions with respect to certain kinds of derivative instruments. For more information about these practices, see Appendix A.

¢   Emerging Countries Risk—The securities markets of most emerging countries are less liquid, are especially subject to greater price volatility, have smaller market capitalizations, have more or less government regulation and are not subject to as extensive and frequent accounting, financial and other reporting requirements as the securities markets of more developed countries. Further, investment in securities of issuers located in certain emerging countries involves risk of loss resulting from problems in registration, settlement or custody and substantial economic and political disruptions. These risks are not normally associated with investments in more developed countries. These risks may be greater for frontier markets.
¢   European Investment Risk—Adverse economic and political events in Europe may cause a Fund’s investments to decline in value. The economies and markets of European countries are often closely connected and interdependent, and events in one country in Europe can have an adverse impact on other European countries. A Fund makes investments in securities of issuers that are domiciled in, or have significant operations in, member countries of the European Union that are subject to economic and monetary controls that can adversely affect the Fund’s investments. The European financial markets have experienced volatility and adverse trends in recent years and these events have adversely affected the exchange rate of the euro and may continue to significantly affect other European countries.

 

28


RISKS OF THE FUNDS

 

¢   Expenses Risk—By investing in pooled investment vehicles (including ETFs) indirectly through the Fund, the investor will incur not only a proportionate share of the expenses of the other pooled investment vehicles held by the Fund (including operating costs and investment management fees), but also expenses of the Fund.
¢   Foreign Risk—When a Fund invests in foreign securities, it may be subject to risk of loss not typically associated with domestic issuers. Loss may result because of more or less foreign government regulation, less public information, less liquidity, greater volatility and less economic, political and social stability in the countries in which a Fund invests. Loss may also result from, among other things, deteriorating economic and business conditions in other countries, including the United States, regional and global conflicts, the imposition of exchange controls, foreign taxes, confiscations, expropriations and other government restrictions by the United States or other governments, higher transaction costs, difficulty enforcing contractual obligations or from problems in registration, settlement or custody. A Fund will also be subject to the risk of negative foreign currency rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which the Fund has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. Foreign risks will normally be greatest when the Fund invests in issuers located in emerging countries.
¢   Foreign Custody Risk—A Fund may hold foreign securities and cash with foreign banks, agents, and securities depositories appointed by the Fund’s custodian (each a “Foreign Custodian”). Some Foreign Custodians may be recently organized or new to the foreign custody business. In some countries, Foreign Custodians may be subject to little or no regulatory oversight over or independent evaluation of their operations. Further, the laws of certain countries may place limitations on a Fund’s ability to recover its assets if a Foreign Custodian enters bankruptcy. Investments in emerging markets may be subject to even greater custody risks than investments in more developed markets. Custody services in emerging countries are very often undeveloped and may be considerably less well regulated than in more developed countries, and this may not afford the same level of investor protection as would apply in developed countries.
¢   Geographic Risk—Concentration of the investments of a Fund in issuers located in a particular country or region will subject such Fund, to a greater extent than if investments were less concentrated, to the risks of volatile economic cycles and/or conditions and developments that may be particular to that country or region, such as: adverse securities markets; adverse exchange rates; social, political, regulatory, economic or environmental developments; or natural disasters.
¢   Index Risk—A Fund will be negatively affected by general declines in the securities and asset classes represented in its Index. In addition, because the Funds are not “actively” managed, unless a specific security is removed from an Index, a Fund generally would not sell a security because the security’s issuer was in financial trouble. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on a Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Index. A Fund also does not attempt to take defensive positions under any market conditions, including declining markets. Therefore, a Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that may actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or to lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers. The Index Provider relies on third party data it believes to be reliable in constructing each Index, but it does not guarantee the accuracy of such third party data. Each Index is new and has a limited performance history. Any new index is subject to errors in its construction.
¢   Industry Concentration Risk—A Fund may concentrate its investments in a particular industry or group of industries to the extent that its Index concentrates in an industry or group of industries. Concentrating Fund investments in a limited number of issuers conducting business in the same industry or group of industries will subject a Fund to a greater risk of loss as a result of adverse economic, business or other developments affecting that industry than if the Fund’s investments were not so concentrated.
¢   Investment Style Risk—Different investment styles (e.g., “growth,” “value” or “quantitative”) tend to shift in and out of favor depending upon market and economic conditions as well as investor sentiment. The Funds intend to employ a blend of growth and value investment styles depending on market conditions, either of which may fall out of favor from time to time. The Funds may outperform or underperform other funds that employ a different investment style.
¢   Japan Risk—The Japanese economy is heavily dependent upon international trade and may be subject to considerable degrees of economic, political and social instability, which could negatively affect a Fund. The Japanese yen has fluctuated widely during recent periods and may be affected by currency volatility elsewhere in Asia, especially Southeast Asia. In addition, the yen has had a history of unpredictable and volatile movements against the U.S. dollar. The performance of the global economy could have a major impact upon equity returns in Japan. Since the mid-2000s, Japan’s economic growth has remained relatively low. A recent economic recession was likely compounded by an unstable financial sector, low domestic consumption, and certain corporate structural weaknesses, which remain some of the major issues facing the Japanese economy. Japan has also experienced natural disasters, such as earthquakes and tidal waves, of varying degrees of severity, which could negatively affect a Fund.
¢  

Liquidity Risk—A Fund may invest to a greater degree in securities or instruments that trade in lower volumes and may make investments that are less liquid than other investments. Also, a Fund may make investments that may become less liquid in response to market developments or adverse investor perceptions. Investments that are illiquid or that trade in lower volumes may

 

29


 

 

be more difficult to value. When there is no willing buyer and investments cannot be readily sold at the desired time or price, a Fund may have to accept a lower price or may not be able to sell the security or instrument at all. An inability to sell one or more portfolio positions can adversely affect a Fund’s value or prevent the Fund from being able to take advantage of other investment opportunities.

If a Fund is forced to sell securities at an unfavorable time and/or under unfavorable conditions, such sales may adversely affect the Fund’s NAV.

¢   Market Risk—The value of the instruments in which a Fund invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies, particular sectors or governments and/or general economic conditions throughout the world. Price changes may be temporary or last for extended periods. A Fund’s investments may be overweighted from time to time in one or more sectors or countries, which will increase the Fund’s exposure to risk of loss from adverse developments affecting those sectors or countries.

Global economies and financial markets are becoming increasingly interconnected, and conditions and events in one country, region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market. In addition, governmental and quasi governmental organizations have taken a number of unprecedented actions designed to support the markets. Such conditions, events and actions may result in greater market risk.

¢   Mid-Cap and Small-Cap Risk—The securities of mid-capitalization and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than those associated with larger, more established companies and may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements. Securities of such issuers may lack sufficient market liquidity to enable a Fund to effect sales at an advantageous time or without a substantial drop in price. Both mid-capitalization and small-capitalization companies often have narrower markets and more limited managerial and financial resources than larger, more established companies. As a result, their performance can be more volatile and they face greater risk of business failure, which could increase the volatility of a Fund’s portfolio. Generally, the smaller the company size, the greater these risks become.
¢   Net Asset Value Risk— The NAV of a Fund and the value of your investment will fluctuate. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of a Fund will approximate the Fund’s NAV when purchased and sold in the secondary market, there may be times when the market price of the shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount). Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for Shares may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses. In addition, disruptions to creations and redemptions, including disruptions at market makers, Authorized Participants or market participants, or during periods of significant market volatility, may result in trading prices for Shares of a Fund that differ significantly from its NAV. Active market trading of Fund shares may cause more frequent creations or redemptions of Creation Units, which, if not conducted in-kind, could increase the rate of portfolio turnover and a Fund’s tracking error versus its underlying index, as well as generate capital gains taxes.
¢   Secondary Listing Risk—Each Fund’s Shares may be listed or traded on U.S. and non-U.S. stock exchanges other than the U.S. stock exchange where the Fund’s primary listing is maintained. There can be no assurance that a Fund’s Shares will continue to trade on any such stock exchange or in any market or that the Fund’s Shares will continue to meet the requirements for listing or trading on any exchange or in any market. A Fund’s Shares may be less actively traded in certain markets than in others, and investors are subject to the execution and settlement risks and market standards of the market where they or their broker direct their trades for execution. Certain information available to investors who trade Fund Shares on a U.S. stock exchange during regular U.S. market hours may not be available to investors who trade in other markets, which may result in secondary market prices in such markets being less efficient.
¢   Stock Risk—Stock prices have historically risen and fallen in periodic cycles. U.S. stock markets have experienced periods of substantial price volatility in the past and may do so again in the future.
¢  

Tracking Error Risk— Tracking error is the divergence of a Fund’s performance from that of its Index. The performance of a Fund may diverge from that of its Index for a number of reasons. Tracking error may occur because of transaction costs, a Fund’s holding of cash, differences in accrual of dividends, changes to its Index or the need to meet new or existing regulatory requirements. Unlike a Fund, the returns of an Index are not reduced by investment and other operating expenses, including the trading costs associated with implementing changes to its portfolio of investments. Tracking error risk may be heightened during times of market volatility or other unusual market conditions. To the extent that a Fund calculates its NAV based on fair value prices and the value of its Index is based on securities’ closing prices (i.e., the value of the Index is not based on fair value prices), the Fund’s ability to track the Index may be adversely affected. Because an Index is not subject to the tax diversification requirements to which a Fund must adhere, a Fund may be required to deviate its investments from the securities and relative weightings of its

 

30


RISKS OF THE FUNDS

 

 

Index. For tax efficiency purposes, a Fund may sell certain securities to realize losses, which will result in a deviation from its Index.

¢   Trading Issues Risk—Trading in Shares on NYSE Arca may be halted due to market conditions or for reasons that, in the view of NYSE Arca, make trading in Shares inadvisable. In addition, trading in Shares on NYSE Arca is subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility pursuant to NYSE Arca’s “circuit breaker” rules. There can be no assurance that the requirements of NYSE Arca necessary to maintain the listing of the Funds will continue to be met or will remain unchanged.
¢   Valuation Risk—The sale price a Fund could receive for a security may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the security and may differ from the value used by the Index, particularly for securities that trade in low volume or volatile markets or that are valued using a fair value methodology. Because non-U.S. exchanges may be open on days when a Fund does not price its Shares, the value of the securities or assets in the Fund’s portfolio may change on days when investors will not be able to purchase or sell the Fund’s Shares. For purposes of calculating a Fund’s NAV, the value of assets denominated in non-U.S. currencies is converted into U.S. dollars using prevailing market rates on the date of valuation as quoted by one or more data service providers. This conversion may result in a difference between the prices used to calculate a Fund’s NAV and the prices used by its Index, which, in turn, could result in a difference between the Fund’s performance and the performance of the Index.

More information about the Funds’ portfolio securities and investment techniques, and their associated risks, is provided in Appendix A. You should consider the investment risks discussed in this section and in Appendix A. Both are important to your investment choice.

 

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Tax Advantaged Product Structure

 

Unlike many conventional mutual funds which are only bought and sold at closing NAVs, the Shares of each Fund have been designed to be created and redeemed principally in-kind, except Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Emerging Markets Equity ETF whose Shares are created and redeemed partially or principally for cash, in Creation Units at each day’s market close. These in-kind arrangements are designed to mitigate adverse effects on a Fund’s portfolio that could arise from frequent cash purchase and redemption transactions that affect the NAV of the Fund. Moreover, in contrast to conventional mutual funds, where frequent redemptions can have an adverse tax impact on taxable shareholders because of the need to sell portfolio securities which, in turn, may generate taxable gain, the in-kind redemption mechanism of certain Funds, to the extent used, generally is not expected to lead to a tax event for shareholders whose Shares are not being redeemed.

 

32


 

Service Providers

 

  INVESTMENT ADVISER     

 

Investment Adviser   Fund

Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P.

 

ActiveBeta® Emerging Markets Equity ETF

200 West Street

 

ActiveBeta® Europe Equity ETF

New York, NY 10282

 

ActiveBeta® International Equity ETF

ActiveBeta® Japan Equity ETF

ActiveBeta® U.S. Large Cap Equity ETF

ActiveBeta® U.S. Small Cap Equity ETF

GSAM has been registered as an investment adviser with the SEC since 1990 and is an affiliate of Goldman, Sachs & Co. (“Goldman Sachs”). As of December 31, 2014, GSAM, including its investment advisory affiliates, had assets under supervision of $1.02 trillion.

The Investment Adviser is responsible for the day-to-day management of the Funds and places purchase and sale orders for the Funds’ portfolio transactions in U.S. and foreign markets. As permitted by applicable law, these orders may be directed to any executing brokers, dealers, futures commission merchants or clearing brokers, including Goldman Sachs and its affiliates. While the Investment Adviser is ultimately responsible for the management of the Funds, it is able to draw upon the research and expertise of its asset management affiliates with respect to managing certain portfolio securities.

The Investment Adviser also performs the following additional services for the Funds:

  ¢   Supervises non-advisory operations of the Funds, including oversight of vendors hired by the Funds, oversight of Fund liquidity and risk management, oversight of regulatory inquiries and requests with respect to the Funds made to the Investment Adviser, valuation and accounting oversight and oversight of ongoing compliance with federal and state securities laws, tax regulations, and other applicable law
  ¢   Provides personnel to perform such executive, administrative and clerical services as are reasonably necessary to provide effective administration of the Funds
  ¢   Arranges for, at the Funds’ expense: (a) the preparation of all required tax returns, (b) the preparation and submission of reports to existing shareholders, (c) the periodic updating of prospectuses and statements of additional information and (d) the preparation of reports to be filed with the SEC and other regulatory authorities
  ¢   Maintains the records of each Fund
  ¢   Provides office space and necessary office equipment and services for the Investment Adviser
  ¢   Markets the Funds

GSAM may manage other funds, accounts, additional pooled vehicles and/or separate accounts that have similar investment strategies to those of the Funds. These funds, pooled vehicles or accounts may perform differently than a Fund despite their similar strategies. Because the pooled vehicles may not be registered under the Investment Company Act, they are subject to fewer regulatory restraints than the Funds (e.g., fewer trading constraints) and may employ strategies that are not subject to the same constraints as the Funds.

GSAM and/or its affiliates expects to make payments to one or more investors that contributed seed capital to one or more Funds for so long as such capital remains invested in the Fund(s). Such payments will be made from the assets of GSAM and/or such affiliates and may be based on revenues generated by GSAM in providing services to one or more ETFs for which it serves as investment adviser.

 

  MANAGEMENT FEE AND OTHER EXPENSES     

Pursuant to the Management Agreement, as compensation for its services to each Fund, the Investment Adviser is entitled to a management fee, computed daily and payable monthly, at an annual rate listed below (as a percentage of each respective Fund’s average daily net assets).

 

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Fund   Fee as a
Percentage of
Average Daily
Net Assets
 

ActiveBeta® Emerging Markets Equity ETF

    [    ]   

ActiveBeta® Europe Equity ETF

    [    ]   

ActiveBeta® International Equity ETF

    [    ]   

ActiveBeta® Japan Equity ETF

    [    ]   

ActiveBeta® U.S. Large Cap Equity ETF

    [    ]   

ActiveBeta® U.S. Small Cap Equity ETF

    [    ]   

[The Investment Adviser has agreed to reduce or limit “Other Expenses” (acquired fund fees and expenses, offering costs, taxes, interest, brokerage fees, shareholder meeting, litigation, short sale, dividend, indemnification and extraordinary expenses) to [            ]%, [            ]%, [            ]%, [            ]%, [            ]% and [            ]% of the average daily net assets for the ActiveBeta® Emerging Markets Equity ETF, ActiveBeta® Europe Equity ETF, ActiveBeta® International Equity ETF, ActiveBeta® Japan Equity ETF, ActiveBeta® U.S. Large Cap Equity ETF and ActiveBeta® U.S. Small Cap Equity ETF, respectively, through at least [            ], and prior to such date, the Investment Adviser may not terminate the arrangement without the approval of the Board of Trustees. This expense limitation may be modified or terminated by the Investment Adviser at its discretion and without shareholder approval after such date, although the Investment Adviser does not presently intend to do so. [A Fund’s “Other Expenses” may be further reduced by any custody and transfer agency fee credits received by the Fund.]]

The Investment Adviser may waive a portion of its management fee from time to time, and may discontinue or modify any such waiver in the future, consistent with the terms of any fee waiver arrangements in place.

A discussion regarding the basis for the Board of Trustees’ approval of the Management Agreement for the Funds will be available in the Funds’ [annual/semi-annual report] for the period ended [ ].

 

  FUND MANAGERS     

 

The QIS team manages exposure to stock, bond, currency and commodities markets. The team develops quantitative models and processes in an effort to build unique investment solutions that seek to manage exposure to a wide variety of risks. These proprietary models, which are continually refined, are developed in a highly academic, innovative team environment. The QIS team’s proprietary research on these models is dynamic and ongoing, with new strategies continually under development.

  ¢   QIS employs a globally-integrated team of over 90 professionals, with an additional 90+ professionals dedicated to trading, information technology and the development of analytical tools.
  ¢   Disciplined, quantitative models are used to determine allocations to the world’s stock, bond, currency and commodity markets
  ¢   Theory and economic intuition guide the investment process

 

Name and Title   Primarily
Responsible
Since
  Five Year Employment History

Steve Jeneste

Managing Director

  2015  

Mr. Jeneste joined the Quantitative Investment Strategies (QIS) team in 1998 and was named a managing director in 2008. Before heading the ETF Portfolio Management team in 2015, Mr. Jeneste spent 16 years in the QIS Macro Alpha group where he was responsible for the portfolio management of the macro alpha strategies and later oversaw the portfolio management of the macro and multi-asset class strategies within the Customized Beta Strategies (CBS) platform in QIS.

Raj Garigipati

Vice President

  2015   Mr. Garigipati joined the ETF Portfolio Management team in 2015. Mr. Garigipati joined Goldman Sachs in 2003 as a Technology audit analyst in the Internal Audit department covering the Investment Management Division and later was the global audit lead for GSAM before joining the Quantitative Investment Strategies (QIS) team in 2011 as the Chief Risk Officer.

For information about portfolio manager compensation, other accounts managed by the portfolio managers and portfolio manager ownership of securities in the Funds, see the SAI.

 

  DISTRIBUTOR AND TRANSFER AGENT     

[            ], serves as the exclusive distributor (the “Distributor”) of each Fund’s Shares. [            ], serves as each Fund’s transfer agent (the “Transfer Agent”) and, as such, performs various shareholder servicing functions.

 

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SERVICE PROVIDERS

 

For its transfer agency services, [            ] is entitled to receive a transfer agency fee equal, on an annualized basis, to [ ]% of average daily net assets.

From time to time, Goldman Sachs or any of its affiliates may purchase and hold Shares of the Funds. Goldman Sachs and its affiliates reserve the right to redeem at any time some or all of the Shares acquired for their own accounts.

 

  ACTIVITIES OF GOLDMAN SACHS AND ITS AFFILIATES AND OTHER ACCOUNTS MANAGED BY GOLDMAN SACHS     

The involvement of the Investment Adviser, Goldman Sachs and their affiliates in the management of, or their interest in, other accounts and other activities of Goldman Sachs may present conflicts of interest with respect to a Fund or limit a Fund’s investment activities. Goldman Sachs is a worldwide, full service investment banking, broker dealer, asset management and financial services organization and a major participant in global financial markets that provides a wide range of financial services to a substantial and diversified client base that includes corporations, financial institutions, governments and high-net-worth individuals. As such, it acts as an investor, investment banker, research provider, investment manager, financier, adviser, market maker, trader, prime broker, lender, agent and principal. In those and other capacities, Goldman Sachs advises clients in all markets and transactions and purchases, sells, holds and recommends a broad array of investments, including securities, derivatives, loans, commodities, currencies, credit default swaps, indices, baskets and other financial instruments and products for its own account or for the accounts of its customers and has other direct and indirect interests in the global fixed income, currency, commodity, equities, bank loans and other markets in which the Funds directly and indirectly invest. Thus, it is likely that the Funds will have multiple business relationships with and will invest in, engage in transactions with, make voting decisions with respect to, or obtain services from entities for which Goldman Sachs performs or seeks to perform investment banking or other services. The Investment Adviser and/or certain of its affiliates are the managers of the Goldman Sachs Funds. The Investment Adviser and its affiliates earn fees from this and other relationships with the Funds. Although these fees are generally based on asset levels, the fees are not directly contingent on Fund performance, and Goldman Sachs would still receive significant compensation from the Funds even if shareholders lose money. Goldman Sachs and its affiliates engage in proprietary trading and advise accounts and funds which have investment objectives similar to those of the Funds and/or which engage in and compete for transactions in the same types of securities, currencies and instruments as the Funds. Goldman Sachs and its affiliates will not have any obligation to make available any information regarding their proprietary activities or strategies, or the activities or strategies used for other accounts managed by them, for the benefit of the management of the Funds. The results of a Fund’s investment activities, therefore, may differ from those of Goldman Sachs, its affiliates, and other accounts managed by Goldman Sachs and it is possible that a Fund could sustain losses during periods in which Goldman Sachs and its affiliates and other accounts achieve significant profits on their trading for proprietary or other accounts. In addition, the Funds may enter into transactions in which Goldman Sachs or its other clients have an adverse interest. For example, a Fund may take a long position in a security at the same time that Goldman Sachs or other accounts managed by the Investment Adviser take a short position in the same security (or vice versa). These and other transactions undertaken by Goldman Sachs, its affiliates or Goldman Sachs advised clients may, individually or in the aggregate, adversely impact the Funds. Transactions by one or more Goldman Sachs advised clients or the Investment Adviser may have the effect of diluting or otherwise disadvantaging the values, prices or investment strategies of the Funds. A Fund’s activities may be limited because of regulatory restrictions applicable to Goldman Sachs and its affiliates, and/or their internal policies designed to comply with such restrictions. As a global financial services firm, Goldman Sachs also provides a wide range of investment banking and financial services to issuers of securities and investors in securities. Goldman Sachs, its affiliates and others associated with it may create markets or specialize in, have positions in and effect transactions in, securities of issuers held by the Funds, and may also perform or seek to perform investment banking and financial services for those issuers. Goldman Sachs and its affiliates may have business relationships with and purchase or distribute or sell services or products from or to distributors, consultants or others who recommend the Funds or who engage in transactions with or for the Funds.

The Funds could raise concerns regarding the potential ability of an affiliated person to manipulate a Fund’s underlying index to the benefit or detriment of the Fund. Conflicts of interest may also arise with respect to the personal trading activity of personnel of the affiliated person who may have access to or knowledge of changes to an underlying index’s composition methodology or the constituent securities in an underlying index prior to the time that information is publicly disseminated. However, such risks may be mitigated by existing protections under the 1940 Act and the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, as amended (the “Advisers Act”), as well as the Funds’ policy to maintain full portfolio transparency.

The Investment Adviser has adopted, pursuant to Rule 206(4)-7 under the Advisers Act, written policies and procedures reasonably designed to prevent violations of the Advisers Act and the rules thereunder. These include policies and procedures designed to

 

35


minimize potential conflicts of interest among the Funds and any affiliated accounts (e.g., other registered investment companies, separately managed accounts of institutional investors, foreign investment companies, and privately offered funds), such as cross trading policies, as well as those designed to ensure the equitable allocation of portfolio transactions and brokerage commissions. In addition, the Investment Adviser has adopted policies and procedures as required under Section 204A of the Advisers Act, which are reasonably designed in light of the nature of its business to prevent the misuse, in violation of the Advisers Act or the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934 or the rules thereunder, of material non-public information by the Investment Adviser or associated person (“Inside Information Policy”). In accordance with the Code of Ethics (discussed in the SAI) and Inside Information Policy of the Investment Adviser, personnel of the Investment Adviser with knowledge about the composition of the instruments and cash that any purchaser is required to deliver in exchange for Creation Units (“Portfolio Deposit”) will be prohibited from disclosing such information to any other person, except as authorized in the course of their employment, until such information is made public. Any of the Trust’s service providers who are provided information on the Portfolio Deposit will be subject to a duty of confidentiality.

For more information about conflicts of interest, see the SAI.

The Funds may make brokerage and other payments to Goldman Sachs and its affiliates in connection with the Funds’ portfolio investment transactions in accordance with applicable law. The Funds’ Board of Trustees may approve a securities lending program where an affiliate of the Investment Adviser is retained to serve as the securities lending agent for each Fund to the extent that the Fund engages in the securities lending program. For these services, the lending agent may receive a fee from the Funds, including a fee based on the returns earned on the Funds’ investment of the cash received as collateral for the loaned securities.

 

36


 

Distributions

 

Each Fund pays distributions from its investment income and from net realized capital gains.

Distributions from net investment income and distributions from net capital gains, if any, are declared and paid annually for each Fund.

 

From time to time a portion of a Fund’s distributions may constitute a return of capital for tax purposes, and/or may include amounts in excess of the Fund’s net investment income for the period calculated in accordance with GAAP accounting practice.

Dividends and other distributions on Shares of a Fund are distributed on a pro rata basis to beneficial owners of such Shares. Dividend payments are made through Depository Trust Company (“DTC”) participants and indirect participants (each as described in the Book Entry section below) to beneficial owners then of record with proceeds received from a Fund.

No dividend reinvestment service is provided by the Funds. Broker-dealers may make available the DTC book-entry dividend reinvestment service for use by beneficial owners of the Funds for reinvestment of their dividend distributions. Beneficial owners should contact their broker to determine the availability and costs of the service and the details of participation therein. Brokers may require beneficial owners to adhere to specific procedures and timetables. If this service is available and used, dividend distributions of both income and realized gains will be automatically reinvested in additional whole Shares of a Fund purchased in the secondary market.

 

37


 

Shareholder Guide

 

  BUYING AND SELLING SHARES     

Shares of a Fund may be acquired or redeemed directly from the Fund only in Creation Units or multiples thereof, as discussed in the Creations and Redemptions section of this Prospectus. Only an Authorized Participant (as defined in the Creations and Redemptions section below) may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with a Fund. Once created, Shares of the Funds generally trade in the secondary market in amounts less than a Creation Unit.

Shares of the Funds are listed for trading on a national securities exchange during the trading day. Shares can be bought and sold throughout the trading day like shares of other publicly traded companies. However, there can be no guarantee that an active trading market will develop or be maintained, or that the Fund Shares listing will continue or remain unchanged. The Trust does not impose any minimum investment for Shares of a Fund purchased on an exchange. Buying or selling a Fund’s Shares involves certain costs that apply to all securities transactions. When buying or selling Shares of a Fund through a financial intermediary, you may incur a brokerage commission or other charges determined by your financial intermediary. Due to these brokerage costs, if any, frequent trading may detract significantly from investment returns. In addition, you may also incur the cost of the spread (the difference between the bid price and the ask price). The commission is frequently a fixed amount and may be a significant cost for investors seeking to buy or sell small amounts of Shares. The spread varies over time for Shares of a Fund based on its trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally less if the Fund has more trading volume and market liquidity and more if the Fund has less trading volume and market liquidity.

Each Fund’s primary listing exchange is NYSE Arca. NYSE Arca is open for trading Monday through Friday and is closed on the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents’ Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.

A “business day” with respect to the Funds is each day the New York Stock Exchange, NYSE Arca and the Trust are open and includes any day that a Fund is required to be open under Section 22(e) of the Investment Company Act. Orders from Authorized Participants to create or redeem Creation Units will only be accepted on a business day. On days when NYSE Arca closes earlier than normal, the Funds may require orders to create or redeem Creation Units to be placed earlier in the day. See the Statement of Additional Information for more information.

The Trust’s Board of Trustees has not adopted a policy of monitoring for frequent purchases and redemptions of Fund Shares (“frequent trading”) that appear to attempt to take advantage of potential arbitrage opportunities presented by a lag between a change in the value of a Fund’s portfolio securities after the close of the primary markets for the Fund’s portfolio securities and the reflection of that change in the Fund’s NAV (“market timing”). The Trust believes this is appropriate because ETFs, such as the Funds, are intended to be attractive to arbitrageurs, as trading activity is critical to ensuring that the market price of Fund Shares remains at or close to NAV. Since the Funds issue and redeem Creation Units at NAV plus applicable transaction fees, and the Funds’ Shares may be purchased and sold on NYSE Arca at prevailing market prices, the risks of frequent trading are limited.

Section 12(d)(1) of the Investment Company Act restricts investments by registered investment companies and companies relying on Sections 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of the Investment Company Act in the securities of other investment companies. Registered investment companies are permitted to invest in the Funds beyond the limits set forth in Section 12(d)(1), subject to certain terms and conditions set forth in an SEC exemptive order issued to GSAM and the Trust, including that such investment companies enter into an agreement with the Trust.

The Funds and the Distributor will have the sole right to accept orders to purchase Shares and reserve the right to reject any order in whole or in part.

 

  PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES     

GSAM and/or the Distributor may make payments to broker-dealers or other financial intermediaries (each, a “Financial Intermediary”) related to activities that are designed to make registered representatives, other professionals and individual investors more knowledgeable about the Funds or for other activities, such as participation in marketing activities and presentations, educational training programs, the support of technology platforms and/or reporting systems. GSAM and/or the Distributor may also make payments to Financial Intermediaries for certain printing, publishing and mailing costs associated with the Funds or materials

 

38


SHAREHOLDER GUIDE

 

relating to exchange-traded funds in general. In addition, GSAM and/or the Distributor may make payments to Financial Intermediaries that make Fund Shares available to their clients or for otherwise promoting the Funds. Such payments, which may be significant to the Financial Intermediary, are not made by a Fund. Rather, such payments are made by GSAM and/or the Distributor from their own resources, which may come directly or indirectly in part from management fees paid by the Funds. Payments of this type are sometimes referred to as marketing support or revenue-sharing payments. A Financial Intermediary may make decisions about which investment options it recommends or makes available, or the level of services provided, to its customers based on the marketing support payments it is eligible to receive. Therefore, such payments to a Financial Intermediary create conflicts of interest between the Financial Intermediary and its customers and may cause the Financial Intermediary to recommend a Fund over another investment. More information regarding these payments is contained in the Statement of Additional Information. A shareholder should contact his or her Financial Intermediary’s salesperson or other investment professional for more information regarding any such payments the Financial Intermediary firm may receive from GSAM and/or the Distributor.

 

  NET ASSET VALUE     

Each Fund calculates its NAV as follows:

 

NAV =  

(Value of Assets of the Fund)

– (Liabilities of the Fund)

  Number of Outstanding Shares of the Fund

Each Fund’s NAV per share is generally calculated on each business day as of the close of regular trading on the New York Stock Exchange (normally 4:00 p.m. Eastern time) or such other times as the New York Stock Exchange or NASDAQ market may officially close. A Fund’s investments for which market quotations are readily available are valued at market value on the basis of quotations furnished by a pricing service or provided by securities dealers. If accurate quotations are not readily available, or if the Investment Adviser believes that such quotations do not accurately reflect fair value, the fair value of the Funds’ investments may be determined in good faith based on yield equivalents, a pricing matrix or other sources, under valuation procedures established by the Board of Trustees.

To the extent a Fund invests in foreign equity securities, “fair value” prices are provided by an independent fair value service in accordance with the fair value procedures approved by the Board of Trustees. Fair value prices are used because many foreign markets operate at times that do not coincide with those of the major U.S. markets. Events that could affect the values of foreign portfolio holdings may occur between the close of the foreign market and the time of determining the NAV, and would not otherwise be reflected in the NAV. If the independent fair value service does not provide a fair value price for a particular security, or if the price provided does not meet the established criteria for a Fund, the Fund will price that security at the most recent closing price for that security on its principal exchange.

Cases where there is no clear indication of the value of a Fund’s investments include, among others, situations where a security or other asset or liability does not have a price source.

In addition, the Investment Adviser, consistent with its procedures and applicable regulatory guidance, may (but need not) determine to make an adjustment to the previous closing prices of either domestic or foreign securities in light of significant events, to reflect what it believes to be the fair value of the securities at the time of determining a Fund’s NAV. Significant events that could affect a large number of securities in a particular market may include, but are not limited to: situations relating to one or more single issuers in a market sector; significant fluctuations in U.S. or foreign markets; market dislocations; market disruptions or unscheduled market closings; equipment failures; natural or man made disasters or acts of God; armed conflicts; governmental actions or other developments; as well as the same or similar events which may affect specific issuers or the securities markets even though not tied directly to the securities markets. Other significant events that could relate to a single issuer may include, but are not limited to: corporate actions such as reorganizations, mergers and buy-outs; corporate announcements, including those relating to earnings, products and regulatory news; significant litigation; ratings downgrades; bankruptcies; and trading suspensions.

One effect of using an independent fair value service and fair valuation may be to reduce stale pricing arbitrage opportunities presented by the pricing of Fund Shares. However, it involves the risk that the values used by the Funds to price their investments may be different from those used by other investment companies and investors to price the same investments.

Foreign securities may trade in their local markets on days a Fund is closed. As a result, if a Fund holds foreign securities, its NAV may be impacted on days when investors may not purchase or sell Fund Shares on the secondary market or purchase or redeem Creation Units through the Fund.

 

39


 

  BOOK ENTRY     

DTC serves as securities depository for the Shares. (The Shares may be held only in book-entry form; stock certificates will not be issued.) DTC, or its nominee, is the record or registered owner of all outstanding Shares. Beneficial ownership of Shares will be shown on the records of DTC or its participants (described below). Beneficial owners of Shares are not entitled to have Shares registered in their names, will not receive or be entitled to receive physical delivery of certificates in definitive form and are not considered the registered holder thereof. Accordingly, to exercise any rights of a holder of Shares, each beneficial owner must rely on the procedures of: (i) DTC; (ii) “DTC Participants,” i.e., securities brokers and dealers, banks, trust companies, clearing corporations and certain other organizations, some of whom (and/or their representatives) own DTC; and (iii) “Indirect Participants,” i.e., brokers, dealers, banks and trust companies that clear through or maintain a custodial relationship with a DTC Participant, either directly or indirectly, through which such beneficial owner holds its interests. The Trust understands that under existing industry practice, in the event the Trust requests any action of holders of Shares, or a beneficial owner desires to take any action that DTC, as the record owner of all outstanding Shares, is entitled to take, DTC would authorize the DTC Participants to take such action and that the DTC Participants would authorize the Indirect Participants and beneficial owners acting through such DTC Participants to take such action and would otherwise act upon the instructions of beneficial owners owning through them. As described above, the Trust recognizes DTC or its nominee as the owner of all Shares for all purposes.

 

  CREATIONS AND REDEMPTIONS     

Prior to trading in the secondary market, Shares of the Funds are “created” at NAV by market makers, large investors and institutions only in block-size Creation Units of 50,000 Shares or multiples thereof. Each “creator” or “Authorized Participant” enters into an authorized participant agreement with the Funds’ Distributor.

A creation transaction, which is subject to acceptance by the transfer agent, generally takes place when an Authorized Participant deposits into a Fund a designated portfolio of securities (including any portion of such securities for which cash may be substituted) and a specified amount of cash approximating the holdings of the Fund in exchange for a specified number of Creation Units. To the extent practicable, the composition of such portfolio generally corresponds pro rata to the positions of a Fund’s portfolio (including cash positions). However, creation and redemption baskets may differ under certain circumstances.

Similarly, Shares can be redeemed only in Creation Units, generally for a designated portfolio of securities (including any portion of such securities for which cash may be substituted) held by a Fund and a specified amount of cash. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, Shares are not redeemable by the Funds.

The prices at which creations and redemptions occur are based on the next calculation of NAV after a creation or redemption order is received in an acceptable form under the authorized participant agreement.

Only an Authorized Participant may create or redeem Creation Units directly with a Fund.

In the event of a system failure or other interruption, including disruptions at market makers or Authorized Participants, orders to purchase or redeem Creation Units either may not be executed according to a Fund’s instructions or may not be executed at all, or the Fund may not be able to place or change orders.

To the extent a Fund engages in in-kind transactions, the Fund intends to comply with the U.S. federal securities laws in accepting securities for deposit and satisfying redemptions with redemption securities by, among other means, assuring that any securities accepted for deposit and any securities used to satisfy redemption requests will be sold in transactions that would be exempt from registration under the 1933 Act. Further, an Authorized Participant that is not a “qualified institutional buyer,” as such term is defined under Rule 144A of the 1933 Act, will not be able to receive restricted securities eligible for resale under Rule 144A.

Creations and redemptions must be made through a firm that is either a member of the Continuous Net Settlement System of the National Securities Clearing Corporation or a DTC participant and has executed an agreement with the Distributor with respect to creations and redemptions of Creation Unit aggregations. Information about the procedures regarding creation and redemption of Creation Units (including the cut-off times for receipt of creation and redemption orders) and the applicable transaction fees is included in the Funds’ SAI.

 

40


 

Taxation

 

As with any investment, you should consider how your investment in the Funds will be taxed. The tax information below is provided as general information. More tax information is available in the SAI. You should consult your tax adviser about the federal, state, local or foreign tax consequences of your investment in the Funds. Except as otherwise noted, the tax information provided assumes that you are a U.S. citizen or resident.

Unless your investment is through an IRA or other tax-advantaged account, you should carefully consider the possible tax consequences of Fund distributions and the sale of your Fund Shares.

 

  DISTRIBUTIONS     

Each Fund contemplates declaring as dividends each year all or substantially all of its taxable income. Distributions you receive from the Funds are generally subject to federal income tax, and may also be subject to state or local taxes. This is true whether you reinvest your distributions in additional Fund Shares or receive them in cash. For federal tax purposes, the Funds’ distributions attributable to net investment income and short-term capital gains are taxable to you as ordinary income while distributions of long-term capital gains are taxable to you as long-term capital gains, no matter how long you have owned your Fund Shares.

Under current provisions of the Code, the maximum individual rate applicable to long-term capital gains is generally either 15% or 20%, depending on whether the individual’s income exceeds certain threshold amounts. Fund distributions to noncorporate shareholders attributable to dividends received by the Funds from U.S. and certain qualified foreign corporations will generally be taxed at the long-term capital gain rate, as long as certain other requirements are met. For these lower rates to apply, the non-corporate shareholder must own their Fund Shares for at least 61 days during the 121-day period beginning 60 days before a Fund’s ex-dividend date.

Distributions in excess of a Fund’s current and accumulated earnings and profits are treated as a tax-free return of your investment to the extent of your basis in the shares, and generally as capital gain thereafter. A return of capital, which for tax purposes is treated as a return of your investment, reduces your basis in shares, thus reducing any loss or increasing any gain on a subsequent taxable disposition of shares. A distribution will reduce a Fund’s NAV per share and may be taxable to you as ordinary income or capital gain even though, from an economic standpoint, the distribution may constitute a return of capital.

An additional 3.8% Medicare tax is imposed on certain net investment income (including ordinary dividends and capital gain distributions received from a Fund and net gains from redemptions or other taxable dispositions of Fund Shares) of U.S. individuals, estates and trusts to the extent that such person’s “modified adjusted gross income” (in the case of an individual) or “adjusted gross income” (in the case of an estate or trust) exceeds certain threshold amounts.

A Fund’s transactions in derivatives (such as futures contracts and swaps) will be subject to special tax rules, the effect of which may be to accelerate income to the Fund, defer losses to the Fund, cause adjustments in the holding periods of the Fund’s securities and convert short-term capital losses into long-term capital losses. These rules could therefore affect the amount, timing and character of distributions to you. A Fund’s use of derivatives may result in the Fund realizing more short-term capital gains and ordinary income subject to tax at ordinary income tax rates than it would if it did not use derivatives.

Although distributions are generally treated as taxable to you in the year they are paid, distributions declared in October, November or December but paid in January are taxable as if they were paid in December. A percentage of the Funds’ dividends paid to corporate shareholders may be eligible for the corporate dividends-received deduction. This percentage may, however, be reduced as a result of a Fund’s securities lending activities or high portfolio turnover rate. Character and tax status of all distributions will be available to shareholders after the close of each calendar year.

Each Fund may be subject to foreign withholding or other foreign taxes on income or gain from certain foreign securities. In general, each Fund may deduct these taxes in computing its taxable income. In general, the Fund may deduct these taxes in computing its taxable income. Rather than deducting these foreign taxes, a Fund (other than the ActiveBeta® U.S. Large Cap ETF and the ActiveBeta® U.S. Small Cap ETF) may make an election to treat a proportionate amount of those taxes as constituting a distribution to each shareholder, which would generally allow you either (i) to credit (subject to certain holding period and other limitations) that proportionate amount of taxes against your U.S. Federal income tax liability as a foreign tax credit or (ii) to take that amount as an itemized deduction.

 

41


 

If you buy Shares of a Fund before it makes a distribution, the distribution will be taxable to you even though it may actually be a return of a portion of your investment. This is known as “buying into a dividend.”

 

  TAXES ON CREATIONS AND REDEMPTIONS OF CREATION UNITS     

A person who exchanges securities for Creation Units generally will recognize a gain or loss. The gain or loss will be equal to the difference between the market value of the Creation Units at the time of exchange and the sum of the exchanger’s aggregate basis in the securities surrendered and the amount of any cash paid for such Creation Units. A person who exchanges Creation Units for securities will generally recognize a gain or loss equal to the difference between the exchanger’s basis in the Creation Units and the sum of the aggregate market value of the securities received. The Internal Revenue Service, however, may assert that a loss realized upon an exchange of primarily securities for Creation Units cannot be deducted currently under the rules governing “wash sales,” or on the basis that there has been no significant change in economic position. Persons exchanging securities for Creation Units or redeeming Creation Units should consult their own tax adviser with respect to whether wash sale rules apply and when a loss might be deductible and the tax treatment of any creation or redemption transaction.

Under current U.S. federal income tax laws, any capital gain or loss realized upon a redemption (or creation) of Creation Units is generally treated as long-term capital gain or loss if the Shares (or securities surrendered) have been held for more than one year and as a short-term capital gain or loss if the Shares (or securities surrendered) have been held for one year or less.

 

  SALES OF FUND SHARES     

Your sale of Fund Shares is a taxable transaction for federal income tax purposes, and may also be subject to state and local taxes. When you sell your Shares, you will generally recognize a capital gain or loss in an amount equal to the difference between your adjusted tax basis in the Shares and the amount received. Generally, this capital gain or loss is long-term or short-term depending on whether your holding period exceeds one year, except that any loss realized on Shares held for six months or less will be treated as a long-term capital loss to the extent of any capital gain dividends that were received on the Shares. Additionally, any loss realized on a sale or redemption of Shares of a Fund may be disallowed under “wash sale” rules to the extent the Shares disposed of are replaced with other Shares of that Fund within a period of 61 days beginning 30 days before and ending 30 days after the date of disposition, such as pursuant to a dividend reinvestment in Shares of that Fund. If disallowed, the loss will be reflected in an adjustment to the basis of the Shares acquired.

 

  OTHER INFORMATION     

You may be subject to backup withholding at a rate of 28% with respect to taxable distributions if you do not provide your correct taxpayer identification number, or certify that it is correct, or if you have been notified by the IRS that you are subject to backup withholding.

Non-U.S. investors are generally subject to U.S. withholding tax with respect to dividends received from the Fund and may be subject to estate tax with respect to their Fund Shares. Under an expired provision (which may possibly be extended by Congress), non-U.S. investors generally are not subject to U.S. federal income tax withholding on certain distributions of interest income and/or short-term capital gains that are designated by the Fund. If the provision is extended by Congress, it is expected that the Fund will generally make designations of short-term gains, to the extent permitted, but the Fund does not intend to make designations of any distributions attributable to interest income. Therefore, all distributions of interest income will be subject to withholding when paid to non-U.S. investors.

Effective July 1, 2014, withholding of U.S. tax (at a 30% rate) is required with respect to payments of taxable dividends and (effective January 1, 2017) certain capital gain dividends made to certain non-U.S. entities that fail to comply (or be deemed compliant) with extensive new reporting and withholding requirements designed to inform the U.S. Department of the Treasury of U.S.-owned foreign investment accounts. Shareholders may be requested to provide additional information t to enable the applicable withholding agent to determine whether withholding is required.

Legislation passed by Congress requires reporting to you and the IRS annually on Form 1099-B not only the gross proceeds of Fund shares you sell or redeem but also their cost basis. Shareholders should contact their intermediaries with respect to reporting of cost basis and available elections with respect to their accounts. You should carefully review the cost basis information provided

 

42


TAXATION

 

by the applicable intermediary and make any additional basis, holding period or other adjustments that are required when reporting these amounts on your federal income tax returns.

You should carefully review the cost basis information provided by the applicable intermediary and make any additional basis, holding period or other adjustments that are required when reporting these amounts on your federal income tax returns.

 

43


 

Index Provider

 

The Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Emerging Markets Equity Index, Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Europe Equity Index, Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® International Equity Index, Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® Japan Equity Index, Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® U.S. Large Cap Equity Index and Goldman Sachs ActiveBeta® U.S. Small Cap Equity Index were developed and are maintained by the Index Provider and calculated by the Calculation Agent. The Index Provider determines the composition and relative weightings of the securities in each Index. The Calculation Agent is not an affiliate of the Index Provider, the Fund or the Investment Adviser and publishes information regarding the market value of each Index.

 

44


 

Other Information

 

  PREMIUM/DISCOUNT INFORMATION     

The Funds have not yet commenced operations and, therefore, do not have information regarding how often the Shares of a Fund traded on NYSE Arca at a price above (i.e., at a premium) or below (i.e., at a discount) the NAV of the Fund to report.

 

  CONTINUOUS OFFERING     

The method by which Creation Units are created and traded may raise certain issues under applicable securities laws. Because new Creation Units are issued and sold by the Trust on an ongoing basis, a “distribution,” as such term is used in the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), may occur at any point. Broker dealers and other persons are cautioned that some activities on their part may, depending on the circumstances, result in their being deemed participants in a distribution in a manner which could render them statutory underwriters and subject them to the prospectus delivery and liability provisions of the Securities Act.

For example, a broker dealer firm or its client may be deemed a statutory underwriter if it takes Creation Units after placing an order with the Distributor, breaks them down into constituent Shares, and sells such Shares directly to customers, or if it chooses to couple the creation of a supply of new Shares with an active selling effort involving solicitation of secondary market demand for Shares. A determination of whether one is an underwriter for purposes of the Securities Act must take into account all the facts and circumstances pertaining to the activities of the broker dealer or its client in the particular case, and the examples mentioned above should not be considered a complete description of all the activities that could lead to a categorization as an underwriter.

Broker dealers who are not “underwriters” but are participating in a distribution (as contrasted to ordinary secondary trading transactions), and thus dealing with Shares that are part of an “unsold allotment” within the meaning of Section 4(3)(C) of the Securities Act, would be unable to take advantage of the prospectus delivery exemption provided by Section 4(3) of the Securities Act. This is because the prospectus delivery exemption in Section 4(3) of the Securities Act is not available in respect of such transactions as a result of Section 24(d) of the Investment Company Act. As a result, broker dealer firms should note that dealers who are not underwriters but are participating in a distribution (as contrasted with ordinary secondary market transactions) and thus dealing with the Shares that are part of an overallotment within the meaning of Section 4(3)(A) of the Securities Act would be unable to take advantage of the prospectus delivery exemption provided by Section 4(3) of the Securities Act. Firms that incur a prospectus delivery obligation with respect to Shares are reminded that, under Rule 153 of the Securities Act, a prospectus delivery obligation under Section 5(b)(2) of the Securities Act owed to an exchange member in connection with a sale on NYSE Arca is satisfied by the fact that the prospectus is available at NYSE Arca upon request. The prospectus delivery mechanism provided in Rule 153 is only available with respect to transactions on an exchange.

In addition, certain affiliates of the Funds and the Investment Adviser may purchase and resell Fund Shares pursuant to this Prospectus.

 

  DISTRIBUTION AND SERVICE PLAN     

The Board of Trustees of the Trust has adopted a distribution and service plan (“Plan”) pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the Act. Under the Plan, each Fund is authorized to pay distribution fees in connection with the sale and distribution of its Shares and pay service fees in connection with the provision of ongoing services to shareholders of each class and the maintenance of shareholder accounts in an amount up to [ ]% of its average daily net assets each year.

No Rule 12b-1 fees are currently paid by the Funds, and there are no current plans to impose these fees. However, in the event Rule 12b-1 fees are charged in the future, because these fees are paid out of each Fund’s assets on an ongoing basis, these fees will increase the cost of your investment in the Funds. By purchasing Shares subject to distribution fees and service fees, you may pay more over time than you would by purchasing Shares with other types of sales charge arrangements. Long-term shareholders may pay more than the economic equivalent of the maximum front-end sales charge permitted by the rules of FINRA. The net income attributable to Shares will be reduced by the amount of distribution fees and service fees and other expenses of the Funds.

 

45


 

Appendix A

Additional Information on Portfolio Risks,

Securities and Techniques

 

  A.    GENERAL PORTFOLIO RISKS     

The Funds will be subject to the risks associated with equity investments. “Equity investments” may include common stocks, preferred stocks, interests in REITs, convertible debt obligations, convertible preferred stocks, equity interests in trusts, partnerships, joint ventures, limited liability companies and similar enterprises, other investment companies (including ETFs), warrants, stock purchase rights and synthetic and derivative instruments (such as swaps and futures contracts) that have economic characteristics similar to equity securities. In general, the values of equity investments fluctuate in response to the activities of individual companies and in response to general market and economic conditions. Accordingly, the values of the equity investments that a Fund holds may decline over short or extended periods. The stock markets tend to be cyclical, with periods when stock prices generally rise and periods when prices generally decline. This volatility means that the value of your investment in a Fund may increase or decrease. In recent years, certain stock markets have experienced substantial price volatility. To the extent a Fund’s net assets decrease or increase in the future due to price volatility or share redemption or purchase activity, the Fund’s expense ratio may correspondingly increase or decrease from the expense ratio disclosed in this Prospectus.

To the extent a Fund invests in pooled investment vehicles (including investment companies and ETFs) and partnerships, that Fund will be affected by the investment policies, practices and performances of such entities in direct proportion to the amount of assets the Fund invests therein.

The following sections provide further information on certain types of securities and investment techniques that may be used by the Funds, including their associated risks. Additional information is provided in the SAI, which is available upon request. Among other things, the SAI describes certain fundamental investment restrictions that cannot be changed without shareholder approval. You should note, however, that all investment objectives, and all investment policies not specifically designated as fundamental are non-fundamental and may be changed without shareholder approval. If there is a change in a Fund’s investment objective, you should consider whether that Fund remains an appropriate investment in light of your then current financial position and needs.

 

  B.    OTHER PORTFOLIO RISKS     

Index Risk.  A Fund will be negatively affected by general declines in the securities and asset classes represented in its Index. In addition, because the Funds are not “actively” managed, unless a specific security is removed from an Index, a Fund generally would not sell a security because the security’s issuer was in financial trouble. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on a Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Index. A Fund also does not attempt to take defensive positions under any market conditions, including declining markets. Therefore, a Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that may actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or to lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers. The Index Provider relies on third party data it believes to be reliable in constructing each Index, but it does not guarantee the accuracy of such third party data. Each Index is new and has a limited performance history. Any new index is subject to errors in its construction.

Tracking Error Risk.  Tracking error is the divergence of a Fund’s performance from that of its Index. The performance of a Fund may diverge from that of its Index for a number of reasons. Tracking error may occur because of transaction costs, a Fund’s holding of cash, differences in accrual of dividends, changes to its Index or the need to meet new or existing regulatory requirements. Unlike a Fund, the returns of an Index are not reduced by investment and other operating expenses, including the trading costs associated with implementing changes to its portfolio of investments. Tracking error risk may be heightened during times of market volatility or other unusual market conditions. To the extent that a Fund calculates its NAV based on fair value prices and the value of its Index is based on securities’ closing prices (i.e., the value of the Index is not based on fair value prices), the Fund’s ability to track the Index may be adversely affected. Because an Index is not subject to the tax diversification requirements to which a Fund must adhere, a Fund may be required to deviate its investments from the securities and relative weightings of its Index. For tax efficiency purposes, a Fund may sell certain securities to realize losses, which will result in a deviation from its Index.

 

46


APPENDIX A

 

Risks of Investing in Mid-Capitalization and Small-Capitalization Companies.  Each Fund (except for ActiveBeta® U.S. Large Cap ETF) may, to the extent consistent with its investment policies, invest in mid- and small-capitalization companies. Investments in mid- and small-capitalization companies involve greater risk and portfolio price volatility than investments in larger capitalization stocks. Among the reasons for the greater price volatility of these investments are the less certain growth prospects of smaller firms and the lower degree of liquidity in the markets for such securities. Mid- and small- capitalization companies may be thinly traded and may have to be sold at a discount from current market prices or in small lots over an extended period of time. In addition, these securities are subject to the risk that during certain periods the liquidity of particular issuers or industries, or all securities in particular investment categories, will shrink or disappear suddenly and without warning as a result of adverse economic or market conditions, or adverse investor perceptions whether or not accurate. Because of the lack of sufficient market liquidity, a Fund may incur losses because it will be required to effect sales at a disadvantageous time and only then at a substantial drop in price. Mid- and small-capitalization companies include “unseasoned” issuers that do not have an established financial history; often have limited product lines, markets or financial resources; may depend on or use a few key personnel for management; and may be susceptible to losses and risks of bankruptcy. Mid- and small-capitalization companies may be operating at a loss or have significant variations in operating results; may be engaged in a rapidly changing business with products subject to a substantial risk of obsolescence; may require substantial additional capital to support their operations, to finance expansion or to maintain their competitive position; and may have substantial borrowings or may otherwise have a weak financial condition. In addition, these companies may face intense competition, including competition from companies with greater financial resources, more extensive development, manufacturing, marketing, and other capabilities, and a larger number of qualified managerial and technical personnel. Transaction costs for these investments are often higher than those of larger capitalization companies. Investments in mid- and small-capitalization companies may be more difficult to price precisely than other types of securities because of their characteristics and lower trading volumes.

Risks of Foreign Investments.  The Funds (except for ActiveBeta® U.S. Large Cap Equity ETF and ActiveBeta® U.S. Small Cap Equity ETF) will make foreign investments. Foreign investments involve special risks that are not typically associated with U.S. dollar denominated or quoted securities of U.S. issuers. Foreign investments may be affected by changes in currency rates, changes in foreign or U.S. laws or restrictions applicable to such investments and changes in exchange control regulations (e.g., currency blockage). A decline in the exchange rate of the currency (i.e., weakening of the currency against the U.S. dollar) in which a portfolio security is quoted or denominated relative to the U.S. dollar would reduce the value of the portfolio security. In addition, if the currency in which a Fund receives dividends, interest or other payments declines in value against the U.S. dollar before such income is distributed as dividends to shareholders or converted to U.S. dollars, the Fund may have to sell portfolio securities to obtain sufficient cash to pay such dividends.

Certain foreign markets may rely heavily on particular industries or foreign capital and are more vulnerable to diplomatic developments, the imposition of economic sanctions against a particular country or countries, organizations, entities and/or individuals, changes in international trading patterns, trade barriers, and other protectionist or retaliatory measures. International trade barriers or economic sanctions against foreign countries, organizations, entities and/or individuals may adversely affect a Fund’s foreign holdings or exposures.

Brokerage commissions, custodial services and other costs relating to investment in international securities markets generally are more expensive than in the United States. In addition, clearance and settlement procedures may be different in foreign countries and, in certain markets, such procedures have been unable to keep pace with the volume of securities transactions, thus making it difficult to conduct such transactions.

Foreign issuers are not generally subject to uniform accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards comparable to those applicable to U.S. issuers. There may be less publicly available information about a foreign issuer than about a U.S. issuer. In addition, there is generally less government regulation of foreign markets, companies and securities dealers than in the United States, and the legal remedies for investors may be more limited than the remedies available in the United States. Foreign securities markets may have substantially less volume than U.S. securities markets and securities of many foreign issuers are less liquid and more volatile than securities of comparable domestic issuers. Furthermore, with respect to certain foreign countries, there is a possibility of nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, imposition of withholding or other taxes on dividend or interest payments (or, in some cases, capital gains distributions), limitations on the removal of funds or other assets from such countries, and risks of political or social instability or diplomatic developments which could adversely affect investments in those countries.

Certain foreign investments may become less liquid in response to social, political or market developments or adverse investor perceptions, or become illiquid after purchase by a Fund, particularly during periods of market turmoil. Certain foreign investments

 

47


may become illiquid when, for instance, there are few, if any, interested buyers and sellers or when dealers are unwilling to make a market for certain securities. When a Fund holds illiquid investments, its portfolio may be harder to value, especially in changing markets.

Concentration of a Fund’s assets in one or a few countries and currencies will subject a Fund to greater risks than if a Fund’s assets were not geographically concentrated.

Investments in foreign securities may take the form of sponsored and ADRs, GDRs, European Depositary Receipts (“EDRs”) or other similar instruments representing securities of foreign issuers. ADRs, GDRs and EDRs represent the right to receive securities of foreign issuers deposited in a bank or other depository. ADRs and certain GDRs are traded in the United States. GDRs may be traded in either the United States or in foreign markets. EDRs are traded primarily outside the United States. Prices of ADRs are quoted in U.S. dollars. EDRs and GDRs are not necessarily quoted in the same currency as the underlying security.

Foreign Custody Risk.  A Fund may hold foreign securities and cash with Foreign Custodians. Some Foreign Custodians may be recently organized or new to the foreign custody business. In some countries, Foreign Custodians may be subject to little or no regulatory oversight over or independent evaluation of their operations. Further, the laws of certain countries may place limitations on a Fund’s ability to recover assets if a Foreign Custodian enters bankruptcy. Investments in emerging market countries may be subject to even greater custody risks than investments in more developed markets. Custody services in emerging market countries are very often undeveloped and may be considerably less well regulated than in more developed countries, and thus may not afford the same level of investor protection as would apply in developed countries.

Risks of Emerging Countries.  The ActiveBeta® Emerging Markets Equity ETF may invest in securities of issuers located in emerging countries. The risks of foreign investment are heightened when the issuer is located in an emerging country. Emerging countries are generally located in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Eastern and Central Europe, and Central and South America. The Fund’s purchase and sale of portfolio securities in certain emerging countries may be constrained by limitations relating to daily changes in the prices of listed securities, periodic trading or settlement volume and/or limitations on aggregate holdings of foreign investors. Such limitations may be computed based on the aggregate trading volume by or holdings of the Fund, the Investment Adviser, their affiliates and their respective clients and other service providers. The Fund may not be able to sell securities in circumstances where price, trading or settlement volume limitations have been reached.

Foreign investment in the securities markets of certain emerging countries is restricted or controlled to varying degrees which may limit investment in such countries or increase the administrative costs of such investments. For example, certain Asian countries require governmental approval prior to investments by foreign persons or limit investment by foreign persons to only a specified percentage of an issuer’s outstanding securities or a specific class of securities which may have less advantageous terms (including price) than securities of the issuer available for purchase by nationals. In addition, certain countries may restrict or prohibit investment opportunities in issuers or industries deemed important to national interests. Such restrictions may affect the market price, liquidity and rights of securities that may be purchased by the Fund. The repatriation of both investment income and capital from certain emerging countries is subject to restrictions such as the need for governmental consents. In situations where a country restricts direct investment in securities (which may occur in certain Asian and other countries), the Fund may invest in such countries through other investment funds in such countries.

Many emerging countries have recently experienced currency devaluations and substantial (and, in some cases, extremely high) rates of inflation. Other emerging countries have experienced economic recessions. These circumstances have had a negative effect on the economies and securities markets of those emerging countries. Economies in emerging countries generally are dependent heavily upon commodity prices and international trade and, accordingly, have been and may continue to be affected adversely by the economies of their trading partners, trade barriers, exchange controls, managed adjustments in relative currency values and other protectionist measures imposed or negotiated by the countries with which they trade.

Many emerging countries are subject to a substantial degree of economic, political and social instability. Governments of some emerging countries are authoritarian in nature or have been installed or removed as a result of military coups, while governments in other emerging countries have periodically used force to suppress civil dissent. Disparities of wealth, the pace and success of democratization, and ethnic, religious and racial disaffection, among other factors, have also led to social unrest, violence and/or labor unrest in some emerging countries. Unanticipated political or social developments may result in sudden and significant investment losses. Investing in emerging countries involves greater risk of loss due to expropriation, nationalization, confiscation of assets and property or the imposition of restrictions on foreign investments and on repatriation of capital invested. As an example, in the past some Eastern European governments have expropriated substantial amounts of private property, and many

 

48


APPENDIX A

 

claims of the property owners have never been fully settled. There is no assurance that similar expropriations will not occur in other countries.

The Fund’s investment in emerging countries may also be subject to withholding or other taxes, which may be significant and may reduce the return to the Fund from an investment in issuers in such countries.

Settlement procedures in emerging countries are frequently less developed and reliable than those in the United States and may involve the Fund’s delivery of securities before receipt of payment for their sale. In addition, significant delays may occur in certain markets in registering the transfer of securities. Settlement or registration problems may make it more difficult for the Fund to value its portfolio securities and could cause the Fund to miss attractive investment opportunities, to have a portion of its assets uninvested or to incur losses due to the failure of a counterparty to pay for securities the Fund has delivered or the Fund’s inability to complete its contractual obligations because of theft or other reasons.

The creditworthiness of the local securities firms used by the Fund in emerging countries may not be as sound as the creditworthiness of firms used in more developed countries. As a result, the Fund may be subject to a greater risk of loss if a securities firm defaults in the performance of its responsibilities.

The small size and inexperience of the securities markets in certain emerging countries and the limited volume of trading in securities in those countries may make the Fund’s investments in such countries less liquid and more volatile than investments in countries with more developed securities markets (such as the United States, Japan and most Western European countries). The Fund’s investments in emerging countries are subject to the risk that the liquidity of a particular investment, or investments generally, in such countries will shrink or disappear suddenly and without warning as a result of adverse economic, market or political conditions or adverse investor perceptions, whether or not accurate. Because of the lack of sufficient market liquidity, the Fund may incur losses because it will be required to effect sales at a disadvantageous time and only then at a substantial drop in price. Investments in emerging countries may be more difficult to value precisely because of the characteristics discussed above and lower trading volumes.

Geographic Risks.  Each Fund (except for ActiveBeta® U.S. Large Cap Equity ETF and ActiveBeta® U.S. Small Cap Equity ETF) may invest in the securities of governmental issuers located in a particular foreign country or region. Concentration of a Fund’s investments in such issuers will subject the Fund, to a greater extent than if investment was more limited, to the risks of adverse securities markets, exchange rates and social, political or economic events which may occur in that country or region.

Risks of Derivative Investments.  The Funds may invest in derivative instruments including without limitation, [options, futures, options on futures, forwards, participation notes, swaps, options on swaps, structured securities and other derivatives] relating to foreign currency transactions. Losses from investments in derivative instruments can result from a lack of correlation between changes in the value of derivative instruments and the portfolio assets (if any) being hedged, the potential illiquidity of the markets for derivative instruments, the failure of the counterparty to perform its contractual obligations, or the risks arising from margin requirements and related leverage factors associated with such transactions. Losses may also arise if the Funds receive cash collateral under the transactions and some or all of that collateral is invested in the market. To the extent that cash collateral is so invested, such collateral will be subject to market depreciation or appreciation, and a Fund may be responsible for any loss that might result from its investment of the counterparty’s cash collateral. Investments in derivative instruments may be harder to value, subject to greater volatility and more likely subject to changes in tax treatment than other investments.

Risks of Illiquid Securities.  Each Fund may invest up to 15% of its net assets in illiquid securities, which are those that cannot be disposed of in seven days in the ordinary course of business at approximately the price at which a Fund values the instrument. Illiquid securities, in which some or all of the Funds may invest, include:

  ¢   Both domestic and foreign securities that are not readily marketable
  ¢   Repurchase agreements and time deposits with a notice or demand period of more than seven days
  ¢   Certain over-the-counter options
  ¢   Certain structured securities and swap transactions
  ¢   Certain restricted securities, unless it is determined, based upon a review of the trading markets for a specific restricted security, that such restricted security is liquid because it is so called “4(2) commercial paper” or is otherwise eligible for resale pursuant to Rule 144A under the Securities Act (“144A Securities”).

 

49


 

Investing in 144A Securities may decrease the liquidity of a Fund’s portfolio to the extent that qualified institutional buyers become for a time uninterested in purchasing these restricted securities. The purchase price and subsequent valuation of restricted and illiquid securities normally reflect a discount, which may be significant, from the market price of comparable securities for which a liquid market exists.

Investments purchased by a Fund, particularly over-the-counter traded instruments, that are liquid at the time of purchase may subsequently become illiquid due to events relating to the issuer of the securities, markets events, economic conditions or investor perceptions. Domestic and foreign markets are becoming more and more complex and interrelated, so that events in one sector of the market or the economy, or in one geographical region, can reverberate and have negative consequences for other market, economic or regional sectors in a manner that may not be reasonably foreseen. With respect to over-the-counter traded securities, the continued viability of any over-the-counter secondary market depends on the continued willingness of dealers and other participants to purchase the instruments.

If one or more instruments in a Fund’s portfolio become illiquid, the Fund may exceed its 15 percent limitation in illiquid instruments. In the event that changes in the portfolio or other external events cause the investments in illiquid instruments to exceed 15 percent of a Fund’s net assets, the Fund must take steps to bring the aggregate amount of illiquid instruments back within the prescribed limitations as soon as reasonably practicable. This requirement would not force a Fund to liquidate any portfolio instrument where the Fund would suffer a loss on the sale of that instrument.

In cases where no clear indication of the value of a Fund’s portfolio instruments is available, the portfolio instruments will be valued at their fair value according to the valuation procedures approved by the Board of Trustees. These cases include, among others, situations where a security or other asset or liability does not have a price source, or the secondary markets on which an investment has previously been traded are no longer viable, due to its lack of liquidity. For more information on fair valuation, please see “Shareholder Guide—Net Asset Value.”

 

  C.    PORTFOLIO SECURITIES AND TECHNIQUES     

This section provides further information on certain types of securities and investment techniques that may be used by the Funds, including their associated risks.

The Funds may purchase other types of securities or instruments similar to those described in this section if otherwise consistent with the Fund’s investment objective and policies. Further information is provided in the SAI, which is available upon request.

Other Investment Companies.  Each Fund may invest in securities of other investment companies, including ETFs, subject to statutory limitations prescribed by the Investment Company Act. These limitations include in certain circumstances a prohibition on any Fund acquiring more than 3% of the voting Shares of any other investment company, and a prohibition on investing more than 5% of a Fund’s total assets in securities of any one investment company or more than 10% of its total assets in securities of all investment companies.

Pursuant to an exemptive order obtained from the SEC or under an exemptive rule adopted by the SEC, a Fund may invest in certain other investment companies and money market funds beyond the statutory limits described above. Some of those investment companies and money market funds may be funds for which the Investment Adviser or any of their affiliates serves as investment adviser, administrator or distributor.

A Fund will indirectly bear its proportionate share of any management fees and other expenses paid by such other investment companies, in addition to the fees and expenses regularly borne by the Fund. Although the Funds do not expect to do so in the foreseeable future, each Fund is authorized to invest substantially all of its assets in a single open-end investment company or series thereof that has substantially the same investment objective, policies and fundamental restrictions as the Fund.

Preferred Stock, Warrants and Stock Purchase Rights.  Each Fund may invest in preferred stock, warrants and stock purchase rights (or “rights”). Preferred stocks are securities that represent an ownership interest providing the holder with claims on the issuer’s earnings and assets before common stock owners but after bond owners. Unlike debt securities, the obligations of an issuer of preferred stock, including dividend and other payment obligations, may not typically be accelerated by the holders of such preferred stock on the occurrence of an event of default or other non-compliance by the issuer of the preferred stock.

 

50


APPENDIX A

 

Warrants and other rights are options to buy a stated number of shares of common stock at a specified price at any time during the life of the warrant or right. The holders of warrants and rights have no voting rights, receive no dividends and have no rights with respect to the assets of the issuer.

Lending of Portfolio Securities.  Each Fund may engage in securities lending. Securities lending involves the lending of securities owned by a Fund to financial institutions such as certain broker-dealers. The borrowers are required to secure their loans continuously with cash, cash equivalents, U.S. Government Securities or letters of credit in an amount at least equal to the market value of the securities loaned. Cash collateral may be invested by a Fund in short-term investments, including registered and unregistered investment pools managed by the Investment Adviser or its affiliates and from which the Investment Adviser or its affiliates may receive fees. To the extent that cash collateral is so invested, such collateral will be subject to market depreciation or appreciation, and a Fund will be responsible for any loss that might result from its investment of the borrowers’ collateral. If the Investment Adviser determines to make securities loans, the value of the securities loaned may not exceed 33 1/3% of the value of the total assets of a Fund (including the loan collateral). Loan collateral (including any investment of that collateral) is not subject to the percentage limitations regarding a Fund’s investments described elsewhere in this Prospectus.

Repurchase Agreements.  Repurchase agreements involve the purchase of securities subject to the seller’s agreement to repurchase them at a mutually agreed upon date and price. Each Fund may enter into repurchase agreements with counterparties approved by the Investment Adviser pursuant to procedures approved by the Board of Trustees that furnish collateral at least equal in value or market price to the amount of their repurchase obligations. The collateral may consist of any type of security in which a Fund is eligible to invest directly. Repurchase agreements involving obligations other than U.S. Government Securities may be subject to additional risks.

If the other party or “seller” defaults, a Fund might suffer a loss to the extent that the proceeds from the sale of the underlying securities and other collateral held by the Fund are less than the repurchase price and the Fund’s costs associated with delay and enforcement of the repurchase agreement. In addition, in the event of bankruptcy of the seller, a Fund could suffer additional losses if a court determines that the Fund’s interest in the collateral is not enforceable.

Certain Funds, together with other registered investment companies having advisory agreements with the Investment Adviser or any of its affiliates, may transfer uninvested cash balances into a single joint account, the daily aggregate balance of which will be invested in one or more repurchase agreements.

Borrowings and Reverse Repurchase Agreements.  Each Fund can borrow money from banks and other financial institutions and may enter into reverse repurchase agreements in amounts not exceeding one-third of the Fund’s total assets (including the amount borrowed). A Fund generally may not make additional investments if borrowings exceed 5% of its net assets.

Reverse repurchase agreements involve the sale of securities held by a Fund subject to the Fund’s agreement to repurchase them at a mutually agreed upon date and price (including interest). These transactions may be entered into as a temporary measure for emergency purposes or to meet redemption requests. Reverse repurchase agreements may also be entered into when the Investment Adviser expects that the interest income to be earned from the investment of the transaction proceeds will be greater than the related interest expense.

Borrowings and reverse repurchase agreements involve leveraging. If the securities held by a Fund decline in value while these transactions are outstanding, the NAV of the Fund’s outstanding Shares will decline in value by proportionately more than the decline in value of the securities. In addition, reverse repurchase agreements involve the risk that the investment return earned by a Fund (from the investment of the proceeds) will be less than the interest expense of the transaction, that the market value of the securities sold by the Fund will decline below the price the Fund is obligated to pay to repurchase the securities, and that the securities may not be returned to the Fund. The Fund must identify on its books liquid assets, or engage in other appropriate measures, to “cover” open positions with respect to its transactions in reverse repurchase agreements.

Asset Segregation.  As an investment company registered with the SEC, the Funds must identify on its books (often referred to as “asset segregation”) liquid assets, or engage in other SEC or SEC-staff approved or other appropriate measures, to “cover” open positions with respect to certain kinds of derivative instruments. In the case of swaps, futures contracts, options, forward contracts and other derivative instruments that do not cash settle, for example, the Funds must identify on their books liquid assets equal to the full notional amount of the instrument while the positions are open, to the extent there is not an offsetting position. However, with respect to certain swaps, futures contracts, options, forward contracts and other derivative instruments that are required to cash settle, a Fund may identify liquid assets in an amount equal to the Fund’s daily marked-to-market net obligations (i.e., the Fund’s daily net liability) under the instrument, if any, rather than its full notional amount. The Funds reserve the right to modify

 

51


their asset segregation policies in the future in its discretion, consistent with the Investment Company Act and SEC or SEC-staff guidance. By identifying assets equal to only its net obligations under certain instruments, the Funds will have the ability to employ leverage to a greater extent than if the Funds were required to identify assets equal to the full notional amount of the instrument.

 

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Appendix B

Financial Highlights

 

Because the Funds have not commenced investment operations as of the date of this Prospectus, financial highlights are not available.

 

54


 

 

ActiveBeta® ETF Prospectus

 

  FOR MORE INFORMATION     

Annual/Semi-annual Report

Additional information about the Funds’ investments will be available in the Funds’ annual and semi-annual reports to shareholders. In the Funds’ annual reports, you will find a discussion of the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected the Funds’ performance during the last fiscal year.

Statement of Additional Information

Additional information about the Funds and their policies is also available in the Funds’ SAI. The SAI is incorporated by reference into this Prospectus (is legally considered part of this Prospectus).

The Funds’ annual and semi-annual reports (when available) and the SAI are available free upon request by calling Goldman Sachs at 1-800-621-2550. You can also access and download the annual and semi-annual reports (when available) and the SAI at the Funds’ website: [http://www.gsamfunds.com/summaries].

From time to time, certain announcements and other information regarding the Funds may be found at [http://www.gsamfunds.com/announcements-ind] for individual investors or [http://www.gsamfunds.com/announcements] for advisers.

To obtain other information and for shareholder inquiries:

 

¢     By  telephone:

   1-800-621-2550

¢     By mail:

  

Goldman Sachs Funds

P.O. Box 06050

Chicago, IL 60606-6306

¢     On the  Internet:

   SEC EDGAR database – http://www.sec.gov

You may review and obtain copies of Trust documents (including the SAI) by visiting the SEC’s public reference room in Washington, D.C. You may also obtain copies of Trust documents, after paying a duplicating fee, by writing to the SEC’s Public Reference Section, Washington, D.C. 20549-1520 or by electronic request to: publicinfo@sec.gov. Information on the operation of the public reference room may be obtained by calling the SEC at (202) 551-8090.

 

 

[CODE]    The Trust’s investment company registration number is 811-23103
GSAM® is a registered service mark of Goldman, Sachs & Co.
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The information in this Prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This Prospectus is not an offer to sell securities and is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.

 

Preliminary Prospectus dated May 4, 2015

Subject to Completion

 

Prospectus

 

GOLDMAN SACHS ETF TRUST

 

 

[                ], 2015

 

¢   Goldman Sachs Equity Long Short Hedge Tracker ETF

 

  n   NYSE Arca: GSLS

 

¢   Goldman Sachs Event Driven Hedge Tracker ETF

 

  n   NYSE Arca: GSED

 

¢   Goldman Sachs Macro Hedge Tracker ETF

 

  n   NYSE Arca: GSMC

 

¢   Goldman Sachs Multi-Strategy Hedge Tracker ETF

 

  n   NYSE Arca: GSMS

 

¢   Goldman Sachs Relative Value Hedge Tracker ETF

 

  n   NYSE Arca: GSRV

 

THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION HAS NOT APPROVED OR DISAPPROVED THESE SECURITIES OR PASSED UPON THE ADEQUACY OF THIS PROSPECTUS. ANY REPRESENTATION TO THE CONTRARY IS A CRIMINAL OFFENSE.

 

AN INVESTMENT IN A FUND IS NOT A BANK DEPOSIT AND IS NOT INSURED BY THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION OR ANY OTHER GOVERNMENT AGENCY. AN INVESTMENT IN A FUND INVOLVES INVESTMENT RISKS, AND YOU MAY LOSE MONEY IN A FUND.

 

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Table of Contents

 

 

Fund Summaries   1   

Goldman Sachs Equity Long Short Hedge Tracker ETF – Summary

  1   

Goldman Sachs Event Driven Hedge Tracker ETF – Summary

  6   

Goldman Sachs Macro Hedge Tracker ETF – Summary

  12   

Goldman Sachs Multi-Strategy Hedge Tracker ETF – Summary

  18   

Goldman Sachs Relative Value Hedge Tracker ETF – Summary

  25   
Investment Management Approach   31   
Risks of the Funds and the Underlying ETFs   34   
Tax Advantaged Product Structure   44   
Service Providers   45   
Distributions   49   
Shareholder Guide   50   

Buying and Selling Shares

  50   

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

  50   

Net Asset Value

  51   

Book Entry

  52   

Creations and Redemptions

  52   
Taxation   53   
Index Provider   56   
Other Information   57   
Appendix A
Additional Information on Portfolio Risks, Securities and Techniques of the Underlying ETFs
  58   
Appendix B
Financial Highlights
  71   


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Goldman Sachs Equity Long Short Hedge Tracker ETF—Summary

Ticker: GSLS            Stock Exchange: NYSE Arca

Investment Objective

The Goldman Sachs Equity Long Short Hedge Tracker ETF (the “Fund”) seeks to provide investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the Goldman Sachs Equity Long Short Hedge Tracker Index (the “Index”).

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

The following tables describe the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold Shares of the Fund.

 

Shareholder Fees

    None   
(fees paid directly from your investment)  

Annual Fund Operating Expenses

 
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)  

Management Fee

    [        

Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fee

    0

Other Expenses1

    [         ]% 

[Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses]

    [        

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses2

    [        

Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation3

       

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation2

    [        

 

1 The Fund’s “Other Expenses” have been estimated to reflect expenses to be incurred in the first fiscal year.
2 The “Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses” will not correlate to the ratios of net and total expenses to average net assets provided in the Financial Highlights (when available), which will reflect the operating expenses of the Fund and will not include “Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses.” Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are indirect fees and expenses that the Fund incurs from investing in the shares of Underlying ETFs (as defined below). The actual Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses will vary with changes in the allocations of the Fund’s assets. These expenses are based on the total expense ratio of the Underlying ETFs disclosed in each Underlying ETF’s most recent shareholder report.
3 The Investment Adviser has agreed to reduce or limit “Other Expenses” (acquired fund fees and expenses, offering costs, taxes, interest, brokerage fees, shareholder meeting, litigation, short sale, dividend, indemnification and extraordinary expenses) to [            ]% of the Fund’s average daily net assets through at least [            ], and prior to such date the Investment Adviser may not terminate the arrangement without the approval of the Board of Trustees.

Expense Example

This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of owning Shares of the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that the Example incorporates the fee waiver and expense limitation arrangement for only the first year). The Example does not taken into account brokerage commissions that you may pay on your purchases and sales of Shares of the Fund. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

 

1 Year

  

3 Years

$[    ]

   $[    ]

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund and each Underlying ETF (as defined below) may pay transaction costs when it buys and sells securities or instruments (i.e., “turns over” its portfolio). A high rate of portfolio turnover may result in increased transaction costs, including brokerage commissions, which must be borne by the Fund and each Underlying ETF and their shareholders, and is also likely to result in higher short-term capital gains for taxable shareholders. These costs are not reflected in total annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, but are reflected in the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund has not yet commenced operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no portfolio turnover information quoted for the Fund.

 

1


 

Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing at least 80% of its assets (exclusive of collateral held from securities lending) in securities included in its underlying index. The Fund is a “fund of funds,” as it primarily invests its assets in the shares of exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and other exchange-traded products (“ETPs”) included in the Index (collectively, the “Underlying ETFs”).

The Index seeks to approximate the return pattern characteristics of hedge funds that employ equity long short investment strategies. Hedge fund equity long short strategies generally involve long and short investing, based on fundamental evaluations, research and various analytical measurements, in equity and equity-related investments. Equity long short managers may, for example, buy stocks that they expect to outperform or that they believe are undervalued, and may also sell short stocks or indices that they believe will underperform, or that they believe are overvalued. Within this framework, equity long short managers may exhibit a range of styles, including longer term buy-and-hold investing and/or shorter term trading styles.

Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. (the “Index Provider”) constructs the Index in accordance with a rules-based methodology. The Index is comprised of shares of ETFs and ETPs listed in the United States that track indices including, among other things, U.S. equity markets, U.S. equity sectors and foreign and emerging market equity markets. The Index will obtain short exposure through the inclusion of inverse ETFs, which seek to deliver the opposite performance (i.e., the inverse of the performance) of an underlying index or benchmark that they track and to profit from the downward movement of markets.

The universe of hedge funds is identified by screening a hedge fund database for hedge funds classified as implementing an equity long short hedge fund strategy. The universe is then divided into one or more subcategories. For each subcategory, the returns for the hedge funds within the subcategory for a specified period of time (the “target returns”) are determined. Further, a set of “risk factors” is defined to describe the return drivers in each subcategory. Risk factors may include “market factors” (for example, commonly used equity market indices) as well as “strategy factors” (for example, gaining long exposure to small market capitalization stocks and short exposure to large capitalization stocks). Each risk factor is represented by one or more publicly available financial indices and, in the case of multiple indices, includes a mathematical description of how to combine these indices into a single factor. The target returns as well as the index-based returns of the risk factors serve as the input into a proprietary methodology, which determines the relative weighting of the specified risk factors for each subcategory to best approximate the subcategory target returns. Each subcategory’s factors are then aggregated into overall factor exposures to approximate the return pattern characteristics of the overall equity long short hedge fund universe based on the relative importance of each subcategory. Finally, the Index methodology determines the Index constituents by identifying Underlying ETFs that correspond to the indices represented by the overall factor exposures.

The Index does not include hedge funds (i.e., unlisted, privately offered funds) and may not succeed in approximating the returns of long short hedge funds. The components of the Index may change over time. The percentage of the portfolio exposed to any asset class, country or geographic region will vary from time to time as the weightings of the securities within the Index change, and the Fund may not be invested in each asset class, country or geographic region at all times. The Index is reconstituted and rebalanced on a monthly basis.

The Fund seeks to invest in the Underlying ETFs in approximately the same weighting that such Underlying ETFs have within the Index at the applicable time. The Fund’s investments in certain Underlying ETFs may give exposure to merger arbitrage strategies. Merger arbitrage strategies utilize an investment methodology that seeks opportunities in equity and equity-related instruments of companies which are currently engaged in a corporate transaction. Merger arbitrage generally involves transactions that have been publicly announced. The transactions can be international and/or cross-border, often involving multiple regulatory institutions.

ETPs included in the Index may include corporations, trusts, and publicly traded partnerships. The Index may include ETFs and other ETPs that are not registered as investment companies under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”), and, therefore, that are not subject to all of the investor protections of the 1940 Act.

Principal Risks of the Fund:

Loss of money is a risk of investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any government agency. The Fund should not be relied upon as a complete investment program. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Investments in the Fund involve substantial risks which prospective investors should consider carefully before investing.

Expenses.  By investing in the Underlying ETFs indirectly through the Fund, the investor will incur not only a proportionate share of the expenses of the Underlying ETFs held by the Fund (including operating costs and investment management fees), but also expenses of the Fund.

Index Risk.  The Fund will be negatively affected by general declines in the Underlying ETFs and asset classes represented in the Index. In addition, because the Fund is not “actively” managed, unless a specific Underlying ETF is removed from the Index, the Fund generally would not sell an Underlying ETF because the Underlying ETF’s securities were in financial trouble. Market disruptions and

 

2


regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Index. The Fund also does not attempt to take defensive positions under any market conditions, including declining markets. Therefore, the Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that may actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or to lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers. The Index Provider relies on third party data it believes to be reliable in constructing the Index, but it does not guarantee the accuracy of such third party data. The Index is new and has a limited performance history. Any new index is subject to errors in its construction. The Index may not be successful in seeking to replicate the returns of hedge funds that employ equity long short investment strategies.

Investing in the Underlying ETFs.  The investments of the Fund are concentrated in the Underlying ETFs, and the Fund’s investment performance is directly related to the investment performance of the Underlying ETFs it holds. There is a risk that the Index Provider’s evaluations and assumptions regarding the asset classes represented in the Index may be incorrect based on actual market conditions. In addition, at times, certain segments of the market represented by constituent Underlying ETFs in the Index may be out of favor and underperform other segments.

Investments of the Underlying ETFs and Other Underlying ETPs.  Because the Fund invests in the Underlying ETFs that comprise the Index, the Fund’s shareholders will be affected by the investment policies and practices of the Underlying ETFs. Most inverse ETFs reset daily, meaning that they are designed to achieve their stated objectives on a daily basis. Their performance over longer period of times can differ significantly from the performance (or the inverse of the performance) of their underlying index or benchmark over the same period of time. The use of futures contracts, options, forward contracts, swaps and certain other instruments by Underlying ETFs may have the economic effect of financial leverage. Through its position in ETPs, the Fund is subject to the risks associated with the ETPs’ investments. In addition, an ETP’s lack of liquidity can result in its value being more volatile than the underlying portfolio of investment or reference components. See the “Principal Risks of the Underlying ETFs” below.

Market Risk.  The value of the instruments, including the Underlying ETFs, in which the Fund invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies, particular sectors or governments and/or general economic conditions throughout the world due to increasingly interconnected global economies and financial markets.

Net Asset Value Risk.  The net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund and the value of your investment may fluctuate. Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for Shares of the Fund may result in Shares of the Fund trading at a significant premium or discount to NAV. If the Fund purchases shares of an Underlying ETF at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells shares of an Underlying ETF at a time when the market price is at a discount to NAV, the Fund may sustain losses. Similarly, if a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses.

Tracking Error Risk.  Tracking error is the divergence of the Fund’s performance from that of the Index. The performance of the Fund may diverge from that of its Index for a number of reasons. Tracking error may also occur because of transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of cash, differences in accrual of dividends, changes to the Index or the need to meet new or existing regulatory requirements, including restricted trading lists. Unlike the Fund, the returns of the Index are not reduced by investment and other operating expenses, including the trading costs associated with implementing changes to its portfolio of investments. Tracking error risk may be heightened during times of market volatility or other unusual market conditions. To the extent that the Fund calculates its NAV based on fair value prices and the value of the Index is based on securities’ closing prices (i.e., the value of the Index is not based on fair value prices), the Fund’s ability to track the Index may be adversely affected. Because the Index is not subject to the tax diversification requirements to which the Fund must adhere, the Fund may be required to deviate its investments from the securities and relative weightings of the Index. For tax efficiency purposes, the Fund may sell certain securities to realize losses, which will result in a deviation from the Index.

Valuation Risk.  The sale price the Fund could receive for an Underlying ETF or security may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the Underlying ETF or security and may differ from the values used by the Index, particularly for securities that trade in low volume or volatile markets or that are valued using a fair value methodology.

Principal Risks of the Underlying ETFs:

The investments in the Underlying ETFs are subject to change. Such changes may cause the Fund to be subject to additional or different risks than the risks listed below.

The investment program of some of the Underlying ETFs is speculative, entails substantial risks and includes alternative investment techniques that may not be employed by traditional funds. The investment techniques of some of the Underlying ETFs (if they do not perform as designed) may increase the volatility of performance and the risk of investment loss, including the loss of the entire amount that is invested, and there can be no assurance that the investment objective of those Underlying ETFs will be achieved. Moreover, certain investment techniques which certain Underlying ETFs may employ in their investment programs can substantially increase the adverse impact to which those Underlying ETFs’ investments may be subject.

 

3


There is no assurance that the investment processes of those Underlying ETFs will be successful, that the techniques utilized therein will be implemented successfully or that they are adequate for their intended uses, or that the discretionary element of the investment processes of those Underlying ETFs will be exercised in a manner that is successful or that is not adverse to the Fund.

Cash Transaction Risk.  Unlike most ETFs, certain Underlying ETFs effect creations and redemptions principally for cash, rather than principally for in-kind securities, because of the nature of such Underlying ETFs’ investments. As such, investments in Underlying ETFs may be less tax efficient than an investment in conventional ETFs.

Depositary Receipts Risk.  Foreign securities may trade in the form of depositary receipts, which include American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) (collectively “Depositary Receipts”). To the extent an Underlying ETF acquires Depositary Receipts through banks which do not have a contractual relationship with the foreign issuer of the security underlying the Depositary Receipts to issue and service such unsponsored Depositary Receipts, there may be an increased possibility that an Underlying ETF would not become aware of and be able to respond to corporate actions such as stock splits or rights offerings involving the foreign issuer in a timely manner. In addition, the lack of information may result in inefficiencies in the valuation of such instruments. Investment in Depositary Receipts does not eliminate all the risks inherent in investing in securities of non-U.S. issuers. The market value of Depositary Receipts is dependent upon the market value of the underlying securities and fluctuations in the relative value of the currencies in which the Depositary Receipts and the underlying securities are quoted.

Derivatives Risk.  Loss may result from an Underlying ETF’s investments in [options, forwards, futures, swaps, structured securities and other derivative instruments]. These instruments may be illiquid, difficult to price and leveraged so that small changes in the value of underlying instruments may produce disproportionate losses to the Underlying ETF. Derivatives are also subject to counterparty risk, which is the risk that the other party in the transaction will not fulfill its contractual obligations.

Expenses Risk.  Because the Underlying ETFs may invest in pooled investment vehicles (including, among others, investment companies and ETFs), the investor will incur indirectly through the Fund a proportionate share of the expenses of the other pooled investment vehicles held by the Underlying ETF (including operating costs and investment management fees), in addition to the expenses of the Underlying ETF.

Foreign and Emerging Countries Risk.  Foreign securities may be subject to risk of loss because of more or less foreign government regulation, less public information and less economic, political and social stability in the countries in which an Underlying ETF invests. Loss may also result from the imposition of exchange controls, confiscations and other government restrictions by the United States or other governments, or from problems in registration, settlement or custody. Foreign risk also involves the risk of negative foreign currency rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which or an Underlying ETF has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. To the extent that an Underlying ETF also invests in issuers located in emerging and frontier markets, these risks may be more pronounced. The securities markets of most emerging countries are less liquid, are especially subject to greater price volatility, have smaller market capitalizations, have more or less government regulation and may not be subject to as extensive and frequent accounting, financial and other reporting requirements as the securities markets of more developed countries. Further, investment in securities of issuers located in certain emerging countries involves risk of loss resulting from problems in registration, settlement or custody and substantial economic and political disruptions. These risks are not normally associated with investments in more developed countries.

Geographic Risk.  Concentration of the investments of an Underlying ETF in issuers located in a particular country or region will subject the Underlying ETF, to a greater extent than if investments were less concentrated, to the risks of volatile economic cycles and/or conditions and developments that may be particular to that country or region, such as: adverse securities markets; adverse exchange rates; social, political, regulatory, economic or environmental developments; or natural disasters.

Industry Concentration Risk.  To the extent that an Underlying ETF concentrates in the securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector, the Fund also will generally concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent. By concentrating its investments in an industry or sector, the Underlying ETF may face more risks than if it were diversified broadly over numerous industries or sectors.

Investment Style Risk.  An Underlying ETF may outperform or underperform other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles.

Management Risk.  Certain Underlying ETFs are subject to management risk because they are actively managed portfolios. In managing such an Underlying ETF’s portfolio securities, an investment adviser will apply investment techniques and risk analyses in making investment decisions for the Underlying ETF, but there can be no guarantee that these will produce the desired results.

Mid-Cap and Small-Cap Risk.  Certain of the Underlying ETFs may make investments mid-capitalization and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than those associated with larger, more established companies. These securities may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and may lack sufficient market liquidity, and these issuers often face greater business risks.

 

4


 

Non-Diversification Risk.  Certain of the Underlying ETFs are non-diversified, meaning that they are permitted to invest a larger percentage of their assets in fewer issuers than “diversified” funds. Thus, such an Underlying ETF may be more susceptible to adverse developments affecting any single issuer held in its portfolio, and may be more susceptible to greater losses because of these developments.

Sampling Risk.  Certain Underlying ETFs’ use of a representative sampling strategy may cause the Underlying ETF to be less correlated to the return of its underlying index than if the Underlying ETF held all of the securities in its underlying index. As a result, an adverse development to an issuer of securities that an Underlying ETF holds could result in a greater decline in the Underlying ETF’s net asset value than would be the case if the Underlying ETF held all of the securities in its underlying index.

Short Position Risk.  Certain Underlying ETFs may engage in short sales. Taking short positions involves leverage of the Underlying ETF’s assets and presents various risks. If the price of the underlying instrument or market on which the Underlying ETF has taken a short position increases, then the Underlying ETF will incur a loss equal to the increase in price from the time that the short position was entered into plus any related interest payments or other fees. Taking short positions involves the risk that losses may be disproportionate, may exceed the amount invested, and may be unlimited. To the extent the Underlying ETF uses the proceeds it receives from a short position to take additional long positions, the risks associated with the short position, including leverage risks, may be heightened, because doing so increases the exposure of the Underlying ETF to the markets and therefore could magnify changes to the Underlying ETF’s NAV.

Stock Risk.  Stock prices have historically risen and fallen in periodic cycles. U.S. and foreign stock markets have experienced periods of substantial price volatility in the past and may do so again in the future.

Performance

Because the Fund had not yet commenced investment operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no performance information quoted for the Fund. Once available, the Fund’s performance information will be accessible on the Fund’s website at www.gsamfunds.com.

Portfolio Management

Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. is the investment adviser for the Fund (the “Investment Adviser” or “GSAM”).

Portfolio Managers:  Steve Jeneste, CFA, Managing Director, and Raj Garigipati, Vice President, have each managed the Fund since inception.

Buying and Selling Fund Shares

The Fund will issue and redeem Shares at NAV only in a large specified number of Shares each called a “Creation Unit,” or multiples thereof. A Creation Unit consists of 50,000 Shares.

Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in secondary market transactions through brokers. Shares of the Fund are anticipated to be approved for listing and trading on the NYSE Arca, Inc. (“NYSE Arca”), subject to notice of issuance, and because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares of the Fund may trade at a price greater than or less than NAV.

Tax Information

The Fund’s distributions are taxable, and will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may become taxable upon withdrawal from such arrangements.

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

If you purchase Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), GSAM or other related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund Shares or related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

 

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Goldman Sachs Event Driven Hedge Tracker ETF—Summary

Ticker: GSED            Stock Exchange: NYSE Arca

Investment Objective

The Goldman Sachs Event Driven Hedge Tracker ETF (the “Fund”) seeks to provide investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the Goldman Sachs Event Driven Hedge Tracker Index (the “Index”).

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

The following tables describe the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold Shares of the Fund.

 

Shareholder Fees

    Non
(fees paid directly from your investment)  

Annual Fund Operating Expenses

 
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)  

Management Fee

    [        

Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fee

    0

Other Expenses1

    [         ]% 

[Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses]

    [        

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses2

    [        

Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation3

    [        

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation2

    [        

 

1  The Fund’s “Other Expenses” have been estimated to reflect expenses to be incurred in the first fiscal year.
2  The “Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses” will not correlate to the ratios of net and total expenses to average net assets provided in the Financial Highlights (when available), which will reflect the operating expenses of the Fund and will not include “Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses.” Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are indirect fees and expenses that the Fund incurs from investing in the shares of Underlying ETFs (as defined below). The actual Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses will vary with changes in the allocations of the Fund’s assets. These expenses are based on the total expense ratio of the Underlying ETFs disclosed in each Underlying ETF’s most recent shareholder report.
3  The Investment Adviser has agreed to reduce or limit “Other Expenses” (acquired fund fees and expenses, offering costs, taxes, interest, brokerage fees, shareholder meeting, litigation, short sale, dividend, indemnification and extraordinary expenses) to [            ]% of the Fund’s average daily net assets through at least [            ], and prior to such date the Investment Adviser may not terminate the arrangement without the approval of the Board of Trustees.

Expense Example

This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of owning Shares of the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. The Example does not taken into account brokerage commissions that you may pay on your purchases and sales of Shares of the Fund. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

 

1 Year

  

3 Years

$[    ]

   $[    ]

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund and each Underlying ETF (as defined below) may pay transaction costs when it buys and sells securities or instruments (i.e. “turns over” its portfolio). A high rate of portfolio turnover may result in increased transaction costs, including brokerage commissions, which must be borne by the Fund and each Underlying ETF and their shareholders, and is also likely to result in higher short-term capital gains for taxable shareholders. These costs are not reflected in total annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, but are reflected in the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund has not yet commenced operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no portfolio turnover information quoted for the Fund.

Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing at least 80% of its assets (exclusive of collateral held from securities lending) in securities included in its underlying index. The Fund is a “fund of funds,” as it primarily invests its assets in the shares of

 

6


exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and other exchange-traded products (“ETPs”) included in the Index (collectively, the “Underlying ETFs”).

The Index seeks to approximate the return pattern characteristics of hedge funds that employ event driven investment styles. Hedge fund event driven strategies seek to achieve gains from market movements in security prices caused by specific corporate events or changes in perceived relative value. These strategies may include, among others, merger arbitrage, distressed credit, opportunistic credit and value with a catalyst. Merger arbitrage investing involves long and/or short investments in securities affected by a corporate merger or acquisition. Distressed credit investing typically involves the purchase of securities or other financial instruments—usually bonds or bank loans—of companies that are in, or are about to enter, bankruptcy or financial distress. Opportunistic credit investing generally involves investing across the capital structure (which could include, investing in both mezzanine debt and convertible securities of an issuer and/or adjusting exposures across fixed income and floating rate market segments based on perceived opportunity and current market conditions). This can be done by taking a long position in a credit security or other financial instrument that is believed to be underpriced or a short position in a credit security or other financial instrument that is believed to be overpriced. Value with a catalyst investing involves taking a view on the likelihood and potential stock price outcome of corporate events such as divestitures, spin-offs, material litigation, changes in management, or large share buybacks.

Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. (the “Index Provider”) constructs the Index in accordance with a rules-based methodology. The Index is comprised of shares of ETFs and ETPs listed in the United States that track indices including, among other things, foreign equity markets and non-investment grade bonds. The Index will obtain short exposure through the inclusion of inverse ETFs, which seek to deliver the opposite performance (i.e., the inverse of the performance) of an underlying index or benchmark that they track and to profit from the downward movement of markets.

The universe of hedge funds is identified by screening a hedge fund database for hedge funds classified as implementing an event driven hedge fund strategy. The universe is then divided into one or more subcategories. For each subcategory, the returns for the hedge funds within the subcategory for a specified period of time (the “target returns”) are determined. Further, a set of “risk factors” is defined to describe the return drivers in each subcategory. Risk factors may include “market factors” (for example, commonly used equity market indices) as well as “strategy factors” (for example, gaining short exposure to the volatility of a market index). Each risk factor is represented by one or more publicly available financial indices and, in the case of multiple indices, includes a mathematical description of how to combine these indices into a single factor. The target returns as well as the index-based returns of the risk factors serve as the input into a proprietary methodology, which determines the relative weighting of the specified risk factors for each subcategory to best approximate the subcategory target returns. Each subcategory’s factors are then aggregated into overall factor exposures to approximate the return pattern characteristics of the overall event driven hedge fund universe based on the relative importance of each subcategory. Finally, the Index methodology determines the Index constituents by identifying Underlying ETFs that correspond to the indices represented by the overall factor exposures.

The Index does not include hedge funds (i.e., unlisted, privately offered funds) and may not succeed in approximating the returns of event driven hedge funds. The components of the Index may change over time. The percentage of the portfolio exposed to any asset class, country or geographic region will vary from time to time as the weightings of the securities within the Index change, and the Fund may not be invested in each asset class, country or geographic region at all times. The Index is reconstituted and rebalanced on a monthly basis.

The Fund seeks to invest in the Underlying ETFs in approximately the same weighting that such Underlying ETFs have within the Index at the applicable time. The Fund’s investments in certain Underlying ETFs give exposure to merger arbitrage and/or volatility strategies. Merger arbitrage strategies utilize an investment methodology that seeks opportunities in equity and equity-related instruments of companies which are currently engaged in a corporate transaction. Merger arbitrage generally involves transactions that have been publicly announced. The transactions can be international and/or cross-border, often involving multiple regulatory institutions. Volatility strategies involve seeking to exploit mispricings in volatility between options or between the relative volatility of options versus their underlying securities. These strategies seek to generate returns that have low correlations with other asset classes.

ETPs included in the Index may include corporations, trusts, and publicly traded partnerships. The Index may include ETFs and other ETPs that are not registered as investment companies under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”), and, therefore, that are not subject to all of the investor protections of the 1940 Act.

Principal Risks of the Fund:

Loss of money is a risk of investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any government agency. The Fund should not be relied upon as a complete investment program. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Investments in the Fund involve substantial risks which prospective investors should consider carefully before investing.

 

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Expenses.  By investing in the Underlying ETFs indirectly through the Fund, the investor will incur not only a proportionate share of the expenses of the Underlying ETFs held by the Fund (including operating costs and investment management fees), but also expenses of the Fund.

Index Risk.  The Fund will be negatively affected by general declines in the Underlying ETFs and asset classes represented in the Index. In addition, because the Fund is not “actively” managed, unless a specific Underlying ETF is removed from the Index, the Fund generally would not sell an Underlying ETF because the Underlying ETF’s securities were in financial trouble. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Index. The Fund also does not attempt to take defensive positions under any market conditions, including declining markets. Therefore, the Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that may actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or to lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers. The Index Provider relies on third party data it believes to be reliable in constructing the Index, but it does not guarantee the accuracy of such third party data. The Index is new and has a limited performance history. Any new index is subject to errors in its construction.

Investing in the Underlying ETFs.  The investments of the Fund are concentrated in the Underlying ETFs, and the Fund’s investment performance is directly related to the investment performance of the Underlying ETFs it holds. There is a risk that the Index Provider’s evaluations and assumptions regarding the asset classes represented in the Index may be incorrect based on actual market conditions. In addition, at times, certain segments of the market represented by constituent Underlying ETFs in the Index may be out of favor and underperform other segments.

Investments of the Underlying ETFs and Other Underlying ETPs.  Because the Fund invests in the Underlying ETFs that comprise the Index, the Fund’s shareholders will be affected by the investment policies and practices of the Underlying ETFs. Most inverse ETFs reset daily, meaning that they are designed to achieve their stated objectives on a daily basis. Their performance over longer period of times can differ significantly from the performance (or the inverse of the performance) of their underlying index or benchmark over the same period of time. The use of futures contracts, options, forward contracts, swaps and certain other instruments by Underlying ETFs may have the economic effect of financial leverage. Through its position in ETPs, the Fund is subject to the risks associated with the ETPs’ investments. In addition, an ETP’s lack of liquidity can result in its value being more volatile than the underlying portfolio of investment or reference components. See the “Principal Risks of the Underlying ETFs” below.

Market Risk.  The value of the instruments, including the Underlying ETFs, in which the Fund invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies, particular sectors or governments and/or general economic conditions throughout the world due to increasingly interconnected global economies and financial markets.

Net Asset Value Risk.  The net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund and the value of your investment may fluctuate. Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for Shares of the Fund may result in Shares of the Fund trading at a significant premium or discount to NAV. If the Fund purchases shares of an Underlying ETF at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells shares of an Underlying ETF at a time when the market price is at a discount to NAV, the Fund may sustain losses. Similarly, if a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses.

Tracking Error Risk.  Tracking error is the divergence of the Fund’s performance from that of the Index. The performance of the Fund may diverge from that of its Index for a number of reasons. Tracking error may occur because of transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of cash, differences in accrual of dividends, changes to the Index or the need to meet new or existing regulatory requirements. Unlike the Fund, the returns of the Index are not reduced by investment and other operating expenses, including the trading costs associated with implementing changes to its portfolio of investments. Tracking error risk may be heightened during times of market volatility or other unusual market conditions. To the extent that the Fund calculates its NAV based on fair value prices and the value of the Index is based on securities’ closing prices (i.e., the value of the Index is not based on fair value prices), the Fund’s ability to track the Index may be adversely affected. Because the Index is not subject to the tax diversification requirements to which the Fund must adhere, the Fund may be required to deviate its investments from the securities and relative weightings of the Index. For tax efficiency purposes, the Fund may sell certain securities to realize losses, which will result in a deviation from the Index.

Valuation Risk.  The sale price the Fund could receive for an Underlying ETF or security may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the Underlying ETF or security and may differ from the values used by the Index, particularly for securities that trade in low volume or volatile markets or that are valued using a fair value methodology.

 

8


 

Principal Risks of the Underlying ETFs:

The investments in the Underlying ETFs are subject to change. Such changes may cause the Fund to be subject to additional or different risks than the risks listed below.

The investment program of some of the Underlying ETFs is speculative, entails substantial risks and includes alternative investment techniques that may not be employed by traditional funds. The investment techniques of some of the Underlying ETFs (if they do not perform as designed) may increase the volatility of performance and the risk of investment loss, including the loss of the entire amount that is invested, and there can be no assurance that the investment objective of those Underlying ETFs will be achieved. Moreover, certain investment techniques which certain Underlying ETFs may employ in their investment programs can substantially increase the adverse impact to which those Underlying ETFs’ investments may be subject. There is no assurance that the investment processes of those Underlying ETFs will be successful, that the techniques utilized therein will be implemented successfully or that they are adequate for their intended uses, or that the discretionary element of the investment processes of those Underlying ETFs will be exercised in a manner that is successful or that is not adverse to the Fund.

Call/Prepayment Risk.  An issuer could exercise its right to pay principal on an obligation held by an Underlying ETF (such as a mortgage-backed security) earlier than expected. This may happen when there is a decline in interest rates, when credit spreads change, or when an issuer’s credit quality improves. Under these circumstances, the Underlying ETF may be unable to recoup all of its initial investment and will also suffer from having to reinvest in lower yielding securities.

Cash Transaction Risk.  Unlike most ETFs, certain Underlying ETFs effect creations and redemptions principally for cash, rather than principally for in-kind securities, because of the nature of such Underlying ETFs’ investments. As such, investments in Underlying ETFs may be less tax efficient than an investment in conventional ETFs.

Credit/Default Risk.  An issuer or guarantor of fixed income securities or instruments held by an Underlying ETF (which may have low credit ratings) may default on its obligation to pay interest and repay principal or default on any other obligation. Additionally, the credit quality of securities may deteriorate rapidly, which may impair an Underlying ETF’s liquidity and cause significant deterioration in NAV. To the extent that an Underlying ETF invests in non-investment grade fixed income securities, these risks will be more pronounced.

Depositary Receipts Risk.  Foreign securities may trade in the form of depositary receipts, which include American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) (collectively “Depositary Receipts”). To the extent an Underlying ETF acquires Depositary Receipts through banks which do not have a contractual relationship with the foreign issuer of the security underlying the Depositary Receipts to issue and service such unsponsored Depositary Receipts, there may be an increased possibility that an Underlying ETF would not become aware of and be able to respond to corporate actions such as stock splits or rights offerings involving the foreign issuer in a timely manner. In addition, the lack of information may result in inefficiencies in the valuation of such instruments. Investment in Depositary Receipts does not eliminate all the risks inherent in investing in securities of non-U.S. issuers. The market value of Depositary Receipts is dependent upon the market value of the underlying securities and fluctuations in the relative value of the currencies in which the Depositary Receipts and the underlying securities are quoted.

Derivatives Risk.  Loss may result from an Underlying ETF’s investments in [options, forwards, futures, swaps, structured securities and other derivative instruments]. These instruments may be illiquid, difficult to price and leveraged so that small changes in the value of underlying instruments may produce disproportionate losses to the Underlying ETF. The writing and purchase of options is a highly specialized activity which involves special investment risks. The successful use of options depends in part on the ability of the Underlying ETF’s investment adviser to anticipate future price fluctuations and the degree of correlation between the options and securities (or currency) markets. Derivatives are also subject to counterparty risk, which is the risk that the other party in the transaction will not fulfill its contractual obligations.

Expenses Risk.  Because the Underlying ETFs may invest in pooled investment vehicles (including, among others, investment companies and ETFs), the investor will incur indirectly through the Fund a proportionate share of the expenses of the other pooled investment vehicles held by the Underlying ETF (including operating costs and investment management fees), in addition to the expenses of the Underlying ETF.

Foreign Countries Risk.  Foreign securities may be subject to risk of loss because of more or less foreign government regulation, less public information and less economic, political and social stability in the countries in which an Underlying ETF invests. Loss may also result from the imposition of exchange controls, confiscations and other government restrictions by the United States or other governments, or from problems in registration, settlement or custody. Foreign risk also involves the risk of negative foreign currency rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which or an Underlying ETF has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time.

 

9


 

Geographic Risk.  Concentration of the investments of an Underlying ETF in issuers located in a particular country or region will subject the Underlying ETF, to a greater extent than if investments were less concentrated, to the risks of volatile economic cycles and/or conditions and developments that may be particular to that country or region, such as: adverse securities markets; adverse exchange rates; social, political, regulatory, economic or environmental developments; or natural disasters.

Interest Rate Risk.  When interest rates increase, fixed income securities or instruments held by an Underlying ETF will generally decline in value. Long-term fixed income securities or instruments will normally have more price volatility because of this risk than short-term fixed income securities or instruments.

Industry Concentration Risk.  To the extent that an Underlying ETF concentrates in the securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector, the Fund also will generally concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent. By concentrating its investments in an industry or sector, the Underlying ETF may face more risks than if it were diversified broadly over numerous industries or sectors.

Investment Style Risk.  An Underlying ETF may outperform or underperform other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles.

Liquidity Risk.  An Underlying ETF may make investments that are illiquid or that may become less liquid in response to market developments or adverse investor perceptions. Illiquid investments may be more difficult to value. Liquidity risk may also refer to the risk that an Underlying ETF will not be able to pay redemption proceeds within the allowable time period because of unusual market conditions, an unusually high volume of redemption requests or other reasons. To meet redemption requests, an Underlying ETF may be forced to sell securities, at an unfavorable time and/or under unfavorable conditions. Liquidity risk may be the result of, among other things, the reduced number and capacity of traditional market participants to make a market in fixed income securities or the lack of an active market. The potential for liquidity risk may be magnified by a rising interest rate environment or other circumstances where investor redemptions from fixed income mutual funds may be higher than normal, potentially causing increased supply in the market due to selling activity.

Management Risk.  Certain Underlying ETFs are subject to management risk because they are actively managed portfolios. In managing such an Underlying ETF’s portfolio securities, an investment adviser will apply investment techniques and risk analyses in making investment decisions for the Underlying ETF, but there can be no guarantee that these will produce the desired results.

Mid-Cap and Small-Cap Risk.  Investments in mid-capitalization and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than those associated with larger, more established companies. These securities may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and may lack sufficient market liquidity, and these issuers often face greater business risks.

Non-Diversification Risk.  Certain of the Underlying ETFs are non-diversified, meaning that they are permitted to invest a larger percentage of their assets in fewer issuers than “diversified” funds. Thus, such an Underlying ETF may be more susceptible to adverse developments affecting any single issuer held in its portfolio, and may be more susceptible to greater losses because of these developments.

Non-Investment Grade Fixed Income Securities Risk.  Non-investment grade fixed income securities and unrated securities of comparable credit quality (commonly known as “junk bonds”) are considered speculative and are subject to the increased risk of an issuer’s inability to meet principal and interest payment obligations. These securities may be subject to greater price volatility due to such factors as specific corporate or municipal developments, interest rate sensitivity, negative perceptions of the junk bond markets generally and less secondary market liquidity.

Sampling Risk.  Certain Underlying ETFs’ use of a representative sampling strategy may cause the Underlying ETF to be less correlated to the return of its underlying index than if the Underlying ETF held all of the securities in its underlying index. As a result, an adverse development to an issuer of securities that an Underlying ETF holds could result in a greater decline in the Underlying ETF’s net asset value than would be the case if the Underlying ETF held all of the securities in its underlying index.

Short Position Risk.  Certain Underlying ETFs may engage in short sales. Taking short positions involves leverage of the Underlying ETF’s assets and presents various risks. If the price of the underlying instrument or market on which the Underlying ETF has taken a short position increases, then the Underlying ETF will incur a loss equal to the increase in price from the time that the short position was entered into plus any related interest payments or other fees. Taking short positions involves the risk that losses may be disproportionate, may exceed the amount invested, and may be unlimited. To the extent the Underlying ETF uses the proceeds it receives from a short position to take additional long positions, the risks associated with the short position, including leverage risks, may be heightened, because doing so increases the exposure of the Underlying ETF to the markets and therefore could magnify changes to the Underlying ETF’s NAV.

Stock Risk.  Stock prices have historically risen and fallen in periodic cycles. U.S. and foreign stock markets have experienced periods of substantial price volatility in the past and may do so again in the future.

 

10


 

Performance

Because the Fund had not yet commenced investment operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no performance information quoted for the Fund. Once available, the Fund’s performance information will be accessible on the Fund’s website at www.gsamfunds.com.

Portfolio Management

Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. is the investment adviser for the Fund (the “Investment Adviser” or “GSAM”).

Portfolio Managers:  Steve Jeneste, CFA, Managing Director, and Raj Garigipati, Vice President, have each managed the Fund since inception.

Buying and Selling Fund Shares

The Fund will issue and redeem Shares at NAV only in a large specified number of Shares each called a “Creation Unit,” or multiples thereof. A Creation Unit consists of 50,000 Shares.

Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in secondary market transactions through brokers. Shares of the Fund are anticipated to be approved for listing and trading on the NYSE Arca, Inc. (“NYSE Arca”), subject to notice of issuance, and because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares of the Fund may trade at a price greater than or less than NAV.

Tax Information

The Fund’s distributions are taxable, and will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may become taxable upon withdrawal from such arrangements.

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

If you purchase Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), GSAM or other related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund Shares or related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

 

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LOGO

 

Goldman Sachs Macro Hedge Tracker ETF—Summary

Ticker: GSMC             Stock Exchange: NYSE Arca

Investment Objective

The Goldman Sachs Macro Hedge Tracker ETF (the “Fund”) seeks to provide investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the Goldman Sachs Macro Hedge Tracker Index (the “Index”).

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

The following tables describe the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold Shares of the Fund.

 

Shareholder Fees

    None   
(fees paid directly from your investment)  

Annual Fund Operating Expenses

 
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)  

Management Fee

    [        

Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fee

    0

Other Expenses1

    [         ]% 

[Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses]

    [        

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses2

    [        

Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation3

    [        

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation2

    [        

 

1 The Fund’s “Other Expenses” have been estimated to reflect expenses to be incurred in the first fiscal year.
2 The “Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses” will not correlate to the ratios of net and total expenses to average net assets provided in the Financial Highlights (when available), which will reflect the operating expenses of the Fund and will not include “Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses.” Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are indirect fees and expenses that the Fund incurs from investing in the shares of Underlying ETFs (as defined below). The actual Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses will vary with changes in the allocations of the Fund’s assets. These expenses are based on the total expense ratio of the Underlying ETFs disclosed in each Underlying ETF’s most recent shareholder report.
3 The Investment Adviser has agreed to reduce or limit “Other Expenses” (acquired fund fees and expenses, offering costs, taxes, interest, brokerage fees, shareholder meeting, litigation, short sale, dividend, indemnification and extraordinary expenses) to [            ]% of the Fund’s average daily net assets through at least [            ], and prior to such date the Investment Adviser may not terminate the arrangement without the approval of the Board of Trustees.

Expense Example

This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of owning Shares of the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that the Example incorporates the fee waiver and expense limitation arrangement for only the first year). The Example does not taken into account brokerage commissions that you may pay on your purchases and sales of Shares of the Fund. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

 

1 Year

  

3 Years

$[    ]

   $[    ]

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund and each Underlying ETF (as defined below) may pay transaction costs when it buys and sells securities or instruments (i.e., “turns over” its portfolio). A high rate of portfolio turnover may result in increased transaction costs, including brokerage commissions, which must be borne by the Fund and each Underlying ETF and their shareholders, and is also likely to result in higher short-term capital gains for taxable shareholders. These costs are not reflected in total annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, but are reflected in the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund has not yet commenced operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no portfolio turnover information quoted for the Fund.

 

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Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing at least 80% of its assets (exclusive of collateral held from securities lending) in securities included in its underlying index. The Fund is a “fund of funds,” as it primarily invests its assets in the shares of exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and other exchange-traded products (“ETPs”) included in the Index (collectively, the “Underlying ETFs”).

The Index seeks to approximate the return pattern characteristics of hedge funds that employ macro investment strategies. Hedge fund macro strategies typically employ top-down macro analysis (e.g., political or macroeconomic trends) to identify dislocations in equity, fixed income, currency and commodity markets that are expected to lead to large price movements. Managers that employ a macro style may select their investments based upon fundamental analysis (determining an asset’s value based upon factors that directly affect its value).

Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. (the “Index Provider”) constructs the Index in accordance with a rules-based methodology. The Index is comprised of shares of ETFs and ETPs listed in the United States that track indices including, among other things, foreign and emerging market equity markets, foreign currencies, commodities and commodities sectors. The Index will obtain short exposure through the inclusion of inverse ETFs, which seek to deliver the opposite performance (i.e., the inverse of the performance) of an underlying index or benchmark that they track and to profit from the downward movement of markets.

The universe of hedge funds is identified by screening a hedge fund database for hedge funds classified as implementing a macro hedge fund strategy. The universe is then divided into one or more subcategories. For each subcategory, the returns for the hedge funds within the subcategory for a specified period of time (the “target returns”) are determined. Further, a set of “risk factors” is defined to describe the return drivers in each subcategory. Risk factors may include “market factors” (for example, commonly used equity market indices) as well as “strategy factors” (for example, gaining long and short exposures based on a trend signal). Each risk factor is represented by one or more publicly available financial indices and, in the case of multiple indices, includes a mathematical description of how to combine these indices into a single factor. The target returns as well as the index-based returns of the risk factors serve as the input into a proprietary methodology, which determines the relative weighting of the specified risk factors for each subcategory to best approximate the subcategory target returns. Each subcategory’s factors are then aggregated into overall factor exposures to approximate the return pattern characteristics of the overall macro hedge fund universe based on the relative importance of each subcategory. Finally, the Index methodology determines the Index constituents by identifying Underlying ETFs that correspond to the indices represented by the overall factor exposures.

The Index does not include hedge funds (i.e., unlisted, privately offered funds) and may not succeed in approximating the returns of macro hedge funds. The components of the Index may change over time. The percentage of the portfolio exposed to any asset class, country or geographic region will vary from time to time as the weightings of the securities within the Index change, and the Fund may not be invested in each asset class, country or geographic region at all times. The Index is reconstituted and rebalanced on a monthly basis.

The Fund seeks to invest in the Underlying ETFs in approximately the same weighting that such Underlying ETFs have within the Index at the applicable time. The Fund’s investments in certain Underlying ETFs may give exposure to managed futures and/or currency carry strategies. Managed futures strategies attempt to identify price trends in equity, fixed income, commodities and/or currency instruments or markets, by taking long and short positions in a portfolio of futures contracts and other derivatives. Currency carry strategies invest in long positions in currencies with relatively high yield interest rates and in short positions in currencies with relatively low yield interest rates.

ETPs included in the Index may include corporations, trusts, and publicly traded partnerships, including those that provide exposure to commodities. The Index may include ETFs and other ETPs that are not registered as investment companies under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”), and, therefore, that are not subject to all of the investor protections of the 1940 Act.

Principal Risks of the Fund:

Loss of money is a risk of investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any government agency. The Fund should not be relied upon as a complete investment program. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Investments in the Fund involve substantial risks which prospective investors should consider carefully before investing.

Expenses.  By investing in the Underlying ETFs indirectly through the Fund, the investor will incur not only a proportionate share of the expenses of the Underlying ETFs held by the Fund (including operating costs and investment management fees), but also expenses of the Fund.

 

 

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Index Risk.  The Fund will be negatively affected by general declines in the Underlying ETFs and asset classes represented in the Index. In addition, because the Fund is not “actively” managed, unless a specific Underlying ETF is removed from the Index, the Fund generally would not sell an Underlying ETF because the Underlying ETF’s securities were in financial trouble. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Index. The Fund also does not attempt to take defensive positions under any market conditions, including declining markets. Therefore, the Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that may actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or to lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers. The Index Provider relies on third party data it believes to be reliable in constructing the Index, but it does not guarantee the accuracy of such third party data. The Index is new and has a limited performance history. Any new index is subject to errors in its construction.

Investing in the Underlying ETFs.  The investments of the Fund are concentrated in the Underlying ETFs, and the Fund’s investment performance is directly related to the investment performance of the Underlying ETFs it holds. There is a risk that the Index Provider’s evaluations and assumptions regarding the asset classes represented in the Index may be incorrect based on actual market conditions. In addition, at times, certain segments of the market represented by constituent Underlying ETFs in the Index may be out of favor and underperform other segments.

Investments of the Underlying ETFs and Other Underlying ETPs.  Because the Fund invests in the Underlying ETFs that comprise the Index, the Fund’s shareholders will be affected by the investment policies and practices of the Underlying ETFs. Most inverse ETFs reset daily, meaning that they are designed to achieve their stated objectives on a daily basis. Their performance over longer period of times can differ significantly from the performance (or the inverse of the performance) of their underlying index or benchmark over the same period of time. The use of futures contracts, options, forward contracts, swaps and certain other instruments by Underlying ETFs may have the economic effect of financial leverage. Through its position in ETPs, the Fund is subject to the risks associated with the ETPs’ investments. In addition, an ETP’s lack of liquidity can result in its value being more volatile than the underlying portfolio of investment or reference components. See the “Principal Risks of the Underlying ETFs” below.

Market Risk.  The value of the instruments, including the Underlying ETFs, in which the Fund invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies, particular sectors or governments and/or general economic conditions throughout the world due to increasingly interconnected global economies and financial markets.

Net Asset Value Risk.  The net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund and the value of your investment may fluctuate. Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for Shares of the Fund may result in Shares of the Fund trading at a significant premium or discount to NAV. If the Fund purchases shares of an Underlying ETF at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells shares of an Underlying ETF at a time when the market price is at a discount to NAV, the Fund may sustain losses. Similarly, if a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses.

Tracking Error Risk.  Tracking error is the divergence of the Fund’s performance from that of the Index. The performance of the Fund may diverge from that of its Index for a number of reasons. Tracking error may occur because of transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of cash, differences in accrual of dividends, changes to the Index or the need to meet new or existing regulatory requirements. Unlike the Fund, the returns of the Index are not reduced by investment and other operating expenses, including the trading costs associated with implementing changes to its portfolio of investments. Tracking error risk may be heightened during times of market volatility or other unusual market conditions. To the extent that the Fund calculates its NAV based on fair value prices and the value of the Index is based on securities’ closing prices (i.e., the value of the Index is not based on fair value prices), the Fund’s ability to track the Index may be adversely affected. Because the Index is not subject to the tax diversification requirements to which the Fund must adhere, the Fund may be required to deviate its investments from the securities and relative weightings of the Index. For tax efficiency purposes, the Fund may sell certain securities to realize losses, which will result in a deviation from the Index.

Valuation Risk.  The sale price the Fund could receive for an Underlying ETF or security may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the Underlying ETF or security and may differ from the values used by the Index, particularly for securities that trade in low volume or volatile markets or that are valued using a fair value methodology.

Principal Risks of the Underlying ETFs:

The investments in the Underlying ETFs are subject to change. Such changes may cause the Fund to be subject to additional or different risks than the risks listed below.

The investment program of some of the Underlying ETFs is speculative, entails substantial risks and includes alternative investment techniques that may not be employed by traditional funds. The investment techniques of some of the Underlying ETFs (if they do not perform as designed) may increase the volatility of performance and the risk of investment loss, including the loss of the entire amount that is invested, and there can be no assurance that the investment objective of those Underlying

 

14


ETFs will be achieved. Moreover, certain investment techniques which certain Underlying ETFs may employ in their investment programs can substantially increase the adverse impact to which those Underlying ETFs’ investments may be subject. There is no assurance that the investment processes of those Underlying ETFs will be successful, that the techniques utilized therein will be implemented successfully or that they are adequate for their intended uses, or that the discretionary element of the investment processes of those Underlying ETFs will be exercised in a manner that is successful or that is not adverse to the Fund.

Cash Transaction Risk.  Unlike most ETFs, certain Underlying ETFs effect creations and redemptions principally for cash, rather than principally for in-kind securities, because of the nature of such Underlying ETFs’ investments. As such, investments in Underlying ETFs may be less tax efficient than an investment in conventional ETFs.

Commodity Sector Risk.  Exposure to the commodities markets may subject certain of the Underlying ETFs to greater volatility than investments in more traditional securities. The value of commodity-linked investments may be affected by changes in overall market movements, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates, or factors affecting a particular industry or commodity, such as drought, floods, weather, livestock disease, embargoes, tariffs and international economic, political and regulatory developments. The prices of energy, industrial metals, precious metals, agriculture and livestock sector commodities may fluctuate widely due to factors such as changes in value, supply and demand and governmental regulatory policies. The commodity-linked swaps in which certain of the Underlying ETFs invest may involve companies in the financial services sector and events affecting the financial services sector may cause the Underlying ETF’s share value to fluctuate.

Depositary Receipts Risk.  Foreign securities may trade in the form of depositary receipts, which include American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) (collectively “Depositary Receipts”). To the extent an Underlying ETF acquires Depositary Receipts through banks which do not have a contractual relationship with the foreign issuer of the security underlying the Depositary Receipts to issue and service such unsponsored Depositary Receipts, there may be an increased possibility that an Underlying ETF would not become aware of and be able to respond to corporate actions such as stock splits or rights offerings involving the foreign issuer in a timely manner. In addition, the lack of information may result in inefficiencies in the valuation of such instruments. Investment in Depositary Receipts does not eliminate all the risks inherent in investing in securities of non-U.S. issuers. The market value of Depositary Receipts is dependent upon the market value of the underlying securities and fluctuations in the relative value of the currencies in which the Depositary Receipts and the underlying securities are quoted.

Derivatives Risk.  Loss may result from an Underlying ETF’s investments in [options, forwards, futures, swaps, structured securities and other derivative instruments]. These instruments may be illiquid, difficult to price and leveraged so that small changes in the value of underlying instruments may produce disproportionate losses to the Underlying ETF. Futures markets are highly volatile and an Underlying ETF’s use of futures may increase the volatility of the Underlying ETF’s NAV. While an Underlying ETF may benefit from the use of futures, unanticipated changes in interest rates, securities prices or currency exchange rates may result in poorer overall performance than if the Underlying ETF had not entered into any futures contracts. Derivatives are also subject to counterparty risk, which is the risk that the other party in the transaction will not fulfill its contractual obligations.

Expenses Risk.  Because the Underlying ETFs may invest in pooled investment vehicles (including, among others, investment companies and ETFs), the investor will incur indirectly through the Fund a proportionate share of the expenses of the other pooled investment vehicles held by the Underlying ETF (including operating costs and investment management fees), in addition to the expenses of the Underlying ETF.

Foreign and Emerging Countries Risk.  Foreign securities may be subject to risk of loss because of more or less foreign government regulation, less public information and less economic, political and social stability in the countries in which an Underlying ETF invests. Loss may also result from the imposition of exchange controls, confiscations and other government restrictions by the United States or other governments, or from problems in registration, settlement or custody. Foreign risk also involves the risk of negative foreign currency rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which or an Underlying ETF has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. To the extent that an Underlying ETF also invests in issuers located in emerging and frontier markets, these risks may be more pronounced. The securities markets of most emerging countries are less liquid, are especially subject to greater price volatility, have smaller market capitalizations, have more or less government regulation and may not be subject to as extensive and frequent accounting, financial and other reporting requirements as the securities markets of more developed countries. Further, investment in securities of issuers located in certain emerging countries involves risk of loss resulting from problems in registration, settlement or custody and substantial economic and political disruptions. These risks are not normally associated with investments in more developed countries.

Geographic Risk.  Concentration of the investments of an Underlying ETF in issuers located in a particular country or region will subject the Underlying ETF, to a greater extent than if investments were less concentrated, to the risks of volatile economic cycles and/or conditions and developments that may be particular to that country or region, such as: adverse securities markets; adverse exchange rates; social, political, regulatory, economic or environmental developments; or natural disasters.

 

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Industry Concentration Risk.  To the extent that an Underlying ETF concentrates in the securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector, the Fund also will generally concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent. By concentrating its investments in an industry or sector, the Underlying ETF may face more risks than if it were diversified broadly over numerous industries or sectors.

Investment Style Risk.  An Underlying ETF may outperform or underperform other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles. An Underlying ETF’s use of managed futures strategies may underperform as managed futures have historically offered weaker performance in range-bound or highly volatile markets. Also, an Underlying ETF’s currency carry trade strategies may fail to achieve their intended results due to fluctuations in currency exchange rates.

Liquidity Risk.  An Underlying ETF may make investments that are illiquid or that may become less liquid in response to market developments or adverse investor perceptions. Illiquid investments may be more difficult to value. Liquidity risk may also refer to the risk that an Underlying ETF will not be able to pay redemption proceeds within the allowable time period because of unusual market conditions, an unusually high volume of redemption requests or other reasons. To meet redemption requests, an Underlying ETF may be forced to sell securities, at an unfavorable time and/or under unfavorable conditions. Liquidity risk may be the result of, among other things, the reduced number and capacity of traditional market participants to make a market in fixed income securities or the lack of an active market. The potential for liquidity risk may be magnified by a rising interest rate environment or other circumstances where investor redemptions from fixed income mutual funds may be higher than normal, potentially causing increased supply in the market due to selling activity.

Management Risk.  Certain Underlying ETFs are subject to management risk because they are actively managed portfolios. In managing such an Underlying ETF’s portfolio securities, an investment adviser will apply investment techniques and risk analyses in making investment decisions for the Underlying ETF, but there can be no guarantee that these will produce the desired results.

Mid-Cap and Small-Cap Risk.  Certain of the Underlying ETFs may make investments mid-capitalization and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than those associated with larger, more established companies. These securities may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and may lack sufficient market liquidity, and these issuers often face greater business risks.

Non-Diversification Risk.  Certain of the Underlying ETFs are non-diversified, meaning that they are permitted to invest a larger percentage of their assets in fewer issuers than “diversified” funds. Thus, such an Underlying ETF may be more susceptible to adverse developments affecting any single issuer held in its portfolio, and may be more susceptible to greater losses because of these developments.

Non-Hedging Foreign Currency Trading Risk.  The Underlying ETFs may engage in forward foreign currency transactions for speculative purposes. The Underlying ETFs may purchase or sell foreign currencies through the use of forward contracts based on the applicable Underlying ETF’s investment adviser’s judgment regarding the direction of the market for a particular foreign currency or currencies. In pursuing this strategy, the Underlying ETFs seek to profit from anticipated movements in currency rates by establishing “long” and/or “short” positions in forward contracts on various foreign currencies. Foreign exchange rates can be extremely volatile and a variance in the degree of volatility of the market or in the direction of the market from the Underlying ETF’s expectations may produce significant losses to the Fund.

Sampling Risk.  Certain Underlying ETFs’ use of a representative sampling strategy may cause the Underlying ETF to be less correlated to the return of its underlying index than if the Underlying ETF held all of the securities in its underlying index. As a result, an adverse development to an issuer of securities that an Underlying ETF holds could result in a greater decline in the Underlying ETF’s net asset value than would be the case if the Underlying ETF held all of the securities in its underlying index.

Short Position Risk.  Certain Underlying ETFs may engage in short sales. Taking short positions involves leverage of the Underlying ETF’s assets and presents various risks. If the price of the underlying instrument or market on which the Underlying ETF has taken a short position increases, then the Underlying ETF will incur a loss equal to the increase in price from the time that the short position was entered into plus any related interest payments or other fees. Taking short positions involves the risk that losses may be disproportionate, may exceed the amount invested, and may be unlimited. To the extent the Underlying ETF uses the proceeds it receives from a short position to take additional long positions, the risks associated with the short position, including leverage risks, may be heightened, because doing so increases the exposure of the Underlying ETF to the markets and therefore could magnify changes to the Underlying ETF’s NAV.

Stock Risk.  Stock prices have historically risen and fallen in periodic cycles. U.S. and foreign stock markets have experienced periods of substantial price volatility in the past and may do so again in the future.

Tax Risk.  The tax treatment of certain of an Underlying ETF’s commodity-linked investments may be adversely affected by future legislation, Treasury Regulations, and/or guidance issued by the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) that could affect whether income from such investments is “qualifying income” under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), or otherwise affect the character, timing and/or amount of the Underlying ETF’s taxable income for any gains and distributions made by an Underlying ETF.

 

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Performance

Because the Fund had not yet commenced investment operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no performance information quoted for the Fund. Once available, the Fund’s performance information will be accessible on the Fund’s website at www.gsamfunds.com.

Portfolio Management

Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. is the investment adviser for the Fund (the “Investment Adviser” or “GSAM”).

Portfolio Managers:  Steve Jeneste, CFA, Managing Director, and Raj Garigipati, Vice President, have each managed the Fund since inception.

Buying and Selling Fund Shares

The Fund will issue and redeem Shares at NAV only in a large specified number of Shares each called a “Creation Unit,” or multiples thereof. A Creation Unit consists of 50,000 Shares.

Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in secondary market transactions through brokers. Shares of the Fund are anticipated to be approved for listing and trading on the NYSE Arca, Inc. (“NYSE Arca”), subject to notice of issuance, and because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares of the Fund may trade at a price greater than or less than NAV.

Tax Information

The Fund’s distributions are taxable, and will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may become taxable upon withdrawal from such arrangements.

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

If you purchase Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), GSAM or other related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund Shares or related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

 

17


LOGO

 

Goldman Sachs Multi-Strategy Hedge Tracker ETF—Summary

Ticker: GSMS            Stock Exchange: NYSE Arca

Investment Objective

The Goldman Sachs Multi-Strategy Hedge Tracker ETF (the “Fund”) seeks to provide investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the Goldman Sachs Multi-Strategy Hedge Tracker Index (the “Index”).

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

The following tables describe the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold Shares of the Fund.

 

Shareholder Fees

    None   
(fees paid directly from your investment)  

Annual Fund Operating Expenses

 
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)  

Management Fee

    [        

Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fee

    0

Other Expenses1

    [         ]% 

[Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses]

    [        

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses2

    [        

Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation3

    [        

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation2

    [        

 

1 The Fund’s “Other Expenses” have been estimated to reflect expenses to be incurred in the first fiscal year.
2 The “Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses” will not correlate to the ratios of net and total expenses to average net assets provided in the Financial Highlights (when available), which will reflect the operating expenses of the Fund and will not include “Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses.” Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are indirect fees and expenses that the Fund incurs from investing in the shares of Underlying ETFs (as defined below). The actual Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses will vary with changes in the allocations of the Fund’s assets. These expenses are based on the total expense ratio of the Underlying ETFs disclosed in each Underlying ETF’s most recent shareholder report.
3 The Investment Adviser has agreed to reduce or limit “Other Expenses” (acquired fund fees and expenses, offering costs, taxes, interest, brokerage fees, shareholder meeting, litigation, short sale, dividend, indemnification and extraordinary expenses) to [            ]% of the Fund’s average daily net assets through at least [            ], and prior to such date the Investment Adviser may not terminate the arrangement without the approval of the Board of Trustees.

Expense Example

This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of owning Shares of the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that the Example incorporates the fee waiver and expense limitation arrangement for only the first year). The Example does not taken into account brokerage commissions that you may pay on your purchases and sales of Shares of the Fund. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

 

1 Year

  

3 Years

$[    ]

   $[    ]

 

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund and each Underlying ETF (as defined below) may pay transaction costs when it buys and sells securities or instruments (i.e. “turns over” its portfolio). A high rate of portfolio turnover may result in increased transaction costs, including brokerage commissions, which must be borne by the Fund and each Underlying ETF and their shareholders, and is also likely to result in higher short-term capital gains for taxable shareholders. These costs are not reflected in total annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, but are reflected in the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund has not yet commenced operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no portfolio turnover information quoted for the Fund.

 

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Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing at least 80% of its assets (exclusive of collateral held from securities lending) in securities included in its underlying index. The Fund is a “fund of funds,” as it primarily invests its assets in the shares of exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and other exchange-traded products (“ETPs”) included in the Index (collectively, the “Underlying ETFs”).

The Index seeks to approximate the return pattern characteristics of hedge funds that employ investment styles that include, but not limited to, equity long/short, macro, event-driven, relative value and other strategies commonly used by hedge fund managers.

Hedge fund equity long short strategies generally involve long and short investing, based on fundamental evaluations, research and various analytical measurements, in equity and equity-related investments. Equity long short managers may, for example, buy stocks that they expect to outperform or that they believe are undervalued, and may also sell short stocks or indices that they believe will underperform, or that they believe are overvalued. Within this framework, equity long short managers may exhibit a range of styles, including longer term buy-and-hold investing and/or shorter term trading styles. The portion of the Fund’s assets invested in equity long/short strategies may cumulatively represent a net short or net long position.

Hedge fund macro strategies typically employ top-down macro analysis (e.g., political or macroeconomic trends) to identify dislocations in equity, fixed income, currency and commodity markets that are expected to lead to large price movements. Managers that employ a macro style may select their investments based upon fundamental analysis (determining an asset’s value based upon factors that directly affect its value).

Hedge fund event driven and credit strategies seek to achieve gains from market movements in security prices caused by specific corporate events or changes in perceived relative value. These strategies may include, among others, merger arbitrage, distressed credit, opportunistic credit, and value with a catalyst investing styles. Merger arbitrage investing involves long and/or short investments in securities affected by a corporate merger or acquisition. Distressed credit investing typically involves the purchase of securities or other financial instruments—usually bonds or bank loans—of companies that are in, or are about to enter, bankruptcy or financial distress. Opportunistic credit investing generally involves investing across the capital structure (which could include, investing in both mezzanine debt and convertible securities of an issuer and/or adjusting exposures across fixed income and floating rate market segments based on perceived opportunity and current market conditions). This can be done by taking a long position in a credit security or other financial instrument that is believed to be underpriced or a short position in a credit security or other financial instrument that is believed to be overpriced. Value with a catalyst investing involves taking a view on the likelihood and potential stock price outcome of corporate events such as divestitures, spin-offs, material litigation, changes in management, or large share buybacks.

Hedge fund relative value strategies seek to identify and benefit from price discrepancies between related assets (assets that share a common financial factor, such as interest rates, an issuer, or an index). Relative value opportunities generally rely on arbitrage (the simultaneous purchase and sale of related assets) and may exist between two issuers or within the capital structure of a single issuer. Relative value strategies attempt to exploit a source of return with low correlation to the market. Relative value strategies include, among others, fixed income arbitrage, convertible arbitrage, volatility arbitrage, statistical arbitrage and equity market neutral strategies.

Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. (the “Index Provider”) constructs the Index in accordance with a rules-based methodology. The Index is comprised of shares of ETFs and ETPs listed in the United States that track indices including, among other things, U.S. equity markets, U.S. equity sectors, foreign and emerging market equity markets, sovereign debt, corporate bonds, investment grade and non-investment grade bonds (or “junk” bonds), foreign currencies, commodities and commodity sectors. The Index will obtain short exposure through the inclusion of inverse ETFs, which seek to deliver the opposite performance (i.e., the inverse of the performance) of an underlying index or benchmark that they track and to profit from the downward movement of markets.

The universe of hedge funds is identified by screening a hedge fund database for hedge funds classified as implementing equity long/short, macro, event-driven, relative value or other strategies commonly used by hedge funds. The universe is then divided into one or more subcategories. For each subcategory, the returns for the hedge funds within the subcategory for a specified period of time (the “target returns”) are determined. Further, a set of “risk factors” is defined to describe the return drivers in each subcategory. Risk factors may include “market factors” (for example, commonly used equity market indices) as well as “strategy factors” (for example, gaining long exposure to small market capitalization stocks and short exposure to large capitalization stocks). Each risk factor is represented by one or more publicly available financial indices and, in the case of multiple indices, includes a mathematical description of how to combine these indices into a single factor. The target returns as well as the index-based returns of the risk factors serve as the input into a proprietary methodology, which determines the relative weighting of the specified risk factors for each subcategory to best approximate the subcategory target returns. Each subcategory’s factors are then aggregated into overall factor exposures to approximate the return pattern characteristics of the overall hedge fund universe based on the relative importance of each subcategory. Finally, the Index methodology determines the Index constituents by identifying Underlying ETFs that correspond to the indices represented by the overall factor exposures.

 

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The Index does not include hedge funds (i.e., unlisted, privately offered funds) and may not succeed in approximating the returns of hedge funds that employ investment styles that include, but are not limited to, equity long/short, macro, event-driven, relative value and other strategies commonly used by hedge fund managers. The components of the Index may change over time. The percentage of the portfolio exposed to any asset class, country or geographic region will vary from time to time as the weightings of the securities within the Index change, and the Fund may not be invested in each asset class, country or geographic region at all times. The Index is reconstituted and rebalanced on a monthly basis.

The Fund seeks to invest in the Underlying ETFs in approximately the same weighting that such Underlying ETFs have within the Index at the applicable time. The Fund’s investments in certain Underlying ETFs may give exposure to currency carry, managed futures, merger arbitrage and/or volatility strategies. Currency carry strategies invest in long positions in currencies with relatively high yield interest rates and in short positions in currencies with relatively low yield interest rates. Managed futures strategies attempt to identify price trends in equity, fixed income, commodities, and/or currency instruments or markets, by taking long and short positions in a portfolio of futures contracts and other derivatives. Merger arbitrage strategies utilize an investment methodology that seeks opportunities in equity and equity-related instruments of companies which are currently engaged in a corporate transaction. Merger arbitrage generally involves transactions that have been publicly announced. The transactions can be international and/or cross-border, often involving multiple regulatory institutions. Volatility strategies involve seeking to exploit mispricings in volatility between options or between the relative volatility of options versus their underlying securities. These strategies seek to generate returns that have low correlations with other asset classes.

ETPs included in the Index may include corporations, trusts, and publicly traded partnerships, including those that provide exposure to commodities. The Index may include ETFs and other ETPs that are not registered as investment companies under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”), and, therefore, that are not subject to all of the investor protections of the 1940 Act.

Principal Risks of the Fund:

Loss of money is a risk of investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any government agency. The Fund should not be relied upon as a complete investment program. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Investments in the Fund involve substantial risks which prospective investors should consider carefully before investing.

Expenses.  By investing in the Underlying ETFs indirectly through the Fund, the investor will incur not only a proportionate share of the expenses of the Underlying ETFs held by the Fund (including operating costs and investment management fees), but also expenses of the Fund.

Index Risk.  The Fund will be negatively affected by general declines in the Underlying ETFs and asset classes represented in the Index. In addition, because the Fund is not “actively” managed, unless a specific Underlying ETF is removed from the Index, the Fund generally would not sell an Underlying ETF because the Underlying ETF’s securities were in financial trouble. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Index. The Fund also does not attempt to take defensive positions under any market conditions, including declining markets. Therefore, the Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that may actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or to lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers. The Index Provider relies on third party data it believes to be reliable in constructing the Index, but it does not guarantee the accuracy of such third party data. The Index is new and has a limited performance history. Any new index is subject to errors in its construction.

Investing in the Underlying ETFs.  The investments of the Fund are concentrated in the Underlying ETFs, and the Fund’s investment performance is directly related to the investment performance of the Underlying ETFs it holds. There is a risk that the Index Provider’s evaluations and assumptions regarding the asset classes represented in the Index may be incorrect based on actual market conditions. In addition, at times, certain segments of the market represented by constituent Underlying ETFs in the Index may be out of favor and underperform other segments.

Investments of the Underlying ETFs and Other Underlying ETPs.  Because the Fund invests in the Underlying ETFs that comprise the Index, the Fund’s shareholders will be affected by the investment policies and practices of the Underlying ETFs. Most inverse ETFs reset daily, meaning that they are designed to achieve their stated objectives on a daily basis. Their performance over longer period of times can differ significantly from the performance (or the inverse of the performance) of their underlying index or benchmark over the same period of time. The use of futures contracts, options, forward contracts, swaps and certain other instruments by Underlying ETFs may have the economic effect of financial leverage. Through its position in ETPs, the Fund is subject to the risks associated with the ETPs’ investments. In addition, an ETP’s lack of liquidity can result in its value being more volatile than the underlying portfolio of investment or reference components. See the “Principal Risks of the Underlying ETFs” below.

 

 

20


Market Risk.  The value of the instruments, including the Underlying ETFs, in which the Fund invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies, particular sectors or governments and/or general economic conditions throughout the world due to increasingly interconnected global economies and financial markets.

Net Asset Value Risk.  The net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund and the value of your investment may fluctuate. Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for Shares of the Fund may result in Shares of the Fund trading at a significant premium or discount to NAV. If the Fund purchases shares of an Underlying ETF at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells shares of an Underlying ETF at a time when the market price is at a discount to NAV, the Fund may sustain losses. Similarly, if a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses.

Tracking Error Risk.  Tracking error is the divergence of the Fund’s performance from that of the Index. The performance of the Fund may diverge from that of its Index for a number of reasons. Tracking error may occur because of transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of cash, differences in accrual of dividends, changes to the Index or the need to meet new or existing regulatory requirements. Unlike the Fund, the returns of the Index are not reduced by investment and other operating expenses, including the trading costs associated with implementing changes to its portfolio of investments. Tracking error risk may be heightened during times of market volatility or other unusual market conditions. To the extent that the Fund calculates its NAV based on fair value prices and the value of the Index is based on securities’ closing prices (i.e., the value of the Index is not based on fair value prices), the Fund’s ability to track the Index may be adversely affected. Because the Index is not subject to the tax diversification requirements to which the Fund must adhere, the Fund may be required to deviate its investments from the securities and relative weightings of the Index. For tax efficiency purposes, the Fund may sell certain securities to realize losses, which will result in a deviation from the Index.

Valuation Risk.  The sale price the Fund could receive for an Underlying ETF or security may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the Underlying ETF or security and may differ from the values used by the Index, particularly for securities that trade in low volume or volatile markets or that are valued using a fair value methodology.

Principal Risks of the Underlying ETFs:

The investments in the Underlying ETFs are subject to change. Such changes may cause the Fund to be subject to additional or different risks than the risks listed below.

The investment program of some of the Underlying ETFs is speculative, entails substantial risks and includes alternative investment techniques that may not be employed by traditional funds. The investment techniques of some of the Underlying ETFs (if they do not perform as designed) may increase the volatility of performance and the risk of investment loss, including the loss of the entire amount that is invested, and there can be no assurance that the investment objective of those Underlying ETFs will be achieved. Moreover, certain investment techniques which certain Underlying ETFs may employ in their investment programs can substantially increase the adverse impact to which those Underlying ETFs’ investments may be subject. There is no assurance that the investment processes of those Underlying ETFs will be successful, that the techniques utilized therein will be implemented successfully or that they are adequate for their intended uses, or that the discretionary element of the investment processes of those Underlying ETFs will be exercised in a manner that is successful or that is not adverse to the Fund.

Call/Prepayment Risk.  An issuer could exercise its right to pay principal on an obligation held by an Underlying ETF (such as a mortgage-backed security) earlier than expected. This may happen when there is a decline in interest rates, when credit spreads change, or when an issuer’s credit quality improves. Under these circumstances, the Underlying ETF may be unable to recoup all of its initial investment and will also suffer from having to reinvest in lower yielding securities.

Cash Transaction Risk.  Unlike most ETFs, certain Underlying ETFs effect creations and redemptions principally for cash, rather than principally for in-kind securities, because of the nature of such Underlying ETFs’ investments. As such, investments in Underlying ETFs may be less tax efficient than an investment in conventional ETFs.

Commodity Sector Risk.  Exposure to the commodities markets may subject certain of the Underlying ETFs to greater volatility than investments in more traditional securities. The value of commodity-linked investments may be affected by changes in overall market movements, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates, or factors affecting a particular industry or commodity, such as drought, floods, weather, livestock disease, embargoes, tariffs and international economic, political and regulatory developments. The prices of energy, industrial metals, precious metals, agriculture and livestock sector commodities may fluctuate widely due to factors such as changes in value, supply and demand and governmental regulatory policies. The commodity-linked swaps in which certain of the Underlying ETFs invest may involve companies in the financial services sector and events affecting the financial services sector may cause the Underlying ETF’s share value to fluctuate.

 

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Credit/Default Risk.  An issuer or guarantor of fixed income securities or instruments held by an Underlying ETF (which may have low credit ratings) may default on its obligation to pay interest and repay principal or default on any other obligation. Additionally, the credit quality of securities may deteriorate rapidly, which may impair an Underlying ETF’s liquidity and cause significant deterioration in NAV. To the extent that an Underlying ETF invests in non-investment grade (or “junk”) fixed income securities, these risks will be more pronounced.

Depositary Receipts Risk.  Foreign securities may trade in the form of depositary receipts, which include American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) (collectively “Depositary Receipts”). To the extent an Underlying ETF acquires Depositary Receipts through banks which do not have a contractual relationship with the foreign issuer of the security underlying the Depositary Receipts to issue and service such unsponsored Depositary Receipts, there may be an increased possibility that an Underlying ETF would not become aware of and be able to respond to corporate actions such as stock splits or rights offerings involving the foreign issuer in a timely manner. In addition, the lack of information may result in inefficiencies in the valuation of such instruments. Investment in Depositary Receipts does not eliminate all the risks inherent in investing in securities of non-U.S. issuers. The market value of Depositary Receipts is dependent upon the market value of the underlying securities and fluctuations in the relative value of the currencies in which the Depositary Receipts and the underlying securities are quoted.

Derivatives Risk.  Loss may result from an Underlying ETF’s investments in [options, forwards, futures, swaps, structured securities and other derivative instruments]. These instruments may be illiquid, difficult to price and leveraged so that small changes in the value of underlying instruments may produce disproportionate losses to the Underlying ETF. Futures markets are highly volatile and an Underlying ETF’s use of futures may increase the volatility of the Underlying ETF’s NAV. While an Underlying ETF may benefit from the use of futures, unanticipated changes in interest rates, securities prices or currency exchange rates may result in poorer overall performance than if the Underlying ETF had not entered into any futures contracts. The writing and purchase of options is a highly specialized activity which involves special investment risks. The successful use of options depends in part on the ability of the Underlying ETF’s investment adviser to anticipate future price fluctuations and the degree of correlation between the options and securities (or currency) markets. Derivatives are also subject to counterparty risk, which is the risk that the other party in the transaction will not fulfill its contractual obligations.

Expenses Risk.  Because the Underlying ETFs may invest in pooled investment vehicles (including, among others, investment companies and ETFs), the investor will incur indirectly through the Fund a proportionate share of the expenses of the other pooled investment vehicles held by the Underlying ETF (including operating costs and investment management fees), in addition to the expenses of the Underlying ETF.

Foreign and Emerging Countries Risk.  Foreign securities may be subject to risk of loss because of more or less foreign government regulation, less public information and less economic, political and social stability in the countries in which an Underlying ETF invests. Loss may also result from the imposition of exchange controls, confiscations and other government restrictions by the United States or other governments, or from problems in registration, settlement or custody. Foreign risk also involves the risk of negative foreign currency rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which or an Underlying ETF has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. To the extent that an Underlying ETF also invests in issuers located in emerging and frontier markets, these risks may be more pronounced. The securities markets of most emerging countries are less liquid, are especially subject to greater price volatility, have smaller market capitalizations, have more or less government regulation and may not be subject to as extensive and frequent accounting, financial and other reporting requirements as the securities markets of more developed countries. Further, investment in securities of issuers located in certain emerging countries involves risk of loss resulting from problems in registration, settlement or custody and substantial economic and political disruptions. These risks are not normally associated with investments in more developed countries

Geographic Risk.  Concentration of the investments of an Underlying ETF in issuers located in a particular country or region will subject the Underlying ETF, to a greater extent than if investments were less concentrated, to the risks of volatile economic cycles and/or conditions and developments that may be particular to that country or region, such as: adverse securities markets; adverse exchange rates; social, political, regulatory, economic or environmental developments; or natural disasters.

Industry Concentration Risk.  To the extent that an Underlying ETF concentrates in the securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector, the Fund also will generally concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent. By concentrating its investments in an industry or sector, the Underlying ETF may face more risks than if it were diversified broadly over numerous industries or sectors.

Interest Rate Risk.  When interest rates increase, fixed income securities or instruments held by an Underlying ETF will generally decline in value. Long-term fixed income securities or instruments will normally have more price volatility because of this risk than short-term fixed income securities or instruments.

Investment Style Risk.  An Underlying ETF may outperform or underperform other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles. An Underlying ETF may outperform or underperform other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles. An Underlying ETF’s use of managed futures strategies may underperform as managed

 

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futures have historically offered weaker performance in range-bound or highly volatile markets. Also, an Underlying ETF’s currency carry trade strategies may fail to achieve their intended results due to fluctuations in currency exchange rates.

Liquidity Risk.  An Underlying ETF may make investments that are illiquid or that may become less liquid in response to market developments or adverse investor perceptions. Illiquid investments may be more difficult to value. Liquidity risk may also refer to the risk that an Underlying ETF will not be able to pay redemption proceeds within the allowable time period because of unusual market conditions, an unusually high volume of redemption requests or other reasons. To meet redemption requests, an Underlying ETF may be forced to sell securities, at an unfavorable time and/or under unfavorable conditions. Liquidity risk may be the result of, among other things, the reduced number and capacity of traditional market participants to make a market in fixed income securities or the lack of an active market. The potential for liquidity risk may be magnified by a rising interest rate environment or other circumstances where investor redemptions from fixed income mutual funds may be higher than normal, potentially causing increased supply in the market due to selling activity.

Management Risk.  Certain Underlying ETFs are subject to management risk because they are actively managed portfolios. In managing such an Underlying ETF’s portfolio securities, an investment adviser will apply investment techniques and risk analyses in making investment decisions for the Underlying ETF, but there can be no guarantee that these will produce the desired results.

Mid-Cap and Small-Cap Risk.  Certain of the Underlying ETFs may make investments mid-capitalization and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than those associated with larger, more established companies. These securities may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and may lack sufficient market liquidity, and these issuers often face greater business risks.

Non-Diversification Risk.  Certain of the Underlying ETFs are non-diversified, meaning that they are permitted to invest a larger percentage of their assets in fewer issuers than “diversified” funds. Thus, such an Underlying ETF may be more susceptible to adverse developments affecting any single issuer held in its portfolio, and may be more susceptible to greater losses because of these developments.

Non-Hedging Foreign Currency Trading Risk.  The Underlying ETFs may engage in forward foreign currency transactions for speculative purposes. The Underlying ETFs may purchase or sell foreign currencies through the use of forward contracts based on the applicable Underlying ETF’s investment adviser’s judgment regarding the direction of the market for a particular foreign currency or currencies. In pursuing this strategy, the Underlying ETFs seek to profit from anticipated movements in currency rates by establishing “long” and/or “short” positions in forward contracts on various foreign currencies. Foreign exchange rates can be extremely volatile and a variance in the degree of volatility of the market or in the direction of the market from the Underlying ETF’s expectations may produce significant losses to the Fund.

Non-Investment Grade Fixed Income Securities Risk.  Non-investment grade fixed income securities and unrated securities of comparable credit quality (commonly known as “junk bonds”) are considered speculative and are subject to the increased risk of an issuer’s inability to meet principal and interest payment obligations. These securities may be subject to greater price volatility due to such factors as specific corporate or municipal developments, interest rate sensitivity, negative perceptions of the junk bond markets generally and less secondary market liquidity.

Sampling Risk.  Certain Underlying ETFs’ use of a representative sampling strategy may cause the Underlying ETF to be less correlated to the return of its underlying index than if the Underlying ETF held all of the securities in its underlying index. As a result, an adverse development to an issuer of securities that an Underlying ETF holds could result in a greater decline in the Underlying ETF’s net asset value than would be the case if the Underlying ETF held all of the securities in its underlying index.

Short Position Risk.  Certain Underlying ETFs may engage in short sales. Taking short positions involves leverage of the Underlying ETF’s assets and presents various risks. If the price of the underlying instrument or market on which the Underlying ETF has taken a short position increases, then the Underlying ETF will incur a loss equal to the increase in price from the time that the short position was entered into plus any related interest payments or other fees. Taking short positions involves the risk that losses may be disproportionate, may exceed the amount invested, and may be unlimited. To the extent the Underlying ETF uses the proceeds it receives from a short position to take additional long positions, the risks associated with the short position, including leverage risks, may be heightened, because doing so increases the exposure of the Underlying ETF to the markets and therefore could magnify changes to the Underlying ETF’s NAV.

Sovereign Default Risk.  An issuer of sovereign debt held by an Underlying ETF or the governmental authorities that control the repayment of the debt may be unable or unwilling to repay the principal or interest when due. This may result from political or social factors, the general economic environment of a country, levels of foreign debt or foreign currency exchange rates.

Stock Risk.  Stock prices have historically risen and fallen in periodic cycles. U.S. and foreign stock markets have experienced periods of substantial price volatility in the past and may do so again in the future.

Tax Risk.  The tax treatment of certain of an Underlying ETF’s commodity-linked investments may be adversely affected by future legislation, Treasury Regulations, and/or guidance issued by the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) that could affect whether

 

23


income from such investments is “qualifying income” under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), or otherwise affect the character, timing and/or amount of the Underlying ETF’s taxable income for any gains and distributions made by an Underlying ETF.

U.S. Government Securities Risk.  The U.S. government may not provide financial support to U.S. government agencies, instrumentalities or sponsored enterprises if it is not obligated to do so by law. U.S. Government Securities issued by those agencies, instrumentalities and sponsored enterprises, including those issued by the Federal National Mortgage Association (“Fannie Mae”), Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“Freddie Mac”) and the Federal Home Loan Banks, are neither issued nor guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury and, therefore, are not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States. The maximum potential liability of the issuers of some U.S. Government Securities held by an Underlying ETF may greatly exceed their current resources, including any legal right to support from the U.S. Treasury. It is possible that issuers of U.S. Government Securities will not have the funds to meet their payment obligations in the future.

Performance

Because the Fund had not yet commenced investment operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no performance information quoted for the Fund. Once available, the Fund’s performance information will be accessible on the Fund’s website at www.gsamfunds.com.

Portfolio Management

Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. is the investment adviser for the Fund (the “Investment Adviser” or “GSAM”).

Portfolio Managers:  Steve Jeneste, CFA, Managing Director, and Raj Garigipati, Vice President, have each managed the Fund since inception.

Buying and Selling Fund Shares

The Fund will issue and redeem Shares at NAV only in a large specified number of Shares each called a “Creation Unit,” or multiples thereof. A Creation Unit consists of 50,000 Shares.

Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in secondary market transactions through brokers. Shares of the Fund are anticipated to be approved for listing and trading on the NYSE Arca, Inc. (“NYSE Arca”), subject to notice of issuance, and because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares of the Fund may trade at a price greater than or less than NAV.

Tax Information

The Fund’s distributions are taxable, and will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may become taxable upon withdrawal from such arrangements.

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

If you purchase Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), GSAM or other related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund Shares or related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

 

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LOGO

 

Goldman Sachs Relative Value Hedge Tracker ETF—Summary

Ticker: GSRV            Stock Exchange: NYSE Arca

Investment Objective

The Goldman Sachs Relative Value Hedge Tracker ETF (the “Fund”) seeks to provide investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the Goldman Sachs Relative Value Hedge Tracker Index (the “Index”).

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

The following tables describe the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold Shares of the Fund.

 

Shareholder Fees

    None   
(fees paid directly from your investment)  

Annual Fund Operating Expenses

 
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)  

Management Fee

    [        

Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fee

    0

Other Expenses1

    [         ]% 

[Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses]

    [        

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses2

    [        

Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation3

    [        

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation2

    [        

 

1 The Fund’s “Other Expenses” have been estimated to reflect expenses to be incurred in the first fiscal year.
2 The “Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses” will not correlate to the ratios of net and total expenses to average net assets provided in the Financial Highlights (when available), which will reflect the operating expenses of the Fund and will not include “Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses.” Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are indirect fees and expenses that the Fund incurs from investing in the shares of Underlying ETFs (as defined below). The actual Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses will vary with changes in the allocations of the Fund’s assets. These expenses are based on the total expense ratio of the Underlying ETFs disclosed in each Underlying ETF’s most recent shareholder report.
3 The Investment Adviser has agreed to reduce or limit “Other Expenses” (acquired fund fees and expenses, offering costs, taxes, interest, brokerage fees, shareholder meeting, litigation, short sale, dividend, indemnification and extraordinary expenses) to [            ]% of the Fund’s average daily net assets through at least [            ], and prior to such date the Investment Adviser may not terminate the arrangement without the approval of the Board of Trustees.

Expense Example

This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of owning Shares of the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that the Example incorporates the fee waiver and expense limitation arrangement for only the first year). The Example does not taken into account brokerage commissions that you may pay on your purchases and sales of Shares of the Fund. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

 

1 Year

  

3 Years

$[    ]

   $[    ]

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund and each Underlying ETF (as defined below) may pay transaction costs when it buys and sells securities or instruments (i.e. “turns over” its portfolio). A high rate of portfolio turnover may result in increased transaction costs, including brokerage commissions, which must be borne by the Fund and each Underlying ETF and their shareholders, and is also likely to result in higher short-term capital gains for taxable shareholders. These costs are not reflected in total annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, but are reflected in the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund has not yet commenced operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no portfolio turnover information quoted for the Fund.

 

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Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing at least 80% of its assets (exclusive of collateral held from securities lending) in securities included in its underlying index. The Fund is a “fund of funds,” as it primarily invests its assets in the shares of exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and other exchange-traded products (“ETPs”) included in the Index (collectively, the “Underlying ETFs”).

The Index seeks to approximate the return pattern characteristics of hedge funds that employ relative value investment strategies. Hedge fund relative value strategies seek to identify and benefit from price discrepancies between related assets (assets that share a common financial factor, such as interest rates, an issuer, or an index). Relative value opportunities generally rely on arbitrage (the simultaneous purchase and sale of related assets) and may exist between two issuers or within the capital structure of a single issuer. Relative value strategies attempt to exploit a source of return with low correlation to the market. Relative value strategies include, among others, fixed income arbitrage, convertible arbitrage, volatility arbitrage, statistical arbitrage and equity market neutral strategies.

Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. (the “Index Provider”) constructs the Index in accordance with a rules-based methodology. The Index is comprised of shares of ETFs and ETPs listed in the United States that track indices including, among other things, foreign equity markets, sovereign debt, corporate bonds and investment and non-investment grade bonds (or “junk” bonds). The Index will obtain short exposure through the inclusion of inverse ETFs, which seek to deliver the opposite performance (i.e., the inverse of the performance) of an underlying index or benchmark that they track and to profit from the downward movement of markets.

The universe of hedge funds is identified by screening a hedge fund database for hedge funds classified as implementing a relative value hedge fund strategy. The universe is then divided into one or more subcategories. For each subcategory, the returns for the hedge funds within the subcategory for a specified period of time (the “target returns”) are determined. Further, a set of “risk factors” is defined to describe the return drivers in each subcategory. Risk factors may include “market factors” (for example, convertible bond indices) as well as “strategy factors” (for example, gaining short exposure to the volatility of a market index). Each risk factor is represented by one or more publicly available financial indices and, in the case of multiple indices, includes a mathematical description of how to combine these indices into a single factor. The target returns as well as the index-based returns of the risk factors serve as the input into a proprietary methodology, which determines the relative weighting of the specified risk factors for each subcategory to best approximate the subcategory target returns. Each subcategory’s factors are then aggregated into overall factor exposures to approximate the return pattern characteristics of the overall relative value hedge fund universe based on the relative importance of each subcategory. Finally, the Index methodology determines the Index constituents by identifying Underlying ETFs that correspond to the indices represented by the overall factor exposures.

The Index does not include hedge funds (i.e., unlisted, privately offered funds) and may not succeed in approximating the returns of relative value hedge funds. The components of the Index may change over time. The percentage of the portfolio exposed to any asset class, country or geographic region will vary from time to time as the weightings of the securities within the Index change, and the Fund may not be invested in each asset class, country or geographic region at all times. The Index is reconstituted and rebalanced on a monthly basis.

The Fund seeks to invest in the Underlying ETFs in approximately the same weighting that such Underlying ETFs have within the Index at the applicable time. The Fund’s investments in certain Underlying ETFs may give exposure to volatility strategies. Volatility strategies involve seeking to exploit mispricings in volatility between options or between the relative volatility of options versus their underlying securities. These strategies seek to generate returns that have low correlations with other asset classes.

ETPs included in the Index may include corporations, trusts, and publicly traded partnerships. The Index may include ETFs and other ETPs that are not registered as investment companies under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”), and, therefore, that are not subject to all of the investor protections of the 1940 Act.

Principal Risks of the Fund:

Loss of money is a risk of investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any government agency. The Fund should not be relied upon as a complete investment program. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Investments in the Fund involve substantial risks which prospective investors should consider carefully before investing.

Expenses.  By investing in the Underlying ETFs indirectly through the Fund, the investor will incur not only a proportionate share of the expenses of the Underlying ETFs held by the Fund (including operating costs and investment management fees), but also expenses of the Fund.

Index Risk.  The Fund will be negatively affected by general declines in the Underlying ETFs and asset classes represented in the Index. In addition, because the Fund is not “actively” managed, unless a specific Underlying ETF is removed from the Index, the Fund generally would not sell an Underlying ETF because the Underlying ETF’s securities were in financial trouble. Market disruptions and

 

26


regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Index. The Fund also does not attempt to take defensive positions under any market conditions, including declining markets. Therefore, the Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that may actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or to lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers. The Index Provider relies on third party data it believes to be reliable in constructing the Index, but it does not guarantee the accuracy of such third party data. The Index is new and has a limited performance history. Any new index is subject to errors in its construction.

Investing in the Underlying ETFs.  The investments of the Fund are concentrated in the Underlying ETFs, and the Fund’s investment performance is directly related to the investment performance of the Underlying ETFs it holds. There is a risk that the Index Provider’s evaluations and assumptions regarding the asset classes represented in the Index may be incorrect based on actual market conditions. In addition, at times, certain segments of the market represented by constituent Underlying ETFs in the Index may be out of favor and underperform other segments.

Investments of the Underlying ETFs and Other Underlying ETPs.  Because the Fund invests in the Underlying ETFs that comprise the Index, the Fund’s shareholders will be affected by the investment policies and practices of the Underlying ETFs. Most inverse ETFs reset daily, meaning that they are designed to achieve their stated objectives on a daily basis. Their performance over longer period of times can differ significantly from the performance (or the inverse of the performance) of their underlying index or benchmark over the same period of time. The use of futures contracts, options, forward contracts, swaps and certain other instruments by Underlying ETFs may have the economic effect of financial leverage. Through its position in ETPs, the Fund is subject to the risks associated with the ETPs’ investments. In addition, an ETP’s lack of liquidity can result in its value being more volatile than the underlying portfolio of investment or reference components. See the “Principal Risks of the Underlying ETFs” below.

Market Risk.  The value of the instruments, including the Underlying ETFs, in which the Fund invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies, particular sectors or governments and/or general economic conditions throughout the world due to increasingly interconnected global economies and financial markets.

Net Asset Value Risk.  The net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund and the value of your investment may fluctuate. Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for Shares of the Fund may result in Shares of the Fund trading at a significant premium or discount to NAV. If the Fund purchases shares of an Underlying ETF at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells shares of an Underlying ETF at a time when the market price is at a discount to NAV, the Fund may sustain losses. Similarly, if a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses.

Tracking Error Risk.  Tracking error is the divergence of the Fund’s performance from that of the Index. The performance of the Fund may diverge from that of its Index for a number of reasons. Tracking error may occur because of transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of cash, differences in accrual of dividends, changes to the Index or the need to meet new or existing regulatory requirements. Unlike the Fund, the returns of the Index are not reduced by investment and other operating expenses, including the trading costs associated with implementing changes to its portfolio of investments. Tracking error risk may be heightened during times of market volatility or other unusual market conditions. To the extent that the Fund calculates its NAV based on fair value prices and the value of the Index is based on securities’ closing prices (i.e., the value of the Index is not based on fair value prices), the Fund’s ability to track the Index may be adversely affected. Because the Index is not subject to the tax diversification requirements to which the Fund must adhere, the Fund may be required to deviate its investments from the securities and relative weightings of the Index. For tax efficiency purposes, the Fund may sell certain securities to realize losses, which will result in a deviation from the Index.

Valuation Risk.  The sale price the Fund could receive for an Underlying ETF or security may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the Underlying ETF or security and may differ from the values used by the Index, particularly for securities that trade in low volume or volatile markets or that are valued using a fair value methodology.

Principal Risks of the Underlying ETFs:

The investments in the Underlying ETFs are subject to change. Such changes may cause the Fund to be subject to additional or different risks than the risks listed below.

The investment program of some of the Underlying ETFs is speculative, entails substantial risks and includes alternative investment techniques that may not be employed by traditional funds. The investment techniques of some of the Underlying ETFs (if they do not perform as designed) may increase the volatility of performance and the risk of investment loss, including the loss of the entire amount that is invested, and there can be no assurance that the investment objective of those Underlying ETFs will be achieved. Moreover, certain investment techniques which certain Underlying ETFs may employ in their investment programs can substantially increase the adverse impact to which those Underlying ETFs’ investments may be subject. There is no assurance that the investment processes of those Underlying ETFs will be successful, that the techniques utilized therein will be implemented successfully or that they are adequate for their intended uses, or that the discretionary element of

 

27


the investment processes of those Underlying ETFs will be exercised in a manner that is successful or that is not adverse to the Fund.

Call/Prepayment Risk.  An issuer could exercise its right to pay principal on an obligation held by an Underlying ETF (such as a mortgage-backed security) earlier than expected. This may happen when there is a decline in interest rates, when credit spreads change, or when an issuer’s credit quality improves. Under these circumstances, the Underlying ETF may be unable to recoup all of its initial investment and will also suffer from having to reinvest in lower yielding securities.

Cash Transaction Risk.  Unlike most ETFs, certain Underlying ETFs effect creations and redemptions principally for cash, rather than principally for in-kind securities, because of the nature of such Underlying ETFs’ investments. As such, investments in Underlying ETFs may be less tax efficient than an investment in conventional ETFs.

Credit/Default Risk.  An issuer or guarantor of fixed income securities or instruments held by an Underlying ETF (which may have low credit ratings) may default on its obligation to pay interest and repay principal or default on any other obligation. Additionally, the credit quality of securities may deteriorate rapidly, which may impair an Underlying ETF’s liquidity and cause significant deterioration in NAV. To the extent that an Underlying ETF invests in non-investment grade (or “junk”) fixed income securities, these risks will be more pronounced.

Depositary Receipts Risk.  Foreign securities may trade in the form of depositary receipts, which include American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) (collectively “Depositary Receipts”). To the extent an Underlying ETF acquires Depositary Receipts through banks which do not have a contractual relationship with the foreign issuer of the security underlying the Depositary Receipts to issue and service such unsponsored Depositary Receipts, there may be an increased possibility that an Underlying ETF would not become aware of and be able to respond to corporate actions such as stock splits or rights offerings involving the foreign issuer in a timely manner. In addition, the lack of information may result in inefficiencies in the valuation of such instruments. Investment in Depositary Receipts does not eliminate all the risks inherent in investing in securities of non-U.S. issuers. The market value of Depositary Receipts is dependent upon the market value of the underlying securities and fluctuations in the relative value of the currencies in which the Depositary Receipts and the underlying securities are quoted.

Derivatives Risk.  Loss may result from an Underlying ETF’s investments in [options, forwards, futures, swaps, structured securities and other derivative instruments]. These instruments may be illiquid, difficult to price and leveraged so that small changes in the value of underlying instruments may produce disproportionate losses to the Underlying ETF. The writing and purchase of options is a highly specialized activity which involves special investment risks. The successful use of options depends in part on the ability of the Underlying ETF’s investment adviser to anticipate future price fluctuations and the degree of correlation between the options and securities (or currency) markets. Derivatives are also subject to counterparty risk, which is the risk that the other party in the transaction will not fulfill its contractual obligations.

Expenses Risk.  Because the Underlying ETFs may invest in pooled investment vehicles (including, among others, investment companies and ETFs), the investor will incur indirectly through the Fund a proportionate share of the expenses of the other pooled investment vehicles held by the Underlying ETF (including operating costs and investment management fees), in addition to the expenses of the Underlying ETF.

Foreign Countries Risk.  Foreign securities may be subject to risk of loss because of more or less foreign government regulation, less public information and less economic, political and social stability in the countries in which an Underlying ETF invests. Loss may also result from the imposition of exchange controls, confiscations and other government restrictions by the United States or other governments, or from problems in registration, settlement or custody. Foreign risk also involves the risk of negative foreign currency rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which or an Underlying ETF has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time.

Geographic Risk.  Concentration of the investments of an Underlying ETF in issuers located in a particular country or region will subject the Underlying ETF, to a greater extent than if investments were less concentrated, to the risks of volatile economic cycles and/or conditions and developments that may be particular to that country or region, such as: adverse securities markets; adverse exchange rates; social, political, regulatory, economic or environmental developments; or natural disasters.

Industry Concentration Risk.  To the extent that an Underlying ETF concentrates in the securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector, the Fund also will generally concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent. By concentrating its investments in an industry or sector, the Underlying ETF may face more risks than if it were diversified broadly over numerous industries or sectors.

Interest Rate Risk. When interest rates increase, fixed income securities or instruments held by an Underlying ETF will generally decline in value. Long-term fixed income securities or instruments will normally have more price volatility because of this risk than short-term fixed income securities or instruments.

 

28


 

Investment Style Risk.  An Underlying ETF may outperform or underperform other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles.

Liquidity Risk.  An Underlying ETF may make investments that are illiquid or that may become less liquid in response to market developments or adverse investor perceptions. Illiquid investments may be more difficult to value. Liquidity risk may also refer to the risk that an Underlying ETF will not be able to pay redemption proceeds within the allowable time period because of unusual market conditions, an unusually high volume of redemption requests or other reasons. To meet redemption requests, an Underlying ETF may be forced to sell securities, at an unfavorable time and/or under unfavorable conditions. Liquidity risk may be the result of, among other things, the reduced number and capacity of traditional market participants to make a market in fixed income securities or the lack of an active market. The potential for liquidity risk may be magnified by a rising interest rate environment or other circumstances where investor redemptions from fixed income mutual funds may be higher than normal, potentially causing increased supply in the market due to selling activity.

Management Risk.  Certain Underlying ETFs are subject to management risk because they are actively managed portfolios. In managing such an Underlying ETF’s portfolio securities, an investment adviser will apply investment techniques and risk analyses in making investment decisions for the Underlying ETF, but there can be no guarantee that these will produce the desired results.

Mid-Cap and Small-Cap Risk.  Certain of the Underlying ETFs may make investments mid-capitalization and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than those associated with larger, more established companies. These securities may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and may lack sufficient market liquidity, and these issuers often face greater business risks.

Non-Diversification Risk.  Certain of the Underlying ETFs are non-diversified, meaning that they are permitted to invest a larger percentage of their assets in fewer issuers than “diversified” funds. Thus, such an Underlying ETF may be more susceptible to adverse developments affecting any single issuer held in its portfolio, and may be more susceptible to greater losses because of these developments.

Non-Investment Grade Fixed Income Securities Risk.  Non-investment grade fixed income securities and unrated securities of comparable credit quality (commonly known as “junk bonds”) are considered speculative and are subject to the increased risk of an issuer’s inability to meet principal and interest payment obligations. These securities may be subject to greater price volatility due to such factors as specific corporate or municipal developments, interest rate sensitivity, negative perceptions of the junk bond markets generally and less secondary market liquidity.

Sampling Risk.  Certain Underlying ETFs’ use of a representative sampling strategy may cause the Underlying ETF to be less correlated to the return of its underlying index than if the Underlying ETF held all of the securities in its underlying index. As a result, an adverse development to an issuer of securities that an Underlying ETF holds could result in a greater decline in the Underlying ETF’s net asset value than would be the case if the Underlying ETF held all of the securities in its underlying index.

Short Position Risk.  Certain Underlying ETFs may engage in short sales. Taking short positions involves leverage of the Underlying ETF’s assets and presents various risks. If the price of the underlying instrument or market on which the Underlying ETF has taken a short position increases, then the Underlying ETF will incur a loss equal to the increase in price from the time that the short position was entered into plus any related interest payments or other fees. Taking short positions involves the risk that losses may be disproportionate, may exceed the amount invested, and may be unlimited. To the extent the Underlying ETF uses the proceeds it receives from a short position to take additional long positions, the risks associated with the short position, including leverage risks, may be heightened, because doing so increases the exposure of the Underlying ETF to the markets and therefore could magnify changes to the Underlying ETF’s NAV.

Sovereign Default Risk.  An issuer of sovereign debt held by an Underlying ETF or the governmental authorities that control the repayment of the debt may be unable or unwilling to repay the principal or interest when due. This may result from political or social factors, the general economic environment of a country, levels of foreign debt or foreign currency exchange rates.

Stock Risk.  Stock prices have historically risen and fallen in periodic cycles. U.S. and foreign stock markets have experienced periods of substantial price volatility in the past and may do so again in the future.

U.S. Government Securities Risk.  The U.S. government may not provide financial support to U.S. government agencies, instrumentalities or sponsored enterprises if it is not obligated to do so by law. U.S. Government Securities issued by those agencies, instrumentalities and sponsored enterprises, including those issued by the Federal National Mortgage Association (“Fannie Mae”), Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“Freddie Mac”) and the Federal Home Loan Banks, are neither issued nor guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury and, therefore, are not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States. The maximum potential liability of the issuers of some U.S. Government Securities held by an Underlying ETF may greatly exceed their current resources, including any legal right to support from the U.S. Treasury. It is possible that issuers of U.S. Government Securities will not have the funds to meet their payment obligations in the future.

 

29


 

Performance

Because the Fund had not yet commenced investment operations as of the date of this Prospectus, there is no performance information quoted for the Fund. Once available, the Fund’s performance information will be accessible on the Fund’s website at www.gsamfunds.com.

Portfolio Management

Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. is the investment adviser for the Fund (the “Investment Adviser” or “GSAM”).

Portfolio Managers:  Steve Jeneste, CFA, Managing Director, and Raj Garigipati, Vice President, have each managed the Fund since inception.

Buying and Selling Fund Shares

The Fund will issue and redeem Shares at NAV only in a large specified number of Shares each called a “Creation Unit,” or multiples thereof. A Creation Unit consists of 50,000 Shares.

Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in secondary market transactions through brokers. Shares of the Fund are anticipated to be approved for listing and trading on the NYSE Arca, Inc. (“NYSE Arca”), subject to notice of issuance, and because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares of the Fund may trade at a price greater than or less than NAV.

Tax Information

The Fund’s distributions are taxable, and will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may become taxable upon withdrawal from such arrangements.

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

If you purchase Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), GSAM or other related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund Shares or related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

 

30


 

Investment Management Approach

 

  INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE     

Each Fund seeks to provide investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of its Index. Each Fund’s investment objective may be changed without shareholder approval.

 

  PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES     

Each Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing at least 80% of its assets (exclusive of collateral held from securities lending) in securities included in its underlying index. Each Fund is a “fund of funds,” as it primarily invests its assets in the shares of ETFs and other exchange-traded vehicles included in its underlying index.

The Investment Adviser anticipates that, generally, each Fund will hold all of the securities that comprise its Index in proportion to their weightings in such Index. However, under various circumstances, it may not be possible or practicable to purchase all of those securities in those weightings. In these circumstances, a Fund may purchase a sample of securities in its Index. There also may be instances in which the Investment Adviser may choose to underweight or overweight a security in a Fund’s Index, purchase securities not in the Fund’s Index that the Investment Adviser believes are appropriate to substitute for certain securities in such Index or utilize various combinations of other available investment techniques. Each Fund may sell securities that are represented in its Index in anticipation of their removal from its Index or purchase securities not represented in its Index in anticipation of their addition to such Index. Each Fund may also, in order to comply with the tax diversification requirements of the Code, temporarily invest in securities not included in its Index that are expected to be correlated with the securities included in its Index.

Given each Fund’s investment objective of attempting to track its Index, the Funds do not follow traditional methods of active investment management, which may involve buying and selling securities based upon analysis of economic and market factors. Also, unlike many investment companies, the Funds do not attempt to outperform their respective Indices that they track and do not seek temporary defensive positions when markets decline or appear overvalued.

Securities are selected for each Index based on a rules-based portfolio construction process. The universe of hedge funds are identified by screening a hedge fund database for hedge funds classified as implementing certain strategies used by hedge fund managers. The universe is then divided into one or more subcategories. For each subcategory, the returns for the hedge funds within the subcategory for a specified period of time (the “target returns”) are determined. Further, a set of “risk factors” is defined to describe the return drivers in each subcategory. Risk factors may include “market factors” (for example, commonly used equity market indices) as well as “strategy factors” (for example, gaining long exposure to small market capitalization stocks and short exposure to large capitalization stocks). Each risk factor is represented by one or more publicly available financial indices and, in the case of multiple indices, includes a mathematical description of how to combine these indices into a single factor. The target returns as well as the index-based returns of the risk factors serve as the input into a proprietary methodology, which determines the relative weighting of the specified risk factors for each subcategory to best approximate the subcategory target returns. Each subcategory’s factors are then aggregated into overall factor exposures to approximate the return pattern characteristics of the overall hedge fund universe based on the relative importance of each subcategory. Finally, the Index methodology determines the Index constituents by identifying Underlying ETFs that correspond to the indices represented by the overall factor exposures. Each index is reconstituted and rebalanced on a monthly basis.

Each Index was developed and is maintained by the Index Provider and calculated by [            ] (the “Calculation Agent”). Certain Funds may also hire an affiliate of the Fund and/or the Investment Adviser to serve as a calculation agent. The Index Provider determines the composition and relative weightings of the Underlying ETFs in each Index.

Each Fund may also invest up to 20% of its assets in securities and other instruments not included in its Index but which the Investment Adviser believes are correlated to its Index, as well as in, among other instruments, futures (including index futures), swaps, other derivatives, investment companies (including ETFs), exchange-traded notes (“ETNs”), preferred stocks, warrants and rights, cash and cash equivalents and money market instruments.

 

31


 

  INDEX DISCLAIMERS     

NEITHER GSAM NOR ANY OF ITS AFFILIATES MAKES ANY REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, TO THE SHAREHOLDERS OF THE FUNDS OR ANY MEMBER OF THE PUBLIC REGARDING THE ADVISABILITY OF INVESTING IN SECURITIES GENERALLY OR IN THE FUNDS PARTICULARLY OR THE ABILITY OF EACH INDEX OR THE FUNDS TO PERFORM AS INTENDED. GSAM, IN ITS CAPACITY AS THE INDEX PROVIDER OF EACH INDEX, LICENSES CERTAIN TRADEMARKS AND TRADE NAMES TO THE FUNDS. NEITHER GSAM NOR ANY OF ITS AFFILIATES NOR AGENTS (INCLUDING ANY CALCULATION AGENT) HAS ANY OBLIGATION TO TAKE THE NEEDS OF THE FUNDS OR THE SHAREHOLDERS OF THE FUNDS INTO CONSIDERATION IN DETERMINING, COMPOSING OR CALCULATING EACH INDEX. GSAM OR ANY OF ITS AFFILIATES MAY HOLD LONG OR SHORT POSITIONS IN SECURITIES HELD BY THE FUNDS OR IN RELATED DERIVATIVES.

NEITHER GSAM NOR ANY OF ITS AFFILIATES GUARANTEES THE ACCURACY AND/OR THE COMPLETENESS OF EACH INDEX OR ANY DATA INCLUDED THEREIN OR RELATING THERETO OR THAT THE FUNDS OR THE INDICES ARE SUITABLE FOR ANY INVESTOR, AND GSAM AND ITS AFFILIATES HEREBY EXPRESSLY DISCLAIM ANY AND ALL LIABILITY FOR ANY ERRORS, OMISSIONS, OR INTERRUPTIONS THEREIN OR IN THE CALCULATION THEREOF. NEITHER GSAM NOR ANY OF ITS AFFILIATES MAKES ANY WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, AS TO THE RESULTS TO BE OBTAINED BY THE FUNDS, THE SHAREHOLDERS, OR ANY OTHER PERSON OR ENTITY FROM USE OF EACH INDEX OR ANY DATA INCLUDED THEREIN. NEITHER GSAM NOR ANY OF ITS AFFILIATES MAKES ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, AND EACH EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE WITH RESPECT TO EACH INDEX OR ANY DATA INCLUDED THEREIN. WITHOUT LIMITING ANY OF THE FOREGOING, GSAM AND ITS AFFILIATES HEREBY EXPRESSLY DISCLAIM ANY AND ALL LIABILITY FOR ANY SPECIAL, PUNITIVE, INDIRECT, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING LOST PROFITS), EVEN IF NOTIFIED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE FOREGOING, GSAM SERVES AS THE INVESTMENT ADVISER FOR THE FUND AND IT IS ACKNOWLEDGED THAT IT MAY BE SUBJECT TO CERTAIN LIABILITIES FOR ITS ACTIONS IN RESPECT OF THE FUNDS IN SUCH CAPACITY.

 

  OTHER INVESTMENT PRACTICES AND SECURITIES     

The following tables identify some of the investment techniques that may (but are not required to) be used by the Funds and/or the Underlying ETFs in seeking to achieve their investment objective. The Funds and/or Underlying ETFs may be subject to additional limitations on their investments not shown here. Numbers in these tables show allowable usage only; for actual usage, consult the Funds’ annual/semi-annual reports (when available). For more information about these and other investment practices and securities, see Appendix A. On each business day, before commencement of trading in Fund Shares on the NYSE Arca, each Fund will disclose on its website ([http://www.gsamfunds.com]) the identities and quantities of the portfolio securities and other assets held by the Fund that will form the basis for the Fund’s calculation of net asset value at the end of the business day. In addition, a description of the Funds’ policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the Funds’ portfolio holdings is available in the Funds’ Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”).

 

32


INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT APPROACH

 

 

10 Percent of total assets (italic type)
10 Percent of net assets (excluding borrowings for investment purposes)
No specific percentage limitation on usage;
limited only by the objective and strategies of the Fund.
A Fund may only invest up to 20% of its assets in securities
and other instruments not included in its underlying index.

 

                                                                                                                                      
  

Equity
Long Short
Hedge
Tracker ETF

Event
Driven
Hedge
Tracker ETF
Macro
Hedge
Tracker ETF
Multi-
Strategy
Hedge
Tracker ETF
Relative
Value
Hedge
Tracker ETF
Investment Practices          

Borrowings

  33 13   33 13   33 13   33 13   33 13

Derivatives, including futures, options and swaps

         

[Futures Contracts and Options and Swaps on Futures Contracts (including index futures)]

         

Illiquid Investments*

  15   15   15   15   15

Preferred Stock, Warrants and Stock Purchase Rights

         

Repurchase Agreements

         

Securities Lending

  33 13   33 13   33 13   33 13   33 13

When-Issued Securities and Forward Commitments

                   

 

  * Illiquid investments are any investments which cannot be disposed of in seven days in the ordinary course of business at approximately the price at which a Fund values the instrument.
** This percentage limitation does not apply to a Fund’s investments in other investment companies where a higher percentage limitation is permitted under the terms of an SEC exemptive order or SEC exemptive rule.
  1 Each Fund may purchase and sell call and put options on foreign currencies.
  2 Each Fund may sell call and put options and purchase call and put options on securities and securities indices in which it may invest.

 

10 Percent of Net Assets (including borrowings for investment
purposes) (roman type)
No specific percentage limitation on usage;
limited only by the objective and strategies of the Fund

 

                                                                                                                                      
  

Equity
Long Short
Hedge
Tracker ETF

Event
Driven
Hedge
Tracker ETF
Macro
Hedge
Tracker ETF
Multi-
Strategy
Hedge
Tracker ETF
Relative
Value
Hedge
Tracker ETF
Investment Securities          

[Convertible Securities

          ]

Emerging Country Securities

         

Equity Investments

         

Foreign Securities

         

[Structured Securities (which may include equity or credit linked notes)

                  ]

 

33


 

Risks of the Funds and the Underlying ETFs

 

  RISKS OF THE FUNDS     

Loss of money is a risk of investing in each Fund. An investment in each Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC or any other governmental agency. The principal risks of each Fund are discussed in the Summary section of this Prospectus. The following section provides additional information on the risks that apply to the Funds, which may result in a loss of your investment. None of the Funds should be relied upon as a complete investment program. There can be no assurance that a Fund will achieve its investment objective.

 

 

 

ü   Principal Risk
  Additional Risk

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
    

Equity

Long Short
Hedge
Tracker ETF

  Event
Driven
Hedge
Tracker ETF
  Macro
Hedge
Tracker ETF
  Multi-
Strategy
Hedge
Tracker ETF
  Relative
Value
Hedge
Tracker ETF

Absence of Prior Active Market

         

Derivatives

         

ETNs

         

Expenses

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Index

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Investing in the Underlying ETFs

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Investments of the Underlying ETFs and Other Underlying ETPs

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Market

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Net Asset Value

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Publicly Traded Partnerships

         

Secondary Listing

         

Short Position

         

Tracking Error

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Trading Issues

         

Valuation

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

 

¢   Absence of Prior Active Market Risk—Each Fund is a newly organized series of an investment company and thus has no operating history. While a Fund’s Shares are expected to be listed on NYSE Arca, there can be no assurance that active trading markets for the Shares will develop or be maintained. [            ], the distributor of the Shares, does not maintain a secondary market in the Shares.

 

¢   ETNs—ETNs have a maturity date and generally are backed only by the creditworthiness of the issuer. As a result, the value of an ETN may be influenced by time to maturity, supply and demand for the ETN and changes in interest rates. ETNs may also be subject to commodities market risk and credit risk.

 

¢   Derivatives Risk—Loss may result from a Fund’s investments in derivative instruments. These instruments may be illiquid, difficult to price and leveraged so that small changes in the value of underlying instruments may produce disproportionate losses to a Fund. Derivatives are also subject to counterparty risk, which is the risk that the other party in the transaction will not fulfill its contractual obligations.

The Fund may invest in swaps. In a standard “swap” transaction, two parties agree to exchange the returns, differentials in rates of return or some other amount earned or realized on the “notional amount” of predetermined investments or instruments, which may be adjusted for an interest factor. Swaps can involve greater risks than direct investment in securities, because swaps may be leveraged and are subject to counterparty risk (e.g., the risk of a counterparty’s defaulting on the obligation or bankruptcy), credit risk and pricing risk (i.e., swaps may be difficult to value). Swaps may also be considered illiquid. It may not be possible for the Fund to liquidate a swap position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses. Please see “Risks of Investing in the Underlying ETFs—Swaps” below.

Futures markets are highly volatile and the Fund’s use of futures may increase the volatility of the Fund’s NAV. While the Fund may benefit from the use of futures, unanticipated changes in interest rates, securities prices or currency exchange rates may result

 

34


RISKS OF THE FUNDS AND THE UNDERLYING ETFS

 

in poorer overall performance than if the Fund had not entered into any futures contracts. The loss incurred by the Fund entering into futures contracts is potentially unlimited and may exceed the amount of the premium received. To the extent an Underlying ETF enters into futures contracts, it will be subject to these risks.

Losses from investments in derivatives can result from a lack of correlation between the value of those derivatives and the value of the portfolio assets (if any) being hedged. In addition, there is a risk that the performance of the derivatives or other instruments used by the Investment Adviser to replicate the performance of a particular asset class may not accurately track the performance of that asset class. Derivatives are also subject to liquidity risk and risks arising from margin requirements. Returns, and potential losses, are dependent on the Investment Adviser’s analysis and decision making capability around, but not limited to, expectations of the timing or level of fluctuations in securities prices, interest rates, currency prices or other variables. In addition, a Fund’s use of derivatives may increase or accelerate the amount of taxes payable by shareholders.

Many of the protections afforded to cleared transactions, such as the security afforded by transacting through a clearing house, might not be available in connection with over-the-counter (“OTC”) transactions. Therefore, in those instances in which a Fund enters into OTC transactions, the Fund will be subject to the risk that its direct counterparty will not perform its obligations under the transactions and that the Fund will sustain losses.

As investment companies registered with the SEC, the Funds must identify on their books (often referred to as “asset segregation”) liquid assets, or engage in other SEC or SEC-staff approved or other appropriate measures, to “cover” open positions with respect to certain kinds of derivative instruments. For more information about these practices, see Appendix A.

 

¢   Expenses—By investing in the Underlying ETFs indirectly through the Fund, the investor will incur not only a proportionate share of the expenses of the Underlying ETFs held by the Fund (including operating costs and investment management fees), but also expenses of the Fund.

 

¢   Index Risk—A Fund will be negatively affected by general declines in the Underlying ETFs and asset classes represented in its Index. In addition, because the Funds are not “actively” managed, unless a specific Underlying ETF is removed from an Index, a Fund generally would not sell an Underlying ETF because the Underlying ETF’s securities were in financial trouble. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on a Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Index. A Fund also does not attempt to take defensive positions under any market conditions, including declining markets. Therefore, a Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that may actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or to lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers. The Index Provider relies on third party data it believes to be reliable in constructing each Index, but it does not guarantee the accuracy of such third party data. Each Index is new and has a limited performance history. Any new index is subject to errors in its construction. The Goldman Sachs Equity Long Short Hedge Tracker Index may not be successful in seeking to replicate the returns of hedge funds that employ equity long short investment strategies

 

¢   Investing in the Underlying ETFs—The investments of the Funds are concentrated in the Underlying ETFs, and each Fund’s investment performance is directly related to the investment performance of the Underlying ETFs it holds. There is a risk that the Index Provider’s evaluations and assumptions regarding the asset classes represented in the Index may be incorrect based on actual market conditions. In addition, at times, certain segments of the market represented by constituent Underlying ETFs in the Index may be out of favor and underperform other segments.

 

¢   Investments of the Underlying ETFs and Other Underlying ETPs—Because the Fund invests in the Underlying ETFs that comprise the Index, the Fund’s shareholders will be affected by the investment policies and practices of the Underlying ETFs. Most inverse ETFs reset daily, meaning that they are designed to achieve their stated objectives on a daily basis. Their performance over longer period of times can differ significantly from the performance (or the inverse of the performance) of their underlying index or benchmark over the same period of time. The use of futures contracts, options, forward contracts, swaps and certain other instruments by Underlying ETFs may have the economic effect of financial leverage. Through its position in ETPs, the Fund is subject to the risks associated with the ETPs’ investments. In addition, an ETP’s lack of liquidity can result in its value being more volatile than the underlying portfolio of investment or reference components. See the “Risks of the Underlying ETFs” below.

 

¢   Market Risk—The value of the instruments, including the Underlying ETFs, in which a Fund invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies, particular sectors or governments and/or general economic conditions throughout the world. Price changes may be temporary or last for extended periods. A Fund’s investments may be overweighted from time to time in one or more sectors or countries, which will increase the Fund’s exposure to risk of loss from adverse developments affecting those sectors or countries.

 

35


 

Global economies and financial markets are becoming increasingly interconnected, and conditions and events in one country, region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market. In addition, governmental and quasi governmental organizations have taken a number of unprecedented actions designed to support the markets. Such conditions, events and actions may result in greater market risk.

 

¢   Net Asset Value Risk—Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of a Fund will approximate the Fund’s NAV when purchased and sold in the secondary market, there may be times when the market price of the shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount). The NAV of a Fund and the value of your investment will fluctuate. Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for Shares may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses. In addition, disruptions to creations and redemptions, including disruptions at market makers, Authorized Participants or market participants, or during periods of significant market volatility, may result in trading prices for Shares of a Fund that differ significantly from its NAV. Active market trading of Fund shares may cause more frequent creations or redemptions of Creation Units, which, if not conducted in-kind, could increase the rate of portfolio turnover and a Fund’s tracking error versus its underlying index, as well as generate capital gains taxes.

 

¢   Publicly Traded Partnerships Risk—The publicly traded partnerships (“PTPs”) in which a Fund intends to invest are limited partnerships, the interests (or “units”) in which are traded on public exchanges, just like ETFs. A Fund may invest in PTPs that are commodity pools. In addition to the risks associated with the underlying assets and exposures within a PTP (which in the case of a Fund’s expected PTP investments, include derivatives and commodity sector risks), risks of investments in PTPs may include, among others, dependence upon specialized skills of the PTP’s manager, potential lack of liquidity, and limitations on voting and distribution rights.

 

¢   Short Position Risk—Each may engage in short sales of any instrument that the Fund may purchase for investment. Taking short positions involves leverage of a Fund’s assets and presents various risks. If the price of the underlying instrument or market on which the Fund has taken a short position increases, then a Fund will incur a loss equal to the increase in price from the time that the short position was entered into plus any related interest payments or other fees. Taking short positions involves the risk that losses may be disproportionate, may exceed the amount invested, and may be unlimited. To the extent a Fund uses the proceeds it receives from a short position to take additional long positions, the risks associated with the short position, including leverage risks, may be heightened, because doing so increases the exposure of the Fund to the markets and therefore could magnify changes to the Fund’s NAV. See “Risks of the Underlying ETF—Short Position Risk.”

 

¢   Tracking Error Risk—Tracking error is the divergence of a Fund’s performance from that of its Index. The performance of a Fund may diverge from that of its Index for a number of reasons. Tracking error may occur because of transaction costs, a Fund’s holding of cash, differences in accrual of dividends, changes to its Index or the need to meet new or existing regulatory requirements. Unlike a Fund, the returns of an Index are not reduced by investment and other operating expenses, including the trading costs associated with implementing changes to its portfolio of investments. Tracking error risk may be heightened during times of market volatility or other unusual market conditions. To the extent that a Fund calculates its NAV based on fair value prices and the value of its Index is based on securities’ closing prices (i.e., the value of the Index is not based on fair value prices), the Fund’s ability to track the Index may be adversely affected. Because an Index is not subject to the tax diversification requirements to which a Fund must adhere, a Fund may be required to deviate its investments from the securities and relative weightings of its Index. For tax efficiency purposes, a Fund may sell certain securities to realize losses, which will result in a deviation from its Index.

 

¢   Trading Issues Risk—Trading in Shares on NYSE Arca may be halted due to market conditions or for reasons that, in the view of NYSE Arca, make trading in Shares inadvisable. In addition, trading in Shares on NYSE Arca is subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility pursuant to NYSE Arca’s “circuit breaker” rules. There can be no assurance that the requirements of NYSE Arca necessary to maintain the listing of the Funds will continue to be met or will remain unchanged.

 

¢   Valuation Risk—The sale price a Fund could receive for an Underlying ETF or security may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the Underlying ETF or security and may differ from the value used by the Index, particularly for securities that trade in low volume or volatile markets or that are valued using a fair value methodology.

 

36


RISKS OF THE FUNDS AND THE UNDERLYING ETFS

 

 

  RISKS OF THE UNDERLYING ETFS     

The investments in the Underlying ETFs are subject to change. Such changes may cause the Fund to be subject to additional or different risks than the risks listed below.

The investment program of some of the Underlying ETFs is speculative, entails substantial risks and includes alternative investment techniques that may not be employed by traditional funds. The investment techniques of some of the Underlying ETFs (if they do not perform as designed) may increase the volatility of performance and the risk of investment loss, including the loss of the entire amount that is invested, and there can be no assurance that the investment objective of those Underlying ETFs will be achieved. Moreover, certain investment techniques which certain Underlying ETFs may employ in their investment programs can substantially increase the adverse impact to which those Underlying ETFs’ investments may be subject. There is no assurance that the investment processes of those Underlying ETFs will be successful, that the techniques utilized therein will be implemented successfully or that they are adequate for their intended uses, or that the discretionary element of the investment processes of those Underlying ETFs will be exercised in a manner that is successful or that is not adverse to the Funds.

 

 

 

ü   Principal Risk
  Additional Risk

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
    

Equity

Long Short
Hedge
Tracker ETF

  Event
Driven
Hedge
Tracker ETF
  Macro
Hedge
Tracker ETF
  Multi-
Strategy
Hedge
Tracker ETF
  Relative
Value
Hedge
Tracker ETF

Call/Prepayment

    ü     ü   ü

Cash Transactions

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Commodity Sector

      ü   ü  

Counterparty

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Credit/Default

    ü     ü   ü

Depositary Receipts

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Derivatives

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Emerging Countries

  ü     ü   ü  

Expenses

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Foreign

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Foreign Custody

         

Geographic

         

Industry Concentration

         

Interest Rate

    ü     ü   ü

Inverse ETF Risk

         

Investment Style

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Liquidity

         

Management

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Mid-Cap and Small-Cap

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Non-Diversification

         

Non-Hedging Foreign Currency Trading

    ü     ü  

Non-Investment Grade Fixed Income Securities

         

Short Position

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Stock

  ü   ü   ü   ü   ü

Sovereign Default

         

Swaps

         

Tax

         

U.S. Government Securities

         

 

37


 

¢   Call/Prepayment Risk—An issuer could exercise its right to pay principal on an obligation held by an Underlying ETF (such as a mortgage-backed security) earlier than expected. This may happen when there is a decline in interest rates, when credit spreads change, or when an issuer’s credit quality improves. Under these circumstances, the Underlying ETF may be unable to recoup all of its initial investment and will also suffer from having to reinvest in lower yielding securities.

 

¢   Cash Transactions Risk—Unlike most ETFs, certain Underlying ETFs effect creations and redemptions principally for cash, rather than principally for in-kind securities, because of the nature of such Underlying ETFs’ investments. As such, investments in Underlying ETFs may be less tax efficient than an investment in conventional ETFs.

 

¢   Commodity Sector Risk—Exposure to the commodities markets may subject an Underlying ETF to greater volatility than investments in more traditional securities. The value of commodity-linked investments may be affected by changes in overall market movements, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates, or sectors affecting a particular industry or commodity, such as drought, floods, weather, livestock disease, embargoes, tariffs and international economic, political and regulatory developments. The prices of energy, industrial metals, precious metals, agriculture and livestock sector commodities may fluctuate widely due to factors such as changes in value, supply and demand and governmental regulatory policies. The energy sector can be significantly affected by changes in the prices and supplies of oil and other energy fuels, energy conservation, the success of exploration projects, and tax and other government regulations, policies of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (“OPEC”) and relationships among OPEC members and between OPEC and oil-importing nations. The metals sector can be affected by sharp price volatility over short periods caused by global economic, financial and political factors, resource availability, government regulation, economic cycles, changes in inflation or expectations about inflation in various countries, interest rates, currency fluctuations, metal sales by governments, central banks or international agencies, investment speculation and fluctuations in industrial and commercial supply and demand. Some commodity-linked investments are issued by companies in the financial services sector, including the banking, brokerage and insurance sectors. As a result, events affecting issuers in the financial services sector may cause an Underlying ETF’s share value to fluctuate. Although investments in commodities typically move in different directions than traditional equity and debt securities when the value of those traditional securities is declining due to adverse economic conditions, there is no guarantee that these investments will perform in that manner, and at certain times the price movements of commodity-linked investments have been parallel to those of debt and equity securities.

 

¢   Counterparty Risk—Many of the protections afforded to cleared transactions, such as the security afforded by transacting through a clearing house, might not be available in connection with over-the-counter (“OTC”) transactions. Therefore, in those instances in which an Underlying ETF enters into OTC transactions, the Underlying ETF will be subject to the risk that its direct counterparty will not perform its obligations under the transactions and that an Underlying ETF will sustain losses.

 

¢   Credit/Default Risk—An issuer or guarantor of fixed income securities or instruments held by an Underlying ETF (which may have low credit ratings) may default on its obligation to pay interest and repay principal or default on any other obligation. The credit quality of an Underlying ETF’s portfolio securities or instruments may meet the Underlying ETF’s credit quality requirements at the time of purchase but then deteriorate thereafter, and such a deterioration can occur rapidly. In certain instances, the downgrading or default of a single holding or guarantor of an Underlying ETF’s holding may impair the Underlying ETF’s liquidity and have the potential to cause significant NAV deterioration.

 

¢   Depositary Receipts Risk—Foreign securities may trade in the form of Depositary Receipts. To the extent an Underlying ETF acquires Depositary Receipts through banks which do not have a contractual relationship with the foreign issuer of the security underlying the Depositary Receipts to issue and service such unsponsored Depositary Receipts, there may be an increased possibility that the Underlying ETF would not become aware of and be able to respond to corporate actions such as stock splits or rights offerings involving the foreign issuer in a timely manner. In addition, the lack of information may result in inefficiencies in the valuation of such instruments. Investment in Depositary Receipts does not eliminate all the risks inherent in investing in securities of non-U.S. issuers. The market value of Depositary Receipts is dependent upon the market value of the underlying securities and fluctuations in the relative value of the currencies in which the Depositary Receipts and the underlying securities are quoted. The Funds will not invest in any Depositary Receipts that the Investment Adviser deems to be illiquid or for which pricing information is not readily available.

 

¢   Derivatives Risk—Loss may result from an Underlying ETF’s investments in [options, forwards, futures, swaps, structured securities and other derivative instruments]. These instruments may be illiquid, difficult to price and leveraged so that small changes in the value of underlying instruments may produce disproportionate losses to the Underlying ETF. Derivatives are also subject to counterparty risk, which is the risk that the other party in the transaction will not fulfill its contractual obligations.

 

38


RISKS OF THE FUNDS AND THE UNDERLYING ETFS

 

The writing and purchase of options is a highly specialized activity which involves special investment risks. The successful use of options depends in part on the ability of the Underlying ETF’s investment adviser to anticipate future price fluctuations and the degree of correlation between the options and securities (or currency) markets. The potential for losses depends on the Underlying ETF’s investment adviser’s analysis and decision making processes around, but not limited to, expectations of changes in market prices or determination of the correlation between the instruments or indices on which options are written and purchased and the instruments in the Underlying ETF’s investment portfolio.

Losses from investments in derivatives can result from a lack of correlation between the value of those derivatives and the value of the portfolio assets (if any) being hedged. In addition, there is a risk that the performance of the derivatives or other instruments used by the Investment Adviser to replicate the performance of a particular asset class may not accurately track the performance of that asset class. Derivatives are also subject to liquidity risk and risks arising from margin requirements. Returns, and potential losses, are dependent on the Investment Adviser’s analysis and decision making capability around, but not limited to, expectations of the timing or level of fluctuations in securities prices, interest rates, currency prices or other variables. In addition, an Underlying ETF’s use of derivatives may increase or accelerate the amount of taxes payable by shareholders.

As investment companies registered with the SEC, the Underlying ETFs must identify on their books (often referred to as “asset segregation”) liquid assets, or engage in other SEC or SEC-staff approved or other appropriate measures, to “cover” open positions with respect to certain kinds of derivative instruments. For more information about these practices, see Appendix A.

 

¢   Emerging Countries Risk—The securities markets of most emerging countries are less liquid, are especially subject to greater price volatility, have smaller market capitalizations, have more or less government regulation and are not subject to as extensive and frequent accounting, financial and other reporting requirements as the securities markets of more developed countries. Further, investment in securities of issuers located in certain emerging countries involves risk of loss resulting from problems in registration, settlement or custody and substantial economic and political disruptions. These risks are not normally associated with investments in more developed countries. These risks may be greater for frontier markets.

 

¢   Expenses Risk—Because the Underlying ETFs may invest in pooled investment vehicles (including, among others, investment companies and ETFs), the investor will incur indirectly through the Underlying ETF a proportionate share of the expenses of the other pooled investment vehicles held by the Underlying ETF (including operating costs and investment management fees), in addition to the expenses of the Underlying ETF.

 

¢   Foreign Risk—When an Underlying ETF invests in foreign securities, it may be subject to risk of loss not typically associated with domestic issuers. Loss may result because of more or less foreign government regulation, less public information, less liquidity, greater volatility and less economic, political and social stability in the countries in which an Underlying ETF invests. Loss may also result from, among other things, deteriorating economic and business conditions in other countries, including the United States, regional and global conflicts, the imposition of exchange controls, foreign taxes, confiscations, expropriations and other government restrictions by the United States or other governments, higher transaction costs, difficulty enforcing contractual obligations or from problems in registration, settlement or custody. An Underlying ETF will also be subject to the risk of negative foreign currency rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which the Underlying ETF has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. Foreign risks will normally be greatest when an Underlying ETF invests in issuers located in emerging countries.

 

¢   Foreign Custody Risk—An Underlying ETF may hold foreign securities and cash with foreign banks, agents, and securities depositories appointed by the Underlying ETF’s custodian (each a “Foreign Custodian”). Some Foreign Custodians may be recently organized or new to the foreign custody business. In some countries, Foreign Custodians may be subject to little or no regulatory oversight over or independent evaluation of their operations. Further, the laws of certain countries may place limitations on an Underlying ETF’s ability to recover its assets if a Foreign Custodian enters bankruptcy. Investments in emerging markets may be subject to even greater custody risks than investments in more developed markets. Custody services in emerging countries are very often undeveloped and may be considerably less well regulated than in more developed countries, and this may not afford the same level of investor protection as would apply in developed countries.

 

¢   Geographic Risk—Concentration of the investments of an Underlying ETF in issuers located in a particular country or region will subject such Underlying ETF, to a greater extent than if investments were less concentrated, to the risks of volatile economic cycles and/or conditions and developments that may be particular to that country or region, such as: adverse securities markets; adverse exchange rates; social, political, regulatory, economic or environmental developments; or natural disasters.

 

39


 

¢   Industry Concentration Risk—An Underlying ETF may concentrate its investments in a particular industry or group of industries to the extent that its Index concentrates in an industry or group of industries. Concentrating an Underlying ETF’s investments in a limited number of issuers conducting business in the same industry or group of industries will subject the Underlying ETF to a greater risk of loss as a result of adverse economic, business or other developments affecting that industry than if the Underlying ETF’s investments were not so concentrated. If an Underlying ETF is not concentrated in a particular industry or sector, a Fund will not concentrate in a particular industry or sector.

 

¢   Interest Rate Risk—When interest rates increase, fixed income securities or instruments held by an Underlying ETF will generally decline in value. Long-term fixed income securities or instruments will normally have more price volatility because of this risk than short-term fixed income securities or instruments. A wide variety of market factors can cause interest rates to rise, including central bank monetary policy, rising inflation and changes in general economic conditions.

 

¢   Inverse ETF Risk—An inverse ETF is a fund that is constructed by using various derivative instruments to profit from a decline in the underlying benchmark. Investing in these ETFs is similar to holding various short positions, or using a combination of advanced investment strategies to profit from falling prices. An inverse ETF thus may incur a loss by subsequently buying a security at a higher price than the price at which it previously sold the security short. Because a loss incurred by an inverse ETF on a short sale results from increases in the value of the security, such losses are theoretically unlimited, and an investment in an inverse ETF could result in a loss of the entire investment in that particular ETF. To the extent an inverse ETF uses derivatives to achieve short exposure, it is subject to derivatives risk including the risk of leverage.

 

¢   Investment Style Risk—Different investment styles (e.g., “growth,” “value” or “quantitative”) tend to shift in and out of favor depending upon market and economic conditions as well as investor sentiment. An Underlying ETF may outperform or underperform other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles. Additionally, with respect to Goldman Sachs Macro Hedge Tracker ETF and Goldman Sachs Multi-Strategy Hedge Tracker ETF, an Underlying ETF’s use of managed futures strategies may underperform as managed futures have historically offered weaker performance in range-bound or highly volatile markets. Also, an Underlying ETF’s currency carry trade strategies may fail to achieve their intended results due to fluctuations in currency exchange rates.

 

¢   Liquidity Risk—An Underlying ETF may invest to a greater degree in securities or instruments that trade in lower volumes and may make investments that are less liquid than other investments. Also, an Underlying ETF may make investments that may become less liquid in response to market developments or adverse investor perceptions. Investments that are illiquid or that trade in lower volumes may be more difficult to value. When there is no willing buyer and investments cannot be readily sold at the desired time or price, an Underlying ETF may have to accept a lower price or may not be able to sell the security or instrument at all. An inability to sell one or more portfolio positions can adversely affect an Underlying ETF’s value or prevent the Underlying ETF from being able to take advantage of other investment opportunities.

If an Underlying ETF is forced to sell securities at an unfavorable time and/or under unfavorable conditions, such sales may adversely affect the Underlying ETF’s NAV.

 

¢   Management Risk—Certain Underlying ETFs are subject to management risk because they are actively managed portfolios. In managing such an Underlying ETF’s portfolio securities, an investment adviser will apply investment techniques and risk analyses in making investment decisions for the Underlying ETF, but there can be no guarantee that these will produce the desired results.

 

¢   Mid-Cap and Small-Cap Risk—The securities of mid-capitalization and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than those associated with larger, more established companies and may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements. Securities of such issuers may lack sufficient market liquidity to enable an Underlying ETF to effect sales at an advantageous time or without a substantial drop in price. Both mid-capitalization and small-capitalization companies often have narrower markets and more limited managerial and financial resources than larger, more established companies. As a result, their performance can be more volatile and they face greater risk of business failure, which could increase the volatility of an Underlying ETF’s portfolio. Generally, the smaller the company size, the greater these risks become.

 

¢  

Non-Hedging Foreign Currency Trading Risk—An Underlying ETF may engage in forward foreign currency transactions for speculative purposes. An Underlying ETF may purchase or sell foreign currencies through the use of forward contracts based on the judgment of the investment adviser of the Underlying ETF regarding the direction of the market for a particular foreign currency or currencies. In pursuing this strategy, an Underlying ETF seeks to profit from anticipated movements in currency rates by establishing “long” and/or “short” positions in forward contracts on various foreign currencies. Foreign exchange rates can be

 

40


RISKS OF THE FUNDS AND THE UNDERLYING ETFS

 

 

extremely volatile and a variance in the degree of volatility of the market or in the direction of the market from the expectations of the investment adviser of the Underlying ETF may produce significant losses to the Underlying ETF.

 

¢   Non-Investment Grade Fixed Income Securities Risk—Non-investment grade fixed income securities and unrated securities of comparable credit quality (commonly known as “junk bonds”) are considered speculative and are subject to the increased risk of an issuer’s inability to meet principal and interest payment obligations. These securities may be subject to greater price volatility due to such factors as specific corporate or municipal developments, interest rate sensitivity, negative perceptions of the junk bond markets generally and less secondary market liquidity. These securities structured as zero-coupon bonds or pay-in-kind securities may require an Underlying ETF to make taxable distributions of imputed income without receiving any corresponding cash. Investments in these types of instruments may present special tax issues for an Underlying ETF. U.S. federal income tax rules are not entirely clear about issues such as when an Underlying ETF may cease to accrue interest, original issue discount or market discount, when and to what extent deductions may be taken for bad debts or worthless instruments, how payments received on obligations in default should be allocated between principal and income and whether exchanges of debt obligations in a bankruptcy or workout context are taxable. These and other issues will be addressed by an Underlying ETF to the extent necessary in order to seek to ensure that it distributes sufficient income that it does not become subject to U.S. federal income or excise tax.

 

¢   Short Position Risk—Taking short positions and short selling involve leverage of Underlying ETF’s assets and present various risks. If the value of the instrument or market in which the Underlying ETF has taken a short position increases, then the Underlying ETF will incur a loss equal to the increase in value from the time that the short position was entered into plus any premiums and interest paid to a third party. Therefore, taking short positions involves the risk that losses may be exaggerated, potentially losing more money than the actual cost of the investment. Also, there is the risk that the counterparty to a short transaction may fail to honor its contract terms, causing a loss to the Underlying ETF.

In order to sell an instrument short, the Underlying ETF must first borrow the instrument from a lender, such as a broker or other institution. The Underlying ETF may not always be able to borrow the instrument at a particular time or at an acceptable price. Thus, there is risk that the Underlying ETF may be unable to implement its investment strategy due to the lack of available instruments or for other reasons.

After selling a borrowed instrument, the Underlying ETF is then obligated to “cover” the short sale by purchasing and returning the instrument to the lender on a later date. The Underlying ETF cannot guarantee that the instrument necessary to cover a short position will be available for purchase at the time the Underlying ETF wishes to close a short position or, if available, that the instrument will be available at an acceptable price. If the borrowed instrument has appreciated in value, the Underlying ETF will be required to pay more for the replacement instrument than the amount it received for selling the instrument short. Moreover, purchasing an instrument to cover a short position can itself cause the price of the instrument to rise further, thereby exacerbating the loss. The potential loss on a short sale is unlimited because the loss increases as the price of the instrument sold short increases and the price may rise indefinitely. To the extent the Underlying ETF uses the proceeds it receives from a short position to take additional long positions, the risks associated with the short position, including leverage risks, may be heightened, because doing so increases the exposure of the Underlying ETF to the markets and therefore could magnify changes to the Underlying ETF’s NAV. If the price of a borrowed instrument declines before the short position is covered, the Underlying ETF may realize a gain. The Underlying ETF’s gain on a short sale, before transaction and other costs, is generally limited to the difference between the price at which it sold the borrowed instrument and the price it paid to purchase the instrument to return to the lender.

While the Underlying ETF has an open short position, it is subject to the risk that the instrument’s lender will terminate the loan at a time when the Underlying ETF is unable to borrow the same instrument from another lender. If this happens, the Underlying ETF may be required to buy the replacement instrument immediately at the instrument’s then current market price or “buy in” by paying the lender an amount equal to the cost of purchasing the instrument to close out the short position.

Short sales also involve other costs. The Underlying ETF must normally repay to the lender an amount equal to any dividends or interest that accrues while a loan is outstanding. In addition, to borrow an instrument, the Underlying ETF may be required to pay a premium. The Underlying ETF also will incur transaction costs in effecting short sales. The amount of any ultimate gain for the Underlying ETF resulting from a short sale will be decreased, and the amount of any ultimate loss will be increased, by the amount of premiums, dividends, interest or expenses the Underlying ETF may be required to pay in connection with the short sale.

Until the Underlying ETF replaces a borrowed instrument, the Underlying ETF will be required to maintain assets with the lending broker as collateral. Moreover, the Underlying ETF may be required to make payments to the lender during the term of the borrowing if the value of the security it borrowed (and sold short) increases. Thus, short sales involve credit exposure to the broker that executes the short sales. In addition, the Underlying ETF is required to identify on its books, liquid assets (less any additional

 

41


collateral held by the broker, not including the short sale proceeds) to cover short sale obligations, marked-to-market daily. The requirement to identify liquid assets limits the Underlying ETF’s leveraging of investments and the related risk of losses from leveraging. However, such identification may also limit the Underlying ETF’s investment flexibility, as well as its ability to meet redemption requests or other current obligations.

 

¢   Sovereign Default Risk—The issuer of non-U.S. sovereign debt held by an Underlying ETF or the governmental authorities that control the repayment of the debt may be unable or unwilling to repay the principal or interest when due. This may result from political or social factors, the general economic environment of a country or levels of foreign debt or foreign currency exchange rates. Sovereign Default Risk includes the following risks:

 

  ¢   Economic Risk—The risks associated with the general economic environment of a country. These can encompass, among other things, low quality and growth rate of Gross Domestic Product (“GDP”), high inflation or deflation, high government deficits as a percentage of GDP, weak financial sector, overvalued exchange rate, and high current account deficits as a percentage of GDP.

 

  ¢   Political Risk—The risks associated with the general political and social environment of a country. These factors may include among other things government instability, poor socioeconomic conditions, corruption, lack of law and order, lack of democratic accountability, poor quality of the bureaucracy, internal and external conflict, and religious and ethnic tensions. High political risk can impede the economic welfare of a country.

 

  ¢   Repayment Risk—A country may be unable to pay its external debt obligations in the immediate future. Repayment risk factors may include but are not limited to high foreign debt as a percentage of GDP, high foreign debt service as a percentage of exports, low foreign exchange reserves as a percentage of short-term debt or exports, and an unsustainable exchange rate structure.

 

¢   Stock Risk—Stock prices have historically risen and fallen in periodic cycles. U.S. and foreign stock markets have experienced periods of substantial price volatility in the past and may do so again in the future.

 

¢   Swaps Risk—The use of swaps is a highly specialized activity which involves investment techniques, risk analyses and tax planning different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. These transactions can result in sizeable realized and unrealized capital gains and losses relative to the gains and losses from an Underlying ETF’s direct investments in securities.

Transactions in swaps can involve greater risks than if an Underlying ETF had invested in securities directly since, in addition to general market risks, swaps may be leveraged and are also subject to illiquidity risk, counterparty risk, credit risk and pricing risk. Regulators also may impose limits on an entity’s or group of entities’ positions in certain swaps. However, certain risks are reduced (but not eliminated) if an Underlying ETF invests in cleared swaps. Because bilateral swap agreements are two-party contracts and because they may have terms of greater than seven days, these swaps may be considered to be illiquid. Moreover, an Underlying ETF bears the risk of loss of the amount expected to be received under a swap in the event of the default or bankruptcy of a swap counterparty. Many swaps are complex and valued subjectively. Swaps and other derivatives may also be subject to pricing or “basis” risk, which exists when the price of a particular derivative diverges from the price of corresponding cash market instruments. Under certain market conditions it may not be economically feasible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position in time to avoid a loss or take advantage of an opportunity. If a swap transaction is particularly large or if the relevant market is illiquid, it may not be possible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses.

The value of swaps can be very volatile, and a variance in the degree of volatility or in the direction of securities prices from the Underlying ETF’s investment adviser’s expectations may produce significant losses in the Underlying ETF’s investments in swaps. In addition, a perfect correlation between a swap and a security position may be impossible to achieve. As a result, an Underlying ETF’s investment adviser’s use of swaps may not be effective in fulfilling the investment adviser’s investment strategies and may contribute to losses that would not have been incurred otherwise.

 

¢  

U.S. Government Securities Risk—The U.S. government may not provide financial support to U.S. government agencies, instrumentalities or sponsored enterprises if it is not obligated to do so by law. U.S. Government Securities issued by those agencies, instrumentalities and sponsored enterprises, including those issued by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and the Federal Home Loan Banks, are neither issued nor guaranteed by the United States Treasury and, therefore, are not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States. The maximum potential liability of the issuers of some U.S. Government Securities held by an Underlying ETF may greatly exceed their current resources, including their legal right to support from the U.S. Treasury. It is possible that issuers

 

42


RISKS OF THE FUNDS AND THE UNDERLYING ETFS

 

 

of U.S. Government Securities will not have the funds to meet their payment obligations in the future. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have been operating under conservatorship, with the Federal Housing Finance Administration (“FHFA”) acting as their conservator, since September 2008. The entities are dependent upon the continued support of the U.S. Department of the Treasury and FHFA in order to continue their business operations. These factors, among others, could affect the future status and role of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and the value of their securities and the securities which they guarantee. Additionally, the U.S. government and its agencies and instrumentalities do not guarantee the market values of their securities, which may fluctuate.

More information about the portfolio securities and investment techniques of the Underlying ETFs, and their associated risks, is provided in Appendix A. You should consider the investment risks discussed in this section and in Appendix A. Both are important to your investment choice.

 

43


 

Tax Advantaged Product Structure

 

  TAX ADVANTAGED PRODUCT STRUCTURE     

Unlike many conventional mutual funds which are only bought and sold at closing NAVs, the Shares of the Funds have been designed to be created and redeemed principally in-kind in Creation Units at each day’s market close. These in-kind arrangements are designed to mitigate adverse effects on a Fund’s portfolio that could arise from frequent cash purchase and redemption transactions that affect the NAV of the Fund. Moreover, in contrast to conventional mutual funds, where frequent redemptions can have an adverse tax impact on taxable shareholders because of the need to sell portfolio securities which, in turn, may generate taxable gain, the in-kind redemption mechanism of a Fund, to the extent used, generally is not expected to lead to a tax event for shareholders whose Shares are not being redeemed.

 

44


 

Service Providers

 

  INVESTMENT ADVISER     

 

Investment Adviser   Fund

Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P.

 

Equity Long Short Hedge Tracker ETF

200 West Street

 

Event Driven Hedge Tracker ETF

New York, NY 10282

 

Macro Hedge Tracker ETF

Multi-Strategy Hedge Tracker ETF

Relative Value Hedge Tracker ETF

GSAM has been registered as an investment adviser with the SEC since 1990 and is an affiliate of Goldman, Sachs & Co. (“Goldman Sachs”). As of December 31, 2014, GSAM, including its investment advisory affiliates, had assets under supervision of $1.02 trillion.

The Investment Adviser is responsible for the day-to-day management of the Funds and places purchase and sale orders for the Funds’ portfolio transactions in U.S. and foreign markets. As permitted by applicable law, these orders may be directed to any executing brokers, dealers, futures commission merchants or clearing brokers, including Goldman Sachs and its affiliates. While the Investment Adviser is ultimately responsible for the management of the Funds, it is able to draw upon the research and expertise of its asset management affiliates with respect to managing certain portfolio securities.

The Investment Adviser also performs the following additional services for the Funds:

  ¢   Supervises non-advisory operations of the Funds, including oversight of vendors hired by the Funds, oversight of Fund liquidity and risk management, oversight of regulatory inquiries and requests with respect to the Funds made to the Investment Adviser, valuation and accounting oversight and oversight of ongoing compliance with federal and state securities laws, tax regulations, and other applicable law
  ¢   Provides personnel to perform such executive, administrative and clerical services as are reasonably necessary to provide effective administration of the Funds
  ¢   Arranges for, at the Funds’ expense: (a) the preparation of all required tax returns, (b) the preparation and submission of reports to existing shareholders, (c) the periodic updating of prospectuses and statements of additional information and (d) the preparation of reports to be filed with the SEC and other regulatory authorities
  ¢   [Maintains the records of each Fund]
  ¢   [Provides office space and necessary office equipment and services for the Investment Adviser]
  ¢   Markets the Funds

GSAM may manage other funds, accounts, additional pooled vehicles and/or separate accounts that have similar investment strategies to those of the Funds. These funds, pooled vehicles or accounts may perform differently than a Fund despite their similar strategies. Because the pooled vehicles may not be registered under the Investment Company Act, they are subject to fewer regulatory restraints than the Funds (e.g., fewer trading constraints) and may employ strategies that are not subject to the same constraints as the Funds.

GSAM and/or its affiliates expects to make payments to one or more investors that contributed seed capital to one or more Funds for so long as such capital remains invested in the Fund(s). Such payments will be made from the assets of GSAM and/or such affiliates and may be based on revenues generated by GSAM in providing services to one or more ETFs for which it serves as investment adviser.

 

  MANAGEMENT FEE AND OTHER EXPENSES     

Pursuant to the Management Agreement, as compensation for its services to each Fund, the Investment Adviser is entitled to a management fee, computed daily and payable monthly, at an annual rate listed below (as a percentage of each respective Fund’s average daily net assets).

 

45


                                       
Fund   Contractual
Management Fee
Annual Rate

Equity Long Short Hedge Tracker ETF

  [        ]

Event Driven Hedge Tracker ETF

  [        ]

Macro Hedge Tracker ETF

  [        ]

Multi-Strategy Hedge Tracker ETF

  [        ]

Relative Value Hedge Tracker ETF

  [        ]

[The Investment Adviser has agreed to reduce or limit “Other Expenses” (acquired fund fees and expenses, offering costs, taxes, interest, brokerage fees, shareholder meeting, litigation, short sale, dividend, indemnification and extraordinary expenses) to [            ]%, [            ]%, [            ]%, [            ]% and [            ]% of the average daily net assets for the Goldman Sachs Equity Long Short Hedge Tracker ETF, Goldman Sachs Event Driven Hedge Tracker ETF, Goldman Sachs Macro Hedge Tracker ETF, Goldman Sachs Multi-Strategy Hedge Tracker ETF and Goldman Sachs Relative Value Hedge Tracker ETF, respectively, through at least [            ], and prior to such date, the Investment Adviser may not terminate the arrangement without the approval of the Board of Trustees. This expense limitation may be modified or terminated by the Investment Adviser at its discretion and without shareholder approval after such date, although the Investment Adviser does not presently intend to do so. [A Fund’s “Other Expenses” may be further reduced by any custody and transfer agency fee credits received by the Fund.]]

The Investment Adviser may waive a portion of its management fee from time to time, and may discontinue or modify any such waiver in the future, consistent with the terms of any fee waiver arrangements in place.

A discussion regarding the basis for the Board of Trustees’ approval of the Management Agreement for the Funds will be available in the Funds’ [annual/semi-annual report] for the period ended [                    ].

 

  FUND MANAGERS     

The QIS team manages exposure to stock, bond, currency and commodities markets. The team develops quantitative models and processes in an effort to build unique investment solutions that seek to manage exposure to a wide variety of risks. These proprietary models, which are continually refined, are developed in a highly academic, innovative team environment. The QIS team’s proprietary research on these models is dynamic and ongoing, with new strategies continually under development.

 

  ¢   QIS employs a globally-integrated team of over 90 professionals, with an additional 90+ professionals dedicated to trading, information technology and the development of analytical tools.
  ¢   Disciplined, quantitative models are used to determine allocations to the world’s stock, bond, currency and commodity markets
  ¢   Theory and economic intuition guide the investment process

 

Name and Title   Primarily
Responsible
Since
  Five Year Employment History

Steve Jeneste

Managing Director

  2015   Mr. Jeneste joined the Quantitative Investment Strategies (QIS) team in 1998 and was named a managing director in 2008. Before heading the ETF Portfolio Management team in 2015, Mr. Jeneste spent 16 years in the QIS Macro Alpha group where he was responsible for the portfolio management of the macro alpha strategies and later oversaw the portfolio management of the macro and multi-asset class strategies within the Customized Beta Strategies (CBS) platform in QIS.

Raj Garigipati

Vice President

  2015   Mr. Garigipati joined the ETF Portfolio Management team in 2015. Mr. Garigipati joined Goldman Sachs in 2003 as a Technology audit analyst in the Internal Audit department covering the Investment Management Division and later was the global audit lead for GSAM before joining the Quantitative Investment Strategies (QIS) team in 2011 as the Chief Risk Officer.

For information about portfolio manager compensation, other accounts managed by the portfolio managers and portfolio manager ownership of securities in the Funds, see the SAI.

 

  DISTRIBUTOR AND TRANSFER AGENT     

[            ], serves as the exclusive distributor (the “Distributor”) of each Fund’s Shares. [            ], serves as each Fund’s transfer agent (the “Transfer Agent”) and, as such, performs various shareholder servicing functions.

 

46


SERVICE PROVIDERS

 

For its transfer agency services, [            ] is entitled to receive a transfer agency fee equal, on an annualized basis, to [ ]% of average daily net assets.

From time to time, Goldman Sachs or any of its affiliates may purchase and hold Shares of the Funds. Goldman Sachs and its affiliates reserve the right to redeem at any time some or all of the Shares acquired for their own accounts.

 

 

ACTIVITIES OF GOLDMAN SACHS AND ITS AFFILIATES AND

OTHER ACCOUNTS MANAGED BY GOLDMAN SACHS

    

The involvement of the Investment Adviser, Goldman Sachs and their affiliates in the management of, or their interest in, other accounts and other activities of Goldman Sachs may present conflicts of interest with respect to a Fund or limit a Fund’s investment activities. Goldman Sachs is a worldwide, full service investment banking, broker dealer, asset management and financial services organization and a major participant in global financial markets that provides a wide range of financial services to a substantial and diversified client base that includes corporations, financial institutions, governments and high-net-worth individuals. As such, it acts as an investor, investment banker, research provider, investment manager, financier, adviser, market maker, trader, prime broker, lender, agent and principal. In those and other capacities, Goldman Sachs advises clients in all markets and transactions and purchases, sells, holds and recommends a broad array of investments, including securities, derivatives, loans, commodities, currencies, credit default swaps, indices, baskets and other financial instruments and products for its own account or for the accounts of its customers and has other direct and indirect interests in the global fixed income, currency, commodity, equities, bank loans and other markets in which the Funds directly and indirectly invest. Thus, it is likely that the Funds will have multiple business relationships with and will invest in, engage in transactions with, make voting decisions with respect to, or obtain services from entities for which Goldman Sachs performs or seeks to perform investment banking or other services. The Investment Adviser and/or certain of its affiliates are the managers of the Goldman Sachs Funds. The Investment Adviser and its affiliates earn fees from this and other relationships with the Funds. Although these fees are generally based on asset levels, the fees are not directly contingent on Fund performance, and Goldman Sachs would still receive significant compensation from the Funds even if shareholders lose money. Goldman Sachs and its affiliates engage in proprietary trading and advise accounts and funds which have investment objectives similar to those of the Funds and/or which engage in and compete for transactions in the same types of securities, currencies and instruments as the Funds. Goldman Sachs and its affiliates will not have any obligation to make available any information regarding their proprietary activities or strategies, or the activities or strategies used for other accounts managed by them, for the benefit of the management of the Funds. The results of a Fund’s investment activities, therefore, may differ from those of Goldman Sachs, its affiliates, and other accounts managed by Goldman Sachs and it is possible that a Fund could sustain losses during periods in which Goldman Sachs and its affiliates and other accounts achieve significant profits on their trading for proprietary or other accounts. In addition, the Funds may enter into transactions in which Goldman Sachs or its other clients have an adverse interest. For example, a Fund may take a long position in a security at the same time that Goldman Sachs or other accounts managed by the Investment Adviser take a short position in the same security (or vice versa). These and other transactions undertaken by Goldman Sachs, its affiliates or Goldman Sachs advised clients may, individually or in the aggregate, adversely impact the Funds. Transactions by one or more Goldman Sachs advised clients or the Investment Adviser may have the effect of diluting or otherwise disadvantaging the values, prices or investment strategies of the Funds. A Fund’s activities may be limited because of regulatory restrictions applicable to Goldman Sachs and its affiliates, and/or their internal policies designed to comply with such restrictions. As a global financial services firm, Goldman Sachs also provides a wide range of investment banking and financial services to issuers of securities and investors in securities. Goldman Sachs, its affiliates and others associated with it may create markets or specialize in, have positions in and effect transactions in, securities of issuers held by the Funds, and may also perform or seek to perform investment banking and financial services for those issuers. Goldman Sachs and its affiliates may have business relationships with and purchase or distribute or sell services or products from or to distributors, consultants or others who recommend the Funds or who engage in transactions with or for the Funds.

[The Funds could raise concerns regarding the potential ability of an affiliated person to manipulate a Fund’s underlying index to the benefit or detriment of the Fund. Conflicts of interest may also arise with respect to the personal trading activity of personnel of the affiliated person who may have access to or knowledge of changes to an underlying index’s composition methodology or the constituent securities in an underlying index prior to the time that information is publicly disseminated. However, such risks may be mitigated by existing protections under the 1940 Act and the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, as amended (the “Advisers Act”), as well as the Funds’ policy to maintain full portfolio transparency.

 

47


 

The Investment Adviser has adopted, pursuant to Rule 206(4)-7 under the Advisers Act, written policies and procedures reasonably designed to prevent violations of the Advisers Act and the rules thereunder. These include policies and procedures designed to minimize potential conflicts of interest among the Funds and any affiliated accounts (e.g., other registered investment companies, separately managed accounts of institutional investors, foreign investment companies, and privately offered funds), such as cross trading policies, as well as those designed to ensure the equitable allocation of portfolio transactions and brokerage commissions. In addition, the Investment Adviser has adopted policies and procedures as required under Section 204A of the Advisers Act, which are reasonably designed in light of the nature of its business to prevent the misuse, in violation of the Advisers Act or the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934 or the rules thereunder, of material non-public information by the Investment Adviser or associated person (“Inside Information Policy”). In accordance with the Code of Ethics (discussed in the SAI) and Inside Information Policy of the Investment Adviser, personnel of the Investment Adviser with knowledge about the composition of the instruments and cash that any purchaser is required to deliver in exchange for Creation Units (“Portfolio Deposit”) will be prohibited from disclosing such information to any other person, except as authorized in the course of their employment, until such information is made public. Any of the Trust’s service providers who are provided information on the Portfolio Deposit will be subject to a duty of confidentiality.

For more information about conflicts of interest, see the SAI.

The Funds may make brokerage and other payments to Goldman Sachs and its affiliates in connection with the Funds’ portfolio investment transactions in accordance with applicable law. The Funds’ Board of Trustees may approve a securities lending program where an affiliate of the Investment Adviser is retained to serve as the securities lending agent for each Fund to the extent that the Fund engages in the securities lending program. For these services, the lending agent may receive a fee from the Funds, including a fee based on the returns earned on the Funds’ investment of the cash received as collateral for the loaned securities.

 

48


 

Distributions

 

Each Fund pays distributions from its investment income and from net realized capital gains.

Distributions from net investment income and distributions from net capital gains, if any, are declared and paid annually for each Fund.

 

From time to time a portion of a Fund’s distributions may constitute a return of capital for tax purposes, and/or may include amounts in excess of the Fund’s net investment income for the period calculated in accordance with GAAP accounting practice.

Dividends and other distributions on Shares of a Fund are distributed on a pro rata basis to beneficial owners of such Shares. Dividend payments are made through Depository Trust Company (“DTC”) participants and indirect participants (each as described in the Book Entry section below) to beneficial owners then of record with proceeds received from a Fund.

No dividend reinvestment service is provided by the Funds. Broker-dealers may make available the DTC book-entry dividend reinvestment service for use by beneficial owners of the Funds for reinvestment of their dividend distributions. Beneficial owners should contact their broker to determine the availability and costs of the service and the details of participation therein. Brokers may require beneficial owners to adhere to specific procedures and timetables. If this service is available and used, dividend distributions of both income and realized gains will be automatically reinvested in additional whole Shares of a Fund purchased in the secondary market.

 

49


 

Shareholder Guide

 

  BUYING AND SELLING SHARES     

Shares of a Fund may be acquired or redeemed directly from the Fund only in Creation Units or multiples thereof, as discussed in the Creations and Redemptions section of this Prospectus. Only an Authorized Participant (as defined in the Creations and Redemptions section below) may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with a Fund. Once created, Shares of the Funds generally trade in the secondary market in amounts less than a Creation Unit.

Shares of the Funds are listed for trading on a national securities exchange during the trading day. Shares can be bought and sold throughout the trading day like shares of other publicly traded companies. However, there can be no guarantee that an active trading market will develop or be maintained, or that the Fund Shares listing will continue or remain unchanged. The Trust does not impose any minimum investment for Shares of a Fund purchased on an exchange. Buying or selling a Fund’s Shares involves certain costs that apply to all securities transactions. When buying or selling Shares of a Fund through a financial intermediary, you may incur a brokerage commission or other charges determined by your financial intermediary. Due to these brokerage costs, if any, frequent trading may detract significantly from investment returns. In addition, you may also incur the cost of the spread (the difference between the bid price and the ask price). The commission is frequently a fixed amount and may be a significant cost for investors seeking to buy or sell small amounts of Shares. The spread varies over time for Shares of a Fund based on its trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally less if the Fund has more trading volume and market liquidity and more if the Fund has less trading volume and market liquidity.

Each Fund’s primary listing exchange is NYSE Arca. NYSE Arca is open for trading Monday through Friday and is closed on the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents’ Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.

A “business day” with respect to the Funds is each day the New York Stock Exchange, NYSE Arca and the Trust are open and includes any day that a Fund is required to be open under Section 22(e) of the Investment Company Act. Orders from Authorized Participants to create or redeem Creation Units will only be accepted on a business day. On days when NYSE Arca closes earlier than normal, the Funds may require orders to create or redeem Creation Units to be placed earlier in the day. See the Statement of Additional Information for more information.

The Trust’s Board of Trustees has not adopted a policy of monitoring for frequent purchases and redemptions of Fund Shares (“frequent trading”) that appear to attempt to take advantage of potential arbitrage opportunities presented by a lag between a change in the value of a Fund’s portfolio securities after the close of the primary markets for the Fund’s portfolio securities and the reflection of that change in the Fund’s NAV (“market timing”). The Trust believes this is appropriate because ETFs, such as the Funds, are intended to be attractive to arbitrageurs, as trading activity is critical to ensuring that the market price of Fund Shares remains at or close to NAV. Since the Funds issue and redeem Creation Units at NAV plus applicable transaction fees, and the Funds’ Shares may be purchased and sold on NYSE Arca at prevailing market prices, the risks of frequent trading are limited.

Section 12(d)(1) of the Investment Company Act restricts investments by registered investment companies and companies relying on Sections 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of the Investment Company Act in the securities of other investment companies.

The Funds and the Distributor will have the sole right to accept orders to purchase Shares and reserve the right to reject any order in whole or in part.

 

  PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES     

[GSAM and/or the Distributor may make payments to broker-dealers or other financial intermediaries (each, a “Financial Intermediary”) related to activities that are designed to make registered representatives, other professionals and individual investors more knowledgeable about the Funds or for other activities, such as participation in marketing activities and presentations, educational training programs, the support of technology platforms and/or reporting systems. GSAM and/or the Distributor may also make payments to Financial Intermediaries for certain printing, publishing and mailing costs associated with the Funds or materials relating to exchange-traded funds in general. In addition, GSAM and/or the Distributor may make payments to Financial Intermediaries that make Fund Shares available to their clients or for otherwise promoting the Funds. Such payments, which may be significant to the Financial Intermediary, are not made by a Fund. Rather, such payments are made by GSAM and/or the Distributor

 

50


SHAREHOLDER GUIDE

 

from their own resources, which may come directly or indirectly in part from management fees paid by the Funds. Payments of this type are sometimes referred to as marketing support or revenue-sharing payments. A Financial Intermediary may make decisions about which investment options it recommends or makes available, or the level of services provided, to its customers based on the marketing support payments it is eligible to receive. Therefore, such payments to a Financial Intermediary create conflicts of interest between the Financial Intermediary and its customers and may cause the Financial Intermediary to recommend a Fund over another investment. More information regarding these payments is contained in the Statement of Additional Information. A shareholder should contact his or her Financial Intermediary’s salesperson or other investment professional for more information regarding any such payments the Financial Intermediary firm may receive from GSAM and/or the Distributor.]

 

  NET ASSET VALUE     

Each Fund calculates its NAV as follows:

 

NAV =  

(Value of Assets of the Fund)

– (Liabilities of the Fund)

  Number of Outstanding Shares of the Fund

Each Fund’s NAV per share is generally calculated on each business day as of the close of regular trading on the New York Stock Exchange (normally 4:00 p.m. Eastern time) or such other times as the New York Stock Exchange or NASDAQ market may officially close. A Fund’s investments for which market quotations are readily available are valued at market value on the basis of quotations furnished by a pricing service or provided by securities dealers. If accurate quotations are not readily available, or if the Investment Adviser believes that such quotations do not accurately reflect fair value, the fair value of the Funds’ investments may be determined in good faith based on yield equivalents, a pricing matrix or other sources, under valuation procedures established by the Board of Trustees.

To the extent a Fund invests in foreign equity securities, “fair value” prices are provided by an independent fair value service in accordance with the fair value procedures approved by the Board of Trustees. Fair value prices are used because many foreign markets operate at times that do not coincide with those of the major U.S. markets. Events that could affect the values of foreign portfolio holdings may occur between the close of the foreign market and the time of determining the NAV, and would not otherwise be reflected in the NAV. If the independent fair value service does not provide a fair value price for a particular security, or if the price provided does not meet the established criteria for a Fund, the Fund will price that security at the most recent closing price for that security on its principal exchange.

Cases where there is no clear indication of the value of a Fund’s investments include, among others, situations where a security or other asset or liability does not have a price source.

In addition, the Investment Adviser, consistent with its procedures and applicable regulatory guidance, may (but need not) determine to make an adjustment to the previous closing prices of either domestic or foreign securities in light of significant events, to reflect what it believes to be the fair value of the securities at the time of determining a Fund’s NAV. Significant events that could affect a large number of securities in a particular market may include, but are not limited to: situations relating to one or more single issuers in a market sector; significant fluctuations in U.S. or foreign markets; market dislocations; market disruptions or unscheduled market closings; equipment failures; natural or man made disasters or acts of God; armed conflicts; governmental actions or other developments; as well as the same or similar events which may affect specific issuers or the securities markets even though not tied directly to the securities markets. Other significant events that could relate to a single issuer may include, but are not limited to: corporate actions such as reorganizations, mergers and buy-outs; corporate announcements, including those relating to earnings, products and regulatory news; significant litigation; ratings downgrades; bankruptcies; and trading suspensions.

One effect of using an independent fair value service and fair valuation may be to reduce stale pricing arbitrage opportunities presented by the pricing of Fund Shares. However, it involves the risk that the values used by the Funds to price their investments may be different from those used by other investment companies and investors to price the same investments. Foreign securities may trade in their local markets on days a Fund is closed. As a result, if a Fund holds foreign securities, its NAV may be impacted on days when investors may not purchase or sell Fund Shares on the secondary market or purchase or redeem Creation Units through the Fund.

 

51


 

  BOOK ENTRY     

DTC serves as securities depository for the Shares. (The Shares may be held only in book-entry form; stock certificates will not be issued.) DTC, or its nominee, is the record or registered owner of all outstanding Shares. Beneficial ownership of Shares will be shown on the records of DTC or its participants (described below). Beneficial owners of Shares are not entitled to have Shares registered in their names, will not receive or be entitled to receive physical delivery of certificates in definitive form and are not considered the registered holder thereof. Accordingly, to exercise any rights of a holder of Shares, each beneficial owner must rely on the procedures of: (i) DTC; (ii) “DTC Participants,” i.e., securities brokers and dealers, banks, trust companies, clearing corporations and certain other organizations, some of whom (and/or their representatives) own DTC; and (iii) “Indirect Participants,” i.e., brokers, dealers, banks and trust companies that clear through or maintain a custodial relationship with a DTC Participant, either directly or indirectly, through which such beneficial owner holds its interests. The Trust understands that under existing industry practice, in the event the Trust requests any action of holders of Shares, or a beneficial owner desires to take any action that DTC, as the record owner of all outstanding Shares, is entitled to take, DTC would authorize the DTC Participants to take such action and that the DTC Participants would authorize the Indirect Participants and beneficial owners acting through such DTC Participants to take such action and would otherwise act upon the instructions of beneficial owners owning through them. As described above, the Trust recognizes DTC or its nominee as the owner of all Shares for all purposes.

 

  CREATIONS AND REDEMPTIONS     

Prior to trading in the secondary market, Shares of the Funds are “created” at NAV by market makers, large investors and institutions only in block-size Creation Units of 50,000 Shares or multiples thereof. Each “creator” or “Authorized Participant” enters into an authorized participant agreement with the Funds’ Distributor.

A creation transaction, which is subject to acceptance by the transfer agent, generally takes place when an Authorized Participant deposits into a Fund a designated portfolio of securities (including any portion of such securities for which cash may be substituted) and a specified amount of cash approximating the holdings of the Fund in exchange for a specified number of Creation Units. To the extent practicable, the composition of such portfolio generally corresponds pro rata to the positions of a Fund’s portfolio (including cash positions). However, creation and redemption baskets may differ under certain circumstances.

Similarly, Shares can be redeemed only in Creation Units, generally for a designated portfolio of securities (including any portion of such securities for which cash may be substituted) held by a Fund and a specified amount of cash. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, Shares are not redeemable by the Funds.

The prices at which creations and redemptions occur are based on the next calculation of NAV after a creation or redemption order is received in an acceptable form under the authorized participant agreement.

Only an Authorized Participant may create or redeem Creation Units directly with a Fund.

In the event of a system failure or other interruption, including disruptions at market makers or Authorized Participants, orders to purchase or redeem Creation Units either may not be executed according to a Fund’s instructions or may not be executed at all, or the Fund may not be able to place or change orders.

To the extent a Fund engages in in-kind transactions, the Fund intends to comply with the U.S. federal securities laws in accepting securities for deposit and satisfying redemptions with redemption securities by, among other means, assuring that any securities accepted for deposit and any securities used to satisfy redemption requests will be sold in transactions that would be exempt from registration under the 1933 Act. Further, an Authorized Participant that is not a “qualified institutional buyer,” as such term is defined under Rule 144A of the 1933 Act, will not be able to receive restricted securities eligible for resale under Rule 144A.

Creations and redemptions must be made through a firm that is either a member of the Continuous Net Settlement System of the National Securities Clearing Corporation or a DTC participant and has executed an agreement with the Distributor with respect to creations and redemptions of Creation Unit aggregations. Information about the procedures regarding creation and redemption of Creation Units (including the cut-off times for receipt of creation and redemption orders) and the applicable transaction fees is included in the Funds’ SAI.

 

52


 

Taxation

 

As with any investment, you should consider how your investment in the Funds will be taxed. The tax information below is provided as general information. More tax information is available in the SAI. You should consult your tax adviser about the federal, state, local or foreign tax consequences of your investment in the Funds. Except as otherwise noted, the tax information provided assumes that you are a U.S. citizen or resident.

Unless your investment is through an IRA or other tax-advantaged account, you should carefully consider the possible tax consequences of Fund distributions and the sale of your Fund Shares.

 

  DISTRIBUTIONS     

Each Fund contemplates declaring as dividends each year all or substantially all of its taxable income. Distributions you receive from the Funds are generally subject to federal income tax, and may also be subject to state or local taxes. This is true whether you reinvest your distributions in additional Fund Shares or receive them in cash. For federal tax purposes, the Funds’ distributions attributable to net investment income and short-term capital gains are taxable to you as ordinary income while distributions of long-term capital gains are taxable to you as long-term capital gains, no matter how long you have owned your Fund Shares.

Under current provisions of the Code, the maximum individual rate applicable to long-term capital gains is generally either 15% or 20%, depending on whether the individual’s income exceeds certain threshold amounts. Fund distributions to noncorporate shareholders attributable to dividends received by the Funds from U.S. and certain qualified foreign corporations will generally be taxed at the long-term capital gain rate, as long as certain other requirements are met. For these lower rates to apply, the non-corporate shareholder must own their Fund Shares for at least 61 days during the 121-day period beginning 60 days before a Fund’s ex-dividend date.

Distributions in excess of a Fund’s current and accumulated earnings and profits are treated as a tax-free return of your investment to the extent of your basis in the shares, and generally as capital gain thereafter. A return of capital, which for tax purposes is treated as a return of your investment, reduces your basis in shares, thus reducing any loss or increasing any gain on a subsequent taxable disposition of shares. A distribution will reduce a Fund’s NAV per share and may be taxable to you as ordinary income or capital gain even though, from an economic standpoint, the distribution may constitute a return of capital.

An additional 3.8% Medicare tax is imposed on certain net investment income (including ordinary dividends and capital gain distributions received from a Fund and net gains from redemptions or other taxable dispositions of Fund Shares) of U.S. individuals, estates and trusts to the extent that such person’s “modified adjusted gross income” (in the case of an individual) or “adjusted gross income” (in the case of an estate or trust) exceeds certain threshold amounts.

A Fund’s transactions in derivatives (such as futures contracts and swaps) will be subject to special tax rules, the effect of which may be to accelerate income to the Fund, defer losses to the Fund, cause adjustments in the holding periods of the Fund’s securities and convert short-term capital losses into long-term capital losses. These rules could therefore affect the amount, timing and character of distributions to you. A Fund’s use of derivatives may result in the Fund realizing more short-term capital gains and ordinary income subject to tax at ordinary income tax rates than it would if it did not use derivatives.

Although distributions are generally treated as taxable to you in the year they are paid, distributions declared in October, November or December but paid in January are taxable as if they were paid in December. A percentage of the Funds’ dividends paid to corporate shareholders may be eligible for the corporate dividends-received deduction. This percentage may, however, be reduced as a result of a Fund’s securities lending activities or high portfolio turnover rate. Character and tax status of all distributions will be available to shareholders after the close of each calendar year.

Each Fund may be subject to foreign withholding or other foreign taxes on income or gain from certain foreign securities. In general, each Fund may deduct these taxes in computing its taxable income. In general, the Fund may deduct these taxes in computing its taxable income. Rather than deducting these foreign taxes, a Fund may make an election to treat a proportionate amount of those taxes as constituting a distribution to each shareholder, which would generally allow you either (i) to credit (subject to certain holding period and other limitations) that proportionate amount of taxes against your U.S. Federal income tax liability as a foreign tax credit or (ii) to take that amount as an itemized deduction.

 

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If you buy Shares of a Fund before it makes a distribution, the distribution will be taxable to you even though it may actually be a return of a portion of your investment. This is known as “buying into a dividend.”

 

  TAXES ON CREATIONS AND REDEMPTIONS OF CREATION UNITS     

A person who exchanges securities for Creation Units generally will recognize a gain or loss. The gain or loss will be equal to the difference between the market value of the Creation Units at the time of exchange and the sum of the exchanger’s aggregate basis in the securities surrendered and the amount of any cash paid for such Creation Units. A person who exchanges Creation Units for securities will generally recognize a gain or loss equal to the difference between the exchanger’s basis in the Creation Units and the sum of the aggregate market value of the securities received. The Internal Revenue Service, however, may assert that a loss realized upon an exchange of primarily securities for Creation Units cannot be deducted currently under the rules governing “wash sales,” or on the basis that there has been no significant change in economic position. Persons exchanging securities for Creation Units or redeeming Creation Units should consult their own tax adviser with respect to whether wash sale rules apply and when a loss might be deductible and the tax treatment of any creation or redemption transaction.

Under current U.S. federal income tax laws, any capital gain or loss realized upon a redemption (or creation) of Creation Units is generally treated as long-term capital gain or loss if the Shares (or securities surrendered) have been held for more than one year and as a short-term capital gain or loss if the Shares (or securities surrendered) have been held for one year or less.

 

  SALES OF FUND SHARES     

Your sale of Fund Shares is a taxable transaction for federal income tax purposes, and may also be subject to state and local taxes. When you sell your Shares, you will generally recognize a capital gain or loss in an amount equal to the difference between your adjusted tax basis in the Shares and the amount received. Generally, this capital gain or loss is long-term or short-term depending on whether your holding period exceeds one year, except that any loss realized on Shares held for six months or less will be treated as a long-term capital loss to the extent of any capital gain dividends that were received on the Shares. Additionally, any loss realized on a sale or redemption of Shares of a Fund may be disallowed under “wash sale” rules to the extent the Shares disposed of are replaced with other Shares of that Fund within a period of 61 days beginning 30 days before and ending 30 days after the date of disposition, such as pursuant to a dividend reinvestment in Shares of that Fund. If disallowed, the loss will be reflected in an adjustment to the basis of the Shares acquired.

 

  OTHER INFORMATION     

You may be subject to backup withholding at a rate of 28% with respect to taxable distributions if you do not provide your correct taxpayer identification number, or certify that it is correct, or if you have been notified by the IRS that you are subject to backup withholding.

Non-U.S. investors are generally subject to U.S. withholding tax with respect to dividends received from the Fund and may be subject to estate tax with respect to their Fund Shares. Under an expired provision (which may possibly be extended by Congress), non-U.S. investors generally are not subject to U.S. federal income tax withholding on certain distributions of interest income and/or short-term capital gains that are designated by the Fund. If the provision is extended by Congress, it is expected that the Fund will generally make designations of short-term gains, to the extent permitted, but the Fund does not intend to make designations of any distributions attributable to interest income. Therefore, all distributions of interest income will be subject to withholding when paid to non-U.S. investors.

Effective July 1, 2014, withholding of U.S. tax (at a 30% rate) is required with respect to payments of taxable dividends and (effective January 1, 2017) certain capital gain dividends made to certain non-U.S. entities that fail to comply (or be deemed compliant) with extensive new reporting and withholding requirements designed to inform the U.S. Department of the Treasury of U.S.-owned foreign investment accounts. Shareholders may be requested to provide additional information to enable the applicable withholding agent to determine whether withholding is required.

Legislation passed by Congress requires reporting to you and the IRS annually on Form 1099-B not only the gross proceeds of Fund shares you sell or redeem but also their cost basis. Shareholders should contact their intermediaries with respect to reporting of cost basis and available elections with respect to their accounts. You should carefully review the cost basis information provided

 

54


TAXATION

 

by the applicable intermediary and make any additional basis, holding period or other adjustments that are required when reporting these amounts on your federal income tax returns.

You should carefully review the cost basis information provided by the applicable intermediary and make any additional basis, holding period or other adjustments that are required when reporting these amounts on your federal income tax returns.

 

55


 

Index Provider

 

The Goldman Sachs Equity Long Short Hedge Tracker Index, Goldman Sachs Event Driven Hedge Tracker Index, Goldman Sachs Macro Hedge Tracker Index, Goldman Sachs Multi-Strategy Hedge Tracker Index and Goldman Sachs Relative Value Hedge Tracker Index were developed and are maintained by the Index Provider and calculated by the Calculation Agent. The Index Provider determines the composition and relative weightings of the securities in each Index. The Calculation Agent is not an affiliate of the Index Provider, the Fund or the Investment Adviser and publishes information regarding the market value of each Index.

 

56


 

Other Information

 

  PREMIUM/DISCOUNT INFORMATION     

The Funds have not yet commenced operations and, therefore, do not have information regarding how often the Shares of a Fund traded on NYSE Arca at a price above (i.e., at a premium) or below (i.e., at a discount) the NAV of the Fund to report.

 

  CONTINUOUS OFFERING     

The method by which Creation Units are created and traded may raise certain issues under applicable securities laws. Because new Creation Units are issued and sold by the Trust on an ongoing basis, a “distribution,” as such term is used in the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), may occur at any point. Broker dealers and other persons are cautioned that some activities on their part may, depending on the circumstances, result in their being deemed participants in a distribution in a manner which could render them statutory underwriters and subject them to the prospectus delivery and liability provisions of the Securities Act.

For example, a broker dealer firm or its client may be deemed a statutory underwriter if it takes Creation Units after placing an order with the Distributor, breaks them down into constituent Shares, and sells such Shares directly to customers, or if it chooses to couple the creation of a supply of new Shares with an active selling effort involving solicitation of secondary market demand for Shares. A determination of whether one is an underwriter for purposes of the Securities Act must take into account all the facts and circumstances pertaining to the activities of the broker dealer or its client in the particular case, and the examples mentioned above should not be considered a complete description of all the activities that could lead to a categorization as an underwriter.

Broker dealers who are not “underwriters” but are participating in a distribution (as contrasted to ordinary secondary trading transactions), and thus dealing with Shares that are part of an “unsold allotment” within the meaning of Section 4(3)(C) of the Securities Act, would be unable to take advantage of the prospectus delivery exemption provided by Section 4(3) of the Securities Act. This is because the prospectus delivery exemption in Section 4(3) of the Securities Act is not available in respect of such transactions as a result of Section 24(d) of the Investment Company Act. As a result, broker dealer firms should note that dealers who are not underwriters but are participating in a distribution (as contrasted with ordinary secondary market transactions) and thus dealing with the Shares that are part of an overallotment within the meaning of Section 4(3)(A) of the Securities Act would be unable to take advantage of the prospectus delivery exemption provided by Section 4(3) of the Securities Act. Firms that incur a prospectus delivery obligation with respect to Shares are reminded that, under Rule 153 of the Securities Act, a prospectus delivery obligation under Section 5(b)(2) of the Securities Act owed to an exchange member in connection with a sale on NYSE Arca is satisfied by the fact that the prospectus is available at NYSE Arca upon request. The prospectus delivery mechanism provided in Rule 153 is only available with respect to transactions on an exchange.

In addition, certain affiliates of the Funds and the Investment Adviser may purchase and resell Fund Shares pursuant to this Prospectus.

 

  DISTRIBUTION AND SERVICE PLAN     

The Board of Trustees of the Trust has adopted a distribution and service plan (“Plan”) pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the Act. Under the Plan, each Fund is authorized to pay distribution fees in connection with the sale and distribution of its Shares and pay service fees in connection with the provision of ongoing services to shareholders of each class and the maintenance of shareholder accounts in an amount up to [ ]% of its average daily net assets each year.

No Rule 12b-1 fees are currently paid by the Funds, and there are no current plans to impose these fees. However, in the event Rule 12b-1 fees are charged in the future, because these fees are paid out of each Fund’s assets on an ongoing basis, these fees will increase the cost of your investment in the Funds. By purchasing Shares subject to distribution fees and service fees, you may pay more over time than you would by purchasing Shares with other types of sales charge arrangements. Long-term shareholders may pay more than the economic equivalent of the maximum front-end sales charge permitted by the rules of FINRA. The net income attributable to Shares will be reduced by the amount of distribution fees and service fees and other expenses of the Funds.

 

57


 

Appendix A

Additional Information on Portfolio Risks, Securities and Techniques of the Underlying ETFs

 

  A. GENERAL PORTFOLIO RISKS OF THE UNDERLYING ETS     

Because each Fund is a fund of funds, its investment performance depends largely on the investment performance of the Underlying ETFs in which it invests. An investment in a Fund is subject to the risks associated with the Underlying ETFs that comprise the Fund’s Index.

The Underlying ETFs will be subject to the risks associated with equity investments. “Equity investments” may include common stocks, preferred stocks, interests in REITs, convertible debt obligations, convertible preferred stocks, equity interests in trusts, partnerships, joint ventures, limited liability companies and similar enterprises, other investment companies (including ETFs), warrants, stock purchase rights and synthetic and derivative instruments (such as swaps and futures contracts) that have economic characteristics similar to equity securities. In general, the values of equity investments fluctuate in response to the activities of individual companies and in response to general market and economic conditions. Accordingly, the values of the equity investments that an Underlying ETF hold may decline over short or extended periods. The stock markets tend to be cyclical, with periods when stock prices generally rise and periods when prices generally decline. This volatility means that the value of your investment in an Underlying ETF may increase or decrease. In recent years, certain stock markets have experienced substantial price volatility. To the extent an Underlying ETF’s net assets decrease or increase in the future due to price volatility or share redemption or purchase activity, the Underlying ETF’s expense ratio may correspondingly increase or decrease from the expense ratio disclosed in this Prospectus.

To the extent an Underlying ETFs invests in pooled investment vehicles (including investment companies and ETFs) and partnerships, that Underlying ETF will be affected by the investment policies, practices and performances of such entities in direct proportion to the amount of assets the Underlying ETF invests therein.

To the extent that an Underlying ETF invests in fixed income securities, that Underlying ETF will also be subject to the risks associated with its fixed income securities. These risks include interest rate risk, credit/default risk and call/extension risk. In general, interest rate risk involves the risk that when interest rates decline, the market value of fixed income securities tends to increase (although many mortgage-related securities will have less potential than other debt securities for capital appreciation during periods of declining rates). Conversely, when interest rates increase, the market value of fixed income securities tends to decline. Credit/default risk involves the risk that an issuer or guarantor could default on its obligations, and an Underlying ETF will not recover their investment. Call risk and extension risk are normally present in mortgage-backed securities and asset-backed securities. For example, homeowners have the option to prepay their mortgages. Therefore, the duration of a security backed by home mortgages can either shorten (call risk) or lengthen (extension risk). In general, if interest rates on new mortgage loans fall sufficiently below the interest rates on existing outstanding mortgage loans, the rate of prepayment would be expected to increase. Conversely, if mortgage loan interest rates rise above the interest rates on existing outstanding mortgage loans, the rate of prepayment would be expected to decrease. In either case, a change in the prepayment rate can result in losses to investors. The same would be true of asset-backed securities such as securities backed by car loans.

A rising interest rate environment could cause the value of an Underlying ETF’s fixed income securities to decrease, and fixed income markets to experience increased volatility in addition to heightened levels of liquidity risk.

Certain Underlying ETFs may invest in non-investment grade fixed income securities (commonly known as “junk bonds”), which are rated below investment grade (or determined to be of comparable credit quality, if not rated) at the time of purchase and are therefore considered speculative. Because non-investment grade fixed income securities are issued by issuers with low credit ratings, they pose a greater risk of default than investment grade securities.

The investment adviser of an Underlying ETF may use derivative instruments, including financial futures contracts and swap transactions, as well as other types of derivatives. An Underlying ETF’s investments in derivative instruments, including financial futures contracts and swaps, can be significant.

Interest rates, fixed income securities prices, the prices of futures and other derivatives, and currency exchange rates can be volatile, and a variance in the degree of volatility or in the direction of the market from the Underlying ETF’s investment adviser’s expectations may produce significant losses in an Underlying ETF’s investments in derivatives.

 

58


APPENDIX A

 

Financial futures contracts used by an Underlying ETF include interest rate futures contracts including, among others, Eurodollar futures contracts. Eurodollar futures contracts are U.S. dollar-denominated futures contracts that are based on the implied forward London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) of a three-month deposit. Further information is included in this Prospectus regarding futures contracts, swaps and other derivative instruments used by the Underlying ETFs, including information on the risks presented by these instruments and purposes for which they may be used by an Underlying ETF.

The Underlying ETFs may, from time to time, enter into arrangements with certain brokers or other counterparties that require the segregation of collateral. For operational, cost or other reasons, when setting up arrangements relating to the execution/clearing of trades, an Underlying ETF may choose to select a segregation model which may not be the most protective option available in the case of a default by a broker or counterparty.

Certain Underlying ETFs will be subject to the risk related to exposure to the commodities markets. Exposure to the commodities markets may subject an Underlying ETF to greater volatility than investments in traditional securities. The value of commodity-linked derivative instruments may be affected by changes in overall market movements, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates, or sectors affecting a particular industry or commodity, such as drought, floods, weather, livestock disease, embargoes, tariffs and international economic, political and regulatory developments.

The following sections provide further information on certain types of securities and investment techniques that may be used by the Underlying ETFs, including their associated risks. To the extent the Fund purchases these securities and engages in these investment techniques, the Fund will be subject to these risks. Additional information is provided in the SAI, which is available upon request. Among other things, the SAI describes certain fundamental investment restrictions that cannot be changed without shareholder approval. You should note, however, that all investment objectives, and all investment policies not specifically designated as fundamental are non-fundamental and may be changed without shareholder approval. If there is a change in an Underlying ETF’s investment objective, you should consider whether the respective Fund remains an appropriate investment in light of your then current financial position and needs.

 

  B. OTHER PORTFOLIO RISKS     

Index Risk.  A Fund will be negatively affected by general declines in the securities and asset classes represented in its Index. In addition, because the Funds are not “actively” managed, unless a specific security is removed from an Index, a Fund generally would not sell a security because the security’s issuer was in financial trouble. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on a Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Index. A Fund also does not attempt to take defensive positions under any market conditions, including declining markets. Therefore, a Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that may actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or to lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers. The Index Provider relies on third party data it believes to be reliable in constructing each Index, but it does not guarantee the accuracy of such third party data. Each Index is new and has a limited performance history. Any new index is subject to errors in its construction.

Tracking Error Risk.  Tracking error is the divergence of a Fund’s performance from that of its Index. The performance of a Fund may diverge from that of its Index for a number of reasons. Tracking error may occur because of transaction costs, a Fund’s holding of cash, differences in accrual of dividends, changes to its Index or the need to meet new or existing regulatory requirements. Unlike a Fund, the returns of an Index are not reduced by investment and other operating expenses, including the trading costs associated with implementing changes to its portfolio of investments. Tracking error risk may be heightened during times of market volatility or other unusual market conditions. To the extent that a Fund calculates its NAV based on fair value prices and the value of its Index is based on securities’ closing prices (i.e., the value of the Index is not based on fair value prices), the Fund’s ability to track the Index may be adversely affected. Because an Index is not subject to the tax diversification requirements to which a Fund must adhere, a Fund may be required to deviate its investments from the securities and relative weightings of its Index. For tax efficiency purposes, a Fund may sell certain securities to realize losses, which will result in a deviation from its Index.

Risks of Investing in Mid-Capitalization and Small-Capitalization Companies.  Certain Underlying ETFs may, to the extent consistent with its investment policies, invest in mid- and small-capitalization companies. Investments in mid- and small-capitalization companies involve greater risk and portfolio price volatility than investments in larger capitalization stocks. Among the reasons for the greater price volatility of these investments are the less certain growth prospects of smaller firms and the lower degree of liquidity in the markets for such securities. Mid- and small- capitalization companies may be thinly traded and may have to be sold at a discount from current market prices or in small lots over an extended period of time. In addition, these securities are

 

59


subject to the risk that during certain periods the liquidity of particular issuers or industries, or all securities in particular investment categories, will shrink or disappear suddenly and without warning as a result of adverse economic or market conditions, or adverse investor perceptions whether or not accurate. Because of the lack of sufficient market liquidity, a an Underlying ETF may incur losses because it will be required to effect sales at a disadvantageous time and only then at a substantial drop in price. Mid- and small-capitalization companies include “unseasoned” issuers that do not have an established financial history; often have limited product lines, markets or financial resources; may depend on or use a few key personnel for management; and may be susceptible to losses and risks of bankruptcy. Mid- and small-capitalization companies may be operating at a loss or have significant variations in operating results; may be engaged in a rapidly changing business with products subject to a substantial risk of obsolescence; may require substantial additional capital to support their operations, to finance expansion or to maintain their competitive position; and may have substantial borrowings or may otherwise have a weak financial condition. In addition, these companies may face intense competition, including competition from companies with greater financial resources, more extensive development, manufacturing, marketing, and other capabilities, and a larger number of qualified managerial and technical personnel. Transaction costs for these investments are often higher than those of larger capitalization companies. Investments in mid- and small-capitalization companies may be more difficult to price precisely than other types of securities because of their characteristics and lower trading volumes.

Risks of Foreign Investments.  Certain Underlying ETFs will make foreign investments. Foreign investments involve special risks that are not typically associated with U.S. dollar denominated or quoted securities of U.S. issuers. Foreign investments may be affected by changes in currency rates, changes in foreign or U.S. laws or restrictions applicable to such investments and changes in exchange control regulations (e.g., currency blockage). A decline in the exchange rate of the currency (i.e., weakening of the currency against the U.S. dollar) in which a portfolio security is quoted or denominated relative to the U.S. dollar would reduce the value of the portfolio security. In addition, if the currency in which an Underlying ETF receives dividends, interest or other payments declines in value against the U.S. dollar before such income is distributed as dividends to shareholders or converted to U.S. dollars, the Underlying ETF may have to sell portfolio securities to obtain sufficient cash to pay such dividends.

Certain foreign markets may rely heavily on particular industries or foreign capital and are more vulnerable to diplomatic developments, the imposition of economic sanctions against a particular country or countries, organizations, entities and/or individuals, changes in international trading patterns, trade barriers, and other protectionist or retaliatory measures. International trade barriers or economic sanctions against foreign countries, organizations, entities and/or individuals may adversely affect an Underlying ETF’s foreign holdings or exposures.

Brokerage commissions, custodial services and other costs relating to investment in international securities markets generally are more expensive than in the United States. In addition, clearance and settlement procedures may be different in foreign countries and, in certain markets, such procedures have been unable to keep pace with the volume of securities transactions, thus making it difficult to conduct such transactions.

Foreign issuers are not generally subject to uniform accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards comparable to those applicable to U.S. issuers. There may be less publicly available information about a foreign issuer than about a U.S. issuer. In addition, there is generally less government regulation of foreign markets, companies and securities dealers than in the United States, and the legal remedies for investors may be more limited than the remedies available in the United States. Foreign securities markets may have substantially less volume than U.S. securities markets and securities of many foreign issuers are less liquid and more volatile than securities of comparable domestic issuers. Furthermore, with respect to certain foreign countries, there is a possibility of nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, imposition of withholding or other taxes on dividend or interest payments (or, in some cases, capital gains distributions), limitations on the removal of funds or other assets from such countries, and risks of political or social instability or diplomatic developments which could adversely affect investments in those countries.

Certain foreign investments may become less liquid in response to social, political or market developments or adverse investor perceptions, or become illiquid after purchase by an Underlying ETF, particularly during periods of market turmoil. Certain foreign investments may become illiquid when, for instance, there are few, if any, interested buyers and sellers or when dealers are unwilling to make a market for certain securities. When an Underlying ETF holds illiquid investments, its portfolio may be harder to value, especially in changing markets.

Concentration of an Underlying ETF’s assets in one or a few countries and currencies will subject the Underlying ETF to greater risks than if the Underlying ETF’s assets were not geographically concentrated.

 

60


APPENDIX A

 

Investments in foreign securities may take the form of sponsored and ADRs, GDRs, European Depositary Receipts (“EDRs”) or other similar instruments representing securities of foreign issuers. ADRs, GDRs and EDRs represent the right to receive securities of foreign issuers deposited in a bank or other depository. ADRs and certain GDRs are traded in the United States. GDRs may be traded in either the United States or in foreign markets. EDRs are traded primarily outside the United States. Prices of ADRs are quoted in U.S. dollars. EDRs and GDRs are not necessarily quoted in the same currency as the underlying security.

Foreign Custody Risk.  Certain Underlying ETFs may hold foreign securities and cash with Foreign Custodians. Some Foreign Custodians may be recently organized or new to the foreign custody business. In some countries, Foreign Custodians may be subject to little or no regulatory oversight over or independent evaluation of their operations. Further, the laws of certain countries m