40-F 1 d348759d40f.htm 40-F 40-F
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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 40-F

 

[Check one]
    ☐            REGISTRATION STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 12 OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 

 

OR

    ☑            ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13(a) or 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended: December 31, 2016      Commission File Number: 1-34513

CENOVUS ENERGY INC.

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

Not applicable

(Translation of Registrant’s name into English (if applicable))

Canada

(Province or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

1311

(Primary Standard Industrial

Classification Code Number (if applicable))

Not applicable

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification Number (if applicable))

2600, 500 Centre Street S.E.

Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2G 1A6

(403) 766-2000

(Address and telephone number of Registrant’s principal executive offices)

CT Corporation System

111 8th Avenue

New York, New York 10011

(212) 894-8641

(Name, address (including zip code) and telephone number (including area code)

of agent for service in the United States)

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act.

 

Title of each class    Name of each exchange on which registered

Common shares, no par value (together with associated

common share purchase rights)

   New York Stock Exchange

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act.

None

(Title of Class)

Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act.

None

(Title of Class)

For annual reports indicate by check mark the information filed with this Form:

☑ Annual information form      ☑ Audited annual financial statements

Indicate the number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer’s classes of capital or common stock as of the close of the period covered by the annual report:

833,289,845

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes ☑    No ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to submit and post such files).

Yes ☐    No ☐

The annual report on Form 40-F shall be incorporated by reference into or as an exhibit to, as applicable, each of the Registrant’s Registration Statements under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended: Form S-8 (File No. 333-163397), Form F-3D (File No. 333-202165) and Form F-10 (File No. 333-209490).

 

 

 


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Principal Documents

The following documents have been filed as part of this annual report on Form 40-F, beginning on the following page:

 

  (a)

Annual Information Form of Cenovus Energy Inc. for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016.

 

  (b)

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Cenovus Energy Inc. for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016.

 

  (c)

Consolidated Financial Statements of Cenovus Energy Inc. for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016.

 

  (d)

Supplementary Information – Oil and Gas Activities (unaudited) for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016.

 

 

 


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LOGO

Cenovus Energy Inc.

Annual Information Form

For the Year Ended December 31, 2016

February 15, 2017


Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

        

FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION

     1   

CORPORATE STRUCTURE

     3   

GENERAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE BUSINESS

     3   

DESCRIPTION OF THE BUSINESS

     6   

Oil Sands

     6   

Conventional

     9   

Refining and Marketing

     11   

RESERVES DATA AND OTHER OIL AND GAS INFORMATION

     12   

Disclosure of Reserves Data

     13   

Development of Proved and Probable Undeveloped Reserves

     18   

Significant Factors or Uncertainties Affecting Reserves Data

     19   

Other Oil and Gas Information

     19   

OTHER INFORMATION

     24   

Competitive Conditions

     24   

Environmental Considerations

     24   

Corporate Responsibility

     25   

Employees

     25   

Foreign Operations

     25   

DIRECTORS AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

     26   

AUDIT COMMITTEE

     30   

DESCRIPTION OF CAPITAL STRUCTURE

     32   

DIVIDENDS

     34   

MARKET FOR SECURITIES

     34   

RISK FACTORS

     34   

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS AND REGULATORY ACTIONS

     47   

INTEREST OF MANAGEMENT AND OTHERS IN MATERIAL TRANSACTIONS

     47   

MATERIAL CONTRACTS

     47   

INTERESTS OF EXPERTS

     47   

TRANSFER AGENTS AND REGISTRARS

     48   

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

     48   

ABBREVIATIONS AND CONVERSIONS

     48   

APPENDIX A -      Report on Reserves Data by Independent Qualified Reserves Evaluators

     A1   

APPENDIX B -      Report of Management and Directors on Reserves Data and Other Information

     B1   

APPENDIX C -     Audit Committee Mandate

     C1   

APPENDIX D -     Netback Reconciliations

     D1   

 

  

 

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2016 Annual Information Form


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FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION

 

 

In this Annual Information Form (“AIF”), unless otherwise specified or the context otherwise requires, references to “we”, “us”, “our”, “its”, “the Corporation” or “Cenovus” mean Cenovus Energy Inc., the subsidiaries of, and partnership interests held by, Cenovus Energy Inc. and its subsidiaries.

This AIF contains forward-looking statements and other information (collectively “forward-looking information”) about Cenovus’s current expectations, estimates and projections, made in light of the Corporation’s experience and perception of historical trends. This forward-looking information is identified by words such as “anticipate”, “believe”, “expect”, “estimate”, “plan”, “forecast” or “F”, “future”, “target”, “position”, “project”, “capacity”, “could”, “should”, “focus”, “goal”, “outlook”, “proposed”, “potential”, “may”, “strategy”, “forward”, “opportunity”, “schedule”, “on track” or similar expressions and includes suggestions of future outcomes, including statements about: Cenovus’s strategy and related milestones and schedules including with respect to the development and growth of our business and operations; projected future value; projections for 2017 and future years; forecast operating and financial results, including forecast sales prices and costs; planned capital expenditures, including the amount, timing and financing thereof; annual capital investment forecasts and plans with respect thereto; techniques expected to be used to recover reserves and forecasts of the timing thereof; future abandonment and reclamation costs and the timing of payments in relation thereto; expected recovery of income taxes; potential impacts of various identified risk factors; expected future production, including the timing, stability or growth thereof; expected reserves and related information, including future net revenue and future development costs; broadening market access; expected capacities, including for projects, transportation and refining; improving cost structures, forecast cost savings and the sustainability thereof; dividend plans and strategy; anticipated timelines for future regulatory, partner or internal approvals; future impact of regulatory measures; forecast commodity prices and trends and expected impacts to Cenovus; and future use and development of technology, including expected effects on environmental impact. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on forward-looking information as the Corporation’s actual results may differ materially from those expressed or implied.

Developing forward-looking information involves reliance on a number of assumptions and consideration of certain risks and uncertainties, some of which are specific to Cenovus and others that apply to the industry in general. The factors or assumptions on which the forward-looking information is based include: assumptions inherent in the Corporation’s current guidance, available at cenovus.com; projected capital investment levels, the flexibility of capital spending plans and the associated source of funding; estimates of quantities

of oil, bitumen, natural gas and natural gas liquids (“NGLs”) from properties and other sources not currently classified as proved; Cenovus’s ability to obtain necessary regulatory and partner approvals; the successful and timely implementation of capital projects or stages thereof; Cenovus’s ability to generate sufficient cash to meet its current and future obligations; and other risks and uncertainties described from time to time in the filings the Corporation makes with securities regulatory authorities.

The risk factors and uncertainties that could cause Cenovus’s actual results to differ materially include: volatility of and other assumptions regarding oil and gas prices; the effectiveness of the Corporation’s risk management program, including the impact of derivative financial instruments, the success of Cenovus’s hedging strategies and the sufficiency of the Corporation’s liquidity position; the accuracy of cost estimates; commodity prices, currency and interest rates; product supply and demand; market competition, including from alternative energy sources; risks inherent in Cenovus’s marketing operations, including credit risks; exposure to counterparties and partners, including ability and willingness of such parties to satisfy contractual obligations in a timely manner; risks inherent in operation of our crude-by-rail terminal, including health, safety and environmental risks; maintaining desirable ratios of debt (and net debt) to adjusted earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization as well as debt (and net debt) to capitalization; the Corporation’s ability to access various sources of debt and equity capital, generally, and on terms acceptable to the Corporation; Cenovus’s ability to finance growth and sustaining capital expenditures; changes in credit ratings applicable to Cenovus or any of Cenovus’s securities; changes to Cenovus’s dividend plans or strategy, including the dividend reinvestment plan; accuracy of Cenovus’s reserves, resources and future production expense and future net revenue estimates; the Corporation’s ability to replace and expand oil and gas reserves; Cenovus’s ability to maintain its relationship with its partners and to successfully manage and operate its integrated business; reliability of the Corporation’s assets, including in order to meet production targets; potential disruption or unexpected technical difficulties in developing new products and manufacturing processes; the occurrence of unexpected events such as fires, severe weather conditions, explosions, blow-outs, equipment failures, transportation incidents and other accidents or similar events; refining and marketing margins; inflationary pressures on operating costs, including labour, natural gas and other energy sources used in oil sands processes; potential failure of new products to achieve acceptance in the market; unexpected cost increases or technical difficulties in constructing or modifying manufacturing or refining facilities; unexpected difficulties in producing, transporting or refining of crude oil into petroleum and chemical products; risks associated with

 

 

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technology and its application to Cenovus’s business; the timing and the costs of well and pipeline construction; the Corporation’s ability to secure adequate and cost-effective product transportation, including sufficient pipeline, crude-by-rail, marine or alternate transportation, and including to address any gaps caused by constraints in the pipeline system; availability of, and Cenovus’s ability to attract and retain, critical talent; changes in the regulatory framework in any of the locations in which Cenovus operates, including changes to the regulatory approval process and land-use designations, royalty, tax, environmental, greenhouse gas (“GHG”), carbon, climate change and other laws or regulations, or changes to the interpretation of such laws and regulations, as adopted or proposed, the impact thereof and the costs associated with compliance; the expected impact and timing of various accounting pronouncements, rule changes and standards on Cenovus’s business, its financial results and its consolidated financial statements; changes in the

general economic, market and business conditions; the political and economic conditions in the countries in which the Corporation operates; the occurrence of unexpected events such as war, terrorist threats and the instability resulting therefrom; and risks associated with existing and potential future lawsuits and regulatory actions against Cenovus.

Readers are cautioned that the foregoing lists are not exhaustive and are made as at the date hereof. For a full discussion of Cenovus’s material risk factors, see “Risk Factors” in this AIF. Readers should also refer to “Risk Management” in the Corporation’s current Management’s Discussion and Analysis (“MD&A”) and to the risk factors described in other documents Cenovus files from time to time with securities regulatory authorities, available on SEDAR at sedar.com, on EDGAR at sec.gov and on the Corporation’s website at cenovus.com.

Information on or connected to our website cenovus.com does not form part of this AIF.

 

 

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CORPORATE STRUCTURE

 

 

Cenovus Energy Inc. was formed under the Canada Business Corporations Act (“CBCA”) by amalgamation of 7050372 Canada Inc. (“7050372”) and Cenovus Energy Inc. (formerly Encana Finance Ltd. and referred to as “Subco”) on November 30, 2009 pursuant to an arrangement under the CBCA (the “Arrangement”) involving, among others, 7050372, Subco and Encana Corporation (“Encana”). On January 1, 2011, Cenovus Energy Inc. amalgamated with its wholly owned subsidiary,

Cenovus Marketing Holdings Ltd., through a plan of arrangement approved by the Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta. On July 31, 2015, Cenovus Energy Inc. amalgamated with its wholly owned subsidiary, 9281584 Canada Limited (formerly 1528419 Alberta Ltd.), by way of a vertical short-form amalgamation.

The Corporation’s head and registered office is located at 2600, 500 Centre Street S.E., Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2G 1A6.

 

 

INTERCORPORATE RELATIONSHIPS

Cenovus’s material subsidiaries and partnerships as at December 31, 2016 are as follows:

 

Subsidiaries & Partnerships   

Percentage

Owned(1)

     Jurisdiction of Incorporation,
Continuance, Formation or
Organization
Cenovus FCCL Ltd.          100          Alberta
Cenovus Energy Marketing Services Ltd.      100          Alberta
Cenovus US Holdings Inc.      100          Delaware
FCCL Partnership (“FCCL”)(2)      50          Alberta
WRB Refining LP (“WRB”)(3)      50          Delaware

 

(1)

Reflects all voting securities of all subsidiaries and partnerships beneficially owned, or controlled or directed, directly or indirectly, by Cenovus.

(2)

Cenovus interest held through Cenovus FCCL Ltd., the operator and managing partner of FCCL.

(3)

Cenovus non-operating interest held through Cenovus American Holdings Ltd. and Cenovus US Holdings Inc.

The Corporation’s remaining subsidiaries and partnerships each account for (i) less than 10 percent of the Corporation’s consolidated assets as at December 31, 2016 and (ii) less than 10 percent of the Corporation’s consolidated revenues for the year ended December 31, 2016. In aggregate, Cenovus’s unidentified subsidiaries and partnerships did not exceed 20 percent of the Corporation’s total consolidated assets or total consolidated revenues as at and for the year ended December 31, 2016.

GENERAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE BUSINESS

 

OVERVIEW

 

Cenovus is an integrated oil company headquartered in Calgary, Alberta. The Corporation began independent operations on December 1, 2009 following the split of Encana into two independent publicly traded energy companies. Cenovus is in the business of developing, producing and marketing crude oil, NGLs and natural gas in Canada. Cenovus also conducts marketing activities and owns refining interests in the United States (“U.S.”).

All of Cenovus’s oil and natural gas reserves and production are located in Canada, within the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan. As at December 31, 2016, Cenovus had a land base of approximately 5.3 million net acres. The estimated proved reserves life index based on working interest production as at December 31, 2016 was approximately 27 years.

 

 

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BUSINESS SEGMENTS

 

The Corporation’s reportable segments are as follows:

Oil Sands

Cenovus’s oil sands segment includes the development and production of bitumen and natural gas in northeast Alberta. Our bitumen assets include Foster Creek, Christina Lake and Narrows Lake as well as projects in the early stages of development, such as Grand Rapids and Telephone Lake. Certain of Cenovus’s operated oil sands properties, notably Foster Creek, Christina Lake and Narrows Lake, are jointly owned with ConocoPhillips, an unrelated U.S. public company.

Conventional

Cenovus’s conventional segment includes the development and production of conventional crude oil(1), NGLs and natural gas(2) in Alberta and Saskatchewan, including the heavy oil(3) assets at Pelican Lake, the carbon dioxide (“CO2”) enhanced oil recovery (“EOR”) project at Weyburn and emerging tight oil opportunities.

Refining and Marketing

Cenovus’s refining and marketing segment includes transporting and selling crude oil and natural gas and joint ownership of two refineries in the U.S. with the operator, Phillips 66, an unrelated U.S. public company. In addition, Cenovus owns and operates a crude-by-rail terminal in Alberta. This segment coordinates Cenovus’s marketing and transportation initiatives to optimize product mix, delivery points, transportation commitments and customer diversification.

Corporate and Eliminations

This segment primarily includes unrealized gains and losses recorded on derivative financial instruments and gains and losses on divestiture of assets, as well as other Cenovus-wide costs for general and administrative (“G&A”), financing activities and research costs. As financial instruments are settled, the realized gains and losses are recorded in the operating segment to which the derivative instrument relates. Eliminations relate to sales and operating revenues and purchased product between segments, recorded at transfer prices based on current market prices, and to unrealized intersegment profits in inventory.

 

 

(1)

For the purpose of this AIF, references to “crude oil” means “heavy crude oil” and “light crude oil and medium crude oil combined” as those terms are defined in National Instrument 51-101 Standards of Disclosure for Oil and Gas Activities (“NI 51-101”).

(2)

For the purpose of this AIF, references to “natural gas” means “conventional natural gas” as defined in NI 51-101.

(3)

For the purpose of this AIF, references to “heavy oil” means “heavy crude oil” as defined in NI 51-101.

THREE YEAR HISTORY

The following describes significant events that have influenced the development of Cenovus’s business during the last three financial years:

 

2014

 

 

Regulatory approval received for Grand Rapids. In the first quarter, Cenovus received regulatory approval for its Grand Rapids thermal oil sands project with an approved gross production capacity of up to 180,000 barrels per day.

 

 

Prepayment of Partnership contribution payable. In the first quarter, Cenovus prepaid its US$2.7 billion partnership contribution payable to WRB, of which Cenovus is a 50 percent owner. This resulted in a net cash payment of approximately US$1.35 billion from Cenovus.

 

 

Divestiture of non-core assets. In the second quarter, Cenovus completed the sale of certain of its Bakken assets to an unrelated third party for net proceeds of $35 million. In the third quarter, Cenovus completed the sale of certain Wainwright properties to an unrelated third party for net proceeds of $234 million.

 

First production from Foster Creek phase F. In the third quarter, Foster Creek phase F achieved first oil production. Phase F added 30,000 barrels per day of gross production capacity.

 

 

Increased rail takeaway capacity. In 2014, Cenovus entered long-term commitments increasing rail takeaway capacity to 30,000 barrels per day.

 

 

Regulatory approval received for Foster Creek phase J. In the fourth quarter, Cenovus received regulatory approval for Foster Creek phase J with approved gross production capacity of 50,000 barrels per day.

 

 

Regulatory approval received for Telephone Lake. In the fourth quarter, Cenovus received regulatory approval for its 100 percent owned Telephone Lake thermal oil sands project with initial production capacity of 90,000 barrels per day. The project is expected to have gross production capacity in excess of 300,000 barrels per day.

 

 

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2015

 

 

Reduced capital spending. Due to the low commodity price environment, Cenovus reduced its 2015 capital spending, including suspension of the bulk of its conventional drilling program in southern Alberta and Saskatchewan and deferral of further construction work on Foster Creek phase H, Christina Lake phase G and Narrows Lake phase A.

 

 

Common share issuance. In the first quarter, Cenovus issued 67.5 million common shares at a price of $22.25 per share for net proceeds of approximately $1.4 billion, a portion of which contributed to funding the Corporation’s capital investment in 2015.

 

 

Permit approval received at Wood River Refinery. In the first quarter, permit approval was received on the Wood River Refinery debottlenecking project.

 

 

Sale of royalty interest and mineral fee title lands business. In the third quarter, Cenovus sold its wholly owned subsidiary, Heritage Royalty Limited Partnership (“HRP”), which held approximately 4.8 million gross acres of royalty interest and mineral fee title lands in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba along with gross overriding royalties on Cenovus’s Pelican Lake property in northern Alberta and its EOR project at Weyburn, Saskatchewan to an unrelated third party for gross cash proceeds of $3.3 billion, a portion of which was used to help fund the Corporation’s capital investment in 2015. Associated third party royalty interest volumes prior to the divestiture were approximately 6,580 barrels of oil equivalent per day.

 

 

Rail terminal purchase. In the third quarter, Cenovus purchased a crude-by-rail terminal located in Bruderheim, Alberta for $75 million, plus closing adjustments.

 

 

Cost reductions. Cenovus achieved total 2015 cost savings of approximately $540 million, including operating, capital and G&A costs compared with its original 2015 budget. The cost reductions were achieved across the Corporation and included savings related to improved drilling efficiency, optimized scheduling and prioritization of repair and maintenance activities, lower chemical costs and improved oil sands waste disposal and handling processes. Additional savings resulted from the deferral of certain capital expenditure projects.

 

Workforce reductions. Cenovus reduced its workforce by approximately 1,500 staff, including full- and part-time employees as well as contract workers. As at December 31, 2015, the Company had approximately 24 percent fewer employee and contractor workforce than it had at December 31, 2014.

 

 

Completed Christina Lake optimization. In the fourth quarter, the Christina Lake optimization program began steam circulation, adding 22,000 barrels per day gross production capacity, taking total gross production capacity to 160,000 barrels per day.

 

 

Regulatory approval received for Christina Lake phase H. In the fourth quarter, Cenovus received regulatory approval for Christina Lake phase H with approved gross production capacity of 50,000 barrels per day.

2016

 

 

Reduced spending. Cenovus achieved its 2016 target of reducing planned capital, operating and G&A spending by $500 million compared with its original 2016 budget.

 

 

Workforce reductions. In the second quarter, Cenovus further reduced its workforce by approximately 440 staff.

 

 

First production from Foster Creek phase G. In the third quarter, Foster Creek phase G achieved first oil production. Phase G is expected to add 30,000 barrels per day of gross production capacity.

 

 

Wood River debottlenecking project completed. In the third quarter, the Wood River debottlenecking project was successfully completed.

 

 

First production from Christina Lake phase F. In the fourth quarter, Christina Lake phase F achieved first oil production. Phase F is expected to add 50,000 barrels per day of gross production capacity. The phase F expansion includes a 100 gross megawatt cogeneration plant.

2017

 

 

Resuming Christina Lake phase G expansion. Cenovus anticipates it will resume the phase G expansion, which has an approved design capacity of 50,000 gross barrels per day. First oil from phase G is expected in the second half of 2019.

 

 

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DESCRIPTION OF THE BUSINESS

 

OIL SANDS

 

Oil Sands includes Cenovus’s bitumen assets at Foster Creek, Christina Lake and Narrows Lake, as well as emerging projects such as Grand Rapids and Telephone Lake. The Corporation’s Athabasca natural gas assets also form part of this segment.

Joint Operations

Foster Creek, Christina Lake and Narrows Lake are jointly owned through FCCL with ConocoPhillips, an unrelated U.S. public company. Cenovus FCCL Ltd., Cenovus’s wholly owned subsidiary, is the operator, managing partner and owner of 50 percent of FCCL. FCCL has a management committee, which is composed of three Cenovus representatives and three ConocoPhillips representatives, with each company holding equal voting rights.

Development Approach

Cenovus applies a manufacturing-like, phased approach to developing its oil sands assets. This approach incorporates learnings from previous phases into future growth plans, helping the Corporation to minimize costs.

New Technology

Cenovus continues to focus on technologies which are targeted to improve business performance and materially increase shareholder value amid continuing price uncertainty, a low carbon future,

increased environmental protection pressure and regulatory changes. Technology development is a critical necessity to stay competitive and to sustain a social licence to operate.

Cenovus collaborates with industry cleantech entrepreneurs and universities around the world with the goal of accelerating environmental and carbon emission solutions.

Efforts are focused on demonstrating a number of potentially impactful technologies. Specifically, efforts are focused on three major areas:

 

 

Accelerate production and achieve significant GHG emissions intensity reduction by injecting solvents. Solvent-aided process (“SAP”) is a technology that has the potential to significantly improve the steam to oil ratio (“SOR”).

 

 

Reduce diluent requirements and the total acid number (“TAN”) of crude oil through the use of technologies such as partial upgrading. Partial upgrading technologies produce products which may significantly reduce costs associated with diluent purchase and transportation.

 

 

Reduce costs of existing and future operations by using innovative facility design which simplify plant facilities and reduce environmental footprint.

 

 

Landholdings

As at December 31, 2016, Cenovus held bitumen rights of approximately 1.9 million gross acres (1.5 million net acres) within the Athabasca and Cold Lake areas, as well as the exclusive rights to lease an additional 478,000 acres on Cenovus’s behalf and/or its assignee’s behalf on the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range.

The following table summarizes Cenovus’s Oil Sands landholdings as at December 31, 2016, all of which are located within the Province of Alberta:

 

     Developed
Acreage
     Undeveloped
Acreage
    

Total

Acreage

    

Average
Working

    Interest(1)

 
  

 

 

    
(thousands of acres)          Gross          Net          Gross          Net          Gross          Net     

 

 

Foster Creek

     16         8         114         57         130         65         50%   

Christina Lake

     9         5         50         25         59         30         50%   

Narrows Lake

     -         -         27         13         27         13         50%   

Grand Rapids(2)

     -         -         61         61         61         61         100%   

Telephone Lake

     16         16         142         142         158         158         100%   

Athabasca

     384         345         448         380         832         725         87%   

Other

     28         10         1,537         1,252         1,565         1,262         81%   

 

 

Total

     453         384         2,379         1,930         2,832         2,314         82%   

 

 

 

(1)

Percentages represented in the above table cannot be calculated based on acreage shown due to rounding.

(2)

Overlapping landholdings between Grand Rapids and Pelican Lake (included in the Conventional segment) have been allocated to Grand Rapids based on the project’s approved development area.

 

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Production

The following table summarizes Cenovus’s share of daily average production for the periods indicated:

 

    

Bitumen

(bbls/d)

    

Natural Gas

(MMcf/d)

    

Total Production

(BOE/d)

 
  

 

 

 
(annual average)                        2016            2015            2016            2015            2016            2015  

 

 

Foster Creek

     70,244         65,345         -         -         70,244         65,345   

Christina Lake

     79,449         74,975         -         -         79,449         74,975   

Athabasca(1)

     -         -         17         19         2,833         3,167   

 

 

Total

     149,693         140,320         17         19         152,526         143,487   

 

 

 

(1)

Net of internal usage of natural gas used at Foster Creek to produce steam.

Producing Wells

The following table summarizes Cenovus’s interests in producing wells as at December 31, 2016. These figures exclude wells which were capable of producing, but that were not producing as at December 31, 2016:

 

    

Producing

Bitumen Wells

    

Producing

Gas Wells

    

Total

Producing Wells

 
  

 

 

 
(number of wells)                      Gross              Net              Gross              Net              Gross              Net  

 

 

Foster Creek

     294         147         -         -         294         147   

Christina Lake

     196         98         -         -         196         98   

Athabasca

     -            293         279         293         279   

 

 

Total

     490         245         293         279         783         524   

 

 

 

Foster Creek

Cenovus has a 50 percent working interest in Foster Creek. It is located on the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range, an active military base, and has a reservoir depth up to 500 meters below the surface. Foster Creek produces from the McMurray formation using steam-assisted gravity drainage (“SAGD”) technology.

The Corporation holds surface access rights from the governments of Canada and Alberta and bitumen rights from the Government of Alberta for exploration, development and transportation from areas within the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range. In addition, Cenovus holds exclusive rights to lease several hundred thousand acres of bitumen rights in other areas on the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range on the Corporation’s and/or its assignee’s behalf.

Production from phases A through G at Foster Creek averaged 70,244 barrels per day in 2016. Phase G was completed in the third quarter of 2016. Phase G is expected to add approximately 30,000 gross barrels per day of nameplate capacity and ramp up to its operational capacity in approximately 12 months from start-up. Expansion work on phase H has been deferred in response to the low commodity price environment.

Cenovus operates a 98 gross megawatt natural gas-fired cogeneration facility in conjunction with Foster Creek. The steam and power generated by the facility is presently being used within the SAGD operation and any excess power generated is being sold into the Alberta Power Pool.

Christina Lake

Cenovus has a 50 percent working interest in Christina Lake. Christina Lake is located approximately 120 kilometers south of Fort McMurray and has a reservoir depth up to 350 meters below the surface. Christina Lake produces

from the McMurray formation using SAGD technology.

Production from phases A through F at Christina Lake averaged 79,449 barrels per day in 2016. Phase F was completed in the fourth quarter of 2016, and is expected to add approximately 50,000 gross barrels per day of nameplate capacity and ramp up to its operational capacity in approximately 12 months from start-up. This expansion includes a 100 gross megawatt natural gas-fired cogeneration facility. The steam and power generated by the facility is presently being used within the SAGD operation and any excess power generated is being sold into the Alberta Power Pool. Cenovus plans to resume work on the phase G expansion in 2017, which was deferred in late 2014 due to the low commodity price environment. Phase G has an approved design capacity of 50,000 gross barrels per day and first oil from the expansion is expected in the second half of 2019.

Narrows Lake

Cenovus has a 50 percent working interest in Narrows Lake. Narrows Lake is located adjacent to Christina Lake and has a reservoir depth up to 375 meters below the surface. Narrows Lake will be Cenovus’s first commercial application of SAP in conjunction with SAGD.

In 2012, Cenovus received regulatory approval for phases A, B and C for 130,000 gross barrels per day of production capacity and partner approval for phase A, a 45,000 gross barrels per day phase. Initial work on phase A commenced in the third quarter of 2013. Due to the low commodity price environment, Cenovus has deferred new construction spending on phase A. It is expected that the future development of Narrows Lake will benefit from the existing infrastructure and resources at Christina Lake, which is expected to lower overall costs.

 

 

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Telephone Lake

Cenovus’s 100 percent owned Telephone Lake property is located in the Borealis Region in northeastern Alberta, approximately 90 kilometers northeast of Fort McMurray.

Cenovus continues to advance development plans for Telephone Lake after receiving approval from the Alberta Energy Regulator (“AER”) in late 2014 for a SAGD project with initial production capacity of 90,000 barrels per day.

Telephone Lake is a unique oil sands project because directly above the oil there is a layer of groundwater that is not suitable for human consumption without treatment (referred to as top water). The top water layer is between 150 and 175 meters below the surface. In 2013, Cenovus completed a dewatering pilot project at Telephone Lake displacing approximately 70 percent of the top water. Although dewatering is not essential to the development of Telephone Lake, Cenovus believes this method will make oil recovery more efficient and help reduce its impact on the environment by reducing the SOR.

Grand Rapids

Cenovus’s 100 percent owned Grand Rapids property is located in the Greater Pelican Region, about 300 kilometers north of Edmonton, Alberta. The project is adjacent to the Corporation’s Pelican Lake heavy oil operations and existing facilities.

In December 2010, the Corporation drilled its first pilot SAGD well pair at Grand Rapids. A second well pair was drilled in early 2012 and a third well pair commenced steam circulation in 2015.

In March 2014, Cenovus received regulatory approval from the AER for its Grand Rapids SAGD project with total production capacity of 180,000 barrels per day. As of February 2016, further activity in respect of the SAGD pilot at Grand Rapids has been deferred in response to the low commodity price environment.

Other Emerging Assets

Cenovus has a number of emerging assets, including the Steepbank and East McMurray properties located in the Borealis Region in northeastern Alberta, which it continues to evaluate, manage and work to decrease risk associated with potential future development of these assets. Cenovus continues to believe in the long-term potential of its emerging projects as a future resource base.

Athabasca Gas

Cenovus produces natural gas from the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range and several surrounding landholdings located in northeastern Alberta. Cenovus holds surface access and natural gas rights

for exploration, development and transportation from areas within the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range that were granted by the governments of Canada and Alberta. The majority of the Corporation’s natural gas production in the area is processed through compression facilities, wholly-owned and operated by Cenovus.

Natural gas production continues to be impacted by the AER’s decisions made between 2003 and 2015 to shut-in natural gas production from the McMurray, Wabiskaw and Clearwater formations that may put the recovery of bitumen resources in the area at risk. This resulted in a decrease in the Corporation’s annualized natural gas production of approximately 13 million cubic feet per day in 2016 (2015 - 14 million cubic feet per day). The Alberta Department of Energy has provided a 10 year royalty credit which can equal up to 50 percent of lost cash flows to help offset the impact of the shut-in wells. This royalty credit fluctuates with the price of natural gas.

Capital Investment

In 2016, the Corporation’s Oil Sands capital investment was $604 million, primarily related to sustaining existing production and the completion of the Foster Creek phase G and Christina Lake phase F facilities. The production capacity for these projects is approximately 390,000 gross barrels per day. Ramp up to full production volumes for these phases is expected to extend into 2017.

 

 

Capital at Foster Creek was focused on sustaining capital related to existing production, completing expansion phase G and the drilling of stratigraphic test wells to determine pad placement for sustaining well pads and near-term phase expansions.

 

 

Capital at Christina Lake was focused on sustaining capital related to existing production, completing expansion phase F and the drilling of stratigraphic test wells to determine pad placement for sustaining well pads and near-term phase expansions.

 

 

Capital at Narrows Lake was focused on engineering work.

 

 

Capital at Telephone Lake was focused on front end engineering work on the central processing facility.

 

 

Capital at Grand Rapids was limited to the wind down of the SAGD pilot.

2017 capital spending is planned to be focused on sustaining current production levels from existing oil sands facilities and construction at Christina Lake phase G. Additional capital will be spent on existing and emerging oil sands assets.

 

 

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CONVENTIONAL

 

Conventional operations include the development and production of conventional crude oil, NGLs and natural gas from assets in Alberta and Saskatchewan, including the heavy oil assets at Pelican Lake, the CO2 EOR project near Weyburn, Saskatchewan and emerging tight oil assets in Alberta. The established assets in this segment are strategically important due to their long life reserves, stable operations and diversity of crude oil produced.

In July of 2015, Cenovus sold HRP, the holder of Cenovus’s royalty interest and mineral fee title lands business in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba to an unrelated third party for gross cash proceeds of $3.3 billion. Associated third party royalty interest volumes prior to the divestiture were approximately 6,580 barrels of oil equivalent per day. With this disposition Cenovus also retained an option to

acquire from HRP leases at pre-determined rates and lease terms for up to five years on more than 800,000 acres in zones of the fee lands currently being developed by Cenovus, with an option for a further five years on approximately 800,000 acres to select leases on half of the remaining undeveloped acreage.

At the beginning of 2015, Cenovus announced the suspension of the bulk of its conventional drilling program in southern Alberta due to the low commodity price environment. After a slight recovery in price, Cenovus resumed its tight oil program in the latter half of 2016 with the restart of stratigraphic test well and horizontal well drilling.

Conventional operations also include leases of Crown lands primarily in the Suffield and Pelican Lake areas and in Saskatchewan.

 

 

Landholdings

 

    

        Developed        

Acreage

     Undeveloped
Acreage
    

Total

Acreage

    

Average
Working

Interest(1)

 
  

 

 

    
(thousands of acres)    Gross      Net      Gross      Net      Gross      Net     

 

 

Alberta

                    

Grassland(2)

     882         843         41         37         923         880         95%   

Suffield

     932         920         51         50         983         970         99%   

Langevin(3)

     578         562         60         58         638         620         97%   

Pelican Lake

     95         94         248         241         343         335         98%   

Wainwright

     32         13         7         4         39         17         42%   

Other

     23         15         134         120         157         135         86%   

Saskatchewan

                    

Weyburn

     46         35         9         7         55         42         74%   

Bakken

     3         1         12         8         15         9         64%   

 

 

Total

     2,591         2,483         562         525         3,153         3,008         95%   

 

 

 

(1)

Percentages as represented in the above table cannot be calculated based on acreage shown due to rounding.

(2)

Grassland is located in the Drumheller and Brooks areas.

(3)

Langevin is located northwest of Medicine Hat.

Production

The following table summarizes Cenovus’s share of daily average production(1) for the periods indicated:

 

    

        Crude Oil and NGLs        

(bbls/d)

    

        Natural Gas        

(MMcf/d)

    

    Total Production    

(BOE/d)

 
  

 

 

 
(annual average)    2016      2015      2016      2015      2016      2015  

 

 

Alberta

                 

Grassland(2)

     5,913         7,248         193         212         38,080         42,581   

Suffield

     7,724         8,854         112         125         26,391         29,687   

Langevin(3)

     6,055         8,025         72         84         18,055         22,025   

Pelican Lake

     21,224         24,421         -         -         21,224         24,421   

Wainwright

     253         1,638         -         1         253         1,805   

Other

     4         10         -         -         4         10   

Saskatchewan

                 

Weyburn

     14,969         15,732         -         -         14,969         15,732   

Bakken

     23         699         -         -         23         699   

 

 

Total

     56,165         66,627         377         422         118,999         136,960   

 

 

 

(1)

Includes production from mineral fee title lands in which Cenovus has a working interest and mineral fee title lands in which Cenovus has retained a royalty interest. In the third quarter of 2015, Cenovus sold those royalty interests.

(2)

Grassland is located in the Drumheller and Brooks areas.

(3)

Langevin is located northwest of Medicine Hat.

 

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Producing Wells

The following table summarizes Cenovus’s interests in producing wells(1) as at December 31, 2016. These figures exclude wells which were capable of producing, but that were not producing, as at December 31, 2016:

 

    

             Producing             

Oil Wells

    

            Producing             

Gas Wells

    

Total

Producing Wells

 
  

 

 

 
(number of wells)    Gross      Net      Gross      Net      Gross      Net  

 

 

Alberta

                 

Grassland(2)

     362         356         8,733         8,591         9,095         8,947   

Suffield

     684         684         10,623         10,605         11,307         11,289   

Langevin(3)

     273         271         4,765         4,754         5,038         5,025   

Pelican Lake

     585         585         1         1         586         586   

Wainwright

     9         6         5         1         14         7   

Other

     10         5         1         -         11         5   

Saskatchewan

                 

Weyburn

     637         401         -         -         637         401   

Bakken

     8         1         -         -         8         1   

 

 

Total

     2,568         2,309         24,128         23,952         26,696         26,261   

 

 

 

(1)

Includes wells on mineral fee title lands where Cenovus has a working interest.

(2)

Grassland is located in the Drumheller and Brooks areas.

(3)

Langevin is located northwest of Medicine Hat.

 

Conventional Crude Oil Assets

Cenovus’s extensive conventional crude oil assets are located in Alberta and Saskatchewan. Cenovus holds interests in multiple zones in the Suffield, Grassland and Langevin areas in Alberta with a mix of medium and heavy crude oil production. Cenovus uses a number of EOR techniques to increase production of the Corporation’s oil assets, including waterflooding, CO2 miscible flooding and alkaline surfactant polymer flooding.

Cenovus operates one of the world’s largest CO2 miscible flood projects. The Weyburn unit produces medium sour crude oil and covers approximately 50,000 acres of land in southeastern Saskatchewan. As at December 31, 2016, approximately 64 percent of the approved CO2 flood pattern development at the Weyburn unit was complete. Since the inception of the project, approximately 30 million tonnes of CO2 have been injected. The CO2 is delivered by pipeline directly to the Weyburn facility from a coal gasification project in North Dakota, U.S. and from

the Boundary Dam Power Station in southeast Saskatchewan. In the unitized portion of the Weyburn field in southeastern Saskatchewan, Cenovus has a 62.1 percent working interest. However, after taking into consideration net royalty obligations to third parties, Cenovus’s economic interest is 50.4 percent. Cenovus is the unit operator and owns 62.1 percent of the CO2 pipeline from the Boundary Dam to Weyburn.

Using a patterned, horizontal well polymer flood and waterflood, Cenovus produces heavy crude oil from the Wabiskaw formation at its Pelican Lake property. The property is located within the Greater Pelican Region in northeastern Alberta. Cenovus holds a 38 percent non-operated interest in a 110 kilometer, 20 inch diameter crude oil pipeline which connects the Pelican Lake area to major pipelines that transport crude oil from northern Alberta to crude oil markets.

 

 

Net Wells Drilled and Production

The following table summarizes net production oil wells drilled and daily average oil production figures(1) for the periods indicated:

 

           

Average Production(2)

(bbls/d)

 
        

 

 

 
     Net Wells Drilled                  Light & Medium Oil                      Heavy Oil                   
  

 

 

 
                     2016      2015      2016      2015      2016      2015  

 

 

Alberta

                 

Grassland(3)

     2         15         5,359         6,632         -         -   

Suffield

     -         1         -         -         7,707         8,837   

Langevin(4)

     6         12         5,939         7,858         -         -   

Wainwright

     -         -         -         1         253         1,630   

Pelican Lake

     -         -         -         -         21,224         24,421   

Other

     -         -         2         10         1         -   

Saskatchewan

                 

Weyburn

     1         6         14,593         15,343         -         -   

Bakken

     -         -         22         642         -         -   

 

 

Total

     9         34         25,915         30,486         29,185         34,888   

 

 

 

(1)

Excludes wells drilled by third parties on mineral fee title lands. In the third quarter of 2015, Cenovus sold those fee lands.

(2)

Includes production from mineral fee title lands in which Cenovus has a working interest and mineral fee title lands in which Cenovus had retained a royalty interest. In the third quarter of 2015, Cenovus sold those fee lands.

(3)

Grassland landholdings are located in the Drumheller and Brooks areas.

(4)

Langevin landholdings are located northwest of Medicine Hat.

 

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Conventional Gas Assets

Cenovus holds natural gas interests in multiple zones in the Suffield, Grassland and Langevin areas in Alberta. Development in these areas has focused on recompletions and optimization of existing wells.

Suffield is one of the core areas of the Corporation’s crude oil and natural gas production in Alberta. The Suffield area is largely made up of the Suffield Block, where operations are carried out pursuant to an agreement among Cenovus, the Government of Canada and the Province of Alberta governing surface access to Canadian Forces Base (“CFB”) Suffield. In 1999, the parties agreed to permit access to the Suffield military training area to additional operators. Cenovus’s predecessor companies, Alberta Energy Company Ltd. and Encana, have operated at CFB Suffield for over 30 years.

The Corporation’s natural gas production acts as an economic hedge for the natural gas required as a fuel source at its oil sands operations and the U.S. refineries in which it has joint interest.

In 2016, Conventional natural gas production averaged 377 MMcf per day (2015 –422 MMcf per day). Cenovus did not drill any gas wells in 2016 or 2015.

Capital Investment

In 2016, the Corporation’s Conventional capital investment was $171 million, primarily related to stratigraphic drilling activity at our tight oil projects in southern Alberta and for maintenance and CO2 injection at our EOR project at Weyburn. Spending on natural gas activities was allocated to a small number of higher return opportunities.

 

 

REFINING AND MARKETING

 

Refining and Marketing reflects U.S. refining interests and coordinates Cenovus’s marketing and transportation initiatives to optimize the value received for its products.

Refining

The refining operations allow Cenovus to capture the value from crude oil production through to refined products, such as diesel, gasoline and jet fuel, to partially mitigate volatility associated with regional North American light/heavy crude oil price differential fluctuations.

Through WRB, Cenovus has a 50 percent ownership interest in both the Wood River and Borger refineries located in Roxana, Illinois and Borger,

Texas, respectively. Phillips 66, an unrelated U.S. public company, is the operator and managing partner of WRB. WRB has a management committee, which is composed of three Cenovus representatives and three Phillips 66 representatives, with each company holding equal voting rights. The refineries have a combined stated processing capacity of approximately 460,000 gross barrels per day of crude oil, including heavy crude oil processing capability of up to 255,000 gross barrels per day. In addition, the Borger Refinery has an NGL fractionation facility with a capacity of 45,000 gross barrels per day.

 

 

The following table summarizes the key operational results for the refineries in the periods indicated:

 

Refinery Operations(1)      2016        2015  

 

 

Crude Oil Capacity (Mbbls/d)

       460           460   

Crude Oil Runs (Mbbls/d)

       444           419   

Heavy Oil

       233           200   

Light & Medium Oil

       211           219   

 

 

Crude Utilization (%)

       97           91   

 

 

Refined Products (Mbbls/d)

         

Gasoline

       236           228   

Distillates

       146           137   

Other

       90           79   

 

 

Total

       471           444   

 

 

 

(1)

Represents 100 percent of the Wood River and Borger Refinery operations.

 

Wood River Refinery

The Wood River Refinery ranks in the top 10 percent of approximately 150 refineries in the U.S., based on total crude oil capacity. It is located in Roxana, Illinois, approximately 25 kilometers northeast of St. Louis, Missouri. The Wood River Refinery processes light low-sulphur and heavy high-sulphur crude oil that it receives from North American crude oil pipelines to produce gasoline, diesel and jet fuel, petrochemical feedstock as well as coke and asphalt. The gasoline and diesel are transported via pipelines to markets in the upper

U.S. Midwest. Other products are transported via pipeline, truck, barge and railcar to markets in the U.S. Midwest.

The Wood River Refinery’s stated crude oil processing capacity for 2016 was 314,000 gross barrels per day, and was unchanged from 2015. Since the completed coker construction and start-up of the coker and refinery expansion project, the Wood River Refinery increased its total Canadian heavy crude oil processing capacity up to 220,000 gross barrels per day. In 2016, almost two-thirds of the crude oil processed at the Wood River Refinery

 

 

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consisted of Canadian heavy crude oil, including a significant proportion of high TAN crudes.

Borger Refinery

The Borger Refinery is located in Borger, Texas, approximately 80 kilometers north of Amarillo, Texas. The Borger Refinery processes mainly medium and heavy high-sulphur crude oil, and NGLs that it receives from North American pipeline systems to produce gasoline, diesel and jet fuel along with NGLs and solvents. The refined products are transported via pipelines to markets in Texas, New Mexico, Colorado and the U.S. Mid-Continent.

The Borger Refinery’s stated oil processing capacity for 2016 was 146,000 gross barrels per day, including 35,000 gross barrels per day of heavy crude oil. The Borger Refinery also has an NGL fractionation facility with stated capacity of 45,000 gross barrels per day. The stated processing capacity is unchanged from 2015.

Marketing

Cenovus’s marketing activities are focused on enhancing the price of the Corporation’s crude oil and natural gas production, including third party purchases and sales of crude oil and natural gas to provide operational flexibility for transportation commitments, product quality, delivery points and customer diversification. Cenovus’s marketing activities are focused on the sale of production, management of condensate supply and optimization of our storage and transportation commitments. The prices Cenovus receives are based primarily on

prevailing crude oil and natural gas index prices which are impacted by global and regional supply and demand factors.

Cenovus’s marketing activities also include entering into various risk management contracts aimed at mitigating the impact of commodity price swings. Details of these transactions are provided in the notes to the Corporation’s audited Consolidated Financial Statements for the year ended December 31, 2016.

Transportation

We continue to focus on near- and mid-term strategies to broaden market access for our crude oil production. As at December 31, 2016, Cenovus has entered into various firm transportation and storage commitments totaling $26 billion, $19 billion of which relate to pipelines that are subject to regulatory approval or have been approved but are not yet in service. We continue to support proposed new pipeline projects that would connect us to new markets in the U.S. and globally. The Corporation’s portfolio of transportation commitments includes feeder pipelines from its production areas to the Edmonton and Hardisty, Alberta trade centres and major pipeline alternatives to markets downstream of these hubs. Other transportation commitments are primarily related to the reliable supply of diluent, railcar transportation as well as tankage and terminalling of both crude oil blend and condensate volumes. Cenovus’s transportation portfolio includes a crude-by-rail terminal located at Bruderheim, Alberta.

 

 

RESERVES DATA AND OTHER OIL AND GAS INFORMATION

 

 

As a Canadian issuer, Cenovus is subject to the reporting requirements of Canadian securities regulatory authorities, including the reporting of the Corporation’s reserves in accordance with NI 51-101.

The Corporation’s reserves are located in Alberta and Saskatchewan, Canada. Cenovus retained two independent qualified reserves evaluators (“IQREs”), McDaniel & Associates Consultants Ltd. (“McDaniel”) and GLJ Petroleum Consultants Ltd. (“GLJ”), to evaluate and prepare reports on 100 percent of its bitumen, heavy oil, light and medium oil(1), NGLs, natural gas, and coal bed methane (“CBM”) proved and probable reserves. McDaniel evaluated approximately 97 percent of Cenovus’s proved reserves, located in Alberta, and GLJ evaluated approximately three percent of the Corporation’s proved reserves, located in Saskatchewan.

The reserves committee (the “Reserves Committee”) of Cenovus’s board of directors (the “Board”), composed of independent directors, reviews the qualifications and appointment of the IQREs, the procedures relating to the disclosure of information with respect to oil and gas activities and the procedures for providing information to the IQREs. The Reserves Committee meets independently with management of Cenovus (“Management”) and each IQRE to determine whether any restrictions affect

the ability of the IQREs to report on the reserves data without reservation. In addition, the Reserves Committee reviews the reserves data and the report of the IQREs and provides a recommendation regarding approval of the reserves disclosure to the Board.

Cenovus’s bitumen reserves will be recovered and produced using SAGD technology. SAGD involves injecting steam into horizontal wells drilled into the bitumen formation and recovering heated bitumen and water from producing wells located below the injection wells. This technique has a surface footprint comparable to conventional oil production. Cenovus has no bitumen reserves that require mining techniques to recover the bitumen.

Classifications of reserves as proved or probable are only attempts to define the degree of certainty associated with the estimates. There are numerous uncertainties inherent in estimating quantities of petroleum reserves. It should not be assumed that the estimates of future net revenues presented in the tables below represent the fair market value of the reserves. There is no assurance that the forecast prices and costs assumptions will be attained and variances could be material. Readers should review the definitions and information contained in “Additional Notes to Reserves Data Tables”, “Definitions” and “Pricing Assumptions” in

 

 

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conjunction with the reserves disclosure. The reserves estimates provided herein are estimates only and there is no guarantee that the estimated reserves will be recovered. Actual reserves may be greater than or less than the estimates disclosed. See “Risk Factors – Operational Risks – Uncertainty of Reserves and Future Net Revenue Estimates” in this AIF for additional information.

The reserves data and other oil and gas information contained in this AIF is dated February 15, 2017, with an effective date of December 31, 2016. McDaniel’s preparation date of the information is January 11, 2017 and GLJ’s preparation date is January 11, 2017.

 

 

(1)

For the purpose of this AIF, references to “light and medium oil” means “light crude oil and medium crude oil combined” as defined in NI 51-101.

DISCLOSURE OF RESERVES DATA

 

The reserves data presented summarizes the Corporation’s bitumen, heavy oil, light and medium oil and NGLs, and natural gas and CBM reserves and the net present values (“NPV”) and future net revenue (“FNR”) for these reserves. The reserves

data uses forecast prices and costs prior to provision for interest, G&A expenses or the impact of any hedging activities. Estimates of FNR have been presented on a before and after income tax basis.

 

 

Summary of Company Interest Oil and Gas Reserves as at December 31, 2016

(Forecast prices and inflation)

 

Before Royalties   

Bitumen

(MMbbls)

    

        Heavy Oil

(MMbbls)

    

    Light & Medium

Oil & NGLs

(MMbbls)

    

        Natural Gas

& CBM

(Bcf)

 

 

 

Proved Reserves

           

Developed Producing

     304         92         84         634   

Developed Non-Producing

     33         8         2         13   

Undeveloped

     2,006         14         15         5   

 

 

Proved Reserves

     2,343         114         101         652   

 

 

Probable Reserves

     976         75         44         212   

 

 

Proved plus Probable Reserves

     3,319         189         145         864   

 

 
After Royalties   

Bitumen

(MMbbls)

    

Heavy Oil

(MMbbls)

    

Light & Medium

Oil & NGLs

(MMbbls)

    

Natural Gas

& CBM

(Bcf)

 

 

 

Proved Reserves

           

Developed Producing

     244         75         65         593   

Developed Non-Producing

     25         7         1         11   

Undeveloped

     1,510         12         12         5   

 

 

Proved Reserves

     1,779         94         78         609   

 

 

Probable Reserves

     739         57         32         189   

 

 

Proved plus Probable Reserves

     2,518         151         110         798   

 

 

 

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Summary of Net Present Value of Future Net Revenue as at December 31, 2016

(Forecast prices and inflation)

 

     Discounted at %/year ($ millions)           

Unit Value  

Discounted at  

10%(1)  

 
  

 

 

      

 

 

 
Before Income Taxes    0%      5%      10%      15%      20%            $/BOE    

 

      

 

 

 

Proved Reserves

                   

Developed Producing

     5,901         8,390         7,778         6,981         6,290           16.13     

Developed Non-Producing

     1,090         776         585         457         366           16.47     

Undeveloped

     58,133         22,973         11,087         6,101         3,642           7.22     

 

      

 

 

 

Proved Reserves

     65,124         32,139         19,450         13,539         10,298           9.48     

Probable Reserves

     30,389         12,221         5,807         3,211         1,987           6.76     

 

      

 

 

 

Proved plus Probable Reserves

                     95,513                 44,360                 25,257                 16,750                 12,285           8.67     

 

      

 

 

 

 

     Discounted at %/year ($ millions)  
  

 

 

 
After Income Taxes(2)    0%      5%      10%      15%      20%  

 

 

Proved Reserves

              

Developed Producing

     3,986         6,847         6,498         5,901         5,366     

Developed Non-Producing

     827         591         453         361         293     

Undeveloped

     42,308         16,985         8,294         4,614         2,787     

 

 

Proved Reserves

     47,121         24,423         15,245         10,876         8,446     

 

 

Probable Reserves

     22,274         9,021         4,301         2,384         1,481     

 

 

Proved plus Probable Reserves

                     69,395                         33,444                         19,546                         13,260                         9,927     

 

 

 

(1)

Unit values have been calculated using Company Interest After Royalties reserves.

(2)

Values are calculated by considering existing tax pools and tax circumstances for Cenovus and its subsidiaries in the consolidated evaluation of Cenovus’s oil and gas properties, and take into account current federal tax regulations. Values do not represent an estimate of the value at the business entity level, which may be significantly different. For information at the business entity level, please see the Corporation’s Consolidated Financial Statements and Management’s Discussion and Analysis for the year ended December 31, 2016.

Total Future Net Revenue (undiscounted) as at December 31, 2016

(Forecast prices and inflation - $ millions)

 

Reserves

Category

     Revenue        Royalties       

Operating

Costs

      

Development

Costs

      

Total

Abandonment

and

Reclamation

Costs(1)

      

Future

Net

Revenue

Before

Future

Income

Taxes

      

Future

Income

Taxes

      

Future

Net

Revenue

After

Future

Income

Taxes

 

Proved

Reserves

       183,743           44,492           46,364           18,378           9,385           65,124           18,003           47,121   

Proved

plus

Probable

Reserves

       266,003           64,859           66,175           28,732           10,724           95,513           26,118           69,395   

 

(1)

Total abandonment and reclamation costs included for all wells, facilities and other liabilities, known and existing, and to be incurred as a result of future development activity.

Future Net Revenue by Product Type as at December 31, 2016

(Forecast prices and inflation)

 

Reserves Category    Product Types   

Future Net Revenue

Before Income Taxes

(discounted at 10%/year)

($ millions)

      

Unit Value

Discounted at

10%/year(1)

($/BOE)

 

Proved Reserves

  

Bitumen

     17,212           9.68   
  

Heavy Oil

     1,048           11.15   
  

Light & Medium Oil and NGLs

     1,221           15.56   
    

Natural Gas

     (31        (0.31
    

Total

     19,450           9.48   
Proved plus   

Bitumen

     21,772           8.65   

Probable Reserves

  

Heavy Oil

     1,539           10.19   
  

Light & Medium Oil and NGLs

     1,788           16.18   
    

Natural Gas

     158           1.19   
    

Total

     25,257           8.67   

 

(1)

Unit values have been calculated using Company Interest After Royalties reserves.

 

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Table of Contents

Additional Notes to Reserves Data Tables

 

 

The estimates of FNR presented do not represent fair market value.

 

 

FNR from reserves excludes cash flows related to Cenovus’s risk management activities.

 

 

For disclosure purposes, Cenovus has included NGLs with light and medium oil, and CBM with natural gas, as the reserves of each are not material relative to the other reported product types.

 

 

In accordance with NI 51-101, NPV and FNR amounts presented include all of Cenovus’s existing estimated abandonment and reclamation costs, plus all forecast estimates of abandonment and reclamation costs attributable to future development activity associated with the reserves.

Definitions

 

1.

After Royalties means volumes after deduction of royalties and includes royalty interest reserves, if any.

 

2.

Before Royalties means volumes before deduction of royalties and excludes royalty interest reserves, if any.

 

3.

Company Interest means, in relation to production, reserves, resources and property, the interest (operating or non-operating) held by Cenovus.

 

4.

Gross means: (a) in relation to wells, the total number of wells in which Cenovus has an interest; and (b) in relation to properties, the total acreage of properties in which Cenovus has an interest.

 

5.

Net means: (a) in relation to wells, the number of wells obtained by aggregating Cenovus’s working interest in each of its gross wells; and (b) in relation to Cenovus’s interest in a property, the total acreage in which it has an interest multiplied by its working interest.

 

6.

Reserves are estimated remaining quantities of oil and natural gas and related substances anticipated to be recoverable from known accumulations, as of a given date, based on analysis of drilling, geological, geophysical and engineering data, the use of established

 

technology and specified economic conditions, which are generally accepted as being reasonable, and are be disclosed later in this AIF.

Reserves are classified according to the degree of certainty associated with the estimates:

 

   

Proved reserves are those reserves that can be estimated with a high degree of certainty to be recoverable. It is likely that the actual remaining quantities recovered will exceed the estimated proved reserves.

 

   

Probable reserves are those additional reserves that are less certain to be recovered than proved reserves. It is equally likely that the actual remaining quantities recovered will be greater or less than the sum of the estimated proved plus probable reserves.

Each of the reserves categories may be divided into developed and undeveloped categories:

 

   

Developed reserves are those reserves that are expected to be recovered from existing wells and installed facilities or, if facilities have not been installed, that would involve a low expenditure (e.g. when compared to the cost of drilling a well) to put the reserves on production. The developed category may be subdivided as follows:

 

  ¡   

Developed producing reserves are those reserves that are expected to be recovered from completion intervals open at the time of the estimate. These reserves may be currently producing or, if shut-in, they must have previously been on production, and the date of resumption of production must be known with reasonable certainty.

 

  ¡   

Developed non-producing reserves are those reserves that either have not been on production, or have previously been on production, but are shut-in, and the date of resumption of production is unknown.

 

   

Undeveloped reserves are those reserves expected to be recovered from known accumulations where a significant expenditure (e.g. when compared to the cost of drilling a well) is required to render them capable of production. They must fully meet the requirements of the reserves classification (proved, probable) to which they are assigned.

 

 

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Pricing Assumptions

The forecast of prices and inflation (the “McDaniel Forecast”) provided in the table below was obtained from McDaniel and used to estimate FNR associated with the reserves disclosed herein. The McDaniel Forecast is dated January 1, 2017. The inflation forecast was applied uniformly to prices beyond the forecast interval, and to all future costs. For historical prices realized during 2016, see “Production History” in this AIF.

 

     Oil             Natural Gas
& CBM
                      
Year   

WTI

Cushing

Oklahoma

(US$/bbl)

    

Edmonton

Par

Price

40 API

(C$/bbl)

    

Cromer

Medium

29.3 API

(C$/bbl)

    

Alberta

Heavy

12 API

(C$/bbl)

    

Western

Canadian

Select

(C$/bbl)

           

AECO

Gas

Price

(C$/MMBtu)

           

Inflation

Rate

(%/year)

    

Exchange

Rate

(US$/C$)

 

2017

     55.00         69.80         62.80         46.50         53.70            3.40            0.0         0.750   

2018

     58.70         72.70         67.60         50.50         58.20            3.15            2.0         0.775   

2019

     62.40         75.50         70.20         54.00         61.90            3.30            2.0         0.800   

2020

     69.00         81.10         75.40         58.00         66.50            3.60            2.0         0.825   

2021

     75.80         86.60         80.50         61.90         71.00            3.90            2.0         0.850   

2022

     77.30         88.30         82.10         63.10         72.40            3.95            2.0         0.850   

2023

     78.80         90.00         83.70         64.40         73.80            4.10            2.0         0.850   

2024

     80.40         91.80         85.40         65.60         75.30            4.25            2.0         0.850   

2025

     82.00         93.70         87.10         67.00         76.80            4.30            2.0         0.850   

2026

     83.70         95.60         88.90         68.40         78.40            4.40            2.0         0.850   

2027

     85.30         97.40         90.60         69.60         79.90            4.50            2.0         0.850   

2028+

     +2%/yr         +2%/yr         +2%/yr         +2%/yr         +2%/yr                  +2%/yr                  2.0         0.850   

Future Development Costs

The following table outlines undiscounted future development costs deducted in the estimation of FNR calculated utilizing forecast prices and inflation for the years indicated:

Reserves Category

($ millions)    2017      2018      2019      2020      2021      Remainder      Total  

Proved Reserves

     311         630         739         775         539         15,384         18,378   

Proved plus Probable Reserves

     426         717         1,033         1,160         880         24,516         28,732   

 

Cenovus believes that existing cash balances, internally generated cash flows, existing credit facilities, management of its asset portfolio and access to capital markets will be sufficient to fund the Corporation’s future development costs. However, there can be no guarantee that the necessary funds will be available or that Cenovus will allocate funding to develop all of its reserves. Failure to develop those reserves would have a negative impact on the Corporation’s FNR.

The interest or other costs of external funding are not included in the reserves and FNR estimates and would reduce FNR depending upon the funding sources utilized. Cenovus does not believe that interest or other funding costs would make development of any property uneconomic.

 

 

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Table of Contents

Reserves Reconciliation

The following tables provide a reconciliation of Cenovus’s Company Interest Before Royalties reserves for bitumen, heavy oil, light and medium oil and NGLs, and natural gas and CBM for the year ended December 31, 2016, presented using forecast prices and inflation. All reserves are located in Canada.

 

Proved   

Bitumen

(MMbbls)

   

Heavy Oil

(MMbbls)

   

Light &

Medium

Oil & NGLs

(MMbbls)

   

Natural

Gas & CBM

(Bcf)

 

As at December 31, 2015

     2,183        133        110        721   

Extensions and Improved Recovery

     154        -        -        -   

Discoveries

     -        -        -        -   

Technical Revisions

     61        (8     1        79   

Economic Factors

     -        -        -        -   

Acquisitions

     -        -        -        -   

Dispositions

     -        -        -        (1

Production(1)

     (55     (11     (10     (147

As at December 31, 2016

     2,343        114        101        652   
Probable   

Bitumen

(MMbbls)

   

Heavy Oil

(MMbbls)

   

Light &

Medium

Oil & NGLs

(MMbbls)

   

Natural

Gas & CBM

(Bcf)

 

As at December 31, 2015

     1,115        87        44        232   

Extensions and Improved Recovery

     -        -        -        -   

Discoveries

     -        -        -        -   

Technical Revisions

     (139     (12     -        (20

Economic Factors

     -        -        -        -   

Acquisitions

     -        -        -        -   

Dispositions

     -        -        -        -   

Production(1)

     -        -        -        -   

As at December 31, 2016

     976        75        44        212   
Proved plus Probable   

Bitumen

(MMbbls)

   

Heavy Oil

(MMbbls)

   

Light &

Medium

Oil & NGLs

(MMbbls)

   

Natural

Gas & CBM

(Bcf)

 

As at December 31, 2015

     3,298        220        154        953   

Extensions and Improved Recovery

     154        -        -        -   

Discoveries

     -        -        -        -   

Technical Revisions

     (78     (20     1        59   

Economic Factors

     -        -        -        -   

Acquisitions

     -        -        -        -   

Dispositions

     -        -        -        (1

Production(1)

     (55     (11     (10     (147

As at December 31, 2016

     3,319        189        145        864   
(1)

Production used for the reserves reconciliation differs from publicly reported production. In accordance with NI 51-101, Company Interest Before Royalties production used for the reserves reconciliation above includes Cenovus’s share of gas volumes provided to FCCL for steam generation, but does not include royalty interest production.

 

Proved bitumen reserves increased by approximately seven percent. Increases at Christina Lake were primarily a result of an area expansion and improved reservoir performance. Increases at Foster Creek were primarily a result of improved reservoir performance. Proved plus probable bitumen reserves increased one percent.

Heavy oil proved reserves decreased by approximately 14 percent primarily as a result of production and drilling deferrals. Heavy oil probable reserves decreased by approximately 14 percent due to drilling deferrals at Pelican Lake. Overall, heavy oil proved plus probable reserves decreased by approximately 14 percent.

Light and medium oil and NGLs proved reserves decreased by eight percent. The decreases were primarily due to production, partially offset by development at Grassland. Overall, light and medium oil and NGLs proved plus probable reserves

decreased six percent, primarily as a result of production.

Natural gas and CBM proved reserves declined by approximately 10 percent as extensions and technical revisions did not offset production. Probable natural gas and CBM reserves and proved plus probable natural gas and CBM reserves declined by approximately nine percent.

Undeveloped Reserves

Undeveloped reserves are those reserves expected to be recovered from known accumulations where a significant expenditure is required to render them capable of production.

Proved and probable undeveloped reserves have been estimated by the IQREs in accordance with procedures and standards contained in the Canadian Oil and Gas Evaluation Handbook. In general, undeveloped reserves are scheduled to be developed within the next one to 45 years.

 

 

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Table of Contents

 

Company Interest Proved Undeveloped – Before Royalties

    

Bitumen

(MMbbls)

    

Heavy Oil

(MMbbls)

    

Light & Medium

Oil & NGLs

(MMbbls)

    

Natural Gas & CBM

(Bcf)

 
     

First

Attributed

    

Total at

Year-End

    

First

Attributed

    

Total at

Year-End

    

First

Attributed

    

Total at

Year-End

    

First

Attributed

    

Total at

Year-End

 

Prior

     1,875         1,629         94         47         59         15         300         4   

2014

     161         1,732         7         40         11         21         4         4   

2015

     238         1,861         -         29         1         19         1         4   

2016

     185         2,006         -         14         -         15         -         5   

Company Interest Probable Undeveloped – Before Royalties

    

Bitumen

(MMbbls)

    

Heavy Oil

(MMbbls)

    

Light & Medium

Oil & NGLs

(MMbbls)

    

Natural Gas & CBM

(Bcf)

 
     

First

Attributed

    

Total at

Year-End

    

First

Attributed

    

Total at

Year-End

    

First

Attributed

    

Total at

Year-End

    

First

Attributed

    

Total at

Year-End

 

Prior

     1,244         649         122         86         35         17         54         16   

2014

     649         1,293         5         76         8         15         7         11   

2015

     1         1,074         -         52         1         14         2         8   

2016

     10         935         -         46         -         15         -         9   

DEVELOPMENT OF PROVED AND PROBABLE UNDEVELOPED RESERVES

 

Bitumen

At the end of 2016, Cenovus had proved undeveloped bitumen reserves of 2,006 million barrels Before Royalties, or approximately 86 percent of the Corporation’s proved bitumen reserves. Of Cenovus’s 976 million barrels of probable bitumen reserves, 935 million barrels, or approximately 96 percent, are undeveloped. The evaluation of these reserves anticipates they will be recovered using SAGD.

Typical SAGD project development involves the initial installation of a steam generation facility, at a cost much greater than drilling a production/injection well pair, and then progressively drilling sufficient SAGD well pairs to fully utilize the available steam.

Bitumen reserves can be classified as proved when there is sufficient stratigraphic drilling to have demonstrated to a high degree of certainty the presence of the bitumen in commercially recoverable volumes. McDaniel’s standard for sufficient drilling in the McMurray formation is a minimum of eight wells per section with 3D seismic, or 16 wells per section with no seismic. In other geological formations, such as Grand Rapids, there may be some variation in the standard. Additionally, all requisite legal and regulatory approvals must have been obtained, operator and partner funding approvals must be in place, and a reasonable development timetable must be established. Proved developed bitumen reserves are differentiated from proved undeveloped bitumen reserves by the presence of drilled production/injection well pairs at the reserves estimation effective date. Because a steam plant has a long life relative to well pairs, in the early stages of a SAGD project, only a small portion of proved reserves will be developed as the number of well pairs drilled will be limited by the available steam capacity.

Recognition of probable reserves requires sufficient drilling of stratigraphic wells to establish reservoir suitability for SAGD. Reserves will be classified as

probable if the number of wells drilled falls between the stratigraphic well requirements for proved reserves and for probable reserves, or if the reserves are located outside of an approved development plan area, but within an approved project area. McDaniel’s standard for probable reserves is a minimum of four stratigraphic wells per section. If reserves lie outside the approved development area, approval to include those reserves in the development area must be obtained before development drilling of SAGD well pairs can commence.

Development of the proved undeveloped reserves will take place in an orderly manner as additional well pairs are drilled to utilize the available steam when existing well pairs reach the end of their steam injection phase. The forecast production of Cenovus’s proved bitumen reserves extends approximately 47 years, based on existing facilities. Production of the current proved developed portion is estimated to take approximately 13 years.

Crude Oil

Cenovus has a significant medium oil CO2 EOR project at Weyburn and a significant heavy oil waterflood/polymer flood EOR project at Pelican Lake. These projects occur in large, well-developed reservoirs, where undeveloped reserves are not necessarily defined by the absence of drilling, but by anticipated improved recovery associated with development of the EOR schemes. Extending both EOR schemes within the projects requires intensive capital investment in infrastructure development and will occur over many years.

At Weyburn, investment in proved undeveloped reserves is projected to continue for over 40 years, with drilling of supplementary wells taking place over the next five years, and CO2 flood advancement continuing many years beyond that. At Pelican Lake, investment in proved undeveloped reserves is projected to continue for three years, with a combination of infrastructure development, infill drilling and polymer flood advancement.

 

 

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Table of Contents

SIGNIFICANT FACTORS OR UNCERTAINTIES AFFECTING RESERVES DATA

 

The evaluation of reserves is a continuous process that can be significantly impacted by a variety of internal and external influences. Revisions are often required resulting from changes in pricing, economic conditions, regulatory changes, and historical performance. While these factors can be considered and potentially anticipated, certain judgments and

assumptions are always required. As new information becomes available, these areas are reviewed and revised accordingly. For a discussion of the risk factors and uncertainties affecting reserves data, see “Risk Factors – Operational Risks – Uncertainty of Reserves and Future Net Revenue Estimates”.

 

 

OTHER OIL AND GAS INFORMATION

Oil and Gas Properties and Wells

The following tables summarize Cenovus’s interests in producing and non-producing wells, as at December 31, 2016:

 

     Oil      Gas      Total  
Producing Wells(1)            Gross              Net              Gross              Net          Gross              Net  

Alberta

                 

Oil Sands

     490         245         293         279         783         524   

Conventional

     1,923         1,907         24,128         23,952         26,051         25,859   

Total Alberta

     2,413         2,152         24,421         24,231         26,834         26,383   

Saskatchewan

     645         402         -         -         645         402   

Total

     3,058         2,554         24,421         24,231         27,479         26,785   
(1) Includes wells containing multiple completions as follows: 22,082 gross gas wells (21,924 net wells) and 1,131 gross oil wells (1,013 net wells).

 

     Oil      Gas      Total  
Non-Producing Wells(1)            Gross              Net               Gross              Net          Gross              Net  

Alberta

                 

Oil Sands

     109         60         349         240         458         300   

Conventional

     929         909         1,085         1,051         2,014         1,960   

Total Alberta

     1,038         969         1,434         1,291         2,472         2,260   

Saskatchewan

     196         85         1         1         197         86   

Total

     1,234         1,054         1,435         1,292         2,669         2,346   
(1) Non-producing wells include wells which are capable of producing, but which are currently not producing. Non-producing wells do not include other types of wells such as stratigraphic test wells, service wells, or wells that have been abandoned.

Cenovus has no material properties with attributed reserves which are capable of producing, but which are not on production.

 

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Table of Contents

Exploration and Development Activity

The following tables summarize Cenovus’s gross participation and net interest in wells drilled in 2016(1):

 

              Oil Sands           Conventional      Total    
  

 

 

 

Development

Wells Drilled

                   Gross                  Net                  Gross                  Net                  Gross                  Net  

 

 

Oil

     54         28         10         9         64         37   

Gas

     -         -         -         -         -         -   

Dry & Abandoned

     -         -         -         -         -         -   

 

 

Total Canada

     54         28         10         9         64         37   

 

 
(1) Cenovus did not have any participation or interest in any exploration wells in 2016.

During the year ended December 31, 2016, Oil Sands drilled 205 gross stratigraphic test wells (103 net wells) and Conventional drilled 58 gross stratigraphic test wells (58 net wells).

During the year ended December 31, 2016, no service wells were drilled within Oil Sands or Conventional. SAGD well pairs are counted as a single producing well in the table above.

For all types of wells except stratigraphic test wells, the calculation of the number of wells is based on the number of surface locations. For stratigraphic test wells, the calculation is based on the number of bottomhole locations.

Development activities were focused on sustaining bitumen production at Foster Creek and Christina Lake, and on supporting our EOR projects at Pelican Lake and Weyburn.

 

Properties With No Attributed Reserves

Cenovus has approximately 3.9 million gross acres (3.4 million net acres) of properties in Canada to which no reserves have been specifically attributed. These properties are planned for current and future development in both the Corporation’s oil sands and conventional oil and gas operations. There are currently no work commitments on these properties.

Cenovus has rights to explore, develop, and exploit approximately 81,000 net acres that could potentially expire by December 31, 2017, which relate entirely to Crown and freehold land.

For areas where Cenovus holds interests in different formations under the same surface area through separate leases, the Corporation has calculated its gross and net acreage on the basis of each individual lease.

Properties with no attributed reserves include Crown lands where bitumen contingent and prospective resources have been identified and Crown lands where exploration activities to date have not identified potential reserves in commercial quantities. See “Risk Factors – Financial Risks – Commodity Prices” and “Risk Factors – Financial Risks – Development and Operating Costs” and “Risk Factors – Operational Risks – Uncertainty of Reserves and Future Net Revenue Estimates” in this AIF for further discussion of economic and risk factors relevant to Cenovus’s properties with no attributed reserves.

Additional Information Concerning Abandonment and Reclamation Costs

The estimated total future abandonment and reclamation costs for existing wells, facilities, and infrastructure is based on Management’s estimate of costs to remediate, reclaim and abandon wells and facilities having regard to Cenovus’s working interest and the estimated timing of the costs to be incurred in future periods. Cenovus has developed a process to calculate these estimates, which considers applicable regulations, actual and anticipated costs, type and size of the well or facility and the geographic location.

Cenovus has estimated undiscounted future abandonment and reclamation costs for its existing upstream assets at approximately $6.14 billion (approximately $1.078 billion, discounted at 10 percent) at December 31, 2016, of which the Corporation expects to pay between $200 million and $240 million in the next three financial years on a portion of the 34,762 net wells.

Of the undiscounted future abandonment and reclamation costs to be incurred over the life of Cenovus’s proved reserves, approximately $9 billion has been deducted in estimating the FNR, which represents the Corporation’s total existing estimated abandonment and reclamation costs, plus all forecast estimates of abandonment and reclamation costs attributable to future development activity associated with the reserves.

Tax Horizon

In 2017, Cenovus currently expects to incur losses for income tax purposes and recover income taxes paid in prior years. Tax may be payable by the Corporation in 2018.

 

 

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Costs Incurred

 

($ millions)    2016  

 

 

Acquisitions

  

Unproved

     11   

Proved

     -   

 

 

Total Acquisitions

     11   

Exploration Costs

     35   

Development Costs

     738   

 

 

Total Costs Incurred

     784   

 

 

Forward Contracts

Cenovus may use financial derivatives to manage its exposure to fluctuations in commodity prices, foreign exchange and interest rates. A description of such instruments is provided in the notes to the Corporation’s annual audited Consolidated Financial Statements for the year ended December 31, 2016.

Production Estimates

The following table summarizes the estimated 2017 average daily volume of Company Working Interest Before Royalties reflected in the reserves reports for all properties held on December 31, 2016 using forecast prices and costs, all of which will be produced in Canada. These estimates assume certain activities take place, such as the development of undeveloped reserves, and that there are no divestitures.

 

2017 Estimated Production

 

Forecast Prices and Costs

   Proved          Proved plus
    Probable
 

Bitumen (bbls/d)(1)

     176,481         184,513   

Light and Medium Oil (bbls/d)

     24,814         27,600   

Heavy Oil (bbls/d)

     25,747         26,812   

Natural Gas (MMcf/d)

     349         376   

Natural Gas Liquids (bbls/d)

     706         778   

Company Working Interest Before Royalties (BOE/d)

     285,952         302,444   

 

(1) Includes Foster Creek production of 74,981 barrels per day for proved and 77,875 barrels per day for proved plus probable, and Christina Lake production of 101,500 barrels per day for proved and 106,638 barrels per day for proved plus probable.

Production History

Average Working Interest Daily Production Volumes - 2016

     Year                  Q4                  Q3                  Q2                  Q1  

 

 

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Liquids (bbls/d)

              

Oil Sands

              

Foster Creek (Bitumen)

     70,244         81,588         73,798         64,544         60,882   

Christina Lake (Bitumen)

     79,449         82,808         79,793         78,060         77,093   

 

 
     149,693         164,396         153,591         142,604         137,975   

Conventional Liquids

              

Heavy Oil

     29,185         28,913         28,096         28,500         31,247   

Light and Medium Oil

     25,844         25,016         25,280         26,127         26,970   

Natural Gas Liquids(1)

     1,064         1,176         1,073         798         1,206   

 

 

Total Crude Oil and Natural Gas Liquids

     205,786         219,501         208,040         198,029         197,398   

 

 

Natural Gas (MMcf/d)

              

Oil Sands

     17         17         18         18         17   

Conventional

     377         362         374         381         391   

 

 

Total Natural Gas

     394         379         392         399         408   

 

 

Total (BOE/d)

     271,453         282,669         273,373         264,528         265,398   

 

 
(1)   Natural gas liquids include condensate volumes.

 

Average Royalty Interest Daily Production Volumes - 2016  
     Year              Q4              Q3              Q2              Q1  

 

 

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Liquids (bbls/d)

              

Conventional Liquids

              

Heavy Oil

     -         -         -         -         -   

Light and Medium Oil

     70         48         31         51         151   

Natural Gas Liquids (1)

     2         1         1         1         2   

 

 

Total Crude Oil and Natural Gas Liquids

     72         49         32         52         153   

 

 

Natural Gas (MMcf/d)

              

Conventional

     -         -         -         -         -   

 

 

Total (BOE/d)

     72         49         32         52         153   

 

 
(1)   Natural gas liquids include condensate volumes.

 

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Per-Unit Results

The following tables summarize Cenovus’s per-unit results, as well as the impact of realized financial hedging, on a quarterly basis, before deduction of royalties, for the periods indicated:

 

Netbacks(1) – 2016

(excluding impact of realized gain (loss) on risk management)

   Year                 Q4                 Q3                  Q2                  Q1  

Bitumen - Foster Creek ($/bbl)

            

Sales Price

     30.32        38.59        33.61         33.40         11.82   

Royalties

     (0.01     (0.27     0.19         0.23         (0.16

Transportation and blending

     8.84        7.37        8.38         11.44         8.70   

Operating expenses

     10.55        10.60        9.63         10.15         12.05   

Netback

     10.94        20.89        15.41         11.58         (8.77

Bitumen - Christina Lake ($/bbl)

            

Sales Price

     25.30        34.78        29.11         28.31         8.85   

Royalties

     0.33        0.56        0.41         0.28         0.05   

Transportation and blending

     4.68        4.08        4.49         4.90         5.28   

Operating expenses

     7.48        8.15        7.72         6.35         7.61   

Netback

     12.81        21.99        16.49         16.78         (4.09

Total Bitumen ($/bbl)

            

Sales Price

     27.64        36.67        31.30         30.59         10.13   

Royalties

     0.17        0.14        0.30         0.26         (0.04

Transportation and blending(3)

     6.62        5.71        6.39         7.84         6.75   

Operating expenses

     8.91        9.37        8.65         8.06         9.52   

Netback

     11.94        21.45        15.96         14.43         (6.10

Heavy Crude Oil ($/bbl)

            

Sales Price

     35.82        40.72        40.50         36.77         25.99   

Royalties

     3.31        4.08        3.97         3.95         1.40   

Transportation and blending

     4.60        4.90        4.86         3.85         4.77   

Operating expenses

     13.38        14.69        12.43         12.34         13.98   

Production and mineral taxes

     0.01        0.01        0.01         0.01         -   

Netback

     14.52        17.04        19.23         16.62         5.84   

 

(1)

Netback is a non-GAAP measure commonly used in the oil and gas industry to assist in measuring operating performance on a per-unit basis. Netback is defined as gross sales less royalties, transportation and blending, operating expenses and production and mineral taxes divided by sales volumes. Netbacks do not reflect non-cash write-downs of product inventory until the inventory is sold. Our calculation is consistent with the definition found in the Canadian Oil and Gas Evaluation Handbook. The crude oil sales price, transportation and blending costs, and sales volumes exclude the impact of purchased condensate. Netback does not have a standardized meaning as prescribed by IFRS and therefore is considered a non-GAAP measure. As such, it may not be comparable to similar measures presented by other issuers. This measure has been described and presented in this AIF in order to provide shareholders and potential investors with additional information regarding Cenovus’s liquidity and its ability to generate funds to finance its operations, and to comply with the requirements of NI 51-101. This measure should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for measures prepared in accordance with IFRS. For further information, refer to Cenovus’s most recent MD&A available at cenovus.com. For the reconciliation of the financial components of Netback to the GAAP measure and the sales volumes used in the calculations, see “Netback Reconciliations” in Appendix D.

 

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Netbacks(1) – 2016

(excluding impact of realized gain (Loss) on risk management)

   Year      Q4      Q3      Q2      Q1  

Light and Medium Crude Oil ($/bbl)

              

Sales Price

     46.48         55.35         48.97         48.09         34.36   

Royalties

     9.28         14.87         8.91         8.52         5.18   

Transportation and blending

     2.73         2.69         2.71         2.77         2.73   

Operating expenses

     15.65         16.05         13.94         16.21         16.34   

Production and mineral taxes

     1.24         1.50         1.48         1.18         0.82   

Netback

     17.58         20.24         21.93         19.41         9.29   

Total Bitumen and Crude Oil

(Heavy, Light and Medium) ($/bbl)

              

Sales Price

     31.20         39.37         34.66         33.89         15.91   

Royalties

     1.77         2.38         1.83         1.93         0.90   

Transportation and blending

     5.84         5.25         5.74         6.56         5.89   

Operating expenses

     10.40         10.85         9.79         9.80         11.14   

Production and mineral taxes

     0.16         0.17         0.18         0.16         0.11   

Netback

     13.03         20.72         17.12         15.44         (2.13

NGLs ($/bbl)

              

Sales Price

     31.16         40.79         29.71         28.11         24.99   

Royalties

     4.21         4.97         3.58         4.20         4.03   

Netback

     26.95         35.82         26.13         23.91         20.96   

Total Bitumen, Crude Oil (Heavy, Light and Medium)

and NGLs ($/bbl)

              

Sales Price

     31.20         39.38         34.64         33.87         15.97   

Royalties

     1.79         2.39         1.84         1.94         0.92   

Transportation and blending

     5.81         5.22         5.71         6.53         5.85   

Operating expenses

     10.35         10.80         9.74         9.76         11.08   

Production and mineral taxes

     0.16         0.17         0.18         0.16         0.11   

Netback

     13.09         20.80         17.17         15.48         (1.99

Total Natural Gas ($/Mcf)

              

Sales Price

     2.32         2.99         2.49         1.53         2.31   

Royalties

     0.10         0.15         0.10         0.04         0.09   

Transportation and blending

     0.11         0.12         0.10         0.13         0.10   

Operating expenses

     1.15         1.25         1.05         1.06         1.23   

Production and mineral taxes

     -         -         0.01         -         -   

Netback

     0.96         1.47         1.23         0.30         0.89   

Total ($/BOE)

              

Sales Price

     27.01         34.53         29.98         27.56         15.43   

Royalties

     1.49         2.06         1.55         1.51         0.82   

Transportation and blending

     4.56         4.20         4.51         5.07         4.51   

Operating expenses

     9.51         10.05         8.92         8.89         10.14   

Production and mineral taxes

     0.12         0.13         0.15         0.12         0.08   

Netback

     11.33         18.09         14.85         11.97         (0.12
(1)

Netback is a non-GAAP measure commonly used in the oil and gas industry to assist in measuring operating performance on a per-unit basis. Netback is defined as gross sales less royalties, transportation and blending, operating expenses and production and mineral taxes divided by sales volumes. Netbacks do not reflect non-cash write-downs of product inventory until the inventory is sold. Our calculation is consistent with the definition found in the Canadian Oil and Gas Evaluation Handbook. The crude oil sales price, transportation and blending costs, and sales volumes exclude the impact of purchased condensate. Netback does not have a standardized meaning as prescribed by IFRS and therefore is considered a non-GAAP measure. As such, it may not be comparable to similar measures presented by other issuers. This measure has been described and presented in this AIF in order to provide shareholders and potential investors with additional information regarding Cenovus’s liquidity and its ability to generate funds to finance its operations, and to comply with the requirements of NI 51-101. This measure should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for measures prepared in accordance with IFRS. For further information, refer to Cenovus’s most recent MD&A available at cenovus.com. For the reconciliation of the financial components of Netback to the GAAP measure and the sales volumes used in the calculations, see “Netback Reconciliations” in Appendix D.

 

Impact of Realized Gain (Loss) on Risk Management – 2016    Year      Q4      Q3      Q2      Q1  

Liquids ($/bbl)

     3.23         0.91         2.14         1.97         8.16   

Natural Gas ($/Mcf)

     -         -         -         -         -   

Total ($/BOE)

     2.44         0.70         1.63         1.46         6.08   

 

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Capital Expenditures, Acquisitions and Divestitures

Cenovus has a large inventory of internal growth opportunities and continues to examine select acquisition opportunities to develop and expand its oil and gas properties. Acquisition opportunities may include corporate or asset acquisitions. Cenovus may finance any such acquisitions with debt, equity, cash generated from operations, proceeds from asset divestitures or a combination of these sources.

In 2016, Cenovus had an active program to divest its non-core assets in order to increase its focus on key assets within the long-range business plan, as well as generate proceeds to partially fund its capital investment.

In the third quarter of 2015, Cenovus sold HRP, the holder of its royalty interest and mineral fee title lands business in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba to an unrelated third party for gross cash proceeds of $3.3 billion. Also in the third quarter of 2015, Cenovus acquired the Bruderheim rail terminal, a crude-by-rail terminal at Bruderheim, Alberta for $75 million plus adjustments.

The following table summarizes Cenovus’s net capital investment for 2016 and 2015:

 

Net Capital Investment              
($ millions)    2016      2015  

 

 

Capital Investment

     

Oil Sands

     

Foster Creek

     263         403   

Christina Lake

     282         647   

 

 

Total

     545         1,050   

Other Oil Sands

     59         135   

 

 
     604         1,185   

Conventional

     171         244   

Refining and Marketing

     220         248   

Corporate

     31         37   

 

 

Capital Investment

     1,026         1,714   

 

 

Acquisitions

     11         87   

Divestitures

     (8      (3,344

 

 

Net Acquisition and Divestiture Activity

     3         (3,257

 

 

Net Capital Investment(1)

     1,029         (1,543

 

 

 

(1)

Includes expenditures on property, plant and equipment and exploration and evaluation assets.

OTHER INFORMATION

 

 

COMPETITIVE CONDITIONS

All aspects of the oil and gas industry are highly competitive. Refer to “Risk Factors –Operational Risks –Competition” for further information on the competitive conditions affecting Cenovus.

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

Cenovus’s operations are subject to laws and regulations concerning protection of the environment, pollution and the handling and transport of hazardous materials. These laws and regulations generally require the Corporation to remove or remedy the effect of its activities on the environment at present and former operating sites, including dismantling production facilities and remediating damage caused by the use or release of specified substances. The Safety, Environment and Responsibility Committee of the Corporation’s Board reviews and recommends policies pertaining to corporate responsibility, including the environment, and oversees compliance with government laws and regulations. Monitoring and reporting programs for environmental, health and safety performance in day-to-day operations, as well as inspections and assessments, have been designed to provide assurance that environmental and regulatory standards are met. Contingency plans have been put in place for a timely response to an environmental event and remediation/reclamation

programs have been put in place and utilized to restore the environment.

Cenovus recognizes that there is a cost associated with carbon emissions and it believes that GHG regulations and the cost of carbon at various price levels can be adequately accounted for as part of business planning. As part of the Corporation’s future planning, Management and the Board review the impact of a variety of carbon constrained scenarios on Cenovus’s strategy. Although uncertainty remains regarding potential future emissions regulation, the Corporation will continue to assess and evaluate the cost of carbon relative to its investments across a range of scenarios. For a discussion of the risks associated with this uncertainty, see “Risk Factors –Environment & Regulatory Risks – Climate Change Regulation”.

Cenovus also examines the impact of carbon regulation on its major projects, including its oil sands operations and its refining assets. Cenovus continues to closely monitor potential GHG legislation and litigation developments both in Canada and in the U.S.

Cenovus expects to incur abandonment and site reclamation costs as existing oil and gas properties are abandoned and reclaimed. Cenovus does not anticipate material expenditures beyond amounts paid in respect of normal compliance with environmental regulations in 2017. Refer to “Risk

 

 

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Factors – Environment & Regulatory Risks – Environmental Regulations” for further information on environmental protection matters affecting Cenovus.

CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY

We are committed to operating in a responsible manner and integrating our corporate responsibility principles in the way we conduct our business. Our Corporate Responsibility (“CR”) policy guides our activities in the areas of: Leadership; Corporate Governance and Business Practices; People;

Environmental Performance; Stakeholder and Aboriginal Engagement; and Community Involvement and Investment.

We published our 2015 CR report in July 2016, detailing our efforts to accelerate our environmental performance, protect the health and safety of our staff, invest in and engage with the communities where we operate and maintain the highest standards of corporate governance. Our CR report also lists external recognition we received for our commitment to corporate responsibility and our efforts to balance economic, governance, social and environmental performance. Our CR policy and 2015 CR report are available on our website at cenovus.com.

 

 

EMPLOYEES

The following table summarizes Cenovus’s full-time equivalent (“FTE”) employees as at December 31, 2016:

 

      FTE Employees  

Upstream

     1,856   

Downstream

     126   

Corporate

     793   

 

 

Total

     2,775   

 

 

Cenovus also engages a number of contractors and service providers. Refer to “Risk Factors - Operational Risks - Leadership and Talent” for further information on employee matters affecting Cenovus.

FOREIGN OPERATIONS

Cenovus, and its reportable segments, are not dependent upon foreign operations outside North America. As a result, the Corporation’s exposure to risks and uncertainties in countries considered politically and economically unstable is limited. Any future operations outside North America may be adversely affected by changes in government policy, social instability or other political or economic developments which are not within Cenovus’s control, including the expropriation of property, the cancellation or modification of contract rights and restrictions on repatriation of cash. Refer to “Risk Factors – Financial Risks – Foreign Exchange Rates” for information on foreign exchange rate matters affecting Cenovus.

 

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DIRECTORS AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

 

DIRECTORS

The following individuals are directors of Cenovus.

 

  Name and

  Residence

   Director
Since(1)
  Principal Occupation During the Past Five Years

Patrick D.

Daniel(2,3,4)

Calgary, Alberta,

Canada

  

2009

Independent

 

Mr. Daniel is a director of Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce; a director of Capital Power Corporation, a publicly traded North American power producer; and Chair of the North American Review Board of American Air Liquide Holdings, Inc., a subsidiary of a publicly traded industrial gases service company. Mr. Daniel served as a director of Enbridge Inc. (“Enbridge”), a publicly traded energy delivery company, from April 2000 to October 2012. During his tenure with Enbridge, he also served as President & Chief Executive Officer from January 2001 to February 2012 and as Chief Executive Officer from February 2012 to October 2012.

Ian W.

Delaney(3,4,6)

Toronto, Ontario,

Canada

  

2009

Independent

 

Mr. Delaney is Chairman of The Westaim Corporation, a publicly traded investment company; and Chairman of Ontario Air Ambulance Services Co. (Ornge) a not-for-profit medical air and ground transportation organization. Mr. Delaney served as a director of Sherritt International Corporation (“Sherritt”), a publicly traded diversified natural resource company that produces nickel, cobalt, thermal coal, oil and gas and electricity, from October 1995 to May 2013. During his tenure with Sherritt, he also served as Chairman from November 1995 to May 2004, Executive Chairman from May 2004 to December 2008, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer from January 2009 to December 2011 and Chairman from January 2012 to May 2013. Mr. Delaney also served as Chairman of UrtheCast Corp. (formerly Longford Energy Inc.), a publicly traded video technology development company, from August 2012 to October 2013 and as a director of Dacha Strategic Metals Inc., a publicly traded investment company focused on the acquisition, storage and trading of strategic metals, from November 2012 to September 2014.

Brian C.

Ferguson(7)

Calgary, Alberta,

Canada

   2009  

Mr. Ferguson has been President & Chief Executive Officer of Cenovus since its formation on November 30, 2009; and serves as a director of The Toronto-Dominion Bank. Mr. Ferguson is a Fellow of the Chartered Professional Accountants of Alberta and a member of the Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada.

Michael A.

Grandin(4,8)

Calgary, Alberta,

Canada

  

2009 (Chair)

Independent

 

Mr. Grandin is the Chair of Cenovus’s Board. He is a director of HSBC Bank Canada and was a director of BNS Split Corp. II, a publicly traded investment company, from February 2005 until November 2016.

Steven F. Leer(2,4,5)

Boca Grande, Florida, United States

  

2015

Independent

 

Mr. Leer is a lead director of Norfolk Southern Corporation, a publicly traded North American rail transportation provider; non-executive Chairman of the Board of USG Corporation (“USG”), a publicly traded manufacturer and distributor of high performance building systems; and a director of Parsons Corporation, a private engineering, construction, technical, and management services firm. Mr. Leer served as a director of USG from June 2005 to January 2012 and was lead director from January 2012 to November 2016. Mr. Leer also served as Chairman of Arch Coal, Inc. (“Arch Coal”), a publicly traded coal producing company, from April 2006 to April 2014 and served as a director of Arch Coal and its predecessor company from 1992. During his tenure with Arch Coal and its predecessor company, he also served as Chief Executive Officer from July 1992 to April 2012.

 

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  Name and

  Residence

   Director
Since(1)
  Principal Occupation During the Past Five Years

Richard J.

Marcogliese(4,5,6)

Alamo, California,

United States

  

2016

Independent

 

Mr. Marcogliese is the Principal of iRefine, LLC, a privately owned petroleum refining consulting company; Executive Advisor of Pilko & Associates L.P., a private chemical and energy advisory company; and is presently engaged as an Operations Advisor to NTR Partners III LLC, a private investment company. He served as Operations Advisor to the CEO of Philadelphia Energy Solutions, a partnership between The Carlyle Group and a subsidiary of Energy Transfer Partners, L.P. that operates an oil refining complex on the U.S. Eastern seaboard, from September 2012 to January 2016.

Claude Mongeau(9)

Montreal, Quebec, Canada

  

2016

Independent

 

Mr. Mongeau is a director of The Toronto-Dominion Bank. Mr. Mongeau served as a director of Canadian National Railway Company (“CN”), a publicly traded railroad and transportation company, from October 2009 to July 2016 and as President and Chief Executive Officer from January 2010 to June 2016. During his tenure with CN, he also served as Executive Vice-President and Chief Financial Officer from October 2000 until December 2009, and held various increasingly senior positions from the time he joined. Mr. Mongeau also served as a director of SNC-Lavalin Group Inc. from August 2003 to May 2015 and Chairman of the Board of the Railway Association of Canada.

Valerie A.A.

Nielsen(3,4,6)

Victoria,

British Columbia,

Canada

  

2009

Independent

 

Ms. Nielsen was a director of Wajax Corporation, a publicly traded industrial parts and service company, from June 1995 to May 2012.

Charles M.

Rampacek(3,4,6)

Dallas, Texas,

United States

  

2009

Independent

 

Mr. Rampacek is a director of Energy Services Holdings, LLC, a private industrial services company that was formed in 2012 from the combination of Ardent Holdings, LLC and another company. Mr. Rampacek served as a director of Flowserve Corporation, a publicly traded manufacturer of industrial equipment from March 1998 to May 2016. He served as Chair of Ardent Holdings, LLC from December 2008 to July 2012. Mr. Rampacek also served as a director of Enterprise Products Holdings, LLC, the sole general partner of Enterprise Products Partners, L.P., a publicly traded midstream energy limited partnership, from November 2006 to September 2011; and Pilko & Associates L.P., a private chemical and energy advisory company, from September 2011 to February 2014.

Colin Taylor(2,4,5)

Toronto, Ontario,

Canada

  

2009

Independent

 

Mr. Taylor served two consecutive four-year terms as Chief Executive & Managing Partner of Deloitte LLP and then acted as Senior Counsel until his retirement in May 2008. Mr. Taylor is a Fellow of the Chartered Professional Accountants of Ontario and a member of the Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada.

Wayne G.

Thomson(2,4,5)

Calgary, Alberta,

Canada

  

2009

Independent

 

Mr. Thomson is a director of TVI Pacific Inc., a publicly traded international mining company; Chairman of Maha Energy Inc., a public Swedish oil and gas company; Chairman and interim Executive Chairman of Inventys Thermal Technologies Inc., a private carbon capture technology company; and Chairman and President of Enviro Valve Inc., a private company manufacturing proprietary pressure relief valves. Mr. Thomson served as a Chief Executive Officer of Iskander Energy Corp., a private international oil and gas company, from November 2011 to August 2014 and as a director from November 2011 to March 2016.

 

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  Name and

  Residence

   Director
Since(1)
  Principal Occupation During the Past Five Years

Rhonda I.

Zygocki(3,4,6)

Friday Harbor,

Washington,

United States

  

2016

Independent

 

Ms. Zygocki served as Executive Vice President, Policy and Planning of Chevron Corporation (“Chevron”), an integrated energy company, from March 2011 until her retirement in February 2015 and prior thereto, during her 34 years with Chevron, she held a number of senior management and executive leadership positions in international operations, public affairs, strategic planning, policy, government affairs and health, environment and safety. She is a senior advisor with the Center for Strategic and International Studies and a former advisory board member of the Woodrow Wilson International Center of Scholars Canada Institute.

 

  (1)

Each of the directors first became members of Cenovus’s Board pursuant to the Arrangement, with the following exceptions:

    Mr. Leer who was elected as a director of Cenovus’s Board at the Annual and Special Meeting of Shareholders held on April 29, 2015,
    Ms. Zygocki and Mr. Marcogliese who were elected as directors of Cenovus’s Board at the Annual Meeting of Shareholders held on April 27, 2016, and
    Mr. Mongeau who was appointed as a director of Cenovus’s Board as of December 1, 2016.

The term of each of the directors is from the date of the meeting at which he or she is elected or appointed until the next annual meeting of shareholders or until a successor is elected or appointed.

  (2)

Member of the Audit Committee.

  (3)

Member of the Human Resources and Compensation Committee.

  (4)

Member of the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee.

  (5)

Member of the Reserves Committee.

  (6)

Member of the Safety, Environment and Responsibility Committee.

  (7)

As an officer and a non-independent director, Mr. Ferguson is not a member of any of the committees of Cenovus’s Board.

  (8)

Ex-officio, by standing invitation, non-voting member of all other committees of Cenovus’s Board. As an ex-officio non-voting member, Mr. Grandin attends as his schedule permits and may vote when necessary to achieve a quorum.

  (9)

Mr. Mongeau is not currently a member of any standing committees of the Board.

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

The following individuals served as executive officers of Cenovus as at December 31, 2016.

 

  Name and Residence   Office Held and Principal Occupation During the Past Five Years

Brian C. Ferguson

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

 

President & Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Ferguson’s biographical information is included under “Directors”.

Ivor M. Ruste

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

 

Executive Vice-President & Chief Financial Officer

Mr. Ruste has been Executive Vice-President & Chief Financial Officer of Cenovus since its formation on November 30, 2009.

Harbir S. Chhina

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

 

Executive Vice-President, Oil Sands Development

Mr. Chhina became Executive Vice-President, Oil Sands Development on September 1, 2015. From December 2010 to August 2015, Mr. Chhina was Cenovus’s Executive Vice-President, Oil Sands. From November 2009 to November 2010, Mr. Chhina was Cenovus’s Executive Vice-President, Enhanced Oil Development & New Resource Plays.

Judy A. Fairburn

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

 

Executive Vice-President, Business Innovation

Ms. Fairburn became Executive Vice-President, Business Innovation on December 1, 2015. From February 2013 to November 2015, Ms. Fairburn was Cenovus’s Executive Advisor. From November 2009 to January 2013, Ms. Fairburn was Cenovus’s Executive Vice-President, Environment & Strategic Planning.

Kieron McFadyen

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

 

Executive Vice-President & President, Upstream Oil & Gas

Mr. McFadyen became Executive Vice-President & President, Upstream Oil & Gas on April 6, 2016. From January 2012 to April 2016, Mr. McFadyen was Group Vice President, Non Operated Joint Ventures of Royal Dutch Shell plc, a multinational oil and gas company (“Royal Dutch Shell”), and from November 2006 to January 2012, he was Group and Executive Vice President (HSSE-SP) of Royal Dutch Shell.

Jacqueline (Jacqui)

A.T. McGillivray

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

 

Executive Vice-President, Safety & Organization Effectiveness

Ms. McGillivray became Executive Vice-President, Safety & Organization Effectiveness on July 1, 2015. From October 2012 to June 2015, Ms. McGillivray was Cenovus’s Senior Vice-President & Chief People Officer. From November 2010 to October 2012, Ms. McGillivray was Head of Global Human Resources at Talisman Energy Inc.

 

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  Name and Residence   Office Held and Principal Occupation During the Past Five Years

Robert W. Pease

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

 

Executive Vice-President, Corporate Strategy & President, Downstream

Mr. Pease became Executive Vice-President, Corporate Strategy & President, Downstream on July 1, 2015. From June 2014 to June 2015, Mr. Pease was Cenovus’s Executive Vice-President, Markets, Products & Transportation. From February 2014 to May 2014, Mr. Pease was Vice President, Global Business Excellence, Supply & Trading of Shell Trading (US) Company, a corporation that acts as the market interface for Royal Dutch Shell companies and affiliates in the U.S.; and from November 2008 until January 2014, he was President and Chief Executive Officer of Motiva Enterprises LLC, a refiner, distributer and marketer of fuels in the eastern and Gulf Coast regions of the U.S.

Alan C. Reid

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

 

Executive Vice-President, Environment, Corporate Affairs, Legal & General Counsel

Mr. Reid became Executive Vice-President, Environment, Corporate Affairs, Legal & General Counsel on December 1, 2015. From September 2015 to November 2015, Mr. Reid was Cenovus’s Executive Vice-President, Environment, Corporate Affairs & Legal. From January 2014 to August 2015, Mr. Reid was Cenovus’s Senior Vice-President, Christina Lake & Narrows Lake. From January 2012 to January 2014, Mr. Reid was Cenovus’s Senior Vice-President, Christina Lake. From November 2009 to January 2012, Mr. Reid was Cenovus’s Vice-President, Regulatory, Health & Safety.

J. Drew Zieglgansberger

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

 

Executive Vice-President, Oil Sands Manufacturing

Mr. Zieglgansberger became Executive Vice-President, Oil Sands Manufacturing on September 1, 2015. From June 2015 to August 2015, Mr. Zieglgansberger was Cenovus’s Executive Vice-President, Operations Shared Services. From June 2012 to May 2015, Mr. Zieglgansberger was Cenovus’s Senior Vice-President, Operations Shared Services. From January 2012 to May 2012, Mr. Zieglgansberger was Cenovus’s Senior Vice-President, Regulatory, Local Community & Military. From December 2010 to January 2012, Mr. Zieglgansberger was Cenovus’s Senior Vice-President, Christina Lake.

 

 

As of December 31, 2016, all of Cenovus’s directors and executive officers, as a group, beneficially owned or exercised control or direction over, directly or indirectly, 1,143,169 common shares of Cenovus (“Common Shares”) or approximately 0.13 percent of the number of Common Shares that were outstanding as of such date.

Investors should be aware that some of Cenovus’s directors and officers are directors and officers of other private and public companies. Some of these private and public companies may, from time to time, be involved in business transactions or banking relationships which may create situations in which conflicts might arise. Any such conflicts shall be resolved in accordance with the procedures and requirements of the relevant provisions of the CBCA, including the duty of such directors and officers to act honestly and in good faith with a view to the best interests of Cenovus.

CEASE TRADE ORDERS, BANKRUPTCIES, PENALTIES OR SANCTIONS

 

To the Corporation’s knowledge, none of its current directors or executive officers are, as at the date of this AIF, or have been, within 10 years prior to the date of this AIF, a director, chief executive officer or chief financial officer of any company that:

 

(a) was subject to a cease trade order, an order similar to a cease trade order or an order that denied the relevant company access to any exemption under securities legislation, that was in effect for a period of more than 30 consecutive days (each, an “Order”) and that was issued while that director or executive officer was acting in the capacity as director, chief executive officer or chief financial officer; or

 

(b) was subject to an Order that was issued after the director or executive officer ceased to be a director, chief executive officer or chief financial officer and which resulted from an event that occurred while that person was acting in the capacity as director, chief executive officer or chief financial officer.

To the Corporation’s knowledge, other than as described below, none of its directors or executive officers:

 

(a) is, as at the date of this AIF, or has been within 10 years prior to the date of this AIF, a director or executive officer of any company that, while that person was acting in that capacity, or within a year of that person ceasing to act in that capacity, became bankrupt, made a proposal under any legislation relating to bankruptcy or insolvency or was subject to or instituted any proceedings, arrangement or compromise with creditors or had a receiver, receiver manager or trustee appointed to hold its assets; or

 

(b)

has, within 10 years prior to the date of this AIF, become bankrupt, made a proposal under any legislation relating to bankruptcy or insolvency, or become subject to or instituted any proceedings, arrangement or compromise with creditors, or had a receiver, receiver manager or

 

 

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trustee appointed to hold the assets of the director or executive officer.

To the Corporation’s knowledge, none of its directors or executive officers has been subject to:

 

(a)

any penalties or sanctions imposed by a court relating to securities legislation or by a securities regulatory authority or has entered into a settlement agreement with a securities regulatory authority; or

 

(b)

any other penalties or sanctions imposed by a court or regulatory body that would likely be considered important to a reasonable investor in making an investment decision.

Mr. Delaney was a director of OPTI Canada Inc. (“OPTI”) when it commenced proceedings for creditor protection under the Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act (Canada) (“CCAA”) on July 13,

2011. Ernst & Young Inc. was appointed as monitor of OPTI. On November 28, 2011, OPTI announced that it had closed a transaction whereby a subsidiary of CNOOC Limited acquired all of the outstanding securities of OPTI pursuant to a plan of arrangement under the CCAA and the Canada Business Corporations Act.

Mr. Mongeau was, prior to August 10, 2009, a director of Nortel Networks Corporation and Nortel Networks Limited, each of which initiated creditor protection proceedings under the Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act (Canada) on January 14, 2009. Certain U.S. subsidiaries filed voluntary petitions in the United States under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code, and certain Europe, Middle East and Africa subsidiaries made consequential filings in Europe and the Middle East.

 

 

AUDIT COMMITTEE

 

The Audit Committee mandate is included as Appendix C to this AIF.

COMPOSITION OF THE AUDIT COMMITTEE

 

The Audit Committee consists of four members, each of whom is independent and financially literate in accordance with National Instrument 52-110 Audit Committees. The education and experience of each of the members of the Audit Committee relevant to the performance of the responsibilities as an Audit Committee member is outlined below.

Patrick D. Daniel

Mr. Daniel holds a Bachelor of Science (University of Alberta) and a Master of Science (University of British Columbia), both in chemical engineering. He also completed Harvard University’s Advanced Management Program. He is a past Chief Executive Officer and director of Enbridge, a publicly traded energy delivery company. He is also a past director and member of the audit committee of Enerflex Systems Income Fund, a compression systems manufacturer, and a past director and Chair of the finance committee of Synenco Energy Inc., an oil sands mining company which was acquired by Total E&P Canada Ltd. in August 2008.

Steven F. Leer

Mr. Leer holds a Bachelor of Electrical Engineering (University of the Pacific) and a Master of Business Administration (Olin School of Business, Washington University). He was awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of the Pacific in May 1993. Mr. Leer is a lead director of Norfolk Southern Corporation, a publicly traded North American rail transportation provider; and a director of Parsons Corporation, a private engineering, construction, technical, and management services firm. Mr. Leer served as director of USG, a publicly traded manufacturer and distributor of high performance building systems, from June 2005 to January 2012

and as lead director of USG from January 2012 to November 2016. He was Chairman of Arch Coal, a publicly traded coal producing company, from April 2006 to April 2014 and served as a director of Arch Coal and its predecessor company from 1992. During his tenure with Arch Coal and its predecessor company he also served as Chief Executive Officer from July 1992 to April 2012 and President from July 1992 to April 2006. He was a member of the Board of Trustees of Washington University in St. Louis and is a former director of the Business Roundtable and the National Association of Manufacturers.

Colin Taylor

(Financial Expert and Audit Committee Chair)

Mr. Taylor is a chartered professional accountant, a Fellow of the Chartered Professional Accountants of Ontario and a member of the Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada. He also completed Harvard University’s Advanced Management Program. Mr. Taylor served two consecutive four-year terms (June 1996 to May 2004) as Chief Executive and Managing Partner of Deloitte LLP and continued as Senior Counsel until his retirement in May 2008. He has held a number of international management and governance responsibilities throughout his professional career. Mr. Taylor also served as Advisory Partner to a number of public and private company clients of Deloitte LLP.

Wayne G. Thomson

Mr. Thomson holds a Bachelor of Science of Mechanical Engineering (University of Manitoba) and is a professional engineer. He is a director of TVI Pacific Inc., a publicly traded international mining company; Chairman of Maha Energy Inc., a public

 

 

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Swedish oil and gas company; Chairman and interim Executive Chairman of Inventys Thermal Technologies Inc. He also serves as Chairman and President of Enviro Valve Inc., a private company manufacturing proprietary pressure relief valves, since 2005. Mr. Thomson served as Chief Executive Officer of Iskander Energy Corp (“Iskander”) and as director of Iskander from November 2011 to March 2016.

The above list does not include Michael A. Grandin who is, by standing invitation, an ex-officio member of Cenovus’s Audit Committee.

Pre-Approval Policies and Procedures

Cenovus has adopted policies and procedures with respect to the pre-approval of audit and permitted non-audit services to be provided by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP. The Audit Committee has established a budget for the provision of a specified list of audit and permitted non-audit services that the Audit Committee believes to be typical, recurring or otherwise likely to be provided by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, the Corporation’s auditor. Subject to the Audit Committee’s discretion, the budget generally covers the period between the adoption of the budget and the next meeting of the Audit Committee. The list of permitted services is sufficiently detailed to ensure that: (i) the Audit Committee knows precisely what services it is being asked to pre-approve; and (ii) it is not necessary for any member of Management to make a judgment as to whether a proposed service fits within the pre-approved services.

 

Subject to the following paragraph, the Audit Committee has delegated authority to the Chair of the Audit Committee (or if the Chair is unavailable, any other member of the Audit Committee) to pre-approve the provision of permitted services by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP which are not otherwise pre-approved by the Audit Committee, including the fees and terms of the proposed services (“Delegated Authority”). Any required determination about the Chair’s unavailability will be required to be made by the good faith judgment of the applicable other member(s) of the Audit Committee after considering all facts and circumstances deemed by such member(s) to be relevant. All pre-approvals granted pursuant to Delegated Authority must be presented by the member(s) who granted the pre-approvals to the full Audit Committee at its next meeting.

The fees payable in connection with any particular service to be provided by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP that has been pre-approved pursuant to Delegated Authority: (i) may not exceed $200,000, in the case of pre-approvals granted by the Chair of the Audit Committee; and (ii) may not exceed $50,000, in the case of pre-approvals granted by any other member of the Audit Committee.

All proposed services or the fees payable in connection with such services that have not already been pre-approved must be pre-approved by either the Audit Committee or pursuant to Delegated Authority. Prohibited services may not be pre-approved by the Audit Committee or pursuant to Delegated Authority.

 

 

External Auditor Service Fees

The following table provides information about the fees billed to Cenovus for professional services rendered by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP in the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015:

 

  ($ thousands)    2016      2015  

  Audit Fees(1)

     2,793         2,692   

  Audit-Related Fees(2)

     111         482   

  Tax Fees(3)

     71         99   

  All Other Fees(4)

     10         -   

  Total

     2,985         3,273   

 

  (1)

Audit Fees consist of the aggregate fees billed for the audit of the Corporation’s annual financial statements or services that are normally provided in connection with statutory and regulatory filings or engagements.

  (2)

Audit-Related Fees consist of the aggregate fees billed for assurance and related services that are reasonably related to the performance of the audit or review of the Corporation’s financial statements and are not reported as Audit Fees. The services provided in this category included audit-related services in relation to Cenovus’s prospectuses, systems development, controls testing and participation fees levied by the Canadian Public Accountability Board.

  (3)

Tax Fees consist of the aggregate fees billed for audit related fees, tax compliance, tax advice and tax planning.

  (4)

All Other Fees are related to a readiness assessment to satisfy Extractive Sector Transparency Measures Act reporting requirements.

 

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DESCRIPTION OF CAPITAL STRUCTURE

 

The following is a summary of the rights, privileges, restrictions and conditions which are attached to Common Shares and Cenovus’s first and second preferred shares (collectively, “Preferred Shares”). Cenovus is authorized to issue an unlimited number of Common Shares and First Preferred Shares and Second Preferred Shares not exceeding, in aggregate, 20 percent of the number of issued and outstanding Common Shares. As at December 31, 2016, there were approximately 833.3 million Common Shares and no Preferred Shares outstanding.

 

COMMON SHARES

The holders of Common Shares are entitled: (i) to receive dividends if, as and when declared by Cenovus’s Board; (ii) to receive notice of, to attend, and to vote on the basis of one vote per Common Share held, at all meetings of shareholders; and (iii) to participate in any distribution of the Corporation’s assets in the event of liquidation, dissolution or winding up or other distribution of its assets among its shareholders for the purpose of winding up its affairs.

PREFERRED SHARES

Preferred Shares may be issued in one or more series. Cenovus’s Board may determine the designation, rights, privileges, restrictions and conditions attached to each series of Preferred Shares before the issue of such series. Holders of Preferred Shares are not entitled to vote at any meeting of shareholders, but may be entitled to vote if the Corporation fails to pay dividends on that series of Preferred Shares. The First Preferred Shares are entitled to priority over the Second Preferred Shares and the Common Shares with respect to the payment of dividends and the distribution of assets in the event of any liquidation, dissolution or winding up of Cenovus’s affairs. Pursuant to a special resolution of the shareholders of the Corporation passed at the annual and special meeting of the Corporation’s shareholders on April 29, 2015, the Corporation’s articles were amended to provide that the aggregate number of Preferred Shares issued by the Corporation may not exceed 20 percent of the aggregate number of Common Shares then outstanding.

SHAREHOLDER RIGHTS PLAN

Cenovus has a shareholder rights plan (the “Shareholder Rights Plan”) that was adopted in 2009 to ensure, to the extent possible, that all its shareholders are treated fairly in connection with any take-over bid for Cenovus. The Shareholder Rights Plan creates a right that attaches to each issued Common Share. Until the separation time, which typically occurs at the time of an unsolicited take-over bid, whereby a person acquires or attempts to acquire 20 percent or more of Cenovus’s Common Shares, the rights are not separable from the Common Shares, are not exercisable and no separate rights certificates are issued. Each right entitles the holder, other than the 20 percent acquirer, from and after the

separation time (unless delayed by the Corporation’s Board) and before certain expiration times, to acquire Common Shares at 50 percent of the market price at the time of exercise. The Shareholder Rights Plan was reconfirmed at the 2015 annual and special meeting of shareholders and must be reconfirmed by the Corporation’s shareholders at every third annual shareholder meeting.

DIVIDEND REINVESTMENT PLAN

Cenovus has a dividend reinvestment plan which permits holders of Common Shares to automatically reinvest all or any portion of the cash dividends paid on their Common Shares in additional Common Shares. At the discretion of the Corporation, the additional Common Shares may be issued from treasury at the volume weighted average price of the Common Shares (denominated in the currency in which the Common Shares trade on the applicable stock exchange) traded on the Toronto Stock Exchange (“TSX”) during the last five trading days preceding the relevant dividend payment date or purchased on the market.

EMPLOYEE STOCK OPTION PLAN

Cenovus has an Employee Stock Option Plan that provides employees with the opportunity to exercise options to purchase Common Shares. Option exercise prices approximate the market price for the Common Shares on the date the options were issued. Options granted are exercisable at 30 percent of the number granted after one year, an additional 30 percent of the number granted after two years and are fully exercisable after three years. Options granted prior to February 17, 2010 expired after five years, while options granted on or after February 17, 2010 expire after seven years. Each option granted prior to February 24, 2011 has an associated tandem stock appreciation right which gives the option holder the right to elect to receive a cash payment equal to the excess of the market price of the Common Shares at the time of exercise over the exercise price of the option in exchange for surrendering the option. Each option granted on or after February 24, 2011 has an associated net settlement right. In lieu of exercising the option, the net settlement right grants the option holder the right to receive the number of Common Shares that could be acquired with the excess value of the market price of the Common Shares at the time of exercise over the exercise price of the option.

 

 

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RATINGS

The following information relating to Cenovus’s credit ratings is provided as it relates to the Corporation’s financing costs and liquidity. Specifically, credit ratings affect Cenovus’s ability to obtain short-term and long-term financing and the cost of such financing. A reduction in the current rating on Cenovus’s debt by the Corporation’s rating agencies or a negative change in its ratings outlook could adversely affect Cenovus’s cost of financing, its access to sources of liquidity and capital, and potentially obligate it to post incremental collateral in the form of cash, letters of credit or other financial instruments. See “Risk Factors” in this AIF for further information.

The following table outlines the current ratings and outlooks of Cenovus’s debt:

 

    

Standard & Poor’s

Ratings Services

(“S&P”)

 

Moody’s Investors

Service

(“Moody’s”)

 

DBRS Limited   

(“DBRS”)

  Senior Unsecured

            Long-Term Rating

  BBB   Ba2   BBB (high)   

            Outlook/Trend

  Stable   Stable   Stable   

 

Credit ratings are intended to provide an independent measure of the credit quality of an issue of securities. The credit ratings assigned by the rating agencies are not recommendations to purchase, hold or sell the securities nor do the ratings comment on market price or suitability for a particular investor. A rating may not remain in effect for any given period of time and, at any time, may be revised or withdrawn entirely by a rating agency in the future if, in its judgment, circumstances so warrant.

S&P’s long-term credit ratings are on a rating scale that ranges from AAA to D, which represents the range from highest to lowest quality of such securities rated. A rating of BBB by S&P is within the fourth highest of 10 categories and indicates that the obligation exhibits adequate protection parameters. However, adverse economic conditions or changing circumstances are more likely to lead to a weakened capacity of the obligor to meet its financial commitment on the obligation. The addition of a plus (+) or minus (-) designation after a rating indicates the relative standing within the major rating categories. A S&P rating outlook assesses the potential direction of a long-term credit rating over the intermediate term (typically six months to two years). In determining a rating outlook, consideration is given to any changes in the economic and/or fundamental business conditions. A “Stable” outlook indicates that a rating is not likely to change.

Moody’s long-term credit ratings are on a rating scale that ranges from Aaa to C, which represents the range from highest to lowest quality of such securities rated. A rating of Ba2 by Moody’s is within the fifth highest of nine categories and is assigned

to debt securities which are considered speculative-grade and subject to substantial credit risk. The addition of a 1, 2 or 3 modifier after a rating indicates the relative standing within a particular rating category. The modifier 1 indicates that the issue ranks in the higher end of its generic rating category, the modifier 2 indicates a mid-range ranking and the modifier 3 indicates a ranking in the lower end of that generic rating category. A designation of Stable indicates a low likelihood of a rating change over the medium term.

DBRS’s long-term credit ratings are on a rating scale that ranges from AAA to D, which represents the range from highest to lowest quality of such securities rated. A rating of BBB (high) by DBRS is within the fourth highest of 10 categories and is assigned to debt securities considered to be of adequate credit quality. The capacity for payment of financial obligations is considered acceptable. Entities in the BBB category may be vulnerable to future events. The assignment of a “(high)” or “(low)” modifier within each rating category indicates relative standing within such category. Rating trends provide guidance in respect of DBRS’ opinion regarding the outlook for the rating in question, with rating trends falling into one of three categories - “Positive”, “Stable” or “Negative”. The rating trend indicates the direction in which DBRS considers the rating is headed should present tendencies continue, or in some cases, unless challenges are addressed.

Throughout the last two years, Cenovus has made payments to each of S&P, Moody’s and DBRS related to the rating of the Corporation’s debt. Additionally, Cenovus has purchased products and services from S&P and Moody’s.

 

 

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DIVIDENDS

 

The declaration of dividends is at the sole discretion of Cenovus’s Board and is considered each quarter. Effective the first quarter of 2016, Cenovus reduced the quarterly dividend by 69 percent from $0.16 to $0.05 per Common Share. The Board has approved a first quarter dividend of $0.05 per share payable on March 31, 2017 to holders of Common Shares of record as of March 15, 2017. Readers should also refer to risk factors “Risk Factors – Financial Risks – Ability to Pay Dividends” for additional information.

Cenovus paid the following dividends over the last three years:

 

Dividends Paid                                   
($ per share)    Year      Q4      Q3      Q2      Q1  

   2016

     0.2000         0.0500         0.0500         0.0500         0.0500   

   2015

     0.8524         0.1600         0.1600         0.2662         0.2662   

   2014

     1.0648         0.2662         0.2662         0.2662         0.2662   

 

MARKET FOR SECURITIES

 

All of the outstanding Common Shares are listed and posted for trading on the TSX and the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) under the symbol CVE. The following table outlines the share price trading range and volume of shares traded by month in 2016:

 

      TSX        NYSE
     Share Price Trading Range                  Share Price Trading Range        
     High        Low        Close       

Share  

Volume  

       High        Low         Close     

Share  

Volume  

             ($ per share)        (thousands)            (US$ per share)      (thousands)

   January

     18.15           15.71           17.26           108,176             12.82           10.76           12.29       58,904  

   February

     17.19           12.70           15.48           105,528             12.44           9.10           11.42       66,848  

   March

     18.14           15.39           16.90           93,522             13.97           11.41           13.00       49,865  

   April

     20.11           16.12           19.89           83,386             16.07           12.25           15.84       45,076  

   May

     20.52           18.30           19.77           70,938             15.80           14.11           15.08       43,105  

   June

     21.00           16.92           17.87           88,827             16.56           12.90           13.82       41,919  

   July

     18.93           17.23           18.69           67,412             14.52           13.11           14.30       41,757  

   August

     20.06           17.68           18.95           54,907             15.72           13.47           14.45       31,370  

   September

     19.84           17.15           18.83           76,582             15.35           12.93           14.37       40,938  

   October

     21.39           18.33           19.35           72,319             15.96           13.96           14.44       40,029  

   November

     21.26           17.96           20.77           69,538             15.82           13.36           15.46       33,592  

   December

     22.07           20.18           20.30           70,528             16.82           14.96           15.13       36,665  

RISK FACTORS

 

Cenovus’s operations are exposed to a number of risks, some that impact the oil and gas industry as a whole and others that are unique to the Corporation’s operations. The impact of any risk or a combination of risks may adversely affect, among other things, the Corporation’s business, reputation, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows, which may reduce or restrict Cenovus’s ability to pay a dividend to its shareholders and may materially affect the market price of its securities.

The Corporation’s approach to risk management includes compliance with the Board approved Enterprise Risk Management Policy and the related enterprise risk management framework and program, as well as integration with Cenovus’s Operations Management System. It includes an annual review of Cenovus’s principal and emerging risks, an analysis of the severity and likelihood of each principal risk, consideration of the Corporation’s current mitigation and an evaluation if additional mitigation or treatment of the risk is required. In addition, Cenovus continuously monitors its risk profile as well as industry best practices.

 

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FINANCIAL RISKS

 

Financial risks include, but are not limited to: fluctuations in commodity prices; royalty regimes and tax laws; volatile capital markets; development and operating costs; availability of capital and access to sufficient liquidity; fluctuations in foreign exchange and interest rates; risks related to Cenovus’s hedging activities; and risks related to the Corporation’s ability to pay a dividend to shareholders. Changes in global economic conditions could impact a number of factors including, but not limited to, Cenovus’s cash flows, financial condition, results of operations and growth, the maintenance of Cenovus’s existing operations, financial strength of the Corporation’s counterparties, access to capital and cost of borrowing.

Commodity Prices

The Corporation’s financial performance is significantly dependent on the prevailing prices of crude oil, natural gas and refined products. Crude oil prices are impacted by a number of factors including, but not limited to: the supply of and demand for crude oil; economic conditions; the actions of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (“OPEC”) including, without limitation, compliance or non-compliance with quotas agreed upon by OPEC members and decisions by OPEC not to impose production quotas on its members; government regulation; political stability; market access constraints and transportation interruptions (pipeline, marine or rail); the availability of alternate fuel sources; and weather conditions. Natural gas prices are impacted by a number of factors including, but not limited to: North American supply and demand; developments related to the market for liquefied natural gas; weather conditions; and prices of alternate sources of energy. Refined product prices are impacted by a number of factors including, but not limited to: global supply and demand for refined products; market competitiveness; levels of refined product inventories; refinery availability; planned and unplanned refinery maintenance; and weather. All of these factors are beyond Cenovus’s control and can result in a high degree of price volatility. Fluctuations in currency exchange rates further compound this volatility when the commodity prices, which are generally set in U.S. dollars, are stated in Canadian dollars.

Cenovus’s financial performance is also impacted by discounted or reduced commodity prices for its oil production relative to certain international benchmark prices, due, in part, to constraints on the ability to transport and sell products to international markets and the quality of oil produced. Of particular importance to Cenovus are diluent cost and supply and the price differentials between bitumen and both light to medium crude oil and heavy crude oil. Bitumen is more expensive for refineries to process and therefore trades at a discount to the market price for light and medium crude oil and heavy oil.

The financial performance of Cenovus’s refining operations is impacted by the relationship, or margin, between refined product prices and the prices of refinery feedstock. Margin volatility is impacted by numerous conditions including, but not limited to: fluctuations in the supply and demand for refined products; market competitiveness; crude oil costs; and weather. Refining margins are subject to seasonal factors as production changes to match seasonal demand. Sales volumes, prices, inventory levels and inventory values will fluctuate accordingly. Future refining margins are uncertain and decreases in refining margins may have a negative impact on the Corporation’s business.

Fluctuations in the price of commodities, associated price differentials and refining margins may impact the value of Cenovus’s assets, the Corporation’s ability to maintain its business and to fund growth projects including, but not limited to, the continued development of its oil sands properties. Prolonged periods of commodity price volatility may also negatively impact Cenovus’s ability to meet guidance targets and meet all of its financial obligations as they come due. Any substantial or extended decline in these commodity prices may result in a delay or cancellation of existing or future drilling, development or construction programs, curtailment in production, unutilized long-term transportation commitments and/or low utilization levels at the Corporation’s refineries.

Cenovus conducts an annual assessment of the carrying value of its assets in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards. If crude oil and natural gas prices decline significantly and remain at low levels for an extended period of time, the carrying value of the Corporation’s assets may be subject to impairment and the Corporation’s net earnings could be adversely affected.

Development and Operating Costs

Cenovus’s financial performance is significantly affected by the cost of developing and operating its assets. Development and operating costs are affected by a number of factors including, but not limited to: development, adoption and success of new technologies; inflationary price pressure; scheduling delays; failure to maintain quality construction and manufacturing standards; and supply chain disruptions, including access to skilled labour. Electricity, water, diluent, chemicals, supplies, reclamation, abandonment and labour costs are examples of operating costs that are susceptible to significant fluctuation.

Hedging Activities

Cenovus’s Market Risk Mitigation Policy, which has been approved by the Board, allows Management to use derivative instruments to help mitigate the impact of changes in oil and natural gas prices, diluent or condensate supply prices and refining margins. Cenovus also uses derivative instruments in various operational markets to help optimize its

 

 

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supply cost or sales. The Corporation may also utilize derivative instruments to help mitigate the potential impact of changes in interest rates and foreign exchange rates.

The use of such hedging activities exposes the Corporation to risks which may cause significant loss. These risks include, but are not limited to: changes in the valuation of the hedge instrument being not well correlated to the change in the valuation of the underlying exposures being hedged; deficiency in the Corporation’s systems or controls; human error; and the unenforceability of Cenovus’s contracts.

There is risk that the consequences of hedging to protect against unfavourable market conditions may limit the benefit to Cenovus of commodity price increases or changes in interest rates and foreign exchange rates. The Corporation may also suffer financial loss due to hedging arrangements if it is unable to produce oil, natural gas or refined products to fulfill its delivery obligations related to the underlying physical transaction.

Exposure to Counterparties

In the normal course of business, Cenovus enters into contractual relationships with suppliers, partners and other counterparties in the energy industry and other industries for the provision and sale of goods and services. If such counterparties do not fulfill their contractual obligations, the Corporation may suffer financial losses, may have to delay its development plans or may have to forego other opportunities which may materially impact its financial condition or operational results.

Credit, Liquidity and Availability of Future Financing

The future development of Cenovus’s business may be dependent on its ability to obtain additional capital including, but not limited to, debt and equity financing. Unpredictable financial markets, a sustained downturn in the prices of crude oil, refined products, natural gas, or significant unanticipated expenses related to development and maintenance of Cenovus’s existing properties and facilities, and the associated credit impacts, may impede the Corporation’s ability to secure and maintain cost-effective financing and limit its ability to achieve timely access to capital markets on acceptable terms and conditions. An inability to access capital could affect Cenovus’s ability to make future capital expenditures and to meet all of its financial obligations as they come due. The Corporation’s ability to obtain additional capital is dependent on, among other things, interest in investments in the energy industry in general and interest in its securities in particular.

As at December 31, 2016, Cenovus had US$4.75 billion in debt outstanding with no principal payments due until October 2019 (US$1.3 billion). The Corporation has a $4.0 billion committed credit facility, with a $1.0 billion tranche maturing on April 30, 2019 and a $3.0 billion tranche maturing on November 30, 2019. The entire amount of the committed credit facility was available at

December 31, 2016, to meet operating and capital requirements. Going forward, an inability to access the capital markets, a sustained downturn in the prices of crude oil, refined products, natural gas or significant unanticipated expenses related to development and maintenance of Cenovus’s existing properties and facilities could negatively impact the Corporation’s liquidity, its credit ratings and its ability to access additional sources of capital. Cenovus is required to comply with various financial and operating covenants under its credit facilities and the indentures governing its debt securities. The Corporation routinely reviews the covenants and may make changes to its development plans, dividend policy, or may take alternative actions to ensure compliance. In the event that Cenovus does not comply with such covenants, its access to capital could be restricted or repayment could be accelerated.

Credit Ratings

The credit rating agencies regularly evaluate the Corporation and its long-term and short-term debt, and their ratings are based on the Corporation’s financial strength and a number of factors not entirely within the Corporation’s control, including conditions affecting the oil and gas industry generally, and the state of the economy. There can be no assurance that one or more of the Corporation’s credit ratings will not be downgraded. A reduction in any of the Corporation’s current credit ratings could adversely affect the cost and availability of borrowing, and access to sources of liquidity and capital.

Counterparties and suppliers are often interested in the Corporation’s credit ratings when establishing and maintaining contractual business arrangements. The Corporation may be obligated to post collateral in the form of cash, letters of credit or other financial instruments in order to establish or maintain business arrangements, if one or more of its credit ratings falls below certain ratings floors. Additional collateral may be required due to further downgrades below certain ratings floors. Failure to provide adequate risk assurance to counterparties and suppliers may result in the Corporation foregoing or having contractual business arrangements terminated.

Foreign Exchange Rates

Fluctuations in foreign exchange rates may affect Cenovus’s results as global prices for crude oil, natural gas and refined products are generally set in U.S. dollars, while many of the Corporation’s operating and capital costs are in Canadian dollars. An increase in the value of the Canadian dollar relative to the U.S. dollar will decrease the revenues received from the sale of the Corporation’s oil, natural gas and refined products. Correspondingly, a decrease in the value of the Canadian dollar relative to the U.S. dollar will increase the revenues received from the sale of the Corporation’s oil, natural gas and refined products. In addition, Cenovus has chosen to borrow U.S. dollar long-term debt. A change in the value of the Canadian dollar against the U.S. dollar will result in an increase or decrease

 

 

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in Cenovus’s U.S. dollar denominated debt and related interest expense, as expressed in Canadian dollars. Exchange rate fluctuations could have a material adverse effect on the Corporation’s financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Interest Rates

The Corporation may be exposed to fluctuations in interest rates as a result of the use of floating rate securities or borrowings. An increase in interest rates could increase Cenovus’s net interest expense and affect how certain liabilities are recorded, both of which could negatively impact its financial results. Additionally, the Corporation is exposed to interest rates upon the refinancing of maturing long-term debt and anticipated future financing needs at prevailing interest rates.

Ability to Pay Dividends

The payment of dividends is at the discretion of the Board. All dividends will be reviewed by the Board and may be increased, reduced or suspended from time to time. Cenovus’s ability to pay dividends and

the actual amount of such dividends is dependent upon, among other things, the Corporation’s financial performance, its debt covenants and obligations, its ability to meet its financial obligations as they come due, its working capital requirements, its future tax obligations, its future capital requirements, commodity prices and the risk factors set forth in this AIF.

Disclosure Controls and Procedures and Internal Controls over Financial Reporting

Based on their inherent limitations, disclosure controls and procedures and internal controls over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements, and even those controls determined to be effective can only provide reasonable assurance with respect to financial statement preparation and presentation. Failure to adequately prevent, detect and correct misstatements could have a material adverse effect on the Corporation’s business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

 

 

OPERATIONAL RISKS

 

Operational risks are those risks that affect the Corporation’s ability to continue operations in the ordinary course of business. In general, Cenovus’s operations are subject to general risks affecting the oil and gas industry. The Corporation’s operational risks include, but are not limited to: operational and safety considerations; market access constraints and transportation interruptions (pipeline, marine or rail); phased growth execution; uncertainty of reserves and resources estimates; reservoir performance and technical challenges; partner risks; competition; technology limitations; third party claims; land claims; leadership and talent gaps; and information system failures.

Health and Safety

The operation of Cenovus’s properties is subject to hazards of finding, recovering, transporting and processing hydrocarbons including, but not limited to: blowouts; fires; explosions; railcar incident or derailment; gaseous leaks; migration of harmful substances; oil spills; corrosion; acts of vandalism and terrorism; and other accidents or hazards that may occur at or during transport to or from commercial or industrial sites. Any of these hazards can interrupt operations, impact the Corporation’s reputation, cause loss of life or personal injury, result in loss of or damage to equipment, property, information technology systems, related data and control systems, and cause environmental damage that may include polluting water, land or air.

Market Access Constraints and Transportation Interruptions

Cenovus’s production is transported through various pipelines and its refineries are reliant on various pipelines to receive feedstock. Disruptions in, or restricted availability of, pipeline service and/or

marine or rail transport, could adversely affect the Corporation’s crude oil and natural gas sales, projected production growth, refining operations and its cash flows.

Interruptions or restrictions in the availability of these pipeline systems may limit the ability to deliver production volumes and could adversely impact commodity prices, sales volumes and/or the prices received for Cenovus’s products. These interruptions and restrictions may be caused by the inability of the pipeline to operate, or they may be related to capacity constraints as the supply of feedstock into the system exceeds the infrastructure capacity. There can be no certainty that investments in new pipeline projects, which would result in extra long-term takeaway capacity, will be made by applicable third party pipeline providers or that any applications to expand capacity will receive the required regulatory approval, or that any such approvals will result in the construction of the pipeline project. There is also no certainty that short-term operational constraints on the pipeline system, arising from pipeline interruption and/or increased supply of crude oil, will not occur.

There is no certainty that crude-by-rail, marine transport and other alternative types of transportation for the Corporation’s production will be sufficient to address any gaps caused by operational constraints on the pipeline system. In addition, Cenovus’s crude-by-rail and marine shipments may be impacted by service delays, inclement weather, railcar derailment or other rail or marine transport incidents and could adversely impact its crude oil sales volumes or the price received for its product or impact the Corporation’s reputation or result in legal liability, loss of life or personal injury, loss of equipment or property, or environmental damage. In addition, new

 

 

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regulations, which will be phased in over time until 2025, will require tank cars used to transport crude oil to be replaced with newer, safer tank cars, or to be retrofitted to meet the same standards. The costs of complying with the new standards, or any further revised standards, will likely be passed on to rail shippers and may adversely affect Cenovus’s ability to transport crude-by-rail or the economics associated with rail transportation. Finally, planned or unplanned shutdowns or closures of the Corporation’s refinery customers may limit Cenovus’s ability to deliver product with negative implications on sales and cash from operating activities.

Operational Considerations

The Corporation’s crude oil and natural gas operations are subject to all of the risks normally incidental to: (i) the storing, transporting, processing, refining and marketing of crude oil, natural gas and other related products; (ii) drilling and completion of crude oil and natural gas wells; and (iii) the operation and development of crude oil and natural gas properties including, but not limited to: encountering unexpected formations or pressures; premature declines of reservoir pressure or productivity; fires; explosions; blowouts; power outages; migration of harmful substances into water systems; oil spills; uncontrollable flows of crude oil, natural gas or well fluids; failure to follow operating procedures or operate within established operating parameters; equipment failures and other accidents; adverse weather conditions; pollution; and other environmental risks.

Producing and refining oil requires high levels of investment and involves particular risks and uncertainties. Cenovus’s oil operations are susceptible to loss of production, slowdowns, shutdowns, or restrictions on the Corporation’s ability to produce higher value products due to the interdependence of its component systems. Delineation of the resources, the costs associated with production, including drilling wells for SAGD operations, and the costs associated with refining oil can entail significant capital outlays. The operating costs associated with oil production are largely fixed in the short-term and, as a result, operating costs per unit are largely dependent on levels of production.

Cenovus’s refining and marketing business is subject to all of the risks inherent in the operation of refineries, terminals, pipelines and other transportation and distribution facilities including, but not limited to: loss of product; failure to follow operating procedures or operate within established operating parameters; slowdowns due to equipment failure or transportation disruptions; railcar incidents or derailments; marine transport incidents; weather; fires and/or explosions; unavailability of feedstock; and price and quality of feedstock.

The Corporation does not insure against all potential occurrences and disruptions and it cannot be guaranteed that its insurance will be sufficient to cover any such occurrences or disruptions.

Cenovus’s operations could also be interrupted by natural disasters or other events beyond its control.

Uncertainty of Reserves and Future Net Revenue Estimates

The reserves estimates included in this AIF are estimates only. There are numerous uncertainties inherent in estimating quantities of reserves, including many factors beyond the Corporation’s control. In general, estimates of economically recoverable crude oil and natural gas reserves and the future net cash flows and revenue derived therefrom are based on a number of variable factors and assumptions including, but not limited to: product prices; future operating and capital costs; historical production from the properties and the assumed effects of regulation by governmental agencies, including royalty payments and taxes; initial production rates; production decline rates; and the availability, proximity and capacity of oil and gas gathering systems, pipelines, rail transportation and processing facilities, all of which may vary considerably from actual results.

All such estimates are to some degree uncertain and classifications of reserves are only attempts to define the degree of uncertainty involved. For those reasons, estimates of the economically recoverable crude oil and natural gas reserves attributable to any particular group of properties, classification of such reserves based on risk of recovery and estimates of FNR expected therefrom, prepared by different engineers or by the same engineers at different times, may vary substantially. Cenovus’s actual production, revenues, taxes and development and operating expenditures with respect to its reserves may vary from current estimates and such variances may be material.

Estimates with respect to reserves that may be developed and produced in the future are often based on volumetric calculations and upon analogy to similar types of reserves, rather than upon actual production history. Subsequent evaluation of the same reserves based on production history will result in variations, which may be material, in the estimated reserves.

The production rate of oil and gas properties tends to decline as reserves are depleted while the associated operating costs increase. Maintaining an inventory of developable projects to support future production of crude oil and natural gas depends on, among other things: obtaining and renewing rights to explore, develop and produce oil and natural gas; drilling success; completing long-lead time capital intensive projects on budget and on schedule; and the application of successful exploitation techniques on mature properties. Cenovus’s business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows are highly dependent upon successfully producing current reserves and adding additional reserves.

Project Execution

There are risks associated with the execution and operation of the Corporation’s upstream growth and development projects. These risks include, but are not limited to: Cenovus’s ability to obtain the

 

 

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necessary environmental and regulatory approvals; risks relating to schedule, resources and costs, including the availability and cost of materials, equipment and qualified personnel; the impact of general economic, business and market conditions; the impact of weather conditions; risk related to the accuracy of project cost estimates; ability to finance growth; ability to source or complete strategic transactions; and the effect of changing government regulation and public expectations in relation to the impact of oil sands and conventional development on the environment. The commissioning and integration of new facilities within the Corporation’s existing asset base could cause delays in achieving targets and objectives. Failure to manage these risks could have a material adverse effect on Cenovus’s financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Partner Risks

Some of the Corporation’s assets are not operated by Cenovus or are held in partnership with others. Therefore, the Corporation’s results of operations may be affected by the actions of third party operators or partners.

Interests in certain of the Corporation’s upstream assets are held in a partnership with ConocoPhillips, an unrelated U.S. public company, and are operated by Cenovus. The Corporation’s refining assets are held in a partnership with Phillips 66, an unrelated U.S. public company, and operated by Phillips 66. The success of Cenovus’s refining operations is dependent on the ability of Phillips 66 to successfully operate this business and maintain the refining assets. The Corporation relies on the judgment and operating expertise of Phillips 66 in respect of the operation of such refining assets and Cenovus also relies on Phillips 66 to provide information on the status of such refining assets and related results of operations.

ConocoPhillips or Phillips 66, as unrelated third parties, may have objectives and interests that do not align with or may conflict with the Corporation’s interests. Major capital decisions affecting these upstream and refining assets require agreement between each respective partner, while certain operational decisions may be made by the operator of the applicable assets. While Cenovus and its partners generally seek consensus with respect to major decisions concerning the direction and operation of these upstream and refining assets, no assurance can be provided that the future demands or expectations of either party relating to such assets will be satisfactorily met or met in a timely manner or at all. Unmet demands or expectations by either party or demands and expectations which are not satisfactorily met may affect Cenovus’s participation in the operation of such assets, the Corporation’s ability to obtain or maintain necessary licences or approvals or affect the timing of undertaking various activities.

Competition

The Canadian and international petroleum industry is highly competitive in all aspects, including the exploration for, and the development of, new and

existing sources of supply, the acquisition of crude oil and natural gas interests and the refining, distribution and marketing of petroleum products. Cenovus competes with other producers and refiners, some of which may have lower operating costs or greater resources than the Corporation does. Competing producers may develop and implement recovery techniques and technologies which are superior to those Cenovus employs. The petroleum industry also competes with other industries in supplying energy, fuel and related products to consumers.

Companies may announce plans to enter the oil sands business, to begin production or to expand existing operations. Expansion of existing operations and development of new projects could materially increase the supply of crude oil in the marketplace which may decrease the market price of crude oil, constrain transportation and increase the Corporation’s input costs for and constrain the supply of skilled labour and materials.

Technology

Current SAGD technologies for the recovery of bitumen are energy intensive, requiring significant consumption of natural gas in the production of steam that is used in the recovery process. The amount of steam required in the production process varies and therefore impacts costs. The performance of the reservoir can also affect the timing and levels of production using this technology. A large increase in recovery costs could cause certain projects that rely on SAGD technology to become uneconomical, which could have a negative effect on Cenovus’s business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. There are risks associated with growth and other capital projects that rely largely or partly on new technologies and the incorporation of such technologies into new or existing operations. The success of projects incorporating new technologies cannot be assured.

Litigation

From time to time, the Corporation may be the subject of litigation arising out of its operations. Claims under such litigation may be material or may be indeterminate. Various types of claims may be made including, without limitation, environmental damages, breach of contract, negligence, product liability, antitrust, bribery and other forms of corruption, tax, patent infringement and employment matters. The outcome of such litigation is uncertain and may materially impact Cenovus’s financial condition or results of operations. Moreover, unfavorable outcomes or settlements of litigation could encourage the commencement of additional litigation. Cenovus may also be subject to adverse publicity associated with such matters, regardless of whether Cenovus is ultimately found responsible. The Corporation may be required to incur significant expenses or devote significant resources in defense against any such litigation.

 

 

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Land Claims

In western Canada, Aboriginal groups have historically filed claims in respect of their Aboriginal rights and treaty rights against the governments of Canada and Alberta, and other government bodies, which may affect Cenovus’s business. In particular, Aboriginal groups have claimed Aboriginal title and rights to a substantial portion of western Canada. In 2014, the Supreme Court of Canada granted Aboriginal title over non-treaty lands, representing the first occurrence of such a declaration. There exist outstanding Aboriginal and treaty rights claims, which may include Aboriginal title claims, on lands where Cenovus operates. Such claims have the potential to have an adverse effect on operations in affected areas. No certainty exists that any lands currently unaffected by claims brought by Aboriginal groups will remain unaffected by future claims. Recent outcomes of litigation concerning Aboriginal rights may result in increased claims and litigation activity in the future.

In May 2016, Canada announced its support for the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (“UNDRIP”). The principles and objectives of UNDRIP have also been endorsed by the Government of Alberta. The means of implementation of UNDRIP by government bodies are uncertain and may include an increase in consultation obligations and processes associated with project development, posing risks and creating uncertainty with respect to project regulatory approval timelines and requirements.

Leadership and Talent

Cenovus’s success in executing its business strategy is dependent upon Management’s ability to source, develop and retain the required competencies to support current and future operations. Failure to attract and retain critical talent with the necessary leadership, professional and technical competencies, could have a material adverse effect on Cenovus’s results of operations, pace of growth and financial condition.

Information Systems

Cenovus relies heavily on information technology, such as computer hardware and software systems, in order to properly operate its business. In the event the Corporation is unable to regularly deploy software and hardware, effectively upgrade systems and network infrastructure, and take other steps to maintain or improve the efficiency and efficacy of systems, the operation of such systems could be interrupted or result in the loss, corruption, or release of data. In addition, information systems could be damaged or interrupted by natural disasters, force majeure events, telecommunications failures, power loss, acts of war or terrorism, computer viruses, malicious code, physical or electronic security breaches, intentional or inadvertent user misuse or error, or similar events or disruptions. Any of these or other events could cause interruptions, delays, loss of critical and/or sensitive data or similar effects, which could have a material adverse impact on the protection of intellectual property, and confidential and proprietary information, and on Cenovus’s business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

In the ordinary course of business, Cenovus collects, uses and stores sensitive data, including intellectual property, proprietary business information and personal information of Cenovus’s employees and third parties. Despite Cenovus’s security measures, Cenovus’s information systems, technology and infrastructure may be vulnerable to attacks by hackers and/or cyberterrorists or breaches due to employee error, malfeasance or other disruptions. Any such breach could compromise information used or stored on Cenovus’s systems and/or networks and, as a result, the information could be accessed, publicly disclosed, lost or stolen. Any such access, disclosure or other loss of information could result in legal claims or proceedings, liability under laws that protect the privacy of personal information, regulatory penalties or other negative consequences, including disruption to Cenovus’s operations and damage to Cenovus’s reputation, which could have a material adverse effect on Cenovus’s business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

 

ENVIRONMENTAL & REGULATORY RISKS

 

Cenovus’s industry and its operations are subject to regulation and intervention under federal, provincial, territorial, state and municipal legislation in Canada and the U.S. in matters such as, but not limited to: land tenure; permitting of production projects; royalties; taxes (including income taxes); government fees; production rates; environmental protection controls; protection of certain species or lands; provincial and federal land use designations; the reduction of GHGs and other emissions; the export of crude oil, natural gas and other products; the transportation of crude-by-rail or marine transport; the awarding or acquisition of exploration and production, oil sands or other interests; the imposition of specific drilling obligations; control

over the development, abandonment and reclamation of fields (including restrictions on production); and/or facilities and possibly expropriation or cancellation of contract rights. Changes to government regulation could impact Cenovus’s existing and planned projects or increase capital investment or operating expenses, adversely impacting the Corporation’s financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Regulatory Approvals

Cenovus’s operations require it to obtain approvals from various regulatory authorities and there are no guarantees that it will be able to obtain all necessary licences, permits and other approvals that

 

 

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may be required to carry out certain exploration and development activities on its properties. In addition, obtaining certain approvals from regulatory authorities can involve, among other things, stakeholder and Aboriginal consultation, environmental impact assessments and public hearings. Regulatory approvals obtained may be subject to the satisfaction of certain conditions including, but not limited to: security deposit obligations; ongoing regulatory oversight of projects; mitigating or avoiding project impacts; habitat assessments; and other commitments or obligations. Failure to obtain applicable regulatory approvals or satisfy any of the conditions thereto on a timely basis on satisfactory terms could result in delays, abandonment or restructuring of projects and increased costs.

Abandonment and Reclamation Cost Risk

The current oil and gas asset abandonment, reclamation and remediation (“A&R”) liability regime in Alberta as a general rule limits each party’s liability to its proportionate ownership of an asset. In the case where one joint owner becomes insolvent and is unable to fund the A&R activities, the solvent counterparties can claim the insolvent party’s share of the remediation costs against the Orphan Well Association (the “OWA”). The OWA administers orphaned assets and is funded through a levy imposed on licencees, including Cenovus, based on their proportionate share of deemed A&R liabilities for oil and gas facilities, wells and unreclaimed sites in Alberta. Saskatchewan has a similar regime.

In May 2016, the Alberta Court of Queen’s Bench issued a decision in the case of Redwater Energy Corporation, (Re) (“Redwater”) that trustees and receivers of insolvent parties may disclaim or renounce uneconomic oil and gas assets to the AER before commencing the sales process for the insolvent party’s assets. These wells and facilities then become “orphans” to be remediated by the OWA. Prior to Redwater, the sales process for the insolvent party’s assets would have typically included both the economic and uneconomic assets, and only in instances where the sales process failed to sell all of the assets, would the remaining assets be classified as orphaned assets by the AER and disclaimed to the OWA. Redwater is currently under appeal by the AER and the OWA.

In June 2016, in response to Redwater, the AER released Bulletin 2016-16 which, among other things, implements important changes to the AER’s procedures relating to liability management ratings, licence eligibility and transfers. The governments of British Columbia and Saskatchewan have announced similar policies within those provinces. These changes may impact Cenovus’s ability to transfer its licences, approvals or permits, and may result in increased costs and delays or require changes to or abandonment of projects and transactions.

Because of Redwater and the current economic environment, the number of orphaned wells in Alberta has increased significantly and, accordingly, the aggregate value of the A&R liabilities assumed by the OWA has increased and may continue to increase. The OWA may seek funding for such liabilities from industry participants, including Cenovus through an increase in its annual levy, further changes to regulations or other means. While the impact on Cenovus of any legislative, regulatory or policy decisions as a result of the Redwater decision and its pending appeal cannot be reliably or accurately estimated, any cost recovery or other measures taken by applicable regulatory bodies may impact Cenovus and materially and adversely affect, among other things, Cenovus’s business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Royalty Regimes

The Corporation’s cash flows may be directly affected by changes to royalty regimes. The governments of Alberta and Saskatchewan receive royalties on the production of hydrocarbons from lands in which they respectively own the mineral rights. Government regulation of Crown royalties is subject to change for a number of reasons, including, among other things, political factors. Royalties are typically calculated based on benchmark prices, productivity per well, location, date of discovery, recovery method, well depth and the nature and quality of petroleum product produced. There is also a mineral tax in each province levied on hydrocarbon production from lands in which the Crown does not own the mineral rights. The potential for changes in the royalty and mineral tax regimes applicable in the provinces in which Cenovus operates creates uncertainty relating to the ability to accurately estimate future Crown burdens.

Alberta Royalty Review

On January 1, 2017, the Government of Alberta implemented a modernized royalty framework (the “Modernized Framework”) based on recommendations of the Royalty Review Advisory Panel. The Modernized Framework will apply to all conventional wells spud on or after January 1, 2017. The Modernized Framework does not apply to oil sands production, which has its own separate royalty framework. Wells spud prior to July 13, 2016 will continue to operate under the previous royalty framework (the “Old Framework”). Wells spud between such dates may elect to opt-in to the Modernized Framework if certain criteria are met. After December 31, 2026, all wells will be subject to the Modernized Framework.

Under the Modernized Framework, royalties are determined on a “revenue-minus-costs” basis, with the cost component based on a drilling and completion cost allowance formula for each well, which is dependent on the vertical depth, horizontal length of the well and proppant placed. The formula is based on the industry’s average drilling and

 

 

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completion costs as determined by the Alberta Department of Energy (“ADOE”) on an annual basis. The cost component attempts to incentivize innovation to reduce costs by allowing wells that operate under the average cost to remain at a lower rate of royalty even after recovering actual costs. Producers pay a flat royalty rate of five percent of gross revenue from each well that is subject to the Modernized Framework until the well reaches payout. Payout for a well is the point at which cumulative revenues from the well equals the drilling and completion cost allowance for the well set by the ADOE. After payout, producers pay an increased post-payout royalty on revenues determined by reference to the then current commodity prices of the various hydrocarbons. Similar to the Old Framework, the post-payout royalty rate under the Modernized Framework varies with commodity prices. Once production in a mature well drops below a threshold level where the rate of production is too low to sustain the full royalty burden, its royalty rate will be adjusted downward as the mature well’s production declines, to a minimum of five percent. The drilling and completion cost allowance formula, post-payout royalty rates and production thresholds for mature wells came into effect on January 1, 2017.

As part of the Modernized Framework, the Alberta government announced two new strategic royalty programs to encourage oil and gas producers to boost production and explore resources in new areas: the Enhanced Hydrocarbon Recovery Program and the Emerging Resources Program. These programs will take into account the higher costs associated with development of emerging resources and enhanced recovery methods when calculating royalty rates.

The royalty structure and rates for oil sands production in Alberta remain generally unchanged following the royalty review. The Government of Alberta has indicated that it plans to modernize the process of calculating costs and collecting oil sands royalties, and to improve disclosure of cost, revenue and collection information relating to oil sands projects and royalties.

Further changes to any of the royalty regimes in Alberta, changes to the existing royalty regime in Saskatchewan, changes to how existing royalty regimes are interpreted and applied by the applicable governments, or an increase in disclosure obligations for the Corporation could have a significant impact on the Corporation’s financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. An increase in the royalty rates in either of Alberta or Saskatchewan would reduce the Corporation’s earnings and could make, in the respective province, future capital expenditures or existing operations uneconomic. A material increase in royalties or mineral taxes may reduce the value of the Corporation’s associated assets.

Tax Laws

Income tax laws, other laws or government incentive programs may in the future be changed or interpreted in a manner that adversely affects Cenovus and its shareholders. Tax authorities having jurisdiction over Cenovus may disagree with the manner in which the Corporation calculates its tax liabilities such that its provision for income taxes may not be sufficient, or such authorities could change their administrative practices to Cenovus’s detriment or the detriment of its shareholders. In addition, all of the Corporation’s tax filings are subject to audit by tax authorities who may disagree with such filings in a manner that adversely affects Cenovus and its shareholders.

United States Tax Risk

In November 2016, the U.S. elected a new Republican president. The Republicans control both the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate. The new administration is reported to be considering comprehensive U.S. tax reform that could have a significant impact on Cenovus’s financial condition or results from operations, however any impact is not presently quantifiable.

Environmental Regulations

All phases of crude oil, natural gas and refining operations are subject to environmental regulation pursuant to a variety of Canadian and U.S. federal, provincial, territorial, state and municipal laws and regulations (collectively, environmental regulations). Environmental regulations provide that wells, facility sites, refineries and other properties and practices associated with the Corporation’s operations be constructed, operated, maintained, abandoned, reclaimed and undertaken in accordance with the requirements set out therein. In addition, certain types of operations, including exploration and development projects and changes to certain existing projects, may require the submission and approval of environmental impact assessments or permit applications. Environmental regulations impose, among other things, restrictions, liabilities and obligations in connection with the generation, handling, use, storage, transportation, treatment and disposal of hazardous substances and waste and in connection with spills, releases and emissions of various substances in the environment. They also impose restrictions, liabilities and obligations in connection with the management of water sources that are being used, or whose use is contemplated, in connection with oil and gas operations. The complexities of changes in environmental regulations make it difficult to predict the potential future impact to Cenovus.

Compliance with environmental regulations can require significant expenditures, including costs and damages arising from releases or contaminated properties or spills, or from new compliance obligations. We anticipate that future capital expenditures and operating expenses could continue to increase as a result of the implementation of new environmental regulations. Failure to comply with environmental regulations may result in the

 

 

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imposition of fines, penalties and environmental protection orders. The costs of complying with environmental regulation may have a material adverse effect on Cenovus’s financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. The implementation of new environmental regulations or the modification of existing environmental regulations affecting the crude oil and natural gas industry generally could reduce demand for crude oil and natural gas and increase compliance costs, and have an adverse impact on the Corporation’s operations.

Failure to comply with environmental regulations could have an adverse impact on Cenovus’s reputation. There is also risk that Cenovus could face litigation initiated by third parties relating to climate change or other environmental regulations.

Climate Change Regulation

Various federal, provincial and state governments have announced intentions to regulate GHG emissions and other air pollutants. Some of these regulations are in effect while others remain in various phases of review, discussion or implementation in the U.S. and Canada. Uncertainties exist relating to the timing and effects of these regulations. Additionally, lack of certainty regarding how any future federal legislation will harmonize with provincial or state regulations makes it difficult to accurately determine the cost estimate of climate change legislation compliance with certainty, including the effects of compliance with such initiatives on the Corporation’s suppliers and service providers.

Alberta Climate Leadership Plan

The Alberta Climate Leadership Plan introduced a new GHG emissions pricing regime. The Climate Leadership Act (the “CLA”) received royal assent on June 13, 2016 and came into force on January 1, 2017. The Climate Leadership Regulation (“CL Regulation”), which provides further detail in respect of the carbon levy regime set out in the CLA, was released on November 3, 2016, and also came into force on January 1, 2017. The CLA establishes an Alberta carbon pricing regime in the form of a carbon levy on various types of fuel, based on rates of $20 per tonne of GHG emissions as of January 1, 2017 and $30 per tonne for 2018. The carbon levy revenue will be used to fund initiatives to reduce GHG emissions, to support Alberta’s ability to adapt to climate change and for rebates or adjustments related to the carbon levy to consumers, businesses, and communities in addition to a household rebate program.

The CLA and the CL Regulation impose registration, payment, remittance, reporting and administrative obligations on applicable persons throughout the fuel supply chain. The application of the carbon levy depends on the type and quantity of fuel purchased or produced and how such fuel is used by the purchaser. Under the CLA and CL Regulations, facilities subject to the Specified Gas Emitters Regulation (Alberta) (the “SGER”) (which includes Cenovus’s operating oil sands assets) are exempt

from the carbon levy. Activities integral to oil and gas production processes are exempt until 2023. At this time, the determination of what constitutes an activity that is “integral” to conventional oil and gas production is still being clarified with the Alberta government. We expect the Corporation’s operations to have minimal direct carbon levy exposure until 2023. It is not known what will occur in 2023 when the current exemptions are expected to end.

The Corporation is subject to the SGER, which requires owners of facilities that emit 100,000 tonnes per year or more of GHG to reduce the facility’s emissions intensity by 20 percent below an average baseline of the facility’s historic emissions performance. Owners may meet the reduction requirements in one of four ways: (1) physically abating emissions intensity at their facilities; (2) purchasing or using Alberta-based emission offset credits; (3) purchasing or using emission performance credits, which are credits generated by facilities that have emissions below the SGER requirements; or (4) purchasing technology offset credits by contributing to Emissions Reduction Alberta at a price of $30 per tonne. Facility owners must submit SGER compliance reports to Alberta Environment and Parks on March 31 of each year. Beginning in 2018, facilities subject to the SGER will transition from a historic emissions performance baseline to an output-based allocation approach.

In addition to GHG emissions pricing, the Climate Leadership Plan sets forth two additional components relevant to the oil and gas sector: (1) limiting oil sands emissions to a province-wide total of 100 megatonnes per year (compared to current industry emissions levels of approximately 70 megatonnes per year), with certain exceptions for cogeneration power sources and new upgrading capacity; and (2) reducing methane emissions from oil and gas activities by 45 percent by 2025.

Additional changes to provincial climate change legislation may adversely affect for the Corporation’s business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows which cannot be reliably or accurately estimated at this time.

Federal Carbon Strategy

In October 2016, Canada ratified the Paris Agreement on climate change that was signed by Canada and over 160 other nations at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in December of 2015. Though the specific details of how Canada will accomplish the goals set out in the Paris Agreement have not yet been announced, in October 2016 the federal government announced a new national carbon pricing regime (the “Carbon Strategy”) that will support the objectives of the Paris Agreement. Under the Carbon Strategy, all provinces will be required to adopt a carbon pricing scheme that includes, at a minimum, a price on carbon emissions of $10 per tonne in 2018, rising by $10 per tonne each year to $50 per tonne in 2022. If the provinces do not adopt such a scheme, a federal regime will be imposed upon them and the funds will be transferred back to the provincial

 

 

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government of the jurisdiction from where they were collected. Alternatively, provinces will be given the opportunity to implement a cap-and-trade system, but will need to demonstrate that the province’s emissions are consistent with both Canada’s national target and the results of the provinces who have implemented the carbon pricing scheme.

On December 9, 2016, all of the provinces and territories except for Saskatchewan and Manitoba signed the pan-Canadian framework to implement the Carbon Strategy. Further legislation and regulation is expected from the provinces in order to comply with the Carbon Strategy’s requirements. For those provinces, including Alberta, which have already established a carbon tax or a cap and trade regime, or both, the national price on carbon will likely have little additional impact in the short term. None of the provinces have yet announced how they intend to comply with the long-term carbon pricing requirements. It is unclear how the Carbon Strategy will be implemented in Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

Adverse impacts to Cenovus’s business as a result of comprehensive GHG legislation or regulation, including the CLA and the Carbon Strategy applied to the Corporation’s business in Alberta or any jurisdiction in which the Corporation operates, may include, but are not limited to: increased compliance costs; permitting delays; substantial costs to generate or purchase emission credits or allowances adding costs to the products Cenovus produces; and reduced demand for crude oil and certain refined products. Emission allowances or offset credits may not be available for acquisition or may not be available on an economic basis. Required emission reductions may not be technically or economically feasible to implement, in whole or in part, and failure to meet such emission reduction requirements or other compliance mechanisms may have a material adverse effect on the Corporation’s business resulting in, among other things, fines, permitting delays, penalties and the suspension of operations. Consequently, no assurances can be given that the effect of future climate change regulations will not be significant to Cenovus.

Beyond existing legal requirements, the extent and magnitude of any adverse impacts of any additional programs or additional regulations cannot be reliably or accurately estimated at this time because specific legislative and regulatory requirements have not been finalized and uncertainty exists with respect to the additional measures being considered and the time frames for compliance.

Low Carbon Fuel Standards

Existing and proposed environmental legislation developed by certain U.S. states, Canadian provinces, the Canadian federal government and members of the European Union, regulating carbon fuel standards could result in increased costs and reduced revenue. The potential regulation may negatively affect the marketing of Cenovus’s bitumen, crude oil or refined products, and may require the Corporation to purchase emissions credits in order to affect sales in such jurisdictions.

 

The state of California has implemented climate change regulation in the form of a Low Carbon Fuel Standard that requires the reduction of life cycle carbon emissions from transportation fuels. As an oil sands producer, Cenovus is not directly regulated and is not expected to have a compliance obligation. Refiners in California are required to comply with the legislation.

Renewable Fuel Standards

Cenovus’s U.S. refining operations are subject to various laws and regulations that impose stringent and costly requirements. Of specific note is the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (“EISA 2007”) that established energy management goals and requirements. Pursuant to EISA 2007, among other things, the Environmental Protection Agency issued the Renewable Fuel Standard program that mandates the total volume of renewable transportation fuel sold or introduced in the U.S. and requires renewable fuels such as ethanol and advanced biofuels to be blended with gasoline by the obligated party. The mandate requires the volume of renewable fuels blended into finished petroleum products to increase over time until 2022. To the extent refineries do not blend renewable fuels into their finished products, they must purchase credits, referred to as Renewable Identification Numbers (“RINs”), in the open market. A RIN is a number assigned to each gallon of renewable fuel produced or imported into the U.S. RIN numbers were implemented to provide refiners with flexibility in complying with the renewable fuel standards.

The Corporation’s refineries do not blend renewable fuels into the motor fuel products they produce and, consequently, Cenovus through WRB is obligated to purchase RINs in the open market, where prices fluctuate. In the future, the regulations could change the volume of renewable fuels required to be blended with refined products, creating volatility in the price for RINs or an insufficient number of RINs being available in order to meet the requirements. The Corporation’s financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows may be materially adversely impacted as a result.

Alberta’s Land-Use Framework

Alberta’s Land-Use Framework has been implemented under the Alberta Land Stewardship Act (“ALSA”) which sets out the Government of Alberta’s approach to managing Alberta’s land and natural resources to achieve long-term economic, environmental and social goals. In some cases, ALSA amends or extinguishes previously issued consents such as regulatory permits, licences, approvals and authorizations in order to achieve or maintain an objective or policy resulting from the implementation of a regional plan.

The Government of Alberta implemented the Lower Athabasca Regional Plan (“LARP”) on September 1, 2012, which was issued under the ALSA. The LARP identifies legally-binding management frameworks, including for air, land and water, that will incorporate cumulative limits and triggers as well as

 

 

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identifying areas related to conservation, tourism and recreation. Cenovus received financial compensation from the Government of Alberta related to some of its non-core oil sands mineral rights that were cancelled. The cancelled mineral rights had no direct impact on the Corporation’s business plan, its current operations at Foster Creek and Christina Lake, or on any of its filed applications. Uncertainty exists with respect to the impact to future development applications in the areas covered by the LARP, including the potential for development restrictions and mineral rights cancellation.

The Government of Alberta has also implemented the South Saskatchewan Regional Plan (“SSRP”), the second and similar regional plan to be developed under the ALSA. This plan applies to Cenovus’s conventional oil and gas operations in southern Alberta. To date, the SSRP is not expected to materially impact Cenovus’s existing conventional oil and gas operations, but no assurance can be given that future expansion of these operations will not be affected.

The Government of Alberta has completed the Phase I consultation on the North Saskatchewan Regional Plan (“NSRP”), and the regional planning process has commenced. This plan will apply to Cenovus’s operations in central Alberta. No assurance can be given that the NSRP, or any future regional plans developed and implemented by the Government of Alberta, will not materially impact operations or future operations in this region.

The Government of Alberta has also announced four additional regional plans under ALSA which may apply to Cenovus’s landholdings and operations in other areas of Alberta, but development of these plans has not yet begun.

Species at Risk Act

The Canadian federal legislation, Species at Risk Act, and provincial counterparts regarding threatened or endangered species may limit the pace and the amount of development in areas identified as critical habitat for species of concern (e.g. woodland caribou). Recent litigation against the federal government in relation to the Species at Risk Act has raised issues associated with the protection of species at risk and their critical habitat both federally and on a provincial level. In Alberta, the Alberta Caribou Action and Range Planning Project has been established to develop range plans and action plans with a view to achieving the maintenance and recovery of Alberta’s 15 caribou populations. The federal and/or provincial implementation of measures to protect species at risk such as woodland caribou and their critical habitat in areas of Cenovus’s current or future operations may modify the Corporation’s pace and amount of development. If action and range plans developed by the Province are deemed not to provide sufficient likelihood of caribou recovery, the federal legislation includes the ability to implement measures that would preclude further development or modify existing operations.

Federal Air Quality Management System

The Multi-sector Air Pollutants Regulations (“MAPR”), issued under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, seek to protect the environment and health of Canadians by setting mandatory, nationally-consistent air pollutant emission standards. The MAPR are aimed at equipment-specific Base-Level Industrial Emissions Requirements (“BLIERs”). Nitrogen oxide BLIERs from the Corporation’s non-utility boilers, heaters and reciprocating engines are regulated in accordance with specified performance standards. Cenovus does not anticipate a material impact to existing or future operations as a result of the MAPR.

Federal Review of Environmental and Regulatory Processes

In 2016, the Government of Canada commenced a review of environmental and regulatory processes under various acts and is scheduled to release various reports in 2017 for public comment. Legislative, regulatory or policy changes may follow the public comment period.

The extent and magnitude of any adverse impacts of changes to the legislation or programs on project development and operations cannot be reliably or accurately estimated at this time as uncertainty exists with respect to recommendations being considered. Increased environmental assessment obligations may create risk of increased costs and project development delays.

Water Licences

Cenovus currently utilizes fresh water in certain operations, which is obtained under licences issued pursuant to the Water Act (Alberta) to provide, for example, domestic and utility water at the Corporation’s SAGD facilities and for its bitumen delineation programs. Currently, the Corporation is not required to pay for the water it uses under these licences. If a change under these licences reduces the amount of water available for the Corporation’s use, its production could decline or operating expenses could increase, both of which may have a material adverse effect on the Corporation’s business and financial performance. There can be no assurance that the licences to withdraw water will not be rescinded or that additional conditions will not be added to these licences. There can be no assurance that Cenovus will not have to pay a fee for the use of water in the future or that any such fees will be reasonable. In addition, the expansion of the Corporation’s projects rely on securing licences for additional water withdrawal, and there can be no assurance that these licences will be granted on terms favourable to Cenovus, or at all, or that such additional water will in fact be available to divert under such licences.

Alberta Wetland Policy

Wetland management within Alberta is regulated by section 36 of the Water Act, together with the Alberta Wetland Policy and the Provincial Wetland Restoration and Compensation Guide. Before

 

 

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undertaking an activity within a wetland, approval must be obtained in accordance with the Water Act and the Water Ministerial Regulation.

Pursuant to the Alberta Wetland Policy, developers of oil and gas assets in wetlands areas may be required to avoid the wetlands or mitigate the development’s effects on wetlands. The Alberta Wetland Policy categorizes wetlands based on environmental value, and wetlands with the highest environmental value require the greatest efforts on behalf of proponents to avoid developmental impacts. Proponents must complete a wetland assessment and impact report and utilize the Alberta Wetland Mitigation Directive to mitigate impacts to wetlands from any activities they are proposing.

The Alberta Wetland Policy is not expected to affect Cenovus’s existing operations in Foster Creek, Christina Lake and Narrows Lake, where the Corporation’s 10 year wetlands mitigation and monitoring plans were approved under the previous wetland policy.

New project developments and future phase expansions will likely be affected by aspects of this

policy. Cenovus’s oil sands leases are in areas where wetlands cover over 50 percent of the landscape. ‘Avoidance’ may not be an option for new projects, developments and phase expansions. Cenovus expects to be required to comply with requirements for wetland reclamation or, where permanent wetland loss will occur, wetland replacement. In accordance with the Alberta Wetland Restoration Directive, 2016, mechanisms for restorative replacement include purchase of credits (under development), payment to an in-lieu fee program, or permittee-responsible replacement action.

Based on written statements in the Alberta Wetland Mitigation Directive, 2016 and consultation with Alberta Environment and Parks (AEP) as well as the AER, Cenovus does not anticipate a material impact; however, with the change in the provincial government and the involvement of multiple agencies it is unclear how this policy will be implemented. At this time, no assurance can be given that the policy will not have an impact on future development plans.

 

 

REPUTATION RISKS

 

Cenovus relies on its reputation to build and maintain positive relationships with its stakeholders, to recruit and retain staff, and to be a credible, trusted company. Any actions the Corporation takes that cause negative public opinion have the potential to negatively impact Cenovus’s reputation which may adversely affect its share price, its development plans and its ability to continue operations.

Public Perception of Alberta Oil Sands

Development of the Alberta oil sands has received considerable attention in recent public commentary on the subjects of environmental impact, climate change and GHG emissions. Despite that much of the focus is on bitumen mining operations and not in-situ production, public concerns about oil sands generally and GHG emissions and water and land use practices in oil sands developments specifically may, directly or indirectly, impair the profitability of the Corporation’s current oil sands projects, and the

viability of future oil sands projects, by creating significant regulatory uncertainty leading to uncertain economic modeling of current and future projects and delays relating to the sanctioning of future projects.

Negative consequences which could arise as a result of changes to the current regulatory environment include, but are not limited to, extraordinary environmental and emissions regulation of current and future projects by governmental authorities, which could result in changes to facility design and operating requirements, thereby potentially increasing the cost of construction, operation and abandonment. In addition, legislation or policies that limit the purchase of crude oil or bitumen produced from the oil sands may be adopted in domestic and/or foreign jurisdictions, which, in turn, may limit the world market for this crude oil, reduce its price and may result in stranded assets or an inability to further develop oil resources.

 

 

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OTHER RISK FACTORS

Arrangement Related Risk

Cenovus has certain post-Arrangement indemnification and other obligations under each of the arrangement agreement (the “Arrangement Agreement”) and the separation and transition agreement (the “Separation Agreement”), both of which are among Encana, 7050372 and Subco, dated October 20, 2009 and November 30, 2009 respectively, entered in connection with the Arrangement. Encana and Cenovus have agreed to indemnify each other for certain liabilities and obligations associated with, among other things, in the case of Encana’s indemnity, the business and assets retained by Encana, and in the case of Cenovus’s indemnity, the Cenovus business and

assets. At the present time, the Corporation cannot determine whether it will have to indemnify Encana for any substantial obligations under the terms of the Arrangement. Cenovus also cannot assure that if Encana has to indemnify Cenovus and its affiliates for any substantial obligations, Encana will be able to satisfy such obligations.

A discussion of additional risks, should they arise after the date of this AIF, which may impact Cenovus’s business, prospects, financial condition, results of operation and cash flows, and in some cases its reputation, can be found in the Corporation’s most recent MD&A, available at sedar.com, sec.gov and cenovus.com.

 

 

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS AND REGULATORY ACTIONS

 

During the year ended December 31, 2016, there were no legal proceedings to which Cenovus is or was a party, or that any of its property is or was the subject of, which involves a claim for damages in an amount, exclusive of interest and costs, that exceeds 10 percent of Cenovus’s current assets and it is not aware of any such legal proceedings that are contemplated.

During the year ended December 31, 2016, there were no penalties or sanctions imposed against Cenovus by a court relating to securities legislation or by a securities regulatory authority, nor have there been any other penalties or sanctions imposed by a court or regulatory body against the Corporation that would likely be considered important to a reasonable investor in making an investment decision, and it has not entered into any settlement agreements before a court relating to securities legislation or with a securities regulatory authority.

INTEREST OF MANAGEMENT AND OTHERS IN MATERIAL TRANSACTIONS

 

None of the Corporation’s directors or executive officers or any person or company that beneficially owns, or controls or directs, directly or indirectly, more than ten percent of any class or series of Cenovus’s outstanding voting securities, of which there are none that the Corporation is aware, or any associate or affiliate of any of the foregoing persons or companies, in each case, as at the date of this AIF, has or has had any material interest, direct or indirect, in any past transaction within the three most recently completed financial years or any proposed transaction that has materially affected or is reasonably expected to materially affect Cenovus.

MATERIAL CONTRACTS

 

During the year ended December 31, 2016, Cenovus has not entered into any contracts, nor are there any contracts still in effect, that are material to the business, other than contracts entered into in the ordinary course of business and each of the Arrangement Agreement and the Separation Agreement, as described under “Risk Factors – Other Risk Factors – Arrangement Related Risk”.

INTERESTS OF EXPERTS

 

The Corporation’s independent auditors are PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, Chartered Professional Accountants, who have issued an independent auditor’s report dated February 15, 2017 in respect of Cenovus’s Consolidated Financial Statements which comprise the Consolidated Balance Sheets as at December 31, 2016 and December 31, 2015 and the Consolidated Statements of Earnings, Comprehensive Income, Shareholders’ Equity and Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015, and 2014 and Cenovus’s internal control over financial reporting as at December 31, 2016. PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP has advised that they are independent with respect to Cenovus within the meaning of the Code of Professional Conduct of the Chartered Professional Accountants of Alberta and the rules of the SEC.

Information relating to reserves in this AIF has been calculated by GLJ and McDaniel as independent qualified reserves evaluators. The principals of each of GLJ and McDaniel, in each case, as a group own beneficially, directly or indirectly, less than one percent of any class of the Corporation’s securities.

 

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TRANSFER AGENTS AND REGISTRARS

 

 

In Canada:

  

In the United States:

Computershare Investor Services Inc.

8th Floor, 100 University Avenue

Toronto, ON M5J 2Y1

Canada

  

Computershare Trust Company NA

250 Royall St.

Canton, MA 02021

U.S.

 

Tel: 1-866-332-8898          Website: www.investorcentre.com/cenovus

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

 

 

Additional information relating to Cenovus is available on SEDAR at sedar.com and EDGAR at sec.gov. Additional financial information is contained in the Corporation’s audited Consolidated Financial Statements and MD&A for the year ended December 31, 2016. Additional information, including directors’ and officers’ remuneration and indebtedness, principal holders of Cenovus’s securities, securities authorized for issuance under its equity-based compensation plans and its statement of corporate governance practices, is included in the Corporation’s management information circular for its most recent annual meeting of shareholders.

Additional financial information, including disclosure regarding the contribution of each reportable segment to revenues and earnings can be found in Cenovus’s audited Consolidated Financial Statements and MD&A for the year ended December 31, 2016, which disclosure is incorporated by reference into this AIF.

As a Canadian corporation listed on the NYSE, Cenovus is not required to comply with most of the NYSE’s corporate governance standards, and instead may comply with Canadian corporate governance

practices. However, the Corporation is required to disclose the significant differences between its corporate governance practices and the requirements applicable to U.S. domestic companies listed on the NYSE. Except as summarized on Cenovus’s website at cenovus.com, it is in compliance with the NYSE corporate governance standards in all significant respects.

ACCOUNTING MATTERS

Unless otherwise specified, all dollar amounts are expressed in Canadian dollars. All references to “dollars”, “C$” or to “$” are to Canadian dollars and all references to “US$” are to U.S. dollars. The information contained in this AIF is dated as at December 31, 2016 unless otherwise indicated. Numbers presented are rounded to the nearest whole number and tables may not add due to rounding.

Unless otherwise indicated, all financial information included in this AIF has been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards, which are also generally accepted accounting principles for publicly accountable enterprises in Canada.

 

 

ABBREVIATIONS AND CONVERSIONS

 

 

Oil and Natural Gas Liquids

 

Natural Gas

bbl

 

barrel

 

Bcf

 

billion cubic feet

bbls/d

 

barrels per day

 

Mcf

 

thousand cubic feet

Mbbls/d

 

thousand barrels per day

 

MMcf

 

million cubic feet

MMbbls

 

million barrels

 

MMcf/d

 

million cubic feet per day

NGLs

 

natural gas liquids

 

MMBtu

 

million British thermal units

BOE

 

barrel of oil equivalent

 

CBM

 

Coal Bed Methane

BOE/d

 

barrels of oil equivalent per day

   

WTI

 

West Texas Intermediate

   

In this AIF, certain natural gas volumes have been converted to BOE on the basis of six Mcf to one bbl. BOE may be misleading, particularly if used in isolation. A conversion ratio of six Mcf to one bbl is based on an energy equivalency conversion method primarily applicable at the burner tip and does not represent value equivalency at the wellhead.

TM denotes a trademark of Cenovus Energy Inc.

 

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APPENDIX A

 

REPORT ON RESERVES DATA BY INDEPENDENT QUALIFIED RESERVES EVALUATORS

To the Board of Directors of Cenovus Energy Inc. (the “Corporation”):

 

1.

We have evaluated the Corporation’s reserves data as at December 31, 2016. The reserves data are estimates of proved reserves and probable reserves and related future net revenue as at December 31, 2016, estimated using forecast prices and costs.

 

2.

The reserves data are the responsibility of the Corporation’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the reserves data based on our evaluation.

 

3.

We carried out our evaluation in accordance with standards set out in the Canadian Oil and Gas Evaluation Handbook as amended from time to time (the “COGE Handbook”) maintained by the Society of Petroleum Evaluation Engineers (Calgary Chapter).

 

4.

Those standards require that we plan and perform an evaluation to obtain reasonable assurance as to whether the reserves data are free of material misstatement. An evaluation also includes assessing whether the reserves data are in accordance with principles and definitions presented in the COGE Handbook.

 

5.

The following table shows the net present value of future net revenue (before deduction of income taxes) attributed to proved plus probable reserves, estimated using forecast prices and costs and calculated using a discount rate of 10 percent, included in the reserves data of the Corporation evaluated for the year ended December 31, 2016, and identifies the respective portions thereof that we have evaluated and reported on to the Corporation’s Board of Directors:

 

   

Independent Qualified

Reserves Evaluator

   Effective Date of
Evaluation Report
   Location of
Reserves
  

Evaluated Net Present  
Value of Future Net  
Revenue  

(before income taxes,  
10% discount rate)  

$ millions  

 

 

 

McDaniel & Associates

Consultants Ltd.

   December 31, 2016    Canada    $23,995
 

GLJ Petroleum

Consultants Ltd.

   December 31, 2016    Canada    $1,262
          
          

 

           $25,257
          

 

 

6.

In our opinion, the reserves data respectively evaluated by us have, in all material respects, been determined and are in accordance with the COGE Handbook, consistently applied.

 

7.

We have no responsibility to update our reports referred to in paragraph five for events and circumstances occurring after their respective effective dates.

 

8.

Because the reserves data are based on judgments regarding future events, actual results will vary and the variations may be material.

Executed as to our report referred to above:

 

/s/ P.A. Welch    /s/ Keith M. Braaten
P.A. Welch, P. Eng    Keith M. Braaten, P. Eng

McDaniel & Associates Consultants Ltd.

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

   GLJ Petroleum Consultants Ltd.
Calgary, Alberta, Canada

February 14, 2017

 

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APPENDIX B

 

REPORT OF MANAGEMENT AND DIRECTORS

ON RESERVES DATA AND OTHER INFORMATION

Management of Cenovus Energy Inc. (the “Corporation”) are responsible for the preparation and disclosure of information with respect to the Corporation’s oil and gas activities in accordance with securities regulatory requirements. This information includes reserves data.

Independent qualified reserves evaluators have evaluated the Corporation’s reserves data. A report of the independent qualified reserves evaluators will be filed with securities regulatory authorities concurrently with this report.

The Reserves Committee of the Board of Directors of the Corporation has:

 

  (a)

reviewed the Corporation’s procedures for providing information to the independent qualified reserves evaluators;

 

  (b)

met with the independent qualified reserves evaluators to determine whether any restrictions affected the ability of the independent qualified reserves evaluators to report without reservation;

 

  (c)

reviewed the reserves data with management and the independent qualified reserves evaluators; and

 

  (d)

reviewed the Corporation’s procedures for assembling and reporting other information associated with oil and gas activities and has reviewed that information with management.

The Board of Directors, on the recommendation of the Reserves Committee, has approved:

 

  (a)

the content and filing with securities regulatory authorities of the reserves data and other oil and gas information;

 

  (b)

the filing of the report of the independent qualified reserves evaluators on the reserves data; and

 

  (c)

the content and filing of this report.

Because the reserves data are based on judgments regarding future events, actual results will vary and the variations may be material.

 

/s/ Brian C. Ferguson    /s/ Ivor M. Ruste
Brian C. Ferguson    Ivor M. Ruste
President & Chief Executive Officer   

Executive Vice-President &

Chief Financial Officer

/s/ Michael A. Grandin    /s/ Wayne G. Thomson
Michael A. Grandin    Wayne G. Thomson
Director and Chair of the Board    Director and Chair of the Reserves Committee

February 15, 2017

 

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APPENDIX C

 

AUDIT COMMITTEE MANDATE

The Audit Committee (the “Committee”) is a committee of the Board of Directors (the “Board”) of Cenovus Energy Inc. (“Cenovus” or the “Corporation”) appointed to assist the Board in fulfilling its oversight responsibilities.

The Committee’s primary duties and responsibilities are to:

 

   

Oversee and monitor the effectiveness and integrity of the Corporation’s accounting and financial reporting processes, financial statements and system of internal controls regarding accounting and financial reporting compliance.

 

   

Oversee audits of the Corporation’s financial statements.

 

   

Review and evaluate the Corporation’s risk management framework and related processes including the supporting guidelines and practice documents.

 

   

Review and approve management’s identification of principal financial risks and monitor the process to manage such risks.

 

   

Oversee and monitor the Corporation’s compliance with legal and regulatory requirements.

 

   

Oversee and monitor the qualifications, independence and performance of the Corporation’s external auditors and internal auditing group.

 

   

Provide an avenue of communication among the external auditors, management, the internal auditing group, and the Board.

 

   

Report to the Board regularly.

The Committee has the authority to conduct any review or investigation appropriate to fulfilling its responsibilities. The Committee shall have unrestricted access to personnel and information, and any resources necessary to carry out its responsibility. In this regard, the Committee may direct internal audit personnel to particular areas of examination.

CONSTITUTION, COMPOSITION AND DEFINITIONS

 

1. Reporting

The Committee shall report to the Board.

 

2. Composition

The Committee shall consist of not less than three and not more than eight directors as determined by the Board, all of whom shall qualify as independent directors pursuant to National Instrument 52-110 Audit Committees (as implemented by the Canadian Securities Administrators (“CSA”) and as amended from time to time) (“NI 52-110”).

All members of the Committee shall be financially literate, as defined in NI 52-110, and at least one member shall have accounting or related financial managerial expertise. In particular, at least one member shall have, through (i) education and experience as a principal financial officer, principal accounting officer, controller, public accountant or auditor or experience in one or more positions that involve the performance of similar functions; (ii) experience actively supervising a principal financial officer, principal accounting officer, controller, public accountant, auditor or person performing similar functions; (iii) experience overseeing or assessing the performance of companies or public accountants with respect to the preparation, auditing or evaluation of financial statements; or (iv) other relevant experience:

 

   

An understanding of accounting principles and financial statements;

 

   

The ability to assess the general application of such principles in connection with the accounting for estimates, accruals and reserves;

 

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Experience preparing, auditing, analyzing or evaluating financial statements that present a breadth and level of complexity of accounting issues that are generally comparable to the breadth and complexity of issues that can reasonably be expected to be raised by the Corporation’s financial statements, or experience actively supervising one or more persons engaged in such activities;

 

   

An understanding of internal controls and procedures for financial reporting; and

 

   

An understanding of audit committee functions.

Committee members may not, other than in their respective capacities as members of the Committee, the Board or any other committee of the Board, accept directly or indirectly any consulting, advisory or other compensatory fee from the Corporation or any subsidiary of the Corporation, or be an “affiliated person” (as such term is defined in the United States Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), and the rules, if any, adopted by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) thereunder) of the Corporation or any subsidiary of the Corporation. For greater certainty, directors’ fees and fixed amounts of compensation under a retirement plan (including deferred compensation) for prior service with the Corporation that are not contingent on continued service should be the only compensation an Audit Committee member receives from the Corporation.

At least one member shall have experience in the oil and gas industry.

Committee members shall not simultaneously serve on the audit committees of more than two other public companies, unless the Board first determines that such simultaneous service will not impair the ability of the relevant members to effectively serve on the Committee, and required public disclosure is made.

The non-executive Board Chair shall be a non-voting member of the Committee. See “Quorum” for further details.

 

3. Appointment of Committee Members

Committee members shall be appointed by the Board, effective after the election of directors at the annual meeting of shareholders, provided that any member may be removed or replaced at any time by the Board and shall, in any event, cease to be a member of the Committee upon ceasing to be a member of the Board.

 

4. Vacancies

Where a vacancy occurs at any time in the membership of the Committee, it may be filled by the Board.

 

5. Chair

The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee will recommend for approval to the Board an unrelated Director to act as Chair of the Committee. The Board shall appoint the Chair of the Committee.

If unavailable or unable to attend a meeting of the Committee, the Chair shall ask another member to chair the meeting, failing which a member of the Committee present at the meeting shall be chosen to preside over the meeting by a majority of the members of the Committee present at such meeting.

The Chair presiding at any meeting of the Committee shall not have a casting vote.

The items pertaining to the Chair in this section should be read in conjunction with the Committee Chair section of the Chair of the Board of Directors and Committee Chair General Guidelines.

 

6. Secretary

The Committee shall appoint a Secretary who need not be a member of the Committee. The Secretary shall keep minutes of the meetings of the Committee.

 

7. Meetings

The Committee shall meet at least quarterly. The Chair of the Committee may call additional meetings as required. In addition, a meeting may be called by the non-executive Board Chair, the Chief Executive Officer, or any member of the Committee or by the external auditors.

 

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Committee meetings may, by agreement of the Chair of the Committee, be held in person, by video conference, by means of telephone or by a combination of any of the foregoing.

 

8. Notice of Meeting

Notice of the time and place of each Committee meeting may be given orally, or in writing, or by facsimile, or by electronic means to each member of the Committee at least 24 hours prior to the time fixed for such meeting. Notice of each meeting shall also be given to the external auditors of the Corporation.

A member and the external auditors may, in any manner, waive notice of the Committee meeting. Attendance of a member at a meeting shall constitute waiver of notice of the meeting except where a member attends a meeting for the express purpose of objecting to the transaction of any business on the grounds that the meeting was not lawfully called.

 

9. Quorum

A majority of Committee members, present in person, by video conference, by telephone, or by a combination thereof, shall constitute a quorum. In addition, if an ex officio, non-voting member’s presence is required to attain a quorum of the Committee, then the said member shall be allowed to cast a vote at the meeting.

 

10. Attendance at Meetings

The Chief Executive Officer, the Chief Financial Officer, the Comptroller and the head of internal audit are expected to be available to attend the Committee’s meetings or portions thereof.

The Committee may, by specific invitation, have other resource persons in attendance.

The Committee shall have the right to determine who shall, and who shall not, be present at any time during a meeting of the Committee.

Directors, who are not members of the Committee, may attend Committee meetings, on an ad hoc basis, upon prior consultation and approval by the Committee Chair or by a majority of the members of the Committee.

 

11. Minutes

Minutes of each Committee meeting should be succinct yet comprehensive in describing substantive issues discussed by the Committee. However, they should clearly identify those items of responsibilities scheduled by the Committee for the meeting that have been discharged by the Committee and those items of responsibilities that are outstanding.

Minutes of Committee meetings shall be sent to all Committee members and to the external auditors. The full Board of Directors shall be kept informed of the Committee’s activities by a report following each Committee meeting.

RESPONSIBILITIES

In carrying out its mandate, the Committee is expected to:

 

12. Review Procedures

 

  (a)

Review and update the Committee’s mandate annually, or sooner if the Committee deems it appropriate to do so. Review the summary of the Committee’s composition and responsibilities in the Corporation’s annual report, annual information form or other public disclosure documentation.

 

  (b)

Review the summary of all approvals by the Committee of the provision of audit, audit-related, tax and other services by the external auditors for inclusion in the Corporation’s annual report and Annual Information Form filed with the CSA and the SEC.

 

13. Annual Financial Statements

 

  (a)

Discuss and review with management and the external auditors the Corporation’s and any subsidiary with public securities’ annual audited financial statements and related documents prior to their filing or distribution. Such review shall include:

 

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  (i)

The annual financial statements and related notes including significant issues regarding accounting principles, practices and significant management estimates and judgments, including any significant changes in the Corporation’s selection or application of accounting principles, any major issues as to the adequacy of the Corporation’s internal controls and any special steps adopted in light of material control deficiencies.

 

  (ii)

Management’s Discussion and Analysis.

 

  (iii)

The use of off-balance sheet financing including management’s risk assessment and adequacy of disclosure.

 

  (iv)

The external auditors’ audit examination of the financial statements and their report thereon.

 

  (v)

Any significant changes required in the external auditors’ audit plan.

 

  (vi)

Any serious difficulties or disputes with management encountered during the course of the audit, including any restrictions on the scope of the external auditors’ work or access to required information.

 

  (vii)

Other matters related to the conduct of the audit, which are to be communicated to the Committee under generally accepted auditing standards.

 

  (b)

Review and formally recommend approval to the Board of the Corporation’s:

 

  (i)

Year-end audited financial statements. Such review shall include discussions with management and the external auditors as to:

 

  i.

  The accounting policies of the Corporation and any changes thereto.

  ii.

  The effect of significant judgments, accruals and estimates.

  iii.

  The manner of presentation of significant accounting items.

  iv.

  The consistency of disclosure.

 

  (ii)

Management’s Discussion and Analysis.

 

  (iii)

Annual Information Form as to financial information.

 

  (iv)

All prospectuses and information circulars as to financial information.

The review shall include a report from the external auditors about the quality of the most critical accounting principles upon which the Corporation’s financial status depends, and which involve the most complex, subjective or significant judgmental decisions or assessments.

 

14. Quarterly Financial Statements

 

  (a)

Review with management and the external auditors and either approve (such approval to include the authorization for public release) or formally recommend for approval to the Board the Corporation’s:

 

  (i)

Quarterly unaudited financial statements and related documents, including Management’s Discussion and Analysis.

 

  (ii)

Any significant changes to the Corporation’s accounting principles.

 

  (b)

Review quarterly unaudited financial statements prior to their distribution of any subsidiary of the Corporation with public securities.

 

15. Other Financial Filings and Public Documents

Review and discuss with management financial information, including earnings press releases, the use of “pro forma” or non-GAAP financial information and earnings guidance, contained in any filings with the CSA or SEC or press releases related thereto, and consider whether the information is consistent with the information contained in the financial statements of the Corporation or any subsidiary with public securities.

 

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16. Internal Control Environment

 

  (a)

Receive and review from management, the external auditors and the internal auditors an annual report on the Corporation’s control environment as it pertains to the Corporation’s financial reporting process and controls.

 

  (b)

Review and discuss significant financial risks or exposures and assess the steps management has taken to monitor, control, report and mitigate such risk to the Corporation.

 

  (c)

Review in consultation with the internal auditors and the external auditors the degree of coordination in the audit plans of the internal auditors and the external auditors and enquire as to the extent the planned scope can be relied upon to detect weaknesses in internal controls, fraud, or other illegal acts. The Committee will assess the coordination of audit effort to assure completeness of coverage and the effective use of audit resources. Any significant recommendations made by the auditors for the strengthening of internal controls shall be reviewed and discussed with management.

 

  (d)

Review with the Chief Executive Officer, the Chief Financial Officer of the Corporation and the external auditors: (i) all significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of the Corporation’s internal controls and procedures for financial reporting which could adversely affect the Corporation’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information required to be disclosed by the Corporation in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act or applicable Canadian federal and provincial legislation and regulations within the required time periods, and (ii) any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management of the Corporation or other employees who have a significant role in the Corporation’s internal controls and procedures for financial reporting.

 

  (e)

Review significant findings prepared by the external auditors and the internal auditing department together with management’s responses.

 

17. Risk Oversight

Review and evaluate the Corporation’s risk management framework and related processes including the supporting guidelines and practice documents.

 

18. Other Review Items

 

  (a)

Review policies and procedures with respect to officers’ and directors’ expense accounts and perquisites, including their use of corporate assets, and consider the results of any review of these areas by the internal auditor or the external auditors.

 

  (b)

Review all related party transactions between the Corporation and any executive officers or directors, including affiliations of any executive officers or directors.

 

  (c)

Review with the General Counsel, the head of internal audit and the external auditors the results of their review of the Corporation’s monitoring compliance with each of the Corporation’s published codes of business conduct and applicable legal requirements.

 

  (d)

Review legal and regulatory matters, including correspondence with and reports received from regulators and government agencies, that may have a material impact on the interim or annual financial statements and related corporate compliance policies and programs. Members from the Legal and Tax groups should be at the meeting in person to deliver their respective reports.

 

  (e)

Review policies and practices with respect to off-balance sheet transactions and trading and hedging activities, and consider the results of any review of these areas by the internal auditors or the external auditors.

 

  (f)

Ensure that the Corporation’s presentation of hydrocarbon reserves has been reviewed with the Reserves Committee of the Board.

 

  (g)

Review management’s processes in place to prevent and detect fraud.