10-Q 1 vdi-10q_20180331.htm VDI-10-Q-20170331 vdi-10q_20180331.htm

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-Q

 

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2018

OR

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from              to             

Commission File Number: 333-212081

 

VANTAGE DRILLING INTERNATIONAL

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

Cayman Islands

 

98-1372204

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

777 Post Oak Boulevard, Suite 800

Houston, TX 77056

(Address of principal executive offices and zip code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (281) 404-4700

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer”, “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

 

  

Accelerated filer

 

 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer

 

 (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

  

Smaller reporting company

 

 

 

 

 

Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.    

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).    Yes      No  

The number of Vantage Drilling International ordinary shares outstanding as of April 20, 2018 is 5,000,053 shares.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed all documents and reports required to be filed by Section 12, 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 subsequent to the distribution of securities under a plan confirmed by a court.    Yes      No  

 

 

 

 

 


 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

 

2


 

SAFE HARBOR STATEMENT

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. These forward-looking statements are included throughout this Quarterly Report, including under “Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” When used, statements which are not historical in nature, including those containing words such as “anticipate,” “assume,” “believe,” “budget,” “continue,” “could,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “potential,” “predict,” “project,” “should,” “would,” “will,” “future” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements in this Quarterly Report.

These forward-looking statements reflect our current views with respect to future events and are based on assumptions and subject to risks and uncertainties. You should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Our actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements.

Among the factors that could cause actual results to differ materially are the risks and uncertainties described in “Item 1A. Risk Factors” of our Annual Report on Form 10-K, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) on March 29, 2018, “Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” of this Quarterly Report and the following:

 

our small number of customers;

 

credit risks of our key customers and certain other third parties;

 

reduced expenditures by oil and natural gas exploration and production companies;

 

our substantial level of indebtedness;

 

our ability to incur additional indebtedness;

 

compliance with restrictions and covenants in our debt agreements;

 

termination or renegotiation of our customer contracts;

 

general economic conditions and conditions in the oil and gas industry;

 

competition within our industry;

 

excess supply of drilling units worldwide;

 

limited mobility of our drilling units between geographic regions;

 

any non-compliance with the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and any other anti-corruption laws;

 

operations in international markets, including geopolitical risk, applicability of foreign laws, including foreign labor and employment laws, foreign tax and customs regimes, and foreign currency exchange rate risk;

 

operating hazards in the offshore drilling industry;

 

ability to obtain indemnity from customers;

 

adequacy of insurance coverage upon the occurrence of a catastrophic event;

 

governmental, tax and environmental regulation;

 

changes in legislation removing or increasing current applicable limitations of liability;

 

effects of new products and new technology on the market;  

 

identifying and completing acquisition opportunities;

 

levels of operating and maintenance costs;

 

our dependence on key personnel;

 

availability of workers and the related labor costs;

 

increased cost of obtaining supplies;

 

the sufficiency of our internal controls;

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changes in tax laws, treaties or regulations; and

 

our incorporation under the laws of the Cayman Islands and the limited rights to relief that may be available compared to U.S. laws.

Many of these factors are beyond our ability to control or predict. Any, or a combination of these factors, could materially affect our future financial condition or results of operations and the ultimate accuracy of the forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are not guarantees of our future performance, and our actual results and future developments may differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements. Management cautions against putting undue reliance on forward-looking statements or projecting any future results based on such statements or present or prior earnings levels.

In addition, each forward-looking statement speaks only as of the date of the particular statement, and we undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements. We may not update these forward-looking statements, even if our situation changes in the future. All forward-looking statements attributable to us are expressly qualified by these cautionary statements. Additional information concerning factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements is contained from time to time in filings we may make with the SEC, which may be obtained by contacting us or the SEC. These filings are also available through our website at www.vantagedrilling.com or through the SEC’s Electronic Data Gathering and Analysis Retrieval system (EDGAR) at www.sec.gov. The contents of our website are not part of this Quarterly Report.

Unless the context indicates otherwise, all references to the “Company,” “Vantage,” “VDI,” “we,” “our” or “us” refer to Vantage Drilling International and its consolidated subsidiaries.

 

 

4


 

PART I—FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements

 

Vantage Drilling International

Consolidated Balance Sheet

(In thousands, except share and par value information)

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

March 31,

2018

 

 

December 31,

2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

192,739

 

 

$

195,455

 

Restricted cash

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

-

 

Trade receivables

 

 

38,881

 

 

 

45,379

 

Inventory

 

 

44,144

 

 

 

43,955

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

11,036

 

 

 

13,207

 

Total current assets

 

 

291,800

 

 

 

297,996

 

Property and equipment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Property and equipment

 

 

904,111

 

 

 

904,584

 

Accumulated depreciation

 

 

(158,942

)

 

 

(141,393

)

Property and equipment, net

 

 

745,169

 

 

 

763,191

 

Other assets

 

 

20,227

 

 

 

21,935

 

Total assets

 

$

1,057,196

 

 

$

1,083,122

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$

41,717

 

 

$

39,666

 

Accrued liabilities

 

 

21,363

 

 

 

25,117

 

Current maturities of long-term debt

 

 

1,430

 

 

 

4,430

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

64,510

 

 

 

69,213

 

Long–term debt, net of discount and financing costs of $43,744 and $56,174

 

 

929,911

 

 

 

919,939

 

Other long-term liabilities

 

 

18,137

 

 

 

17,195

 

Commitments and contingencies (Note 7)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shareholders' equity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ordinary shares, $0.001 par value, 50 million shares authorized; 5,000,053 shares issued and outstanding

 

 

5

 

 

 

5

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

373,972

 

 

 

373,972

 

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(329,339

)

 

 

(297,202

)

Total shareholders' equity

 

 

44,638

 

 

 

76,775

 

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity

 

$

1,057,196

 

 

$

1,083,122

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

 

5


 

Vantage Drilling International

Consolidated Statement of Operations

(In thousands, except per share amounts)

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31,

 

 

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contract drilling services

 

$

51,595

 

 

$

38,056

 

 

Management fees

 

 

301

 

 

 

401

 

 

Reimbursables

 

 

5,767

 

 

 

3,592

 

 

Total revenue

 

 

57,663

 

 

 

42,049

 

 

Operating costs and expenses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating costs

 

 

40,985

 

 

 

28,998

 

 

General and administrative

 

 

7,354

 

 

 

11,479

 

 

Depreciation

 

 

17,868

 

 

 

18,439

 

 

Total operating costs and expenses

 

 

66,207

 

 

 

58,916

 

 

Loss from operations

 

 

(8,544

)

 

 

(16,867

)

 

Other income (expense)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest income

 

 

221

 

 

 

141

 

 

Interest expense and other financing charges

 

 

(19,271

)

 

 

(18,899

)

 

Other, net

 

 

(570

)

 

 

552

 

 

Total other expense

 

 

(19,620

)

 

 

(18,206

)

 

Loss before income taxes

 

 

(28,164

)

 

 

(35,073

)

 

Income tax provision

 

 

3,973

 

 

 

1,426

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(32,137

)

 

$

(36,499

)

 

Net loss per share, basic and diluted

 

$

(6.43

)

 

$

(7.30

)

 

Weighted average successor ordinary shares outstanding, basic and diluted

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

 

6


 

Vantage Drilling International

Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows

(In thousands)

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31,

 

 

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(32,137

)

 

$

(36,499

)

 

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash provided by (used in) operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation expense

 

 

17,868

 

 

 

18,439

 

 

Amortization of debt financing costs

 

 

117

 

 

 

117

 

 

Amortization of debt discount

 

 

12,313

 

 

 

12,191

 

 

Amortization of contract value

 

 

1,556

 

 

 

 

 

PIK interest on the Convertible Notes

 

 

1,912

 

 

 

1,890

 

 

Share-based compensation expense

 

 

1,745

 

 

 

780

 

 

Deferred income tax (expense) benefit

 

 

419

 

 

 

(1,789

)

 

Gain on disposal of assets

 

 

(2,682

)

 

 

 

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trade receivables

 

 

6,498

 

 

 

1,207

 

 

Inventory

 

 

(189

)

 

 

293

 

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

120

 

 

 

(951

)

 

Other assets

 

 

(383

)

 

 

1,434

 

 

Accounts payable

 

 

2,051

 

 

 

1,668

 

 

Accrued liabilities and other long-term liabilities

 

 

(6,292

)

 

 

(401

)

 

Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities

 

 

2,916

 

 

 

(1,621

)

 

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additions to property and equipment

 

 

(19

)

 

 

(2,156

)

 

Proceeds from sale of Vantage 260

 

 

4,845

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities

 

 

4,826

 

 

 

(2,156

)

 

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Repayment of long-term debt

 

 

(5,458

)

 

 

(358

)

 

Net cash used in financing activities

 

 

(5,458

)

 

 

(358

)

 

Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents

 

 

2,284

 

 

 

(4,135

)

 

Cash and cash equivalents—beginning of period

 

 

195,455

 

 

 

231,727

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents—end of period

 

$

197,739

 

 

$

227,592

 

 

SUPPLEMENTAL CASH FLOW INFORMATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash paid for:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest

 

$

6,836

 

 

$

2,829

 

 

Income taxes (net of refunds)

 

 

2,891

 

 

 

3,024

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

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VANTAGE DRILLING INTERNATIONAL

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

1. Organization and Recent Events

Vantage Drilling International, a Cayman Islands exempted company, is an international offshore drilling company focused on operating a fleet of modern, high specification drilling units. Our principal business is to contract drilling units, related equipment and work crews, primarily on a dayrate basis to drill oil and natural gas wells for our customers. Through our fleet of drilling units, we are a provider of offshore contract drilling services to major, national and independent oil and natural gas companies, focused on international markets. Additionally, for drilling units owned by others, we provide construction supervision services while under construction, preservation management services when stacked and operations and marketing services for operating rigs.

On April 5, 2017, pursuant to a purchase and sale agreement with a third party, we completed the purchase of a class 154-44C jackup rig and related multi-year drilling contract for $13.0 million. A down payment of $1.3 million was made in February 2017 upon execution of the agreement and the remaining $11.7 million was paid at closing. The rig was renamed the Vantage 260. In August 2017, we substituted the Sapphire Driller, a Baker Marine Pacific Class 375 jack-up rig to fulfill the drilling contract. On October 19, 2017, we entered into a purchase and sale agreement to sell the Vantage 260 for $5.1 million. The transaction closed and the Vantage 260 was sold on February 26, 2018. 

Restructuring Agreement and Emergence from Voluntary Reorganization under Chapter 11 Proceeding

On December 1, 2015, we and Vantage Drilling Company (“VDC”), our former parent company, entered into a restructuring support agreement (the “Restructuring Agreement”) with a majority of our secured creditors. Pursuant to the terms of the Restructuring Agreement, the Company agreed to pursue a pre-packaged plan of reorganization (the “Reorganization Plan”) under Chapter 11 of Title 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code and VDC agreed to commence official liquidation proceedings under the laws of the Cayman Islands. On December 2, 2015, pursuant to the Restructuring Agreement, the Company acquired two subsidiaries responsible for the management of the Company from VDC in exchange for a $61.5 million promissory note (the “VDC Note”). As this transaction involved a reorganization of entities under common control, it was reflected in the consolidated financial statements, at carryover basis, on a retrospective basis. Effective as of the Company’s emergence from bankruptcy on February 10, 2016 (the “Effective Date”), VDC’s former equity interest in the Company was cancelled. Immediately following that event, the VDC Note was converted into 655,094 new ordinary shares of the reorganized Company (the “New Shares”) in accordance with the terms thereof, in satisfaction of the obligation thereunder, which, including accrued interest, totaled approximately $62.6 million as of such date.

On December 3, 2015 (the “Petition Date”), the Company, certain of its subsidiaries and certain VDC subsidiaries who were guarantors of the Company’s pre-bankruptcy secured debt, filed the Reorganization Plan in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware (In re Vantage Drilling International (F/K/A Offshore Group Investment Limited), et al., Case No. 15-12422). On January 15, 2016, the District Court of Delaware confirmed the Company’s pre-packaged Reorganization Plan and the Company emerged from bankruptcy on the Effective Date.

Pursuant to the terms of the Reorganization Plan, the pre-bankruptcy term loans and senior notes were retired on the Effective Date by issuing to the debtholders 4,344,959 units in the reorganized Company (the “Units”). Each Unit of securities originally consisted of one New Share and $172.61 of principal of the Company’s 1%/12% Step-Up Senior Secured Third Lien Convertible Notes due 2030 (the “Convertible Notes”), subject to adjustment upon the payment of interest in kind (“PIK interest”) and certain cases of redemption or conversion of the Convertible Notes, as well as share splits, share dividends, consolidation or reclassification of the New Shares. The New Shares and the Convertible Notes are subject to the terms of an agreement that prohibits the New Shares and Convertible Notes from being traded separately.

The Convertible Notes are convertible into New Shares in certain circumstances, at a conversion price (subject to adjustment in accordance with the terms of the Indenture for the Convertible Notes), which was $95.60 as of the issue date. The Indenture for the Convertible Notes includes customary covenants that restrict, among other things, the granting of liens and customary events of default, including among other things, failure to issue securities upon conversion of the Convertible Notes. As of March 31, 2018, after taking into account the payment of PIK interest on the Convertible Notes to such date, each such Unit consisted of one New Share and $175.90 of principal of Convertible Notes.

Other significant elements of the Reorganization Plan included:

Second Amended and Restated Credit Agreement. The Company’s pre-petition credit agreement was amended and restated to (i) replace the $32.0 million revolving letter of credit commitment under its pre-petition facility with a new $32.0 million revolving letter of credit facility and (ii) repay the $150 million of outstanding borrowings with (a) $7.0 million of cash and (b) the issuance of $143.0 million initial term loans (the “2016 Term Loan Facility”).

10% Senior Secured Second Lien Notes. Holders of the Company’s pre-petition  term loans and senior notes claims were eligible to participate in a rights offering conducted by the Company for $75.0 million of the Company’s new 10% Senior Secured Second Lien Notes due 2020 (the “10% Second Lien Notes”). In connection with this rights offering, certain creditors entered into a

8


 

“backstop” agreement to purchase 10% Second Lien Notes if the offer was not fully subscribed. The premium paid to such creditors under the backstop agreement was approximately $2.2 million, which was paid $1.1 million in cash and $1.1 million in additional 10% Second Lien Notes, resulting in a total issued amount of $76.1 million of 10% Second Lien Notes and net cash proceeds to the Company of $73.9 million, after deducting the cash portion of the backstop premium.

The Reorganization Plan allowed the Company to continue business operations during the court proceedings and maintain all operating assets and agreements. The Company had adequate liquidity prior to the filing and did not have to seek any debtor-in-possession financing. All trade payables, credits, wages and other related obligations were unimpaired by the Reorganization Plan.

Other Events: Since July 2015, the Company has been cooperating in an investigation by the U.S. Department of Justice (“DOJ”) and the SEC arising from allegations that Hamylton Padilha, the Brazilian agent VDC used in the contracting of the Titanium Explorer drillship to Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (“Petrobras”), and Mr. Hsin-Chi Su, a former member of the Board of Directors and a significant shareholder of our former parent company, VDC, had engaged in an alleged scheme to pay bribes to former Petrobras executives, in violation of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”).  In August 2017, we received a letter from the DOJ acknowledging our full cooperation in the DOJ’s investigation and closing the investigation without any action against the Company. We have continued our cooperation in the investigation by the SEC into the same allegations and engaged in negotiations with the staff of the Division of Enforcement of the SEC to resolve their investigation. We have reached an agreement in principle with the staff relating to terms of a proposed offer of settlement, which is being presented to the Commission for approval. While there can be no assurance that the proposed offer of settlement will be accepted by the Commission, the Company believes the proposed resolution will become final in the second quarter of 2018. In connection with the proposed offer of settlement, we have accrued a liability in the amount of $5 million.  If the Commission does not accept the proposed offer of settlement and the SEC determines that violations of the FCPA have occurred, the Company could be subject to civil and criminal sanctions, including monetary penalties, as well as additional requirements or changes to our business practices and compliance programs, any or all of which could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition. For more information about this matter, please seeNote 7. Commitments and Contingencies”.

 

2. Basis of Presentation and Significant Accounting Policies

Basis of Consolidation: The accompanying interim consolidated financial information as of March 31, 2018 and for the three months ended March 31, 2018 and 2017 has been prepared without audit, pursuant to the rules and regulations of the SEC and includes our accounts and those of our majority owned subsidiaries. All significant intercompany transactions and accounts have been eliminated. They reflect all adjustments which are, in the opinion of management, necessary for a fair presentation of the financial position and results of operations for the interim periods, on a basis consistent with the annual audited financial statements. Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) have been condensed or omitted pursuant to the rules and regulations of the SEC, although we believe that the disclosures made are adequate to provide for fair presentation. The balance sheet at December 31, 2017 is derived from our December 31, 2017 audited financial statements. These interim financial statements should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and the notes thereto included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2017. The results of operations for the interim periods are not necessarily indicative of the operating results for the full fiscal year or any future periods. Certain previously reported amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current period presentation.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents: Includes deposits with financial institutions as well as short-term money market instruments with maturities of three months or less when purchased.

Inventory: Consists of materials, spare parts, consumables and related supplies for our drilling rigs.

Property and Equipment: Consists of the costs of our drilling rigs, furniture and fixtures, computer equipment and capitalized costs for computer software. Drilling rigs are depreciated on a component basis over estimated useful lives ranging from five to thirty-five years on a straight-line basis as of the date placed in service. Other assets are depreciated upon placement in service over estimated useful lives ranging from three to seven years on a straight-line basis. When assets are sold, retired or otherwise disposed of, the related cost and accumulated depreciation are removed from the balance sheet and the resulting gain or loss is included in operating costs or general and administrative expenses, depending on nature of the asset. For the three months ended March 31, 2018, we recognized a net gain of $2.7 million related to the sale or retirement of assets. We did not sell or retire any assets in the three months ended March 31, 2017.

We evaluate the realization of property and equipment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. An impairment loss on our property and equipment exists when estimated undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use of the asset and its eventual disposition are less than its carrying amount. Any impairment loss recognized would be computed as the excess of the asset’s carrying value over the estimated fair value. Estimates of future cash flows require us to make long-term forecasts of our future revenues and operating costs with regard to the assets subject to review. Our business, including the utilization rates and dayrates we receive for our drilling rigs, depends on the level of our customers’ expenditures for oil and natural gas exploration, development and production expenditures. Oil and natural gas prices and customers’

9


 

expectations of potential changes in these prices, the general outlook for worldwide economic growth, political and social stability in the major oil and natural gas producing basins of the world, availability of credit and changes in governmental laws and regulations, among many other factors, significantly affect our customers’ levels of expenditures. Sustained declines in or persistent depressed levels of oil and natural gas prices, worldwide rig counts and utilization, reduced access to credit markets, reduced or depressed sale prices of comparably equipped jackups and drillships and any other significant adverse economic news could require us to evaluate the realization of our drilling rigs. In connection with our adoption of fresh-start accounting upon our emergence from bankruptcy on February 10, 2016, an adjustment of $2.0 billion was recorded to decrease the net book value of our drilling rigs to estimated fair value. The projections and assumptions used in that valuation have not changed significantly as of March 31, 2018; accordingly, no triggering event has occurred to indicate that the current carrying value of our drilling rigs may not be recoverable.

Interest costs and the amortization of debt financing costs related to the financings of our drilling rigs are capitalized as part of the cost while they are under construction and prior to the commencement of each vessel’s first contract. We did not capitalize any interest for the reported periods.

Intangible assets: In connection with our acquisition of the Vantage 260 and related multi-year drilling contract in April 2017, the Company recorded an identifiable intangible asset of $12.6 million for the fair value of the acquired favorable drilling contract. The resulting intangible asset is being amortized on a straight-line basis over the two-year term of the drilling contract. We recognized approximately $1.5 million of amortization expense for intangible assets for the three months ended March 31, 2018.    

Expected future intangible asset amortization as of March 31, 2018 is as follows:

(in thousands)

 

 

 

Fiscal year:

 

 

 

2018

$

4,755

 

2019

 

1,643

 

Thereafter

 

-

 

Total

$

6,398

 

 

 

 

 

Debt Financing Costs: Costs incurred with debt financings are deferred and amortized over the term of the related financing facility on a straight-line basis which approximates the interest method. Debt issuance costs related to a recognized debt liability are presented in the consolidated balance sheet as a direct deduction from the carrying amount of that debt liability.  

Revenue: We adopted ASU No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (ASC Topic 606) effective January 1, 2018. The standard outlines a five-step model whereby revenue is recognized as performance obligations within a contract are satisfied. The standard also requires new, expanded disclosures regarding revenue recognition. We adopted the new revenue standard using the modified retrospective approach and after evaluating all outstanding contracts, determined there to be no cumulative effect adjustment on retained earnings and no adjustments were made to prior periods. While ASC Topic 606 requires additional disclosure regarding revenues recognized from customer contracts, our adoption did not have a material impact on the recognition of current or prior period revenues as compared to previous guidance.

In applying ASU Topic 606, we account for revenue and earnings for the integrated services provided within our drilling contracts as a single performance obligation composed of a series of distinct time increments, which are satisfied over time. Consideration that does not relate to a distinct good or service, such as mobilization and demobilization revenue, is allocated across the single performance obligation and recognized over the series of distinct time increments within the term of the contract. All other components of consideration within a contract, including dayrate revenues, are recognized in the period when the services are performed because the associated payments relate specifically to our efforts to provide those services. Our revenue recognition under ASC 606 differs from our previous revenue recognition pattern only as it relates to demobilization revenue. Demobilization revenue, which was previously recognized upon completion of a drilling contract, is now estimated at contract commencement and recognized over the term of the contract. In some cases, demobilization fees may be contingent upon the occurrence or non-occurrence of a future event. In these cases, this may result in cumulative-effect adjustments to demobilization revenue upon changes in our estimates of future events during the contract term.

In connection with a customer contract, we may receive lump-sum fees for the mobilization of equipment and personnel or the demobilization of equipment and personnel upon completion. Mobilization fees received and pre-commencement costs incurred to mobilize a rig from one geographic market to another are deferred and recognized over the term of such contract, excluding any option periods. Costs incurred to mobilize a rig without a contract are expensed as incurred. Fees or lump-sum payments received for capital improvements to rigs are deferred and amortized to income across the single performance obligation within the term of the related drilling contract. The costs of such capital improvements are capitalized and depreciated over the useful lives of the assets. We record reimbursements from customers for rebillable costs and expenses as revenue and the related direct costs as operating expenses. Sales and usage-based taxes are excluded from revenues. Deferred revenues under drilling contracts at March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 totaled $6.2 million and $6.8 million, respectively. Deferred revenue is recorded as a contract liability and included in either

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accrued liabilities or other long-term liabilities in our consolidated balance sheet, based upon the initial term of the related drilling contract.

Rig and Equipment Certifications: We are required to obtain regulatory certifications to operate our drilling rigs and certain specified equipment and must maintain such certifications through periodic inspections and surveys. The costs associated with these certifications, including drydock costs, are deferred and amortized over the corresponding certification periods.

Income Taxes: Income taxes are provided for based upon the tax laws and rates in effect in the countries in which operations are conducted and income is earned. Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are computed for differences between the financial statement basis and tax basis of assets and liabilities that will result in future taxable or tax deductible amounts and are based on enacted tax laws and rates applicable to the periods in which the differences are expected to affect taxable income. Valuation allowances are established when necessary to reduce deferred income tax assets to the amount expected to be realized. We recognize interest and penalties related to income taxes as a component of income tax expense.

Concentrations of Credit Risk: Financial instruments that potentially subject us to a significant concentration of credit risk consist primarily of cash and cash equivalents, restricted cash and accounts receivable. We maintain deposits in federally insured financial institutions in excess of federally insured limits. We monitor the credit ratings and our concentration of risk with these financial institutions on a continuing basis to safeguard our cash deposits. We have a limited number of key customers, who are primarily large international oil and gas operators, national oil companies and other international oil and gas companies. Our contracts provide for monthly billings as services are performed and we monitor compliance with contract payment terms on an ongoing basis. Payment terms on customer invoices typically range 30 – 45 days. Outstanding receivables beyond payment terms are promptly investigated and discussed with the specific customer. We do not have an allowance for doubtful accounts on our trade receivables as of March 31, 2018 or December 31, 2017.

Use of Estimates: The preparation of financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates, including those related to property and equipment, income taxes, insurance, employee benefits and contingent liabilities. Actual results could differ from these estimates.

Functional Currency: We consider the U.S. dollar to be the functional currency for all of our operations since the majority of our revenues and expenditures are denominated in U.S. dollars, which limits our exposure to currency exchange rate fluctuations.  We recognize currency exchange rate gains and losses in other, net.  For the three months ended March 31, 2018 and 2017, we recognized a net loss of $0.6 million and a net gain of $0.5 million, respectively, related to currency exchange rates.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments: The fair value of our short-term financial assets and liabilities approximates the carrying amounts represented in the consolidated balance sheet principally due to the short-term nature or floating rate nature of these instruments. At March 31, 2018, the fair value of the 2016 Term Loan Facility, the 10% Second Lien Notes and the Convertible Notes was approximately $136.0 million, $74.6 million and $955.9 million, respectively, based on quoted market prices in a less active market, a Level 2 measurement.

Recent Accounting Standards:

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842): Amendments to the FASB Accounting Standards Codification, to increase transparency and comparability among organizations by recognizing lease assets and liabilities on the balance sheet and disclosing key information about leasing arrangements. ASU No. 2016-02 is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and early adoption is permitted.  A modified retrospective approach is required. We expect to adopt ASU 2016-02 on January 1, 2019. Under the updated accounting standards, we have concluded that our drilling contracts contain a lease component, and our adoption, therefore, could require that we separately recognize revenues associated with the lease of our drilling rigs and the provision of contract drilling services. In January 2018, the FASB issued a proposed update to provide targeted improvements which allow for application of transition provisions at adoption date instead of earliest comparative period and provide lessors with a practical expedient to not separate non-lease components from related lease components, by class of underlying asset. On March 28, 2018, the FASB met to approve a revision to the practical expedient that would allow a lessor to account for the combined lease and non-lease components under Topic 606 if the non-lease component is the predominant element. Depending on the criteria included in the final update, this practical expedient might be available to us. Our adoption of ASU No. 2016-02, and the ultimate effect on our consolidated financial statements, will be based on an evaluation of the contract-specific facts and circumstances, and such effect could result in differences in the timing of our revenue recognition relative to current accounting standards. With respect to leases whereby we are the lessee we expect to recognize lease liabilities and corresponding “right of use” assets.  We are continuing to evaluate the requirements with regard to arrangements under which we are either the lessor or lessee, to determine the effect such requirements may have on our consolidated statements of financial position, operations and cash flows and on the disclosures contained in our notes to consolidated financial statements.  

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In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-15, Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments, which addresses the classification and presentation of eight specific cash flow issues that currently result in diverse practice. ASU No. 2016-15 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those fiscal years. We adopted ASU No. 2016-15 effective January 1, 2018 with minimal impact on the presentation of cash receipts and cash payments within our consolidated statements of cash flows.

In November 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-18, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Restricted Cash, which requires that the statement of cash flows explain the change during the period in the total of cash, cash equivalents, and amounts generally described as restricted cash or restricted cash equivalents when reconciling the beginning-of-period and end-of-period total amounts shown on the statement of cash flows. ASU No. 2016-18 also requires the disclosure of details on the nature and amounts of restricted cash. We adopted the amendments in this ASU effective January 1, 2018 including amounts generally described as restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents with cash and cash equivalents when reconciling the beginning-of-period and end-of-period total amounts shown on the statement of cash flows.

In October 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-16, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Intra-Entity Transfers of Assets Other Than Inventory, which requires entities to recognize the income tax consequences of an intra-entity transfer of an asset other than inventory when the transaction occurs as opposed to deferring tax consequences and amortizing them into future periods. This update is effective for annual and interim periods beginning after December 15, 2017. A modified retrospective approach with a cumulative-effect adjustment directly to retained earnings at the beginning of the period of adoption is required. We adopted ASU No. 2016-16 on January 1, 2018 with no impact on our financial statements and related disclosures.

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-01, Business Combinations (Topic 805): Clarifying the Definition of a Business, which clarifies the definition of a business with the objective of adding guidance to assist entities with evaluating whether transactions should be accounted for as acquisitions (or disposals) of assets or businesses. ASU No. 2017-01 is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017 utilizing a prospective basis on or after the effective date. We adopted ASU No. 2017-01 effective January 1, 2018 with no impact on our financial statements and related disclosures. 

 

 

3. Acquisitions

On April 5, 2017, pursuant to a purchase and sale agreement with a third party, we completed the purchase of a class 154-44C jackup rig and related multi-year drilling contract for $13.0 million. A down payment of $1.3 million was made in February 2017 upon execution of the agreement and the remaining $11.7 million was paid at closing. The rig was renamed the Vantage 260. In August 2017 we substituted the Sapphire Driller, a Baker Marine Pacific Class 375 jack-up rig to fulfill the contract. The Vantage 260 was classified as held for sale on acquisition and was sold on February 26, 2018. We accounted for the acquisition as a business combination in accordance with accounting guidance which requires, among other things, that we allocate the purchase price to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed based on their fair values as of the acquisition date. The following table provides the estimated fair values of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed.    

(in thousands)

 

 

 

 

Total cash consideration

$

13,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchase price allocation:

 

 

 

 

Drilling contract value

 

12,640

 

 

Rig equipment to be sold (net of disposal costs)

 

2,050

 

 

Drillpipe assets

 

700

 

 

Severance liabilities assumed

 

(480

)

 

Net assets acquired

 

14,910

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bargain purchase gain

$

1,910

 

 

Under accounting guidance, a bargain purchase gain results from an acquisition if the fair value of the purchase consideration paid in connection with such acquisition is less than the net fair value of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed. We recorded a bargain purchase gain of approximately $1.9 million related to the acquisition. We believe that we were able to negotiate a bargain purchase price as a result of our operational presence in West Africa and the seller’s liquidation. The purchase of the Vantage 260 and related two-year drilling contract allowed for the reactivation of the Sapphire Driller and further extended our operational presence in West Africa.  

Pro forma results of operations related to the acquisition have not been presented because they are not material to our consolidated statement of operations.

 

 

 

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4. Debt

Our debt was composed of the following as of the dates indicated:

 

 

 

March 31, 2018

 

 

December 31, 2017

 

(unaudited, in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016 Term Loan Facility

 

$

134,682

 

 

$

140,140

 

10% Second Lien Notes, net of financing costs of $1,287 and $1,404

 

 

74,838

 

 

 

74,721

 

Convertible Notes, net of discount of $42,457 and $54,770

 

 

721,821

 

 

 

709,508

 

 

 

 

931,341

 

 

 

924,369

 

Less current maturities of long-term debt

 

 

1,430

 

 

 

4,430

 

Long-term debt, net

 

$

929,911

 

 

$

919,939

 

Second Amended and Restated Credit Agreement. The Company entered into the 2016 Term Loan Facility providing for (i) a $32.0 million revolving letter of credit facility to replace the Company’s then existing $32.0 million revolving letter of credit commitment under its pre-petition credit facility and (ii) $143.0 million of term loans into which the claims of the lenders under the Company’s pre-petition credit facility were converted. The lenders under the Company’s pre-petition credit facility also received $7.0 million of cash under the Reorganization Plan. The obligations under the 2016 Term Loan Facility are guaranteed by substantially all of the Company’s subsidiaries, subject to limited exceptions, and secured on a first priority basis by substantially all of the Company’s and the guarantors’ assets, including ship mortgages on all vessels, assignments of related earnings and insurance and pledges of the capital stock of all guarantors, in each case, subject to certain exceptions. We have issued $17.7 million in letters of credit under the 2016 Term Loan Facility as of March 31, 2018.

The maturity date of the term loans and commitments established under the 2016 Term Loan Facility is December 31, 2019. Interest is payable on the unpaid principal amount of each term loan under the 2016 Term Loan Facility at LIBOR plus 6.5%, with a LIBOR floor of 0.5%. The term loans are currently bearing interest at 8.4%. The 2016 Term Loan Facility has quarterly scheduled debt maturities of $357,500 which commenced in March 2016.

Fees are payable on the outstanding face amount of letters of credit at a rate per annum equal to 5.5% pursuant to the terms of the 2016 Term Loan Facility.

The 2016 Term Loan Facility includes customary representations and warranties, mandatory prepayments, affirmative and negative covenants and events of default, including covenants that, among other things, restrict the granting of liens, the incurrence of indebtedness, the making of investments and capital expenditures, the sale or other conveyance of assets, including vessels, transactions with affiliates, prepayments of certain debt and the operation of vessels. The 2016 Term Loan Facility also requires that the Company maintain $75.0 million of available cash (defined to include unrestricted cash and cash equivalents plus undrawn commitments).

10% Senior Secured Second Lien Notes. The Company engaged in a rights offering for $75.0 million of new 10% Second Lien Notes for certain holders of its secured debt claims. In connection with this rights offering, certain creditors entered into a “backstop” agreement to purchase 10% Second Lien Notes if the offer was not fully subscribed. The premium paid to such creditors under the backstop agreement was approximately $2.2 million, which was paid $1.1 million in cash and $1.1 million in additional 10% Second Lien Notes, resulting in a total issued amount of $76.1 million of 10% Second Lien Notes, and in net cash proceeds of approximately $73.9 million after deducting the cash portion of the backstop premium.

The 10% Second Lien Notes were issued at par and are fully and unconditionally guaranteed (except for customary release provisions), on a senior secured basis, by all of the subsidiaries of the Company. The 10% Second Lien Notes mature on December 31, 2020, and bear interest from the date of their issuance at the rate of 10% per year. Interest on outstanding 10% Second Lien Notes is payable semi-annually in arrears, which commenced on June 30, 2016. Interest is computed on the basis of a 360-day year comprised of twelve 30-day months. The 10% Second Lien Notes rank behind the 2016 Term Loan Facility as to collateral.

The Indenture for the 10% Second Lien Notes includes customary covenants and events of default, including covenants that, among other things, restrict the granting of liens, restrict the making of investments, restrict the incurrence of indebtedness and the conveyance of vessels, limit transactions with affiliates, and require that the Company provide periodic financial reports.

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1%/12% Step-Up Senior Secured Third Lien Convertible Notes. The Company issued 4,344,959 New Shares and $750.0 million of the Convertible Notes to certain creditors holding approximately $2.5 billion of pre-petition secured debt claims. The New Shares issued to the creditors and the Convertible Notes may only be traded together and not separately. The Convertible Notes mature on December 31, 2030 and are convertible into New Shares, in certain circumstances, at a conversion price (subject to adjustment in accordance with the terms of the Indenture for the Convertible Notes) which was $95.60 as of the issue date. The Indenture for the Convertible Notes includes customary covenants that restrict, among other things, the granting of liens and customary events of default, including among other things, failure to issue securities upon conversion of the Convertible Notes. As of March 31, 2018, taking into account the payment of PIK interest on the Convertible Notes to such date, each such unit of securities was comprised of one New Share and $175.90 of principal of Convertible Notes. As of March 31, 2018, we would be required to issue approximately 8.0 million New Shares if the Convertible Notes were converted.

The Convertible Notes were initially recorded at an estimated fair value of approximately $603.1 million. The difference between face value and the fair value at date of issuance of the Convertible Notes was recorded as a debt discount and is being amortized to interest expense over the expected life of the Convertible Notes using the effective interest rate method.

Interest on the Convertible Notes is payable semi-annually in arrears commencing June 30, 2016 as a payment in kind, either through an increase in the outstanding principal amount of the Convertible Notes or, if the Company is unable to increase such principal amount, by the issuance of additional Convertible Notes.  Interest is computed on the basis of a 360-day year comprised of twelve 30-day months at a rate of 1% per annum for the first four years and then increasing to 12% per annum until maturity.

The Company’s obligations under the Convertible Notes are fully and unconditionally guaranteed (except for customary release provisions), on a senior secured basis, by all of the subsidiaries of the Company, and the obligations of the Company and guarantors are secured by liens on substantially all of their respective assets. The guarantees by the Company’s subsidiaries of the Convertible Notes are joint and several. The Company has no independent assets or operations apart from the assets and operations of its wholly-owned subsidiaries. In addition, there are no significant restrictions on the Company’s or any subsidiary guarantor’s ability to obtain funds from its subsidiaries by dividend or loan. The Indenture for the Convertible Notes includes customary covenants that restrict the granting of liens and customary events of default, including, among other things, failure to issue securities upon conversion of the Convertible Notes. In addition, the Indenture, and the applicable collateral agreements, provide that any capital stock and other securities of any of the guarantors will be excluded from the collateral to the extent the pledge of such capital stock or other securities to secure the Convertible Notes would cause such guarantor to be required to file separate financial statements with the SEC pursuant to Rule 3-16 of Regulation S-X (as in effect from time to time).

The Convertible Notes will convert only (a) prior to the third anniversary of the issue date (such anniversary date, February 10, 2019), (i) upon the instruction of holders of a majority in principal amount of the Convertible Notes or (ii) upon the full and final resolution of all potential Investigation Claims (as defined below), as determined in good faith by the board of directors of the Company (the “Board”) (which determination shall require the affirmative vote of a supermajority of the non-management directors), and (b) from and after February 10, 2019 through their maturity date of December 31, 2030, upon the approval of the Board (which approval shall require the affirmative vote of a supermajority of the non-management directors). For these purposes, (i) “supermajority of the non-management directors” means five affirmative votes of non-management directors assuming six non-management directors eligible to vote and, in all other circumstances, the affirmative vote of at least 75% of the non-management directors eligible to vote and (ii) “Investigation Claim” means any claim held by a United States or Brazilian governmental unit and arising from or related to the procurement of that certain Agreement for the Provision of Drilling Services, dated as of February 4, 2009, by and between Petrobras Venezuela Investments & Services B.V. and Vantage Deepwater Company, as amended, modified, supplemented, or novated from time to time.

In the event of a change in control, the holders of our Convertible Notes have the right to require us to repurchase all or any part of the Convertible Notes at a price equal to 101% of their principal amount. We assessed the prepayment requirements and concluded that this feature met the criteria to be considered an embedded derivative and must be bifurcated and separately valued at fair value due to the discount on the Convertible Notes at issuance. We considered the probabilities of a change of control occurring and determined that the derivative had a de minimis value as of December 31, 2017 and March 31, 2018.

Upon the occurrence of specified change of control events or certain losses of our vessels in the agreements governing our 10% Second Lien Notes, Convertible Notes or 2016 Term Loan Facility, we will be required to offer to repurchase or repay all (or in the case of events of losses of vessels, an amount up to the amount of proceeds received from such event of loss) of such outstanding debt under such debt agreements at the prices and upon the terms set forth in the applicable agreements. In addition, in connection with certain asset sales, we will be required to offer to repurchase or repay such outstanding debt as set forth in the applicable debt agreements. In addition, in connection with their investigation, if the SEC determines that violations of the FCPA have occurred, the Company could be subject to civil and criminal sanctions, including monetary penalties, and if we become subject to any judgment, decree, order, governmental penalty or fine, this may constitute an event of default under the terms of our secured debt agreements and, following notice from the requisite lenders and/or noteholders, as applicable, result in our outstanding debt under the 2016 Term Loan Facility and 10% Second Lien Notes becoming immediately due and payable at par, and our outstanding debt under Convertible Notes becoming immediately due and payable at the make-whole amount specified in the Indenture governing the Convertible Notes.   

 

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5. Shareholders’ Equity

We have 50,000,000 authorized ordinary shares, par value $0.001 per share. Upon emergence from bankruptcy, we issued 5,000,053 ordinary shares in connection with the settlement of Liabilities Subject To Compromise in accordance with the Reorganization Plan and the VDC Note. As of March 31, 2018, 5,000,053 ordinary shares were issued and outstanding.

   On August 9, 2016, the Company adopted the Amended and Restated 2016 Management Incentive Plan (the “2016 Amended MIP”) to align the interests of participants with those of the shareholders by providing incentive compensation opportunities tied to the performance of the Company’s equity securities. Pursuant to the 2016 Amended MIP, the Compensation Committee may grant to employees, directors and consultants stock options, restricted stock, restricted stock units or other awards.

During the three months ended March 31, 2017, we granted to employees and directors 30,668 time-based restricted stock units (“TBGs”) and 67,685 performance-based restricted stock units (“PBGs”) under our 2016 Amended MIP. The TBGs vest annually, ratably over four years; however, accelerated vesting is provided for in the event of a qualified liquidity event as defined in the 2016 Amended MIP (a “QLE”). Otherwise, the settlement of any vested TBGs occurs upon the seventh anniversary of the Effective Date. The PBGs contain vesting eligibility provisions tied to the earlier of a QLE or seven years from the Effective Date. Upon the occurrence of a vesting eligibility event, the number of PBGs that actually vest will be dependent on the achievement of pre-determined Total Enterprise Value (“TEV”) targets specified in the grants. No awards were granted to employees or directors during the three months ended March 31, 2018.      

Both the TBGs and PBGs are classified as liabilities consistent with the classification of the underlying securities and under the provisions of ASC 718 Compensation – Stock Compensation are remeasured at each reporting period until settled. Share based compensation expense is recognized over the requisite service period until settled. We recognized approximately $1.7 million and $780,000 of share-based compensation expense for the three months ended March 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. In the three months ended March 31, 2018, 18,904 of previously granted TBGs vested.

Share based compensation expense for PBGs will be recognized when it is probable that the TEV targets will be met. Once it is probable the performance condition will be met, compensation expense based on the fair value of the PBGs at the balance sheet date will be recognized for the service period completed. As of March 31, 2018, we concluded that it was not probable that the TEV performance condition would be met and therefore, no share based compensation expense was recognized for PBGs.

 

 

6. Income Taxes

We are a Cayman Islands entity. The Cayman Islands do not impose corporate income taxes. Consequently, we have calculated income taxes based on the laws and tax rates in effect in the countries in which operations are conducted, or in which we and our subsidiaries are considered resident for income tax purposes. We operate in multiple countries under different legal forms. As a result, we are subject to the jurisdiction of numerous domestic and foreign tax authorities, as well as to tax agreements and treaties among these governments. Tax rates vary between jurisdictions, as does the tax base to which the rates are applied. Taxes may be levied based on net profit before taxes or gross revenues or as withholding tax on revenues. Determination of taxable income in any jurisdiction requires the interpretation of the related tax laws and regulations and the use of estimates and assumptions regarding significant future events, such as the amount, timing and character of deductions, permissible revenue recognition methods under the tax law and the sources and character of income and tax credits. Our income tax expense may vary substantially from one period to another as a result of changes in tax laws, regulations, agreements and treaties, foreign currency exchange restrictions, rig movements or our level of operations or profitability in each tax jurisdiction. Furthermore, our income taxes are generally dependent upon the results of our operations and, when we generate significant revenues in jurisdictions where the income tax liability is based on gross revenues or asset values, there is no correlation between our operating results and the income tax expense. Furthermore, in some jurisdictions we do not pay taxes or receive benefits for certain income and expense items, including interest expense, loss on extinguishment of debt and disposal gains or losses.  

On December 22, 2017, Public Law 115-97, commonly known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (the “Act”) was enacted.  The Act, among other things, makes significant changes to the U.S. corporate income tax system, including reducing the federal corporate income tax rate from 35% to 21%; changes certain business-related deductions, including modifying the rules regarding limitations on certain deductions for executive compensation, introducing a capital investment deduction in certain circumstances, placing certain limitations on the interest deduction, modifying the rules regarding the usability of certain net operating losses; and transitions U.S. international taxation from a worldwide tax system to a territorial tax system.  Our current tax liability and deferred tax assets in relation to the U.S. operations are based on the newly enacted corporate income tax rate. We continue to monitor and evaluate any new guidance in relation to the Act and potential impact on our financial statements.

Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are recorded for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been recognized in our financial statements or tax returns. We provide for deferred taxes on temporary differences between the financial statements and tax bases of assets and liabilities using the enacted tax rates which are expected to apply to taxable income when the

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temporary differences are expected to reverse. Deferred tax assets are also provided for certain loss and tax credit carryforwards. A valuation allowance is established to reduce deferred tax assets when it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax asset will not be realized.

In certain jurisdictions we are taxed under preferential tax regimes, which may require our compliance with specified requirements to sustain the tax benefits. We believe we are in compliance with the specified requirements and will continue to make all reasonable efforts to comply; however, our ability to meet the requirements of the preferential tax regimes may be affected by changes in laws, our business operations and other factors affecting our company and industry, many of which are beyond our control.

Our periodic tax returns are subject to examination by taxing authorities in the jurisdictions in which we operate in accordance with the normal statute of limitations applicable in a particular jurisdiction. These examinations may result in assessments of additional taxes that are resolved with the authorities or through the courts. Resolution of these matters involves uncertainties and there are no assurances as to the outcome. Our tax years 2010 and forward remain open to examination in many of our jurisdictions and we are currently involved in several tax examinations in jurisdictions where we are operating or have previously operated. As information becomes available during the course of these examinations, we may increase or decrease our estimates of tax assessments and accruals.

 

 

7. Commitments and Contingencies

We are subject to litigation, claims and disputes in the ordinary course of business, some of which may not be covered by insurance. There is an inherent risk in any litigation or dispute and no assurance can be given as to the outcome of any claims.

In July 2015, we became aware of media reports that Hamylton Padilha, the Brazilian agent VDC used in the contracting of the Titanium Explorer drillship to Petrobras, had entered into a plea arrangement with the Brazilian authorities in connection with his role in facilitating the payment of bribes to former Petrobras executives. Among other things, Mr. Padilha provided information to the Brazilian authorities of an alleged bribery scheme between former Petrobras executives and Mr. Hsin-Chi, who was, at the time of the alleged bribery scheme, a member of the Board of Directors and a significant shareholder of our former parent company, VDC. When we learned of Mr. Padilha’s plea agreement and the allegations, we voluntarily contacted the DOJ and the SEC to advise them of these  developments, as well as the fact that we had engaged outside counsel to conduct an internal investigation of the allegations. Since disclosing this matter to the DOJ and SEC, we have cooperated fully in their investigation of these allegations. In connection with such cooperation, we advised both agencies that in early 2010, we engaged outside counsel to investigate a report of alleged improper payments to customs and immigration officials in Asia. That investigation was concluded in 2011, and we determined at that time that no disclosure was warranted; however, in an abundance of caution, we provided the results of this investigation to the DOJ and SEC in light of the allegations in the Petrobras matter. In August 2017, we received a letter from the DOJ acknowledging our full cooperation in the DOJ’s investigation into the Company concerning possible violations of the FCPA by VDC in the Petrobras matter and indicating that the DOJ has closed such investigation without any action. In addition, the Company has engaged in negotiations with the staff of the Division of Enforcement of the SEC to resolve their investigation. We have reached an agreement in principle with the staff of the SEC relating to terms of a proposed offer of settlement, which is being presented to the Commission for approval. While there can be no assurance that the proposed offer of settlement will be accepted by the Commission, the Company believes the proposed resolution will become final in the second quarter of 2018. In connection with the proposed offer of settlement, we have accrued a liability in the amount of $5 million. If the Commission does not accept the proposed offer of settlement and the SEC determines that violations of the FCPA have occurred, the Company could be subject to civil and criminal sanctions, including monetary penalties, as well as additional requirements or changes to our business practices and compliance programs, any or all of which could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition. Additionally, if we become subject to any judgment, decree, order, governmental penalty or fine, this may constitute an event of default under the terms of our secured debt agreements and, following notice from the requisite lenders and/or noteholders, as applicable, result in our outstanding debt under the 2016 Term Loan Facility and 10% Second Lien Notes becoming immediately due and payable at par, and our outstanding debt under Convertible Notes becoming immediately due and payable at the make-whole amount specified in the indenture governing the Convertible Notes.

In connection with our bankruptcy cases, two appeals were filed relating to the confirmation of the Reorganization Plan. Specifically, on January 29, 2016, Hsin Chi Su and F3 Capital filed two appeals before the United States District Court for the District of Delaware seeking a reversal of (i) the Court’s determination that Hsin Chi Su and F3 Capital did not have standing to appear and be heard in the bankruptcy cases, which was made on the record at a hearing held on January 14, 2016, and (ii) the Court’s Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law, and Order (I) Approving the Debtors’ (A) Disclosure Statement Pursuant to Sections 1125 and 1126(b) of the Bankruptcy Code, (B) Solicitation of Votes and Voting Procedures, and (C) Forms of Ballots, and (II) Confirming the Amended Joint Prepackaged Chapter 11 Plan of Offshore Group Investment Limited and its Affiliated Debtors [Docket No. 188], which was entered on January 15, 2016. The appeals were consolidated on June 14, 2016. We cannot predict with certainty the ultimate outcome of any such appeals. An adverse outcome could negatively affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

On August 31, 2015, VDC received notice from Petrobras America, Inc. (“PAI”) and Petrobras Venezuela Investments & Services B.V. (“PVIS”) stating that PAI and PVIS were terminating the Agreement for the Provision of Drilling Services dated

16


 

February 4, 2009 (the “Drilling Contract”). The Drilling Contract was initially entered into between PVIS and Vantage Deepwater Company, one of our wholly-owned indirect subsidiaries, and was later novated by PVIS to PAI and by Vantage Deepwater Company to Vantage Deepwater Drilling, Inc., another of our wholly-owned indirect subsidiaries. The notice stated that PAI and PVIS were terminating the Drilling Contract because Vantage had allegedly breached its obligations under the agreement. Under the terms of the Drilling Contract we initiated arbitration proceedings before the American Arbitration Association on August 31, 2015, challenging PVIS and PAI’s wrongful attempt to terminate the Drilling Contract. Vantage has maintained that it complied with all of its obligations under the Drilling Contract and that PVIS and PAI’s attempt to terminate the agreement is both improper and a breach of the Drilling Contract.

In the ongoing arbitration proceeding, the hearing on the merits has concluded and the parties have exchanged post-hearing briefs. Vantage has asserted claims against PAI and PVIS for declaratory relief and monetary damages based on breach of contract. Vantage has also asserted a claim against Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (“PBP”) to enforce a guaranty provided by PBP.  The Petrobras entities (PVIS, PAI and PBP) have asserted that the Drilling Contract is void as illegally procured, that PVIS and PBP are not proper parties to the arbitration, and that PAI and PVIS properly terminated the contract. PAI has further counterclaimed for attorneys’ fees and costs alleging that Vantage failed to negotiate in good faith before commencing arbitration proceedings and is seeking disgorgement damages of approximately $102 million. We are vigorously pursuing our claims in the arbitration and deny that any of the claims or defenses asserted by the Petrobras entities have merit.

Pursuant to the terms of the Restructuring Agreement, the Company agreed to the Reorganization Plan and VDC agreed to commence official liquidation proceedings under the laws of the Cayman Islands. On December 2, 2015, pursuant to the Restructuring Agreement, the Company acquired two subsidiaries responsible for the management of the Company from VDC in exchange for the VDC Note.  In connection with our separation from our former parent company, we and the Joint Official Liquidators, appointed to oversee the liquidation of VDC, are in discussions regarding the settlement of certain intercompany receivables and payables as between the Company and its subsidiaries, on the one hand, and VDC and its subsidiaries on the other. While we continue to believe that our position regarding the settlement of such amounts is correct, we cannot predict the ultimate outcome of this matter should legal proceedings between the parties transpire.

 

8. Supplemental Financial Information

Prepaid Expenses and Other Current Assets

Prepaid expenses and other current assets consisted of the following as of the dates indicated:  

 

 

March 31, 2018

 

 

December 31, 2017

 

(unaudited, in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prepaid insurance

 

$

592

 

 

$

294

 

Sales tax receivable

 

 

5,133

 

 

 

5,652

 

Income tax receivable

 

 

902

 

 

 

1,374

 

Other receivables

 

 

181

 

 

 

158

 

Assets held for sale

 

 

 

 

 

2,050

 

Other

 

 

4,228

 

 

 

3,679

 

 

 

$

11,036

 

 

$

13,207

 

 

Property and Equipment, net

Property and equipment, net, consisted of the following as of the dates indicated:  

 

 

March 31, 2018

 

 

December 31, 2017

 

(unaudited, in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drilling equipment

 

$

883,789

 

 

$

883,598

 

Assets under construction

 

 

705

 

 

 

1,043

 

Office and technology equipment

 

 

18,452

 

 

 

18,778

 

Leasehold improvements

 

 

1,165

 

 

 

1,165

 

 

 

 

904,111

 

 

 

904,584

 

Accumulated depreciation

 

 

(158,942

)

 

 

(141,393

)

Property and equipment, net

 

$

745,169

 

 

$

763,191

 

17


 

 

Other Assets

Other assets consisted of the following as of the dates indicated:  

 

 

March 31, 2018

 

 

December 31, 2017

 

(unaudited, in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contract value, net

 

$

6,398

 

 

$

7,954

 

Deferred certification costs

 

 

3,455

 

 

 

3,497

 

Deferred mobilization costs

 

 

6,308

 

 

 

6,216

 

Deferred income taxes

 

 

2,626

 

 

 

3,162

 

Other non-current assets

 

 

1,440

 

 

 

1,106

 

 

 

$

20,227

 

 

$

21,935

 

 

Accrued Liabilities

Accrued liabilities consisted of the following as of the dates indicated:  

 

 

March 31, 2018

 

 

December 31, 2017

 

 

(unaudited, in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest

 

$

3,958

 

 

$

3,952

 

 

Compensation

 

 

5,956

 

 

 

10,285

 

 

Income taxes payable

 

 

3,898

 

 

 

3,740

 

 

SEC penalty payable

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

5,000

 

 

Unearned income

 

 

1,138

 

 

 

510

 

 

Other

 

 

1,413

 

 

 

1,630

 

 

 

 

$

21,363

 

 

$

25,117

 

 

  Long-term Liabilities

Long-term liabilities consisted of the following as of the dates indicated:

 

 

 

March 31, 2018

 

 

December 31, 2017

 

 

(unaudited, in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deferred revenue

 

$

6,182

 

 

$

6,757

 

 

Deferred income taxes

 

 

179

 

 

 

296

 

 

2016 MIP

 

 

6,145

 

 

 

4,399

 

 

Other non-current liabilities

 

 

5,631

 

 

 

5,743

 

 

 

 

$

18,137

 

 

$

17,195

 

 

Cash, Cash Equivalents and Restricted Cash

The following table provides a reconciliation of cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash reported within the Consolidated Balance Sheet that sum to the total of the same amounts shown in the Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows as of the dates indicated:

 

 

March 31, 2018

 

 

December 31, 2017

 

 

(unaudited, in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

192,739

 

 

$

195,455

 

 

Restricted cash

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

 

 

Total cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash shown in the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

 

$

197,739

 

 

$

195,455

 

 

18


 

The restricted cash balance as of March 31, 2018 relates to funds held in escrow in connection with the proposed offer of settlement with the SEC, as described in "Note 7. Commitments and Contingencies".

Contract Assets and Liabilities from Contracts with Customers

The following table reflects the changes in our contract liabilities, which we classify as “Unearned income”, in accrued liabilities, or “Deferred revenue”, in long-term liabilities, for the three months ended March 31, 2018:

 

 

March 31, 2018

 

 

December 31, 2017

 

 

Three month change

 

(unaudited, in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unearned income

 

$

1,138

 

 

$

510

 

 

$

628

 

Deferred revenue

 

 

6,182

 

 

 

6,757

 

 

 

(575

)

 

 

$

7,320

 

 

$

7,267

 

 

$

53

 

When we receive consideration from a customer prior to the commencement of services, we record deferred revenue, which represents a contract liability. Such deferred revenue typically results from mobilization fees billed prior to commencement of drilling contracts or to advance payments received on management contracts. During the three months ended March 31, 2018, we recognized mobilization revenue of $0.6 million that was included in deferred revenue at the beginning of the period.

The following table reflects the changes in our deferred contract fulfillment costs, which we classify as “Deferred mobilization costs”, for the three months ended March 31, 2018:

 

 

March 31, 2018

 

 

December 31, 2017

 

 

Three month change

 

(unaudited, in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deferred mobilization costs

 

$

6,308

 

 

$

6,216

 

 

$

92

 

 

 

$

6,308

 

 

$

6,216

 

 

$

92

 

Contract fulfillment costs are costs incurred under a contract for rig mobilizations and contract preparation before commencement of operations. During the three months ended March 31, 2018 and 2017, amortization of such costs totaled $1.5 million and $770,000, respectively.

Transactions with Former Parent Company

The following table summarizes the balances payable to VDC included in the Company's Consolidated Balance Sheet as of the dates indicated: 

 

 

March 31, 2018

 

 

December 31, 2017

 

 

(unaudited, in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable to related parties, net

 

$

17,278

 

 

$

17,278

 

 

 

 

$

17,278

 

 

$

17,278

 

 

 

Pursuant to the terms of the Restructuring Agreement, the Company agreed to the Reorganization Plan and VDC agreed to commence official liquidation proceedings under the laws of the Cayman Islands. On December 2, 2015, pursuant to the Restructuring Agreement, the Company acquired two subsidiaries responsible for the management of the Company from VDC in exchange for the VDC Note. In connection with our separation from our former parent company, we and the Joint Official Liquidators, appointed to oversee the liquidation of VDC, are in discussions regarding the settlement of certain intercompany receivables and payables as between the Company and its subsidiaries, on the one hand, and VDC and its subsidiaries on the other. While we continue to believe that our position regarding the settlement of such amounts is correct, we cannot predict the ultimate outcome of this matter should legal proceedings between the parties transpire.

 

9. Business Segment and Significant Customer Information

We aggregate our contract drilling operations into one reportable segment even though we provide contract drilling services with different types of rigs, including jackup rigs and drillships, and in different geographic regions. Our operations are dependent on the global oil and gas industry and our rigs are relocated based on demand for our services and customer requirements. Our customers consist primarily of large international oil and gas companies, national or government-controlled oil and gas companies and other international exploration and production companies.  

Additionally, for drilling units owned by others, we provide construction supervision services while under construction, preservation management services when stacked and operations and marketing services for operating rigs.  In September 2013, we signed an agreement to supervise and manage the construction of two ultra-deepwater drillships for a third party. In January 2017, we signed an agreement to manage the preservation of two ultra-deepwater drillships for a third party. Our management business represented approximately 0.5% and 1.0% of our total revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

19


 

For the three months ended March 31, 2018 and 2017, all of our revenue was from countries outside of the United States. Consequently, we are exposed to the risk of changes in economic, political and social conditions inherent in foreign operations.  Three customers accounted for approximately 46%, 17% and 11% of consolidated revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2018. For the three months ended March 31, 2017, three customers accounted for approximately 64%, 19% and 14% of consolidated revenue.    

Our revenue by country was as follows for the periods indicated:  

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31,

 

 

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

(unaudited, in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Congo

 

$

35,853

 

 

$

26,875

 

 

India

 

 

6,530

 

 

 

 

 

Malaysia

 

 

 

 

 

7,923

 

 

Qatar

 

 

 

 

 

5,784

 

 

Other countries (a)

 

 

15,280

 

 

 

1,467

 

 

Total revenues

 

$

57,663

 

 

$

42,049

 

 

 

(a)

Other countries represent countries in which we operate that individually had operating revenues representing less than 10% of total revenues earned.

Our property and equipment, net by country was as follows as of the dates indicated: 

 

 

March 31, 2018

 

 

December 31, 2017

 

 

(unaudited, in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Congo

 

$

250,817

 

 

$

256,200

 

 

India

 

 

152,470

 

 

 

155,362

 

 

Malaysia

 

 

 

 

 

103,603

 

 

South Africa

 

 

175,711

 

 

 

179,468

 

 

Other countries (a)

 

 

166,171

 

 

 

68,558

 

 

Total property and equipment

 

$

745,169

 

 

$

763,191

 

 

 

(a)

Other countries represent countries in which we individually had property and equipment, net, representing less than 10% of total property and equipment, net.

A substantial portion of our assets are mobile drilling units. Asset locations at the end of the period are not necessarily indicative of the geographic distribution of the revenues generated by such assets during the periods.

 

The following table presents our revenue disaggregated by revenue source for the periods indicated:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31, 2018

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31, 2017

 

 

 

Jackups

 

 

Deepwater

 

 

Management

 

 

Consolidated

 

 

Jackups

 

 

Deepwater

 

 

Management

 

 

Consolidated

 

(unaudited, in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dayrate revenue

 

$

19,950

 

 

$

31,070

 

 

$

301

 

 

$

51,321

 

 

$

12,347

 

 

$

25,709

 

 

$

401

 

 

$

38,457

 

Mobilization revenue

 

 

 

 

 

575

 

 

 

 

 

 

575

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reimbursable revenue

 

 

3,126

 

 

 

1,578

 

 

 

1,063

 

 

 

5,767

 

 

 

1,359

 

 

 

1,167

 

 

 

1,066

 

 

 

3,592

 

Total revenue

 

$

23,076

 

 

$

33,223

 

 

$

1,364

 

 

$

57,663

 

 

$

13,706

 

 

$

26,876

 

 

$

1,467

 

 

$

42,049

 

 

 

20


 

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

The following discussion is intended to assist you in understanding our financial position at March 31, 2018 and our results of operations for the three months ended March 31, 2018 and 2017. The discussion should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and notes thereto included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2017. The results of operations for the interim periods are not necessarily indicative of the operating results for the full fiscal year or any future periods. Certain previously reported amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current year presentation.

Overview

We are an international offshore drilling company focused on operating a fleet of modern, high specification drilling units. Our principal business is to contract drilling units, related equipment and work crews, primarily on a dayrate basis to drill oil and natural gas wells for our customers. Through our fleet of drilling units we are a provider of offshore contract drilling services to major, national and independent oil and natural gas companies, focused on international markets. Additionally, for drilling units owned by others, we provide construction supervision services while under construction, preservation management services when stacked and operations and marketing services for operating rigs.

The following table sets forth certain current information concerning our offshore drilling fleet as of April 20, 2018.  

Name

 

 

Year Built

 

 

Water Depth

Rating (feet)

 

 

Drilling Depth
Capacity

(feet)

 

 

Status

Jackups

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emerald Driller

 

 

2008

 

 

 

375

 

 

 

30,000

 

 

Operating

Sapphire Driller

 

 

2009

 

 

 

375

 

 

 

30,000

 

 

Operating

Aquamarine Driller

 

 

2009

 

 

 

375

 

 

 

30,000

 

 

Operating

Topaz Driller

 

 

2009

 

 

 

375

 

 

 

30,000

 

 

Mobilizing

Drillships (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Platinum Explorer

 

 

2010

 

 

 

12,000

 

 

 

40,000

 

 

Operating

Titanium Explorer

 

 

2012

 

 

 

12,000

 

 

 

40,000

 

 

Warm Stacked

Tungsten Explorer

 

 

2013

 

 

 

12,000

 

 

 

40,000

 

 

Operating

(1) The drillships are designed to drill in up to 12,000 feet of water. The Platinum Explorer, Titanium Explorer and Tungsten Explorer are currently equipped to drill in 10,000 feet of water.

In April 2017, we purchased the Vantage 260, a class 154-44C jackup rig, and related multi-year drilling contract. In August 2017, we substituted the Sapphire Driller, a Baker Marine Pacific Class 375 jack-up rig, to fulfill the drilling contract. On October 19, 2017, we entered into a purchase and sale agreement to sell the Vantage 260. The transaction closed and the Vantage 260 was sold on February 26, 2018.

Reorganization

On the Petition Date, we filed a reorganization plan in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware (In re Vantage Drilling International (F/K/A Offshore Group Investment Limited), et al., Case No. 15-12422). On January 15, 2016, the District Court of Delaware confirmed the Company’s pre-packaged reorganization plan and we emerged from bankruptcy effective on the Effective Date.

Pursuant to the terms of the Reorganization Plan, the pre-bankruptcy term loans and senior notes were retired on the Effective Date by issuing to the debtholders 4,344,959 Units in the reorganized Company. Each Unit of securities originally consisted of one New Share and $172.61 of principal of the Convertible Notes, subject to adjustment upon the payment of PIK interest and certain cases of redemption or conversion of the Convertible Notes, as well as share splits, share dividends, consolidation or reclassification of the New Shares. The New Shares and the Convertible Notes are subject to the terms of an agreement that prohibits the New Shares and Convertible Notes from being traded separately.

The Convertible Notes are convertible into New Shares in certain circumstances, at a conversion price (subject to adjustment in accordance with the terms of the Indenture for the Convertible Notes) which was $95.60 as of the issue date. The Indenture for the Convertible Notes includes customary covenants that restrict, among other things, the granting of liens and customary events of default, including among other things, failure to issue securities upon conversion of the Convertible Notes. As of March 31, 2018, taking into account the payment of PIK interest on the Convertible Notes to such date, each such Unit consisted of one New Share and $175.90 of principal of Convertible Notes.

Other significant elements of the Reorganization Plan included:

Second Amended and Restated Credit Agreement. The Company’s pre-petition credit agreement was amended and restated to (i) replace the $32.0 million revolving letter of credit commitment under its pre-petition facility with a new $32.0 million revolving letter

21


 

of credit facility and (ii) repay the $150 million of outstanding borrowings under its pre-petition facility with (a) $7.0 million of cash and (b) the issuance of $143.0 million initial term loans.

10% Senior Secured Second Lien Notes. Holders of the Company’s pre-petition  secured debt claims were eligible to participate in a rights offering conducted by the Company for $75.0 million of the Company’s 10% Second Lien Notes. In connection with this rights offering, certain creditors entered into a “backstop” agreement to purchase 10% Second Lien Notes if the offer was not fully subscribed. The premium paid to such creditors under the backstop agreement was approximately $2.2 million, paid $1.1 million in cash and $1.1 million in additional 10% Second Lien Notes, resulting in a total issued amount of $76.1 million of 10% Second Lien Notes, and in net cash proceeds of $73.9 million, after deducting the cash portion of the backstop premium.

VDC Note. Effective with the Company’s emergence from bankruptcy, VDC’s former equity interest in the Company was cancelled. Immediately following that event, the VDC Note was converted into 655,094 New Shares in accordance with the terms thereof, in satisfaction of the obligation thereunder, which, including accrued interest, totaled approximately $62.6 million as of such date.

The Reorganization Plan allowed the Company to maintain all operating assets and agreements. All trade payables, credits, wages and other related obligations were unimpaired by the Reorganization Plan.

Upon emergence from bankruptcy on the Effective Date, we adopted fresh-start accounting in accordance with ASC 852, which resulted in the Company becoming a new entity for financial reporting purposes. Upon adoption of fresh-start accounting, our assets and liabilities were recorded at their fair values as of the Effective Date. The Effective Date fair values of our assets and liabilities differed materially from the recorded values of our assets and liabilities as reflected in our historical consolidated balance sheets.

Business Outlook

Expectations about future oil and natural gas prices have historically been a key driver of demand for our services. The International Energy Agency (the “Agency”), in their April 2018 Oil Market Report, forecasts a growth in demand of 1.5 million barrels per day for 2018. The Agency reports that this growth, together with current forecast production levels, will result in an inventory draw of 0.6 million barrels per day for 2018. Although oil prices have partially rebounded from the historical lows experienced during early 2016 to levels above $60 per barrel at the end of March 2018, this increase has not yet resulted in a measurable increase in operators’ offshore capital expenditures.

In addition to the reduction in demand for drilling rigs, the additional supply of newbuild rigs is further depressing the market. According to Bassoe Offshore A.S., there are currently 99 jackups and 29 deepwater/harsh environment floaters on order at shipyards with scheduled deliveries extending out to April 2021. It is unclear when these drilling rigs will actually be delivered as many rig deliveries have already been deferred to later dates and some rig orders have been canceled. In response to the oversupply of drilling rigs, a number of competitors are removing older, less efficient rigs from their fleets by either cold stacking the drilling rigs or taking them permanently out of service.

Since the oil price decline in 2014, 123 rigs, with an average age of approximately 36 years, have been removed from the drilling fleet according to Bassoe Offshore AS (“Bassoe”). Of these 123 rigs, 83 are semisubmersibles, 18 are drillships and 22 are jackups. In addition, Bassoe estimates that approximately 300 additional rigs have the potential to be recycled by year-end 2019. While we believe this is an important element in bringing the supply of drilling rigs back into balance with demand, we do not anticipate that it will be sufficient to materially improve market conditions in 2018.

In response to market conditions and to excessive levels of idle capacity in recent years, there has been intense pressure on operating dayrates as drilling contractors have generally preferred to maintain rigs in an active state and customers have generally favored recently operating rigs over reactivated cold-stacked rigs. Therefore, while opportunities for our services have increased over the past year, we believe the market will continue to be highly competitive for the foreseeable future and dayrates will remain depressed.

The following table reflects a summary of our contract drilling backlog coverage of days contracted and related revenue as of March 31, 2018 forward (based on information available at that time).  

 

Percentage of Days Contracted

 

 

Revenues Contracted

(in thousands)

 

 

2018

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2019

 

 

Beyond

 

Jackups

 

89%

 

 

 

49%

 

 

$

59,983

 

 

$

38,820

 

 

$

7,027

 

Drillships

 

59%

 

 

 

33%

 

 

$

88,988

 

 

$

36,896

 

 

$

33,257

 

 

 

22


 

Results of Operations

Operating results for our contract drilling services are dependent on three primary metrics: available days, rig utilization and dayrates. The following table sets forth this selected operational information for the periods indicated.  

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31,

 

 

 

 

2018