10-Q/A 1 sfmi1021201410qa.htm AMENDED QTR REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING 09/30/2013

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549


Form 10-Q/A

(Amendment No. 1 of FORM 10-Q)

(Mark One)

x   QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2013

or

[ ]   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15 (d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from ___________ to __________

Commission file number 000-53765

SILVER FALCON MINING, INC.

(Exact name of small business issuer as specified in its charter)

DELAWARE

26-1266967

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

(IRS Employer Identification No.)

1001 3rd Ave., W., Bradenton, Florida 34205

 (Address of principal executive offices)

(941) 761-7819

 (Issuer’s telephone number, including area code)

______________________________________________________

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  x  Yes  [ ]  No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer [ ] Accelerated filer [ ]Non-accelerated filer [ ] Smaller reporting company x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes [ ]   No x

State the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of common equity, as of the latest practicable date: 1,341,900,755 and 31,753,180 shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock, respectively, as of November 4, 2013.

 

EXPLANATORY NOTE: The Company has included the XBRL Interactive Data Table 101 Exhibits with this amended filing.

 

 

1

 

SILVER FALCON MINING, INC.

(AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)

FORM 10-Q REPORT INDEX

PART I.  FINANCIAL INFORMATION

3

Item 1.  Financial Statements

3

Item 2.  Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

19

Item 3.  Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk.

27

Item 4.  Controls and Procedures.

27

PART II.  OTHER INFORMATION.

27

Item 1.  Legal Proceedings.

27

Item 1A.  Risk Factors.

27

Item 2.  Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds.

28

Item 3.  Defaults upon Senior Securities.

28

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.

28

Item 5.  Other Information.

28

Item 6.  Exhibits.

28

SIGNATURES

30



2


PART I.  FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

SILVER FALCON MINING, INC.

(AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET

SEPTEMBER 30, 2013 AND DECEMBER 31, 2012


 

SEPTEMBER 30,

2013

DECEMBER 31, 2012

 

(UNAUDITED)

(AUDITED)

ASSETS

  

Cash

          $             32,241                     

$              3,141

Inventories, work in process

2,538,929

2,618,655

Due from related parties, net of amounts due to related parties

22,006

823,244

Total current assets

2,593,176

3,445,040

   

Mill equipment, net of accumulated depreciation of $1,446,849 and $1,131,849, respectively (see Note 4)

711,823

990,233

Properties

2,851,073

2,842,253

Prepaid expenses (see Notes 5 and 8)

447,177

312,183

Other assets

22,797

9,900

Total Assets

$       6,626,046

$      7,599,609

   

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT

  

Accounts payable

$          870,670

$         936,456

Payroll liabilities

277,113

187,142

Accrued compensation

610,500

-

Accrued interest

136,543

74,199

Notes payable - current portion (see Note 3)

2,466,146

2,906,605

Total current liabilities

4,360,972

4,104,402

   

Notes payable (see Note 3)

59,500

407,228

Total liabilities

4,420,472

4,511,630

   

STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT

  

Common stock, Class A, par value $0.0001, 10,000,000,000 shares authorized, 1,315,100,755 and 815,008,857, issued and outstanding, respectively

131,510

81,501

Common stock, Class B, par value $0.0001, 250,000,000 shares authorized, 21,253,180 and 15,865,419 issued and outstanding, respectively

2,126

1,587

Additional paid in capital

51,635,602

45,781,931

Accumulated deficit

(49,563,664)

(42,777,040)

 

2,205,574

3,087,979

Total liabilities and stockholders' deficit

 $       6,626,046

 $      7,599,609

See accompanying notes to financial statements.



3


SILVER FALCON MINING, INC.

(AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

FOR THE NINE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2013 AND 2012,

AND THE PERIOD FROM OCTOBER 15, 2007 (INCEPTION) TO SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

(UNAUDITED)


 

2013

2012

Cumulative from Inception

       

Revenue

        $       30,902

        $       82,415   

 $        370,005

       

Expenses

     

Consulting fees

       $   1,371,980

 $  1,999,527

$   17,848,548

Exploration and improvement

            94,129

        8,240

           2,581,871

Mill operating expenses

346,556

329,691

2,361,090

Property lease fees

            750,000

750,000

2,000,000

Compensation expense

          69,703

309,762

           2,846,885

Stock compensation expense

1,210,260

1,375,726

10,603,145

Depreciation expense

            315,000

290,462

1,446,849

General and administrative

          1,198,628

        793,047

        5,611,861

 

5,356,256

     5,856,455

45,300,249

 

 

 

 

 Loss from operations

     (5,325,354)

    (5,774,040)

(44,930,244)

       

Interest expense

          (696,547)

(293,414)                    

(1,779,698)

Debt conversion expense

(764,723)

(2,077,175)

(2,853,722)

       

Net Loss

$  (6,786,624)

$ (8,144,629)

$  (49,563,664)

       

Net loss per common share - basic and diluted

    $         (0.01)

 $          (0.01)

         (0.13)

       

Weighted average number of common shares outstanding – basic and diluted

     1,036,936,339

638,568,479

369,822,883

 

See accompanying notes to financial statements.



4


SILVER FALCON MINING, INC.

(AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2013 AND 2012

 (UNAUDITED)


 

2013

2012

   

Revenue

       $        10,200

        $       7,161

 

Expenses

Consulting fees

       $      253,907

 $  443,657

Exploration and improvement

            1,092

        6,576

Mill operating expenses

126,343

185,393

Property lease fees

            250,000

250,000

Compensation expense

          4,520

89,071

Stock compensation expense

337,092

458,575

Depreciation expense

            105,000

97,778

General and administrative

          415,375

        213,735

 

1,493,329

1,744,785

 

 

 

 Loss from operations

     (1,483,129)

    (1,737,624)

 

Interest expense

          (270,875)

(139,055)                    

Debt conversion expense

(441,297)

(20,548)

 

Net Loss

$(2,195,301)

$ (1,897,227)

 

Net loss per common share - basic and diluted

    $                -

$                -

 

Weighted average number of common shares outstanding – basic and diluted

     1,191,374,198

681,475,345

 

See accompanying notes to financial statements.



5


 

SILVER FALCON MINING, INC.

(AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

FOR THE NINE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2013 AND 2012,

AND THE PERIOD FROM OCTOBER 15, 2007 (INCEPTION) TO SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

(UNAUDITED)


 

 2013

 2012

Cumulative from Inception

Cash flows from operating activities

   

Net Loss

 $   (6,786,624)

 $  (8,144,629)

$  (49,563,664)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

   

Issuance of common stock for consulting services

      1,387,565

     1,894,636

22,019,383

Issuance of common stock for compensation

1,434,237

1,834,302

6,981,746

Issuance of common stock for related party

294,000

1,534,854

1,951,979

Issuance of common stock for road access

-

-

13,050

Issuance of common stock for interest

7,697

133,335

203,992

Issuance of common stock for rent

-

        113,600

1,315,730

Depreciation and amortization

           581,438

419,038

1,922,210

Debt conversion expense

764,723

2,077,175

2,853,722

Options granted

-

-

3,845,375

Increase (decrease) in operating assets and liabilities:

   

Inventories, work in process

-

(766,677)

(2,618,655)

Prepaid expenses

(134,994)

(475,726)

(447,177)

Due from related party

801,238

(712,802)

(22,006)

Other assets

66,829

(6,000)

 61,929

Accounts payable and accrued expenses

         (65,786)

        (248,770)

1,180,975

Accrued interest

408,886

(59,366)

539,463

Accrued payroll and payroll liabilities

         700,471

        50,376

2,382,534

Net cash used in operating activities

(540,320)

       (2,356,654)

(7,379,414)

    

Cash flows from investing activities

   

Purchase of equipment

        (36,590)

        (168,778)

(2,133,846)

Purchase of mill and mining properties

(8,820)

(58,365)

(2,096,985)

Cash acquired in acquisition

-

-

39,780

Net cash used in investing activities

        (45,410)

(227,143)

(4,191,051)



6


SILVER FALCON MINING, INC.

(AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

FOR THE NINE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2013 AND 2012,

AND THE PERIOD FROM OCTOBER 15, 2007 (INCEPTION) TO SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

(UNAUDITED)

(continued)

 

2013

2012

Cumulative from Inception

Cash flows from financing activities

   

Proceeds from notes payable

650,830

2,758,842

11,784,797

Proceeds from sale of common stock

-

65,667

140,667

Purchase of common stock

-

-

(63,000)

Repayments of notes payable

(36,000)

(174,258)

(259,758)

Proceeds from Directors loans

-

-

338,113

Repayments of Directors loans

-

-

(338,113)

Net cash provided by financing activities

      614,830

2,650,251

11,602,706

    

Net increase in cash

29,100

66,454

32,241

    

Cash - beginning of year

3,141

-

-

Cash - end of year

    $        32,241

$         66,454

        $    32,241

SUPPLEMENTARY DISCLOSURE OF NONCASH TRANSACTIONS

 2013

 2012

Cumulative from Inception

    

Shares issued for notes payable conversions

2,015,997

3,723,268

9,492,717

Shares issued for accrued compensation

-

-

1,494,921

Shares issued for rent

-

113,600

453,600

Shares issued for interest

7,697

133,335

203,992

Shares issued for related party

294,000

1,534,854

1,951,979

Shares issued for acquisition

-

-

355,085

Shares issued for purchase mining properties  

-

-

754,089

Shares issued for compensation

1,434,237

1,834,302

6,981,746

 

See accompanying notes to financial statements


7

 


SILVER FALCON MINING, INC.

 (AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT

FOR THE NINE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

(UNAUDITED)


    

 COMMON STOCK

 COMMON STOCK

 ADDITIONAL

  
    

 SERIES A

 SERIES B

 PAID IN

 ACCUMULATED

 
    

 SHARES

 AMOUNT

 SHARES

 AMOUNT

 CAPITAL

 DEFICIT

 TOTAL

           

Balance as of December 31, 2012

  

815,008,857

$   81,501

15,865,419

$        1,587

$   45,781,931

$        (42,777,040)

$       3,087,979

          

Issuance of common stock for services

  

145,551,883

14,555

-

-

1,373,010

-

1,387,565

Issuance of common stock for related party

  

12,000,000

1,200

-

-

292,800

-

294,000

Issuance of common stock for interest

  

320,731

32

-

-

7,665

-

7,697

Issuance of common stock for notes payable conversions

  

270,621,586

27,062

-

-

1,988,935

-

2,015,997

Issuance of common stock for compensation

  

76,985,459

7,699

-

-

1,426,538

-

1,434,237

Conversion of Class A to Class B common stock

  

(5,387,761)

(539)

5,387,761

539

  

-

Beneficial conversion and debt issue costs

    

-

-

764,723

-

764,723

Net loss

  

-

-

-

-

-

(6,786,624)

(6,786,624)

          

Balance as of September 30, 2013

  

1,315,100,755

$  131,510

21,253,180

$        2,126

$   51,635,602

$      (49,563,664)

$    2,205,574

          


See accompanying notes to financial statements.



8


SILVER FALCON MINING, INC.

(AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE NINE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2013 AND 2012

(UNAUDITED)


NOTE 1 - ORGANIZATION AND DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS

Silver Falcon Mining, Inc. (the “Company,” “we” or “us”) was formed in the State of Delaware on October 11th, 2007.  On October 15, 2007, we completed a holding company reorganization with Dicut, Inc. (“Dicut”) pursuant to Section 251(g) of the Delaware General Corporation Law.  Dicut previously operated in the information technology business, but ceased operations in 2005.

On October 11, 2007, GoldLand leased its mineral rights on War Eagle Mountain to us.  Under the lease, we are responsible for all mining activities on War Eagle Mountain, and we are obligated to pay GoldLand annual lease payments of $1,000,000, payable on a monthly basis, a monthly non-accountable expense reimbursement of $10,000 during any month in which minerals are mined from the leased premises, and a royalty of 15% of all amounts we receive from the processing of minerals mined from tailing piles on the premises or through shafts or adits located on the premises.  The lease provides that lease payments must commence April 1, 2008, but by agreement with GoldLand we extended the commencement date to July 1, 2010.  On the first quarter of 2011, we amended the above-described lease with GoldLand.  The amendment provided that the annual lease payments would be deferred for a fifteen month period from October 2010 to December 2011, and the term of the Lease would be extended for an equal amount of time.  We remain obligated to pay any royalties or the nonaccountable fee that accrues during the deferral period.  

NOTE 2 - SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Revenue Recognition

Sales of all metals products sold directly to refiners, including by-product metals, are recorded as revenues when the refiner pay us for the metals derived from our shipments to the refiner. Revenue is recognized, net of treatment and refining charges, from a sale when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, the price is determinable, the product has been delivered, the title has been transferred to the customer and collection of the sales price has been received.  

Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents consist of all cash balances and highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less. Because of the short maturity of these investments, the carrying amounts approximate their fair value.

Inventories

Inventories are stated at the lower of average costs incurred or estimated net realizable value. Inventories include metals product inventory, which is determined by the stage at which the minerals are in processing (stockpiled minerals, work in process and finished goods).

Stockpiled minerals inventory represents minerals that have been hauled our mill site for further processing. Stockpiles are measured by estimating the number of tons added and removed from the stockpile, the number of contained metal ounces or pounds (based on assay data) and the estimated metallurgical recovery rates (based on the expected processing method). Stockpile mineral tonnages are verified by periodic surveys. Costs are allocated to a stockpile based on relative values of material stockpiled and processed using current mining costs incurred up to the point of stockpiling the minerals, including applicable overhead, depreciation, depletion and amortization relating to mining operations, and removed at each stockpile’s average cost per recoverable unit.

 

9


Work in process inventory represents materials that are currently in the process of being converted to a saleable product and includes inventories in our milling process. In-process material is measured based on assays of the material fed into the process and the projected recoveries of the respective plants. In-process inventories are valued at the average cost of the material fed into the process attributable to the source material coming from the mines and stockpiles, plus the in-process conversion costs, including applicable depreciation relating to the process facilities incurred to that point in the process.

The Company categorizes all of its inventory as work in process.  The Company processes its inventory into dore bars which its ships to a refiner for final processing, and therefore it never holds finished goods.

At the present time, our inventories consist of the historical cost of transporting raw minerals from our mine site to our milling site for further processing. Until we begin receiving regular revenues from our milling and smelting operations, all milling and smelting costs are expensed as incurred.

Property, Plant and Equipment

Expenditures for new facilities or equipment and expenditures that extend the useful lives of existing facilities or equipment are capitalized and recorded at cost. The facilities and equipment are depreciated using the straight-line method at rates sufficient to depreciate such costs over the estimated productive lives.

Costs are capitalized when it has been determined a mineral body can be economically developed as a result of establishing proven and probable reserves. The development stage begins at new projects when our management and/or Board of Directors makes the decision to bring a mine into commercial operation, and ends when the operation stage, or exploitation of reserves, begins.  Expenditures incurred during the development and operation stages for new facilities, new assets or expenditures that extend the useful lives of existing facilities and major mine development expenditures are capitalized, including primary development costs such as costs of building access ways, shaft sinking, lateral development, drift development, ramps and infrastructure developments.

Costs for exploration, secondary development at operating mines, and maintenance and repairs on capitalized property, plant and equipment are charged to operations as incurred. Exploration costs include those relating to activities carried out (a) in search of previously unidentified mineral deposits, (b) at undeveloped concessions, or (c) at operating mines already containing proven and probable reserves, where a determination remains pending as to whether new target deposits outside of the existing reserve areas can be economically developed. Secondary development costs are incurred for preparation of a mineral body for processing in a specific block, stope or work area, providing a relatively short-lived benefit only to the mine area they relate to, and not to the mineral body as a whole.

When assets are retired or sold, the costs and related allowances for depreciation and amortization are eliminated from the accounts and any resulting gain or loss is reflected in current period net income (loss). Idle facilities placed on standby basis are carried at the lower of net carrying value or estimated net realizable value.



10

 

Proven and Probable Reserves 

At least annually, management reviews the reserves used to estimate the quantities and grades of minerals at our mines which we believe can be recovered and sold economically.  Management’s calculations of proven and probable mineral reserves are based on engineering and geological estimates, including future metals prices and operating costs. From time to time, management obtains external audits of reserves.  To date, we have not obtained any third party report regarding potential reserves on our owned and leased property at War Eagle Mountain, and accordingly we have not estimated that there are any proven or probable reserves on our property.

Reserve estimates will change as existing reserves are depleted through production and as processing costs and/or metals prices change. A significant drop in metals prices may reduce reserves by making some portion of such minerals uneconomic to produce. Changes in reserves may also reflect that actual grades of minerals processed may be different from stated reserve grades because of variation in grades in areas mined, mining dilution and other factors. Estimated reserves, particularly for properties that have not yet commenced production, may require revision based on actual experience. It is reasonably possible that certain of our estimates of proven and probable mineral reserves will change in the near term, which could result in a change to estimated future cash flows, associated carrying values of the asset and amortization rates in future reporting periods, among other things.

Declines in the market prices of metals, increased processing or capital costs, reduction in the grade or tonnage of the deposit or an increase in the dilution of the minerals or reduced recovery rates may render mineral reserves uneconomic to exploit unless the utilization of forward sales contracts or other hedging techniques are sufficient to offset such effects. If our realized price for the metals we produce were to decline substantially below the levels set for calculation of reserves for an extended period, there could be material delays in new projects, net losses, reduced cash flow, restatements or reductions in reserves and asset write-downs in the applicable accounting periods. Reserves should not be interpreted as assurances of mine life or of the profitability of current or future operations. No assurance can be given that the estimate of the amount of metal or the indicated level of recovery of these metals will be realized.

To date, we have not obtained any third party report regarding potential reserves on our owned and leased property at War Eagle Mountain, and accordingly we have not estimated that there are any proven or probable reserves on our property.

Depreciation, Depletion and Amortization

Capitalized costs are depreciated or depleted using the straight-line method or unit-of-production method at rates sufficient to depreciate such costs over the shorter of estimated productive lives of such facilities or the useful life of the individual assets. Productive lives do not exceed the useful life of the individual asset. Determination of expected useful lives for amortization calculations are made on a property-by-property or asset-by-asset basis at least annually. Our estimates for mineral reserves are a key component in determining our depreciation rates. Our estimates of proven and probable mineral reserves may change, possibly in the near term, resulting in changes to depreciation, depletion and amortization rates in future reporting periods.

Undeveloped mineral interests are amortized on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives taking into account residual values. At such time as an undeveloped mineral interest is converted to proven and probable reserves, the remaining unamortized basis is amortized on a unit-of-production basis as described above.


11


Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

We review and evaluate our long-lived assets for impairment when events or changes in circumstances indicate that the related carrying amounts may not be recoverable.  An impairment is considered to exist if the total estimated future cash flows on an undiscounted basis are less than the carrying amount of the assets, including goodwill, if any.  An impairment loss is measured and recorded based on discounted estimated future cash flows. Future cash flows are estimated based on quantities of recoverable minerals, expected gold and other commodity prices (considering current and historical prices, price trends and related factors), processing levels, operating costs and capital, all based on life-of-mine plans. Existing proven and probable reserves and value beyond proven and probable reserves, including mineralization other than proven and probable reserves and other material that is not part of the measured, indicated or inferred resource base, are included when determining the fair value of mine site reporting units at acquisition and, subsequently, in determining whether the assets are impaired. The term “recoverable minerals” refers to the estimated amount of gold or other commodities that will be obtained after taking into account losses during mineral processing and treatment. Estimates of recoverable minerals from such exploration stage mineral interests are risk adjusted based on management’s relative confidence in such materials. In estimating future cash flows, assets are grouped at the lowest level for which there are identifiable cash flows that are largely independent of future cash flows from other asset groups.  Our estimates of future cash flows are based on numerous assumptions and it is possible that actual future cash flows will be significantly different than the estimates, as actual future quantities of recoverable minerals, gold and other commodity prices, processing levels, operating costs and capital are each subject to significant risks and uncertainties.

Reclamation and Remediation Costs (Asset Retirement Obligations)

We accrue costs associated with environmental remediation obligations in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification 410, “Asset Retirement and Environmental Obligations.” ASC No. 410 requires us to record a liability for the present value of our estimated environmental remediation costs, and the related asset created with it, in the period in which the liability is incurred. The liability will be accreted and the asset will be depreciated over the life of the related assets. Adjustments for changes resulting from the passage of time and changes to either the timing or amount of the original present value estimate underlying the obligation will be made.

Future closure, reclamation and environmental-related expenditures are difficult to estimate, in many circumstances, due to the early stage nature of investigations, and uncertainties associated with defining the nature and extent of environmental contamination and the application of laws and regulations by regulatory authorities and changes in reclamation or remediation technology. We periodically review accrued liabilities for such reclamation and remediation costs as evidence becomes available indicating that our liabilities have potentially changed. Changes in estimates at our non-operating properties are reflected in current period net income (loss).  We had no accruals for closure costs, reclamation and environmental matters for operating and non-operating properties at September 30, 2013.

Goodwill

We evaluate, on at least an annual basis during the fourth quarter, the carrying amount of goodwill to determine whether current events and circumstances indicate that such carrying amount may no longer be recoverable. To accomplish this, we compare the estimated fair value of our reporting units to their carrying amounts. If the carrying value of a reporting unit exceeds its estimated fair value, we compare the implied fair value of the reporting unit’s goodwill to its carrying amount, and any excess of the carrying value over the fair value is charged to earnings. Our fair value estimates are based on numerous assumptions and it is possible that actual fair value will be significantly different than the estimates, as actual future quantities of recoverable minerals, gold and other commodity prices, processing levels, operating costs and capital are each subject to significant risks and uncertainties.


12

 

Stock Based Compensation

We have issued and may issue stock in lieu of cash for certain transactions. The fair value of the stock, which is based on comparable cash purchases, third party quotations, or the value of services, whichever is more readily determinable, is used to value the transaction in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification 718, “Stock Compensation”.

Use of Estimates

Our Consolidated Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The preparation of our Consolidated Financial Statements requires that we make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and the related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the Consolidated Financial Statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. Accordingly, actual results may differ significantly from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

Basic and Diluted Per Common Share

Basic earnings  per common  share is computed by dividing income available to common stockholders by the weighted average number of common shares assumed to be outstanding during the period of computation. Diluted earnings per share is computed similar to basic earnings per share except that the denominator is increased to include the number of additional common shares that would have been outstanding if the potential common shares had been issued and if the additional common shares were dilutive. Because we have incurred net losses, basic and diluted loss per share are the same since additional potential common shares would be anti-dilutive.

NOTE 3 – NOTES PAYABLE

7% Two Year Notes

As of September 30, 2013, we had outstanding $1,151,062 of two-year promissory notes that we have issued to various investors starting in 2011.  Interest accrues on the notes at the rate of 7% per year, and is payable monthly, except for notes issued to New Vision Financial, Ltd., which provide that interest is payable annually.  Principal and interest due on the notes is convertible into shares of Class A Common Stock at the election of the holder at conversion prices ranging from $0.0033 to $0.275 per share.  The conversion price of the notes is set at the market price of the Class A Common Stock on the date of issuance.  The notes mature at various dates ranging from October 7, 2013 to September 26, 2015.  During the three months ended September 30, 2013, we issued $104,084 of new notes.



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During the three months ended September 30, 2013, we issued 123,998,455 shares of our Class A Common Stock upon conversion of notes payable with an aggregate principal amount of $518,241.  These conversions were at prices lower than the conversion price at the date of issuance.  The conversion of the notes at discounts to their stated conversion prices resulted in the recognition of an additional expense of $441,297 and a corresponding increase to paid in capital.

8% Notes

As of September 30, 2013, we had outstanding $339,682 of two-year promissory notes that we have issued to various investors starting in 2012.  Interest accrues on the notes at the rate of 8% per year, and is payable monthly.  Principal and interest due on the notes is convertible into shares of Class A Common Stock at the election of the holder at conversion prices ranging from $0.0162 to $0.031 per share.  The conversion price of the notes is set at the market price of the Class A Common Stock on the date of issuance.  The notes mature at various dates ranging from January 18, 2014 to September 6, 2014.  $301,182 of the notes were issued in 2012 and mature two years after the date of issuance.  During the three months ended March 31, 2013, we issued $38,500 of new notes that mature one year after the date of issuance.  The notes are also convertible into gold at the market price at the option of the lender.

The maturities of 7% and 8% notes payable are as follows:

2013

 

   $         43,000

2014

 

952,660

2015

 

         495,084

  Total

 

1,490,744

   

Less current maturities

 

        (1,431,244)

  Long term debt

 

  $        59,500

Land Purchase Note

On December 3, 2009, we executed a promissory note for $225,000 as partial consideration for the purchase of land in Idaho.  The promissory note is payable without interest in ten annual installments of $22,500 each, with the first installment being due on January 1, 2010.  The balance due on the note at September 30, 2013 was $157,485.  We are in default on the payment due January 1, 2013.

Iliad Research & Trading, LP Convertible Note

On March 30, 2012 we issued a convertible promissory note to Iliad Research & Trading, LP (“Iliad”) in the original principal amount of $566,500.  Our net proceeds were $500,000, after deducting original issue discount of $51,500 and attorney’s fees and costs of the investor of $15,000.  The note bears interest at 8% per annum, and is payable in twelve monthly installments beginning on October 1, 2012 and continuing for each of the next eleven calendar months.  Each monthly payment will be equal to $47,208.33, plus any accrued and unpaid interest as of the installment date.  Any installment payment may be either cash or shares of common stock, at our election, except that we may not pay less than six of the twelve installments in shares of common stock.  Also, of the first six installment payments not less than three must be in shares of common stock, and of the last six installment payments not less than three must be in shares of common stock.  If we make an installment payment in cash that we are required to make in shares of common stock, then we will be required to pay a 25% penalty on the amount of the installment payment.  The note is convertible into shares of Class A Common Stock at $0.04 per share, subject to adjustment downward under certain circumstances defined in the note.  During the three months ended September 30, 2013, we issued 25,931,105 shares of our Class A Common Stock in payment of principal and interest of $67,629 and $7,371, respectively.


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JMJ Financial Convertible Note

On June 4, 2012, we issued a convertible promissory note in the original principal amount of $315,000 to JMJ Financial.  The note bears interest at the rate of 5% per annum.  All principal and accrued interest is due and payable under the note on December 4, 2013.  The note is convertible into shares of Class A Common Stock at any time at the option of the holder.  The conversion price is equal to 80% of the three lowest daily average trading prices of our Class A Common Stock during the 15 trading days preceding any conversion. We received gross proceeds of $300,000, which was net of original issue discount of $15,000. We cannot prepay any part of the note without the prior consent of the holder. The note is subject to standard default provisions.  

We also issued the holder a warrant to purchase 10,000,000 shares of Class A Common Stock for $0.03 per share at any time until June 4, 2016.  The warrant must be exercised for cash, unless after the earlier of (i) the six (6) month anniversary of the date of the note and (ii) the completion of the then-applicable holding period required by Rule 144, there is no effective registration statement registering shares issuable upon exercise of the warrant, in which event the holder may exercise the warrant on a “cashless basis.” In October 2012, we obtained approval of a registration statement covering the shares issuable upon exercise of the warrant, and therefore the warrant may not be exercised on a cashless basis.

The holder has the right to loan us up to $1,000,000 more in multiple transactions on the same or better terms for a three year period following the date of this transaction.  We also granted the holder piggyback registration rights, under which we are required to include all shares issuable upon conversion of the Note in any future registration statement filed by the us, other than a registration statement filed on Form S-8 or a registration statement that is a post-effective amendment to a registration statement that is in effect on the date of the Purchase Agreement.

In connection with the loan from JMJ Financial, we also issued to Iliad a warrant to 16,666,667 shares of Common Stock at an exercise price of $0.03 per share until June 4, 2016.  The form of warrant issued to Iliad is the same as the form of warrant issued to JMJ.

On July 12, 2012, we issued a convertible promissory note in the original principal amount of $525,000 to JMJ Financial.  The note bears interest at the rate of 5% per annum.  All principal and accrued interest is due and payable under the note on January 12, 2014.  The note is convertible into shares of Class A Common Stock at any time at the option of the holder.  The conversion price is equal to 80% of the three lowest daily average trading prices of the Common Stock during the 15 trading days preceding any conversion.  We received gross proceeds of $500,000, which was net of original issue discount of $25,000.  We cannot prepay any part of the note without the prior consent of the holder. The note is subject to standard default provisions.  

We also issued the holder a warrant to purchase 16,666,667 shares of Common Stock for $0.03 per share at any time until January 12, 2016.  The form of the warrant is the same as the warrant that was issued in connection with the June 4, 2012 loan from JMJ Financial.

NOTE 4 – MILL EQUIPMENT

The following table summarizes the Company’s equipment as of September 30, 2013.


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Mill equipment

 

$      1,981,355

Vehicles

 

177,317

Accumulated depreciation

 

(1,446,849)

       Net

 

$          711,823

NOTE 5 – PREPAID EXPENSES

On October 1, 2010, we entered into a four year Commercial Lease Agreement, under which we leased office space in New York, New York.  Under the Commercial Lease Agreement, we issued the lessor 9,000,000 shares of our Class A Common Stock at the inception of the lease in full payment of lease payments under the lease totaling $444,000.  We capitalized the lease payment as a prepaid expense, and are amortizing the amount on a monthly basis over the life of the lease.

We also lease office space at 641-2 Chrislea Road, Woodbridge, Ontario Canada, under a lease that runs from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2013 at a rate of $400 per month.  Under the lease, we issued the lessor 480,000 shares of our common stock valued at $9,600.  We capitalized the lease payment as a prepaid expense, and are amortizing the amount on a monthly basis over the life of the lease.

During the three months ended March 31, 2013, we issued 35,271,999 shares of our common stock to our officers for compensation totaling $895,909 for the year 2013.  We capitalized these payments as a prepaid expense, and amortize the amounts over the life of the employment contracts of the officers, which is for the twelve months ended December 31, 2013.  

 NOTE 6 - RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

We are obligated to pay Goldland $83,333 per month as rent under a lease of Goldland’s interest in War Eagle Mountain dated October 11, 2007, plus a monthly non-accountable expense reimbursement of $10,000 during any month in which minerals are mined from the leased premises, and a royalty of 15% of all amounts we receive from the processing of minerals mined from the properties. The lease currently expires on October 1, 2026, although we have the right to extend the lease for an additional five years upon payment of a lease extension fee of $1,000,000.  All of the officers and directors of GoldLand are also officers and directors of us. Instead of paying the rent in cash, we have, since January 1, 2012, satisfied our rental obligation by reductions in the amount that Goldland owes us, as discussed below.

During the six months ended June 30, 2013, we issued 12,000,000 shares valued at $294,000 to various officers of Goldland (who are also our officers) to pay compensation that will be owed to them by Goldland for the 2013 fiscal year.  The value of the shares issued by us was recorded as an amount due to us by Goldland.  

As of September 30, 2013 and December 31, 2012, Goldland owed us $710,479 and $1,187,282 respectively.  The amounts are non-interest bearing, unsecured demand loans.

Pierre Quilliam, our chairman and chief executive officer, has made loans to us from time to time.  The loans are non-interest bearing, unsecured demand loans.  The amount outstanding to Mr. Quilliam at September 30, 2013 and December 31, 2012 was $275,253 and $156,713, respectively.  The loans represent amounts paid by Mr. Quilliam on our behalf for expenses relating to various mill operating costs.  In addition, we owe Bisell Investments of Florida, Inc. $296,289.  Mr. Quilliam is President of Bisell Investments of Florida, Inc.


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Thomas C. Ridenour, our chief financial officer and a director, has made loans to us from time to time.  The loans are non-interest bearing, unsecured demand loans.  The amount outstanding to Mr. Ridenour at September 30, 2013 and December 31, 2012 was $87,739 and $45,378, respectively.

Christian Quilliam, our chief operating officer and a director, has made loans to us from time to time.  The loans are non-interest bearing, unsecured demand loans.  The amount outstanding to Mr. Quilliam at September 30, 2013 and December 31, 2012 was $29,192 and $26,176, respectively.

Paul Parliament, one of our directors, has invested an aggregate $665,007 in our 7% two year notes, of which $570,005 was invested by The Parliament Corporation and $95,002 was invested by Mr. Parliament. Of the amounts invested by The Parliament Corporation, $500,000 was invested in 2012 and $70,005 was invested in the quarter ending June 30, 2013.  Of the amounts invested by Mr. Parliament $20,001was invested in the quarter ending March 31, 2013 and $20,001 was invested in the quarter ending September 30, 2013.  Mr. Parliament and The Parliament Corporation converted all but $20,001 of the notes into 55,469,183 and 4,141,559 shares of Class A Common Stock in the quarters ending June 30, 2013 and September 30, 2013, respectively.  The notes were converted into Class A Common Stock at the market price of the Class A Common Stock on the date of conversion, which was $0.0115 and $0.0049, respectively, which was less than the conversion price stated in the notes.  

NOTE 7 - COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

On October 11, 2007, we entered into a lease agreement with GoldLand, under which we leased its mineral rights on War Eagle Mountain.  Under the lease, we are responsible for all mining activities on War Eagle Mountain, and we are obligated to pay GoldLand annual lease payments of $1,000,000, payable on a monthly basis, a monthly non-accountable expense reimbursement of $10,000 during any month in which minerals are mined from the leased premises, and a royalty of 15% of all amounts we receive from the processing of minerals mined from tailing piles on the premises or through shafts or adits located on the premises.  The lease currently expires on October 1, 2026, although we have the right to extend the lease for an additional five years upon payment of a lease extension fee of $1,000,000.

On June 4, 2012, we issued a convertible promissory note to JMJ Financial in the original principal amount of $315,000 (the “June Note”).  On July 12, 2012, we issued a convertible promissory note to JMJ Financial in the original principal amount of $525,000 (the “July Note” and with the June Note, the “Notes”).  The Notes are convertible into Class A Common Stock at a conversion price equal to 80% of the three lowest daily average trading prices of the Common Stock during the 15 trading days preceding the conversion. On November 30, 2012, JMJ submitted a conversion request for $54,079.20 of indebtedness under the June Note, which by JMJ’s calculations would have required us to issue JMJ 3,000,000 shares of Class A Common Stock.  On December 12, 2012, JMJ submitted another conversion request for $52,360 of indebtedness under the June Note, which by JMJ’s calculations would have required us to issue JMJ 3,500,000 shares of Class A Common Stock.  We did not honor either conversion request because of our belief that JMJ was impermissibly shorting our Class A Common Stock, and was improperly manipulating the market price of our Class A Common Stock.   On December 17, 2012, JMJ issued us a notice of default.  On December 18, 2012, JMJ sent us a Notice of Acceleration for immediate payment of all amounts due under both Notes.  On December 21, 2012, JMJ filed a lawsuit against us and Pierre Quilliam, our chief executive officer.  The lawsuit seeks a judgment against us for all amounts due under both Notes.  The lawsuit also seeks a judgment against Mr. Quilliam for amounts due under both Notes on the theory of fraudulent inducement and/or fraudulent misrepresentation. In November 2013, we reached an agreement to settle the litigation with JMJ.  See “Note 10 – Subsequent Events.”


17

 

 

In July 2012, we filed a lawsuit against Earll Excavations, Inc. (“EEI”) and William Earll (“Earll”) in Owyhee County, Idaho seeking damages of $2,000,000. In the lawsuit, we contend that EEI failed to complete improvements to the Sinker Tunnel and construction of our metallurgical laboratory complex in accordance with the contracts. Our lawsuit also seeks damages for Earll’s and EEI’s breach of a confidentiality agreement, breach of an implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, and for slander. At about the same time that we filed our lawsuit, EEI filed suit against us in Owyhee County, Idaho. EEI’s lawsuit seeks damages of $477,783 for amounts that EEI contends it is owed for construction services performed on the Sinker Tunnel, construction services performed on the Diamond Creek Mill, hauling services, and road maintenance, as well as managerial services provided to Diamond Creek Mill. In June 2013, we were notified that a Default Judgment and Decree of Foreclosure (the “Judgment”) had been entered in the lawsuit by the District Court for the Third Judicial District of the State of Idaho for the County of Owyhee.  The Judgment granted a judgment against us in favor of EEI in the amount of $567,743.56, plus post-judgment interest at the rate of 5.25% per annum.  The Judgment also held that EEI had a first lien our Diamond Creek Mill site in Owyhee County, Idaho to secure an indebtedness of $289,648.30, plus post-judgment interest.  The Judgment further ordered that a sheriff’s sale be held of such property.  Finally, the Judgment dismissed our counterclaims against EEI and Earll with prejudice.  We retained new counsel who filed a motion to vacate the Judgment. On July 17, 2013, the court revoked and set aside the Judgment.  In October, the court held another hearing and reversed its prior decision to set aside the Judgment.  See “Note 10 - Subsequent Events”).  We plan to continue vigorously defending the action as well as our claims against EEI and Earll.

NOTE 8 - CAPITAL STOCK

We are authorized to issue 10,000,000,000 shares of Class A Common Stock with a par value of $0.0001 per share, and 250,000,000 shares of Class B Common Stock with a par value of $0.0001 per share.  Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock have equal rights to dividends and distributions.  However, each outstanding share of Class A Common Stock is entitled to one vote on all matters that may be voted upon by the owners thereof at meetings of the stockholders, while each outstanding share of Class B Common Stock is entitled to forty votes on all matters that may be voted upon by the owners thereof at meetings of the stockholders.  As of September 30, 2013, there were 1,315,100,755 and 21,253,180 shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock issued and outstanding, respectively.  

During the three months ended September 30, 2013, we issued shares of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock in the following transactions:

·

123,998,455 shares of Class A Common Stock upon conversion of 7% two year promissory notes with a principal balance of $518,241, plus accrued interest thereon.

·

25,931,105 shares of Class A Common Stock upon conversion of convertible notes held by Iliad Research & Trading, LP.

·

26,000,000 shares of Class A Common Stock to two consultants.

·

22,622,897 shares of Class A Common Stock valued at $113,114 were issued in payment of compensation to officers.



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·

958,183 shares of Class A Common Stock were issued for investor relations services.

·

22,382,180 shares of Class A Common Stock for services under our stock compensation plan.

As of September 30, 2013, the Company had outstanding notes payable to various investors in the original principal amount of $2,434,258.  All of the notes are convertible into shares of Class A Common Stock at the election of the holder at conversion prices ranging from $0.0033 to $0.275 per share.  The conversion price of the notes is set at the market price of the Class A Common Stock on the date of issuance.  The notes mature at various dates ranging from October 7, 2013 to September 26, 2015.  At September 30, 2013, an aggregate of 192,113,133 shares of Class A Common Stock were issuable upon conversion of the notes.

Shares issued for services are valued at the market price on the date of the invoice for the services.  Shares issues for prepaid services are valued at the market price on the date of the contract for the services.  Shares issued for services which specify that a specific number of shares be issued are valued at the market price on the date of the contract.  The conversion prices on all convertible notes were set at the market price on the date on the issuance of the convertible note.

NOTE 9 – GOING CONCERN

These financial statements have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles applicable to a going concern, which contemplates the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business.  However, we incurred a net loss of ($6,786,624) for the nine months ended September 30, 2013.  We have remained in business primarily through the deferral of salaries by management, the issuance of stock to compensate employees and consultants, and raising funds from the sale of two year convertible notes. We intend on financing our future development activities from the same sources, until such time that funds provided by operations are sufficient to fund working capital requirements.

These factors, among others, raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern for a reasonable period of time.

NOTE 10 – SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

Issuance of Shares:  During October 2013, we issued shares of Class A Common Stock in the following transactions:

·

16,700,000 shares of Class A Common Stock to various vendors for consulting services valued at $68,500.

·

10,100,000 shares of Class A Common Stock upon conversion of notes payable with a aggregate principal amount of at $23,563.

Earll Action:  On October 11, 2013, the court held in hearing in the litigation with William Earll and Earll Excavations, Inc.  (See “Note 7 – Commitments and Contingencies”).  The hearing resulted in the court entering an order on October 29, 2013 directing that an Order of Default be entered nunc pro tunc to June 14, 2013.  As a result, we expect the court to enter a new default judgment against us consistent with the prior Judgment that was set aside.  We plan to file a motion to reconsider and set aside the court’s October 29, 2013 order, and if necessary pursue all possible appeals.

JMJ Settlement. In November, we reached a settlement of the litigation with JMJ.  (See “Note 7 – Commitments and Contingencies”).  Under the settlement, we agreed to a schedule under which JMJ’s existing indebtedness will be satisfied by the issuance of shares of Class A Common Stock, and JMJ will loan the Company an additional $100,000 pursuant to a convertible promissory note.  

 

19

 

ITEM 2.  MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.

Disclosure Regarding Forward Looking Statements

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q includes forward looking statements (“Forward Looking Statements”). All statements other than statements of historical fact included in this report are Forward Looking Statements. In the normal course of its business, the Company, in an effort to help keep its shareholders and the public informed about the Company’s operations, may from time-to-time issue certain statements, either in writing or orally, that contain or may contain Forward-Looking Statements. Although the Company believes that the expectations reflected in such Forward Looking Statements are reasonable, it can give no assurance that such expectations will prove to have been correct.  Generally, these statements relate to business plans or strategies, projected or anticipated benefits or other consequences of such plans or strategies, past and possible future, of acquisitions and projected or anticipated benefits from acquisitions made by or to be made by the Company, or projections involving anticipated revenues, earnings, levels of capital expenditures or other aspects of operating results. All phases of the Company operations are subject to a number of uncertainties, risks and other influences, many of which are outside the control of the Company and any one of which, or a combination of which, could materially affect the results of the Company’s proposed operations and whether Forward Looking Statements made by the Company ultimately prove to be accurate. Such important factors (“Important Factors”) and other factors could cause actual results to differ materially from the Company’s expectations are disclosed in this report. All prior and subsequent written and oral Forward Looking Statements attributable to the Company or persons acting on its behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by the Important Factors described below that could cause actual results to differ materially from the Company’s expectations as set forth in any Forward Looking Statement made by or on behalf of the Company.

Overview

On September 14, 2007, GoldLand acquired an interest in 174.82 acres of land on War Eagle Mountain, consisting of a 100% interest in 103 acres, and a 29.166% interest in 71.82 acres.  GoldLand also has five placer claims on War Eagle Mountain from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, each of which covers approximately 20 acres, or approximately 100 acres in total.

On October 11, 2007, GoldLand leased its mineral rights on War Eagle Mountain to us.  Under the lease, we are responsible for all mining activities on War Eagle Mountain, and we are obligated to pay GoldLand annual lease payments of $1,000,000, payable on a monthly basis, a monthly non-accountable expense reimbursement of $10,000 during any month in which minerals are mined from the leased premises, and a royalty of 15% of all amounts we receive from the processing of minerals mined from tailing piles on the premises or through shafts or adits located on the premises.  The lease, as amended, provides that lease payments must commence July 1, 2010.  Effective October 1, 2010, GoldLand agreed to allow us to defer lease payments until December 31, 2011, and to extend the lease term by fifteen months.  

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On September 21, 2008, we acquired from Mineral Extraction, Inc. all mineral, mining and access rights to two mining claims on War Eagle Mountain, covering 18.877 total acres, as well as claims for four mill site locations and the Sinker Tunnel location.

We began actual operations in May 2010.  Initially, as described below, actual operations consists of processing dump material left on the mine site from prior mining operations.  Later, after we complete an exploration program to prove up and locate reserves on our property, and make further capital improvements to the mine site, we plan to begin mining and processing raw minerals.

Our plan to develop our mining properties into an active mine will take place in three phases.

Start-up Phase

Our initial phase involved completing construction of a mill, and using the mill to process tailings left over from prior mining operations.  We were successful in our negotiations to purchase a parcel of land about half way between Highway 78 and the Sinker Tunnel entrance where we have constructed our mill.  We closed on the purchase of this site in December 2009.  We have purchased all of the milling equipment we need, which is currently installed and operating in Murphy, Idaho.  As the mill is up and running, we plan to haul sufficient dump material, leftover from 6 prior mill sites on the mountain, during the summer months, to our mill site for processing during the summer and winter.  Our testing indicates that, as a result of milling techniques used in the 1800’s which failed to extract all of the gold and silver from the raw materials, there are sufficient quantities of gold and silver remaining in the dump material to justify further processing.  We elected to build the mill on private property that we own, rather than BLM property, because of lower reclamation costs, even though the offsite property will entail higher transportation costs. In early 2011, we began construction of a metallurgical lab at our mill site.  A temporary smelter became operational in July 2011, although we still need to complete a building to house the smelter and lab. In the Fall of 2013, we plan to install a chemical leaching facility at our mill site in order to improve the yields from our raw material.

The installation and startup of the mill and the working capital to begin transport of raw materials to the mill for processing has necessitated an investment of approximately $3.46 million, as follows:

·

The purchase and the preparation of property for mill use cost about $549,375;

·

The installation and certification of the mill cost about $517,283;

·

Completing the purchase mill equipment cost about $1,617,368;

·

Moving raw materials to stockpile at the mill in 2010 cost about $352,911;  

·

The purchase and installation of smelter equipment;

·

Start-up mill salaries to the end of 2010 cost $425,238.

We have also made a number of improvements that we initially expected would not occur until the development phase.  In particular, in 2010, the roads to the Sinker Tunnel Complex were upgraded to allow 25-ton trucks access to the site, and an area 300x400 feet was prepared to act as a staging area at the 5,200 foot level. The Sinker Tunnel was aerated in its entire length and the entrance to the Sinker Tunnel was permanently extended to avoid land or snow slides to block access to the Sinker Tunnel. Permanent drainage pipes are being laid in the tunnel as it was determined that the Sinker Tunnel is the main drain for the War Eagle complex. Exploring and shoring or rock bolting of some weak points in the top wall is underway. Permitting for exploration of the Sinker Tunnel is underway with training for underground personnel and safety measures being installed as per the latest mining rules and regulations.



22

 

 

We need approximately $1,900,000 in capital to complete the start-up phase, of which about $1,800,000 is attributable to working capital and $100,000 is the estimated cost of completing our permanent metallurgical lab.  In addition, we estimate that our leaching facility will cost an estimated $2,000,000.

Exploration Phase

During 2010, we substantially revised the scope and cost of our exploration phase.  Our exploration phase refers to a program to prove up and locate reserves on our property. We need to obtain a satisfactory estimate of the remaining reserves on the property and their location in order to develop a comprehensive plan for the full development of the mine site.  The program will involve building a three dimensional map of War Eagle Mountain showing the precise location of veins, shafts and tunnels.  Through exploratory drilling and core sampling, we hope to obtain as much information as possible about the location, thickness and quality of the vein systems near the main shafts, and later throughout the entire mountain.  The map will be a valuable tool in analyzing the extent of the remaining reserves, mineralization trends, and other pertinent geological and mining information.  The most significant change to the exploration phase contemplates a more comprehensive set of core samples, both from the surface of the mountain and from the inside of the mountain using the Sinker Tunnel, and associated costs, including locating drilling equipment at the site, and logistical costs for the crew, such as vehicles, meals, shelter on the mountain, and accommodations for a geologist, field technician and drill crew.  We decided to expand the scope of the exploration phase in order to obtain a National Instrument 43-101, which is a report developed by the Canadian Securities Administrators for mining companies.  A National Instrument 43-101 is necessary for listing our common stock on any exchange overseen by the Canadian Securities Authority, including the Toronto Stock Exchange.

Another aspect of the exploration phase will involve the development of a plan to use the Sinker Tunnel to mine the interior of the mountain on a year round basis.  The plan will involve accessing and draining the mine shafts on the top of the mountain from the Sinker Tunnel, as well as relocating and collaring old shafts on the mountain.  We estimate that the exploration phase will take about 18 months from mid-April 2013, and will cost approximately $10,000,000.  We began preliminary work on the exploration phase in mid-2010.

Development Phase

The development phase involves transitioning the mine from processing tailings leftover from prior mining activities to extracting and processing raw material from the mountain, assuming that the exploration phase demonstrates that there are economically viable reserves in War Eagle Mountain.  We believe that full scale mining of raw material or minerals will be profitable. In particular, historical records of mining on the site, and subsequent reports of the geology of the mountain, indicate that veins containing gold and silver extend much further vertically than could be mined when the site was last mined in the 1880’s.  In addition, historical records indicate that gold and silver exists in the veins in sufficient densities to warrant mining using modern extraction and milling techniques.  The scope of the development phase will depend on the outcome of the exploration phase, which is designed to test the accuracy of our analysis.  The development phase will not take place unless that exploration phase demonstrates that there are reserves in War Eagle Mountain that can be extracted and processed in an economically viable fashion. Our goal is to develop a drilling program that reaches as many reserves as possible at the lowest cost.  Among the improvements to the mine site that we anticipate making in the development phase are:



23

 

·

We plan to connect the mine shafts on the top of the mountain to the Sinker Tunnel in order to provide drainage to those shafts;

·

We plan to install a transportation system in the Sinker Tunnel (either tire mounted trams, narrow gauge railway, or conveyor system) to move raw material or minerals out of the Sinker Tunnel for transport to our mill site; and

·

Additional improvements include housing, storage, food preparation facilities, generators for power, etc.

In addition to the improvements identified above, we expect that we will need to make other improvements necessary to access the highest quality mineral veins, which improvements are not known at this time but which will be identified in our National Instrument 43-101 report. In 2010, we started (and have since completed) some improvements to the mine site that were previously part of our development phase, including improving about four miles of the county road linking State Route 78 with Silver City, 1.8 miles of access road to the Sinker Tunnel Complex from the county road, and about 1.6 miles of access road to the Oro Fino vein outcrop area to permit heavier loads and year round access, as well improvements to the physical facilities at the milling location site and mine site to accommodate our workers.  

Our revenue, profitability, and future growth rate depend substantially on factors beyond our control, including our success in the commencement of mining operations, as well as economic, political, and regulatory developments and fluctuations in the market prices of minerals processed from raw material or minerals derived from our mining operations.

Results of Operations

Nine months ended September 30, 2013 and 2012

We are in the exploration stage and generated revenues of $30,902 and $82,415 in the nine months ended September 30, 2013 and 2012, respectively.  During the quarter ended September 30, 2013, our revenues included $10,200 that we generated from a toll milling test program.  Our revenues in the nine months ended September 30, 2013 are not representative of our revenues in the future.  Our primary operations consist of processing tailing from our mine site at the mill, and our ancillary operations consist of exploring War Eagle Mountain to evaluate and prove up its reserves.  Our analysis indicates that we can profitably process tailings left from prior mining operations if we have the proper infrastructure to extract the minerals from the tailings. In May 2010, we began processing tailings from our mine site at our mill.  We initially planned to process the tailings into concentrate, which would then be shipped for final processing to a smelter, which would either then either return the material to us in the form of dore bars (which would have to be shipped to a refiner for final processing) or pay us a market price for the minerals ultimately extracted from the concentrate.  In October 2010, we shipped our first load of concentrate to a smelter.  We subsequently decided to construct our own metallurgical lab at our milling site, and stockpiled concentrate until we had the capacity to smelt our concentrate.  In 2011, we completed a temporary smelter on our mill site and began shipping dore bars in limited quantities to a refiner on a regular basis.  We expect to report increased revenues from our milling operation when our metallurgical lab and our leaching facility are completed.  The leaching facility will increase the percentage of valuable minerals that are extracted from the raw materials, and the completion of the metallurgical lab will increase the rate at which we can complete dore bars for shipment to refiners. Until the metallurgical lab and leaching facility are completed, our revenues may not differ materially from what we have generated to date in 2013.


24

 

Below are some metrics that are relevant to our current operations:

·

In the nine months ending September 30, 2012 and 2013, we did not transport any tailings to our mill.  In 2013, we decided not to transport tailings and focus our resources on completing our metallurgical lab, floatation circuit and leaching circuit which will increase our recoveries.

·

In the nine months ending September 30, 2012 and 2013, we processed 12,039 and 0 tons of tailings, respectively, through our mill circuit into concentrate. We have stockpiled most of the concentrate until it can be processed in our metallurgical lab.  In addition to concentrate, the processed tailings have been stockpiled for further processing through the planned leaching circuit.

·

In the nine months ending September 30, 2012, our refiner extracted 100.698 ounces of gold and 190.534 ounces of silver.  The average price per ounce was $1,666 for gold and $33.5 for silver.

·

In the nine months ending September 30, 2013, our refiner extracted 98.33 ounces of gold and 80.776 ounces of silver.  The average price per ounce was $1,623 for gold and $33 for silver.

We reported losses from operations during the nine months ended September 30, 2013 and 2012 of ($5,325,354) and ($5,774,040), respectively.  The decreased loss in 2013 as compared to 2012 was attributable to the following factors:

·

Consulting fees decreased from $1,999,527 in 2012 to $1,371,980 in 2013 as a result of decreased use of consultants in 2013.   The material components of expenses charged to consulting services in both years were as follows:

Type of Services

2013

 

2012

    

Shareholder relations services

62,730

 

128,700

Locating and due diligence services on future acquisition opportunities

809,879

 

721,800

Legal and compliance services

90,000

 

36,320

Advice on debt and equity capital raising

427,090

 

945,000

    

·

Compensation expense related to Mill administrative decreased from $309,762 in 2012 to $69,703 in 2013 as a result of a reduction of payroll during the period.

·

Depreciation expense increased from $290,462 in 2012 to $315,000 in 2013 as a result of the acquisition of equipment to be used in our operations.

·

Exploration and improvement costs increased from $8,240 in 2012 to $94,129 in 2013 as a result of increased work on the Sinker Tunnel.

·

Lease payment fees remained the same at $750,000 in 2012 and $750,000 in 2013.


25

 

·

Stock compensation expense declined slightly from $1,375,726 in 2012 to $1,210,260 in 2013.

·

Mill operating expenses increased from $329,691 in 2012 to $346,556 in 2013.  We began capitalizing certain operating costs in the fourth quarter of 2011 and continued until the third quarter of 2012.

·

General and administrative expenses increased to $1,198,628 in 2013 as compared to $793,047 in 2012 as a result of decreased expenses related to the mill general and administrative expenses offset by compensation expense accruals.

We reported net losses during the nine months ended September 30, 2013 and 2012 of ($6,786,624) and ($8,144,629), respectively.  The decreased loss in 2013 as compared to 2012 was largely attributable to lower debt conversion expenses in 2013 of $764,723, as compared to $2,077,175 in 2012, and by a decrease in the loss from operations, offset by an increase in interest expense resulting from higher levels of interest bearing debt in 2013 and additional interest fees on the Iliad note.  In particular, interest expense increased from $293,414 in 2012 to $696,547 in 2013.

Three months ended September 30, 2013 and 2012

We are in the exploration stage and generated revenues of $10,200 and $7,161 in the three months ended September 30, 2013 and 2012, respectively. During the quarter ended September 30, 2013, all of our revenues were generated from a toll milling test program.   Our revenues in the three months ended September 30, 2013 are not representative of our revenues in the future.  Our primary operations consist of processing tailing from our mine site at the mill, and our ancillary operations consist of exploring War Eagle Mountain to evaluate and prove up its reserves.  Our analysis indicates that we can profitably process tailings left from prior mining operations if we have the proper infrastructure to extract the minerals from the tailings. In May 2010, we began processing tailings from our mine site at our mill.  We initially planned to process the tailings into concentrate, which would then be shipped for final processing to a smelter, which would either then either return the material to us in the form of dore bars (which would have to be shipped to a refiner for final processing) or pay us a market price for the minerals ultimately extracted from the concentrate.  In October 2010, we shipped our first load of concentrate to a smelter.  We subsequently decided to construct our own metallurgical lab at our milling site, and stockpiled concentrate until we had the capacity to smelt our concentrate.  In 2011, we completed a temporary smelter on our mill site and began shipping dore bars in limited quantities to a refiner on a regular basis.  We expect to report increased revenues from our milling operation when our metallurgical lab and our leaching facility are completed.  The leaching facility will increase the percentage of valuable minerals that are extracted from the raw materials, and the completion of the metallurgical lab will increase the rate at which we can complete dore bars for shipment to refiners. Until the metallurgical lab and leaching facility are completed, our revenues may not differ materially from what we have generated to date in 2012.

Below are some metrics that are relevant to our current operations:

·

In the three months ending September 30, 2012 and 2013, we did not transport any tailings to our mill.  In 2013, we decided not to transport tailings and focus our resources on completing our metallurgical lab, floatation circuit and leaching circuit which will increase our recoveries.


26

 

·

In the three months ending September 30, 2012 and 2013, we processed 1,119 and 0 tons of tailings, respectively, through our mill circuit into concentrate. We have stockpiled most of the concentrate until it can be processed in our metallurgical lab.  In addition to concentrate, the processed tailings have been stockpiled for further processing through the planned leaching circuit.

·

In the three months ending September 30, 2012, our refiner did not extract precious metals.

·

We reported losses from operations during the three months ended September 30, 2013 and 2012 of ($1,483,129) and ($1,737,624), respectively.  The increased loss in 2013 as compared to 2012 was attributable to the following factors:

·

Consulting fees decreased from $443,657 in 2012 to $253,907 in 2013 as a result of decreased use of consultants in 2013.   The material components of expenses charged to consulting services in both years were as follows:

Type of Services

2013

 

2012

    

Shareholder relations services

6,000

 

86,700

Locating and due diligence services on future acquisition opportunities

188,846

 

158,800

Legal and compliance services

39,000

 

-

Investment banking

-

 

105,100

    

·

Compensation expense related to Mill administrative decreased from $89,071 in 2012 to $4,520 as a result of a reduction of payroll during the quarter.

·

Depreciation expense increased from $97,778 in 2012 to $105,000 in 2013 as a result of the acquisition of equipment to be used in our operations.

·

Exploration and improvement costs decreased from $6,576 in 2012 to $1,092 in 2013 as a result of decreased work on the Sinker Tunnel.

·

Lease payment fees remained the same at $250,000 in 2012 and $250,000 in 2013.

·

Stock compensation expense declined slightly from $458,575 in 2012 to $337,092 in 2013.

·

Mill operating expenses decreased from $185,383 in 2012 to $126,343 in 2013.  We began to slow operations during the quarter.

·

General and administrative expenses increased to $415,375 in 2013 as compared to $213,735 in 2012 as a result decreased expenses related to the new mill operations offset by compensation expense accruals.

We reported net losses during the three months ended September 30, 2013 and 2012 of ($2,195,301) and ($1,897,227), respectively.  The increased loss in 2013 as compared to 2012 was attributable higher debt conversion expenses in 2013 of $441,297, as compared to $20,548 in 2012 and higher interest expense in 2013 of $270,875 as compared to $139,055 in 2012 resulting from higher levels of interest bearing debt in 2013 and additional interest fees on the Iliad note, offset by a decrease in the loss from operations.


27

 

Liquidity and Sources of Capital

The following table sets forth the major sources and uses of cash for the nine months ended September 30, 2012 and 2013:

 

Nine months ended September 30,

 

2012

 

2013

Net cash provided by (used) in operating activities

$     (2,356,654)

 

$    (540,320)

Net cash provided by (used) in investing activities

(227,143)

 

(45,410)

Net cash provided by (used) in financing activities

2,650,251

 

614,830

Net (decrease) increase in unrestricted cash and cash equivalents

$          66,454

 

                $      29,100

    

Comparison of 2013 and 2012

In the nine months ended September 30, 2013 and 2012, we financed our operations primarily through the issuance of convertible notes and the issuance of common stock for services.

Operating activities used ($540,320) of cash in 2013, as compared to ($2,356,654) of cash in 2012.  Major non-cash items that affected our cash flow from operations in 2013 were non-cash charges of $581,438 for depreciation and amortization, non-cash debt conversion costs of $764,723, $1,387,565 for the value of common stock issued for services, and $1,434,237 for the value of common stock issued for compensation.  Other non-cash items include changes in operating assets and liabilities of $1,776,644, most of which resulted from an increase in prepaid expenses of ($134,994), an increase in payroll liabilities of $700,471, an decrease in due from related parties of $801,238 and accrued interest of $408,886.

Major non-cash items that affected our cash flow from operations in 2012 were non-cash charges of $419,038 for depreciation and amortization, non-cash debt conversion costs of $2,077,175, $1,894,636 for the value of common stock issued for services and $1,834,302 for the value of common stock issued for compensation.  Other non-cash items include changes in operating assets and liabilities of ($1,452,288), most of which resulted from an increase in prepaid expenses of ($475,726), an increase in due from related party of ($712,802) and an increase in accrued payroll of $50,376, offset by a reduction of ($248,770) of accounts payable and accrued expenses.

Investing activities used ($227,143) of cash in 2012, as compared to ($45,410) of cash in 2013.  The decrease in cash used in investing activities was attributable to lower expenditures for equipment and improvements to our mill property.  

Financing activities supplied $2,650,251 of cash in 2012 as compared to $614,830 of cash in 2013.  Substantially all of the cash supplied in both years derived from the issuance of notes, net of sums spent to repay notes.  In 2012, we issued $2,758,842 in notes, as compared to 2013 when we issued $650,830 of notes.  

Liquidity

Our balance sheet as of September 30, 2013 reflects current assets of $2,593,176, current liabilities of $4,360,972, and working capital deficit of ($1,767,796).

We will need substantial capital over the next year.  We project that we will need about $1,900,000 of working capital pending the building of a leaching unit, about $2,000,000 to build a leaching unit to improve the yields from our tailings, and about $10,000,000 to complete the exploration phase.  In addition, we financed a lot of prior activities by the issuance of convertible notes that mature two years after their issuance.


28

 

As of September 30, 2013, we had the following debts that mature in the near future:

·

$1,490,744 in two year notes payable, of which $888,614 is due within one year of September 30, 2013.  As of November 1, 2013, we had failed to pay all interest owed on the notes, and we are in default thereunder.  We do not face any legal action from any of the note holders at this time;

·

$183,874 owed to Iliad Research & Trading, LP, which requires monthly payments of $47,208.33 per month, plus the amount of accrued interest on the note. As of November 1, 2013, we were not in default to Iliad;

·

$759,640 owed to JMJ Financial, consisting of one note for $315,000 which provides for payment of all principal and interest owed on December 4, 2013, and another note for $525,000 which provides for payment of all principal and interest owed on January 12, 2014.  As of November 1, 2013, we had failed to honor several conversion requests submitted by JMJ Financial, and as a consequence JMJ Financial has accelerated the maturity of its notes.  Our obligation to JMJ Financial is currently in litigation. After November 1, 2013, we reached an agreement to settle our obligations to JMJ Financial.

Also, beginning January 1, 2012, we began to make monthly payments of $83,333 to GoldLand under our lease of its mining interests on War Eagle Mountain.  We pay the monthly liability to Goldland by issuing shares of our Class A Common Stock to GoldLand employees for compensation on behalf of GoldLand, and applying the value of the shares against our liability to GoldLand.

The amount of capital that we currently have the capacity to raise is not sufficient to pay all of the capital expenses that we need to pay to commence operations, and pay our other liabilities as they come due.  However, we have a number of options that we believe will enable us to continue with our business plan despite insufficient capital.  For example, we plan to continue paying most of the salaries of our management by issuing shares of Class A Common Stock.  We also plan to continue paying certain accounts payable with common stock, including our monthly lease payments to GoldLand.  GoldLand, for example, is controlled by our officers, and therefore we do not expect GoldLand to take any legal action as a result of our deferral of lease payments to it.  We also plan to continue issuing shares to certain service providers that are willing to accept shares for payment.  In the event we are able to raise some, but not all, of the capital that we need, we plan to request that note holders extend the maturity of their notes or convert their notes into shares of common stock.

As of September 30, 2013, we are obligated to issue approximately 192 million shares of Class A Common Stock upon conversion of outstanding notes.  Our contingent obligation to issue new shares of Class A Common Stock, combined with our plans to issue shares of Class A Common Stock to satisfy certain recurring liabilities, may impair our ability to raise capital by issuing shares of Class A Common Stock or securities convertible into Class A Common Stock, because future investors may be worried about future dilution.   

Notwithstanding the fact that we are able to satisfy many of our liabilities by the issuance of shares, there are still many liabilities and capital expenditures that we cannot satisfy through the issuance of shares, including most of the construction cost to complete our metallurgical lab and leaching facility.  We are actively seeking investment banking professionals to assist us in raising capital as well as advice on how we can be restructured to make the company sufficiently attractive to induce new investors to provide the capital we need.  In the event we are not able to raise new cash capital, we will not be able to complete our business plan, and may be forced to consider a sale of the entire company.


29

 

Going Concern

Our financial statements have been presented on the basis that we continue as a going concern, which contemplates the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business.  As shown in the accompanying financial statements, we incurred a net operating loss in the nine months ended September 30, 2013, and have minimal revenues at this time.  These factors create an uncertainty about our ability to continue as a going concern.  We are currently trying to raise capital through a private offering of convertible notes and to solicit existing convertible note holders to convert their notes into common stock.  Our ability to continue as a going concern is dependent on the success of this plan.  The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might be necessary if we are unable to continue as a going concern.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements that are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that are material to investors.

Critical Accounting Estimates

Our significant accounting policies are described in Note 2 of Notes to Financial Statements. At this time, we are not required to make any material estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts and related disclosures of assets, liabilities, revenue, and expenses. However, as we begin actual mining operations, we will be required to make estimates and assumptions typical of other companies in the mining business.  

For example, we will be required to make critical accounting estimates related to future metals prices, obligations for environmental, reclamation, and closure matters, mineral reserves, and accounting for business combinations.  The estimates will require us to rely upon assumptions that were highly uncertain at the time the accounting estimates are made, and changes in them are reasonably likely to occur from period to period.  Changes in estimates used in these and other items could have a material impact on our financial statements in the future.

Our estimates will be based on our experience and our interpretation of economic, political, regulatory, and other factors that affect our business prospects. Actual results may differ significantly from our estimates.

ITEM 3.  QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK.

Because the Company is a smaller reporting company, it is not required to provide the information called for by this Item.

ITEM 4.  CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES.

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

Pierre Quilliam, our chief executive officer, and Tom Ridenour, our chief financial officer, are responsible for establishing and maintaining our disclosure controls and procedures.  Disclosure controls and procedures means controls and other procedures that are designed to ensure that information we are required to disclose in the reports that we file or submit under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified



30

 

in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms, and to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in those reports is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our principal executive and principal financial officers, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.  Our chief executive officer and chief financial officer evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934) as of September 30, 2013.  Based on that evaluation, our chief executive officer and chief financial officer concluded that, as of the evaluation date, such controls and procedures were effective.

Changes in internal controls

There were no changes in our internal controls over financial reporting that occurred during the quarter ended September 30, 2013 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

PART II.  OTHER INFORMATION.

ITEM 1.  LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.

On June 4, 2012, we issued a convertible promissory note to JMJ Financial in the original principal amount of $315,000 (the “June Note”).  On July 12, 2012, we issued a convertible promissory note to JMJ Financial in the original principal amount of $525,000 (the “July Note” and with the June Note, the “Notes”).  The Notes are convertible into Class A Common Stock at a conversion price equal to 80% of the three lowest daily average trading prices of the Common Stock during the 15 trading days preceding the conversion. On November 30, 2012, JMJ submitted a conversion request for $54,079.20 of indebtedness under the June Note, which by JMJ’s calculations would have required us to issue JMJ 3,000,000 shares of Class A Common Stock.  On December 12, 2012, JMJ submitted another conversion request for $52,360 of indebtedness under the June Note, which by JMJ’s calculations would have required us to issue JMJ 3,500,000 shares of Class A Common Stock.  We did not honor either conversion request because of our belief that JMJ was impermissibly shorting our Class A Common Stock, and was improperly manipulating the market price of our Class A Common Stock.   On December 17, 2012, JMJ issued us a notice of default.  On December 18, 2012, JMJ sent us a Notice of Acceleration for immediate payment of all amounts due under both Notes.  On December 21, 2012, JMJ filed a lawsuit against us and Pierre Quilliam, our chief executive officer.  The lawsuit seeks a judgment against us for all amounts due under both Notes.  The lawsuit also seeks a judgment against Mr. Quilliam for amounts due under both Notes on the theory of fraudulent inducement and/or fraudulent misrepresentation. In November, we reached a settlement of the litigation with JMJ.  Under the settlement, we agreed to a schedule under which JMJ’s existing indebtedness will be satisfied by the issuance of shares of Class A Common Stock, and JMJ will loan the Company an additional $100,000 pursuant to a convertible promissory note.

In July 2012, we filed a lawsuit against Earll Excavations, Inc. (“EEI”) and William Earll (“Earll”) in Owyhee County, Idaho seeking damages of $2,000,000. In the lawsuit, we contend that EEI failed to complete improvements to the Sinker Tunnel and construction of our metallurgical laboratory complex in accordance with the contracts. Our lawsuit also seeks damages for Earll’s and EEI’s breach of a confidentiality agreement, breach of an implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, and for slander. At about the same time that we filed our lawsuit, EEI filed suit against us in Owyhee County, Idaho. EEI’s lawsuit seeks damages of $477,783 for amounts that EEI contends it is owed for construction services performed on the Sinker Tunnel, construction services performed on the Diamond Creek Mill, hauling services, and road maintenance, as well as managerial services provided to Diamond Creek Mill.



31

 

In June 2013, we were notified that a Default Judgment and Decree of Foreclosure (the “Judgment”) had been entered in the lawsuit by the District Court for the Third Judicial District of the State of Idaho for the County of Owyhee.  The Judgment granted a judgment against us in favor of EEI in the amount of $567,743.56, plus post-judgment interest at the rate of 5.25% per annum.  The Judgment also held that EEI had a first lien our Diamond Creek Mill site in Owyhee County, Idaho to secure an indebtedness of $289,648.30, plus post-judgment interest.  The Judgment further ordered that a sheriff’s sale be held of such property.  Finally, the Judgment dismissed our counterclaims against EEI and Earll with prejudice.  We retained new counsel who filed a motion to vacate the Judgment. On July 17, 2013, the court revoked and set aside the Judgment.  On October 11, 2013, the court held in hearing in the litigation with William Earll and Earll Excavations, Inc.  The hearing resulted in the court entering an order on October 29, 2013 directing that an Order of Default be entered nunc pro tunc to June 14, 2013.  As a result, we expect the court to enter a new default judgment against us consistent with the prior Judgment that was set aside.  We plan to file a motion to reconsider and set aside the court’s October 29, 2013 order, and if necessary pursue all possible appeals.

ITEM 1A.  RISK FACTORS.

Not applicable.

ITEM 2.  UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS.

During the three months ended September 30, 2013, we issued shares of Class A Common Stock in the following transactions:

·

123,998,455 shares of Class A Common Stock upon conversion of 7% two year promissory notes with a principal balance of $518,241, plus accrued interest thereon.

·

25,931,105 shares of Class A Common Stock upon conversion of convertible notes held by Iliad Research & Trading, LP.

·

26,000,000 shares of Class A Common Stock to two consultants.

·

22,622,897 shares of Class A Common Stock valued at $113,114 were issued in payment of compensation to officers.

·

958,183 shares of Class A Common Stock were issued for investor relations services.

During the three months ended September 30, 2013, we issued $104,084 of our 7% two year convertible promissory notes to various investors.  Each note is convertible into shares of common stock at the holder’s election at the market price of the common stock on the date of issuance.

The shares and notes were issued pursuant to the exemption from registration provided by Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

ITEM 3.  DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES.

As of September 30, 2013, we were indebted under a promissory note dated December 3, 2009 in the original principal amount of $225,000, which is payable without interest in ten annual installments of $22,500 each, with the first installment being due on January 1, 2010.  As of September 30, 2013, we had not paid the installment due on January 1, 2013.



32

 

As of September 30, 2013, we are indebted to JMJ Financial (“JMJ”) under two convertible promissory notes, one in the original principal amount of $315,000 and the other in the original principal amount of $525,000 (the “Notes”).  On November 30, 2012, JMJ submitted a conversion request for $54,079.20 of indebtedness under one of the Notes, which by JMJ’s calculations would have required us to issue JMJ 3,000,000 shares of Class A Common Stock.  On December 12, 2012, JMJ submitted another conversion request for $52,360 of indebtedness under one of the Notes, which by JMJ’s calculations would have required us to issue JMJ 3,500,000 shares of Class A Common Stock.  We did not honor either conversion request because of our belief that JMJ was impermissibly shorting our Class A Common Stock, and was improperly manipulating the market price of our Class A Common Stock.  On December 17, 2012, JMJ issued us a notice of default.  On December 18, 2012, JMJ sent us a Notice of Acceleration for immediate payment of all amounts due under both Notes.  On December 21, 2012, JMJ filed a lawsuit against us and Pierre Quilliam, our chief executive officer.  The lawsuit seeks a judgment against us for all amounts due under both Notes.  In November, we reached a settlement of the litigation with JMJ.  See “Item 1. Legal Proceedings.”

As of September 30, 2013, we were indebted under $1,151,062 principal amount of 7% two year notes. All of the 7% two year notes provide for monthly interest payments.  As of September 30, 2013, we had not made interest payments that are due on substantially all of the 7% two year notes.

As of September 30, 2013, we were indebted under $339,682 principal amount of 8% two year notes. All of the 8% two year notes provide for monthly interest payments.  As of September 30, 2013, we had not made interest payments that are due on substantially all of the 8% two year notes.

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES.

The information concerning mine safety violations and other regulatory matters required by Item 104 of Regulation S-K is included in Exhibit 95 to this Report on Form 10-Q.

ITEM 5.  OTHER INFORMATION.

None.

ITEM 6.  EXHIBITS.

TR>

31.1

Amended Certification Pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

31.2

Amended Certification Pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

32.1

Amended Certification Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

32.2

Amended Certification Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

95*

Mine safety information listed in Section 1503 of the Dodd-Frank Act.

EX-101.INS

XBRL Instance Document

EX-101.SCH

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema

EX-101.CAL

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase

EX-101.DEF

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase

EX-101.LAB

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase

EX-101.PRE

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase

 

*

Previously Filed on Form 10-Q on November 19, 2013

 

33

 

SIGNATURES

In accordance with the requirements of the Exchange Act, the registrant caused this amended report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

  

 

SILVER FALCON MINING, INC.

Date: October 21, 2014


/s/ Pierre Quilliam

 

By: Pierre Quilliam, Chief Executive Officer

(principal executive officer)

  

Date: October 21, 2014


/s/ Thomas C. Ridenour

 

By: Thomas C. Ridenour, Chief Financial Officer

(principal financial and accounting officer)




 

 

 

 

 

 

 

34