10-K 1 form10-k.htm

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

(Mark One)

 

[X] ANNUAL REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2020

 

[  ] TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from ____________ to____________

 

Commission File Number: 000-55954

 

ESPORTS ENTERTAINMENT GROUP, INC
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Nevada   26-3062752

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

identification No.)

     

170 Pater House, Psaila Street

Birkirkara, Malta, BKR 9077

  89109
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (268) 562-9111

 

Securities registered under Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act:

 

Title of each class   Trading Symbol(s)   Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock   GMBL   The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
Common Stock Purchase Warrants   GMBLW   The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. [  ] Yes [X] No

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. [  ] Yes [X] No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. [X] Yes [  ] No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). [X] Yes [  ] No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer [  ]   Accelerated filer [  ]
Non-accelerated filer [X]   Smaller reporting company [X]
    Emerging growth company [  ]

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transaction period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). [  ] Yes [X] No

 

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates was $29,833,943 computed by reference to the closing price of the registrant’s common stock as quoted on the Nasdaq Capital Markets on September 22, 2020 (which was $4.16 per share). For purposes of the above statement only, all directors, executive officers and 10% shareholders are assumed to be affiliates. This determination of affiliate status is not necessarily a conclusive determination for any other purpose.

 

As of September 28, 2020, there were 12,543,750 shares of common stock, par value $0.001 issued and outstanding.

 

 

 

   

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

    Page
    Number
  PART I  
     
Item 1. Business. 1
Item 1A Risk Factors. 8
Item 1B Unresolved Staff Comments. 34
Item 2. Properties. 34
Item 3. Legal Proceedings. 34
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures. 35
     
  PART II  
     
Item 5. Market for the Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities. 35
Item 6. Selected Financial Data. 36
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations. 36
Item 7A Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosure about Market Risk. 39
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data. 39
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure. 39
Item 9A Controls and Procedures. 39
Item 9B Other Information. 40
     
  PART III  
     
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance. 41
Item 11. Executive Compensation. 47
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters. 51
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence. 53
Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services. 54
     
  PART IV  
     
Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules. 54

 

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FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K (including the section regarding Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations) contains forward-looking statements regarding our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. Words such as “expects,” “anticipates,” “intends,” “plans,” “believes,” “seeks,” “estimates” and similar expressions or variations of such words are intended to identify forward-looking statements, but are not deemed to represent an all-inclusive means of identifying forward-looking statements as denoted in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Additionally, statements concerning future matters are forward-looking statements.

 

Although forward-looking statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K reflect the good faith judgment of our Management, such statements can only be based on facts and factors currently known by us. Consequently, forward-looking statements are inherently subject to risks and uncertainties and actual results and outcomes may differ materially from the results and outcomes discussed in or anticipated by the forward-looking statements. Readers are urged not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. We file reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). You can read and copy any materials we file with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, DC 20549. You can obtain additional information about the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. In addition, the SEC maintains an Internet site (www.sec.gov) that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC, including us.

 

We undertake no obligation to revise or update any forward-looking statements in order to reflect any event or circumstance that may arise after the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Readers are urged to carefully review and consider the various disclosures made throughout the entirety of this annual Report, which attempt to advise interested parties of the risks and factors that may affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

 

In this Annual Report on Form 10-K, the terms “we”, “our”, and “us” refer to Esports Entertainment Group, Inc. (“Esports”) and our wholly owned subsidiaries, Vie Esports Services BV, a Curacao corporation, Esports Entertainment (Malta) Limited, a Malta corporation, Esports Services (Malta) Limited, a Malta corporation, GMBL New Jersey Inc, a US corporation, and LHE Enterprises Limited, a company registered in Gibraltar.

 

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PART I

 

Item 1. Business

 

Corporate History

 

Esports Entertainment Group, Inc. was formed in the State of Nevada on July 22, 2008 under our prior name Virtual Closet, Inc. Virtual Closet, Inc. changed its name to DK Sinopharma, Inc. on June 6, 2010. DK Sinopharma, Inc. changed its name to VGambling, Inc. on August 12, 2014. On or about April 24, 2017, VGambling, Inc. changed its name to Esports Entertainment Group, Inc. Our company was engaged in a number of different enterprises up until May 20, 2013, when, pursuant to the terms of the Share Exchange Agreement, we acquired all of the outstanding capital stock of H&H Arizona Corporation in exchange for 3,333,334 shares of our common stock. From May 2013 until August 2018, our operations were limited to designing, developing and testing our wagering systems. We launched our online esports wagering website (www.vie.gg) in August 2018.

 

Business Overview

 

Esports is the competitive playing of video games by amateur and professional teams for cash prizes. Esports typically takes the form of organized, multiplayer video games that include real-time strategy, fighting, first-person shooter and multiplayer online battle arena games. As of March 20, 2020, the three largest selling esports games were Dota 2, League of Legends (each multiplayer online battle arena games) and Counter Strike: Global Offensive (a first-person shooter game). Other popular games include Smite, StarCraft II, Call of Duty¸ Heroes of the Storm, Hearthstone and Fortnite. Esports also includes games which can be played, primarily by amateurs, in multiplayer competitions on the Sony PlayStation, Microsoft Xbox and Nintendo Switch. Most major professional esports events and a wide range of amateur esports events are broadcast live via streaming services including twitch.tv, azubu.tv, ustream.tv and youtube.com.

 

We are an esports entertainment and online gambling company primarily focused on three verticals, (i): esports entertainment, (ii) esports wagering, and (iii) iGaming and traditional sports betting. We believe focusing on these verticals positions the Company to take advantage of a trending and expanding marketplace in esports with the rise of competitive gaming as well as the legalization of online gambling in the United States.

 

Esports Entertainment:

 

Our esports entertainment vertical includes any activity that we pursue within esports that does not include real-money wagering. Right now, the main component of this vertical is our skill-based tournament platform. This allows us to engage and monetize players across 41 states where skill-based gambling is legal as well as create relationships with players that can eventually migrate to our Vie.gg real-money wagering platform.

 

Esports Wagering:

 

We intend to be a leader in the large and rapidly growing sector of esports real-money wagering. Our Vie.gg platform offers fans the ability to wager on professional esports events in a licensed and secure environment. At the current time, under the terms of our existing Curacao license, we are currently able to accept wagers from residents of over 149 jurisdictions including Canada, Japan, Germany and South Africa. On April 30, 2020, we received our gaming service license from the Malta Gaming Authority (MGA). We now expect that residents in a number of European Union member states will be able to place bets on our website. On August 20, 2020, we announced that we entered into a multi-year partnership with Twin River Worldwide Holdings, Inc (NYSE: TRWH) to launch our proprietary mobile sports betting product in the state of New Jersey. We intend to have our platform live in the state by the end of the first quarter of 2021.

 

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iGaming and Traditional Sports Betting:

 

The goal of our iGaming and traditional Sports Betting vertical is to provide profitable growth and access to strategic licenses in jurisdictions that we can cross-sell into our Vie.gg platform. On July 7, 2020, we entered into a stock purchase agreement (the “Argyll Purchase Agreement”), by and among the Company, LHE Enterprises Limited (“LHE”), and AHG Entertainment, LLC (“AHG”) whereby, upon closing on July 31, 2020, the Company acquired all of the outstanding capital stock of LHE and its subsidiaries, (i) Argyll Entertainment AG, (ii) Nevada Holdings Limited and (iii) Argyll Productions Limited (collectively the “Acquired Companies” or “Argyle”). AHG is licensed and regulated by the UK Gambling Commission and the Irish Revenue Commissioners to operate online sportsbook and casino sites in the UK and Ireland, respectively. Argyll has a flagship brand, www.SportNation.bet, as well as two white label brands, www.RedZone.bet and www.uk.Fansbet.com (collectively the “Argyll Brands”), with over 200K registered players at the end of calendar year 2019.

 

Competitive Advantages/Operational Strengths

 

We believe the following strengths position us for sustainable growth:

 

Management Team and Key Personnel Experience: Our Board includes senior managers with extensive experience in online gambling, esports, information technology, compliance, regulation, accounting and finance. Our Officers and management include individuals with extensive experience in online gambling, esports, information technology, marketing, business development, payment processing, compliance, regulation, accounting, finance and customer service.

 

Licensed Technology/Proprietary B2C wagering platform: We have entered into a White Label Services Agreement dated December 12, 2019 (the “Askott Agreement”) with a subsidiary of Askott Entertainment Inc. (“Askott”) whereby Esports has secured a non-exclusive license to “white label” Askott’s proprietary software and systems as the platform through which we run our business (the “Platform”). The Platform requires complex code and very skilled development. Accordingly, we believe the complexity of our Platform offers a higher barrier to entry than standard wagering platforms. Furthermore, in September 10, 2020, we acquired certain intellectual property assets developed by FLIP Sports (“Flip Sports”). As part of the acquisition of assets, the Flip employees became employees of Argyll Productions Ltd, a subsidiary of LHE, with the intention to have them build a best-in-class proprietary esports wagering platform. We believe our proprietary platform will provide us with a competitive advantage as it offers what we believe to be the widest variety of betting options available for esports wagering.

 

Argyll’s “Rewards” Program: built in-house, and in conjunction with FLIP Sports, provides an industry-leading customer loyalty program, driving above-industry customer retention rates and player lifetime values. The Program helped earn Argyll the Innovative Start-up of the Year award, at the 2018 EGR Marketing & Innovation Awards. We believe the platform can be leveraged across all of our verticals.

 

Affiliate Marketing Program: Our affiliate marketing program focuses on professional esports teams and individual social media influencers. As part of our efforts to market our online gaming services, we attempt to enter into “Affiliate Marketing Agreements” with professional esports teams and other influential individuals and groups within esports. As an “Marketing Affiliate”, the esports team will provide their fans with a link to our online gaming website, where the fan, if located in a country which allows the fan to place a bet using our gaming platform, can bet on teams playing in esports tournaments. For a player placing a bet through the marketing affiliate’s link to our website and provided such player wins the bet, we pay the “Marketing Affiliate” a percentage of the amount we collect from the winning bet (typically between 25% - 35%).

 

Growth Strategy

 

In the future, we intend to:

 

  expand our Esports services into more of the 41 states where skill-based gambling is legal, enhance the Product offering, as well as create relationships with players that will migrate into our Vie.gg real-money wagering platform.
     
  expand our Esports Wagering services into more jurisdictions, utilizing the recently acquired MGA gaming license, as well as the recent multi-year partnership with Twin River Worldwide Holdings, Inc (NYSE: TRWH) to launch our proprietary mobile sports betting product in the state of New Jersey.
     
  continue with our M&A strategy in the iGaming and Traditional Sports Betting space, to acquire profitable Operators in different jurisdictions, that will also allow for cross-pollination of services (Sportsbook, Casino and Esports).

 

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Future Products and Services:

 

Online Esports Tournament Play

 

We intend to offer players from around the world, including the United States (except in 13 states in the US and other jurisdictions outside the US which currently prohibit playing games of skill for cash prizes), the ability to enter and participate in online video game tournaments and win cash prizes. Online esports tournament play consists of two or more people playing against each other in a game from their personal phones or computers, where such players do not necessarily have to be playing in real time. These events could be held over the course of a day, a week or even a month and the winner will be the one with the top score or the fastest time at the conclusion of the event. Cash-based tournaments involving games of skill are not considered gambling in most U.S. states because the generally accepted definition of gambling involves three specific things: (1) the award of a prize, (2) paid-in consideration (meaning entrants pay to compete) and (3) an outcome determined on the basis of chance. As a result, games of skill are not generally subject to the same laws and regulations as our esports event wagering service. We expect participants in our tournaments being able to enter and play against each other with prize money distributed to the last remaining competitors. We anticipate collecting a tournament entry fee for our tournaments, as well as a percentage of total winnings that are paid to users (typically 10% of the entry fees) and thus none of our money will be at risk or otherwise dependent on the outcome. We intend to offer users a wide selection of video games of skill to be played online for real money in small groups to major tournaments. The tournament platform will also serve as a tool to help us determine which markets we are finding the most esports players. We believe using the tournament platform to penetrate the US market will allow us to grow our brand within the esports community and lead to lower customer-acquisition-costs for our wagering platform.

 

US Market Expansion

 

Currently we do not offer players in the US the ability to wager on our Vie.gg platform. However, on August 20, 2020, we announced that we entered into a multi-year partnership with Twin River Worldwide Holdings, Inc (NYSE: TRWH) to launch our proprietary mobile sports betting product in the state of New Jersey. We intend to have our platform live in the state by the end of the first quarter of 2021. Following our launch in New Jersey, we intend to evaluate additional jurisdictions in the US that could be commercially viable for further expansion of our Vie.gg platform.

 

International Market Expansion

 

We received a Gaming Service License for online pool betting from the Malta Gaming Authority in April 2020, established a brick and mortar office in such jurisdiction and anticipate commencing online gaming operations in that jurisdiction in 2020, both on the Vie.gg and Argyll Brands. We expect that residents of a number of both European Union and non-EU countries will be able to place bets on our website. In the future, we may consider obtaining additional country specific gaming licenses should we determine there is sufficient local demand for our services in these markets. In order to effectively penetrate international markets, we intend to translate our website into several additional languages and offer customer service and technical support in the local language of key markets.

 

Our Online Wagering Platforms

 

According to Zion Market Research’s, Online Gambling & Betting Market by Game Form (Poker, Casino, Sports Betting, Bingo, Lottery, Horse Racing Betting, and Others) and by Component (Hardware, Software, and Service): Global Industry Perspective, Comprehensive Analysis and Forecast, 2017 – 2024, the online gambling market represents one of the fastest growing segments of the gambling industry. Zion Market estimates the current size of the global online gambling market is in excess of US$45.8 billion and is projected to reach US$94.4 billion by 2024.

 

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Although the Vie.gg brand is focused solely on offering online wagering on the widest range of esports events broadcast from around the world, the Argyll Brands offer online users traditional casino style games such as poker, craps or slots, as well as offering online wagering on traditional sporting events such as soccer, horse racing and football.

 

All persons 18 years and older can presently place bets on our online gambling website at www.vie.gg except for residents of the United States and other jurisdictions that the Company is precluded from supplying its services to pursuant to its gaming licenses.

 

With respect to our Argyll Brands, wagering is only permitted by customers in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland.

 

On April 30, 2020, the Company received its Gaming Service License for online pool betting from the Malta Gaming Authority. This allows residents of certain European Union member countries to place bets on our website.

 

Once on our websites, a player can place a bet on a team participating in any number of tournaments which are scheduled to be held in the upcoming weeks. We also maintain a “how to play” section on the website which provides players with instructional videos on placing bets as well as other pieces of information that may be beneficial to an inexperienced player or a new user of our website. Additionally, we maintain a “frequently asked questions” section which provides our customers with the ability to easily navigate general questions relating to the website, personal account information, payment processing, betting rules and procedures as well as tips.

 

We have agreements with the following third party companies that provide us with certain services that enable our website to function efficiently:

 

Money Matrix. MoneyMatrix provides us with the software we use to receive payments from players. Using MoneyMatrix, a player can select from over 150 payment options (i.e. Skrill, Astropay) to deposit funds with us for use in placing bets.

 

Partner Matrix. Partner Matrix provides us with the software we use to track players placing a bet through an Affiliate’s link to our website.

 

Money Matrix, Partner Matrix are both paid monthly for their services to the Company.

 

Askott Entertainment Inc. The Vie.gg Platform is hosted from Askott Entertainment Inc., who provides us with a website hosting subscription, and provides e-games, development and IT services related to the software interface and web design. We will pay the Askott subsidiary a percentage on gaming revenues, this percentage varies based on the amount of monthly gaming revenues generated but shall not exceed twenty-percent (20%) of monthly gaming revenues but gradually decreases based on increased revenues. Additionally, we will pay Askott a minimum monthly fee of $9,000 EUR for services which amount will be subject to increase based on the number of games made available on the Platform.

 

SB Tech Global – the Argyll Brands use the SB Tech platform to host their websites, and pay a percentage on both Sportsbook and Casino Gross Gaming revenues, as well as certain hosting and data feed fees.

 

Marketing and Sales Initiatives

 

The Company has several sponsorship marketing agreements in place for its website as well as an extended marketing agreement with Dignitas, an esports brand owned by Harris Blitzer sports and entertainment with multiple professional teams playing several titles with over a million fans worldwide. The Company also has an agreement with Allied Esports to run esports tournaments to promote the brand globally to esports fans.

 

We are looking to expand into new geographic territories by obtaining licenses to operate in those territories. The need for hands-on implementation in these territories and support will require investment in additional marketing activities, offices, and other overhead.

 

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We will also accelerate our expansion if we find complementary businesses that we are able to acquire in other markets. Our marketing efforts to expand into new territories have included esports team and tournament sponsorship, affiliate marketing, social media advertising, content creation, and attendance at esports and gaming events in addition to personal contact with other industry leaders.

 

Esports games are played by professional teams, amateur teams, and individuals. Professional esports teams have their own social media presence, with some of the top professional teams having millions of fans who follow and interact with the team on a regular basis. A website of a professional esports team usually contains specific information about the team and lists upcoming tournaments or events in which the team will be participating. As part of our efforts to market our online gaming services, we attempt to enter into affiliate marketing agreements with professional Esports teams.

 

As a marketing affiliate, the esports team will promote our brand in the content they create and on their social media and Website. The fans will be provided with a link to our online gaming website, where the Fan, if located in a country that allows the fan to place a bet using our gaming platform, can bet on teams playing in esports tournaments. For a player placing a bet through the team’s link to our website (and provided the player won the bet), we pay the Affiliate a percentage of the amount we collect from the winning bet. As of September 1st, 2020, we had more than 220 esports teams agreeing to act as our marketing affiliates.

 

We plan to increase our marketing efforts and awareness of our websites, www.vie.gg and www.sportnation.bet, as well as future offerings by:

 

  Educating sports betting consumers to bet on esports and we want gamers to start betting on esports.

 

  Sponsoring professional esports teams and tournaments that have a global reach.

 

  Working with sports and gaming celebrities and social media influencers who have an interest in video games and esports to generate new customers. We intend to increase our efforts in attracting esports players and other celebrities who have an interest in video games and esports.

 

  Using a multichannel approach focused on acquiring and retaining customers we intend to utilize multiple social media platforms to promote the Company’s wagering business including, but not limited to, Facebook Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, TikTok, Youtube, Twitch, Whatsapp, QQ, WeChat, email and SMS messages and using online advertisements, paid search optimization, and various social media campaigns to increase our online presence and drive traffic to our website. We intend to increase our investments in online advertisements, including esports gambling-related websites. We also intend to continue to invest in optimizing the Company’s website so it will attain a high ranking under key search words or phrases, such as “esports gambling.”

 

Competition

 

The online gambling and wagering industry is increasingly competitive. With relatively low barriers to entry, new competitors are entering the esports wagering and video game tournament segments. In both of these segments, there currently exist several major competitors. Because many of these competitors focus on delivering one product, as opposed to a full suite of esports and video gambling products and services that we intend to offer, the competitors may offer an equivalent or superior product to that of the Company. We expect the number of companies offering products and services in each market segment to increase. Most of our current competitors, including Unikrn, bet365, William Hill, Betway, and Pinnacle Sports, have far greater resources than we have.

 

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In the UK, where Argyll is heavily concentrated, the competition in the online gambling industry is extremely competitive. As of June 2020, the UK Gambling Commission oversaw 3641 gambling licenses, held by 2,652 gaming operators, which makes competing for the acquisition and retention of customers, continually challenging.

 

We believe the following differentiates us from our competitors:

 

  Esports Focused:

 

The Vig.gg brand is focused solely on esports gambling and 18+ gaming. We will not offer users traditional casino style games like poker, craps or slots nor do we anticipate offering wagering on traditional sporting events like football or soccer. We are focused solely on delivering the widest selection of content and offering the widest range of esports events all for real-money wagering.

 

  Strength of Argyll proposition:

 

With the industry reaching saturation point with similar offers around bonuses and free bets, often with complex terms and conditions, Argyll’s vision and ambition was to launch a totally unique in-house product, seamlessly in to SportNation.bet, to provide customers with an experience like no other, while tackling one of the major challenges that any operator faces; retention. That product and concept is our Rewards Program.

 

Argyll’s Rewards Program offers customers a simple and genuinely rewarding loyalty scheme, where every bet on the site, win, lose or draw, earns points to redeem into our “Reward Store”. No turnover requirements, no minimum odds conditions, no new customer or single-use restrictions.

 

We have developed an in house, turnover based model to reward customers with points based on their activity. Customers earn points faster by increasing the number of selections in sportsbook bets, providing an opportunity to increase the rate at which points are earned.

 

Customers are able to select when and how they want to redeem. A customer is not bound to certain activity or staking criteria. A customer can decide when and what they want to redeem, which could either be frequently, or allowing customers to save for a larger item.

 

As an extension to the already unique Rewards offering that SportNation provides its users, a range of product enhancements have also been integrated in to SportNation, including live streaming, responsible gaming and compliance tools and data driven customized journeys. All integrations have been designed and developed in house, to align with the feel and tone of the site. By combining research and insight with the latest technology to implement real time solutions, SportNation offers an innovative, safe and responsible product that is tailored to each individual user, on and offsite, from registration and throughout their customer lifetime.

 

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Regulations Affecting our Business

 

The offering and operation of online real-money gambling platforms and related software and solutions is subject to extensive regulation and approval by various national, federal, state, provincial, tribal and foreign agencies (collectively, “gaming authorities”). Gambling laws require us to obtain licenses or findings of suitability from gaming authorities for Esports Entertainment, including each of our subsidiaries engaged in these activities, and certain of our directors, officers, employees and in some instances, significant shareholders (typically beneficial owners of more than 5% of a company’s outstanding equity). The criteria used by gambling authorities to make determinations as to qualification and suitability of an applicant varies among jurisdictions, but generally require the submission of detailed personal and financial information followed by a thorough and sometimes lengthy investigation. Gaming authorities have broad discretion in determining whether an applicant qualifies for licensing or should be found suitable. Gambling authorities generally look to the following criteria when determining to grant a license or finding of suitability, including (i) the financial stability, integrity and responsibility of the applicant, (ii) the quality and security of the applicant’s online real-money platform and gaming equipment and related software, as applicable, and (iii) the past history of the applicant. Gambling authorities may, subject to certain administrative proceeding requirements, (i) deny an application, or limit, condition, restrict, revoke or suspend any license, registration, finding of suitability or approval, and (ii) fine any person licensed, registered or found suitable or approved. Notwithstanding the foregoing, some jurisdictions explicitly prohibit gaming in all or certain forms and we will not market our gambling services in these jurisdictions. If any director, officer or employee of ours fails to qualify for a license or is found unsuitable (including due to the failure to submit the required documentation) by a gaming authority, we may deem it necessary, or be required to, sever our relationship with such person, which may include terminating the employment of any such person. Gambling authorities have the right to investigate any individual or entity having a material relationship with us, to determine whether such individual or entity is suitable or should be licensed to do business as a business associate of ours. In addition, certain gambling authorities monitor the activities of the entities they regulate both in their respective jurisdiction and in other jurisdictions to ensure that these entities are in compliance with local standards on a worldwide basis.

 

On May 14, 2018, the Supreme Court of the United States struck down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act, a 1992 law that barred state-authorized sports gambling with some exceptions and made Nevada the only state where a person could wager on the results of a single game. Since the Supreme Court’s decision, sports gambling has commenced in several states and several more states have enabling legislation pending. We believe that the Supreme Court’s decision will allow our platform to be used in the United States at some point in the future. We plan to explore expansion of our esports online wagering platform into the US market place at the appropriate time.

 

The Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006 (“UIEGA”) made it a federal offense, punishable by up to five years in prison, for a business to accept payments “in connection with the participation of another person in unlawful internet gambling.” In support of such new prohibitions, the UIGEA uses a variety of terms — some of which are ambiguous or undefined. Initially, the UIGEA broadly defines a “bet or wager” as: the staking or risking by any person of something of value upon the outcome of a contest of others, a sporting event, or a game subject to chance, upon an agreement or understanding that the person or another person will receive something of value in the event of a certain outcome.

 

Further, a “bet or wager” specifically includes a chance on a lottery or prize awarded predominantly by chance; a “scheme” as defined in Title 28, U.S.C. § 3702 relating to government-sponsored amateur or professional sports betting and, “any instructions or information pertaining to the establishment or movement of funds by the bettor or customer in, to, or from, an account with the business of betting or wagering.” While this final prohibition incorporates the term “business of betting or wagering,” that term is not specifically defined anywhere in the UIGEA. The only reference to that term comes in § 5362(2), which states: The term “business of betting or wagering” does not include the activities of a financial transaction provider, or any interactive computer service or telecommunications service.

 

Nonetheless, the law does contain specific prohibitions. In order to establish a violation of the UIGEA, it must be shown that:

 

  1. A “person” was engaged in the business of betting or wagering;
     
  2. That person knowingly accepted a financial instrument or proceeds thereof; and,
     
  3. That instrument was accepted (by the person) in connection with the participation of another person in “unlawful Internet gambling.”

 

In the context of this statute “unlawful Internet gambling” is defined as follows:

 

To place, receive, or otherwise knowingly transmit a bet or wager by any means which involves the use, at least in part, of the Internet where such bet or wager is unlawful under any applicable Federal or State law in the state or tribal lands in which the bet or wager is initiated, received, or otherwise made.

 

Therefore, the UIGEA only applies to online gambling transactions that are already prohibited by other state, federal, or tribal laws. Therefore, in order for the financial transaction to be prohibited by § 5363 of the UIGEA, the bet or wager must be “initiated, received, or otherwise made” in a place where such activity (the bet of wager) violates preexisting state, federal, or tribal law.

 

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At the current time, we are able to accept wagers on our vie.gg website from residents of over 149 jurisdictions including Canada, Japan, Germany and South Africa. We do not accept wagers from United States residents at this time and therefore the bet or wager on our platform is not “initiated, received, or otherwise made” in a place where such activity violates preexisting state, federal, or tribal law.

 

Great Britain

 

Betting and gaming with respect to customers in Great Britain (England, Scotland and Wales, but excluding Northern Ireland, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man) is regulated by the Gambling Act 2005 (the “2005 Act”). The 2005 Act established the Gambling Commission as the regulator responsible for granting licenses to operate gambling services as well as overseeing compliance with applicable law and regulation. In 2014, the UK Parliament passed the Gambling (Licensing and Advertising) Act 2014, which required all remote gambling operators serving customers in Great Britain or advertising in Great Britain to obtain a license from the Gambling Commission. Our Argyll Brands operate in the UK pursuant to remote operating licences issued by the Gambling Commission along with the separate software and “key personnel” individual licenses. Various additional operating subsidiaries of EEG are endorsed upon the licenses and are hence authorized to carry out the licensed activities on a so-called “umbrella” basis in addition to the “primary” licensee. The terms of these operating licenses require that the relevant subsidiaries of EEG must source all gambling software used in connection with British players from the holder of a gambling software licenses issued by the Gambling Commission. So long as the applicable license fees are paid and the British licenses are not suspended, revoked or otherwise surrendered, EEG expects that the licenses will remain valid indefinitely.

 

British regulations require licensed companies to file quarterly returns as well as a more extensive “annual assurance statement” to provide the Gambling Commission with information regarding matters such as significant changes in control systems, risk management and governance since the last assurance statement, how the licensee is addressing gambling by problem and at-risk customers and any improvements that the licensee plans to implement to its control systems, risk management and governance and/or its approach to addressing problem and at-risk gambling and promoting socially responsible gambling. The Gambling Commission also subjects its licensees to periodical regulatory compliance visits subsequent to which recommendations may be issued to the licensee.

 

Intellectual Property

 

We have not filed to register any patents, trade names or trademarks in any jurisdictions in relation to our Vie.gg brand, but we do intend to file applications to register patents, tradenames or trademarks in the near future.

 

Argyll owns a European Union registered trade mark for its SportNation brand.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors.

 

Risks Related to Our Business

 

We are a development stage company with a limited operating history.

 

While we were incorporated under the laws of Nevada in July 2008, we did not begin to engage in our current business until May 2013 and our operations since that time have been mostly limited to designing, developing and testing our wagering systems. We have had de minimis revenues to date. Consequently, we are subject to all the risks and uncertainties inherent in a new business and in connection with the development and sale of new products and services. As a result, we still must establish many corporate functions necessary to operate our business, including finalizing our administrative structure, continuing our product development, assessing and expanding our marketing activities, implementing financial systems and controls and personnel recruitment. Accordingly, you should consider the Company’s prospects in light of the costs, uncertainties, delays, and difficulties frequently encountered by companies in this early stage of development. You should carefully consider the risks and uncertainties that a company, such as ours, with a limited operating history will face. In particular, you should consider that we cannot provide assurance that we will be able to:

 

  successfully implement or execute our current business plan;

 

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  maintain our management team;
     
  raise sufficient funds in the capital markets to effectuate our business plan;
     
  attract, enter into or maintain contracts with, and retain customers; and/or
     
  compete effectively in the extremely competitive environment in which we operate.

 

If we cannot successfully accomplish any of the foregoing objectives, our business may not succeed.

 

We have a history of accumulated deficits, recurring losses and negative cash flows from operating activities. We may be unable to achieve or sustain profitability

 

To date, we have recorded de minimis revenues from the sale of our products. If we are unable to generate revenues, we will not be able to achieve and maintain profitability. Beyond this, we may incur significant losses in the future for a number of reasons including other risks described in this document, and we may encounter unforeseen expenses, difficulties, complications, delays and other unknown events. Accordingly, we may not ever be able to achieve profitability. We incurred negative cash flows from operating activities and recurring net losses in fiscal years 2020 and 2019. As of June 30, 2020, and 2019, our accumulated deficit was $20,535,602 and $10,184,187, respectively. These factors, among others, raised substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern, which has been alleviated by the execution of management’s plans. On April 16, 2020, the Company raised approximately $7,000,000 in net proceeds from its public offering. Additionally, the Company raised approximately $7,000,000 from the exercise of warrants and over-allotments during the year ended June 30, 2020.

 

We will require additional financing and cannot be certain that such additional financing will be available on reasonable terms when required, or at all.

 

As of June 30, 2020, we had cash of approximately $12,000,000, raised form the public offering and associated warrant exercises. While this amount is sufficient to continue with Operating activities for at least the next 12 months, we anticipate that we will need to raise additional capital to fund our operations while we implement and execute our business plan and acquisition strategy. We currently do not have any contracts or commitments for additional financing. In addition, any additional equity financing may involve substantial dilution to the existing shareholders. There can be no assurance that such additional capital will be available, on a timely basis, or on terms acceptable to the Company. Failure to obtain such additional financing could result in delay or indefinite postponement of operations or the further development of its business with the possible loss of such properties or assets. If adequate funds are not available or are not available on acceptable terms, the Company may not be able to fund its business or the expansion thereof, take advantage of strategic acquisitions or investment opportunities or respond to competitive pressures. Such inability to obtain additional financing when needed could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, results of operations, cash flow, financial condition and prospects.

 

The gaming and interactive entertainment industries are intensely competitive. Esports faces competition from a growing number of companies and, if Esports is unable to compete effectively, its business could be negatively impacted.

 

There is intense competition amongst gaming solution providers. There are a number of established, well financed companies producing both land-based and online gaming and interactive entertainment products and systems that compete with the products of the Company. As some of our competitors have financial resources that are greater than Esports’, they may spend more money and time on developing and testing products, undertake more extensive marketing campaigns, adopt more aggressive pricing policies or otherwise develop more commercially successful products than the Company, which could impact the Company’s ability to win new marketing contracts and renew our existing ones. Furthermore, new competitors may enter the Company’s key market areas. If the Company is unable to obtain significant market presence or if it loses market share to its competitors, the Company’s results of operations and future prospects would be materially adversely affected. There are many companies with already established relationships with third parties, including gaming operators that are able to introduce directly competitive products and have the potential and resources to quickly develop competitive technologies. The Company’s success depends on its ability to develop new products and enhance existing products at prices and on terms that are attractive to its customers.

 

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There has also been consolidation among the Company’s competitors in the esports and gaming industry. Such consolidation could result in the formation of larger competitors with increased financial resources and altered cost structures, which may enable them to offer more competitive pricing models, gain a larger market share of customers, expand product offerings and broaden their geographic scope of operations.

 

Risks that impact our customers may impact us.

 

Because we generate website traffic through our affiliate marketing program, if participants in our affiliate marketing program see a slowdown in business or website traffic it may lead to fewer visitors on our website, which could have an adverse effect on our business.

 

Because four of our directors and a substantial portion of our assets are located in jurisdictions other than the United States and Canada, you may have no effective recourse against the directors not located in the United States and Canada for misconduct and may not be able to enforce judgment and civil liabilities against these directors.

 

Four of our directors and a substantial portion of our assets are or may be located in jurisdictions outside the U.S. As a result, a person may not be able to affect service of process within the U.S. on our directors and officers. A person also may not be able to recover against them on judgments of U.S. courts or to obtain original judgments against them in foreign courts, including judgments predicated upon civil liability provisions of the U.S. federal securities laws.

 

We operate in a very competitive business environment and if we do not adapt our approach and our products to meet this competitive environment, our business, results of operations or financial condition could be adversely impacted.

 

There is intense competition in the gaming management and gaming products industry which is characterized by dynamic customer demand and rapid technological advances. Today, there are many systems providers in the U.S. and abroad offering casinos and gaming operators “total solution” casino management and table games management systems. As a result, we must continually adapt our approach and our products to meet this demand and match technological advances and if we cannot do so, our business results of operations or financial condition may be adversely impacted. Conversely, the development of new competitive products or the enhancement of existing competitive products in any market in which we operate could have an adverse impact on our business, results of operations or financial condition. If we are unable to remain dynamic in the face of changes in the market, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.

 

We are vulnerable to additional or increased taxes and fees.

 

We believe that the prospect of raising significant additional revenue through taxes and fees is one of the primary reasons that certain jurisdictions permit legalized gaming. As a result, gaming companies are typically subject to significant taxes and fees in addition to the normal federal, state, provincial and local income taxes and such taxes and fees may be increased at any time. From time to time, legislators and officials have proposed changes in tax laws or in the administration of laws affecting the gaming industry. Many states and municipalities, including ones in which we operate, are currently experiencing budgetary pressures that may make it more likely they would seek to impose additional taxes and fees on our operations. It is not possible to determine the likelihood or extent of any such future changes in tax laws or fees, or changes in the administration of such laws; however, if enacted, such changes could have a material adverse impact on our business.

 

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The legalization of online real money gaming in the United States and our ability to predict and capitalize on any such legalization may impact our business.

 

Nevada, Delaware, New Jersey and Pennsylvania have enacted legislation to legalize online real money gaming. In recent years, California, Mississippi, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Iowa, Illinois, New York, Washington D.C. and West Virginia have considered such legislation. If a large number of additional states or the Federal government enact online real money gaming legislation and we are unable to obtain the necessary licenses to operate online real money gaming websites in United States jurisdictions where such games are legalized, our future growth in real money gaming could be materially impaired.

 

States or the Federal government may legalize online real money gaming in a manner that is unfavorable to us. Several states and the Federal government are considering draft laws that require online casinos to also have a license to operate a brick-and mortar casino, either directly or indirectly through an affiliate. If, like Nevada and New Jersey, state jurisdictions enact legislation legalizing online real money casino gaming subject to this brick-and-mortar requirement, we may be unable to offer online real money gaming in such jurisdictions if we are unable to establish an affiliation with a brick-and-mortar casino in such jurisdiction on acceptable terms.

 

In the online real money gaming industry, a significant “first mover” advantage exists. Our ability to compete effectively in respect of a particular style of online real money gaming in the United States may be premised on introducing a style of gaming before our competitors. Failing to do so (“move first”) could materially impair our ability to grow in the online real money gaming space. We may fail to accurately predict when online real money gaming will be legalized in significant jurisdictions. The legislative process in each state and at the Federal level is unique and capable of rapid, often unpredictable change. If we fail to accurately forecast when and how, if at all, online real money gaming will be legalized in additional state jurisdictions, such failure could impair our readiness to introduce online real money gaming offerings in such jurisdictions which could have a material adverse impact on our business.

 

Our business is subject to online security risk, including security breaches, and loss or misuse of our stored information as a result of such a breach, including customers’ personal information, could lead to government enforcement action or other litigation, potential liability, or otherwise harm our business.

 

We receive, process, store and use personal information and other customer data. There are numerous federal, state and local laws regarding privacy and the storing, sharing, use, processing, disclosure and protection of personal information and other data. Any failure or perceived failure by us to comply with our privacy policies, our privacy-related obligations to customers or other third parties, or our privacy-related legal obligations, or any compromise of security that results in the unauthorized release or transfer of personally identifiable information or other player data, may result in governmental enforcement actions, litigation or public statements against us by consumer advocacy groups or others and could cause our customers to lose trust in us which could have an adverse impact on our business. In the area of information security and data protection, many states have passed laws requiring notification to customers when there is a security breach for personal data, such as the 2002 amendment to California’s Information Practices Act, or requiring the adoption of minimum information security standards that are often vaguely defined and difficult to practically implement. The costs of compliance with these types of laws may increase in the future as a result of changes in interpretation or changes in law. Any failure on our part to comply with these types of laws may subject us to significant liabilities.

 

Third parties we work with, such as vendors, may violate applicable laws or our policies, and such violations may also put our customers’ information at risk and could in turn have an adverse impact on our business. We are also subject to payment card association rules and obligations under each association’s contracts with payment card processors. Under these rules and obligations, if information is compromised, we could be liable to payment card issuers for the associated expense and penalties. If we fail to follow payment card industry security standards, even if no customer information is compromised, we could incur significant fines or experience a significant increase in payment card transaction costs.

 

Security breaches, computer malware and computer hacking attacks have become more prevalent in our industry. Many companies, including ours, have been the targets of such attacks. Any security breach caused by hacking which involves efforts to gain unauthorized access to information or systems, or to cause intentional malfunctions or loss or corruption of data, software, hardware or other computer equipment, and the inadvertent transmission of computer viruses could harm our business. Though it is difficult to determine what harm may directly result from any specific interruption or breach, any failure to maintain performance, reliability, security and availability of our network infrastructure to the satisfaction of our players may harm our reputation and our ability to retain existing players and attract new players.

 

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If unauthorized disclosure of the source code we currently license we could potentially lose future trade secret protection for that source code. This could make it easier for third parties to compete with our products by copying functionality which could adversely affect our revenue and operating margins. Unauthorized disclosure of source code also could increase security risks.

 

Because the techniques used to obtain unauthorized access, disable or degrade service, or sabotage systems, change frequently and often are not recognized until launched against a target, we may be unable to anticipate these techniques or to implement adequate preventative measures. We have developed systems and processes that are designed to protect customer information and prevent data loss and other security breaches, including systems and processes designed to reduce the impact of a security breach at a third party vendor; however, such measures cannot provide absolute security.

 

Risks related to our reliance on third party technology, platforms and software (“third-party software”), and any failures, errors, defects or disruptions in such third-party software could diminish our brand and reputation, subject us to liability, disrupt our business and adversely affect our operating results and growth prospects.

 

We rely on third party software that is critical to the performance of our platform and offerings and to user satisfaction, the principal suppliers being Askott for our vie.gg website and SB Tech for our Argyll Brands.

 

If there is any interruption to the third-party software provided by these suppliers or their products or services are not as scalable as anticipated or at all, or if there are problems in upgrading such products or services, our business could be adversely affected, and we may be unable to find adequate replacement services on a timely basis or at all and/or at a reasonable price. Additionally, third-party software may contain errors, bugs, flaws or corrupted data, and these defects may only become apparent after their launch. If a particular product offering is unavailable when end users attempt to access it or navigation through our platforms is slower than they expect, users may be unable to place their bets and may be less likely to return to our platforms as often, if at all. Furthermore, programming errors, defects and data corruption could disrupt our operations, adversely affect the experience of our users, harm our reputation, cause our users to stop utilizing our platforms, divert our resources and delay market acceptance of our offerings, any of which could result in legal liability to us or harm our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. Moreover, end users are discriminating about the nature of the products offered and our suppliers do not provide new and improved products on a regular basis, we may lose market share.

 

There is a risk that if the contracts with such third parties are terminated and not renewed, or not renewed on favourable terms, or if they do not get the level of support (in terms of updates and technical assistance) they require as we grow, this will materially impact upon our financial condition and performance going forward. There may be circumstances in which we wish to terminate our arrangements with such suppliers due to poor performance or other reasons but we are unable to do so. Any such circumstance may have a material adverse effect on our reputation, business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We are dependent upon such software suppliers defending any challenges to their intellectual property; any litigation that arises as a result of such change could materially impact upon us and, following even if legal actions were successfully defended, such actions could disrupt our business in the interim, divert management time and result in significant cost and expense for us. Further, any negative publicity related to any of our third-party partners, including any publicity related to regulatory concerns, could adversely affect our reputation and brand, and could potentially lead to increased regulatory or litigation exposure.

 

As a condition of an ongoing licence, permit or other authorisation required for their business, a key supplier to the Company may determine that a condition of the ongoing use of their products and services, or the continuation of the licence, is that the Company should block custom from certain territories, which may cause business disruption and loss should the Company either need to switch suppliers at short notice or discontinue business in certain territories, either permanently (while such suppliers are necessary) or pending the expiry of contract notice periods and/or the sourcing of alternative suppliers.

 

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We rely on other third-party data and live-streaming providers for real-time and accurate data and/or live streams for sporting events, and if such third parties do not perform adequately or terminate their relationships with us, our costs may increase and our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

 

We rely on third-party sports data and live streaming providers to obtain accurate information regarding schedules, results, performance and outcomes of sporting events and the live streaming of such events, such as horse racing. We rely on this data to determine when and how bets are settled. We have experienced, and may continue to experience, errors in this data and/or streaming feed which may result in us incorrectly settling bets. If we cannot adequately resolve the issue with our end users, our end users may have a negative experience with our offerings, our brand or reputation may be negatively affected and our users may be less inclined to continue or resume utilizing our products or recommend our platform to other potential users. As such, a failure or significant interruption in our service would harm our reputation, business and operating results.

 

Furthermore, if any of our data and/or live streaming partners terminates its relationship with us or refuses to renew its agreement with us on commercially reasonable terms, we would need to find an alternate provider, and may not be able to secure similar terms or replace such providers in an acceptable time frame. Any of these risks could increase our costs and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Further, any negative publicity related to any of our third-party partners, including any publicity related to regulatory concerns, could adversely affect our reputation and brand, and could potentially lead to increased regulatory or litigation exposure.

 

We may be subject to the payment of contributions or fees to sporting bodies or rights holders for the use of their data.

 

Gambling operators can be liable to make contributions to sporting bodies whether under regulations or agreement, such as The Horserace Betting Levy Board in the UK, as a way of ensuring certain revenues generated from betting on sports are used to benefit those sports or related interests. We may also be required to pay royalties or other types of levy to the organisers of sporting events, or the rights holders in respect of such, to offer betting markets on such events. Any requirement to pay additional levies, fees or royalties would have a material adverse effect on our business. In all such cases, the level of any such levy, fee or royalty will be outside the control of the Company. The Company cannot predict with any certainty what future payments may be required for the success of their business in the future and what other additional resources will need to be made available to address the conditions which impose fees, royalties or other levies, as well as sports integrity issues.

 

The success, including win or hold rates, of existing or future online betting and casino gaming products depends on a variety of factors and is not completely controlled by us.

 

The sports betting and casino gaming industries are characterized by an element of chance. Accordingly, our Argyll Brands employ theoretical win rates to estimate what a certain type of sports bet or game, on average, will win or lose in the long run. Net win is impacted by variations in the hold percentage (the ratio of net win to total amount wagered), or actual outcome, on our games and sports betting we offer to our users. We use the hold percentage as an indicator of a casino game’s or sports bet’s performance against its expected outcome. Although each game or sports bet generally performs within a defined statistical range of outcomes, actual outcomes may vary for any given period. In addition to the element of chance, win rates (hold percentages) may also (depending on the game involved) be affected by the spread of limits and factors that are beyond our control, such as an end user’s skill, experience and behavior, the mix of games played, the financial resources of users, the volume of bets placed and the amount of time spent gambling. As a result of the variability in these factors, the actual win rates on our online casino games and sports bets may differ from the theoretical win rates we have estimated and could result in the winnings of our casino game’s or sports bet’s users exceeding those anticipated. The variability of win rates (hold rates) also have the potential to negatively impact our financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows.

 

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Participation in the sports betting industry exposes us to trading, liability management and pricing risk. We may experience lower than expected profitability and potentially significant losses as a result of a failure to determine accurately the odds in relation to any particular event and/or any failure of its sports risk management processes.

 

Our fixed-odds betting products involve betting where winnings are paid on the basis of the stake placed and the odds quoted. Odds are determined with the objective of providing an average return to the Company over a large number of events and therefore, over the long term, gross win percentage is expected to remain fairly constant. However, there can be significant variation in gross win percentage event-by-event and day-by-day. As a result, in the short term, there is less certainty of generating a positive gross win, and we may experience significant losses with respect to individual events or betting outcomes, in particular if large individual bets are placed on an event or betting outcome or series of events or betting outcomes. Odds compilers and risk managers are capable of human error, thus even allowing for the fact that a number of betting products are subject to capped pay-outs, significant volatility can occur. In addition, it is possible that there may be such a high volume of trading during any particular period that even automated systems would be unable to address and eradicate all risks. Any significant losses on a gross-win basis could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, if a jurisdiction where we hold or wish to apply for a license imposes a high turnover tax for betting (as opposed to a gross-win tax), this too would impact profitability, particularly with high value/low margin bets, and likewise have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

We are required to comply with applicable anti-money laundering and countering the financing of terrorism legislation a breach of which could lead to government enforcement action or other litigation, potential liability, or otherwise harm our business.

 

The Company receive deposits and other payments from customers in the normal course of their business. The receipt of monies from customers imposes anti-money laundering and other obligations and potential liabilities on the Company. Compliance with all such laws and regulations creates complex regulatory obligations which involves a risk of large financial penalties (in not being fully compliant) and additional potential burdens (in being fully compliant). While the Company has processes in place regarding customer profiling and the identification of customers’ source of funds, such processes may fail or prove to be inadequate whether in respect of the source of customers’ funds or otherwise. Any such failure or inadequacy could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial position and impact upon its licensing obligations.

 

Handling, or any form of facilitating the use of criminal property, is a crime in all jurisdictions in which the Company takes material custom (and going forward will take material custom). In instances where no local licensing regime is in place and there is doubt in connection with the legality of the remote supply of gambling services, there is a risk that the authorities will claim that money movements in connection with gambling amounts to money laundering, irrespective of whether the intention is actually to launder money (i.e. to disguise or conceal its provenance). This gives rise to a risk that when monies are held in (or moved into) certain territories, authorities may wish to freeze their onward payment, seek to trace money movements into different jurisdictions and recover the relevant sums. This would give rise to conflicts of law issues (not all the definitions of what comprises criminal property are identical in all jurisdictions) and what may not amount to money laundering in one jurisdiction may satisfy the definition in that other territory. There is a risk that should any such claim be brought and be successful, significant funds may have to be repatriated to the jurisdiction bringing a claim, which would have a significant impact on the profitability of the Company.

 

We are subject to payment-related risks, such as risk associated with the fraudulent use of credit or debit cards which could have adverse effects on our business due to chargebacks from customers

 

We allow funding and payments to accounts using a variety of methods, including electronic funds transfer (“EFT”), and credit and debit cards. As we continue to introduce new funding or payment options to our players, we may be subject to additional regulatory and compliance requirements. We also may be subject to the risk of fraudulent use of credit or debit cards, or other funding and/or payment options. For certain funding or payment options, including credit and debit cards, we may pay interchange and other fees which may increase over time and, therefore, raise operating costs and reduce profitability. We rely on third parties to provide payment-processing services and it could disrupt our business if these companies become unwilling or unable to provide these services to us. We are also subject to rules and requirements governing EFT which could change or be reinterpreted to make it difficult or impossible for us to comply. If we fail to comply with these rules or requirements, we may be subject to fines and higher transaction fees or possibly lose our ability to accept credit or debit cards, or other forms of payment from customers which could have a material adverse impact on our business.

 

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Chargebacks occur when customers seek to void credit card or other payment transactions. Cardholders are intended to be able to reverse card transactions only if there has been unauthorized use of the card or the services contracted for have not been provided. In our business, customers occasionally seek to reverse online gaming losses through chargebacks. We place great emphasis on control procedures to protect from chargebacks; however, these control procedures may not be sufficient to protect us from adverse effects on our business or results of operations.

 

Our profitability depends upon many factors for which no assurance can be given.

 

Profitability depends upon many factors, including the ability to develop and maintain valuable products and services, our ability to identify and obtain the rights to additional products to add to our existing product line, success and expansion of our sales programs, expansion of our customer base, obtaining the right balance of expense levels and the overall success of our business activities. Operating Income will be earned during the next 12 months, buoyed by the Argyll acquisition, but even if we do achieve profitability, we may not be able to sustain or increase profitability on a quarterly or annual basis. Our failure to become and remain profitable would depress the value of our company and could impair our ability to raise capital, expand our business, diversify our product offerings or even continue our operations. A decline in the value of our stock could also cause you to lose all or part of your investment.

 

Future cash flows fluctuations may affect our ability to fund our working capital requirements or achieve our business objectives in a timely manner.

 

Our working capital requirements and cash flows are expected to be subject to quarterly and yearly fluctuations, depending on such factors as timing and size of capital expenditures, levels of sales and collection of receivables, customer payment terms and supplier terms and conditions. We expect that a greater than expected slow-down in capital spending by our customers may require us to adjust our current business model. As a result, our revenues and cash flows may be materially lower than we expect and we may be required to reduce our capital expenditures and investments or take other measures in order to meet our cash requirements. We may seek additional funds from liquidity-generating transactions and other conventional sources of external financing (which may include a variety of debt, convertible debt and/or equity financings). We cannot provide any assurance that our net cash requirements will be as we currently expect. Our inability to manage cash flow fluctuations resulting from the above factors could have a material adverse effect on our ability to fund our working capital requirements from operating cash flows and other sources of liquidity or to achieve our business objectives in a timely manner.

 

Our business may be materially and adversely affected by increased levels of debt.

 

In order to finance our business or to finance possible acquisitions we may incur significant levels of debt compared to historical levels, and we may need to secure additional sources of funding, which may include debt or convertible debt financing, in the future. A high level of debt, arduous or restrictive terms and conditions relating to accessing certain sources of funding, failure to meet the financial and/or other covenants in our credit and/or support facilities and any significant reduction in, or access to, such facilities, poor business performance or lower than expected cash inflows could have adverse consequences on our ability to fund our business operations. Other effects of a high level of debt include the following:

 

  we may have difficulty borrowing money in the future or accessing sources of funding;
     
  we may need to use a large portion of our cash flows from operating activities to pay principal and interest on our indebtedness, which would reduce the amount of cash available to finance our operations and other business activities;
     
  a high debt level, arduous or restrictive terms and conditions, or lower than expected cash flows would make us more vulnerable to economic downturns and adverse developments in our business; and
     
  if operating cash flows are not sufficient to meet our operating expenses, capital expenditures and debt service requirements as they become due, we may be required, in order to meet our debt service obligations, to delay or reduce capital expenditures or the introduction of new products and services, sell assets and/or forego business opportunities including acquisitions, research and development projects or product design enhancements.

 

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Esports’ online offerings are part of new and evolving industries, which presents significant uncertainty and business risks.

 

The online gaming and interactive entertainment industry, which includes social, casual and mobile gaming and interactive entertainment, is relatively new and continues to evolve. Whether these industries grow and whether Esports’ online business will ultimately succeed, will be affected by, among other things, developments in social networks, mobile platforms, legal and regulatory developments (such as the passage of new laws or regulations or the extension of existing laws or regulations to online gaming activities), taxation of gaming activities, data privacy laws and regulation and other factors that the Company is unable to predict and which are beyond the Company’s control. Given the dynamic evolution of these industries, it can be difficult to plan strategically, and it is possible that competitors will be more successful than the Company at adapting to change and pursuing business opportunities. Additionally, as the online gaming industry advances, including with respect to regulation, the Company may become subject to additional compliance-related costs. Consequently, the Company cannot provide assurance that its online and interactive offerings will grow at the rates expected or be successful in the long term.

 

Several companies have launched online social casino offerings, and new competitors are likely to continue to emerge, some of which may be operated by social gaming companies with a larger base of existing users, or by casino operators with more experience in operating a casino. If our products do not obtain popularity or maintain popularity or fail to grow in a manner that meets management’s expectations, our results of operations and financial condition could be harmed.

 

Esports’ success in the competitive gaming and interactive entertainment industries depends in large part on its ability to develop and manage frequent introductions of innovative products.

 

The online gaming and interactive entertainment industries are characterized by dynamic customer demand and technological advances, including for land-based and online gaming products. As a result, the Company must continually introduce and successfully market new themes and technologies in order to remain competitive and effectively stimulate customer demand. The process of developing new products and systems is inherently complex and uncertain. It requires accurate anticipation of changing customer needs and end user preferences as well as emerging technological trends. If the Company’s competitors develop new content and technologically innovative products, and Esports fails to keep pace, its business could be adversely affected. Additionally, the introduction of products embodying new technology and the emergence of new industry standards can render the Company’s existing solutions obsolete and unmarketable and can exert price pressures on existing solutions. To remain competitive, the Company must invest resources towards its research and development efforts to introduce new and innovative products with dynamic features to attract new customers and retain existing customers. If the Company fails to accurately anticipate customer needs and end-user preferences through the development of new products and technologies, it could lose business to its competitors, which would adversely affect the Company’s results of operations and financial position.

 

The Company intends to continue investing resources toward its research and development efforts. There is no assurance that its investments in research and development will lead to successful new technologies or timely new products. If a new product does not gain market acceptance, the Company’s business could be adversely affected. Most directly, if a product is unsuccessful, the Company could incur losses. Additionally, if the Company cannot efficiently adapt its processes and infrastructure to meet the needs of its product innovations, its business could be negatively impacted. There is no certainty that the Company’s new products will attain market acceptance or that its competitors will not more effectively anticipate or respond to changing customer preferences. In addition, any delays by the Company in introducing new products could negatively impact its operating results by providing an opportunity for its competitors to introduce new products and gain market share.

 

 16 

 

 

The Company cannot give assurance that it will successfully develop new products or enhance and improve its existing products, that new products and enhanced and improved existing products will achieve market acceptance or that the introduction of new products or enhanced existing products by others will not render the Company’s products obsolete. Dynamic customer demand and technological advances often demand high levels of research and development expenditures in order to meet accelerated product introductions, and the life cycles of certain products may be short, which could adversely affect the Company’s operating results. In some cases, the Company’s new products and solutions may require long development and testing periods and may not be introduced in a timely manner or may not achieve the broad market acceptance necessary to generate significant revenue. The Company’s inability to develop solutions that meet customer needs and compete successfully against competitors’ offerings could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our growth will depend on our ability to attract and retain users, and the loss of our users, failure to attract new users in a cost-effective manner, or failure to effectively manage our growth could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

 

Our ability to achieve growth in revenue in the future will depend, in large part, upon our ability to attract new users to our offerings, retain existing users of our offerings and reactivate users in a cost-effective manner. Achieving growth in our community of users may require us to increasingly engage in sophisticated and costly sales and marketing efforts, which may not make sense in terms of return on investment. We have used and expect to continue to use a variety of free and paid marketing channels, in combination with compelling offers and exciting games to achieve our objectives. For paid marketing, we intend to leverage a broad array of advertising channels, including sponsorships, affiliate networks, social media platforms, such as Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Twitch, paid and organic search, and other digital channels, such as mobile display. If the search engines on which we rely modify their algorithms, change their terms around gaming, or if the prices at which we may purchase listings increase, then our costs could increase, and fewer users may click through to our website. If links to our website are not displayed prominently in online search results, if fewer users click through to our website, if our other digital marketing campaigns are not effective, or if the costs of attracting users using any of our current methods significantly increase, then our ability to efficiently attract new users could be reduced, our revenue could decline and our business, financial condition and results of operations could be harmed.

 

In addition, our ability to increase the number of users of our offerings will depend on continued user adoption of esports. Growth in the esports industry and the level of demand for and market acceptance of our product offerings will be subject to a high degree of uncertainty. We cannot assure that consumer adoption of our product offerings will continue or exceed current growth rates, or that the industry will achieve more widespread acceptance.

 

Additionally, as technological or regulatory standards change and we modify our platforms to comply with those standards, we may need users to take certain actions to continue playing, such as performing age verification checks or accepting new terms and conditions. Users may stop using our product offerings at any time, including if the quality of the user experience on our platform, including our support capabilities in the event of a problem, does not meet their expectations or keep pace with the quality of the customer experience generally offered by competitive offerings.

 

Failure to attract, retain and motivate key employees may adversely affect the Company’s ability to compete and the loss of the services of key personnel could have a material adverse effect on Esports’ business.

 

The Company depends on the services of a few key executive officers. The loss of any of these key persons could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, results of operations and financial condition. The Company’s success is also highly dependent on its continuing ability to identify, hire, train, motivate and retain highly qualified technical, marketing and management personnel. Competition for such personnel can be intense, and the Company cannot provide assurance that it will be able to attract or retain highly qualified technical, marketing and management personnel in the future. Stock options may comprise a significant component of key employee compensation, and if the Company’s Common Share price declines, it may be difficult to retain such individuals. Similarly, changes in the Company’s share price may hinder the Company’s ability to recruit key employees, as they may elect to seek employment with other companies that they believe have better long-term prospects. The Company’s inability to attract and retain the necessary technical, marketing and management personnel may adversely affect its future growth and profitability. The Company’s retention and recruiting may require significant increases in compensation expense, which would adversely affect the Company’s results of operation.

 

 17 

 

 

The leadership of Esports’ Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Grant Johnson (“Mr. Johnson”), has been a critical element of the Company’s success. The departure, death or disability of Mr. Johnson or other extended or permanent loss of his services, or any negative market or industry perception with respect to him or arising from his loss, could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business. Esports’ other executive officers and other members of senior management have substantial experience and expertise in Esports’ business and have made significant contributions to its growth and success. The unexpected loss of services of one or more of these individuals could also adversely affect the Company. Esports is not protected by key man or similar life insurance covering members of senior management but is contemplating obtaining key man insurance.

 

Our management team has limited experience managing a public company and regulatory compliance may divert our attention from the day-to-day management of its business.

 

Our management team has limited experience managing a publicly-traded company and limited experience complying with the increasingly complex laws pertaining to public companies. These obligations typically require substantial attention from our senior management and could divert our attention away from the day-to-day management of our business.

 

Our internal control over financial reporting does not currently meet the standards required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, and failure to achieve and maintain effective internal control over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act could have a material adverse effect on our business and stock price.

 

We have not maintained internal control over financial reporting in a manner that meets the standards of publicly traded companies required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. The rules governing the standards that must be met for our management to assess our internal control over financial reporting are complex and require significant documentation, testing and possible remediation. We might encounter problems or delays in completing the implementation of any changes necessary to make a favorable assessment of our internal control over financial reporting. If we cannot favorably assess the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting, investors could lose confidence in our financial information and the price of our common stock could decline. We appointed our new CFO on June 11, 2020 and we expect that his experience in the financing and accounting industry will enhance the internal control processes across the organization.

 

The Company’s business is vulnerable to changing economic conditions and to other factors that adversely affect the industries in which it operates.

 

The demand for entertainment and leisure activities tends to be highly sensitive to changes in consumers’ disposable income, and thus can be affected by changes in the economy and consumer tastes, both of which are difficult to predict and beyond the control of the Company. Unfavorable changes in general economic conditions, including recessions, economic slowdown, sustained high levels of unemployment, and increasing fuel or transportation costs, may reduce customers’ disposable income or result in fewer individuals visiting casinos, whether land-based or online, or otherwise engaging in entertainment and leisure activities, including gambling. As a result, the Company cannot ensure that demand for its products or services will remain constant. Continued or renewed adverse developments affecting economies throughout the world, including a general tightening of availability of credit, decreased liquidity in many financial markets, increasing interest rates, increasing energy costs, acts of war or terrorism, transportation disruptions, natural disasters, declining consumer confidence, sustained high levels of unemployment or significant declines in stock markets, could lead to a further reduction in discretionary spending on leisure activities, such as gambling. Any significant or prolonged decrease in consumer spending on entertainment or leisure activities could reduce the Company’s online games, reducing the Company’s cash flows and revenues. If the Company experiences a significant unexpected decrease in demand for its products, it could incur losses.

 

 18 

 

 

Changes in ownership of competitors or consolidations within the gaming industry may negatively impact pricing and lead to downward pricing pressures which could reduce revenue.

 

A decline in demand for the Company’s products in the gaming industry could adversely affect its business. Demand for the Company’s products is driven primarily by the replacement of existing services as well as the expansion of existing online gaming, and the expansion of new channels of distribution, such as mobile gaming. Additionally, consolidation within the online gambling market could result in the Company facing competition from larger combined entities, which may benefit from greater resources and economies of scale. Also, any fragmentation within the industry creating a number of smaller, independent operators with fewer resources could also adversely affect the Company’s business as these operators might cause a further slowdown in the replacement cycle for the Company’s products.

 

Litigation costs and the outcome of litigation could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business.

 

From time to time, Esports may be subject to litigation claims through the ordinary course of its business operations regarding, but not limited to, employment matters, security of consumer and employee personal information, contractual relations with suppliers, marketing and infringement of trademarks and other intellectual property rights. Litigation to defend Esports against claims by third parties, or to enforce any rights that Esports may have against third parties, may be necessary, which could result in substantial costs and diversion of Esports’ resources, causing a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition and results of operations. Aside from the lawsuit and other matters referenced herein under the heading “Legal Proceedings” (which includes certain allegations made by our former Chief Technology Officer), the Company is not aware of any current material legal proceedings outstanding, threatened or pending as of the date hereof by or against the Company, given the nature of its business, it is, and may from time to time in the future be, party to various, and at times numerous, legal, administrative and regulatory inquiries, investigations, proceedings and claims that arise in the ordinary course of business. Because the outcome of litigation is inherently uncertain, if one or more of such legal matters were to be resolved against the Company for amounts in excess of management’s expectations, the Company’s results of operations and financial condition could be materially adversely affected.

 

The Company relies on its internal marketing and branding function, and intends to rely on relationship with ambassadors, distributors, service providers and channel partners to promote its products and generate revenue, and the failure to maintain and develop these relationships could adversely affect the business and financial condition of the Company.

 

The Company is dependent upon its internal marketing and branding function as well as its ability to establish and develop new relationships and to build relationships with distributors and service providers on which it will rely to promote its current and future products, including online gaming services and live events such as potentially creating and hosting live esports tournaments. The Company cannot provide assurance that it will be successful in maintaining or advancing such internal function or relationship. In addition, the Company cannot provide assurance that its future distributors and service providers will act in a manner that will promote the success of the Company’s products and services. Failure by its internal marketing and branding function or channel partners to promote and support the Company’s products and services or failure by the Company to establish and develop relationships with ambassadors, distributors and service providers, could adversely affect the Company’s business, results of operations and financial condition. Even if the Company is successful in maintaining or advancing such internal function or establishing and developing relationships with distributors or service providers, there is no guarantee that this will result in a growth in revenue.

 

 19 

 

 

Moreover, if some of the Company’s competitors offer their products and services to distributors on more favorable terms or have more products or services available to meet their needs, there may be pressure on the Company to reduce the price of its products or services, failing which the Company’s distributors and service providers may stop carrying its products or services or de-emphasize the sale of its products and services in favor of the products and services of competitors.

 

Risks Related to International Operations

 

The risks related to international operations, in particular in countries outside of the United States and Canada, could negatively affect the Company’s results.

 

All of the Company’s operations are conducted in foreign jurisdictions including, but not limited to: Curacao, the United Kingdom, Switzerland and Malta. It is expected that the Company will derive more than 95% of its revenue from transactions denominated in currencies other than the United States and the Canadian dollar, and the Company expects that receivables with respect to foreign sales will continue to account for a significant majority of its total accounts and receivables outstanding. As such, the Company’s operations may be adversely affected by changes in foreign government policies and legislation or social instability and other factors which are not within the control of the Company, including, but not limited to, recessions in foreign economies, expropriation, nationalization and limitation or restriction on repatriation of funds, assets or earnings, longer receivables collection periods and greater difficulty in collecting accounts receivable, changes in consumer tastes and trends, renegotiation or nullification of existing contracts or licenses, changes in gaming policies, regulatory requirements or the personnel administering them, currency fluctuations and devaluations, exchange controls, economic sanctions and royalty and tax increases, risk of terrorist activities, revolution, border disputes, implementation of tariffs and other trade barriers and protectionist practices, taxation policies, including royalty and tax increases and retroactive tax claims, volatility of financial markets and fluctuations in foreign exchange rates, difficulties in the protection of intellectual property particularly in countries with fewer intellectual property protections, the effects that evolving regulations regarding data privacy may have on the Company’s online operations, adverse changes in the creditworthiness of parties with whom the Company has significant receivables or forward currency exchange contracts, labour disputes and other risks arising out of foreign governmental sovereignty over the areas in which the Company’s operations are conducted. The Company’s operations may also be adversely affected by social, political and economic instability and by laws and policies of such foreign jurisdictions affecting foreign trade, taxation and investment. If the Company’s operations are disrupted and/or the economic integrity of its contracts is threatened for unexpected reasons, its business may be harmed.

 

The Company’s international activities may require protracted negotiations with host governments, national companies and third parties. Foreign government regulations may favor or require the awarding of contracts to local contractors or require foreign contractors to employ citizens of, or purchase supplies from, a particular jurisdiction. In the event of a dispute arising in connection with the Company’s operations in a foreign jurisdiction where it conducts its business, the Company may be subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of foreign courts or may not be successful in subjecting foreign persons to the jurisdictions of the courts of United States or Canada or enforcing American and Canadian judgments in such other jurisdictions. The Company may also be hindered or prevented from enforcing its rights with respect to a governmental instrumentality because of the doctrine of sovereign immunity. Accordingly, the Company’s activities in foreign jurisdictions could be substantially affected by factors beyond the Company’s control, any of which could have a material adverse effect on it. The Company believes that management’s experience to date in commercializing its products and solutions in Europe and the Caribbean may be of assistance in helping to reduce these risks. Some countries in which the Company may operate may be considered politically and economically unstable.

 

Doing business in the industries in which the Company operates often requires compliance with numerous and extensive procedures and formalities. These procedures and formalities may result in unexpected or lengthy delays in commencing important business activities. In some cases, failure to follow such formalities or obtain relevant evidence may call into question the validity of the entity or the actions taken. Management of the Company is unable to predict the effect of additional corporate and regulatory formalities which may be adopted in the future including whether any such laws or regulations would materially increase Esports’ cost of doing business or affect its operations in any area.

 

Esports may in the future enter into agreements and conduct activities outside of the jurisdictions where it currently carries on business, which expansion may present challenges and risks that Esports has not faced in the past, any of which could adversely affect the results of operations and/or financial condition of Esports.

 

 20 

 

 

The Company is subject to foreign exchange and currency risks that could adversely affect its operations, and the Company’s ability to mitigate its foreign exchange risk through hedging transactions may be limited.

 

The Company expects that it will derive in excess of 95% of its revenues in currencies other than the United States and Canadian dollar; however, a substantial portion of the Company’s operating expenses are incurred in United States dollars. Fluctuations in the exchange rate between the U.S. dollar, the Euro and other currencies may have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition and operating results. The Company’s consolidated financial results are affected by foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations. Foreign currency exchange rate exposures arise from current transactions and anticipated transactions denominated in currencies other than United States and Canadian dollars and from the translation of foreign-currency-denominated balance sheet accounts into United States and Canadian dollar-denominated balance sheet accounts. The Company is exposed to currency exchange rate fluctuations because portions of its revenue and expenses are denominated in currencies other than the United States and Canadian dollar, particularly the Euro. In particular, uncertainty regarding economic conditions in Europe and the debt crisis affecting certain countries in the European Union pose risk to the stability of the Euro. Exchange rate fluctuations could adversely affect the Company’s operating results and cash flows and the value of its assets outside of United States and Canada. If a foreign currency is devalued in a jurisdiction in which the Company is paid in such currency, then the Company’s customers may be required to pay higher amounts for the Company’s products, which they may be unable or unwilling to pay.

 

While the Company may enter into forward currency swaps and other derivative instruments intended to mitigate the foreign currency exchange risk, there can be no assurance the Company will do so or that any instruments that the Company enters into will successfully mitigate such risk. If the Company enters into foreign currency forward or other hedging contracts, the Company would be subject to the risk that a counterparty to one or more of these contracts defaults on its performance under the contracts. During an economic downturn, a counterparty’s financial condition may deteriorate rapidly and with little notice, and the Company may be unable to take action to protect its exposure. In the event of a counterparty default, the Company could lose the benefit of its hedging contract, which may harm its business and financial condition. In the event that one or more of the Company’s counterparties becomes insolvent or files for bankruptcy, its ability to eventually recover any benefit lost as a result of that counterparty’s default may be limited by the liquidity of the counterparty. The Company expects that it will not be able to hedge all of its exposure to any particular foreign currency, and it may not hedge its exposure at all with respect to certain foreign currencies. Changes in exchange rates and the Company’s limited ability or inability to successfully hedge exchange rate risk could have an adverse impact on the Company’s liquidity and results of operations.

 

Privacy concerns could result in regulatory changes and impose additional costs and liabilities on the Company, limit its use of information, and adversely affect its business.

 

Personal privacy has become a significant issue in Canada, the United States, Europe, and many other countries in which the Company currently operates and may operate in the future. Many federal, state, and foreign legislatures and government agencies have imposed or are considering imposing restrictions and requirements about the collection, use, and disclosure of personal information obtained from individuals. Changes to laws or regulations affecting privacy could impose additional costs and liability on the Company and could limit its use of such information to add value for customers. If the Company were required to change its business activities or revise or eliminate services, or to implement burdensome compliance measures, its business and results of operations could be harmed. In addition, the Company may be subject to fines, penalties, and potential litigation if it fails to comply with applicable privacy regulations, any of which could adversely affect the Company’s business, liquidity and results of operation.

 

 21 

 

 

The Company’s results of operations could be affected by natural events in the locations in which it operates or where its customers or suppliers operate.

 

Esports, its customers, and its suppliers have operations in locations subject to natural occurrences such as severe weather and other geological events, including hurricanes, earthquakes, or flood that could disrupt operations. Any serious disruption at any of Esports’ facilities or the facilities of its customers or suppliers due to a natural disaster could have a material adverse effect on Esports’ revenues and increase its costs and expenses. If there is a natural disaster or other serious disruption at any of Esports’ facilities, it could impair its ability to adequately supply its customers, cause a significant disruption to its operations, cause Esports to incur significant costs to relocate or re-establish these functions and negatively impact its operating results. While Esports intends to seek insurance against certain business interruption risks, such insurance may not adequately compensate Esports for any losses incurred as a result of natural or other disasters. In addition, any natural disaster that results in a prolonged disruption to the operations of Esports’ customers or suppliers may adversely affect its business, results of operations or financial condition.

 

Our quarterly results can fluctuate and if we fail to meet the expectations of analysts or investors, our stock price and the value of your investment could decline substantially.

 

The betting operations of the Company are subject to the seasonal variations dictated by the sporting calendar, which may have an effect on its financial performance. Traditional sports have an off-season that can cause a corresponding, temporary decrease in their respective revenues. The Company’s ability to generate revenues is also affected by the scheduling of major events that do not occur annually.

 

Cancellation or curtailment of significant sporting events, for example due to adverse weather, traffic or transport disruption or civil disturbances or the outbreak of infectious diseases, or the failure of certain sporting teams to qualify for sporting events, may adversely impact the business, financial condition and results of operations of the Company for the relevant period.

 

While we work to integrate newly acquired third party entities, businesses and operations, management’s focus and resources may be diverted from operational matters and other strategic opportunities.

 

Successful integration of third party businesses, operations, technology and personnel (“Acquired Assets”) that the Company may acquire going forward, may place a significant burden on management and other internal resources. The diversion of management’s attention and any difficulties encountered in the transition and integration process could harm our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

 

Furthermore, the overall integration of Acquired Assets may result in material unanticipated problems, expenses, liabilities, competitive responses, and loss of customers and other relationships. The difficulties of combining or integrating Acquired Assets, among others, include difficulties in integrating operations and systems; conforming standards, controls, procedures and accounting and other policies, business cultures and compensation structures; assimilating employees, including possible culture conflicts and different opinions on technical decisions and product roadmaps; managing the expanded operations of a larger and more complex company, including coordinating a geographically dispersed organization; and keeping existing customers and obtaining new customers. Many of these factors will be outside our control and any one of them could result in increased costs, decreases in the amount of expected revenues and diversion of management’s time and energy, which could materially impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We may also be subject to certain liabilities of Acquired Assets. Any litigation may be expensive and time-consuming and could divert management’s attention from its business and negatively affect its operating results or financial condition. The outcome of any litigation cannot be guaranteed and adverse outcomes can affect us negatively. We may also face inquiry and investigation by governmental authorities, which could in turn lead to fines, as the regulatory landscape of sport betting and gaming changes. Certain acquisitions may also be subject to governmental approval which cannot be guaranteed and adverse outcomes can affect us negatively.

 

Risks Related to Regulation

 

The Company is subject to various laws relating to trade, export controls, and foreign corrupt practices, the violation of which could adversely affect its operations, reputation, business, prospects, operating results and financial condition.

 

We are subject to risks associated with doing business outside of the United States, including exposure to complex foreign and U.S. regulations such as the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (the “FCPA”) and other anti-corruption laws which generally prohibit U.S. companies and their intermediaries from making improper payments to foreign officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. Violations of the FCPA and other anti-corruption laws may result in severe criminal and civil sanctions and other penalties. It may be difficult to oversee the conduct of any contractors, third-party partners, representatives or agents who are not our employees, potentially exposing us to greater risk from their actions. If our employees or agents fail to comply with applicable laws or company policies governing our international operations, we may face legal proceedings and actions which could result in civil penalties, administration actions and criminal sanctions. Any determination that we have violated any anti-corruption laws could have a material adverse impact on our business. Changes in trade sanctions laws may restrict the Company’s business practices, including cessation of business activities in sanctioned countries or with sanctioned entities.

 

 22 

 

 

Violations of these laws and regulations could result in significant fines, criminal sanctions against Esports, its officers or its employees, requirements to obtain export licenses, disgorgement of profits, cessation of business activities in sanctioned countries, prohibitions on the conduct of its business and its inability to market and sell the Company’s products in one or more countries. Additionally, any such violations could materially damage the Company’s reputation, brand, international expansion efforts, ability to attract and retain employees and the Company’s business, prospects, operating results and financial condition.

 

We also deal with significant amounts of cash in our operations and are subject to various reporting and anti-money laundering regulations. Any violation of anti-money laundering laws or regulations by any of our properties could have a material adverse impact on our business.

 

The gaming industry is heavily regulated and failure by the Company to comply with applicable requirements could be disruptive to its business and could adversely affect its operations.

 

The gaming industry is subject to extensive scrutiny and regulation at all levels of government, both domestic and foreign, including but not limited to, federal, state, provincial, local, and in some instances, tribal authorities. While the regulatory requirements vary by jurisdiction, most require:

 

  licenses and/or permits;

 

  findings of suitability;

 

  documentation of qualifications, including evidence of financial stability; and

 

  other required approvals for companies who operate in online gaming or manufacture or distribute gaming equipment and services, including but not limited to approvals for new products.

 

Compliance with the various regulations applicable to internet gaming is costly and time-consuming. Regulatory authorities at the non-U.S., U.S. federal, state and local levels have broad powers with respect to the regulation and licensing of internet gaming operations and the Company’s licenses may be revoked, suspended or limited for non-compliance and regulators have the power to impose substantial fines on us and take other actions, any one of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. These laws and regulations are dynamic and subject to potentially differing interpretations, and various legislative and regulatory bodies may expand current laws or regulations or enact new laws and regulations regarding these matters. We will strive to comply with all applicable laws and regulations relating to our business. It is possible, however, that these requirements may be interpreted and applied in a manner that is inconsistent from one jurisdiction to another and may conflict with other rules. Non-compliance with any such law or regulations could expose us to claims, proceedings, litigation and investigations by private parties and regulatory authorities, as well as substantial fines and negative publicity, each of which may materially and adversely affect our business.

 

 23 

 

 

Any license, permit, approval or finding of suitability may be revoked, suspended or conditioned at any time. The loss of a license in one jurisdiction could trigger the loss of a license or affect the Company’s eligibility for a license in another jurisdiction. The Company may be unable to obtain or maintain all necessary registrations, licenses, permits or approvals, and could incur fines or experience delays related to the licensing process which could adversely affect its operations. The finding of suitability process may be expensive and time-consuming. The Company’s delay or failure to obtain licenses and approvals in any jurisdiction may prevent it from distributing its solutions and generating revenues. A gaming regulatory body may refuse to issue or renew a registration if the Company, or one of its directors, officers, employees or associates: (i) is considered to be a detriment to the integrity or lawful conduct or management of gaming, (ii) no longer meets a registration requirement, (iii) has breached or is in breach of a condition of registration or an operational agreement with a regulatory authority, (iv) has made a material misrepresentation, omission or misstatement in an application for registration or in reply to an enquiry by a person conducting an audit, investigation or inspection for a gaming regulatory authority, (v) has been refused a similar registration in another jurisdiction, (vi) has held a similar registration, or license in that province, state or another jurisdiction which has been suspended, revoked or cancelled, or (vii) has been convicted of an offence, inside or outside of the United States that calls into question the Company’s honesty or integrity or the honesty or integrity of one of its directors, officers, employees or associates.

 

Additionally, the Company’s services must be approved in some jurisdictions in which they are offered; this process cannot be assured or guaranteed. Obtaining these approvals is a time-consuming process that can be extremely costly. Even where a jurisdiction regulates online gaming, it may not be commercially desirable to secure a licence in such a jurisdiction due to tax or other operational considerations.

 

A provider of gaming solutions may pursue corporate regulatory approval with regulators of a particular jurisdiction while it pursues technical regulatory approval for its gaming solutions by that same jurisdiction. It is possible that after incurring significant expenses and dedicating substantial time and effort towards such regulatory approvals, that Esports may not obtain either of them. If the Company fails to obtain the necessary certification, registration, license, approval or finding of suitability in a given jurisdiction, it would likely be prohibited from distributing its services in that particular jurisdiction altogether. If the Company fails to seek, does not receive, or receives a revocation of a license in a particular jurisdiction for its games, hardware or software, then it cannot sell, service or place on a participation or leased basis or license its products in that jurisdiction and its issued licenses in other jurisdictions may be impacted. Furthermore, some jurisdictions require license holders to obtain government approval before engaging in some transactions, such as business combinations, reorganizations, stock offerings and repurchases. The Company may not be able to obtain all necessary registrations, licenses, permits, approvals or findings of suitability in a timely manner, or at all. Delays in regulatory approvals or failure to obtain such approvals may also serve as a barrier to entry to the market for the Company’s solutions. If the Company is unable to overcome the barriers to entry, it will materially affect its results of operations and future prospects. To the extent new gaming jurisdictions are established or expanded, the Company cannot guarantee it will be successful in penetrating such new jurisdictions or expanding its business in line with the growth of existing jurisdictions. As the Company enters into new markets, it may encounter legal and regulatory challenges that are difficult or impossible to foresee and which could result in an unforeseen adverse impact on planned revenues or costs associated with the new market opportunity. If the Company is unable to effectively develop and operate within these new markets, then its business, operating results and financial condition could be impaired. The Company’s failure to obtain the necessary regulatory approvals in jurisdictions, whether individually or collectively, would have a material adverse effect on its business.

 

To expand into new jurisdictions, the Company may need to be licensed, obtain approvals of its products and/or seek licensure of its officers, directors, major shareholders, key employees or business partners. Any delays in obtaining or difficulty in maintaining regulatory approvals needed for expansion within existing markets or into new jurisdictions can negatively affect the Company’s opportunities for growth or delay its ability to recognize revenue from the sale or installation of products in any such jurisdictions.

 

The Company is subject to regulation affecting internet gaming which varies from one jurisdiction to another and future legislative and court proceedings pertaining to internet gaming may have a material impact on the operations and financial results of Esports.

 

Online gambling is not unequivocally legal in all jurisdictions. The Company is licensed to supply gambling services from jurisdictions in which it operates but not in every jurisdiction where the customer is located.

Some countries have introduced regulations attempting to restrict or prohibit internet gaming, while others have taken the position that internet gaming should be regulated and have adopted or are in the process of considering legislation to enable that regulation.

 

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While the U.K. and other European countries and territories such as Malta, Alderney and Gibraltar have currently adopted a regime which permits its licensees to accept wagers from any jurisdiction, other countries, including the United States have, or are in the process of implementing, regimes which permit only the targeting of the domestic market provided a local license is obtained and local taxes accounted for. Other European countries and territories continue to defend a licensing regime that protects monopoly providers and have combined this with an attempt to outlaw all other supplies. By contrast, a number of countries have not passed legislation in relation to online gambling but may introduce it. Some jurisdictions have not updated legislation focused on land-based gambling which may be interpreted in an unfavourable way to online gambling. Different jurisdictions have different views to determining where gambling takes place and which jurisdiction’s law applies and these views may change from time to time.

 

We currently block, through IP address filtering, direct access to wagering on our website from the United States and other jurisdictions that the Company is precluded from supplying its services to pursuant to its gaming licenses. Individuals are required to enter their age upon gaining access to our platform and any misrepresentation of such users age will result in the forfeiting of his or her deposit and any withdrawals from such users account requires proof of government issued identification. In addition, our payment service providers use their own identity and ISP verification software. Despite all such measures, it is conceivable that that a user, under age, or otherwise could devise a way to evade our blocking measures and access our website from the United States or any other foreign jurisdiction in which we do not currently permit users to use our services.

 

Future legislative and court decisions may have a material impact on the operations and financial results. Therefore, there is a risk that civil and criminal proceedings, including class actions brought by or on behalf of prosecutors or public entities incumbent monopoly providers, or private individuals, could be initiated against the Company, internet service providers, credit card processors, advertisers and others involved in the internet gaming industry. Such potential proceedings could involve substantial litigation expense, penalties, fines, seizure of assets, injunctions or other restrictions being imposed upon the Company or its licensees or other business partners, while diverting the attention of key executives. Such proceedings could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, revenues, operating results and financial condition as well as impact upon the Company’s reputation.

 

There can be no assurance that legally enforceable prohibiting legislation will not be proposed and passed in jurisdictions relevant or potentially relevant to the Company’s business to legislate or regulate various aspects of the internet or the online gaming industry (or that existing laws in those jurisdictions will not be interpreted negatively). Compliance with any such legislation may have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition and results of operations, either as a result of the Company’s determining that a jurisdiction should be blocked, or because a local license may be costly for the Company or its licensees to obtain and/or such licenses may contain other commercially undesirable conditions.

 

The Company may not be able to capitalize on the expansion of online or other forms of interactive gaming or other trends and changes in the gaming industry, including due to laws and regulations governing these industries.

 

The Company participates in the new and evolving interactive gaming industry through its online, social and mobile products. The Company intends to take advantage of the liberalization of online and mobile gaming, within Canada, the U.S. and internationally; however, expansion of online and mobile gaming involves significant risks and uncertainties, including legal, business and financial risks. The success of online and mobile gaming and the Company’s interactive products and services may be affected by future developments in social networks, including Facebook, mobile platforms, regulatory developments, data privacy laws and other factors that the Company is unable to predict and are beyond its control. Consequently, the Company’s future operating results relating to its online gaming products and services are difficult to predict, and Esports cannot provide assurance that its products and services will grow at expected rates or be successful in the long term.

 

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Additionally, the Company’s ability to successfully pursue its interactive gaming strategy depends on the laws and regulations relating to wagering through interactive channels. Internationally, laws relating to online gaming are evolving, particularly in Europe. To varying degrees, a number of European governments have taken steps to change the regulation of online wagering through the implementation of new or revised licensing and taxation regimes, including the possible imposition of sanctions on unlicensed providers. The Company cannot predict the timing, scope or terms of any such state, federal or foreign laws and regulations, or the extent to which any such laws and regulations will facilitate or hinder its interactive strategy.

 

The Company’s ability to operate in its proposed online jurisdictions or expand in new online jurisdictions could be adversely affected by new or changing laws or regulations, new interpretations of existing laws or regulations, and difficulties or delays in obtaining or maintaining required licenses or product approvals.

 

Changes in existing gaming laws or regulations, new interpretations of existing gaming laws or regulations or changes in the manner in which existing laws and regulations are enforced, all with respect to online gaming activities, may hinder or prevent the Company from continuing to operate in those jurisdictions where it currently carries on business, which would harm its operating results and financial condition. Furthermore, gaming regulatory bodies may from time to time amend the various disclosures and reporting requirements. If the Company fails to comply with any existing or future disclosure or reporting requirements, the regulators may take action against the Company which could ultimately include fines, the conditioning, suspension or revocation of approvals, registrations, permits or licenses and other disciplinary action. It cannot be assured that the Company will be able to adequately adjust to such potential changes. Additionally, evolving laws and regulations regarding data privacy, cyber security and anti-money laundering could adversely impact opportunities for growth in Esports’ online business, and could result in additional compliance-related costs.

 

Public opinion can also exert a significant influence over the regulation of the gaming industry. A negative shift in the public’s perception of gaming could affect future legislation in different jurisdictions. Among other things, such a shift could cause jurisdictions to abandon proposals to legalize gaming, thereby limiting the number of new jurisdictions into which the Company could expand. Negative public perception could also lead to new restrictions on or to the prohibition of gaming in jurisdictions in which the Company currently operates.

 

Regulations that may be adopted with respect to the internet and electronic commerce may decrease the growth in the use of the internet and lead to the decrease in the demand for Esports’ products and services.

 

In addition to regulations pertaining to the gaming industry in general and specifically to online gaming, the Company may become subject to any number of laws and regulations that may be adopted with respect to the internet and electronic commerce. New laws and regulations that address issues such as user privacy, pricing, online content regulation, taxation, advertising, intellectual property, information security, and the characteristics and quality of online products and services may be enacted. As well, current laws, which predate or are incompatible with the internet and electronic commerce, may be applied and enforced in a manner that restricts the electronic commerce market. The application of such pre-existing laws regulating communications or commerce in the context of the internet and electronic commerce is uncertain. Moreover, it may take years to determine the extent to which existing laws relating to issues such as intellectual property ownership and infringement, libel and personal privacy are applicable to the internet. The adoption of new laws or regulations relating to the internet, or particular applications or interpretations of existing laws, could decrease the growth in the use of the internet, decrease the demand for Esports’ products and services, increase Esports’ cost of doing business or could otherwise have a material adverse effect on Esports’ business, revenues, operating results and financial condition.

 

Esports shareholders are subject to extensive governmental regulation and if a shareholder is found unsuitable by a gaming authority, that shareholder would not be able to beneficially own the Company’s Common Shares directly or indirectly.

 

In many jurisdictions, gaming laws can require any of the Company’s shareholders to file an application, be investigated, and qualify or have his, her or its suitability determined by gaming authorities. Gaming authorities have very broad discretion in determining whether an applicant should be deemed suitable. Subject to certain administrative proceeding requirements, the gaming regulators have the authority to deny any application or limit, condition, restrict, revoke or suspend any license, registration, finding of suitability or approval, or fine any person licensed, registered or found suitable or approved, for any cause deemed reasonable by the gaming authorities.

 

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Furthermore, any person required by a gaming authority to be found suitable, who is found unsuitable by the gaming authority, may not hold directly or indirectly ownership of any voting security or the beneficial or record ownership of any non-voting security or any debt security of any public corporation which is registered with the relevant gaming authority beyond the time prescribed by the relevant gaming authority. A violation of the foregoing may constitute a criminal offence. A finding of unsuitability by a particular gaming authority impacts that person’s ability to associate or affiliate with gaming licensees in that particular jurisdiction and could impact the person’s ability to associate or affiliate with gaming licensees in other jurisdictions.

 

Many jurisdictions also require any person who acquires beneficial ownership of more than a certain percentage of voting securities of a gaming company and, in some jurisdictions, non-voting securities, typically 5%, to report the acquisition to gaming authorities, and gaming authorities may require such holders to apply for qualification or a finding of suitability, subject to limited exceptions for “institutional investors” that hold a company’s voting securities for investment purposes only.

 

Current environmental laws and regulations, or those enacted in the future, could result in additional liabilities and costs. Compliance with these laws could increase Esports’ costs and impact the availability of components required to manufacture its products. Violation of these laws may subject Esports to significant fines, penalties or disposal costs, which could negatively impact its results of operations, financial position or cash flows.

 

Legislative and regulatory changes could negatively affect our business and the business of our customers.

 

Legislative and regulatory changes may affect demand for or place limitations on the placement of our products. Such changes could affect us in a variety of ways. Legislation or regulation may introduce limitations on our products or opportunities for the use of our products and could foster competitive products or solutions at our or our customers’ expense. Our business will likely also suffer if our products became obsolete due to changes in laws or the regulatory framework.

 

Legislative or regulatory changes negatively impacting the gaming industry as a whole or our customers in particular could also decrease the demand for our products. Opposition to gaming could result in restrictions or even prohibitions of gaming operations in any jurisdiction or could result in increased taxes on gaming revenues. Tax matters, including changes in state, federal or other tax legislation or assessments by tax authorities could have a negative impact on our business. A reduction in growth of the gaming industry or in the number of gaming jurisdictions or delays in the opening of new or expanded casinos could reduce demand for our products. Changes in current or future laws or regulations or future judicial intervention in any particular jurisdiction may have a material adverse effect on our existing and proposed foreign and domestic operations. Any such adverse change in the legislative or regulatory environment could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.

 

Risks Related to Intellectual Property and Technology

 

Esports’ intellectual property may be insufficient to properly safeguard its technology and brands.

 

The Company may apply for patent protection in the United States, Canada, Europe and other countries relating to certain existing and proposed processes, designs and methods and other product innovations. Patent applications can, however, take many years to issue and the Company can provide no assurance that any of these patents will be issued at all. If the Company is denied any or all of these patents, it may not be able to successfully prevent its competitors from imitating its solutions or using some or all of the processes that are the subject of such patent applications. Such imitation may lead to increased competition within the finite market for the Company’s solutions. Even if pending patents are issued to the Company, its intellectual property rights may not be sufficiently comprehensive to prevent its competitors from developing similar competitive products and technologies. The Company’s success may also depend on its ability to obtain trademark protection for the names or symbols under which it markets its products and to obtain copyright protection and patent protection of its proprietary technologies, intellectual property and other game innovations and if the granted patents are challenged, protection may be lost. The Company may not be able to build and maintain goodwill in its trademarks or obtain trademark or patent protection, and there can be no assurance that any trademark, copyright or issued patent will provide competitive advantages for Esports or that Esports’ intellectual property will not be successfully challenged or circumvented by competitors.

 

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Computer source codes for technology Esports licenses may also receive protection under international copyright laws. As such, EEG, or the party which it licenses the source code from, may need to initiate legal proceedings following such use to obtain orders to prevent further use of the source code.

 

The Company will also rely on trade secrets, ideas and proprietary know-how. Although the Company generally requires its employees and independent contractors to enter into confidentiality and intellectual property assignment agreements, it cannot be assured that the obligations therein will be maintained and honored. If these agreements are breached, it is unlikely that the remedies available to the Company will be sufficient to compensate it for the damages suffered. In spite of confidentiality agreements and other methods of protecting trade secrets, the Company’s proprietary information could become known to or independently developed by competitors. If the Company fails to adequately protect its intellectual property and confidential information, its business may be harmed, and its liquidity and results of operations may be materially adversely impacted.

 

The Company may be subject to claims of intellectual property infringement or invalidity and adverse outcomes of litigation could unfavorably affect its operating results.

 

Monitoring infringement and misappropriation of intellectual property can be difficult and expensive, and the Company may not be able to detect infringement or misappropriation of its proprietary rights. Although the Company intends to aggressively pursue anyone who is reasonably believed to be infringing upon its intellectual property rights and who poses a significant commercial risk to the business, to protect and enforce its intellectual property rights, initiating and maintaining suits against such third parties will require substantial financial resources. The Company may not have the financial resources to bring such suits, and, if it does bring such suits, it may not prevail. Regardless of the Company’s success in any such actions, the expenses and management distraction involved may have a material adverse effect on its financial position.

 

A significant portion of the Company’s revenues may be generated from products using certain intellectual property rights, and EEG’s operating results would be negatively impacted if it was unsuccessful in licensing certain of those rights and/or protecting those rights from infringement, including losses of proprietary information from breaches of the Company’s cyber security efforts.

 

Further, the Company’s competitors have been granted patents protecting various gaming products and solutions features, including systems, methods and designs. If the Company’s products and solutions employ these processes, or other subject matter that is claimed under its competitors’ patents, or if other companies obtain patents claiming subject matter that the Company uses, those companies may bring infringement actions against it. The question of whether a product infringes a patent involves complex legal and factual issues, the determination of which is often uncertain. In addition, because patent applications can take many years to issue, there may be applications now pending of which the Company is unaware, which might later result in issued patents that the Company’s products and solutions may infringe. There can be no assurance that the Company’s products, including those with currently pending patent applications, will not be determined to have infringed upon an existing third-party patent. If any of the Company’s products and solutions infringes a valid patent, the Company may be required to discontinue offering certain products or systems, pay damages, purchase a license to use the intellectual property in question from its owner, or redesign the product in question to avoid infringement. A license may not be available or may require EEG to pay substantial royalties, which could in turn force EEG to attempt to redesign the infringing product or to develop alternative technologies at a considerable expense. Additionally, the Company may not be successful in any attempt to redesign the infringing product or to develop alternative technologies, which could force the Company to withdraw its product or services from the market.

 

The Company may also infringe other intellectual property rights belonging to third parties, such as trademarks, copyrights and confidential information. As with patent litigation, the infringement of trademarks, copyrights and confidential information involve complex legal and factual issues and the Company’s products, branding or associated marketing materials may be found to have infringed existing third-party rights. When any third-party infringement occurs, the Company may be required to stop using the infringing intellectual property rights, pay damages and, if it wishes to keep using the third party intellectual property, purchase a license or otherwise redesign the product, branding or associated marketing materials to avoid further infringement. Such a license may not be available or may require EEG to pay substantial royalties.

 

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It is also possible that the validity of any of EEG’s intellectual property rights might be challenged either in standalone proceedings or as part of infringement claims in the future. There can be no assurance that EEG’s intellectual property rights will withstand an invalidity claim and, if declared invalid, the protection afforded to the product, branding or marketing material will be lost.

 

Moreover, the future interpretation of intellectual property law regarding the validity of intellectual property by governmental agencies or courts in the United States, Canada, Europe or other jurisdictions in which EEG has rights could negatively affect the validity or enforceability of the Company’s current or future intellectual property. This could have multiple negative impacts including, without limitation, the marketability of, or anticipated revenue from, certain of EEG’s products. Additionally, due to the differences in foreign patent, trademark, copyright and other laws concerning proprietary rights, the Company’s intellectual property may not receive the same degree of protection in foreign countries as it would in the United States, Canada, or Europe. The Company’s failure to possess, obtain or maintain adequate protection of its intellectual property rights for any reason in these jurisdictions could have a material adverse effect on its business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Furthermore, infringement and other intellectual property claims, with or without merit, can be expensive and time-consuming to litigate, and the Company may not have the financial and human resources to defend itself against any infringement suits that may be brought against EEG. Litigation can also distract management from day-to-day operations of the business.

 

In addition, the Company’s business is dependent in part on the intellectual property of third-parties. For example, the Company licenses intellectual property from third parties for use in its gaming products. The future success of the Company may depend upon its ability to obtain licenses to use new and existing intellectual property and its ability to retain or expand existing licenses for certain products. If the Company is unable to obtain new licenses or renew or expand existing licenses, it may be required to discontinue or limit its use of such products that use the licensed marks and its financial condition, operating results or prospects may be harmed.

 

The failure to enforce and maintain our intellectual property rights could enable others to use trademarks used by our business which could adversely affect the value of the Company.

 

The success of our business depends on our continued ability to use our existing tradenames in order to increase our brand awareness. Argyll owns a European Union registered trade mark for its SportNation brand. As of the date hereof, we do not have any federally registered trademarks owned by us in relation to the Vie.gg brand, but we plan to pursue registered trademarks for Vie.gg and the Esports Entertainment Group. The unauthorized use or other misappropriation of any of the foregoing trademarks or tradenames could diminish the value of our business which would have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operation.

 

Compromises of the Company’s systems or unauthorized access to confidential information or EEG’s customers’ personal information could materially harm EEG’s reputation and business.

 

EEG collects and stores confidential, personal information relating to its customers for various business purposes, including marketing and financial purposes, and credit card information for processing payments. For example, the Company handles, collects and stores personal information in connection with its online gaming products. The Company may share this personal and confidential information with vendors or other third parties in connection with processing of transactions, operating certain aspects of EEG’s business or for marketing purposes. The Company’s collection and use of personal data is governed by federal, state and provincial laws and regulations as well as the applicable laws and regulations in other countries in which it operates. Privacy law is an area that changes often and varies significantly by jurisdiction. EEG may incur significant costs in order to ensure compliance with the various privacy requirements. In addition, privacy laws and regulations may limit EEG’s ability to market to its customers.

 

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EEG intends to assess and monitor the security of collection, storage and transmission of customer information on an ongoing basis. EEG intends to utilize commercially available software and technologies to monitor, assess and secure its network. However, the systems currently intended for transmissions and approval of payment card transactions, and the technology utilized in payment cards themselves, all of which can put payment card data at risk, are determined and controlled by the payment card industry, not EEG. Although EEG intends to take steps designed to safeguard its customers’ confidential personal information, its network and other systems and those of third parties, such as service providers, could be compromised by a third-party breach of EEG’s system’s security or that of a third-party provider or as a result of purposeful or accidental actions of third parties, EEG’s employees or those employees of a third party. Advances in computer and software capabilities and encryption technology, new tools and other developments may increase the risk of such a breach. As a result of any security breach, customer information or other proprietary data may be accessed or transmitted by or to a third party. Despite these measures, there can be no assurance that EEG is adequately protecting its customers’ information.

 

Any loss, disclosure or misappropriation of, or access to, customers’ or other proprietary information or other breach of EEG’s information security could result in legal claims or legal proceedings, including regulatory investigations and actions, or liability for failure to comply with privacy and information security laws, including for failure to protect personal information or for misusing personal information, which could disrupt EEG’s operations, damage its reputation and expose it to claims from its customers, financial institutions, regulators, payment card associations, employees and other persons, any of which could have a material adverse effect on EEG’s business, revenues, financial conditions and operations.

 

Service interruptions of internet service providers could impair the Company’s ability to carry on its business.

 

Most of the Company’s customers will rely on internet service providers to allow the Company’s customers and servers to communicate with each other. If internet service providers experience service interruptions, communications over the internet may be interrupted and impair the Company’s ability to carry on business. In addition, the Company’s ability to process e-commerce transactions depends on bank processing and credit card systems. In order to prepare for system problems, the Company intends to continuously seek to strengthen and enhance its planned facilities and the capability of its system infrastructure and support. Nevertheless, any system failure as a result of reliance on third parties, including network, software or hardware failure, which causes a delay or interruption in the Company’s online services and products and e-commerce services, could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, revenues, operating results and financial condition.

 

There is a risk that the Company’s network systems will be unable to meet the growing demand for its online products.

 

The growth of internet usage has caused frequent interruptions and delays in processing and transmitting data over the internet. There can be no assurance that the internet infrastructure or the Company’s own network systems will be able to meet the demand placed on it by the continued growth of the internet, the overall online gaming and interactive entertainment industry and the Company’s customers.

 

The internet’s viability as a medium for products and services offered by the Company could be affected if the necessary infrastructure is not sufficient, or if other technologies and technological devices eclipse the internet as a viable channel.

 

End-users of the Company’s products and services will depend on internet service providers and the Company’s system infrastructure (or those of its licensed partners) for access to the Company’s or its licensees’ products and services. Many of these services have experienced service outages in the past and could experience service outages, delays and other difficulties due to system failures, stability or interruption.

 

Systems, network or telecommunications failures or cyber-attacks may disrupt the Company’s business and have an adverse effect on EEG’s results of operations.

 

Any disruption in the Company’s network or telecommunications services could affect the Company’s ability to operate its games and online offerings, which would result in reduced revenues and customer down time. The Company’s network and databases of business or customer information, including intellectual property, trade secrets, and other proprietary business information and those of third parties EEG utilizes, will be susceptible to outages due to fire, floods, power loss, break-ins, cyber-attacks, hackers, network penetration, data privacy or security breaches, denial of service attacks and similar events, including inadvertent dissemination of information due to increased use of social media. Despite implementation of network security measures and data protection safeguards by EEG, including a disaster recovery strategy for back office systems, the Company’s servers and computer resources will be vulnerable to viruses, malicious software, hacking, break-ins or theft, third-party security breaches, employee error or malfeasance, and other potential compromises. Disruptions from unauthorized access to or tampering with the Company’s computer systems, or those of third parties EEG utilizes, in any such event could result in a wide range of negative outcomes, including devaluation of the Company’s intellectual property goodwill and/or brand appeal, increased expenditures on data security, and costly litigation, and can have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, revenues, reputation, operating results and financial condition.

 

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Malfunctions of third-party communications infrastructure, hardware and software expose Esports to a variety of risks Esports cannot control.

 

Our business will depend upon the capacity, reliability and security of the infrastructure owned by third parties over which our offerings would be deployed. Esports has no control over the operation, quality or maintenance of a significant portion of that infrastructure or whether or not those third parties will upgrade or improve their equipment. Esports depends on these companies to maintain the operational integrity of our connections. If one or more of these companies is unable or unwilling to supply or expand our levels of service in the future, our operations could be adversely impacted. Also, to the extent the number of users of networks utilizing our future products and services suddenly increases, the technology platform and secure hosting services which will be required to accommodate a higher volume of traffic may result in slower response times or service interruptions. System interruptions or increases in response time could result in a loss of potential or existing users and, if sustained or repeated, could reduce the appeal of the networks to users. In addition, users depend on real-time communications; outages caused by increased traffic could result in delays and system failures. These types of occurrences could cause users to perceive that our products and services do not function properly and could therefore adversely affect our ability to attract and retain licensees, strategic partners and customers.

 

Risks Related to Our Common Stock

 

Our officers, directors and 5% stockholders may exert significant influence over our affairs, including the outcome of matters requiring stockholder approval.

 

As of the date of this prospectus, our officers, directors 5% stockholders collectively have an approximately 48.22% beneficial ownership of our company. As a result, when acting together, such individuals will have a controlling influence over the election of our directors and in determining the outcome of any corporate action, including corporate actions requiring stockholder approval, such as: (i) a merger or a sale of our company, (ii) a sale of all or substantially all of our assets, and (iii) amendments to our articles of incorporation and bylaws. This concentration of voting power and influence could have a significant effect in delaying, deferring or preventing an action that might otherwise be beneficial to our other stockholders and be disadvantageous to our stockholders with interests different from those individuals. Certain of these individuals also have significant control over our business, policies and affairs as officers or directors of our company. Therefore, you should not invest in reliance on your ability to have any control over our company.

 

We currently do not intend to pay dividends on our common stock. As a result, your only opportunity to achieve a return on your investment is if the price of our common stock appreciates.

 

We currently do not expect to declare or pay dividends on our common stock. In addition, in the future we may enter into agreements that prohibit or restrict our ability to declare or pay dividends on our common stock. As a result, your only opportunity to achieve a return on your investment will be if the market price of our common stock appreciates and you sell your shares at a profit.

 

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You may experience dilution of your ownership interest due to the future issuance of additional shares of our common stock.

 

We are in a capital intensive business and we do not have sufficient funds to finance the growth of our business or to support our projected capital expenditures. As a result, we will require additional funds from future equity or debt financings, including sales of preferred shares or convertible debt, to complete the development of new projects and pay the general and administrative costs of our business. We may in the future issue our previously authorized and unissued securities, resulting in the dilution of the ownership interests of holders of our common stock. We are currently authorized to issue 500,000,000 shares of common stock and 10,000,000 shares of preferred stock. Additionally, the Board may subsequently approve increases in authorized common stock. The potential issuance of such additional shares of common or preferred stock or convertible debt may create downward pressure on the trading price of our common stock. We may also issue additional shares of common stock or other securities that are convertible into or exercisable for common stock in future public offerings or private placements for capital raising purposes or for other business purposes. The future issuance of a substantial number of common shares into the public market, or the perception that such issuance could occur, could adversely affect the prevailing market price of our common shares. A decline in the price of our common shares could make it more difficult to raise funds through future offerings of our common shares or securities convertible into common shares.

 

Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation allows for our board of directors to create new series of preferred stock without further approval by our stockholders, which could have an anti-takeover effect and could adversely affect holders of our common stock.

 

Our authorized capital includes preferred stock issuable in one or more series. Our board has the authority to issue preferred stock and determine the price, designation, rights, preferences, privileges, restrictions and conditions, including voting and dividend rights, of those shares without any further vote or action by stockholders. The rights of the holders of common stock will be subject to, and may be adversely affected by, the rights of holders of any preferred stock that may be issued in the future. The issuance of additional preferred stock, while providing desirable flexibility in connection with possible financings and acquisitions and other corporate purposes, could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire a majority of the voting power of our outstanding voting securities, which could deprive our holders of common stock of a premium that they might otherwise realize in connection with a proposed acquisition of our company.

 

If and when a larger trading market for our securities develops, the market price of such securities is still likely to be highly volatile and subject to wide fluctuations, and you may be unable to resell your securities at or above the price at which you acquired them.

 

The stock market in general and the market for smaller health service companies in particular have experienced extreme volatility that has often been unrelated to the operating performance of particular companies. The market price for our securities may be influenced by many factors that are beyond our control, including, but not limited to:

 

  variations in our revenue and operating expenses;
     
  market conditions in our industry and the economy as a whole;
     
  actual or expected changes in our growth rates or our competitors’ growth rates;
     
  developments or disputes concerning patent applications, issued patents or other proprietary rights;
     
  developments in the financial markets and worldwide or regional economies;
     
  variations in our financial results or those of companies that are perceived to be similar to us;
     
  announcements by the government relating to regulations that govern our industry;
     
  sales of our common stock or other securities by us or in the open market;
     
  changes in the market valuations of other comparable companies;
     
  general economic, industry and market conditions; and
     
  the other factors described in this “Risk Factors” section.

 

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The trading price of our shares might also decline in reaction to events that affect other companies in our industry, even if these events do not directly affect us. Each of these factors, among others, could harm the value of your investment in our securities. In the past, following periods of volatility in the market, securities class-action litigation has often been instituted against companies. Such litigation, if instituted against us, could result in substantial costs and diversion of management’s attention and resources, which could materially and adversely affect our business, operating results and financial condition.

 

Efforts to comply with the applicable provisions of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act will involve significant expenditures, and non-compliance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act may adversely affect us and the market price of our common stock.

 

Under current SEC rules, we have been required to report on our internal control over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, or Section 404, and related rules and regulations of the SEC. We will be required to review on an annual basis our internal control over financial reporting, and on a quarterly and annual basis to evaluate and disclose changes in our internal control over financial reporting. This process may result in a diversion of management’s time and attention and may involve significant expenditures. We have not maintained internal control over financial reporting in a manner that meets the standards of publicly traded companies required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. The rules governing the standards that must be met for our evaluation management to assess our internal control over financial reporting are complex and require significant documentation, testing and possible remediation. We might encounter problems or delays in completing the implementation of any changes necessary to make a favorable assessment of our internal control over financial reporting. If we cannot favorably assess the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting, investors could lose confidence in our financial information and the price of our common stock could decline.

 

If securities or industry analysts do not publish or cease publishing research or reports about us, or publish inaccurate or unfavorable reports about, our business or our market, or if they change their recommendations regarding our stock adversely, our stock price and trading volume could decline.

 

The trading market for our common stock, to some extent, will be influenced by the research and reports that industry or securities analysts may publish about us, our business, our market or our competitors. We do not have any control over these analysts.

 

Our internal control over financial reporting does not currently meet the standards required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, and failure to achieve and maintain effective internal control over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act could have a material adverse effect on our business and stock price.

 

We have not maintained internal control over financial reporting in a manner that meets the standards of publicly traded companies required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. The rules governing the standards that must be met for our management to assess our internal control over financial reporting are complex and require significant documentation, testing and possible remediation. We might encounter problems or delays in completing the implementation of any changes necessary to make a favorable assessment of our internal control over financial reporting. If we cannot favorably assess the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting, investors could lose confidence in our financial information and the price of our common stock could decline.

 

Anti-takeover provisions in our charter documents and Nevada law could discourage, delay or prevent a change in control of our company and may affect the trading price of our common stock and warrants.

 

We are a Nevada corporation and the anti-takeover provisions of the Nevada Revised Statutes may discourage, delay or prevent a change in control by prohibiting us from engaging in a business combination with an interested stockholder for a period of three years after the person becomes an interested stockholder, even if a change in control would be beneficial to our existing stockholders. In addition, our certificate of incorporation and bylaws may discourage, delay or prevent a change in our management or control over us that stockholders may consider favorable. Our certificate of incorporation and bylaws:

 

  authorize the issuance of “blank check” preferred stock that could be issued by our board of directors to thwart a takeover attempt;

 

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  provide that vacancies on our board of directors, including newly created directorships, may be filled by a majority vote of directors then in office;
     
  place restrictive requirements (including advance notification of stockholder nominations and proposals) on how special meetings of stockholders may be called by our stockholders; do not provide stockholders with the ability to cumulate their votes; and
     
  provide that our board of directors or a majority of our stockholders may amend our bylaws.

 

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.

 

None.

 

Item 2. Properties.

 

Our executive and business offices are located at 170 Pater House, Psaila Street, Birkirkara, Malta, BKR 9077 where we sub-lease approximately 150 square feet of property in Birkirkara, Malta.

 

We have access to office and meeting space for a nominal fee, on an as-used basis, in Willemstad, Curacao.

 

The Company entered into a one-year lease term with Contact Advisory Services to rent office space starting on January 1, 2020 and terminating on December 31, 2020, with one-year renewal options. The minimum rent payment for the year ending June 30, 2020 is $22,252.

 

Item 3. Legal Proceedings.

 

In September 2018, Boustead Securities, LLC (“Boustead”) notified us via letter of a claim that they were owed $192,664, as well as warrants to purchase 1,417,909 shares of our common stock as compensation for their acting as the placement agent for the sale of our securities between June 2017 and 2018. This matter was then brought to JAMS pursuant to an arbitration clause in the placement agent agreement entered into by the Company and Boustead.

 

The Arbitration is currently scheduled for December 2020.

 

On August 3, 2020, Tangiers Global, LLC (“Tangiers”) filed a lawsuit in the United States District Court for the District of Nevada, entitled Tangiers Global, LLC, v. VGambling, Inc. et al, Case No. 2:20-cv-01434-APG-DJA.  While filed in Nevada, the matter is in the process of being transferred to the District of Puerto Rico. The complaint for the lawsuit alleges, among other things, that the Company breached a certain 8% convertible promissory note, dated June 3, 2016, and Common Stock Purchase warrant of the same date.

 

The Company believes the lawsuit lacks merit and will vigorously challenge the action, in addition, to file any counterclaims that may exist. At this time, the Company is unable to estimate potential damage exposure, if any, related to the litigation.

 

From time to time, we may be involved in litigation relating to claims arising out of our operations in the normal course of business. With the exception of the foregoing, we are currently not involved in any litigation that we believe could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations. There is no action, suit, proceeding, inquiry or investigation before or by any court, public board, government agency, self-regulatory organization or body pending or, to the knowledge of the executive officers of our Company or any of our subsidiaries, threatened against or affecting our company, our common stock, any of our subsidiaries or of our companies or our subsidiaries’ officers or directors in their capacities as such, in which an adverse decision could have a material adverse effect.

 

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Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.

 

Not applicable.

 

PART II

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

 

Market Information

 

Our Common Stock and Unit A Warrants are quoted for trading on Nasdaq under the symbols “GMBL”, and “GMBLW”, respectively.

 

As of September 28, 2020, 12,543,750 shares of our common stock were issued and outstanding.

 

Holders

 

As of September 23, 2020, there were approximately 95 holders of record of our common stock. This number does not include shares held by brokerage clearing houses, depositories or others in unregistered form.

 

Dividend Policy

 

To date, we have not paid any dividends on our common stock and do not anticipate paying any dividends in the foreseeable future. The declaration and payment of dividends on the common stock is at the discretion of our Board and will depend on, among other things, our operating results, financial condition, capital requirements, contractual restrictions or such other factors as our Board may deem relevant. We currently expect to use all available funds to finance the future development and expansion of our business and do not anticipate paying dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future.

 

Transfer Agent and Registrar

 

The transfer agent and registrar for our common stock is VStock Transfer, LLC with an address at 18 Lafayette Pl, Woodmere, NY 11598.

 

Rule 10B-18 Transactions

 

During the fiscal year ended June 30, 2020, there were no repurchases of the Company’s common stock by the Company.

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities 

 

During the year ended June 30, 2020, we issued securities that were not registered under the Securities Act. Except where noted, all of the securities discussed in this Item 5 were issued in reliance on the exemption under Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act.

 

On July 17, 2019, the Company issued 16,667 shares of its common stock to a consultant for services.

 

On October 1, 2019, the Company issued 2,222 shares of its common stock in connection with a sponsorship agreement.

 

On October 8, 2019, the Company issued 41,780 shares of its common stock upon the exercise of 79,444 warrants upon a cashless exercise.

 

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On October 9, 2019, the Company issued 11,248 shares of its common stock upon the exercise of 21,389 warrants upon a cashless exercise.

 

On October 30, 2019, the Company issued 6,667 shares of its common stock in connection with a consulting agreement.

 

On November 18, 2019, the Company issued 4,444 shares of its common stock related to the exercise warrants with a weighted average exercise price of $2.25 per share.

 

On November 20, 2019, the Company issued 5,435 shares of common stock in connection with a consulting agreement.

 

On March 4, 2020, we issued 40,001 shares of common stock upon the exercise of warrants for proceeds of $90,000.

 

On June 3, 2020, the board of directors granted 117,450 shares of common stock in connection with services rendered.

 

Item 6. Selected Financial Data.

 

Not applicable.

 

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

 

This section of this report includes a number of forward-looking statements that reflect our current views with respect to future events and financial performance. As the Company’s acquisition of Argyll took place after the fiscal year end this Management Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations speaks only to the historical operations of the Company during the 2020 fiscal year end and the Company’s historical business prior such acquisition. Forward looking statements are often identified by words like: believe, expect, estimate, anticipate, intend, project and similar expressions or words which, by their nature, refer to future events. You should not place undue certainty on these forward-looking statements, which apply only as of the date of this report. These forward-looking statements are subject to certain risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from historical results or our predictions.

 

Overview

 

Esports is the competitive playing of video games by amateur and professional teams for cash prizes. Esports typically takes the form of organized, multiplayer video games that include real-time strategy, fighting, first-person shooter and multiplayer online battle arena games. As of March 20, 2020, the three largest selling esports games were Dota 2, League of Legends (each multiplayer online battle arena games) and Counter Strike: Global Offensive (a first-person shooter game). Other popular games include Smite, StarCraft II, Call of Duty¸ Heroes of the Storm, Hearthstone and Fortnite. Esports also includes games which can be played, primarily by amateurs, in multiplayer competitions on the Sony PlayStation, Microsoft Xbox and Nintendo Switch. Most major professional esports events and a wide range of amateur esports events are broadcast live via streaming services including twitch.tv, azubu.tv, ustream.tv and youtube.com.

 

We are an esports entertainment and online gambling company primarily focused on three verticals, (i): esports entertainment, (ii) esports wagering, and (iii) iGaming and traditional sports betting. We believe focusing on these verticals positions the Company to take advantage of a trending and expanding marketplace in esports with the rise of competitive gaming as well as the legalization of online gambling in the United States.

 

Esports Entertainment:

 

Our esports entertainment vertical includes any activity that we pursue within esports that does not include real-money wagering. Right now, the main component of this pillar is our skill-based tournament platform This allows us to engage and monetize players across 41 states where skill-based gambling is legal as well as create relationships with players that can eventually migrate into our Vie.ggGG real-money wagering platform.

 

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Esports Wagering:

 

We intend to be the leader in the large and rapidly growing sector of esports real-money wagering. Our Vie.gg platform offers fans the ability to wager on professional esports events in a licensed and secure environment. At the current time, under the terms of our existing Curacao license, we are currently able to accept wagers from residents of over 149 jurisdictions including Canada, Japan, Germany and South Africa. On April 30, 2020, we received our gaming service license from the Malta Gaming Authority (MGA). We now expect that residents in a number of European Union member states will be able to place bets on our website. On August 20, 2020, we announced that we entered into a multi-year partnership with Twin River Worldwide Holdings, Inc (NYSE: TRWH) to launch our proprietary mobile sports betting product in the state of New Jersey. We intend to have our platform live in the state by the end of the first quarter of 2021.

 

iGaming and Traditional Sports Betting:

 

The goal of our iGaming and traditional Sports Betting vertical is to provide profitable growth and access to strategic licenses in jurisdictions that we can cross-sell into our Vie.gg platform On July 7, 2020, we entered into a stock purchase agreement (the “Argyll Purchase Agreement”), by and among the Company, LHE Enterprises Limited (“LHE”), and AHG Entertainment, LLC (“AHG”) whereby upon closing on July 31, 2020 the Company acquired all of the outstanding capital stock of LHE and its subsidiaries, (i) Argyll Entertainment AG, (ii) Nevada Holdings Limited and (iii) Argyll Productions Limited (collectively the “Acquired Companies” or “Argyle”). AHG is licensed and regulated by the UK Gambling Commission and the Irish Revenue Commissioners to operate online sportsbook and casino sites in the UK and Ireland, respectively. Argyll has a flagship brand, www.SportNation.bet, as well as two white label brands, www.RedZone.bet and www.uk.Fansbet.com (collectively the “Argyll Brands”), with over 200K registered players at the end of calendar year 2019.

 

We believe that as the size of the market and the number of Esports Enthusiasts continues to grow, so will the number of Esports Enthusiasts who gamble on events, which would likely increase the demand for our platform.

 

We have financed operations primarily through the sale of equity securities and short-term debt. Until revenues are sufficient to meet our needs, we will continue to attempt to secure financing through equity or debt securities. We continue to incur negative cash flows from operating activities and net losses. We had minimal cash, negative working capital, and negative total equity as of June 30, 2019.

 

On April 16, 2020, the Company consummated its public offering of securities (the “April Offering”) in which we sold 1,980,000 units, with each unit consisting of one share of the Company’s common stock and two warrants (“Unit A Warrant” and “Unit B Warrant”, and collectively with the common stock the “Units”), each to purchase one share of common stock, at a public offering price of $4.25 per share. In connection with the April Offering, we (i) received proceeds of approximately $7 million, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions, (ii) converted our convertible debt and accrued interest, (iii) and issued 1,217,241 shares of common stock and 2,434,482 warrants with an exercise price of $4.25 per share in connection with the conversion of our convertible debt. In addition, the underwriters were granted a 45-day option to purchase up to an additional 297,000 shares of Common Stock, and/or 297,000 Unit A Warrants, and/or 297,000 Unit B Warrants, or any combination thereof, to cover over-allotments, if any (the “Over-Allotment Option”). The underwriters exercised Over-Allotment Option” and the Company received net proceeds of $823,759 from the exercise. The Units were offered and sold to the public pursuant to our registration statement on Form S-1, filed by us with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 2, 2019, as amended, which became effective on April 14, 2020.

 

Results of Operations

 

Comparison on Year ended June 30, 2020 and 2019

 

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this report. Material changes in line items in our Statement of Operations for the year ended June 30, 2020 as compared to the same period last year, are discussed below.

 

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General and Administrative

 

General and administrative expenses consist primarily of costs associated with our overall operations and being a public company. These costs include personnel, legal and financial professional services, insurance, investor relations, and compliance related fees.

 

General and administrative expenses for the year ended June 30, 2020 totaled $4,049,714, an increase of $1,035,241 over the $3,014,473 recorded for the year ended June 30, 2019. The increase was primarily attributable to increases of $914,375 in stock based compensation, $205,689 in wages and benefits, $227,250 in consulting and professional, $50,124 in licenses and related fees, and $98,444 in directors fees, offset by decreases of $184,520 in information technology related costs, $42,390 in legal costs, $106,425 in advertising and promotion costs, and $127,306 in other general and administrative costs.

 

Other Expenses

 

Other expenses for the year ended June 30, 2020 totaled $6,299,303, an increase of $2,942,126 over the $3,357,177 recorded for the year ended June 30, 2019. The increase was primarily attributable to increases of $4,952,362 in the loss on the change in fair market value of derivative liabilities, $2,795,582 in the loss on extinguishment of debt, $866,157 in the net amortization of debt discount and premium on convertible debt, and $67,132 impairment of intangible asset, offset by decreases of $3,591,159 in interest expense, $1,894,418 gain on warrant exchange, and $253,588 gain on settlement of debt.

 

Capital Resources and Liquidity

 

The Company’s sources and (uses) of cash for the year ended June 30, 2020 and 2019 are shown below:

 

   2020   2019 
Cash used in operating activities  $2,269,652   $2,020,457 
Cash used in investing activities  $500,000   $12,134 
Cash provided by financing activities  $15,079,547   $1,975,836 

 

To date, we have experienced negative operating cash flows and have incurred substantial operating losses from our activities. We expect operating costs will increase significantly as we incur costs associated with commercialization activities related to our recent acquisitions. We expect to continue to fund our operations primarily through utilization of our current financial resources, future revenue, and through the issuance of debt or equity.

 

Our ability to continue as a going concern has been alleviated by the execution of managements’ plans. On April 16, 2020, we raised approximately $7,000,000 in net proceeds from our public offering and an additional approximately $7,000,000 in cash received from warrant exercises during the year ended June 30, 2020. The funds received in the public offering and warrant exercises are expected to be enough to satisfy the Company’s current obligations to continue operations for at least the next twelve months.

 

At June 30, 2020, we had total current assets of $13,116,652 and total current liabilities of $1,739,404 resulting in working capital of $11,377,248. Net cash used in operating activities for the year ended June 30, 2020 was $2,269,652, which includes a net loss of $10,351,415, offset by non-cash expenses of $7,934,212 principally related to share based compensation expense of $1,614,236, impairment of intangible asset of $67,132, net amortization of debt discount and premium on convertible debt of $1,054,386, change in the fair market value of derivative liabilities of $2,432,302, loss on extinguishment of debt of $2,795,582, and non-cash interest expense of $2,097,949 offset by the gain on warrant exchange of $1,894,418 and gain on settlement of debt of $253,588; and cash provided by the change in net working capital items of $147,551 related to the increase in prepaid expense and other current asset of $123,831, offset by the increase in accounts payable and accrued expenses of $251,275 and due to officers of $20,107.

 

Net cash used in investing activities for the year ended June 30, 2020 totaled $500,000 for the initial payment made in connection with the Argyll acquisition.

 

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Net cash provided by financing activities for the year ended June 30, 2020 totaled $15,079,547 principally related to the proceeds received from public offerings and the exercise of over-allotment options of $9,304,950, proceeds from the exercise of warrants of $6,688,865, and proceeds from promissory convertible notes of $1,160,000, offset by the repayment of promissory convertible notes of $230,000 and the payment of deferred financing costs of $1,844,268.

 

Off Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

None.

 

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.

 

Not applicable.

 

Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.

 

Our financial statements are contained in pages F-1 through F-25,  which appear at the end of this Form 10-K Annual Report.

 

Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure.

 

None.

 

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures.

 

Evaluation of disclosure controls and procedures.

 

We conducted an evaluation, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer/Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures, as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, as of June 30, 2020, to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports filed or submitted by us under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the Securities Exchange Commission’s rules and forms, including to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports filed or submitted by us under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our principal executive/principal financial officer, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Based on that evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer/Chief Financial Officer have concluded that as of June 30, 2020, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective at the reasonable assurance level due to the material weaknesses identified and described below.

 

Our principal executive officers do not expect that our disclosure controls or internal controls will prevent all error and all fraud. Although our disclosure controls and procedures were designed to provide reasonable assurance of achieving their objectives and our principal executive officers have determined that our disclosure controls and procedures are effective at doing so, a control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute assurance that the objectives of the system are met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented if there exists in an individual a desire to do so. There can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions.

 

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Remediation Plan to Address the Material Weaknesses in Internal Control over Financial Reporting.

 

A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.

 

Management identified the following four material weaknesses that have caused management to conclude that, as of June 30, 2020, our disclosure controls and procedures, and our internal control over financial reporting, were not effective at the reasonable assurance level:

 

  1. We do not have sufficient segregation of duties within accounting functions, which is a basic internal control. Due to our size and nature, segregation of all conflicting duties may not always be possible and may not be economically feasible. However, to the extent possible, the initiation of transactions, the custody of assets and the recording of transactions should be performed by separate individuals. Based on the current magnitude of our operations, it is impractical to employ sufficient staff to fully address the separation of duties issue. As the business plan is implemented and additional staff is required, we will be able to and intend to address this identified weakness.
     
  2. Effective controls over the control environment have not been fully implemented. Specifically, management has not developed and effectively communicated to employees its accounting policies and procedures. This has resulted in inconsistent practices. Since these entity level programs have a pervasive effect across the organization, management has determined that these circumstances constitute a material weakness. As the expansion plans are implemented, we intend to communicate our accounting policies and procedures to our employees.
     
  3. We do not employ accounting staff with the technical capabilities to identify non-routine complex transactions including transactions which involve issuance of debt and equity.

 

As a result of the material weaknesses identified above, our internal control over financial reporting was not effective as of June 30, 2020.

 

The Company plans to initiate a program to address the above weakness. While segregation of duties is very difficult in a small company. The Company has an internal policy that all major expenditures must be approved by a majority of the Board of Directors. In addition, the Company has constituted an Audit Committee, consisting of two non-management directors with an Independent Director as the Chair.

 

We plan to document our internal control policies and procedures. Written documentation of key internal controls over financial reporting is a requirement of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act as of the period ending June 30, 2020. We plan to progressively implement the written policies and procedures commencing in the immediate future.

 

To address the material weaknesses identified, management performed additional analyses and other procedures to ensure that the financial statements included herein fairly present, in all material respects, our financial position, results of operations and cash flows for the periods presented. Accordingly, we believe that the financial statements included in this report fairly present, in all material respects, our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows for the periods presented.

 

As part of the implementation strategy for the expansion of the Company we have engaged a third-party firm to assist us with the development of any additional systems required. We intend to remedy our material weakness with regard to insufficient segregation of duties by hiring additional employees as funding becomes available to implement the business plan in order to segregate duties in a manner that establishes effective internal controls. All such required remedies are dependent on having the financial resources available to complete them.

 

Changes in internal controls.

 

No change in our system of internal control over financial reporting occurred during the period covered by this report, the year ended June 30, 2020, that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

Item 9B. Other Information.

 

On September 29, 2020, we entered into an Amended and Restated Employment Agreement with Grant Johnson to serve as our Chief Executive Officer (the “Johnson Employment Agreement”). The Company will continue to employ Mr. Johnson for the period beginning retroactively on May 1, 2020 (the “Commencement Date”) and ending on January 31, 2025, (the “Initial Term”). The Initial Term shall be automatically renewed for successive consecutive one (1) year periods (each, a “Renewal Term” and the Initial Term and Renewal Term are collectively referred to as the “term of employment”) thereafter unless either party sends written notice to the other party, not more than 270 days and not less than 180 days before the end of the then-existing term of employment, of such party’s desire to terminate the Johnson Employment Agreement at the end of the then-existing term, in which case the Johnson Employment Agreement will terminate at the end of the then-existing term.

 

Mr. Johnson will receive an annual salary of $300,000 (the “Base Salary”) retroactive to May 1, 2020. The Base Salary will be increased on January 1 of each year by three percent (3%) per annum (which figure shall act as a surrogate for the service cost of living increases) over the then-existing Base Salary.

 

In addition to the Base Salary, the Company shall pay to Mr. Johnson a cash bonus up to 150% of the Base Salary determined by the relationship between the Company’s annual performance and an annual target performance set each year by mutual agreement between the Board of Directors.

 

Mr. Johnson will participate in the executive stock option plan consistent with other C-level officers, once adopted by the Company. In addition, the Mr. Johnson will receive 100,000 shares of common stock of the Company for each stock or asset acquisition that the Company consummates during the term of his employment that increases the gross revenues of the Company by $10,000,000.00 or more, as determined by the Company’s auditors and the Board of Directors. There will be a 200,000 common stock issuance if the Company reaches positive cash flow EBIDTA, as determined by the Company’s auditors and the Board of Directors. Mr. Johnson will further receive a common stock issuance of 200,000 shares if the market capitalization of the Company exceeds $500,000,000 for a period of 30 consecutive trading days. In addition, the Mr. Johnson will receive a 200,000 common stock issuance if the market capitalization of the Company exceeds $1,000,000,000 for a period of 30 consecutive trading days. Further, Mr. Johnson will receive an issuance of 200,000 shares of common stock if the market capitalization of the Company exceeds $1,500,000,000 for a period of 30 consecutive trading days. Mr. Johnson will also be entitled receive an additional 100,000 shares of common stock for each additional $100,000,000 increase in market capitalization thereafter, provided that such increase is sustained for a period of 30 consecutive trading days.

 

Mr. Johnson is entitled to receive various employee benefits generally made available to other C-level officers and senior managers of the Company.

 

If the Company were to terminate Mr. Johnson’s employment without cause, Mr. Johnson would be entitled to receive all compensation earned but unpaid through the date of termination and a severance payment equal to two (2) years’ worth of his then-existing Base Salary and previous years’ bonus.

 

On September 30, 2020, upon the approval of the Nominating and Governance Committee, the Board approved and acknowledged that the role of Chief Legal Officer be recognized as an executive officer position with the Company.

 

On August 1, 2020, the Company entered into a consulting agreement with Rivington Law (the “Tilly Consulting Agreement”), whereby Stuart Tilly, as a consultant to the Company, will among other things, provide legal services to the Company. The Company has appointed Mr. Tilly as Chief Legal Officer and Secretary. The Company has determined that the Tilly Consulting Agreement is now material given the Board’s acknowledgement of the role of Chief Legal Officer as an executive officer position.

 

Pursuant to the Tilly Consulting Agreement, Mr. Tilly is entitled to receive £18,000 per month. Mr. Tilly will be eligible for discretionary cash bonuses as determined from time to time by the Board or Compensation Committee as well as participation in any executive stock option plan consistent with other C-level officers, once adopted by the Company.

 

Either party may terminate the Tilly Consulting Agreement upon six months written notice (the “Notice Period”). The Company may, at is sole discretion, terminate the Tilly Agreement immediately by paying all amounts that otherwise would have been due owing during the Notice Period. On the date of termination, for any reason whatsoever, Mr. Tilly will only be entitled to any outstanding fees or consideration earned and owed though the date of such termination.

 

See Item 10 for a description of Mr. Tilly’s professional work experience.

 

Family Relationships

 

Mr. Tilly does not have a family relationship with any of the current officers or directors of the Company.

 

The foregoing is only a brief description of the material terms of the amended and restated employment agreement and Tilly Consulting Agreement and is qualified in its entirety by reference to the amended and restated employment agreements for Mr. Johnson and the Tilly Consulting Agreement filed as Exhibit 10.9 and Exhibit 10.31 hereto, respectively.

 

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Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance.

 

The names of our executive officers and directors and their age, title, and biography as of September 22, 2020 are set forth below. Our officers and directors serve until their respective successors are elected and qualified.

 

Name   Age   Position(s)
Grant Johnson   59   President, Secretary/ Treasurer, Chief Executive Officer
(Principal Executive Officer) and Chairman of the Board of Directors
Daniel Marks   41   Chief Financial Officer (Principal Financial Officer)
(Principal Accounting Officer) and Director
John Brackens   39   Chief Information Officer & Chief Technology Officer
Damian Mathews   48   Director
Chul Woong Lim   37   Director
Alan Alden   57   Director
Warwick Bartlett   73   Director
Stuart Tilly   42   Chief Legal Officer

 

Background of Officers and Directors

 

Grant Johnson

 

Mr. Johnson has been the Chief Executive Officer of the Company since 2013. From 2007 to 2013, Mr. Johnson advised several development stage companies as a sales management and business development consultant. From 2003 to 2007, Mr. Johnson was co-founder, President, Chief Operating Officer and a Director of Swiss Medica Inc., a US publicly listed company which manufactured and sold nutraceutical products online. From 2000 to 2003, Mr. Johnson was founder, President, Chief Executive Officer and a Director of Healthnet International Inc., a US publicly listed company which sold nutraceutical products online. From early 1996 to 1999, Mr. Johnson was Vice President of Starnet Communications International, Inc. and Softec Systems Inc., a market leader in the B2B sector of the online gambling industry. Mr. Johnson obtained his Bachelor of Arts degree in economics and history from the University of Western Ontario in Canada.

 

Daniel Marks

 

Mr. Marks combines over twenty (20) years of experience of senior management in online gambling and corporate banking. From 2016 through the present, Mr. Marks has served as Chief Financial Officer of Argyll Entertainment AG, an online gambling operator licensed in the UK and Ireland. From 2014 to 2016, he was Chief Financial Officer for Large and Mid-Market Corporates for HSBC, North America, a British multinational banking and financial services organization. From 2008 through 2014, Mr. Marks held multiple financial and operational leadership roles, including Chief Operating Officer for UK Coverage at Barclays plc, a British multinational investment bank and financial services company. He has an undergraduate degree from the University of Bristol, UK, and is a CIMA qualified accountant.

 

John Brackens

 

Mr. Brackens combines over 12 years of experience in information technology senior management following a 4 year career leading customer experience teams. Previously, he had been involved in five organizations within the game industry holding positions including Chief Operating Officer, Treasurer, Foreign Director, and Network Operations Manager. From 2018 through January 2019, Mr. Brackens was the Operations Director for Carte Blanche Entertainment, Inc., an iGaming company. From 2016 to 2017, he was Chief Operating Officer for Sparkjumpers Pte Ltd., a company involved in video game development and eSports tournament events. From January 2014 to January 2016, he was Manager of Network Operations of Activision Blizzard - Demonware an entertainment company that focused on AAA game development. Mr. Brackens studied Electrical Engineering at Arizona State University. On September 26, 2019, Mr. Brackens was appointed chief technology officer of the Company.

 

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Stuart Tilly

 

Mr. Tilly combines over 15 years of experience in the online gaming industry having previously trained and qualified as a Solicitor.   Previously, he had been involved in several online gaming companies, holding positions including Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Chief Legal Officer and Non-Executive Director and board member.   From 2016 through 2020, Stuart was the Chief Executive Officer for Argyll Entertainment AG, a UK licensed online sports betting and gaming company. From 2014 to 2020, he was also Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Flip Sports Limited, a mobile games development company. From 2012 to 2016 he was Founder and Executive Director of iGaming Counsel, a legal and commercial advisory firm to the online gaming industry. From 2005 to 2012 he held senior legal positions in the online gaming industry. Stuart was also a founding member of the International Social Games Association, an industry trade body for the social gaming industry and a non-executive advisor to Game Sparks Limited, a games platform as a service company. He has a law degree from the University of Exeter and an LPC Masters Degree from Nottingham Trent Law School. Stuart trained and qualified as a solicitor at Magic Circle law firm, Allen & Overy LLP. 

 

Damian Mathews

 

Mr. Mathews combines over 25 years of experience in senior finance positions within investment management, banking and accounting. Previously, he had been involved with the Qatar and Abu Dhabi Investment Company (a sovereign wealth fund owned investment company) as Chief Financial Officer from 2014 to 2020. From 2012 to 2014 he was a Director of his own consultancy business, NZ Pacific Investments, in New Zealand. From 2009 to 2012 he held senior management positions including General Manager Finance (New Zealand); Head of Finance and Operations Americas (United States); and Head of Change Management (Australia) at Commonwealth Bank of Australia Group. From 2007 to 2008 Damian was a Director in Product Control at ABN Amro bank in London. From 2002 to 2006 he held various senior financial controller positions at Royal Bank of Scotland Group in London. From 1998 to 2002 he was an Assistant Vice President at Credit Suisse First Boston investment bank in London and the Bahamas. From 1994 to 1998, he was an Assistant Manager at KPMG accountants in London. He has a joint honors undergraduate degree in Economics and Politics from the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom and is a fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales.

 

Chul Woong Lim

 

Since June 2018 Mr. Lim has been Director of Global Business for Loud Communications based in Seoul, South Korea. Between 2014 and 2018 Mr. Lim was the Secretary General of the International e-Sports Federation (IeSF) based in Seoul, South Korea where he was responsible for relations with 47 national federations, international sports authorities, and global partners, in addition to organizing and operating the eSports World Championship and other international esports tournaments. During 2010, Mr. Lim was Deputy Manager of Sports Marketing with FIRSONS Inc., a Seoul, South Korea based sports events marketing firm. Mr. Lim was one of our Directors between January 30, 2015 and October 26, 2016. Mr. Lim received a B.S. in Physical Education from Seoul National University.

 

Alan Alden

 

Mr. Alden has been a specialist in advising remote gaming companies located in Malta since 2000, when he advised the first remote gaming companies as the Senior Manager of Enterprise Risk Services at Deloitte & Touche (Malta). In 2006, Mr. Alden established Kyte Consultants Ltd, a company that specialized in the remote gaming and payment card sectors, to assist companies located in Malta. In 2009, Mr. Alden became a founding director in Contact Advisory Services Ltd, a licensed Company Service Provider (CSP) that offers a complete service to its customers, from company incorporation, to licensing for gaming and financial institutions. Since 2010, Mr. Alden has served as the General Secretary of the Malta Remote Gaming Council. Mr. Alden is a Certified Information Systems Security Professional (“CISSP”) and a Certified Information Systems Auditor (“CISA”). Mr. Alden was also the founding President of the ISACA Malta Chapter between 2005 and 2008. In 2015, Mr. Alden became a Part Time Lecturer on IT Auditing at the University of Malta.

 

Warwick Bartlett

 

Mr. Bartlett combines over fifty (50) years of experience in the gaming industry. From 1999 through the present, Mr. Bartlett has served as Chief Executive Officer of Global Betting & Gaming Consultants Ltd, a company that provides data and market reports for the global gambling industry. From 1989 to 2019, Mr. Bartlett served on the board of directors of Cashline Pawnbrokers Ltd. From 2002 to 2013, Mr. Bartlett served as Non-Executive Chairman of the Association of British Bookmakers a trade organization for betting shop operators in the United Kingdom which represents its members and their interests through legislative advocacy and media relations. From 2004 to 2010, Mr. Bartlett served as Member of the Horserace Betting Levy Board a UK statutory body that was established by the Betting Levy Act 1961. From 1992 to 2000, Mr. Bartlett served as Chairman of the British Betting Office Association.

 

Warwick Bartlett, Damian Mathews, Chul Woong Lim and Alan Alden are independent directors as that term is defined in Section 5605(a)(2) of the Nasdaq Stock Market rules.

 

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We believe our directors are qualified to serve for the following reasons:

 

Name   Reason
Grant Johnson   Experience in online gambling.
Daniel Marks   Experience in financial and operational leadership roles.
Damian Mathews   Experience in financial and accounting leadership roles
Chul Woong Lim   Experience with esports.
Alan Alden   Experience advising companies in gaming.
Warwick Bartlett   Experience in the gaming industry.

 

Family Relationships

 

There are no family relationships between any of our directors or executive officers.

 

Section 16(a) Beneficial Owner Reporting Compliance

 

Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance

 

Under Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act, all executive officers, directors, and each person who is the beneficial owner of more than 10% of the common stock of a company that files reports pursuant to Section 12 of the Exchange Act, are required to report the ownership of such common stock, options, and stock appreciation rights (other than certain cash-only rights) and any changes in that ownership with the Commission. Specific due dates for these reports have been established, and the Company is required to report, in this Annual Report, any failure to comply therewith during the fiscal year ended June 30. The Company believes that all of these filing requirements were satisfied by its executive officers, directors and by the beneficial owners of more than 10% of the Company’s common stock. In making this statement, the Company has relied solely on copies of any reporting forms received by it, and upon any written representations received from reporting persons that no Form 5 (Annual Statement of Changes in Beneficial Ownership) was required to be filed under applicable rules of the Commission.   

 

Board Composition and Director Independence

 

Our Common Stock and warrants are listed on The NASDAQ Capital Market. Under the rules of NASDAQ, “independent” directors must make up a majority of a listed company’s board of directors. In addition, applicable NASDAQ rules require that, subject to specified exceptions, each member of a listed company’s audit and compensation committees be independent within the meaning of the applicable NASDAQ rules. Audit committee members must also satisfy the independence criteria set forth in Rule 10A-3 under the Exchange Act.

 

Our board of directors consists of 6 members. The directors will serve until our next annual meeting and until their successors are duly elected and qualified. The Company defines “independent” as that term is defined in Rule 5605(a)(2) of the Nasdaq Stock Market rules.

 

In making the determination of whether a member of the board is independent, our board considers, among other things, transactions and relationships between each director and his immediate family and the Company, including those reported under the caption “Related Party Transactions.” The purpose of this review is to determine whether any such relationships or transactions are material and, therefore, inconsistent with a determination that the directors are independent. On the basis of such review and its understanding of such relationships and transactions, our board affirmatively determined that Damian Mathews, Chul Woong Lim, Alan Alden and Warwick Bartlett are qualified as independent and do not have any material relationships with us that might interfere with his exercise of independent judgment.

 

Board Committees

 

Our board of directors has established an audit committee, a compensation committee and a nominating and corporate governance committee. Each committee has its own charter, which is available on our website at www.esportsentertainmentgroup.com. Each of the board committees has the composition and responsibilities described below.

 

Members will serve on these committees until their resignation or until otherwise determined by our Board of Directors.

 

Damien Matthews, Chul Woong Lim, Warwick Bartlett and Alan Alden are our independent directors within the meaning of the NASDAQ Stock Market rules.

 

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The members of each committee are, as follows:

 

Audit Committee: Damien Matthews, Alan Alden and Warwick Bartlett with Mr. Matthews serving as the Chairman. Our Board has determined the Mr. Matthews is currently qualified as an “audit committee financial expert”, as such term is defined in Item 407(d)(5) of Regulation S-K.

 

Compensation Committee: Alan Alden Chul Woong Lim, and Warwick Bartlett. Mr. Alden serves as Compensation Committee Chairman.

 

Nominating and Governance Committee: Warwick Bartlett, Alan Alden and Damian Matthews. Mr. Bartlett serves as Chairman of the Nominating and Governance Committee.

 

Audit Committee

 

The Audit Committee oversees our accounting and financial reporting processes and oversee the audit of our consolidated financial statements and the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. The specific functions of this Committee include, but are not limited to:

 

  selecting and recommending to our board of directors the appointment of an independent registered public accounting firm and overseeing the engagement of such firm;
     
  approving the fees to be paid to the independent registered public accounting firm;
     
  helping to ensure the independence of the independent registered public accounting firm;
     
  overseeing the integrity of our financial statements;
     
  preparing an audit committee report as required by the SEC to be included in our annual proxy statement;
     
  resolving any disagreements between management and the auditors regarding financial reporting;
     
  reviewing with management and the independent auditors any correspondence with regulators and any published reports that raise material issues regarding the Company’s accounting policies;
     
  reviewing and approving all related-party transactions; and
     
  overseeing compliance with legal and regulatory requirements.

 

Compensation Committee

 

Our Compensation Committee assists the board of directors in the discharge of its responsibilities relating to the compensation of the board of directors and our executive officers.

 

The Committee’s compensation-related responsibilities include, but are not limited to:

 

  reviewing and approving on an annual basis the corporate goals and objectives with respect to compensation for our Chief Executive Officer;
     
  reviewing, approving and recommending to our board of directors on an annual basis the evaluation process and compensation structure for our other executive officers;

 

 

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  determining the need for and the appropriateness of employment agreements and change in control agreements for each of our executive officers and any other officers recommended by the Chief Executive Officer or board of directors;
     
  providing oversight of management’s decisions concerning the performance and compensation of other company officers, employees, consultants and advisors;
     
  reviewing our incentive compensation and other equity-based plans and recommending changes in such plans to our board of directors as needed, and exercising all the authority of our board of directors with respect to the administration of such plans;
     
  reviewing and recommending to our board of directors the compensation of independent directors, including incentive and equity-based compensation; and
     
  selecting, retaining and terminating such compensation consultants, outside counsel or other advisors as it deems necessary or appropriate.

 

Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee

 

The purpose of the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee is to recommend to the board nominees for election as directors and persons to be elected to fill any vacancies on the board, develop and recommend a set of corporate governance principles and oversee the performance of the board.

 

The Committee’s responsibilities include:

 

  recommending to the board of directors nominees for election as directors at any meeting of stockholders and nominees to fill vacancies on the board;
     
  considering candidates proposed by stockholders in accordance with the requirements in the Committee charter;
     
  overseeing the administration of the Company’s code of business conduct and ethics;
     
  reviewing with the entire board of directors, on an annual basis, the requisite skills and criteria for board candidates and the composition of the board as a whole;
     
  the authority to retain search firms to assist in identifying board candidates, approve the terms of the search firm’s engagement, and cause the Company to pay the engaged search firm’s engagement fee;
     
  recommending to the board of directors on an annual basis the directors to be appointed to each committee of the board of directors;
     
  overseeing an annual self-evaluation of the board of directors and its committees to determine whether it and its committees are functioning effectively; and
     
  developing and recommending to the board a set of corporate governance guidelines applicable to the Company.

 

The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee may delegate any of its responsibilities to subcommittees as it deems appropriate. The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee is authorized to retain independent legal and other advisors, and conduct or authorize investigations into any matter within the scope of its duties.

 

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Code of Business Conduct and Ethics

 

We have adopted a code of business conduct and ethics applicable to our principal executive, financial and accounting officers and all persons performing similar functions. A copy of that code is available on our corporate website at www.esportsentertainmentgroup.com. We expect that any amendments to such code, or any waivers of its requirements, will be disclosed on our website.

 

Disclosure of Commission Position on Indemnification of Securities Act Liabilities

 

Our directors and officers are indemnified as provided by the Nevada corporate law and our bylaws. We have agreed to indemnify each of our directors and certain officers against certain liabilities, including liabilities under the Securities Act. Insofar as indemnification for liabilities arising under the Securities Act may be permitted to our directors, officers and controlling persons pursuant to the provisions described above, or otherwise, we have been advised that in the opinion of the SEC such indemnification is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act and is, therefore, unenforceable. In the event that a claim for indemnification against such liabilities (other than our payment of expenses incurred or paid by our director, officer or controlling person in the successful defense of any action, suit or proceeding) is asserted by such director, officer or controlling person in connection with the securities being registered, we will, unless in the opinion of our counsel the matter has been settled by controlling precedent, submit to a court of appropriate jurisdiction the question whether such indemnification by it is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act and will be governed by the final adjudication of such issue.

 

We have been advised that in the opinion of the SEC indemnification for liabilities arising under the Securities Act is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act, and is, therefore, unenforceable. In the event that a claim for indemnification against such liabilities is asserted by one of our directors, officers, or controlling persons in connection with the securities being registered, we will, unless in the opinion of our legal counsel the matter has been settled by controlling precedent, submit the question of whether such indemnification is against public policy to a court of appropriate jurisdiction. We will then be governed by the court’s decision.

 

Involvement in Certain Legal Proceedings

 

To the best of our knowledge, none of our directors or executive officers has, during the past ten years:

 

  been convicted in a criminal proceeding or been subject to a pending criminal proceeding (excluding traffic violations and other minor offenses);
     
  had any bankruptcy petition filed by or against the business or property of the person, or of any partnership, corporation or business association of which he was a general partner or executive officer, either at the time of the bankruptcy filing or within two years prior to that time;
     
  been subject to any order, judgment, or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any court of competent jurisdiction or federal or state authority, permanently or temporarily enjoining, barring, suspending or otherwise limiting, his involvement in any type of business, securities, futures, commodities, investment, banking, savings and loan, or insurance activities, or to be associated with persons engaged in any such activity;
     
  been found by a court of competent jurisdiction in a civil action or by the Securities and Exchange Commission or the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to have violated a federal or state securities or commodities law, and the judgment has not been reversed, suspended, or vacated;
     
  been the subject of, or a party to, any federal or state judicial or administrative order, judgment, decree, or finding, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated (not including any settlement of a civil proceeding among private litigants), relating to an alleged violation of any federal or state securities or commodities law or regulation, any law or regulation respecting financial institutions or insurance companies including, but not limited to, a temporary or permanent injunction, order of disgorgement or restitution, civil money penalty or temporary or permanent cease-and-desist order, or removal or prohibition order, or any law or regulation prohibiting mail or wire fraud or fraud in connection with any business entity; or
     
  been the subject of, or a party to, any sanction or order, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any self-regulatory organization (as defined in Section 3(a)(26) of the Exchange Act), any registered entity (as defined in Section 1(a)(29) of the Commodity Exchange Act), or any equivalent exchange, association, entity or organization that has disciplinary authority over its members or persons associated with a member.

 

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Except as set forth in our discussion below in “Certain Relationships and Related Transactions,” none of our directors or executive officers has been involved in any transactions with us or any of our directors, executive officers, affiliates or associates which are required to be disclosed pursuant to the rules and regulations of the SEC.

 

Item 11. Executive Compensation.

 

The following table summarizes information concerning the compensation awarded to, earned by, or paid to, our Chief Executive Officer (Principal Executive Officer or PEO) and our two most highly compensated executive officers other than the Principal Executive Officer during fiscal years 2020 and 2019 (collectively, the “Named Executive Officers”) who served in such capacities.

 

Name and Principal Position  Year   Salary   Bonus  

Stock

Awards

  

Option

Awards(1)

  

Other

Annual

Compensation

  

All Other

Compensation(1)

   Total 
Grant Johnson,   2020   $150,000                       $150,000 
CEO and President(2)   2019   $120,000                       $120,000 
                                         

John Brackens

CTO(3)

   2020   $94,000         83,645                  $177,645 
    2019    -         -    -    -    -    - 
                                         
Daniel Marks,   2020   $9,000         -    -    -    -    9,000 
CFO(4)   2019   $-         -    -    -    -    - 
                                         
Christopher Malone,   2020   $56,000                        $56,000 
Former CFO(5)   2019   $49,000        61,500               $110,500 
                                         

Jay Cardwell

Former Interim

   

2020

   $

8,750

    

-

    

-

    

-

    

-

    

-

   $

8,750

 
CFO(6)   2019   $

-

    

-

    

-

    

-

    

-

    

-

   $

-

 

 

(1) The fair value of options granted computed in accordance with ASC718 on the date of grant.
   
(2) Annual salary of $150,000.
   
(3) Annual salary of $144,000.
   
(4) Annual salary of $192,225. Mr. Daniel Marks was appointed as the Company’s Chief Financial Officer on June 11, 2020.
   
(5) Annual salary of $84,000 with a signing bonus stock award of 100,000 shares of common stock. Commenced as CFO on November 16, 2018. Mr. Malone resigned of his position as Chief Financial Officer and director on February 20, 2020.
   
(6) Mr. Cardwell resigned as Interim Chief Financial Officer on June 11, 2020.

 

Employment Agreements

 

Grant Johnson

 

On June 1, 2017, we entered into an Employment Agreement with Grant Johnson to serve as our Chief Executive, President, Financial and Accounting Officer. The agreement provides for an annual salary of $120,000. The Employment Agreement has a term of two years and automatically extends for successive one-year periods unless terminated by the Company or Mr. Johnson. The agreement also provides for an annual bonus of up to 50% of Mr. Grant’s base salary at the Board’s discretion and entitles Mr. Johnson to receive various employee benefits generally made available to other officers and senior managers of the Company.

 

Under this agreement, if the Company were to terminate Mr. Johnson’s employment without cause, Mr. Johnson would be entitled to receive all compensation earned but unpaid through the date of termination and a severance payment equal to three months’ base annual salary. 

 

On September 29, 2020, Mr. Johnson entered into an amended and restated employment agreement with the Company as further described in Item 9b below.

 

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John Brackens

 

On May 9, 2019, the Company entered into an employment agreement with Mr. John Brackens to serve as the Company’s Chief Information Officer (the “May Brackens Employment Agreement”). The term of the Brackens Employment Agreement is for one year (the “Initial Term”) and shall be automatically extended for additional terms of successive one-year periods (the “Additional Term”) unless the Company or Mr. Brakens gives written notice to the other of the termination of Mr. Bracken’s employment hereunder at least 30 days prior to the expiration of the Initial Term or Additional Term of the Brackens Employment Agreement. Mr. Brackens is to receive an initial base salary of $120,000 per annum, and if the Company were to complete a financing in excess of $5,000,000, the base salary would increase to $144,000 per annum. Mr. Brackens is eligible to earn an annual employee stock option bonus in such amount, if any, as determined in the sole discretion of the Board. The Brackens Employment Agreement may be terminated with or without cause. The Company can terminate Mr. Brackens without cause at any time during the first ninety (90) days of the Initial Term of the Brackens Employment Agreement. Upon termination of Mr. Brackens because of disability, the Company shall pay or provide to Mr. Brackens (1) any unpaid salary and any accrued vacation through the date of termination; (2) any unpaid bonus accrued with respect to the fiscal year ending on or preceding the date of termination; (3) reimbursement for any unreimbursed expenses properly incurred through the date of termination; and (4) all other payments or benefits to which he may be entitled under the terms of any applicable employee benefit plan, program or arrangement.

 

On September 20, 2019, the Company entered in a new employment agreement with Mr. Brackens (the “September Brackens Employment Agreement”). The September Brackens Employment Agreement was entered into specifically to update Mr. Brackens position with the Company as its Chief Technology Officer. All of the material terms of the May Brackens Employment Agreement remain the same. Under this agreement, if the Company were to terminate Mr. Brackens’ employment without cause, Mr. Brackens would be entitled to receive all compensation earned but unpaid through the date of termination and a severance payment equal to two weeks’ base annual salary for each full year of employment.

 

Upon termination Mr. Brackens’ employment because of disability, the Company shall pay or provide Mr. Brackens (i) any unpaid base fee and any accrued vacation through the date of termination; (ii) any unpaid annual bonus accrued with respect to the fiscal year ending on or preceding the date of termination; (iii) reimbursement for any unreimbursed expenses properly incurred through the date of termination; and (iv) any Accrued Benefits. Upon the termination of Mr. Brackens’ employment because of death, Mr. Brackens’ estate shall be entitled to any Accrued Benefits. Upon the termination Mr. Brackens’ employment by the Company for cause or by either party in connection with a failure to renew the employment agreement, the Company shall pay Mr. Brackens any Accrued Benefits.

 

Daniel Marks

 

On June 11, 2020, Mr. Marks entered into an engagement agreement with the Company. The Engagement Agreement is for a term of one year (the “Initial Term”) and shall be automatically extended for additional terms of successive one-year periods (the “Additional Term”) unless the Company or Mr. Marks gives at least 30 days written notice prior to the expiration of the Initial Term or each Additional Term.. Mr. Marks is to receive a base salary of $18,000 per month. Mr. Marks is eligible to earn an annual employee stock option bonus in such amount, if any, as determined in the sole discretion of the Board. The Engagement Agreement may be terminated with or without cause. The Company can terminate Mr. Marks without cause at any time during the first ninety (90) days of the Initial Term of the Engagement Agreement. Upon termination of Mr. Marks because of disability, the Company shall pay or provide to Mr. Marks (1) any unpaid salary and any accrued vacation through the date of termination; (2) any unpaid bonus accrued with respect to the fiscal year ending on or preceding the date of termination; (3) reimbursement for any unreimbursed expenses properly incurred through the date of termination; and (4) all other payments or benefits to which he may be entitled under the terms of any applicable employee benefit plan, program or arrangement.

 

As a full-time employee of the Company, Mr. Marks will be eligible to participate in all of the Company’s benefit programs.

 

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Christopher Malone

 

On November 16, 2018, the Company entered into an employment agreement with Mr. Christopher Malone to serve as the Company’s Chief Financial Officer (the “Malone Employment Agreement”). The term of the Malone Employment Agreement is for one year and shall be automatically extended for additional terms of successive one-year periods (the “Additional Term”) unless the Company or the Executive gives written notice to the other of the termination of Mr. Malone’s employment hereunder at least 90 days prior to the expiration of the initial term or additional term of the Malone Employment Agreement. Mr. Malone is to receive an initial base salary of $84,000 per annum, and if the Company were to list on Nasdaq, the base salary would increase to $120,000 per annum. Mr. Malone Executive is eligible to earn an annual employee stock option bonus in such amount, if any, as determined in the sole discretion of the Board. The Malone Employment Agreement may be terminated with or without cause.

 

Under this agreement, if the Company were to terminate Mr. Malone’s employment without cause, Mr. Malone would be entitled to receive all compensation earned but unpaid through the date of termination and a severance payment equal to one months’ base annual salary for each full year of employment.

 

Upon termination Mr. Malone’s employment because of disability, the Company shall pay or provide Mr. Malone (i) any unpaid base fee and any accrued vacation through the date of termination; (ii) any unpaid annual bonus accrued with respect to the fiscal year ending on or preceding the date of termination; (iii) reimbursement for any unreimbursed expenses properly incurred through the date of termination; and (iv) any Accrued Benefits. Upon the termination of Mr. Malone’s employment because of death, Mr. Malone’s estate shall be entitled to any Accrued Benefits. Upon the termination Mr. Malone’s employment by the Company for cause or by either party in connection with a failure to renew the employment agreement, the Company shall pay Mr. Malone any Accrued Benefits.

 

On February 20, 2020, Mr. Malone resigned from his positions as Chief Financial Officer and member of the board of directors, effective immediately.

 

Outstanding Equity Awards at June 30, 2020

 

The following table summarizes the outstanding equity award holdings held by our named executive officers and directors at June 30, 2020.

 

Name  Shares issuable upon exercise
of options
  

Option

exercise

price ($)

  

Option

expiration

date

David Watt(1)   1,333   $10.50   8-1-23
Yan Rozum(2)   5,000   $10.50   8-1-23
Chul Wong Lim   1,333   $10.50   8-1-23

 

(1) Mr. Watt resigned from his position as member of the Board of Directors on June 5, 2020.
   
(2) Mr. Rozum resigned from his positions as Chief Technology Officer and member of the board of directors on September 19, 2019.

 

Stock Incentive Plans

 

The 2017 Plan

 

On August 1, 2017, the Company adopted the 2017 Stock Incentive Plan (the “2017 Plan”). Pursuant to the 2017 Plan, the number of incentive stock options issued to employees, officers, and directors of the Company shall not exceed 166,667.

 

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The following lists, as of June 30, 2020 the options and shares granted pursuant to the 2017 Plan. Each option represents the right to purchase one share of our common stock.

 

Name of Plan 

Total

Shares

Reserved
Under Plan

  

Shares

Reserved for

Outstanding Options

  

Shares

Issued as
Stock Bonus

  

Remaining

Options/Shares
Under Plan

 
Stock Incentive Plan   166,667    51,942    114,725    - 

 

Pursuant to the 2017 Plan, awards may be in the form of Incentive Stock Options, Non-Qualified Sock Options, or Stock Bonuses.

 

Incentive Stock Options

 

All of our employees are eligible to be granted Incentive Stock Options pursuant to the 2017 Plan as may be determined by our Board of Directors which administers the Plan.

 

Options granted pursuant to the 2017 Plan terminate at such time as may be specified when the option is granted.

 

The total fair market value of the shares of common stock (determined at the time of the grant of the option) for which any employee may be granted options which are first exercisable in any calendar year may not exceed $100,000.

 

In the discretion of the Board of Directors, options granted pursuant to the 2017 Plan may include instalment exercise terms for any option such that the option becomes fully exercisable in a series of cumulating portions. The Board of Directors may also accelerate the date upon which any option (or any part of any option) is first exercisable. However, no option, or any portion thereof may be exercisable until one year following the date of grant. In no event shall an option granted to an employee then owning more than l0% of our common stock be exercisable by its terms after the expiration of five years from the date of grant, nor shall any other option granted pursuant to 2017 Plan be exercisable by its terms after the expiration of ten years from the date of grant.

 

Non-Qualified Stock Options

 

Our employees, directors and officers, and consultants or advisors are eligible to be granted Non-Qualified Stock Options pursuant to 2017 Plan as may be determined by our Board of Directors which administers the Plan, provided however that bona fide services must be rendered by such consultants or advisors and such services must not be in connection with a capital-raising transaction or promoting our common stock.

 

Options granted pursuant to 2017 Plan terminate at such time as may be specified when the option is granted.

 

In the discretion of the Board of Directors options granted pursuant to the Plan may include instalment exercise terms for any option such that the option becomes fully exercisable in a series of cumulating portions. The Board of Directors may also accelerate the date upon which any option (or any part of any option) is first exercisable. In no event shall an option be exercisable by its terms after the expiration of ten years from the date of grant.

 

The 2020 Plan

 

On August 13, 2020, the Company adopted the Esports Entertainment Group, Inc. 2020 Equity and Incentive Plan (the “2020 Plan”), designed by the Compensation Committee with the assistance of management as part of a comprehensive compensation strategy to provide long-term incentives for employees and non-employees to contribute to the growth of the Company and attain specific performance goals. There are 1,500,000 shares available under the 2020 Plan.

 

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Stock Bonuses

 

Our employees, directors and officers, and consultants or advisors are eligible to receive a grant of our shares, provided however that bona fide services must be rendered by such consultants or advisors and such services must not be in connection with a capital-raising transaction or promoting our common stock. The grant of the shares rests entirely with our Board of Directors which administers the Plan. It is also left to the Board of Directors to decide the type of vesting and transfer restrictions which will be placed on the shares.

 

Employee Pension, Profit Sharing or other Retirement Plan

 

We do not have a defined benefit, pension plan, profit sharing or other retirement plan, although we may adopt one or more of such plans in the future.

 

Directors’ Compensation

 

The table below shows the compensation paid to our directors during the year ended June 30, 2020. Grant Johnson was not compensated for acting as a director during fiscal 2020 and 2019.

 

Name  Year   Fees Earned or
Paid in Cash
   Stock
Awards(1)
   Option
Awards(2)
   Total 
Chul Woong Lim   2020   $20,000   $30,531   $   $50,531 
    2019   $20,000   $   $   $20,000 
Yan Rozum(3)   2020   $   $   $   $ 
    2019   $   $   $   $ 
David Watt(4)   2020   $38,750   $20,000   $   $58,750 
    2019   $25,000   $   $   $25,000 
Allan Alden   2020   $20,000   $20,000   $   $40,000 
    2019   $10,000   $   $   $10,000 
Damian Mathews   2020   $1,667   $   $   $1,667 
    2019   $   $   $   $ 

 

(1) The fair value of stock issued for services computed in accordance with ASC718 on the date of grant.
(2) The fair value of options granted computed in accordance with ASC718 on the date of grant
(3) Mr. Rozum resigned from his positions as Chief Technology Officer and member of the board of directors on September 19, 2019.
(4) Mr. Watt resigned from his position as member of the Board of Directors on June 5, 2020.

 

During the year ended June 30, 2019, no director was also an executive officer of another entity, which had one of our executive officers serving as a director of such entity or as a member of the compensation committee of such entity.

 

Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters.

 

The following tables set forth certain information regarding our voting shares beneficially owned as of September 22, 2020 and is based on 12,543,750 shares issued and outstanding, for (i) each stockholder known to be the beneficial owner of 5% or more of our outstanding shares of Common Stock, (ii) each named executive officer and director, and (iii) all executive officers and directors as a group. A person is considered to beneficially own any shares: (i) over which such person, directly or indirectly, exercises sole or shared voting or investment power, or (ii) of which such person has the right to acquire beneficial ownership at any time within 60 days through an exercise of stock options or warrants. Unless otherwise indicated, voting and investment power relating to the shares shown in the tables for our directors and executive officers is exercised solely by the beneficial owner or shared by the owner and the owner’s spouse or children.

 

 51 

 

 

For purposes of these tables, a person or group of persons is deemed to have “beneficial ownership” of any shares of Common Stock that such person has the right to acquire within 60 days of September 22, 2020. For purposes of computing the percentage of outstanding shares of our Common Stock held by each person or group of persons, any shares that such person or persons has the right to acquire within 60 days of September 22, 2020 is deemed to be outstanding, but is not deemed to be outstanding for the purpose of computing the percentage ownership of any other person. The inclusion herein of any shares listed as beneficially owned does not constitute an admission of beneficial ownership. Unless otherwise indicated, each of the shareholders named in the table below, or his or her family members, has sole voting and investment power with respect to such shares of our Common Stock. Except as otherwise indicated, the address of each of the shareholders listed below is: 170 Pater House, Psaila Street, Birkirkara, Malta, BKR 9077.

 

The following shows the stock ownership of our officers, directors and any person known to us who owns more than 5% of our common stock as of September 22, 2020.

 

Name and Address of Beneficial Owner  Number   Percent 

Grant Johnson(1)

1370 Pilgrims Way

Oakville, ON, Canada

   3,333,334    26.57%

Daniel Marks

121 Lockwood Road

Riverside, CT, US

   70,588    *  

John Brackens

66 Eastville, Subdivision Filinvest East Homes

Cainta Rizal, Philippines

   10,888    * 

Chul Woong Lim(2)

204-804 Susaek Rd.

100 Seodaemun-gu Seoul, Korea

   14,667    *  

Damian Mathews(3)

69 De Luen Avenue

Tindalls Beach, Whangaparaoa

Auckland 0930

   6,667    *  

Stuart Tilly

87 Luton Road

Harpenden, UK

   70,588    * 
Warwick Bartlett        

Rose Cottage, 28 Bowling Green Road

Castletown, Isle of Man, British Isles, IM9 1EB

          

Alan Alden

202, Yucca, Swieqi Road

Swieqi, SWQ 3454, Malta

        
All Officers and Directors as a group (seven persons)   3,506,732    27.95%

Shawn Erickson(4)

122-201 Rua Figueiredo Magnalhaes

Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil

   506,667    4.04%

VG-SPV LLC(5)

50 South Steele, Suite 508

Denver, CO 80209

   481,932    3.79%

AHG (6)

700 West Morse Blvd, Suite 220

Winter Park, FL, US

   2,291,097    16.49%
           
5% Beneficial Shareholders as a Group   3,279,696    23.31%

 

* less than 1%

 

(1) Second Generation Holdings Trust is a trust controlled by Grant Johnson and currently holds 3,333,334 shares of common stock.

 

 52 

 

 

(2) Includes 13,333 shares of common stock and 1,334 options to purchase shares of common stock currently exercisable.
   
(3) Includes 6,667 shares of common stock.
   
(4) Includes 506,667 shares of common stock.
   
(5) Includes 304,154 shares of common stock and warrants to purchase 177,778 shares of common stock currently exercisable VG-SPV, LLC is an entity controlled by First Capital Ventures, LLC. Gary Graham is the manager of First Capital Ventures, LLC.
   
(6) Includes 941,160 shares of common stock and warrants to purchase 1,349,937 shares of common stock currently exercisable.

 

Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.

 

Related Party Transactions

 

The following is a description of each transaction since June 30, 2017 and each currently proposed transaction in which:

 

  we have been or are to be a participant;
     
  the amount involved exceeded the lesser of $120,000 or one percent of the average of our total assets at year-end for the last two completed fiscal years; and
     
  any of our directors, executive officers or holders of more than 5% of our outstanding capital stock, or any immediate family member of, or person sharing the household with, any of these individuals or entities, had or will have a direct or indirect material interest.

 

Our Company’s policy with regard to related party transactions is for the Board as a whole to approve any material transactions involving our directors, executive officers or holders of more than 5% of our outstanding capital stock.

 

The Company incurs home office expenses allowances of $4,800 per year charged by the President of the Company for use of a home office for him and an employee of the Company. As of June 30, 2020, the Company did not have a balance payable to the President related to rent payments.  

 

From June 12, 2014 through November 6, 2019, our betting platform and source code (the “Swiss Licensed Software”) was licensed from Swiss Interactive Software (GmbH) Switzerland (“Swiss Interactive”), a company controlled by Yan Rozum, our previous Chief Technology Officer and a former member of the board of directors. We paid Swiss Interactive a percentage on gaming revenues up to $300,000 annually for this license depending on the volume of transactions. Additionally, we paid a monthly service fee of $24,500 to Swiss Interactive.

 

On April 7, 2019, we entered into a software transfer agreement (the “Software Transfer Agreement”) with Swiss Interactive for the purchase of the Swiss Licensed Software for consideration of $1,700,000.

 

On November 6, 2019 the Software Transfer Agreement was terminated. The Company no longer uses the Swiss Licensed Software and has no contractual relationship with Swiss Interactive, its affiliates or affiliated entities.

 

During the year ended June 30, 2020, Swiss Interactive Software charged the Company in the aggregate $20,505 in accordance with the agreements. As of June 30, 2020 the Company owed Ardmore/Swiss $36,650.

 

53

 

 

Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services.

 

Audit Fees. The aggregate fees billed by our independent registered public accounting firm, for professional services rendered for the audit of our annual financial statements for the years ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, including review of our interim financial statements were $84,350 and $70,000, respectively.

 

Audit Related Fees. We incurred fees to our independent registered public accounting firm of $53,850 and $34,207 for audit related fees during the fiscal years ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively, which related to filings with the SEC.

 

Tax and Other Fees. We incurred fees to our independent registered public accounting firm of $NIL for tax and fees during the fiscal years ended June 30, 2020 and 2019.

 

The Audit Committee pre-approves all auditing services and all permitted non-auditing services (including the fees and terms thereof) to be performed by our independent registered public accounting firm.

 

PART IV

 

Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules.

 

  (a) The following documents are filed as part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K:

 

  1. Financial Statements:

 

Our financial statements and the Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm are included herein on page F-1

 

  2. Financial Statement Schedules:

 

The financial statement schedules are omitted as they are either not applicable or the information required is presented in the financial statements and notes thereto on page F-1.

 

  3. Exhibits:

 

INDEX TO EXHIBITS

 

Exhibit
Number
  Exhibit Description   Incorporated by Reference   Filed or Furnished
Form   Exhibit   Filing Date   Herewith
3.1   Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation   S-1   3.1   05/02/2019             
3.2   Amended and Restated Bylaws.   S-1   3.2   05/02/2019    
10.1   Share Exchange Agreement dated May 20, 2013 between our company, Shawn Erickson, H&H Arizona, Inc., Next Generation Holdings Trust, a Nevis trust, and the Shareholder of H&H Arizona, Inc.   8-K   10.1   08/07/2014    
10.2   Convertible Promissory Note with Tangiers Global, LLC dated June 3, 2016   8-K   10.1   06/21/2016    
10.3   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement   8-K   10.1   11/15/2018    
10.4   Form of Senior Secured Convertible Note   8-K   10.2   11/15/2018    
10.5   Form of Warrant   8-K   10.3   11/15/2018    
10.6   Form of Security Agreement   8-K   10.4   11/15/2018    
10.7   Form of Pledge Agreement   8-K   10.5   11/15/2018    
10.8   Form of Subsidiary Guarantee   8-K   10.6   11/15/2018    

 

54

 

 

10.9*   Amended and Restated Employment Agreement with Grant Johnson                X
10.10*   Employment Agreement with Yan Rozum   S-1   10.11   05/02/2019    
10.11*   Employment Agreement with Christopher Malone   S-1   10.13   05/02/2019    
10.12   First Amendment to Employment Agreement, dated February 21, 2020, by and between Esports Entertainment Group, Inc. and Christopher Malone   8-K   10.2   02/24/2020    
10.13*   Employment Agreement with John Brackens   8-K   10.1   05/23/2019    
10.14   Lease Agreement with Polskie NieruchomoŚci Sp. Z.O.O.   S-1   10.15   05/02/2019    
10.15   Software Transfer Agreement dated April 7, 2019, by and between Swiss Interactive Software and the Company   S-1   10.16   05/02/2019    
10.16   Form of Waiver Agreement   8-K   10.4   07/22/2019    
10.17   Form of Amended and Restates Senior Secured Convertible Promissory Note   8-K   10.5   07/22/2019    
10.18   Form of Cavalry Fund I LP Warrant   8-K   10.6   07/22/2019    
10.19   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement   8-K   10.1   08/20/2019    
10.20   Form of Convertible Promissory Note   8-K   10.2   08/20/2019    
10.21   Form of Warrant   8-K   10.3   08/20/2019    
10.22   Form of Placement Agent Warrant   8-K   10.4   08/20/2019    
10.23   Consulting Agreement, dated February 22, 2020, by and between Esports Entertainment Group, Inc. and James S. Cardwell   8-K   10.1   02/24/2020    
10.24   Underwriting Agreement, by and among Esports Entertainment Group, Inc., Maxim Group LLC, and Joseph Gunnar & Co., LLC   8-K   1.1   04/14/2020    
10.25   Form of Warrant Agency Agreement by and between Esports Entertainment Group, Inc. and VStock Transfer, LLC including Form of Unit A Warrant and Form of Unit B Warrant   8-K   4.1   04/14/2020    
10.26   Form of Director Agreement   8-K   10.1   09/03/2020    
10.27   Form of Engagement Agreement               X
10.28   Stock purchase agreement, by and among Esports Entertainment Group, Inc., LHE Enterprises Limited, and AHG Entertainment, LLC               X
10.29   Form of Warrant issued to AHG Entertainment, LLC               X
10.30   Assignment of Intellectual Property Rights Agreement, by and among Esports Entertainment Group, Inc., AHG Entertainment Associates, LLC and Flip Sports Limited               X
10.31   Consulting Agreement, by and among Esports Entertainment Group, Inc. and Rivington Law               X
22.1   Subsidiaries               X
31.1   Certification by the Principal Executive Officer of Registrant pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (Rule 13a-14(a) or Rule 15d-14(a))               X
31.2   Certification by the Principal Financial Officer of Registrant pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (Rule 13a-14(a) or Rule 15d-14(a))               X
32.1   Certification by the Principal Executive Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 1350 as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002               X
32.2   Certification by the Principal Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 1350 as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002               X
99.1   Audit Committee Charter   S-1       05/02/2019    
99.2   Compensation Committee Charter   S-1       05/02/2019    
99.3   Nominating Committee Charter   S-1       05/02/2019    
101.INS   XBRL Instance Document               X
101.SCH   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema               X
101.CAL   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase               X
101.DEF   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase               X
101.LAB   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase               X
101.PRE   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase               X

 

 

* Management contracts or compensation plans or arrangements in which directors or executive officers are eligible to participate.

 

55

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

  Esports Entertainment Group, Inc.
   
Date: October 1, 2020 By: /s/ Grant Johnson
    Grant Johnson
   

Chief Executive Officer, and

Chairman of the Board of Directors

(Principal Executive Officer)

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

Signature   Title   Date
         
/s/ Grant Johnson   Chief Executive Officer, Secretary, and   October 1, 2020
Grant Johnson  

Chairman of the Board of Directors

(Principal Executive Officer)

   
         
/s/ Daniel Marks   Chief Financial Officer   October 1, 2020
Daniel Marks  

(Principal Accounting Officer and

Principal Financial Officer)

   
         
/s/ Damian Mathews   Director   October 1, 2020
Damian Mathews        
         
/s/ Chul Woong Lim   Director   October 1, 2020
Chul Woong Lim        
         
/s/ Alan Alden   Director   October 1, 2020
         

/s/ Warwick Bartlett

  Director   October 1, 2020

 

56

 

 

ESPORTS ENTERTAINMENT GROUP, INC.

 

CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm F-2
   
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2020 and 2019 F-3
   
Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss for the Years Ended June 30, 2020 and 2019 F-4
   
Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Deficit for the Two Years Ended June 30, 2020 F-5
   
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Years Ended June 30, 2020 and 2019 F-6
   
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements F-7

 

 F-1 

 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and

Stockholders of Esports Entertainment Group Inc.

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying balance sheets of Esports Entertainment Group Inc. (the Company) as of June 30, 2020 and 2019, and the related statements of operations, comprehensive income (loss), stockholders’ deficit, and cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended June 30, 2020, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the financial statements). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of June 30, 2020 and 2019, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended June 30, 2020, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits, we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

Rosenberg Rich Baker Berman, P.A.
   
We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2019.
   
Somerset, New Jersey
   
October 1, 2020  

 

 F-2 

 

 

Esports Entertainment Group, Inc.

Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

   June 30, 
   2020   2019 
         
ASSETS          
           
Current assets          
Cash  $12,353,307   $43,412 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets - related parties   -    190,280 
Deposit on business acquisition   500,000    - 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets   263,345    213,817 
Total current assets   13,116,652    447,509 
           
Fixed assets   8,041    16,577 
Intangible assets   2,000    81,226 
Other non-current assets   6,833    16,480 
           
TOTAL ASSETS  $13,133,526   $561,792 
           
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT          
           
Accounts payable and accrued expenses  $789,891   $607,448 

Liabilities to be settled in stock

   

927,855

    - 
Due to officers   21,658    1,551 
Convertible note   -    290,720 
Derivative liabilities   -    4,655,031 
           
Total liabilities   1,739,404    5,554,750 
           
Stockholders’ deficit          
Preferred stock $0.001 par value; 10,000,000 shares authorized, zero shares issued and outstanding as of June 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively   -    - 
Common stock $0.001 par value; 500,000,000 shares authorized, 11,233,223 and 5,849,208 shares issued and outstanding as of June 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively   11,233    5,850 
Additional paid-in capital   31,803,491    4,955,379 
Equity to be issued   115,000    230,000 
Accumulated deficit   (20,535,602)   (10,184,187)
Total stockholders’ deficit   11,394,122    (4,992,958)
           
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT  $13,133,526   $561,792 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

 F-3 

 

 

Esports Entertainment Group, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss

 

   Years Ended June 30, 
   2020   2019 
         
Operating expenses:          
General and administrative  $4,049,714   $3,014,473 
           
Total operating expenses   4,049,714    3,014,473 
           
Operating loss   (4,049,714)   (3,014,473)
           

Other income (expense)

          
Interest expense   (1,995,458)   (5,586,617)
Net amortization of debt discount and premium on convertible debt   

(1,156,877

)   (290,720)
Change in fair market value of derivative liabilities   (2,432,302)   2,520,060 
Loss on extinguishment of debt, net   (2,795,582)   - 
Gain on Warrant Exchange   1,894,418    - 
Impairment of intangible asset   (67,132)   - 
Gain on settlement of debt   253,588    - 
Foreign exchange gain (loss)   42    100 
           
Total other expense   

(6,299,303

)   

(3,357,117

)
           
Loss before income taxes   (10,349,017)   (6,371,650)
           
Income tax expense   (2,398)   (9,715)
           
Net loss and comprehensive loss  $(10,351,415)  $(6,381,365)
Basic and diluted loss per common share  $(1.50)  $(1.10)
           
Weighted average number of common shares outstanding, basic and diluted   6,880,321    5,791,145 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

 F-4 

 

 

Esports Entertainment Group, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders Equity (Deficit)

For the Twelve Months Ending June 30, 2020 and 2019

 

   Common Stock   Additional paid-in   Equity
to be
   Accumulated     
   Shares   Amount   capital   issued   Deficit   Total 
                         
Balance as at July 1, 2018   5,572,697    5,573    3,684,265    379,102    (3,802,822)   266,118 
Common stock and warrants issued for services   37,333    37    550,172    (127,500)   -    422,709 
Common stock issued for cash, net of costs   13,778    14    30,986    (31,000)   -    - 
Common stock issued upon the exercise of warrants   226,013    226    538,905    (220,602)        318,529 
Issuance of stock options   -    -    151,051    -    -    151,051 
Equity to be issued   -    -    -    230,000    -    230,000 
Net loss for the period   -    -    -    -    (6,381,365)   (6,381,365)
Balance as at June 30, 2019   5,849,821    5,850    4,955,379    230,000    (10,184,187)   (4,992,958)
Common stock and warrants issued for cash, net of costs   1,980,000    1,980    6,769,460    -    -    6,771,440 
Common stock issued upon the exercise of over-allotment, net of costs   209,400    209    823,550    -    -    823,759 
Common stock issued upon the exercise of warrants, net of costs   1,543,396    1,543    6,552,739    85,000    -    6,639,282 
Common stock issued upon the conversion of debt   1,217,241    1,217    4,137,373    -    -    4,138,590 
Reclassification of derivative liability upon conversion of debt   -    -    4,793,462    -    -    4,793,462 
Common stock issued for waiver agreement   5,435    5    26,897    -    -    26,902 
Reclassification of derivative liability from warrants upon removal of derivative feature   -    -    221,222    -    -    221,222 
Common stock issued for warrant exchange   288,722    289    1,688,735    -    -    1,689,024 
Common stock and warrants issued for services   25,556    26    257,974    (200,000)   -    58,000 
Non-cash warrant exercise   53,028    53    1,222,549    -    -    1,222,602 
Stock based compensation   60,624    61    354,151    -    -    354,212 
Net loss for the period   -    -    -    -    (10,351,415)   (10,351,415)
Balance as at June 30, 2020   11,233,223   $11,233   $31,803,491   $115,000   $(20,535,602)  $11,394,122 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

 F-5 

 

 

Esports Entertainment Group, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

 

   For the Years Ended June 30, 
   2020   2019 
Cash flows from operating activities:          
Net loss  $(10,351,415)  $(6,381,365)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:          
Stock based compensation   1,614,236    699,861 
Amortization and depreciation   20,631    51,243 
Non-cash interest expense for issuance of derivative   -    5,586,617 
Impairment of intangible asset   67,132    - 
Net amortization of debt discount and premium on convertible debt   1,156,887    290,720 
Change in the fair market value of derivative liabilities   2,432,302    (2,520,060)
Loss on extinguishment of debt   1,995,458    - 
Non-cash interest expense   2,097,949    - 
Gain on warrant exchange   (1,894,418)   - 
Gain on settlement of debt   (253,588)   - 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:          
Prepaid expenses and other current assets   (123,831)   55,930 
Accounts payable and accrued expenses   251,275    196,597 
Due to officers    20,107    - 
Net cash used in operating activities   (2,269,652)   (2,020,457)
           
Cash flows from investing activities:          
           
Payment made in connection with business acquisition   (500,000)   - 
Rent security deposit   -    (12,134)
Net cash used in investing activities   (500,000)   (12,134)
           
Cash flows from financing activities:          
           
Proceeds from promissory convertible note   1,160,000    2,000,000 
Repayment of promissory convertible note   (230,000)   - 
Proceeds from the issuance of common stock   8,415,000    - 
Proceeds from the exercise of over-allotments   889,950    - 
Proceeds from the exercise of warrants   6,688,865    318,529 
Deferred financing costs   (1,844,268)   (336,193)
Proceeds from promissory note - related party   -    50,000 
Payment of promissory note - related party   -    (56,500)
Net cash provided by financing activities   15,079,547    1,975,836 
           
Net (decrease) increase in cash   12,309,895    (56,755)
           
Cash, beginning of period   43,412    100,167 
           
Cash, end of period  $12,353,307   $43,412 
           
SUPPLEMENTAL CASH FLOW INFORMATION:          
CASH PAID FOR:          
Interest  $-   $- 
Income taxes  $-   $- 
           
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF NON-CASH FINANCING ACTIVITIES:          
Extinguishment of derivative liability associated with extinguishment of convertible notes  $6,219,785   $- 
Extinguishment of debt discount associated with extinguishment of convertible notes  $1,909,280   $- 
Debt discount and derivative liability associated with amended and restated note  $1,394,798   $- 
Increase in principal amount of convertible debt associated with amended and restated note  $660,000   $- 
Derivative liability associated with convertible notes entered into  $1,136,231   $- 
Debt discount associated with convertible notes entered into  $1,276,000   $1,663,807 
Extinguishment of derivative liability associated with cashless warrant exercise  $1,222,602   $- 
Extinguishment of derivative liability associated with warrant exchange  $3,583,442   $- 
Extinguishment of derivative liability upon exchange of warrants  $221,222   $- 
Original issuance discount of convertible notes  $116,000   $200,000 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 


 F-6 

 

 

Esports Entertainment Group, Inc.

Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements

June 30, 2020

(Expressed in U.S. dollars)

 

Note 1 – Nature of Operations

 

Esports Entertainment Group, Inc. (formerly VGambling Inc.) (the “Company”) was incorporated in the state of Nevada on July 22, 2008. On April 18, 2017, the majority of the shareholders of the Company’s common stock voted to approve a change of the name of the Company from VGambling, Inc. to Esports Entertainment Group, Inc.

 

The Company operates a licensed online gambling platform focused purely on the esports industry. Utilizing our peer-to-peer wagering system, we offer real money betting exchange style wagering on esports events from around the world in a secure environment. A betting exchange allows players to bet against one another rather than a bookmaker. Players can offer odds to, or request odds from, other players who wish to wager. Where traditional bookmakers risk going head-to-head with gamblers on markets, a betting exchange takes on no risk on the particular outcome of an event. Instead, a betting exchange provides the platform for its customers to match bets against one another and takes a small commission on winnings. Betting exchanges are becoming an increasingly integral part of the global gambling landscape, in many cases enabling customers to obtain better odds, more transparency and an experience that feels intuitively fairer. Further, the platform also facilitates gambling through “pool betting” whereby a group of people, be it a fan base of a team or a player or a group of friends and family, can pay a fixed price into a “pool” and then make a selection on an outcome, related to a tournament or game in esport. After the event has finished, those that selected the winner get an equal share of the pool.

 

At the current time, under our existing Curacao license, we are able to accept wagers from residents of over 149 jurisdictions including Canada, Japan, Germany and South Africa. On April 30, 2020, we received our Gaming Service License (“License”) for online pool betting from the Malta Gaming Authority (“MGA”). The MGA is a long established authority that sets standards for gambling practices across the world with emphasis on safeguarding players and promoting responsible gambling. As an MGA license holder we will be able to benefit from onshore status in Europe as Maltese registered operators can advertise across the European Union.

 

On April 30, 2020 the Company received its Gaming Service License (“License”) for online pool betting from the Malta Gaming Authority (“MGA”). The License, is effective for a 10-year term and may be renewed by MGA for further 10-year periods subject to regulatory provisions.

 

On July 7, 2020, the Company entered into a stock purchase agreement (the “Argyll Purchase Agreement”), between the Company, LHE Enterprises Limited (“LHE”), and AHG Entertainment, LLC (“AHG”) whereby upon closing on July 31, 2020 the Company acquired all of the outstanding capital stock of LHE and its subsidiaries, (i) Argyll Entertainment AG, (ii) Nevada Holdings Limited and (iii) Argyll Productions Limited (collectively the “Acquired Companies”). Argyll Entertainment is licensed and regulated by the UK Gambling Commission and the Irish Revenue Commissioners to operate online sportsbook and casino sites in the UK and Ireland, respectively. Argyll has a flagship brand, www.SportNation.bet, as well as two white label brands, www.RedZone.bet and www.uk.Fansbet.com, with over 200K registered players at the end of calendar year 2019.

 

On July 31, 2020, the Company consummated the closing of the Argyll Purchase Agreement. As consideration for the Acquired Companies, the Company (i) paid AHG $1,250,000 in cash (the “Cash Purchase Price”) of which $500,000 was previously paid; (ii) issued to AHG 650,000 shares of common stock of the Company (the “Consideration Shares”); and (iii) issued to AHG warrants to purchase up to 1,000,000 shares of common stock of the Company at an exercise price of $8.00 per share (the “Consideration Warrants” together with the Cash Purchase Price and the Consideration Shares the “Purchase Price”). The Consideration Warrants are exercisable for a term of three (3) years.

 

We do not accept wagers from United States residents at this time.

 

Pro Forma Operating Results

 

The following table provides unaudited pro forma results for the years ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, as if the Argyll Purchase Agreement consummated on July 1, 2018. The pro forma results of operations were prepared for comparative purposes only and do not purport to be indicative of what would have occurred had the Argyll Purchase Agreement been made as of July 1, 2018 or results that may occur in the future.

 

    Pro Forma (Unaudited) for the years ended
June 30, 2020 and 2019
 
    2020    2019 
Net sales  $

8,367,407

   $

12,357,277

 
Net loss  $

(12,459,156

)  $

(9,215,991

)
Net loss per common share, basic and diluted  $

(1.65

)  $(1.43)

 

 F-7 

 

 

Esports Entertainment Group, Inc.

Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements

June 30, 2020

(Expressed in U.S. dollars)

 

Note 2 – Basis of Presentation and Liquidity

 

The Company is in the development stage and has not yet realized profitable operations and has relied on non-operational sources to fund operations. The Company has incurred recurring losses and additional future losses are anticipated as the Company has not yet been able to generate revenue. The Company’s activities are subject to significant risks and uncertainties, including failing to obtain the licenses required to operate its gambling business, failing to secure the additional funding required to fully operationalize the Company’s business, and the risk of existing or future competitors offering similar or more advanced technology.

 

As of June 30, 2020, the Company had an accumulated deficit of $20,535,602 and a working capital of $11,377,248. The Company has not generated any revenues during the years ended June 30, 2020 and 2019. These factors raised substantial doubt regarding the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern, which has been alleviated by the execution of management’s plans. On April 16, 2020, the Company raised approximately $7,000,000 in net proceeds from its April Offering, as defined in Note 9. Additionally, the Company raised approximately $7,000,000 from the exercise of warrants and over-allotments during the year ended June 30, 2020. The funds received in the April Offering and warrant exercises are expected to be enough to satisfy the Company’s current obligations to continue operations at least for the next twelve months from the date of this filing.

 

There have been recent outbreaks in several countries, including the United States, of the highly transmissible and pathogenic coronavirus (“COVID-19”). The outbreak of such communicable diseases could result in a widespread health crisis that could adversely affect general commercial activity and the economies and financial markets of many countries, including the United States. An outbreak of communicable diseases, or the perception that such an outbreak could occur, and the measures taken by the governments of countries affected could adversely affect the Company’s business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

Note 3 – Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

A summary of the significant accounting policies applied in the preparation of the accompanying consolidated financial statements follows:

 

Basis of presentation and principles of consolidation

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”) and include the accounts of the Company and its wholly owned subsidiaries. All inter-company accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

The Company’s financial statements are prepared using the accrual basis of accounting in accordance and the Company’s functional and reporting currency is the U.S. dollar.

 

 F-8 

 

 

Esports Entertainment Group, Inc.

Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements

June 30, 2020

(Expressed in U.S. dollars)

 

Reverse Stock-Split

 

All share and per share amounts have been presented to give retroactive effect to a 1 for 15 reverse stock-split that occurred in January 2020.

 

Use of estimates

 

The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities as of the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand, and all highly liquid debt instruments purchased with an original maturity of three months or less. As at June 30, 2020 and 2019 there were no cash equivalents. At times, cash deposits may exceed FDIC-insured limits. At June 30, 2020, the amount the Company had on deposit funds that exceeded the FDIC-insured limits which were approximately $12,000,000. At June 30, 2019, the Company’s balances did not exceed the FDIC-insured limits.

 

Prepaid Expenses

 

Prepaid expenses consist of insurance and services paid in advance, for which the Company has not yet received the benefit.

 

Equipment

 

Equipment is stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Cost includes expenditures that are directly attributable to the acquisition of the asset. Subsequent costs are included in the asset’s carrying amount or recognized as a separate asset, as appropriate, only when it is probable that future economic benefits associated with the item will flow to the Company and the cost can be measured reliably. The carrying amount of an asset is derecognized when replaced.

 

Repairs and maintenance costs are charged to the statements of operations, during the year in which they are incurred.

 

Depreciation is provided for over the estimated useful life of the asset as follows:

 

Furniture and equipment   5 years 
Computer equipment   3 years 

 

Useful lives and residual values are reviewed and adjusted, if appropriate, at the end of each reporting period. An asset’s carrying amount is written down immediately to its recoverable amount if the asset’s carrying amount is greater than its estimated recoverable amount. The cost and accumulated depreciation of assets retired or sold are removed from the respective accounts and any gain or loss is recognized in operations.

 

Intangible Assets

 

Intangible assets are comprised of online gaming website development costs and software are capitalized and amortized over an estimated useful life of 3 years. Costs related to the design or maintenance of internal-use software and website development are expensed as incurred.

 

 F-9 

 

 

Esports Entertainment Group, Inc.

Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements

June 30, 2020

(Expressed in U.S. dollars)

 

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

 

The Company reviews its long-lived assets for impairment whenever events and circumstances indicate that the carrying value of an asset might not be recoverable. An impairment loss, measured as the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds the fair value, is recognized if the carrying amount exceeds estimated undiscounted future cash flows.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes under ASC 740 “Income Taxes,” which codified SFAS 109, “Accounting for Income Taxes” and FIN 48 “Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes – an Interpretation of FASB Statement No. 109.” Under the asset and liability method of ASC 740, deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statements carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. Under ASC 740, the effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period the enactment occurs. A valuation allowance is provided for certain deferred tax assets if it is more likely than not that the Company will not realize tax assets through future operations.

 

FASB issued ASC 740-10 “Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes”. ASC 740-10 clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in an enterprise’s financial statements. This standard requires a company to determine whether it is more likely than not that a tax position will be sustained upon examination based upon the technical merits of the position. If the more-likely-than-not threshold is met, a company must measure the tax position to determine the amount to recognize in the financial statements.

 

Derivative Instruments

 

The Company evaluates its convertible notes and warrants to determine if those contracts or embedded components of those contracts qualify as derivatives to be separately accounted for in accordance with Paragraph 815-10-05-4 of the Codification and Paragraph 815-40-25 of the Codification. The result of this accounting treatment is that the fair value of the embedded derivative is marked-to-market each balance sheet date and recorded as a liability. In the event that the fair value is recorded as a liability, the change in fair value is recorded in the statements of operations as other income or expense. Upon conversion or exercise of a derivative instrument, the instrument is marked to fair value at the conversion date and then that fair value is reclassified to equity.

 

In circumstances where the embedded conversion option in a convertible instrument is required to be bifurcated and there are also other embedded derivative instruments in the convertible instrument that are required to be bifurcated, the bifurcated derivative instruments are accounted for as a single, compound derivative instrument.

 

The classification of derivative instruments, including whether such instruments should be recorded as liabilities or as equity, is re-assessed at the end of each reporting period. Equity instruments that are initially classified as equity that become subject to reclassification are reclassified to liability at the fair value of the instrument on the reclassification date. Derivative instrument liabilities are classified in the balance sheet as current or non-current to correspond with its host instrument.

 

The Company marks to market the fair value of the remaining embedded derivative warrants at each balance sheet date and records the change in the fair value of the remaining embedded derivative warrants as other income or expense in the statements of operations.

 

The Company utilizes the Monte Carlo Method that values the liability of the debt conversion feature derivative financial instruments and derivative warrants based on exercise contingencies. The reason the Company selected the lattice binomial model is that in many cases there may be multiple embedded features or the features of the bifurcated derivatives may be so complex that a Black-Scholes valuation does not consider all of the terms of the instrument. Therefore, the fair value may not be appropriately captured by simple models.

 

 F-10 

 

 

Esports Entertainment Group, Inc.

Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements

June 30, 2020

(Expressed in U.S. dollars)

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

ASC 820 “Fair Value Measurement” defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value under generally accepted accounting principles and enhances disclosures about fair value measurements. Fair value is defined under ASC 820 as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. Valuation techniques used to measure fair value under ASC 820 must maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs. The standard describes a fair value hierarchy based on three levels of inputs, of which the first two are considered observable and the last unobservable, that may be used to measure fair value as follows:

 

Level 1 – unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities;

Level 2 – inputs other than quoted prices that are observable for asset or liability or indirectly; and

Level 3 – inputs that are not based on observable market data.

 

The carrying amounts of the Company’s financial instruments including cash, amounts receivable, accounts payable, accrued liabilities, and due to shareholder approximate their fair values due to their short-term nature.

 

Income (Loss) Per Share

 

Basic income (loss) per share is computed by dividing net loss attributable to common shareholders (the numerator) by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding (the denominator) for the period. In periods of losses, diluted loss per share is computed on the same basis as basic loss per share as the inclusion of any other potential shares outstanding would be anti-dilutive.

 

The following securities were excluded from weighted average diluted common shares outstanding for the twelve months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019 because their inclusion would have been antidilutive.

 

   As of June 30, 
   2020   2019 
Common stock equivalents:          
Common stock options   51,942    51,942 
Warrants issued with notes and placement agent warrants   5,264,592    727,779 
Convertible notes   -    537,777 
Equity to be issued   22,667    - 
Totals   5,339,201    1,317,498 

 

Foreign Currency Translation

 

Monetary assets and liabilities are translated from Canadian into U.S. dollars, which is the functional currency of the Company, at the year-end exchange rate, while foreign currency expenses are translated at the exchange rate in effect on the date of the transaction. The resultant gains or losses are included in the statement of operations. Non-monetary items are translated at historical rates.

 

Stock-based compensation

 

The Company applies ASC 718-10, “Share-Based Payment,” which requires the measurement and recognition of compensation expenses for all share-based payment awards made to employees and directors including employee stock options under the Company’s stock plans based on estimated fair values.

 

ASC 718-10 requires companies to estimate the fair value of equity-based payment awards on the date of grant using an option-pricing model. The fair value of the award is recognized as an expense on a straight-line basis over the requisite service periods in the Company’s statement of operations and comprehensive loss. The Company recognizes share-based award forfeitures as they occur rather than estimate by applying a forfeiture rate.

 

 F-11 

 

 

Esports Entertainment Group, Inc.

Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements

June 30, 2020

(Expressed in U.S. dollars)

 

The Company accounts for stock-based compensation in accordance with ASC Topic 718-10, “Compensation – Stock Compensation”. Therefore, the measurement of compensation expense for all stock awards granted are at the fair value on the date of grant and recognition of compensation expense is based on the related service periods for awards expected to vest, which is typically the performance period. The Company has adopted ASU 2018-07, Compensation – Stock Compensation. There was no accounting impact related to the adoption of ASU 2018-07.

 

All issuances of stock options or other equity instruments to non-employees as consideration for goods or services received by the Company are accounted for based on the fair value of the equity instruments issued. Non-employee equity based payments are recorded as an expense over the service period, as if the Company had paid cash for the services. The Company recognizes compensation expense for the fair value of non-employee awards based on the straight-line method over the requisite service period of each award. The Company estimates the fair value of stock options granted as equity awards using a Black-Scholes options pricing model.

 

Advertising

 

Advertising consist primarily of online search and advertising, trade shows, marketing fees, and other promotional expenses. Online search and advertising costs, which are expensed as incurred, include online advertising media such as banner ads and pay-per-click payments to search engines. Advertising expense for the years ended June 30, 2020 and 2019 was $322,517 and $428,942, respectively.

 

Beneficial Conversion Feature

 

From time to time, the Company may issue convertible notes that may contain an embedded beneficial conversion feature. A beneficial conversion feature exists on the date a convertible note is issued when the fair value of the underlying common stock to which the note is convertible into is in excess of the remaining unallocated proceeds of the note after first considering the allocation of a portion of the note proceeds to the fair value of the warrants, if related warrants have been granted. The intrinsic value of the beneficial conversion feature is recorded as a debt discount with a corresponding amount to additional paid in capital. The debt discount is amortized to interest expense over the life of the note using the effective interest method.

 

Recently issued accounting standards

 

The Company has implemented all new accounting pronouncements that are in effect and that may impact its financial statements.

 

In July 2017, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update No. 2017-11, Earnings Per Share (Topic 260); Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity (Topic 480); Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815): (Part I) Accounting for Certain Financial Instruments with Down Round Features; (Part II) Replacement of the Indefinite Deferral for Mandatorily Redeemable Financial Instruments of Certain Nonpublic Entities and Certain Mandatorily Redeemable Noncontrolling Interests with a Scope Exception (“ASU 2017-11”). ASU 2017-11 allows companies to exclude a down round feature when determining whether a financial instrument (or embedded conversion feature) is considered indexed to the entity’s own stock. As a result, financial instruments (or embedded conversion features) with down round features may no longer be required to be accounted for as derivative liabilities. A company will recognize the value of a down round feature only when it is triggered and the strike price has been adjusted downward. For equity-classified freestanding financial instruments, an entity will treat the value of the effect of the down round as a dividend and a reduction of income available to common shareholders in computing basic earnings per share. For convertible instruments with embedded conversion features containing down round provisions, entities will recognize the value of the down round as a beneficial conversion discount to be amortized to earnings. ASU 2017-11 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company adopted ASU 2017-11 which did not have any impact on the Company’s financial statement presentation or disclosures.

 

 F-12 

 

 

Esports Entertainment Group, Inc.

Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements

June 30, 2020

(Expressed in U.S. dollars)

 

In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU No. 2019-12, Income Taxes (Topic 740) (“ASU 2019-12”): Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes. The new standard eliminates certain exceptions related to the approach for intraperiod tax allocation, the methodology for calculating income taxes in an interim period, and the recognition of deferred tax liabilities for outside basis differences related to changes in ownership of equity method investments and foreign subsidiaries. The guidance also simplifies aspects of accounting for franchise taxes and enacted changes in tax laws or rates, and clarifies the accounting for transactions that result in a step-up in the tax basis of goodwill. For public business entities, it is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020, including interim periods within those fiscal years. We are currently evaluating the potential impact of this standard on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In June 2020, the FASB issued ASU No. 2020-06, Debt with Conversion and Other Options (Subtopic 470-20) and Derivatives and Hedging - Contracts in Entity’s Own Equity (Subtopic 815-40). This standard eliminates the beneficial conversion and cash conversion accounting models for convertible instruments. It also amends the accounting for certain contracts in an entity’s own equity that are currently accounted for as derivatives because of specific settlement provisions. In addition, the new guidance modifies how particular convertible instruments and certain contracts that may be settled in cash or shares impact the diluted EPS computation. For public business entities, it is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021, including interim periods within those fiscal years using the fully retrospective or modified retrospective method. Early adoption is permitted but no earlier than fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020, including interim periods within those fiscal years. We are currently evaluating the potential impact of this standard on our consolidated financial statements.

 

From time to time, new accounting pronouncements are issued by the Financial Accounting Standard Board (“FASB”) or other standard setting bodies that the Company adopts as of the specified effective date. The Company does not believe that the impact of recently issued standards that are not yet effective will have a material impact on the Company’s financial position or results of operations upon adoption.

 

Note 4 – Fixed Assets

 

Fixed assets as of June 30, 2020 and June 30, 2019 consists the following:

 

   June 30, 2020   June 30, 2019 
Computer equipment  $14,450   $14,450 
Furniture and equipment   20,241    20,241 
Total   34,691    34,691 
Accumulated depreciation   (26,650)   (18,114)
Net carrying value  $8,041   $16,577 

 

During the years ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, the Company recorded total depreciation expense of $8,537 and $8,865, respectively.

 

Note 5 – Intangible Assets

 

Intangible assets as of June 30, 2020 and 2019 consists the following:

 

   June 30, 2020   June 30, 2019 
Online gaming website  $6,000   $127,133 
Accumulated amortization   (4,000)   (45,907)
Net carrying value  $2,000   $81,226 

 

During the years ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, the Company recorded total amortization expense of $12,094 and $42,378, respectively. During the years ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, the Company recorded an impairment associated with the website asset of $67,132 and $0, respectively.

 

 F-13 

 

 

Esports Entertainment Group, Inc.

Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements

June 30, 2020

(Expressed in U.S. dollars)

 

Note 6 – Related party transactions

 

The Company entered into transactions and owes balances related to cash to officers and directors.

 

a) The Company currently leases office space from the Chief Executive Officer of the Company, Grant Johnson. During the years ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, the Company incurred rent of $7,200 and $4,800, respectively, charged by its Chief Executive Officer. As of June 30, 2020 and 2019, the Company owed $21,658 and $1,551, respectively, to its Chief Executive Officer related to rent payments and corporate expenses paid on the Company’s behalf.

 

b) The Company provides an expense advance to David Watt, a former Director of the Company. For the years ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, the Company had provided an expense advance of $0 and $18,750, respectively, to Mr. Watt. As of June 30, 2020 and June 30, 2019, the Company included in prepaid expenses and other current assets – related party was $0 and $16,050 for both periods related to David Watt’s expense advance.

 

d) On April 7, 2019, the Company entered into the Software Transfer Agreement with an entity owned by a former related party (the “Former Related Party”) which was terminated on November 6, 2019. On June 12, 2014, the Company entered into a Betting Gaming Platform Software Agreement with an entity owned by the Former Related Party which was terminated in December 2019. During the year ended June 30, 2019, the former Related Party performed IT consulting services for the Company in accordance with a consulting agreement which was terminated during the year ended June 30, 2019. The aforementioned agreements are collectively referred to as the Agreements (the “Agreements”). During the years ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, the Former Related Party charged the Company in the aggregate $20,505 and $323,480, respectively, in accordance with the Agreements. As of June 30, 2020 and 2019, the Company has accrued in the aggregate $36,650 and $155,495, respectively, to the former Related Party in accordance with the Agreements.

 

e) The Company has entered into a rental agreement and a referral agreement with Contact Advisory Services Ltd, which is partly owned by a member of our board of directors. During the years ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, the Company expensed $43,107 and $40,780, respectively, in accordance with the agreement. As of June 30, 2020 and 2019, the Company owed $0 and $8,153, respectively to Contact Advisory Services Ltd.

 

Note 7 – Commitments and contingencies

 

Consultant Agreements

 

On August 1, 2017, the Company entered into a consulting agreement with a consultant for compensation of $48,000 per year. If the Company’s generates revenues exceeding $1,000,000 per month for six consecutive months the base annual compensation will increase to $72,000 per year. On March 1, 2020, the Company amended the original consulting agreement in order to employ the consultant as head of Esports, Americas. The employee will be compensated $4,000 per month in accordance with regular payroll practices of the Company. The agreement terminates on February 28, 2021, and automatically extents for additional successive one-year periods unless the Company or the employee provides 30-days’ notice prior to expiration.

 

On July 13, 2018, the Company entered into an agreement in principle with a third party, to assist the Company with an offering of common stock of the Company or any other financing. Pursuant to this agreement, the Company advanced $50,000 for expenses which has been included in prepaid expenses as a deferred financing cost as of June 30, 2019. On April 16, 2020, the Company recorded the $50,000 as a reduction to additional paid in capital upon consummation of the April Offering, as define in Note 9.

 

On October 1, 2019, the Company entered into a sponsorship agreement with an eSports team (the “Team”) in order to obtain certain sponsorship-related rights, benefits, and opportunities with respect to the eSports team. The term of the contract was from October 1, 2019 to June 30, 2022. The Company agreed to pay the Team $516,000 over the term of the contract and $230,000 worth of common stock. The stock is payable in 12 equal installments on the first day of each month. On August 6, 2020, the Company entered into an amended and restated sponsorship agreement whereby the Company agreed to pay a total of $2,545,000 in cash and $825,000 of common stock in tranches throughout the term of the contract which expires on January 31, 2023. As of June 30, 2020, the Company issued 33,333 shares of common stock to the Team. As of June 30, 2020, the Company has accrued $181,590 as accrued expenses in relation to this agreement. For the year ended June 30, 2020, the Company has expensed $203,590 in accordance with the agreement. As of June 30, 2020, the Company owed 21,650 shares of common stock to the Team.

 

 F-14 

 

 

Esports Entertainment Group, Inc.

Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements

June 30, 2020

(Expressed in U.S. dollars)

 

Purchase Agreement

 

On July 7, 2020, the Company entered into a stock purchase agreement (the “Purchase Agreement”), by and among the Company, LHE, and AHG whereby the Company acquired all of the outstanding capital stock of LHE and its subsidiaries, (i) Argyll Entertainment AG, (ii) Nevada Holdings Limited and (iii) Argyll Productions Limited (collectively the “Acquired Companies”).