485APOS 1 d657751d485apos.htm PIMCO ETF PIMCO ETF

As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on January 24, 2014

File Nos. 333-155395

811-22250

U.S. SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

Form N-1A

 

   REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933    x   
   Post-Effective Amendment No. 66    x   
   And      
  

REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER THE INVESTMENT

COMPANY ACT OF 1940

   x   
   Amendment No. 68    x   

PIMCO ETF TRUST

(Exact name of Registrant as Specified in Charter)

840 Newport Center Drive

Newport Beach, California 92660

(Address of Principal Executive Offices) (Zip Code)

Registrant’s Telephone Number, including Area Code

(866) 746-2606

 

Robert W. Helm, Esq.

Douglas P. Dick, Esq.

Dechert LLP

1900 K Street, N.W.

Washington, D.C. 20006

 

Brent R. Harris

Pacific Investment Management Company LLC

840 Newport Center Drive

Newport Beach, California 92660

(Name and Address of Agent for Service)

It is proposed that this filing will become effective:

 

¨   immediately upon filing pursuant to paragraph (b)    ¨    on (date) pursuant to paragraph (b)
¨   60 days after filing pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)    ¨    on (date) pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)
x   75 days after filing pursuant to paragraph (a)(2)    ¨    on (date) pursuant to paragraph (a)(2) of rule 485.

If appropriate, check the following box:

¨     this post-effective amendment designates a new effective date for a previously filed post-effective amendment.


EXPLANATORY NOTE

This Post-Effective Amendment No. 66 to the Registration Statement of PIMCO ETF Trust (the “Trust” or the “Registrant”) on Form N-1A (File No. 333-155395) (the “Amendment”) is being filed pursuant to Rule 485(a) to register the PIMCO Foreign Bond Exchange-Traded Fund (U.S. Dollar-Hedged), the PIMCO Foreign Bond Exchange-Traded Fund (Unhedged), the PIMCO Global Advantage Bond Exchange-Traded Fund, and the PIMCO International Advantage Bond Exchange-Traded Fund, each a new series of the Registrant. This Amendment does not affect the currently effective prospectuses for other series of the Trust’s shares not included herein.


Preliminary Prospectus

 

PIMCO ETFs

The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. Shares of the Fund may not be sold until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has not approved or disapproved these securities, or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

Actively-Managed Exchange-Traded Fund

[___]
Subject to Completion

 

[______]

PIMCO Foreign Bond Exchange-Traded Fund (U.S. Dollar-Hedged)

 



Table of Contents

Fund Summary

Summary Information About the Fund

Description of Principal Risks

Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings

Management of the Fund

Buying and Selling Shares

How Net Asset Value is Determined

Fund Distributions

Tax Consequences

Characteristics and Risks of Securities and Investment Techniques

Financial Highlights

Appendix A - Description of Securities Ratings


PIMCO Foreign Bond Exchange-Traded Fund (U.S. Dollar-Hedged)

Investment Objective

The Fund seeks maximum total return, consistent with preservation of capital and prudent investment management.

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund:

Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment): None

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):

 

Management Fees

[__]%

Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees

N/A

Other Expenses1

[__]%

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses

[__]%

Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement2

[__]%

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement

[__]%

1

"Other Expenses" reflect organizational expenses for the Fund's first fiscal year.

2

Pacific Investment Management Company LLC ("PIMCO") has contractually agreed, through [___], to waive its management fee, or reimburse the Fund, to the extent that organizational expenses and pro rata Trustees' fees exceed 0.0049% of the Fund's average net assets (the "Expense Limit"). Under the Expense Limitation Agreement, which renews annually for a full year unless terminated by PIMCO upon at least 30 days' notice prior to the end of the contract term, PIMCO may recoup these waivers and reimbursements in future periods, not exceeding three years, provided that organizational expenses and pro rata Trustees' fees, plus recoupment, do not exceed the Expense Limit.

Example. The Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the costs of investing in other exchange-traded funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund's operating expenses remain the same. Investors may pay brokerage commissions on their purchases and sales of Fund shares, which are not reflected in the Example. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

 

1 Year

3 Years

$__

$__

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in the Annual Fund Operating Expenses or in the Example tables, affect the Fund's performance. The Fund has not yet commenced operations as of the date of this prospectus. Thus, no portfolio turnover rate is provided for the Fund.

Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing under normal circumstances at least 80% of its assets in Fixed Income Instruments that are economically tied to foreign (non-U.S.) countries, representing at least three foreign countries, which may be represented by forwards or derivatives such as options, future contracts or swap agreements. "Fixed Income Instruments" include bonds, debt securities and other similar instruments issued by various U.S. and non-U.S. public- or private-sector entities. The Fund will normally limit its foreign currency exposure (from non-U.S. dollar-denominated securities or currencies) to 20% of its total assets.

Pacific Investment Management Company LLC ("PIMCO") selects the Fund's foreign country and currency compositions based on an evaluation of various factors, including, but not limited to relative interest rates, exchange rates, monetary and fiscal policies, trade and current account balances. The Fund may invest, without limitation, in securities and instruments that are economically tied to emerging market countries. The average portfolio duration of this Fund normally varies within three years (plus or minus) of the portfolio duration of the securities comprising the JPMorgan GBI Global ex-US Index Hedged in USD, as calculated by PIMCO, which as of [ ] was [ ] years. Duration is a measure used to determine the sensitivity of a security's price to changes in interest rates. The longer a security's duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates. The Fund invests primarily in investment grade debt securities, but may invest up to 10% of its total assets in high yield securities ("junk bonds") rated B or higher by Moody's Investors Service, Inc. ("Moody's"), or equivalently rated by Standard & Poor's Ratings Services ("S&P") or Fitch, Inc. ("Fitch"), or, if unrated, determined by PIMCO to be of comparable quality (except that within such limitation, the Fund may invest in mortgage-related securities rated below B). The Fund is non-diversified, which means that it may invest its assets in a smaller number of issuers than a diversified fund.

The Fund may invest, without limitation, in derivative instruments, such as options, futures contracts or swap agreements, and in mortgage- or asset-backed securities, subject to applicable law and any other restrictions described in the Fund's prospectus or Statement of Additional Information. The Fund may purchase or sell securities on a when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment basis and may engage in short sales. The Fund may, without limitation, seek to obtain market exposure to the securities in which it primarily invests by entering into a series of purchase and sale contracts or by using other investment techniques (such as buy backs or dollar rolls). The "total return" sought by the Fund consists of income earned on the Fund's investments, plus capital appreciation, if any, which generally arises from decreases in interest rates, foreign currency appreciation, or improving credit fundamentals for a particular sector or security. The Fund may also invest up to 10% of its total assets in preferred stock, convertible securities and other equity-related securities.

Principal Risks

It is possible to lose money on an investment in the Fund. The principal risks of investing in the Fund, which could adversely affect its net asset value, yield and total return are:

Market Trading Risk: the risk that an active secondary trading market for Fund shares does not continue once developed, that the Fund may not continue to meet a listing exchange's trading or listing requirements, or that Fund shares trade at prices other than the Fund's net asset value

Interest Rate Risk: the risk that fixed income securities will decline in value because of an increase in interest rates; a fund with a longer average portfolio duration will be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than a fund with a shorter average portfolio duration

Credit Risk: the risk that the Fund could lose money if the issuer or guarantor of a fixed income security, or the counterparty to a derivative contract, is unable or unwilling to meet its financial obligations

High Yield Risk: the risk that high yield securities and unrated securities of similar credit quality (commonly known as "junk bonds") are subject to greater levels of credit and liquidity risks. High yield securities are considered primarily speculative with respect to the issuer's continuing ability to make principal and interest payments

Market Risk: the risk that the value of securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to factors affecting securities markets generally or particular sectors

Issuer Risk: the risk that the value of a security may decline for reasons directly related to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer's goods or services

Liquidity Risk: the risk that a particular investment may be difficult to purchase or sell and that the Fund may be unable to sell illiquid securities at an advantageous time or price or achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain sector

Derivatives Risk: the risk of investing in derivative instruments, including liquidity, interest rate, market, credit and management risks, mispricing or improper valuation. Changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index, and the Fund could lose more than the principal amount invested

Equity Risk: the risk that the value of equity securities, such as common stocks and preferred stocks, may decline due to general market conditions which are not specifically related to a particular company or to factors affecting a particular industry or industries. Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed income securities

Mortgage-Related and Other Asset-Backed Securities Risk: the risk of investing in mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities, including interest rate risk, extension risk and prepayment risk

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Investment Risk: the risk that investing in foreign (non-U.S.) securities may result in the Fund experiencing more rapid and extreme changes in value than a fund that invests exclusively in securities of U.S. companies, due to smaller markets, differing reporting, accounting and auditing standards, increased risk of delayed settlements of portfolio transactions or loss of certificates of portfolio securities, and the risk of unfavorable foreign government actions, including nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, currency blockage, or political changes or diplomatic developments. Foreign securities may also be less liquid and more difficult to value than securities of U.S. issuers

Emerging Markets Risk: the risk of investing in emerging market securities, primarily increased foreign (non-U.S.) investment risk

Currency Risk: the risk that foreign currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar and affect the Fund's investments in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or in securities that trade in, and receive revenues in, or in derivatives that provide exposure to, foreign (non-U.S.) currencies

Issuer Non-Diversification Risk: the risk of focusing investments in a small number of issuers, including being more susceptible to risks associated with a single economic, political or regulatory occurrence than a more diversified portfolio might be. Funds that are "non-diversified" may invest a greater percentage of their assets in the securities of a single issuer (such as bonds issued by a particular state) than funds that are "diversified"

Leveraging Risk: the risk that certain transactions of the Fund, such as reverse repurchase agreements, loans of portfolio securities, and the use of when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment transactions, or derivative instruments, may give rise to leverage, causing the Fund to be more volatile than if it had not been leveraged

Management Risk: the risk that the investment techniques and risk analyses applied by PIMCO will not produce the desired results, and that legislative, regulatory, or tax restrictions, policies or developments may affect the investment techniques available to PIMCO in connection with managing the Fund. There is no guarantee that the investment objective of the Fund will be achieved

Short Sale Risk: the risk of entering into short sales, including the potential loss of more money than the actual cost of the investment, and the risk that the third party to the short sale may fail to honor its contract terms, causing a loss to the Fund

Please see "Description of Principal Risks" in the Fund's prospectus for a more detailed description of the risks of investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency.

Performance Information

The Fund does not have a full calendar year of performance. Thus, no bar chart or Average Annual Total Returns table is included for the Fund. Once the Fund commences operations, performance will be updated daily and quarterly and may be obtained at www.pimcoetfs.com/fundinfo.

Investment Adviser/Portfolio Manager

PIMCO serves as the investment adviser for the Fund. The Fund's portfolio is managed by [____].

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares

The Fund is an exchange-traded fund ("ETF"). Individual Fund shares may only be purchased and sold on a national securities exchange through a broker-dealer and may not be purchased or redeemed directly with the Fund. The price of Fund shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than net asset value ("NAV"), shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). The Funds will only issue or redeem shares at NAV that have been aggregated into blocks of [_____] shares or multiples thereof ("Creation Units") with certain large institutional investors who have entered into agreements with the Funds' Distributor ("Authorized Participants"). The Fund will issue or redeem Creation Units in return for a basket of cash and/or securities that the Fund specifies each Business Day.

Tax Information

The Fund's taxable distributions are generally taxable to you as ordinary income, capital gains, or a combination of the two, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account.

Summary Information About the Fund

Summary Information About the Fund

This prospectus describes one ETF (the "Fund") offered by PIMCO ETF Trust (the "Trust"). The Fund provides access to the professional investment advisory services offered by PIMCO. 

ETFs are funds that trade like other publicly-traded securities and may be designed to track an index or to be actively managed. Unlike conventional ETFs, the Fund is not an index fund. The Fund is actively managed and does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. Unlike shares of a mutual fund, which can be bought from and redeemed by the issuing fund by all shareholders at a price based on NAV, shares of the Fund may be directly purchased from and redeemed by the Fund at NAV solely by Authorized Participants. Also unlike shares of a mutual fund, shares of the Fund are listed on a national securities exchange and trade in the secondary market at market prices that change throughout the day.

Once operational, shares of the Fund are listed and traded at market prices on NYSE Arca, Inc. ("NYSE Arca") and other secondary markets. The market price for the Fund's shares may be different from the Fund's NAV. The Fund issues and redeems shares at NAV only in Creation Units. Only Authorized Participants may purchase or redeem Creation Units directly with the Fund at NAV. These transactions are in exchange for cash and/or securities. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, shares of the Fund are not redeemable securities. Shareholders who are not Authorized Participants may not purchase or redeem shares directly from the Fund.

An investment in the Fund alone should not constitute an entire investment program. This prospectus explains what you should know about the Fund before you invest. Please read it carefully.

Investors should be aware that the investments made by the Fund and the results achieved by the Fund at any given time are not expected to be the same as those made by other funds for which PIMCO acts as investment adviser, including funds with names, investment objectives and policies similar to the Fund.

On each business day, before commencement of trading on NYSE Arca, the Fund will disclose on www.pimcoetfs.com the identities and quantities of the Fund's portfolio holdings that will form the basis for the Fund's calculation of NAV at the end of the business day. Fund fact sheets provide additional information regarding the Fund and may be requested by calling 1-888-400-4ETF (1-888-400-4383).

 

Description of Principal Risks

The value of your investment in the Fund changes with the market price of the Fund's shares determined in the secondary market. Market price may be determined, in part, by the values of the Fund's investments. Many factors can affect those values. The factors that are most likely to have a material effect on the Fund's portfolio as a whole are called "principal risks." The principal risks of the Fund are identified in the "Fund Summary" and are described in this section. The Fund may be subject to additional risks other than those described below because the types of investments made by the Fund can change over time. Securities and investment techniques mentioned in this section that appear in bold type are described in greater detail under "Characteristics and Risks of Securities and Investment Techniques." That section and "Investment Objectives and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information also include more information about the Fund, its investments and the related risks. There is no guarantee that the Fund will be able to achieve its investment objective. It is possible to lose money by investing in the Fund.

Market Trading Risk

The Fund is subject to secondary market trading risks. Once operational, shares of the Fund are listed for trading on an exchange, however, there can be no guarantee that an active trading market for such shares will develop or continue. Shares of the Fund may be listed or traded on U.S. and foreign (non-U.S.) exchanges other than the Fund's primary U.S. listing exchange. There can be no guarantee that the Fund's shares will continue trading on any exchange or in any market or that the Fund's shares will continue to meet the listing or trading requirements of any exchange or market. The Fund's shares may experience higher trading volumes on one exchange as compared to another and investors are subject to the execution and settlement risks of the market where their broker directs trades.

Secondary market trading in the Fund's shares may be halted by an exchange because of market conditions. Pursuant to exchange or market rules, trading in the Fund's shares on an exchange or in any market may be subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility. There can be no guarantee that the Fund's exchange listing or ability to trade its shares will continue or remain unchanged. In the event the Fund ceases to be listed on an exchange, the Fund may cease operating as an "exchange-traded" fund and operate as a mutual fund, provided that shareholders are given advance notice.

Shares of the Fund may trade on an exchange at prices at, above or below their most recent NAV. The per share NAV of the Fund is calculated at the end of each business day, as described below, and fluctuates with changes in the market value of the Fund's holdings. The trading prices of the Fund's shares fluctuate continuously throughout the trading day based on market supply and demand, and may not closely track NAV. The trading prices of the Fund's shares may differ significantly from NAV during periods of market volatility, which may, among other factors, lead to the Fund's shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV.

Buying or selling the Fund's shares on an exchange may require the payment of brokerage commissions. In addition, you may also incur the cost of the spread (the difference between the bid price and the ask price). The commission is frequently a fixed amount and may be a significant cost for investors seeking to buy or sell small amounts of shares. The spread varies over time for shares of the Fund based on their trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally less if the Fund has more trading volume and market liquidity and more if the Fund has less trading volume and market liquidity. Due to the costs inherent in buying or selling the Fund's shares, frequent trading may detract significantly from investment returns. Investment in the Fund's shares may not be advisable for investors who expect to engage in frequent trading.

Interest Rate Risk

Interest rate risk is the risk that fixed income securities and other instruments in the Fund's portfolio will decline in value because of an increase in interest rates. As nominal interest rates rise, the value of certain fixed income securities held by the Fund is likely to decrease. A nominal interest rate can be described as the sum of a real interest rate and an expected inflation rate. Fixed income securities with longer durations tend to be more sensitive to changes in interest rates, usually making them more volatile than securities with shorter durations. Inflation-indexed bonds, including Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities ("TIPS"), decline in value when real interest rates rise. In certain interest rate environments, such as when real interest rates are rising faster than nominal interest rates, inflation-indexed bonds may experience greater losses than other fixed income securities with similar durations.

Variable and floating rate securities generally are less sensitive to interest rate changes but may decline in value if their interest rates do not rise as much, or as quickly, as interest rates in general. Conversely, floating rate securities will not generally increase in value if interest rates decline. Inverse floating rate securities may decrease in value if interest rates increase. Inverse floating rate securities may also exhibit greater price volatility than a fixed rate obligation with similar credit quality. When the Fund holds variable or floating rate securities, a decrease (or, in the case of inverse floating rate securities, an increase) in market interest rates will adversely affect the income received from such securities and the net asset value of the Fund's shares.

Credit Risk

The Fund could lose money if the issuer or guarantor of a fixed income security (including a security purchased with securities lending collateral), or the counterparty to a derivatives contract, repurchase agreement or a loan of portfolio securities is unable or unwilling, or is perceived (whether by market participants, ratings agencies, pricing services or otherwise) as unable or unwilling, to make timely principal and/or interest payments, or to otherwise honor its obligations. The downgrade of the credit of a security held by the Fund may decrease its value. Securities are subject to varying degrees of credit risk, which are often reflected in credit ratings. Municipal bonds are subject to the risk that litigation, legislation or other political events, local business or economic conditions, or the bankruptcy of the issuer could have a significant effect on an issuer's ability to make payments of principal and/or interest.

High Yield Risk

Funds that invest in high yield securities and unrated securities of similar credit quality (commonly known as "junk bonds") may be subject to greater levels of credit and liquidity risk than funds that do not invest in such securities. These securities are considered predominately speculative with respect to the issuer's continuing ability to make principal and interest payments. An economic downturn or period of rising interest rates could adversely affect the market for these securities and reduce the Fund's ability to sell these securities (liquidity risk). If the issuer of a security is in default with respect to interest or principal payments, the Fund may lose its entire investment. Because of the risks involved in investing in high yield securities, an investment in the Fund that invests in such securities should be considered speculative.

Market Risk

The market price of securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. Securities may decline in value due to factors affecting securities markets generally or particular industries represented in the securities markets. The value of a security may decline due to general market conditions which are not specifically related to a particular company, such as real or perceived adverse economic conditions, changes in the general outlook for corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates or adverse investor sentiment generally. The value of a security may also decline due to factors which affect a particular industry or industries, such as labor shortages or increased production costs and competitive conditions within an industry. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple asset classes may decline in value simultaneously.

Issuer Risk

The value of a security may decline for a number of reasons which directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer's goods or services, as well as the historical and prospective earnings of the issuer and the value of its assets.

Liquidity Risk

Liquidity risk exists when particular investments are difficult to purchase or sell. Illiquid securities are securities that cannot be disposed of within seven days in the ordinary course of business at approximately the value at which the Fund has valued the securities. The Fund's investments in illiquid securities, if any, may reduce the returns of the Fund because it may be unable to sell the illiquid securities at an advantageous time or price. Additionally, the market for certain investments may become illiquid under adverse market or economic conditions independent of any specific adverse changes in the conditions of a particular issuer. In such cases, the Fund, due to limitations on investments in illiquid securities and the difficulty in purchasing and selling such securities or instruments, may be unable to achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain sector. To the extent that the Fund's principal investment strategies involve derivatives, foreign (non-U.S.) securities or securities with substantial market and/or credit risk, the Fund will tend to have the greatest exposure to liquidity risk.

Derivatives Risk

Derivatives are financial contracts whose value depends on, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index. The various derivative instruments that the Fund may use are referenced under "Characteristics and Risks of Securities and Investment Techniques—Derivatives" in this prospectus and described in more detail under "Investment Objectives and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information. The Fund may use derivatives as a substitute for taking a position in the underlying asset and/or as part of a strategy designed to reduce exposure to other risks, such as interest rate or currency risk. The Fund may also use derivatives for leverage, in which case their use would involve leveraging risk. The Fund's use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. Derivatives are subject to a number of risks described elsewhere in this section, such as liquidity risk, interest rate risk, market risk, credit risk and management risk. They also involve the risk of mispricing or improper valuation and the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. If the Fund invests in a derivative instrument, the Fund could lose more than the principal amount invested. Also, suitable derivative transactions may not be available in all circumstances and there can be no assurance that the Fund will engage in these transactions to reduce exposure to other risks when that would be beneficial.

Equity Risk

Equity securities represent an ownership interest, or the right to acquire an ownership interest, in an issuer. Equity securities also include, among other things, preferred stocks, convertible stocks and warrants. The values of equity securities, such as common stocks and preferred stocks, may decline due to general market conditions which are not specifically related to a particular company, such as real or perceived adverse economic conditions, changes in the general outlook for corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates or adverse investor sentiment generally. They may also decline due to factors which affect a particular industry or industries, such as labor shortages or increased production costs and competitive conditions within an industry. Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed income securities.

Mortgage-Related and Other Asset-Backed Securities Risk

Mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities often involve risks that are different from or more acute than risks associated with other types of debt instruments. Generally, rising interest rates tend to extend the duration of fixed rate mortgage-related securities, making them more sensitive to changes in interest rates. As a result, in a period of rising interest rates, if the Fund holds mortgage-related securities, it may exhibit additional volatility. This is known as extension risk. In addition, adjustable and fixed rate mortgage-related securities are subject to prepayment risk. When interest rates decline, borrowers may pay off their mortgages sooner than expected. This can reduce the returns of the Fund because the Fund may have to reinvest that money at the lower prevailing interest rates. The Fund's investments in other asset-backed securities are subject to risks similar to those associated with mortgage-related securities, as well as additional risks associated with the nature of the assets and the servicing of those assets.

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Investment Risk

Because the Fund invests in foreign (non-U.S.) securities, it may experience more rapid and extreme changes in value than the Fund that invests exclusively in securities of U.S. companies. The securities markets of many foreign countries are relatively small, with a limited number of companies representing a small number of industries. Additionally, issuers of foreign (non-U.S.) securities are usually not subject to the same degree of regulation as U.S. issuers. Reporting, accounting and auditing standards of foreign countries differ, in some cases significantly, from U.S. standards. Also, nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, currency blockage, political changes or diplomatic developments could adversely affect the Fund's investments in a foreign country. In the event of nationalization, expropriation or other confiscation, the Fund could lose its entire investment in foreign (non-U.S.) securities. Adverse conditions in a certain region can adversely affect securities of other countries whose economies appear to be unrelated. To the extent that the Fund invests a significant portion of its assets in a specific geographic region, the Fund will generally have more exposure to regional economic risks associated with foreign investments.  Foreign securities may also be less liquid and more difficult to value than securities of U.S. issuers.

Emerging Markets Risk

Foreign (non-U.S.) investment risk may be particularly high to the extent the Fund invests in emerging market securities. Emerging market securities may present market, credit, currency, liquidity, legal, political and other risks different from, and potentially greater than, the risks of investing in securities and instruments economically tied to developed foreign countries. To the extent the Fund invests in emerging market securities that are economically tied to a particular region, country or group of countries, the Fund may be more sensitive to adverse political or social events affecting that region, country or group of countries. Economic, business, political, or social instability may affect emerging market securities differently. Accordingly, to the extent the Fund invests in a wide range of emerging market securities (e.g., different regions or countries, asset classes, issuers, sectors or credit qualities) it may perform differently in response to such instability than if the Fund invested in a more limited range of emerging market securities. For example, if the Fund focuses its investments in multiple asset classes of emerging market securities, the Fund may have a limited ability to mitigate losses in an environment that is adverse to emerging market securities in general. Emerging market securities may also be more volatile, less liquid and more difficult to value than securities economically tied to developed foreign countries. The systems and procedures for trading and settlement of securities in emerging markets are less developed and less transparent and transactions may take longer to settle. The Fund may not know the identity of trading counterparties, which may increase the possibility of the Fund not receiving payment or delivery of securities in a transaction.

Currency Risk

If the Fund invests directly in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or in securities that trade in, and receive revenues in, foreign (non-U.S.) currencies, or in derivatives that provide exposure to foreign (non-U.S.) currencies, it will be subject to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar, or, in the case of hedging positions, that the U.S. dollar will decline in value relative to the currency being hedged.

Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates, intervention (or the failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments, central banks or supranational entities such as the International Monetary Fund, or by the imposition of currency controls or other political developments in the United States or abroad. As a result, the Fund's investments in foreign currency denominated securities may reduce the returns of the Fund.

Currency risk may be particularly high to the extent that the Fund invests in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or engages in foreign currency transactions that are economically tied to emerging market countries. These currency transactions may present market, credit, currency, liquidity, legal, political and other risks different from, or greater than, the risks of investing in developed foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or engaging in foreign currency transactions that are economically tied to developed foreign countries.

Issuer Non-Diversification Risk

Focusing investments in a small number of issuers increases risk. Funds that are "non-diversified" may invest a greater percentage of their assets in the securities of a single issuer (such as bonds issued by a particular foreign government) than funds that are "diversified." Funds that invest in a relatively small number of issuers are more susceptible to risks associated with a single economic, political or regulatory occurrence than a more diversified portfolio might be. Some of those issuers also may present substantial credit or other risks.

Leveraging Risk

Certain transactions may give rise to a form of leverage. Such transactions may include, among others, reverse repurchase agreements, dollar rolls, loans of portfolio securities and the use of when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment transactions. The Fund's use of derivatives may also create leveraging risk for the Fund. To mitigate leveraging risk, PIMCO will segregate or "earmark" liquid assets or otherwise cover transactions that may give rise to such risk. The Fund also may be exposed to leveraging risk by borrowing money for investment purposes. Leveraging may cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations or to meet segregation requirements when it may not be advantageous to do so. Leveraging, including borrowing, may cause the Fund to be more volatile than if the Fund had not been leveraged. This is because leveraging tends to exaggerate the effect of any increase or decrease in the value of the Fund's portfolio securities.

Management Risk

The Fund is subject to management risk because it is an actively managed investment portfolio. PIMCO and each portfolio manager will apply investment techniques and risk analyses in making investment decisions for the Fund, but there can be no guarantee that these decisions will produce the desired results. Additionally, legislative, regulatory, or tax restrictions, policies or developments may affect the investment techniques available to PIMCO and each portfolio manager in connection with managing the Fund and may also adversely affect the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective.

Short Sale Risk

Short sales are subject to special risks. A short sale involves the sale by the Fund of a security that it does not own with the hope of purchasing the same security at a later date at a lower price. The Fund may also enter into a short position through a forward commitment or a short derivative position through a futures contract or swap agreement. If the price of the security has increased during this time, then the Fund will incur a loss equal to the increase in price from the time that the short sale was entered into plus any premiums and interest paid to the third party.

Therefore, short sales involve the risk that losses may be exaggerated, potentially losing more money than the actual cost of the investment. By contrast, a loss on a long position arises from decreases in the value of the security and is limited by the fact that a security's value cannot decrease below zero.

By investing the proceeds received from selling securities short, the Fund could be deemed to be employing a form of leverage, which creates special risks. The use of leverage may increase the Fund's exposure to long securities positions and make any change in the Fund's NAV greater than it would be without the use of leverage. This could result in increased volatility of returns. There is no guarantee that any leveraging strategy the Fund employs will be successful during any period in which it is employed.

In times of unusual or adverse market, economic, regulatory or political conditions, the Fund may not be able, fully or partially, to implement its short selling strategy. Periods of unusual or adverse market, economic, regulatory or political conditions generally may exist for as long as six months and, in some cases, much longer. Also, there is the risk that the third party to the short sale may fail to honor its contract terms, causing a loss to the Fund.

Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings

Please see "Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings" in the Statement of Additional Information for information about the availability of the complete schedule of the Fund's holdings.

Management of the Fund

Investment Manager

PIMCO serves as the investment manager for the Fund. Subject to the supervision of the Board of Trustees, PIMCO is responsible for managing the investment activities of the Fund and the Fund's business affairs and other administrative matters.

PIMCO is located at 840 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach, CA 92660. Organized in 1971, PIMCO provides investment management and advisory services to private accounts of institutional and individual clients and to mutual funds. As of [_____], PIMCO had approximately $[__] trillion in assets under management.

Management Fees

The Fund pays PIMCO fees in return for providing investment advisory, supervisory and administrative services under an all-in fee structure. The Fund will pay monthly management fees to PIMCO at the annual rate (stated as a percentage of the average daily net assets of the Fund) of [__]%.

In addition to providing investment advisory services, PIMCO provides or procures supervisory and administrative services for shareholders and also bears the costs of various third-party services required by the Fund, including audit, custodial, portfolio accounting, legal, transfer agency and printing costs. The Fund bears other expenses which are not covered under the management fee which may vary and affect the total level of expenses paid by shareholders, such as taxes and governmental fees, brokerage fees, commissions and other transaction expenses, costs of borrowing money, including interest expenses, securities lending expenses, extraordinary expenses (such as litigation and indemnification expenses) and fees and expenses of the Trust's Independent Trustees and their counsel. PIMCO generally earns a profit on the management fee paid by the Fund. Also, under the terms of the investment management agreement, PIMCO, and not Fund shareholders, would benefit from any price decreases in third-party services, including decreases resulting from an increase in net assets.

A discussion of the basis for the Board of Trustees' approval of the Fund's investment management agreement will be available in the Fund's first annual or semi-annual report to shareholders.

PIMCO has contractually agreed, through [__], to waive its management fee, or reimburse the Fund, to the extent that organizational expenses and pro rata Trustees' fees exceed 0.0049% of the Fund's average net assets. Under the Expense Limitation Agreement, which renews annually for a full year unless terminated by PIMCO upon at least 30 days' notice prior to the end of the contract term, PIMCO may recoup these waivers and reimbursements in future periods not exceeding three years, provided that organizational expenses and pro rata Trustees' fees, plus recoupment, do not exceed the Expense Limit.

Individual Portfolio Manager

The following individual has primary responsibility for managing the Fund.

 

Portfolio Manager

Since

Recent Professional Experience

[___________]

*

[_________]

*

Inception of the Fund.

Please see the Statement of Additional Information for additional information about other accounts managed by the portfolio manager, the portfolio manager's compensation and the portfolio manager's ownership of shares of the Fund.

Distributor

The Trust's Distributor is PIMCO Investments LLC ("Distributor"). The Distributor, located at 1633 Broadway, New York, NY 10019, is a broker-dealer registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC"). The Distributor distributes Creation Units for the Fund and does not maintain a secondary market in shares of the Fund.

Distribution and Servicing Plan

The Trust has adopted a Distribution and Servicing Plan for shares of the Fund pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act (the "12b-1 Plan"). The 12b-1 Plan permits compensation in connection with the distribution and marketing of Fund shares and/or the provision of certain shareholder services. The 12b-1 Plan permits the Fund to pay compensation at an annual rate of up to 0.25% of the Fund's average daily net assets. However, the Board of Trustees has determined not to authorize payment of a 12b-1 Plan fee at this time.

The 12b-1 fee may only be imposed or increased when the Board of Trustees determines that it is in the best interests of shareholders to do so. Because these fees are paid out of the Fund's assets on an ongoing basis, to the extent that a fee is authorized, over time they will increase the cost of an investment in the Fund. The 12b-1 Plan fee may cost an investor more than other types of sales charges.

Buying and Selling Shares

Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on a national securities exchange during the trading day. Shares can be bought and sold throughout the trading day like shares of other publicly traded companies. However, there can be no guarantee that an active trading market will develop or be maintained, or that the Fund shares listing will continue or remain unchanged. The Trust does not impose any minimum investment for shares of the Fund purchased on an exchange. Buying or selling the Fund's shares involves certain costs that apply to all securities transactions. When buying or selling shares of the Fund through a financial intermediary, you may incur a brokerage commission or other charges determined by your financial intermediary. Due to these brokerage costs, if any, frequent trading may detract significantly from investment returns. In addition, you may also incur the cost of the spread (the difference between the bid price and the ask price). The commission is frequently a fixed amount and may be a significant cost for investors seeking to buy or sell small amounts of shares. The spread varies over time for shares of the Fund based on its trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally less if the Fund has more trading volume and market liquidity and more if the Fund has less trading volume and market liquidity.

Shares of the Fund may be acquired from the Distributor or redeemed directly from the Fund only in Creation Units or multiples thereof, as discussed in the "Creations and Redemptions" section of the Statement of Additional Information. Once created, shares of the Fund generally trade in the secondary market in amounts less than a Creation Unit.

The Trust's Board of Trustees has not adopted a policy of monitoring for frequent purchases and redemptions of Fund shares ("frequent trading") that appear to attempt to take advantage of potential arbitrage opportunities presented by a lag between a change in the value of the Fund's portfolio securities after the close of the primary markets for the Fund's portfolio securities and the reflection of that change in the Fund's NAV ("market timing"). The Trust believes this is appropriate because an ETF, such as the Fund, is intended to be attractive to arbitrageurs, as trading activity is critical to ensuring that the market price of Fund shares remains at or close to NAV. Since the Fund issues and redeems Creation Units at NAV plus applicable transaction fees, and the Fund's shares may be purchased and sold on NYSE Arca at prevailing market prices, the risks of frequent trading are limited.

The Fund's primary listing exchange is NYSE Arca. NYSE Arca is open for trading Monday through Friday and is closed on the following holidays: New Year's Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents' Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.

A "Business Day" with respect to the Fund is each day NYSE Arca is open. Orders from Authorized Participants to create or redeem Creation Units will only be accepted on a Business Day. On days when NYSE Arca closes earlier than normal, the Fund may require orders to create or redeem Creation Units to be placed earlier in the day. See the Statement of Additional Information for more information.

Section 12(d)(1) of the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the "1940 Act"), restricts investments by registered investment companies and companies relying on Sections 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of the 1940 Act in the securities of other investment companies. Registered investment companies are permitted to invest in the Fund beyond the limits set forth in Section 12(d)(1), subject to certain terms and conditions set forth in an SEC exemptive order issued to PIMCO and the Trust, including that such investment companies enter into an agreement with the Trust.

The Trust typically does not offer or sell its shares to non- U.S. resident Authorized Participants. For purposes of this policy, a U.S. resident is defined as an account with (i) a U.S. address of record and (ii) all account owners residing in the U.S. at the time of sale.

Book Entry

Shares of the Fund are held in book-entry form, which means that no stock certificates are issued. The Depository Trust Company ("DTC") or its nominee is the record owner of all outstanding shares of the Fund and is recognized as the owner of all shares for all purposes.

Investors owning shares of the Fund are beneficial owners as shown on the records of DTC or its participants. DTC serves as the securities depository for shares of the Fund. DTC participants include securities brokers and dealers, banks, trust companies, clearing corporations and other institutions that directly or indirectly maintain a custodial relationship with DTC. As a beneficial owner of shares, you are not entitled to receive physical delivery of stock certificates or to have shares registered in your name, and you are not considered a registered owner of shares. Therefore, to exercise any right as an owner of shares, you must rely upon the procedures of DTC and its participants. These procedures are the same as those that apply to any other exchange-traded securities that you hold in book-entry or "street name" form.

Share Prices

The trading prices of the Fund's shares in the secondary market generally differ from the Fund's daily NAV per share and are affected by market forces such as supply and demand, economic conditions and other factors. Information regarding the intra-day net asset value of the Fund is disseminated every 15 seconds throughout the trading day by the national securities exchange on which the Fund's shares are primarily listed or by market data vendors or other information providers. The intra-day net asset value is based on the current market value of the securities and/or cash included in the Fund's intra-day net asset value basket. The intra-day net asset value does not necessarily reflect the precise composition of the current portfolio of securities and instruments held by the Fund at a particular point in time or the best possible valuation of the current portfolio. Therefore, the intra-day net asset value should not be viewed as a "real-time" update of the NAV, which is computed only once a day. The intra-day net asset value is generally determined by using both current market quotations and/or price quotations obtained from broker-dealers that may trade in the portfolio securities and instruments included in the Fund's intra-day net asset value basket. The Fund is not involved in, or responsible for, the calculation or dissemination of the intra-day net asset value and makes no representation or warranty as to its accuracy. An inaccuracy in the intra-day net asset value could result from various factors, including the difficulty of pricing portfolio instruments on an intra-day basis.

Premiums and Discounts

There may be differences between the daily market prices on secondary markets for shares of the Fund and the Fund's NAV. NAV is the price per share at which the Fund issues and redeems shares. See "How Net Asset Value Is Determined" below. The price used to calculate market returns ("Market Price") of the Fund generally is determined using the midpoint between the highest bid and the lowest offer on the national securities exchange on which shares of the Fund are primarily listed for trading, as of the time that the Fund's NAV is calculated. The Fund's Market Price may be at, above or below its NAV. The NAV of the Fund will fluctuate with changes in the market value of its portfolio holdings. The Market Price of the Fund will fluctuate in accordance with changes in its NAV, as well as market supply and demand.

Premiums or discounts are the differences (expressed as a percentage) between the NAV and the Market Price of the Fund on a given day, generally at the time the NAV is calculated. A premium is the amount that the Fund is trading above the reported NAV, expressed as a percentage of the NAV. A discount is the amount that the Fund is trading below the reported NAV, expressed as a percentage of the NAV. A discount or premium could be significant.  Information regarding the frequency of daily premiums or discounts, generally at the time the NAV is calculated, during the Fund's four previous calendar quarters (or for the life of the Fund, if shorter) can be found at www.pimcoetfs.com.

Request for Multiple Copies of Shareholder Documents

To reduce expenses, it is intended that only one copy of the Fund's prospectus and each annual and semi-annual report, when available, will be mailed to those addresses shared by two or more accounts. If you wish to receive individual copies of these documents, please contact the financial intermediary through which you hold your shares.

How Net Asset Value Is Determined

The NAV of the Fund's shares is determined by dividing the total value of the Fund's portfolio investments and other assets, less any liabilities, by the total number of shares outstanding.

Fund shares are valued as of the close of regular trading (normally 4:00 p.m., Eastern time) (the "NYSE Close") on each Business Day. Information that becomes known to the Fund or its agents after the NAV has been calculated on a particular day will not generally be used to retroactively adjust the price of a security or the NAV determined earlier that day. The Fund reserves the right to change the time its NAV is calculated if the Fund closes earlier, or as permitted by the SEC. 

For purposes of calculating NAV, portfolio securities and other assets for which market quotes are readily available are valued at market value. Market value is generally determined on the basis of last reported sales prices, or if no sales are reported, based on quotes obtained from a quotation reporting system, established market makers, or pricing services. Fixed income securities and non-exchange traded derivatives are normally valued on the basis of quotes obtained from brokers and dealers or pricing services using data reflecting the earlier closing of the principal markets for those securities. Prices obtained from independent pricing services use information provided by market makers or estimates of market values obtained from yield data relating to investments or securities with similar characteristics. Certain fixed income securities purchased on a delayed-delivery basis are marked to market daily until settlement at the forward settlement date. Short-term investments having a maturity of 60 days or less are generally valued at amortized cost. Exchange traded options, futures and options on futures are valued at the settlement price determined by the exchange. With respect to any portion of the Fund's assets that are invested in one or more open-end management investment companies, the Fund's NAV will be calculated based upon the NAVs of such investments. The value of securities traded in markets outside the United States may be affected significantly on a day that the NYSE is closed and an Authorized Participant is not able to purchase or redeem shares.

If a foreign security's value has materially changed after the close of the security's primary exchange or principal market but before the NYSE Close, the security will be valued at fair value based on procedures established and approved by the Board of Trustees. Foreign securities that do not trade when the NYSE is open are also valued at fair value. Foreign exchanges may permit trading in foreign securities on days when the Trust is not open for business, which may result in the Fund's portfolio investments being affected when you are unable to buy or sell shares.

Securities and other assets for which market quotes are not readily available are valued at fair value as determined in good faith by the Board of Trustees or persons acting at their direction. The Board of Trustees has adopted methods for valuing securities and other assets in circumstances where market quotes are not readily available, and has delegated to PIMCO the responsibility for applying the valuation methods. In the event that market quotes are not readily available, and the security or asset cannot be valued pursuant to one of the valuation methods, the value of the security or asset will be determined in good faith by the Valuation Committee of the Board of Trustees, generally based upon recommendations provided by PIMCO.

Market quotes are considered not readily available in circumstances where there is an absence of current or reliable market-based data (e.g., trade information, bid/ask information, broker quotes), including where events occur after the close of the relevant market, but prior to the NYSE Close, that materially affect the values of the Fund's securities or assets. In addition, market quotes are considered not readily available when, due to extraordinary circumstances, the exchanges or markets on which the securities trade do not open for trading for the entire day and no other market prices are available. The Board has delegated to PIMCO the responsibility for monitoring significant events that may materially affect the values of the Fund's securities or assets and for determining whether the value of the applicable securities or assets should be reevaluated in light of such significant events.

When the Fund uses fair value pricing to determine its NAV, securities will not be priced on the basis of quotes from the primary market in which they are traded, but rather may be priced by another method that the Board of Trustees or persons acting at their direction believe accurately reflects fair value. Fair value pricing may require subjective determinations about the value of a security. While the Trust's policy is intended to result in a calculation of the Fund's NAV that fairly reflects security values as of the time of pricing, the Trust cannot ensure that fair values determined by the Board of Trustees or persons acting at their direction would accurately reflect the price that the Fund could obtain for a security if it were to dispose of that security as of the time of pricing (for instance, in a forced or distressed sale). The prices used by the Fund may differ from the value that would be realized if the securities were sold.

Fund Distributions

The Fund distributes substantially all of its net investment income to shareholders in the form of dividends. The Fund intends to declare and distribute income dividends monthly to shareholders of record. In addition, the Fund distributes any net capital gains it earns from the sale of portfolio securities to shareholders no less frequently than annually. Net short-term capital gains may be paid more frequently. Dividend payments are made through DTC participants and indirect participants to beneficial owners then of record with proceeds received from the Fund.

No dividend reinvestment service is provided by the Trust. Financial intermediaries may make available the DTC book-entry Dividend Reinvestment Service for use by beneficial owners of Fund shares for reinvestment of their dividend distributions. Beneficial owners should contact their financial intermediary to determine the availability and costs of the service and the details of participation therein. Financial intermediaries may require beneficial owners to adhere to specific procedures and timetables. If this service is available and used, dividend distributions of both income and net capital gains will be automatically reinvested in additional whole shares of the Fund purchased in the secondary market.

Tax Consequences

Taxes on Fund distributions. If you are subject to U.S. federal income tax, you will be subject to tax on Fund taxable distributions. For federal income tax purposes, Fund taxable distributions will be taxable to you as either ordinary income or capital gains.

Fund taxable dividends (i.e., distributions of investment income) are generally taxable to you as ordinary income. Federal taxes on Fund distributions of gains are determined by how long the Fund owned the investments that generated the gains, rather than how long you have owned your shares. Distributions of gains from investments that the Fund owned for more than one year will generally be taxable to you as long-term capital gains. Distributions of gains from investments that the Fund owned for one year or less, including income from securities lending, will generally be taxable to you as ordinary income.

Fund distributions are taxable to you even if they are paid from income or gains earned by the Fund prior to your investment and thus were included in the price you paid for your shares. For example, if you purchase shares on or just before the record date of the Fund distribution, you will pay full price for the shares and may receive a portion of your investment back as a taxable distribution.

Taxes when you sell your shares. Any gain resulting from the sale of Fund shares will generally be subject to federal income tax. Currently, any capital gain or loss realized upon a sale of Fund shares is generally treated as a long-term gain or loss if the shares have been held for more than one year. Any capital gain or loss realized upon a sale of Fund shares held for one year or less is generally treated as short-term gain or loss, except that any capital loss on the sale of shares held for six months or less is treated as long-term capital loss to the extent that capital gain dividends were paid with respect to such shares.

Returns of capital. If the Fund's distributions exceed its taxable income and capital gains realized during a taxable year, all or a portion of the distributions made in the same taxable year may be recharacterized as a return of capital to shareholders. A return of capital distribution will generally not be taxable, but will reduce each shareholder's cost basis in the Fund and result in a higher reported capital gain or lower reported capital loss when those shares on which the distribution was received are sold.

Important Tax Reporting Considerations. Legislation passed by Congress requires reporting of adjusted cost basis information for covered securities, which generally include shares of a regulated investment company acquired after January 1, 2012, to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and to taxpayers. Shareholders should contact their financial intermediaries with respect to reporting of cost basis and available elections for their accounts.

Backup withholding. The Fund may be required to withhold U.S. federal income tax on all taxable distributions payable to shareholders if they fail to provide the Fund with their correct taxpayer identification number or to make required certifications, or if they have been notified by the IRS that they are subject to backup withholding. Backup withholding is not an additional tax. Any amounts withheld may be credited against U.S. federal income tax liability.

Foreign Withholding Taxes. The Fund may be subject to foreign withholding or other foreign taxes, which in some cases can be significant on any income or gain from investments in foreign securities. In that case, the Fund's total return on those securities would be decreased. The Fund may generally deduct these taxes in computing its taxable income. Rather than deducting these foreign taxes, the Fund, when investing more than 50% of its assets in the stock or securities of foreign corporations or foreign governments at the end of its taxable year, may make an election to treat a proportionate amount of eligible foreign taxes as constituting a taxable distribution to each shareholder, which would, subject to certain limitations, generally allow the shareholder to either (i) credit that proportionate amount of taxes against U.S. Federal income tax liability as a foreign tax credit or (ii) take that amount as an itemized deduction. Although in some cases the Fund may be able to apply for a refund of a portion of such taxes, the ability to successfully obtain such a refund may be uncertain.

Any foreign shareholders would generally be subject to U.S. tax withholding of 30% (or lower applicable treaty rate) on distributions by the Fund.

This "Tax Consequences" section relates only to federal income tax; the consequences under other tax laws may differ. Shareholders should consult their tax advisors as to the possible application of foreign, state and local income tax laws to Fund dividends and capital distributions. Please see the Statement of Additional Information for additional information regarding the tax aspects of investing in the Fund.

Characteristics and Risks of Securities and Investment Techniques

This section provides additional information about some of the principal investments and related risks of the Fund described under "Fund Summary" and "Description of Principal Risks" above. It also describes characteristics and risks of additional securities and investment techniques that may be used by the Fund from time to time. Most of the securities and investment techniques described herein are discretionary, which means that PIMCO can decide whether to use them or not. This prospectus does not attempt to disclose all of the various types of securities and investment techniques that may be used by the Fund. As with any fund, investors in the Fund rely on the professional investment judgment and skill of PIMCO and the individual portfolio manager. Please see "Investment Objectives and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information for more detailed information about the securities and investment techniques described in this section and about other strategies and techniques that may be used by the Fund.

Investment Selection

The Fund seeks maximum total return. The total return sought by the Fund consists of both income earned on the Fund's investments and capital appreciation, if any, arising from increases in the market value of the Fund's holdings. Capital appreciation of Fixed Income Instruments generally results from decreases in market interest rates, foreign currency appreciation, or improving credit fundamentals for a particular market sector or security.

In selecting investments for the Fund, PIMCO develops an outlook for interest rates, currency exchange rates and the economy, analyzes credit and call risks, and uses other investment selection techniques. The proportion of the Fund's assets committed to investment in securities with particular characteristics (such as quality, sector, interest rate or maturity) varies based on PIMCO's outlook for the U.S. economy and the economies of other countries in the world, the financial markets and other factors.

With respect to fixed income investing, PIMCO attempts to identify areas of the bond market that are undervalued relative to the rest of the market. PIMCO identifies these areas by grouping Fixed Income Investments into sectors such as money markets, governments, corporates, mortgages, asset-backed and international. In seeking to identify undervalued currencies, PIMCO may consider many factors, including but not limited to longer-term analysis of relative interest rates, inflation rates, real exchange rates, purchasing power parity, trade account balances and current account balances, as well as other factors that influence exchange rates such as flows, market technical trends and government policies. Sophisticated proprietary software then assists in evaluating sectors and pricing specific investments. Once investment opportunities are identified, PIMCO will shift assets among sectors depending upon changes in relative valuations, credit spreads and other factors. There is no guarantee that PIMCO's investment selection techniques will produce the desired results.

Investors should be aware that the investments made by the Fund and the results achieved by the Fund at any given time are not expected to be the same as those made by other funds for which PIMCO acts as investment adviser, including funds with names, investment objectives and policies similar to the Fund.

Fixed Income Instruments

"Fixed Income Instruments," as used generally in this prospectus, includes:

securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies or government sponsored enterprises ("U.S. Government Securities");

corporate debt securities of U.S. and non-U.S. issuers, including convertible securities and corporate commercial paper;

mortgage-backed and other asset-backed securities;

inflation-indexed bonds issued both by governments and corporations;

structured notes, including hybrid or "indexed" securities and event-linked bonds;

bank capital and trust preferred securities;

loan participations and assignments;

delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities;

bank certificates of deposit, fixed time deposits and bankers' acceptances;

repurchase agreements on Fixed Income Instruments and reverse repurchase agreements on Fixed Income Instruments;

debt securities issued by states or local governments and their agencies, authorities and other government-sponsored enterprises;

obligations of non-U.S. governments or their subdivisions, agencies and government-sponsored enterprises; and

obligations of international agencies or supranational entities.

Securities issued by U.S. Government agencies or government-sponsored enterprises may not be guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury.

The Fund may invest in derivatives based on Fixed Income Instruments.

Duration

Duration is a measure used to determine the sensitivity of a security's price to changes in interest rates. The longer a security's duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates. Similarly, a Fund with a longer average portfolio duration will be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than a Fund with a shorter average portfolio duration. By way of example, the price of a bond fund with an average duration of five years would be expected to fall approximately 5% if interest rates rose by one percentage point. Conversely, the price of a bond fund with an average duration of negative three years would be expected to rise approximately 3% if interest rates rose by one percentage point. The maturity of a security, another commonly used measure of price sensitivity, measures only the time until final payment is due, whereas duration takes into account the pattern of all payments of interest and principal on a security over time, including how these payments are affected by prepayments and by changes in interest rates, as well as the time until an interest rate on a security is reset (in the case of variable-rate securities). PIMCO uses an internal model for calculating duration, which may result in a different value for the duration of an index compared to the duration calculated by the index provider or another third party.

U.S. Government Securities

U.S. Government Securities are obligations of, or guaranteed by, the U.S. Government, its agencies or government-sponsored enterprises. The U.S. Government does not guarantee the NAV of the Fund's shares. U.S. Government Securities are subject to market and interest rate risk, as well as varying degrees of credit risk. Some U.S. Government Securities are issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury and are supported by the full faith and credit of the United States. Other types of U.S. Government Securities are supported by the full faith and credit of the United States (but not issued by the U.S. Treasury). These securities may have less credit risk than U.S. Government Securities not supported by the full faith and credit of the United States. Such other types of U.S. Government Securities are: (1) supported by the ability of the issuer to borrow from the U.S. Treasury; (2) supported only by the credit of the issuing agency, instrumentality or government-sponsored corporation; or (3) supported by the United States in some other way. These securities may be subject to greater credit risk. U.S. Government Securities include zero coupon securities, which tend to be subject to greater market risk than interest-paying securities of similar maturities.

Securities issued by U.S. Government agencies or government-sponsored enterprises may not be guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury. Government National Mortgage Association ("GNMA"), a wholly owned U.S. Government corporation, is authorized to guarantee, with the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government, the timely payment of principal and interest on securities issued by institutions approved by GNMA and backed by pools of mortgages insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Government related guarantors (i.e., not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government) include the Federal National Mortgage Association ("FNMA") and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation ("FHLMC"). Pass-through securities issued by FNMA are guaranteed as to timely payment of principal and interest by FNMA but are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. FHLMC guarantees the timely payment of interest and ultimate collection of principal, but its participation certificates are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government.

Municipal Bonds

Municipal Bonds are generally issued by states, territories, possessions and local governments and their agencies, authorities and other instrumentalities. Municipal Bonds are subject to interest rate, credit and market risk. The ability of an issuer to make payments could be affected by litigation, legislation or other political events or the bankruptcy of the issuer. Lower rated Municipal Bonds are subject to greater credit and market risk than higher quality Municipal Bonds. The types of Municipal Bonds in which the Fund may invest include municipal lease obligations, municipal general obligation bonds, municipal cash equivalents, and pre-refunded and escrowed to maturity Municipal Bonds. The Fund may also invest in industrial development bonds, which are Municipal Bonds issued by a government agency on behalf of a private sector company and, in most cases, are not backed by the credit of the issuing municipality and may therefore involve more risk. The Fund may also invest in securities issued by entities whose underlying assets are Municipal Bonds.

Pre-refunded Municipal Bonds are tax-exempt bonds that have been refunded to a call date on or before the final maturity of principal and remain outstanding in the municipal market. The payment of principal and interest of the pre-refunded Municipal Bonds held by the Fund is funded from securities in a designated escrow account that holds U.S. Treasury securities or other obligations of the U.S. Government (including its agencies and instrumentalities ("Agency Securities")). As the payment of principal and interest is generated from securities held in a designated escrow account, the pledge of the municipality has been fulfilled and the original pledge of revenue by the municipality is no longer in place. The escrow account securities pledged to pay the principal and interest of the pre-refunded Municipal Bond do not guarantee the price movement of the bond before maturity. Investment in pre-refunded Municipal Bonds held by the Fund may subject the Fund to interest rate risk, market risk and credit risk. In addition, while a secondary market exists for pre-refunded Municipal Bonds, if the Fund sells pre-refunded Municipal Bonds prior to maturity, the price received may be more or less than the original cost, depending on market conditions at the time of sale.

High Yield Securities

Securities rated lower than Baa by Moody's, or equivalently rated by S&P or Fitch, are sometimes referred to as "high yield securities" or "junk bonds." Investing in these securities involves special risks in addition to the risks associated with investments in higher-rated fixed income securities. While offering a greater potential opportunity for capital appreciation and higher yields, high yield securities typically entail greater potential price volatility and may be less liquid than higher-rated securities. High yield securities may be regarded as predominately speculative with respect to the issuer's continuing ability to meet principal and interest payments. They may also be more susceptible to real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions than higher-rated securities. Issuers of securities in default may fail to resume principal or interest payments, in which case a Fund may lose its entire investment.

Mortgage-Related and Other Asset-Backed Securities

Mortgage-related securities include mortgage pass-through securities, collateralized mortgage obligations ("CMOs"), commercial mortgage-backed securities, mortgage dollar rolls, CMO residuals, stripped mortgage-backed securities ("SMBSs") and other securities that directly or indirectly represent a participation in, or are secured by and payable from, mortgage loans on real property. A to-be-announced ("TBA") transaction is a method of trading mortgage-backed securities. In a TBA transaction, the buyer and seller agree upon general trade parameters such as agency, settlement date, par amount and price. The actual pools delivered generally are determined two days prior to the settlement date.

The value of some mortgage-or asset-backed securities may be particularly sensitive to changes in prevailing interest rates. Early repayment of principal on some mortgage-related securities may expose the Fund to a lower rate of return upon reinvestment of principal. When interest rates rise, the value of a mortgage-related security generally will decline; however, when interest rates are declining, the value of mortgage-related securities with prepayment features may not increase as much as other fixed income securities. The rate of prepayments on underlying mortgages will affect the price and volatility of a mortgage-related security, and may shorten or extend the effective maturity of the security beyond what was anticipated at the time of purchase. If unanticipated rates of prepayment on underlying mortgages increase the effective maturity of a mortgage-related security, the volatility of the security can be expected to increase. The value of these securities may fluctuate in response to the market's perception of the creditworthiness of the issuers. See "Extension Risk" and "Prepayment Risk" below. Additionally, although mortgages and mortgage-related securities are generally supported by some form of government or private guarantee and/or insurance, there is no assurance that guarantors or insurers will meet their obligations.

Extension Risk. Mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities are subject to Extension Risk, which is the risk that the issuer of such a security pays back the principal of such an obligation later than expected. This may occur when interest rates rise. This may negatively affect Fund returns, as the value of the security decreases when principal payments are made later than expected. In addition, because principal payments are made later than expected, the Fund may be prevented from investing proceeds it would otherwise have received at a given time at the higher prevailing interest rates.

Prepayment Risk. Mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities are subject to Prepayment Risk, which is the risk that the issuer of such a security pays back the principal of such an obligation earlier than expected (due to the sale of the underlying property, refinancing, or foreclosure). This may occur when interest rates decline. Prepayment may expose the Fund to a lower rate of return upon reinvestment of principal. Also, if a security subject to prepayment has been purchased at a premium, the value of the premium would be lost in the event of prepayment.

One type of SMBS has one class receiving all of the interest from the mortgage assets (the interest-only, or "IO" class), while the other class will receive all of the principal (the principal-only, or "PO" class). The yield to maturity on an IO class is extremely sensitive to the rate of principal payments (including prepayments) on the underlying mortgage assets, and a rapid rate of principal payments may have a material adverse effect on the Fund's yield to maturity from these securities. The Fund may invest up to 5% of its total assets in any combination of mortgage-related or other asset-backed IO, PO or inverse floater securities.

The Fund may invest in collateralized debt obligations ("CDOs"), which include collateralized bond obligations ("CBOs"), collateralized loan obligations ("CLOs") and other similarly structured securities CBOs and CLOs are types of asset-backed securities. A CBO is a trust which is backed by a diversified pool of high risk, below investment grade fixed income securities. A CLO is a trust typically collateralized by a pool of loans, which may include, among others, domestic and foreign senior secured loans, senior unsecured loans, and subordinate corporate loans, including loans that may be rated below investment grade or equivalent unrated loans. The Fund may invest in other asset-backed securities that have been offered to investors.

Reinvestment

The Fund may be subject to the risk that the returns of the Fund will decline during periods of falling interest rates because the Fund may have to reinvest the proceeds from matured, traded or called debt obligations at interest rates below the Fund's current earnings rate. For instance, when interest rates decline, an issuer of debt obligations may exercise an option to redeem securities prior to maturity, thereby forcing the Fund to invest in lower-yielding securities. The Fund also may choose to sell higher-yielding portfolio securities and to purchase lower-yielding securities to achieve greater portfolio diversification, because the Fund's portfolio manager believes the current holdings are overvalued or for other investment-related reasons. A decline in the returns received by the Fund from its investments is likely to have an adverse effect on the Fund's net asset value, yield and total return.

Focused Investment

To the extent that the Fund focuses its investments in a particular sector, the Fund may be susceptible to loss due to adverse developments affecting that sector. These developments include, but are not limited to, governmental regulation; inflation; rising interest rates; cost increases in raw materials, fuel and other operating expenses; technological innovations that may render existing products and equipment obsolete; competition from new entrants; high research and development costs; increased costs associated with compliance with environmental or other governmental regulations; and other economic, business or political developments specific to that sector. Furthermore, the Fund may invest a substantial portion of its assets in companies in related sectors that may share common characteristics, are often subject to similar business risks and regulatory burdens, and whose securities may react similarly to the types of developments described above, which will subject the Fund to greater risk. The Fund also will be subject to focused investment risk to the extent that it invests a substantial portion of its assets in a particular issuer, market, asset class, country or geographic region.

Corporate Debt Securities

Corporate debt securities are subject to the risk of the issuer's inability to meet principal and interest payments on the obligation and may also be subject to price volatility due to such factors as interest rate sensitivity, market perception of the creditworthiness of the issuer and general market liquidity. When interest rates rise, the value of corporate debt securities can be expected to decline. Debt securities with longer maturities tend to be more sensitive to interest rate movements than those with shorter maturities.

Bank Capital Securities and Trust Preferred Securities

There are two common types of bank capital: Tier I and Tier II. Bank capital is generally, but not always, of investment grade quality. Tier I securities often take the form of trust preferred securities. Tier II securities are commonly thought of as hybrids of debt and preferred stock, are often perpetual (with no maturity date), callable and, under certain conditions, allow for the issuer bank to withhold payment of interest until a later date.

Trust preferred securities have the characteristics of both subordinated debt and preferred stock. The primary advantage of the structure of trust preferred securities is that they are treated by the financial institution as debt securities for tax purposes and as equity for the calculation of capital requirements. Trust preferred securities typically bear a market rate coupon comparable to interest rates available on debt of a similarly rated issuer. Typical characteristics include long-term maturities, early redemption by the issuer, periodic fixed or variable interest payments, and maturities at face value. The market value of trust preferred securities may be more volatile than those of conventional debt securities. There can be no assurance as to the liquidity of trust preferred securities and the ability of holders, such as the Fund, to sell their holdings.

Loan Participations and Assignments

The Fund may invest in fixed- and floating-rate loans, which investments generally will be in the form of loan participations and assignments of portions of such loans. Participations and assignments involve special types of risk, including credit risk, interest rate risk, liquidity risk, and the risks of being a lender. If the Fund purchases a participation, it may only be able to enforce its rights through the lender, and may assume the credit risk of the lender in addition to the borrower.

Variable and Floating Rate Securities

Variable and floating rate securities are securities that pay interest at rates that adjust whenever a specified interest rate changes and/or that reset on predetermined dates (such as the last day of a month or calendar quarter). The Fund may invest in floating rate debt instruments ("floaters") and engage in credit spread trades. Variable and floating rate securities generally are less sensitive to interest rate changes but may decline in value if their interest rates do not rise as much, or as quickly, as interest rates in general. Conversely, floating rate securities will not generally increase in value if interest rates decline. The Fund may also invest in inverse floating rate debt instruments ("inverse floaters"). An inverse floater may exhibit greater price volatility than a fixed rate obligation of similar credit quality. The Fund may invest up to 5% of its total assets in any combination of mortgage-related or other asset-backed IO, PO or inverse floater securities.

Inflation-Indexed Bonds

Inflation-indexed bonds (other than municipal inflation-indexed bonds and certain corporate inflation-indexed bonds, which are more fully described below) are fixed income securities whose principal value is periodically adjusted according to the rate of inflation. If the index measuring inflation falls, the principal value of inflation-indexed bonds (other than municipal inflation-indexed bonds and certain corporate inflation-indexed bonds) will be adjusted downward, and consequently the interest payable on these securities (calculated with respect to a smaller principal amount) will be reduced. Repayment of the original bond principal upon maturity (as adjusted for inflation) is guaranteed in the case of TIPS. For bonds that do not provide a similar guarantee, the adjusted principal value of the bond repaid at maturity may be less than the original principal. TIPS may also be divided into individual zero-coupon instruments for each coupon or principal payment (known as "iSTRIPS"). An iSTRIP of the principal component of a TIPS issue will retain the embedded inflation floor that will allow the holder of that security to receive the greater of the original principal or inflation-adjusted principal value at maturity. iSTRIPS may be less liquid than conventional TIPS because they are a small component of the TIPS market.

Municipal inflation-indexed securities are municipal bonds that pay coupons based on a fixed rate plus the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers ("CPI"). With regard to municipal inflation-indexed bonds and certain corporate inflation-indexed bonds, the inflation adjustment is reflected in the semi-annual coupon payment. As a result, the principal value of municipal inflation-indexed bonds and such corporate inflation-indexed bonds does not adjust according to the rate of inflation. At the same time, the value of municipal inflation-indexed securities and such corporate inflation-indexed securities generally will not increase if the rate of inflation decreases. Because municipal inflation-indexed securities and corporate inflation-indexed securities are a small component of the municipal bond and corporate bond markets, respectively, they may be less liquid than conventional municipal and corporate bonds.

The value of inflation-indexed bonds is expected to change in response to changes in real interest rates. Real interest rates are tied to the relationship between nominal interest rates and the rate of inflation. If nominal interest rates increase at a faster rate than inflation, real interest rates may rise, leading to a decrease in value of inflation-indexed bonds. Any increase in the principal amount of an inflation-indexed bond will be considered taxable ordinary income, even though investors do not receive their principal until maturity.

Event-Linked Exposure

The Fund may obtain event-linked exposure by investing in "event-linked bonds" or "event-linked swaps" or by implementing "event-linked strategies." Event-linked exposure results in gains or losses that typically are contingent, or formulaically related to defined trigger events. Examples of trigger events include hurricanes, earthquakes, weather-related phenomena, or statistics relating to such events. Some event-linked bonds are commonly referred to as "catastrophe bonds." If a trigger event occurs, the Fund may lose a portion or its entire principal invested in the bond or notional amount on a swap. Event-linked exposure often provides for an extension of maturity to process and audit loss claims where a trigger event has, or possibly has, occurred. An extension of maturity may increase volatility. Event-linked exposure may also expose the Fund to certain unanticipated risks including credit risk, counterparty risk, adverse regulatory or jurisdictional interpretations, and adverse tax consequences. Event-linked exposures may also be subject to liquidity risk.

Convertible and Equity Securities

Common stock represents equity ownership in a company and typically provides the common stockholder the power to vote on certain corporate actions, including the election of the company's directors. Common stockholders participate in company profits through dividends and, in the event of bankruptcy, distributions, on a pro-rata basis after other claims are satisfied. Many factors affect the value of common stock, including earnings, earnings forecasts, corporate events and factors impacting the issuer's industry and the market generally. Common stock generally has the greatest appreciation and depreciation potential of all corporate securities.

The Fund may invest up to 10% of its total assets in preferred stock, convertible securities and other equity-related securities. Convertible securities are generally preferred stocks and other securities, including fixed income securities and warrants, that are convertible into or exercisable for common stock at a stated price or rate. The price of a convertible security will normally vary in some proportion to changes in the price of the underlying common stock because of this conversion or exercise feature. However, the value of a convertible security may not increase or decrease as rapidly as the underlying common stock. A convertible security will normally also provide income and is subject to interest rate risk. Convertible securities may be lower-rated securities subject to greater levels of credit risk. The Fund may be forced to convert a security before it would otherwise choose, which may have an adverse effect on the Fund's ability to achieve its investment objective.

"Synthetic" convertible securities are selected based on the similarity of their economic characteristics to those of a traditional convertible security due to the combination of separate securities that possess the two principal characteristics of a traditional convertible security, i.e., an income-producing security ("income-producing component") and the right to acquire an equity security ("convertible component"). The income-producing component is achieved by investing in non-convertible, income-producing securities such as bonds, preferred stocks and money market instruments, which may be represented by derivative instruments. The convertible component is achieved by investing in securities or instruments such as warrants or options to buy common stock at a certain exercise price, or options on a stock index. A simple example of a synthetic convertible security is the combination of a traditional corporate bond with a warrant to purchase equity securities of the issuer of the bond. The Fund may also purchase synthetic securities created by other parties, typically investment banks, including convertible structured notes. The income-producing and convertible components of a synthetic convertible security may be issued separately by different issuers and at different times.

Preferred stock represents an equity interest in a company that generally entitles the holder to receive, in preference to the holders of other stocks such as common stocks, dividends and a fixed share of the proceeds resulting from a liquidation of the company. Preferred stocks may pay fixed or adjustable rates of return. Preferred stock is subject to issuer-specific and market risks applicable generally to equity securities. In addition, a company's preferred stock generally pays dividends only after the company makes required payments to holders of its bonds and other debt. For this reason, the value of preferred stock will usually react more strongly than bonds and other debt to actual or perceived changes in the company's financial condition or prospects.

While some countries or companies may be regarded as favorable investments, pure fixed income opportunities may be unattractive or limited due to insufficient supply, or legal or technical restrictions. In such cases, the Fund may consider convertible securities or equity securities to gain exposure to such investments.

At times, in connection with the restructuring of a preferred stock or fixed income instrument either outside of bankruptcy court or in the context of bankruptcy court proceedings, the Fund may determine or be required to accept equity securities, such as common stocks, in exchange for all or a portion of a preferred stock or fixed income instrument. Depending upon, among other things, PIMCO's evaluation of the potential value of such securities in relation to the price that could be obtained by the Fund at any given time upon sale thereof, the Fund may determine to hold such securities in its portfolio.

Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed income securities. The market price of equity securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. Equity securities may decline in value due to factors affecting equity securities markets generally or particular industries represented in those markets. The value of an equity security may also decline for a number of reasons which directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer's goods or services.

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Securities

The Fund may invest in securities and instruments that are economically tied to foreign (non-U.S.) countries. PIMCO generally considers an instrument to be economically tied to a non-U.S. country if the issuer is a foreign government (or any political subdivision, agency, authority or instrumentality of such government), or if the issuer is organized under the laws of a non-U.S. country. In the case of certain money market instruments, such instruments will be considered economically tied to a non-U.S. country if either the issuer or the guarantor of such money market instrument is organized under the laws of a non-U.S. country. With respect to derivative instruments, PIMCO generally considers such instruments to be economically tied to non-U.S. countries if the underlying assets are foreign currencies (or baskets or indexes of such currencies), or instruments or securities that are issued by foreign governments or issuers organized under the laws of a non-U.S. country (or if the underlying assets are certain money market instruments, if either the issuer or the guarantor of such money market instruments is organized under the laws of a non-U.S. country).

Investing in foreign (non-U.S.) securities involves special risks and considerations not typically associated with investing in U.S. securities. Shareholders should consider carefully the substantial risks involved for the Fund that invests in securities issued by foreign companies and governments of foreign countries. These risks include: differences in accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards; generally higher commission rates on foreign portfolio transactions; the possibility of nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation; adverse changes in investment or exchange control regulations; and political instability. Individual foreign economies may differ favorably or unfavorably from the U.S. economy in such respects as growth of gross domestic product, rates of inflation, capital reinvestment, resources, self-sufficiency and balance of payments position. The securities markets, values of securities, yields and risks associated with foreign (non-U.S.) securities markets may change independently of each other. Also, foreign (non-U.S.) securities and dividends and interest payable on those securities may be subject to foreign taxes, including taxes withheld from payments on those securities. Foreign (non-U.S.) securities often trade with less frequency and volume than domestic securities and therefore may exhibit greater price volatility. Investments in foreign (non-U.S.) securities may also involve higher custodial costs than domestic investments.

Emerging Market Securities. The Fund may invest, without limitation, in securities and instruments that are economically tied to emerging market countries. PIMCO generally considers an instrument to be economically tied to an emerging market country if the security's "country of exposure" is an emerging market country, as determined by the criteria set forth below. Alternatively, such as when a "country of exposure" is not available or when PIMCO believes the following tests more accurately reflect which country the security is economically tied to, PIMCO may consider an instrument to be economically tied to an emerging market country if the issuer or guarantor is a government of an emerging market country (or any political subdivision, agency, authority or instrumentality of such government), if the issuer or guarantor is organized under the laws of an emerging market country, or if the currency of settlement of the security is a currency of an emerging market country. With respect to derivative instruments, PIMCO generally considers such instruments to be economically tied to emerging market countries if the underlying assets are currencies of emerging market countries (or baskets or indexes of such currencies), or instruments or securities that are issued or guaranteed by governments of emerging market countries or by entities organized under the laws of emerging market countries. A security's "country of exposure" is determined by PIMCO using certain factors provided by a third-party analytical service provider. The factors are applied in order such that the first factor to result in the assignment of a country determines the "country of exposure." The factors, listed in the order in which they are applied, are: (i) if an asset-backed or other collateralized security, the country in which the collateral backing the security is located, (ii) if the security is guaranteed by the government of a country (or any political subdivision, agency, authority or instrumentality of such government), the country of the government or instrumentality providing the guarantee, (iii) the "country of risk" of the issuer, (iv) the "country of risk" of the issuer's ultimate parent, or (v) the country where the issuer is organized or incorporated under the laws thereof. "Country of risk" is a separate four-part test determined by the following factors, listed in order of importance: (i) management location, (ii) country of primary listing, (iii) sales or revenue attributable to the country, and (iv) reporting currency of the issuer. PIMCO has broad discretion to identify countries that it considers to qualify as emerging markets. In making investments in emerging market securities, the Fund emphasizes those countries with relatively low gross national product per capita and with the potential for rapid economic growth. Emerging market countries are generally located in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and Eastern Europe. PIMCO will select the country and currency composition based on its evaluation of relative interest rates, inflation rates, exchange rates, monetary and fiscal policies, trade and current account balances, legal and political developments and any other specific factors it believes to be relevant.

Investing in emerging market securities imposes risks different from, or greater than, risks of investing in domestic securities or in foreign, developed countries. These risks include: smaller market capitalization of securities markets, which may suffer periods of relative illiquidity; significant price volatility; restrictions on foreign investment; possible repatriation of investment income and capital. In addition, foreign investors may be required to register the proceeds of sales; future economic or political crises could lead to price controls, forced mergers, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, seizure, nationalization, or creation of government monopolies.  The currencies of emerging market countries may experience significant declines against the U.S. dollar, and devaluation may occur subsequent to investments in these currencies by the Fund.  Inflation and rapid fluctuations in inflation rates have had, and may continue to have, negative effects on the economies and securities markets of certain emerging market countries.

Additional risks of emerging markets securities may include: greater social, economic and political uncertainty and instability; more substantial governmental involvement in the economy; less governmental supervision and regulation; unavailability of currency hedging techniques; companies that are newly organized and small; differences in auditing and financial reporting standards, which may result in unavailability of material information about issuers; and less developed legal systems. In addition, emerging securities markets may have different clearance and settlement procedures, which may be unable to keep pace with the volume of securities transactions or otherwise make it difficult to engage in such transactions. Settlement problems may cause the Fund to miss attractive investment opportunities, hold a portion of its assets in cash pending investment, or be delayed in disposing of a portfolio security. Such a delay could result in possible liability to a purchaser of the security.

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Currencies

The Fund invests directly in foreign currencies or in securities that trade in, or receive revenues in, foreign (non-U.S.) currencies and will be subject to currency risk. Foreign currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. They generally are determined by supply and demand in the foreign exchange markets and the relative merits of investments in different countries, actual or perceived changes in interest rates and other complex factors. Currency exchange rates also can be affected unpredictably by intervention (or the failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments or central banks, or by currency controls or political developments. Currencies in which the Fund's assets are denominated may be devalued against the U.S. dollar, resulting in a loss to the Fund.

Foreign Currency Transactions. The Fund may invest in securities denominated in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies, engage in foreign currency transactions on a spot (cash) basis and enter into forward foreign currency exchange contracts and invest in foreign currency futures contracts and options on foreign currencies and futures. A forward foreign currency exchange contract, which involves an obligation to purchase or sell a specific currency at a future date at a price set at the time of the contract, reduces the Fund's exposure to changes in the value of the currency it will deliver and increases its exposure to changes in the value of the currency it will receive for the duration of the contract. Certain foreign currency transactions may also be settled in cash rather than the actual delivery of the relevant currency. The effect on the value of the Fund is similar to selling securities denominated in one currency and purchasing securities denominated in another currency. A contract to sell a foreign currency would limit any potential gain which might be realized if the value of the hedged currency increases. The Fund may enter into these contracts to hedge against foreign exchange risk, to increase exposure to a foreign currency or to shift exposure to foreign currency fluctuations from one currency to another. Suitable hedging transactions may not be available in all circumstances and there can be no assurance that the Fund will engage in such transactions at any given time or from time to time. Also, such transactions may not be successful and may eliminate any chance for the Fund to benefit from favorable fluctuations in relevant foreign currencies. The Fund may use one currency (or a basket of currencies) to hedge against adverse changes in the value of another currency (or a basket of currencies) when exchange rates between the two currencies are positively correlated. The Fund will segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO in accordance with the procedures established by the Board of Trustees (or, as permitted by applicable law, enter into certain offsetting positions) to cover its obligations under forward foreign currency exchange contracts entered into for non-hedging purposes.

Redenomination. Continuing uncertainty as to the status of the euro and the European Monetary Union (the "EMU") has created significant volatility in currency and financial markets generally. Any partial or complete dissolution of the EMU could have significant adverse effects on currency and financial markets and on the values of the Fund's portfolio investments. If one or more EMU countries were to stop using the euro as its primary currency, the Fund's investments in such countries may be redenominated into a different or newly adopted currency. As a result, the value of those investments could decline significantly and unpredictably. In addition, securities or other investments that are redenominated may be subject to currency risk, liquidity risk and risk of improper valuation to a greater extent than similar investments currently denominated in euros. To the extent a currency used for redenomination purposes is not specified in respect of certain EMU-related investments, or should the euro cease to be used entirely, the currency in which such investments are denominated may be unclear, making such investments particularly difficult to value or dispose of. The Fund may incur additional expenses to the extent it is required to seek judicial or other clarification of the denomination or value of such securities.

There can be no assurance that if the Fund earns income or capital gains in a non-U.S. country or PIMCO otherwise seeks to withdraw the Fund's investments from a given country, capital controls imposed by such country will not prevent, or cause significant expense in, doing so.

Repurchase Agreements

The Fund may enter into repurchase agreements, in which the Fund purchases a security from a bank or broker-dealer, which agrees to repurchase the security at the Fund's cost plus interest within a specified time. If the party agreeing to repurchase should default, the Fund will seek to sell the securities which it holds. This could involve procedural costs or delays in addition to a loss on the securities if their value should fall below their repurchase price. Repurchase agreements maturing in more than seven days and which may not be terminated within seven days at approximately the amount at which the Fund has valued the agreements are considered illiquid securities.

Reverse Repurchase Agreements, Dollar Rolls and Other Borrowings

The Fund may enter into reverse repurchase agreements and dollar rolls subject to the Fund's limitations on borrowings. A reverse repurchase agreement involves the sale of a security by the Fund and its agreement to repurchase the instrument at a specified time and price. A dollar roll is similar except that the counterparty is not obligated to return the same securities as those originally sold by the Fund but only securities that are "substantially identical." Reverse repurchase agreements and dollar rolls may be considered borrowing for some purposes. The Fund will segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO in accordance with procedures established by the Board of Trustees to cover its obligations under reverse repurchase agreements and dollar rolls. Reverse repurchase agreements, dollar rolls and other forms of borrowings may create leveraging risk for the Fund.

The Fund may borrow money to the extent permitted under the 1940 Act. This means that, in general, the Fund may borrow money from banks for any purpose in an amount up to 1/3 of the Fund's total assets, less all liabilities and indebtedness not represented by senior securities. The Fund may also borrow money for temporary administrative purposes in an amount not to exceed 5% of the Fund's total assets.

Derivatives

The Fund may, but is not required to, use derivative instruments for risk management purposes or as part of its investment strategies. Generally, derivatives are financial contracts whose value depends upon, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index, and may relate to stocks, bonds, interest rates, spreads between different interest rates, currencies or currency exchange rates, commodities, and related indexes. Examples of derivative instruments include options contracts, futures contracts, options on futures contracts and swap agreements (including, but not limited to, credit default swaps and swaps on exchange-traded funds). The Fund may invest a portion of its assets in derivative instruments. The portfolio manager may decide not to employ any of these strategies and there is no assurance that any derivatives strategy used by the Fund will succeed. A description of these and other derivative instruments that the Fund may use are described under "Investment Objectives and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information.

The Fund's use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other more traditional investments. Certain derivative transactions may have a leveraging effect on the Fund. For example, a small investment in a derivative instrument may have a significant impact on the Fund's exposure to interest rates, currency exchange rates or other investments. As a result, a relatively small price movement in a derivative instrument may cause an immediate and substantial loss or gain. The Fund may engage in such transactions regardless of whether the Fund owns the asset, instrument or components of the index underlying the derivative instrument. The Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in these types of instruments. If it does, the Fund's investment exposure could far exceed the value of its portfolio securities and its investment performance could be primarily dependent upon securities it does not own. A description of various risks associated with particular derivative instruments is included in "Investment Objective and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information. The following provides a more general discussion of important risk factors relating to all derivative instruments that may be used by the Fund.

Management Risk. Derivative products are highly specialized instruments that require investment techniques and risk analyses different from those associated with stocks and bonds. The use of a derivative requires an understanding not only of the underlying instrument but also of the derivative itself, without the benefit of observing the performance of the derivative under all possible market conditions.

Credit Risk. The use of a derivative instrument involves the risk that a loss may be sustained as a result of the failure of another party to the contract (usually referred to as a "counterparty") to make required payments or otherwise comply with the contract's terms. Additionally, a short position in a credit default swap could result in losses if the Fund does not correctly evaluate the creditworthiness of the company on which the credit default swap is based.

Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk exists when a particular derivative instrument is difficult to purchase or sell. If a derivative transaction is particularly large or if the relevant market is illiquid (as is the case with many privately negotiated derivatives), it may not be possible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position at an advantageous time or price.

Leverage Risk. Because many derivatives have a leverage component, adverse changes in the value or level of the underlying asset, reference rate or index can result in a loss substantially greater than the amount invested in the derivative itself. Certain derivatives have the potential for unlimited loss, regardless of the size of the initial investment. When the Fund uses derivatives for leverage, investments in the Fund will tend to be more volatile, resulting in larger gains or losses in response to market changes. To limit leverage risk, the Fund will segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO in accordance with procedures established by the Board of Trustees (or, as permitted by applicable regulation, enter into certain offsetting positions) to cover its obligations under derivative instruments.

Lack of Availability. Because the markets for certain derivative instruments (including markets located in foreign countries) are relatively new and still developing, suitable derivatives transactions may not be available in all circumstances for risk management or other purposes. Upon the expiration of a particular contract, the portfolio manager may wish to retain the Fund's position in the derivative instrument by entering into a similar contract, but may be unable to do so if the counterparty to the original contract is unwilling to enter into the new contract and no other suitable counterparty can be found. There is no assurance that the Fund will engage in derivatives transactions at any time or from time to time. The Fund's ability to use derivatives may also be limited by certain regulatory and tax considerations.

Market and Other Risks. Like most other investments, derivative instruments are subject to the risk that the market value of the instrument will change in a way detrimental to the Fund's interest. If the portfolio manager incorrectly forecasts the values of securities or interest rates or other economic factors in using derivatives for the Fund, the Fund might have been in a better position if it had not entered into the transaction at all. While some strategies involving derivative instruments can reduce the risk of loss, they can also reduce the opportunity for gain or even result in losses by offsetting favorable price movements in other Fund investments. The Fund may also have to buy or sell a security at a disadvantageous time or price because the Fund is legally required to maintain offsetting positions or asset coverage in connection with certain derivatives transactions.

Other risks in using derivatives include the risk of mispricing or improper valuation of derivatives and the inability of derivatives to correlate perfectly with underlying assets, rates and indexes. Many derivatives, in particular privately negotiated derivatives, are complex and often valued subjectively. Improper valuations can result in increased cash payment requirements to counterparties or a loss of value to the Fund. Also, the value of derivatives may not correlate perfectly, or at all, with the value of the assets, reference rates or indexes they are designed to closely track. For example, a swap agreement on an exchange-traded fund would not correlate perfectly with the index upon which the exchange-traded fund is based because the fund's return is net of fees and expenses. In addition, the Fund's use of derivatives may cause the Fund to realize higher amounts of short-term capital gains (generally taxed at ordinary income tax rates) than if the Fund had not used such instruments.

Delayed Funding Loans and Revolving Credit Facilities

The Fund may also enter into, or acquire participations in, delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities, in which a lender agrees to make loans up to a maximum amount upon demand by the borrower during a specified term. These commitments may have the effect of requiring the Fund to increase its investments in a company at a time when it might not otherwise decide to do so (including at a time when the company's financial condition makes it unlikely that such amounts will be repaid). To the extent that the Fund is committed to advance additional funds, it will segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO in accordance with procedures established by the Board of Trustees in an amount sufficient to meet such commitments. Delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities are subject to credit, interest rate and liquidity risk and the risks of being a lender.

When-Issued, Delayed Delivery and Forward Commitment Transactions

The Fund may purchase or sell securities which it is eligible to purchase or sell on a when-issued basis, may purchase and sell such securities for delayed delivery and may make contracts to purchase or sell such securities for a fixed price at a future date beyond normal settlement time (forward commitments). When-issued transactions, delayed delivery purchases and forward commitments involve a risk of loss if the value of the securities declines prior to the settlement date. This risk is in addition to the risk that the Fund's other assets will decline in value. Therefore, these transactions may result in a form of leverage and increase the Fund's overall investment exposure. Typically, no income accrues on securities the Fund has committed to purchase prior to the time delivery of the securities is made, although the Fund may earn income on securities it has segregated or "earmarked" to cover these positions. When the Fund has sold a security on a when-issued, delayed delivery, or forward commitment basis, the Fund does not participate in future gains or losses with respect to the security. If the other party to a transaction fails to pay for the securities, the Fund could realize a loss. Additionally, when selling a security on a when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment basis without owning a security, the Fund will incur a loss if the security's price appreciates in value such that the security's price is above the agreed-upon price on the settlement date.

Investment in Other Funds

Section 12(d)(1) of the 1940 Act restricts investments by registered investment companies and companies relying on Sections 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of the 1940 Act in the securities of other investment companies. Registered investment companies are permitted to invest in the Fund beyond the limits set forth in Section 12(d)(1), subject to certain terms and conditions set forth in an SEC exemptive order issued to PIMCO and the Trust, including that such investment companies enter into an agreement with the Trust.

The Fund may invest in, to the extent permitted by Section 12(d)(1)(A) of the 1940 Act, other affiliated and unaffiliated funds, such as open-end or closed-end management investment companies, including other exchange traded funds, provided that the Fund's investment in units or shares of investment companies and other open-end collective investment vehicles will not exceed 10% of the Fund's total assets. The Fund may invest securities lending collateral in one or more money market funds to the extent permitted by Rule 12d1-1 under the 1940 Act, including series of PIMCO Funds, an affiliated open-end management investment company managed by PIMCO. As a shareholder of a fund, the Fund may indirectly bear investment advisory fees, supervisory and administrative fees, service fees and other fees which are in addition to the fees the Fund pays its service providers.

Subject to the restrictions and limitations of the 1940 Act, the Fund may, in the future, elect to pursue its investment objective by investing in one or more underlying investment vehicles or companies that have substantially similar investment objectives and policies as the Fund.

Small-Cap and Mid-Cap Companies

The Fund may invest in securities of small-capitalization and mid-capitalization companies. The Fund considers a small-cap company to be a company with a market capitalization of up to $1.5 billion and a mid-cap company to be a company with a market capitalization of between $1.5 billion and $10 billion. Investments in small-cap and mid-cap companies involve greater risk than investments in large-capitalization companies. Small and mid-cap companies may not have an established financial history, which can present valuation challenges. The securities of small- and mid-cap companies may be subject to increased market fluctuations, due to less liquid markets and more limited managerial and financial resources. The Fund's investments in small- and mid-cap companies may increase the volatility of the Fund's portfolio.

Short Sales

The Fund may make short sales as part of its overall portfolio management strategies or to offset a potential decline in value of a security. A short sale involves the sale of a security that is borrowed from a broker or other institution to complete the sale. Short sales expose the Fund to the risk that it will be required to acquire, convert or exchange securities to replace the borrowed securities (also known as "covering" the short position) at a time when the securities sold short have appreciated in value, thus resulting in a loss to the Fund. When making a short sale (other than a "short sale against the box"), the Fund must segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO in accordance with procedures established by the Board of Trustees or otherwise cover its position in a permissible manner. The Fund may engage in short selling to the extent permitted by the 1940 Act and rules and interpretations thereunder and other federal securities laws. To the extent the Fund engages in short selling in foreign (non-U.S.) jurisdictions, the Fund will do so to the extent permitted by the laws and regulations of such jurisdictions.

Illiquid Securities

The Fund may invest up to 15% of its net assets (taken at the time of investment) in illiquid securities. Certain illiquid securities may require pricing at fair value as determined in good faith under the supervision of the Board of Trustees. The portfolio manager may be subject to significant delays in disposing of illiquid securities, and transactions in illiquid securities may entail registration expenses and other transaction costs that are higher than those for transactions in liquid securities. The term "illiquid securities" for this purpose means securities that cannot be disposed of within seven days in the ordinary course of business at approximately the amount at which the Fund has valued the securities. Restricted securities, i.e., securities subject to legal or contractual restrictions on resale, may be illiquid. However, some restricted securities (such as securities issued pursuant to Rule 144A under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and certain commercial paper) may be treated as liquid, although they may be less liquid than registered securities traded on established secondary markets.

Loans of Portfolio Securities

For the purpose of achieving income, the Fund may lend its portfolio securities to brokers, dealers, and other financial institutions provided a number of conditions are satisfied, including that the loan is fully collateralized. Please see "Investment Objectives and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information for details. When the Fund lends portfolio securities, its investment performance will continue to reflect changes in the value of the securities loaned, and the Fund will also receive a fee or interest on the collateral. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in the collateral or delay in recovery of the collateral if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. The Fund may pay lending fees to a party arranging the loan. Cash collateral received by the Fund in securities lending transactions may be invested in short-term liquid Fixed Income Instruments or in money market or short-term mutual funds, or similar investment vehicles, including affiliated money market or short-term mutual funds. The Fund bears the risk of such investments.

Portfolio Turnover

The length of time the Fund has held a particular security is not generally a consideration in investment decisions. A change in the securities held by the Fund is known as "portfolio turnover." When the portfolio manager deems it appropriate and particularly during periods of volatile market movements, the Fund may engage in frequent and active trading of portfolio securities to achieve its investment objective. To the extent that Creation Unit purchases from and redemptions by the Fund are effected in cash, frequent purchases and redemptions may increase the rate of portfolio turnover. Higher portfolio turnover (e.g., an annual rate greater than 100% of the average value of the Fund's portfolio) involves correspondingly greater expenses to the Fund, including brokerage commissions or dealer mark-ups and other transaction costs on the sale of securities and reinvestments in other securities. Such sales may also result in realization of taxable capital gains, including short-term capital gains (which are generally taxed at ordinary income tax rates). The trading costs and tax effects associated with portfolio turnover may adversely affect the Fund's performance. In addition, large movements of cash into or out of the Fund may negatively impact the Fund's ability to achieve its investment objective or maintain a consistent level of operating expenses.

Temporary Defensive Positions

For temporary or defensive purposes, the Fund may invest without limit in U.S. debt securities, including taxable securities and short-term money market securities, when PIMCO deems it appropriate to do so. When the Fund engages in such strategies, it may not achieve its investment objective.

Changes in Investment Objectives and Policies

The investment objective of the Fund is non-fundamental and may be changed by the Board of Trustees without shareholder approval. Unless otherwise stated, all investment policies of the Fund may be changed by the Board of Trustees without shareholder approval. In addition, the Trust may determine to cease operating the Fund as an "exchange-traded" fund and cause the Fund's shares to stop trading on a securities exchange.

Percentage Investment Limitations

Unless otherwise stated, all percentage limitations on Fund investments listed in this prospectus will apply at the time of investment. The Fund would not violate these limitations unless an excess or deficiency occurs or exists immediately after and as a result of an investment. The Fund has adopted a non-fundamental investment policy to invest at least 80% of its assets in investments suggested by its name. For purposes of this policy, the term "assets" means net assets plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes.

Credit Ratings and Unrated Securities

Rating agencies are private services that provide ratings of the credit quality of fixed income securities, including convertible securities. Appendix A to this prospectus describes the various ratings assigned to fixed income securities, including convertible securities by Moody's, S&P and Fitch. Ratings assigned by a rating agency are not absolute standards of credit quality and do not evaluate market risks. Rating agencies may fail to make timely changes in credit ratings and an issuer's current financial condition may be better or worse than a rating indicates. The Fund will not necessarily sell a security when its rating is reduced below its rating at the time of purchase. PIMCO does not rely solely on credit ratings, and develops its own analysis of issuer credit quality.

The Fund may purchase unrated securities (which are not rated by a rating agency) if its portfolio manager determines that the security is of comparable quality to a rated security that the Fund may purchase. Unrated securities may be less liquid than comparable rated securities and involve the risk that the portfolio manager may not accurately evaluate the security's comparative credit rating. Analysis of the creditworthiness of issuers of high yield securities may be more complex than for issuers of higher-quality fixed income securities. To the extent that certain Funds invest in high yield and/or unrated securities, the Fund's success in achieving its investment objective may depend more heavily on the portfolio manager's creditworthiness analysis than if the Fund invested exclusively in higher quality and rated securities.

Other Investments and Techniques

The Fund may invest in other types of securities and use a variety of investment techniques and strategies which are not described in this prospectus. These securities and techniques may subject the Fund to additional risks. Please see the Statement of Additional Information for additional information about the securities and investment techniques described in this prospectus and about additional securities and techniques that may be used by the Fund.

Financial Highlights

Because the Fund has not operated for a full fiscal period as of the date of this prospectus, audited financial highlights are not available.

Appendix A
Description of Securities Ratings

Each Fund's investments may range in quality from securities rated in the lowest category in which the Fund is permitted to invest to securities rated in the highest category (as rated by Moody's, S&P or Fitch, or, if unrated, determined by PIMCO to be of comparable quality). The percentage of a Fund's assets invested in securities in a particular rating category will vary. The following terms are generally used to describe the credit quality of fixed income securities:

High Quality Debt Securities are those rated in one of the two highest rating categories (the highest category for commercial paper) or, if unrated, deemed comparable by PIMCO.

Investment Grade Debt Securities are those rated in one of the four highest rating categories, or if unrated deemed comparable by PIMCO.

Below Investment Grade High Yield Securities ("Junk Bonds") are those rated lower than Baa by Moody's, BBB by S&P or Fitch and comparable securities. They are deemed predominantly speculative with respect to the issuer's ability to repay principal and interest.

The following is a description of Moody's, S&P's and Fitch's rating categories applicable to fixed income securities.

Moody's Investors Service, Inc.

Long-Term Corporate Obligation Ratings
Moody's long-term obligation ratings are opinions of the relative credit risk of fixed-income obligations with an original maturity of one year or more. They address the possibility that a financial obligation will not be honored as promised. Such ratings use Moody's global scale and reflect both the likelihood of default and any financial loss suffered in the event of default.

Aaa: Obligations rated Aaa are judged to be of the highest quality, with minimal credit risk.

Aa: Obligations rated Aa are judged to be of high quality and are subject to very low credit risk.

A: Obligations rated A are considered upper-medium grade and are subject to low credit risk.

Baa: Obligations rated Baa are subject to moderate credit risk. They are considered medium-grade and as such may possess certain speculative characteristics.

Ba: Obligations rated Ba are judged to have speculative elements and are subject to substantial credit risk.

B: Obligations rated B are considered speculative and are subject to high credit risk.

Caa: Obligations rated Caa are judged to be of poor standing and are subject to very high credit risk.

Ca: Obligations rated Ca are highly speculative and are likely in, or very near, default, with some prospect of recovery of principal and interest.

C: Obligations rated C are the lowest rated class of bonds and are typically in default, with little prospect for recovery of principal or interest.

Moody's appends numerical modifiers 1, 2, and 3 to each generic rating classification from Aa through Caa. The modifier 1 indicates that the obligation ranks in the higher end of its generic rating category; the modifier 2 indicates a mid-range ranking; and the modifier 3 indicates a ranking in the lower end of that generic rating category.

Medium-Term Note Ratings
Moody's assigns long-term ratings to individual debt securities issued from medium-term note (MTN) programs, in addition to indicating ratings to MTN programs themselves. These long-term ratings are expressed on Moody's general long-term scale. Notes issued under MTN programs with such indicated ratings are rated at issuance at the rating applicable to all pari passu notes issued under the same program, at the program's relevant indicated rating, provided such notes do not exhibit any of the characteristics listed below:

Notes containing features that link interest or principal to the credit performance of any third party or parties (i.e., credit-linked notes);

Notes allowing for negative coupons, or negative principal;

Notes containing any provision that could obligate the investor to make any additional payments;

Notes containing provisions that subordinate the claim.

For notes with any of these characteristics, the rating of the individual note may differ from the indicated rating of the program.

For credit-linked securities, Moody's policy is to "look through" to the credit risk of the underlying obligor. Moody's policy with respect to non-credit linked obligations is to rate the issuer's ability to meet the contract as stated, regardless of potential losses to investors as a result of non-credit developments. In other words, as long as the obligation has debt standing in the event of bankruptcy, we will assign the appropriate debt class level rating to the instrument.

Market participants must determine whether any particular note is rated, and if so, at what rating level. Moody's encourages market participants to contact Moody's Ratings Desks or visit www.moodys.com directly if they have questions regarding ratings for specific notes issued under a medium-term note program. Unrated notes issued under an MTN program may be assigned an NR (not rated) symbol.

Short-Term Ratings
Moody's short-term ratings are opinions of the ability of issuers to honor short-term financial obligations. Ratings may be assigned to issuers, short-term programs or to individual short-term debt instruments. Such obligations generally have an original maturity not exceeding thirteen months, unless explicitly noted.

Moody's employs the following designations to indicate the relative repayment ability of rated issuers:

P-1: Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Prime-1 have a superior ability to repay short-term debt obligations.

P-2: Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Prime-2 have a strong ability to repay short-term debt obligations.

P-3: Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Prime-3 have an acceptable ability to repay short-term obligations.

NP: Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Not Prime do not fall within any of the Prime rating categories.

Canadian issuers rated P-1 or P-2 have their short-term ratings enhanced by the senior-most long-term rating of the issuer, its guarantor or support-provider.

US Municipal Ratings
Moody's US Municipal ratings are opinions of the investment quality of issuers and issues in the US municipal market. As such, these ratings incorporate Moody's assessment of the default probability and loss severity of these issuers and issues. The default and loss content for Moody's municipal long-term rating scale differs from Moody's general long-term rating scale. Historical default and loss rates for obligations rated on the US Municipal Scale are significantly lower than for similarly rated corporate obligations. It is important that users of Moody's ratings understand these differences when making rating comparisons between the Municipal and Global Scales.

US Municipal Long-Term Debt Ratings

Municipal Ratings are based upon the analysis of five primary factors related to municipal finance: market position, financial position, debt levels, governance, and covenants. Each of the factors is evaluated individually and for its effect on the other factors in the context of the municipality's ability to repay its debt.

Aaa: Issuers or issues rated Aaa demonstrate the strongest creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

Aa: Issuers or issues rated Aa demonstrate very strong creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

A: Issuers or issues rated A present above-average creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

Baa: Issuers or issues rated Baa represent average creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax- exempt issuers or issues.

Ba: Issuers or issues rated Ba demonstrate below-average creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

B: Issuers or issues rated B demonstrate weak creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax- exempt issuers or issues.

Caa: Issuers or issues rated Caa demonstrate very weak creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

Ca: Issuers or issues rated Ca demonstrate extremely weak creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

C: Issuers or issues rated C demonstrate the weakest creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

US Municipal Short-Term Debt and Demand Obligation Ratings

Short-Term Obligation Ratings
There are three rating categories for short-term municipal obligations that are considered investment grade. These ratings are designated as Municipal Investment Grade (MIG) and are divided into three levels—MIG 1 through MIG 3. In addition, those short-term obligations that are of speculative quality are designated SG, or speculative grade. MIG ratings expire at the maturity of the obligation.

MIG 1: This designation denotes superior credit quality. Excellent protection is afforded by established cash flows, highly reliable liquidity support, or demonstrated broad-based access to the market for refinancing.

MIG 2: This designation denotes strong credit quality. Margins of protection are ample, although not as large as in the preceding group.

MIG 3: This designation denotes acceptable credit quality. Liquidity and cash-flow protection may be narrow, and mar-
ket access for refinancing is likely to be less well-established.

SG: This designation denotes speculative-grade credit quality. Debt instruments in this category may lack sufficient margins of protection.

Demand Obligation Ratings
In the case of variable rate demand obligations (VRDOs), a two-component rating is assigned; a long- or short-term debt rating and a demand obligation rating. The first element represents Moody's evaluation of the degree of risk associated with scheduled principal and interest payments. The second element represents Moody's evaluation of the degree of risk associated with the ability to receive purchase price upon demand ("demand feature"), using a variation of the MIG rating scale, the Variable Municipal Investment Grade or VMIG rating. When either the long- or short-term aspect of a VRDO is not rated, that piece is designated NR, e.g., Aaa/NR or NR/VMIG 1. VMIG rating expirations are a function of each issue's specific structural or credit features.

VMIG 1: This designation denotes superior credit quality. Excellent protection is afforded by the superior short-term credit strength of the liquidity provider and structural and legal protections that ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

VMIG 2: This designation denotes strong credit quality. Good protection is afforded by the strong short-term credit strength of the liquidity provider and structural and legal protections that ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

VMIG 3: This designation denotes acceptable credit quality. Adequate protection is afforded by the satisfactory short-term credit strength of the liquidity provider and structural and legal protections that ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

SG: This designation denotes speculative-grade credit quality. Demand features rated in this category may be supported by a liquidity provider that does not have an investment grade short-term rating or may lack the structural and/or legal protections necessary to ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

Standard & Poor's Ratings Services

Long-Term Issue Credit Ratings
Issue credit ratings are based, in varying degrees, on Standard & Poor's analysis of the following considerations:

Likelihood of payment—capacity and willingness of the obligor to meet its financial commitment on an obligation in accordance with the terms of the obligation;

Nature of and provisions of the obligation;

Protection afforded by, and relative position of, the obligation in the event of bankruptcy, reorganization, or other arrangement under the laws of bankruptcy and other laws affecting creditors' rights.

Issue ratings are an assessment of default risk, but may incorporate an assessment of relative seniority or ultimate recovery in the event of default. Junior obligations are typically rated lower than senior obligations, to reflect the lower priority in bankruptcy, as noted above (Such differentiation may apply when an entity has both senior and subordinated obligations, secured and unsecured obligations, or operating company and holding company obligations.).

Investment Grade
AAA: An obligation rated 'AAA' has the highest rating assigned by Standard & Poor's. The obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is extremely strong.

AA: An obligation rated 'AA' differs from the highest-rated obligations only to a small degree. The obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is very strong.

A: An obligation rated 'A' is somewhat more susceptible to the adverse effects of changes in circumstances and economic conditions than obligations in higher-rated categories. However, the obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is still strong.

BBB: An obligation rated 'BBB' exhibits adequate protection parameters. However, adverse economic conditions or changing circumstances are more likely to lead to a weakened capacity of the obligor to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

Speculative Grade
Obligations rated 'BB', 'B', 'CCC', 'CC', and 'C' are regarded as having significant speculative characteristics. 'BB' indicates the least degree of speculation and 'C' the highest. While such obligations will likely have some quality and protective characteristics, these may be outweighed by large uncertainties or major exposures to adverse conditions.

BB: An obligation rated 'BB' is less vulnerable to nonpayment than other speculative issues. However, it faces major ongoing uncertainties or exposure to adverse business, financial, or economic conditions which could lead to the obligor's inadequate capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

B: An obligation rated 'B' is more vulnerable to nonpayment than obligations rated 'BB', but the obligor currently has the capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation. Adverse business, financial, or economic conditions will likely impair the obligor's capacity or willingness to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

CCC: An obligation rated 'CCC' is currently vulnerable to nonpayment, and is dependent upon favorable business, financial, and economic conditions for the obligor to meet its financial commitment on the obligation. In the event of adverse business, financial, or economic conditions, the obligor is not likely to have the capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

CC: An obligation rated 'CC' is currently highly vulnerable to nonpayment.

C: A 'C' rating is assigned to obligations that are currently highly vulnerable to nonpayment, obligations that have payment arrearages allowed by the terms of the documents, or obligations of an issuer that is the subject of a bankruptcy petition or similar action which have not experienced a payment default. Among others, the 'C' rating may be assigned to subordinated debt, preferred stock or other obligations on which cash payments have been suspended in accordance with the instrument's terms or when preferred stock is the subject of a distressed exchange offer, whereby some or all of the issue is either repurchased for an amount of cash or replaced by other instruments having a total value that is less than par.

D: An obligation rated 'D' is in payment default. The 'D' rating category is used when payments on an obligation are not made on the date due unless Standard & Poor's believes that such payments will be made within five business days, irrespective of any grace period. The 'D' rating also will be used upon the filing of a bankruptcy petition or the taking of a similar action if payments on an obligation are jeopardized.  An obligation's rating is lowered to 'D' upon completion of a distressed exchange offer, whereby some or all of the issue is either repurchased for an amount of cash or replaced by other instruments having a total value that is less than par.

Plus (+) or minus (-): The ratings from 'AA' to 'CCC' may be modified by the addition of a plus (+) or minus (-) sign to show relative standing within the major rating categories.

NR: This indicates that no rating has been requested, that there is insufficient information on which to base a rating, or that Standard & Poor's does not rate a particular obligation as a matter of policy.

Short-Term Issue Credit Ratings
A-1: A short-term obligation rated 'A-1' is rated in the highest category by Standard & Poor's. The obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is strong. Within this category, certain obligations are designated with a plus sign (+). This indicates that the obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on these obligations is extremely strong.

A-2: A short-term obligation rated 'A-2' is somewhat more susceptible to the adverse effects of changes in circumstances and economic conditions than obligations in higher rating categories. However, the obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is satisfactory.

A-3: A short-term obligation rated 'A-3' exhibits adequate protection parameters. However, adverse economic conditions or changing circumstances are more likely to lead to a weakened capacity of the obligor to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

B: A short-term obligation rated 'B' is regarded as vulnerable and has significant speculative characteristics. The obligor currently has the capacity to meet its financial commitments; however, it faces major ongoing uncertainties which could lead to the obligor's inadequate capacity to meet its financial commitments.

C: A short-term obligation rated 'C' is currently vulnerable to nonpayment and is dependent upon favorable business, financial, and economic conditions for the obligor to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

D: A short-term obligation rated 'D' is in payment default. The 'D' rating category is used when payments on an obligation, including a regulatory capital instrument, are not made on the date due even if the applicable grace period has not expired, unless Standard & Poor's believes that such payments will be made within any stated grace period. However, any stated grace period longer than five business days will be treated as five business days. The 'D' rating also will be used upon the filing of a bankruptcy petition or the taking of a similar action if payments on an obligation are jeopardized.

Dual Ratings: Standard & Poor's assigns "dual" ratings to all debt issues that have a put option or demand feature as part of their structure. The first rating addresses the likelihood of repayment of principal and interest as due, and the second rating addresses only the demand feature. The long-term rating symbols are used for bonds to denote the long-term maturity and the short-term rating symbols for the put option (for example, 'AAA/A-1+'). With U.S. municipal short-term demand debt, note rating symbols are used with the short-term issue credit rating symbols (for example, 'SP-1+/A-1+').

Active Qualifiers
Standard & Poor's uses six qualifiers that limit the scope of a rating. The structure of the transaction can require the use of a qualifier such as a 'p' qualifier, which indicates the rating addressed the principal portion of the obligation only. Likewise, the qualifier can indicate a limitation on the type of information used, such as "pi" for public information. A qualifier appears as a suffix and is part of the rating.

L: Ratings qualified with 'L' apply only to amounts invested up to federal deposit insurance limits.

p: This suffix is used for issues in which the credit factors, the terms, or both, that determine the likelihood of receipt of payment of principal are different from the credit factors, terms or both that determine the likelihood of receipt of interest on the obligation. The 'p' suffix indicates that the rating addresses the principal portion of the obligation only. The 'p' suffix will always be used in conjunction with the 'i' suffix, which addresses likelihood of receipt of interest. For example, a rated obligation could be assigned ratings of "AAAp NRi" indicating that the principal portion is rated "AAA" and the interest portion of the obligation is not rated.

i: This subscript is used for issues in which the credit factors, the terms, or both, that determine the likelihood of receipt of payment of interest are different from the credit factors, terms or both that determine the likelihood of receipt of principal on the obligation. The 'i' suffix indicates that the rating addresses the interest portion of the obligation only. The 'i' suffix will always be used in conjunction with the 'p' suffix, which addresses likelihood of receipt of principal. For example, a rated obligation could be assigned ratings of "AAAp NRi" indicating that the principal portion is rated "AAA" and the interest portion of the obligation is not rated.

pi: Ratings with a 'pi' suffix are based on an analysis of an issuer's published financial information, as well as additional information in the public domain. They do not, however, reflect in-depth meetings with an issuer's management and therefore may be based on less comprehensive information than ratings without a 'pi' suffix. Ratings with a 'pi' suffix are reviewed annually based on a new year's financial statements, but may be reviewed on an interim basis if a major event occurs that may affect the issuer's credit quality.

preliminary: Preliminary ratings, with the 'prelim' suffix, may be assigned to obligors or obligations, including financial programs, in the circumstances described below. Assignment of a final rating is conditional on the receipt by Standard & Poor's of appropriate documentation. Standard & Poor's reserves the right not to issue a final rating. Moreover, if a final rating is issued, it may differ from the preliminary rating.

Preliminary ratings may be assigned to obligations, most commonly structured and project finance issues, pending receipt of final documentation and legal opinions.

Preliminary ratings are assigned to Rule 415 Shelf Registrations. As specific issues, with defined terms, are offered from the master registration, a final rating may be assigned to them in accordance with Standard & Poor's policies.

Preliminary ratings may be assigned to obligations that will likely be issued upon the obligor's emergence from bankruptcy or similar reorganization, based on late-stage reorganization plans, documentation and discussions with the obligor. Preliminary ratings may also be assigned to the obligors. These ratings consider the anticipated general credit quality of the reorganized or postbankruptcy issuer as well as attributes of the anticipated obligation(s).

Preliminary ratings may be assigned to entities that are being formed or that are in the process of being independently established when, in Standard & Poor's opinion, documentation is close to final. Preliminary ratings may also be assigned to these entities' obligations.

Preliminary ratings may be assigned when a previously unrated entity is undergoing a well-formulated restruc-
turing, recapitalization, significant financing or other transformative event, generally at the point that investor or lender commitments are invited. The preliminary rating may be assigned to the entity and to its proposed obligation(s). These preliminary ratings consider the anticipated general credit quality of the obligor, as well as attributes of the anticipated obligation(s), assuming successful completion of the transformative event. Should the transformative event not occur, Standard & Poor's would likely withdraw these preliminary ratings.

A preliminary recovery rating may be assigned to an obligation that has a preliminary issue credit rating.

t: This symbol indicates termination structures that are designed to honor their contracts to full maturity or, should certain events occur, to terminate and cash settle all their contracts before their final maturity date.

Inactive Qualifiers (no longer applied or outstanding)
*: This symbol indicated continuance of the ratings is contingent upon Standard & Poor's receipt of an executed copy of the escrow agreement or closing documentation confirming investments and cash flows. Discontinued use in August 1998.

c: This qualifier was used to provide additional information to investors that the bank may terminate its obligation to purchase tendered bonds if the long-term credit rating of the issuer is below an investment-grade level and/or the issuer's bonds are deemed taxable. Discontinued use in January 2001.

G: The letter 'G' followed the rating symbol when a fund's portfolio consisted primarily of direct U.S. government securities.

pr: The letters 'pr' indicate that the rating is provisional. A provisional rating assumes the successful completion of the project financed by the debt being rated and indicates that payment of debt service requirements is largely or entirely dependent upon the successful, timely completion of the project. This rating, however, while addressing credit quality subsequent to completion of the project, makes no comment on the likelihood of or the risk of default upon failure of such completion. The investor should exercise his own judgment with respect to such likelihood and risk.

q: A 'q' subscript indicates that the rating is based solely on quantitative analysis of publicly available information. Discontinued use in April 2001.

r: The 'r' modifier was assigned to securities containing extraordinary risks, particularly market risks, which are not covered in the credit rating. The absence of an 'r' modifier should not be taken as an indication that an obligation will not exhibit extraordinary non-credit related risks. Standard & Poor's discontinued the use of the 'r' modifier for most obligations in June 2000 and for the balance of obligations (mainly structured finance transactions) in November 2002.

Fitch, Inc.

Long-Term Credit Ratings

Investment Grade
AAA: Highest credit quality. 'AAA' ratings denote the lowest expectation of credit risk. They are assigned only in cases of exceptionally strong capacity for payment of financial commitments. This capacity is highly unlikely to be adversely affected by foreseeable events.

AA: Very high credit quality. "AA" ratings denote expectations of very low credit risk. They indicate very strong capacity for payment of financial commitments. This capacity is not significantly vulnerable to foreseeable events.

A: High credit quality. "A" ratings denote expectations of low credit risk. The capacity for payment of financial commitments is considered strong. This capacity may, nevertheless, be more vulnerable to adverse business or economic conditions than is the case for higher ratings.

BBB: Good credit quality. "BBB" ratings indicate that expectations of credit risk are currently low. The capacity for payment of financial commitments is considered adequate, but adverse business or economic conditions are more likely to impair this capacity.

Speculative Grade
BB: Speculative. 'BB' ratings indicate an elevated vulnerability to credit risk, particularly in the event of adverse changes in business or economic conditions over time; however, business or financial alternatives may be available to allow financial commitments to be met.

B: Highly speculative. 'B' ratings indicate that material credit risk is present.

CCC: Substantial credit risk. 'CCC' ratings indicate that substantial credit risk is present.

CC: Very high levels of credit risk. 'CC' ratings indicate very high levels of credit risk.

C: Exceptionally high levels of credit risk. 'C' indicates exceptionally high levels of credit risk.

Defaulted obligations typically are not assigned 'D' ratings, but are instead rated in the 'B' to 'C' rating categories, depending upon their recovery prospects and other relevant characteristics. This approach better aligns obligations that have comparable overall expected loss but varying vulnerability to default and loss.

The modifiers "+" or "-" may be appended to a rating to denote relative status within major rating categories. Such suffixes are not added to the 'AAA' obligation rating category, or to corporate finance obligation ratings in the categories below 'CCC.'

The subscript 'emr' is appended to a rating to denote embedded market risk which is beyond the scope of the rating. The designation is intended to make clear that the rating solely addresses the counterparty risk of the issuing bank. It is not meant to indicate any limitation in the analysis of the counterparty risk, which in all other respects follows published Fitch criteria for analyzing the issuing financial institution. Fitch does not rate these instruments where the principal is to any degree subject to market risk.

Recovery Ratings
Recovery Ratings are assigned to selected individual securities and obligations. These currently are published for most individual obligations of corporate issuers with IDRs in the 'B' rating category and below.

Among the factors that affect recovery rates for securities are the collateral, the seniority relative to other obligations in the capital structure (where appropriate), and the expected value of the company or underlying collateral in distress.

The Recovery Rating scale is based upon the expected relative recovery characteristics of an obligation upon the curing of a default, emergence from insolvency or following the liquidation or termination of the obligor or its associated collateral.

Recovery Ratings are an ordinal scale and do not attempt to precisely predict a given level of recovery. As a guideline in developing the rating assessments, the agency employs broad theoretical recovery bands in its ratings approach based on historical averages, but actual recoveries for a given security may deviate materially from historical averages.

RR1: Outstanding recovery prospects given default. 'RR1' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 91%-100% of current principal and related interest.

RR2: Superior recovery prospects given default. 'RR2' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 71%-90% of current principal and related interest.

RR3: Good recovery prospects given default. 'RR3' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 51%-70% of current principal and related interest.

RR4: Average recovery prospects given default. 'RR4' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 31%-50% of current principal and related interest.

RR5: Below average recovery prospects given default. 'RR5' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 11%-30% of current principal and related interest.

RR6: Poor recovery prospects given default. 'RR6' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 0%-10% of current principal and related interest.

Short-Term Credit Ratings
A short-term issuer or obligation rating is based in all cases on the short-term vulnerability to default of the rated entity or security stream and relates to the capacity to meet financial obligations in accordance with the documentation governing the relevant obligation. Short-Term Ratings are assigned to obligations whose initial maturity is viewed as "short term" based on market convention. Typically, this means up to 13 months for corporate, sovereign and structured obligations, and up to 36 months for obligations in US public finance markets.

F1: Highest short-term credit quality. Indicates the strongest intrinsic capacity for timely payment of financial commitments; may have an added "+" to denote any exceptionally strong credit feature.

F2: Good short-term credit quality. Good intrinsic capacity for timely payment of financial commitments.

F3: Fair short-term credit quality. The intrinsic capacity for timely payment of financial commitments is adequate.

B: Speculative short-term credit quality. Minimal capacity for timely payment of financial commitments, plus heightened vulnerability to near term adverse changes in financial and economic conditions.

C: High short-term default risk. Default is a real possibility.

RD: Restricted default. Indicates an entity that has defaulted on one or more of its financial commitments, although it continues to meet other financial obligations. Applicable to entity ratings only.

D: Default. Indicates a broad-based default event for an entity, or the default of a specific short-term obligation.

INVESTMENT MANAGER

PIMCO, 840 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach, CA 92660

DISTRIBUTOR

PIMCO Investments LLC, 1633 Broadway, New York, NY 10019

CUSTODIAN

State Street Bank & Trust Co., State Street Financial Center, One Lincoln Street, Boston, MA 02111

TRANSFER AGENT

State Street Bank & Trust Co., State Street Financial Center, One Lincoln Street, Boston, MA 02111

INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, 1100 Walnut Street, Suite 1300, Kansas City, MO 64106-2197

LEGAL COUNSEL

Dechert LLP, 1900 K Street N.W., Washington, D.C. 20006

PIMCO ETF Trust
840 Newport Center Drive
Newport Beach, CA 92660

The Trust's Statement of Additional Information ("SAI") includes additional information about the Fund. The SAI is incorporated by reference into this Prospectus, which means it is part of this Prospectus for legal purposes. The Fund's annual report, once it is available, will discuss the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected the Fund's performance during its last fiscal year.

You may get free copies of any of these materials, request other information about the Fund, or make shareholder inquiries by calling the Trust at 888.400.4ETF (888.400.4383) by visiting www.pimcoetfs.com or by writing to:

PIMCO ETF Trust
840 Newport Center Drive
Newport Beach, CA 92660

You may review and copy information about the Trust, including its SAI, at the Securities and Exchange Commission's public reference room in Washington, D.C. You may call the Commission at 1-202-551-8090 for information about the operation of the public reference room. You may also access reports and other information about the Trust on the EDGAR Database on the Commission's Web site at www.sec.gov. You may get copies of this information, with payment of a duplication fee, by writing the Public Reference Section of the Commission, Washington, D.C. 20549-1520, or by e-mailing your request to publicinfo@sec.gov.

You can also visit our Web site at www.pimcoetfs.com for additional information about the Fund, including the SAI, which is available for download free of charge.

Reference the Trust's Investment Company Act file number in your correspondence.

 

 

Investment Company Act File Number: 811-22250

xxxxx_[____]


Preliminary Prospectus

 

PIMCO ETFs

The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. Shares of the Fund may not be sold until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has not approved or disapproved these securities, or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

Actively-Managed Exchange-Traded Fund

[___]
Subject to Completion

 

[______]

PIMCO Foreign Bond Exchange-Traded Fund (Unhedged)

 



Table of Contents

Fund Summary

Summary Information About the Fund

Description of Principal Risks

Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings

Management of the Fund

Buying and Selling Shares

How Net Asset Value is Determined

Fund Distributions

Tax Consequences

Characteristics and Risks of Securities and Investment Techniques

Financial Highlights

Appendix A - Description of Securities Ratings


PIMCO Foreign Bond Exchange-Traded Fund (Unhedged)

Investment Objective

The Fund seeks maximum total return, consistent with preservation of capital and prudent investment management.

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund:

Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment): None

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):

 

Management Fees

[__]%

Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees

N/A

Other Expenses1

[__]%

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses

[__]%

Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement2

[__]%

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement

[__]%

1

"Other Expenses" reflect organizational expenses for the Fund's first fiscal year.

2

Pacific Investment Management Company LLC ("PIMCO") has contractually agreed, through [___], to waive its management fee, or reimburse the Fund, to the extent that organizational expenses and pro rata Trustees' fees exceed 0.0049% of the Fund's average net assets (the "Expense Limit"). Under the Expense Limitation Agreement, which renews annually for a full year unless terminated by PIMCO upon at least 30 days' notice prior to the end of the contract term, PIMCO may recoup these waivers and reimbursements in future periods, not exceeding three years, provided that organizational expenses and pro rata Trustees' fees, plus recoupment, do not exceed the Expense Limit.

Example. The Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the costs of investing in other exchange-traded funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund's operating expenses remain the same. Investors may pay brokerage commissions on their purchases and sales of Fund shares, which are not reflected in the Example. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

 

1 Year

3 Years

$__

$__

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in the Annual Fund Operating Expenses or in the Example tables, affect the Fund's performance. The Fund has not yet commenced operations as of the date of this prospectus. Thus, no portfolio turnover rate is provided for the Fund.

Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing under normal circumstances at least 80% of its assets in Fixed Income Instruments that are economically tied to foreign (non-U.S.) countries, representing at least three foreign countries, which may be represented by forwards or derivatives such as options, futures contracts or swap agreements. "Fixed Income Instruments" include bonds, debt securities and other similar instruments issued by various U.S. and non-U.S. public or private-sector entities.

Pacific Investment Management Company LLC ("PIMCO") selects the Fund's foreign country and currency compositions based on an evaluation of various factors, including, but not limited to relative interest rates, exchange rates, monetary and fiscal policies, trade and current account balances. The average portfolio duration of this Fund normally varies within three years (plus or minus) of the portfolio duration of the securities comprising the JPMorgan GBI Global ex-US FX NY Index Unhedged in USD, as calculated by PIMCO, which as of [ ] was [ ] years. Duration is a measure used to determine the sensitivity of a security's price to changes in interest rates. The longer a security's duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates. The Fund invests primarily in investment grade debt securities, but may invest up to 10% of its total assets in high yield securities ("junk bonds") rated B or higher by Moody's Investors Service, Inc. ("Moody's"), or equivalently rated by Standard & Poor's Ratings Services ("S&P") or Fitch, Inc. ("Fitch"), or, if unrated, determined by PIMCO to be of comparable quality (except that within such limitation, the Fund may invest in mortgage-related securities rated below B). The Fund may invest, without limitation, in securities and instruments that are economically tied to emerging market countries. The Fund is non-diversified, which means that it may invest its assets in a smaller number of issuers than a diversified fund.

The Fund may invest, without limitation, in derivative instruments, such as options, futures contracts or swap agreements, and in mortgage- or asset-backed securities, subject to applicable law and any other restrictions described in the Fund's prospectus or Statement of Additional Information. The Fund may purchase or sell securities on a when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment basis and may engage in short sales. The Fund may, without limitation, seek to obtain market exposure to the securities in which it primarily invests by entering into a series of purchase and sale contracts or by using other investment techniques (such as buy backs or dollar rolls). The "total return" sought by the Fund consists of income earned on the Fund's investments, plus capital appreciation, if any, which generally arises from decreases in interest rates, foreign currency appreciation, or improving credit fundamentals for a particular sector or security. The Fund may also invest up to 10% of its total assets in preferred stock, convertible securities and other equity-related securities.

Principal Risks

It is possible to lose money on an investment in the Fund. The principal risks of investing in the Fund, which could adversely affect its net asset value, yield and total return are:

Market Trading Risk: the risk that an active secondary trading market for Fund shares does not continue once developed, that the Fund may not continue to meet a listing exchange's trading or listing requirements, or that Fund shares trade at prices other than the Fund's net asset value

Interest Rate Risk: the risk that fixed income securities will decline in value because of an increase in interest rates; a fund with a longer average portfolio duration will be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than a fund with a shorter average portfolio duration

Credit Risk: the risk that the Fund could lose money if the issuer or guarantor of a fixed income security, or the counterparty to a derivative contract, is unable or unwilling to meet its financial obligations

High Yield Risk: the risk that high yield securities and unrated securities of similar credit quality (commonly known as "junk bonds") are subject to greater levels of credit and liquidity risks. High yield securities are considered primarily speculative with respect to the issuer's continuing ability to make principal and interest payments

Market Risk: the risk that the value of securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to factors affecting securities markets generally or particular sectors

Issuer Risk: the risk that the value of a security may decline for reasons directly related to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer's goods or services

Liquidity Risk: the risk that a particular investment may be difficult to purchase or sell and that the Fund may be unable to sell illiquid securities at an advantageous time or price or achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain sector

Derivatives Risk: the risk of investing in derivative instruments, including liquidity, interest rate, market, credit and management risks, mispricing or improper valuation. Changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index, and the Fund could lose more than the principal amount invested

Equity Risk: the risk that the value of equity securities, such as common stocks and preferred stocks, may decline due to general market conditions which are not specifically related to a particular company or to factors affecting a particular industry or industries. Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed income securities

Mortgage-Related and Other Asset-Backed Securities Risk: the risk of investing in mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities, including interest rate risk, extension risk and prepayment risk

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Investment Risk: the risk that investing in foreign (non-U.S.) securities may result in the Fund experiencing more rapid and extreme changes in value than a fund that invests exclusively in securities of U.S. companies, due to smaller markets, differing reporting, accounting and auditing standards, increased risk of delayed settlements of portfolio transactions or loss of certificates of portfolio securities, and the risk of unfavorable foreign government actions, including nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, currency blockage, or political changes or diplomatic developments. Foreign securities may also be less liquid and more difficult to value than securities of U.S. issuers

Emerging Markets Risk: the risk of investing in emerging market securities, primarily increased foreign (non-U.S.) investment risk

Currency Risk: the risk that foreign currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar and affect the Fund's investments in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or in securities that trade in, and receive revenues in, or in derivatives that provide exposure to, foreign (non-U.S.) currencies

Issuer Non-Diversification Risk: the risk of focusing investments in a small number of issuers, including being more susceptible to risks associated with a single economic, political or regulatory occurrence than a more diversified portfolio might be. Funds that are "non-diversified" may invest a greater percentage of their assets in the securities of a single issuer (such as bonds issued by a particular state) than funds that are "diversified"

Leveraging Risk: the risk that certain transactions of the Fund, such as reverse repurchase agreements, loans of portfolio securities, and the use of when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment transactions, or derivative instruments, may give rise to leverage, causing the Fund to be more volatile than if it had not been leveraged

Management Risk: the risk that the investment techniques and risk analyses applied by PIMCO will not produce the desired results, and that legislative, regulatory, or tax restrictions, policies or developments may affect the investment techniques available to PIMCO in connection with managing the Fund. There is no guarantee that the investment objective of the Fund will be achieved

Short Sale Risk: the risk of entering into short sales, including the potential loss of more money than the actual cost of the investment, and the risk that the third party to the short sale may fail to honor its contract terms, causing a loss to the Fund

Please see "Description of Principal Risks" in the Fund's prospectus for a more detailed description of the risks of investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency.

Performance Information

The Fund does not have a full calendar year of performance. Thus, no bar chart or Average Annual Total Returns table is included for the Fund. Once the Fund commences operations, performance will be updated daily and quarterly and may be obtained at www.pimcoetfs.com/fundinfo.

Investment Adviser/Portfolio Manager

PIMCO serves as the investment adviser for the Fund. The Fund's portfolio is managed by [____].

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares

The Fund is an exchange-traded fund ("ETF"). Individual Fund shares may only be purchased and sold on a national securities exchange through a broker-dealer and may not be purchased or redeemed directly with the Fund. The price of Fund shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than net asset value ("NAV"), shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). The Funds will only issue or redeem shares at NAV that have been aggregated into blocks of [_____] shares or multiples thereof ("Creation Units") with certain large institutional investors who have entered into agreements with the Funds' Distributor ("Authorized Participants"). The Fund will issue or redeem Creation Units in return for a basket of cash and/or securities that the Fund specifies each Business Day.

Tax Information

The Fund's taxable distributions are generally taxable to you as ordinary income, capital gains, or a combination of the two, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account.

Summary Information About the Fund

Summary Information About the Fund

This prospectus describes one ETF (the "Fund") offered by PIMCO ETF Trust (the "Trust"). The Fund provides access to the professional investment advisory services offered by PIMCO. 

ETFs are funds that trade like other publicly-traded securities and may be designed to track an index or to be actively managed. Unlike conventional ETFs, the Fund is not an index fund. The Fund is actively managed and does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. Unlike shares of a mutual fund, which can be bought from and redeemed by the issuing fund by all shareholders at a price based on NAV, shares of the Fund may be directly purchased from and redeemed by the Fund at NAV solely by Authorized Participants. Also unlike shares of a mutual fund, shares of the Fund are listed on a national securities exchange and trade in the secondary market at market prices that change throughout the day.

Once operational, shares of the Fund are listed and traded at market prices on NYSE Arca, Inc. ("NYSE Arca") and other secondary markets. The market price for the Fund's shares may be different from the Fund's NAV. The Fund issues and redeems shares at NAV only in Creation Units. Only Authorized Participants may purchase or redeem Creation Units directly with the Fund at NAV. These transactions are in exchange for cash and/or securities. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, shares of the Fund are not redeemable securities. Shareholders who are not Authorized Participants may not purchase or redeem shares directly from the Fund.

An investment in the Fund alone should not constitute an entire investment program. This prospectus explains what you should know about the Fund before you invest. Please read it carefully.

Investors should be aware that the investments made by the Fund and the results achieved by the Fund at any given time are not expected to be the same as those made by other funds for which PIMCO acts as investment adviser, including funds with names, investment objectives and policies similar to the Fund.

On each business day, before commencement of trading on NYSE Arca, the Fund will disclose on www.pimcoetfs.com the identities and quantities of the Fund's portfolio holdings that will form the basis for the Fund's calculation of NAV at the end of the business day. Fund fact sheets provide additional information regarding the Fund and may be requested by calling 1-888-400-4ETF (1-888-400-4383).

 

Description of Principal Risks

The value of your investment in the Fund changes with the market price of the Fund's shares determined in the secondary market. Market price may be determined, in part, by the values of the Fund's investments. Many factors can affect those values. The factors that are most likely to have a material effect on the Fund's portfolio as a whole are called "principal risks." The principal risks of the Fund are identified in the "Fund Summary" and are described in this section. The Fund may be subject to additional risks other than those described below because the types of investments made by the Fund can change over time. Securities and investment techniques mentioned in this section that appear in bold type are described in greater detail under "Characteristics and Risks of Securities and Investment Techniques." That section and "Investment Objectives and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information also include more information about the Fund, its investments and the related risks. There is no guarantee that the Fund will be able to achieve its investment objective. It is possible to lose money by investing in the Fund.

Market Trading Risk

The Fund is subject to secondary market trading risks. Once operational, shares of the Fund are listed for trading on an exchange, however, there can be no guarantee that an active trading market for such shares will develop or continue. Shares of the Fund may be listed or traded on U.S. and foreign (non-U.S.) exchanges other than the Fund's primary U.S. listing exchange. There can be no guarantee that the Fund's shares will continue trading on any exchange or in any market or that the Fund's shares will continue to meet the listing or trading requirements of any exchange or market. The Fund's shares may experience higher trading volumes on one exchange as compared to another and investors are subject to the execution and settlement risks of the market where their broker directs trades.

Secondary market trading in the Fund's shares may be halted by an exchange because of market conditions. Pursuant to exchange or market rules, trading in the Fund's shares on an exchange or in any market may be subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility. There can be no guarantee that the Fund's exchange listing or ability to trade its shares will continue or remain unchanged. In the event the Fund ceases to be listed on an exchange, the Fund may cease operating as an "exchange-traded" fund and operate as a mutual fund, provided that shareholders are given advance notice.

Shares of the Fund may trade on an exchange at prices at, above or below their most recent NAV. The per share NAV of the Fund is calculated at the end of each business day, as described below, and fluctuates with changes in the market value of the Fund's holdings. The trading prices of the Fund's shares fluctuate continuously throughout the trading day based on market supply and demand, and may not closely track NAV. The trading prices of the Fund's shares may differ significantly from NAV during periods of market volatility, which may, among other factors, lead to the Fund's shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV.

Buying or selling the Fund's shares on an exchange may require the payment of brokerage commissions. In addition, you may also incur the cost of the spread (the difference between the bid price and the ask price). The commission is frequently a fixed amount and may be a significant cost for investors seeking to buy or sell small amounts of shares. The spread varies over time for shares of the Fund based on their trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally less if the Fund has more trading volume and market liquidity and more if the Fund has less trading volume and market liquidity. Due to the costs inherent in buying or selling the Fund's shares, frequent trading may detract significantly from investment returns. Investment in the Fund's shares may not be advisable for investors who expect to engage in frequent trading.

Interest Rate Risk

Interest rate risk is the risk that fixed income securities and other instruments in the Fund's portfolio will decline in value because of an increase in interest rates. As nominal interest rates rise, the value of certain fixed income securities held by the Fund is likely to decrease. A nominal interest rate can be described as the sum of a real interest rate and an expected inflation rate. Fixed income securities with longer durations tend to be more sensitive to changes in interest rates, usually making them more volatile than securities with shorter durations. Inflation-indexed bonds, including Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities ("TIPS"), decline in value when real interest rates rise. In certain interest rate environments, such as when real interest rates are rising faster than nominal interest rates, inflation-indexed bonds may experience greater losses than other fixed income securities with similar durations.

Variable and floating rate securities generally are less sensitive to interest rate changes but may decline in value if their interest rates do not rise as much, or as quickly, as interest rates in general. Conversely, floating rate securities will not generally increase in value if interest rates decline. Inverse floating rate securities may decrease in value if interest rates increase. Inverse floating rate securities may also exhibit greater price volatility than a fixed rate obligation with similar credit quality. When the Fund holds variable or floating rate securities, a decrease (or, in the case of inverse floating rate securities, an increase) in market interest rates will adversely affect the income received from such securities and the net asset value of the Fund's shares.

Credit Risk

The Fund could lose money if the issuer or guarantor of a fixed income security (including a security purchased with securities lending collateral), or the counterparty to a derivatives contract, repurchase agreement or a loan of portfolio securities is unable or unwilling, or is perceived (whether by market participants, ratings agencies, pricing services or otherwise) as unable or unwilling, to make timely principal and/or interest payments, or to otherwise honor its obligations. The downgrade of the credit of a security held by the Fund may decrease its value. Securities are subject to varying degrees of credit risk, which are often reflected in credit ratings. Municipal bonds are subject to the risk that litigation, legislation or other political events, local business or economic conditions, or the bankruptcy of the issuer could have a significant effect on an issuer's ability to make payments of principal and/or interest.

High Yield Risk

Funds that invest in high yield securities and unrated securities of similar credit quality (commonly known as "junk bonds") may be subject to greater levels of credit and liquidity risk than funds that do not invest in such securities. These securities are considered predominately speculative with respect to the issuer's continuing ability to make principal and interest payments. An economic downturn or period of rising interest rates could adversely affect the market for these securities and reduce the Fund's ability to sell these securities (liquidity risk). If the issuer of a security is in default with respect to interest or principal payments, the Fund may lose its entire investment. Because of the risks involved in investing in high yield securities, an investment in the Fund that invests in such securities should be considered speculative.

Market Risk

The market price of securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. Securities may decline in value due to factors affecting securities markets generally or particular industries represented in the securities markets. The value of a security may decline due to general market conditions which are not specifically related to a particular company, such as real or perceived adverse economic conditions, changes in the general outlook for corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates or adverse investor sentiment generally. The value of a security may also decline due to factors which affect a particular industry or industries, such as labor shortages or increased production costs and competitive conditions within an industry. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple asset classes may decline in value simultaneously.

Issuer Risk

The value of a security may decline for a number of reasons which directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer's goods or services, as well as the historical and prospective earnings of the issuer and the value of its assets.

Liquidity Risk

Liquidity risk exists when particular investments are difficult to purchase or sell. Illiquid securities are securities that cannot be disposed of within seven days in the ordinary course of business at approximately the value at which the Fund has valued the securities. The Fund's investments in illiquid securities, if any, may reduce the returns of the Fund because it may be unable to sell the illiquid securities at an advantageous time or price. Additionally, the market for certain investments may become illiquid under adverse market or economic conditions independent of any specific adverse changes in the conditions of a particular issuer. In such cases, the Fund, due to limitations on investments in illiquid securities and the difficulty in purchasing and selling such securities or instruments, may be unable to achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain sector. To the extent that the Fund's principal investment strategies involve derivatives, foreign (non-U.S.) securities or securities with substantial market and/or credit risk, the Fund will tend to have the greatest exposure to liquidity risk.

Derivatives Risk

Derivatives are financial contracts whose value depends on, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index. The various derivative instruments that the Fund may use are referenced under "Characteristics and Risks of Securities and Investment Techniques—Derivatives" in this prospectus and described in more detail under "Investment Objectives and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information. The Fund may use derivatives as a substitute for taking a position in the underlying asset and/or as part of a strategy designed to reduce exposure to other risks, such as interest rate or currency risk. The Fund may also use derivatives for leverage, in which case their use would involve leveraging risk. The Fund's use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. Derivatives are subject to a number of risks described elsewhere in this section, such as liquidity risk, interest rate risk, market risk, credit risk and management risk. They also involve the risk of mispricing or improper valuation and the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. If the Fund invests in a derivative instrument, the Fund could lose more than the principal amount invested. Also, suitable derivative transactions may not be available in all circumstances and there can be no assurance that the Fund will engage in these transactions to reduce exposure to other risks when that would be beneficial.

Equity Risk

Equity securities represent an ownership interest, or the right to acquire an ownership interest, in an issuer. Equity securities also include, among other things, preferred stocks, convertible stocks and warrants. The values of equity securities, such as common stocks and preferred stocks, may decline due to general market conditions which are not specifically related to a particular company, such as real or perceived adverse economic conditions, changes in the general outlook for corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates or adverse investor sentiment generally. They may also decline due to factors which affect a particular industry or industries, such as labor shortages or increased production costs and competitive conditions within an industry. Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed income securities.

Mortgage-Related and Other Asset-Backed Securities Risk

Mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities often involve risks that are different from or more acute than risks associated with other types of debt instruments. Generally, rising interest rates tend to extend the duration of fixed rate mortgage-related securities, making them more sensitive to changes in interest rates. As a result, in a period of rising interest rates, if the Fund holds mortgage-related securities, it may exhibit additional volatility. This is known as extension risk. In addition, adjustable and fixed rate mortgage-related securities are subject to prepayment risk. When interest rates decline, borrowers may pay off their mortgages sooner than expected. This can reduce the returns of the Fund because the Fund may have to reinvest that money at the lower prevailing interest rates. The Fund's investments in other asset-backed securities are subject to risks similar to those associated with mortgage-related securities, as well as additional risks associated with the nature of the assets and the servicing of those assets.

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Investment Risk

Because the Fund invests in foreign (non-U.S.) securities, it may experience more rapid and extreme changes in value than the Fund that invests exclusively in securities of U.S. companies. The securities markets of many foreign countries are relatively small, with a limited number of companies representing a small number of industries. Additionally, issuers of foreign (non-U.S.) securities are usually not subject to the same degree of regulation as U.S. issuers. Reporting, accounting and auditing standards of foreign countries differ, in some cases significantly, from U.S. standards. Also, nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, currency blockage, political changes or diplomatic developments could adversely affect the Fund's investments in a foreign country. In the event of nationalization, expropriation or other confiscation, the Fund could lose its entire investment in foreign (non-U.S.) securities. Adverse conditions in a certain region can adversely affect securities of other countries whose economies appear to be unrelated. To the extent that the Fund invests a significant portion of its assets in a specific geographic region, the Fund will generally have more exposure to regional economic risks associated with foreign investments.  Foreign securities may also be less liquid and more difficult to value than securities of U.S. issuers.

Emerging Markets Risk

Foreign (non-U.S.) investment risk may be particularly high to the extent the Fund invests in emerging market securities. Emerging market securities may present market, credit, currency, liquidity, legal, political and other risks different from, and potentially greater than, the risks of investing in securities and instruments economically tied to developed foreign countries. To the extent the Fund invests in emerging market securities that are economically tied to a particular region, country or group of countries, the Fund may be more sensitive to adverse political or social events affecting that region, country or group of countries. Economic, business, political, or social instability may affect emerging market securities differently. Accordingly, to the extent the Fund invests in a wide range of emerging market securities (e.g., different regions or countries, asset classes, issuers, sectors or credit qualities) it may perform differently in response to such instability than if the Fund invested in a more limited range of emerging market securities. For example, if the Fund focuses its investments in multiple asset classes of emerging market securities, the Fund may have a limited ability to mitigate losses in an environment that is adverse to emerging market securities in general. Emerging market securities may also be more volatile, less liquid and more difficult to value than securities economically tied to developed foreign countries. The systems and procedures for trading and settlement of securities in emerging markets are less developed and less transparent and transactions may take longer to settle. The Fund may not know the identity of trading counterparties, which may increase the possibility of the Fund not receiving payment or delivery of securities in a transaction.

Currency Risk

If the Fund invests directly in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or in securities that trade in, and receive revenues in, foreign (non-U.S.) currencies, or in derivatives that provide exposure to foreign (non-U.S.) currencies, it will be subject to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar, or, in the case of hedging positions, that the U.S. dollar will decline in value relative to the currency being hedged.

Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates, intervention (or the failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments, central banks or supranational entities such as the International Monetary Fund, or by the imposition of currency controls or other political developments in the United States or abroad. As a result, the Fund's investments in foreign currency denominated securities may reduce the returns of the Fund.

Currency risk may be particularly high to the extent that the Fund invests in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or engages in foreign currency transactions that are economically tied to emerging market countries. These currency transactions may present market, credit, currency, liquidity, legal, political and other risks different from, or greater than, the risks of investing in developed foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or engaging in foreign currency transactions that are economically tied to developed foreign countries.

Issuer Non-Diversification Risk

Focusing investments in a small number of issuers increases risk. Funds that are "non-diversified" may invest a greater percentage of their assets in the securities of a single issuer (such as bonds issued by a particular foreign government) than funds that are "diversified." Funds that invest in a relatively small number of issuers are more susceptible to risks associated with a single economic, political or regulatory occurrence than a more diversified portfolio might be. Some of those issuers also may present substantial credit or other risks.

Leveraging Risk

Certain transactions may give rise to a form of leverage. Such transactions may include, among others, reverse repurchase agreements, dollar rolls, loans of portfolio securities and the use of when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment transactions. The Fund's use of derivatives may also create leveraging risk for the Fund. To mitigate leveraging risk, PIMCO will segregate or "earmark" liquid assets or otherwise cover transactions that may give rise to such risk. The Fund also may be exposed to leveraging risk by borrowing money for investment purposes. Leveraging may cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations or to meet segregation requirements when it may not be advantageous to do so. Leveraging, including borrowing, may cause the Fund to be more volatile than if the Fund had not been leveraged. This is because leveraging tends to exaggerate the effect of any increase or decrease in the value of the Fund's portfolio securities.

Management Risk

The Fund is subject to management risk because it is an actively managed investment portfolio. PIMCO and each portfolio manager will apply investment techniques and risk analyses in making investment decisions for the Fund, but there can be no guarantee that these decisions will produce the desired results. Additionally, legislative, regulatory, or tax restrictions, policies or developments may affect the investment techniques available to PIMCO and each portfolio manager in connection with managing the Fund and may also adversely affect the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective.

Short Sale Risk

Short sales are subject to special risks. A short sale involves the sale by the Fund of a security that it does not own with the hope of purchasing the same security at a later date at a lower price. The Fund may also enter into a short position through a forward commitment or a short derivative position through a futures contract or swap agreement. If the price of the security has increased during this time, then the Fund will incur a loss equal to the increase in price from the time that the short sale was entered into plus any premiums and interest paid to the third party.

Therefore, short sales involve the risk that losses may be exaggerated, potentially losing more money than the actual cost of the investment. By contrast, a loss on a long position arises from decreases in the value of the security and is limited by the fact that a security's value cannot decrease below zero.

By investing the proceeds received from selling securities short, the Fund could be deemed to be employing a form of leverage, which creates special risks. The use of leverage may increase the Fund's exposure to long securities positions and make any change in the Fund's NAV greater than it would be without the use of leverage. This could result in increased volatility of returns. There is no guarantee that any leveraging strategy the Fund employs will be successful during any period in which it is employed.

In times of unusual or adverse market, economic, regulatory or political conditions, the Fund may not be able, fully or partially, to implement its short selling strategy. Periods of unusual or adverse market, economic, regulatory or political conditions generally may exist for as long as six months and, in some cases, much longer. Also, there is the risk that the third party to the short sale may fail to honor its contract terms, causing a loss to the Fund.

Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings

Please see "Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings" in the Statement of Additional Information for information about the availability of the complete schedule of the Fund's holdings.

Management of the Fund

Investment Manager

PIMCO serves as the investment manager for the Fund. Subject to the supervision of the Board of Trustees, PIMCO is responsible for managing the investment activities of the Fund and the Fund's business affairs and other administrative matters.

PIMCO is located at 840 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach, CA 92660. Organized in 1971, PIMCO provides investment management and advisory services to private accounts of institutional and individual clients and to mutual funds. As of [_____], PIMCO had approximately $[__] trillion in assets under management.

Management Fees

The Fund pays PIMCO fees in return for providing investment advisory, supervisory and administrative services under an all-in fee structure. The Fund will pay monthly management fees to PIMCO at the annual rate (stated as a percentage of the average daily net assets of the Fund) of [__]%.

In addition to providing investment advisory services, PIMCO provides or procures supervisory and administrative services for shareholders and also bears the costs of various third-party services required by the Fund, including audit, custodial, portfolio accounting, legal, transfer agency and printing costs. The Fund bears other expenses which are not covered under the management fee which may vary and affect the total level of expenses paid by shareholders, such as taxes and governmental fees, brokerage fees, commissions and other transaction expenses, costs of borrowing money, including interest expenses, securities lending expenses, extraordinary expenses (such as litigation and indemnification expenses) and fees and expenses of the Trust's Independent Trustees and their counsel. PIMCO generally earns a profit on the management fee paid by the Fund. Also, under the terms of the investment management agreement, PIMCO, and not Fund shareholders, would benefit from any price decreases in third-party services, including decreases resulting from an increase in net assets.

A discussion of the basis for the Board of Trustees' approval of the Fund's investment management agreement will be available in the Fund's first annual or semi-annual report to shareholders.

PIMCO has contractually agreed, through [__], to waive its management fee, or reimburse the Fund, to the extent that organizational expenses and pro rata Trustees' fees exceed 0.0049% of the Fund's average net assets. Under the Expense Limitation Agreement, which renews annually for a full year unless terminated by PIMCO upon at least 30 days' notice prior to the end of the contract term, PIMCO may recoup these waivers and reimbursements in future periods not exceeding three years, provided that organizational expenses and pro rata Trustees' fees, plus recoupment, do not exceed the Expense Limit.

Individual Portfolio Manager

The following individual has primary responsibility for managing the Fund.

 

Portfolio Manager

Since

Recent Professional Experience

[___________]

*

[_________]

*

Inception of the Fund.

Please see the Statement of Additional Information for additional information about other accounts managed by the portfolio manager, the portfolio manager's compensation and the portfolio manager's ownership of shares of the Fund.

Distributor

The Trust's Distributor is PIMCO Investments LLC ("Distributor"). The Distributor, located at 1633 Broadway, New York, NY 10019, is a broker-dealer registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC"). The Distributor distributes Creation Units for the Fund and does not maintain a secondary market in shares of the Fund.

Distribution and Servicing Plan

The Trust has adopted a Distribution and Servicing Plan for shares of the Fund pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act (the "12b-1 Plan"). The 12b-1 Plan permits compensation in connection with the distribution and marketing of Fund shares and/or the provision of certain shareholder services. The 12b-1 Plan permits the Fund to pay compensation at an annual rate of up to 0.25% of the Fund's average daily net assets. However, the Board of Trustees has determined not to authorize payment of a 12b-1 Plan fee at this time.

The 12b-1 fee may only be imposed or increased when the Board of Trustees determines that it is in the best interests of shareholders to do so. Because these fees are paid out of the Fund's assets on an ongoing basis, to the extent that a fee is authorized, over time they will increase the cost of an investment in the Fund. The 12b-1 Plan fee may cost an investor more than other types of sales charges.

Buying and Selling Shares

Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on a national securities exchange during the trading day. Shares can be bought and sold throughout the trading day like shares of other publicly traded companies. However, there can be no guarantee that an active trading market will develop or be maintained, or that the Fund shares listing will continue or remain unchanged. The Trust does not impose any minimum investment for shares of the Fund purchased on an exchange. Buying or selling the Fund's shares involves certain costs that apply to all securities transactions. When buying or selling shares of the Fund through a financial intermediary, you may incur a brokerage commission or other charges determined by your financial intermediary. Due to these brokerage costs, if any, frequent trading may detract significantly from investment returns. In addition, you may also incur the cost of the spread (the difference between the bid price and the ask price). The commission is frequently a fixed amount and may be a significant cost for investors seeking to buy or sell small amounts of shares. The spread varies over time for shares of the Fund based on its trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally less if the Fund has more trading volume and market liquidity and more if the Fund has less trading volume and market liquidity.

Shares of the Fund may be acquired from the Distributor or redeemed directly from the Fund only in Creation Units or multiples thereof, as discussed in the "Creations and Redemptions" section of the Statement of Additional Information. Once created, shares of the Fund generally trade in the secondary market in amounts less than a Creation Unit.

The Trust's Board of Trustees has not adopted a policy of monitoring for frequent purchases and redemptions of Fund shares ("frequent trading") that appear to attempt to take advantage of potential arbitrage opportunities presented by a lag between a change in the value of the Fund's portfolio securities after the close of the primary markets for the Fund's portfolio securities and the reflection of that change in the Fund's NAV ("market timing"). The Trust believes this is appropriate because an ETF, such as the Fund, is intended to be attractive to arbitrageurs, as trading activity is critical to ensuring that the market price of Fund shares remains at or close to NAV. Since the Fund issues and redeems Creation Units at NAV plus applicable transaction fees, and the Fund's shares may be purchased and sold on NYSE Arca at prevailing market prices, the risks of frequent trading are limited.

The Fund's primary listing exchange is NYSE Arca. NYSE Arca is open for trading Monday through Friday and is closed on the following holidays: New Year's Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents' Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.

A "Business Day" with respect to the Fund is each day NYSE Arca is open. Orders from Authorized Participants to create or redeem Creation Units will only be accepted on a Business Day. On days when NYSE Arca closes earlier than normal, the Fund may require orders to create or redeem Creation Units to be placed earlier in the day. See the Statement of Additional Information for more information.

Section 12(d)(1) of the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the "1940 Act"), restricts investments by registered investment companies and companies relying on Sections 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of the 1940 Act in the securities of other investment companies. Registered investment companies are permitted to invest in the Fund beyond the limits set forth in Section 12(d)(1), subject to certain terms and conditions set forth in an SEC exemptive order issued to PIMCO and the Trust, including that such investment companies enter into an agreement with the Trust.

The Trust typically does not offer or sell its shares to non- U.S. resident Authorized Participants. For purposes of this policy, a U.S. resident is defined as an account with (i) a U.S. address of record and (ii) all account owners residing in the U.S. at the time of sale.

Book Entry

Shares of the Fund are held in book-entry form, which means that no stock certificates are issued. The Depository Trust Company ("DTC") or its nominee is the record owner of all outstanding shares of the Fund and is recognized as the owner of all shares for all purposes.

Investors owning shares of the Fund are beneficial owners as shown on the records of DTC or its participants. DTC serves as the securities depository for shares of the Fund. DTC participants include securities brokers and dealers, banks, trust companies, clearing corporations and other institutions that directly or indirectly maintain a custodial relationship with DTC. As a beneficial owner of shares, you are not entitled to receive physical delivery of stock certificates or to have shares registered in your name, and you are not considered a registered owner of shares. Therefore, to exercise any right as an owner of shares, you must rely upon the procedures of DTC and its participants. These procedures are the same as those that apply to any other exchange-traded securities that you hold in book-entry or "street name" form.

Share Prices

The trading prices of the Fund's shares in the secondary market generally differ from the Fund's daily NAV per share and are affected by market forces such as supply and demand, economic conditions and other factors. Information regarding the intra-day net asset value of the Fund is disseminated every 15 seconds throughout the trading day by the national securities exchange on which the Fund's shares are primarily listed or by market data vendors or other information providers. The intra-day net asset value is based on the current market value of the securities and/or cash included in the Fund's intra-day net asset value basket. The intra-day net asset value does not necessarily reflect the precise composition of the current portfolio of securities and instruments held by the Fund at a particular point in time or the best possible valuation of the current portfolio. Therefore, the intra-day net asset value should not be viewed as a "real-time" update of the NAV, which is computed only once a day. The intra-day net asset value is generally determined by using both current market quotations and/or price quotations obtained from broker-dealers that may trade in the portfolio securities and instruments included in the Fund's intra-day net asset value basket. The Fund is not involved in, or responsible for, the calculation or dissemination of the intra-day net asset value and makes no representation or warranty as to its accuracy. An inaccuracy in the intra-day net asset value could result from various factors, including the difficulty of pricing portfolio instruments on an intra-day basis.

Premiums and Discounts

There may be differences between the daily market prices on secondary markets for shares of the Fund and the Fund's NAV. NAV is the price per share at which the Fund issues and redeems shares. See "How Net Asset Value Is Determined" below. The price used to calculate market returns ("Market Price") of the Fund generally is determined using the midpoint between the highest bid and the lowest offer on the national securities exchange on which shares of the Fund are primarily listed for trading, as of the time that the Fund's NAV is calculated. The Fund's Market Price may be at, above or below its NAV. The NAV of the Fund will fluctuate with changes in the market value of its portfolio holdings. The Market Price of the Fund will fluctuate in accordance with changes in its NAV, as well as market supply and demand.

Premiums or discounts are the differences (expressed as a percentage) between the NAV and the Market Price of the Fund on a given day, generally at the time the NAV is calculated. A premium is the amount that the Fund is trading above the reported NAV, expressed as a percentage of the NAV. A discount is the amount that the Fund is trading below the reported NAV, expressed as a percentage of the NAV. A discount or premium could be significant.  Information regarding the frequency of daily premiums or discounts, generally at the time the NAV is calculated, during the Fund's four previous calendar quarters (or for the life of the Fund, if shorter) can be found at www.pimcoetfs.com.

Request for Multiple Copies of Shareholder Documents

To reduce expenses, it is intended that only one copy of the Fund's prospectus and each annual and semi-annual report, when available, will be mailed to those addresses shared by two or more accounts. If you wish to receive individual copies of these documents, please contact the financial intermediary through which you hold your shares.

How Net Asset Value Is Determined

The NAV of the Fund's shares is determined by dividing the total value of the Fund's portfolio investments and other assets, less any liabilities, by the total number of shares outstanding.

Fund shares are valued as of the close of regular trading (normally 4:00 p.m., Eastern time) (the "NYSE Close") on each Business Day. Information that becomes known to the Fund or its agents after the NAV has been calculated on a particular day will not generally be used to retroactively adjust the price of a security or the NAV determined earlier that day. The Fund reserves the right to change the time its NAV is calculated if the Fund closes earlier, or as permitted by the SEC. 

For purposes of calculating NAV, portfolio securities and other assets for which market quotes are readily available are valued at market value. Market value is generally determined on the basis of last reported sales prices, or if no sales are reported, based on quotes obtained from a quotation reporting system, established market makers, or pricing services. Fixed income securities and non-exchange traded derivatives are normally valued on the basis of quotes obtained from brokers and dealers or pricing services using data reflecting the earlier closing of the principal markets for those securities. Prices obtained from independent pricing services use information provided by market makers or estimates of market values obtained from yield data relating to investments or securities with similar characteristics. Certain fixed income securities purchased on a delayed-delivery basis are marked to market daily until settlement at the forward settlement date. Short-term investments having a maturity of 60 days or less are generally valued at amortized cost. Exchange traded options, futures and options on futures are valued at the settlement price determined by the exchange. With respect to any portion of the Fund's assets that are invested in one or more open-end management investment companies, the Fund's NAV will be calculated based upon the NAVs of such investments. The value of securities traded in markets outside the United States may be affected significantly on a day that the NYSE is closed and an Authorized Participant is not able to purchase or redeem shares.

If a foreign security's value has materially changed after the close of the security's primary exchange or principal market but before the NYSE Close, the security will be valued at fair value based on procedures established and approved by the Board of Trustees. Foreign securities that do not trade when the NYSE is open are also valued at fair value. Foreign exchanges may permit trading in foreign securities on days when the Trust is not open for business, which may result in the Fund's portfolio investments being affected when you are unable to buy or sell shares.

Securities and other assets for which market quotes are not readily available are valued at fair value as determined in good faith by the Board of Trustees or persons acting at their direction. The Board of Trustees has adopted methods for valuing securities and other assets in circumstances where market quotes are not readily available, and has delegated to PIMCO the responsibility for applying the valuation methods. In the event that market quotes are not readily available, and the security or asset cannot be valued pursuant to one of the valuation methods, the value of the security or asset will be determined in good faith by the Valuation Committee of the Board of Trustees, generally based upon recommendations provided by PIMCO.

Market quotes are considered not readily available in circumstances where there is an absence of current or reliable market-based data (e.g., trade information, bid/ask information, broker quotes), including where events occur after the close of the relevant market, but prior to the NYSE Close, that materially affect the values of the Fund's securities or assets. In addition, market quotes are considered not readily available when, due to extraordinary circumstances, the exchanges or markets on which the securities trade do not open for trading for the entire day and no other market prices are available. The Board has delegated to PIMCO the responsibility for monitoring significant events that may materially affect the values of the Fund's securities or assets and for determining whether the value of the applicable securities or assets should be reevaluated in light of such significant events.

When the Fund uses fair value pricing to determine its NAV, securities will not be priced on the basis of quotes from the primary market in which they are traded, but rather may be priced by another method that the Board of Trustees or persons acting at their direction believe accurately reflects fair value. Fair value pricing may require subjective determinations about the value of a security. While the Trust's policy is intended to result in a calculation of the Fund's NAV that fairly reflects security values as of the time of pricing, the Trust cannot ensure that fair values determined by the Board of Trustees or persons acting at their direction would accurately reflect the price that the Fund could obtain for a security if it were to dispose of that security as of the time of pricing (for instance, in a forced or distressed sale). The prices used by the Fund may differ from the value that would be realized if the securities were sold.

Fund Distributions

The Fund distributes substantially all of its net investment income to shareholders in the form of dividends. The Fund intends to declare and distribute income dividends monthly to shareholders of record. In addition, the Fund distributes any net capital gains it earns from the sale of portfolio securities to shareholders no less frequently than annually. Net short-term capital gains may be paid more frequently. Dividend payments are made through DTC participants and indirect participants to beneficial owners then of record with proceeds received from the Fund.

No dividend reinvestment service is provided by the Trust. Financial intermediaries may make available the DTC book-entry Dividend Reinvestment Service for use by beneficial owners of Fund shares for reinvestment of their dividend distributions. Beneficial owners should contact their financial intermediary to determine the availability and costs of the service and the details of participation therein. Financial intermediaries may require beneficial owners to adhere to specific procedures and timetables. If this service is available and used, dividend distributions of both income and net capital gains will be automatically reinvested in additional whole shares of the Fund purchased in the secondary market.

Tax Consequences

Taxes on Fund distributions. If you are subject to U.S. federal income tax, you will be subject to tax on Fund taxable distributions. For federal income tax purposes, Fund taxable distributions will be taxable to you as either ordinary income or capital gains.

Fund taxable dividends (i.e., distributions of investment income) are generally taxable to you as ordinary income. Federal taxes on Fund distributions of gains are determined by how long the Fund owned the investments that generated the gains, rather than how long you have owned your shares. Distributions of gains from investments that the Fund owned for more than one year will generally be taxable to you as long-term capital gains. Distributions of gains from investments that the Fund owned for one year or less, including income from securities lending, will generally be taxable to you as ordinary income.

Fund distributions are taxable to you even if they are paid from income or gains earned by the Fund prior to your investment and thus were included in the price you paid for your shares. For example, if you purchase shares on or just before the record date of the Fund distribution, you will pay full price for the shares and may receive a portion of your investment back as a taxable distribution.

Taxes when you sell your shares. Any gain resulting from the sale of Fund shares will generally be subject to federal income tax. Currently, any capital gain or loss realized upon a sale of Fund shares is generally treated as a long-term gain or loss if the shares have been held for more than one year. Any capital gain or loss realized upon a sale of Fund shares held for one year or less is generally treated as short-term gain or loss, except that any capital loss on the sale of shares held for six months or less is treated as long-term capital loss to the extent that capital gain dividends were paid with respect to such shares.

Returns of capital. If the Fund's distributions exceed its taxable income and capital gains realized during a taxable year, all or a portion of the distributions made in the same taxable year may be recharacterized as a return of capital to shareholders. A return of capital distribution will generally not be taxable, but will reduce each shareholder's cost basis in the Fund and result in a higher reported capital gain or lower reported capital loss when those shares on which the distribution was received are sold.

Important Tax Reporting Considerations. Legislation passed by Congress requires reporting of adjusted cost basis information for covered securities, which generally include shares of a regulated investment company acquired after January 1, 2012, to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and to taxpayers. Shareholders should contact their financial intermediaries with respect to reporting of cost basis and available elections for their accounts.

Backup withholding. The Fund may be required to withhold U.S. federal income tax on all taxable distributions payable to shareholders if they fail to provide the Fund with their correct taxpayer identification number or to make required certifications, or if they have been notified by the IRS that they are subject to backup withholding. Backup withholding is not an additional tax. Any amounts withheld may be credited against U.S. federal income tax liability.

Foreign Withholding Taxes. The Fund may be subject to foreign withholding or other foreign taxes, which in some cases can be significant on any income or gain from investments in foreign securities. In that case, the Fund's total return on those securities would be decreased. The Fund may generally deduct these taxes in computing its taxable income. Rather than deducting these foreign taxes, the Fund, when investing more than 50% of its assets in the stock or securities of foreign corporations or foreign governments at the end of its taxable year, may make an election to treat a proportionate amount of eligible foreign taxes as constituting a taxable distribution to each shareholder, which would, subject to certain limitations, generally allow the shareholder to either (i) credit that proportionate amount of taxes against U.S. Federal income tax liability as a foreign tax credit or (ii) take that amount as an itemized deduction. Although in some cases the Fund may be able to apply for a refund of a portion of such taxes, the ability to successfully obtain such a refund may be uncertain.

Any foreign shareholders would generally be subject to U.S. tax withholding of 30% (or lower applicable treaty rate) on distributions by the Fund.

This "Tax Consequences" section relates only to federal income tax; the consequences under other tax laws may differ. Shareholders should consult their tax advisors as to the possible application of foreign, state and local income tax laws to Fund dividends and capital distributions. Please see the Statement of Additional Information for additional information regarding the tax aspects of investing in the Fund.

Characteristics and Risks of Securities and Investment Techniques

This section provides additional information about some of the principal investments and related risks of the Fund described under "Fund Summary" and "Description of Principal Risks" above. It also describes characteristics and risks of additional securities and investment techniques that may be used by the Fund from time to time. Most of the securities and investment techniques described herein are discretionary, which means that PIMCO can decide whether to use them or not. This prospectus does not attempt to disclose all of the various types of securities and investment techniques that may be used by the Fund. As with any fund, investors in the Fund rely on the professional investment judgment and skill of PIMCO and the individual portfolio manager. Please see "Investment Objectives and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information for more detailed information about the securities and investment techniques described in this section and about other strategies and techniques that may be used by the Fund.

Investment Selection

The Fund seeks maximum total return. The total return sought by the Fund consists of both income earned on the Fund's investments and capital appreciation, if any, arising from increases in the market value of the Fund's holdings. Capital appreciation of Fixed Income Instruments generally results from decreases in market interest rates, foreign currency appreciation, or improving credit fundamentals for a particular market sector or security.

In selecting investments for the Fund, PIMCO develops an outlook for interest rates, currency exchange rates and the economy, analyzes credit and call risks, and uses other investment selection techniques. The proportion of the Fund's assets committed to investment in securities with particular characteristics (such as quality, sector, interest rate or maturity) varies based on PIMCO's outlook for the U.S. economy and the economies of other countries in the world, the financial markets and other factors.

With respect to fixed income investing, PIMCO attempts to identify areas of the bond market that are undervalued relative to the rest of the market. PIMCO identifies these areas by grouping Fixed Income Investments into sectors such as money markets, governments, corporates, mortgages, asset-backed and international. In seeking to identify undervalued currencies, PIMCO may consider many factors, including but not limited to longer-term analysis of relative interest rates, inflation rates, real exchange rates, purchasing power parity, trade account balances and current account balances, as well as other factors that influence exchange rates such as flows, market technical trends and government policies. Sophisticated proprietary software then assists in evaluating sectors and pricing specific investments. Once investment opportunities are identified, PIMCO will shift assets among sectors depending upon changes in relative valuations, credit spreads and other factors. There is no guarantee that PIMCO's investment selection techniques will produce the desired results.

Investors should be aware that the investments made by the Fund and the results achieved by the Fund at any given time are not expected to be the same as those made by other funds for which PIMCO acts as investment adviser, including funds with names, investment objectives and policies similar to the Fund.

Fixed Income Instruments

"Fixed Income Instruments," as used generally in this prospectus, includes:

securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies or government sponsored enterprises ("U.S. Government Securities");

corporate debt securities of U.S. and non-U.S. issuers, including convertible securities and corporate commercial paper;

mortgage-backed and other asset-backed securities;

inflation-indexed bonds issued both by governments and corporations;

structured notes, including hybrid or "indexed" securities and event-linked bonds;

bank capital and trust preferred securities;

loan participations and assignments;

delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities;

bank certificates of deposit, fixed time deposits and bankers' acceptances;

repurchase agreements on Fixed Income Instruments and reverse repurchase agreements on Fixed Income Instruments;

debt securities issued by states or local governments and their agencies, authorities and other government-sponsored enterprises;

obligations of non-U.S. governments or their subdivisions, agencies and government-sponsored enterprises; and

obligations of international agencies or supranational entities.

Securities issued by U.S. Government agencies or government-sponsored enterprises may not be guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury.

The Fund may invest in derivatives based on Fixed Income Instruments.

Duration

Duration is a measure used to determine the sensitivity of a security's price to changes in interest rates. The longer a security's duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates. Similarly, a Fund with a longer average portfolio duration will be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than a Fund with a shorter average portfolio duration. By way of example, the price of a bond fund with an average duration of five years would be expected to fall approximately 5% if interest rates rose by one percentage point. Conversely, the price of a bond fund with an average duration of negative three years would be expected to rise approximately 3% if interest rates rose by one percentage point. The maturity of a security, another commonly used measure of price sensitivity, measures only the time until final payment is due, whereas duration takes into account the pattern of all payments of interest and principal on a security over time, including how these payments are affected by prepayments and by changes in interest rates, as well as the time until an interest rate on a security is reset (in the case of variable-rate securities). PIMCO uses an internal model for calculating duration, which may result in a different value for the duration of an index compared to the duration calculated by the index provider or another third party.

U.S. Government Securities

U.S. Government Securities are obligations of, or guaranteed by, the U.S. Government, its agencies or government-sponsored enterprises. The U.S. Government does not guarantee the NAV of the Fund's shares. U.S. Government Securities are subject to market and interest rate risk, as well as varying degrees of credit risk. Some U.S. Government Securities are issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury and are supported by the full faith and credit of the United States. Other types of U.S. Government Securities are supported by the full faith and credit of the United States (but not issued by the U.S. Treasury). These securities may have less credit risk than U.S. Government Securities not supported by the full faith and credit of the United States. Such other types of U.S. Government Securities are: (1) supported by the ability of the issuer to borrow from the U.S. Treasury; (2) supported only by the credit of the issuing agency, instrumentality or government-sponsored corporation; or (3) supported by the United States in some other way. These securities may be subject to greater credit risk. U.S. Government Securities include zero coupon securities, which tend to be subject to greater market risk than interest-paying securities of similar maturities.

Securities issued by U.S. Government agencies or government-sponsored enterprises may not be guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury. Government National Mortgage Association ("GNMA"), a wholly owned U.S. Government corporation, is authorized to guarantee, with the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government, the timely payment of principal and interest on securities issued by institutions approved by GNMA and backed by pools of mortgages insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Government related guarantors (i.e., not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government) include the Federal National Mortgage Association ("FNMA") and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation ("FHLMC"). Pass-through securities issued by FNMA are guaranteed as to timely payment of principal and interest by FNMA but are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. FHLMC guarantees the timely payment of interest and ultimate collection of principal, but its participation certificates are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government.

Municipal Bonds

Municipal Bonds are generally issued by states, territories, possessions and local governments and their agencies, authorities and other instrumentalities. Municipal Bonds are subject to interest rate, credit and market risk. The ability of an issuer to make payments could be affected by litigation, legislation or other political events or the bankruptcy of the issuer. Lower rated Municipal Bonds are subject to greater credit and market risk than higher quality Municipal Bonds. The types of Municipal Bonds in which the Fund may invest include municipal lease obligations, municipal general obligation bonds, municipal cash equivalents, and pre-refunded and escrowed to maturity Municipal Bonds. The Fund may also invest in industrial development bonds, which are Municipal Bonds issued by a government agency on behalf of a private sector company and, in most cases, are not backed by the credit of the issuing municipality and may therefore involve more risk. The Fund may also invest in securities issued by entities whose underlying assets are Municipal Bonds.

Pre-refunded Municipal Bonds are tax-exempt bonds that have been refunded to a call date on or before the final maturity of principal and remain outstanding in the municipal market. The payment of principal and interest of the pre-refunded Municipal Bonds held by the Fund is funded from securities in a designated escrow account that holds U.S. Treasury securities or other obligations of the U.S. Government (including its agencies and instrumentalities ("Agency Securities")). As the payment of principal and interest is generated from securities held in a designated escrow account, the pledge of the municipality has been fulfilled and the original pledge of revenue by the municipality is no longer in place. The escrow account securities pledged to pay the principal and interest of the pre-refunded Municipal Bond do not guarantee the price movement of the bond before maturity. Investment in pre-refunded Municipal Bonds held by the Fund may subject the Fund to interest rate risk, market risk and credit risk. In addition, while a secondary market exists for pre-refunded Municipal Bonds, if the Fund sells pre-refunded Municipal Bonds prior to maturity, the price received may be more or less than the original cost, depending on market conditions at the time of sale.

High Yield Securities

Securities rated lower than Baa by Moody's, or equivalently rated by S&P or Fitch, are sometimes referred to as "high yield securities" or "junk bonds." Investing in these securities involves special risks in addition to the risks associated with investments in higher-rated fixed income securities. While offering a greater potential opportunity for capital appreciation and higher yields, high yield securities typically entail greater potential price volatility and may be less liquid than higher-rated securities. High yield securities may be regarded as predominately speculative with respect to the issuer's continuing ability to meet principal and interest payments. They may also be more susceptible to real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions than higher-rated securities. Issuers of securities in default may fail to resume principal or interest payments, in which case a Fund may lose its entire investment.

Mortgage-Related and Other Asset-Backed Securities

Mortgage-related securities include mortgage pass-through securities, collateralized mortgage obligations ("CMOs"), commercial mortgage-backed securities, mortgage dollar rolls, CMO residuals, stripped mortgage-backed securities ("SMBSs") and other securities that directly or indirectly represent a participation in, or are secured by and payable from, mortgage loans on real property. A to-be-announced ("TBA") transaction is a method of trading mortgage-backed securities. In a TBA transaction, the buyer and seller agree upon general trade parameters such as agency, settlement date, par amount and price. The actual pools delivered generally are determined two days prior to the settlement date.

The value of some mortgage-or asset-backed securities may be particularly sensitive to changes in prevailing interest rates. Early repayment of principal on some mortgage-related securities may expose the Fund to a lower rate of return upon reinvestment of principal. When interest rates rise, the value of a mortgage-related security generally will decline; however, when interest rates are declining, the value of mortgage-related securities with prepayment features may not increase as much as other fixed income securities. The rate of prepayments on underlying mortgages will affect the price and volatility of a mortgage-related security, and may shorten or extend the effective maturity of the security beyond what was anticipated at the time of purchase. If unanticipated rates of prepayment on underlying mortgages increase the effective maturity of a mortgage-related security, the volatility of the security can be expected to increase. The value of these securities may fluctuate in response to the market's perception of the creditworthiness of the issuers. See "Extension Risk" and "Prepayment Risk" below. Additionally, although mortgages and mortgage-related securities are generally supported by some form of government or private guarantee and/or insurance, there is no assurance that guarantors or insurers will meet their obligations.

Extension Risk. Mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities are subject to Extension Risk, which is the risk that the issuer of such a security pays back the principal of such an obligation later than expected. This may occur when interest rates rise. This may negatively affect Fund returns, as the value of the security decreases when principal payments are made later than expected. In addition, because principal payments are made later than expected, the Fund may be prevented from investing proceeds it would otherwise have received at a given time at the higher prevailing interest rates.

Prepayment Risk. Mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities are subject to Prepayment Risk, which is the risk that the issuer of such a security pays back the principal of such an obligation earlier than expected (due to the sale of the underlying property, refinancing, or foreclosure). This may occur when interest rates decline. Prepayment may expose the Fund to a lower rate of return upon reinvestment of principal. Also, if a security subject to prepayment has been purchased at a premium, the value of the premium would be lost in the event of prepayment.

One type of SMBS has one class receiving all of the interest from the mortgage assets (the interest-only, or "IO" class), while the other class will receive all of the principal (the principal-only, or "PO" class). The yield to maturity on an IO class is extremely sensitive to the rate of principal payments (including prepayments) on the underlying mortgage assets, and a rapid rate of principal payments may have a material adverse effect on the Fund's yield to maturity from these securities. The Fund may invest up to 5% of its total assets in any combination of mortgage-related or other asset-backed IO, PO or inverse floater securities.

The Fund may invest in collateralized debt obligations ("CDOs"), which include collateralized bond obligations ("CBOs"), collateralized loan obligations ("CLOs") and other similarly structured securities CBOs and CLOs are types of asset-backed securities. A CBO is a trust which is backed by a diversified pool of high risk, below investment grade fixed income securities. A CLO is a trust typically collateralized by a pool of loans, which may include, among others, domestic and foreign senior secured loans, senior unsecured loans, and subordinate corporate loans, including loans that may be rated below investment grade or equivalent unrated loans. The Fund may invest in other asset-backed securities that have been offered to investors.

Reinvestment

The Fund may be subject to the risk that the returns of the Fund will decline during periods of falling interest rates because the Fund may have to reinvest the proceeds from matured, traded or called debt obligations at interest rates below the Fund's current earnings rate. For instance, when interest rates decline, an issuer of debt obligations may exercise an option to redeem securities prior to maturity, thereby forcing the Fund to invest in lower-yielding securities. The Fund also may choose to sell higher-yielding portfolio securities and to purchase lower-yielding securities to achieve greater portfolio diversification, because the Fund's portfolio manager believes the current holdings are overvalued or for other investment-related reasons. A decline in the returns received by the Fund from its investments is likely to have an adverse effect on the Fund's net asset value, yield and total return.

Focused Investment

To the extent that the Fund focuses its investments in a particular sector, the Fund may be susceptible to loss due to adverse developments affecting that sector. These developments include, but are not limited to, governmental regulation; inflation; rising interest rates; cost increases in raw materials, fuel and other operating expenses; technological innovations that may render existing products and equipment obsolete; competition from new entrants; high research and development costs; increased costs associated with compliance with environmental or other governmental regulations; and other economic, business or political developments specific to that sector. Furthermore, the Fund may invest a substantial portion of its assets in companies in related sectors that may share common characteristics, are often subject to similar business risks and regulatory burdens, and whose securities may react similarly to the types of developments described above, which will subject the Fund to greater risk. The Fund also will be subject to focused investment risk to the extent that it invests a substantial portion of its assets in a particular issuer, market, asset class, country or geographic region.

Corporate Debt Securities

Corporate debt securities are subject to the risk of the issuer's inability to meet principal and interest payments on the obligation and may also be subject to price volatility due to such factors as interest rate sensitivity, market perception of the creditworthiness of the issuer and general market liquidity. When interest rates rise, the value of corporate debt securities can be expected to decline. Debt securities with longer maturities tend to be more sensitive to interest rate movements than those with shorter maturities.

Bank Capital Securities and Trust Preferred Securities

There are two common types of bank capital: Tier I and Tier II. Bank capital is generally, but not always, of investment grade quality. Tier I securities often take the form of trust preferred securities. Tier II securities are commonly thought of as hybrids of debt and preferred stock, are often perpetual (with no maturity date), callable and, under certain conditions, allow for the issuer bank to withhold payment of interest until a later date.

Trust preferred securities have the characteristics of both subordinated debt and preferred stock. The primary advantage of the structure of trust preferred securities is that they are treated by the financial institution as debt securities for tax purposes and as equity for the calculation of capital requirements. Trust preferred securities typically bear a market rate coupon comparable to interest rates available on debt of a similarly rated issuer. Typical characteristics include long-term maturities, early redemption by the issuer, periodic fixed or variable interest payments, and maturities at face value. The market value of trust preferred securities may be more volatile than those of conventional debt securities. There can be no assurance as to the liquidity of trust preferred securities and the ability of holders, such as the Fund, to sell their holdings.

Loan Participations and Assignments

The Fund may invest in fixed- and floating-rate loans, which investments generally will be in the form of loan participations and assignments of portions of such loans. Participations and assignments involve special types of risk, including credit risk, interest rate risk, liquidity risk, and the risks of being a lender. If the Fund purchases a participation, it may only be able to enforce its rights through the lender, and may assume the credit risk of the lender in addition to the borrower.

Variable and Floating Rate Securities

Variable and floating rate securities are securities that pay interest at rates that adjust whenever a specified interest rate changes and/or that reset on predetermined dates (such as the last day of a month or calendar quarter). The Fund may invest in floating rate debt instruments ("floaters") and engage in credit spread trades. Variable and floating rate securities generally are less sensitive to interest rate changes but may decline in value if their interest rates do not rise as much, or as quickly, as interest rates in general. Conversely, floating rate securities will not generally increase in value if interest rates decline. The Fund may also invest in inverse floating rate debt instruments ("inverse floaters"). An inverse floater may exhibit greater price volatility than a fixed rate obligation of similar credit quality. The Fund may invest up to 5% of its total assets in any combination of mortgage-related or other asset-backed IO, PO or inverse floater securities.

Inflation-Indexed Bonds

Inflation-indexed bonds (other than municipal inflation-indexed bonds and certain corporate inflation-indexed bonds, which are more fully described below) are fixed income securities whose principal value is periodically adjusted according to the rate of inflation. If the index measuring inflation falls, the principal value of inflation-indexed bonds (other than municipal inflation-indexed bonds and certain corporate inflation-indexed bonds) will be adjusted downward, and consequently the interest payable on these securities (calculated with respect to a smaller principal amount) will be reduced. Repayment of the original bond principal upon maturity (as adjusted for inflation) is guaranteed in the case of TIPS. For bonds that do not provide a similar guarantee, the adjusted principal value of the bond repaid at maturity may be less than the original principal. TIPS may also be divided into individual zero-coupon instruments for each coupon or principal payment (known as "iSTRIPS"). An iSTRIP of the principal component of a TIPS issue will retain the embedded inflation floor that will allow the holder of that security to receive the greater of the original principal or inflation-adjusted principal value at maturity. iSTRIPS may be less liquid than conventional TIPS because they are a small component of the TIPS market.

Municipal inflation-indexed securities are municipal bonds that pay coupons based on a fixed rate plus the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers ("CPI"). With regard to municipal inflation-indexed bonds and certain corporate inflation-indexed bonds, the inflation adjustment is reflected in the semi-annual coupon payment. As a result, the principal value of municipal inflation-indexed bonds and such corporate inflation-indexed bonds does not adjust according to the rate of inflation. At the same time, the value of municipal inflation-indexed securities and such corporate inflation-indexed securities generally will not increase if the rate of inflation decreases. Because municipal inflation-indexed securities and corporate inflation-indexed securities are a small component of the municipal bond and corporate bond markets, respectively, they may be less liquid than conventional municipal and corporate bonds.

The value of inflation-indexed bonds is expected to change in response to changes in real interest rates. Real interest rates are tied to the relationship between nominal interest rates and the rate of inflation. If nominal interest rates increase at a faster rate than inflation, real interest rates may rise, leading to a decrease in value of inflation-indexed bonds. Any increase in the principal amount of an inflation-indexed bond will be considered taxable ordinary income, even though investors do not receive their principal until maturity.

Event-Linked Exposure

The Fund may obtain event-linked exposure by investing in "event-linked bonds" or "event-linked swaps" or by implementing "event-linked strategies." Event-linked exposure results in gains or losses that typically are contingent, or formulaically related to defined trigger events. Examples of trigger events include hurricanes, earthquakes, weather-related phenomena, or statistics relating to such events. Some event-linked bonds are commonly referred to as "catastrophe bonds." If a trigger event occurs, the Fund may lose a portion or its entire principal invested in the bond or notional amount on a swap. Event-linked exposure often provides for an extension of maturity to process and audit loss claims where a trigger event has, or possibly has, occurred. An extension of maturity may increase volatility. Event-linked exposure may also expose the Fund to certain unanticipated risks including credit risk, counterparty risk, adverse regulatory or jurisdictional interpretations, and adverse tax consequences. Event-linked exposures may also be subject to liquidity risk.

Convertible and Equity Securities

Common stock represents equity ownership in a company and typically provides the common stockholder the power to vote on certain corporate actions, including the election of the company's directors. Common stockholders participate in company profits through dividends and, in the event of bankruptcy, distributions, on a pro-rata basis after other claims are satisfied. Many factors affect the value of common stock, including earnings, earnings forecasts, corporate events and factors impacting the issuer's industry and the market generally. Common stock generally has the greatest appreciation and depreciation potential of all corporate securities.

The Fund may invest up to 10% of its total assets in preferred stock, convertible securities and other equity-related securities. Convertible securities are generally preferred stocks and other securities, including fixed income securities and warrants, that are convertible into or exercisable for common stock at a stated price or rate. The price of a convertible security will normally vary in some proportion to changes in the price of the underlying common stock because of this conversion or exercise feature. However, the value of a convertible security may not increase or decrease as rapidly as the underlying common stock. A convertible security will normally also provide income and is subject to interest rate risk. Convertible securities may be lower-rated securities subject to greater levels of credit risk. The Fund may be forced to convert a security before it would otherwise choose, which may have an adverse effect on the Fund's ability to achieve its investment objective.

"Synthetic" convertible securities are selected based on the similarity of their economic characteristics to those of a traditional convertible security due to the combination of separate securities that possess the two principal characteristics of a traditional convertible security, i.e., an income-producing security ("income-producing component") and the right to acquire an equity security ("convertible component"). The income-producing component is achieved by investing in non-convertible, income-producing securities such as bonds, preferred stocks and money market instruments, which may be represented by derivative instruments. The convertible component is achieved by investing in securities or instruments such as warrants or options to buy common stock at a certain exercise price, or options on a stock index. A simple example of a synthetic convertible security is the combination of a traditional corporate bond with a warrant to purchase equity securities of the issuer of the bond. The Fund may also purchase synthetic securities created by other parties, typically investment banks, including convertible structured notes. The income-producing and convertible components of a synthetic convertible security may be issued separately by different issuers and at different times.

Preferred stock represents an equity interest in a company that generally entitles the holder to receive, in preference to the holders of other stocks such as common stocks, dividends and a fixed share of the proceeds resulting from a liquidation of the company. Preferred stocks may pay fixed or adjustable rates of return. Preferred stock is subject to issuer-specific and market risks applicable generally to equity securities. In addition, a company's preferred stock generally pays dividends only after the company makes required payments to holders of its bonds and other debt. For this reason, the value of preferred stock will usually react more strongly than bonds and other debt to actual or perceived changes in the company's financial condition or prospects.

While some countries or companies may be regarded as favorable investments, pure fixed income opportunities may be unattractive or limited due to insufficient supply, or legal or technical restrictions. In such cases, the Fund may consider convertible securities or equity securities to gain exposure to such investments.

At times, in connection with the restructuring of a preferred stock or fixed income instrument either outside of bankruptcy court or in the context of bankruptcy court proceedings, the Fund may determine or be required to accept equity securities, such as common stocks, in exchange for all or a portion of a preferred stock or fixed income instrument. Depending upon, among other things, PIMCO's evaluation of the potential value of such securities in relation to the price that could be obtained by the Fund at any given time upon sale thereof, the Fund may determine to hold such securities in its portfolio.

Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed income securities. The market price of equity securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. Equity securities may decline in value due to factors affecting equity securities markets generally or particular industries represented in those markets. The value of an equity security may also decline for a number of reasons which directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer's goods or services.

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Securities

The Fund may invest in securities and instruments that are economically tied to foreign (non-U.S.) countries. PIMCO generally considers an instrument to be economically tied to a non-U.S. country if the issuer is a foreign government (or any political subdivision, agency, authority or instrumentality of such government), or if the issuer is organized under the laws of a non-U.S. country. In the case of certain money market instruments, such instruments will be considered economically tied to a non-U.S. country if either the issuer or the guarantor of such money market instrument is organized under the laws of a non-U.S. country. With respect to derivative instruments, PIMCO generally considers such instruments to be economically tied to non-U.S. countries if the underlying assets are foreign currencies (or baskets or indexes of such currencies), or instruments or securities that are issued by foreign governments or issuers organized under the laws of a non-U.S. country (or if the underlying assets are certain money market instruments, if either the issuer or the guarantor of such money market instruments is organized under the laws of a non-U.S. country).

Investing in foreign (non-U.S.) securities involves special risks and considerations not typically associated with investing in U.S. securities. Shareholders should consider carefully the substantial risks involved for the Fund that invests in securities issued by foreign companies and governments of foreign countries. These risks include: differences in accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards; generally higher commission rates on foreign portfolio transactions; the possibility of nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation; adverse changes in investment or exchange control regulations; and political instability. Individual foreign economies may differ favorably or unfavorably from the U.S. economy in such respects as growth of gross domestic product, rates of inflation, capital reinvestment, resources, self-sufficiency and balance of payments position. The securities markets, values of securities, yields and risks associated with foreign (non-U.S.) securities markets may change independently of each other. Also, foreign (non-U.S.) securities and dividends and interest payable on those securities may be subject to foreign taxes, including taxes withheld from payments on those securities. Foreign (non-U.S.) securities often trade with less frequency and volume than domestic securities and therefore may exhibit greater price volatility. Investments in foreign (non-U.S.) securities may also involve higher custodial costs than domestic investments.

Emerging Market Securities. The Fund may invest, without limitation, in securities and instruments that are economically tied to emerging market countries. PIMCO generally considers an instrument to be economically tied to an emerging market country if the security's "country of exposure" is an emerging market country, as determined by the criteria set forth below. Alternatively, such as when a "country of exposure" is not available or when PIMCO believes the following tests more accurately reflect which country the security is economically tied to, PIMCO may consider an instrument to be economically tied to an emerging market country if the issuer or guarantor is a government of an emerging market country (or any political subdivision, agency, authority or instrumentality of such government), if the issuer or guarantor is organized under the laws of an emerging market country, or if the currency of settlement of the security is a currency of an emerging market country. With respect to derivative instruments, PIMCO generally considers such instruments to be economically tied to emerging market countries if the underlying assets are currencies of emerging market countries (or baskets or indexes of such currencies), or instruments or securities that are issued or guaranteed by governments of emerging market countries or by entities organized under the laws of emerging market countries. A security's "country of exposure" is determined by PIMCO using certain factors provided by a third-party analytical service provider. The factors are applied in order such that the first factor to result in the assignment of a country determines the "country of exposure." The factors, listed in the order in which they are applied, are: (i) if an asset-backed or other collateralized security, the country in which the collateral backing the security is located, (ii) if the security is guaranteed by the government of a country (or any political subdivision, agency, authority or instrumentality of such government), the country of the government or instrumentality providing the guarantee, (iii) the "country of risk" of the issuer, (iv) the "country of risk" of the issuer's ultimate parent, or (v) the country where the issuer is organized or incorporated under the laws thereof. "Country of risk" is a separate four-part test determined by the following factors, listed in order of importance: (i) management location, (ii) country of primary listing, (iii) sales or revenue attributable to the country, and (iv) reporting currency of the issuer. PIMCO has broad discretion to identify countries that it considers to qualify as emerging markets. In making investments in emerging market securities, the Fund emphasizes those countries with relatively low gross national product per capita and with the potential for rapid economic growth. Emerging market countries are generally located in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and Eastern Europe. PIMCO will select the country and currency composition based on its evaluation of relative interest rates, inflation rates, exchange rates, monetary and fiscal policies, trade and current account balances, legal and political developments and any other specific factors it believes to be relevant.

Investing in emerging market securities imposes risks different from, or greater than, risks of investing in domestic securities or in foreign, developed countries. These risks include: smaller market capitalization of securities markets, which may suffer periods of relative illiquidity; significant price volatility; restrictions on foreign investment; possible repatriation of investment income and capital. In addition, foreign investors may be required to register the proceeds of sales; future economic or political crises could lead to price controls, forced mergers, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, seizure, nationalization, or creation of government monopolies.  The currencies of emerging market countries may experience significant declines against the U.S. dollar, and devaluation may occur subsequent to investments in these currencies by the Fund.  Inflation and rapid fluctuations in inflation rates have had, and may continue to have, negative effects on the economies and securities markets of certain emerging market countries.

Additional risks of emerging markets securities may include: greater social, economic and political uncertainty and instability; more substantial governmental involvement in the economy; less governmental supervision and regulation; unavailability of currency hedging techniques; companies that are newly organized and small; differences in auditing and financial reporting standards, which may result in unavailability of material information about issuers; and less developed legal systems. In addition, emerging securities markets may have different clearance and settlement procedures, which may be unable to keep pace with the volume of securities transactions or otherwise make it difficult to engage in such transactions. Settlement problems may cause the Fund to miss attractive investment opportunities, hold a portion of its assets in cash pending investment, or be delayed in disposing of a portfolio security. Such a delay could result in possible liability to a purchaser of the security.

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Currencies

The Fund invests directly in foreign currencies or in securities that trade in, or receive revenues in, foreign (non-U.S.) currencies and will be subject to currency risk. Foreign currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. They generally are determined by supply and demand in the foreign exchange markets and the relative merits of investments in different countries, actual or perceived changes in interest rates and other complex factors. Currency exchange rates also can be affected unpredictably by intervention (or the failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments or central banks, or by currency controls or political developments. Currencies in which the Fund's assets are denominated may be devalued against the U.S. dollar, resulting in a loss to the Fund.

Foreign Currency Transactions. The Fund may invest in securities denominated in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies, engage in foreign currency transactions on a spot (cash) basis and enter into forward foreign currency exchange contracts and invest in foreign currency futures contracts and options on foreign currencies and futures. A forward foreign currency exchange contract, which involves an obligation to purchase or sell a specific currency at a future date at a price set at the time of the contract, reduces the Fund's exposure to changes in the value of the currency it will deliver and increases its exposure to changes in the value of the currency it will receive for the duration of the contract. Certain foreign currency transactions may also be settled in cash rather than the actual delivery of the relevant currency. The effect on the value of the Fund is similar to selling securities denominated in one currency and purchasing securities denominated in another currency. A contract to sell a foreign currency would limit any potential gain which might be realized if the value of the hedged currency increases. The Fund may enter into these contracts to hedge against foreign exchange risk, to increase exposure to a foreign currency or to shift exposure to foreign currency fluctuations from one currency to another. Suitable hedging transactions may not be available in all circumstances and there can be no assurance that the Fund will engage in such transactions at any given time or from time to time. Also, such transactions may not be successful and may eliminate any chance for the Fund to benefit from favorable fluctuations in relevant foreign currencies. The Fund may use one currency (or a basket of currencies) to hedge against adverse changes in the value of another currency (or a basket of currencies) when exchange rates between the two currencies are positively correlated. The Fund will segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO in accordance with the procedures established by the Board of Trustees (or, as permitted by applicable law, enter into certain offsetting positions) to cover its obligations under forward foreign currency exchange contracts entered into for non-hedging purposes.

Redenomination. Continuing uncertainty as to the status of the euro and the European Monetary Union (the "EMU") has created significant volatility in currency and financial markets generally. Any partial or complete dissolution of the EMU could have significant adverse effects on currency and financial markets and on the values of the Fund's portfolio investments. If one or more EMU countries were to stop using the euro as its primary currency, the Fund's investments in such countries may be redenominated into a different or newly adopted currency. As a result, the value of those investments could decline significantly and unpredictably. In addition, securities or other investments that are redenominated may be subject to currency risk, liquidity risk and risk of improper valuation to a greater extent than similar investments currently denominated in euros. To the extent a currency used for redenomination purposes is not specified in respect of certain EMU-related investments, or should the euro cease to be used entirely, the currency in which such investments are denominated may be unclear, making such investments particularly difficult to value or dispose of. The Fund may incur additional expenses to the extent it is required to seek judicial or other clarification of the denomination or value of such securities.

There can be no assurance that if the Fund earns income or capital gains in a non-U.S. country or PIMCO otherwise seeks to withdraw the Fund's investments from a given country, capital controls imposed by such country will not prevent, or cause significant expense in, doing so.

Repurchase Agreements

The Fund may enter into repurchase agreements, in which the Fund purchases a security from a bank or broker-dealer, which agrees to repurchase the security at the Fund's cost plus interest within a specified time. If the party agreeing to repurchase should default, the Fund will seek to sell the securities which it holds. This could involve procedural costs or delays in addition to a loss on the securities if their value should fall below their repurchase price. Repurchase agreements maturing in more than seven days and which may not be terminated within seven days at approximately the amount at which the Fund has valued the agreements are considered illiquid securities.

Reverse Repurchase Agreements, Dollar Rolls and Other Borrowings

The Fund may enter into reverse repurchase agreements and dollar rolls subject to the Fund's limitations on borrowings. A reverse repurchase agreement involves the sale of a security by the Fund and its agreement to repurchase the instrument at a specified time and price. A dollar roll is similar except that the counterparty is not obligated to return the same securities as those originally sold by the Fund but only securities that are "substantially identical." Reverse repurchase agreements and dollar rolls may be considered borrowing for some purposes. The Fund will segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO in accordance with procedures established by the Board of Trustees to cover its obligations under reverse repurchase agreements and dollar rolls. Reverse repurchase agreements, dollar rolls and other forms of borrowings may create leveraging risk for the Fund.

The Fund may borrow money to the extent permitted under the 1940 Act. This means that, in general, the Fund may borrow money from banks for any purpose in an amount up to 1/3 of the Fund's total assets, less all liabilities and indebtedness not represented by senior securities. The Fund may also borrow money for temporary administrative purposes in an amount not to exceed 5% of the Fund's total assets.

Derivatives

The Fund may, but is not required to, use derivative instruments for risk management purposes or as part of its investment strategies. Generally, derivatives are financial contracts whose value depends upon, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index, and may relate to stocks, bonds, interest rates, spreads between different interest rates, currencies or currency exchange rates, commodities, and related indexes. Examples of derivative instruments include options contracts, futures contracts, options on futures contracts and swap agreements (including, but not limited to, credit default swaps and swaps on exchange-traded funds). The Fund may invest a portion of its assets in derivative instruments. The portfolio manager may decide not to employ any of these strategies and there is no assurance that any derivatives strategy used by the Fund will succeed. A description of these and other derivative instruments that the Fund may use are described under "Investment Objectives and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information.

The Fund's use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other more traditional investments. Certain derivative transactions may have a leveraging effect on the Fund. For example, a small investment in a derivative instrument may have a significant impact on the Fund's exposure to interest rates, currency exchange rates or other investments. As a result, a relatively small price movement in a derivative instrument may cause an immediate and substantial loss or gain. The Fund may engage in such transactions regardless of whether the Fund owns the asset, instrument or components of the index underlying the derivative instrument. The Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in these types of instruments. If it does, the Fund's investment exposure could far exceed the value of its portfolio securities and its investment performance could be primarily dependent upon securities it does not own. A description of various risks associated with particular derivative instruments is included in "Investment Objective and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information. The following provides a more general discussion of important risk factors relating to all derivative instruments that may be used by the Fund.

Management Risk. Derivative products are highly specialized instruments that require investment techniques and risk analyses different from those associated with stocks and bonds. The use of a derivative requires an understanding not only of the underlying instrument but also of the derivative itself, without the benefit of observing the performance of the derivative under all possible market conditions.

Credit Risk. The use of a derivative instrument involves the risk that a loss may be sustained as a result of the failure of another party to the contract (usually referred to as a "counterparty") to make required payments or otherwise comply with the contract's terms. Additionally, a short position in a credit default swap could result in losses if the Fund does not correctly evaluate the creditworthiness of the company on which the credit default swap is based.

Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk exists when a particular derivative instrument is difficult to purchase or sell. If a derivative transaction is particularly large or if the relevant market is illiquid (as is the case with many privately negotiated derivatives), it may not be possible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position at an advantageous time or price.

Leverage Risk. Because many derivatives have a leverage component, adverse changes in the value or level of the underlying asset, reference rate or index can result in a loss substantially greater than the amount invested in the derivative itself. Certain derivatives have the potential for unlimited loss, regardless of the size of the initial investment. When the Fund uses derivatives for leverage, investments in the Fund will tend to be more volatile, resulting in larger gains or losses in response to market changes. To limit leverage risk, the Fund will segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO in accordance with procedures established by the Board of Trustees (or, as permitted by applicable regulation, enter into certain offsetting positions) to cover its obligations under derivative instruments.

Lack of Availability. Because the markets for certain derivative instruments (including markets located in foreign countries) are relatively new and still developing, suitable derivatives transactions may not be available in all circumstances for risk management or other purposes. Upon the expiration of a particular contract, the portfolio manager may wish to retain the Fund's position in the derivative instrument by entering into a similar contract, but may be unable to do so if the counterparty to the original contract is unwilling to enter into the new contract and no other suitable counterparty can be found. There is no assurance that the Fund will engage in derivatives transactions at any time or from time to time. The Fund's ability to use derivatives may also be limited by certain regulatory and tax considerations.

Market and Other Risks. Like most other investments, derivative instruments are subject to the risk that the market value of the instrument will change in a way detrimental to the Fund's interest. If the portfolio manager incorrectly forecasts the values of securities or interest rates or other economic factors in using derivatives for the Fund, the Fund might have been in a better position if it had not entered into the transaction at all. While some strategies involving derivative instruments can reduce the risk of loss, they can also reduce the opportunity for gain or even result in losses by offsetting favorable price movements in other Fund investments. The Fund may also have to buy or sell a security at a disadvantageous time or price because the Fund is legally required to maintain offsetting positions or asset coverage in connection with certain derivatives transactions.

Other risks in using derivatives include the risk of mispricing or improper valuation of derivatives and the inability of derivatives to correlate perfectly with underlying assets, rates and indexes. Many derivatives, in particular privately negotiated derivatives, are complex and often valued subjectively. Improper valuations can result in increased cash payment requirements to counterparties or a loss of value to the Fund. Also, the value of derivatives may not correlate perfectly, or at all, with the value of the assets, reference rates or indexes they are designed to closely track. For example, a swap agreement on an exchange-traded fund would not correlate perfectly with the index upon which the exchange-traded fund is based because the fund's return is net of fees and expenses. In addition, the Fund's use of derivatives may cause the Fund to realize higher amounts of short-term capital gains (generally taxed at ordinary income tax rates) than if the Fund had not used such instruments.

Delayed Funding Loans and Revolving Credit Facilities

The Fund may also enter into, or acquire participations in, delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities, in which a lender agrees to make loans up to a maximum amount upon demand by the borrower during a specified term. These commitments may have the effect of requiring the Fund to increase its investments in a company at a time when it might not otherwise decide to do so (including at a time when the company's financial condition makes it unlikely that such amounts will be repaid). To the extent that the Fund is committed to advance additional funds, it will segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO in accordance with procedures established by the Board of Trustees in an amount sufficient to meet such commitments. Delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities are subject to credit, interest rate and liquidity risk and the risks of being a lender.

When-Issued, Delayed Delivery and Forward Commitment Transactions

The Fund may purchase or sell securities which it is eligible to purchase or sell on a when-issued basis, may purchase and sell such securities for delayed delivery and may make contracts to purchase or sell such securities for a fixed price at a future date beyond normal settlement time (forward commitments). When-issued transactions, delayed delivery purchases and forward commitments involve a risk of loss if the value of the securities declines prior to the settlement date. This risk is in addition to the risk that the Fund's other assets will decline in value. Therefore, these transactions may result in a form of leverage and increase the Fund's overall investment exposure. Typically, no income accrues on securities the Fund has committed to purchase prior to the time delivery of the securities is made, although the Fund may earn income on securities it has segregated or "earmarked" to cover these positions. When the Fund has sold a security on a when-issued, delayed delivery, or forward commitment basis, the Fund does not participate in future gains or losses with respect to the security. If the other party to a transaction fails to pay for the securities, the Fund could realize a loss. Additionally, when selling a security on a when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment basis without owning a security, the Fund will incur a loss if the security's price appreciates in value such that the security's price is above the agreed-upon price on the settlement date.

Investment in Other Funds

Section 12(d)(1) of the 1940 Act restricts investments by registered investment companies and companies relying on Sections 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of the 1940 Act in the securities of other investment companies. Registered investment companies are permitted to invest in the Fund beyond the limits set forth in Section 12(d)(1), subject to certain terms and conditions set forth in an SEC exemptive order issued to PIMCO and the Trust, including that such investment companies enter into an agreement with the Trust.

The Fund may invest in, to the extent permitted by Section 12(d)(1)(A) of the 1940 Act, other affiliated and unaffiliated funds, such as open-end or closed-end management investment companies, including other exchange traded funds, provided that the Fund's investment in units or shares of investment companies and other open-end collective investment vehicles will not exceed 10% of the Fund's total assets. The Fund may invest securities lending collateral in one or more money market funds to the extent permitted by Rule 12d1-1 under the 1940 Act, including series of PIMCO Funds, an affiliated open-end management investment company managed by PIMCO. As a shareholder of a fund, the Fund may indirectly bear investment advisory fees, supervisory and administrative fees, service fees and other fees which are in addition to the fees the Fund pays its service providers.

Subject to the restrictions and limitations of the 1940 Act, the Fund may, in the future, elect to pursue its investment objective by investing in one or more underlying investment vehicles or companies that have substantially similar investment objectives and policies as the Fund.

Small-Cap and Mid-Cap Companies

The Fund may invest in securities of small-capitalization and mid-capitalization companies. The Fund considers a small-cap company to be a company with a market capitalization of up to $1.5 billion and a mid-cap company to be a company with a market capitalization of between $1.5 billion and $10 billion. Investments in small-cap and mid-cap companies involve greater risk than investments in large-capitalization companies. Small and mid-cap companies may not have an established financial history, which can present valuation challenges. The securities of small- and mid-cap companies may be subject to increased market fluctuations, due to less liquid markets and more limited managerial and financial resources. The Fund's investments in small- and mid-cap companies may increase the volatility of the Fund's portfolio.

Short Sales

The Fund may make short sales as part of its overall portfolio management strategies or to offset a potential decline in value of a security. A short sale involves the sale of a security that is borrowed from a broker or other institution to complete the sale. Short sales expose the Fund to the risk that it will be required to acquire, convert or exchange securities to replace the borrowed securities (also known as "covering" the short position) at a time when the securities sold short have appreciated in value, thus resulting in a loss to the Fund. When making a short sale (other than a "short sale against the box"), the Fund must segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO in accordance with procedures established by the Board of Trustees or otherwise cover its position in a permissible manner. The Fund may engage in short selling to the extent permitted by the 1940 Act and rules and interpretations thereunder and other federal securities laws. To the extent the Fund engages in short selling in foreign (non-U.S.) jurisdictions, the Fund will do so to the extent permitted by the laws and regulations of such jurisdictions.

Illiquid Securities

The Fund may invest up to 15% of its net assets (taken at the time of investment) in illiquid securities. Certain illiquid securities may require pricing at fair value as determined in good faith under the supervision of the Board of Trustees. The portfolio manager may be subject to significant delays in disposing of illiquid securities, and transactions in illiquid securities may entail registration expenses and other transaction costs that are higher than those for transactions in liquid securities. The term "illiquid securities" for this purpose means securities that cannot be disposed of within seven days in the ordinary course of business at approximately the amount at which the Fund has valued the securities. Restricted securities, i.e., securities subject to legal or contractual restrictions on resale, may be illiquid. However, some restricted securities (such as securities issued pursuant to Rule 144A under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and certain commercial paper) may be treated as liquid, although they may be less liquid than registered securities traded on established secondary markets.

Loans of Portfolio Securities

For the purpose of achieving income, the Fund may lend its portfolio securities to brokers, dealers, and other financial institutions provided a number of conditions are satisfied, including that the loan is fully collateralized. Please see "Investment Objectives and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information for details. When the Fund lends portfolio securities, its investment performance will continue to reflect changes in the value of the securities loaned, and the Fund will also receive a fee or interest on the collateral. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in the collateral or delay in recovery of the collateral if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. The Fund may pay lending fees to a party arranging the loan. Cash collateral received by the Fund in securities lending transactions may be invested in short-term liquid Fixed Income Instruments or in money market or short-term mutual funds, or similar investment vehicles, including affiliated money market or short-term mutual funds. The Fund bears the risk of such investments.

Portfolio Turnover

The length of time the Fund has held a particular security is not generally a consideration in investment decisions. A change in the securities held by the Fund is known as "portfolio turnover." When the portfolio manager deems it appropriate and particularly during periods of volatile market movements, the Fund may engage in frequent and active trading of portfolio securities to achieve its investment objective. To the extent that Creation Unit purchases from and redemptions by the Fund are effected in cash, frequent purchases and redemptions may increase the rate of portfolio turnover. Higher portfolio turnover (e.g., an annual rate greater than 100% of the average value of the Fund's portfolio) involves correspondingly greater expenses to the Fund, including brokerage commissions or dealer mark-ups and other transaction costs on the sale of securities and reinvestments in other securities. Such sales may also result in realization of taxable capital gains, including short-term capital gains (which are generally taxed at ordinary income tax rates). The trading costs and tax effects associated with portfolio turnover may adversely affect the Fund's performance. In addition, large movements of cash into or out of the Fund may negatively impact the Fund's ability to achieve its investment objective or maintain a consistent level of operating expenses.

Temporary Defensive Positions

For temporary or defensive purposes, the Fund may invest without limit in U.S. debt securities, including taxable securities and short-term money market securities, when PIMCO deems it appropriate to do so. When the Fund engages in such strategies, it may not achieve its investment objective.

Changes in Investment Objectives and Policies

The investment objective of the Fund is non-fundamental and may be changed by the Board of Trustees without shareholder approval. Unless otherwise stated, all investment policies of the Fund may be changed by the Board of Trustees without shareholder approval. In addition, the Trust may determine to cease operating the Fund as an "exchange-traded" fund and cause the Fund's shares to stop trading on a securities exchange.

Percentage Investment Limitations

Unless otherwise stated, all percentage limitations on Fund investments listed in this prospectus will apply at the time of investment. The Fund would not violate these limitations unless an excess or deficiency occurs or exists immediately after and as a result of an investment. The Fund has adopted a non-fundamental investment policy to invest at least 80% of its assets in investments suggested by its name. For purposes of this policy, the term "assets" means net assets plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes.

Credit Ratings and Unrated Securities

Rating agencies are private services that provide ratings of the credit quality of fixed income securities, including convertible securities. Appendix A to this prospectus describes the various ratings assigned to fixed income securities, including convertible securities by Moody's, S&P and Fitch. Ratings assigned by a rating agency are not absolute standards of credit quality and do not evaluate market risks. Rating agencies may fail to make timely changes in credit ratings and an issuer's current financial condition may be better or worse than a rating indicates. The Fund will not necessarily sell a security when its rating is reduced below its rating at the time of purchase. PIMCO does not rely solely on credit ratings, and develops its own analysis of issuer credit quality.

The Fund may purchase unrated securities (which are not rated by a rating agency) if its portfolio manager determines that the security is of comparable quality to a rated security that the Fund may purchase. Unrated securities may be less liquid than comparable rated securities and involve the risk that the portfolio manager may not accurately evaluate the security's comparative credit rating. Analysis of the creditworthiness of issuers of high yield securities may be more complex than for issuers of higher-quality fixed income securities. To the extent that certain Funds invest in high yield and/or unrated securities, the Fund's success in achieving its investment objective may depend more heavily on the portfolio manager's creditworthiness analysis than if the Fund invested exclusively in higher quality and rated securities.

Other Investments and Techniques

The Fund may invest in other types of securities and use a variety of investment techniques and strategies which are not described in this prospectus. These securities and techniques may subject the Fund to additional risks. Please see the Statement of Additional Information for additional information about the securities and investment techniques described in this prospectus and about additional securities and techniques that may be used by the Fund.

Financial Highlights

Because the Fund has not operated for a full fiscal period as of the date of this prospectus, audited financial highlights are not available.

Appendix A
Description of Securities Ratings

Each Fund's investments may range in quality from securities rated in the lowest category in which the Fund is permitted to invest to securities rated in the highest category (as rated by Moody's, S&P or Fitch, or, if unrated, determined by PIMCO to be of comparable quality). The percentage of a Fund's assets invested in securities in a particular rating category will vary. The following terms are generally used to describe the credit quality of fixed income securities:

High Quality Debt Securities are those rated in one of the two highest rating categories (the highest category for commercial paper) or, if unrated, deemed comparable by PIMCO.

Investment Grade Debt Securities are those rated in one of the four highest rating categories, or if unrated deemed comparable by PIMCO.

Below Investment Grade High Yield Securities ("Junk Bonds") are those rated lower than Baa by Moody's, BBB by S&P or Fitch and comparable securities. They are deemed predominantly speculative with respect to the issuer's ability to repay principal and interest.

The following is a description of Moody's, S&P's and Fitch's rating categories applicable to fixed income securities.

Moody's Investors Service, Inc.

Long-Term Corporate Obligation Ratings
Moody's long-term obligation ratings are opinions of the relative credit risk of fixed-income obligations with an original maturity of one year or more. They address the possibility that a financial obligation will not be honored as promised. Such ratings use Moody's global scale and reflect both the likelihood of default and any financial loss suffered in the event of default.

Aaa: Obligations rated Aaa are judged to be of the highest quality, with minimal credit risk.

Aa: Obligations rated Aa are judged to be of high quality and are subject to very low credit risk.

A: Obligations rated A are considered upper-medium grade and are subject to low credit risk.

Baa: Obligations rated Baa are subject to moderate credit risk. They are considered medium-grade and as such may possess certain speculative characteristics.

Ba: Obligations rated Ba are judged to have speculative elements and are subject to substantial credit risk.

B: Obligations rated B are considered speculative and are subject to high credit risk.

Caa: Obligations rated Caa are judged to be of poor standing and are subject to very high credit risk.

Ca: Obligations rated Ca are highly speculative and are likely in, or very near, default, with some prospect of recovery of principal and interest.

C: Obligations rated C are the lowest rated class of bonds and are typically in default, with little prospect for recovery of principal or interest.

Moody's appends numerical modifiers 1, 2, and 3 to each generic rating classification from Aa through Caa. The modifier 1 indicates that the obligation ranks in the higher end of its generic rating category; the modifier 2 indicates a mid-range ranking; and the modifier 3 indicates a ranking in the lower end of that generic rating category.

Medium-Term Note Ratings
Moody's assigns long-term ratings to individual debt securities issued from medium-term note (MTN) programs, in addition to indicating ratings to MTN programs themselves. These long-term ratings are expressed on Moody's general long-term scale. Notes issued under MTN programs with such indicated ratings are rated at issuance at the rating applicable to all pari passu notes issued under the same program, at the program's relevant indicated rating, provided such notes do not exhibit any of the characteristics listed below:

Notes containing features that link interest or principal to the credit performance of any third party or parties (i.e., credit-linked notes);

Notes allowing for negative coupons, or negative principal;

Notes containing any provision that could obligate the investor to make any additional payments;

Notes containing provisions that subordinate the claim.

For notes with any of these characteristics, the rating of the individual note may differ from the indicated rating of the program.

For credit-linked securities, Moody's policy is to "look through" to the credit risk of the underlying obligor. Moody's policy with respect to non-credit linked obligations is to rate the issuer's ability to meet the contract as stated, regardless of potential losses to investors as a result of non-credit developments. In other words, as long as the obligation has debt standing in the event of bankruptcy, we will assign the appropriate debt class level rating to the instrument.

Market participants must determine whether any particular note is rated, and if so, at what rating level. Moody's encourages market participants to contact Moody's Ratings Desks or visit www.moodys.com directly if they have questions regarding ratings for specific notes issued under a medium-term note program. Unrated notes issued under an MTN program may be assigned an NR (not rated) symbol.

Short-Term Ratings
Moody's short-term ratings are opinions of the ability of issuers to honor short-term financial obligations. Ratings may be assigned to issuers, short-term programs or to individual short-term debt instruments. Such obligations generally have an original maturity not exceeding thirteen months, unless explicitly noted.

Moody's employs the following designations to indicate the relative repayment ability of rated issuers:

P-1: Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Prime-1 have a superior ability to repay short-term debt obligations.

P-2: Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Prime-2 have a strong ability to repay short-term debt obligations.

P-3: Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Prime-3 have an acceptable ability to repay short-term obligations.

NP: Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Not Prime do not fall within any of the Prime rating categories.

Canadian issuers rated P-1 or P-2 have their short-term ratings enhanced by the senior-most long-term rating of the issuer, its guarantor or support-provider.

US Municipal Ratings
Moody's US Municipal ratings are opinions of the investment quality of issuers and issues in the US municipal market. As such, these ratings incorporate Moody's assessment of the default probability and loss severity of these issuers and issues. The default and loss content for Moody's municipal long-term rating scale differs from Moody's general long-term rating scale. Historical default and loss rates for obligations rated on the US Municipal Scale are significantly lower than for similarly rated corporate obligations. It is important that users of Moody's ratings understand these differences when making rating comparisons between the Municipal and Global Scales.

US Municipal Long-Term Debt Ratings

Municipal Ratings are based upon the analysis of five primary factors related to municipal finance: market position, financial position, debt levels, governance, and covenants. Each of the factors is evaluated individually and for its effect on the other factors in the context of the municipality's ability to repay its debt.

Aaa: Issuers or issues rated Aaa demonstrate the strongest creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

Aa: Issuers or issues rated Aa demonstrate very strong creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

A: Issuers or issues rated A present above-average creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

Baa: Issuers or issues rated Baa represent average creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax- exempt issuers or issues.

Ba: Issuers or issues rated Ba demonstrate below-average creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

B: Issuers or issues rated B demonstrate weak creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax- exempt issuers or issues.

Caa: Issuers or issues rated Caa demonstrate very weak creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

Ca: Issuers or issues rated Ca demonstrate extremely weak creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

C: Issuers or issues rated C demonstrate the weakest creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

US Municipal Short-Term Debt and Demand Obligation Ratings

Short-Term Obligation Ratings
There are three rating categories for short-term municipal obligations that are considered investment grade. These ratings are designated as Municipal Investment Grade (MIG) and are divided into three levels—MIG 1 through MIG 3. In addition, those short-term obligations that are of speculative quality are designated SG, or speculative grade. MIG ratings expire at the maturity of the obligation.

MIG 1: This designation denotes superior credit quality. Excellent protection is afforded by established cash flows, highly reliable liquidity support, or demonstrated broad-based access to the market for refinancing.

MIG 2: This designation denotes strong credit quality. Margins of protection are ample, although not as large as in the preceding group.

MIG 3: This designation denotes acceptable credit quality. Liquidity and cash-flow protection may be narrow, and mar-
ket access for refinancing is likely to be less well-established.

SG: This designation denotes speculative-grade credit quality. Debt instruments in this category may lack sufficient margins of protection.

Demand Obligation Ratings
In the case of variable rate demand obligations (VRDOs), a two-component rating is assigned; a long- or short-term debt rating and a demand obligation rating. The first element represents Moody's evaluation of the degree of risk associated with scheduled principal and interest payments. The second element represents Moody's evaluation of the degree of risk associated with the ability to receive purchase price upon demand ("demand feature"), using a variation of the MIG rating scale, the Variable Municipal Investment Grade or VMIG rating. When either the long- or short-term aspect of a VRDO is not rated, that piece is designated NR, e.g., Aaa/NR or NR/VMIG 1. VMIG rating expirations are a function of each issue's specific structural or credit features.

VMIG 1: This designation denotes superior credit quality. Excellent protection is afforded by the superior short-term credit strength of the liquidity provider and structural and legal protections that ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

VMIG 2: This designation denotes strong credit quality. Good protection is afforded by the strong short-term credit strength of the liquidity provider and structural and legal protections that ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

VMIG 3: This designation denotes acceptable credit quality. Adequate protection is afforded by the satisfactory short-term credit strength of the liquidity provider and structural and legal protections that ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

SG: This designation denotes speculative-grade credit quality. Demand features rated in this category may be supported by a liquidity provider that does not have an investment grade short-term rating or may lack the structural and/or legal protections necessary to ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

Standard & Poor's Ratings Services

Long-Term Issue Credit Ratings
Issue credit ratings are based, in varying degrees, on Standard & Poor's analysis of the following considerations:

Likelihood of payment—capacity and willingness of the obligor to meet its financial commitment on an obligation in accordance with the terms of the obligation;

Nature of and provisions of the obligation;

Protection afforded by, and relative position of, the obligation in the event of bankruptcy, reorganization, or other arrangement under the laws of bankruptcy and other laws affecting creditors' rights.

Issue ratings are an assessment of default risk, but may incorporate an assessment of relative seniority or ultimate recovery in the event of default. Junior obligations are typically rated lower than senior obligations, to reflect the lower priority in bankruptcy, as noted above (Such differentiation may apply when an entity has both senior and subordinated obligations, secured and unsecured obligations, or operating company and holding company obligations.).

Investment Grade
AAA: An obligation rated 'AAA' has the highest rating assigned by Standard & Poor's. The obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is extremely strong.

AA: An obligation rated 'AA' differs from the highest-rated obligations only to a small degree. The obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is very strong.

A: An obligation rated 'A' is somewhat more susceptible to the adverse effects of changes in circumstances and economic conditions than obligations in higher-rated categories. However, the obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is still strong.

BBB: An obligation rated 'BBB' exhibits adequate protection parameters. However, adverse economic conditions or changing circumstances are more likely to lead to a weakened capacity of the obligor to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

Speculative Grade
Obligations rated 'BB', 'B', 'CCC', 'CC', and 'C' are regarded as having significant speculative characteristics. 'BB' indicates the least degree of speculation and 'C' the highest. While such obligations will likely have some quality and protective characteristics, these may be outweighed by large uncertainties or major exposures to adverse conditions.

BB: An obligation rated 'BB' is less vulnerable to nonpayment than other speculative issues. However, it faces major ongoing uncertainties or exposure to adverse business, financial, or economic conditions which could lead to the obligor's inadequate capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

B: An obligation rated 'B' is more vulnerable to nonpayment than obligations rated 'BB', but the obligor currently has the capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation. Adverse business, financial, or economic conditions will likely impair the obligor's capacity or willingness to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

CCC: An obligation rated 'CCC' is currently vulnerable to nonpayment, and is dependent upon favorable business, financial, and economic conditions for the obligor to meet its financial commitment on the obligation. In the event of adverse business, financial, or economic conditions, the obligor is not likely to have the capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

CC: An obligation rated 'CC' is currently highly vulnerable to nonpayment.

C: A 'C' rating is assigned to obligations that are currently highly vulnerable to nonpayment, obligations that have payment arrearages allowed by the terms of the documents, or obligations of an issuer that is the subject of a bankruptcy petition or similar action which have not experienced a payment default. Among others, the 'C' rating may be assigned to subordinated debt, preferred stock or other obligations on which cash payments have been suspended in accordance with the instrument's terms or when preferred stock is the subject of a distressed exchange offer, whereby some or all of the issue is either repurchased for an amount of cash or replaced by other instruments having a total value that is less than par.

D: An obligation rated 'D' is in payment default. The 'D' rating category is used when payments on an obligation are not made on the date due unless Standard & Poor's believes that such payments will be made within five business days, irrespective of any grace period. The 'D' rating also will be used upon the filing of a bankruptcy petition or the taking of a similar action if payments on an obligation are jeopardized.  An obligation's rating is lowered to 'D' upon completion of a distressed exchange offer, whereby some or all of the issue is either repurchased for an amount of cash or replaced by other instruments having a total value that is less than par.

Plus (+) or minus (-): The ratings from 'AA' to 'CCC' may be modified by the addition of a plus (+) or minus (-) sign to show relative standing within the major rating categories.

NR: This indicates that no rating has been requested, that there is insufficient information on which to base a rating, or that Standard & Poor's does not rate a particular obligation as a matter of policy.

Short-Term Issue Credit Ratings
A-1: A short-term obligation rated 'A-1' is rated in the highest category by Standard & Poor's. The obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is strong. Within this category, certain obligations are designated with a plus sign (+). This indicates that the obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on these obligations is extremely strong.

A-2: A short-term obligation rated 'A-2' is somewhat more susceptible to the adverse effects of changes in circumstances and economic conditions than obligations in higher rating categories. However, the obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is satisfactory.

A-3: A short-term obligation rated 'A-3' exhibits adequate protection parameters. However, adverse economic conditions or changing circumstances are more likely to lead to a weakened capacity of the obligor to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

B: A short-term obligation rated 'B' is regarded as vulnerable and has significant speculative characteristics. The obligor currently has the capacity to meet its financial commitments; however, it faces major ongoing uncertainties which could lead to the obligor's inadequate capacity to meet its financial commitments.

C: A short-term obligation rated 'C' is currently vulnerable to nonpayment and is dependent upon favorable business, financial, and economic conditions for the obligor to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

D: A short-term obligation rated 'D' is in payment default. The 'D' rating category is used when payments on an obligation, including a regulatory capital instrument, are not made on the date due even if the applicable grace period has not expired, unless Standard & Poor's believes that such payments will be made within any stated grace period. However, any stated grace period longer than five business days will be treated as five business days. The 'D' rating also will be used upon the filing of a bankruptcy petition or the taking of a similar action if payments on an obligation are jeopardized.

Dual Ratings: Standard & Poor's assigns "dual" ratings to all debt issues that have a put option or demand feature as part of their structure. The first rating addresses the likelihood of repayment of principal and interest as due, and the second rating addresses only the demand feature. The long-term rating symbols are used for bonds to denote the long-term maturity and the short-term rating symbols for the put option (for example, 'AAA/A-1+'). With U.S. municipal short-term demand debt, note rating symbols are used with the short-term issue credit rating symbols (for example, 'SP-1+/A-1+').

Active Qualifiers
Standard & Poor's uses six qualifiers that limit the scope of a rating. The structure of the transaction can require the use of a qualifier such as a 'p' qualifier, which indicates the rating addressed the principal portion of the obligation only. Likewise, the qualifier can indicate a limitation on the type of information used, such as "pi" for public information. A qualifier appears as a suffix and is part of the rating.

L: Ratings qualified with 'L' apply only to amounts invested up to federal deposit insurance limits.

p: This suffix is used for issues in which the credit factors, the terms, or both, that determine the likelihood of receipt of payment of principal are different from the credit factors, terms or both that determine the likelihood of receipt of interest on the obligation. The 'p' suffix indicates that the rating addresses the principal portion of the obligation only. The 'p' suffix will always be used in conjunction with the 'i' suffix, which addresses likelihood of receipt of interest. For example, a rated obligation could be assigned ratings of "AAAp NRi" indicating that the principal portion is rated "AAA" and the interest portion of the obligation is not rated.

i: This subscript is used for issues in which the credit factors, the terms, or both, that determine the likelihood of receipt of payment of interest are different from the credit factors, terms or both that determine the likelihood of receipt of principal on the obligation. The 'i' suffix indicates that the rating addresses the interest portion of the obligation only. The 'i' suffix will always be used in conjunction with the 'p' suffix, which addresses likelihood of receipt of principal. For example, a rated obligation could be assigned ratings of "AAAp NRi" indicating that the principal portion is rated "AAA" and the interest portion of the obligation is not rated.

pi: Ratings with a 'pi' suffix are based on an analysis of an issuer's published financial information, as well as additional information in the public domain. They do not, however, reflect in-depth meetings with an issuer's management and therefore may be based on less comprehensive information than ratings without a 'pi' suffix. Ratings with a 'pi' suffix are reviewed annually based on a new year's financial statements, but may be reviewed on an interim basis if a major event occurs that may affect the issuer's credit quality.

preliminary: Preliminary ratings, with the 'prelim' suffix, may be assigned to obligors or obligations, including financial programs, in the circumstances described below. Assignment of a final rating is conditional on the receipt by Standard & Poor's of appropriate documentation. Standard & Poor's reserves the right not to issue a final rating. Moreover, if a final rating is issued, it may differ from the preliminary rating.

Preliminary ratings may be assigned to obligations, most commonly structured and project finance issues, pending receipt of final documentation and legal opinions.

Preliminary ratings are assigned to Rule 415 Shelf Registrations. As specific issues, with defined terms, are offered from the master registration, a final rating may be assigned to them in accordance with Standard & Poor's policies.

Preliminary ratings may be assigned to obligations that will likely be issued upon the obligor's emergence from bankruptcy or similar reorganization, based on late-stage reorganization plans, documentation and discussions with the obligor. Preliminary ratings may also be assigned to the obligors. These ratings consider the anticipated general credit quality of the reorganized or postbankruptcy issuer as well as attributes of the anticipated obligation(s).

Preliminary ratings may be assigned to entities that are being formed or that are in the process of being independently established when, in Standard & Poor's opinion, documentation is close to final. Preliminary ratings may also be assigned to these entities' obligations.

Preliminary ratings may be assigned when a previously unrated entity is undergoing a well-formulated restruc-
turing, recapitalization, significant financing or other transformative event, generally at the point that investor or lender commitments are invited. The preliminary rating may be assigned to the entity and to its proposed obligation(s). These preliminary ratings consider the anticipated general credit quality of the obligor, as well as attributes of the anticipated obligation(s), assuming successful completion of the transformative event. Should the transformative event not occur, Standard & Poor's would likely withdraw these preliminary ratings.

A preliminary recovery rating may be assigned to an obligation that has a preliminary issue credit rating.

t: This symbol indicates termination structures that are designed to honor their contracts to full maturity or, should certain events occur, to terminate and cash settle all their contracts before their final maturity date.

Inactive Qualifiers (no longer applied or outstanding)
*: This symbol indicated continuance of the ratings is contingent upon Standard & Poor's receipt of an executed copy of the escrow agreement or closing documentation confirming investments and cash flows. Discontinued use in August 1998.

c: This qualifier was used to provide additional information to investors that the bank may terminate its obligation to purchase tendered bonds if the long-term credit rating of the issuer is below an investment-grade level and/or the issuer's bonds are deemed taxable. Discontinued use in January 2001.

G: The letter 'G' followed the rating symbol when a fund's portfolio consisted primarily of direct U.S. government securities.

pr: The letters 'pr' indicate that the rating is provisional. A provisional rating assumes the successful completion of the project financed by the debt being rated and indicates that payment of debt service requirements is largely or entirely dependent upon the successful, timely completion of the project. This rating, however, while addressing credit quality subsequent to completion of the project, makes no comment on the likelihood of or the risk of default upon failure of such completion. The investor should exercise his own judgment with respect to such likelihood and risk.

q: A 'q' subscript indicates that the rating is based solely on quantitative analysis of publicly available information. Discontinued use in April 2001.

r: The 'r' modifier was assigned to securities containing extraordinary risks, particularly market risks, which are not covered in the credit rating. The absence of an 'r' modifier should not be taken as an indication that an obligation will not exhibit extraordinary non-credit related risks. Standard & Poor's discontinued the use of the 'r' modifier for most obligations in June 2000 and for the balance of obligations (mainly structured finance transactions) in November 2002.

Fitch, Inc.

Long-Term Credit Ratings

Investment Grade
AAA: Highest credit quality. 'AAA' ratings denote the lowest expectation of credit risk. They are assigned only in cases of exceptionally strong capacity for payment of financial commitments. This capacity is highly unlikely to be adversely affected by foreseeable events.

AA: Very high credit quality. "AA" ratings denote expectations of very low credit risk. They indicate very strong capacity for payment of financial commitments. This capacity is not significantly vulnerable to foreseeable events.

A: High credit quality. "A" ratings denote expectations of low credit risk. The capacity for payment of financial commitments is considered strong. This capacity may, nevertheless, be more vulnerable to adverse business or economic conditions than is the case for higher ratings.

BBB: Good credit quality. "BBB" ratings indicate that expectations of credit risk are currently low. The capacity for payment of financial commitments is considered adequate, but adverse business or economic conditions are more likely to impair this capacity.

Speculative Grade
BB: Speculative. 'BB' ratings indicate an elevated vulnerability to credit risk, particularly in the event of adverse changes in business or economic conditions over time; however, business or financial alternatives may be available to allow financial commitments to be met.

B: Highly speculative. 'B' ratings indicate that material credit risk is present.

CCC: Substantial credit risk. 'CCC' ratings indicate that substantial credit risk is present.

CC: Very high levels of credit risk. 'CC' ratings indicate very high levels of credit risk.

C: Exceptionally high levels of credit risk. 'C' indicates exceptionally high levels of credit risk.

Defaulted obligations typically are not assigned 'D' ratings, but are instead rated in the 'B' to 'C' rating categories, depending upon their recovery prospects and other relevant characteristics. This approach better aligns obligations that have comparable overall expected loss but varying vulnerability to default and loss.

The modifiers "+" or "-" may be appended to a rating to denote relative status within major rating categories. Such suffixes are not added to the 'AAA' obligation rating category, or to corporate finance obligation ratings in the categories below 'CCC.'

The subscript 'emr' is appended to a rating to denote embedded market risk which is beyond the scope of the rating. The designation is intended to make clear that the rating solely addresses the counterparty risk of the issuing bank. It is not meant to indicate any limitation in the analysis of the counterparty risk, which in all other respects follows published Fitch criteria for analyzing the issuing financial institution. Fitch does not rate these instruments where the principal is to any degree subject to market risk.

Recovery Ratings
Recovery Ratings are assigned to selected individual securities and obligations. These currently are published for most individual obligations of corporate issuers with IDRs in the 'B' rating category and below.

Among the factors that affect recovery rates for securities are the collateral, the seniority relative to other obligations in the capital structure (where appropriate), and the expected value of the company or underlying collateral in distress.

The Recovery Rating scale is based upon the expected relative recovery characteristics of an obligation upon the curing of a default, emergence from insolvency or following the liquidation or termination of the obligor or its associated collateral.

Recovery Ratings are an ordinal scale and do not attempt to precisely predict a given level of recovery. As a guideline in developing the rating assessments, the agency employs broad theoretical recovery bands in its ratings approach based on historical averages, but actual recoveries for a given security may deviate materially from historical averages.

RR1: Outstanding recovery prospects given default. 'RR1' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 91%-100% of current principal and related interest.

RR2: Superior recovery prospects given default. 'RR2' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 71%-90% of current principal and related interest.

RR3: Good recovery prospects given default. 'RR3' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 51%-70% of current principal and related interest.

RR4: Average recovery prospects given default. 'RR4' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 31%-50% of current principal and related interest.

RR5: Below average recovery prospects given default. 'RR5' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 11%-30% of current principal and related interest.

RR6: Poor recovery prospects given default. 'RR6' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 0%-10% of current principal and related interest.

Short-Term Credit Ratings
A short-term issuer or obligation rating is based in all cases on the short-term vulnerability to default of the rated entity or security stream and relates to the capacity to meet financial obligations in accordance with the documentation governing the relevant obligation. Short-Term Ratings are assigned to obligations whose initial maturity is viewed as "short term" based on market convention. Typically, this means up to 13 months for corporate, sovereign and structured obligations, and up to 36 months for obligations in US public finance markets.

F1: Highest short-term credit quality. Indicates the strongest intrinsic capacity for timely payment of financial commitments; may have an added "+" to denote any exceptionally strong credit feature.

F2: Good short-term credit quality. Good intrinsic capacity for timely payment of financial commitments.

F3: Fair short-term credit quality. The intrinsic capacity for timely payment of financial commitments is adequate.

B: Speculative short-term credit quality. Minimal capacity for timely payment of financial commitments, plus heightened vulnerability to near term adverse changes in financial and economic conditions.

C: High short-term default risk. Default is a real possibility.

RD: Restricted default. Indicates an entity that has defaulted on one or more of its financial commitments, although it continues to meet other financial obligations. Applicable to entity ratings only.

D: Default. Indicates a broad-based default event for an entity, or the default of a specific short-term obligation.

INVESTMENT MANAGER

PIMCO, 840 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach, CA 92660

DISTRIBUTOR

PIMCO Investments LLC, 1633 Broadway, New York, NY 10019

CUSTODIAN

State Street Bank & Trust Co., State Street Financial Center, One Lincoln Street, Boston, MA 02111

TRANSFER AGENT

State Street Bank & Trust Co., State Street Financial Center, One Lincoln Street, Boston, MA 02111

INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, 1100 Walnut Street, Suite 1300, Kansas City, MO 64106-2197

LEGAL COUNSEL

Dechert LLP, 1900 K Street N.W., Washington, D.C. 20006

PIMCO ETF Trust
840 Newport Center Drive
Newport Beach, CA 92660

The Trust's Statement of Additional Information ("SAI") includes additional information about the Fund. The SAI is incorporated by reference into this Prospectus, which means it is part of this Prospectus for legal purposes. The Fund's annual report, once it is available, will discuss the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected the Fund's performance during its last fiscal year.

You may get free copies of any of these materials, request other information about the Fund, or make shareholder inquiries by calling the Trust at 888.400.4ETF (888.400.4383) by visiting www.pimcoetfs.com or by writing to:

PIMCO ETF Trust
840 Newport Center Drive
Newport Beach, CA 92660

You may review and copy information about the Trust, including its SAI, at the Securities and Exchange Commission's public reference room in Washington, D.C. You may call the Commission at 1-202-551-8090 for information about the operation of the public reference room. You may also access reports and other information about the Trust on the EDGAR Database on the Commission's Web site at www.sec.gov. You may get copies of this information, with payment of a duplication fee, by writing the Public Reference Section of the Commission, Washington, D.C. 20549-1520, or by e-mailing your request to publicinfo@sec.gov.

You can also visit our Web site at www.pimcoetfs.com for additional information about the Fund, including the SAI, which is available for download free of charge.

Reference the Trust's Investment Company Act file number in your correspondence.

 

 

Investment Company Act File Number: 811-22250

xxxxx_[____]


Preliminary Prospectus

 

PIMCO ETFs

The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. Shares of the Fund may not be sold until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has not approved or disapproved these securities, or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

Actively-Managed Exchange-Traded Fund

[___]
Subject to Completion

 

[______]

PIMCO Global Advantage® Bond Exchange-Traded Fund

 



Table of Contents

Fund Summary

Summary Information About the Fund

Description of Principal Risks

Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings

Management of the Fund

Buying and Selling Shares

How Net Asset Value is Determined

Fund Distributions

Tax Consequences

Characteristics and Risks of Securities and Investment Techniques

Financial Highlights

Appendix A - Description of Securities Ratings


PIMCO Global Advantage® Bond Exchange-Traded Fund

Investment Objective

The Fund seeks total return which exceeds that of its benchmarks, consistent with prudent investment management.

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund:

Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment): None

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):

 

Management Fees

[__]%

Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees

N/A

Other Expenses1

[__]%

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses

[__]%

Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement2

[__]%

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement

[__]%

1

"Other Expenses" reflect organizational expenses for the Fund's first fiscal year.

2

Pacific Investment Management Company LLC ("PIMCO") has contractually agreed, through [___], to waive its management fee, or reimburse the Fund, to the extent that organizational expenses and pro rata Trustees' fees exceed 0.0049% of the Fund's average net assets (the "Expense Limit"). Under the Expense Limitation Agreement, which renews annually for a full year unless terminated by PIMCO upon at least 30 days' notice prior to the end of the contract term, PIMCO may recoup these waivers and reimbursements in future periods, not exceeding three years, provided that organizational expenses and pro rata Trustees' fees, plus recoupment, do not exceed the Expense Limit.

Example. The Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the costs of investing in other exchange-traded funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund's operating expenses remain the same. Investors may pay brokerage commissions on their purchases and sales of Fund shares, which are not reflected in the Example. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

 

1 Year

3 Years

$__

$__

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in the Annual Fund Operating Expenses or in the Example tables, affect the Fund's performance. The Fund has not yet commenced operations as of the date of this prospectus. Thus, no portfolio turnover rate is provided for the Fund.

Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing under normal circumstances at least 80% of its assets in Fixed Income Instruments that are economically tied to at least three countries (one of which may be the United States), which may be represented by forwards or derivatives such as options, futures contracts, or swap agreements. "Fixed Income Instruments" include bonds, debt securities and other similar instruments issued by various U.S. and non-U.S. public- or private-sector entities.

Pacific Investment Management Company LLC ("PIMCO") selects the Fund's foreign country and currency compositions based on an evaluation of various factors, including, but not limited to, relative interest rates, exchange rates, monetary and fiscal policies, and trade and current account balances. The Fund may invest without limitation in securities denominated in foreign currencies and in U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers. The Fund may invest, without limitation, in securities and instruments that are economically tied to emerging market countries. The Fund may also invest up to 10% of its total assets in preferred stock, convertible securities and other equity-related securities. In addition, the Fund may invest in both investment-grade securities and high yield securities ("junk bonds") subject to a maximum of 15% its total assets in securities rated below B by Moody's Investors Service, Inc. ("Moody's"), or equivalently rated by Standard & Poor's Ratings Services ("S&P") or Fitch, Inc. ("Fitch"), or, if unrated, determined by PIMCO to be of comparable quality. The average portfolio duration of this Fund varies based on PIMCO's forecast for interest rates and, under normal market conditions, is not expected to exceed eight years. Duration is a measure used to determine the sensitivity of a security's price to changes in interest rates. The longer a security's duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates. The Fund is non-diversified, which means that it may invest its assets in a smaller number of issuers than a diversified fund.

The Fund may invest, without limitation, in derivative instruments, such as options, futures contracts or fixed income swap agreements, and in mortgage- or asset-backed securities, subject to applicable law and any other restrictions described in the Fund's prospectus or Statement of Additional Information. The Fund may purchase or sell securities on a when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment basis and may engage in short sales. The Fund may, without limitation, seek to obtain market exposure to the securities in which it primarily invests by entering into a series of purchase and sale contracts or by using other investment techniques (such as buy backs or dollar rolls). The "total return" sought by the Fund consists of income earned on the Fund's investments, plus capital appreciation, if any, which generally arises from decreases in interest rates, foreign currency appreciation or improving credit fundamentals for a particular sector or security.

Principal Risks

It is possible to lose money on an investment in the Fund. The principal risks of investing in the Fund, which could adversely affect its net asset value, yield and total return are:

Market Trading Risk: the risk that an active secondary trading market for Fund shares does not continue once developed, that the Fund may not continue to meet a listing exchange's trading or listing requirements, or that Fund shares trade at prices other than the Fund's net asset value

Interest Rate Risk: the risk that fixed income securities will decline in value because of an increase in interest rates; a fund with a longer average portfolio duration will be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than a fund with a shorter average portfolio duration

Credit Risk: the risk that the Fund could lose money if the issuer or guarantor of a fixed income security, or the counterparty to a derivative contract, is unable or unwilling to meet its financial obligations

High Yield Risk: the risk that high yield securities and unrated securities of similar credit quality (commonly known as "junk bonds") are subject to greater levels of credit and liquidity risks. High yield securities are considered primarily speculative with respect to the issuer's continuing ability to make principal and interest payments

Market Risk: the risk that the value of securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to factors affecting securities markets generally or particular sectors

Issuer Risk: the risk that the value of a security may decline for reasons directly related to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer's goods or services

Liquidity Risk: the risk that a particular investment may be difficult to purchase or sell and that the Fund may be unable to sell illiquid securities at an advantageous time or price or achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain sector

Derivatives Risk: the risk of investing in derivative instruments, including liquidity, interest rate, market, credit and management risks, mispricing or improper valuation. Changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index, and the Fund could lose more than the principal amount invested

Equity Risk: the risk that the value of equity securities, such as common stocks and preferred stocks, may decline due to general market conditions which are not specifically related to a particular company or to factors affecting a particular industry or industries. Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed income securities

Mortgage-Related and Other Asset-Backed Securities Risk: the risk of investing in mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities, including interest rate risk, extension risk and prepayment risk

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Investment Risk: the risk that investing in foreign (non-U.S.) securities may result in the Fund experiencing more rapid and extreme changes in value than a fund that invests exclusively in securities of U.S. companies, due to smaller markets, differing reporting, accounting and auditing standards, increased risk of delayed settlements of portfolio transactions or loss of certificates of portfolio securities, and the risk of unfavorable foreign government actions, including nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, currency blockage, or political changes or diplomatic developments. Foreign securities may also be less liquid and more difficult to value than securities of U.S. issuers

Emerging Markets Risk: the risk of investing in emerging market securities, primarily increased foreign (non-U.S.) investment risk

Currency Risk: the risk that foreign currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar and affect the Fund's investments in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or in securities that trade in, and receive revenues in, or in derivatives that provide exposure to, foreign (non-U.S.) currencies

Issuer Non-Diversification Risk: the risk of focusing investments in a small number of issuers, including being more susceptible to risks associated with a single economic, political or regulatory occurrence than a more diversified portfolio might be. Funds that are "non-diversified" may invest a greater percentage of their assets in the securities of a single issuer (such as bonds issued by a particular state) than funds that are "diversified"

Leveraging Risk: the risk that certain transactions of the Fund, such as reverse repurchase agreements, loans of portfolio securities, and the use of when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment transactions, or derivative instruments, may give rise to leverage, causing the Fund to be more volatile than if it had not been leveraged

Management Risk: the risk that the investment techniques and risk analyses applied by PIMCO will not produce the desired results, and that legislative, regulatory, or tax restrictions, policies or developments may affect the investment techniques available to PIMCO in connection with managing the Fund. There is no guarantee that the investment objective of the Fund will be achieved

Short Sale Risk: the risk of entering into short sales, including the potential loss of more money than the actual cost of the investment, and the risk that the third party to the short sale may fail to honor its contract terms, causing a loss to the Fund

Please see "Description of Principal Risks" in the Fund's prospectus for a more detailed description of the risks of investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency.

Performance Information

The Fund does not have a full calendar year of performance. Thus, no bar chart or Average Annual Total Returns table is included for the Fund. Once the Fund commences operations, performance will be updated daily and quarterly and may be obtained at www.pimcoetfs.com/fundinfo.

Investment Adviser/Portfolio Manager

PIMCO serves as the investment adviser for the Fund. The Fund's portfolio is managed by [____].

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares

The Fund is an exchange-traded fund ("ETF"). Individual Fund shares may only be purchased and sold on a national securities exchange through a broker-dealer and may not be purchased or redeemed directly with the Fund. The price of Fund shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than net asset value ("NAV"), shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). The Funds will only issue or redeem shares at NAV that have been aggregated into blocks of [_____] shares or multiples thereof ("Creation Units") with certain large institutional investors who have entered into agreements with the Funds' Distributor ("Authorized Participants"). The Fund will issue or redeem Creation Units in return for a basket of cash and/or securities that the Fund specifies each Business Day.

Tax Information

The Fund's taxable distributions are generally taxable to you as ordinary income, capital gains, or a combination of the two, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account.

Summary Information About the Fund

Summary Information About the Fund

This prospectus describes one ETF (the "Fund") offered by PIMCO ETF Trust (the "Trust"). The Fund provides access to the professional investment advisory services offered by PIMCO. 

ETFs are funds that trade like other publicly-traded securities and may be designed to track an index or to be actively managed. Unlike conventional ETFs, the Fund is not an index fund. The Fund is actively managed and does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. Unlike shares of a mutual fund, which can be bought from and redeemed by the issuing fund by all shareholders at a price based on NAV, shares of the Fund may be directly purchased from and redeemed by the Fund at NAV solely by Authorized Participants. Also unlike shares of a mutual fund, shares of the Fund are listed on a national securities exchange and trade in the secondary market at market prices that change throughout the day.

Once operational, shares of the Fund are listed and traded at market prices on NYSE Arca, Inc. ("NYSE Arca") and other secondary markets. The market price for the Fund's shares may be different from the Fund's NAV. The Fund issues and redeems shares at NAV only in Creation Units. Only Authorized Participants may purchase or redeem Creation Units directly with the Fund at NAV. These transactions are in exchange for cash and/or securities. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, shares of the Fund are not redeemable securities. Shareholders who are not Authorized Participants may not purchase or redeem shares directly from the Fund.

An investment in the Fund alone should not constitute an entire investment program. This prospectus explains what you should know about the Fund before you invest. Please read it carefully.

Investors should be aware that the investments made by the Fund and the results achieved by the Fund at any given time are not expected to be the same as those made by other funds for which PIMCO acts as investment adviser, including funds with names, investment objectives and policies similar to the Fund.

On each business day, before commencement of trading on NYSE Arca, the Fund will disclose on www.pimcoetfs.com the identities and quantities of the Fund's portfolio holdings that will form the basis for the Fund's calculation of NAV at the end of the business day. Fund fact sheets provide additional information regarding the Fund and may be requested by calling 1-888-400-4ETF (1-888-400-4383).

 

Description of Principal Risks

The value of your investment in the Fund changes with the market price of the Fund's shares determined in the secondary market. Market price may be determined, in part, by the values of the Fund's investments. Many factors can affect those values. The factors that are most likely to have a material effect on the Fund's portfolio as a whole are called "principal risks." The principal risks of the Fund are identified in the "Fund Summary" and are described in this section. The Fund may be subject to additional risks other than those described below because the types of investments made by the Fund can change over time. Securities and investment techniques mentioned in this section that appear in bold type are described in greater detail under "Characteristics and Risks of Securities and Investment Techniques." That section and "Investment Objectives and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information also include more information about the Fund, its investments and the related risks. There is no guarantee that the Fund will be able to achieve its investment objective. It is possible to lose money by investing in the Fund.

Market Trading Risk

The Fund is subject to secondary market trading risks. Once operational, shares of the Fund are listed for trading on an exchange, however, there can be no guarantee that an active trading market for such shares will develop or continue. Shares of the Fund may be listed or traded on U.S. and foreign (non-U.S.) exchanges other than the Fund's primary U.S. listing exchange. There can be no guarantee that the Fund's shares will continue trading on any exchange or in any market or that the Fund's shares will continue to meet the listing or trading requirements of any exchange or market. The Fund's shares may experience higher trading volumes on one exchange as compared to another and investors are subject to the execution and settlement risks of the market where their broker directs trades.

Secondary market trading in the Fund's shares may be halted by an exchange because of market conditions. Pursuant to exchange or market rules, trading in the Fund's shares on an exchange or in any market may be subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility. There can be no guarantee that the Fund's exchange listing or ability to trade its shares will continue or remain unchanged. In the event the Fund ceases to be listed on an exchange, the Fund may cease operating as an "exchange-traded" fund and operate as a mutual fund, provided that shareholders are given advance notice.

Shares of the Fund may trade on an exchange at prices at, above or below their most recent NAV. The per share NAV of the Fund is calculated at the end of each business day, as described below, and fluctuates with changes in the market value of the Fund's holdings. The trading prices of the Fund's shares fluctuate continuously throughout the trading day based on market supply and demand, and may not closely track NAV. The trading prices of the Fund's shares may differ significantly from NAV during periods of market volatility, which may, among other factors, lead to the Fund's shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV.

Buying or selling the Fund's shares on an exchange may require the payment of brokerage commissions. In addition, you may also incur the cost of the spread (the difference between the bid price and the ask price). The commission is frequently a fixed amount and may be a significant cost for investors seeking to buy or sell small amounts of shares. The spread varies over time for shares of the Fund based on their trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally less if the Fund has more trading volume and market liquidity and more if the Fund has less trading volume and market liquidity. Due to the costs inherent in buying or selling the Fund's shares, frequent trading may detract significantly from investment returns. Investment in the Fund's shares may not be advisable for investors who expect to engage in frequent trading.

Interest Rate Risk

Interest rate risk is the risk that fixed income securities and other instruments in the Fund's portfolio will decline in value because of an increase in interest rates. As nominal interest rates rise, the value of certain fixed income securities held by the Fund is likely to decrease. A nominal interest rate can be described as the sum of a real interest rate and an expected inflation rate. Fixed income securities with longer durations tend to be more sensitive to changes in interest rates, usually making them more volatile than securities with shorter durations. Inflation-indexed bonds, including Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities ("TIPS"), decline in value when real interest rates rise. In certain interest rate environments, such as when real interest rates are rising faster than nominal interest rates, inflation-indexed bonds may experience greater losses than other fixed income securities with similar durations.

Variable and floating rate securities generally are less sensitive to interest rate changes but may decline in value if their interest rates do not rise as much, or as quickly, as interest rates in general. Conversely, floating rate securities will not generally increase in value if interest rates decline. Inverse floating rate securities may decrease in value if interest rates increase. Inverse floating rate securities may also exhibit greater price volatility than a fixed rate obligation with similar credit quality. When the Fund holds variable or floating rate securities, a decrease (or, in the case of inverse floating rate securities, an increase) in market interest rates will adversely affect the income received from such securities and the net asset value of the Fund's shares.

Credit Risk

The Fund could lose money if the issuer or guarantor of a fixed income security (including a security purchased with securities lending collateral), or the counterparty to a derivatives contract, repurchase agreement or a loan of portfolio securities is unable or unwilling, or is perceived (whether by market participants, ratings agencies, pricing services or otherwise) as unable or unwilling, to make timely principal and/or interest payments, or to otherwise honor its obligations. The downgrade of the credit of a security held by the Fund may decrease its value. Securities are subject to varying degrees of credit risk, which are often reflected in credit ratings. Municipal bonds are subject to the risk that litigation, legislation or other political events, local business or economic conditions, or the bankruptcy of the issuer could have a significant effect on an issuer's ability to make payments of principal and/or interest.

High Yield Risk

Funds that invest in high yield securities and unrated securities of similar credit quality (commonly known as "junk bonds") may be subject to greater levels of credit and liquidity risk than funds that do not invest in such securities. These securities are considered predominately speculative with respect to the issuer's continuing ability to make principal and interest payments. An economic downturn or period of rising interest rates could adversely affect the market for these securities and reduce the Fund's ability to sell these securities (liquidity risk). If the issuer of a security is in default with respect to interest or principal payments, the Fund may lose its entire investment. Because of the risks involved in investing in high yield securities, an investment in the Fund that invests in such securities should be considered speculative.

Market Risk

The market price of securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. Securities may decline in value due to factors affecting securities markets generally or particular industries represented in the securities markets. The value of a security may decline due to general market conditions which are not specifically related to a particular company, such as real or perceived adverse economic conditions, changes in the general outlook for corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates or adverse investor sentiment generally. The value of a security may also decline due to factors which affect a particular industry or industries, such as labor shortages or increased production costs and competitive conditions within an industry. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple asset classes may decline in value simultaneously.

Issuer Risk

The value of a security may decline for a number of reasons which directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer's goods or services, as well as the historical and prospective earnings of the issuer and the value of its assets.

Liquidity Risk

Liquidity risk exists when particular investments are difficult to purchase or sell. Illiquid securities are securities that cannot be disposed of within seven days in the ordinary course of business at approximately the value at which the Fund has valued the securities. The Fund's investments in illiquid securities, if any, may reduce the returns of the Fund because it may be unable to sell the illiquid securities at an advantageous time or price. Additionally, the market for certain investments may become illiquid under adverse market or economic conditions independent of any specific adverse changes in the conditions of a particular issuer. In such cases, the Fund, due to limitations on investments in illiquid securities and the difficulty in purchasing and selling such securities or instruments, may be unable to achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain sector. To the extent that the Fund's principal investment strategies involve derivatives, foreign (non-U.S.) securities or securities with substantial market and/or credit risk, the Fund will tend to have the greatest exposure to liquidity risk.

Derivatives Risk

Derivatives are financial contracts whose value depends on, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index. The various derivative instruments that the Fund may use are referenced under "Characteristics and Risks of Securities and Investment Techniques—Derivatives" in this prospectus and described in more detail under "Investment Objectives and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information. The Fund may use derivatives as a substitute for taking a position in the underlying asset and/or as part of a strategy designed to reduce exposure to other risks, such as interest rate or currency risk. The Fund may also use derivatives for leverage, in which case their use would involve leveraging risk. The Fund's use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. Derivatives are subject to a number of risks described elsewhere in this section, such as liquidity risk, interest rate risk, market risk, credit risk and management risk. They also involve the risk of mispricing or improper valuation and the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. If the Fund invests in a derivative instrument, the Fund could lose more than the principal amount invested. Also, suitable derivative transactions may not be available in all circumstances and there can be no assurance that the Fund will engage in these transactions to reduce exposure to other risks when that would be beneficial.

Equity Risk

Equity securities represent an ownership interest, or the right to acquire an ownership interest, in an issuer. Equity securities also include, among other things, preferred stocks, convertible stocks and warrants. The values of equity securities, such as common stocks and preferred stocks, may decline due to general market conditions which are not specifically related to a particular company, such as real or perceived adverse economic conditions, changes in the general outlook for corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates or adverse investor sentiment generally. They may also decline due to factors which affect a particular industry or industries, such as labor shortages or increased production costs and competitive conditions within an industry. Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed income securities.

Mortgage-Related and Other Asset-Backed Securities Risk

Mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities often involve risks that are different from or more acute than risks associated with other types of debt instruments. Generally, rising interest rates tend to extend the duration of fixed rate mortgage-related securities, making them more sensitive to changes in interest rates. As a result, in a period of rising interest rates, if the Fund holds mortgage-related securities, it may exhibit additional volatility. This is known as extension risk. In addition, adjustable and fixed rate mortgage-related securities are subject to prepayment risk. When interest rates decline, borrowers may pay off their mortgages sooner than expected. This can reduce the returns of the Fund because the Fund may have to reinvest that money at the lower prevailing interest rates. The Fund's investments in other asset-backed securities are subject to risks similar to those associated with mortgage-related securities, as well as additional risks associated with the nature of the assets and the servicing of those assets.

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Investment Risk

Because the Fund invests in foreign (non-U.S.) securities, it may experience more rapid and extreme changes in value than the Fund that invests exclusively in securities of U.S. companies. The securities markets of many foreign countries are relatively small, with a limited number of companies representing a small number of industries. Additionally, issuers of foreign (non-U.S.) securities are usually not subject to the same degree of regulation as U.S. issuers. Reporting, accounting and auditing standards of foreign countries differ, in some cases significantly, from U.S. standards. Also, nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, currency blockage, political changes or diplomatic developments could adversely affect the Fund's investments in a foreign country. In the event of nationalization, expropriation or other confiscation, the Fund could lose its entire investment in foreign (non-U.S.) securities. Adverse conditions in a certain region can adversely affect securities of other countries whose economies appear to be unrelated. To the extent that the Fund invests a significant portion of its assets in a specific geographic region, the Fund will generally have more exposure to regional economic risks associated with foreign investments.  Foreign securities may also be less liquid and more difficult to value than securities of U.S. issuers.

Emerging Markets Risk

Foreign (non-U.S.) investment risk may be particularly high to the extent the Fund invests in emerging market securities. Emerging market securities may present market, credit, currency, liquidity, legal, political and other risks different from, and potentially greater than, the risks of investing in securities and instruments economically tied to developed foreign countries. To the extent the Fund invests in emerging market securities that are economically tied to a particular region, country or group of countries, the Fund may be more sensitive to adverse political or social events affecting that region, country or group of countries. Economic, business, political, or social instability may affect emerging market securities differently. Accordingly, to the extent the Fund invests in a wide range of emerging market securities (e.g., different regions or countries, asset classes, issuers, sectors or credit qualities) it may perform differently in response to such instability than if the Fund invested in a more limited range of emerging market securities. For example, if the Fund focuses its investments in multiple asset classes of emerging market securities, the Fund may have a limited ability to mitigate losses in an environment that is adverse to emerging market securities in general. Emerging market securities may also be more volatile, less liquid and more difficult to value than securities economically tied to developed foreign countries. The systems and procedures for trading and settlement of securities in emerging markets are less developed and less transparent and transactions may take longer to settle. The Fund may not know the identity of trading counterparties, which may increase the possibility of the Fund not receiving payment or delivery of securities in a transaction.

Currency Risk

If the Fund invests directly in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or in securities that trade in, and receive revenues in, foreign (non-U.S.) currencies, or in derivatives that provide exposure to foreign (non-U.S.) currencies, it will be subject to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar, or, in the case of hedging positions, that the U.S. dollar will decline in value relative to the currency being hedged.

Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates, intervention (or the failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments, central banks or supranational entities such as the International Monetary Fund, or by the imposition of currency controls or other political developments in the United States or abroad. As a result, the Fund's investments in foreign currency denominated securities may reduce the returns of the Fund.

Currency risk may be particularly high to the extent that the Fund invests in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or engages in foreign currency transactions that are economically tied to emerging market countries. These currency transactions may present market, credit, currency, liquidity, legal, political and other risks different from, or greater than, the risks of investing in developed foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or engaging in foreign currency transactions that are economically tied to developed foreign countries.

Issuer Non-Diversification Risk

Focusing investments in a small number of issuers increases risk. Funds that are "non-diversified" may invest a greater percentage of their assets in the securities of a single issuer (such as bonds issued by a particular foreign government) than funds that are "diversified." Funds that invest in a relatively small number of issuers are more susceptible to risks associated with a single economic, political or regulatory occurrence than a more diversified portfolio might be. Some of those issuers also may present substantial credit or other risks.

Leveraging Risk

Certain transactions may give rise to a form of leverage. Such transactions may include, among others, reverse repurchase agreements, dollar rolls, loans of portfolio securities and the use of when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment transactions. The Fund's use of derivatives may also create leveraging risk for the Fund. To mitigate leveraging risk, PIMCO will segregate or "earmark" liquid assets or otherwise cover transactions that may give rise to such risk. The Fund also may be exposed to leveraging risk by borrowing money for investment purposes. Leveraging may cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations or to meet segregation requirements when it may not be advantageous to do so. Leveraging, including borrowing, may cause the Fund to be more volatile than if the Fund had not been leveraged. This is because leveraging tends to exaggerate the effect of any increase or decrease in the value of the Fund's portfolio securities.

Management Risk

The Fund is subject to management risk because it is an actively managed investment portfolio. PIMCO and each portfolio manager will apply investment techniques and risk analyses in making investment decisions for the Fund, but there can be no guarantee that these decisions will produce the desired results. Additionally, legislative, regulatory, or tax restrictions, policies or developments may affect the investment techniques available to PIMCO and each portfolio manager in connection with managing the Fund and may also adversely affect the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective.

Short Sale Risk

Short sales are subject to special risks. A short sale involves the sale by the Fund of a security that it does not own with the hope of purchasing the same security at a later date at a lower price. The Fund may also enter into a short position through a forward commitment or a short derivative position through a futures contract or swap agreement. If the price of the security has increased during this time, then the Fund will incur a loss equal to the increase in price from the time that the short sale was entered into plus any premiums and interest paid to the third party.

Therefore, short sales involve the risk that losses may be exaggerated, potentially losing more money than the actual cost of the investment. By contrast, a loss on a long position arises from decreases in the value of the security and is limited by the fact that a security's value cannot decrease below zero.

By investing the proceeds received from selling securities short, the Fund could be deemed to be employing a form of leverage, which creates special risks. The use of leverage may increase the Fund's exposure to long securities positions and make any change in the Fund's NAV greater than it would be without the use of leverage. This could result in increased volatility of returns. There is no guarantee that any leveraging strategy the Fund employs will be successful during any period in which it is employed.

In times of unusual or adverse market, economic, regulatory or political conditions, the Fund may not be able, fully or partially, to implement its short selling strategy. Periods of unusual or adverse market, economic, regulatory or political conditions generally may exist for as long as six months and, in some cases, much longer. Also, there is the risk that the third party to the short sale may fail to honor its contract terms, causing a loss to the Fund.

Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings

Please see "Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings" in the Statement of Additional Information for information about the availability of the complete schedule of the Fund's holdings.

Management of the Fund

Investment Manager

PIMCO serves as the investment manager for the Fund. Subject to the supervision of the Board of Trustees, PIMCO is responsible for managing the investment activities of the Fund and the Fund's business affairs and other administrative matters.

PIMCO is located at 840 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach, CA 92660. Organized in 1971, PIMCO provides investment management and advisory services to private accounts of institutional and individual clients and to mutual funds. As of [_____], PIMCO had approximately $[__] trillion in assets under management.

Management Fees

The Fund pays PIMCO fees in return for providing investment advisory, supervisory and administrative services under an all-in fee structure. The Fund will pay monthly management fees to PIMCO at the annual rate (stated as a percentage of the average daily net assets of the Fund) of [__]%.

In addition to providing investment advisory services, PIMCO provides or procures supervisory and administrative services for shareholders and also bears the costs of various third-party services required by the Fund, including audit, custodial, portfolio accounting, legal, transfer agency and printing costs. The Fund bears other expenses which are not covered under the management fee which may vary and affect the total level of expenses paid by shareholders, such as taxes and governmental fees, brokerage fees, commissions and other transaction expenses, costs of borrowing money, including interest expenses, securities lending expenses, extraordinary expenses (such as litigation and indemnification expenses) and fees and expenses of the Trust's Independent Trustees and their counsel. PIMCO generally earns a profit on the management fee paid by the Fund. Also, under the terms of the investment management agreement, PIMCO, and not Fund shareholders, would benefit from any price decreases in third-party services, including decreases resulting from an increase in net assets.

A discussion of the basis for the Board of Trustees' approval of the Fund's investment management agreement will be available in the Fund's first annual or semi-annual report to shareholders.

PIMCO has contractually agreed, through [__], to waive its management fee, or reimburse the Fund, to the extent that organizational expenses and pro rata Trustees' fees exceed 0.0049% of the Fund's average net assets. Under the Expense Limitation Agreement, which renews annually for a full year unless terminated by PIMCO upon at least 30 days' notice prior to the end of the contract term, PIMCO may recoup these waivers and reimbursements in future periods not exceeding three years, provided that organizational expenses and pro rata Trustees' fees, plus recoupment, do not exceed the Expense Limit.

Individual Portfolio Manager

The following individual has primary responsibility for managing the Fund.

 

Portfolio Manager

Since

Recent Professional Experience

[___________]

*

[_________]

*

Inception of the Fund.

Please see the Statement of Additional Information for additional information about other accounts managed by the portfolio manager, the portfolio manager's compensation and the portfolio manager's ownership of shares of the Fund.

Distributor

The Trust's Distributor is PIMCO Investments LLC ("Distributor"). The Distributor, located at 1633 Broadway, New York, NY 10019, is a broker-dealer registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC"). The Distributor distributes Creation Units for the Fund and does not maintain a secondary market in shares of the Fund.

Distribution and Servicing Plan

The Trust has adopted a Distribution and Servicing Plan for shares of the Fund pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act (the "12b-1 Plan"). The 12b-1 Plan permits compensation in connection with the distribution and marketing of Fund shares and/or the provision of certain shareholder services. The 12b-1 Plan permits the Fund to pay compensation at an annual rate of up to 0.25% of the Fund's average daily net assets. However, the Board of Trustees has determined not to authorize payment of a 12b-1 Plan fee at this time.

The 12b-1 fee may only be imposed or increased when the Board of Trustees determines that it is in the best interests of shareholders to do so. Because these fees are paid out of the Fund's assets on an ongoing basis, to the extent that a fee is authorized, over time they will increase the cost of an investment in the Fund. The 12b-1 Plan fee may cost an investor more than other types of sales charges.

Buying and Selling Shares

Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on a national securities exchange during the trading day. Shares can be bought and sold throughout the trading day like shares of other publicly traded companies. However, there can be no guarantee that an active trading market will develop or be maintained, or that the Fund shares listing will continue or remain unchanged. The Trust does not impose any minimum investment for shares of the Fund purchased on an exchange. Buying or selling the Fund's shares involves certain costs that apply to all securities transactions. When buying or selling shares of the Fund through a financial intermediary, you may incur a brokerage commission or other charges determined by your financial intermediary. Due to these brokerage costs, if any, frequent trading may detract significantly from investment returns. In addition, you may also incur the cost of the spread (the difference between the bid price and the ask price). The commission is frequently a fixed amount and may be a significant cost for investors seeking to buy or sell small amounts of shares. The spread varies over time for shares of the Fund based on its trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally less if the Fund has more trading volume and market liquidity and more if the Fund has less trading volume and market liquidity.

Shares of the Fund may be acquired from the Distributor or redeemed directly from the Fund only in Creation Units or multiples thereof, as discussed in the "Creations and Redemptions" section of the Statement of Additional Information. Once created, shares of the Fund generally trade in the secondary market in amounts less than a Creation Unit.

The Trust's Board of Trustees has not adopted a policy of monitoring for frequent purchases and redemptions of Fund shares ("frequent trading") that appear to attempt to take advantage of potential arbitrage opportunities presented by a lag between a change in the value of the Fund's portfolio securities after the close of the primary markets for the Fund's portfolio securities and the reflection of that change in the Fund's NAV ("market timing"). The Trust believes this is appropriate because an ETF, such as the Fund, is intended to be attractive to arbitrageurs, as trading activity is critical to ensuring that the market price of Fund shares remains at or close to NAV. Since the Fund issues and redeems Creation Units at NAV plus applicable transaction fees, and the Fund's shares may be purchased and sold on NYSE Arca at prevailing market prices, the risks of frequent trading are limited.

The Fund's primary listing exchange is NYSE Arca. NYSE Arca is open for trading Monday through Friday and is closed on the following holidays: New Year's Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents' Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.

A "Business Day" with respect to the Fund is each day NYSE Arca is open. Orders from Authorized Participants to create or redeem Creation Units will only be accepted on a Business Day. On days when NYSE Arca closes earlier than normal, the Fund may require orders to create or redeem Creation Units to be placed earlier in the day. See the Statement of Additional Information for more information.

Section 12(d)(1) of the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the "1940 Act"), restricts investments by registered investment companies and companies relying on Sections 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of the 1940 Act in the securities of other investment companies. Registered investment companies are permitted to invest in the Fund beyond the limits set forth in Section 12(d)(1), subject to certain terms and conditions set forth in an SEC exemptive order issued to PIMCO and the Trust, including that such investment companies enter into an agreement with the Trust.

The Trust typically does not offer or sell its shares to non- U.S. resident Authorized Participants. For purposes of this policy, a U.S. resident is defined as an account with (i) a U.S. address of record and (ii) all account owners residing in the U.S. at the time of sale.

Book Entry

Shares of the Fund are held in book-entry form, which means that no stock certificates are issued. The Depository Trust Company ("DTC") or its nominee is the record owner of all outstanding shares of the Fund and is recognized as the owner of all shares for all purposes.

Investors owning shares of the Fund are beneficial owners as shown on the records of DTC or its participants. DTC serves as the securities depository for shares of the Fund. DTC participants include securities brokers and dealers, banks, trust companies, clearing corporations and other institutions that directly or indirectly maintain a custodial relationship with DTC. As a beneficial owner of shares, you are not entitled to receive physical delivery of stock certificates or to have shares registered in your name, and you are not considered a registered owner of shares. Therefore, to exercise any right as an owner of shares, you must rely upon the procedures of DTC and its participants. These procedures are the same as those that apply to any other exchange-traded securities that you hold in book-entry or "street name" form.

Share Prices

The trading prices of the Fund's shares in the secondary market generally differ from the Fund's daily NAV per share and are affected by market forces such as supply and demand, economic conditions and other factors. Information regarding the intra-day net asset value of the Fund is disseminated every 15 seconds throughout the trading day by the national securities exchange on which the Fund's shares are primarily listed or by market data vendors or other information providers. The intra-day net asset value is based on the current market value of the securities and/or cash included in the Fund's intra-day net asset value basket. The intra-day net asset value does not necessarily reflect the precise composition of the current portfolio of securities and instruments held by the Fund at a particular point in time or the best possible valuation of the current portfolio. Therefore, the intra-day net asset value should not be viewed as a "real-time" update of the NAV, which is computed only once a day. The intra-day net asset value is generally determined by using both current market quotations and/or price quotations obtained from broker-dealers that may trade in the portfolio securities and instruments included in the Fund's intra-day net asset value basket. The Fund is not involved in, or responsible for, the calculation or dissemination of the intra-day net asset value and makes no representation or warranty as to its accuracy. An inaccuracy in the intra-day net asset value could result from various factors, including the difficulty of pricing portfolio instruments on an intra-day basis.

Premiums and Discounts

There may be differences between the daily market prices on secondary markets for shares of the Fund and the Fund's NAV. NAV is the price per share at which the Fund issues and redeems shares. See "How Net Asset Value Is Determined" below. The price used to calculate market returns ("Market Price") of the Fund generally is determined using the midpoint between the highest bid and the lowest offer on the national securities exchange on which shares of the Fund are primarily listed for trading, as of the time that the Fund's NAV is calculated. The Fund's Market Price may be at, above or below its NAV. The NAV of the Fund will fluctuate with changes in the market value of its portfolio holdings. The Market Price of the Fund will fluctuate in accordance with changes in its NAV, as well as market supply and demand.

Premiums or discounts are the differences (expressed as a percentage) between the NAV and the Market Price of the Fund on a given day, generally at the time the NAV is calculated. A premium is the amount that the Fund is trading above the reported NAV, expressed as a percentage of the NAV. A discount is the amount that the Fund is trading below the reported NAV, expressed as a percentage of the NAV. A discount or premium could be significant.  Information regarding the frequency of daily premiums or discounts, generally at the time the NAV is calculated, during the Fund's four previous calendar quarters (or for the life of the Fund, if shorter) can be found at www.pimcoetfs.com.

Request for Multiple Copies of Shareholder Documents

To reduce expenses, it is intended that only one copy of the Fund's prospectus and each annual and semi-annual report, when available, will be mailed to those addresses shared by two or more accounts. If you wish to receive individual copies of these documents, please contact the financial intermediary through which you hold your shares.

How Net Asset Value Is Determined

The NAV of the Fund's shares is determined by dividing the total value of the Fund's portfolio investments and other assets, less any liabilities, by the total number of shares outstanding.

Fund shares are valued as of the close of regular trading (normally 4:00 p.m., Eastern time) (the "NYSE Close") on each Business Day. Information that becomes known to the Fund or its agents after the NAV has been calculated on a particular day will not generally be used to retroactively adjust the price of a security or the NAV determined earlier that day. The Fund reserves the right to change the time its NAV is calculated if the Fund closes earlier, or as permitted by the SEC. 

For purposes of calculating NAV, portfolio securities and other assets for which market quotes are readily available are valued at market value. Market value is generally determined on the basis of last reported sales prices, or if no sales are reported, based on quotes obtained from a quotation reporting system, established market makers, or pricing services. Fixed income securities and non-exchange traded derivatives are normally valued on the basis of quotes obtained from brokers and dealers or pricing services using data reflecting the earlier closing of the principal markets for those securities. Prices obtained from independent pricing services use information provided by market makers or estimates of market values obtained from yield data relating to investments or securities with similar characteristics. Certain fixed income securities purchased on a delayed-delivery basis are marked to market daily until settlement at the forward settlement date. Short-term investments having a maturity of 60 days or less are generally valued at amortized cost. Exchange traded options, futures and options on futures are valued at the settlement price determined by the exchange. With respect to any portion of the Fund's assets that are invested in one or more open-end management investment companies, the Fund's NAV will be calculated based upon the NAVs of such investments. The value of securities traded in markets outside the United States may be affected significantly on a day that the NYSE is closed and an Authorized Participant is not able to purchase or redeem shares.

If a foreign security's value has materially changed after the close of the security's primary exchange or principal market but before the NYSE Close, the security will be valued at fair value based on procedures established and approved by the Board of Trustees. Foreign securities that do not trade when the NYSE is open are also valued at fair value. Foreign exchanges may permit trading in foreign securities on days when the Trust is not open for business, which may result in the Fund's portfolio investments being affected when you are unable to buy or sell shares.

Securities and other assets for which market quotes are not readily available are valued at fair value as determined in good faith by the Board of Trustees or persons acting at their direction. The Board of Trustees has adopted methods for valuing securities and other assets in circumstances where market quotes are not readily available, and has delegated to PIMCO the responsibility for applying the valuation methods. In the event that market quotes are not readily available, and the security or asset cannot be valued pursuant to one of the valuation methods, the value of the security or asset will be determined in good faith by the Valuation Committee of the Board of Trustees, generally based upon recommendations provided by PIMCO.

Market quotes are considered not readily available in circumstances where there is an absence of current or reliable market-based data (e.g., trade information, bid/ask information, broker quotes), including where events occur after the close of the relevant market, but prior to the NYSE Close, that materially affect the values of the Fund's securities or assets. In addition, market quotes are considered not readily available when, due to extraordinary circumstances, the exchanges or markets on which the securities trade do not open for trading for the entire day and no other market prices are available. The Board has delegated to PIMCO the responsibility for monitoring significant events that may materially affect the values of the Fund's securities or assets and for determining whether the value of the applicable securities or assets should be reevaluated in light of such significant events.

When the Fund uses fair value pricing to determine its NAV, securities will not be priced on the basis of quotes from the primary market in which they are traded, but rather may be priced by another method that the Board of Trustees or persons acting at their direction believe accurately reflects fair value. Fair value pricing may require subjective determinations about the value of a security. While the Trust's policy is intended to result in a calculation of the Fund's NAV that fairly reflects security values as of the time of pricing, the Trust cannot ensure that fair values determined by the Board of Trustees or persons acting at their direction would accurately reflect the price that the Fund could obtain for a security if it were to dispose of that security as of the time of pricing (for instance, in a forced or distressed sale). The prices used by the Fund may differ from the value that would be realized if the securities were sold.

Fund Distributions

The Fund distributes substantially all of its net investment income to shareholders in the form of dividends. The Fund intends to declare and distribute income dividends monthly to shareholders of record. In addition, the Fund distributes any net capital gains it earns from the sale of portfolio securities to shareholders no less frequently than annually. Net short-term capital gains may be paid more frequently. Dividend payments are made through DTC participants and indirect participants to beneficial owners then of record with proceeds received from the Fund.

No dividend reinvestment service is provided by the Trust. Financial intermediaries may make available the DTC book-entry Dividend Reinvestment Service for use by beneficial owners of Fund shares for reinvestment of their dividend distributions. Beneficial owners should contact their financial intermediary to determine the availability and costs of the service and the details of participation therein. Financial intermediaries may require beneficial owners to adhere to specific procedures and timetables. If this service is available and used, dividend distributions of both income and net capital gains will be automatically reinvested in additional whole shares of the Fund purchased in the secondary market.

Tax Consequences

Taxes on Fund distributions. If you are subject to U.S. federal income tax, you will be subject to tax on Fund taxable distributions. For federal income tax purposes, Fund taxable distributions will be taxable to you as either ordinary income or capital gains.

Fund taxable dividends (i.e., distributions of investment income) are generally taxable to you as ordinary income. Federal taxes on Fund distributions of gains are determined by how long the Fund owned the investments that generated the gains, rather than how long you have owned your shares. Distributions of gains from investments that the Fund owned for more than one year will generally be taxable to you as long-term capital gains. Distributions of gains from investments that the Fund owned for one year or less, including income from securities lending, will generally be taxable to you as ordinary income.

Fund distributions are taxable to you even if they are paid from income or gains earned by the Fund prior to your investment and thus were included in the price you paid for your shares. For example, if you purchase shares on or just before the record date of the Fund distribution, you will pay full price for the shares and may receive a portion of your investment back as a taxable distribution.

Taxes when you sell your shares. Any gain resulting from the sale of Fund shares will generally be subject to federal income tax. Currently, any capital gain or loss realized upon a sale of Fund shares is generally treated as a long-term gain or loss if the shares have been held for more than one year. Any capital gain or loss realized upon a sale of Fund shares held for one year or less is generally treated as short-term gain or loss, except that any capital loss on the sale of shares held for six months or less is treated as long-term capital loss to the extent that capital gain dividends were paid with respect to such shares.

Returns of capital. If the Fund's distributions exceed its taxable income and capital gains realized during a taxable year, all or a portion of the distributions made in the same taxable year may be recharacterized as a return of capital to shareholders. A return of capital distribution will generally not be taxable, but will reduce each shareholder's cost basis in the Fund and result in a higher reported capital gain or lower reported capital loss when those shares on which the distribution was received are sold.

Important Tax Reporting Considerations. Legislation passed by Congress requires reporting of adjusted cost basis information for covered securities, which generally include shares of a regulated investment company acquired after January 1, 2012, to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and to taxpayers. Shareholders should contact their financial intermediaries with respect to reporting of cost basis and available elections for their accounts.

Backup withholding. The Fund may be required to withhold U.S. federal income tax on all taxable distributions payable to shareholders if they fail to provide the Fund with their correct taxpayer identification number or to make required certifications, or if they have been notified by the IRS that they are subject to backup withholding. Backup withholding is not an additional tax. Any amounts withheld may be credited against U.S. federal income tax liability.

Foreign Withholding Taxes. The Fund may be subject to foreign withholding or other foreign taxes, which in some cases can be significant on any income or gain from investments in foreign securities. In that case, the Fund's total return on those securities would be decreased. The Fund may generally deduct these taxes in computing its taxable income. Rather than deducting these foreign taxes, the Fund, when investing more than 50% of its assets in the stock or securities of foreign corporations or foreign governments at the end of its taxable year, may make an election to treat a proportionate amount of eligible foreign taxes as constituting a taxable distribution to each shareholder, which would, subject to certain limitations, generally allow the shareholder to either (i) credit that proportionate amount of taxes against U.S. Federal income tax liability as a foreign tax credit or (ii) take that amount as an itemized deduction. Although in some cases the Fund may be able to apply for a refund of a portion of such taxes, the ability to successfully obtain such a refund may be uncertain.

Any foreign shareholders would generally be subject to U.S. tax withholding of 30% (or lower applicable treaty rate) on distributions by the Fund.

This "Tax Consequences" section relates only to federal income tax; the consequences under other tax laws may differ. Shareholders should consult their tax advisors as to the possible application of foreign, state and local income tax laws to Fund dividends and capital distributions. Please see the Statement of Additional Information for additional information regarding the tax aspects of investing in the Fund.

Characteristics and Risks of Securities and Investment Techniques

This section provides additional information about some of the principal investments and related risks of the Fund described under "Fund Summary" and "Description of Principal Risks" above. It also describes characteristics and risks of additional securities and investment techniques that may be used by the Fund from time to time. Most of the securities and investment techniques described herein are discretionary, which means that PIMCO can decide whether to use them or not. This prospectus does not attempt to disclose all of the various types of securities and investment techniques that may be used by the Fund. As with any fund, investors in the Fund rely on the professional investment judgment and skill of PIMCO and the individual portfolio manager. Please see "Investment Objectives and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information for more detailed information about the securities and investment techniques described in this section and about other strategies and techniques that may be used by the Fund.

Investment Selection

The Fund seeks total return. The total return sought by the Fund consists of both income earned on the Fund's investments and capital appreciation, if any, arising from increases in the market value of the Fund's holdings. Capital appreciation of Fixed Income Instruments generally results from decreases in market interest rates, foreign currency appreciation, or improving credit fundamentals for a particular market sector or security.

In selecting investments for the Fund, PIMCO develops an outlook for interest rates, currency exchange rates and the economy, analyzes credit and call risks, and uses other investment selection techniques. The proportion of the Fund's assets committed to investment in securities with particular characteristics (such as quality, sector, interest rate or maturity) varies based on PIMCO's outlook for the U.S. economy and the economies of other countries in the world, the financial markets and other factors.

With respect to fixed income investing, PIMCO attempts to identify areas of the bond market that are undervalued relative to the rest of the market. PIMCO identifies these areas by grouping Fixed Income Investments into sectors such as money markets, governments, corporates, mortgages, asset-backed and international. In seeking to identify undervalued currencies, PIMCO may consider many factors, including but not limited to longer-term analysis of relative interest rates, inflation rates, real exchange rates, purchasing power parity, trade account balances and current account balances, as well as other factors that influence exchange rates such as flows, market technical trends and government policies. Sophisticated proprietary software then assists in evaluating sectors and pricing specific investments. Once investment opportunities are identified, PIMCO will shift assets among sectors depending upon changes in relative valuations, credit spreads and other factors. There is no guarantee that PIMCO's investment selection techniques will produce the desired results.

Investors should be aware that the investments made by the Fund and the results achieved by the Fund at any given time are not expected to be the same as those made by other funds for which PIMCO acts as investment adviser, including funds with names, investment objectives and policies similar to the Fund.

Fixed Income Instruments

"Fixed Income Instruments," as used generally in this prospectus, includes:

securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies or government sponsored enterprises ("U.S. Government Securities");

corporate debt securities of U.S. and non-U.S. issuers, including convertible securities and corporate commercial paper;

mortgage-backed and other asset-backed securities;

inflation-indexed bonds issued both by governments and corporations;

structured notes, including hybrid or "indexed" securities and event-linked bonds;

bank capital and trust preferred securities;

loan participations and assignments;

delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities;

bank certificates of deposit, fixed time deposits and bankers' acceptances;

repurchase agreements on Fixed Income Instruments and reverse repurchase agreements on Fixed Income Instruments;

debt securities issued by states or local governments and their agencies, authorities and other government-sponsored enterprises;

obligations of non-U.S. governments or their subdivisions, agencies and government-sponsored enterprises; and

obligations of international agencies or supranational entities.

Securities issued by U.S. Government agencies or government-sponsored enterprises may not be guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury.

The Fund may invest in derivatives based on Fixed Income Instruments.

Duration

Duration is a measure used to determine the sensitivity of a security's price to changes in interest rates. The longer a security's duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates. Similarly, a Fund with a longer average portfolio duration will be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than a Fund with a shorter average portfolio duration. By way of example, the price of a bond fund with an average duration of five years would be expected to fall approximately 5% if interest rates rose by one percentage point. Conversely, the price of a bond fund with an average duration of negative three years would be expected to rise approximately 3% if interest rates rose by one percentage point. The maturity of a security, another commonly used measure of price sensitivity, measures only the time until final payment is due, whereas duration takes into account the pattern of all payments of interest and principal on a security over time, including how these payments are affected by prepayments and by changes in interest rates, as well as the time until an interest rate on a security is reset (in the case of variable-rate securities). PIMCO uses an internal model for calculating duration, which may result in a different value for the duration of an index compared to the duration calculated by the index provider or another third party.

U.S. Government Securities

U.S. Government Securities are obligations of, or guaranteed by, the U.S. Government, its agencies or government-sponsored enterprises. The U.S. Government does not guarantee the NAV of the Fund's shares. U.S. Government Securities are subject to market and interest rate risk, as well as varying degrees of credit risk. Some U.S. Government Securities are issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury and are supported by the full faith and credit of the United States. Other types of U.S. Government Securities are supported by the full faith and credit of the United States (but not issued by the U.S. Treasury). These securities may have less credit risk than U.S. Government Securities not supported by the full faith and credit of the United States. Such other types of U.S. Government Securities are: (1) supported by the ability of the issuer to borrow from the U.S. Treasury; (2) supported only by the credit of the issuing agency, instrumentality or government-sponsored corporation; or (3) supported by the United States in some other way. These securities may be subject to greater credit risk. U.S. Government Securities include zero coupon securities, which tend to be subject to greater market risk than interest-paying securities of similar maturities.

Securities issued by U.S. Government agencies or government-sponsored enterprises may not be guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury. Government National Mortgage Association ("GNMA"), a wholly owned U.S. Government corporation, is authorized to guarantee, with the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government, the timely payment of principal and interest on securities issued by institutions approved by GNMA and backed by pools of mortgages insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Government related guarantors (i.e., not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government) include the Federal National Mortgage Association ("FNMA") and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation ("FHLMC"). Pass-through securities issued by FNMA are guaranteed as to timely payment of principal and interest by FNMA but are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. FHLMC guarantees the timely payment of interest and ultimate collection of principal, but its participation certificates are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government.

Municipal Bonds

Municipal Bonds are generally issued by states, territories, possessions and local governments and their agencies, authorities and other instrumentalities. Municipal Bonds are subject to interest rate, credit and market risk. The ability of an issuer to make payments could be affected by litigation, legislation or other political events or the bankruptcy of the issuer. Lower rated Municipal Bonds are subject to greater credit and market risk than higher quality Municipal Bonds. The types of Municipal Bonds in which the Fund may invest include municipal lease obligations, municipal general obligation bonds, municipal cash equivalents, and pre-refunded and escrowed to maturity Municipal Bonds. The Fund may also invest in industrial development bonds, which are Municipal Bonds issued by a government agency on behalf of a private sector company and, in most cases, are not backed by the credit of the issuing municipality and may therefore involve more risk. The Fund may also invest in securities issued by entities whose underlying assets are Municipal Bonds.

Pre-refunded Municipal Bonds are tax-exempt bonds that have been refunded to a call date on or before the final maturity of principal and remain outstanding in the municipal market. The payment of principal and interest of the pre-refunded Municipal Bonds held by the Fund is funded from securities in a designated escrow account that holds U.S. Treasury securities or other obligations of the U.S. Government (including its agencies and instrumentalities ("Agency Securities")). As the payment of principal and interest is generated from securities held in a designated escrow account, the pledge of the municipality has been fulfilled and the original pledge of revenue by the municipality is no longer in place. The escrow account securities pledged to pay the principal and interest of the pre-refunded Municipal Bond do not guarantee the price movement of the bond before maturity. Investment in pre-refunded Municipal Bonds held by the Fund may subject the Fund to interest rate risk, market risk and credit risk. In addition, while a secondary market exists for pre-refunded Municipal Bonds, if the Fund sells pre-refunded Municipal Bonds prior to maturity, the price received may be more or less than the original cost, depending on market conditions at the time of sale.

High Yield Securities

Securities rated lower than Baa by Moody's, or equivalently rated by S&P or Fitch, are sometimes referred to as "high yield securities" or "junk bonds." Investing in these securities involves special risks in addition to the risks associated with investments in higher-rated fixed income securities. While offering a greater potential opportunity for capital appreciation and higher yields, high yield securities typically entail greater potential price volatility and may be less liquid than higher-rated securities. High yield securities may be regarded as predominately speculative with respect to the issuer's continuing ability to meet principal and interest payments. They may also be more susceptible to real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions than higher-rated securities. Issuers of securities in default may fail to resume principal or interest payments, in which case a Fund may lose its entire investment.

Mortgage-Related and Other Asset-Backed Securities

Mortgage-related securities include mortgage pass-through securities, collateralized mortgage obligations ("CMOs"), commercial mortgage-backed securities, mortgage dollar rolls, CMO residuals, stripped mortgage-backed securities ("SMBSs") and other securities that directly or indirectly represent a participation in, or are secured by and payable from, mortgage loans on real property. A to-be-announced ("TBA") transaction is a method of trading mortgage-backed securities. In a TBA transaction, the buyer and seller agree upon general trade parameters such as agency, settlement date, par amount and price. The actual pools delivered generally are determined two days prior to the settlement date.

The value of some mortgage-or asset-backed securities may be particularly sensitive to changes in prevailing interest rates. Early repayment of principal on some mortgage-related securities may expose the Fund to a lower rate of return upon reinvestment of principal. When interest rates rise, the value of a mortgage-related security generally will decline; however, when interest rates are declining, the value of mortgage-related securities with prepayment features may not increase as much as other fixed income securities. The rate of prepayments on underlying mortgages will affect the price and volatility of a mortgage-related security, and may shorten or extend the effective maturity of the security beyond what was anticipated at the time of purchase. If unanticipated rates of prepayment on underlying mortgages increase the effective maturity of a mortgage-related security, the volatility of the security can be expected to increase. The value of these securities may fluctuate in response to the market's perception of the creditworthiness of the issuers. See "Extension Risk" and "Prepayment Risk" below. Additionally, although mortgages and mortgage-related securities are generally supported by some form of government or private guarantee and/or insurance, there is no assurance that guarantors or insurers will meet their obligations.

Extension Risk. Mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities are subject to Extension Risk, which is the risk that the issuer of such a security pays back the principal of such an obligation later than expected. This may occur when interest rates rise. This may negatively affect Fund returns, as the value of the security decreases when principal payments are made later than expected. In addition, because principal payments are made later than expected, the Fund may be prevented from investing proceeds it would otherwise have received at a given time at the higher prevailing interest rates.

Prepayment Risk. Mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities are subject to Prepayment Risk, which is the risk that the issuer of such a security pays back the principal of such an obligation earlier than expected (due to the sale of the underlying property, refinancing, or foreclosure). This may occur when interest rates decline. Prepayment may expose the Fund to a lower rate of return upon reinvestment of principal. Also, if a security subject to prepayment has been purchased at a premium, the value of the premium would be lost in the event of prepayment.

One type of SMBS has one class receiving all of the interest from the mortgage assets (the interest-only, or "IO" class), while the other class will receive all of the principal (the principal-only, or "PO" class). The yield to maturity on an IO class is extremely sensitive to the rate of principal payments (including prepayments) on the underlying mortgage assets, and a rapid rate of principal payments may have a material adverse effect on the Fund's yield to maturity from these securities. The Fund may invest up to 5% of its total assets in any combination of mortgage-related or other asset-backed IO, PO or inverse floater securities.

The Fund may invest in collateralized debt obligations ("CDOs"), which include collateralized bond obligations ("CBOs"), collateralized loan obligations ("CLOs") and other similarly structured securities CBOs and CLOs are types of asset-backed securities. A CBO is a trust which is backed by a diversified pool of high risk, below investment grade fixed income securities. A CLO is a trust typically collateralized by a pool of loans, which may include, among others, domestic and foreign senior secured loans, senior unsecured loans, and subordinate corporate loans, including loans that may be rated below investment grade or equivalent unrated loans. The Fund may invest in other asset-backed securities that have been offered to investors.

Reinvestment

The Fund may be subject to the risk that the returns of the Fund will decline during periods of falling interest rates because the Fund may have to reinvest the proceeds from matured, traded or called debt obligations at interest rates below the Fund's current earnings rate. For instance, when interest rates decline, an issuer of debt obligations may exercise an option to redeem securities prior to maturity, thereby forcing the Fund to invest in lower-yielding securities. The Fund also may choose to sell higher-yielding portfolio securities and to purchase lower-yielding securities to achieve greater portfolio diversification, because the Fund's portfolio manager believes the current holdings are overvalued or for other investment-related reasons. A decline in the returns received by the Fund from its investments is likely to have an adverse effect on the Fund's net asset value, yield and total return.

Focused Investment

To the extent that the Fund focuses its investments in a particular sector, the Fund may be susceptible to loss due to adverse developments affecting that sector. These developments include, but are not limited to, governmental regulation; inflation; rising interest rates; cost increases in raw materials, fuel and other operating expenses; technological innovations that may render existing products and equipment obsolete; competition from new entrants; high research and development costs; increased costs associated with compliance with environmental or other governmental regulations; and other economic, business or political developments specific to that sector. Furthermore, the Fund may invest a substantial portion of its assets in companies in related sectors that may share common characteristics, are often subject to similar business risks and regulatory burdens, and whose securities may react similarly to the types of developments described above, which will subject the Fund to greater risk. The Fund also will be subject to focused investment risk to the extent that it invests a substantial portion of its assets in a particular issuer, market, asset class, country or geographic region.

Corporate Debt Securities

Corporate debt securities are subject to the risk of the issuer's inability to meet principal and interest payments on the obligation and may also be subject to price volatility due to such factors as interest rate sensitivity, market perception of the creditworthiness of the issuer and general market liquidity. When interest rates rise, the value of corporate debt securities can be expected to decline. Debt securities with longer maturities tend to be more sensitive to interest rate movements than those with shorter maturities.

Bank Capital Securities and Trust Preferred Securities

There are two common types of bank capital: Tier I and Tier II. Bank capital is generally, but not always, of investment grade quality. Tier I securities often take the form of trust preferred securities. Tier II securities are commonly thought of as hybrids of debt and preferred stock, are often perpetual (with no maturity date), callable and, under certain conditions, allow for the issuer bank to withhold payment of interest until a later date.

Trust preferred securities have the characteristics of both subordinated debt and preferred stock. The primary advantage of the structure of trust preferred securities is that they are treated by the financial institution as debt securities for tax purposes and as equity for the calculation of capital requirements. Trust preferred securities typically bear a market rate coupon comparable to interest rates available on debt of a similarly rated issuer. Typical characteristics include long-term maturities, early redemption by the issuer, periodic fixed or variable interest payments, and maturities at face value. The market value of trust preferred securities may be more volatile than those of conventional debt securities. There can be no assurance as to the liquidity of trust preferred securities and the ability of holders, such as the Fund, to sell their holdings.

Loan Participations and Assignments

The Fund may invest in fixed- and floating-rate loans, which investments generally will be in the form of loan participations and assignments of portions of such loans. Participations and assignments involve special types of risk, including credit risk, interest rate risk, liquidity risk, and the risks of being a lender. If the Fund purchases a participation, it may only be able to enforce its rights through the lender, and may assume the credit risk of the lender in addition to the borrower.

Variable and Floating Rate Securities

Variable and floating rate securities are securities that pay interest at rates that adjust whenever a specified interest rate changes and/or that reset on predetermined dates (such as the last day of a month or calendar quarter). The Fund may invest in floating rate debt instruments ("floaters") and engage in credit spread trades. Variable and floating rate securities generally are less sensitive to interest rate changes but may decline in value if their interest rates do not rise as much, or as quickly, as interest rates in general. Conversely, floating rate securities will not generally increase in value if interest rates decline. The Fund may also invest in inverse floating rate debt instruments ("inverse floaters"). An inverse floater may exhibit greater price volatility than a fixed rate obligation of similar credit quality. The Fund may invest up to 5% of its total assets in any combination of mortgage-related or other asset-backed IO, PO or inverse floater securities.

Inflation-Indexed Bonds

Inflation-indexed bonds (other than municipal inflation-indexed bonds and certain corporate inflation-indexed bonds, which are more fully described below) are fixed income securities whose principal value is periodically adjusted according to the rate of inflation. If the index measuring inflation falls, the principal value of inflation-indexed bonds (other than municipal inflation-indexed bonds and certain corporate inflation-indexed bonds) will be adjusted downward, and consequently the interest payable on these securities (calculated with respect to a smaller principal amount) will be reduced. Repayment of the original bond principal upon maturity (as adjusted for inflation) is guaranteed in the case of TIPS. For bonds that do not provide a similar guarantee, the adjusted principal value of the bond repaid at maturity may be less than the original principal. TIPS may also be divided into individual zero-coupon instruments for each coupon or principal payment (known as "iSTRIPS"). An iSTRIP of the principal component of a TIPS issue will retain the embedded inflation floor that will allow the holder of that security to receive the greater of the original principal or inflation-adjusted principal value at maturity. iSTRIPS may be less liquid than conventional TIPS because they are a small component of the TIPS market.

Municipal inflation-indexed securities are municipal bonds that pay coupons based on a fixed rate plus the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers ("CPI"). With regard to municipal inflation-indexed bonds and certain corporate inflation-indexed bonds, the inflation adjustment is reflected in the semi-annual coupon payment. As a result, the principal value of municipal inflation-indexed bonds and such corporate inflation-indexed bonds does not adjust according to the rate of inflation. At the same time, the value of municipal inflation-indexed securities and such corporate inflation-indexed securities generally will not increase if the rate of inflation decreases. Because municipal inflation-indexed securities and corporate inflation-indexed securities are a small component of the municipal bond and corporate bond markets, respectively, they may be less liquid than conventional municipal and corporate bonds.

The value of inflation-indexed bonds is expected to change in response to changes in real interest rates. Real interest rates are tied to the relationship between nominal interest rates and the rate of inflation. If nominal interest rates increase at a faster rate than inflation, real interest rates may rise, leading to a decrease in value of inflation-indexed bonds. Any increase in the principal amount of an inflation-indexed bond will be considered taxable ordinary income, even though investors do not receive their principal until maturity.

Event-Linked Exposure

The Fund may obtain event-linked exposure by investing in "event-linked bonds" or "event-linked swaps" or by implementing "event-linked strategies." Event-linked exposure results in gains or losses that typically are contingent, or formulaically related to defined trigger events. Examples of trigger events include hurricanes, earthquakes, weather-related phenomena, or statistics relating to such events. Some event-linked bonds are commonly referred to as "catastrophe bonds." If a trigger event occurs, the Fund may lose a portion or its entire principal invested in the bond or notional amount on a swap. Event-linked exposure often provides for an extension of maturity to process and audit loss claims where a trigger event has, or possibly has, occurred. An extension of maturity may increase volatility. Event-linked exposure may also expose the Fund to certain unanticipated risks including credit risk, counterparty risk, adverse regulatory or jurisdictional interpretations, and adverse tax consequences. Event-linked exposures may also be subject to liquidity risk.

Convertible and Equity Securities

Common stock represents equity ownership in a company and typically provides the common stockholder the power to vote on certain corporate actions, including the election of the company's directors. Common stockholders participate in company profits through dividends and, in the event of bankruptcy, distributions, on a pro-rata basis after other claims are satisfied. Many factors affect the value of common stock, including earnings, earnings forecasts, corporate events and factors impacting the issuer's industry and the market generally. Common stock generally has the greatest appreciation and depreciation potential of all corporate securities.

The Fund may invest up to 10% of its total assets in preferred stock, convertible securities and other equity-related securities. Convertible securities are generally preferred stocks and other securities, including fixed income securities and warrants, that are convertible into or exercisable for common stock at a stated price or rate. The price of a convertible security will normally vary in some proportion to changes in the price of the underlying common stock because of this conversion or exercise feature. However, the value of a convertible security may not increase or decrease as rapidly as the underlying common stock. A convertible security will normally also provide income and is subject to interest rate risk. Convertible securities may be lower-rated securities subject to greater levels of credit risk. The Fund may be forced to convert a security before it would otherwise choose, which may have an adverse effect on the Fund's ability to achieve its investment objective.

"Synthetic" convertible securities are selected based on the similarity of their economic characteristics to those of a traditional convertible security due to the combination of separate securities that possess the two principal characteristics of a traditional convertible security, i.e., an income-producing security ("income-producing component") and the right to acquire an equity security ("convertible component"). The income-producing component is achieved by investing in non-convertible, income-producing securities such as bonds, preferred stocks and money market instruments, which may be represented by derivative instruments. The convertible component is achieved by investing in securities or instruments such as warrants or options to buy common stock at a certain exercise price, or options on a stock index. A simple example of a synthetic convertible security is the combination of a traditional corporate bond with a warrant to purchase equity securities of the issuer of the bond. The Fund may also purchase synthetic securities created by other parties, typically investment banks, including convertible structured notes. The income-producing and convertible components of a synthetic convertible security may be issued separately by different issuers and at different times.

Preferred stock represents an equity interest in a company that generally entitles the holder to receive, in preference to the holders of other stocks such as common stocks, dividends and a fixed share of the proceeds resulting from a liquidation of the company. Preferred stocks may pay fixed or adjustable rates of return. Preferred stock is subject to issuer-specific and market risks applicable generally to equity securities. In addition, a company's preferred stock generally pays dividends only after the company makes required payments to holders of its bonds and other debt. For this reason, the value of preferred stock will usually react more strongly than bonds and other debt to actual or perceived changes in the company's financial condition or prospects.

While some countries or companies may be regarded as favorable investments, pure fixed income opportunities may be unattractive or limited due to insufficient supply, or legal or technical restrictions. In such cases, the Fund may consider convertible securities or equity securities to gain exposure to such investments.

At times, in connection with the restructuring of a preferred stock or fixed income instrument either outside of bankruptcy court or in the context of bankruptcy court proceedings, the Fund may determine or be required to accept equity securities, such as common stocks, in exchange for all or a portion of a preferred stock or fixed income instrument. Depending upon, among other things, PIMCO's evaluation of the potential value of such securities in relation to the price that could be obtained by the Fund at any given time upon sale thereof, the Fund may determine to hold such securities in its portfolio.

Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed income securities. The market price of equity securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. Equity securities may decline in value due to factors affecting equity securities markets generally or particular industries represented in those markets. The value of an equity security may also decline for a number of reasons which directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer's goods or services.

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Securities

The Fund may invest in securities and instruments that are economically tied to foreign (non-U.S.) countries. PIMCO generally considers an instrument to be economically tied to a non-U.S. country if the issuer is a foreign government (or any political subdivision, agency, authority or instrumentality of such government), or if the issuer is organized under the laws of a non-U.S. country. In the case of certain money market instruments, such instruments will be considered economically tied to a non-U.S. country if either the issuer or the guarantor of such money market instrument is organized under the laws of a non-U.S. country. With respect to derivative instruments, PIMCO generally considers such instruments to be economically tied to non-U.S. countries if the underlying assets are foreign currencies (or baskets or indexes of such currencies), or instruments or securities that are issued by foreign governments or issuers organized under the laws of a non-U.S. country (or if the underlying assets are certain money market instruments, if either the issuer or the guarantor of such money market instruments is organized under the laws of a non-U.S. country).

Investing in foreign (non-U.S.) securities involves special risks and considerations not typically associated with investing in U.S. securities. Shareholders should consider carefully the substantial risks involved for the Fund that invests in securities issued by foreign companies and governments of foreign countries. These risks include: differences in accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards; generally higher commission rates on foreign portfolio transactions; the possibility of nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation; adverse changes in investment or exchange control regulations; and political instability. Individual foreign economies may differ favorably or unfavorably from the U.S. economy in such respects as growth of gross domestic product, rates of inflation, capital reinvestment, resources, self-sufficiency and balance of payments position. The securities markets, values of securities, yields and risks associated with foreign (non-U.S.) securities markets may change independently of each other. Also, foreign (non-U.S.) securities and dividends and interest payable on those securities may be subject to foreign taxes, including taxes withheld from payments on those securities. Foreign (non-U.S.) securities often trade with less frequency and volume than domestic securities and therefore may exhibit greater price volatility. Investments in foreign (non-U.S.) securities may also involve higher custodial costs than domestic investments.

Emerging Market Securities. The Fund may invest, without limitation, in securities and instruments that are economically tied to emerging market countries. PIMCO generally considers an instrument to be economically tied to an emerging market country if the security's "country of exposure" is an emerging market country, as determined by the criteria set forth below. Alternatively, such as when a "country of exposure" is not available or when PIMCO believes the following tests more accurately reflect which country the security is economically tied to, PIMCO may consider an instrument to be economically tied to an emerging market country if the issuer or guarantor is a government of an emerging market country (or any political subdivision, agency, authority or instrumentality of such government), if the issuer or guarantor is organized under the laws of an emerging market country, or if the currency of settlement of the security is a currency of an emerging market country. With respect to derivative instruments, PIMCO generally considers such instruments to be economically tied to emerging market countries if the underlying assets are currencies of emerging market countries (or baskets or indexes of such currencies), or instruments or securities that are issued or guaranteed by governments of emerging market countries or by entities organized under the laws of emerging market countries. A security's "country of exposure" is determined by PIMCO using certain factors provided by a third-party analytical service provider. The factors are applied in order such that the first factor to result in the assignment of a country determines the "country of exposure." The factors, listed in the order in which they are applied, are: (i) if an asset-backed or other collateralized security, the country in which the collateral backing the security is located, (ii) if the security is guaranteed by the government of a country (or any political subdivision, agency, authority or instrumentality of such government), the country of the government or instrumentality providing the guarantee, (iii) the "country of risk" of the issuer, (iv) the "country of risk" of the issuer's ultimate parent, or (v) the country where the issuer is organized or incorporated under the laws thereof. "Country of risk" is a separate four-part test determined by the following factors, listed in order of importance: (i) management location, (ii) country of primary listing, (iii) sales or revenue attributable to the country, and (iv) reporting currency of the issuer. PIMCO has broad discretion to identify countries that it considers to qualify as emerging markets. In making investments in emerging market securities, the Fund emphasizes those countries with relatively low gross national product per capita and with the potential for rapid economic growth. Emerging market countries are generally located in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and Eastern Europe. PIMCO will select the country and currency composition based on its evaluation of relative interest rates, inflation rates, exchange rates, monetary and fiscal policies, trade and current account balances, legal and political developments and any other specific factors it believes to be relevant.

Investing in emerging market securities imposes risks different from, or greater than, risks of investing in domestic securities or in foreign, developed countries. These risks include: smaller market capitalization of securities markets, which may suffer periods of relative illiquidity; significant price volatility; restrictions on foreign investment; possible repatriation of investment income and capital. In addition, foreign investors may be required to register the proceeds of sales; future economic or political crises could lead to price controls, forced mergers, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, seizure, nationalization, or creation of government monopolies.  The currencies of emerging market countries may experience significant declines against the U.S. dollar, and devaluation may occur subsequent to investments in these currencies by the Fund.  Inflation and rapid fluctuations in inflation rates have had, and may continue to have, negative effects on the economies and securities markets of certain emerging market countries.

Additional risks of emerging markets securities may include: greater social, economic and political uncertainty and instability; more substantial governmental involvement in the economy; less governmental supervision and regulation; unavailability of currency hedging techniques; companies that are newly organized and small; differences in auditing and financial reporting standards, which may result in unavailability of material information about issuers; and less developed legal systems. In addition, emerging securities markets may have different clearance and settlement procedures, which may be unable to keep pace with the volume of securities transactions or otherwise make it difficult to engage in such transactions. Settlement problems may cause the Fund to miss attractive investment opportunities, hold a portion of its assets in cash pending investment, or be delayed in disposing of a portfolio security. Such a delay could result in possible liability to a purchaser of the security.

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Currencies

The Fund invests directly in foreign currencies or in securities that trade in, or receive revenues in, foreign (non-U.S.) currencies and will be subject to currency risk. Foreign currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. They generally are determined by supply and demand in the foreign exchange markets and the relative merits of investments in different countries, actual or perceived changes in interest rates and other complex factors. Currency exchange rates also can be affected unpredictably by intervention (or the failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments or central banks, or by currency controls or political developments. Currencies in which the Fund's assets are denominated may be devalued against the U.S. dollar, resulting in a loss to the Fund.

Foreign Currency Transactions. The Fund may invest in securities denominated in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies, engage in foreign currency transactions on a spot (cash) basis and enter into forward foreign currency exchange contracts and invest in foreign currency futures contracts and options on foreign currencies and futures. A forward foreign currency exchange contract, which involves an obligation to purchase or sell a specific currency at a future date at a price set at the time of the contract, reduces the Fund's exposure to changes in the value of the currency it will deliver and increases its exposure to changes in the value of the currency it will receive for the duration of the contract. Certain foreign currency transactions may also be settled in cash rather than the actual delivery of the relevant currency. The effect on the value of the Fund is similar to selling securities denominated in one currency and purchasing securities denominated in another currency. A contract to sell a foreign currency would limit any potential gain which might be realized if the value of the hedged currency increases. The Fund may enter into these contracts to hedge against foreign exchange risk, to increase exposure to a foreign currency or to shift exposure to foreign currency fluctuations from one currency to another. Suitable hedging transactions may not be available in all circumstances and there can be no assurance that the Fund will engage in such transactions at any given time or from time to time. Also, such transactions may not be successful and may eliminate any chance for the Fund to benefit from favorable fluctuations in relevant foreign currencies. The Fund may use one currency (or a basket of currencies) to hedge against adverse changes in the value of another currency (or a basket of currencies) when exchange rates between the two currencies are positively correlated. The Fund will segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO in accordance with the procedures established by the Board of Trustees (or, as permitted by applicable law, enter into certain offsetting positions) to cover its obligations under forward foreign currency exchange contracts entered into for non-hedging purposes.

Redenomination. Continuing uncertainty as to the status of the euro and the European Monetary Union (the "EMU") has created significant volatility in currency and financial markets generally. Any partial or complete dissolution of the EMU could have significant adverse effects on currency and financial markets and on the values of the Fund's portfolio investments. If one or more EMU countries were to stop using the euro as its primary currency, the Fund's investments in such countries may be redenominated into a different or newly adopted currency. As a result, the value of those investments could decline significantly and unpredictably. In addition, securities or other investments that are redenominated may be subject to currency risk, liquidity risk and risk of improper valuation to a greater extent than similar investments currently denominated in euros. To the extent a currency used for redenomination purposes is not specified in respect of certain EMU-related investments, or should the euro cease to be used entirely, the currency in which such investments are denominated may be unclear, making such investments particularly difficult to value or dispose of. The Fund may incur additional expenses to the extent it is required to seek judicial or other clarification of the denomination or value of such securities.

There can be no assurance that if the Fund earns income or capital gains in a non-U.S. country or PIMCO otherwise seeks to withdraw the Fund's investments from a given country, capital controls imposed by such country will not prevent, or cause significant expense in, doing so.

Repurchase Agreements

The Fund may enter into repurchase agreements, in which the Fund purchases a security from a bank or broker-dealer, which agrees to repurchase the security at the Fund's cost plus interest within a specified time. If the party agreeing to repurchase should default, the Fund will seek to sell the securities which it holds. This could involve procedural costs or delays in addition to a loss on the securities if their value should fall below their repurchase price. Repurchase agreements maturing in more than seven days and which may not be terminated within seven days at approximately the amount at which the Fund has valued the agreements are considered illiquid securities.

Reverse Repurchase Agreements, Dollar Rolls and Other Borrowings

The Fund may enter into reverse repurchase agreements and dollar rolls subject to the Fund's limitations on borrowings. A reverse repurchase agreement involves the sale of a security by the Fund and its agreement to repurchase the instrument at a specified time and price. A dollar roll is similar except that the counterparty is not obligated to return the same securities as those originally sold by the Fund but only securities that are "substantially identical." Reverse repurchase agreements and dollar rolls may be considered borrowing for some purposes. The Fund will segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO in accordance with procedures established by the Board of Trustees to cover its obligations under reverse repurchase agreements and dollar rolls. Reverse repurchase agreements, dollar rolls and other forms of borrowings may create leveraging risk for the Fund.

The Fund may borrow money to the extent permitted under the 1940 Act. This means that, in general, the Fund may borrow money from banks for any purpose in an amount up to 1/3 of the Fund's total assets, less all liabilities and indebtedness not represented by senior securities. The Fund may also borrow money for temporary administrative purposes in an amount not to exceed 5% of the Fund's total assets.

Derivatives

The Fund may, but is not required to, use derivative instruments for risk management purposes or as part of its investment strategies. Generally, derivatives are financial contracts whose value depends upon, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index, and may relate to stocks, bonds, interest rates, spreads between different interest rates, currencies or currency exchange rates, commodities, and related indexes. Examples of derivative instruments include options contracts, futures contracts, options on futures contracts and swap agreements (including, but not limited to, credit default swaps and swaps on exchange-traded funds). The Fund may invest a portion of its assets in derivative instruments. The portfolio manager may decide not to employ any of these strategies and there is no assurance that any derivatives strategy used by the Fund will succeed. A description of these and other derivative instruments that the Fund may use are described under "Investment Objectives and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information.

The Fund's use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other more traditional investments. Certain derivative transactions may have a leveraging effect on the Fund. For example, a small investment in a derivative instrument may have a significant impact on the Fund's exposure to interest rates, currency exchange rates or other investments. As a result, a relatively small price movement in a derivative instrument may cause an immediate and substantial loss or gain. The Fund may engage in such transactions regardless of whether the Fund owns the asset, instrument or components of the index underlying the derivative instrument. The Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in these types of instruments. If it does, the Fund's investment exposure could far exceed the value of its portfolio securities and its investment performance could be primarily dependent upon securities it does not own. A description of various risks associated with particular derivative instruments is included in "Investment Objective and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information. The following provides a more general discussion of important risk factors relating to all derivative instruments that may be used by the Fund.

Management Risk. Derivative products are highly specialized instruments that require investment techniques and risk analyses different from those associated with stocks and bonds. The use of a derivative requires an understanding not only of the underlying instrument but also of the derivative itself, without the benefit of observing the performance of the derivative under all possible market conditions.

Credit Risk. The use of a derivative instrument involves the risk that a loss may be sustained as a result of the failure of another party to the contract (usually referred to as a "counterparty") to make required payments or otherwise comply with the contract's terms. Additionally, a short position in a credit default swap could result in losses if the Fund does not correctly evaluate the creditworthiness of the company on which the credit default swap is based.

Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk exists when a particular derivative instrument is difficult to purchase or sell. If a derivative transaction is particularly large or if the relevant market is illiquid (as is the case with many privately negotiated derivatives), it may not be possible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position at an advantageous time or price.

Leverage Risk. Because many derivatives have a leverage component, adverse changes in the value or level of the underlying asset, reference rate or index can result in a loss substantially greater than the amount invested in the derivative itself. Certain derivatives have the potential for unlimited loss, regardless of the size of the initial investment. When the Fund uses derivatives for leverage, investments in the Fund will tend to be more volatile, resulting in larger gains or losses in response to market changes. To limit leverage risk, the Fund will segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO in accordance with procedures established by the Board of Trustees (or, as permitted by applicable regulation, enter into certain offsetting positions) to cover its obligations under derivative instruments.

Lack of Availability. Because the markets for certain derivative instruments (including markets located in foreign countries) are relatively new and still developing, suitable derivatives transactions may not be available in all circumstances for risk management or other purposes. Upon the expiration of a particular contract, the portfolio manager may wish to retain the Fund's position in the derivative instrument by entering into a similar contract, but may be unable to do so if the counterparty to the original contract is unwilling to enter into the new contract and no other suitable counterparty can be found. There is no assurance that the Fund will engage in derivatives transactions at any time or from time to time. The Fund's ability to use derivatives may also be limited by certain regulatory and tax considerations.

Market and Other Risks. Like most other investments, derivative instruments are subject to the risk that the market value of the instrument will change in a way detrimental to the Fund's interest. If the portfolio manager incorrectly forecasts the values of securities or interest rates or other economic factors in using derivatives for the Fund, the Fund might have been in a better position if it had not entered into the transaction at all. While some strategies involving derivative instruments can reduce the risk of loss, they can also reduce the opportunity for gain or even result in losses by offsetting favorable price movements in other Fund investments. The Fund may also have to buy or sell a security at a disadvantageous time or price because the Fund is legally required to maintain offsetting positions or asset coverage in connection with certain derivatives transactions.

Other risks in using derivatives include the risk of mispricing or improper valuation of derivatives and the inability of derivatives to correlate perfectly with underlying assets, rates and indexes. Many derivatives, in particular privately negotiated derivatives, are complex and often valued subjectively. Improper valuations can result in increased cash payment requirements to counterparties or a loss of value to the Fund. Also, the value of derivatives may not correlate perfectly, or at all, with the value of the assets, reference rates or indexes they are designed to closely track. For example, a swap agreement on an exchange-traded fund would not correlate perfectly with the index upon which the exchange-traded fund is based because the fund's return is net of fees and expenses. In addition, the Fund's use of derivatives may cause the Fund to realize higher amounts of short-term capital gains (generally taxed at ordinary income tax rates) than if the Fund had not used such instruments.

Delayed Funding Loans and Revolving Credit Facilities

The Fund may also enter into, or acquire participations in, delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities, in which a lender agrees to make loans up to a maximum amount upon demand by the borrower during a specified term. These commitments may have the effect of requiring the Fund to increase its investments in a company at a time when it might not otherwise decide to do so (including at a time when the company's financial condition makes it unlikely that such amounts will be repaid). To the extent that the Fund is committed to advance additional funds, it will segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO in accordance with procedures established by the Board of Trustees in an amount sufficient to meet such commitments. Delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities are subject to credit, interest rate and liquidity risk and the risks of being a lender.

When-Issued, Delayed Delivery and Forward Commitment Transactions

The Fund may purchase or sell securities which it is eligible to purchase or sell on a when-issued basis, may purchase and sell such securities for delayed delivery and may make contracts to purchase or sell such securities for a fixed price at a future date beyond normal settlement time (forward commitments). When-issued transactions, delayed delivery purchases and forward commitments involve a risk of loss if the value of the securities declines prior to the settlement date. This risk is in addition to the risk that the Fund's other assets will decline in value. Therefore, these transactions may result in a form of leverage and increase the Fund's overall investment exposure. Typically, no income accrues on securities the Fund has committed to purchase prior to the time delivery of the securities is made, although the Fund may earn income on securities it has segregated or "earmarked" to cover these positions. When the Fund has sold a security on a when-issued, delayed delivery, or forward commitment basis, the Fund does not participate in future gains or losses with respect to the security. If the other party to a transaction fails to pay for the securities, the Fund could realize a loss. Additionally, when selling a security on a when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment basis without owning a security, the Fund will incur a loss if the security's price appreciates in value such that the security's price is above the agreed-upon price on the settlement date.

Investment in Other Funds

Section 12(d)(1) of the 1940 Act restricts investments by registered investment companies and companies relying on Sections 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of the 1940 Act in the securities of other investment companies. Registered investment companies are permitted to invest in the Fund beyond the limits set forth in Section 12(d)(1), subject to certain terms and conditions set forth in an SEC exemptive order issued to PIMCO and the Trust, including that such investment companies enter into an agreement with the Trust.

The Fund may invest in, to the extent permitted by Section 12(d)(1)(A) of the 1940 Act, other affiliated and unaffiliated funds, such as open-end or closed-end management investment companies, including other exchange traded funds, provided that the Fund's investment in units or shares of investment companies and other open-end collective investment vehicles will not exceed 10% of the Fund's total assets. The Fund may invest securities lending collateral in one or more money market funds to the extent permitted by Rule 12d1-1 under the 1940 Act, including series of PIMCO Funds, an affiliated open-end management investment company managed by PIMCO. As a shareholder of a fund, the Fund may indirectly bear investment advisory fees, supervisory and administrative fees, service fees and other fees which are in addition to the fees the Fund pays its service providers.

Subject to the restrictions and limitations of the 1940 Act, the Fund may, in the future, elect to pursue its investment objective by investing in one or more underlying investment vehicles or companies that have substantially similar investment objectives and policies as the Fund.

Small-Cap and Mid-Cap Companies

The Fund may invest in securities of small-capitalization and mid-capitalization companies. The Fund considers a small-cap company to be a company with a market capitalization of up to $1.5 billion and a mid-cap company to be a company with a market capitalization of between $1.5 billion and $10 billion. Investments in small-cap and mid-cap companies involve greater risk than investments in large-capitalization companies. Small and mid-cap companies may not have an established financial history, which can present valuation challenges. The securities of small- and mid-cap companies may be subject to increased market fluctuations, due to less liquid markets and more limited managerial and financial resources. The Fund's investments in small- and mid-cap companies may increase the volatility of the Fund's portfolio.

Short Sales

The Fund may make short sales as part of its overall portfolio management strategies or to offset a potential decline in value of a security. A short sale involves the sale of a security that is borrowed from a broker or other institution to complete the sale. Short sales expose the Fund to the risk that it will be required to acquire, convert or exchange securities to replace the borrowed securities (also known as "covering" the short position) at a time when the securities sold short have appreciated in value, thus resulting in a loss to the Fund. When making a short sale (other than a "short sale against the box"), the Fund must segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO in accordance with procedures established by the Board of Trustees or otherwise cover its position in a permissible manner. The Fund may engage in short selling to the extent permitted by the 1940 Act and rules and interpretations thereunder and other federal securities laws. To the extent the Fund engages in short selling in foreign (non-U.S.) jurisdictions, the Fund will do so to the extent permitted by the laws and regulations of such jurisdictions.

Illiquid Securities

The Fund may invest up to 15% of its net assets (taken at the time of investment) in illiquid securities. Certain illiquid securities may require pricing at fair value as determined in good faith under the supervision of the Board of Trustees. The portfolio manager may be subject to significant delays in disposing of illiquid securities, and transactions in illiquid securities may entail registration expenses and other transaction costs that are higher than those for transactions in liquid securities. The term "illiquid securities" for this purpose means securities that cannot be disposed of within seven days in the ordinary course of business at approximately the amount at which the Fund has valued the securities. Restricted securities, i.e., securities subject to legal or contractual restrictions on resale, may be illiquid. However, some restricted securities (such as securities issued pursuant to Rule 144A under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and certain commercial paper) may be treated as liquid, although they may be less liquid than registered securities traded on established secondary markets.

Loans of Portfolio Securities

For the purpose of achieving income, the Fund may lend its portfolio securities to brokers, dealers, and other financial institutions provided a number of conditions are satisfied, including that the loan is fully collateralized. Please see "Investment Objectives and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information for details. When the Fund lends portfolio securities, its investment performance will continue to reflect changes in the value of the securities loaned, and the Fund will also receive a fee or interest on the collateral. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in the collateral or delay in recovery of the collateral if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. The Fund may pay lending fees to a party arranging the loan. Cash collateral received by the Fund in securities lending transactions may be invested in short-term liquid Fixed Income Instruments or in money market or short-term mutual funds, or similar investment vehicles, including affiliated money market or short-term mutual funds. The Fund bears the risk of such investments.

Portfolio Turnover

The length of time the Fund has held a particular security is not generally a consideration in investment decisions. A change in the securities held by the Fund is known as "portfolio turnover." When the portfolio manager deems it appropriate and particularly during periods of volatile market movements, the Fund may engage in frequent and active trading of portfolio securities to achieve its investment objective. To the extent that Creation Unit purchases from and redemptions by the Fund are effected in cash, frequent purchases and redemptions may increase the rate of portfolio turnover. Higher portfolio turnover (e.g., an annual rate greater than 100% of the average value of the Fund's portfolio) involves correspondingly greater expenses to the Fund, including brokerage commissions or dealer mark-ups and other transaction costs on the sale of securities and reinvestments in other securities. Such sales may also result in realization of taxable capital gains, including short-term capital gains (which are generally taxed at ordinary income tax rates). The trading costs and tax effects associated with portfolio turnover may adversely affect the Fund's performance. In addition, large movements of cash into or out of the Fund may negatively impact the Fund's ability to achieve its investment objective or maintain a consistent level of operating expenses.

Temporary Defensive Positions

For temporary or defensive purposes, the Fund may invest without limit in U.S. debt securities, including taxable securities and short-term money market securities, when PIMCO deems it appropriate to do so. When the Fund engages in such strategies, it may not achieve its investment objective.

Changes in Investment Objectives and Policies

The investment objective of the Fund is non-fundamental and may be changed by the Board of Trustees without shareholder approval. Unless otherwise stated, all investment policies of the Fund may be changed by the Board of Trustees without shareholder approval. In addition, the Trust may determine to cease operating the Fund as an "exchange-traded" fund and cause the Fund's shares to stop trading on a securities exchange.

Percentage Investment Limitations

Unless otherwise stated, all percentage limitations on Fund investments listed in this prospectus will apply at the time of investment. The Fund would not violate these limitations unless an excess or deficiency occurs or exists immediately after and as a result of an investment. The Fund has adopted a non-fundamental investment policy to invest at least 80% of its assets in investments suggested by its name. For purposes of this policy, the term "assets" means net assets plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes.

Credit Ratings and Unrated Securities

Rating agencies are private services that provide ratings of the credit quality of fixed income securities, including convertible securities. Appendix A to this prospectus describes the various ratings assigned to fixed income securities, including convertible securities by Moody's, S&P and Fitch. Ratings assigned by a rating agency are not absolute standards of credit quality and do not evaluate market risks. Rating agencies may fail to make timely changes in credit ratings and an issuer's current financial condition may be better or worse than a rating indicates. The Fund will not necessarily sell a security when its rating is reduced below its rating at the time of purchase. PIMCO does not rely solely on credit ratings, and develops its own analysis of issuer credit quality.

The Fund may purchase unrated securities (which are not rated by a rating agency) if its portfolio manager determines that the security is of comparable quality to a rated security that the Fund may purchase. Unrated securities may be less liquid than comparable rated securities and involve the risk that the portfolio manager may not accurately evaluate the security's comparative credit rating. Analysis of the creditworthiness of issuers of high yield securities may be more complex than for issuers of higher-quality fixed income securities. To the extent that certain Funds invest in high yield and/or unrated securities, the Fund's success in achieving its investment objective may depend more heavily on the portfolio manager's creditworthiness analysis than if the Fund invested exclusively in higher quality and rated securities.

Other Investments and Techniques

The Fund may invest in other types of securities and use a variety of investment techniques and strategies which are not described in this prospectus. These securities and techniques may subject the Fund to additional risks. Please see the Statement of Additional Information for additional information about the securities and investment techniques described in this prospectus and about additional securities and techniques that may be used by the Fund.

Financial Highlights

Because the Fund has not operated for a full fiscal period as of the date of this prospectus, audited financial highlights are not available.

Appendix A
Description of Securities Ratings

Each Fund's investments may range in quality from securities rated in the lowest category in which the Fund is permitted to invest to securities rated in the highest category (as rated by Moody's, S&P or Fitch, or, if unrated, determined by PIMCO to be of comparable quality). The percentage of a Fund's assets invested in securities in a particular rating category will vary. The following terms are generally used to describe the credit quality of fixed income securities:

High Quality Debt Securities are those rated in one of the two highest rating categories (the highest category for commercial paper) or, if unrated, deemed comparable by PIMCO.

Investment Grade Debt Securities are those rated in one of the four highest rating categories, or if unrated deemed comparable by PIMCO.

Below Investment Grade High Yield Securities ("Junk Bonds") are those rated lower than Baa by Moody's, BBB by S&P or Fitch and comparable securities. They are deemed predominantly speculative with respect to the issuer's ability to repay principal and interest.

The following is a description of Moody's, S&P's and Fitch's rating categories applicable to fixed income securities.

Moody's Investors Service, Inc.

Long-Term Corporate Obligation Ratings
Moody's long-term obligation ratings are opinions of the relative credit risk of fixed-income obligations with an original maturity of one year or more. They address the possibility that a financial obligation will not be honored as promised. Such ratings use Moody's global scale and reflect both the likelihood of default and any financial loss suffered in the event of default.

Aaa: Obligations rated Aaa are judged to be of the highest quality, with minimal credit risk.

Aa: Obligations rated Aa are judged to be of high quality and are subject to very low credit risk.

A: Obligations rated A are considered upper-medium grade and are subject to low credit risk.

Baa: Obligations rated Baa are subject to moderate credit risk. They are considered medium-grade and as such may possess certain speculative characteristics.

Ba: Obligations rated Ba are judged to have speculative elements and are subject to substantial credit risk.

B: Obligations rated B are considered speculative and are subject to high credit risk.

Caa: Obligations rated Caa are judged to be of poor standing and are subject to very high credit risk.

Ca: Obligations rated Ca are highly speculative and are likely in, or very near, default, with some prospect of recovery of principal and interest.

C: Obligations rated C are the lowest rated class of bonds and are typically in default, with little prospect for recovery of principal or interest.

Moody's appends numerical modifiers 1, 2, and 3 to each generic rating classification from Aa through Caa. The modifier 1 indicates that the obligation ranks in the higher end of its generic rating category; the modifier 2 indicates a mid-range ranking; and the modifier 3 indicates a ranking in the lower end of that generic rating category.

Medium-Term Note Ratings
Moody's assigns long-term ratings to individual debt securities issued from medium-term note (MTN) programs, in addition to indicating ratings to MTN programs themselves. These long-term ratings are expressed on Moody's general long-term scale. Notes issued under MTN programs with such indicated ratings are rated at issuance at the rating applicable to all pari passu notes issued under the same program, at the program's relevant indicated rating, provided such notes do not exhibit any of the characteristics listed below:

Notes containing features that link interest or principal to the credit performance of any third party or parties (i.e., credit-linked notes);

Notes allowing for negative coupons, or negative principal;

Notes containing any provision that could obligate the investor to make any additional payments;

Notes containing provisions that subordinate the claim.

For notes with any of these characteristics, the rating of the individual note may differ from the indicated rating of the program.

For credit-linked securities, Moody's policy is to "look through" to the credit risk of the underlying obligor. Moody's policy with respect to non-credit linked obligations is to rate the issuer's ability to meet the contract as stated, regardless of potential losses to investors as a result of non-credit developments. In other words, as long as the obligation has debt standing in the event of bankruptcy, we will assign the appropriate debt class level rating to the instrument.

Market participants must determine whether any particular note is rated, and if so, at what rating level. Moody's encourages market participants to contact Moody's Ratings Desks or visit www.moodys.com directly if they have questions regarding ratings for specific notes issued under a medium-term note program. Unrated notes issued under an MTN program may be assigned an NR (not rated) symbol.

Short-Term Ratings
Moody's short-term ratings are opinions of the ability of issuers to honor short-term financial obligations. Ratings may be assigned to issuers, short-term programs or to individual short-term debt instruments. Such obligations generally have an original maturity not exceeding thirteen months, unless explicitly noted.

Moody's employs the following designations to indicate the relative repayment ability of rated issuers:

P-1: Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Prime-1 have a superior ability to repay short-term debt obligations.

P-2: Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Prime-2 have a strong ability to repay short-term debt obligations.

P-3: Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Prime-3 have an acceptable ability to repay short-term obligations.

NP: Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Not Prime do not fall within any of the Prime rating categories.

Canadian issuers rated P-1 or P-2 have their short-term ratings enhanced by the senior-most long-term rating of the issuer, its guarantor or support-provider.

US Municipal Ratings
Moody's US Municipal ratings are opinions of the investment quality of issuers and issues in the US municipal market. As such, these ratings incorporate Moody's assessment of the default probability and loss severity of these issuers and issues. The default and loss content for Moody's municipal long-term rating scale differs from Moody's general long-term rating scale. Historical default and loss rates for obligations rated on the US Municipal Scale are significantly lower than for similarly rated corporate obligations. It is important that users of Moody's ratings understand these differences when making rating comparisons between the Municipal and Global Scales.

US Municipal Long-Term Debt Ratings

Municipal Ratings are based upon the analysis of five primary factors related to municipal finance: market position, financial position, debt levels, governance, and covenants. Each of the factors is evaluated individually and for its effect on the other factors in the context of the municipality's ability to repay its debt.

Aaa: Issuers or issues rated Aaa demonstrate the strongest creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

Aa: Issuers or issues rated Aa demonstrate very strong creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

A: Issuers or issues rated A present above-average creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

Baa: Issuers or issues rated Baa represent average creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax- exempt issuers or issues.

Ba: Issuers or issues rated Ba demonstrate below-average creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

B: Issuers or issues rated B demonstrate weak creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax- exempt issuers or issues.

Caa: Issuers or issues rated Caa demonstrate very weak creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

Ca: Issuers or issues rated Ca demonstrate extremely weak creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

C: Issuers or issues rated C demonstrate the weakest creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

US Municipal Short-Term Debt and Demand Obligation Ratings

Short-Term Obligation Ratings
There are three rating categories for short-term municipal obligations that are considered investment grade. These ratings are designated as Municipal Investment Grade (MIG) and are divided into three levels—MIG 1 through MIG 3. In addition, those short-term obligations that are of speculative quality are designated SG, or speculative grade. MIG ratings expire at the maturity of the obligation.

MIG 1: This designation denotes superior credit quality. Excellent protection is afforded by established cash flows, highly reliable liquidity support, or demonstrated broad-based access to the market for refinancing.

MIG 2: This designation denotes strong credit quality. Margins of protection are ample, although not as large as in the preceding group.

MIG 3: This designation denotes acceptable credit quality. Liquidity and cash-flow protection may be narrow, and mar-
ket access for refinancing is likely to be less well-established.

SG: This designation denotes speculative-grade credit quality. Debt instruments in this category may lack sufficient margins of protection.

Demand Obligation Ratings
In the case of variable rate demand obligations (VRDOs), a two-component rating is assigned; a long- or short-term debt rating and a demand obligation rating. The first element represents Moody's evaluation of the degree of risk associated with scheduled principal and interest payments. The second element represents Moody's evaluation of the degree of risk associated with the ability to receive purchase price upon demand ("demand feature"), using a variation of the MIG rating scale, the Variable Municipal Investment Grade or VMIG rating. When either the long- or short-term aspect of a VRDO is not rated, that piece is designated NR, e.g., Aaa/NR or NR/VMIG 1. VMIG rating expirations are a function of each issue's specific structural or credit features.

VMIG 1: This designation denotes superior credit quality. Excellent protection is afforded by the superior short-term credit strength of the liquidity provider and structural and legal protections that ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

VMIG 2: This designation denotes strong credit quality. Good protection is afforded by the strong short-term credit strength of the liquidity provider and structural and legal protections that ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

VMIG 3: This designation denotes acceptable credit quality. Adequate protection is afforded by the satisfactory short-term credit strength of the liquidity provider and structural and legal protections that ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

SG: This designation denotes speculative-grade credit quality. Demand features rated in this category may be supported by a liquidity provider that does not have an investment grade short-term rating or may lack the structural and/or legal protections necessary to ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

Standard & Poor's Ratings Services

Long-Term Issue Credit Ratings
Issue credit ratings are based, in varying degrees, on Standard & Poor's analysis of the following considerations:

Likelihood of payment—capacity and willingness of the obligor to meet its financial commitment on an obligation in accordance with the terms of the obligation;

Nature of and provisions of the obligation;

Protection afforded by, and relative position of, the obligation in the event of bankruptcy, reorganization, or other arrangement under the laws of bankruptcy and other laws affecting creditors' rights.

Issue ratings are an assessment of default risk, but may incorporate an assessment of relative seniority or ultimate recovery in the event of default. Junior obligations are typically rated lower than senior obligations, to reflect the lower priority in bankruptcy, as noted above (Such differentiation may apply when an entity has both senior and subordinated obligations, secured and unsecured obligations, or operating company and holding company obligations.).

Investment Grade
AAA: An obligation rated 'AAA' has the highest rating assigned by Standard & Poor's. The obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is extremely strong.

AA: An obligation rated 'AA' differs from the highest-rated obligations only to a small degree. The obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is very strong.

A: An obligation rated 'A' is somewhat more susceptible to the adverse effects of changes in circumstances and economic conditions than obligations in higher-rated categories. However, the obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is still strong.

BBB: An obligation rated 'BBB' exhibits adequate protection parameters. However, adverse economic conditions or changing circumstances are more likely to lead to a weakened capacity of the obligor to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

Speculative Grade
Obligations rated 'BB', 'B', 'CCC', 'CC', and 'C' are regarded as having significant speculative characteristics. 'BB' indicates the least degree of speculation and 'C' the highest. While such obligations will likely have some quality and protective characteristics, these may be outweighed by large uncertainties or major exposures to adverse conditions.

BB: An obligation rated 'BB' is less vulnerable to nonpayment than other speculative issues. However, it faces major ongoing uncertainties or exposure to adverse business, financial, or economic conditions which could lead to the obligor's inadequate capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

B: An obligation rated 'B' is more vulnerable to nonpayment than obligations rated 'BB', but the obligor currently has the capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation. Adverse business, financial, or economic conditions will likely impair the obligor's capacity or willingness to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

CCC: An obligation rated 'CCC' is currently vulnerable to nonpayment, and is dependent upon favorable business, financial, and economic conditions for the obligor to meet its financial commitment on the obligation. In the event of adverse business, financial, or economic conditions, the obligor is not likely to have the capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

CC: An obligation rated 'CC' is currently highly vulnerable to nonpayment.

C: A 'C' rating is assigned to obligations that are currently highly vulnerable to nonpayment, obligations that have payment arrearages allowed by the terms of the documents, or obligations of an issuer that is the subject of a bankruptcy petition or similar action which have not experienced a payment default. Among others, the 'C' rating may be assigned to subordinated debt, preferred stock or other obligations on which cash payments have been suspended in accordance with the instrument's terms or when preferred stock is the subject of a distressed exchange offer, whereby some or all of the issue is either repurchased for an amount of cash or replaced by other instruments having a total value that is less than par.

D: An obligation rated 'D' is in payment default. The 'D' rating category is used when payments on an obligation are not made on the date due unless Standard & Poor's believes that such payments will be made within five business days, irrespective of any grace period. The 'D' rating also will be used upon the filing of a bankruptcy petition or the taking of a similar action if payments on an obligation are jeopardized.  An obligation's rating is lowered to 'D' upon completion of a distressed exchange offer, whereby some or all of the issue is either repurchased for an amount of cash or replaced by other instruments having a total value that is less than par.

Plus (+) or minus (-): The ratings from 'AA' to 'CCC' may be modified by the addition of a plus (+) or minus (-) sign to show relative standing within the major rating categories.

NR: This indicates that no rating has been requested, that there is insufficient information on which to base a rating, or that Standard & Poor's does not rate a particular obligation as a matter of policy.

Short-Term Issue Credit Ratings
A-1: A short-term obligation rated 'A-1' is rated in the highest category by Standard & Poor's. The obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is strong. Within this category, certain obligations are designated with a plus sign (+). This indicates that the obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on these obligations is extremely strong.

A-2: A short-term obligation rated 'A-2' is somewhat more susceptible to the adverse effects of changes in circumstances and economic conditions than obligations in higher rating categories. However, the obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is satisfactory.

A-3: A short-term obligation rated 'A-3' exhibits adequate protection parameters. However, adverse economic conditions or changing circumstances are more likely to lead to a weakened capacity of the obligor to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

B: A short-term obligation rated 'B' is regarded as vulnerable and has significant speculative characteristics. The obligor currently has the capacity to meet its financial commitments; however, it faces major ongoing uncertainties which could lead to the obligor's inadequate capacity to meet its financial commitments.

C: A short-term obligation rated 'C' is currently vulnerable to nonpayment and is dependent upon favorable business, financial, and economic conditions for the obligor to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

D: A short-term obligation rated 'D' is in payment default. The 'D' rating category is used when payments on an obligation, including a regulatory capital instrument, are not made on the date due even if the applicable grace period has not expired, unless Standard & Poor's believes that such payments will be made within any stated grace period. However, any stated grace period longer than five business days will be treated as five business days. The 'D' rating also will be used upon the filing of a bankruptcy petition or the taking of a similar action if payments on an obligation are jeopardized.

Dual Ratings: Standard & Poor's assigns "dual" ratings to all debt issues that have a put option or demand feature as part of their structure. The first rating addresses the likelihood of repayment of principal and interest as due, and the second rating addresses only the demand feature. The long-term rating symbols are used for bonds to denote the long-term maturity and the short-term rating symbols for the put option (for example, 'AAA/A-1+'). With U.S. municipal short-term demand debt, note rating symbols are used with the short-term issue credit rating symbols (for example, 'SP-1+/A-1+').

Active Qualifiers
Standard & Poor's uses six qualifiers that limit the scope of a rating. The structure of the transaction can require the use of a qualifier such as a 'p' qualifier, which indicates the rating addressed the principal portion of the obligation only. Likewise, the qualifier can indicate a limitation on the type of information used, such as "pi" for public information. A qualifier appears as a suffix and is part of the rating.

L: Ratings qualified with 'L' apply only to amounts invested up to federal deposit insurance limits.

p: This suffix is used for issues in which the credit factors, the terms, or both, that determine the likelihood of receipt of payment of principal are different from the credit factors, terms or both that determine the likelihood of receipt of interest on the obligation. The 'p' suffix indicates that the rating addresses the principal portion of the obligation only. The 'p' suffix will always be used in conjunction with the 'i' suffix, which addresses likelihood of receipt of interest. For example, a rated obligation could be assigned ratings of "AAAp NRi" indicating that the principal portion is rated "AAA" and the interest portion of the obligation is not rated.

i: This subscript is used for issues in which the credit factors, the terms, or both, that determine the likelihood of receipt of payment of interest are different from the credit factors, terms or both that determine the likelihood of receipt of principal on the obligation. The 'i' suffix indicates that the rating addresses the interest portion of the obligation only. The 'i' suffix will always be used in conjunction with the 'p' suffix, which addresses likelihood of receipt of principal. For example, a rated obligation could be assigned ratings of "AAAp NRi" indicating that the principal portion is rated "AAA" and the interest portion of the obligation is not rated.

pi: Ratings with a 'pi' suffix are based on an analysis of an issuer's published financial information, as well as additional information in the public domain. They do not, however, reflect in-depth meetings with an issuer's management and therefore may be based on less comprehensive information than ratings without a 'pi' suffix. Ratings with a 'pi' suffix are reviewed annually based on a new year's financial statements, but may be reviewed on an interim basis if a major event occurs that may affect the issuer's credit quality.

preliminary: Preliminary ratings, with the 'prelim' suffix, may be assigned to obligors or obligations, including financial programs, in the circumstances described below. Assignment of a final rating is conditional on the receipt by Standard & Poor's of appropriate documentation. Standard & Poor's reserves the right not to issue a final rating. Moreover, if a final rating is issued, it may differ from the preliminary rating.

Preliminary ratings may be assigned to obligations, most commonly structured and project finance issues, pending receipt of final documentation and legal opinions.

Preliminary ratings are assigned to Rule 415 Shelf Registrations. As specific issues, with defined terms, are offered from the master registration, a final rating may be assigned to them in accordance with Standard & Poor's policies.

Preliminary ratings may be assigned to obligations that will likely be issued upon the obligor's emergence from bankruptcy or similar reorganization, based on late-stage reorganization plans, documentation and discussions with the obligor. Preliminary ratings may also be assigned to the obligors. These ratings consider the anticipated general credit quality of the reorganized or postbankruptcy issuer as well as attributes of the anticipated obligation(s).

Preliminary ratings may be assigned to entities that are being formed or that are in the process of being independently established when, in Standard & Poor's opinion, documentation is close to final. Preliminary ratings may also be assigned to these entities' obligations.

Preliminary ratings may be assigned when a previously unrated entity is undergoing a well-formulated restruc-
turing, recapitalization, significant financing or other transformative event, generally at the point that investor or lender commitments are invited. The preliminary rating may be assigned to the entity and to its proposed obligation(s). These preliminary ratings consider the anticipated general credit quality of the obligor, as well as attributes of the anticipated obligation(s), assuming successful completion of the transformative event. Should the transformative event not occur, Standard & Poor's would likely withdraw these preliminary ratings.

A preliminary recovery rating may be assigned to an obligation that has a preliminary issue credit rating.

t: This symbol indicates termination structures that are designed to honor their contracts to full maturity or, should certain events occur, to terminate and cash settle all their contracts before their final maturity date.

Inactive Qualifiers (no longer applied or outstanding)
*: This symbol indicated continuance of the ratings is contingent upon Standard & Poor's receipt of an executed copy of the escrow agreement or closing documentation confirming investments and cash flows. Discontinued use in August 1998.

c: This qualifier was used to provide additional information to investors that the bank may terminate its obligation to purchase tendered bonds if the long-term credit rating of the issuer is below an investment-grade level and/or the issuer's bonds are deemed taxable. Discontinued use in January 2001.

G: The letter 'G' followed the rating symbol when a fund's portfolio consisted primarily of direct U.S. government securities.

pr: The letters 'pr' indicate that the rating is provisional. A provisional rating assumes the successful completion of the project financed by the debt being rated and indicates that payment of debt service requirements is largely or entirely dependent upon the successful, timely completion of the project. This rating, however, while addressing credit quality subsequent to completion of the project, makes no comment on the likelihood of or the risk of default upon failure of such completion. The investor should exercise his own judgment with respect to such likelihood and risk.

q: A 'q' subscript indicates that the rating is based solely on quantitative analysis of publicly available information. Discontinued use in April 2001.

r: The 'r' modifier was assigned to securities containing extraordinary risks, particularly market risks, which are not covered in the credit rating. The absence of an 'r' modifier should not be taken as an indication that an obligation will not exhibit extraordinary non-credit related risks. Standard & Poor's discontinued the use of the 'r' modifier for most obligations in June 2000 and for the balance of obligations (mainly structured finance transactions) in November 2002.

Fitch, Inc.

Long-Term Credit Ratings

Investment Grade
AAA: Highest credit quality. 'AAA' ratings denote the lowest expectation of credit risk. They are assigned only in cases of exceptionally strong capacity for payment of financial commitments. This capacity is highly unlikely to be adversely affected by foreseeable events.

AA: Very high credit quality. "AA" ratings denote expectations of very low credit risk. They indicate very strong capacity for payment of financial commitments. This capacity is not significantly vulnerable to foreseeable events.

A: High credit quality. "A" ratings denote expectations of low credit risk. The capacity for payment of financial commitments is considered strong. This capacity may, nevertheless, be more vulnerable to adverse business or economic conditions than is the case for higher ratings.

BBB: Good credit quality. "BBB" ratings indicate that expectations of credit risk are currently low. The capacity for payment of financial commitments is considered adequate, but adverse business or economic conditions are more likely to impair this capacity.

Speculative Grade
BB: Speculative. 'BB' ratings indicate an elevated vulnerability to credit risk, particularly in the event of adverse changes in business or economic conditions over time; however, business or financial alternatives may be available to allow financial commitments to be met.

B: Highly speculative. 'B' ratings indicate that material credit risk is present.

CCC: Substantial credit risk. 'CCC' ratings indicate that substantial credit risk is present.

CC: Very high levels of credit risk. 'CC' ratings indicate very high levels of credit risk.

C: Exceptionally high levels of credit risk. 'C' indicates exceptionally high levels of credit risk.

Defaulted obligations typically are not assigned 'D' ratings, but are instead rated in the 'B' to 'C' rating categories, depending upon their recovery prospects and other relevant characteristics. This approach better aligns obligations that have comparable overall expected loss but varying vulnerability to default and loss.

The modifiers "+" or "-" may be appended to a rating to denote relative status within major rating categories. Such suffixes are not added to the 'AAA' obligation rating category, or to corporate finance obligation ratings in the categories below 'CCC.'

The subscript 'emr' is appended to a rating to denote embedded market risk which is beyond the scope of the rating. The designation is intended to make clear that the rating solely addresses the counterparty risk of the issuing bank. It is not meant to indicate any limitation in the analysis of the counterparty risk, which in all other respects follows published Fitch criteria for analyzing the issuing financial institution. Fitch does not rate these instruments where the principal is to any degree subject to market risk.

Recovery Ratings
Recovery Ratings are assigned to selected individual securities and obligations. These currently are published for most individual obligations of corporate issuers with IDRs in the 'B' rating category and below.

Among the factors that affect recovery rates for securities are the collateral, the seniority relative to other obligations in the capital structure (where appropriate), and the expected value of the company or underlying collateral in distress.

The Recovery Rating scale is based upon the expected relative recovery characteristics of an obligation upon the curing of a default, emergence from insolvency or following the liquidation or termination of the obligor or its associated collateral.

Recovery Ratings are an ordinal scale and do not attempt to precisely predict a given level of recovery. As a guideline in developing the rating assessments, the agency employs broad theoretical recovery bands in its ratings approach based on historical averages, but actual recoveries for a given security may deviate materially from historical averages.

RR1: Outstanding recovery prospects given default. 'RR1' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 91%-100% of current principal and related interest.

RR2: Superior recovery prospects given default. 'RR2' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 71%-90% of current principal and related interest.

RR3: Good recovery prospects given default. 'RR3' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 51%-70% of current principal and related interest.

RR4: Average recovery prospects given default. 'RR4' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 31%-50% of current principal and related interest.

RR5: Below average recovery prospects given default. 'RR5' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 11%-30% of current principal and related interest.

RR6: Poor recovery prospects given default. 'RR6' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 0%-10% of current principal and related interest.

Short-Term Credit Ratings
A short-term issuer or obligation rating is based in all cases on the short-term vulnerability to default of the rated entity or security stream and relates to the capacity to meet financial obligations in accordance with the documentation governing the relevant obligation. Short-Term Ratings are assigned to obligations whose initial maturity is viewed as "short term" based on market convention. Typically, this means up to 13 months for corporate, sovereign and structured obligations, and up to 36 months for obligations in US public finance markets.

F1: Highest short-term credit quality. Indicates the strongest intrinsic capacity for timely payment of financial commitments; may have an added "+" to denote any exceptionally strong credit feature.

F2: Good short-term credit quality. Good intrinsic capacity for timely payment of financial commitments.

F3: Fair short-term credit quality. The intrinsic capacity for timely payment of financial commitments is adequate.

B: Speculative short-term credit quality. Minimal capacity for timely payment of financial commitments, plus heightened vulnerability to near term adverse changes in financial and economic conditions.

C: High short-term default risk. Default is a real possibility.

RD: Restricted default. Indicates an entity that has defaulted on one or more of its financial commitments, although it continues to meet other financial obligations. Applicable to entity ratings only.

D: Default. Indicates a broad-based default event for an entity, or the default of a specific short-term obligation.

INVESTMENT MANAGER

PIMCO, 840 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach, CA 92660

DISTRIBUTOR

PIMCO Investments LLC, 1633 Broadway, New York, NY 10019

CUSTODIAN

State Street Bank & Trust Co., State Street Financial Center, One Lincoln Street, Boston, MA 02111

TRANSFER AGENT

State Street Bank & Trust Co., State Street Financial Center, One Lincoln Street, Boston, MA 02111

INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, 1100 Walnut Street, Suite 1300, Kansas City, MO 64106-2197

LEGAL COUNSEL

Dechert LLP, 1900 K Street N.W., Washington, D.C. 20006

PIMCO ETF Trust
840 Newport Center Drive
Newport Beach, CA 92660

The Trust's Statement of Additional Information ("SAI") includes additional information about the Fund. The SAI is incorporated by reference into this Prospectus, which means it is part of this Prospectus for legal purposes. The Fund's annual report, once it is available, will discuss the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected the Fund's performance during its last fiscal year.

You may get free copies of any of these materials, request other information about the Fund, or make shareholder inquiries by calling the Trust at 888.400.4ETF (888.400.4383) by visiting www.pimcoetfs.com or by writing to:

PIMCO ETF Trust
840 Newport Center Drive
Newport Beach, CA 92660

You may review and copy information about the Trust, including its SAI, at the Securities and Exchange Commission's public reference room in Washington, D.C. You may call the Commission at 1-202-551-8090 for information about the operation of the public reference room. You may also access reports and other information about the Trust on the EDGAR Database on the Commission's Web site at www.sec.gov. You may get copies of this information, with payment of a duplication fee, by writing the Public Reference Section of the Commission, Washington, D.C. 20549-1520, or by e-mailing your request to publicinfo@sec.gov.

You can also visit our Web site at www.pimcoetfs.com for additional information about the Fund, including the SAI, which is available for download free of charge.

Reference the Trust's Investment Company Act file number in your correspondence.

 

 

Investment Company Act File Number: 811-22250

xxxxx_[____]


Preliminary Prospectus

 

PIMCO ETFs

The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. Shares of the Fund may not be sold until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has not approved or disapproved these securities, or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

Actively-Managed Exchange-Traded Fund

[___]
Subject to Completion

 

[______]

PIMCO International Advantage Bond Exchange-Traded Fund

 



Table of Contents

Fund Summary

Summary Information About the Fund

Description of Principal Risks

Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings

Management of the Fund

Buying and Selling Shares

How Net Asset Value is Determined

Fund Distributions

Tax Consequences

Characteristics and Risks of Securities and Investment Techniques

Financial Highlights

Appendix A - Description of Securities Ratings


PIMCO International Advantage Bond Exchange-Traded Fund

Investment Objective

The Fund seeks total return which exceeds that of its benchmarks, consistent with prudent investment management.

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund:

Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment): None

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):

 

Management Fees

[__]%

Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees

N/A

Other Expenses1

[__]%

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses

[__]%

Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement2

[__]%

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement

[__]%

1

"Other Expenses" reflect organizational expenses for the Fund's first fiscal year.

2

Pacific Investment Management Company LLC ("PIMCO") has contractually agreed, through [___], to waive its management fee, or reimburse the Fund, to the extent that organizational expenses and pro rata Trustees' fees exceed 0.0049% of the Fund's average net assets (the "Expense Limit"). Under the Expense Limitation Agreement, which renews annually for a full year unless terminated by PIMCO upon at least 30 days' notice prior to the end of the contract term, PIMCO may recoup these waivers and reimbursements in future periods, not exceeding three years, provided that organizational expenses and pro rata Trustees' fees, plus recoupment, do not exceed the Expense Limit.

Example. The Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the costs of investing in other exchange-traded funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund's operating expenses remain the same. Investors may pay brokerage commissions on their purchases and sales of Fund shares, which are not reflected in the Example. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

 

1 Year

3 Years

$__

$__

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in the Annual Fund Operating Expenses or in the Example tables, affect the Fund's performance. The Fund has not yet commenced operations as of the date of this prospectus. Thus, no portfolio turnover rate is provided for the Fund.

Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing under normal circumstances at least 80% of its assets in Fixed Income Instruments that are economically tied to foreign (non-U.S.) countries, representing at least three foreign countries, which may be represented by forwards or derivatives such as options, futures contracts, or swap agreements. "Fixed Income Instruments" include bonds, debt securities and other similar instruments issued by various U.S. and non-U.S. public- or private-sector entities.

Pacific Investment Management Company LLC ("PIMCO") selects the Fund's foreign country and currency compositions based on an evaluation of various factors, including, but not limited to, relative interest rates, exchange rates, monetary and fiscal policies, and trade and current account balances. The Fund may invest without limitation in securities denominated in foreign currencies and in U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers. The Fund may invest, without limitation, in securities and instruments that are economically tied to emerging market countries. The Fund may also invest up to 10% of its total assets in preferred stock, convertible securities and other equity-related securities. In addition, the Fund may invest in both investment-grade securities and high yield securities ("junk bonds") subject to a maximum of 15% its total assets in securities rated below B by Moody's Investors Service, Inc. ("Moody's"), or equivalently rated by Standard & Poor's Ratings Services ("S&P") or Fitch, Inc. ("Fitch"), or, if unrated, determined by PIMCO to be of comparable quality. The average portfolio duration of this Fund varies based on PIMCO's forecast for interest rates and, under normal market conditions, is not expected to exceed eight years. Duration is a measure used to determine the sensitivity of a security's price to changes in interest rates. The longer a security's duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates. The Fund is non-diversified, which means that it may invest its assets in a smaller number of issuers than a diversified fund.

The Fund may invest, without limitation, in derivative instruments, such as options, futures contracts or fixed income swap agreements, and in mortgage- or asset-backed securities, subject to applicable law and any other restrictions described in the Fund's prospectus or Statement of Additional Information. The Fund may purchase or sell securities on a when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment basis and may engage in short sales. The Fund may, without limitation, seek to obtain market exposure to the securities in which it primarily invests by entering into a series of purchase and sale contracts or by using other investment techniques (such as buy backs or dollar rolls). The "total return" sought by the Fund consists of income earned on the Fund's investments, plus capital appreciation, if any, which generally arises from decreases in interest rates, foreign currency appreciation or improving credit fundamentals for a particular sector or security.

Principal Risks

It is possible to lose money on an investment in the Fund. The principal risks of investing in the Fund, which could adversely affect its net asset value, yield and total return are:

Market Trading Risk: the risk that an active secondary trading market for Fund shares does not continue once developed, that the Fund may not continue to meet a listing exchange's trading or listing requirements, or that Fund shares trade at prices other than the Fund's net asset value

Interest Rate Risk: the risk that fixed income securities will decline in value because of an increase in interest rates; a fund with a longer average portfolio duration will be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than a fund with a shorter average portfolio duration

Credit Risk: the risk that the Fund could lose money if the issuer or guarantor of a fixed income security, or the counterparty to a derivative contract, is unable or unwilling to meet its financial obligations

High Yield Risk: the risk that high yield securities and unrated securities of similar credit quality (commonly known as "junk bonds") are subject to greater levels of credit and liquidity risks. High yield securities are considered primarily speculative with respect to the issuer's continuing ability to make principal and interest payments

Market Risk: the risk that the value of securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to factors affecting securities markets generally or particular sectors

Issuer Risk: the risk that the value of a security may decline for reasons directly related to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer's goods or services

Liquidity Risk: the risk that a particular investment may be difficult to purchase or sell and that the Fund may be unable to sell illiquid securities at an advantageous time or price or achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain sector

Derivatives Risk: the risk of investing in derivative instruments, including liquidity, interest rate, market, credit and management risks, mispricing or improper valuation. Changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index, and the Fund could lose more than the principal amount invested

Equity Risk: the risk that the value of equity securities, such as common stocks and preferred stocks, may decline due to general market conditions which are not specifically related to a particular company or to factors affecting a particular industry or industries. Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed income securities

Mortgage-Related and Other Asset-Backed Securities Risk: the risk of investing in mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities, including interest rate risk, extension risk and prepayment risk

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Investment Risk: the risk that investing in foreign (non-U.S.) securities may result in the Fund experiencing more rapid and extreme changes in value than a fund that invests exclusively in securities of U.S. companies, due to smaller markets, differing reporting, accounting and auditing standards, increased risk of delayed settlements of portfolio transactions or loss of certificates of portfolio securities, and the risk of unfavorable foreign government actions, including nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, currency blockage, or political changes or diplomatic developments. Foreign securities may also be less liquid and more difficult to value than securities of U.S. issuers

Emerging Markets Risk: the risk of investing in emerging market securities, primarily increased foreign (non-U.S.) investment risk

Currency Risk: the risk that foreign currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar and affect the Fund's investments in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or in securities that trade in, and receive revenues in, or in derivatives that provide exposure to, foreign (non-U.S.) currencies

Issuer Non-Diversification Risk: the risk of focusing investments in a small number of issuers, including being more susceptible to risks associated with a single economic, political or regulatory occurrence than a more diversified portfolio might be. Funds that are "non-diversified" may invest a greater percentage of their assets in the securities of a single issuer (such as bonds issued by a particular state) than funds that are "diversified"

Leveraging Risk: the risk that certain transactions of the Fund, such as reverse repurchase agreements, loans of portfolio securities, and the use of when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment transactions, or derivative instruments, may give rise to leverage, causing the Fund to be more volatile than if it had not been leveraged

Management Risk: the risk that the investment techniques and risk analyses applied by PIMCO will not produce the desired results, and that legislative, regulatory, or tax restrictions, policies or developments may affect the investment techniques available to PIMCO in connection with managing the Fund. There is no guarantee that the investment objective of the Fund will be achieved

Short Sale Risk: the risk of entering into short sales, including the potential loss of more money than the actual cost of the investment, and the risk that the third party to the short sale may fail to honor its contract terms, causing a loss to the Fund

Please see "Description of Principal Risks" in the Fund's prospectus for a more detailed description of the risks of investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency.

Performance Information

The Fund does not have a full calendar year of performance. Thus, no bar chart or Average Annual Total Returns table is included for the Fund. Once the Fund commences operations, performance will be updated daily and quarterly and may be obtained at www.pimcoetfs.com/fundinfo.

Investment Adviser/Portfolio Manager

PIMCO serves as the investment adviser for the Fund. The Fund's portfolio is managed by [____].

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares

The Fund is an exchange-traded fund ("ETF"). Individual Fund shares may only be purchased and sold on a national securities exchange through a broker-dealer and may not be purchased or redeemed directly with the Fund. The price of Fund shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than net asset value ("NAV"), shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). The Funds will only issue or redeem shares at NAV that have been aggregated into blocks of [_____] shares or multiples thereof ("Creation Units") with certain large institutional investors who have entered into agreements with the Funds' Distributor ("Authorized Participants"). The Fund will issue or redeem Creation Units in return for a basket of cash and/or securities that the Fund specifies each Business Day.

Tax Information

The Fund's taxable distributions are generally taxable to you as ordinary income, capital gains, or a combination of the two, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account.

Summary Information About the Fund

Summary Information About the Fund

This prospectus describes one ETF (the "Fund") offered by PIMCO ETF Trust (the "Trust"). The Fund provides access to the professional investment advisory services offered by PIMCO. 

ETFs are funds that trade like other publicly-traded securities and may be designed to track an index or to be actively managed. Unlike conventional ETFs, the Fund is not an index fund. The Fund is actively managed and does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. Unlike shares of a mutual fund, which can be bought from and redeemed by the issuing fund by all shareholders at a price based on NAV, shares of the Fund may be directly purchased from and redeemed by the Fund at NAV solely by Authorized Participants. Also unlike shares of a mutual fund, shares of the Fund are listed on a national securities exchange and trade in the secondary market at market prices that change throughout the day.

Once operational, shares of the Fund are listed and traded at market prices on NYSE Arca, Inc. ("NYSE Arca") and other secondary markets. The market price for the Fund's shares may be different from the Fund's NAV. The Fund issues and redeems shares at NAV only in Creation Units. Only Authorized Participants may purchase or redeem Creation Units directly with the Fund at NAV. These transactions are in exchange for cash and/or securities. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, shares of the Fund are not redeemable securities. Shareholders who are not Authorized Participants may not purchase or redeem shares directly from the Fund.

An investment in the Fund alone should not constitute an entire investment program. This prospectus explains what you should know about the Fund before you invest. Please read it carefully.

Investors should be aware that the investments made by the Fund and the results achieved by the Fund at any given time are not expected to be the same as those made by other funds for which PIMCO acts as investment adviser, including funds with names, investment objectives and policies similar to the Fund.

On each business day, before commencement of trading on NYSE Arca, the Fund will disclose on www.pimcoetfs.com the identities and quantities of the Fund's portfolio holdings that will form the basis for the Fund's calculation of NAV at the end of the business day. Fund fact sheets provide additional information regarding the Fund and may be requested by calling 1-888-400-4ETF (1-888-400-4383).

 

Description of Principal Risks

The value of your investment in the Fund changes with the market price of the Fund's shares determined in the secondary market. Market price may be determined, in part, by the values of the Fund's investments. Many factors can affect those values. The factors that are most likely to have a material effect on the Fund's portfolio as a whole are called "principal risks." The principal risks of the Fund are identified in the "Fund Summary" and are described in this section. The Fund may be subject to additional risks other than those described below because the types of investments made by the Fund can change over time. Securities and investment techniques mentioned in this section that appear in bold type are described in greater detail under "Characteristics and Risks of Securities and Investment Techniques." That section and "Investment Objectives and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information also include more information about the Fund, its investments and the related risks. There is no guarantee that the Fund will be able to achieve its investment objective. It is possible to lose money by investing in the Fund.

Market Trading Risk

The Fund is subject to secondary market trading risks. Once operational, shares of the Fund are listed for trading on an exchange, however, there can be no guarantee that an active trading market for such shares will develop or continue. Shares of the Fund may be listed or traded on U.S. and foreign (non-U.S.) exchanges other than the Fund's primary U.S. listing exchange. There can be no guarantee that the Fund's shares will continue trading on any exchange or in any market or that the Fund's shares will continue to meet the listing or trading requirements of any exchange or market. The Fund's shares may experience higher trading volumes on one exchange as compared to another and investors are subject to the execution and settlement risks of the market where their broker directs trades.

Secondary market trading in the Fund's shares may be halted by an exchange because of market conditions. Pursuant to exchange or market rules, trading in the Fund's shares on an exchange or in any market may be subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility. There can be no guarantee that the Fund's exchange listing or ability to trade its shares will continue or remain unchanged. In the event the Fund ceases to be listed on an exchange, the Fund may cease operating as an "exchange-traded" fund and operate as a mutual fund, provided that shareholders are given advance notice.

Shares of the Fund may trade on an exchange at prices at, above or below their most recent NAV. The per share NAV of the Fund is calculated at the end of each business day, as described below, and fluctuates with changes in the market value of the Fund's holdings. The trading prices of the Fund's shares fluctuate continuously throughout the trading day based on market supply and demand, and may not closely track NAV. The trading prices of the Fund's shares may differ significantly from NAV during periods of market volatility, which may, among other factors, lead to the Fund's shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV.

Buying or selling the Fund's shares on an exchange may require the payment of brokerage commissions. In addition, you may also incur the cost of the spread (the difference between the bid price and the ask price). The commission is frequently a fixed amount and may be a significant cost for investors seeking to buy or sell small amounts of shares. The spread varies over time for shares of the Fund based on their trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally less if the Fund has more trading volume and market liquidity and more if the Fund has less trading volume and market liquidity. Due to the costs inherent in buying or selling the Fund's shares, frequent trading may detract significantly from investment returns. Investment in the Fund's shares may not be advisable for investors who expect to engage in frequent trading.

Interest Rate Risk

Interest rate risk is the risk that fixed income securities and other instruments in the Fund's portfolio will decline in value because of an increase in interest rates. As nominal interest rates rise, the value of certain fixed income securities held by the Fund is likely to decrease. A nominal interest rate can be described as the sum of a real interest rate and an expected inflation rate. Fixed income securities with longer durations tend to be more sensitive to changes in interest rates, usually making them more volatile than securities with shorter durations. Inflation-indexed bonds, including Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities ("TIPS"), decline in value when real interest rates rise. In certain interest rate environments, such as when real interest rates are rising faster than nominal interest rates, inflation-indexed bonds may experience greater losses than other fixed income securities with similar durations.

Variable and floating rate securities generally are less sensitive to interest rate changes but may decline in value if their interest rates do not rise as much, or as quickly, as interest rates in general. Conversely, floating rate securities will not generally increase in value if interest rates decline. Inverse floating rate securities may decrease in value if interest rates increase. Inverse floating rate securities may also exhibit greater price volatility than a fixed rate obligation with similar credit quality. When the Fund holds variable or floating rate securities, a decrease (or, in the case of inverse floating rate securities, an increase) in market interest rates will adversely affect the income received from such securities and the net asset value of the Fund's shares.

Credit Risk

The Fund could lose money if the issuer or guarantor of a fixed income security (including a security purchased with securities lending collateral), or the counterparty to a derivatives contract, repurchase agreement or a loan of portfolio securities is unable or unwilling, or is perceived (whether by market participants, ratings agencies, pricing services or otherwise) as unable or unwilling, to make timely principal and/or interest payments, or to otherwise honor its obligations. The downgrade of the credit of a security held by the Fund may decrease its value. Securities are subject to varying degrees of credit risk, which are often reflected in credit ratings. Municipal bonds are subject to the risk that litigation, legislation or other political events, local business or economic conditions, or the bankruptcy of the issuer could have a significant effect on an issuer's ability to make payments of principal and/or interest.

High Yield Risk

Funds that invest in high yield securities and unrated securities of similar credit quality (commonly known as "junk bonds") may be subject to greater levels of credit and liquidity risk than funds that do not invest in such securities. These securities are considered predominately speculative with respect to the issuer's continuing ability to make principal and interest payments. An economic downturn or period of rising interest rates could adversely affect the market for these securities and reduce the Fund's ability to sell these securities (liquidity risk). If the issuer of a security is in default with respect to interest or principal payments, the Fund may lose its entire investment. Because of the risks involved in investing in high yield securities, an investment in the Fund that invests in such securities should be considered speculative.

Market Risk

The market price of securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. Securities may decline in value due to factors affecting securities markets generally or particular industries represented in the securities markets. The value of a security may decline due to general market conditions which are not specifically related to a particular company, such as real or perceived adverse economic conditions, changes in the general outlook for corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates or adverse investor sentiment generally. The value of a security may also decline due to factors which affect a particular industry or industries, such as labor shortages or increased production costs and competitive conditions within an industry. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple asset classes may decline in value simultaneously.

Issuer Risk

The value of a security may decline for a number of reasons which directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer's goods or services, as well as the historical and prospective earnings of the issuer and the value of its assets.

Liquidity Risk

Liquidity risk exists when particular investments are difficult to purchase or sell. Illiquid securities are securities that cannot be disposed of within seven days in the ordinary course of business at approximately the value at which the Fund has valued the securities. The Fund's investments in illiquid securities, if any, may reduce the returns of the Fund because it may be unable to sell the illiquid securities at an advantageous time or price. Additionally, the market for certain investments may become illiquid under adverse market or economic conditions independent of any specific adverse changes in the conditions of a particular issuer. In such cases, the Fund, due to limitations on investments in illiquid securities and the difficulty in purchasing and selling such securities or instruments, may be unable to achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain sector. To the extent that the Fund's principal investment strategies involve derivatives, foreign (non-U.S.) securities or securities with substantial market and/or credit risk, the Fund will tend to have the greatest exposure to liquidity risk.

Derivatives Risk

Derivatives are financial contracts whose value depends on, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index. The various derivative instruments that the Fund may use are referenced under "Characteristics and Risks of Securities and Investment Techniques—Derivatives" in this prospectus and described in more detail under "Investment Objectives and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information. The Fund may use derivatives as a substitute for taking a position in the underlying asset and/or as part of a strategy designed to reduce exposure to other risks, such as interest rate or currency risk. The Fund may also use derivatives for leverage, in which case their use would involve leveraging risk. The Fund's use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. Derivatives are subject to a number of risks described elsewhere in this section, such as liquidity risk, interest rate risk, market risk, credit risk and management risk. They also involve the risk of mispricing or improper valuation and the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. If the Fund invests in a derivative instrument, the Fund could lose more than the principal amount invested. Also, suitable derivative transactions may not be available in all circumstances and there can be no assurance that the Fund will engage in these transactions to reduce exposure to other risks when that would be beneficial.

Equity Risk

Equity securities represent an ownership interest, or the right to acquire an ownership interest, in an issuer. Equity securities also include, among other things, preferred stocks, convertible stocks and warrants. The values of equity securities, such as common stocks and preferred stocks, may decline due to general market conditions which are not specifically related to a particular company, such as real or perceived adverse economic conditions, changes in the general outlook for corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates or adverse investor sentiment generally. They may also decline due to factors which affect a particular industry or industries, such as labor shortages or increased production costs and competitive conditions within an industry. Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed income securities.

Mortgage-Related and Other Asset-Backed Securities Risk

Mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities often involve risks that are different from or more acute than risks associated with other types of debt instruments. Generally, rising interest rates tend to extend the duration of fixed rate mortgage-related securities, making them more sensitive to changes in interest rates. As a result, in a period of rising interest rates, if the Fund holds mortgage-related securities, it may exhibit additional volatility. This is known as extension risk. In addition, adjustable and fixed rate mortgage-related securities are subject to prepayment risk. When interest rates decline, borrowers may pay off their mortgages sooner than expected. This can reduce the returns of the Fund because the Fund may have to reinvest that money at the lower prevailing interest rates. The Fund's investments in other asset-backed securities are subject to risks similar to those associated with mortgage-related securities, as well as additional risks associated with the nature of the assets and the servicing of those assets.

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Investment Risk

Because the Fund invests in foreign (non-U.S.) securities, it may experience more rapid and extreme changes in value than the Fund that invests exclusively in securities of U.S. companies. The securities markets of many foreign countries are relatively small, with a limited number of companies representing a small number of industries. Additionally, issuers of foreign (non-U.S.) securities are usually not subject to the same degree of regulation as U.S. issuers. Reporting, accounting and auditing standards of foreign countries differ, in some cases significantly, from U.S. standards. Also, nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, currency blockage, political changes or diplomatic developments could adversely affect the Fund's investments in a foreign country. In the event of nationalization, expropriation or other confiscation, the Fund could lose its entire investment in foreign (non-U.S.) securities. Adverse conditions in a certain region can adversely affect securities of other countries whose economies appear to be unrelated. To the extent that the Fund invests a significant portion of its assets in a specific geographic region, the Fund will generally have more exposure to regional economic risks associated with foreign investments.  Foreign securities may also be less liquid and more difficult to value than securities of U.S. issuers.

Emerging Markets Risk

Foreign (non-U.S.) investment risk may be particularly high to the extent the Fund invests in emerging market securities. Emerging market securities may present market, credit, currency, liquidity, legal, political and other risks different from, and potentially greater than, the risks of investing in securities and instruments economically tied to developed foreign countries. To the extent the Fund invests in emerging market securities that are economically tied to a particular region, country or group of countries, the Fund may be more sensitive to adverse political or social events affecting that region, country or group of countries. Economic, business, political, or social instability may affect emerging market securities differently. Accordingly, to the extent the Fund invests in a wide range of emerging market securities (e.g., different regions or countries, asset classes, issuers, sectors or credit qualities) it may perform differently in response to such instability than if the Fund invested in a more limited range of emerging market securities. For example, if the Fund focuses its investments in multiple asset classes of emerging market securities, the Fund may have a limited ability to mitigate losses in an environment that is adverse to emerging market securities in general. Emerging market securities may also be more volatile, less liquid and more difficult to value than securities economically tied to developed foreign countries. The systems and procedures for trading and settlement of securities in emerging markets are less developed and less transparent and transactions may take longer to settle. The Fund may not know the identity of trading counterparties, which may increase the possibility of the Fund not receiving payment or delivery of securities in a transaction.

Currency Risk

If the Fund invests directly in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or in securities that trade in, and receive revenues in, foreign (non-U.S.) currencies, or in derivatives that provide exposure to foreign (non-U.S.) currencies, it will be subject to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar, or, in the case of hedging positions, that the U.S. dollar will decline in value relative to the currency being hedged.

Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates, intervention (or the failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments, central banks or supranational entities such as the International Monetary Fund, or by the imposition of currency controls or other political developments in the United States or abroad. As a result, the Fund's investments in foreign currency denominated securities may reduce the returns of the Fund.

Currency risk may be particularly high to the extent that the Fund invests in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or engages in foreign currency transactions that are economically tied to emerging market countries. These currency transactions may present market, credit, currency, liquidity, legal, political and other risks different from, or greater than, the risks of investing in developed foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or engaging in foreign currency transactions that are economically tied to developed foreign countries.

Issuer Non-Diversification Risk

Focusing investments in a small number of issuers increases risk. Funds that are "non-diversified" may invest a greater percentage of their assets in the securities of a single issuer (such as bonds issued by a particular foreign government) than funds that are "diversified." Funds that invest in a relatively small number of issuers are more susceptible to risks associated with a single economic, political or regulatory occurrence than a more diversified portfolio might be. Some of those issuers also may present substantial credit or other risks.

Leveraging Risk

Certain transactions may give rise to a form of leverage. Such transactions may include, among others, reverse repurchase agreements, dollar rolls, loans of portfolio securities and the use of when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment transactions. The Fund's use of derivatives may also create leveraging risk for the Fund. To mitigate leveraging risk, PIMCO will segregate or "earmark" liquid assets or otherwise cover transactions that may give rise to such risk. The Fund also may be exposed to leveraging risk by borrowing money for investment purposes. Leveraging may cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations or to meet segregation requirements when it may not be advantageous to do so. Leveraging, including borrowing, may cause the Fund to be more volatile than if the Fund had not been leveraged. This is because leveraging tends to exaggerate the effect of any increase or decrease in the value of the Fund's portfolio securities.

Management Risk

The Fund is subject to management risk because it is an actively managed investment portfolio. PIMCO and each portfolio manager will apply investment techniques and risk analyses in making investment decisions for the Fund, but there can be no guarantee that these decisions will produce the desired results. Additionally, legislative, regulatory, or tax restrictions, policies or developments may affect the investment techniques available to PIMCO and each portfolio manager in connection with managing the Fund and may also adversely affect the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective.

Short Sale Risk

Short sales are subject to special risks. A short sale involves the sale by the Fund of a security that it does not own with the hope of purchasing the same security at a later date at a lower price. The Fund may also enter into a short position through a forward commitment or a short derivative position through a futures contract or swap agreement. If the price of the security has increased during this time, then the Fund will incur a loss equal to the increase in price from the time that the short sale was entered into plus any premiums and interest paid to the third party.

Therefore, short sales involve the risk that losses may be exaggerated, potentially losing more money than the actual cost of the investment. By contrast, a loss on a long position arises from decreases in the value of the security and is limited by the fact that a security's value cannot decrease below zero.

By investing the proceeds received from selling securities short, the Fund could be deemed to be employing a form of leverage, which creates special risks. The use of leverage may increase the Fund's exposure to long securities positions and make any change in the Fund's NAV greater than it would be without the use of leverage. This could result in increased volatility of returns. There is no guarantee that any leveraging strategy the Fund employs will be successful during any period in which it is employed.

In times of unusual or adverse market, economic, regulatory or political conditions, the Fund may not be able, fully or partially, to implement its short selling strategy. Periods of unusual or adverse market, economic, regulatory or political conditions generally may exist for as long as six months and, in some cases, much longer. Also, there is the risk that the third party to the short sale may fail to honor its contract terms, causing a loss to the Fund.

Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings

Please see "Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings" in the Statement of Additional Information for information about the availability of the complete schedule of the Fund's holdings.

Management of the Fund

Investment Manager

PIMCO serves as the investment manager for the Fund. Subject to the supervision of the Board of Trustees, PIMCO is responsible for managing the investment activities of the Fund and the Fund's business affairs and other administrative matters.

PIMCO is located at 840 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach, CA 92660. Organized in 1971, PIMCO provides investment management and advisory services to private accounts of institutional and individual clients and to mutual funds. As of [_____], PIMCO had approximately $[__] trillion in assets under management.

Management Fees

The Fund pays PIMCO fees in return for providing investment advisory, supervisory and administrative services under an all-in fee structure. The Fund will pay monthly management fees to PIMCO at the annual rate (stated as a percentage of the average daily net assets of the Fund) of [__]%.

In addition to providing investment advisory services, PIMCO provides or procures supervisory and administrative services for shareholders and also bears the costs of various third-party services required by the Fund, including audit, custodial, portfolio accounting, legal, transfer agency and printing costs. The Fund bears other expenses which are not covered under the management fee which may vary and affect the total level of expenses paid by shareholders, such as taxes and governmental fees, brokerage fees, commissions and other transaction expenses, costs of borrowing money, including interest expenses, securities lending expenses, extraordinary expenses (such as litigation and indemnification expenses) and fees and expenses of the Trust's Independent Trustees and their counsel. PIMCO generally earns a profit on the management fee paid by the Fund. Also, under the terms of the investment management agreement, PIMCO, and not Fund shareholders, would benefit from any price decreases in third-party services, including decreases resulting from an increase in net assets.

A discussion of the basis for the Board of Trustees' approval of the Fund's investment management agreement will be available in the Fund's first annual or semi-annual report to shareholders.

PIMCO has contractually agreed, through [__], to waive its management fee, or reimburse the Fund, to the extent that organizational expenses and pro rata Trustees' fees exceed 0.0049% of the Fund's average net assets. Under the Expense Limitation Agreement, which renews annually for a full year unless terminated by PIMCO upon at least 30 days' notice prior to the end of the contract term, PIMCO may recoup these waivers and reimbursements in future periods not exceeding three years, provided that organizational expenses and pro rata Trustees' fees, plus recoupment, do not exceed the Expense Limit.

Individual Portfolio Manager

The following individual has primary responsibility for managing the Fund.

 

Portfolio Manager

Since

Recent Professional Experience

[___________]

*

[_________]

*

Inception of the Fund.

Please see the Statement of Additional Information for additional information about other accounts managed by the portfolio manager, the portfolio manager's compensation and the portfolio manager's ownership of shares of the Fund.

Distributor

The Trust's Distributor is PIMCO Investments LLC ("Distributor"). The Distributor, located at 1633 Broadway, New York, NY 10019, is a broker-dealer registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC"). The Distributor distributes Creation Units for the Fund and does not maintain a secondary market in shares of the Fund.

Distribution and Servicing Plan

The Trust has adopted a Distribution and Servicing Plan for shares of the Fund pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act (the "12b-1 Plan"). The 12b-1 Plan permits compensation in connection with the distribution and marketing of Fund shares and/or the provision of certain shareholder services. The 12b-1 Plan permits the Fund to pay compensation at an annual rate of up to 0.25% of the Fund's average daily net assets. However, the Board of Trustees has determined not to authorize payment of a 12b-1 Plan fee at this time.

The 12b-1 fee may only be imposed or increased when the Board of Trustees determines that it is in the best interests of shareholders to do so. Because these fees are paid out of the Fund's assets on an ongoing basis, to the extent that a fee is authorized, over time they will increase the cost of an investment in the Fund. The 12b-1 Plan fee may cost an investor more than other types of sales charges.

Buying and Selling Shares

Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on a national securities exchange during the trading day. Shares can be bought and sold throughout the trading day like shares of other publicly traded companies. However, there can be no guarantee that an active trading market will develop or be maintained, or that the Fund shares listing will continue or remain unchanged. The Trust does not impose any minimum investment for shares of the Fund purchased on an exchange. Buying or selling the Fund's shares involves certain costs that apply to all securities transactions. When buying or selling shares of the Fund through a financial intermediary, you may incur a brokerage commission or other charges determined by your financial intermediary. Due to these brokerage costs, if any, frequent trading may detract significantly from investment returns. In addition, you may also incur the cost of the spread (the difference between the bid price and the ask price). The commission is frequently a fixed amount and may be a significant cost for investors seeking to buy or sell small amounts of shares. The spread varies over time for shares of the Fund based on its trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally less if the Fund has more trading volume and market liquidity and more if the Fund has less trading volume and market liquidity.

Shares of the Fund may be acquired from the Distributor or redeemed directly from the Fund only in Creation Units or multiples thereof, as discussed in the "Creations and Redemptions" section of the Statement of Additional Information. Once created, shares of the Fund generally trade in the secondary market in amounts less than a Creation Unit.

The Trust's Board of Trustees has not adopted a policy of monitoring for frequent purchases and redemptions of Fund shares ("frequent trading") that appear to attempt to take advantage of potential arbitrage opportunities presented by a lag between a change in the value of the Fund's portfolio securities after the close of the primary markets for the Fund's portfolio securities and the reflection of that change in the Fund's NAV ("market timing"). The Trust believes this is appropriate because an ETF, such as the Fund, is intended to be attractive to arbitrageurs, as trading activity is critical to ensuring that the market price of Fund shares remains at or close to NAV. Since the Fund issues and redeems Creation Units at NAV plus applicable transaction fees, and the Fund's shares may be purchased and sold on NYSE Arca at prevailing market prices, the risks of frequent trading are limited.

The Fund's primary listing exchange is NYSE Arca. NYSE Arca is open for trading Monday through Friday and is closed on the following holidays: New Year's Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents' Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.

A "Business Day" with respect to the Fund is each day NYSE Arca is open. Orders from Authorized Participants to create or redeem Creation Units will only be accepted on a Business Day. On days when NYSE Arca closes earlier than normal, the Fund may require orders to create or redeem Creation Units to be placed earlier in the day. See the Statement of Additional Information for more information.

Section 12(d)(1) of the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the "1940 Act"), restricts investments by registered investment companies and companies relying on Sections 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of the 1940 Act in the securities of other investment companies. Registered investment companies are permitted to invest in the Fund beyond the limits set forth in Section 12(d)(1), subject to certain terms and conditions set forth in an SEC exemptive order issued to PIMCO and the Trust, including that such investment companies enter into an agreement with the Trust.

The Trust typically does not offer or sell its shares to non- U.S. resident Authorized Participants. For purposes of this policy, a U.S. resident is defined as an account with (i) a U.S. address of record and (ii) all account owners residing in the U.S. at the time of sale.

Book Entry

Shares of the Fund are held in book-entry form, which means that no stock certificates are issued. The Depository Trust Company ("DTC") or its nominee is the record owner of all outstanding shares of the Fund and is recognized as the owner of all shares for all purposes.

Investors owning shares of the Fund are beneficial owners as shown on the records of DTC or its participants. DTC serves as the securities depository for shares of the Fund. DTC participants include securities brokers and dealers, banks, trust companies, clearing corporations and other institutions that directly or indirectly maintain a custodial relationship with DTC. As a beneficial owner of shares, you are not entitled to receive physical delivery of stock certificates or to have shares registered in your name, and you are not considered a registered owner of shares. Therefore, to exercise any right as an owner of shares, you must rely upon the procedures of DTC and its participants. These procedures are the same as those that apply to any other exchange-traded securities that you hold in book-entry or "street name" form.

Share Prices

The trading prices of the Fund's shares in the secondary market generally differ from the Fund's daily NAV per share and are affected by market forces such as supply and demand, economic conditions and other factors. Information regarding the intra-day net asset value of the Fund is disseminated every 15 seconds throughout the trading day by the national securities exchange on which the Fund's shares are primarily listed or by market data vendors or other information providers. The intra-day net asset value is based on the current market value of the securities and/or cash included in the Fund's intra-day net asset value basket. The intra-day net asset value does not necessarily reflect the precise composition of the current portfolio of securities and instruments held by the Fund at a particular point in time or the best possible valuation of the current portfolio. Therefore, the intra-day net asset value should not be viewed as a "real-time" update of the NAV, which is computed only once a day. The intra-day net asset value is generally determined by using both current market quotations and/or price quotations obtained from broker-dealers that may trade in the portfolio securities and instruments included in the Fund's intra-day net asset value basket. The Fund is not involved in, or responsible for, the calculation or dissemination of the intra-day net asset value and makes no representation or warranty as to its accuracy. An inaccuracy in the intra-day net asset value could result from various factors, including the difficulty of pricing portfolio instruments on an intra-day basis.

Premiums and Discounts

There may be differences between the daily market prices on secondary markets for shares of the Fund and the Fund's NAV. NAV is the price per share at which the Fund issues and redeems shares. See "How Net Asset Value Is Determined" below. The price used to calculate market returns ("Market Price") of the Fund generally is determined using the midpoint between the highest bid and the lowest offer on the national securities exchange on which shares of the Fund are primarily listed for trading, as of the time that the Fund's NAV is calculated. The Fund's Market Price may be at, above or below its NAV. The NAV of the Fund will fluctuate with changes in the market value of its portfolio holdings. The Market Price of the Fund will fluctuate in accordance with changes in its NAV, as well as market supply and demand.

Premiums or discounts are the differences (expressed as a percentage) between the NAV and the Market Price of the Fund on a given day, generally at the time the NAV is calculated. A premium is the amount that the Fund is trading above the reported NAV, expressed as a percentage of the NAV. A discount is the amount that the Fund is trading below the reported NAV, expressed as a percentage of the NAV. A discount or premium could be significant.  Information regarding the frequency of daily premiums or discounts, generally at the time the NAV is calculated, during the Fund's four previous calendar quarters (or for the life of the Fund, if shorter) can be found at www.pimcoetfs.com.

Request for Multiple Copies of Shareholder Documents

To reduce expenses, it is intended that only one copy of the Fund's prospectus and each annual and semi-annual report, when available, will be mailed to those addresses shared by two or more accounts. If you wish to receive individual copies of these documents, please contact the financial intermediary through which you hold your shares.

How Net Asset Value Is Determined

The NAV of the Fund's shares is determined by dividing the total value of the Fund's portfolio investments and other assets, less any liabilities, by the total number of shares outstanding.

Fund shares are valued as of the close of regular trading (normally 4:00 p.m., Eastern time) (the "NYSE Close") on each Business Day. Information that becomes known to the Fund or its agents after the NAV has been calculated on a particular day will not generally be used to retroactively adjust the price of a security or the NAV determined earlier that day. The Fund reserves the right to change the time its NAV is calculated if the Fund closes earlier, or as permitted by the SEC. 

For purposes of calculating NAV, portfolio securities and other assets for which market quotes are readily available are valued at market value. Market value is generally determined on the basis of last reported sales prices, or if no sales are reported, based on quotes obtained from a quotation reporting system, established market makers, or pricing services. Fixed income securities and non-exchange traded derivatives are normally valued on the basis of quotes obtained from brokers and dealers or pricing services using data reflecting the earlier closing of the principal markets for those securities. Prices obtained from independent pricing services use information provided by market makers or estimates of market values obtained from yield data relating to investments or securities with similar characteristics. Certain fixed income securities purchased on a delayed-delivery basis are marked to market daily until settlement at the forward settlement date. Short-term investments having a maturity of 60 days or less are generally valued at amortized cost. Exchange traded options, futures and options on futures are valued at the settlement price determined by the exchange. With respect to any portion of the Fund's assets that are invested in one or more open-end management investment companies, the Fund's NAV will be calculated based upon the NAVs of such investments. The value of securities traded in markets outside the United States may be affected significantly on a day that the NYSE is closed and an Authorized Participant is not able to purchase or redeem shares.

If a foreign security's value has materially changed after the close of the security's primary exchange or principal market but before the NYSE Close, the security will be valued at fair value based on procedures established and approved by the Board of Trustees. Foreign securities that do not trade when the NYSE is open are also valued at fair value. Foreign exchanges may permit trading in foreign securities on days when the Trust is not open for business, which may result in the Fund's portfolio investments being affected when you are unable to buy or sell shares.

Securities and other assets for which market quotes are not readily available are valued at fair value as determined in good faith by the Board of Trustees or persons acting at their direction. The Board of Trustees has adopted methods for valuing securities and other assets in circumstances where market quotes are not readily available, and has delegated to PIMCO the responsibility for applying the valuation methods. In the event that market quotes are not readily available, and the security or asset cannot be valued pursuant to one of the valuation methods, the value of the security or asset will be determined in good faith by the Valuation Committee of the Board of Trustees, generally based upon recommendations provided by PIMCO.

Market quotes are considered not readily available in circumstances where there is an absence of current or reliable market-based data (e.g., trade information, bid/ask information, broker quotes), including where events occur after the close of the relevant market, but prior to the NYSE Close, that materially affect the values of the Fund's securities or assets. In addition, market quotes are considered not readily available when, due to extraordinary circumstances, the exchanges or markets on which the securities trade do not open for trading for the entire day and no other market prices are available. The Board has delegated to PIMCO the responsibility for monitoring significant events that may materially affect the values of the Fund's securities or assets and for determining whether the value of the applicable securities or assets should be reevaluated in light of such significant events.

When the Fund uses fair value pricing to determine its NAV, securities will not be priced on the basis of quotes from the primary market in which they are traded, but rather may be priced by another method that the Board of Trustees or persons acting at their direction believe accurately reflects fair value. Fair value pricing may require subjective determinations about the value of a security. While the Trust's policy is intended to result in a calculation of the Fund's NAV that fairly reflects security values as of the time of pricing, the Trust cannot ensure that fair values determined by the Board of Trustees or persons acting at their direction would accurately reflect the price that the Fund could obtain for a security if it were to dispose of that security as of the time of pricing (for instance, in a forced or distressed sale). The prices used by the Fund may differ from the value that would be realized if the securities were sold.

Fund Distributions

The Fund distributes substantially all of its net investment income to shareholders in the form of dividends. The Fund intends to declare and distribute income dividends monthly to shareholders of record. In addition, the Fund distributes any net capital gains it earns from the sale of portfolio securities to shareholders no less frequently than annually. Net short-term capital gains may be paid more frequently. Dividend payments are made through DTC participants and indirect participants to beneficial owners then of record with proceeds received from the Fund.

No dividend reinvestment service is provided by the Trust. Financial intermediaries may make available the DTC book-entry Dividend Reinvestment Service for use by beneficial owners of Fund shares for reinvestment of their dividend distributions. Beneficial owners should contact their financial intermediary to determine the availability and costs of the service and the details of participation therein. Financial intermediaries may require beneficial owners to adhere to specific procedures and timetables. If this service is available and used, dividend distributions of both income and net capital gains will be automatically reinvested in additional whole shares of the Fund purchased in the secondary market.

Tax Consequences

Taxes on Fund distributions. If you are subject to U.S. federal income tax, you will be subject to tax on Fund taxable distributions. For federal income tax purposes, Fund taxable distributions will be taxable to you as either ordinary income or capital gains.

Fund taxable dividends (i.e., distributions of investment income) are generally taxable to you as ordinary income. Federal taxes on Fund distributions of gains are determined by how long the Fund owned the investments that generated the gains, rather than how long you have owned your shares. Distributions of gains from investments that the Fund owned for more than one year will generally be taxable to you as long-term capital gains. Distributions of gains from investments that the Fund owned for one year or less, including income from securities lending, will generally be taxable to you as ordinary income.

Fund distributions are taxable to you even if they are paid from income or gains earned by the Fund prior to your investment and thus were included in the price you paid for your shares. For example, if you purchase shares on or just before the record date of the Fund distribution, you will pay full price for the shares and may receive a portion of your investment back as a taxable distribution.

Taxes when you sell your shares. Any gain resulting from the sale of Fund shares will generally be subject to federal income tax. Currently, any capital gain or loss realized upon a sale of Fund shares is generally treated as a long-term gain or loss if the shares have been held for more than one year. Any capital gain or loss realized upon a sale of Fund shares held for one year or less is generally treated as short-term gain or loss, except that any capital loss on the sale of shares held for six months or less is treated as long-term capital loss to the extent that capital gain dividends were paid with respect to such shares.

Returns of capital. If the Fund's distributions exceed its taxable income and capital gains realized during a taxable year, all or a portion of the distributions made in the same taxable year may be recharacterized as a return of capital to shareholders. A return of capital distribution will generally not be taxable, but will reduce each shareholder's cost basis in the Fund and result in a higher reported capital gain or lower reported capital loss when those shares on which the distribution was received are sold.

Important Tax Reporting Considerations. Legislation passed by Congress requires reporting of adjusted cost basis information for covered securities, which generally include shares of a regulated investment company acquired after January 1, 2012, to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and to taxpayers. Shareholders should contact their financial intermediaries with respect to reporting of cost basis and available elections for their accounts.

Backup withholding. The Fund may be required to withhold U.S. federal income tax on all taxable distributions payable to shareholders if they fail to provide the Fund with their correct taxpayer identification number or to make required certifications, or if they have been notified by the IRS that they are subject to backup withholding. Backup withholding is not an additional tax. Any amounts withheld may be credited against U.S. federal income tax liability.

Foreign Withholding Taxes. The Fund may be subject to foreign withholding or other foreign taxes, which in some cases can be significant on any income or gain from investments in foreign securities. In that case, the Fund's total return on those securities would be decreased. The Fund may generally deduct these taxes in computing its taxable income. Rather than deducting these foreign taxes, the Fund, when investing more than 50% of its assets in the stock or securities of foreign corporations or foreign governments at the end of its taxable year, may make an election to treat a proportionate amount of eligible foreign taxes as constituting a taxable distribution to each shareholder, which would, subject to certain limitations, generally allow the shareholder to either (i) credit that proportionate amount of taxes against U.S. Federal income tax liability as a foreign tax credit or (ii) take that amount as an itemized deduction. Although in some cases the Fund may be able to apply for a refund of a portion of such taxes, the ability to successfully obtain such a refund may be uncertain.

Any foreign shareholders would generally be subject to U.S. tax withholding of 30% (or lower applicable treaty rate) on distributions by the Fund.

This "Tax Consequences" section relates only to federal income tax; the consequences under other tax laws may differ. Shareholders should consult their tax advisors as to the possible application of foreign, state and local income tax laws to Fund dividends and capital distributions. Please see the Statement of Additional Information for additional information regarding the tax aspects of investing in the Fund.

Characteristics and Risks of Securities and Investment Techniques

This section provides additional information about some of the principal investments and related risks of the Fund described under "Fund Summary" and "Description of Principal Risks" above. It also describes characteristics and risks of additional securities and investment techniques that may be used by the Fund from time to time. Most of the securities and investment techniques described herein are discretionary, which means that PIMCO can decide whether to use them or not. This prospectus does not attempt to disclose all of the various types of securities and investment techniques that may be used by the Fund. As with any fund, investors in the Fund rely on the professional investment judgment and skill of PIMCO and the individual portfolio manager. Please see "Investment Objectives and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information for more detailed information about the securities and investment techniques described in this section and about other strategies and techniques that may be used by the Fund.

Investment Selection

The Fund seeks maximum total return. The total return sought by the Fund consists of both income earned on the Fund's investments and capital appreciation, if any, arising from increases in the market value of the Fund's holdings. Capital appreciation of Fixed Income Instruments generally results from decreases in market interest rates, foreign currency appreciation, or improving credit fundamentals for a particular market sector or security.

In selecting investments for the Fund, PIMCO develops an outlook for interest rates, currency exchange rates and the economy, analyzes credit and call risks, and uses other investment selection techniques. The proportion of the Fund's assets committed to investment in securities with particular characteristics (such as quality, sector, interest rate or maturity) varies based on PIMCO's outlook for the U.S. economy and the economies of other countries in the world, the financial markets and other factors.

With respect to fixed income investing, PIMCO attempts to identify areas of the bond market that are undervalued relative to the rest of the market. PIMCO identifies these areas by grouping Fixed Income Investments into sectors such as money markets, governments, corporates, mortgages, asset-backed and international. In seeking to identify undervalued currencies, PIMCO may consider many factors, including but not limited to longer-term analysis of relative interest rates, inflation rates, real exchange rates, purchasing power parity, trade account balances and current account balances, as well as other factors that influence exchange rates such as flows, market technical trends and government policies. Sophisticated proprietary software then assists in evaluating sectors and pricing specific investments. Once investment opportunities are identified, PIMCO will shift assets among sectors depending upon changes in relative valuations, credit spreads and other factors. There is no guarantee that PIMCO's investment selection techniques will produce the desired results.

Investors should be aware that the investments made by the Fund and the results achieved by the Fund at any given time are not expected to be the same as those made by other funds for which PIMCO acts as investment adviser, including funds with names, investment objectives and policies similar to the Fund.

Fixed Income Instruments

"Fixed Income Instruments," as used generally in this prospectus, includes:

securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies or government sponsored enterprises ("U.S. Government Securities");

corporate debt securities of U.S. and non-U.S. issuers, including convertible securities and corporate commercial paper;

mortgage-backed and other asset-backed securities;

inflation-indexed bonds issued both by governments and corporations;

structured notes, including hybrid or "indexed" securities and event-linked bonds;

bank capital and trust preferred securities;

loan participations and assignments;

delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities;

bank certificates of deposit, fixed time deposits and bankers' acceptances;

repurchase agreements on Fixed Income Instruments and reverse repurchase agreements on Fixed Income Instruments;

debt securities issued by states or local governments and their agencies, authorities and other government-sponsored enterprises;

obligations of non-U.S. governments or their subdivisions, agencies and government-sponsored enterprises; and

obligations of international agencies or supranational entities.

Securities issued by U.S. Government agencies or government-sponsored enterprises may not be guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury.

The Fund may invest in derivatives based on Fixed Income Instruments.

Duration

Duration is a measure used to determine the sensitivity of a security's price to changes in interest rates. The longer a security's duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates. Similarly, a Fund with a longer average portfolio duration will be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than a Fund with a shorter average portfolio duration. By way of example, the price of a bond fund with an average duration of five years would be expected to fall approximately 5% if interest rates rose by one percentage point. Conversely, the price of a bond fund with an average duration of negative three years would be expected to rise approximately 3% if interest rates rose by one percentage point. The maturity of a security, another commonly used measure of price sensitivity, measures only the time until final payment is due, whereas duration takes into account the pattern of all payments of interest and principal on a security over time, including how these payments are affected by prepayments and by changes in interest rates, as well as the time until an interest rate on a security is reset (in the case of variable-rate securities). PIMCO uses an internal model for calculating duration, which may result in a different value for the duration of an index compared to the duration calculated by the index provider or another third party.

U.S. Government Securities

U.S. Government Securities are obligations of, or guaranteed by, the U.S. Government, its agencies or government-sponsored enterprises. The U.S. Government does not guarantee the NAV of the Fund's shares. U.S. Government Securities are subject to market and interest rate risk, as well as varying degrees of credit risk. Some U.S. Government Securities are issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury and are supported by the full faith and credit of the United States. Other types of U.S. Government Securities are supported by the full faith and credit of the United States (but not issued by the U.S. Treasury). These securities may have less credit risk than U.S. Government Securities not supported by the full faith and credit of the United States. Such other types of U.S. Government Securities are: (1) supported by the ability of the issuer to borrow from the U.S. Treasury; (2) supported only by the credit of the issuing agency, instrumentality or government-sponsored corporation; or (3) supported by the United States in some other way. These securities may be subject to greater credit risk. U.S. Government Securities include zero coupon securities, which tend to be subject to greater market risk than interest-paying securities of similar maturities.

Securities issued by U.S. Government agencies or government-sponsored enterprises may not be guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury. Government National Mortgage Association ("GNMA"), a wholly owned U.S. Government corporation, is authorized to guarantee, with the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government, the timely payment of principal and interest on securities issued by institutions approved by GNMA and backed by pools of mortgages insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Government related guarantors (i.e., not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government) include the Federal National Mortgage Association ("FNMA") and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation ("FHLMC"). Pass-through securities issued by FNMA are guaranteed as to timely payment of principal and interest by FNMA but are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. FHLMC guarantees the timely payment of interest and ultimate collection of principal, but its participation certificates are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government.

Municipal Bonds

Municipal Bonds are generally issued by states, territories, possessions and local governments and their agencies, authorities and other instrumentalities. Municipal Bonds are subject to interest rate, credit and market risk. The ability of an issuer to make payments could be affected by litigation, legislation or other political events or the bankruptcy of the issuer. Lower rated Municipal Bonds are subject to greater credit and market risk than higher quality Municipal Bonds. The types of Municipal Bonds in which the Fund may invest include municipal lease obligations, municipal general obligation bonds, municipal cash equivalents, and pre-refunded and escrowed to maturity Municipal Bonds. The Fund may also invest in industrial development bonds, which are Municipal Bonds issued by a government agency on behalf of a private sector company and, in most cases, are not backed by the credit of the issuing municipality and may therefore involve more risk. The Fund may also invest in securities issued by entities whose underlying assets are Municipal Bonds.

Pre-refunded Municipal Bonds are tax-exempt bonds that have been refunded to a call date on or before the final maturity of principal and remain outstanding in the municipal market. The payment of principal and interest of the pre-refunded Municipal Bonds held by the Fund is funded from securities in a designated escrow account that holds U.S. Treasury securities or other obligations of the U.S. Government (including its agencies and instrumentalities ("Agency Securities")). As the payment of principal and interest is generated from securities held in a designated escrow account, the pledge of the municipality has been fulfilled and the original pledge of revenue by the municipality is no longer in place. The escrow account securities pledged to pay the principal and interest of the pre-refunded Municipal Bond do not guarantee the price movement of the bond before maturity. Investment in pre-refunded Municipal Bonds held by the Fund may subject the Fund to interest rate risk, market risk and credit risk. In addition, while a secondary market exists for pre-refunded Municipal Bonds, if the Fund sells pre-refunded Municipal Bonds prior to maturity, the price received may be more or less than the original cost, depending on market conditions at the time of sale.

High Yield Securities

Securities rated lower than Baa by Moody's, or equivalently rated by S&P or Fitch, are sometimes referred to as "high yield securities" or "junk bonds." Investing in these securities involves special risks in addition to the risks associated with investments in higher-rated fixed income securities. While offering a greater potential opportunity for capital appreciation and higher yields, high yield securities typically entail greater potential price volatility and may be less liquid than higher-rated securities. High yield securities may be regarded as predominately speculative with respect to the issuer's continuing ability to meet principal and interest payments. They may also be more susceptible to real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions than higher-rated securities. Issuers of securities in default may fail to resume principal or interest payments, in which case a Fund may lose its entire investment.

Mortgage-Related and Other Asset-Backed Securities

Mortgage-related securities include mortgage pass-through securities, collateralized mortgage obligations ("CMOs"), commercial mortgage-backed securities, mortgage dollar rolls, CMO residuals, stripped mortgage-backed securities ("SMBSs") and other securities that directly or indirectly represent a participation in, or are secured by and payable from, mortgage loans on real property. A to-be-announced ("TBA") transaction is a method of trading mortgage-backed securities. In a TBA transaction, the buyer and seller agree upon general trade parameters such as agency, settlement date, par amount and price. The actual pools delivered generally are determined two days prior to the settlement date.

The value of some mortgage-or asset-backed securities may be particularly sensitive to changes in prevailing interest rates. Early repayment of principal on some mortgage-related securities may expose the Fund to a lower rate of return upon reinvestment of principal. When interest rates rise, the value of a mortgage-related security generally will decline; however, when interest rates are declining, the value of mortgage-related securities with prepayment features may not increase as much as other fixed income securities. The rate of prepayments on underlying mortgages will affect the price and volatility of a mortgage-related security, and may shorten or extend the effective maturity of the security beyond what was anticipated at the time of purchase. If unanticipated rates of prepayment on underlying mortgages increase the effective maturity of a mortgage-related security, the volatility of the security can be expected to increase. The value of these securities may fluctuate in response to the market's perception of the creditworthiness of the issuers. See "Extension Risk" and "Prepayment Risk" below. Additionally, although mortgages and mortgage-related securities are generally supported by some form of government or private guarantee and/or insurance, there is no assurance that guarantors or insurers will meet their obligations.

Extension Risk. Mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities are subject to Extension Risk, which is the risk that the issuer of such a security pays back the principal of such an obligation later than expected. This may occur when interest rates rise. This may negatively affect Fund returns, as the value of the security decreases when principal payments are made later than expected. In addition, because principal payments are made later than expected, the Fund may be prevented from investing proceeds it would otherwise have received at a given time at the higher prevailing interest rates.

Prepayment Risk. Mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities are subject to Prepayment Risk, which is the risk that the issuer of such a security pays back the principal of such an obligation earlier than expected (due to the sale of the underlying property, refinancing, or foreclosure). This may occur when interest rates decline. Prepayment may expose the Fund to a lower rate of return upon reinvestment of principal. Also, if a security subject to prepayment has been purchased at a premium, the value of the premium would be lost in the event of prepayment.

One type of SMBS has one class receiving all of the interest from the mortgage assets (the interest-only, or "IO" class), while the other class will receive all of the principal (the principal-only, or "PO" class). The yield to maturity on an IO class is extremely sensitive to the rate of principal payments (including prepayments) on the underlying mortgage assets, and a rapid rate of principal payments may have a material adverse effect on the Fund's yield to maturity from these securities. The Fund may invest up to 5% of its total assets in any combination of mortgage-related or other asset-backed IO, PO or inverse floater securities.

The Fund may invest in collateralized debt obligations ("CDOs"), which include collateralized bond obligations ("CBOs"), collateralized loan obligations ("CLOs") and other similarly structured securities CBOs and CLOs are types of asset-backed securities. A CBO is a trust which is backed by a diversified pool of high risk, below investment grade fixed income securities. A CLO is a trust typically collateralized by a pool of loans, which may include, among others, domestic and foreign senior secured loans, senior unsecured loans, and subordinate corporate loans, including loans that may be rated below investment grade or equivalent unrated loans. The Fund may invest in other asset-backed securities that have been offered to investors.

Reinvestment

The Fund may be subject to the risk that the returns of the Fund will decline during periods of falling interest rates because the Fund may have to reinvest the proceeds from matured, traded or called debt obligations at interest rates below the Fund's current earnings rate. For instance, when interest rates decline, an issuer of debt obligations may exercise an option to redeem securities prior to maturity, thereby forcing the Fund to invest in lower-yielding securities. The Fund also may choose to sell higher-yielding portfolio securities and to purchase lower-yielding securities to achieve greater portfolio diversification, because the Fund's portfolio manager believes the current holdings are overvalued or for other investment-related reasons. A decline in the returns received by the Fund from its investments is likely to have an adverse effect on the Fund's net asset value, yield and total return.

Focused Investment

To the extent that the Fund focuses its investments in a particular sector, the Fund may be susceptible to loss due to adverse developments affecting that sector. These developments include, but are not limited to, governmental regulation; inflation; rising interest rates; cost increases in raw materials, fuel and other operating expenses; technological innovations that may render existing products and equipment obsolete; competition from new entrants; high research and development costs; increased costs associated with compliance with environmental or other governmental regulations; and other economic, business or political developments specific to that sector. Furthermore, the Fund may invest a substantial portion of its assets in companies in related sectors that may share common characteristics, are often subject to similar business risks and regulatory burdens, and whose securities may react similarly to the types of developments described above, which will subject the Fund to greater risk. The Fund also will be subject to focused investment risk to the extent that it invests a substantial portion of its assets in a particular issuer, market, asset class, country or geographic region.

Corporate Debt Securities

Corporate debt securities are subject to the risk of the issuer's inability to meet principal and interest payments on the obligation and may also be subject to price volatility due to such factors as interest rate sensitivity, market perception of the creditworthiness of the issuer and general market liquidity. When interest rates rise, the value of corporate debt securities can be expected to decline. Debt securities with longer maturities tend to be more sensitive to interest rate movements than those with shorter maturities.

Bank Capital Securities and Trust Preferred Securities

There are two common types of bank capital: Tier I and Tier II. Bank capital is generally, but not always, of investment grade quality. Tier I securities often take the form of trust preferred securities. Tier II securities are commonly thought of as hybrids of debt and preferred stock, are often perpetual (with no maturity date), callable and, under certain conditions, allow for the issuer bank to withhold payment of interest until a later date.

Trust preferred securities have the characteristics of both subordinated debt and preferred stock. The primary advantage of the structure of trust preferred securities is that they are treated by the financial institution as debt securities for tax purposes and as equity for the calculation of capital requirements. Trust preferred securities typically bear a market rate coupon comparable to interest rates available on debt of a similarly rated issuer. Typical characteristics include long-term maturities, early redemption by the issuer, periodic fixed or variable interest payments, and maturities at face value. The market value of trust preferred securities may be more volatile than those of conventional debt securities. There can be no assurance as to the liquidity of trust preferred securities and the ability of holders, such as the Fund, to sell their holdings.

Loan Participations and Assignments

The Fund may invest in fixed- and floating-rate loans, which investments generally will be in the form of loan participations and assignments of portions of such loans. Participations and assignments involve special types of risk, including credit risk, interest rate risk, liquidity risk, and the risks of being a lender. If the Fund purchases a participation, it may only be able to enforce its rights through the lender, and may assume the credit risk of the lender in addition to the borrower.

Variable and Floating Rate Securities

Variable and floating rate securities are securities that pay interest at rates that adjust whenever a specified interest rate changes and/or that reset on predetermined dates (such as the last day of a month or calendar quarter). The Fund may invest in floating rate debt instruments ("floaters") and engage in credit spread trades. Variable and floating rate securities generally are less sensitive to interest rate changes but may decline in value if their interest rates do not rise as much, or as quickly, as interest rates in general. Conversely, floating rate securities will not generally increase in value if interest rates decline. The Fund may also invest in inverse floating rate debt instruments ("inverse floaters"). An inverse floater may exhibit greater price volatility than a fixed rate obligation of similar credit quality. The Fund may invest up to 5% of its total assets in any combination of mortgage-related or other asset-backed IO, PO or inverse floater securities.

Inflation-Indexed Bonds

Inflation-indexed bonds (other than municipal inflation-indexed bonds and certain corporate inflation-indexed bonds, which are more fully described below) are fixed income securities whose principal value is periodically adjusted according to the rate of inflation. If the index measuring inflation falls, the principal value of inflation-indexed bonds (other than municipal inflation-indexed bonds and certain corporate inflation-indexed bonds) will be adjusted downward, and consequently the interest payable on these securities (calculated with respect to a smaller principal amount) will be reduced. Repayment of the original bond principal upon maturity (as adjusted for inflation) is guaranteed in the case of TIPS. For bonds that do not provide a similar guarantee, the adjusted principal value of the bond repaid at maturity may be less than the original principal. TIPS may also be divided into individual zero-coupon instruments for each coupon or principal payment (known as "iSTRIPS"). An iSTRIP of the principal component of a TIPS issue will retain the embedded inflation floor that will allow the holder of that security to receive the greater of the original principal or inflation-adjusted principal value at maturity. iSTRIPS may be less liquid than conventional TIPS because they are a small component of the TIPS market.

Municipal inflation-indexed securities are municipal bonds that pay coupons based on a fixed rate plus the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers ("CPI"). With regard to municipal inflation-indexed bonds and certain corporate inflation-indexed bonds, the inflation adjustment is reflected in the semi-annual coupon payment. As a result, the principal value of municipal inflation-indexed bonds and such corporate inflation-indexed bonds does not adjust according to the rate of inflation. At the same time, the value of municipal inflation-indexed securities and such corporate inflation-indexed securities generally will not increase if the rate of inflation decreases. Because municipal inflation-indexed securities and corporate inflation-indexed securities are a small component of the municipal bond and corporate bond markets, respectively, they may be less liquid than conventional municipal and corporate bonds.

The value of inflation-indexed bonds is expected to change in response to changes in real interest rates. Real interest rates are tied to the relationship between nominal interest rates and the rate of inflation. If nominal interest rates increase at a faster rate than inflation, real interest rates may rise, leading to a decrease in value of inflation-indexed bonds. Any increase in the principal amount of an inflation-indexed bond will be considered taxable ordinary income, even though investors do not receive their principal until maturity.

Event-Linked Exposure

The Fund may obtain event-linked exposure by investing in "event-linked bonds" or "event-linked swaps" or by implementing "event-linked strategies." Event-linked exposure results in gains or losses that typically are contingent, or formulaically related to defined trigger events. Examples of trigger events include hurricanes, earthquakes, weather-related phenomena, or statistics relating to such events. Some event-linked bonds are commonly referred to as "catastrophe bonds." If a trigger event occurs, the Fund may lose a portion or its entire principal invested in the bond or notional amount on a swap. Event-linked exposure often provides for an extension of maturity to process and audit loss claims where a trigger event has, or possibly has, occurred. An extension of maturity may increase volatility. Event-linked exposure may also expose the Fund to certain unanticipated risks including credit risk, counterparty risk, adverse regulatory or jurisdictional interpretations, and adverse tax consequences. Event-linked exposures may also be subject to liquidity risk.

Convertible and Equity Securities

Common stock represents equity ownership in a company and typically provides the common stockholder the power to vote on certain corporate actions, including the election of the company's directors. Common stockholders participate in company profits through dividends and, in the event of bankruptcy, distributions, on a pro-rata basis after other claims are satisfied. Many factors affect the value of common stock, including earnings, earnings forecasts, corporate events and factors impacting the issuer's industry and the market generally. Common stock generally has the greatest appreciation and depreciation potential of all corporate securities.

The Fund may invest up to 10% of its total assets in preferred stock, convertible securities and other equity-related securities. Convertible securities are generally preferred stocks and other securities, including fixed income securities and warrants, that are convertible into or exercisable for common stock at a stated price or rate. The price of a convertible security will normally vary in some proportion to changes in the price of the underlying common stock because of this conversion or exercise feature. However, the value of a convertible security may not increase or decrease as rapidly as the underlying common stock. A convertible security will normally also provide income and is subject to interest rate risk. Convertible securities may be lower-rated securities subject to greater levels of credit risk. The Fund may be forced to convert a security before it would otherwise choose, which may have an adverse effect on the Fund's ability to achieve its investment objective.

"Synthetic" convertible securities are selected based on the similarity of their economic characteristics to those of a traditional convertible security due to the combination of separate securities that possess the two principal characteristics of a traditional convertible security, i.e., an income-producing security ("income-producing component") and the right to acquire an equity security ("convertible component"). The income-producing component is achieved by investing in non-convertible, income-producing securities such as bonds, preferred stocks and money market instruments, which may be represented by derivative instruments. The convertible component is achieved by investing in securities or instruments such as warrants or options to buy common stock at a certain exercise price, or options on a stock index. A simple example of a synthetic convertible security is the combination of a traditional corporate bond with a warrant to purchase equity securities of the issuer of the bond. The Fund may also purchase synthetic securities created by other parties, typically investment banks, including convertible structured notes. The income-producing and convertible components of a synthetic convertible security may be issued separately by different issuers and at different times.

Preferred stock represents an equity interest in a company that generally entitles the holder to receive, in preference to the holders of other stocks such as common stocks, dividends and a fixed share of the proceeds resulting from a liquidation of the company. Preferred stocks may pay fixed or adjustable rates of return. Preferred stock is subject to issuer-specific and market risks applicable generally to equity securities. In addition, a company's preferred stock generally pays dividends only after the company makes required payments to holders of its bonds and other debt. For this reason, the value of preferred stock will usually react more strongly than bonds and other debt to actual or perceived changes in the company's financial condition or prospects.

While some countries or companies may be regarded as favorable investments, pure fixed income opportunities may be unattractive or limited due to insufficient supply, or legal or technical restrictions. In such cases, the Fund may consider convertible securities or equity securities to gain exposure to such investments.

At times, in connection with the restructuring of a preferred stock or fixed income instrument either outside of bankruptcy court or in the context of bankruptcy court proceedings, the Fund may determine or be required to accept equity securities, such as common stocks, in exchange for all or a portion of a preferred stock or fixed income instrument. Depending upon, among other things, PIMCO's evaluation of the potential value of such securities in relation to the price that could be obtained by the Fund at any given time upon sale thereof, the Fund may determine to hold such securities in its portfolio.

Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed income securities. The market price of equity securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. Equity securities may decline in value due to factors affecting equity securities markets generally or particular industries represented in those markets. The value of an equity security may also decline for a number of reasons which directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer's goods or services.

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Securities

The Fund may invest in securities and instruments that are economically tied to foreign (non-U.S.) countries. PIMCO generally considers an instrument to be economically tied to a non-U.S. country if the issuer is a foreign government (or any political subdivision, agency, authority or instrumentality of such government), or if the issuer is organized under the laws of a non-U.S. country. In the case of certain money market instruments, such instruments will be considered economically tied to a non-U.S. country if either the issuer or the guarantor of such money market instrument is organized under the laws of a non-U.S. country. With respect to derivative instruments, PIMCO generally considers such instruments to be economically tied to non-U.S. countries if the underlying assets are foreign currencies (or baskets or indexes of such currencies), or instruments or securities that are issued by foreign governments or issuers organized under the laws of a non-U.S. country (or if the underlying assets are certain money market instruments, if either the issuer or the guarantor of such money market instruments is organized under the laws of a non-U.S. country).

Investing in foreign (non-U.S.) securities involves special risks and considerations not typically associated with investing in U.S. securities. Shareholders should consider carefully the substantial risks involved for the Fund that invests in securities issued by foreign companies and governments of foreign countries. These risks include: differences in accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards; generally higher commission rates on foreign portfolio transactions; the possibility of nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation; adverse changes in investment or exchange control regulations; and political instability. Individual foreign economies may differ favorably or unfavorably from the U.S. economy in such respects as growth of gross domestic product, rates of inflation, capital reinvestment, resources, self-sufficiency and balance of payments position. The securities markets, values of securities, yields and risks associated with foreign (non-U.S.) securities markets may change independently of each other. Also, foreign (non-U.S.) securities and dividends and interest payable on those securities may be subject to foreign taxes, including taxes withheld from payments on those securities. Foreign (non-U.S.) securities often trade with less frequency and volume than domestic securities and therefore may exhibit greater price volatility. Investments in foreign (non-U.S.) securities may also involve higher custodial costs than domestic investments.

Emerging Market Securities. The Fund may invest, without limitation, in securities and instruments that are economically tied to emerging market countries. PIMCO generally considers an instrument to be economically tied to an emerging market country if the security's "country of exposure" is an emerging market country, as determined by the criteria set forth below. Alternatively, such as when a "country of exposure" is not available or when PIMCO believes the following tests more accurately reflect which country the security is economically tied to, PIMCO may consider an instrument to be economically tied to an emerging market country if the issuer or guarantor is a government of an emerging market country (or any political subdivision, agency, authority or instrumentality of such government), if the issuer or guarantor is organized under the laws of an emerging market country, or if the currency of settlement of the security is a currency of an emerging market country. With respect to derivative instruments, PIMCO generally considers such instruments to be economically tied to emerging market countries if the underlying assets are currencies of emerging market countries (or baskets or indexes of such currencies), or instruments or securities that are issued or guaranteed by governments of emerging market countries or by entities organized under the laws of emerging market countries. A security's "country of exposure" is determined by PIMCO using certain factors provided by a third-party analytical service provider. The factors are applied in order such that the first factor to result in the assignment of a country determines the "country of exposure." The factors, listed in the order in which they are applied, are: (i) if an asset-backed or other collateralized security, the country in which the collateral backing the security is located, (ii) if the security is guaranteed by the government of a country (or any political subdivision, agency, authority or instrumentality of such government), the country of the government or instrumentality providing the guarantee, (iii) the "country of risk" of the issuer, (iv) the "country of risk" of the issuer's ultimate parent, or (v) the country where the issuer is organized or incorporated under the laws thereof. "Country of risk" is a separate four-part test determined by the following factors, listed in order of importance: (i) management location, (ii) country of primary listing, (iii) sales or revenue attributable to the country, and (iv) reporting currency of the issuer. PIMCO has broad discretion to identify countries that it considers to qualify as emerging markets. In making investments in emerging market securities, the Fund emphasizes those countries with relatively low gross national product per capita and with the potential for rapid economic growth. Emerging market countries are generally located in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and Eastern Europe. PIMCO will select the country and currency composition based on its evaluation of relative interest rates, inflation rates, exchange rates, monetary and fiscal policies, trade and current account balances, legal and political developments and any other specific factors it believes to be relevant.

Investing in emerging market securities imposes risks different from, or greater than, risks of investing in domestic securities or in foreign, developed countries. These risks include: smaller market capitalization of securities markets, which may suffer periods of relative illiquidity; significant price volatility; restrictions on foreign investment; possible repatriation of investment income and capital. In addition, foreign investors may be required to register the proceeds of sales; future economic or political crises could lead to price controls, forced mergers, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, seizure, nationalization, or creation of government monopolies.  The currencies of emerging market countries may experience significant declines against the U.S. dollar, and devaluation may occur subsequent to investments in these currencies by the Fund.  Inflation and rapid fluctuations in inflation rates have had, and may continue to have, negative effects on the economies and securities markets of certain emerging market countries.

Additional risks of emerging markets securities may include: greater social, economic and political uncertainty and instability; more substantial governmental involvement in the economy; less governmental supervision and regulation; unavailability of currency hedging techniques; companies that are newly organized and small; differences in auditing and financial reporting standards, which may result in unavailability of material information about issuers; and less developed legal systems. In addition, emerging securities markets may have different clearance and settlement procedures, which may be unable to keep pace with the volume of securities transactions or otherwise make it difficult to engage in such transactions. Settlement problems may cause the Fund to miss attractive investment opportunities, hold a portion of its assets in cash pending investment, or be delayed in disposing of a portfolio security. Such a delay could result in possible liability to a purchaser of the security.

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Currencies

The Fund invests directly in foreign currencies or in securities that trade in, or receive revenues in, foreign (non-U.S.) currencies and will be subject to currency risk. Foreign currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. They generally are determined by supply and demand in the foreign exchange markets and the relative merits of investments in different countries, actual or perceived changes in interest rates and other complex factors. Currency exchange rates also can be affected unpredictably by intervention (or the failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments or central banks, or by currency controls or political developments. Currencies in which the Fund's assets are denominated may be devalued against the U.S. dollar, resulting in a loss to the Fund.

Foreign Currency Transactions. The Fund may invest in securities denominated in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies, engage in foreign currency transactions on a spot (cash) basis and enter into forward foreign currency exchange contracts and invest in foreign currency futures contracts and options on foreign currencies and futures. A forward foreign currency exchange contract, which involves an obligation to purchase or sell a specific currency at a future date at a price set at the time of the contract, reduces the Fund's exposure to changes in the value of the currency it will deliver and increases its exposure to changes in the value of the currency it will receive for the duration of the contract. Certain foreign currency transactions may also be settled in cash rather than the actual delivery of the relevant currency. The effect on the value of the Fund is similar to selling securities denominated in one currency and purchasing securities denominated in another currency. A contract to sell a foreign currency would limit any potential gain which might be realized if the value of the hedged currency increases. The Fund may enter into these contracts to hedge against foreign exchange risk, to increase exposure to a foreign currency or to shift exposure to foreign currency fluctuations from one currency to another. Suitable hedging transactions may not be available in all circumstances and there can be no assurance that the Fund will engage in such transactions at any given time or from time to time. Also, such transactions may not be successful and may eliminate any chance for the Fund to benefit from favorable fluctuations in relevant foreign currencies. The Fund may use one currency (or a basket of currencies) to hedge against adverse changes in the value of another currency (or a basket of currencies) when exchange rates between the two currencies are positively correlated. The Fund will segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO in accordance with the procedures established by the Board of Trustees (or, as permitted by applicable law, enter into certain offsetting positions) to cover its obligations under forward foreign currency exchange contracts entered into for non-hedging purposes.

Redenomination. Continuing uncertainty as to the status of the euro and the European Monetary Union (the "EMU") has created significant volatility in currency and financial markets generally. Any partial or complete dissolution of the EMU could have significant adverse effects on currency and financial markets and on the values of the Fund's portfolio investments. If one or more EMU countries were to stop using the euro as its primary currency, the Fund's investments in such countries may be redenominated into a different or newly adopted currency. As a result, the value of those investments could decline significantly and unpredictably. In addition, securities or other investments that are redenominated may be subject to currency risk, liquidity risk and risk of improper valuation to a greater extent than similar investments currently denominated in euros. To the extent a currency used for redenomination purposes is not specified in respect of certain EMU-related investments, or should the euro cease to be used entirely, the currency in which such investments are denominated may be unclear, making such investments particularly difficult to value or dispose of. The Fund may incur additional expenses to the extent it is required to seek judicial or other clarification of the denomination or value of such securities.

There can be no assurance that if the Fund earns income or capital gains in a non-U.S. country or PIMCO otherwise seeks to withdraw the Fund's investments from a given country, capital controls imposed by such country will not prevent, or cause significant expense in, doing so.

Repurchase Agreements

The Fund may enter into repurchase agreements, in which the Fund purchases a security from a bank or broker-dealer, which agrees to repurchase the security at the Fund's cost plus interest within a specified time. If the party agreeing to repurchase should default, the Fund will seek to sell the securities which it holds. This could involve procedural costs or delays in addition to a loss on the securities if their value should fall below their repurchase price. Repurchase agreements maturing in more than seven days and which may not be terminated within seven days at approximately the amount at which the Fund has valued the agreements are considered illiquid securities.

Reverse Repurchase Agreements, Dollar Rolls and Other Borrowings

The Fund may enter into reverse repurchase agreements and dollar rolls subject to the Fund's limitations on borrowings. A reverse repurchase agreement involves the sale of a security by the Fund and its agreement to repurchase the instrument at a specified time and price. A dollar roll is similar except that the counterparty is not obligated to return the same securities as those originally sold by the Fund but only securities that are "substantially identical." Reverse repurchase agreements and dollar rolls may be considered borrowing for some purposes. The Fund will segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO in accordance with procedures established by the Board of Trustees to cover its obligations under reverse repurchase agreements and dollar rolls. Reverse repurchase agreements, dollar rolls and other forms of borrowings may create leveraging risk for the Fund.

The Fund may borrow money to the extent permitted under the 1940 Act. This means that, in general, the Fund may borrow money from banks for any purpose in an amount up to 1/3 of the Fund's total assets, less all liabilities and indebtedness not represented by senior securities. The Fund may also borrow money for temporary administrative purposes in an amount not to exceed 5% of the Fund's total assets.

Derivatives

The Fund may, but is not required to, use derivative instruments for risk management purposes or as part of its investment strategies. Generally, derivatives are financial contracts whose value depends upon, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index, and may relate to stocks, bonds, interest rates, spreads between different interest rates, currencies or currency exchange rates, commodities, and related indexes. Examples of derivative instruments include options contracts, futures contracts, options on futures contracts and swap agreements (including, but not limited to, credit default swaps and swaps on exchange-traded funds). The Fund may invest a portion of its assets in derivative instruments. The portfolio manager may decide not to employ any of these strategies and there is no assurance that any derivatives strategy used by the Fund will succeed. A description of these and other derivative instruments that the Fund may use are described under "Investment Objectives and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information.

The Fund's use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other more traditional investments. Certain derivative transactions may have a leveraging effect on the Fund. For example, a small investment in a derivative instrument may have a significant impact on the Fund's exposure to interest rates, currency exchange rates or other investments. As a result, a relatively small price movement in a derivative instrument may cause an immediate and substantial loss or gain. The Fund may engage in such transactions regardless of whether the Fund owns the asset, instrument or components of the index underlying the derivative instrument. The Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in these types of instruments. If it does, the Fund's investment exposure could far exceed the value of its portfolio securities and its investment performance could be primarily dependent upon securities it does not own. A description of various risks associated with particular derivative instruments is included in "Investment Objective and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information. The following provides a more general discussion of important risk factors relating to all derivative instruments that may be used by the Fund.

Management Risk. Derivative products are highly specialized instruments that require investment techniques and risk analyses different from those associated with stocks and bonds. The use of a derivative requires an understanding not only of the underlying instrument but also of the derivative itself, without the benefit of observing the performance of the derivative under all possible market conditions.

Credit Risk. The use of a derivative instrument involves the risk that a loss may be sustained as a result of the failure of another party to the contract (usually referred to as a "counterparty") to make required payments or otherwise comply with the contract's terms. Additionally, a short position in a credit default swap could result in losses if the Fund does not correctly evaluate the creditworthiness of the company on which the credit default swap is based.

Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk exists when a particular derivative instrument is difficult to purchase or sell. If a derivative transaction is particularly large or if the relevant market is illiquid (as is the case with many privately negotiated derivatives), it may not be possible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position at an advantageous time or price.

Leverage Risk. Because many derivatives have a leverage component, adverse changes in the value or level of the underlying asset, reference rate or index can result in a loss substantially greater than the amount invested in the derivative itself. Certain derivatives have the potential for unlimited loss, regardless of the size of the initial investment. When the Fund uses derivatives for leverage, investments in the Fund will tend to be more volatile, resulting in larger gains or losses in response to market changes. To limit leverage risk, the Fund will segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO in accordance with procedures established by the Board of Trustees (or, as permitted by applicable regulation, enter into certain offsetting positions) to cover its obligations under derivative instruments.

Lack of Availability. Because the markets for certain derivative instruments (including markets located in foreign countries) are relatively new and still developing, suitable derivatives transactions may not be available in all circumstances for risk management or other purposes. Upon the expiration of a particular contract, the portfolio manager may wish to retain the Fund's position in the derivative instrument by entering into a similar contract, but may be unable to do so if the counterparty to the original contract is unwilling to enter into the new contract and no other suitable counterparty can be found. There is no assurance that the Fund will engage in derivatives transactions at any time or from time to time. The Fund's ability to use derivatives may also be limited by certain regulatory and tax considerations.

Market and Other Risks. Like most other investments, derivative instruments are subject to the risk that the market value of the instrument will change in a way detrimental to the Fund's interest. If the portfolio manager incorrectly forecasts the values of securities or interest rates or other economic factors in using derivatives for the Fund, the Fund might have been in a better position if it had not entered into the transaction at all. While some strategies involving derivative instruments can reduce the risk of loss, they can also reduce the opportunity for gain or even result in losses by offsetting favorable price movements in other Fund investments. The Fund may also have to buy or sell a security at a disadvantageous time or price because the Fund is legally required to maintain offsetting positions or asset coverage in connection with certain derivatives transactions.

Other risks in using derivatives include the risk of mispricing or improper valuation of derivatives and the inability of derivatives to correlate perfectly with underlying assets, rates and indexes. Many derivatives, in particular privately negotiated derivatives, are complex and often valued subjectively. Improper valuations can result in increased cash payment requirements to counterparties or a loss of value to the Fund. Also, the value of derivatives may not correlate perfectly, or at all, with the value of the assets, reference rates or indexes they are designed to closely track. For example, a swap agreement on an exchange-traded fund would not correlate perfectly with the index upon which the exchange-traded fund is based because the fund's return is net of fees and expenses. In addition, the Fund's use of derivatives may cause the Fund to realize higher amounts of short-term capital gains (generally taxed at ordinary income tax rates) than if the Fund had not used such instruments.

Delayed Funding Loans and Revolving Credit Facilities

The Fund may also enter into, or acquire participations in, delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities, in which a lender agrees to make loans up to a maximum amount upon demand by the borrower during a specified term. These commitments may have the effect of requiring the Fund to increase its investments in a company at a time when it might not otherwise decide to do so (including at a time when the company's financial condition makes it unlikely that such amounts will be repaid). To the extent that the Fund is committed to advance additional funds, it will segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO in accordance with procedures established by the Board of Trustees in an amount sufficient to meet such commitments. Delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities are subject to credit, interest rate and liquidity risk and the risks of being a lender.

When-Issued, Delayed Delivery and Forward Commitment Transactions

The Fund may purchase or sell securities which it is eligible to purchase or sell on a when-issued basis, may purchase and sell such securities for delayed delivery and may make contracts to purchase or sell such securities for a fixed price at a future date beyond normal settlement time (forward commitments). When-issued transactions, delayed delivery purchases and forward commitments involve a risk of loss if the value of the securities declines prior to the settlement date. This risk is in addition to the risk that the Fund's other assets will decline in value. Therefore, these transactions may result in a form of leverage and increase the Fund's overall investment exposure. Typically, no income accrues on securities the Fund has committed to purchase prior to the time delivery of the securities is made, although the Fund may earn income on securities it has segregated or "earmarked" to cover these positions. When the Fund has sold a security on a when-issued, delayed delivery, or forward commitment basis, the Fund does not participate in future gains or losses with respect to the security. If the other party to a transaction fails to pay for the securities, the Fund could realize a loss. Additionally, when selling a security on a when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment basis without owning a security, the Fund will incur a loss if the security's price appreciates in value such that the security's price is above the agreed-upon price on the settlement date.

Investment in Other Funds

Section 12(d)(1) of the 1940 Act restricts investments by registered investment companies and companies relying on Sections 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of the 1940 Act in the securities of other investment companies. Registered investment companies are permitted to invest in the Fund beyond the limits set forth in Section 12(d)(1), subject to certain terms and conditions set forth in an SEC exemptive order issued to PIMCO and the Trust, including that such investment companies enter into an agreement with the Trust.

The Fund may invest in, to the extent permitted by Section 12(d)(1)(A) of the 1940 Act, other affiliated and unaffiliated funds, such as open-end or closed-end management investment companies, including other exchange traded funds, provided that the Fund's investment in units or shares of investment companies and other open-end collective investment vehicles will not exceed 10% of the Fund's total assets. The Fund may invest securities lending collateral in one or more money market funds to the extent permitted by Rule 12d1-1 under the 1940 Act, including series of PIMCO Funds, an affiliated open-end management investment company managed by PIMCO. As a shareholder of a fund, the Fund may indirectly bear investment advisory fees, supervisory and administrative fees, service fees and other fees which are in addition to the fees the Fund pays its service providers.

Subject to the restrictions and limitations of the 1940 Act, the Fund may, in the future, elect to pursue its investment objective by investing in one or more underlying investment vehicles or companies that have substantially similar investment objectives and policies as the Fund.

Small-Cap and Mid-Cap Companies

The Fund may invest in securities of small-capitalization and mid-capitalization companies. The Fund considers a small-cap company to be a company with a market capitalization of up to $1.5 billion and a mid-cap company to be a company with a market capitalization of between $1.5 billion and $10 billion. Investments in small-cap and mid-cap companies involve greater risk than investments in large-capitalization companies. Small and mid-cap companies may not have an established financial history, which can present valuation challenges. The securities of small- and mid-cap companies may be subject to increased market fluctuations, due to less liquid markets and more limited managerial and financial resources. The Fund's investments in small- and mid-cap companies may increase the volatility of the Fund's portfolio.

Short Sales

The Fund may make short sales as part of its overall portfolio management strategies or to offset a potential decline in value of a security. A short sale involves the sale of a security that is borrowed from a broker or other institution to complete the sale. Short sales expose the Fund to the risk that it will be required to acquire, convert or exchange securities to replace the borrowed securities (also known as "covering" the short position) at a time when the securities sold short have appreciated in value, thus resulting in a loss to the Fund. When making a short sale (other than a "short sale against the box"), the Fund must segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO in accordance with procedures established by the Board of Trustees or otherwise cover its position in a permissible manner. The Fund may engage in short selling to the extent permitted by the 1940 Act and rules and interpretations thereunder and other federal securities laws. To the extent the Fund engages in short selling in foreign (non-U.S.) jurisdictions, the Fund will do so to the extent permitted by the laws and regulations of such jurisdictions.

Illiquid Securities

The Fund may invest up to 15% of its net assets (taken at the time of investment) in illiquid securities. Certain illiquid securities may require pricing at fair value as determined in good faith under the supervision of the Board of Trustees. The portfolio manager may be subject to significant delays in disposing of illiquid securities, and transactions in illiquid securities may entail registration expenses and other transaction costs that are higher than those for transactions in liquid securities. The term "illiquid securities" for this purpose means securities that cannot be disposed of within seven days in the ordinary course of business at approximately the amount at which the Fund has valued the securities. Restricted securities, i.e., securities subject to legal or contractual restrictions on resale, may be illiquid. However, some restricted securities (such as securities issued pursuant to Rule 144A under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and certain commercial paper) may be treated as liquid, although they may be less liquid than registered securities traded on established secondary markets.

Loans of Portfolio Securities

For the purpose of achieving income, the Fund may lend its portfolio securities to brokers, dealers, and other financial institutions provided a number of conditions are satisfied, including that the loan is fully collateralized. Please see "Investment Objectives and Policies" in the Statement of Additional Information for details. When the Fund lends portfolio securities, its investment performance will continue to reflect changes in the value of the securities loaned, and the Fund will also receive a fee or interest on the collateral. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in the collateral or delay in recovery of the collateral if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. The Fund may pay lending fees to a party arranging the loan. Cash collateral received by the Fund in securities lending transactions may be invested in short-term liquid Fixed Income Instruments or in money market or short-term mutual funds, or similar investment vehicles, including affiliated money market or short-term mutual funds. The Fund bears the risk of such investments.

Portfolio Turnover

The length of time the Fund has held a particular security is not generally a consideration in investment decisions. A change in the securities held by the Fund is known as "portfolio turnover." When the portfolio manager deems it appropriate and particularly during periods of volatile market movements, the Fund may engage in frequent and active trading of portfolio securities to achieve its investment objective. To the extent that Creation Unit purchases from and redemptions by the Fund are effected in cash, frequent purchases and redemptions may increase the rate of portfolio turnover. Higher portfolio turnover (e.g., an annual rate greater than 100% of the average value of the Fund's portfolio) involves correspondingly greater expenses to the Fund, including brokerage commissions or dealer mark-ups and other transaction costs on the sale of securities and reinvestments in other securities. Such sales may also result in realization of taxable capital gains, including short-term capital gains (which are generally taxed at ordinary income tax rates). The trading costs and tax effects associated with portfolio turnover may adversely affect the Fund's performance. In addition, large movements of cash into or out of the Fund may negatively impact the Fund's ability to achieve its investment objective or maintain a consistent level of operating expenses.

Temporary Defensive Positions

For temporary or defensive purposes, the Fund may invest without limit in U.S. debt securities, including taxable securities and short-term money market securities, when PIMCO deems it appropriate to do so. When the Fund engages in such strategies, it may not achieve its investment objective.

Changes in Investment Objectives and Policies

The investment objective of the Fund is non-fundamental and may be changed by the Board of Trustees without shareholder approval. Unless otherwise stated, all investment policies of the Fund may be changed by the Board of Trustees without shareholder approval. In addition, the Trust may determine to cease operating the Fund as an "exchange-traded" fund and cause the Fund's shares to stop trading on a securities exchange.

Percentage Investment Limitations

Unless otherwise stated, all percentage limitations on Fund investments listed in this prospectus will apply at the time of investment. The Fund would not violate these limitations unless an excess or deficiency occurs or exists immediately after and as a result of an investment. The Fund has adopted a non-fundamental investment policy to invest at least 80% of its assets in investments suggested by its name. For purposes of this policy, the term "assets" means net assets plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes.

Credit Ratings and Unrated Securities

Rating agencies are private services that provide ratings of the credit quality of fixed income securities, including convertible securities. Appendix A to this prospectus describes the various ratings assigned to fixed income securities, including convertible securities by Moody's, S&P and Fitch. Ratings assigned by a rating agency are not absolute standards of credit quality and do not evaluate market risks. Rating agencies may fail to make timely changes in credit ratings and an issuer's current financial condition may be better or worse than a rating indicates. The Fund will not necessarily sell a security when its rating is reduced below its rating at the time of purchase. PIMCO does not rely solely on credit ratings, and develops its own analysis of issuer credit quality.

The Fund may purchase unrated securities (which are not rated by a rating agency) if its portfolio manager determines that the security is of comparable quality to a rated security that the Fund may purchase. Unrated securities may be less liquid than comparable rated securities and involve the risk that the portfolio manager may not accurately evaluate the security's comparative credit rating. Analysis of the creditworthiness of issuers of high yield securities may be more complex than for issuers of higher-quality fixed income securities. To the extent that certain Funds invest in high yield and/or unrated securities, the Fund's success in achieving its investment objective may depend more heavily on the portfolio manager's creditworthiness analysis than if the Fund invested exclusively in higher quality and rated securities.

Other Investments and Techniques

The Fund may invest in other types of securities and use a variety of investment techniques and strategies which are not described in this prospectus. These securities and techniques may subject the Fund to additional risks. Please see the Statement of Additional Information for additional information about the securities and investment techniques described in this prospectus and about additional securities and techniques that may be used by the Fund.

Financial Highlights

Because the Fund has not operated for a full fiscal period as of the date of this prospectus, audited financial highlights are not available.

Appendix A
Description of Securities Ratings

Each Fund's investments may range in quality from securities rated in the lowest category in which the Fund is permitted to invest to securities rated in the highest category (as rated by Moody's, S&P or Fitch, or, if unrated, determined by PIMCO to be of comparable quality). The percentage of a Fund's assets invested in securities in a particular rating category will vary. The following terms are generally used to describe the credit quality of fixed income securities:

High Quality Debt Securities are those rated in one of the two highest rating categories (the highest category for commercial paper) or, if unrated, deemed comparable by PIMCO.

Investment Grade Debt Securities are those rated in one of the four highest rating categories, or if unrated deemed comparable by PIMCO.

Below Investment Grade High Yield Securities ("Junk Bonds") are those rated lower than Baa by Moody's, BBB by S&P or Fitch and comparable securities. They are deemed predominantly speculative with respect to the issuer's ability to repay principal and interest.

The following is a description of Moody's, S&P's and Fitch's rating categories applicable to fixed income securities.

Moody's Investors Service, Inc.

Long-Term Corporate Obligation Ratings
Moody's long-term obligation ratings are opinions of the relative credit risk of fixed-income obligations with an original maturity of one year or more. They address the possibility that a financial obligation will not be honored as promised. Such ratings use Moody's global scale and reflect both the likelihood of default and any financial loss suffered in the event of default.

Aaa: Obligations rated Aaa are judged to be of the highest quality, with minimal credit risk.

Aa: Obligations rated Aa are judged to be of high quality and are subject to very low credit risk.

A: Obligations rated A are considered upper-medium grade and are subject to low credit risk.

Baa: Obligations rated Baa are subject to moderate credit risk. They are considered medium-grade and as such may possess certain speculative characteristics.

Ba: Obligations rated Ba are judged to have speculative elements and are subject to substantial credit risk.

B: Obligations rated B are considered speculative and are subject to high credit risk.

Caa: Obligations rated Caa are judged to be of poor standing and are subject to very high credit risk.

Ca: Obligations rated Ca are highly speculative and are likely in, or very near, default, with some prospect of recovery of principal and interest.

C: Obligations rated C are the lowest rated class of bonds and are typically in default, with little prospect for recovery of principal or interest.

Moody's appends numerical modifiers 1, 2, and 3 to each generic rating classification from Aa through Caa. The modifier 1 indicates that the obligation ranks in the higher end of its generic rating category; the modifier 2 indicates a mid-range ranking; and the modifier 3 indicates a ranking in the lower end of that generic rating category.

Medium-Term Note Ratings
Moody's assigns long-term ratings to individual debt securities issued from medium-term note (MTN) programs, in addition to indicating ratings to MTN programs themselves. These long-term ratings are expressed on Moody's general long-term scale. Notes issued under MTN programs with such indicated ratings are rated at issuance at the rating applicable to all pari passu notes issued under the same program, at the program's relevant indicated rating, provided such notes do not exhibit any of the characteristics listed below:

Notes containing features that link interest or principal to the credit performance of any third party or parties (i.e., credit-linked notes);

Notes allowing for negative coupons, or negative principal;

Notes containing any provision that could obligate the investor to make any additional payments;

Notes containing provisions that subordinate the claim.

For notes with any of these characteristics, the rating of the individual note may differ from the indicated rating of the program.

For credit-linked securities, Moody's policy is to "look through" to the credit risk of the underlying obligor. Moody's policy with respect to non-credit linked obligations is to rate the issuer's ability to meet the contract as stated, regardless of potential losses to investors as a result of non-credit developments. In other words, as long as the obligation has debt standing in the event of bankruptcy, we will assign the appropriate debt class level rating to the instrument.

Market participants must determine whether any particular note is rated, and if so, at what rating level. Moody's encourages market participants to contact Moody's Ratings Desks or visit www.moodys.com directly if they have questions regarding ratings for specific notes issued under a medium-term note program. Unrated notes issued under an MTN program may be assigned an NR (not rated) symbol.

Short-Term Ratings
Moody's short-term ratings are opinions of the ability of issuers to honor short-term financial obligations. Ratings may be assigned to issuers, short-term programs or to individual short-term debt instruments. Such obligations generally have an original maturity not exceeding thirteen months, unless explicitly noted.

Moody's employs the following designations to indicate the relative repayment ability of rated issuers:

P-1: Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Prime-1 have a superior ability to repay short-term debt obligations.

P-2: Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Prime-2 have a strong ability to repay short-term debt obligations.

P-3: Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Prime-3 have an acceptable ability to repay short-term obligations.

NP: Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Not Prime do not fall within any of the Prime rating categories.

Canadian issuers rated P-1 or P-2 have their short-term ratings enhanced by the senior-most long-term rating of the issuer, its guarantor or support-provider.

US Municipal Ratings
Moody's US Municipal ratings are opinions of the investment quality of issuers and issues in the US municipal market. As such, these ratings incorporate Moody's assessment of the default probability and loss severity of these issuers and issues. The default and loss content for Moody's municipal long-term rating scale differs from Moody's general long-term rating scale. Historical default and loss rates for obligations rated on the US Municipal Scale are significantly lower than for similarly rated corporate obligations. It is important that users of Moody's ratings understand these differences when making rating comparisons between the Municipal and Global Scales.

US Municipal Long-Term Debt Ratings

Municipal Ratings are based upon the analysis of five primary factors related to municipal finance: market position, financial position, debt levels, governance, and covenants. Each of the factors is evaluated individually and for its effect on the other factors in the context of the municipality's ability to repay its debt.

Aaa: Issuers or issues rated Aaa demonstrate the strongest creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

Aa: Issuers or issues rated Aa demonstrate very strong creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

A: Issuers or issues rated A present above-average creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

Baa: Issuers or issues rated Baa represent average creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax- exempt issuers or issues.

Ba: Issuers or issues rated Ba demonstrate below-average creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

B: Issuers or issues rated B demonstrate weak creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax- exempt issuers or issues.

Caa: Issuers or issues rated Caa demonstrate very weak creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

Ca: Issuers or issues rated Ca demonstrate extremely weak creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

C: Issuers or issues rated C demonstrate the weakest creditworthiness relative to other US municipal or tax-exempt issuers or issues.

US Municipal Short-Term Debt and Demand Obligation Ratings

Short-Term Obligation Ratings
There are three rating categories for short-term municipal obligations that are considered investment grade. These ratings are designated as Municipal Investment Grade (MIG) and are divided into three levels—MIG 1 through MIG 3. In addition, those short-term obligations that are of speculative quality are designated SG, or speculative grade. MIG ratings expire at the maturity of the obligation.

MIG 1: This designation denotes superior credit quality. Excellent protection is afforded by established cash flows, highly reliable liquidity support, or demonstrated broad-based access to the market for refinancing.

MIG 2: This designation denotes strong credit quality. Margins of protection are ample, although not as large as in the preceding group.

MIG 3: This designation denotes acceptable credit quality. Liquidity and cash-flow protection may be narrow, and mar-
ket access for refinancing is likely to be less well-established.

SG: This designation denotes speculative-grade credit quality. Debt instruments in this category may lack sufficient margins of protection.

Demand Obligation Ratings
In the case of variable rate demand obligations (VRDOs), a two-component rating is assigned; a long- or short-term debt rating and a demand obligation rating. The first element represents Moody's evaluation of the degree of risk associated with scheduled principal and interest payments. The second element represents Moody's evaluation of the degree of risk associated with the ability to receive purchase price upon demand ("demand feature"), using a variation of the MIG rating scale, the Variable Municipal Investment Grade or VMIG rating. When either the long- or short-term aspect of a VRDO is not rated, that piece is designated NR, e.g., Aaa/NR or NR/VMIG 1. VMIG rating expirations are a function of each issue's specific structural or credit features.

VMIG 1: This designation denotes superior credit quality. Excellent protection is afforded by the superior short-term credit strength of the liquidity provider and structural and legal protections that ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

VMIG 2: This designation denotes strong credit quality. Good protection is afforded by the strong short-term credit strength of the liquidity provider and structural and legal protections that ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

VMIG 3: This designation denotes acceptable credit quality. Adequate protection is afforded by the satisfactory short-term credit strength of the liquidity provider and structural and legal protections that ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

SG: This designation denotes speculative-grade credit quality. Demand features rated in this category may be supported by a liquidity provider that does not have an investment grade short-term rating or may lack the structural and/or legal protections necessary to ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

Standard & Poor's Ratings Services

Long-Term Issue Credit Ratings
Issue credit ratings are based, in varying degrees, on Standard & Poor's analysis of the following considerations:

Likelihood of payment—capacity and willingness of the obligor to meet its financial commitment on an obligation in accordance with the terms of the obligation;

Nature of and provisions of the obligation;

Protection afforded by, and relative position of, the obligation in the event of bankruptcy, reorganization, or other arrangement under the laws of bankruptcy and other laws affecting creditors' rights.

Issue ratings are an assessment of default risk, but may incorporate an assessment of relative seniority or ultimate recovery in the event of default. Junior obligations are typically rated lower than senior obligations, to reflect the lower priority in bankruptcy, as noted above (Such differentiation may apply when an entity has both senior and subordinated obligations, secured and unsecured obligations, or operating company and holding company obligations.).

Investment Grade
AAA: An obligation rated 'AAA' has the highest rating assigned by Standard & Poor's. The obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is extremely strong.

AA: An obligation rated 'AA' differs from the highest-rated obligations only to a small degree. The obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is very strong.

A: An obligation rated 'A' is somewhat more susceptible to the adverse effects of changes in circumstances and economic conditions than obligations in higher-rated categories. However, the obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is still strong.

BBB: An obligation rated 'BBB' exhibits adequate protection parameters. However, adverse economic conditions or changing circumstances are more likely to lead to a weakened capacity of the obligor to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

Speculative Grade
Obligations rated 'BB', 'B', 'CCC', 'CC', and 'C' are regarded as having significant speculative characteristics. 'BB' indicates the least degree of speculation and 'C' the highest. While such obligations will likely have some quality and protective characteristics, these may be outweighed by large uncertainties or major exposures to adverse conditions.

BB: An obligation rated 'BB' is less vulnerable to nonpayment than other speculative issues. However, it faces major ongoing uncertainties or exposure to adverse business, financial, or economic conditions which could lead to the obligor's inadequate capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

B: An obligation rated 'B' is more vulnerable to nonpayment than obligations rated 'BB', but the obligor currently has the capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation. Adverse business, financial, or economic conditions will likely impair the obligor's capacity or willingness to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

CCC: An obligation rated 'CCC' is currently vulnerable to nonpayment, and is dependent upon favorable business, financial, and economic conditions for the obligor to meet its financial commitment on the obligation. In the event of adverse business, financial, or economic conditions, the obligor is not likely to have the capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

CC: An obligation rated 'CC' is currently highly vulnerable to nonpayment.

C: A 'C' rating is assigned to obligations that are currently highly vulnerable to nonpayment, obligations that have payment arrearages allowed by the terms of the documents, or obligations of an issuer that is the subject of a bankruptcy petition or similar action which have not experienced a payment default. Among others, the 'C' rating may be assigned to subordinated debt, preferred stock or other obligations on which cash payments have been suspended in accordance with the instrument's terms or when preferred stock is the subject of a distressed exchange offer, whereby some or all of the issue is either repurchased for an amount of cash or replaced by other instruments having a total value that is less than par.

D: An obligation rated 'D' is in payment default. The 'D' rating category is used when payments on an obligation are not made on the date due unless Standard & Poor's believes that such payments will be made within five business days, irrespective of any grace period. The 'D' rating also will be used upon the filing of a bankruptcy petition or the taking of a similar action if payments on an obligation are jeopardized.  An obligation's rating is lowered to 'D' upon completion of a distressed exchange offer, whereby some or all of the issue is either repurchased for an amount of cash or replaced by other instruments having a total value that is less than par.

Plus (+) or minus (-): The ratings from 'AA' to 'CCC' may be modified by the addition of a plus (+) or minus (-) sign to show relative standing within the major rating categories.

NR: This indicates that no rating has been requested, that there is insufficient information on which to base a rating, or that Standard & Poor's does not rate a particular obligation as a matter of policy.

Short-Term Issue Credit Ratings
A-1: A short-term obligation rated 'A-1' is rated in the highest category by Standard & Poor's. The obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is strong. Within this category, certain obligations are designated with a plus sign (+). This indicates that the obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on these obligations is extremely strong.

A-2: A short-term obligation rated 'A-2' is somewhat more susceptible to the adverse effects of changes in circumstances and economic conditions than obligations in higher rating categories. However, the obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is satisfactory.

A-3: A short-term obligation rated 'A-3' exhibits adequate protection parameters. However, adverse economic conditions or changing circumstances are more likely to lead to a weakened capacity of the obligor to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

B: A short-term obligation rated 'B' is regarded as vulnerable and has significant speculative characteristics. The obligor currently has the capacity to meet its financial commitments; however, it faces major ongoing uncertainties which could lead to the obligor's inadequate capacity to meet its financial commitments.

C: A short-term obligation rated 'C' is currently vulnerable to nonpayment and is dependent upon favorable business, financial, and economic conditions for the obligor to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.

D: A short-term obligation rated 'D' is in payment default. The 'D' rating category is used when payments on an obligation, including a regulatory capital instrument, are not made on the date due even if the applicable grace period has not expired, unless Standard & Poor's believes that such payments will be made within any stated grace period. However, any stated grace period longer than five business days will be treated as five business days. The 'D' rating also will be used upon the filing of a bankruptcy petition or the taking of a similar action if payments on an obligation are jeopardized.

Dual Ratings: Standard & Poor's assigns "dual" ratings to all debt issues that have a put option or demand feature as part of their structure. The first rating addresses the likelihood of repayment of principal and interest as due, and the second rating addresses only the demand feature. The long-term rating symbols are used for bonds to denote the long-term maturity and the short-term rating symbols for the put option (for example, 'AAA/A-1+'). With U.S. municipal short-term demand debt, note rating symbols are used with the short-term issue credit rating symbols (for example, 'SP-1+/A-1+').

Active Qualifiers
Standard & Poor's uses six qualifiers that limit the scope of a rating. The structure of the transaction can require the use of a qualifier such as a 'p' qualifier, which indicates the rating addressed the principal portion of the obligation only. Likewise, the qualifier can indicate a limitation on the type of information used, such as "pi" for public information. A qualifier appears as a suffix and is part of the rating.

L: Ratings qualified with 'L' apply only to amounts invested up to federal deposit insurance limits.

p: This suffix is used for issues in which the credit factors, the terms, or both, that determine the likelihood of receipt of payment of principal are different from the credit factors, terms or both that determine the likelihood of receipt of interest on the obligation. The 'p' suffix indicates that the rating addresses the principal portion of the obligation only. The 'p' suffix will always be used in conjunction with the 'i' suffix, which addresses likelihood of receipt of interest. For example, a rated obligation could be assigned ratings of "AAAp NRi" indicating that the principal portion is rated "AAA" and the interest portion of the obligation is not rated.

i: This subscript is used for issues in which the credit factors, the terms, or both, that determine the likelihood of receipt of payment of interest are different from the credit factors, terms or both that determine the likelihood of receipt of principal on the obligation. The 'i' suffix indicates that the rating addresses the interest portion of the obligation only. The 'i' suffix will always be used in conjunction with the 'p' suffix, which addresses likelihood of receipt of principal. For example, a rated obligation could be assigned ratings of "AAAp NRi" indicating that the principal portion is rated "AAA" and the interest portion of the obligation is not rated.

pi: Ratings with a 'pi' suffix are based on an analysis of an issuer's published financial information, as well as additional information in the public domain. They do not, however, reflect in-depth meetings with an issuer's management and therefore may be based on less comprehensive information than ratings without a 'pi' suffix. Ratings with a 'pi' suffix are reviewed annually based on a new year's financial statements, but may be reviewed on an interim basis if a major event occurs that may affect the issuer's credit quality.

preliminary: Preliminary ratings, with the 'prelim' suffix, may be assigned to obligors or obligations, including financial programs, in the circumstances described below. Assignment of a final rating is conditional on the receipt by Standard & Poor's of appropriate documentation. Standard & Poor's reserves the right not to issue a final rating. Moreover, if a final rating is issued, it may differ from the preliminary rating.

Preliminary ratings may be assigned to obligations, most commonly structured and project finance issues, pending receipt of final documentation and legal opinions.

Preliminary ratings are assigned to Rule 415 Shelf Registrations. As specific issues, with defined terms, are offered from the master registration, a final rating may be assigned to them in accordance with Standard & Poor's policies.

Preliminary ratings may be assigned to obligations that will likely be issued upon the obligor's emergence from bankruptcy or similar reorganization, based on late-stage reorganization plans, documentation and discussions with the obligor. Preliminary ratings may also be assigned to the obligors. These ratings consider the anticipated general credit quality of the reorganized or postbankruptcy issuer as well as attributes of the anticipated obligation(s).

Preliminary ratings may be assigned to entities that are being formed or that are in the process of being independently established when, in Standard & Poor's opinion, documentation is close to final. Preliminary ratings may also be assigned to these entities' obligations.

Preliminary ratings may be assigned when a previously unrated entity is undergoing a well-formulated restruc-
turing, recapitalization, significant financing or other transformative event, generally at the point that investor or lender commitments are invited. The preliminary rating may be assigned to the entity and to its proposed obligation(s). These preliminary ratings consider the anticipated general credit quality of the obligor, as well as attributes of the anticipated obligation(s), assuming successful completion of the transformative event. Should the transformative event not occur, Standard & Poor's would likely withdraw these preliminary ratings.

A preliminary recovery rating may be assigned to an obligation that has a preliminary issue credit rating.

t: This symbol indicates termination structures that are designed to honor their contracts to full maturity or, should certain events occur, to terminate and cash settle all their contracts before their final maturity date.

Inactive Qualifiers (no longer applied or outstanding)
*: This symbol indicated continuance of the ratings is contingent upon Standard & Poor's receipt of an executed copy of the escrow agreement or closing documentation confirming investments and cash flows. Discontinued use in August 1998.

c: This qualifier was used to provide additional information to investors that the bank may terminate its obligation to purchase tendered bonds if the long-term credit rating of the issuer is below an investment-grade level and/or the issuer's bonds are deemed taxable. Discontinued use in January 2001.

G: The letter 'G' followed the rating symbol when a fund's portfolio consisted primarily of direct U.S. government securities.

pr: The letters 'pr' indicate that the rating is provisional. A provisional rating assumes the successful completion of the project financed by the debt being rated and indicates that payment of debt service requirements is largely or entirely dependent upon the successful, timely completion of the project. This rating, however, while addressing credit quality subsequent to completion of the project, makes no comment on the likelihood of or the risk of default upon failure of such completion. The investor should exercise his own judgment with respect to such likelihood and risk.

q: A 'q' subscript indicates that the rating is based solely on quantitative analysis of publicly available information. Discontinued use in April 2001.

r: The 'r' modifier was assigned to securities containing extraordinary risks, particularly market risks, which are not covered in the credit rating. The absence of an 'r' modifier should not be taken as an indication that an obligation will not exhibit extraordinary non-credit related risks. Standard & Poor's discontinued the use of the 'r' modifier for most obligations in June 2000 and for the balance of obligations (mainly structured finance transactions) in November 2002.

Fitch, Inc.

Long-Term Credit Ratings

Investment Grade
AAA: Highest credit quality. 'AAA' ratings denote the lowest expectation of credit risk. They are assigned only in cases of exceptionally strong capacity for payment of financial commitments. This capacity is highly unlikely to be adversely affected by foreseeable events.

AA: Very high credit quality. "AA" ratings denote expectations of very low credit risk. They indicate very strong capacity for payment of financial commitments. This capacity is not significantly vulnerable to foreseeable events.

A: High credit quality. "A" ratings denote expectations of low credit risk. The capacity for payment of financial commitments is considered strong. This capacity may, nevertheless, be more vulnerable to adverse business or economic conditions than is the case for higher ratings.

BBB: Good credit quality. "BBB" ratings indicate that expectations of credit risk are currently low. The capacity for payment of financial commitments is considered adequate, but adverse business or economic conditions are more likely to impair this capacity.

Speculative Grade
BB: Speculative. 'BB' ratings indicate an elevated vulnerability to credit risk, particularly in the event of adverse changes in business or economic conditions over time; however, business or financial alternatives may be available to allow financial commitments to be met.

B: Highly speculative. 'B' ratings indicate that material credit risk is present.

CCC: Substantial credit risk. 'CCC' ratings indicate that substantial credit risk is present.

CC: Very high levels of credit risk. 'CC' ratings indicate very high levels of credit risk.

C: Exceptionally high levels of credit risk. 'C' indicates exceptionally high levels of credit risk.

Defaulted obligations typically are not assigned 'D' ratings, but are instead rated in the 'B' to 'C' rating categories, depending upon their recovery prospects and other relevant characteristics. This approach better aligns obligations that have comparable overall expected loss but varying vulnerability to default and loss.

The modifiers "+" or "-" may be appended to a rating to denote relative status within major rating categories. Such suffixes are not added to the 'AAA' obligation rating category, or to corporate finance obligation ratings in the categories below 'CCC.'

The subscript 'emr' is appended to a rating to denote embedded market risk which is beyond the scope of the rating. The designation is intended to make clear that the rating solely addresses the counterparty risk of the issuing bank. It is not meant to indicate any limitation in the analysis of the counterparty risk, which in all other respects follows published Fitch criteria for analyzing the issuing financial institution. Fitch does not rate these instruments where the principal is to any degree subject to market risk.

Recovery Ratings
Recovery Ratings are assigned to selected individual securities and obligations. These currently are published for most individual obligations of corporate issuers with IDRs in the 'B' rating category and below.

Among the factors that affect recovery rates for securities are the collateral, the seniority relative to other obligations in the capital structure (where appropriate), and the expected value of the company or underlying collateral in distress.

The Recovery Rating scale is based upon the expected relative recovery characteristics of an obligation upon the curing of a default, emergence from insolvency or following the liquidation or termination of the obligor or its associated collateral.

Recovery Ratings are an ordinal scale and do not attempt to precisely predict a given level of recovery. As a guideline in developing the rating assessments, the agency employs broad theoretical recovery bands in its ratings approach based on historical averages, but actual recoveries for a given security may deviate materially from historical averages.

RR1: Outstanding recovery prospects given default. 'RR1' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 91%-100% of current principal and related interest.

RR2: Superior recovery prospects given default. 'RR2' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 71%-90% of current principal and related interest.

RR3: Good recovery prospects given default. 'RR3' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 51%-70% of current principal and related interest.

RR4: Average recovery prospects given default. 'RR4' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 31%-50% of current principal and related interest.

RR5: Below average recovery prospects given default. 'RR5' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 11%-30% of current principal and related interest.

RR6: Poor recovery prospects given default. 'RR6' rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 0%-10% of current principal and related interest.

Short-Term Credit Ratings
A short-term issuer or obligation rating is based in all cases on the short-term vulnerability to default of the rated entity or security stream and relates to the capacity to meet financial obligations in accordance with the documentation governing the relevant obligation. Short-Term Ratings are assigned to obligations whose initial maturity is viewed as "short term" based on market convention. Typically, this means up to 13 months for corporate, sovereign and structured obligations, and up to 36 months for obligations in US public finance markets.

F1: Highest short-term credit quality. Indicates the strongest intrinsic capacity for timely payment of financial commitments; may have an added "+" to denote any exceptionally strong credit feature.

F2: Good short-term credit quality. Good intrinsic capacity for timely payment of financial commitments.

F3: Fair short-term credit quality. The intrinsic capacity for timely payment of financial commitments is adequate.

B: Speculative short-term credit quality. Minimal capacity for timely payment of financial commitments, plus heightened vulnerability to near term adverse changes in financial and economic conditions.

C: High short-term default risk. Default is a real possibility.

RD: Restricted default. Indicates an entity that has defaulted on one or more of its financial commitments, although it continues to meet other financial obligations. Applicable to entity ratings only.

D: Default. Indicates a broad-based default event for an entity, or the default of a specific short-term obligation.

INVESTMENT MANAGER

PIMCO, 840 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach, CA 92660

DISTRIBUTOR

PIMCO Investments LLC, 1633 Broadway, New York, NY 10019

CUSTODIAN

State Street Bank & Trust Co., State Street Financial Center, One Lincoln Street, Boston, MA 02111

TRANSFER AGENT

State Street Bank & Trust Co., State Street Financial Center, One Lincoln Street, Boston, MA 02111

INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, 1100 Walnut Street, Suite 1300, Kansas City, MO 64106-2197

LEGAL COUNSEL

Dechert LLP, 1900 K Street N.W., Washington, D.C. 20006

PIMCO ETF Trust
840 Newport Center Drive
Newport Beach, CA 92660

The Trust's Statement of Additional Information ("SAI") includes additional information about the Fund. The SAI is incorporated by reference into this Prospectus, which means it is part of this Prospectus for legal purposes. The Fund's annual report, once it is available, will discuss the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected the Fund's performance during its last fiscal year.

You may get free copies of any of these materials, request other information about the Fund, or make shareholder inquiries by calling the Trust at 888.400.4ETF (888.400.4383) by visiting www.pimcoetfs.com or by writing to:

PIMCO ETF Trust
840 Newport Center Drive
Newport Beach, CA 92660

You may review and copy information about the Trust, including its SAI, at the Securities and Exchange Commission's public reference room in Washington, D.C. You may call the Commission at 1-202-551-8090 for information about the operation of the public reference room. You may also access reports and other information about the Trust on the EDGAR Database on the Commission's Web site at www.sec.gov. You may get copies of this information, with payment of a duplication fee, by writing the Public Reference Section of the Commission, Washington, D.C. 20549-1520, or by e-mailing your request to publicinfo@sec.gov.

You can also visit our Web site at www.pimcoetfs.com for additional information about the Fund, including the SAI, which is available for download free of charge.

Reference the Trust's Investment Company Act file number in your correspondence.

 

 

Investment Company Act File Number: 811-22250

xxxxx_[____]


PIMCO ETF Trust

Statement of Additional Information

October 31, 2013 (as supplemented [], 2014)

This Statement of Additional Information is not a prospectus, and should be read in conjunction with the prospectuses of PIMCO ETF Trust (the “Trust”), as described below and as supplemented from time to time. The Trust is an open-end management investment company currently consisting of [] separate portfolios (each such portfolio discussed in this Statement of Additional Information is referred to herein as a “Fund” and collectively as the “Funds”), including:

 

Index Funds and Ticker Symbols         
PIMCO 0-1 Year U.S. Treasury Index Exchange-Traded Fund       PIMCO Australia Bond Index Exchange-Traded Fund    AUD
PIMCO 0-5 Year High Yield Corporate Bond Index Exchange-Traded Fund    HYS    PIMCO Broad U.S. TIPS Index Exchange-Traded Fund    TIPZ
PIMCO 1-3 Year U.S. Treasury Index Exchange-Traded Fund    TUZ    PIMCO Broad U.S. Treasury Index Exchange-Traded Fund    TRSY
PIMCO 1-5 Year U.S. TIPS Index Exchange-Traded Fund    STPZ    PIMCO Canada Bond Index Exchange-Traded Fund    CAD
PIMCO 3-7 Year U.S. Treasury Index Exchange-Traded Fund    FIVZ    PIMCO Germany Bond Index Exchange-Traded Fund    BUND
PIMCO 7-15 Year U.S. Treasury Index Exchange-Traded Fund    TENZ    PIMCO High Yield Corporate Bond Index Exchange-Traded Fund    PHYD

PIMCO 15+ Year U.S. TIPS Index Exchange- Traded

Fund

   LPTZ    PIMCO Investment Grade Corporate Bond Index Exchange-Traded Fund    CORP
PIMCO 25+ Year Zero Coupon U.S. Treasury Index Exchange-Traded Fund    ZROZ      
Actively Managed Funds and Ticker Symbols         
PIMCO Build America Bond Exchange-Traded Fund    BABZ    PIMCO Government Limited Maturity Exchange-Traded Fund    GOVY
PIMCO Diversified Income Exchange-Traded Fund    DI    PIMCO Intermediate Municipal Bond Exchange-Traded Fund    MUNI
PIMCO Enhanced Short Maturity Exchange-Traded Fund    MINT    PIMCO International Advantage Bond Exchange-Traded Fund    []
PIMCO Foreign Bond Exchange-Traded Fund (Unhedged)    []    PIMCO Low Duration Exchange-Traded Fund    LDUR
PIMCO Foreign Bond Exchange-Traded Fund (U.S. Dollar-Hedged)    []    PIMCO Prime Limited Maturity Exchange-Traded Fund    PPRM
PIMCO Foreign Currency Strategy Exchange-Traded Fund    FORX    PIMCO Real Return Exchange-Traded Fund    REAL
PIMCO Global Advantage® Bond Exchange-Traded Fund    []    PIMCO Short Term Municipal Bond Exchange-Traded Fund    SMMU
PIMCO Global Advantage® Inflation-Linked Bond Exchange-Traded Fund   

ILB

   PIMCO Total Return Exchange-Traded Fund    BOND

Shares of the PIMCO 0-1 Year U.S. Treasury Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO 0-5 Year High Yield Corporate Bond Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO 1-3 Year U.S. Treasury Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO 3-7 Year U.S. Treasury Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO 7-15 Year U.S. Treasury Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO 25+ Year Zero Coupon U.S. Treasury Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO 1-5 Year U.S. TIPS Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO 15+ Year U.S. TIPS Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Australia Bond Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Broad U.S. TIPS Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Broad U.S. Treasury Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Canada Bond Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Germany Bond Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO High Yield Corporate Bond Index Exchange-Traded Fund and PIMCO Investment Grade Corporate Bond Index Exchange-Traded Fund are offered through a prospectus dated October 31, 2013, shares of the PIMCO Build America Bond Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Diversified Income Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Enhanced Short Maturity Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Foreign Currency Strategy Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Global Advantage® Inflation-Linked Bond Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Government Limited Maturity Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Intermediate Municipal Bond


Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Low Duration Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Prime Limited Maturity Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Real Return Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Short Term Municipal Bond Exchange-Traded Fund and PIMCO Total Return Exchange-Traded Fund are offered through a prospectus dated October 31, 2013, and shares of the PIMCO Foreign Bond Exchange-Traded Fund (Unhedged), PIMCO Foreign Bond Exchange-Traded Fund (U.S. Dollar-Hedged), PIMCO Global Advantage® Bond Exchange-Traded Fund and PIMCO International Advantage Bond Exchange-Traded Fund are offered through separate prospectuses dated [], each as supplemented from time to time (collectively, the “Prospectuses”). Copies of the Prospectuses may be obtained free of charge at the address and telephone number listed below.

Each Fund operates as an exchange-traded fund (“ETF”). As identified and described in more detail within the Prospectuses and this Statement of Additional Information, certain Funds are ETFs that seek to replicate the performance of a specified index (collectively, the “Index Funds”). Other Funds are actively managed ETFs that do not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index (collectively, the “Active Funds”). Once a Fund commences operations, the shares described in the Prospectuses and in this Statement of Additional Information are listed and trade on NYSE Arca, Inc. (“NYSE Arca”), a national securities exchange (the “Listing Exchange”) and other secondary markets.

Pacific Investment Management Company LLC (“PIMCO” or the “Manager”), 840 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach, California 92660, is the investment manager of the Funds. Copies of the Prospectuses and annual or semi-annual reports, when available, may be obtained free of charge at the following address and telephone number:

PIMCO Investments LLC

1633 Broadway

New York, New York 10019

Telephone: (800) 426-0107

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

     Page  

THE TRUST

     1   

EXCHANGE LISTING AND TRADING

     1   

INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES AND POLICIES

     2   

U.S. Government Securities

     2   

Municipal Bonds

     2   

Mortgage-Related Securities and Asset-Backed Securities

     9   

Real Estate Securities and Related Derivatives

     16   

Bank Obligations

     16   

Indebtedness, Loan Participations and Assignments

     16   

Trade Claims

     18   

Corporate Debt Securities

     18   

High Yield Securities (“Junk Bonds”) and Securities of Distressed Companies

     18   

Creditor Liability and Participation on Creditors Committees

     19   

Variable and Floating Rate Securities

     20   

Inflation-Indexed Bonds

     20   

Event-Linked Exposure

     21   

Convertible Securities

     21   

Equity Securities

     22   

Preferred Stock

     23   

Foreign Securities

     23   

Foreign Currency Transactions

     27   

Foreign Currency Exchange-Related Securities

     29   

Borrowing

     30   

Commodities

     31   

Derivative Instruments

     31   

Structured Products

     40   

Bank Capital Securities

     41   

Trust Preferred Securities

     41   

Exchange-Traded Notes

     41   

Delayed Funding Loans and Revolving Credit Facilities

     42   

When-Issued, Delayed Delivery and Forward Commitment Transactions

     42   

Short Sales

     43   

144A Securities

     43   

Illiquid Securities

     43   

Loans of Portfolio Securities

     44   

Investment Companies

     44   

Government Intervention in Financial Markets

     45   

Temporary Investment

     45   

Increasing Government Debt

     45   

Inflation and Deflation

     46   

INVESTMENT RESTRICTIONS

     46   

Fundamental Investment Restrictions

     46   

Non-Fundamental Investment Restrictions

     47   

UNDERLYING INDEXES FOR INDEX FUNDS

     50   

The BofA Merrill Lynch 0-1 Year US Treasury Index

     50   

The BofA Merrill Lynch 0-5 Year US High Yield Constrained Index

     50   

The BofA Merrill Lynch 1-3 Year US Treasury Index

     51   

The BofA Merrill Lynch 1-5 Year US Inflation-Linked Treasury Index

     51   

The BofA Merrill Lynch 3-7 Year US Treasury Index

     51   

The BofA Merrill Lynch 7-15 Year US Treasury Index

     52   

The BofA Merrill Lynch 15+ Year US Inflation-Linked Treasury Index

     52   


The BofA Merrill Lynch Diversified Australia Bond Index

     52   

The BofA Merrill Lynch Diversified Canada Government Bond Index

     53   

The BofA Merrill Lynch Diversified Germany Bond Index

     53   

The BofA Merrill Lynch Liquid US Treasury Index

     54   

The BofA Merrill Lynch Long US Treasury Principal STRIPS Index

     54   

The BofA Merrill Lynch US Corporate Index

     55   

The BofA Merrill Lynch US High Yield Constrained Index

     55   

The BofA Merrill Lynch US Inflation-Linked Treasury Index

     56   

MANAGEMENT OF THE TRUST

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