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As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on August 1, 2008

Registration No. 333-          



UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

Form S-1
REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933

TREE.COM, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  6163
(Primary Standard Industrial
Classification Code Number)
  26-2414818
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

11115 Rushmore Drive
Charlotte, NC 28277
(704) 541-5351

(Address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of registrant's principal executive offices)

Scott Cammarn
Senior Vice President and General Counsel
Tree.com, Inc.
11115 Rushmore Drive
Charlotte, NC 28277
(704) 541-5351

(Name, address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of agent for service)

With a copy to:

Pamela S. Seymon
Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz
51 West 52nd Street
New York, NY 10019
(212) 403-1000

Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale to the public:
As soon as practicable after this registration statement becomes effective.

          If any of the securities being registered on this Form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933, check the following box. þ

          If this Form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. o

          If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. o

          If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. o

          Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer" and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

Large accelerated filer o   Accelerated filer o   Non-accelerated filer þ
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
  Smaller reporting company o

CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE


Title of Each Class of Securities to be Registered
  Amount to be Registered(1)
  Proposed Maximum Offering Price Per Unit
  Proposed Maximum Aggregate Offering Price(2)(3)
  Amount of Registration Fee(3)

Common stock, par value $0.01 per share   16,654,428 shares   N/A   $244,545   $9.61

(1)
This registration statement relates to shares of common stock, par value $0.01 per share, of Tree.com, Inc. (the "Registrant"), which will be distributed pursuant to a spin-off transaction to the holders of common stock and Class B common stock of IAC/InterActiveCorp ("IAC"). The amount of the Registrant's common stock to be registered represents the sum of (i) 9,302,842 shares of common stock to be distributed to the holders of IAC common stock and IAC Class B common stock upon consummation of the spin-off, (ii) up to 5,051,586 shares of common stock to be issued in respect of certain restricted stock units, or stock options, in each case, previously issued pursuant to IAC's equity incentive plans and that will be converted, in whole or in part, in connection with the spin-off into stock options and restricted stock units to be issued under the Tree.com, Inc. 2008 Stock and Annual Incentive Plan (the "Stock and Annual Incentive Plan"), (iii) up to 2,200,000 shares of common stock issuable in respect of stock options, restricted stock units and other equity-based awards that may be granted from time to time following the spin-off pursuant to the Stock and Annual Incentive Plan and (iv) up to 100,000 shares of common stock issuable pursuant to the Tree.com, Inc. Deferred Compensation Plan for Non-Employee Directors. To the extent additional shares of common stock may be issued or become issuable as a result of a stock split, stock dividend, or other distribution involving the common stock while this registration statement is in effect, this registration statement hereby is deemed to cover all such additional shares of common stock in accordance with Rule 416 under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended. In connection with the spin-off, one thirtieth of one share of the Registrant's common stock will be distributed for each share of IAC common stock or Class B common stock outstanding on the record date for the spin-off and each share of IAC common stock issued in connection with the exercise of IAC stock options and the settlement of IAC restricted stock units between the record date for the spin-off and the date of the spin-off. Because it is not possible to accurately state the number of shares of IAC common stock and Class B common stock that will be outstanding as of the spin-off date, this calculation is based on the number of shares of IAC common stock and IAC Class B common stock outstanding as of April 30, 2008, vested options to purchase shares of IAC common stock and IAC restricted units in respect of shares of IAC common stock as of December 31, 2008 that may settle prior to the date of the spin-off.

(2)
Estimated solely for the purpose of determining the registration fee pursuant to Rule 457(f)(2) and Rule 457(h)(1) under the Securities Act, based on the book value of the common stock as of March 31, 2008, the most recent practicable date.

(3)
Calculated by multiplying 0.00003930 by the proposed maximum aggregate offering price.

          The Registrant hereby amends this Registration Statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the Registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this Registration Statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act of 1933 or until the Registration Statement shall become effective on such date as the Commission, acting pursuant to Section 8(a), may determine.





EXPLANATORY NOTE

        This Registration Statement has been prepared on a prospective basis on the assumption that, among other things, the spin-off of the Registrant from IAC/InterActiveCorp (as described in the Prospectus which is a part of this Registration Statement) and the related transactions contemplated to occur prior to or contemporaneously with the spin-off will be consummated as contemplated by the Prospectus. There can be no assurance, however, that any or all of such transactions will occur or will occur as so contemplated. Any significant modifications to or variations in the transactions contemplated will be reflected in an amendment or supplement to this Registration Statement.


The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not issue these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.

Subject to Completion, dated August 1, 2008

PROSPECTUS


TREE.COM, INC.



16,654,428 Shares of Common Stock, Par Value $0.01 Per Share

        This prospectus is being furnished to you as a stockholder of IAC in connection with the spin-off by IAC/InterActiveCorp to its stockholders of HSN, Inc. ("HSNi"), Interval Leisure Group, Inc. ("ILG), Ticketmaster and Tree.com, Inc. ("Tree.com" or the "Company") (each, a "Spinco" and collectively, the "Spincos"), each a wholly-owned subsidiary of IAC that at the time of its spin-off will hold directly or indirectly the assets and liabilities associated with the following businesses:

    HSNi: HSN TV, HSN.com, and the Cornerstone Brands, Inc. portfolio of catalogs, websites and retail locations;

    ILG: the businesses currently comprising IAC's Interval segment;

    Ticketmaster: Ticketmaster's primary domestic and international operations, as well as certain investments in unconsolidated affiliates; and

    Tree.com: the businesses currently comprising IAC's Lending and Real Estate segments.

        To implement the spin-offs, IAC, the Company and the other Spincos will effect a series of restructuring transactions following which IAC will distribute all of the outstanding shares of common stock of the Spincos on a pro rata basis to the holders of IAC common stock and/or Class B common stock. Each of you, as a holder of IAC common stock and/or Class B common stock, will receive one-fifth of a share of common stock of HSNi, one-fifth of a share of common stock of ILG, one-fifth of a share of common stock of Ticketmaster and one-thirtieth of a share of common stock of Tree.com for every share of IAC common stock and/or Class B common stock that you held at the close of business on [    •    ], 2008, the record date for the spin-offs. The spin-offs will be effective as of [    •    ], 2008, unless otherwise determined by IAC's board of directors.

        Immediately after the spin-off of Tree.com is completed, Tree.com will be a separate public company. All of the outstanding shares of the common stock of Tree.com are currently owned by IAC. Accordingly, there currently is no public trading market for the common stock of Tree.com. Tree.com has been approved to list its common stock under the ticker symbol "TREE" on the NASDAQ Stock Market.

        No vote of IAC stockholders is required in connection with the Tree.com spin-off. Neither IAC nor the Company is asking you for a proxy, and you are not requested to send us a proxy. IAC stockholders will not be required to pay any consideration for the shares of common stock of the Company they receive in the spin-off, and they will not be required to surrender or exchange shares of their IAC common stock and/or Class B common stock or take any other action in connection with the spin-off.

        In reviewing this prospectus, you should carefully consider the matters described under the caption "Risk Factors" beginning on page 8 of this prospectus.


        NEITHER THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION NOR ANY STATE SECURITIES COMMISSION HAS APPROVED OR DISAPPROVED OF THESE SECURITIES OR PASSED UPON THE ACCURACY OR ADEQUACY OF THIS PROSPECTUS. ANY REPRESENTATION TO THE CONTRARY IS A CRIMINAL OFFENSE.


The date of this prospectus is [    •    ], 2008.



TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
  Page
Summary   2
Questions and Answers about Tree.com and the Spin-Offs   4
Risk Factors—Risk Factors Relating to Our Spin-Off From IAC   8
Risk Factors—Risk Factors Relating to Our Business Following Tree.com's Spin-Off From IAC   11
Forward-Looking Statements   20
The Separation   22
  General   22
  The Number of Shares You Will Receive in the Tree.com Spin-Off   22
  When and How You Will Receive the Dividend   22
  Results of the Separation   23
  Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Consequences of the Spin-Offs   23
  Market for Common Stock of Tree.com   27
  Trading Before the Distribution Date   27
  Conditions to the Spin-Offs   28
  Reasons for the Separation   29
  Litigation with Liberty Media Corporation   30
  Financial Advisor   30
Treatment of Outstanding IAC Compensatory Equity-Based Awards   30
Dividend Policy   32
Transfers to IAC and Financing   33
Certain Information With Respect To Tree.com   34
  Business of Tree.com   34
  Capitalization   49
  Selected Historical Financial Data   50
  Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Combined Financial Statements   51
  Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations of Tree.com   58
  Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk   83
  Management of Tree.com   84
  Tree.com Executive Compensation   88
  Tree.com Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management   100
Description of Capital Stock of Tree.com   102
Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions   106
Description of the Stock and Annual Incentive Plan   114
Use of Proceeds   117
Determination of Offering Price   117
Legal Matters   117
Experts   117
Where You Can Find More Information   118

Tree.com, Inc. and Subsidiaries Consolidated Financial Statements Table of Contents

 

F-1

i


        This prospectus describes the businesses of the Company as though they were its businesses for all historical periods described. However, the Company is a newly formed entity that has not conducted any operations prior to the spin-off and instead will have had such businesses transferred to it prior to the spin-off. References in this prospectus to the historical assets, liabilities, products, businesses or activities of the businesses of the Company are intended to refer to the historical assets, liabilities, products, businesses or activities of the relevant businesses as those businesses were conducted as part of IAC prior to the spin-off. Following the spin-off, the Company will be a separate, publicly traded company, and IAC will have no continuing stock ownership in the Company. The historical consolidated financial information of the Company as part of IAC contained in this prospectus is not necessarily indicative of its future financial position, future results of operations or future cash flows, nor does it reflect what the financial position, results of operations or cash flows of the Company would have been had it been operated as a stand-alone company during the periods presented.

        You should not assume that the information contained in this prospectus is accurate as of any date other than the date set forth on the cover. Changes to the information contained in this prospectus may occur after that date and the Company does not undertake any obligation to update the information unless required to do so by law.

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SUMMARY

        This summary highlights selected information from this prospectus and may not contain all the information that may be important to you. Accordingly, you are encouraged to read carefully the entire prospectus, its annexes and the documents filed as exhibits to the Company's registration statement on Form S-1, of which this prospectus is a part.

        Except as otherwise indicated or unless the context otherwise requires, (i) "Spinco" refers to any of HSNi, ILG, Ticketmaster and Tree.com and their respective subsidiaries, (ii) "Spincos" refers to all of the foregoing collectively, (iii) "IAC/InterActiveCorp" and "IAC" refer to IAC/InterActiveCorp and its consolidated subsidiaries other than, for all periods following the spin-offs, the Spincos, (iv) "HSNi" refers to HSN, Inc., (v) "ILG" refers to Interval Leisure Group, Inc., (vi) "Tree.com," the "Company," "we," "our" or "us" refers to Tree.com, Inc. and (vii) "Spin-Off," "spin-off" or "distribution" refers to the distribution by IAC of the common stock of the Company, and the "spin-offs," the "distributions" or the "separation" refers collectively to the distribution by IAC of the common stock of the Company and the other Spincos, as more fully described in this prospectus.

Company Information

        Tree.com was incorporated in Delaware in April 2008. Its principal offices are located at 11115 Rushmore Drive, Charlotte, NC 28277. Its main telephone number is 704-541-5351.

Business of Tree.com

        Through its various subsidiaries, Tree.com currently operates a lending business (the "Lending Business") and a real estate business (the "Real Estate Business"). The Lending Business consists of online networks, principally LendingTree.com and GetSmart.com, as well as call centers, which match consumers with lenders and loan brokers. In addition, the Lending Business originates, processes, approves and funds various types of residential real estate loans under two brand names, LendingTree Loans® and HomeLoanCenter.com®, and offers residential mortgage loan settlement services under the name LendingTree Settlement Services. The Real Estate Business consists primarily of an internet-enabled national residential real estate brokerage that currently operates offices in 14 markets under the brand name "RealEstate.com, REALTORS." The Real Estate Business also consists of a brokerage that matches residential home buyers interested in newly constructed homes with builders and currently operates under the brand name "iNest®."

Businesses of the Other Spincos

        HSNi.    HSNi owns and operates, through its subsidiaries, HSN, a retailer and interactive lifestyle network offering a broad assortment of products through television home shopping programming on the HSN television network and HSN.com. HSN strives to transform the shopping experience by incorporating experts, entertainment, inspiration, solutions, tips and ideas in connection with the sale of products through the HSN television network and HSN.com. HSNi also owns and operates, through its subsidiaries, the Cornerstone Brands portfolio of catalogs and related websites, including Frontgate, Ballard Designs, Garnet Hill, Smith+Noble, The Territory Ahead, TravelSmith and Improvements, as well as a limited number of retail stores.

        ILG.    ILG is a leading provider of membership services to the vacation ownership industry, which is a segment of the broader hospitality industry. Vacation ownership is a term used to describe the shared ownership of vacation real estate and includes those businesses which develop, manage, operate and sell vacation interests (i.e., the ownership or use of accommodations at a given property or properties, together with associated amenities and facilities for a specified period of time). ILG's principal business segment, Interval, makes available vacation ownership membership services to individual members of its exchange networks, which allows such members to exchange the use and

2



occupancy of their vacation interest for comparable, alternative accommodations at the same or another resort participating in an Interval exchange network and provides such members with certain value-added products and services depending on the program and country of residence. Interval also makes available related services to developers of the resorts participating in its exchange networks worldwide. ILG's other business segment, RQH, was acquired in May 2007 and is a provider of vacation rental and property management services to vacationers and vacation property owners across Hawaii.

        Ticketmaster.    As the world's leading live entertainment ticketing and marketing company, Ticketmaster connects the world to live entertainment. Ticketmaster currently operates in 20 countries worldwide, providing ticket sales, ticket resale services, marketing and distribution through www.ticketmaster.com and related proprietary Internet and mobile channels, independent sales outlets and call centers worldwide. Established in 1976, Ticketmaster serves clients across multiple live event categories, providing exclusive ticketing services for leading arenas, stadiums, amphitheaters, music clubs, concert promoters, professional sports franchises and leagues, college sports teams, performing arts venues, museums and theaters.

Overview of the Separation

        On July 1, 2008, the Board of Directors of IAC approved a plan to separate IAC into five separate, publicly traded companies via the distribution of all of the outstanding shares of common stock of the Spincos, each a wholly-owned subsidiary of IAC, with each Spinco having a single class of common stock. At the time of the spin-offs, the Spincos will hold directly or indirectly the assets and liabilities associated with the following businesses:

    HSNi: HSN TV, HSN.com, and the Cornerstone Brands, Inc. portfolio of catalogs, websites and retail locations;

    ILG: the businesses currently comprising IAC's Interval segment;

    Ticketmaster: Ticketmaster's primary domestic and international operations, as well as certain investments in unconsolidated affiliates; and

    Tree.com: the businesses currently comprising IAC's Lending and Real Estate segments.

        Unless otherwise indicated or the context otherwise requires, references in this prospectus to the businesses of HSNi, ILG, Ticketmaster and Tree.com respectively refer to the businesses described above.

        Immediately following the spin-offs, IAC primarily will be engaged in the business and operations relating to (i) Ask.com, Citysearch, IAC Advertising Solutions, Evite and Funweb Products; (ii) Match.com, ServiceMagic and Shoebuy.com; (iii) its emerging businesses, including Black Web Enterprises, BustedTees, CollegeHumor, GarageGames, Gifts.com, Green.com, InstantAction, Primal Ventures, Pronto, Very Short List, Vimeo and 23/6; and (iv) certain investments in unconsolidated entities.

        Prior to the spin-offs, we will enter into a Separation and Distribution Agreement and several other agreements with IAC and the other Spincos to effect the separation of the Spincos and provide a framework for the relationships of the Spincos with IAC and each other. Immediately following the spin-offs, IAC stockholders will own 100% of the outstanding common stock of each of the Spincos.

3



QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT TREE.COM AND THE SPIN-OFFS

Why are the spin-offs structured as dividends?   IAC believes that a tax-free distribution of shares of the Spincos to IAC stockholders is a tax-efficient way to separate HSNi, ILG, Ticketmaster and Tree.com from the rest of IAC in a manner that will create long-term value for IAC stockholders.

How will the Tree.com spin-off occur?

 

IAC will distribute to its stockholders via dividend all of the outstanding shares of common stock of Tree.com owned by IAC, which will be 100% of the common stock of Tree.com outstanding immediately prior to the spin-off.

How many shares of Tree.com will I receive?

 

Unless otherwise determined by the IAC Board of Directors prior to the distribution date, for every share of IAC common stock or Class B common stock held by you as of the record date, you will receive one-thirtieth of a share of common stock of Tree.com. IAC will not distribute any fractional shares of Tree.com common stock to its stockholders. Instead, the distribution agent will aggregate fractional shares into whole shares, sell the whole shares in the open market at prevailing market prices and distribute the aggregate net cash proceeds of the sales pro rata to each holder who otherwise would have been entitled to receive a fractional share in the spin-off. Recipients of cash in lieu of fractional shares will not be entitled to any interest on the amounts of payment made in lieu of fractional shares. The number of shares that IAC will distribute to its stockholders will be reduced to the extent that cash payments are to be made in lieu of the issuance of fractional shares of Tree.com common stock.

Can IAC decide not to complete the Tree.com spin-off?

 

Yes. The IAC Board of Directors has reserved the right, in its sole discretion, to amend, modify or abandon the spin-offs and related transactions at any time prior to the distribution date. This means that IAC has the right not to complete the spin-off of any or all of the Spincos if, at any time, the IAC Board of Directors determines, at its sole discretion, that the spin-off is not in the best interests of IAC or its stockholders. Alternatively, the IAC Board of Directors may determine to delay the spin-off of one or more of the Spincos, in which event the spin-offs may not occur simultaneously. In addition, the spin-offs are subject to the satisfaction or waiver of a number of conditions. See "The Separation—Conditions to the Spin-offs."

What is the record date for the Tree.com spin-off?

 

The record date for determining stockholders entitled to receive the shares of Tree.com in the spin-off is the close of business on [    •    ], 2008.

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What is the distribution date for the Tree.com Spin-off?

 

The distribution date for distributing the shares of common stock of Tree.com under the spin-off is [            ], 2008. However, the IAC Board of Directors may determine to delay the spin-off.

What other transactions affecting Tree.com are occurring with the spin-off?

 

It is currently expected that, at the time of the spin-off, Tree.com will have approximately $110 million in cash, which would mean a $55 million cash contribution by IAC based upon March 31, 2008 balances. See "Transfers to IAC and Financing."

 

 

In addition, IAC expects to effect a reverse stock split following the spin-offs, as described under "The Separation—Results of the Separation."

What are the U.S. federal income tax consequences of the spin-offs to IAC stockholders?

 

IAC has requested and expects to receive, prior to effecting any of the spin-offs, a private letter ruling from the Internal Revenue Service (the "IRS") and/or an opinion of counsel satisfactory to the IAC Board of Directors regarding the qualification of the spin-offs, together with certain related transactions, as transactions that are generally tax free for U.S. federal income tax purposes under Sections 355 and/or 368(a)(1)(D) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the "Code"). If the private letter ruling is received prior to the spin-offs, IAC expects to receive an opinion of counsel regarding certain aspects of the transaction that are not covered by the private letter ruling. If the private letter ruling is not received prior to the spin-offs, IAC expects to receive an opinion of counsel regarding the qualification of the spin-offs as transactions that are generally tax free for U.S. federal income tax purposes under Sections 355 and/or 368(a)(1)(D) of the Code. Assuming the spin-offs qualify as transactions that are generally tax free for U.S. federal income tax purposes under Sections 355 and/or 368(a)(1)(D) of the Code, for U.S. federal income tax purposes, no gain or loss will be recognized by you, and no amount will be included in your income, upon the receipt of shares of Spinco common stock pursuant to the spin-offs, except with respect to any cash received in lieu of a fractional share of Spinco common stock. For more information, see "The Separation—Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Consequences of the Spin-Offs," included elsewhere in this prospectus.

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What will the relationships among IAC and each of the Spincos be following the spin-offs?

 

Prior to the spin-offs, we will enter into a Separation and Distribution Agreement and several other agreements with IAC and the other Spincos to effect the spin-offs and provide a framework for the relationships of each of the Spincos with IAC and the other Spincos. These agreements will govern our relationships with IAC and the other Spincos subsequent to the completion of the spin-off. See "Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions—Relationships Among IAC and the Spincos."

Will I receive physical certificates representing shares of common stock of Tree.com following the separation?

 

No. Following the separation, neither IAC nor Tree.com will be issuing physical certificates representing shares of the common stock of Tree.com. Instead, IAC, with the assistance of The Bank of New York, the distribution agent, will electronically issue shares of Tree.com common stock to you or to your bank or brokerage firm on your behalf by way of direct registration in book-entry form. The Bank of New York will mail you a book-entry account statement that reflects your shares of Tree.com common stock, or your bank or brokerage firm will credit your account for the shares.

What if I want to sell my IAC common stock or my common stock in Tree.com?

 

You should consult with your financial advisors, such as your stockbroker or bank. Neither IAC nor Tree.com makes any recommendations on the purchase, retention or sale of shares of IAC common stock or the Spinco common stock to be distributed.

 

 

If you decide to sell any shares before the spin-offs, you should make sure your stockbroker, bank or other nominee understands whether you want to sell your IAC shares or Spinco shares you will receive in the spin-offs or both.

Where will I be able to trade shares of the common stock of Tree.com?

 

There is not currently a public market for the common stock of Tree.com. We have been approved to list our common stock on the NASDAQ Stock Market, or "NASDAQ," under the symbol "TREE." We anticipate that trading in shares of our common stock will begin on a "when-issued" basis prior to the distribution date and will continue up to and including through the distribution date and that "regular-way" trading in shares of our common stock will begin on the first trading day following the distribution date. If trading begins on a "when-issued" basis, you may purchase or sell your Tree.com common stock up to and including through the distribution date, but your transaction will not settle until after the distribution date. You will not be required to make any payment, surrender or exchange your shares of IAC common stock and/or Class B common stock or take any other action to receive your shares of Tree.com common stock.

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Will the number of IAC shares I own change as a result of the spin-offs?

 

No. The number of shares of IAC common stock you own will not change as a result of the spin-offs. However, in connection with the spin-offs, and as described under "The Separation—Results of the Separation," IAC expects to effect a reverse stock split following the spin-offs.

What will happen to the listing of IAC common stock?

 

Nothing. IAC common stock will continue to be traded on NASDAQ under the symbol "IACI."

Which businesses will be retained by IAC following the spin-offs?

 

Immediately following the spin-offs, IAC primarily will be engaged in the business and operations relating to (i) Ask.com, Citysearch, IAC Advertising Solutions, Evite, and Funweb Products; (ii) Match.com, ServiceMagic and Shoebuy.com; (iii) its emerging businesses, including Black Web Enterprises, BustedTees, CollegeHumor, GarageGames, Gifts.com, Green.com, InstantAction, Primal Ventures, Pronto, Very Short List, Vimeo and 23/6; and (iv) certain investments in unconsolidated entities.

Are there risks to owning Tree.com common stock?

 

Yes. Our business is subject to both general and specific risks relating to our business, leverage, relationship with IAC and being a separate publicly traded company. Our business is also subject to risks relating to the separation. These risks are described in the "Risk Factors" section of this prospectus beginning on page 8. You are encouraged to read that section carefully.

Where can IAC stockholders get more information?

 

Before the spin-offs, if you have any questions relating to the spin-offs, you should contact:

 

 

IAC
Investor Relations
555 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011
Tel: (212) 314-7400
Fax: (212) 314-7379
ir@iac.com

Is Liberty Media Corporation challenging the spin-offs?

 

No. Liberty Media Corporation and IAC have agreed to a single-tiered voting structure for each of the Spincos and the Spinco governance provisions as set forth under "Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions—Agreements with Liberty Media Corporation."

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RISK FACTORS

RISK FACTORS RELATING TO OUR SPIN-OFF FROM IAC

After our spin-off from IAC, we may be unable to make the changes necessary to operate effectively as a separate public entity.

        Following our spin-off from IAC, IAC will have no obligation to provide financial, operational or organizational assistance to us, other than limited services pursuant to a transition services agreement that we will enter into with IAC and the other Spincos in connection with the spin-offs. As a separate public entity, we will be subject to, and responsible for, regulatory compliance, including periodic public filings with the SEC and compliance with NASDAQ's continued listing requirements, as well as generally applicable tax and accounting rules. We may be unable to implement successfully the changes necessary to operate as an independent public entity.

We expect to incur increased costs relating to operating as an independent company that could cause our cash flow and results of operations to decline.

        We expect that the obligations of being a public company, including substantial public reporting and investor relations obligations, will require new expenditures, place new demands on our management and will require the hiring of additional personnel. We may need to implement additional systems that require new expenditures in order to adequately function as a public company. Such expenditures could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        In addition, IAC's businesses, by virtue of being under the same corporate structure, currently share economies of scope and scale in costs, human capital, vendor relationships and customer relationships with the businesses that we and the other Spincos will own following the spin-offs. The increased costs resulting from the loss of these benefits could have an adverse effect on us.

If one or more spin-offs, together with certain related transactions, were to fail to qualify as a transaction that is generally tax free for U.S. federal income tax purposes under Sections 355 and/or 368(a)(1)(D) of the Code, IAC, the Spincos and IAC stockholders may be subject to significant tax liabilities.

        IAC expects to receive a private letter ruling from the IRS and/or an opinion of counsel satisfactory to the IAC Board of Directors regarding the qualification of the spin-offs, together with certain related transactions, as transactions that are generally tax free for U.S. federal income tax purposes under Sections 355 and/or 368(a)(1)(D) of the Code. If the private letter ruling is received prior to the spin-offs, IAC expects to receive an opinion of counsel regarding certain aspects of the transaction that are not covered by the private letter ruling. If the private letter ruling is not received prior to the spin-offs, IAC expects to receive an opinion of counsel regarding the qualification of the spin-offs as transactions that are generally tax free for U.S. federal income tax purposes under Section 355 and/or Section 368(a)(1)(D) of the Code, and opinions from its external tax advisors regarding the U.S. federal income tax consequences to IAC of certain related matters and transactions, and certain state tax consequences to IAC of the spin-offs. The IRS private letter ruling and the opinions will be based on, among other things, certain assumptions as well as the accuracy of certain representations and statements that IAC and the Spincos make to the IRS and to counsel or IAC's external tax advisors. If any of these representations or statements are, or become, inaccurate or incomplete, or if IAC or the Spincos breach any of their respective covenants, the IRS private letter ruling and/or the opinions may be invalid.

        Moreover, as noted above, the IRS private letter ruling would not address all the issues that are relevant to determining whether the spin-offs qualify as transactions that are generally tax free for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Notwithstanding the IRS private letter ruling and/or opinion of counsel, the IRS could determine that one or more of the spin-offs should be treated as a taxable distribution if

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it determines that any of the representations, assumptions or undertakings that were included in the request for the IRS private letter ruling is false or has been violated or if it disagrees with the conclusions in the opinion of counsel that are not covered by the IRS ruling.

        If one or more spin-offs were to fail to qualify as a transaction that is generally tax free for U.S. federal income tax purposes under Sections 355 and/or 368(a)(1)(D) of the Code, then IAC generally would recognize gain in an amount equal to the excess of (i) the fair market value of the Spinco common stock distributed to the IAC stockholders in such taxable spin-off over (ii) IAC's tax basis in the common stock of such Spinco. In addition, each IAC stockholder who received Spinco common stock in such taxable spin-off generally would be treated as having received a taxable distribution in an amount equal to the fair market value of the Spinco common stock received (including any fractional share sold on behalf of the stockholder) in such spin-off, which would be taxable as a dividend to the extent of the stockholder's ratable share of IAC's current and accumulated earnings and profits (as increased to reflect any current income, including any gain, recognized by IAC on the taxable spin-off). The balance, if any, of the distribution would be treated as a nontaxable return of capital to the extent of the IAC stockholder's tax basis in its IAC stock, with any remaining amount being taxed as capital gain. For more information, see "The Separation—Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Consequences of the Spin-Offs," included elsewhere in this prospectus.

        Under the Tax Sharing Agreement that we will enter into with IAC and the other Spincos, each Spinco generally would be required to indemnify IAC and the other Spincos for any taxes resulting from the spin-off of such Spinco (and any related interest, penalties, legal and professional fees, and all costs and damages associated with related stockholder litigation or controversies) to the extent such amounts resulted from (i) any act or failure to act by such Spinco described in the covenants in the Tax Sharing Agreement, (ii) any acquisition of equity securities or assets of such Spinco or a member of its group, or (iii) any breach by such Spinco or any member of its group of any representation or covenant contained in the separation documents or in the documents relating to the IRS private letter ruling and/or tax opinions. The ability of IAC or the other Spincos to collect under these indemnity provisions will depend on the financial position of the indemnifying party. See "Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions—Tax Sharing Agreement."

        In addition, the IRS could disagree with or challenge the conclusions reached in one or more of the tax opinions that IAC expects to receive with respect to certain related matters and transactions. In such case, IAC could recognize material amounts of taxable income or gain.

The market price and trading volume of Tree.com securities may be volatile and may face negative pressure.

        There is currently no trading market for any Tree.com securities. Investors may decide to dispose of some or all of the Tree.com securities that they receive in the Tree.com spin-off. Tree.com securities issued in the Tree.com spin-off will be trading publicly for the first time. Until, and possibly even after, orderly trading markets develop for these securities, there may be significant fluctuations in price. It is not possible to accurately predict how investors in Tree.com's securities will behave after the Tree.com spin-off. The market price for Tree.com's securities following the Tree.com spin-off may be more volatile than the market price of IAC securities before the spin-off. The market price of Tree.com's securities could fluctuate significantly for many reasons, including the risks identified in this prospectus or reasons unrelated to our performance. These factors may result in short- or long-term negative pressure on the value of the Tree.com securities.

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After our spin-off from IAC, our securities may not qualify for placement in investment indices. In addition, our securities may fail to meet the investment guidelines of institutional investors. In either case, these factors may negatively impact the price of our securities and may impair our ability to raise capital through the sale of securities.

        Some of the holders of IAC securities are index funds tied to NASDAQ or other stock or investment indices, or are institutional investors bound by various investment guidelines. Companies are generally selected for investment indices, and in some cases selected by institutional investors, based on factors such as market capitalization, industry, trading liquidity and financial condition. As an independent company, we will initially have a lower market capitalization than IAC has today. As a result, our securities may not qualify for those investment indices. In addition, the securities that are received in the Tree.com spin-off may not meet the investment guidelines of some institutional investors. Consequently, these index funds and institutional investors may have to sell some or all of the securities they receive in the Tree.com spin-off, and the price of our securities may fall as a result. Any such decline could impair our ability to raise capital through future sales of securities.

Financing—We may have future capital needs and may not be able to obtain additional financing on acceptable terms.

        The current uncertainties surrounding the industries in which operate, as well as other factors, may constrain our financing abilities. Our ability to secure additional financing and satisfy our financial obligations under indebtedness outstanding from time to time will depend upon our future operating performance, which is subject to then prevailing general economic and credit market conditions, including interest rate levels and the availability of credit generally, and financial, business and other factors, many of which are beyond our control. The prolonged continuation or worsening of current credit market conditions would have a material adverse effect on our ability to secure financing on favorable terms, if at all.

        We may be unable to secure additional financing or financing on favorable terms or our operating cash flow may be insufficient to satisfy our financial obligations under indebtedness outstanding from time to time (if any). Furthermore, if financing is not available when needed, or is available on unfavorable terms, we may be unable to develop new or enhance our existing services, complete acquisitions or otherwise take advantage of business opportunities or respond to competitive pressures, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. If additional funds are raised through the issuance of equity securities, our stockholders may experience significant dilution.

The spin-off agreements were not the result of arm's length negotiations. In addition, the Tax Sharing Agreement restricts our ability to enter into certain transactions that might otherwise be beneficial to us and our stockholders.

        The agreements that we will enter into with IAC and the other Spincos in connection with the spin-offs, including the separation and distribution agreement, tax sharing agreement, employee matters agreement and transition services agreement, were established by IAC, in consultation with the Spincos, with the intention of maximizing the value to current IAC's shareholders. Accordingly, the terms for us may not be as favorable as would have resulted from negotiations among unrelated third parties.

        We and the other Spincos will enter into a Tax Sharing Agreement with IAC that will restrict our ability to enter into certain transactions that might be advantageous to us and our stockholders. In particular, the Tax Sharing Agreement will limit our ability to issue securities to satisfy financial needs, repurchase equity securities, dispose of certain assets, engage in mergers and acquisitions and, under certain circumstances, acquire businesses or assets with equity securities or agree to be acquired. See "The Separation—Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Consequences of the Spin-Offs" and "Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions—Tax Sharing Agreement."

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RISK FACTORS RELATING TO OUR BUSINESS FOLLOWING
TREE.COM'S SPIN-OFF FROM IAC

Adverse Events and Trends—Adverse conditions in the primary and secondary mortgage markets, as well as the economy generally, could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        The primary and secondary mortgage markets have been (and are currently) experiencing unprecedented and continuing disruption, which have had, and are expected to continue to have, an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. These conditions, coupled with adverse economic conditions and continuing declines in residential real estate prices generally, have resulted, and are expected to continue to result, in decreased consumer demand for the lending and real estate offerings provided by our networks and other businesses. Generally, increases in interest rates adversely affect the ability of the Lending Business and Network Lenders to close loans, while adverse economic trends limit the ability of the Lending Business and Network Lenders to offer home loans other than low margin conforming loans. Likewise, adverse economic trends have reduced, and are expected to continue to reduce, the number of prospective home purchasers and home prices, which adversely affects our Real Estate Business. Our businesses may experience a further decline in demand for their offerings due to decreased consumer demand as a result of the conditions described above now or in the future. Conversely, during periods of robust consumer demand, which are typically associated with decreased interest rates, some Network Lenders may have less incentive to use our networks. Prolonged declines in demand for offerings of our businesses could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        The secondary mortgage markets have also been (and are currently) experiencing unprecedented and continued disruptions resulting from reduced investor demand for mortgage loans and mortgage-backed securities and increased investor yield requirements for those loans and securities. These conditions may continue for a prolonged period of time or worsen in the future. Home Loan Center, Inc. does not have the capital resources or credit necessary to retain the loans it funds and closes, and as a result sells substantially all such loans within 30 days of funding as discussed above. Accordingly, a prolonged period of secondary market illiquidity may force the Lending Business to significantly reduce the volume of loans that it originates and funds through Home Loan Center, Inc., which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Adverse Events and Trends—Adverse conditions in the credit markets could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operation.

        The credit markets, in particular those financial institutions that provide warehouse financing and similar arrangements to mortgage lenders have been (and are currently) experiencing unprecedented and continued disruptions resulting from instability in the mortgage and housing markets. As previously discussed, Tree.com's Lending Business originates, processes, approves and funds various consumer mortgage loans through Home Loan Center, Inc., which operates primarily under the brand name "LendingTree Loans®." These direct lending operations have significant financing needs that are currently being met through borrowings under warehouse lines of credit or repurchase agreements to fund and close loans, followed by the sale of substantially all loans funded to investors in the secondary mortgage markets. Current credit market conditions, such as significantly reduced and limited availability of credit, increased credit risk premiums for certain market participants and increased interest rates generally, increase the cost and reduce the availability of debt and may continue for a prolonged period of time or worsen in the future.

        As of December 31, 2007, LendingTree Loans had committed lines of credit, primarily warehouse lines, totaling $550 million, of which $500 million expired on January 31, 2008, and $50 million expires on October 31, 2008, and an uncommitted line of $150 million. Borrowings under these lines of credit

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are used to fund, and are secured by, consumer residential loans that are held for sale. Loans under these lines of credit are repaid from proceeds from the sales of loans held for sale by LendingTree Loans. The interest rate under these lines of credit is 30-day LIBOR plus 75 to 100 basis points, but may be higher under certain circumstances. The committed line that expired on January 31, 2008 was subsequently renewed at a reduced size of $50 million and will expire on January 24, 2009 and can be cancelled at the option of the lender without default upon sixty days notice. However, if the lender determines at any time prior to January 24, 2009 the spin-off materially and adversely affects us, the lender reserves the right to deem the line of credit expired prior to January 24, 2009. The interest rate under this line of credit increased at the renewal date to 30-day LIBOR plus 140 basis points, but may be higher under certain circumstances. The $50 million committed line of credit that expires on January 24, 2009 and the $150 million uncommitted line are provided by the same lender. The $50 million committed line that expires on October 31, 2008 is provided by one other lender. LendingTree Loans is highly dependent on the availability of credit to finance its operations.

        Although we believe that our lines of credit are sufficient for our current operations, further reductions in our available credit, or the inability to renew or replace these lines, could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. The Lending Business attempts to mitigate the impact of current conditions and future credit market disruptions by maintaining committed and uncommitted warehouse lines of credit (currently, two committed warehouse lines of credit) with financial institutions. However, both of these financial institutions, like all financial institutions, are subject to the same adverse market conditions and may be affected by recent market disruptions, which may affect the decision to reduce or renew these lines, or the pricing for these lines. As a result, current committed warehouse lines of credit may be inadequate to support operations or the cost of debt may not allow Home Loan Center, Inc. to operate at profitable levels. Because Home Loan Center, Inc. is highly dependent on the availability of credit to finance its operations, the continuation of current credit market conditions for a prolonged period of time or worsening of such conditions could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations, particularly over the next few years.

Contingent Liabilities—Litigation and Indemnification of Secondary Market Purchasers—Litigation and indemnification of secondary market purchasers could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and liquidity.

        In connection with the sale of loans to secondary market purchasers, Home Loan Center, Inc. makes certain representations regarding related consumer credit information, loan documentation and collateral. To the extent that these representations are incorrect, Home Loan Center, Inc. may be required to repurchase loans or indemnify secondary market purchasers for losses due to borrower defaults. While Home Loan Center, Inc. seeks to ensure that loans it originates comply with these representations and warranties, secondary market purchasers may take a contrary position. In connection with the sale of loans to secondary market purchasers, Home Loan Center, Inc. also agrees to repurchase loans or indemnify secondary market purchasers for losses due to early payment defaults (i.e., late payments during a limited time period immediately following origination). In connection with the sale of a majority of its loans to secondary market purchasers, Home Loan Center, Inc. also agrees to repay all or a portion of the initial premiums paid by secondary market purchasers in instances where loans are prepaid prior to the end of relevant prepayment penalty periods.

        We and our businesses are also parties to litigation involving a variety of matters, many of which involve damage claims for substantial amounts (see "Business of Tree.com—Legal Proceedings").

        We believe that following the spin-offs we will have adequate resources to satisfy our obligations relating to the potential exposures described above. However, it is possible that these liabilities will be greater than anticipated. Given that we may have limited access to the credit markets following the spin-offs, if the liabilities are in excess of expectations, our ability to satisfy such obligations may be

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dependent upon our ability to raise capital in the equity markets, which may be uncertain and is subject to limitations under the tax sharing agreement.

Third-Party Relationships—We depend on relationships with Network Lenders, real estate professionals, credit providers and secondary market investors and any adverse changes in these relationships could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        Our success depends, in significant part, on the quality and pricing of services provided by, and/or the continued financial stability of, Network Lenders and real estate professionals participating on our networks, credit providers and secondary market investors. Network Lenders or real estate professionals could, for any reason, cease participating on the networks operated by (or otherwise choose not to enter into relationships with) our businesses, fail to pay matching and/or closing fees when due and/or cease providing quality services on competitive terms. In addition, credit providers and/or secondary market investors could, for any reason, choose not to make credit available to (or otherwise enter into relationships with) Home Loan Center, Inc., and in the case of secondary market investors only, cease purchasing loans from Home Loan Center, Inc. In particular, revenues attributable to purchases of loans by two such entities, Countrywide and CitiMortgage, represented approximately 28% and 13%, respectively, of our consolidated revenues in 2007. The occurrence of one of more of these events by a significant number of Network Lenders, real estate professionals, credit providers and/or secondary market investors, particularly Countrywide and CitiMortgage, could, alone or in combination, have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Network Security—A breach of our network security or the misappropriation or misuse of personal consumer information may have an adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        Any penetration of network security or other misappropriation or misuse of personal consumer information maintained by us could cause interruptions in the operations of our businesses and subject us to increased costs, litigation and other liabilities. Claims could also be made against us for other misuse of personal information, such as for unauthorized purposes or identity theft, which could result in litigation and financial liabilities, as well as administrative action from governmental authorities. Security breaches could also significantly damage our reputation with consumers and third parties with whom we do business. In that regard, on April 21, 2008, we announced that several mortgage companies had gained unauthorized access to LendingTree's customer information database and had used the information to solicit mortgage loans directly from our customers. We promptly reported the situation to the Federal Bureau of Investigation and have been cooperating fully with the FBI's investigation. While LendingTree does not believe this situation resulted in any fraud on the consumer or identity theft, LendingTree notified affected consumers as required by applicable law. Notwithstanding the foregoing, following our announcement, several putative class action lawsuits were filed against LendingTree, seeking to recover damages for consumers allegedly injured by this incident (see "Business of Tree.com—Legal Proceedings").

        As in the case of any financial services company, we may be required to expend significant capital and other resources to protect against and remedy any potential or existing security breaches and their consequences. We also face risks associated with security breaches affecting third parties with which we are affiliated or otherwise conduct business online. Consumers are generally concerned with security and privacy of the internet, and any publicized security problems affecting our businesses and/or those of third parties may discourage consumers from doing business with us, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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Failure to Provide Competitive Service—Network Lenders and real estate professionals may not provide competitive levels of service to consumers, which could adversely affect our brands and businesses and their ability to attract consumers.

        The ability of our businesses to provide consumers with a high-quality experience depends, in part, on consumers receiving competitive levels of convenience, customer service, price and responsiveness from Network Lenders and real estate professionals with whom they are matched through our networks. If Network Lenders and real estate professionals do not provide consumers with competitive levels of convenience, customer service, price and responsiveness, the value of our various brands may be harmed, the ability of our businesses to attract consumers to our websites may be limited and the number of consumers ultimately matched through our networks may decline, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Brand Recognition—Failure to maintain brand recognition and attract and retain customers in a cost-effective manner could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        In order to attract visitors to their websites, convert these visitors into paying customers and capture repeat business from existing customers, our businesses must promote and maintain their various brands successfully, which involves the expenditure of considerable money and resources for online and offline advertising, marketing and related efforts, as well as the continued provision and introduction of high-quality products and services.

        We believe that continuing to build and maintain the recognition of our various brands is critical to achieving increased demand for the services provided by our businesses, given that brand recognition is a key differentiating factor among providers of online services. Accordingly, we have spent, and expect to continue to spend, significant amounts of money on, and devote significant resources to, branding, advertising and other marketing initiatives, which may not be successful or cost-effective. We believe that rates for desirable online and offline advertising and marketing are likely to increase in the foreseeable future. The failure of our businesses to maintain the recognition of their respective brands and attract and retain customers in a cost-effective manner could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        Lastly, publicity from legal proceedings against us or our businesses, particularly governmental proceedings, consumer class action litigation or the disclosure of information security breaches, could negatively impact our various brands, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Third-Party Relationships Are Not Exclusive—Network Lenders and real estate professionals affiliated with our networks are not precluded from offering products and services outside of these networks.

        Because our businesses do not have exclusive relationships with Network Lenders and real estate professionals, consumers may obtain loans and real estate offerings directly from these third-party service providers without having to go through our networks. Network Lenders can offer loans (and real estate professionals can offer services) directly to consumers through marketing campaigns or other traditional methods of distribution, such as referral arrangements, brick and mortar operations or, in the case of lending, broker agreements. Network Lenders and real estate professionals can also offer loans and services to prospective customers online directly or through one or more online competitors of our businesses or both. If a significant number of consumers seek loans and services directly from Network Lenders and real estate professionals as opposed to through our networks, our business, financial conditions and results of operations would be adversely affected.

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Compliance and Changing Laws, Rules and Regulations—Failure to comply with existing laws, rules and regulations, or to obtain and maintain required licenses, could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        The failure of our businesses to comply with existing laws, rules and regulations, or to obtain required licenses, could result in administrative fines and/or proceedings against us or our businesses by governmental agencies and/or litigation by consumers, which could adversely affect our business, financial conditions and results of operations. Our businesses market and provide services in heavily regulated industries through a number of different online and offline channels across the United States. As a result, they are subject to a variety of statutes, rules, regulations, policies and procedures in various jurisdictions in the United States, which are subject to change at any time.

        Our businesses conduct marketing activities via the telephone, the mail and/or through online marketing channels, which activities are governed by numerous federal and state regulations, such as the Telemarketing Sales Rule, state telemarketing laws, federal and state privacy laws, the CAN-SPAM Act, and the Federal Trade Commission Act and its accompanying regulations and guidelines, among others. While we believe that the practices of our businesses have been structured in a manner to ensure compliance with these laws and regulations, federal or state regulatory authorities may take a contrary position.

        Most states require licenses to solicit, broker or make loans secured by residential mortgages and other consumer loans to residents of those states, as well as to operate real estate referral and brokerage services, and in many cases require the licensure or registration of individual employees engaged in aspects of these businesses. Currently, Congress, many state legislatures and state agencies are proposing to adopt, or have recently implemented, additional licensing requirements on mortgage lenders, brokers and their employees. While our businesses have endeavored to comply with applicable requirements, the application of these licensing requirements to persons operating online is not always clear. Moreover, any of the licenses or rights currently held by our businesses or their employees may be revoked prior to, or may not be renewed upon, their expiration. In addition, our businesses or their employees may not be granted new licenses or rights for which they may be required to apply from time to time in the future.

        Our businesses are also subject to various state, federal and/or local laws, rules and regulations that regulate the amount and nature of fees that may be charged for transactions and incentives, such as rebates, that may be offered to consumers by our businesses, as well as the manner in which these businesses may offer, advertise or promote transactions. For example, the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, or RESPA, generally prohibits the payment or receipt of referral fees and fee shares or splits in connection with residential mortgage loan transactions, subject to certain exceptions. The applicability of referral fee and fee sharing prohibitions to lenders and real estate providers, including online networks, may have the effect of reducing the types and amounts of fees that may be charged or paid in connection with real estate-secured loan offerings or activities, including mortgage brokerage, lending and real estate brokerage services, or otherwise limiting the ability to conduct marketing and referral activities. Although we believe that our businesses have been structured in such a way so as to comply with RESPA, the relevant regulatory agency may take a contrary position.

        In addition, some states have regulations that prohibit real estate brokers from providing consumers with rebates or other incentives in connection with real estate transactions. Additional states could promulgate similar regulations or interpret existing regulations in a way that limits the ability of online networks to offer consumer incentives in connection with real estate transactions, thereby limiting the attractiveness of real estate brokerage activities offered by our Real Estate Business.

        Additional federal, state and in some instances, local, laws regulate residential lending and real estate brokerage activities. These laws generally regulate the manner in which lending, lending-related and real estate brokerage activities are made available, including advertising and other consumer

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disclosures, payments for services and record keeping requirements, and include RESPA, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, the Truth in Lending Act, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act and the Fair Housing Act. In addition, state laws often restrict the amount of interest and fees that may be charged by a lender or mortgage broker, or otherwise regulate the manner in which lenders or mortgage brokers operate or advertise. Furthermore, Congress, many state legislatures and state agencies are proposing, or have recently implemented, additional restrictions on mortgage lending practices. Failure to comply with applicable laws and regulatory requirements may result in, among other things, revocation of required licenses or registrations, loss of approval status, termination of contracts without compensation, administrative enforcement actions and fines, class action lawsuits, cease and desist orders and civil and criminal liability. While we believe that our businesses have been structured in such a way so as to comply with existing and new laws, the relevant regulatory authorities may take a contrary position or future legislation may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        Likewise, states or municipalities may adopt statutes or regulations making it unattractive, impracticable, or infeasible for our businesses to continue to conduct business in that jurisdiction. The withdrawal from any jurisdiction due to emerging legal requirements could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        Federal, state and in some instances, local, laws also prohibit unfair and deceptive sales practices generally. While we have adopted appropriate policies and procedures to address these requirements (such as appropriate consumer disclosures and call scripting, call monitoring, pricing controls and other quality assurance and compliance measures, which have evolved and improved over time), employees do not always comply with policies and procedures, and therefore, liability and brand injury could result from such employee misconduct.

        As employers, our businesses are subject to federal and state employment laws. In particular, the Fair Labor Standards Act and California wage and hour laws govern the treatment of "non-exempt" employees, which may include loan officers and loan processors at Home Loan Center, Inc. Failure to comply with applicable employment laws may result in, among other things, administrative fines, class action lawsuits, damages awards and injunctions, any of which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        Parties with whom our businesses conduct business similarly may be subject to federal and state regulation. These parties typically act as independent contractors and not as agents in their solicitations and transactions with consumers. Consequently, we cannot ensure that these entities will comply with applicable laws and regulations at all times. Failure on the part of a lender, real estate professional, website operator or other third party to comply with these laws or regulations could result in, among other things, claims of vicarious liability or a negative impact on the reputation of Tree.com and its businesses. The occurrence of one or more of these events could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operation.

        Our Real Estate Business is subject to rules and regulations of various real estate boards, as well as the rules of various non-governmental associations and organizations, including but, not limited to, local and regional Multiple Listing Services that provide real estate listing data. Our Real Estate Business is dependent on real estate listing data made available through Multiple Listing Services and other sources. While we believe that our Real Estate Business is structured to comply with these rules and regulations, the relevant organization may take a contrary position, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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Third Party Compliance—If Network Lenders fail to produce required documents for examination by, or other affiliated parties fail to make certain filings with, state regulators, Tree.com may be subject to fines, forfeitures and the revocation of required licenses.

        Some of the states in which our businesses maintain licenses require them to collect various loan documentation from Network Lenders and produce this documentation for examination by state regulators. While Network Lenders are contractually obligated to provide these documents upon request, these measures may be insufficient. Failure to produce required documents for examination could result in fines, as well as the revocation of our businesses' licenses to operate in key states, which could have a material adverse affect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        Regulations promulgated by some states may impose compliance obligations on directors, executive officers, large customers and any person who acquires a certain percentage (for example, 10% or more) of our common stock, including requiring such persons to periodically file financial and other personal and business information with state regulators. If any such person refuses or fails to comply with these requirements, our businesses may be unable to obtain a license, and existing licensing arrangements may be jeopardized, in particular states. The inability to obtain, or the loss of, required licenses could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial conditions and results of operations.

Maintenance of Systems and Infrastructure—Our success depends, in part, on the integrity of our systems and infrastructures. System interruption and the lack of integration and redundancy in these systems and infrastructures may have an adverse impact on our business, financial conditions and results of operations.

        Our success depends, in part, on our ability to maintain the integrity of our systems and infrastructures, including websites, information and related systems, call centers and distribution and fulfillment facilities. System interruption and the lack of integration and redundancy in our information systems and infrastructures may adversely affect our ability to operate websites, process and fulfill transactions, respond to customer inquiries and generally maintain cost-efficient operations. We may experience occasional system interruptions that make some or all systems or data unavailable or prevent our businesses from efficiently providing services or fulfilling orders. We also rely on affiliate and third-party computer systems, broadband and other communications systems and service providers in connection with the provision of services generally, as well as to facilitate, process and fulfill transactions. Any interruptions, outages or delays in our systems and infrastructures, our businesses, our affiliates and/or third parties, or deterioration in the performance of these systems and infrastructures, could impair the ability of our businesses to provide services, fulfill orders and/or process transactions. Fire, flood, power loss, telecommunications failure, hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, acts of war or terrorism, acts of God and similar events or disruptions may damage or interrupt computer, broadband or other communications systems and infrastructures at any time. Any of these events could cause system interruption, delays and loss of critical data, and could prevent our businesses from providing services, fulfilling orders and/or processing transactions. While our businesses have backup systems for certain aspects of their operations, these systems are not fully redundant and disaster recovery planning is not sufficient for all eventualities. In addition, we may not have adequate insurance coverage to compensate for losses from a major interruption. If any of these adverse events were to occur, it could adversely affect our business, financial conditions and results of operations.

        In addition, any penetration of network security or other misappropriation or misuse of personal consumer information could cause interruptions in the operations of our businesses and subject us to increased costs, litigation and other liabilities. Claims could also be made against us for other misuse of personal information, such as for unauthorized purposes or identity theft, which could result in litigation and financial liabilities, as well as administrative action from governmental authorities. Security breaches could also significantly damage our reputation with consumers and third parties with whom we do business. It is possible that advances in computer capabilities, new discoveries, undetected fraud, inadvertent violations of company policies or procedures or other developments could result in a

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compromise of information or a breach of the technology and security processes that are used to protect consumer transaction data. As a result, current security measures may not prevent any or all security breaches. We may be required to expend significant capital and other resources to protect against and remedy any potential or existing security breaches and their consequences. We also faces risks associated with security breaches affecting third parties with which we are affiliated or otherwise conduct business online. Consumers are generally concerned with security and privacy of the Internet, and any publicized security problems affecting our businesses and/or those of third parties may discourage consumers from doing business with us, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Privacy—The processing, storage, use and disclosure of personal data could give rise to liabilities as a result of governmental regulation, conflicting legal requirements or differing views of personal privacy rights.

        In the processing of consumer transactions, our businesses receive, transmit and store a large volume of personally identifiable information and other user data. The sharing, use, disclosure and protection of this information are governed by the privacy and data security policies maintained by us and our businesses. Moreover, there are federal, state and international laws regarding privacy and the storing, sharing, use, disclosure and protection of personally identifiable information and user data. Specifically, personally identifiable information is increasingly subject to legislation and regulations in numerous jurisdictions around the world, the intent of which is to protect the privacy of personal information that is collected, processed and transmitted in or from the governing jurisdiction. We could be adversely affected if legislation or regulations are expanded to require changes in business practices or privacy policies, or if governing jurisdictions interpret or implement their legislation or regulations in ways that negatively affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        Our businesses may also become exposed to potential liabilities as a result of differing views on the privacy of consumer and other user data collected by these businesses. Our failure, and/or the failure by the various third party vendors and service providers with which we do business, to comply with applicable privacy policies or federal, state or similar international laws and regulations or any compromise of security that results in the unauthorized release of personally identifiable information or other user data could damage the reputation of these businesses, discourage potential users from trying our products and services and/or result in fines and/or proceedings by governmental agencies and/or consumers, one or all of which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Intellectual Property—We may fail to adequately protect our intellectual property rights or may be accused of infringing intellectual property rights of third parties.

        We may fail to adequately protect our intellectual property rights or may be accused of infringing intellectual property rights of third parties. We regard our intellectual property rights, including patents, service marks, trademarks and domain names, copyrights, trade secrets and similar intellectual property (as applicable), as critical to our success. Our businesses also rely heavily upon software codes, informational databases and other components that make up their products and services.

        We rely on a combination of laws and contractual restrictions with employees, customers, suppliers, affiliates and others to establish and protect these proprietary rights. Despite these precautions, it may be possible for a third party to copy or otherwise obtain and use trade secret or copyrighted intellectual property without authorization which, if discovered, might require legal action to correct. In addition, third parties may independently and lawfully develop substantially similar intellectual properties.

        We have generally registered and continue to apply to register, or secure by contract when appropriate, our trademarks and service marks as they are developed and used, and reserve and register domain names as we deem appropriate. We generally consider the protection of our

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trademarks to be important for purposes of brand maintenance and reputation. While we vigorously protect our trademarks, service marks and domain names, effective trademark protection may not be available or may not be sought in every country in which products and services are made available, and contractual disputes may affect the use of marks governed by private contract. Similarly, not every variation of a domain name may be available or be registered, even if available. Our failure to protect our intellectual property rights in a meaningful manner or challenges to related contractual rights could result in erosion of brand names and limit our ability of to control marketing on or through the internet using our various domain names or otherwise, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        Some of our businesses have been granted patents and/or have patent applications pending with the United States Patent and Trademark Office and/or various foreign patent authorities for various proprietary technologies and other inventions. We consider applying for patents or for other appropriate statutory protection when we develop valuable new or improved proprietary technologies or inventions are identified, and will continue to consider the appropriateness of filing for patents to protect future proprietary technologies and inventions as circumstances may warrant. The status of any patent involves complex legal and factual questions, and the breadth of claims allowed is uncertain. Accordingly, any patent application filed may not result in a patent being issued or existing or future patents may not be adjudicated valid by a court or be afforded adequate protection against competitors with similar technology. In addition, third parties may create new products or methods that achieve similar results without infringing upon patents that we own. Likewise, the issuance of a patent to us does not mean that our processes or inventions will not be found to infringe upon patents or other rights previously issued to third parties.

        From time to time, we are subject to legal proceedings and claims in the ordinary course of business, including claims of alleged infringement of the trademarks, copyrights, patents and other intellectual property rights of third parties. In addition, litigation may be necessary in the future to enforce our intellectual property rights, protect trade secrets or to determine the validity and scope of proprietary rights claimed by others. Any litigation of this nature, regardless of outcome or merit, could result in substantial costs and diversion of management and technical resources, any of which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Patent litigation tends to be particularly protracted and expensive.

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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

        Forward-looking statements in this prospectus, the public filings or other public statements of the Company are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause actual results, performance or achievements of the Company to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements or other public statements. Forward-looking statements include the information regarding future financial performance, business prospects and strategy, including the completion of the spin-offs and the realization of related anticipated benefits, anticipated financial position, liquidity and capital needs and other similar matters, in each case relating to the Company.

        Statements preceded by, followed by or that otherwise include the words "believes," "expects," "anticipates," "intends," "projects," "estimates," "plans," "may increase," "may fluctuate," and similar expressions or future or conditional verbs such as "will," "should," "would," "may" and "could" are generally forward-looking in nature and not historical facts. You should understand that the following important factors could affect future results and could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in such forward-looking statements:

    adverse changes in economic conditions generally or in any of the markets or industries in which the businesses of the Company operate;

    changes in senior management at the Company;

    adverse changes to, or interruptions in, relationships with third parties;

    changes affecting the ability of the Company to efficiently maintain and grow the market share of its various brands, as well as to extend the reach of these brands through a variety of distribution channels and to attract new (and retain existing) customers;

    consumer acceptance of new products and services offered by the Company;

    the rates of growth of the Internet and the e-commerce industry;

    changes adversely affecting the ability of the Company to adequately expand the reach of its businesses into various international markets, as well as to successfully manage risks specific to international operations and acquisitions, including the successful integration of acquired businesses;

    future regulatory and legislative actions and conditions affecting the Company, including:

    the promulgation of new, and/or the amendment of existing laws, rules and regulations applicable to the Company and its businesses; and

    changes in the application or interpretation of existing laws, rules and regulations in the case of the businesses of the Company. In each case, laws, rules and regulations include, among others, those relating to sales, use, value-added and other taxes, software programs, consumer protection and privacy, intellectual property, the Internet and e-commerce;

    competition from other companies;

    changes adversely affecting the ability of the Company and its businesses to adequately protect intellectual property rights, as well as to obtain licenses or other rights with respect to intellectual property in the future, which may or may not be available on favorable terms (if at all);

    the substantial indebtedness of the Company and the possibility that the Company may incur additional indebtedness;

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    third-party claims alleging infringement of intellectual property rights by the Company or its businesses, which could result in the expenditure of significant financial and managerial resources, injunctions or the imposition of damages, as well as the need to enter into formal licensing or other similar arrangements with such third parties, which may or may not be available on favorable terms (if at all); and

    natural disasters, acts of terrorism, war or political instability.

        Certain of these factors and other factors, risks and uncertainties are discussed in the "Risk Factors" section of this prospectus. Other unknown or unpredictable factors may also cause actual results to differ materially from those projected by the forward-looking statements. Most of these factors are difficult to anticipate and are generally beyond the control of IAC and the Company.

        You should consider the areas of risk described above, as well as those set forth under the heading "Risk Factors," in connection with considering any forward-looking statements that may be made by the Company generally. Except for the ongoing obligations of the Company to disclose material information under the federal securities laws, the Company does not undertake any obligation to release publicly any revisions to any forward-looking statements, to report events or to report the occurrence of unanticipated events unless required to do so by law.

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THE SEPARATION

General

        On July 31, 2008, the IAC Board of Directors approved the separation of IAC into five separate, publicly traded companies, with each Spinco having a single class of common stock: (1) IAC, (2) HSNi, (3) ILG, (4) Ticketmaster and (5) Tree.com. The separation will be accomplished through the distribution by IAC of all of the shares of the common stock of the Spincos held by IAC to holders of IAC common stock on the record date. Immediately following the distributions, IAC stockholders will own 100% of the outstanding common stock of IAC and the Spincos. You will not be required to make any payment, surrender or exchange your shares of IAC common stock and/or Class B common stock or take any other action to receive your shares of Tree.com common stock.

        The Board of Directors of IAC has reserved the right to modify, delay or abandon the spin-off of any or all of the Spincos. In addition, the spin-offs are subject to the satisfaction or waiver of a number of conditions described under "—Conditions to the Spin-Offs."

The Number of Shares You Will Receive in the Tree.com Spin-off

        For every share of IAC common stock and/or Class B common stock that you owned at the close of business on [    •    ], 2008, the record date, you will receive one-thirtieth of a share of common stock of Tree.com on the distribution date. As described below under "—When and How You Will Receive the Dividend," IAC will not distribute any fractional shares of Tree.com common stock to its stockholders.

When and How You Will Receive the Dividend

        IAC will distribute the shares of Tree.com common stock on [    •    ], 2008, the distribution date. However, the IAC Board of Directors may determine to delay the Tree.com spin-off. The Bank of New York, which currently serves as the transfer agent and registrar for IAC's common stock, will serve as transfer agent and registrar for the Tree.com common stock and as distribution agent in connection with the spin-offs.

        If you own IAC common stock and/or Class B common stock as of the close of business on the record date, the shares of Spinco common stock that you are entitled to receive in the spin-off will be issued electronically, as of the distribution date, to you or to your bank or brokerage firm on your behalf by way of direct registration in book-entry form. Registration in book-entry form refers to a method of recording stock ownership when no physical share certificates are issued to stockholders, as is the case in the spin-off.

        Commencing on or shortly after the distribution date, if you hold physical stock certificates that represent your shares of IAC common stock and/or Class B common stock and you are the registered holder of the IAC shares represented by those certificates, the distribution agent will mail to you an account statement that indicates the number of shares of Spinco common stock that have been registered in book-entry form in your name. If you have any questions concerning the mechanics of having shares of Tree.com common stock registered in book-entry form, you are encouraged to contact The Bank of New York by mail at 480 Washington Blvd, Jersey City, NJ 07310 or PO Box 358015, Pittsburgh, PA 15252-8015, by phone at 866-203-6218 (US and Canada) or 201-680-6685 (International), or by email at shrrelations@bnymellon.com.

        Most IAC stockholders hold their shares of IAC common stock through a bank or brokerage firm. In such cases, the bank or brokerage firm would be said to hold the stock in "street name" and ownership would be recorded on the bank or brokerage firm's books. If you hold your IAC common stock through a bank or brokerage firm, your bank or brokerage firm will credit your account for the shares of common stock of the Spincos that you are entitled to receive in the spin-offs. If you have any

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questions concerning the mechanics of having shares of Tree.com common stock held in "street name," you are encouraged to contact your bank or brokerage firm.

        The Bank of New York, as distribution agent, will not deliver any fractional shares of Tree.com common stock in connection with the spin-off. Instead, The Bank of New York will aggregate all fractional shares and sell them on behalf of the holders who otherwise would be entitled to receive fractional shares. If you physically hold IAC common stock certificates and are the registered holder, you will receive a check from the distribution agent in an amount equal to your pro rata share of the aggregate net cash proceeds of the sales. We estimate that it will take approximately two weeks from the distribution date for the distribution agent to complete the distributions of the aggregate net cash proceeds. If you hold your IAC stock through a bank or brokerage firm, your bank or brokerage firm will receive on your behalf your pro rata share of the aggregate net cash proceeds of the sales and should electronically credit your account for your share of such proceeds.

Results of the Separation

        After the spin-off, we will be a separate publicly traded company. Immediately following the spin-offs, based on the number of registered stockholders of IAC common stock and Class B common stock on February 25, 2008, and without giving effect to "when-issued" trading, we expect to have approximately 1,500 stockholders of record.

        The actual number of shares to be distributed will be determined based on the number of shares of IAC common stock and class B common stock outstanding on the record date and will reflect the issuance of IAC common stock in connection with any exercise of IAC options, vesting of restricted share units or conversion of other convertible IAC securities between the date the IAC Board of Directors declares the dividend for the distribution and the record date for the spin-off and the issuance of IAC shares under vested IAC equity-based awards between the record date for the spin-off and the distribution date.

        The spin-offs will not affect the number of outstanding shares of IAC common stock and/or Class B common stock or any rights of IAC stockholders. However, in connection with the spin-offs, as more fully described in IAC's proxy statement under Schedule 14A under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act"), filed on July 10, 2008, IAC has sought approval from its stockholders of a proposal to amend its Restated Certificate of Incorporation to effect a 1-for-2 reverse stock split of its common stock and Class B common stock, which may be implemented by IAC's Board of Directors in its sole discretion immediately following the completion of the spin-offs or, if not all of the spin-offs are effected substantially simultaneously, immediately following the first spin-off. If the reverse stock split is approved by IAC's stockholders and implemented by IAC's Board of Directors, each two shares of IAC common stock or Class B common stock will be combined into one share of IAC common stock or Class B common stock, respectively. The purpose of implementing the reverse stock split would be to seek to increase the per share trading price of IAC's common stock following the spin-offs relative to what the per share trading price would be if the reverse stock split were not implemented. An increased trading price could increase interest from institutional investors, investment funds and brokerage firms in IAC common stock, lower the transaction costs involved in purchasing IAC common stock and improve the trading liquidity of IAC common stock. There can be no assurance that the reverse stock split would have the effect of increasing the per share trading price of IAC common stock following the spin-offs relative to what the per share trading price would be if the reverse stock split were not implemented.

Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Consequences of the Spin-Offs

        The following section describes the material U.S. federal income tax consequences of the spin-offs to "U.S. holders" (as defined below) of IAC common stock. This summary is based on current

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provisions of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the "Code"), final, temporary or proposed U.S. Treasury regulations promulgated thereunder, judicial opinions, published positions of the IRS and all other applicable authorities, all as in effect as of the date of this document and all of which are subject to change, possibly with retroactive effect. Any such change could affect the accuracy of the statements and conclusions set forth in this document.

        For purposes of this discussion, the term "U.S. holder" means a beneficial owner of IAC common stock that is, for U.S. federal income tax purposes:

    an individual who is a citizen or resident of the United States;

    a corporation, or other entity taxable as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, created or organized under the laws of the United States, any state thereof, or the District of Columbia;

    an estate, the income of which is subject to U.S. federal income tax regardless of its source; or

    a trust if (1) a court within the United States is able to exercise primary supervision over the administration of the trust and one or more U.S. persons have the authority to control all substantial decisions of the trust or (2) it has a valid election in effect under applicable U.S. Treasury regulations to be treated as a U.S. person.

        If an entity or arrangement that is treated as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes holds IAC common stock, the tax treatment of a partner in such entity generally will depend on the status of the partners and the activities of the partnership. If you are a partner in a partnership holding IAC common stock, please consult your tax advisor.

        This discussion only addresses holders of IAC common stock that are U.S. holders and hold such stock as a capital asset within the meaning of Section 1221 of the Code. Further, this summary does not address all aspects of U.S. federal income taxation that may be relevant to a holder in light of the holder's particular circumstances or that may be applicable to holders subject to special treatment under U.S. federal income tax law (including, for example, persons that are not U.S. holders, financial institutions, dealers in securities, traders in securities that elect mark-to-market treatment, insurance companies, mutual funds, tax-exempt organizations, partnerships or other flow-through entities and their partners or members, U.S. expatriates, holders liable for the alternative minimum tax, holders whose functional currency is not the U.S. dollar, and holders who hold their IAC common stock as part of a hedge, straddle, constructive sale or conversion transaction, or holders who acquired IAC common stock pursuant to the exercise of employee stock options or otherwise as compensation). This discussion does not address the tax consequences to any person who actually or constructively owns more than 5% of IAC common stock. In addition, no information is provided herein with respect to the tax consequences of the spin-offs under applicable state, local or non-U.S. laws or federal laws other than those pertaining to the federal income tax.

        IAC STOCKHOLDERS SHOULD CONSULT THEIR TAX ADVISORS REGARDING THE TAX CONSEQUENCES OF THE SPIN-OFFS TO THEM, INCLUDING THE EFFECTS OF U.S. FEDERAL, STATE AND LOCAL, FOREIGN AND OTHER TAX LAWS.

        IAC has requested and expects to receive, prior to effecting any of the spin-offs, a private letter ruling from the IRS and/or an opinion of counsel satisfactory to the IAC board of directors regarding the qualification of the spin-offs, together with certain related transactions, as transactions that are generally tax free for U.S. federal income tax purposes under Sections 355 and/or 368(a)(1)(D) of the Code. If the private letter ruling is received prior to the spin-offs, IAC expects to receive an opinion of counsel regarding certain aspects of the transaction that are not covered by the private letter ruling. If the private letter ruling is not received prior to the spin-offs, IAC expects to receive an opinion of counsel regarding the qualification of the spin-offs as transactions that are generally tax free for U.S.

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federal income tax purposes under Sections 355 and/or 368(a)(1)(D) of the Code, and opinions from its external tax advisors regarding the U.S. federal income tax consequences to IAC of certain related matters and transactions, and certain state tax consequences to IAC of the spin-offs.

    Certain U.S. Federal Income Tax Consequences if Each of the Spin-Offs Qualifies as a Transaction that Is Generally Tax Free under Sections 355 and/or 368(a)(1)(D) of the Code

        Assuming that each of the spin-offs qualifies as a transaction that is generally tax free for U.S. federal income tax purposes under Sections 355 and/or 368(a)(1)(D) of the Code:

    no gain or loss will be recognized by, and no amount will be includible in the income of IAC as a result of the spin-offs, other than gain or income arising in connection with certain internal restructurings undertaken in connection with the spin-offs and with respect to any "excess loss account" or "intercompany transaction" required to be taken into account by IAC under U.S. Treasury regulations relating to consolidated federal income tax returns;

    an IAC stockholder will not recognize income, gain, or loss as a result of the receipt of Spinco common stock pursuant to the spin-offs, except with respect to any cash received in lieu of fractional shares of Spinco common stock;

    an IAC stockholder's aggregate tax basis in such stockholder's Spinco common stock received in the spin-offs (including any fractional share interests in Spinco common stock for which cash is received) will equal such stockholder's aggregate tax basis in its IAC common stock immediately before the spin-offs, allocated between the IAC common stock and the common stock of each Spinco (including any fractional share interest of Spinco common stock for which cash is received) in proportion to their relative fair market values on the date of the spin-offs;

    an IAC stockholder's holding period for Spinco common stock received in the spin-offs (including any fractional share interests of Spinco common stock for which cash is received) will include the holding period for that stockholder's IAC common stock; and

    an IAC stockholder who receives cash in lieu of a fractional share of Spinco common stock in the spin-offs will be treated as having sold such fractional share for cash, and will generally recognize capital gain or loss in an amount equal to the difference between the amount of cash received and the IAC stockholder's adjusted tax basis in the fractional share of Spinco common stock. Such gain or loss will be long-term capital gain or loss if the stockholder's holding period for its Spinco common stock exceeds one year.

        If an IAC stockholder holds different blocks of IAC common stock (generally, shares of IAC common stock acquired on different dates or at different prices), such holder should consult its tax advisor regarding the determination of the basis and holding period of shares of Spinco common stock received in the spin-offs in respect of particular blocks of IAC common stock.

        U.S. Treasury regulations require IAC stockholders who receive Spinco common stock in the spin-offs to attach to their U.S. federal income tax returns for the year in which the Spinco stock is received a detailed statement setting forth such data as may be appropriate to demonstrate the applicability of Section 355 of the Code to the spin-offs.

    Certain U.S. Federal Income Tax Consequences If One or More of the Spin-Offs Were Taxable

        The IRS private letter ruling and/or the opinion of counsel will be based on, among other things, certain assumptions as well as on the accuracy of certain representations and statements that IAC and the Spincos make to the IRS and to counsel. If any of these representations or statements are, or become, inaccurate or incomplete, or if IAC or the Spincos breach any of their respective covenants, the IRS private letter ruling and/or the opinion of counsel may be invalid.

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        Moreover, the IRS private letter ruling would not address all the issues that are relevant to determining whether the spin-offs qualify as transactions that are generally tax free for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Notwithstanding the IRS private letter ruling and/or opinion, the IRS could determine that one or more of the spin-offs should be treated as a taxable distribution if it determines that any of the representations, assumptions or undertakings that were included in the request for the private letter ruling is false or has been violated or if it disagrees with the conclusions in the opinion of counsel that are not covered by the IRS ruling.

        If the IRS were to assert successfully that one or more of the spin-offs were taxable, the above consequences would not apply with respect to such spin-off and both IAC and holders of IAC common stock who received shares of Spinco common stock in such spin-off could be subject to tax, as described below. In addition, certain events that may or may not be within the control of IAC or a Spinco, including extraordinary purchases of IAC common stock or Spinco common stock, could cause one or more of the spin-offs not to qualify as tax free to IAC and/or holders of IAC common stock. Depending on the circumstances, a Spinco may be required to indemnify IAC and the other Spincos for some or all of the taxes and certain related losses resulting from the spin-off of such Spinco not qualifying as tax free under Sections 355 and/or 368(a)(1)(D) of the Code. See "Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions—Tax Sharing Agreement." If a spin-off were taxable, then:

    IAC would recognize gain in an amount equal to the excess of the fair market value of Spinco common stock on the date of the spin-off distributed to IAC stockholders over IAC's adjusted tax basis in the stock of such Spinco, and IAC may also recognize income or gain with respect to certain restructuring transactions undertaken in connection with such spin-off;

    each IAC stockholder who received Spinco common stock in the taxable spin-off would be treated as having received a taxable distribution in an amount equal to the fair market value of such Spinco stock (including any fractional shares sold on behalf of the stockholder) on the spin-off date. That distribution would be taxable to the stockholder as a dividend to the extent of IAC's current and accumulated earnings and profits (as increased to reflect any current income, including any gain, recognized by IAC on the taxable spin-off). Any amount that exceeded IAC's earnings and profits would be treated first as a non-taxable return of capital to the extent of the IAC stockholder's tax basis in its IAC common stock with any remaining amounts being taxed as capital gain;

    certain stockholders could be subject to additional special rules, such as rules relating to the dividends received deduction and extraordinary dividends; and

    a stockholder's tax basis in Spinco common stock received generally would equal the fair market value of Spinco common stock on the spin-off date, and the holding period for that stock would begin the day after the spin-off date.

        Even if one or more spin-offs otherwise qualify as transactions that are generally tax free for U.S. federal income tax purposes under Sections 355 and/or 368(a)(1)(D) of the Code, they could be taxable to IAC under Section 355(e) of the Code if one or more persons were to acquire directly or indirectly stock representing a 50% or greater interest, by vote or value, in IAC or one of the Spincos during the four-year period beginning on the date which is two years before the date of the spin-off, as part of a plan or series of related transactions that includes the spin-off. If such an acquisition of IAC stock or Spinco stock were to trigger the application of Section 355(e), IAC would recognize taxable gain as described above, but the spin-offs would be tax free to IAC stockholders. In addition, the IRS could disagree with or challenge the conclusions reached in one or more of the tax opinions that IAC expects to receive with respect to certain related matters and transactions. In such case, IAC could recognize material amounts of taxable income or gain.

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        In connection with the spin-offs, IAC and the Spincos will enter into a Tax Sharing Agreement. Under the Tax Sharing Agreement, each Spinco will have to indemnify IAC and the other Spincos for any taxes resulting from the spin-off of such Spinco (and any related interest, penalties, legal and professional fees, and all costs and damages associated with related stockholder litigation or controversies) to the extent such amounts result from (i) any act or failure to act by such Spinco described in the covenants in the Tax Sharing Agreement, (ii) any acquisition of equity securities or assets of such Spinco or a member of its group, or (iii) any breach by such Spinco or any member of its group of any representation or covenant contained in the separation documents or in the documents relating to the IRS private letter ruling and/or tax opinions. The ability of IAC or any of the Spincos to collect under these indemnity provisions will depend on the financial position of the indemnifying party. See "Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions—Tax Sharing Agreement."

        THE FOREGOING IS A SUMMARY OF CERTAIN U.S. FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSEQUENCES OF THE SPIN-OFFS UNDER CURRENT LAW AND IS FOR GENERAL INFORMATION ONLY. THE FOREGOING DOES NOT PURPORT TO ADDRESS ALL U.S. FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSEQUENCES OR TAX CONSEQUENCES THAT MAY ARISE UNDER THE TAX LAWS OF OTHER JURISDICTIONS OR THAT MAY APPLY TO PARTICULAR CATEGORIES OF STOCKHOLDERS. EACH IAC STOCKHOLDER SHOULD CONSULT ITS TAX ADVISOR AS TO THE PARTICULAR TAX CONSEQUENCES OF THE SPIN-OFFS TO SUCH STOCKHOLDER, INCLUDING THE APPLICATION OF U.S. FEDERAL, STATE, LOCAL AND FOREIGN TAX LAWS, AND THE EFFECT OF POSSIBLE CHANGES IN TAX LAWS THAT MAY AFFECT THE TAX CONSEQUENCES DESCRIBED ABOVE.

Market for Common Stock of Tree.com

        There is currently no public market for the Tree.com common stock. We have been approved to list our common stock on NASDAQ under the symbol "TREE." The Tree.com common stock has been approved for inclusion in the global market tier of the Nasdaq Stock Market.

Trading Before the Distribution Date

        Beginning on or shortly before the record date and continuing through the distribution date, it is expected that there will be two markets in IAC common stock: a "regular-way" market and an "ex-distribution" market. Shares of IAC common stock that trade on the regular way market will trade with an entitlement to shares of the common stock of the Spincos distributed pursuant to the spin-offs. Shares that trade on the ex-distribution market will trade without an entitlement to shares of the common stock of the Spincos distributed pursuant to the spin-offs. Therefore, if you sell shares of IAC common stock in the "regular-way" market up to and including through the distribution date, you will be selling your right to receive shares of the common stock of the Spincos in the spin-offs. If you own shares of IAC common stock at the close of business on the record date and sell those shares on the "ex-distribution" market, up to and including through the distribution date, you will still receive the shares of the common stock of the Spincos that you would be entitled to receive pursuant to your ownership of the shares of IAC common stock.

        Furthermore, beginning shortly before the distribution date and continuing up to and including through the distribution date, it is expected that there will be a "when-issued" market in the common stock of each of the Spincos. "When-issued" trading refers to a sale or purchase made conditionally because the security has been authorized but not yet issued. The "when-issued" trading market will be a market for shares of Spinco common stock that will be distributed to IAC stockholders on the distribution date. If you owned shares of IAC common stock at the close of business on the record date, you would be entitled to shares of the Spincos' common stock distributed pursuant to the spin-offs. You may trade this entitlement to shares of common stock of all or any of the Spincos, without the shares of IAC common stock you own, on the "when-issued" market. On the first trading

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day following the distribution date, "when-issued" trading with respect to Spinco common stock will end and "regular-way" trading will begin.

Conditions to the Spin-Offs

        The IAC Board of Directors has reserved the right, in its sole discretion, to amend, modify or abandon the spin-offs and the related transactions at any time prior to the distribution date. This means IAC may cancel or delay the planned distribution of common stock of all or any of the Spincos if at any time the Board of Directors of IAC determines that the distribution of such common stock is not in the best interests of IAC and its stockholders. If IAC's Board of Directors determines to cancel the spin-off of a Spinco, stockholders of IAC will not receive any dividend of common stock of such Spinco and IAC will be under no obligation whatsoever to its stockholders to distribute such shares.

        Absent a determination of IAC's Board of Directors to the contrary, the Spincos expect that the spin-offs will be effective on [    •    ], 2008, the distribution date. In addition, the spin-offs and related transactions are subject to the satisfaction or waiver (by IAC's Board of Directors in its sole discretion) of the following conditions:

    the registration statement on Form S-1 filed by each of the Spincos with respect to its common shares shall have been declared effective by the SEC or become effective under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act"), no stop order suspending the effectiveness of such registration statement shall have been issued and no proceedings for that purpose shall have been instituted or threatened by the SEC;

    the common stock of each of the Spincos shall have been accepted for listing on NASDAQ, subject to compliance with applicable listing requirements;

    no order or other legal restraint or prohibition preventing the consummation of any of the spin-offs or related transactions shall be threatened, pending or in effect;

    any material consents and governmental authorizations necessary to complete the spin-offs shall have been obtained and be in full force and effect;

    the stockholders of IAC shall have approved, in accordance with the Delaware General Corporation Law (the "DGCL"), a merger agreement providing for the merger of a wholly-owned subsidiary of IAC with and into IAC pursuant to which all of the outstanding shares of preferred stock of IAC shall be converted into the right to receive cash;

    the IAC Board of Directors shall have received a written solvency opinion, in form and substance acceptable to the IAC Board of Directors, from Duff & Phelps regarding the spin-offs and related transactions, which opinion shall not have been withdrawn or modified;

    IAC shall have received an opinion of Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz, in form and substance satisfactory to the IAC Board of Directors, regarding the qualification of the spin-offs as transactions that are generally tax free for U.S. federal income tax purposes under Sections 355 and/or 368(a)(1)(D) of the Code (to the extent such qualification is not addressed by an Internal Revenue Service private letter ruling (the "IRS Ruling") received by IAC), which opinion (and, in the event IAC shall have received the IRS Ruling, the IRS Ruling) shall not have been withdrawn or modified;

    IAC shall have received opinions from its external tax advisors, in form and substance satisfactory to the IAC Board of Directors regarding the U.S. federal income tax consequences to IAC of certain related matters and transactions (to the extent such matters are not addressed by the IRS Ruling) and certain state tax consequences to IAC of the spin-offs, which opinions shall not have been withdrawn or modified; and

28


    IAC shall have received an opinion of Delaware counsel to IAC, in form and substance satisfactory to the IAC Board of Directors, to the effect that the spin-offs do not require approval of the stockholders of IAC under Section 271 of the DGCL.

Reasons for the Separation

        During the fall of 2007, IAC's management, in reviewing the strategic agendas and prospects of its various businesses, concluded that a separation of IAC into five separately traded public companies would best facilitate growth of the businesses. After discussion with the IAC Board of Directors, the Board agreed. Among the factors considered in arriving at this determination were:

    While the Spincos share common attributes, both with each other and with IAC, they generally face different strategic and competitive challenges. As a result, IAC management and the IAC Board determined that, in IAC's current configuration, when facing strategic and operating issues for a particular business, whether having to do with transactional alternatives, capital investment, new business initiatives, compensation or otherwise, considerations of the other businesses and of the company as a whole had the potential to lead to different decisions than might be made by standalone companies. IAC concluded, therefore, that the current structure may not be the most responsive to the exigencies of each business and that the spin-offs will enhance the success of each business by enabling IAC and the Spincos to resolve the problems that arise from the operation of different businesses within the IAC group.

    The lack of a liquid equity currency linked directly to the individual businesses constrained each business' ability to transact in its own industry and to provide equity-based incentive programs for employees that were entirely dependent on the performance of the specific business.

    While efforts were underway to increase the benefits to each business resulting from being a part of IAC, including through cost savings, better talent development and deployment, increased business opportunities, and other initiatives, the common attributes of the Spincos were more limited than initially believed, and there was therefore a limit to the benefits to be realized from such integration and the time horizon for realizing such benefits was substantially longer than IAC had initially believed.

    IAC believed that its stock performance during recent years did not reflect its operating performance or the true value of its businesses. IAC believed that this was in part because of the complexity involved in understanding a variety of businesses represented by a single equity investment, and that increased transparency and clarity into the different businesses of IAC would allow investors to more appropriately value the merits, performance and future prospects of the companies.

        Because IAC concluded that the separation of these businesses would over time enhance their operating performance, open up strategic alternatives that may otherwise not have been readily available to them, and facilitate investor understanding and better target investor demand, IAC believes that following the spin-offs, the common stock of the five publicly traded companies will have a higher aggregate market value than would IAC if it were to remain in its current configuration. No assurances, however, can be given that such higher aggregate market value will be achieved. The IAC Board of Directors believes that such value increase would further facilitate growth of the separated businesses by reducing the costs of equity compensation and acquisitions undertaken with equity consideration, in each case resulting in a real and substantial benefit for the companies.

        The IAC Board of Directors considered a number of other potentially negative factors in evaluating the separation, including loss of synergies from operating as one company, potential disruptions to the businesses as a result of the separation, the potential impact of the separation on the anticipated credit ratings of the Spincos, risks of being unable to achieve the benefits expected to be

29



achieved by the separation and the reaction of IAC stockholders to the separation, the risk that the plan of execution might not be completed and the one-time and ongoing costs of the separation. The IAC Board of Directors concluded that the anticipated benefits of the spin-offs outweighed these factors. In view of the wide variety of factors considered in connection with the evaluation of the separation and the complexity of these matters, the IAC Board of Directors did not find it useful to, and did not attempt to, quantify, rank or otherwise assign relative weights to the factors considered. The individual members of the IAC Board of Directors likely may have given different weights to different factors.

Litigation with Liberty Media Corporation

        In January 2008, IAC, Barry Diller and Liberty Media Corporation ("Liberty") commenced actions in the Delaware Chancery Court in which Liberty asserted, among other things, that Mr. Diller, the Chairman and CEO of IAC, had breached an agreement between Liberty and him and that therefore Liberty had assumed the right to exercise voting control over IAC. The basis for this claim was that IAC did not have the right to consummate the spin-offs with a single class voting structure and therefore acts in furtherance of the transaction had breached the agreement. After a chancery court decision in IAC and Mr. Diller's favor on March 28, 2008, the parties agreed, on May 13, 2008, to settle that litigation pursuant to the "Spinco Agreement." As described in more detail below under "Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions—Agreements with Liberty Media Corporation," the Spinco Agreement also contains, among other things, provisions that will become effective at the time of the spin-off of each Spinco with a single class of common stock, including provisions providing Liberty the right to nominate directors to the Spinco's Board of Directors so long as Liberty maintains specified ownership levels, restrictions on acquisitions and transfers of the securities of the Spinco by Liberty and its affiliates, certain standstill restrictions on Liberty and its affiliates and registration rights to be granted to Liberty.

Financial Advisor

        Allen & Company LLC provided financial advice in connection with the spin-offs. Allen & Company was retained in connection with the transaction because of the firm's familiarity with the businesses and assets of IAC and the Spincos and the firm's qualifications and reputation. IAC and Allen & Company have not yet determined the amount of fees to be paid to Allen & Company in connection with its engagement. IAC expects to pay Allen & Company a customary fee.


TREATMENT OF OUTSTANDING IAC COMPENSATORY EQUITY-BASED AWARDS

        In November of 2007, IAC's Compensation and Human Resources Committee (the "Committee") made determinations regarding the treatment in the spin-offs of IAC's compensatory equity-based awards granted on or prior to December 31, 2007. The various adjustments the Committee has determined to make are described below:

    (1)
    All unvested IAC restricted stock units ("RSUs") granted prior to August 2005 will vest immediately prior to the spin-offs, with awards thereafter settled, in accordance with applicable law, in shares of common stock of IAC, HSNi, ILG, Ticketmaster and Tree.com, in each case as though the equity holder owned the number of shares of IAC common stock underlying the IAC RSU award immediately prior to the spin-offs. Based on the most recent available information, it is expected that at the time of the spin-offs HSNi employees, ILG employees, Ticketmaster employees and Tree.com employees will hold 225,233 RSUs, 116,008 RSUs, 328,887 RSUs and 394,110 RSUs, respectively, subject to this treatment.

    (2)
    All unvested IAC RSUs scheduled to vest through February 2009 will vest immediately prior to the spin-offs, with awards thereafter settled, in accordance with applicable law, in shares of

30


      common stock of IAC, HSNi, ILG, Ticketmaster and Tree.com, in each case as though the equity holder owned the number of shares of IAC common stock underlying the IAC RSU award immediately prior to the spin-offs. Based on the most recent available information, it is expected that at the time of the spin-offs HSNi employees, ILG employees, Ticketmaster employees and Tree.com employees will hold 78,772 RSUs, 39,685 RSUs, 98,306 RSUs and 32,816 RSUs, respectively, subject to this treatment.

    (3)
    Performance-based IAC RSUs granted in 2007, or Growth Shares, will be converted into non-performance-based IAC RSUs based on "target" value with the same vesting schedule and will thereafter be subject to the other adjustment and conversion provisions described below. Based on the most recent available information, it is expected that at the time of the spin-offs Tree.com employees will hold 157,948 RSUs subject to this treatment.

    (4)
    With respect to each IAC RSU award that provides for vesting of 100% of the award following passage of a multi-year period (cliff vesting awards), the portion of the unvested IAC RSU award that would have vested through February 2009 if the award had vested on an annual basis will convert into five separate RSU awards with respect to IAC and each of the Spincos, based on the applicable distribution ratios in the spin-offs and the two-for-one reverse stock split at IAC, but will otherwise have the same vesting terms and other applicable terms and conditions. Based on the most recent available information, it is expected that at the time of the spin-offs HSNi employees, ILG employees, Ticketmaster employees and Tree.com employees will hold 164,907 RSUs, 118,035 RSUs, 193,104 RSUs and 110,203 RSUs, respectively, subject to this treatment (inclusive of converted Growth Shares).

    (5)
    With respect to all other IAC RSUs that do not vest or convert pursuant to paragraphs (1), (2) or (4) above, the IAC RSUs will convert into an RSU award with respect to shares of common stock of the company that continues to employ the equity holder following the spin-offs, with appropriate adjustments to the number of shares of common stock underlying each such award to maintain pre- and post spin-off values, but otherwise preserving the same vesting terms and other applicable terms and conditions. Based on the most recent available information, it is expected that at the time of the spin-offs Tree.com employees will hold 161,424 RSUs subject to this treatment (inclusive of converted Growth Shares); and

    (6)
    All unexercised option awards, whether vested or unvested, will be split among IAC and each of the Spincos based on relative value at the time of the spin-offs, with appropriate adjustments to the number of shares of common stock underlying each such award and the per share exercise price of each such award to maintain pre- and post spin-off values, but otherwise preserving the same vesting terms and other applicable terms and conditions. Based on the most recent available information, it is expected that at the time of the spin-offs HSNi employees, ILG employees, Ticketmaster employees and Tree.com employees will hold 734,633 options, 0 options, 816,784 options and 451,885 options, respectively, subject to this treatment.

        With respect to any IAC compensatory equity-based awards granted after December 31, 2007, those awards will convert into awards with respect to shares of common stock of the company that continues to employ the equity holder following the spin-offs, with appropriate adjustments to the number of shares underlying each such award and the per share exercise price of each such award (with respect to options) to maintain pre- and post spin-off values, but otherwise preserving the same vesting terms and other applicable terms and conditions. Based on the most recent available information, it is expected that at the time of the spin-offs Tree.com employees will hold 6,451 RSUs and 0 options subject to this treatment. With respect to stock options, the number of shares of common stock subject to any adjusted stock option will be rounded down to the nearest whole share. With respect to restricted stock units that do not vest in connection with the spin-offs, the number of shares of common stock subject to any adjusted restricted stock unit will be rounded up to the nearest whole

31



share. With respect to restricted stock units that vest in connection with the spin-offs, the number of shares of common stock that an individual will be entitled to receive in connection with the spin-offs will be rounded up to the nearest whole share.

        In the event that IAC abandons the spin-off with respect to one or more Spincos, the adjustments set forth above will apply as described above except that there will be no conversion of IAC equity awards into equity awards of a Spinco that IAC does not spin-off and employees of any such Spinco will be treated as employees of IAC for purposes of the foregoing adjustments.

        The treatment of IAC compensatory equity-based awards held by persons who will be employed by IAC immediately following the spin-offs is generally similar to that described above, with certain adjustments intended to provide retention incentives for IAC corporate employees.

        The principal objective of the Committee in making these adjustments was one of fairness, with some of the particular considerations being:

    A desire to reward service prior to the spin-offs with stock of the companies that made up IAC before the spin-offs, and reward service after the spin-offs with stock of the company for which an employee will work after the spin-offs;

    A recognition that the primary motivation for the Growth Share grants, which was to provide increased incentives for employees to focus on the total performance of the entire IAC conglomerate as opposed to the individual businesses for which they worked through increased volatility of potential rewards, no longer was present given the determination to do the spin-offs;

    An interest in eliminating the complexities that would be associated with adjusting the 2007 performance conditions among five separate public companies and the possibility that such adjustments would not be equitable to all holders of the awards; and

    Compliance with the terms of the applicable equity plans, tax laws and accounting requirements.


DIVIDEND POLICY

        We do not currently expect to pay a regular cash dividend. The declaration and payment of future dividends to holders of common stock of the Company will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend upon many factors, including our financial condition, earnings, capital requirements of our businesses, covenants associated with certain debt obligations, legal requirements, regulatory constraints, industry practice and other factors that our board of directors deems relevant.

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TRANSFERS TO IAC AND FINANCING

        It is currently expected that in connection with the spin-offs, HSNi, Ticketmaster and an entity that will become a subsidiary of ILG prior to the spin-offs will make certain distributions to IAC. To fund these distributions, each of these Spincos has entered into certain financing arrangements. Additionally, each of these companies may distribute some amount of cash on hand, but these amounts are not presently knowable and are unlikely to be material. HSNi, the borrowing subsidiary of ILG and Ticketmaster are each also expected to dividend to IAC prior to the spin-offs all net receivables owed them by IAC and its affiliates.

        Tree.com is expected to have $110 million at the time of the separation, which would mean a $55 million cash contribution by IAC based upon March 31, 2008 balances.

        These dividends and cash contributions were determined by IAC after an assessment of the optimal capital structure for Tree.com and for IAC, taking into account each company's cash flow prospects, working capital and other cash needs, potential acquisition agenda and other relevant factors.

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CERTAIN INFORMATION WITH RESPECT TO TREE.COM

BUSINESS OF TREE.COM

        When used with respect to any periods following the spin-offs and unless otherwise indicated, the term "Tree.com" refers to Tree.com, Inc., a Delaware corporation that was incorporated in connection with the spin-offs in April 2008 to hold IAC's lending and real estate businesses, subsidiaries and investments, the results of which were previously reported in the Lending and Real Estate reporting segments of IAC's Transactions reporting sector immediately prior to the completion of the spin-offs. The following disclosure regarding Tree.com's business assumes completion of the spin-offs.

        For information regarding the results of operations of Tree.com and its segments on a historical basis, see the Consolidated Financial Statements of Tree.com and the disclosure set forth under the caption "—Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations of Tree.com." For information regarding the results of operations of Tree.com on a pro forma basis to give effect to the completion of the spin-offs, see the Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for Tree.com.

History and Overview

        Tree.com is the parent of LendingTree, LLC and is the indirect parent of several companies owned by LendingTree, LLC. LendingTree, LLC (formerly, LendingTree, Inc.) was incorporated in the state of Delaware in June 1996 and commenced nationwide operations in July 1998. LendingTree, Inc. was acquired by IAC in 2003 and converted to a Delaware limited liability company (LendingTree, LLC) in December 2004. Through its various subsidiaries, Tree.com currently operates a lending business (the "Lending Business") and a real estate business (the "Real Estate Business"). Tree.com's main website address is www.lendingtree.com.

        The Lending Business consists of online networks, principally LendingTree.com and GetSmart.com, as well as call centers, which match consumers with lenders and loan brokers. In addition, the Lending Business originates, processes, approves and funds various types of residential real estate loans under two brand names, LendingTree Loans® and HomeLoanCenter.com, and offers residential mortgage loan settlement services under the name LendingTree Settlement Services.

        The Real Estate Business consists primarily of an internet-enabled national residential real estate brokerage that currently operates offices in 14 markets under the brand name "RealEstate.com, REALTORS." Outside of these 14 markets, RealEstate.com maintains relationships with a network of third-party brokerages that receive leads from RealEstate.com and pay a referral fee on closed transactions. The Real Estate Business also consists of a brokerage that matches residential home buyers interested in newly constructed homes with builders and currently operates under the brand name "iNest®."

Lending Business

    Our Lending Networks

        Consumers can access Tree.com's nationwide network of more than 200 banks, lenders and loan brokers online (via www.lendingtree.com or www.getsmart.com) or by calling 1-800-555-TREE. Loans offered by these banks, lenders and loan brokers (the "Network Lenders") consist primarily of home mortgages (in connection with refinancings and purchases) and home equity loans.

        Tree.com selects lenders throughout the country in an effort to provide full geographic lending coverage of the country and to offer a complete suite of loan offerings available in the market. Frequently, before a lender joins the Network, Tree.com performs credit and financial reviews on the lender. In addition, as a further quality assurance measure, Tree.com recently began checking new

34



lenders against a national antifraud database maintained by the Mortgage Asset Research Institute. All Network Lenders are required to enter into a contract that generally may be terminated upon notice by either party. No individual Network Lender accounted for more than 5% of the Lending Business revenue in any period.

        Consumers seeking mortgage loans through one of Tree.com's lending networks can receive multiple conditional loan offers from Network Lenders, or from Tree.com's subsidiary doing business under the name "LendingTree Loans" (as described below), in response to a single loan request form.

        The process by which the Lending Business matches consumers and Network Lenders, which is referred to in the document as the "matching process," is innovative and customer-friendly. This matching process consists of the following steps:

    Credit Request.  Consumers complete a single loan request form for the selected loan with information regarding their income, assets and liabilities, loan preferences and other data. Consumers also consent to the retrieval of their credit report.

    Loan Request Form Matching and Transmission.  Tree.com matches a given consumer's loan request form data, credit profile and geographic location against certain pre-established creditworthiness criteria of Network Lenders, which may be modified from time to time. Once a given loan request passes through the matching process, the loan request is automatically transmitted to up to four or five Network Lenders.

    Lender Evaluation and Response.  Network Lenders who receive a loan request form evaluate the information in the loan request to determine whether to make a conditional loan offer. If a given Network Lender does not respond with a conditional loan offer, the loan request form is directed through the matching process a second time in an attempt to match the consumer with another Network Lender.

    Communication of a Conditional Offer.  If one or more Network Lenders make a conditional offer, the consumer is automatically notified via e-mail, typically within minutes after the submission of the loan request form. Through these e-mails, consumers may access a dedicated webpage where they can view the proposed terms of each conditional offer, including: interest rate, closing costs, monthly payment amount, lender fees and other information. If a consumer does not have access to e-mail, conditional offers are provided to the consumer by phone or fax.

    Loan Processing.  Consumers work offline with the relevant Network Lender to provide additional information bearing on creditworthiness to the Network Lender. If the Network Lender approves a consumer, it will then underwrite and originate the loan.

    Ongoing Consumer and Lender Support.  Active e-mail and telephone follow-up and support is provided to both Network Lenders and consumers during the loan transaction process. This follow-up and support is designed to provide technical assistance and increase overall satisfaction of Network Lenders, as well as increase the percentage of consumers who close a loan through financial institutions found through the Lending Business.

        The Lending Business also offers a short-form matching process under the LendingTree® and GetSmart® brands. This process, which provides consumers with lender contact information only, typically requires the consumer to submit less data than that required in connection with the matching process described above.

        The Lending Business does not charge consumers a fee to use its lending networks. Substantially all revenues from lending networks are derived from both up-front matching fees paid by Network Lenders who receive a loan request form and closing fees paid by Network Lenders who close a transaction with the consumer. Since a given loan request form can be matched with more than one Network Lender, multiple match fees may be generated from the same form. Matching fees are

35



recognized at the time the loan request form is transmitted and closing fees are recognized at the time the Network Lender reports that it has closed the loan, which may be several months after the time the loan request form is transmitted.

    LendingTree Loans/Home Loan Center, Inc.

        The Lending Business also originates, processes, approves and funds various consumer mortgage loans through a Tree.com subsidiary, Home Loan Center, Inc., which operates primarily under the brand name "LendingTree Loans®." For these purposes, the Lending Business maintains loan origination offices in California and is able to provide a broad range of mortgage loan offerings to consumers in most states, primarily conforming and prime loans, and, to a lesser extent, non-conforming, Alt-A and subprime loans. Products available include both adjustable loans and fixed rate loans.

        A summary of loans sold by type of loan for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2007 and the three months ended March 31, 2008 and 2007 and the loans held as of the periods then ended is presented below (in millions):

 
   
  Year Ended December 31,
  Three Months
Ended March 31,

 
 
   
  2005
  2006
  2007
  2007
  2008
 
Loans Sold                                    
Conforming   $ 3,462   $ 3,773   $ 4,210   $ 1,132   $ 523  
% of Total     48.2 %   47.9 %   69.3 %   58.6 %   86.3 %
Non-Conforming /Alt-A   $ 2,291   $ 2,386   $ 1,323   $ 504   $ 83  
% of Total     31.9 %   30.0 %   21.8 %   26.1 %   13.7 %
SubPrime   $ 269   $ 251   $ 51   $ 44   $  
% of Total     3.7 %   3.2 %   0.8 %   2.3 %    
Home equity   $ 1,161   $ 1,461   $ 489   $ 252   $ 0.2  
% of Total     16.2 %   18.6 %   8.1 %   13.1 %    
       
 
 
 
 
 
Total   $ 7,183   $ 7,871   $ 6,073   $ 1,932   $ 606  
       
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
  December 31,
  March 31,
 

 

 

 


 

2005


 

2006


 

2007


 

2007


 

2008


 
Loans Held For Sale                                    
Conforming   $ 124   $ 147   $ 76   $ 219   $ 74  
% of Total     33.0 %   42.2 %   82.2 %   53.0 %   79.1 %
Non-Conforming /Alt-A   $ 140   $ 102   $ 10   $ 119   $ 13  
% of Total     37.5 %   29.2 %   10.5 %   28.8 %   14.0 %
SubPrime   $ 32   $ 22   $ 2   $ 6   $ 2  
% of Total     8.7 %   6.3 %   2.7 %   1.5 %   2.5 %
Home equity   $ 78   $ 78   $ 4   $ 69   $ 4  
% of Total     20.8 %   22.3 %   4.6 %   16.7 %   4.4 %
       
 
 
 
 
 
Total   $ 374   $ 349   $ 92   $ 413   $ 93  
       
 
 
 
 
 

        All LendingTree Loans® -branded loan originations are derived from consumer loan requests received through www.lendingtree.com, www.getsmart.com or 1-800-555-TREE. A portion of all consumer loan request forms received through these channels are referred to LendingTree Loans. LendingTree Loans offers those consumers a choice among various loan alternatives, with loan pricing based upon different wholesale offerings received by LendingTree Loans from the secondary market investors who purchase the loans (plus a fixed margin to cover internal costs). LendingTree Loans maintains controls to ensure that its consumer loan pricing correlates to secondary market pricing and to ensure that its consumers receive multiple loan alternatives, thus maintaining the competition and choice elements

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inherent in the LendingTree brand. Tree.com believes that LendingTree Loans provides value to consumers who do not wish to negotiate with multiple lenders, but still wish to obtain loan alternatives.

        LendingTree Loans® -branded loans are funded and closed using proceeds from borrowings under available warehouse lines of credit or repurchase agreements. Substantially all of the loans funded are sold, along with the accompanying loan servicing rights, to investors in the secondary market, generally within 30 days of funding, with the proceeds from such sales being used to repay borrowings under the warehouse lines of credit or repurchase agreements. For terms of the warehouse lines of credit and repurchase agreements see "Financial Position, Liquidity and Capital Resources."

        Although most of Home Loan Center, Inc.'s consumer leads are sourced through www.lendingtree.com or 1-800-555-TREE and originated under the LendingTree Loans® brand, a small portion of Home Loan Center, Inc.'s leads are sourced from a variety of non-LendingTree channels, including third-party online lead aggregators, direct mail marketing campaigns and www.homeloancenter.com. When obtaining leads from third-party sources, Home Loan Center, Inc. operates under its traditional name and brand (HomeLoanCenter). Consumers who request loans through the HomeLoanCenter brand typically receive single loan offers. HomeLoanCenter -branded loans are funded, closed and sold into the secondary market in the same manner, and on substantially the same terms, as LendingTree Loans -branded loans.

        Revenues from direct lending operations are derived from the sale of loans to secondary market investors and from origination and other fees paid by borrowers. Of Home Loan Center, Inc.'s seventeen secondary market investors in 2007, the two largest, Countrywide and CitiMortgage, represented approximately 28% and 13%, respectively, of Tree.com's consolidated revenue in 2007. See "Risk Factors Relating to the Business of Tree.com Following the Spin-Offs—Adverse Events and Trends."

    LendingTree Settlement Services

        The Lending Business also provides loan settlement services, including title insurance, appraisal and other collateral evaluation products, flood insurance, escrow, and closing services, through LendingTree Settlement Services, Inc., which provides services to Network Lenders, as well as to Home Loan Center, Inc. (including when doing business as LendingTree Loans®). In addition, Home Loan Center, Inc. offers escrow and sub-escrow services through its subsidiary, HLC Escrow, Inc.

        Revenues from LendingTree Settlement Services are derived from service fees paid by lenders, which fees may or may not be passed on by the lender to the loan customer. Revenues from escrow and sub-escrow services are derived from fees charged to the consumer by the lender or by Home Loan Center, Inc.

    Other Businesses

        Through the LendingTree.com and GetSmart.com websites, Tree.com's Lending Business also offers:

    unsecured loans, through which consumers are matched with multiple lenders using a network-based process similar to the mortgage loan matching process described above;

    automobile loans, through which consumers are linked with one or more third-party automobile lenders;

    credit cards, through which consumers can search various credit card offerings through a third-party vendor;

    student loans, through which consumers receive initial student loan offers through a third-party vendor; and

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    various consumer insurance products, pursuant to which consumers are linked with licensed insurance agents and insurance lead aggregators to obtain insurance offers.

        Revenues from these businesses are derived either from matching and closing fees, or in some cases, volume-based marketing fees. While the revenues from these businesses do not currently represent a significant portion of the revenues of the Lending Business, these revenues are expected to grow over time.

    Competition

        Tree.com's Lending Business, particularly its lending networks, competes with other lead aggregators, including online intermediaries that operate network-type arrangements. In the case of the direct lending operations, Tree.com believes that the primary competitors of its Lending Business are traditional lending institutions, including those that are developing their own direct, online lending channels. While these financial institutions do not operate lending networks, they process, close and fund loans as direct lenders through well-recognized, national brands, many of which are industry leaders. Tree.com's Lending Business also faces additional competition from direct lending websites owned and operated by other online lenders that originate the bulk of their loans through their websites or by phone. These companies typically operate a consumer-branded website and attract consumers via online banner ads, key word placement on search engines, partnering with affiliates and business development arrangements with other properties, including major online portals.

Real Estate Business

    Real Estate Brokerage

        RealEstate.com, REALTORS is Tree.com's proprietary real estate brokerage business, which currently operates in the following 14 markets: Greater Portland, Seattle, Denver, Salt Lake City, San Diego, Las Vegas, Phoenix, Tucson, Sierra Vista (AZ), Charlotte, New York, New Jersey, Philadelphia and Boston. Most of the business for the proprietary real estate brokerage is internally generated based on consumers accessing www.realestate.com or by calling 1-800-REALESTATE. The brokerage recruits agents to join as independent contractors, for whom it then generates leads, with the brokerage retaining a significant share of the gross commission on closed transactions originating from company-generated leads (and a lesser share in the case of agent-generated leads). Tree.com uses both a central agent recruiting group in Charlotte, as well as local recruiting efforts, to identify agents who fit its model and would be willing to join the company. Third-party brokerage services provided by approximately 300 real estate brokerage firms are also available through www.realestate.com or by calling 1-800-REALESTATE. The Real Estate Business has developed relationships with brokers over the years, and targets prospective companies based on available lead flow by geography, their willingness to work with a lead generation company under Tree.com's terms and conditions, and the belief that such brokerage firms would generate an acceptable closing conversion rate. These third-party brokerage services are available nationwide, as well as in the 14 markets in which RealEstate.com, REALTORS currently operates. Once the consumer and the real estate professional are matched and agree to work together, the remainder of the transaction is completed locally.

        The proprietary real estate brokerage business earns revenues through the real estate brokerage commissions it collects in connection with company- and agent-generated transactions. The Real Estate Business also earns revenue from referral fees paid by participating real estate brokerages.

    Other Real Estate Services

        The Real Estate Business also owns and operates www.inest.com, a website that matches potential purchasers of newly constructed homes with new home builders. iNest.com is currently available in 28 states and allows consumers to view new home community information (new home listings) on the

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iNest website. From the iNest website a consumer can print a coupon to present to builders that participate in the iNest.com network upon his or her first visit to a home site, which signifies that iNest.com will act as the buyer's real estate broker for a new home purchase from that builder. Upon closing, the builder pays a commission to iNest, which in turn is split between iNest, the licensed iNest real estate broker representing the consumer, and the consumer.

    Competition

        Tree.com's Real Estate Business competes with all real estate brokerages within the RealEstate.com, REALTORS fourteen markets. These brokerages are comprised mainly of traditional real estate companies operating as independent brands or franchisees, as well as non-traditional models, such as salaried-agent, fee-for-service, flat-fee, discount, or rebate commission models, many of which generate leads from the Internet. In addition, the Real Estate Business competes for customers with companies that are not brokerages, such as websites that aggregate real estate broker listings without related services and customer support. Given the downturn in the credit and mortgage markets, and the decline in the number of housing transactions, competition in this segment has increased.

Regulation and Legal Compliance

        Tree.com businesses market and provide services in heavily regulated industries through a number of different online and offline channels across the United States (see "Risk Factors Relating to the Business of Tree.com Following the Spin-Offs—Compliance and Changing Laws, Rules and Regulations"). As a result, they are subject to a variety of statutes, rules, regulations, policies and procedures in various jurisdictions in the United States, including:

    Restrictions on the amount and nature of fees or interest that may be charged in connection with a loan, in particular, state usury and fee restrictions;

    Restrictions on the manner in which consumer loans are marketed and originated, including the making of required consumer disclosures, such the federal Truth-in-Lending Act, the federal Equal Credit Opportunity Act, the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act, the federal Fair Housing Act, the federal Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA), and similar state laws;

    Restrictions on the amount and nature of fees that may be charged lenders and real estate professionals for providing or obtaining consumer leads, in particular, RESPA;

    Restrictions on the amount and nature of fees that may be charged consumers for real estate brokerage transactions, including any incentives and rebates, that may be offered to consumers by Tree.com businesses;

    State, and in some instances, federal, licensing or registration requirements applicable to both individuals or businesses engaged in the making or brokerage of loans (or certain kinds of loans, such as loans made pursuant to the Federal Housing Act), or the brokering of real estate transactions; and

    State and federal restrictions on the marketing activities conducted by telephone, the mail or by email, or over the internet, including the Telemarketing Sales Rule, state telemarketing laws, federal and state privacy laws, the CAN-SPAM Act, and the Federal Trade Commission Act and its accompanying regulations and guidelines.

Employees

        As of December 31, 2007, Tree.com had approximately 1,000 full-time employees. None of Tree.com's employees are represented under collective bargaining agreements. Tree.com considers its relations with its employees and independent contractors to be good.

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Properties

        Tree.com's principal executive offices, together with certain personnel and operations of its Lending and Real Estate Businesses, are currently located in approximately 89,000 square feet of office space in Charlotte, North Carolina under leases that expire in 2015. 95,500 square feet of office space in Irvine, California is utilized by Home Loan Center, Inc. under a lease expiring in 2010, and 31,667 square feet of office space in Jacksonville, Florida is utilized by LendingTree Settlement Services under leases that expire in 2009.

Tree.com Legal Proceedings

        In the ordinary course of business, Tree.com and its subsidiaries are parties to litigation involving property, personal injury, contract, intellectual property and other claims. The amounts that may be recovered in such matters may be subject to insurance coverage. Tree.com does not believe that such ordinary course litigation will have a material effect on its business, financial condition or results of operations.

        Rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission require the description of material pending legal proceedings, other than ordinary, routine litigation incident to the registrant's business, and advise that proceedings ordinarily need not be described if they primarily involve damage claims for amounts (exclusive of interest and costs) not exceeding 10% of the current assets of the registrant and its subsidiaries on a consolidated basis. Certain of the pending litigation matters described below, which management believes are the material litigations that Tree.com now faces, could involve amounts of the magnitude described above.

Patent Litigation

        Block Financial Corp. v. LendingTree, Inc., No. 01-cv-1007 ODS (U.S. Dist. Ct., W.D. Mo.); LendingTree, LLC v. Block Financial LLC, No. 08-cv-164 ODS (U.S. Dist. Ct., W.D. Mo.). On September 14, 2001, Block Financial Corporation ("Block") filed suit against LendingTree, LLC in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Missouri, alleging that LendingTree, LLC's loan-matching process infringes U.S. Patent No. 6,014,645 (the "'645 patent"), which generally claims a real-time application system for financial cards. Block seeks damages, attorneys' fees and injunctive relief.

        In 2002, LendingTree, LLC filed a petition to reexamine the '645 patent with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The Patent Office agreed to reexamine the '645 patent, and the court stayed the litigation pending reexamination. In December 2006, the Patent Office republished the patent, with certain modifications. The court then lifted its stay of the litigation. On September 27, 2007, the court issued a claim construction order.

        In February 2008, Block provided LendingTree, LLC with notice of a recently issued patent, U.S. Patent No. 7,310,617 (the "'617 patent"), a continuation of the '645 patent that purports to claim a real-time application system for financial offerings (as opposed to only financial cards). On March 6, 2008, LendingTree, LLC filed suit in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Missouri seeking a declaration that the '617 patent is invalid. On April 14, 2008, Block filed an answer and counterclaim. Block asserts that LendingTree, LLC's loan-matching process infringes the '617 patent. Block seeks damages, attorneys' fees and injunctive relief.

        On June 24, 2008, the court consolidated the two cases and approved a schedule setting a trial date of October 26, 2009. The consolidated case is currently in discovery.

        IMX, Inc. v. E-Loan, Inc., et al., No. 03-CV-1067 (U.S. Dist. Ct., D. Del.). On November 24, 2003, IMX, Inc. ("IMX") filed suit against LendingTree, LLC and several other companies in the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware, alleging infringement of U.S. Patent No. 5,995,947 (the

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"'947 patent"), which generally claims an interactive real-time trading system for loans. In its complaint, IMX sought damages, attorneys' fees and injunctive relief. On January 26, 2004, LendingTree, LLC filed a counterclaim seeking a declaration that the '947 patent is invalid and unenforceable.

        On December 14, 2005, the court (i) construed the claims of the '947 patent, (ii) granted partial summary judgment to LendingTree, LLC, limiting recoverable damages to the period commencing after the filing of suit due to IMX's failure to "mark" its website with its patent and (iii) denied the parties' cross-motions for summary judgment on the issues of infringement and invalidity.

        The case against LendingTree, LLC went to trial, and on January 23, 2006, the jury returned a verdict finding infringement and awarding IMX approximately $5.8 million in damages. The jury also found that the infringement was willful and that the asserted claims of the '947 patent are valid. LendingTree, LLC subsequently designed and implemented a work-around to avoid further infringement of the '947 patent.

        On January 10, 2007, the court, ruling on various post-trial motions, (i) denied IMX's motion for a permanent injunction and its request for attorneys' fees, (ii) enhanced the damages award by 50% in light of the jury's finding of willful infringement, (iii) awarded IMX pre- and post-judgment interest, (iv) rejected LendingTree, LLC's counterclaim alleging inequitable conduct by IMX and (v) entered judgment in favor of IMX for approximately $8.7 million plus interest.

        On July 27, 2007, the court, ruling on additional motions, (i) denied IMX's renewed request for an injunction, (ii) awarded IMX approximately $2.7 million in supplemental damages for the post-verdict, pre-design-around period, (iii) denied IMX's request to enhance those supplemental damages and (iv) awarded IMX approximately $1.0 million in pre-judgment interest and approximately $0.2 million in post-judgment interest to date. On August 9, 2007, an amended judgment was entered in favor of IMX for the foregoing amounts.

        LendingTree, LLC appealed from this judgment to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. IMX cross-appealed from the District Court's order prohibiting recovery of damages attributable to the period prior to the filing of the complaint, and from the court's refusal to award enhanced damages for post-verdict infringement. Briefing on the appeals has been completed. Oral argument has not yet been scheduled.

        As of December 31, 2007, LendingTree, LLC's reserve for this matter was approximately $12.8 million. In connection with the appeal, IAC executed a guarantee in favor of LendingTree, LLC in the amount of $13.5 million in lieu of LendingTree, LLC posting a bond. Before the spin-off of Tree.com is consummated, LendingTree, LLC will have to put in place a bond or similar security.

        On July 24, 2008, LendingTree and IMX reached a settlement in principle concerning this matter. The parties are currently negotiating a definitive settlement agreement, which LendingTree expects to execute prior to the spin-off of Tree.com.

        Source Search Technologies, LLC v. LendingTree, LLC, No. 2:04-CV-04420 (U.S. Dist. Ct., D.N.J.). On September 13, 2004, Source Search Technologies, LLC ("SST") filed suit against LendingTree, LLC and other companies in the U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey, alleging infringement of U.S. Patent No. 5,758,328 (the "'328 patent"), which generally claims a computerized procurement system. SST seeks damages, attorneys' fees and injunctive relief. On November 10, LendingTree, LLC filed a counterclaim seeking a declaration that the '328 patent is invalid and unenforceable.

        The court issued claim construction orders on October 16 and November 13, 2007. Following the completion of discovery, LendingTree, LLC and SST filed cross-motions for summary judgment on the issues of infringement and invalidity. LendingTree, LLC also filed a motion for summary judgment on the ground that any infringement was not willful. The court heard oral argument on these motions on November 13, 2007 and February 4, 2008.

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        On July 9, 2008, the court entered an opinion regarding the parties' motions for summary judgment. The court granted LendingTree's motion that the asserted claims of the '328 patent are invalid for obviousness, granted SST's motion that LendingTree infringes the asserted '328 claims, granted SST's motion that the '328 claims are not invalid for indefiniteness, dismissed LendingTree's motion for summary judgment of no willful infringement as moot, and denied SST's motion to strike the supplemental report of LendingTree's expert. On July 10, 2008, the court entered an order consistent with the rulings in its opinion and closed the case. LendingTree has not received notice from SST regarding whether it intends to appeal the court's ruling on obviousness.

Employment (Wage-and-Hour) Litigation

        Gonzalez v. Home Loan Center, Inc., No. CV06-5007 (U.S. Dist. Ct., C.D. Cal.). On August 9, 2006, Daniel Gonzalez filed this putative class action against Home Loan Center, Inc. (hereinafter, for the purpose of this section, "HLC") in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California. Plaintiff, a former HLC loan officer, asserts that HLC: failed to pay overtime; failed to pay wages due upon termination; failed to provide proper wage statements; failed to reimburse employees for expenses and/or improperly deducted wages for business-related expenses; and failed to provide meal and rest periods. Based upon these factual allegations, Plaintiff asserts violations of various California wage and hour laws, conversion, and violations of California Business & Professions Code § 17200. Plaintiff purports to represent a class of loan officers employed by HLC in California since August 9, 2002, and seeks damages, restitution, attorneys' fees and injunctive relief.

        On December 27, 2006, Plaintiff filed a second amended complaint, adding two additional plaintiffs, David Nottingham and Jeffrey Howerton. Because these new plaintiffs had signed agreements with HLC to arbitrate all employment-related claims, HLC filed a motion to compel arbitration.

        Following a mediation held in September 2007, the parties entered into an agreement to settle this action. Under the settlement agreement, HLC has agreed to pay a maximum of $4.0 million, inclusive of payments to class members as well as attorneys' fees and costs. The settlement agreement must be approved by the court in order to become effective. On May 13, 2008, Plaintiffs filed a motion for preliminary approval of the settlement. On June 13, 2008, the court, following a hearing, granted Plaintiffs' motion and preliminarily approved the settlement. The court also scheduled a final approval hearing for December 16, 2008.

        As of December 31, 2007, LendingTree, LLC's reserve for this matter was approximately $2.1 million. This figure reflects Tree.com's estimates as to the minimum percentage of class members likely to submit claims for payment and the contractual indemnity obligations of former HLC shareholders for liability that arose prior to LendingTree, LLC's acquisition of HLC.

        Richardson v. Home Loan Center, Inc., No. 07CC01337 (Cal. Super. Ct., Orange Cty.). On August 2, 2007, Angela Richardson filed this putative class action against HLC in the California Superior Court for Orange County. Plaintiff, a former HLC loan processor, alleges that HLC: failed to pay overtime; failed to provide meal and rest periods; failed to pay wages due upon termination; and failed to provide proper wage statements. Based upon these factual allegations, plaintiff asserts that HLC violated various California wage and hour laws as well as California Business & Professions Code § 17200. Plaintiff purports to represent all loan processors, funders and underwriters employed by HLC since August 2, 2003, and seeks damages, restitution, attorneys' fees and injunctive relief.

        On December 21, 2007, plaintiff filed a second amended complaint. On February 15, 2008, HLC filed a demurrer and a motion to strike portions of the second amended complaint. On April 3, 2008, the court overruled the demurrer and denied the motion to strike. On April 23, 2008, HLC filed an answer to the second amended complaint. A mediation is scheduled for August 15, 2008.

        Plaintiffs have not yet filed a motion for class certification. No trial date has been set.

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        As of December 31, 2007, LendingTree, LLC's reserve for this matter was approximately $0.4 million. This reserve was established in connection with a settlement offer by HLC. No settlement has been reached to date.

        Primanto v. Home Loan Center, Inc., No. 07CC01382 (Cal. Super. Ct., Orange Cty.). On September 28, 2007, William Primanto filed this putative class action against HLC in the California Superior Court for Orange County. Plaintiff, a former HLC loan officer, alleges that HLC failed to pay overtime and asserts violations of various California wage and hour laws and of California Business & Professions Code § 17200. Plaintiff purports to represent all loan officers employed by HLC in California since September 28, 2003, and seeks compensatory damages, statutory penalties, restitution and attorneys' fees.

        On December 13, 2007, the court, at the request of the parties, entered an order staying the action pending resolution of the Gonzalez action (discussed above). The case remains stayed.

        Johanson v. Home Loan Center, Inc., No. 07CC01405 (Cal. Super. Ct., Orange Cty.). On November 8, 2007, Brian Johanson and Brendan Dwyer filed this putative class action against HLC in the California Superior Court for Orange County. Plaintiffs, former HLC loan officers, assert that HLC: failed to pay overtime, compensation, commission wages and bonus wages; failed to provide proper wage statements; failed to provide rest periods and meal periods or compensation in lieu thereof; and failed to pay wages due employees upon termination. Based upon these factual allegations, Plaintiffs assert violations of various California wage and hour laws and of California Business & Professions Code § 17200. Plaintiffs purport to represent a class of all persons employed by HLC in California since November 8, 2003, and seek compensatory damages, statutory penalties, restitution and attorneys' fees.

        On February 21, 2008, HLC filed an answer to the complaint. A mediation is scheduled for August 15, 2008. Plaintiffs have not yet filed a motion for class certification. No trial date has been set.

        D'Asero v. Home Loan Center, Inc., No. SACV08-384 (U.S. Dist. Ct., C.D. Cal.). On April 9, 2008, Frank D'Asero, Ezekial Mohammed, Pouria Safabakhsh and Michael McCarver filed this putative class action against HLC in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California. Plaintiffs, former HLC loan officers, allege that HLC: denied overtime compensation in violation of federal labor law; denied overtime compensation in violation of California labor law; failed to pay wages for compensable meal breaks in violation of California labor law; made unauthorized deductions from earned wages, failed to indemnify employees and coerced purchases in violation of California labor law; made unauthorized deductions from wages in violation of North Carolina labor law; failed to pay timely wages in violation of California labor law; failed to pay wages in violation of North Carolina labor law; failed to furnish itemized wage statements in violation of California labor law; and based upon the foregoing, committed unfair business practices in violation of California Business & Professions Code § 17200.

        Plaintiffs purport to represent all loan officers employed by HLC in California since April 9, 2004 and all loan officers employed by HLC in North Carolina since April 9, 2006. Plaintiffs also purport to bring a collective action under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act on behalf of all loan officers employed by HLC since April 9, 2005. Plaintiffs seek declaratory relief, an injunction, liquidated damages, compensatory damages, attorneys' fees, restitution and penalties.

        On May 30, 2008, HLC filed a motion to compel arbitration of Plaintiffs' claims based upon their signed agreements with HLC to arbitrate all employment-related claims.

        On June 10, 2008, Plaintiffs filed a first amended complaint, which added a new claim for violation of California's Private Attorneys General Act of 2004. In addition, on June 10, 2008, Plaintiffs filed a motion for conditional class certification. A hearing date on Plaintiffs' motion is scheduled for July 1, 2008.

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        On June 17, 2008, the parties executed a joint stipulation and proposed order staying all proceedings for 90 days to facilitate mediation. The parties have filed the joint stipulation and proposed order with the court for approval. A mediation is scheduled for August 15, 2008.

        Plaintiffs have not yet filed a motion for class certification. No trial date has been set.

Privacy/Information Security Litigation

        Miller v. LendingTree, LLC, No. 08cv2300 (U.S. Dist. Ct., N.D. Ill.). On April 22, 2008, Eugene Miller filed this putative class action against LendingTree, LLC in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois. The case arises out of LendingTree, LLC's April 21, 2008 announcement that unauthorized persons had gained access to non-public information relating to its customers. Plaintiff alleges that LendingTree, LLC is a "consumer reporting agency" within the meaning of the FCRA and has violated the FCRA by failing to maintain reasonable procedures designed to limit the furnishing of consumer reports. Plaintiff also asserts claims for negligence, breach of implied contract, invasion of privacy and misappropriation of confidential information. Plaintiff purports to represent all LendingTree, LLC customers affected by the information security breach, and seeks damages, attorneys' fees and injunctive relief.

        LendingTree has filed a motion to dismiss this action and to compel arbitration, or, in the alternative, to dismiss for improper venue. Plaintiffs have not yet filed a motion for class action certification. No trial date has been set.

        Mitchell v. Home Loan Center, Inc., No. 08-303-RJC (U.S. Dist. Ct., W.D. N.C.). On April 28, 2008, Angela Mitchell filed this putative class action against Home Loan Center, Inc. and LendingTree, LLC in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma. On LendingTree's demand, Plaintiff transferred this case to the Western District of North Carolina. As in the Miller case (discussed above), the case arises out of LendingTree, LLC's April 21, 2008 announcement that unauthorized persons had gained access to non-public information relating to its customers. Plaintiff asserts claims for breach of contract, negligence and negligence per se. Plaintiff purports to represent all similarly situated persons, and seeks damages, attorneys' fees and injunctive relief.

        LendingTree has filed a motion to dismiss this action and to compel arbitration. Plaintiffs have not yet filed a motion for class action certification. No trial date has been set.

        Constance Spinozzi v. LendingTree, LLC, No. 3:08-cv-229 (U.S. Dist. Ct., W.D.N.C.). On May 15, 2008, Constance Spinozzi filed this putative class action against LendingTree, LLC in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of North Carolina. As in the Miller case (discussed above), the case arises out of LendingTree, LLC's April 21, 2008 announcement that unauthorized persons had gained access to non-public information relating to its customers. Plaintiff alleges that LendingTree, LLC is a "consumer reporting agency" within the meaning of the FCRA and has violated the FCRA by failing to maintain reasonable procedures designed to limit the furnishing of consumer reports. Plaintiff also asserts claims for negligence and breach of implied contract. Plaintiff purports to represent all LendingTree, LLC customers affected by the information security breach, and seeks damages, attorneys' fees and injunctive relief.

        On June 11, 2008, Plaintiff and the plaintiff in the Carson case (discussed below) filed a motion with the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation requesting that it (1) exercise jurisdiction over all actions arising out of LendingTree, LLC's April 21, 2008 announcement that unauthorized persons had gained access to non-public information relating to its customers; and (2) consolidate all such cases and transfer them to the U.S. District Court for the Western District of North Carolina.

        LendingTree has filed a motion to dismiss this action and to compel arbitration. Plaintiffs have not yet filed a motion for class certification. No trial date has been set.

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        Marvin Garcia v. LendingTree, LLC, No. 08 Civ. 4551 (U.S. Dist. Ct., S.D.N.Y.). On May 16, 2008, Marvin Garcia filed this putative class action against LendingTree, LLC in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York. As in the Miller case (discussed above), the case arises out of LendingTree, LLC's April 21, 2008 announcement that unauthorized persons had gained access to non-public information relating to its customers. Plaintiff asserts claims for breach of contract and negligence. Plaintiff purports to represent all LendingTree, LLC customers affected by the information security breach, and seeks damages, attorneys' fees and injunctive relief.

        Plaintiffs have not yet filed a motion for class certification. No trial date has been set.

        Sylvia Carson v. LendingTree, LLC, No. 3:08-cv-247 (U.S. Dist. Ct., W.D.N.C.). On May 30, 2008, Sylvia Carson filed this putative class action against LendingTree,  LLC in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of North Carolina. As in the Miller case (discussed above), the case arises out of LendingTree, LLC's April 21, 2008 announcement that unauthorized persons had gained access to non-public information relating to its customers. Plaintiff alleges that LendingTree, LLC is a "consumer reporting agency" within the meaning of the FCRA and has violated the FCRA by failing to maintain reasonable procedures designed to limit the furnishing of consumer reports. Plaintiff also asserts claims for negligence and breach of implied contract. Plaintiff purports to represent all LendingTree, LLC customers affected by the information security breach, and seeks damages, attorneys' fees and injunctive relief.

        As set forth in the Spinozzi discussion (above), on June 11, 2008, Plaintiff and the Spinozzi plaintiff filed a motion with the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation requesting that it (1) exercise jurisdiction over all actions arising out of LendingTree, LLC's April 21, 2008 announcement that unauthorized persons had gained access to non-public information relating to its customers; and (2) transfer and consolidate all such cases in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of North Carolina.

        LendingTree has filed a motion to dismiss this action and to compel arbitration. Plaintiffs have not yet filed a motion for class certification. No trial date has been set.

        Amy Bercaw v. LendingTree, LLC, No. SACV08-660 (U.S. Dist. Ct., C.D. Cal.). On June 13, 2008, Amy Bercaw, Russell Winsett and Ty Woods filed this putative class action against LendingTree, LLC in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California. As in the Miller case (discussed above), the case arises out of LendingTree, LLC's April 21, 2008 announcement that unauthorized persons had gained access to non-public information relating to its customers. Plaintiffs allege that LendingTree, LLC is a "consumer reporting agency" within the meaning of the FCRA and has violated the FCRA by failing to maintain reasonable procedures designed to limit the furnishing of consumer reports. Plaintiffs also assert claims against LendingTree, LLC for negligence, breach of implied contract, invasion of privacy, misappropriation of confidential information in violation of California Civil Code § 17980.89, and violation of California Business and Professions Code § 17200. Plaintiff purports to represent all LendingTree, LLC customers affected by the information security breach, and seeks damages, attorneys' fees and injunctive relief.

        Plaintiffs have not yet filed a motion for class certification. No trial date has been set.

        Bradley v. LendingTree, LLC, et al., SACV08-755 (U.S. Dist. Ct. C.D. Cal.). On July 10, 2008, Geraldine Bradley, Joy Paxton-Collis, James Larson and Mark Swearingen filed this putative class action against LendingTree, LLC in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California.

        As in the Miller case (discussed above), the case arises out of LendingTree, LLC's April 21, 2008 announcement that unauthorized persons had gained access to non-public information relating to its customers. Plaintiffs allege that LendingTree, LLC is a "consumer reporting agency" within the meaning of the FCRA. According to Plaintiffs, LendingTree, LLC has intentionally violated the FCRA by failing to maintain reasonable procedures designed to limit the furnishing of consumer reports.

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Plaintiffs also allege LendingTree, LLC negligently violated the FCRA by failing to maintain reasonable procedures to protect Plaintiffs' personal and financial information. Plaintiffs also assert claims against LendingTree, LLC for negligence, breach of implied contract, invasion of privacy, misappropriation of confidential information in violation of California statute, and violation of California's unfair competition law.

        Plaintiffs purport to represent all similarly situated persons, and seeks damages, attorneys' fees and injunctive relief.

        Plaintiffs have not yet filed a motion for class action certification. No trial date has been set.

        Shaver v. LendingTree, LLC, et al., SACV08-755 (U.S. Dist. Ct. C.D. Cal.). On July 10, 2008, Paul Shaver filed this putative class action against LendingTree, LLC in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California.

        As in the Miller case (discussed above), the case arises out of LendingTree, LLC's April 21, 2008 announcement that unauthorized persons had gained access to non-public information relating to its customers. Plaintiff alleges that LendingTree, LLC is a "consumer reporting agency" within the meaning of the FCRA. According to Plaintiff, LendingTree, LLC has intentionally violated the FCRA by failing to maintain reasonable procedures designed to limit the furnishing of consumer reports. Plaintiff also alleges LendingTree, LLC negligently violated the FCRA by failing to maintain reasonable procedures to protect Plaintiff's personal and financial information. Plaintiff also asserts claims against LendingTree, LLC for negligence, breach of implied contract, invasion of privacy, misappropriation of confidential information in violation of California statute, and violation of California's unfair competition law.

        Plaintiff purports to represent all similarly situated persons, and seeks damages, attorneys' fees and injunctive relief.

        Plaintiff has not yet filed a motion for class action certification. No trial date has been set.

Other Litigation

        Boschma v. Home Loan Center, Inc., No. SACV07-613 (U.S. Dist. Ct., C.D. Cal.). On May 25, 2007, Clarence and Shirley Boschma filed this putative class action against HLC in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California. Plaintiffs allege that HLC sold them an option ARM (adjustable-rate mortgage) loan but failed to disclose in a clear and conspicuous manner, among other things, that the interest rate was not fixed, that negative amortization could occur and that the loan had a prepayment penalty. Based upon these factual allegations, Plaintiffs assert violations of the federal Truth in Lending Act (the "TILA"), violations of California Business and Professions Code § 17200 (the "UCL"), breach of contract, breach of the covenant of good faith and fair dealing and violations of California's Consumer Legal Remedies Act (the "CLRA"). Plaintiffs purport to represent a class of all individuals who between June 1, 2003 and May 31, 2007 obtained through HLC an option ARM loan on their primary residence located in California, and seek rescission, damages, attorneys' fees and injunctive relief. On August 10, 2007, Plaintiffs filed a first amended complaint that dropped their CLRA claim.

        On September 11, 2007, HLC filed a motion to dismiss and a motion to strike the amended complaint. In its motion to dismiss, HLC argued that Plaintiffs' UCL claim should be dismissed because they fail to properly allege that they or the putative class members suffered injury as a result of HLC's alleged misrepresentations. The motion to dismiss also requests dismissal of Plaintiffs' claims for breach of contract and for breach of the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing. HLC's motion to strike requests that the court strike Plaintiffs' demand for class-wide rescission under the TILA and demand for disgorgement the UCL. Plaintiffs opposed both motions. On May 27, 2008, the court granted HLC's motion to dismiss, denied HLC's motion to strike as moot, and granted Plaintiffs

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leave to file a second amended complaint. On June 16, 2008, Plaintiffs filed a second amended complaint, which added a claim for fraudulent omissions. In response, HLC raised the issue that the class representatives had no standing to assert any claims for rescission under the TILA based on the fact that they had since refinanced their loan. Plaintiffs have agreed to substitute a new class representative and intend to file a third amended complaint.

        The parties have agreed not to conduct discovery until after the court rules on HLC's motions. Plaintiffs have not yet filed a motion for class certification. No trial date has been set.

        Gaines v. Home Loan Center, Inc., No. SACV08-667 (U.S. Dist. Ct., C.D. Cal.). On June 13, 2008, Joanne Gaines and Johnnie Cave filed this putative class action against HLC and LendingTree, LLC in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California. Plaintiffs allege, in essence, that (1) HLC failed to disclose that the bundled amount for certain loan closing services (called the "TrueCost") that HLC charged to Plaintiffs was greater than HLC's actual costs for those services; (2) HLC's option ARM (adjustable rate mortgage) note failed to tell Plaintiffs that the stated interest rate and payment amounts would change after the first month and that the payment amount stated in the note was not sufficient to pay interest charges, resulting in negative amortization; and (3) HLC misrepresented that Plaintiffs would have to obtain a home equity line of credit in order to obtain a low interest rate on their option ARM loans. Based upon these factual allegations, Plaintiffs assert violations of the federal Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, the federal Truth in Lending Act, California Business and Professions Code §§ 17200 and 17500, California's Consumers Legal Remedies Act, breach of contract, breach of the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, unjust enrichment, conversion, and money had and received.

        Plaintiffs purport to represent all HLC customers who, since December 14, 2004 (1) were charged by HLC and paid a TrueCost amount that exceeded HLC's actual costs for the TrueCost services; and/or (2) entered into option ARM loan agreements with HLC; and/or (3) were misled into taking out a home equity line of credit along with their option ARM mortgage. Plaintiffs seek restitution, disgorgement, damages, attorneys' fees and injunctive relief.

        Plaintiffs have not yet filed a motion for class certification. No trial date has been set.

        Schnee v. LendingTree, LLC and Home Loan Center, Inc., No. 06CC00211 (Cal. Super. Ct., Orange Cty.). On October 11, 2006, four individual plaintiffs filed this putative class action against LendingTree, LLC and HLC in the California Superior Court for Orange County. Plaintiffs allege that they used the LendingTree.com website to find potential lenders and without their knowledge were referred to LendingTree, LLC's direct lender, HLC; that Lending Tree, LLC and HLC did not adequately disclose the relationship between them; and that HLC charged Plaintiffs higher rates and fees than they otherwise would have been charged. Based upon these allegations, Plaintiffs assert that LendingTree, LLC and HLC violated California Business and Professions Code §§ 17200 and 17500 and California's Consumer Legal Remedies Act. Plaintiffs purport to represent a nationwide class of consumers who sought lender referrals from LendingTree, LLC and obtained loans from HLC since December 1, 2004. Plaintiffs seek damages, restitution, attorneys' fees and injunctive relief.

        On November 27, 2006, LendingTree, LLC and HLC filed demurrers and a motion to strike portions of the complaint, arguing, among other things, that the complaint did not adequately allege that the named class representatives read and relied upon the allegedly deceptive representations on LendingTree, LLC's website. On January 25, 2007, the court sustained the demurrers and granted the motion to strike on the reliance issue, but otherwise overruled the demurrers and denied the motion to strike. On February 14, 2007, Plaintiffs filed their first amended complaint.

        On March 12, 2007, LendingTree, LLC and HLC filed demurrers and a motion to strike portions of the first amended complaint. On May 17, 2007, the court overruled the demurrers and denied the

47



motion to strike. On June 11, 2007, LendingTree, LLC and HLC filed an answer to the first amended complaint.

        The case is currently in discovery. Plaintiffs have not yet filed a motion for class certification. No trial date has been set.

        Mortgage Store, Inc. v. LendingTree Loans d/b/a Home Loan Center, Inc., No. 06CC00250 (Cal. Super. Ct., Orange Cty.). On November 30, 2006, The Mortgage Store, Inc. and Castleview Home Loans, Inc. filed this putative class action against HLC in the California Superior Court for Orange County. Plaintiffs, two former Network Lenders, allege that HLC interfered with LendingTree, LLC's contracts with Network Lenders by taking referrals from LendingTree, LLC. The complaint is largely based upon the factual allegations made in the Schnee complaint (described above). Based upon these factual allegations, Plaintiffs assert claims for intentional interference with contractual relations, intentional interference with prospective economic advantage, and violation of California Business and Professions Code §§ 17200 and 17500. Plaintiffs purport to represent all Network Lenders from December 14, 2004 to date, and seek damages, restitution, attorneys' fees, and punitive damages.

        On February 8, 2007, HLC filed a demurrer and a motion to strike portions of Plaintiffs' complaint. On March 15, 2007, the court overruled the demurrer but granted the motion to strike in part, striking the portion of the complaint that sought restitution and disgorgement of all profits made by HLC from December 14, 2004 to date.

        The case is currently in discovery. Plaintiffs have not yet filed a motion for class certification. No trial date has been set.

48


CAPITALIZATION

        The following table presents Tree.com's cash and cash equivalents and capitalization as of March 31, 2008 on an historical basis and on an unaudited pro forma basis for the separation. Pro forma for the separation includes the transfer of $55 million in cash from IAC to Tree.com. IAC determined to contribute additional capital in anticipation of the separation to help Tree.com, which has recently experienced operating losses and negative cash flow from operations, weather continued uncertainties in the industries in which it operates. Tree.com is expected to have $110 million at the time of the separation. The separation of Tree.com is described in the notes to the Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet under the Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements as if the separation and the related transactions and events had been consummated on March 31, 2008.

        The assumptions used and pro forma adjustments derived from such assumptions are based on currently available information and Tree.com believes such assumptions are reasonable under the circumstances. Such adjustments are subject to change based upon the finalization of the terms of the separation and the underlying separation agreements.

        This table should be read in conjunction with "Selected Historical Financial Data," "Transfers to IAC and Financing," "Description of Capital Stock of the Spincos," "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations of Tree.com" the consolidated financial statements of Tree.com and the "Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements" and accompanying notes included in this Prospectus.

        The table below is not necessarily indicative of Tree.com's cash and cash equivalents and capitalization had the separation and the related transactions been completed on the date assumed. The capitalization table below may not reflect the capitalization or financial condition which would have resulted had Tree.com been operating as an independent, publicly-traded company at March 31, 2008 and is not necessarily indicative of Tree.com's future capitalization or financial condition.

 
  As of March 31, 2008
 
  Historical
  Unaudited
Pro Forma
for the
Separation

 
  (In millions)

Cash and cash equivalents, including restricted cash and cash equivalents   $ 55   $ 110
   
 
Indebtedness:            
  Short term borrowings:            
    Lines of credit (primarily warehouse lines)   $ 79   $ 79
   
 
Total indebtedness     79     79
   
 
Shareholders' equity     245     300
   
 
Total capitalization   $ 324   $ 379
   
 

49



SELECTED HISTORICAL FINANCIAL DATA

        The following table presents summary selected historical consolidated financial information for Tree.com, Inc. ("Tree.com"). This data was derived, in part, from the historical consolidated financial statements of Tree.com included elsewhere in this document and reflects the operations and financial position of Tree.com at the dates and for the periods indicated. The information in this table should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes and other financial data pertaining to Tree.com included herein. However, this information does not necessarily reflect what the historical financial position and results of operations of Tree.com would have been had Tree.com been a stand-alone company during the periods presented.

 
  Year Ended December 31,
  Three Months Ended March 31,
 
 
  2007(1)
  2006
  2005
  2004(2)
(unaudited)

  2003(3)
(unaudited)

  2008
(unaudited)

  2007
(unaudited)

 
 
  (In thousands)

 
Statement of Operations Data:                                            
Revenue   $ 346,378   $ 476,478   $ 421,355   $ 189,783   $ 55,795   $ 70,193   $ 109,999  
Operating (loss) income     (540,440 )   14,171     19,254     (12,067 )   (18,068 )   (9,488 )   (8,404 )
Net (loss) income     (550,402 )   8,693     5,851     (9,187 )   (11,359 )   (9,799 )   (5,123 )
 
  December 31,
  March 31,
 
  2007(1)
  2006
  2005
(unaudited)

  2004(2)
(unaudited)

  2003(3)
(unaudited)

  2008
(unaudited)

 
  (In thousands)


Balance Sheet Data (end of period):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Working capital (deficit)   $ (16,487 ) $ 79,463   $ 74,754   $ 35,784   $ 10,540   $ 18,662
Total assets     443,587     1,261,045     1,326,961     1,074,896     745,400     442,810
Long-term obligations, net of current maturities         19,347     28,894     36,755     375    
Shareholders' equity     214,624     773,453     766,486     753,674     707,948     244,545

(1)
Net loss includes impairment charges of $475.7 million related to the write-down of Tree.com's Lending segment goodwill and intangible assets.

(2)
Includes the results of Home Loan Center since its acquisition on December 14, 2004.

(3)
Includes the results of LendingTree since its acquisition by IAC on August 8, 2003.

50



TREE.COM, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

UNAUDITED PRO FORMA
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

        The following Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements of Tree.com, Inc. and subsidiaries ("Tree.com") reflect adjustments to the historical consolidated financial statements of Tree.com to give effect to the separation and related transactions described in the notes to the Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements as of March 31, 2008 for the Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet and as of January 1, 2007 and January 1, 2008 for the Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations for the year ended December 31, 2007 and the three months ended March 31, 2008, respectively.

        The assumptions used and pro forma adjustments derived from such assumptions are based on currently available information and Tree.com believes such assumptions are reasonable under the circumstances. At this time Tree.com does not expect material changes to the separation agreements.

        The following Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements should be read in conjunction with the historical consolidated financial statements of Tree.com and "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" of Tree.com included in this Prospectus.

        These Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements are not necessarily indicative of Tree.com's results of operations or financial condition had the separation and related transactions been completed on the dates assumed. Also, they may not reflect the results of operations or financial condition which would have resulted had Tree.com been operating as an independent publicly-traded company during such periods. In addition, they are not necessarily indicative of Tree.com's future results of operations or financial condition.

51



TREE.COM, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

UNAUDITED PRO FORMA
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET

MARCH 31, 2008

 
  Historical
  Pro Forma
Adjustments

  Notes
  Pro Forma
 
 
  (In thousands, except share data)

 
ASSETS                        
Cash and cash equivalents, including restricted cash and cash equivalents   $ 54,958   $ 55,042   (a)   $ 110,000  
Other current assets     121,672             121,672  
   
 
     
 
  Total current assets     176,630     55,042         231,672  
Non-current assets     266,180             266,180  
   
 
     
 
TOTAL ASSETS   $ 442,810   $ 55,042       $ 497,852  
   
 
     
 
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY                        

LIABILITIES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Current liabilities   $ 157,968   $       $ 157,968  
Long-term liabilities     40,297             40,297  

SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Common shares, $0.01 par value, 50,000,000 authorized; 9,291,185 issued and outstanding on a pro forma basis         93   (a)     93  
Additional paid-in capital         863,560   (a)     863,560  
Invested capital     766,374     (766,374 ) (a)      
Payables to IAC and subsidiaries     42,237     (42,237 ) (a)      
Accumulated deficit     (564,066 )           (564,066 )
   
 
     
 
  Total shareholders' equity     244,545     55,042         299,587  
   
 
     
 
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY   $ 442,810   $ 55,042       $ 497,852  
   
 
     
 

The accompanying Notes to Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements are an integral part of these statements.

52



TREE.COM, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

UNAUDITED PRO FORMA
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS

THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2008

 
  Historical
  Pro Forma
Adjustments

  Notes
  Pro Forma
 
 
  (In thousands, except per share data)
 
Revenue   $ 70,193   $       $ 70,193  
Operating expenses     79,681
    1,379
1,106
  (b)
(c)
    82,166
 
   
 
     
 
  Operating loss     (9,488 )   (2,485 )       (11,973 )
Other income (expense):                        
  Interest income     9             9  
  Interest expense     (109 )   32   (d)     (77 )
  Other expense     (2 )           (2 )
   
 
     
 
Total other expense, net     (102 )   32         (70 )
   
 
     
 
Loss before income taxes     (9,590 )   (2,453 )       (12,043 )
Income tax (provision) benefit     (209 )   1,016   (e)     807  
   
 
     
 
Net loss   $ (9,799 ) $ (1,437 )     $ (11,236 )
   
 
     
 
Pro forma loss per share:(f)(g)                        
  Basic loss per share   $ (1.21 )
  Diluted loss per share   $ (1.21 )

The accompanying Notes to Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements are
an integral part of these statements.

53



TREE.COM, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

UNAUDITED PRO FORMA
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS

YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2007

 
  Historical
  Pro Forma Adjustments
  Notes
  Pro Forma
 
 
  (In thousands, except per share data)

 
Revenue   $ 346,378   $       $ 346,378  
Operating expenses     886,818
    5,351
4,426
  (b)
(c)
    896,595
 
   
 
     
 
  Operating loss     (540,440 )   (9,777 )       (550,217 )
Other income:                        
  Interest income     1,171     (1,000 ) (d)     171  
  Interest expense     (986 )           (986 )
  Other income     14             14  
   
 
     
 
Total other income (expense), net     199     (1,000 )       (801 )
   
 
     
 
Loss before income taxes     (540,241 )   (10,777 )       (551,018 )
Income tax provision     (10,161 )   4,462   (e)     (5,699 )
   
 
     
 
Net loss   $ (550,402 ) $ (6,315 )     $ (556,717 )
   
 
     
 
Pro forma loss per share:(f)(g)                        
  Basic loss per share   $ (58.46 )
  Diluted loss per share   $ (58.46 )

The accompanying Notes to Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements are
an integral part of these statements.

54



TREE.COM, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO UNAUDITED PRO FORMA
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(a)
To effect the terms of the separation as follows:

(i)
the transfer of $55.0 million in cash from IAC to Tree.com to bring Tree.com's cash balance to $110.0 million upon its separation from IAC;

(ii)
the extinguishment of the payable to IAC and subsidiaries; and

(iii)
the issuance of 9.3 million Tree.com shares to effect the transfer of its ownership from IAC to IAC's shareholders based on an expected exchange ratio of 1/30th of a share of Tree.com for each share of IAC and the number of IAC common shares outstanding as of March 31, 2008 before giving effect to the 1 for 2 reverse stock split of IAC shares that is expected to be effected in connection with the spin-off.

(b)
Tree.com expects to incur additional costs related to being a stand-alone, public company. These costs have been estimated to be $6.3 million on an annual basis. These costs relate to the following:

additional personnel including accounting, tax, treasury, internal audit and legal personnel;

professional fees associated with audits, tax and other services;

increased insurance premiums;

increased health and welfare benefit costs;

costs associated with a board of directors;

increased franchise taxes, stock exchange listing fees, fees for preparing and distributing periodic filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission; and

other administrative costs and fees.

    The total costs referred to above were compared to the corporate allocations from IAC for the three months ended March 31, 2008 and for the year ended December 31, 2007 in order to determine the incremental costs expected to be incurred for each period as follows:

 
  Three Months Ended
March 31, 2008

  Year Ended
December 31, 2007

 
 
  (In thousands)

 
Estimated stand-alone, public company costs   $ 1,569   $ 6,344  
Less: corporate allocations     (190 )   (993 )
   
 
 
Incremental costs of being a stand-alone, public company   $ 1,379   $ 5,351  
   
 
 

    The significant assumptions underlying the determination of these estimates include:

    the number of additional personnel required to operate as a public company and the compensation level with respect to each position;

    the level of additional assistance Tree.com will require from professional service providers;

    the increase in insurance premiums as a stand-alone public company;

    the increase in health and welfare costs as a stand-alone entity; and

55


TREE.COM, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO UNAUDITED PRO FORMA
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

    the type and level of other costs expected to be incurred in connection with being a stand-alone public company.

    This amount excludes $0.6 million of estimated one-time recruiting fees, professional fees for legal and tax services (e.g. initial benefit plan design) and other costs (e.g. initial stock exchange listing fees) expected to be incurred in initially establishing Tree.com as a stand-alone public company. These costs are therefore not expected to recur.

    The information presented above in note (b), with respect to the costs that Tree.com expects to incur as a stand-alone, public company, is forward looking information within the meaning of "Forward-Looking Statements" as described on pages 21-22 of this Prospectus.

(c)
To reflect the additional compensation expense associated with equity-based awards that will be granted upon consummation of the separation.

    The awards related to the consummation of the separation were granted to the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer in connection with the employment agreement that was executed upon his appointment to that role. The issuance of these awards are contingent upon the consummation of the separation. The expense related to these awards is included as a pro forma adjustment because they will vest over periods ranging from one to five years and will therefore have an impact on the ongoing operations of Tree.com. The amount was determined using a Black Scholes calculation for the stock option awards and an assumed value for the restricted stock award. The aggregate estimated value of these awards is being amortized to expense on a straight-line basis over the vesting period of the awards. This does not reflect non-recurring compensation expense related to modifications of existing equity-based awards that will be made in connection with the separation described below.

    Vested stock options to purchase shares of IAC common stock will be modified as follows in connection with the separation:

      Each option will convert into an option to purchase shares of common stock of all five companies, with adjustments to the number of shares subject to each option and the option exercise prices based on the relative values of IAC and the other four companies following the separation, with the intent to generally maintain equivalent value immediately pre and post the transaction.

    A calculation of the estimated value of the vested options immediately prior to the separation and immediately after the separation was performed using the Black Scholes model. The incremental charge of $0.1 million resulted from the higher estimated value of the vested stock options after the separation. This higher value is due to higher estimated weighted average volatility of the stock price of the five companies after the separation than the expected volatility of IAC's stock price. The expense is a one-time charge because the options are fully vested and there is no future service requirement.

    The modification related to IAC restricted stock units ("RSUs") relates to the accelerated vesting, upon the consummation of the separation, of all RSUs granted prior to August 8, 2005 and all awards that were scheduled to vest prior to February 28, 2009. The estimated expense of $3.1 million is the previously unrecognized compensation expense associated with these awards. The expense is treated as non-recurring because after the separation no future service is required with respect to these awards.

56


TREE.COM, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO UNAUDITED PRO FORMA
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

    There may be additional stock-based awards granted in connection with the separation but the amount of such awards, if any, has not yet been determined and no expense with respect thereto has been reflected herein.

(d)
To reflect the elimination of intercompany interest expense for the three months ended March 31, 2008 and intercompany interest income for the year ended December 31, 2007 allocated by IAC to Tree.com.

(e)
To reflect the tax effect of the pro forma adjustments at an assumed effective tax rate of 41.4% which represents a federal statutory tax rate of 35% and a state effective statutory rate of 6.4%.

(f)
Loss per share and weighted average shares outstanding reflect the historical number of IAC common shares used to calculate IAC's earnings per share, adjusted based on an expected exchange ratio of 1/30th of a share of Tree.com for each share of IAC before giving effect to the 1 for 2 reverse stock split for IAC shares that is expected to be effected in connection with the separation. These amounts reflect the outstanding equity-based awards that were included in IAC's dilutive earnings per share calculation. Pro forma loss per share is calculated using the following:

 
  Three Months Ended
March 31, 2008

  Year Ended
December 31, 2007

 
 
  (In thousands)

 
Net loss   $ (11,236 ) $ (556,717 )
   
 
 
Basic shares outstanding—weighted average shares     9,292     9,523  
Other dilutive securities including stock options, warrants and restricted stock and share units(g)          
   
 
 
Diluted shares outstanding—weighted average shares     9,292     9,523  
   
 
 
(g)
The effect of dilutive securities would be antidilutive due to the net loss and are therefore excluded from the calculation of diluted earnings per share.

57



MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS OF TREE.COM

        The following discussion describes the financial condition and results of operations of Tree.com, Inc. ("Tree.com") as though Tree.com were a separate company as of the dates and for the periods presented and includes the businesses, assets and liabilities that will comprise Tree.com following the spin-off.

Spin-Off

        On November 5, 2007, IAC/InterActiveCorp ("IAC") announced that its Board of Directors approved a plan to separate IAC into five publicly traded companies, identifying Tree.com as one of those five companies. We refer to the separation transaction herein as the "spin-off." In connection with the spin-off, Tree.com was incorporated as a Delaware corporation in April 2008. Tree.com currently does not have any material assets or liabilities, nor does it engage in any business or other activities and, other than in connection with the spin-off, will not acquire or incur any material assets or liabilities, nor will it engage in any business or other activities. Upon completion of the spin-off, Tree.com will consist of the businesses that formerly comprised IAC's Lending and Real Estate segments. We refer herein to these businesses as the "Tree.com Businesses," which include LendingTree.com, RealEstate.com, GetSmart.com, LendingTree Loans, iNest and Domania.

Basis of Presentation

        The historical consolidated financial statements of Tree.com and its subsidiaries and the disclosure set forth in this Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations of Tree.com reflect the contribution or other transfer to Tree.com of all of the subsidiaries and assets and the assumption by Tree.com of all of the liabilities relating to the Tree.com Businesses in connection with the spin-off and the allocation to Tree.com of certain IAC corporate expenses relating to the Tree.com Businesses. Accordingly, the historical consolidated financial statements of Tree.com reflect the historical financial position, results of operations and cash flows of the Tree.com Businesses since their respective dates of acquisition by IAC, based on the historical consolidated financial statements and accounting records of IAC and using the historical results of operations and historical bases of the assets and liabilities of the Tree.com Businesses with the exception of accounting for income taxes, which have been computed for Tree.com on an as if stand- alone, separate tax return basis. Intercompany transactions and accounts have been eliminated.

        In the opinion of Tree.com's management, the assumptions underlying the historical consolidated financial statements of Tree.com are reasonable. However, this financial information does not necessarily reflect what the historical financial position, results of operations and cash flows of Tree.com would have been had Tree.com been a stand-alone company during the periods presented.

58



MANAGEMENT OVERVIEW

        Tree.com's Lending segment consists of online networks (principally LendingTree.com and GetSmart.com) and call centers that connect consumers and financial providers in the lending industry (the "lending networks"). Tree.com also originates, processes, approves and funds various residential real estate loans through Home Loan Center, which does business as LendingTree Loans in certain jurisdictions. The Home Loan Center and LendingTree Loans brand names are collectively referred to in this report as "LendingTree Loans". Additionally, Tree.com provides mortgage settlement services, including title search, appraisals, flood certification and closing transactions, under the name "LendingTree Settlement Services".

        Tree.com's Real Estate segment primarily consists of a proprietary full-service real estate brokerage that operates in 14 U.S. markets, www.RealEstate.com, an online network that connects consumers with real estate brokerages around the country, iNest, an online network that matches buyers and builders of new homes, and Domania, an online lead provider for banks, mortgage lenders and real estate professionals (the "real estate networks").

Sources of Revenue

        Lending is generally compensated on a fee basis by the lenders who participate in its online lending networks, with LendingTree Loans principally deriving revenue from the origination and sale in the secondary markets of various residential real estate loans. Real Estate is generally compensated from subscription and cooperative brokerage fees paid by real estate professionals participating in its real estate networks and from commissions paid by consumers for its agents closing a real estate transaction on their behalf.

Channels of Distribution; Marketing Costs

        Tree.com markets and offers services directly to customers through branded websites allowing customers to transact directly with Tree.com in a convenient manner. Tree.com has made, and expects to continue to make, substantial investments in online and offline advertising to build its brands and drive traffic to its businesses.

        Tree.com also pays to market and distribute services on third-party distribution channels, such as internet portals and search engines. In addition, some of the Tree.com Businesses manage affiliate marketing programs, pursuant to which the Tree.com businesses pay commissions and fees to third parties based on the number of leads generated or the revenue earned. These distribution channels might also offer their own products, as well as those of other third parties, that compete with those made available and offered by Tree.com businesses.

        The cost of acquiring new customers through online and offline third-party distribution channels has increased, particularly in the case of online channels as internet commerce continues to grow and competition in the housing market increases. Tree.com expects sales and marketing expense as a percentage of revenue to continue to increase. Sales and marketing expense as a percentage of revenue increased to approximately 54% in 2007 from approximately 46% in 2006 and 42% in 2005.

Access to Supply

        Tree.com provides lending and real estate network partners with important customer acquisition channels. Tree.com believes that the ability of its partners to reach a large qualified audience through its brands and businesses is a significant benefit. Tree.com offers its customers the choice of multiple suppliers in one setting.

59


Economic and Other Trends and Events; Industry Specific Factors

        The credit and secondary mortgage markets have been experiencing unprecedented and continuing disruption, which had an adverse effect on Tree.com's business, financial condition and results of operations in 2007 and 2008. These conditions, coupled with adverse economic conditions and continuing declines in residential real estate prices generally, have resulted in decreased consumer demand for the lending and real estate offerings provided by Tree.com's networks and other businesses. Generally, increases in interest rates adversely affect the ability of the Lending Business and Network Lenders to close loans, while adverse economic trends limit the ability of the Lending Business and Network Lenders to offer home loans other than low margin conforming loans. The number of Network Lenders also decreased in 2007 and 2008 as many lenders exited the business due to the difficult economic conditions. Likewise, adverse economic trends have reduced the number of prospective home purchasers and home prices, which adversely affected Tree.com's Real Estate Business.

        Tree.com recognized impairment charges of $475.7 million related to the write-down of its Lending segment goodwill and intangible assets in the fourth quarter of 2007. These impairments resulted from Tree.com's reassessment of the likely future profitability of Lending in light of the persistent adverse mortgage market conditions and the operational strategies Tree.com has undertaken in response to these market realities. These adverse conditions include, among others, constrained liquidity, lender focus on low margin conforming loans, uncertainty as to the eventuality and timing of the return of higher margin mortgage products, the decline in real estate values and a high rate of delinquency for existing mortgages. Tree.com has significantly reduced its mortgage origination operations in response to these conditions which will reduce or slow its ability to react to possible improvements in the market. The impairments at the Lending segment occurred during the fourth quarter of 2007 as Tree.com completed an updated assessment of mortgage market conditions and the development and implementation of Lending's responsive operational strategies, and quantified these considerations in Lending's future forecasted results. In addition, in response to these persistent adverse mortgage market conditions, Tree.com restructured its operations in 2007 and recorded $22.9 million in restructuring expense. This restructuring affected all departments and locations within Tree.com but were principally related to the mortgage origination operations.

        In connection with the preparation of its consolidated financial statements as of and for the six months ended June 30, 2008, Tree.com has identified impairment charges of $104.9 million related to the goodwill and intangible assets of its Lending segment and $61.0 million related to the goodwill of its Real Estate segment. The impairments relate to Tree.com's most recent assessment of the likely profitability of its Lending and Real Estate segments in light of the persistent adverse mortgage and real estate market conditions.

        These restructuring efforts described above may be insufficient to allow Tree.com to weather these continuing adverse market conditions. Continued protracted adverse market conditions may require additional restructuring of Tree.com's operations and could give rise to additional restructuring charges and additional impairment charges.

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Results of Operations for the Years Ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005

Revenue

 
  Years Ended December 31,
 
  2007
  % Change
  2006
  % Change
  2005
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
Lending   $ 294,626   (30 )% $ 419,657   15 % $ 363,800
Real Estate     51,752   (9 )%   56,821   (1 )%   57,555
   
     
     
Total revenue   $ 346,378   (27 )% $ 476,478   13 % $ 421,355
   
     
     

        Revenue in 2007 decreased $130.1 million, or 27%, from 2006 primarily due to fewer loans sold into the secondary market, lower revenue per loan sold, fewer loans closed on the lending networks and an increase of $13.5 million in the liability for losses on previously sold loans. Also contributing to the decrease in revenue is a decrease of $13.1 million related to the Real Estate builder and broker networks, which decreased closings year over year. Lenders' narrowing focus on traditional mortgages in reaction to changes in the mortgage market contributed to lower close rates, a shift to lower margin products, and lower revenue per loan sold at LendingTree Loans. Revenue from home equity loans fell 58% due in part to an exit from certain home equity loans at LendingTree Loans and as a result of deteriorating market conditions. Additionally, purchase mortgage revenue and refinance mortgage revenue declined 21% and 16%, respectively. The dollar value of loans closed by network lenders and directly by LendingTree Loans in 2007 decreased 23% to $24.9 billion. This includes refinance mortgages of $13.0 billion, purchase mortgages of $6.9 billion and home equity loans of $4.2 billion. The dollar value of closed loans in 2006 was $32.1 billion, including refinance mortgages of $16.9 billion, purchase mortgages of $8.3 billion and home equity loans of $5.9 billion.

        Partially offsetting the revenue decrease in 2007 is an increase of $9.7 million in revenue from our company-owned brokerage business, which increased closings by 190%. The company-owned brokerage business began closing transactions in the first quarter of 2006 and now operates in fourteen metropolitan markets. Similar to closing loans in our own name, through LendingTree Loans, the company-owned brokerage enables Real Estate to capture a larger portion of the transaction revenue.

        LendingTree Loans originates mortgage loans on property located throughout the United States, with no one location representing more than 10% of Tree.com's consolidated revenue for any periods presented. Revenue from loans originated for property located in California and Florida in the aggregate totaled approximately 10%, 14% and 14% of Tree.com's consolidated revenue for the years ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005, respectively.

        Revenue in 2006 increased $55.1 million, or 13%, from 2005 driven primarily by higher revenue per loan, increased sales of loans into the secondary market and increased match fee revenue due to both growth in loan request form volume and higher prices on the networks. Increased revenue from settlement services also impacted revenue growth in 2006. Revenue from refinance mortgage, home equity loans and purchase mortgage loans grew 15%, 16% and 26%, respectively, from the prior year, despite the difficult market conditions in 2006. The dollar value of loans closed by exchange lenders and directly by LendingTree Loans in 2006 decreased 8% to $32.1 billion. This includes refinance mortgages of $16.9 billion, purchase mortgages of $8.3 billion and home equity loans of $5.9 billion. The dollar value of closed loans in 2005 was $34.7 billion, including refinance mortgages of $19.8 billion, purchase mortgages of $8.0 billion and home equity loans of $5.8 billion.

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Cost of revenue

 
  Years Ended December 31,
 
  2007
  % Change
  2006
  % Change
  2005
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
Lending   $47,264   (0)%   $47,412   22%   $38,904
Real Estate     25,850   0%     25,805   (6)%     27,438
   
     
     
Cost of revenue   $73,114   (0)%   $73,217   10%   $66,342
   
     
     
As a percentage of total revenue   21%   574 bp   15%   (38) bp   16%
Gross margins   79%   (574) bp   85%   38 bp   84%
 
  Years Ended December 31,
 
  2007
  % Change
  2006
  % Change
  2005
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
Cost of revenue—Lending   $47,264   (0)%   $47,412   22%   $38,904
As a percentage of Lending revenue   16%   474 bp   11%   60 bp   11%
Lending gross margins   84%   (474) bp   89%   (60) bp   89%

Cost of revenue—Real Estate

 

$25,850

 

0%

 

$25,805

 

(6)%

 

$27,438
As a percentage of Real Estate revenue   50%   453 bp   45%   (226) bp   48%
Real Estate gross margins   50%   (453) bp   55%   226 bp   52%

        Cost of revenue consists primarily of costs associated with unsuccessful loan origination attempts, compensation and other employee-related costs (including stock-based compensation) related to customer call centers, real estate network support staff and loan officers, as well as credit scoring fees, consumer incentive costs, real estate agent commissions and website network hosting and server fees.

        Cost of revenue in 2007 was relatively unchanged from 2006 despite the significant revenue decline. The increase in cost of revenue as a percentage of total revenue is principally due to the reduced revenue discussed above, and a $5.5 million increase in costs associated with unsuccessful loan originations. If a loan funds, these costs are deferred until the loan is sold to an investor and are included in revenue on a net basis. However, costs associated with all unsuccessful loan origination attempts are expensed as incurred. This increase was partially offset by a $3.5 million decrease in compensation and other employee-related costs as Tree.com reduced its personnel costs associated with its customer call center, settlement services operation and portions of its loan processing department. Cost of revenue also increased as a percentage of revenue due to an increase of $5.0 million in commission expense primarily related to the increase in closings at company-owned brokerage business, partially offset by a decrease of $4.6 million in consumer incentive rebates related to decreased closings at the Real Estate builder and broker network businesses.

        Cost of revenue in 2006 increased $6.9 million from 2005 primarily due to increases of $4.5 million in compensation and other employee-related costs, $3.9 million in commission expense related to the company-owned brokerage business and $3.0 million in direct costs associated with the growth in the settlement services business. These increases were partially offset by a decrease of $2.8 million in customer incentive rebates at Real Estate related to the builder and broker network businesses.

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Selling and marketing expense

 
  Years Ended December 31,
 
  2007
  % Change
  2006
  % Change
  2005
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
Lending   $168,436   (14)%   $195,245   32%   $148,227
Real Estate       19,176   (19)%       23,665   (17)%       28,522
   
     
     
Selling and marketing expense   $187,612   (14)%   $218,910   24%   $176,749
   
     
     
As a percentage of total revenue   54%   822 bp   46%   400 bp   42%
 
  Years Ended December 31,
 
  2007
  % Change
  2006
  % Change
  2005
 
  (Dollars in thousands)

Selling and marketing expense—Lending

 

$168,436

 

(14)%

 

$195,245

 

32%

 

$148,227
As a percentage of Lending revenue   57%   1,064 bp   47%   578 bp   41%

Selling and marketing expense—Real Estate

 

$  19,176

 

(19)%

 

$  23,665

 

(17)%

 

$  28,522
As a percentage of Real Estate revenue   37%   (460) bp   42%   (791) bp   50%

        Selling and marketing expense consists primarily of advertising and promotional expenditures, fees paid to affiliates and compensation and other employee-related costs (including stock-based compensation) for personnel engaged in the sales function. Advertising and promotional expenditures primarily include online marketing, as well as television, print and radio spending. Advertising production costs are expensed in the period the related ad is first run.

        Selling and marketing expense in 2007 decreased $31.3 million from 2006 primarily due to a decrease of $27.2 million in advertising and promotional expenditures. In 2007, Tree.com experienced decreases in advertising of $13.1 million, $8.8 million and $7.7 million associated with print, television and online advertising, respectively. The increase in selling and marketing expense as a percentage of revenue is due to decreased conversions of consumer leads into closed transactions. Tree.com anticipates that selling and marketing expense will continue to represent a high percentage of revenue as it continues to promote its brands both online and offline.

        Selling and marketing expense in 2006 increased $42.2 million from 2005 primarily due to an increase of $37.7 million in advertising and promotional expenditures as Tree.com shifted to online marketing to drive lead volume in more difficult mortgage market conditions. Selling and marketing expense as a percentage of revenue increased due in part to lower close rates.

63


General and administrative expense

 
  Years Ended December 31,
 
  2007
  % Change
  2006
  % Change
  2005
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
Lending   $79,172   (18)%   $  96,888   12%   $  86,272
Real Estate     20,072   (10)%       22,396   43%       15,703
   
     
     
General and administrative expense   $99,244   (17)%   $119,284   17%   $101,975
   
     
     
As a percentage of total revenue   29%   362 bp   25%   83 bp   24%
 
  Years Ended December 31,
 
  2007
  % Change
  2006
  % Change
  2005
 
  (Dollars in thousands)

General and administrative expense—Lending

 

$79,172

 

(18)%

 

$96,888

 

12%

 

$86,272
As a percentage of Lending revenue   27%   378 bp   23%   (63) bp   24%

General and administrative expense—Real Estate

 

$20,072

 

(10)%

 

$22,396

 

43%

 

$15,703
As a percentage of Real Estate revenue   39%   (63) bp   39%   1,213 bp   27%

        General and administrative expense consists primarily of compensation and other employee-related costs (including stock-based compensation) for personnel engaged in finance, legal, tax, human resources and executive management functions, facilities and infrastructure costs and fees for professional services.

        General and administrative expense in 2007 decreased $20.0 million from 2006 primarily due to a decrease of $13.2 million in compensation and other employee-related costs, due principally to a reduction in workforce, and a decrease of $2.5 million in professional fees. Refer to "Restructuring expense" below for additional information on the reduction in workforce. Tree.com expects to incur increased costs related to the additional financial and legal requirements associated with being a separate public company, as well as increased non-cash compensation associated with the modification of existing stock-based compensation awards in connection with the spin-off and the grant of new awards post spin-off.

        General and administrative expense in 2006 increased $17.3 million from 2005 primarily due to an increase of $11.1 million in compensation and other employee-related costs and an increase of $2.8 million in facilities and infrastructure costs. The increase in compensation and other employee-related costs was due in part to an increase in headcount. General and administrative expense in 2006 and 2005 were negatively impacted by accruals of $3.5 million and $5.8 million, respectively, related to an adverse legal judgment.

        Effective January 1, 2006, Tree.com adopted Statement of Financial Accounting Standards ("SFAS") No. 123 (revised 2004), "Share-Based Payment" ("SFAS 123R"), using the modified prospective transition method. There was no impact to the amount of stock-based compensation recorded in the consolidated statement of operations for the years ended December 31, 2006 and 2005 as a result of adopting SFAS 123R. Tree.com has been recognizing expense for all stock-based grants since its acquisition by IAC on August 8, 2003, in accordance with SFAS No. 123, "Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation" ("SFAS 123"). The majority of stock-based compensation expense is reflected in general and administrative expense. As of December 31, 2007, there was approximately $10.2 million of unrecognized compensation cost, net of estimated forfeitures, related to all equity-based awards, which is expected to be recognized over a weighted average period of approximately 2.8 years.

64


Product development

 
  Years Ended December 31,
 
  2007
  % Change
  2006
  % Change
  2005
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
Lending   $  9,720   (6)%   $10,301   (5)%   $10,803
Real Estate       5,271   8%       4,867   16%       4,198
   
     
     
Product development   $14,991   (1)%   $15,168   1%   $15,001
   
     
     
As a percentage of total revenue   4%   114 bp   3%   (38) bp   4%
 
  Years Ended December 31,
 
  2007
  % Change
  2006
  % Change
  2005
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
Product development—Lending   $9,720   (6)%   $10,301   (5)%   $10,803
As a percentage of Lending revenue   3%   84 bp   2%   (51) bp   3%

Product development—Real Estate

 

$5,271

 

8%

 

$  4,867

 

16%

 

$  4,198
As a percentage of Real Estate revenue   10%   162 bp   9%   127 bp   7%

        Product development expense consists primarily of compensation and other employee-related costs (including stock-based compensation) for personnel engaged in product development, which include costs related to the design, development, testing and enhancement of technology that are not capitalized.

        Product development expense in 2007 decreased $0.2 million from 2006, primarily due to decreased compensation and other employee-related costs.

        Product development expense in 2006 increased $0.2 million from 2005, primarily due to increased compensation and other employee-related costs related to modifying, maintaining and enhancing its technology and web-pages.

Restructuring expense

 
  Years Ended December 31,
 
  2007
  % Change
  2006
  % Change
  2005
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
Lending   $21,566   N/A   $—     $—
Real Estate       1,301   N/A      
   
     
     
Restructuring expense   $22,867   N/A   $—     $—
   
     
     
As a percentage of total revenue   7%   N/A      

        In response to persistent adverse mortgage market conditions, Tree.com completed a restructuring of its operations and recorded $22.9 million in restructuring expense. As a part of this restructuring, approximately 800 positions across all departments and locations of its business were eliminated, however the restructuring principally related to the mortgage origination operations of LendingTree Loans. In addition, Tree.com ceased use of space in six of its facilities previously used by LendingTree Loans. In connection with this reduction in workforce and facilities restructuring, Tree.com recorded $9.3 million in employee termination costs, $5.0 million for liabilities associated with exiting the lease obligations, $8.0 million for write-offs of fixed assets and other projects in progress and $0.6 million for other items.

65


Depreciation

 
  Years Ended December 31,
 
  2007
  % Change
  2006
  % Change
  2005
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
Lending   $  8,905   (4)%   $  9,309   68%   $5,540
Real Estate       1,153   (52)%       2,401   104%     1,180
   
     
     
Depreciation   $10,058   (14)%   $11,710   74%   $6,720
   
     
     
As a percentage of total revenue   3%   45 bp   2%   86 bp   2%
 
  Years Ended December 31,
 
  2007
  % Change
  2006
  % Change
  2005
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
Depreciation—Lending   $8,905   (4)%   $9,309   68%   $5,540
As a percentage of Lending revenue   3%   80 bp   2%   70 bp   2%

Depreciation—Real Estate

 

$1,153

 

(52)%

 

$2,401

 

104%

 

$1,180
As a percentage of Real Estate revenue   2%   (200) bp   4%   218 bp   2%

        Depreciation in 2007 decreased $1.7 million from 2006 primarily due to the write-off of fixed assets referred to above and certain fixed assets becoming fully depreciated and decreased capital expenditures as Tree.com scaled back its spending in light of mortgage market conditions.

        Depreciation in 2006 increased $5.0 million from 2005 primarily due to the incremental depreciation associated with capital expenditures made throughout 2006 and 2005, partially offset by certain fixed assets becoming fully depreciated during the period.

Operating Income Before Amortization

        Operating Income Before Amortization is a Non-GAAP measure and is defined in "Tree.com's Principles of Financial Reporting".

 
  Years Ended December 31,
 
  2007
  % Change
  2006
  % Change
  2005
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
Lending   $(23,524)   NM   $  61,873   (22)%   $  78,883
Real Estate     (20,059)   7%     (21,507)   (27)%     (16,930)
   
     
     
Operating Income Before Amortization   $(43,583)   NM   $  40,366   (35)%   $  61,953
   
     
     
As a percentage of total revenue   (13)%   NM   8%   (623) bp   15%
 
  Years Ended December 31,
 
  2007
  % Change
  2006
  % Change
  2005
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
Operating Income Before Amortization—Lending   $(23,524)   NM   $61,873   (22)%   $78,883
As a percentage of Lending revenue   (8)%   NM   15%   (694) bp   22%

Operating Income Before Amortization—Real Estate

 

$(20,059)

 

7%

 

$(21,507)

 

(27)%

 

$(16,930)
As a percentage of Real Estate revenue   (39)%   (91) bp   (38)%   (844) bp   (29)%

        Operating Income Before Amortization in 2007 decreased $83.9 million to a loss of $43.6 million, declining at a faster rate than revenue due to higher costs per loan sold resulting from a shift to lowering margin products, lower close rates and stricter underwriting criteria, and $22.9 million in restructuring costs, due in part to a reduction in workforce, partially offset by a decrease of $31.3 million in selling and marketing expense. Operating Income Before Amortization was adversely

66



impacted by a $20.2 million provision for loan losses in 2007, compared to $6.6 million in 2006. The 2007 provision reflects the increased losses Tree.com is experiencing related to obligations to investors with respect to previously sold loans. Operating Income Before Amortization benefited by $12.9 million due to the net impact of a favorable legal settlement and an increase in certain legal reserves.

        Operating Income Before Amortization in 2006 decreased $21.6 million from 2005, negatively impacted by increased marketing expenses, an increase of $17.3 million in general and administrative expenses, $11.1 million of which relates to an increase in compensation and other employee-related costs, and higher costs associated with the origination of loans sold into the secondary market.

Operating (loss) income

 
  Years Ended December 31,
 
  2007
  % Change
  2006
  % Change
  2005
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
Lending   $(512,584)   NM   $  44,091   (13)%   $  50,605
Real Estate       (27,856)   7%       (29,920)   5%       (31,351)
   
     
     
Operating (loss) income   $(540,440)   NM   $  14,171   (26)%   $  19,254
   
     
     
As a percentage of total revenue   (156)%   NM   3%   (160) bp   5%
 
  Years Ended December 31,
 
  2007
  % Change
  2006
  % Change
  2005
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
Operating (loss) income—Lending   $(512,584)   NM   $  44,091   (13)%   $  50,605
As a percentage of Lending revenue   (174)%   NM   11%   (340) bp   14%

Operating (loss)—Real Estate

 

$  (27,856)

 

7%

 

$(29,920)

 

5%

 

$(31,351)
As a percentage of Real Estate revenue   (54)%   (117) bp   (53)%   181 bp   (54)%

        Operating income decreased $554.6 million to a loss of $540.4 million in 2007, resulting primarily from a goodwill impairment charge of $459.5 million which was recorded in the fourth quarter of 2007 in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations as a component of operating income. The write-down was determined by comparing the fair value of the business and the implied value of the goodwill with the carrying amounts on the balance sheet. In addition, an impairment charge of $16.2 million was recorded in the fourth quarter of 2007 in connection with the write-down of certain intangible assets which has been included in amortization of intangibles in the accompanying consolidated statement of operations. These impairments were identified in connection with Tree.com's annual impairment assessment which is performed as of October 1st. Also contributing to the increase in operating loss was the decrease in Operating Income Before Amortization described above and an increase in non-cash compensation expense.

        As discussed above in the management overview, in response to adverse mortgage market conditions, Tree.com has significantly reduced its mortgage origination operations, incurred substantial restructuring charges, recorded significant provisions for loan losses and recorded substantial impairment charges. Given that overall conditions in the credit markets and the mortgage market continue to evolve rapidly, no assurances can be made that the changes Tree.com has undertaken will be sufficient or that Tree.com will not be required to take additional impairment or restructuring charges. In addition, these actions will reduce or slow its ability to react to possible improvements in the market.

        Operating income in 2006 decreased $5.1 million from 2005 primarily due to the decrease in Operating Income Before Amortization described above, partially offset by an $11.3 million decrease in amortization of intangibles resulting from certain intangible assets being fully amortized in 2005 and 2006, as well as a $5.2 million decrease in non-cash compensation expense. The decrease in non-cash

67



compensation expense is primarily due to the transfer of Tree.com's founder and Chief Executive Officer to IAC, effective January 1, 2006.

Income tax provision

        In 2007, Tree.com recorded an income tax provision of $10.2 million, despite a loss from operations, due principally to the impairment of goodwill that is largely non-deductible for income tax purposes and an increase in the valuation allowance on deferred tax assets. In light of the reassessment of the likely future profitability of Tree.com, it has been determined that it is not more likely than not that deferred tax assets at December 31, 2007 will be realized. In 2006, Tree.com recorded a tax provision of $5.0 million which represents an effective tax rate of 37%. The 2006 tax rate is higher than the federal statutory rate of 35% due principally to state and local income taxes. In 2005, Tree.com recorded a tax provision of $11.4 million which represents an effective tax rate of 66%. The 2005 tax rate is higher than the federal statutory rate of 35% due principally to state and local income taxes which included an increase in net deferred tax liabilities due to a change in the effective state tax rate and an increase in the valuation allowance on deferred tax assets related to state net operating losses.

        Tree.com adopted the provisions of FASB Interpretation No. 48, "Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes—an interpretation of FASB Statement No. 109" ("FIN 48") effective January 1, 2007. There was no effect to Tree.com's accumulated deficit as a result of the adoption. As of January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2007, Tree.com had unrecognized tax benefits of approximately $0.5 million and $5.8 million, respectively, which included accrued interest at December 31, 2007 of $1.4 million.

        By virtue of the previously filed separate company and consolidated tax returns with IAC, Tree.com is routinely under audit by federal, state and local authorities in the area of income tax. These audits include questioning the timing and the amount of deductions and the allocation of income among various tax jurisdictions. Income taxes payable include amounts considered sufficient to pay assessments that may result from examination of prior year returns; however, the amount paid upon resolution of issues raised may differ from the amount provided. Differences between the reserves for tax contingencies and the amounts owed by Tree.com are recorded in the period they become known.

        The Internal Revenue Service ("IRS") is currently examining the IAC consolidated tax returns for the years ended December 31, 2001 through 2003, which includes the operations of Tree.com from August 8, 2003, its date of acquisition by IAC. The statute of limitations for these years has been extended to December 31, 2008. Tax filings in various state, local and foreign jurisdictions are currently under examinations, the most significant of which are Florida, New York state and New York City, for various tax years after December 31, 2001. These examinations are expected to be completed by late 2008. Tree.com believes that it is reasonably possible that its unrecognized tax benefits could decrease by approximately $2.6 million within twelve months of the current reporting date due to the reversal of deductible temporary differences which will result in a corresponding increase in net deferred tax liabilities. An estimate of other changes in unrecognized tax benefits cannot be made, but are not expected to be significant.

        Under the terms of the tax sharing agreement, which will be executed in connection with the spin-off, IAC will generally retain the liability related to federal and state tax returns filed on a consolidated or unitary basis for all periods prior to the spin-off.

68



FINANCIAL POSITION, LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

        As of December 31, 2007, Tree.com had $60.9 million of cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash and cash equivalents.

        Net cash provided by operating activities was $233.0 million and $74.9 million in 2007 and 2006, respectively. The increase of $158.1 million in net cash provided by operating activities primarily reflects an increase in net proceeds from the sale of loans held for sale of $153.2 million.

        Net cash used in investing activities in 2007 and 2006 of $10.9 million and $16.4 million, respectively, primarily resulted from capital expenditures of $9.4 million and $13.3 million, respectively.

        Net cash used in financing activities in 2007 of $275.6 million was primarily due to net payments under various lines of credit, primarily warehouse lines, of $259.0 million at LendingTree Loans, payments on notes payable and capital lease obligations of $11.7 million and cash transfers of $7.1 million to IAC. The net payments under various lines of credit, primarily warehouse lines, is directly related to the net proceeds from sales of loans held for sale included within cash flows from operating activities. The cash transfers to IAC relate primarily to the transfer of Tree.com's excess cash to IAC in connection with IAC's centrally managed U.S. treasury function. Net cash used in financing activities in 2006 of $45.9 million was primarily due to net payments under various lines of credit, primarily warehouse lines, of $23.8 million at LendingTree Loans, payments on notes payable and capital lease obligations of $11.5 million and cash transfers of $3.9 million to IAC.

        As of December 31, 2007, LendingTree Loans had committed lines of credit, primarily warehouse lines, totaling $550 million, of which $500 million expired on January 31, 2008, and $50 million expires on October 31, 2008, and an uncommitted line of $150 million. Borrowings under these lines of credit are used to fund, and are secured by, consumer residential loans that are held for sale. Loans under these lines of credit are repaid from proceeds from the sales of loans held for sale by LendingTree Loans. The interest rate under these lines of credit is 30-day LIBOR plus 75 to 100 basis points, but may be higher under certain circumstances. The committed line that expired on January 31, 2008 was subsequently renewed at a reduced size of $50 million and will expire on the earlier of sixty days prior to the spin-off or January 24, 2009 and can be cancelled at the option of the lender without default upon sixty days notice. On June 25, 2008, certain terms of the warehouse line of credit were waived in order for the line of credit not to expire 60 days prior to the spin-off. However, if the lender determines at any time prior to January 24, 2009 the spin-off materially and adversely affects Tree.com, the lender reserves the right to deem the line of credit expired prior to January 24, 2009. The interest rate under this line of credit increased at the renewal date to 30-day LIBOR plus 140 basis points, but may be higher under certain circumstances. The $50 million committed line of credit that expires on January 24, 2009 and the $150 million uncommitted line are provided by the same lender. The $50 million committed line that expires on October 31, 2008 is provided by one other lender. LendingTree Loans is highly dependent on the availability of credit to finance its operations. Its inability to renew or replace existing facilities upon expiration or termination, which could be impacted by continuing disruptions in the credit market, would adversely impact its results of operations and financial condition. At December 31, 2007 there was $79.4 million outstanding under the committed lines of credit. Under the terms of the committed lines of credit, LendingTree Loans is required to maintain various financial and other covenants. These financial covenants include, but are not limited to, maintaining (i) minimum levels of tangible net worth, cash on hand with a certain lender and liquid assets, (ii) a maximum ratio of total liabilities to net worth and (iii) positive pre-tax net income on a quarterly basis. During the fourth quarter, LendingTree Loans was not in compliance with the quarterly positive pre-tax net income covenant set forth in one of its lines of credit. LendingTree Loans received a waiver of this covenant breach on February 8, 2008. The breach and the subsequent waiver did not have an impact on LendingTree Loans' other lines of credit and Tree.com does not expect it to have an impact on LendingTree Loans' ability to secure lines of credit in the future. Borrowings under all of LendingTree Loans' lines of credit are non-recourse to Tree.com.

69



CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS AND COMMERCIAL COMMITMENTS

 
  Payments Due by Period
Contractual Obligations
  Total
  Less Than
1 Year

  1-3 Years
  3-5 Years
  More Than
5 Years

 
  (In thousands)

Short-term and current portion of long-term obligations   $ 99,350   $ 99,350   $   $   $
Capital lease obligations     272     272            
Purchase obligations(a)     330     330            
Operating leases     27,633     7,168     9,674     4,983     5,808
   
 
 
 
 
Total contractual cash obligations   $ 127,585   $ 107,120   $ 9,674   $ 4,983   $ 5,808
   
 
 
 
 

(a)
The purchase obligations primarily relate to marketing event contracts in 2008.

 
  Amount of Commitment Expiration Per Period
Other Commercial Commitments*
  Total Amounts
Committed

  Less Than
1 Year

  1-3 Years
  3-5 Years
  More Than
5 Years

 
  (In thousands)

Surety bonds and letters of credit   $ 8,182   $ 7,477   $ 705   $   $
   
 
 
 
 

*
Commercial commitments are funding commitments that could potentially require performance in the event of demands by third parties or contingent events, such as under lines of credit extended or under guarantees of debt.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

        Other than the items described above, Tree.com does not have any off-balance sheet arrangements as of December 31, 2007.

70


Results of Operations for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2008 Compared to the Three Months Ended March 31, 2007

Revenue

 
  Three Months Ended March 31,
 
  2008
  % Change
  2007
 
  (Dollars in thousands)

Lending   $ 61,811   (36 )% $ 96,768
Real Estate     8,382   (37 )%   13,231
   
     
Total revenue   $ 70,193   (36 )% $ 109,999
   
     

        Revenue in 2008 decreased $39.8 million, or 36%, from 2007 primarily due to fewer loan originations and sales into the secondary market and fewer loans closed on the lending networks. Also contributing to the decrease in revenue is a decrease of $3.9 million related to the Real Estate builder and broker networks, which experienced decreased closings year over year, as well as the absence of revenue from the agent network business which ceased operations in December 2007. Lenders' continued narrow focus on traditional mortgage products contributed to lower close rates and a shift to lower margin products as compared to the prior year. The dollar value of loans closed by network lenders and directly by LendingTree Loans in 2008 decreased 42% to $4.3 billion. This includes refinance mortgages of $2.7 billion, purchase mortgages of $1.0 billion and home equity loans of $0.5 billion. The dollar value of loans closed by network lenders in 2007 was $7.4 billion, including refinance mortgages of $4.1 billion, purchase mortgages of $1.8 billion and home equity loans of $1.3 billion. Revenue from all home loan offerings declined with home equity loans, purchase mortgage revenue and refinance mortgage revenue declining 75%, 38% and 22%, respectively.

        Partially offsetting the revenue decrease from fewer loans sold in 2008 is higher revenue per loan sold and an increase of $1.2 million in revenue from Tree.com's company-owned brokerage business, which increased closings by 40%. The company-owned brokerage business began closing transactions in the first quarter of 2006 and now operates in fourteen markets. Similar to closing loans through LendingTree Loans, the company-owned brokerage enables Real Estate to capture a larger portion of the transaction revenue.

        LendingTree Loans originates mortgage loans on property located throughout the United States, with no one location representing more than 10% of Tree.com's consolidated revenue for any periods presented. Revenue from loans originated for property in California and Florida in the aggregate totaled approximately 8% and 11% of Tree.com's consolidated revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2008 and 2007, respectively.

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Cost of revenue

 
  Three Months Ended March 31,
 
  2008
  % Change
  2007
 
  (Dollars in thousands)

Lending   $12,796   (11 )% $14,312
Real Estate   4,970   (20 )% 6,184
   
     
Cost of revenue   $17,766   (13 )% $20,496
   
     
As a percentage of total revenue   25%   668   bp 19%
Gross margins   75%   (668 )  bp 81%
 
 
  Three Months Ended March 31,
 
  2008
  % Change
  2007
 
  (Dollars in thousands)

Cost of revenue—Lending   $12,796   (11 )% $14,312
As a percentage of Lending revenue   21%   591   bp 15%
Lending gross margins   79%   (591 )  bp 85%

Cost of revenue—Real Estate

 

$4,970

 

(20

)%

$6,184
As a percentage of Real Estate revenue   59%   1,256   bp 47%
Real Estate gross margins   41%   (1,256 )  bp 53%

        Cost of revenue consists primarily of costs associated with loan originations, compensation and other employee-related costs (including stock-based compensation) related to customer call centers, real estate network support staff and loan officers, as well as credit scoring fees, consumer incentive costs, real estate agent commissions and website network hosting and server fees.

        Cost of revenue in 2008 decreased $2.7 million from 2007 primarily due to decreases of $1.5 million in consumer incentive rebates related to decreased closings at the Real Estate builder and broker network businesses, $1.2 million in direct costs associated with the settlement services business and $1.2 million in compensation and other employee-related costs. Offsetting these decreases in cost of revenue were increases of $0.6 million in costs associated with loan originations and $0.5 million in commission expense primarily related to the increase in closings at company-owned brokerage business. The decrease in compensation and other employee-related costs is primarily due to reduced personnel costs associated with Tree.com's customer call center, settlement services operation and portions of its loan processing department. Included in cost of revenue in 2008 is the impact of Tree.com's adoption of Statement of Financial Accounting Standards ("SFAS") No. 159, "The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities Including an amendment of FASB Statement No. 115" ("SFAS 159"). Upon adoption of SFAS 159, Tree.com elected to account for all loans held for sale issued after January 1, 2008 at fair value. Electing the fair value option requires loan origination fees and costs to be recorded in earnings as incurred instead of being deferred until the loan is sold as in prior year periods. In 2008, all loan origination costs are recognized in cost of revenue. Prior to 2008, Tree.com applied the provisions of SFAS 91, "Accounting for Nonrefundable Fees and Costs Associated with Originating or Acquiring Loans and Initial Direct Costs of Leases", effectively deferring loan origination fees and costs until the underlying loan was sold. Upon sale of the loan, the origination fees and costs were recognized as a component of the gain on sale of the loan in revenue.

72


Selling and marketing expense

 
  Three Months Ended March 31,
 
  2008
  % Change
  2007
 
  (Dollars in thousands)

Lending   $31,028   (39 )% $50,795
Real Estate   2,169   (62 )% 5,683
   
     
Selling and marketing expense   $33,197   (41 )% $56,478
   
     
As a percentage of total revenue   47%   (405 )  bp 51%
 
 
  Three Months Ended March 31,
 
  2008
  % Change
  2007
 
  (Dollars in thousands)

Selling and marketing expense—Lending   $31,028   (39 )% $50,795
As a percentage of Lending revenue   50%   (229 )  bp 52%

Selling and marketing expense—Real Estate

 

$2,169

 

(62

)%

$5,683
As a percentage of Real Estate revenue   26%   (1,708 )  bp 43%

        Selling and marketing expense consists primarily of advertising and promotional expenditures, fees paid to affiliates and compensation and other employee-related costs (including stock-based compensation) for personnel engaged in the sales function. Advertising and promotional expenditures primarily include online marketing, as well as television, print and radio spending. Advertising production costs are expensed in the period the related ad is first run.

        Selling and marketing expense in 2008 decreased $23.3 million from 2007 primarily due to a decrease of $22.3 million in advertising and promotional expenditures. In 2008, Tree.com experienced decreases in advertising of $11.9 million, $6.1 million and $4.1 million associated with online marketing, print and television advertising, respectively. Tree.com anticipates that selling and marketing expense will continue to represent a high percentage of revenue as it continues to promote its brands both online and offline.

General and administrative expense

 
  Three Months Ended March 31,
 
  2008
  % Change
  2007
 
  (Dollars in thousands)

Lending   $16,454   (31 )% $23,869
Real Estate   4,310   (30 )% 6,177
   
     
General and administrative expense   $20,764   (31 )% $30,046
   
     
As a percentage of total revenue   30%   227   bp 27%
 
 
  Three Months Ended March 31,
 
  2008
  % Change
  2007
 
  (Dollars in thousands)

General and administrative expense—Lending   $16,454   (31 )% $23,869
As a percentage of Lending revenue   27%   195   bp 25%

General and administrative expense—Real Estate

 

$4,310

 

(30

)%

$6,177
As a percentage of Real Estate revenue   51%   473   bp 47%

        General and administrative expense consists primarily of compensation and other employee-related costs (including stock-based compensation) for personnel engaged in finance, legal, tax, human resources and executive management functions, facilities and infrastructure costs and fees for professional services.

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        General and administrative expense in 2008 decreased $9.3 million from 2007 primarily due to a decrease of $7.5 million in compensation and other employee-related costs, due principally to a reduction in workforce that occurred in 2007, subsequent to the first quarter. Offsetting this decrease in general and administrative expense is a charge of approximately $1.4 million associated with legal and regulatory costs. Tree.com expects to incur increased costs related to the additional financial and legal requirements associated with being a separate public company, as well as increased non-cash compensation associated with the modification of existing stock-based compensation awards in connection with the spin-off and the grant of new awards in connection with and subsequent to the spin-off.

        General and administrative expense includes non-cash compensation expense of $0.5 million in 2008 compared with $1.0 million in 2007. The decrease in non-cash compensation expense is primarily due to a reduction in workforce that occurred in 2007, subsequent to the first quarter and various equity grants fully vesting throughout 2007. As of March 31, 2008, there was approximately $8.2 million of unrecognized compensation cost, net of estimated forfeitures, related to all equity-based awards, which is currently expected to be recognized over a weighted average period of approximately 2.7 years (exclusive of the impact of the modification related to the spin-off, which consists of the accelerated vesting of certain restricted stock units and the modification of vested stock options).

Product development

 
  Three Months Ended March 31,
 
  2008
  % Change
  2007
 
  (Dollars in thousands)

Lending   $1,454   (47 )% $2,766
Real Estate   655   (56 )% 1,504
   
     
Product development   $2,109   (51 )% $4,270
   
     
As a percentage of total revenue   3%   (88 )  bp 4%
 
 
  Three Months Ended March 31,
 
  2008
  % Change
  2007
 
  (Dollars in thousands)

Product development—Lending   $1,454   (47 )% $2,766
As a percentage of Lending revenue   2%   (51 )  bp 3%

Product development—Real Estate

 

$655

 

(56

)%

$1,504
As a percentage of Real Estate revenue   8%   (356 )  bp 11%

        Product development expense consists primarily of compensation and other employee-related costs (including stock-based compensation) for personnel engaged in product development, which include costs related to the design, development, testing and enhancement of technology that are not capitalized.

        Product development expense in 2008 decreased $2.2 million from 2007, due to decreased compensation and other employee-related costs associated with a reduction in workforce that occurred in 2007, subsequent to the first quarter.

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Depreciation

 
  Three Months Ended March 31,
 
  2008
  % Change
  2007
 
  (Dollars in thousands)

Lending   $1,366   (46 )% $2,530
Real Estate   409   32 % 309
   
     
Depreciation   $1,775   (37 )% $2,839
   
     
As a percentage of total revenue   3%   (5 )  bp 3%
 
 
  Three Months Ended March 31,
 
  2008
  % Change
  2007
 
  (Dollars in thousands)

Depreciation—Lending   $1,366   (46 )% $2,530
As a percentage of Lending revenue   2%   (40 )  bp 3%

Depreciation—Real Estate

 

$409

 

32

%

$309
As a percentage of Real Estate revenue   5%   255   bp 2%

        Depreciation in 2008 decreased $1.1 million from 2007 primarily due to certain fixed assets becoming fully depreciated and decreased capital expenditures made in 2008 and 2007 and the write-off of certain assets subsequent to the first quarter of 2007 as Tree.com scaled back its operations in response to mortgage market conditions.

Operating Income Before Amortization

 
  Three Months Ended March 31,
 
  2008
  % Change
  2007
 
  (Dollars in thousands)

Lending   $(1,298)   NM   $3,239
Real Estate   (3,966)   37 % (6,248)
   
     
Operating Income Before Amortization   $(5,264)   (75 )% $(3,009)
   
     
As a percentage of total revenue   (7)%   (476 )  bp (3)%
 
 
  Three Months Ended March 31,
 
  2008
  % Change
  2007
 
  (Dollars in thousands)

Operating Income Before Amortization—Lending   $(1,298)   NM   $3,239
As a percentage of Lending revenue   (2)%   NM   3%

Operating Income Before Amortization—Real Estate

 

$(3,966)

 

37%

 

$(6,248)
As a percentage of Real Estate revenue   (47)%   (9)  bp   (47)%

        Operating Income Before Amortization in 2008 decreased $2.3 million to a loss of $5.3 million, declining at a faster rate than revenue due to higher costs per loan sold resulting from lower close rates and stricter underwriting criteria, partially offset by decreases of $23.3 million in selling and marketing expense and $9.3 million in general and administrative expense. Operating Income Before Amortization was adversely impacted in 2008 by charges, aggregating $3.1 million, associated with legal and regulatory costs and restructuring initiatives.

75


Operating loss

 
  Three Months Ended March 31,
 
  2008
  % Change
  2007
 
  (Dollars in thousands)

Lending   $(4,249)   (980 )% $(393)
Real Estate   (5,239)   35 % (8,011)
   
     
Operating loss   $(9,488)   (13 )% $(8,404)
   
     
As a percentage of total revenue   (14)%   (588 )  bp (8)%
 
 
  Three Months Ended March 31,
 
  2008
  % Change
  2007
 
  (Dollars in thousands)

Operating loss—Lending   $(4,249)   (980 )% $(393)
As a percentage of Lending revenue   (7)%   (647 )  bp (0)%

Operating loss—Real Estate

 

$(5,239)

 

35

%

$(8,011)
As a percentage of Real Estate revenue   (63)%   (195 )  bp (61)%

        Operating loss in 2008 increased $1.1 million from 2007, primarily due to the decrease in Operating Income Before Amortization described above, partially offset by a $0.6 million decrease in both non-cash compensation expense and amortization of intangibles.

Income tax provision

        For the three months ended March 31, 2008, Tree.com recorded a tax provision of $0.2 million despite a loss from operations, due principally to an increase in valuation allowance on deferred tax assets. For the three months ended March 31, 2007, Tree.com recorded a tax benefit of $3.5 million on a pre-tax loss of $8.6 million, which represents an effective tax rate of 41%. This tax benefit is higher than the federal statutory rate of 35% due principally to state taxes.

        As of December 31, 2007 and March 31, 2008, Tree.com had unrecognized tax benefits of approximately $4.4 million. Included in unrecognized tax benefits at March 31, 2008 is approximately $3.6 million for tax positions included in IAC's consolidated tax return filings that will remain a liability of IAC after the spin-off. Tree.com recognizes interest and, if applicable, penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits in income tax expense. There were no material accruals for interest for 2008. At March 31, 2008, Tree.com has accrued $1.5 million for the payment of interest. There are no material accruals for penalties.

        By virtue of previously filed separate company and consolidated tax returns with IAC, Tree.com is routinely under audit by federal, state, local and foreign authorities in the area of income tax. These audits include questioning the timing and the amount of deductions and the allocation of income among various tax jurisdictions. Income taxes payable include amounts considered sufficient to pay assessments that may result from examination of prior year returns; however, the amount paid upon resolution of issues raised may differ from the amount provided. Differences between the reserves for tax contingencies and the amounts owed by Tree.com are recorded in the period they become known. Tree.com believes that it is reasonably possible that its unrecognized tax benefits could decrease by approximately $2.7 million within twelve months of the current reporting date due to the reversal of deductible temporary differences which will result in a corresponding increase in net deferred tax liabilities. An estimate of other changes in unrecognized tax benefits cannot be made, but are not expected to be significant.

        Under the terms of the tax sharing agreement, which will be executed in connection with the spin-off, IAC will generally retain the liability related to federal and state returns filed on a consolidated or unitary basis for all periods prior to the spin-off.

76



FINANCIAL POSITION, LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

        As of March 31, 2008, Tree.com had $55.0 million of cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash and cash equivalents.

        Net cash used in operating activities improved by $69.0 million to $5.6 million in 2008 from $74.6 million in 2007. The improvement is primarily due to a $64.2 million increase in loans held for sale in 2007 compared to $4.4 million in 2008 reflecting significantly higher net loan originations in 2007. Also impacting net cash used in operations is an increase in accounts payable as Tree.com aggressively managed working capital in the first quarter of 2008.

        Net cash used in investing activities in 2008 of $16.0 million primarily resulted from the payment of contingent consideration associated with the Home Loan Center acquisition and capital expenditures of $1.5 million. Net cash used in investing activities in 2007 of $3.7 million primarily resulted from capital expenditures.

        Net cash provided by financing activities in 2008 of $28.2 million was primarily due to cash transfers of $21.8 million from IAC, capital contributions of $14.5 million from IAC and a decrease of $12.5 million in restricted cash, partially offset by payments on notes payable and capital lease obligations of $20.0 million. The cash transfers from IAC relate to IAC's centrally managed U.S. treasury function. Net cash provided by financing activities in 2007 of $69.6 million was primarily due to net borrowings under various lines of credit of $62.4 million at LendingTree Loans and payments on notes payable and capital lease obligations of $10.4 million, partially offset by cash transfers of $18.0 million from IAC. The net borrowings under various lines of credit in 2007 is related to the increase in loans held for sale included within cash flow from operations.

        As of March 31, 2008, LendingTree Loans had committed lines of credit totaling $100 million, of which $50 million expires on October 31, 2008, and another $50 million is set to expire on the earlier of sixty days prior to the spin-offs or January 24, 2009, and an uncommitted line of credit of $150 million. The committed line of credit that expires sixty days prior to the spin-offs or January 24, 2009 can be cancelled at the option of the lender without default upon sixty days notice. The $50 million committed line of credit that expires on January 24, 2009 and the $150 million uncommitted line are provided by the same lender. The $50 million committed line that expires on October 31, 2008 is provided by one other lender. Borrowings under these lines of credit are used to fund, and are secured by, consumer residential loans that are held for sale. Loans under these lines of credit are repaid from proceeds from the sales of loans held for sale by LendingTree Loans. The interest rate under these lines of credit is 30-day LIBOR plus 75 to 140 basis points, but may be higher under certain circumstances. At March 31, 2008, there was $78.7 million outstanding under the committed lines of credit. Under the terms of the committed lines of credit, LendingTree Loans is required to maintain various financial and other covenants. These financial covenants include, but are not limited to, maintaining (i) minimum levels of tangible net worth, cash on hand with a certain lender and liquid assets, (ii) a maximum ratio of total liabilities to net worth and (iii) positive pre-tax net income on a quarterly basis. During the first quarter of 2008, LendingTree Loans was in compliance with all covenants. Borrowings under all of LendingTree Loans' lines of credit are non-recourse to Tree.com.

        Tree.com anticipates that it will need to make capital and other expenditures in connection with the development and expansion of its overall operations.

        Tree.com has considered its anticipated operating cash flows in 2008, cash and cash equivalents, current borrowing capacity under lines of credit, its expected capitalization upon completion of the spin-off and access to capital markets, subject to restrictions in the tax sharing agreement, and believes that these are sufficient to fund its operating needs, including debt requirements, commitments and contingencies and capital and investing commitments for the foreseeable future. LendingTree Loans is highly dependent on the availability of credit to finance its operations. Its inability to renew or replace

77



existing facilities upon expiration or termination, which could be impacted by continuing disruptions in the credit market, would adversely impact its results of operations and financial condition. In connection with the completion of the spin-off, intercompany payable balances will be extinguished. It is expected that IAC will transfer to Tree.com an amount of cash that will be sufficient for its initial capitalization.


CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS AND COMMERCIAL COMMITMENTS

 
  Payments Due by Period
Contractual Obligations

  Total
  Less Than 1 Year
  1-3 Years
  3-5 Years
  More Than 5 Years
 
  (In thousands)

Short-term and current portion of long-term obligations   $ 78,739   $ 78,739   $   $   $
Capital lease obligations     15     15            
Purchase obligations(a)     587     587            
Operating leases     27,724     7,395     8,723     5,669     5,937
   
 
 
 
 
Total contractual cash obligations   $ 107,065   $ 86,736   $ 8,723   $ 5,669   $ 5,937
   
 
 
 
 

(a)
The purchase obligations primarily relate to marketing event contracts in 2008.

78



TREE.COM'S PRINCIPLES OF FINANCIAL REPORTING

        Tree.com reports Operating Income Before Amortization as a supplemental measure to generally accepted accounting principles ("GAAP"). This measure is one of the primary metrics by which Tree.com evaluates the performance of its businesses, on which its internal budgets are based and by which management is compensated. Tree.com believes that investors should have access to the same set of tools that it uses in analyzing its results. This non-GAAP measure should be considered in addition to results prepared in accordance with GAAP, but should not be considered a substitute for or superior to GAAP results. Tree.com provides and encourages investors to examine the reconciling adjustments between the GAAP and non-GAAP measure which are discussed below.

Definition of Tree.com's Non-GAAP Measure

        Operating Income Before Amortization is defined as operating income excluding, if applicable: (1) non-cash compensation expense, (2) amortization of intangibles and goodwill impairment, (3) pro forma adjustments for significant acquisitions, and (4) one-time items. Tree.com believes this measure is useful to investors because it represents the operating results from the Tree.com Businesses, taking into account depreciation, which Tree.com believes is an ongoing cost of doing business, but excluding the effects of any other non-cash expenses. Operating Income Before Amortization has certain limitations in that it does not take into account the impact to Tree.com's statement of operations of certain expenses, including non-cash compensation, and acquisition-related accounting. Tree.com endeavors to compensate for the limitations of the non-GAAP measure presented by also providing the comparable GAAP measure with equal or greater prominence and descriptions of the reconciling items, including quantifying such items, to derive the non-GAAP measure.

Pro Forma Results

        Tree.com will only present Operating Income Before Amortization on a pro forma basis if it views a particular transaction as significant in size or transformational in nature. For the periods presented in this report, there are no transactions that Tree.com has included on a pro forma basis.

One-Time Items

        Operating Income Before Amortization is presented before one-time items, if applicable. These items are truly one-time in nature and non-recurring, infrequent or unusual, and have not occurred in the past two years or are not expected to recur in the next two years, in accordance with SEC rules. For the periods presented in this report, there are no one-time items.

Non-Cash Expenses That Are Excluded From Tree.com's Non-GAAP Measure

        Non-cash compensation expense consists principally of expense associated with the grants, including unvested grants assumed in acquisitions, of restricted stock, restricted stock units and stock options. These expenses are not paid in cash, and Tree.com will include the related shares in its future calculations of fully diluted shares outstanding. Upon vesting of restricted stock and restricted stock units and the exercise of certain stock options, the awards will be settled, at Tree.com's discretion, on a net basis, with Tree.com remitting the required tax withholding amount from its current funds.

        Amortization of intangibles is a non-cash expense relating primarily to acquisitions. At the time of an acquisition, the intangible assets of the acquired company, such as purchase agreements, technology and customer relationships, are valued and amortized over their estimated lives. Tree.com believes that since intangibles represent costs incurred by the acquired company to build value prior to acquisition, they were part of transaction costs.

79


Reconciliation of Operating Income Before Amortization

        For a reconciliation of Operating Income Before Amortization to operating (loss) income for Tree.com's operating segments and to net (loss) income in total for the years ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005, see Note 8 to the consolidated financial statements. For a reconciliation of Operating Income Before Amortization to operating loss for Tree.com's operating segments and to net loss for the three months ended March 31, 2008 and 2007, see Note 5 to the unaudited interim financial statements.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

        The following disclosure is provided to supplement the descriptions of Tree.com's accounting policies contained in Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements in regard to significant areas of judgment. Tree.com's management is required to make certain estimates and assumptions during the preparation of its consolidated financial statements in accordance with GAAP. These estimates and assumptions impact the reported amount of assets and liabilities and disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities as of the date of the consolidated financial statements. They also impact the reported amount of net income during any period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Because of the size of the financial statement elements to which they relate, some of Tree.com's accounting policies and estimates have a more significant impact on its consolidated financial statements than others. What follows is a discussion of some of Tree.com's more significant accounting policies and estimates.

    Recoverability of Long-Lived Assets

        Tree.com reviews the carrying value of all long-lived assets, primarily property and equipment and definite-lived intangible assets, for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value of an asset may be impaired. In accordance with SFAS 144, "Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long-Lived Assets" ("SFAS 144"), impairment is considered to have occurred whenever the carrying value of a long-lived asset exceeds the sum of the undiscounted cash flows that is expected to result from the use and eventual disposition of the asset. The determination of cash flows is based upon assumptions that may not occur. The value of long-lived assets that is subject to assessment for impairment in accordance with SFAS 144 is $41.3 million at December 31, 2007.

    Recoverability of Goodwill and Indefinite-Lived Intangible Assets

        Goodwill impairment is determined using a two-step process. The first step of the process is to compare the fair value of a reporting unit with its carrying amount, including goodwill. In performing the first step, Tree.com determines the fair value of its reporting units by using a discounted cash flow ("DCF") analysis. Determining fair value using a DCF analysis requires the exercise of significant judgments, including judgments about appropriate discount rates, perpetual growth rates and the amount and timing of expected future cash flows. If the fair value of a reporting unit exceeds its carrying amount, goodwill of the reporting unit is not impaired and the second step of the impairment test is not required. If the carrying amount of a reporting unit exceeds its fair value, the second step of the goodwill impairment test is required to be performed to measure the amount of impairment, if any. The second step of the goodwill impairment test compares the implied fair value of the reporting unit's goodwill with the carrying amount of that goodwill. The implied fair value of goodwill is determined in the same manner as the amount of goodwill recognized in a business combination. If the carrying amount of the reporting unit's goodwill exceeds the implied fair value of that goodwill, an impairment loss is recognized in an amount equal to that excess.

        The impairment test for indefinite-lived intangible assets involves a comparison of the estimated fair value of the intangible asset with its carrying value. If the carrying value of the indefinite-lived

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intangible asset exceeds its fair value, an impairment loss is recognized in an amount equal to that excess. The estimates of fair value of indefinite-lived intangible assets are determined using a DCF valuation analysis that employs a "relief from royalty" methodology in estimating the fair value of its trade names and trademarks. Significant judgments inherent in this analysis include the determination of royalty rates, discount rates and the terminal growth rates.

        Goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets, primarily trade names and trademarks, are tested annually for impairment as of October 1 or earlier upon the occurrence of certain events or substantive changes in circumstances. The annual assessment for 2007 identified impairment charges for the Lending reporting unit as more fully described above in "Results of Operations for the Years Ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005." Tree.com's reporting units are currently operating in dynamic and challenged industry segments. To illustrate the magnitude of potential impairment charges relative to future changes in estimated fair value, had the estimated fair value of Tree.com's reporting units and their respective indefinite-lived intangible assets been hypothetically lower by 10% as of October 1, 2007 the aggregate book value of goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets would have exceeded fair value by approximately $7.0 million at Lending and $8.0 million at Real Estate. Had the estimated fair values of Tree.com's reporting units and their respective indefinite-lived intangible assets been hypothetically lower by 20% as of October 1, 2007, the book value of goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets would have exceeded fair value by approximately $21.0 million at Lending and $18.0 million at Real Estate.

    Income Taxes

        Estimates of deferred income taxes and the significant items giving rise to the deferred assets and liabilities are shown in Note 7, and reflect management's assessment of actual future taxes to be paid on items reflected in the consolidated financial statements, giving consideration to both timing and the probability of realization. As of December 31, 2007, the balance of deferred tax liabilities, net, is $30.3 million. Actual income taxes could vary from these estimates due to future changes in income tax law, state income tax apportionment or the outcome of any review of IAC's tax returns by the IRS, as well as actual operating results of Tree.com that vary significantly from anticipated results. Effective January 1, 2007, Tree.com adopted the provisions of FIN 48. As a result of the adoption of FIN 48, Tree.com recognizes liabilities for uncertain tax positions based on the two-step process prescribed by the interpretation. The first step is to evaluate the tax position for recognition by determining if the weight of available evidence indicates it is more likely than not that the position will be sustained on audit, including resolution of related appeals or litigation processes, if any. The second step is to measure the tax benefit as the largest amount which is more than 50% likely of being realized upon ultimate settlement. This measurement step is inherently difficult and requires subjective estimations of such amounts to determine the probability of various possible outcomes. Tree.com considers many factors when evaluating and estimating its tax positions and tax benefits, which may require periodic adjustments and which may not accurately anticipate actual outcomes.

    Loans Held for Sale

        Loans held for sale consist primarily of residential first and second mortgage loans that are secured by residential real estate throughout the United States. LendingTree Loans originates residential loans with the intent to sell them in the secondary market. Loans held for sale are carried at the lower of cost or market value in accordance with SFAS No. 65, "Accounting for Certain Mortgage Banking Activities." The lower of cost or market value is determined on an individual basis for loans that have been impaired and on an aggregate basis for loans that have not been impaired. The cost basis of loans held for sale includes the capitalized cost associated with the interest rate lock commitments, deferred origination fees, deferred origination costs and prior to April 1, 2007 the effects of hedge accounting. The market value of loans held for sale is determined using current secondary

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market prices for loans with similar coupons, maturities and credit quality. The December 31, 2007 consolidated balance sheet includes $86.8 million of loans held for sale, which is net of an associated valuation allowance of $4.3 million. The valuation allowance is the amount by which the cost of loans held for sale exceeds the market value of loans held for sale.

        LendingTree Loans sells loans it originates to investors on a servicing released basis so the risk of loss or default by the borrower is generally transferred to the investor. However, LendingTree Loans is required by these investors to make certain representations relating to credit information, loan documentation and collateral. To the extent LendingTree Loans does not comply with such representations, or there are early payment defaults, LendingTree Loans may be required to repurchase loans or indemnify the investors for any losses from borrower defaults. As such, LendingTree Loans records a liability for the estimated obligation related to this exposure based, in part, on historical and projected loss frequency and loss severity, the original principal amount of the loans previously sold, the year the loans were sold, and loan type. There are four loan types used in this analysis which are determined based on the extent of the documentation received (full or limited) and the lien position of the mortgage in the underling property (first or second position). In the case of early payment payoffs, which occurs when a borrower prepays a loan prior to the end of the prepayment penalty period, LendingTree Loans may be required to repay all or a portion of the premium initially paid by the investor. The estimated obligation associated with early loan payoffs is calculated based on historical loss experience by type of loan. Specific circumstances may also cause management to estimate and record additional liabilities specific to a situation based on certain assumptions of future losses as a result of current activity. Because LendingTree Loans does not service the loans it sells, it does not maintain nor have access to the current balances and loan performance data with respect to the individual loans previously sold to investors. As such, LendingTree Loans is unable to determine its maximum loss exposure. For the year ended December 31, 2007 LendingTree Loans increased its liability for losses on previously sold loans by approximately $15.5 million as a reduction to revenue. In 2007, $5.4 million was paid or written off against the liability. The related liability at December 31, 2007 is $13.9 million.

Seasonality

        Lending and Real Estate revenue is subject to the seasonal and cyclical trends of the U.S. housing market. On a seasonal basis, home sales typically rise during the spring and summer months and decline during the fall and winter months. The current cyclical trends have impacted and are expected to continue to impact typical seasonal trends. Refinancing and home equity activity is principally driven by mortgage interest rates as well as real estate values.

New Accounting Pronouncements

        Refer to Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements for a description of recent accounting pronouncements.

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QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

Interest Rate Risk

        Tree.com's exposure to market rate risk for changes in interest rates relates primarily to its loans held for sale, and LendingTree Loans' lines of credit.

    Loans Held for Sale

        LendingTree Loans' mortgage banking operations expose Tree.com to interest rate risk for loans originated until those loans are sold in the secondary market ("loans held for sale"). The fair value of loans held for sale is subject to change primarily due to changes in market interest rates. LendingTree Loans hedges the changes in fair value of certain loans held for sale primarily by entering into mortgage forward delivery contracts. Although LendingTree Loans continues to enter into derivatives for risk management purposes, effective April 1, 2007 management determined these derivative instruments would no longer qualify for the hedge accounting provisions of SFAS No. 133, "Accounting for Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities."

        When hedge accounting was discontinued, the affected loans held for sale were no longer adjusted for changes in fair value. However, the changes in fair value of the derivative instruments continue to be recognized in current earnings as a component of revenue. For the year ended December 31, 2007 Tree.com recognized losses of $1.1 million related to the changes in fair value of derivative instruments related to loans held for sale. For the three months ended March 31, 2008, Tree.com recognized losses of less than $0.1 million related to the changes in fair value of derivative instruments related to loans held for sale.

        In addition, LendingTree Loans provides interest rate lock commitments ("IRLCs") to fund mortgage loans at interest rates previously agreed upon with the borrower for specified periods of time, which also expose it to interest rate risk. IRLCs are considered derivative instruments and, therefore, are recorded at fair value, with changes in fair value reflected in current period earnings. To manage the interest rate risk associated with the IRLCs, Tree.com uses derivative instruments, including mortgage forward delivery contracts. These instruments do not qualify for hedge accounting. The net change in the fair value of these derivatives for the year ended December 31, 2007 resulted in losses of $0.8 million which have been recognized as a component of revenue in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations.

        On January 1, 2008, Tree.com adopted the provisions of SFAS No. 157, "Fair Value Measurements" ("SFAS No. 157"). Prior to the adoption of SFAS 157 the recognition of gains and losses at the inception of a derivative contract were prohibited unless the fair value of the contract was evidenced by a quoted price in an active market. As no active market exists for IRLCs, such day one gains and losses were not recognized until the related loan was sold. Prior to January 1, 2008, guidance also prohibited including the value of servicing the loan in calculating the fair value of an IRLC. Such guidance was rescinded by Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 109, "Written Loan Commitments Recorded at Fair Value Through Earnings" ("SAB 109"). Accordingly, with the adoption of SFAS No. 157 and SAB 109 on January 1, 2008, the day one gains and servicing value, adjusted by the loan funding probability, are included in the value of IRLCs. The net change in the fair value of the IRLCs and related forward delivery contracts, including the impact of day one gains and servicing value, for the three months ended March 31, 2008 resulted in gains of $14.8 million which have been recognized as a component of revenue in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations.

        The fair values of derivative financial instruments at LendingTree Loans are impacted by movements in market interest rates. Changes in the fair value of the derivative financial instruments would substantially be offset by changes in the fair value of the items for which risk is being mitigated. As of March 31, 2008 and December 31, 2007, if market interest rates had increased by 100 basis points, the aggregate fair value of the derivative financial instruments and the hedged items at LendingTree Loans would have increased by $0.1 million and decreased by $0.2 million, respectively. As of March 31, 2008 and December 31, 2007, if market interest rates had decreased by 100 basis points, the aggregate fair value of the derivative financial instruments and the hedged items at LendingTree Loans would have decreased by $0.8 million and $0.3 million, respectively.

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Management of Tree.com

Tree.com Board of Directors and Executive Officers

        The following table sets forth information as to persons who are expected to serve as Tree.com directors and executive officers following the spin-offs. The Tree.com Board of Directors, the composition of which complies with the independence requirements under the current standards imposed by the Marketplace Rules, including the transitional rules set forth therein, is currently expected to consist of five directors.

Name

  Age
  Position(s)
Douglas Lebda   38   Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and Director of Tree.com
Scott Cammarn   47   Senior Vice President and General Counsel of Tree.com
Robert Harris   48   President, LendingTree Exchange
Peter C. Horan   53   Director of Tree.com
Joseph Levin   28   Director of Tree.com
Lance Melber*   46   Director of Tree.com
David Norris   43   President of Home Loan Center, Inc.
Steven Ozonian*   53   Director of Tree.com
Matthew Packey   40   Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Tree.com
Bret Violette   41   President of Real Estate

*
Independent Directors

Directors

        Background information about those individuals who are expected to serve as directors of Tree.com appears below. Liberty Media Corporation has chosen not to immediately exercise its right to nominate directors at Tree.com, but retains its ability to do so in the future. See "Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions—Agreements with Liberty Media Corporation."

        Douglas Lebda, age 38, will serve as Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and director of Tree.com upon completion of the spin-offs and has served in such capacity for LendingTree since January 2008. Mr. Lebda has also served as President and Chief Operating Officer of IAC since the end of 2005. Prior to assuming his current roles, Mr. Lebda served as the Chief Executive Officer of LendingTree, which he founded, since September 1998. Prior to his tenure as Chief Executive Officer of LendingTree, Mr. Lebda served as Chairman of the Board and President of LendingTree since June 1996. Before founding LendingTree in June 1996, Mr. Lebda worked as an auditor and consultant for PriceWaterhouseCoopers. Mr. Lebda is a member of the Board of Directors of Eastman Kodak.

        Peter C. Horan, age 53, currently serves as CEO of GoodmailSystems, Inc. Prior to that, he served as CEO of IAC Media & Advertising from January 2007 to June 2008. Mr. Horan previously served as CEO of AllBusiness.com, Inc. Prior to that, Mr. Horan was CEO of About.com. Prior to About.com, he served as President and Chief Executive Officer of DevX.com, Inc., an Internet media company. Mr. Horan spent 10 years at International Data Group, a leading global technology media company, where he spearheaded relationships with top advertisers on a worldwide basis, and also served as Senior Vice President and Publisher of Computerworld. Prior to that Mr. Horan spent more than 15 years in senior account management roles at leading advertising agencies, including BBDO and Ogilvy & Mather.

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        Joseph Levin, age 28, currently serves Senior Vice President, Mergers & Acquisitions and Finance for IAC. Prior to his current position, Mr. Levin served as Vice President, Finance. In his four years at IAC, Mr. Levin has worked in Strategic Planning, M&A, and Finance. Prior to joining IAC, Mr. Levin worked in the Technology Mergers & Acquisitions group for Credit Suisse First Boston (now Credit Suisse) in San Francisco.

        Lance Melber, age 46, served as Senior Vice President for Capital One from early 2005 until March of 2008. Prior to that, Mr. Melber founded eSmartloan.com and served as its CEO from 2001 until it was sold to Capital One in early 2005. Prior to founding eSmartloan.com, Mr. Melber served as the Managing Director of Oneloan.com working for First Horizon National Corp. Mr. Melber has a technology background with over 25 years experience in the industry.

        Steven Ozonian, age 53, is currently the Executive Chairman of Global Mobility Solutions. In 2004, Mr. Ozonian founded Spinnaker Capital Partners in 2004. Prior to that he was a senior executive at Re/Max and Bank of America where he worked in the business development and real estate brokerage acquisition activities.

Executive Officers

        Background about Tree.com's executive officers who are not expected to serve as directors appears below.

        Scott Cammarn, age 47, will serve as Senior Vice President and General Counsel of Tree.com upon the completion of the spin-offs and has served in such capacity for LendingTree since May 2006. Prior to joining LendingTree, Mr. Cammarn worked for Bank of America for eleven years, during which he served in various legal capacities, most recently as Associate General Counsel, Global Marketing and Global Corporate Affairs. Before joining Bank of America, Mr. Cammarn was a partner at the law firm of Zeiger, Dreher & Carpenter, where he represented a number of leading consumer lending institutions.

        Robert L. Harris, age 48, will serve as President of Tree.com's LendingTree Exchange business upon completion of the spin-offs and has served in such capacity for LendingTree since June 2008. Mr. Harris previously served as President and Chief Operating Officer of the Lending Business from May 2007 through January 2008 and Vice Chairman from January 2008 through June 2008. Mr. Harris joined LendingTree as Vice President of Marketing in June 2000 and served as Chief Marketing Officer of LendingTree from September 2003 through April 2007. Prior to joining LendingTree, Mr. Harris served as Managing Director, Consumer Marketing of The Coca-Cola Company and worked at McCormick & Company, where he was responsible for leading brand marketing, new products and sales initiatives within the U.S. Consumer Products Group.

        David Norris, age 43, will serve as President of Home Loan Center, Inc., Tree.com's mortgage subsidiary, upon the spin-off and has served in such capacity since June 2008. Mr. Norris previously served as Senior Vice President of Home Loan Center and LendingTree, LLC, with responsibility for several areas, including Business Planning & Intelligence, Project Management, Call Center, Customer Experience, Six Sigma, and Sales Training. Mr. Norris joined LendingTree in September, 2006 as Vice President of Corporate Quality. Prior to joining LendingTree, Mr. Norris served as Vice President of Service and Solutions for Toshiba America's Digital Products Division where he was responsible for delivering customer solutions and all post-sale product support. Within Toshiba, Mr. Norris also served as Vice President of Management Innovation.

        Matthew Packey, age 40, will serve as Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Tree.com upon completion of the spin-offs and has served in such capacity for LendingTree since September 2007. Mr. Packey previously served as LendingTree's Chief Accounting Officer from August

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2005 to September 2007 and Controller from January 2000 to August 2005. Prior to joining LendingTree, Mr. Packey served as Vice President and Controller of Broadway & Seymour, Inc., and as a Manager at Deloitte & Touche, LLP. Mr. Packey is a certified public accountant.

        Bret A. Violette, age 41, will serve as President of Tree.com's Real Estate Business and has served in such capacity for LendingTree since April 2007. Mr. Violette previously served as Senior Vice President and General Manager of LendingTree's real estate brokerage business from June 2005. Before joining LendingTree, Mr. Violette served as President of Weichert Lead Network, Inc. and Weichert Rental Network, Inc. from 2002 to June 2005. Prior to that time, Mr. Violette served as Chief Financial Officer and Vice President of Business Development of YHD Foxtons, Vice President of Business Development at CMP Media Inc. and as a Group Business Director of Ziff-Davis.

Committees of the Board of Directors

        Concurrent with the completion of the spin-offs, the Tree.com Board of Directors will establish the following committees: the Audit Committee, the Compensation Committee and the Nominating Committee. The composition of each such committee will satisfy the independence requirements and current standards of the SEC, Marketplace Rules and Internal Revenue Service rules (as applicable), including the transitional rules set forth therein.

        Audit Committee.    The Audit Committee of the Tree.com Board of Directors will consist of Messrs. Melber, Ozonian and Horan. IAC has concluded, subject to confirmation by the Tree.com Board of Directors, that Mr. Ozonian is an "audit committee financial expert," as such term is defined in applicable SEC rules.

        The Audit Committee will function pursuant to a written charter adopted by the Tree.com Board of Directors, pursuant to which it will be granted the responsibilities and authority necessary to comply with Rule 10A-3 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. The Audit Committee will be appointed by the Tree.com Board of Directors to assist the Tree.com Board with a variety of matters, including monitoring (1) the integrity of Tree.com's financial statements, (2) the effectiveness of Tree.com's internal control over financial reporting, (3) the qualifications and independence of Tree.com's independent registered public accounting firm, (4) the performance of Tree.com's internal audit function and independent registered public accounting firm and (5) the compliance by Tree.com with legal and regulatory requirements.

        Compensation Committee.    The Compensation Committee will be comprised of Messrs. Melber and Ozonian and will be authorized to exercise all of the powers of the Tree.com Board of Directors with respect to matters pertaining to compensation and benefits, including, but not limited to, salary matters, incentive/bonus plans, stock compensation plans, retirement programs and insurance plans.

        Nominating Committee.    The Nominating Committee will be comprised of Messrs. Melber and Ozonian and will be responsible for identifying individuals qualified to become members of Tree.com's Board of Directors, recommending to the Board director nominees for the annual meeting of shareholders and otherwise on an as needed basis.

        Other Committees.    In addition to the foregoing committees, the Tree.com Board of Directors, by resolution, may from time to time establish other committees of the Tree.com Board of Directors, consisting of one or more of its directors.

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Director Compensation

        Non-Employee Director Arrangements.    Each member of the Tree.com Board of Directors will receive an annual retainer in the amount of $40,000. Each member of the Audit or Compensation Committee will receive an additional annual retainer in the amount of $10,000, although the chair of the Audit Committee will receive an additional annual chairperson retainer in the amount of $15,000.

        In addition, each non-employee director will receive a grant of restricted stock units with a dollar value of $50,000 upon his or her initial election to the Tree.com Board of Directors and annually thereafter upon re-election on the date of Tree.com's annual meeting of stockholders. The terms of these restricted stock units provide for (i) vesting in two equal annual installments commencing on the first anniversary of the grant date, (ii) cancellation and forfeiture of unvested units in their entirety upon termination of service with the Tree.com Board of Directors and (iii) full acceleration of vesting upon a change in control of Tree.com. Directors will be able to elect to receive their cash payments in restricted stock at a fixed discount to the market price at the grant date. Non-employee directors are also reimbursed for all reasonable expenses incurred in connection with attendance at Tree.com Board and Committee meetings.

        The Compensation Committee will have primary responsibility for establishing non-employee director compensation arrangements, which are designed to provide competitive compensation necessary to attract and retain high quality non-employee directors and to encourage ownership of Tree.com stock to further align directors' interests with those of Tree.com's stockholders. When considering non-employee director compensation arrangements, Tree.com management will provide the Compensation Committee with information regarding various types of non-employee director compensation arrangements and practices of select peer companies.

        Deferred Compensation Plan for Non-Employee Directors. Under Tree.com's Deferred Compensation Plan for Non-Employee Directors, non-employee directors will be able to defer all or a portion of their Board and Board Committee fees. Eligible directors who defer all or any portion of these fees can elect to have such fees applied to the purchase of share units, representing the number of shares of Tree.com common stock that could have been purchased on the relevant date, or credited to a cash fund. If any dividends are paid on Tree.com common stock, dividend equivalents will be credited on the share units. The cash fund will be credited with deemed interest at an annual rate equal to the weighted average prime lending rate of JPMorgan Chase Bank. After a director ceases to be a member of the Tree.com Board of Directors, he or she will receive (i) with respect to share units, such number of shares of Tree.com common stock as the share units represent and (ii) with respect to the cash fund, a cash payment in an amount equal to deferred amounts, plus accrued interest. These payments will be made in either one lump sum or up to five installments, as previously elected by the eligible director at the time of the related deferral election.

Director Independence

        Under the Marketplace Rules, Tree.com's Board will have a responsibility to make an affirmative determination that those members of its Board that serve as independent directors do not have any relationships with Tree.com and its businesses that would impair their independence. In connection with these determinations, Tree.com's Board will review information regarding transactions, relationships and arrangements involving Tree.com and its businesses and each director that it deems relevant to independence, including those required by the Marketplace Rules. This information is obtained from director responses to a questionnaire circulated by Tree.com management, Tree.com records and publicly available information. Following these determinations, Tree.com management will monitor those transactions, relationships and arrangements that are relevant to such determinations, as well as solicit updated information potentially relevant to independence from internal personnel and directors, to determine whether there have been any developments that could potentially have an adverse impact on Tree.com's prior independence determinations.

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Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation

        Tree.com's Board of Directors will have a Compensation Committee comprised of Messrs. Melber and Ozonian, neither of whom will be or has been in the past an officer or employee of Tree.com or any of its businesses at the time of their respective service on the Committee.

Tree.com Executive Compensation

Compensation Discussion and Analysis

    Roles and Responsibilities

        To date, the compensation of Tree.com's executive officers has been predominantly determined by IAC, acting in effect as Tree.com's compensation committee. IAC's compensation process is principally driven by IAC's General Counsel, who has primary responsibility for administering compensation and making compensation recommendations, with all material decisions approved by IAC's Chairman and Chief Executive Officer and, where appropriate, the Compensation Committee of IAC's Board of Directors (specifically with respect to all awards of IAC equity).

        This Compensation Discussion and Analysis deals exclusively with historical information while Tree.com has been a part of IAC. Following the spin-off, Tree.com will have an independent board of directors, which will in turn have a compensation committee with responsibility for establishing Tree.com's compensation philosophy and programs and determining appropriate payments and awards to its executive officers. Because Tree.com's compensation committee has not yet been established, Tree.com cannot predict what compensation philosophies and programs will be adopted following the spin-off, and therefore this historical report is not necessarily indicative of the practices it will follow when it is an independent public company.

        In general, IAC has been responsible for establishing bonus pools and equity pools for Tree.com, and then such pools are allocated throughout Tree.com, with IAC directly establishing all compensation elements for Tree.com's CEO, while the Tree.com CEO makes the determinations for Tree.com's other executive officers, subject to IAC's review and approval.

        Neither Tree.com nor IAC has an ongoing relationship with any particular compensation consulting firm, though IAC has from time to time retained the services of consultants on specific occasions regarding broad-based IAC compensation programs. At no time has a consultant been engaged with respect to compensation of any of Tree.com's executive officers.

        Until January 2008, Mr. Lebda was an executive officer of IAC, and not of Tree.com, and as such all decisions relating to Mr. Lebda's compensation were made by the IAC Compensation Committee with respect to IAC's performance overall, and his performance in his capacity as President and Chief Operating Officer of IAC.

        As of the end of 2007, C.D. Davies served in the capacity of CEO, Lending Tree LLC, and as such was an executive officer of the Company. In 2008, Mr. Davies accepted a new role with the Company as Vice Chairman, a part time position in which he serves in primarily an advisory capacity, and as such is no longer considered an executive officer of the Company. Accordingly, his 2008 compensation is discussed in this Compensation Discussion and Analysis, and is reflected in the compensation tables, but he is not listed as an executive officer of the Company.

    Philosophy and Objectives

        Tree.com's executive officer compensation program is designed to increase long-term stockholder value by attracting, retaining, motivating and rewarding leaders with the competence, character, experience and ambition necessary to enable Tree.com to meet its growth objectives.

        When establishing compensation packages for a given executive, Tree.com has followed a flexible approach, and has made decisions based on a host of factors particular to a given executive situation, including its firsthand experience with the competition for recruiting and retaining executives,

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negotiation and discussion with the relevant individual, competitive survey data, internal equity considerations and other factors it deems relevant at the time.

        Similarly, Tree.com has not followed an arithmetic approach to establishing compensation levels and measuring and rewarding performance for its executive officers, as these often fail to adequately take into account the multiple factors that contribute to success at the individual and business level. In any given period, Tree.com may have multiple objectives, and these objectives, and their relative importance, often change as the competitive and strategic landscape shifts, even within a given compensation cycle. As a result, formulaic approaches often over-compensate or under-compensate a given performance level. Accordingly, Tree.com has historically avoided the use of strict formulas in its compensation practices and has relied primarily on a discretionary approach.

    Compensation Elements

        Tree.com's compensation packages for executive officers have primarily consisted of salary, annual bonuses, long term incentives (typically equity awards) and other benefits. Prior to making specific decisions related to any particular element of compensation, Tree.com typically reviews the total compensation of each executive, evaluating the executive's total near and long-term compensation in the aggregate. Tree.com determines which element or combinations of compensation elements (salary, bonus or equity) can be used most effectively to further its compensation objectives. However, all such decisions are subjective, and made on a facts and circumstances basis without any prescribed relationship between the various elements of the total compensation package.

    Salary

        General.    Tree.com typically negotiates a new executive officer's starting salary upon arrival, based on the executive's prior compensation history, prior compensation levels for the particular position within Tree.com, Tree.com's location, salary levels of other executives within Tree.com, salary levels available to the individual in alternative opportunities, reference to certain survey information and the extent to which Tree.com desires to secure the executive's services.

        Once established, salaries can increase based on a number of factors, including the assumption of additional responsibilities, internal equity, periodic market checks and other factors which demonstrate an executive's increased value to Tree.com.

        Tree.com utilizes the Towers Perrin Executive Compensation Data Bank when referring to survey data in formulating its compensation packages.

        2007.    In 2007, Mr. C.D. Davies (who served as CEO of the Lending business as of the end of 2007, but no longer serves as an executive of Tree.com), Mr. Violette, Mr. Harris and Mr. Packey each received salary increases in connection with the assumption of new roles within Tree.com. To reflect his promotion to Chief Executive Officer of the company's Lending business, Mr. Davies received a salary increase from $300,000 to $450,000. Mr. Violette was promoted to President of the company's Real Estate business in April 2007 and received a salary increase from $312,000 to $400,000. Mr. Harris was promoted to President and Chief Operating Officer of the Lending business in May 2007 and received a salary increase from $255,000 to $325,000. Mr. Packey was promoted to Chief Financial Officer in October 2007 and received an increase from $210,000 to $241,500. All of these increases were the result of conversations between the company and the relevant executives, and in making its determinations Tree.com took into account a variety of factors, including internal pay structure, its assessment of market salaries, and, in certain instances, survey data.

        2008.    In connection with the employment agreement pursuant to which Mr. Lebda returned to Tree.com as its Chairman and Chief Executive Officer (the "New Lebda Employment Agreement"), Mr. Lebda agreed to a salary of $750,000, which is the same as the salary he had been receiving as President and Chief Operating Officer of IAC.

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    Annual Bonuses

        General.    Tree.com's bonus program is designed to reward performance on an annual basis. Because of the variable nature of the bonus program, and because in any given year bonuses have the potential to make up a significant portion of an executive's total compensation, the bonus program provides an important incentive tool to achieve Tree.com's annual objectives.

        After consultation with Tree.com management, IAC establishes the annual bonus pool for the Lending and Real Estate businesses based on its assessment of their respective performances during the completed year. Both the Lending and Real Estate businesses have generally been measured by growth in profitability, but this is measured subjectively both in absolute terms over the prior year and in comparison to their competitors, taking into account economic and other factors, without any pre-established targets. Additionally, consideration has sometimes been given to achievement of various strategic objectives over the course of the year and other factors IAC and Tree.com's management deem relevant. No quantified weight has been given to any particular consideration and there has generally been no formulaic calculation. Rather, IAC has engaged in an overall assessment of appropriate bonus levels based on a subjective interpretation of all the relevant criteria.

        IAC determines the bonus amounts for the Presidents of the Lending and Real Estate businesses, based largely on the same considerations used in establishing the bonus pools for the businesses generally.

        The Presidents of each business then establish the bonus payments to the other executive officers out of the bonus pool. Specific bonus payouts are determined based loosely on Tree.com's actual bonus pool and the relative role and importance of each executive, with individualized adjustments in certain instances for an executive's individual performance. With the exception of Mr. Violette, none of the executives at Tree.com have target bonus opportunities.

        Tree.com generally pays bonuses shortly after year-end following finalization of financial results for the prior year.

        2007.    Lending and Real Estate each had difficult years in extremely challenging environments, and bonuses generally reflected these factors. In 2007, Mr. Davies and Mr. Violette each received guaranteed minimum bonuses under the terms of their employment agreements. Given disappointing financial results, IAC determined not to make bonus payments in excess of those minimums. Mr. Davies received a bonus of $350,000 and Mr. Violette received a bonus of $500,000. Tree.com's overall 2007 performance did not warrant reward bonuses, but concerned about turmoil in the lending industry, Tree.com determined to pay guaranteed bonuses to certain key performers, as determined by Mr. Davies and Mr. Lebda. Mr. Harris and Mr. Packey were included in this group. For each individual receiving a bonus, an amount was established, with 50% guaranteed to be paid in February 2008 and 50% in July 2008, in each case based on continued employment with Tree.com. For purposes of this compensation disclosure, Tree.com has considered the 50% payout made in February 2008 to Messrs. Harris and Packey as being bonuses paid with respect to 2007. Mr. Harris and Mr. Packey received payouts of $75,000 and $50,000, respectively, in each of February and July. These amounts were established based on a subjective determination by Mr. Davies, in consultation with Mr. Lebda, of the amounts necessary to retain these individuals, given the limited amount of cash provided by IAC for the retention program company-wide.

        No bonuses were paid to IAC executive officers on account of 2007 as a result of poor performance of IAC as a whole, and consequently Mr. Lebda was not paid a bonus for 2007.

    Long-Term Incentives

        General.    Tree.com believes that ownership shapes behavior, and that by providing a meaningful portion of an executive officer's compensation in stock, the executive's incentives are aligned with stockholder interests in a manner that drives better performance over time. As part of IAC, that led to Tree.com's executive officers receiving IAC equity awards on a regular basis.

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        In setting particular award levels, the predominant objectives are providing the recipient with effective retention incentives, appropriate reward for past performance, and incentives for strong future performance. Appropriate levels to meet these goals may vary from year to year, and from individual to individual, based on a variety of factors.

        The annual corporate performance factors relevant to setting bonus amounts that were discussed above, while taken into account, are generally less relevant in setting annual equity awards, as the awards tend to be more forward looking, and are a longer-term retention and reward instrument than Tree.com's annual bonuses.

        Awards to the Presidents of Lending and Real Estate have been made by IAC. Additionally, IAC establishes a pool for annual equity awards which the Presidents then allocate to the rest of their businesses, including the other executive officers, subject to IAC's approval. Additionally, IAC approves any equity grants recommended to be made to Tree.com executives outside of the annual process. Executive officers receive grants that are subjectively determined based on IAC's (or the Presidents') view of how best to allocate the equity pool for retention, reward and motivation based on a host of subjective factors (including past contribution, retention risk, contribution potential, and market data).

        Except where otherwise noted, Tree.com grants equity awards following year-end after finalization of financial results for the prior year. The meeting of the Compensation Committee of the IAC Board at which the awards are made is generally scheduled months in advance and without regard to the timing of the release of earnings or other material information.

        Restricted Stock Units.    Until 2008, IAC used restricted stock units, or RSUs, as its exclusive equity compensation tool for Tree.com's executive officers. Through 2006, these awards generally vested in equal annual installments over 5 years (annual vesting RSUs), or cliff vested at the end of five years (cliff-vesting RSUs). Annual awards were intended to provide frequent rewards and near-term retention incentives, while cliff-vesting RSUs provided more of a long-term retention mechanism.

        In February 2007, IAC implemented a new equity instrument, Growth Shares, which were RSU grants that cliff vested at the end of three years in varying amounts depending upon growth in IAC's publicly reported metric, Adjusted Earnings Per Share, with certain modifications.

        These awards were introduced throughout IAC to more closely link long-term reward with IAC's overall performance and to provide greater retentive effect by providing the opportunity to earn greater amounts through increased IAC performance. However, in connection with the spin-off, these awards will be converted into three-year cliff-vesting awards at the "target" value (or 50% of the shares actually granted), without variability based on performance. For information regarding the reasons behind this conversion, see "The Separation—Treatment of Outstanding IAC Compensatory Equity-Based Awards."

        LendingTree Equity.    At the time of IAC's acquisition of LendingTree, a wholly owned subsidiary of Tree.com which contains Tree.com's operating assets, Mr. Lebda, Mr. Harris and Mr. Packey were granted awards representing 4.25%, 0.7% and 0.075% of LendingTree's common equity. In addition to common equity, LendingTree has outstanding another class of equity with a liquidation preference equal to the price IAC paid for LendingTree plus accreted dividends since the acquisition. At the time Mr. Lebda became President and Chief Operating Officer of IAC, he exchanged 25% of his LendingTree award for 200,000 shares of restricted stock of IAC, and acquired a right to exchange 25% of his award for 300,000 shares of IAC stock in 2009. All these LendingTree awards are fully vested, and subject to a put right to Tree.com in 2009 (and annually thereafter) and a call right by Tree.com in 2011 (and annually thereafter). Tree.com believes the liquidation preference of the senior equity is significantly greater than the value of LendingTree, and therefore believes it is highly unlikely that these equity awards will ever result in value to the holders. Additionally, Tree.com expects Mr. Lebda to exercise his exchange right for 300,000 shares of IAC, which right will be accelerated at the time of the spin-off.

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        2007.    Mr. Davies received 10,659 RSUs when hired by Tree.com and also received 7,500 Growth Shares (at target) to reflect his promotion to Chief Executive Officer of Tree.com. Mr. Harris received 2,509 RSUs and 15,056 Growth Shares (at target) in connection with the annual grant process and also received 5,738 Growth Shares (at target) related to his promotion to President and Chief Operating Officer of Tree.com. Mr. Violette received 10,000 Growth Shares (at target) in connection with his assuming the role of President of the Real Estate business. Each of these awards were arrived at as a result of negotiations relating to the entering into of new employment agreements by the recipients. Mr. Packey also received 5,833 Growth Shares (at target) and 2,447 annual vesting RSUs in connection with the annual grant process.

        Mr. Lebda received 62,735 Growth Shares (at target), the same amount received by the other IAC executive officers (other than the CEO).

        2008.    Mr. Packey received 12,000 RSUs with a five year annual vesting schedule in recognition of his promotion to Chief Financial Officer of Tree.com. This grant was agreed upon in 2007, but not granted until 2008, and was based on the assumption of additional responsibilities, a review of competitive data, internal equity considerations, and discussions with Mr. Packey.

        Under the New Lebda Employment Agreement, Mr. Lebda was granted the right to receive, upon consummation of the spin-off, RSUs in Tree.com equal to 2% of the fully diluted equity of the company, as well as four grants of options, each of which represented the right to acquire 2.5% of the fully diluted equity at exercise prices representing a total equity value of the company of $250 million, $300 million, $400 million and $450 million, with possible upward adjustments based on the initial trading value in the spin-off. Fully diluted equity will be measured at the time of the spin-off. The restricted stock units vest equally over five years, while the stock options all cliff vest at the end of five years. The New Lebda Employment Agreement also provides that all of Mr. Lebda's outstanding IAC equity awards will vest immediately prior to the spin-off.

        Tree.com plans to grant stock options to the other executive officers at the time of the spin-off, although the size of such grants have not yet been determined.

        Spin-Off Adjustments.    In the spin-off, equity awards denominated in IAC stock will be adjusted as described in "Treatment of Outstanding IAC Compensatory Equity-Based Awards."

        Presuming the spin-off transactions occur prior to February 2009, the following table reflects the effect of these adjustments on all equity awards held by Tree.com's executive officers:

 
  Upon Completion of the Spin-Off*
Name

  RSUs that
will vest (#)

  RSUs that
will be
converted
exclusively
into RSUs of
Tree.com and vest
on regular
schedule (#)

  RSUs that
will be split
among the
post-transaction
companies and
vest after
February 2009
on regular
schedule (#)

  Options
outstanding at
December 31,
2007—all of
which will be
split among the
post-transaction
companies (#)

Doug Lebda   192,235 (1)    
C.D. Davies     13,528   2,500  
Bret Violette   39,029   6,667   3,333  
Robert Harris   19,354   17,538   22,728   10,848
Matt Packey   1,994   16,850   3,890  

*
Excludes 7,186, 2,131, 39,027, 501 and 1,525 RSUs that vested since December 31, 2007 or will vest prior to August 1, 2008 for Messrs. Lebda, Davies, Violette, Harris and Packey, respectively.

(1)
In addition, 500,000 shares of restricted stock held (or to be received by) Mr. Lebda will vest at the time of the spin-offs.

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        Violette Long Term Cash Bonus Plan.    In connection with his agreement to serve as the President of Tree.com's Real Estate business, the company agreed to pay a one-time bonus if the Real Estate business' 2009 revenues are at least $130 million and 2009 operating income before amortization is at least $10 million (in which case the bonus shall be $1 million) or at least $20 million (in which case the bonus shall be $2 million). This bonus structure was put in place to provide an incentive for Mr. Violette to grow both the business' top and bottom lines.

    Change of Control and Severance

        Tree.com believes that providing executives with severance and change of control protection is critical to allowing executives to fully value the forward looking elements of their compensation packages, and therefore limit retention risk during uncertain times. Accordingly, Tree.com's employment agreements and equity awards generally provide for salary continuation in the event of certain employment terminations beyond the control of the executive, as well as varying degrees of accelerated vesting in the event of a change of control of the company.

    Other Compensation

        Under limited circumstances, certain Tree.com executive officers have received non-cash and non-equity compensatory benefits. The values of these benefits are reported under the heading "Other Annual Compensation" in this filing pursuant to applicable rules. The executive officers do not participate in any deferred compensation or retirement program other than IAC's 401(k) plan.

    Tax Deductibility

        IAC's practice has been to structure Tree.com's compensation program in such a manner so that the compensation it pays is deductible by IAC for federal income tax purposes. However, because Tree.com's executive officers will now be subject to the limitations on deductibility under Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, and were not previously, certain compensatory arrangements established prior to the spin-off but that will be paid following the spin-off may not result in deductible compensation for Tree.com.

Summary Compensation Table

Name and Principal Position

  Year
  Salary
($)

  Bonus
($)

  Stock Awards
($)(1)

  All Other Compensation
($)

  Total
($)

Douglas R. Lebda(2)
Chairman and CEO
  2007
2006
  750,000
750,000
 
1,300,000
  6,392,587
5,483,376
  7,750(4
602,974
)
7,150,337
8,136,350
C. D. Davies(3)
Vice Chairman
  2007   377,885   350,000   123,105   4,689(3 ) 855,679
Bret Violette
President, Real Estate
  2007   375,631   500,000   1,175,887   6,750(4 ) 2,058,268
Robert Harris(5)
President, LendingTree Exchange
  2007   299,423   75,000   482,163   6,750(4 ) 863,336
Matthew Packey
CFO
  2007   218,692   50,000   122,617   6,750(4 ) 398,059

(1)
Reflects the dollar amount recognized by IAC for financial statement reporting purposes for the applicable fiscal years ended December 31, in accordance with SFAS 123R, for IAC restricted stock units ("RSUs") awarded in and prior to the applicable year under IAC's stock and annual incentive plans. These amounts do not, therefore, represent the value of IAC equity compensation awarded or realized in the applicable year. For further discussion of IAC's accounting for its equity compensation plans, see note 4 of IAC's audited financial statements for the fiscal year ended

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    December 31, 2007 included in its Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC on February 29, 2008. For information on awards made and realized in 2007, see the Grants of Plan-Based Awards and Option Exercises and Stock Vested tables below.

(2)
Reflects compensation received by Mr. Lebda in his capacity as President and Chief Operating Officer of IAC.

(3)
Reflects compensation received in his capacity as CEO, LendingTree.

(4)
Reflects matching contributions under IAC's 401(k) plan.

(5)
Reflects compensation received as President of the Lending Business.

Grants of Plan-Based Awards

        The table below provides information regarding IAC equity awards granted to Tree.com's named executives in 2007.

 
   
  Estimated Future Payouts Under
Equity Incentive Plan Awards(1)(2)

   
   
 
   
  All other stock
awards:
number of
shares of stock
or units (#)(2)

   
Name

  Grant Date
  Threshold (#)
  Target (#)
  Maximum (#)
  Grant Date
Fair Value of
Stock and Option Awards ($)(3)

Douglas R. Lebda   2/16/07   3,488   62,735   125,470     2,499,990
C.D. Davies   6/18/07   417   7,500   15,000   10,659   623,762
Bret Violette   6/18/07   556   10,000   20,000     343,500
Robert Harris   2/16/07
6/18/07
  837
319
  15,056
5,738
  30,112
11,476
  2,509
  699,965
197,101
Matthew Packey   2/16/07   324   5,833   11,666   2,447   329,958

(1)
Reflects performance-based RSU awards which cliff vest at the end of three years in varying amounts depending upon growth in IAC's publicly reported metric, Adjusted Earnings Per Share, with certain modifications. The threshold amount represents 5.56% of the target payout, which amount will vest upon achieving the minimum growth threshold. These awards will be converted into three year cliff-vesting awards in the spin-offs as described under "The Separation—Treatment of Outstanding IAC Compensatory Equity-Based Awards."

(2)
RSU award recipients would be credited with amounts for cash dividends paid on IAC common stock, with such additional amounts vesting concurrently with the related RSU award. For information on the treatment of RSU awards granted to Tree.com's named executives upon a termination of employment or a change in control, see the discussion under "Potential Payments Upon Termination or Change in Control" below.

(3)
The fair value of equity incentive plan awards is based on the target payout.

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Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End

        The table below provides information regarding various IAC equity awards held by Tree.com's named executives as of December 31, 2007. The market value of all RSU and restricted stock awards is based on the closing price of IAC common stock as of December 31, 2007 ($26.92), the last trading day of 2007.

 
   
   
   
  Stock Awards(1)(2)
 
   
   
   
   
   
  Equity incentive plan awards: Number of unearned shares, units or other rights that have not vested (#)(4)
  Equity incentive plan awards: Market or payout value of unearned shares, units or other rights that have not vested ($)(4)
 
  Option Awards(1)
   
   
 
  Number of shares or units of stock that have not vested (#)(4)
  Market
value of
shares or units
of stock that
have not
vested ($)(4)

Name

  Number of securities underlying unexercised options (#)(3)
  Option exercise price ($)
  Option expiration date
 
  (Exercisable)

   
   
   
   
   
   
Douglas R. Lebda(5)   17,892
52,304
49,204
49,592
61,990
54,241
38,744

  $
$
$
$
$
$
$

9.30
10.87
16.58
5.01
6.16
14.11
23.62

  12/28/08
9/2/09
1/7/10
12/6/10
4/2/11
3/8/12
12/20/12

 






200,000
136,686







(6)







5,384,000
3,679,587







(6)








3,488
 







93,897
C. D. Davies           10,659   286,940   417   11,226
Bret Violette           78,056   2,101,268   556   14,968
Robert Harris(5)   10,848   $ 23.62   12/20/12   39,327   1,058,683   1,156   31,120
Matthew Packey(5)           6,426   172,988   324   8,722

(1)
For a discussion regarding how these equity awards will be treated in the spin-offs, see under "Treatment of Outstanding IAC Compensatory Equity-Based Awards."

(2)
Amounts shown for equity incentive plan awards are based on achieving the minimum growth threshold in accordance with SEC rules.

(3)
On August 9, 2005, IAC completed the separation of its travel and travel-related businesses and investments (other than Interval and TV Travel Shop) into an independent public company (the "Expedia Spin-Off"). In connection with the Expedia Spin-Off, each then-vested option to purchase shares of IAC common stock was converted into an option to purchase shares of IAC common stock and an option to purchase shares of Expedia common stock. Adjustments were made to the number of shares subject to each IAC and Expedia stock option to give effect to the one-for-two reverse stock split effected in connection with the Expedia Spin-Off and to the corresponding exercise prices based on the relative market capitalizations of IAC and Expedia at the time of the Expedia Spin-Off. The adjusted IAC and Expedia stock options otherwise have the same terms and conditions, including exercise periods, as the corresponding vested IAC stock options outstanding immediately prior to the Expedia Spin-Off.

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For the named executives, any value realized upon the exercise of Expedia stock options is treated for tax purposes as compensation payable to them in their respective capacities as executive officers of Tree.com. Accordingly, information regarding Expedia stock options held by Tree.com's named executives as of December 31, 2007 appears in the table immediately below and information regarding any exercises of Expedia stock options by such named executives is reported in the Option Exercises and Stock Vested table below.

Name

  Number of
Options (#)

  Option Exercise Price ($)
  Option Expiration Date
Douglas R. Lebda   38,744   $ 18.91   12/20/12

Robert Harris

 

10,848

 

$

18.91

 

12/20/12
(4)
The table below provides the following information regarding RSU awards held by Tree.com's named executives as of December 31, 2007: (i) the grant date of each award, (ii) the number of RSUs outstanding (on an aggregate and grant-by-grant basis), (iii) the market value of RSUs outstanding as of December 31, 2007, (iv) the vesting schedule for each award and (v) the total number of RSUs that vested or are scheduled to vest in each of the fiscal years ending December 31, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012.

 
   
  Market
Value of
Unvested
RSUs as
of 12/31/07

   
   
   
   
   
 
  Number of
Unvested
RSUs as
of 12/31/07

   
   
   
   
   
 
  Vesting Schedule (#)
Grant Date

  (#)
  ($)
  2008
  2009
  2010
  2011
  2012
Douglas R. Lebda                            
  8/8/03(a)   11,255   302,985   11,255        
  2/4/04(b)   58,982   1,587,795     58,982      
  2/10/05(b)   37,703   1,014,965       37,703    
  2/6/06(c)   28,746   773,842   7,186   7,186   7,187   7,187  
  2/16/07(d)   62,735   1,688,826       62,735    
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
    Total   199,421   5,368,413   18,441   66,168   107,625   7,187  
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
C.D. Davies                            
  6/18/07(e)   10,659   286,940   2,131   2,132   2,132   2,132   2,132
  6/18/07(d)   7,500   201,900       7,500    
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
    Total   18,159   488,840   2,131   2,132   9,632   2,132   2,132
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bret Violette                            
  6/15/05(c)   78,056   2,101,268   39,027   39,029      
  6/18/07(d)   10,000   269,200       10,000    
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
    Total   88,056   2,370,468   39,027   39,029   10,000    
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Robert Harris                            
  2/10/05(b)   18,852   507,496       18,852    
  2/6/06(b)   17,966   483,645         17,966  
  2/16/07(c)   2,509   67,542   501   502   502   502   502
  2/16/07(d)   15,056   405,308       15,056    
  6/18/07(d)   5,738   154,467       5,738    
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
    Total   60,121   1,618,458   501   502   40,148   18,468   502
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Matthew Packey                            
  9/30/03(a)   152   4,092   152        
  2/10/05(c)   952   25,628   317   317   318    
  2/6/06(c)   2,875   77,395   719   718   719   719  
  2/16/07(c)   2,447   65,873   489   489   490   489   490
  2/16/07(d)   5,833   157,024       5,833    
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
    Total   12,259   330,012   1,677   1,524   7,360   1,208   490
   
 
 
 
 
 
 

    (a)
    These awards vest in four equal installments, beginning on the second anniversary of the grant date, subject to continued employment.

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    (b)
    These awards vest in one lump sum installment on the fifth anniversary of the grant date, subject to continued employment.

    (c)
    These awards vest in five equal annual installments on each of the first five anniversaries of the grant date, subject to continued employment.

    (d)
    Represents the initial "target" awards. See the Grant of Plan-Based Awards table and footnote (1) thereto.

    (e)
    These awards vest in five equal annual installments on each of the first five anniversaries of January 22, 2007, Mr. Davies' date of hire.

(5)
Excludes LendingTree units held as of December 31, 2007 and, in the case of Mr. Lebda, also excludes 300,000 shares of IAC common stock receivable upon the exercise of contractual right to exchange certain LendingTree units in early 2009 (or, if earlier, at the time of the spin-off). These units have no market value and are instead subject to appraisal at the time of certain put-call rights. Tree.com believes that these awards have no value. For more information regarding these equity arrangements, see the discussion under the "Compensation Discussion and Analysis" and "Potential Payments Upon Termination or Change in Control" sections, and the Option Exercises and Stock Vested table.

(6)
Reflects shares of restricted stock received by Mr. Lebda upon the effective date of the 2006 agreement relating to his promotion to President and Chief Operating Officer of IAC in exchange for certain of his LendingTree units.

Option Exercises and Stock Vested

        The table below provides information regarding the number of shares acquired by Tree.com's named executives in 2007 upon the exercise of stock options and the vesting of RSU awards and the related value realized, in each case, excluding the effect of any applicable taxes. The dollar value realized upon exercise of stock options represents the difference between (i) the sale price of the shares acquired on exercise for simultaneous exercise and sale transactions and (ii) the exercise price of the stock option, multiplied by the number of stock options that were exercised. The dollar value realized upon vesting of RSUs represents the closing price of IAC common stock on the applicable vesting date multiplied by the number of RSUs so vesting.

 
  Option Awards
  Stock Awards
Name

  Number of
Shares Acquired
on Exercise
(#)

  Value Realized
on Exercise
($)

  Number of
Shares Acquired
on Vesting
(#)

  Value Realized
on Vesting
($)

Douglas R. Lebda(1)   70,832 (2) 1,318,126   18,440   582,789
C.D. Davies        
Bret Violette       39,027   1,358,140
Robert Harris(1)        
Matthew Packey(1)       1,134   43,693

(1)
In addition, 1.42, 1.4, and 0.15 LendingTree units held by Messrs. Lebda, Harris and Packey, respectively, vested in 2007, which number represents less than 1% of the total outstanding common units of LendingTree. These awards were granted to certain LendingTree employees at the time of its acquisition by IAC in 2003, became fully vested in February 2008, and are subject to put and call rights beginning in 2009. This table also excludes, in the case of Mr. Lebda, LendingTree units held by him that are subject to the 2009 exchange right, as discussed under Compensation Discussion and Analysis. These units are significantly out of the money and are not expected to result in any value.

(2)
Includes 49,204 Expedia shares acquired upon the exercise of Expedia stock options received in connection with the Expedia Spin-Off.

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Potential Payments Upon Termination or Change in Control

    Change of Control

        Pursuant to the terms of IAC's (and, following the spin-off, Tree.com's) equity compensation plans and the award agreements thereunder, upon a change of control the named executive officers are generally entitled to accelerated vesting of (i) equity awards made prior to 2006 and (ii) equity awards made thereafter if, following such change in control, their employment is terminated by the Company for any reason other than death, disability or cause (as defined in the relevant employment agreement), or by the executive for good reason (as defined in the relevant plan or employment agreement) (a "Qualifying Termination").

    Severance

        Cash.    Upon a Qualifying Termination, Mr. Lebda and Mr. Violette shall be entitled to salary continuation for the remainder of the terms of their employment agreements, provided Mr. Lebda shall not receive such continuation for more than three years. Mr. Harris would receive salary continuation for twelve months following a Qualifying Termination. Upon a Qualifying Termination, Mr. Violette would also be entitled to a pro rated portion of his long-term cash bonus plan if any such payout is ultimately earned and his remaining guaranteed bonuses of $500,000 payable in July of 2008 and 2009.

        Equity.    Upon a Qualifying Termination, Mr. Lebda will receive full acceleration of his equity awards outstanding immediately following the spin-off, Mr. Violette will receive full acceleration of any unvested RSUs he received in 2005, and Mr. Harris will receive acceleration of a portion of the cliff-vesting RSU awards granted in 2005 and 2006 equal to 20% of each such award for each full year of service from the date of grant to the date of termination.

        Obligations.    The amounts payable upon a Qualifying Termination are all subject to the execution of a general release and to compliance with confidentiality, non-compete, non-solicitation of employees and non-solicitation of customer covenants set forth in the relevant employment agreements. Salary continuation payments will be offset by the amount of any compensation earned by an executive from other employment during the severance payment period.

        The amounts shown in the table assume that the termination or change in control was effective as of December 31, 2007 and that the price of IAC common stock on which certain calculations are based was the closing price of $26.92 on The Nasdaq Stock Market on that date. These amounts are estimates of the incremental amounts that would have been paid out to the executive upon such terminations/change in control, and do not take into account equity grants made, and contractual

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obligations entered into, after December 31, 2007. The actual amounts to be paid out can only be determined at the time the event actually occurs.

Name and Benefit

  Termination without cause
  Resignation for good reason
  Death or Disability
  Change in Control of IAC
  Termination w/o cause or for good reason in connection with Change in Control
Douglas Lebda(1)                    
Cash Severance (salary)   750,000   750,000       750,000
RSUs (vesting accelerated)   13,762,985   13,762,985   9,130,860   10,752,413   16,225,654
Total estimated value   14,512,985   14,512,985   9,130,860   10,752,413   16,975,654
C.D. Davies(2)                    
Cash Severance (salary)   450,000         450,000
RSUs (vesting accelerated)           488,840
Total estimated value   450,000         938,840
Bret Violette                    
Cash Severance (salary)   800,000   800,000       800,000
Guaranteed Bonus   1,000,000   1,000,000       1,000,000
RSUs (vesting accelerated)   2,101,268   2,101,268     2,101,268   2,370,468
Total estimated value   3,901,268   3,901,268     2,101,268   4,170,468
Robert Harris(1)(2)                    
Cash Severance (salary)   325,000   325,000       325,000
RSUs (vesting accelerated)   299,700   299,700     507,496   1,618,457
Total estimated value   624,700   624,700     507,496   1,943,457
Matthew Packey(1)                    
Cash Severance (salary)          
RSUs (vesting accelerated)   2,073     1,669   29,720   330,012
Total estimated value   2,073     1,669   29,720   330,012

(1)
Excludes, in all cases, LendingTree units held at December 31, 2007 (and, in the case of Mr. Lebda, that would accelerate upon the events set forth above), given that the value of these units as of that date was zero.

(2)
One year's salary also payable upon a change in control of LendingTree.

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Tree.com Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management

        As of the date hereof, all of Tree.com's outstanding shares of common stock are owned by IAC. After the distribution, IAC will no longer own any shares of Tree.com common stock. The following table presents information relating to the expected beneficial ownership of shares of Tree.com common stock, assuming completion of the distribution as if it occurred on April 30, 2008, by (i) each individual or entity expected to own beneficially more than 5% of the outstanding shares of Tree.com common stock, assuming that there are 278,735,546 shares of common stock and Class B common stock of IAC outstanding and a distribution ratio of one-thirtieth of a share of Tree common stock for every share of IAC common stock and/or Class B common stock, (ii) each director of Tree.com (iii) the Chief Executive Officer, the Chief Financial Officer and the other three named executive officers in the Tree.com summary compensation table (see "Tree.com Executive Compensation") and (iv) all of Tree.com's executive officers and directors as a group.

        Unless otherwise indicated, beneficial owners listed here may be contacted at Tree.com's corporate headquarters at 11115 Rushmore Drive, Charlotte, North Carolina 28277. For each listed person, the number of shares of Tree.com common stock and percent of such class listed assumes the conversion or exercise of any Tree.com equity securities owned by such person that are or will become convertible or exercisable, and the exercise of stock options and the vesting of restricted stock units, if any, that will vest, within 60 days of April 30, 2008, but does not assume the conversion, exercise or vesting of any such equity securities owned by any other person.

        The share amounts for each beneficial owner listed here are based on each such individual's beneficial ownership of shares of IAC common stock and/or Class B common stock as of April 30, 2008, and assuming a distribution ratio of one thirtieth of a share of Tree.com common stock for every share of IAC common stock and/or Class B common stock. To the extent that Tree.com directors and executive officers own shares of IAC common stock at the time of the distribution, they will participate in the distribution on the same terms as other holders of IAC common stock. In addition, following the distribution, Tree.com expects that all IAC stock-based awards held by these individuals will be adjusted to become awards relating to common stock of all five companies resulting from the spin-offs. Those awards that will relate to Tree.com common stock are reflected in the table below based upon the expected adjustment formula described under the caption "The Separation—Treatment of Outstanding IAC Compensatory Equity-Based Awards."

        The actual number of shares of Tree.com capital stock outstanding as of the date of the distribution may differ due, among other things, to the exercise of stock options or warrants or the

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vesting of restricted stock units, in each case, between April 30, 2008 and the date of the distribution and to the extent the other assumptions set forth above differ from actual developments.

 
  Tree.com
Common Stock

Name and Address of Beneficial Owner

  Shares
  %
Clearbridge Advisors, LLC, et al.(1)(2)
399 Park Avenue
New York, NY 10022
  441,885   4.75
Lord Abbett & Co. LLC(1)(2)
90 Hudson Street, 11th Floor
Jersey City, NJ 07302
  1,306,628   14.06
Liberty Media Corporation(4)(5)
12300 Liberty Boulevard
Englewood, CO 80112
  2,773,993   29.86
Scott Cammarn(5)   45   *
Robert Harris(5)   10   *
Peter C. Horan   207   *
Douglas Lebda(5)   13,743   *
Joseph Levin(5)   85   *
Lance Melber    
David Norris(5)    
Steven Ozonian    
Matthew Packey(5)   65   *
Bret Violette(5)   878   *
All executive officers and directors as a group (10 persons)   15,033   *

*
The percentage of shares beneficially owned does not exceed 1%.

(1)
We have not been able to determine the person or persons controlling the fund through publicly available information.

(2)
Based upon information regarding IAC holdings reported on a Schedule 13G, as amended, which was filed with the SEC on February 14, 2008 and a distribution ratio of one-thirtieth of a share of Tree common stock for every share of IAC common stock and/or Class B common stock.

(3)
Liberty Media Corporation is a publicly traded corporation. According to Liberty Media Corporation's Schedule 14A, filed April 24, 2008, Liberty's chairman, John C. Malone, controls 33% of the voting power of Liberty Media Corporation.

(4)
Based on 58,796,381 shares of IAC common stock held by Liberty and 4,000,000, 15,618,230, 4,005,190 and 800,006 shares of IAC Class B common stock held by each of BDTV Inc., BDTV II Inc., BDTV III Inc. and BDTV IV Inc., respectively and a distribution ratio of one-thirtieth of a share of Tree common stock for every share of IAC common stock and/or Class B common stock.

(5)
Excludes any equity awards that will vest upon completion of the spin-offs.

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DESCRIPTION OF CAPITAL STOCK OF TREE.COM

General

        The following is a summary of information concerning the capital stock of the Company. The summaries and descriptions below do not purport to be complete statements of the relevant provisions of the Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation of the Company or its by-laws. The summary is qualified by reference to these documents, which you must read for complete information on the capital stock of the Company. The Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation and by-laws of the Company are included as exhibits to the Company's registration statement on Form S-1, of which this prospectus is a part.

Distributions of Securities

        In the past three years, the Company has not sold any securities, including sales of reacquired securities, new issues, securities issued in exchange for property, services, or other securities, and new securities resulting from the modification of outstanding securities, that were not registered under the Securities Act.

Common Stock

        Immediately following the spin-off, our authorized capital stock will consist of 50,000,000 shares of common stock, par value $0.01 per share, and the preferred stock described below.

        Shares Outstanding.    Immediately following the spin-off, we expect that the number of shares of common stock that we will have issued and outstanding will be approximately 9.29 million shares of common stock, par value $0.01 per share (based on a distribution ratio of one-thirtieth of a share of Tree.com for each share of IAC common stock and Class B common stock outstanding). This is based upon approximately 253,135,548 shares of IAC common stock and 25,599,998 shares of IAC Class B common stock outstanding as of March 31, 2008.

        Dividends.    Subject to prior dividend rights of the holders of any preferred shares, holders of shares of common stock of the Company are entitled to receive dividends when, as and if declared by its board of directors out of funds legally available for that purpose.

        Voting Rights.    Each share of common stock is entitled to one vote on all matters submitted to a vote of stockholders. Holders of shares of common stock do not have cumulative voting rights. In other words, a holder of a single share of our common stock cannot cast more than one vote for each position to be filled on our board of directors.

        Other Rights.    In the event of any liquidation, dissolution or winding up of the Company after the satisfaction in full of the liquidation preferences of holders of any preferred shares, holders of shares of our common stock are entitled to ratable distribution of the remaining assets available for distribution to stockholders. Shares of common stock are not subject to redemption by operation of a sinking fund or otherwise. Holders of shares of common stock are not currently entitled to preemptive rights.

        Fully Paid.    The issued and outstanding shares of our common stock are fully paid and non-assessable. This means the full purchase price for the outstanding shares of common stock has been paid and the holders of such shares will not be assessed any additional amounts for such shares. Any additional shares of common stock that we may issue in the future will also be fully paid and non-assessable.

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Preferred Stock

        Tree.com is authorized to issue up to 5,000,000 shares of preferred stock, par value $.01 per share. Our board of directors, without further action by the holders of our common stock, may issue shares of preferred stock. The board of directors is vested with the authority to fix by resolution the designations, preferences and relative, participating, optional or other special rights, and such qualifications, limitations or restrictions thereof, including, without limitation, redemption rights, dividend rights, liquidation preferences and conversion or exchange rights of any class or series of preferred stock, and to fix the number of classes or series of preferred stock, the number of shares constituting any such class or series and the voting powers for each class or series.

        The authority possessed by our board of directors to issue preferred stock could potentially be used to discourage attempts by third parties to obtain control of the Company through a merger, tender offer, proxy contest or otherwise by making such attempts more difficult or more costly. Our board of directors may issue preferred stock with voting rights or conversion rights that, if exercised, could adversely affect the voting power of the holders of our common stock. There are no current agreements or understandings with respect to the issuance of preferred stock and the board of directors does not have a present intention to issue any shares of preferred stock.

Restrictions on Payment of Dividends

        The Company is incorporated in Delaware and is governed by Delaware law. Delaware law allows a corporation to pay dividends only out of surplus, as determined under Delaware law.

Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law

        Section 203 ("Section 203") of the Delaware General Corporation Law prohibits certain transactions between a Delaware corporation and an "interested stockholder." Generally, an "interested stockholder" for this purpose is a stockholder who is directly or indirectly a beneficial owner of 15% or more of the outstanding voting power of a Delaware corporation. This provision, if applicable, prohibits certain business combinations between an interested stockholder and a corporation for a period of three years after the date on which the stockholder became an interested stockholder, unless: (1) the transaction which resulted in the stockholder becoming an interested stockholder is approved by the corporation's board of directors before the stockholder became an interested stockholder, (2) the interested stockholder acquired at least 85% of the voting power (as calculated pursuant to Section 203) of the corporation in the transaction in which the stockholder became an interested stockholder, or (3) the business combination is approved by a majority of the board of directors and the affirmative vote of the holders of two-thirds of the outstanding voting power not owned by the interested stockholder at or subsequent to the time that the stockholder became an interested stockholder. These restrictions do not apply in certain circumstances, including if the corporation's certificate of incorporation contains a provision expressly electing not to be governed by Section 203. If such a provision is adopted by an amendment to the corporation's certificate of incorporation, the amendment will be effective immediately if, among other requirements, the corporation has never had a class of voting stock listed on a national securities exchange or held of record by more than 2,000 stockholders. If this and other requirements are not satisfied, the amendment will not be effective until 12 months after its adoption and will not apply to any business combination between the corporation and any person who became an interested stockholder on or prior to such adoption.

        In accordance with Section 203, the restrictions on certain business combinations in Section 203 will not apply in respect of the Company following the spin-off.

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Anti-takeover Effects of the Certificate of Incorporation and By-laws of Tree.com and Delaware Law

        Some provisions of our Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation and by-laws and certain provisions of Delaware law could make the following more difficult:

    acquisition of the Company by means of a tender offer;

    acquisition of the Company by means of a proxy contest or otherwise; or

    removal of incumbent officers and directors of the Company.

    Size of Board and Vacancies

        Our Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation and by-laws provide that the number of directors on the Company's board of directors will be fixed exclusively by the board of directors. Newly created directorships resulting from any increase in the authorized number of directors will be filled by a majority of the directors then in office, provided that a majority of the entire board of directors, or a quorum, is present and any vacancies in the board of directors resulting from death, resignation, retirement, disqualification, removal from office or other cause will be filled generally by the majority vote of the remaining directors in office, even if less than a quorum is present.

    Elimination of Stockholder Action by Written Consent

        Our Amended and Restated certificate of incorporation and by-laws expressly eliminate the right of stockholders to act by written consent. Stockholder action must take place at the annual or a special meeting of the Company's stockholders.

    Stockholder Meetings

        Under our Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation and by-laws, stockholders are not entitled to call special meetings of stockholders; only a majority of our board of directors or specified individuals may call such meetings.

    Requirements for Advance Notification of Stockholder Nominations and Proposals

        Our by-laws establish advance notice procedures with respect to stockholder proposals and nomination of candidates for election as directors other than nominations made by or at the direction of the board of directors or a committee of the board of directors. In particular, stockholders must notify the corporate secretary in writing prior to the meeting at which the matters are to be acted upon or directors are to be elected. The notice must contain the information specified in our Amended and Restated by-laws. To be timely, the notice must be received at the Company's principal executive office not later than 60 or more than 90 days prior to the first anniversary of the date for the preceding year's annual meeting of stockholders. However, if the date of the annual meeting is advanced more than 30 days prior to or delayed by more than 30 days after the anniversary of the preceding year's annual meeting, notice by the stockholder, to be timely, must be delivered no later than the close of business on the later of the 90th day prior to such annual meeting or the 10th day following the day on which public announcement of the date of such meeting is first made. Moreover, in the event that the number of directors to be elected to the board of directors is increased and there is no public announcement by the Company naming all of the nominees for director or specifying the size of the increased board of directors at least 55 days prior to the first anniversary of the date on which the Company first mailed its proxy materials for the preceding year's annual meeting of stockholders, the stockholder's notice will be considered timely, but only with respect to nominees for any new positions created by such increase, if it is delivered to the corporate secretary at the principal executive offices of the Company not later than the close of business on the 10th day following the day on which such public announcement is first made by the Company.

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    Undesignated Preferred Stock

        The authorization in our Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation with respect to the issuance of undesignated preferred stock makes it possible for the our board of directors to issue preferred stock with voting or other rights or preferences that could impede the success of any attempt to change control of the Company. The provision in our Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation authorizing such preferred stock may have the effect of deferring hostile takeovers or delaying changes of control of the Company's management.

NASDAQ Listing

        The Company has been approved to list its shares of common stock on NASDAQ and expects that its shares will trade under the ticker symbol "TREE."

Resale of Tree.com Common Stock

        As security holders, you will be subject to applicable provisions of the Exchange Act and the rules and regulations thereunder, which provisions may limit the timing of purchases and sales of our securities by you. In addition, if you are deemed an "affiliate" of Tree.com (as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act), the securities offered hereby may be deemed "restricted securities" (as defined in Rule 144 under the Securities Act) notwithstanding their registration under this registration statement. As a result you will not be able to sell the securities offered hereby absent an effective registration statement covering such sales or an available exemption from registration under the Securities Act.

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CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

Agreements with Liberty Media Corporation

        In May 2008, in connection with the settlement of litigation relating to the proposed spin-offs, IAC entered into a "Spinco Agreement" with Liberty and affiliates of Liberty that hold shares of IAC common stock and/or Class B common stock (together with Liberty, the "Liberty Parties"), among others. At the time of the spin-offs, each Spinco will assume from IAC all of those rights and obligations under the Spinco Agreement providing for post-spin-off governance arrangements at the Spincos. As of April 30, 2008, Liberty may be deemed to beneficially own (within the meaning of Rule 13d-3 under the Exchange Act) 83,219,807 shares of IAC common stock that consists of shares of common stock and Class B common stock. Such shares constitute 29.9% of the outstanding shares of IAC common stock. Immediately following the spin-offs, it is expected that Liberty will beneficially own shares of common stock in each of the Spincos representing approximately 29.9% of the outstanding common stock of each of the Spincos. The following summary describes the material terms of those governance arrangements and related matters and is qualified by reference to the full Spinco Agreement, which has been filed as an exhibit to each of the Form S-1 registration statements of the Spincos. The Spinco Agreement also requires each Spinco to enter into a registration rights agreement with the Liberty Parties at the time of the spin-offs, as described below.

    Spinco Agreement

    Representation of Liberty on the Spinco Boards of Directors

        The Spinco Agreement generally provides that so long as Liberty beneficially owns securities of a Spinco representing at least 20% of the total voting power of the Spinco's equity securities, Liberty has the right to nominate up to 20% of the directors serving on the Spinco Board of Directors (rounded up to the nearest whole number). Any director nominated by Liberty must be reasonably acceptable to a majority of the directors on the Spinco's Board who were not nominated by Liberty. All but one of Liberty's nominees serving on the Spinco Board of directors must qualify as "independent" under applicable stock exchange rules. In addition, the Nominating and/or Governance committee of the Spinco Board may include only "Qualified Directors," namely directors other than any who were nominated by Liberty, are officers or employees of the Spinco or were not nominated by the Nominating and/or Governance Committee of the Spinco's Board in their initial election to the Board and for whose election any Liberty Party voted shares.

        Until the second anniversary of the spin-off of a Spinco, the Liberty Parties agreed to vote all of the equity securities of a Spinco beneficially owned by them in favor of the election of the full slate of director nominees recommended to stockholders by the Spinco Board of Directors so long as the slate includes the director-candidates that Liberty has the right to nominate.

    Acquisition Restrictions

        The Liberty Parties have agreed in the Spinco Agreement not to acquire beneficial ownership of any equity securities of a Spinco (with specified exceptions) unless:

    the acquisition was approved by a majority of the Qualified Directors;

    the acquisition is permitted under the provisions described in "Competing Offers" below; or

    after giving effect to the acquisition, Liberty's ownership percentage of the equity securities of the Spinco, based on voting power, would not exceed the Applicable Percentage.

        The "Applicable Percentage" initially is Liberty's ownership percentage upon the spin-off of a Spinco, based on voting power (expected to be approximately 30%), plus 5%, but in no event more than 35%. Following a spin-off, the Applicable Percentage for the Spinco will be reduced for specified

106


transfers of equity securities of the Spinco by the Liberty Parties. During the first two years following the spin-off of a Spinco, acquisitions by the Liberty Parties are further limited to specified extraordinary transactions and, otherwise, to acquisitions representing no more than one-third of the Spinco Common Stock received by the Liberty Parties in the spin-off.

    Standstill Restrictions

        Until the second anniversary of the spin-off, unless a majority of the Qualified Directors consent or to the extent permitted by the provisions described under "Acquisition Restrictions" or "Competing Offers" or in certain other limited circumstances, no Liberty Party may:

    offer to acquire beneficial ownership of any equity securities of such Spinco;

    initiate or propose any stockholder proposal or seek or propose to influence, advise, change or control the management, Board of Directors, governing instruments or policies or affairs of such Spinco;

    offer, seek or propose, collaborate on or encourage any merger or other extraordinary transaction;

    subject any equity securities of such Spinco to a voting agreement;

    make a request to amend any of the provisions described under "Acquisition Restrictions", "Standstill Restrictions" or "Competing Offers";

    make any public disclosure, or take any action which could reasonably be expected to require such Spinco to make any public disclosure, with respect to any of the provisions described under "Standstill Restrictions"; or

    enter into any discussions, negotiations, arrangements or understandings with any third party with respect to any of the provisions described under "Standstill Restrictions".

    Transfer Restrictions

        Unless a majority of the Qualified Directors consent, the Spinco Agreement prohibits transfers by the Liberty Parties of any equity securities of a Spinco to any person except for certain transfers, including:

    transfers under Rule 144 under the Securities Act (or, if Rule 144 is not applicable, in "broker transactions");

    transfers pursuant to a third party tender or exchange offer or in connection with any merger or other business combination, which merger or business combination has been approved by the Spinco;

    transfers in a public offering in a manner designed to result in a wide distribution, provided that no such transfer is made, to the knowledge of the Liberty Parties, to any person whose ownership percentage (based on voting power) of the Spinco's equity securities, giving effect to the transfer, would exceed 15%;

    a transfer of all of the equity securities of the Spinco beneficially owned by the Liberty Parties and their affiliates in a single transaction if the transferee's ownership percentage (based on voting power), after giving effect to the transfer, would not exceed the Applicable Percentage and only if the transferee assumes all of the rights and obligations (subject to limited exceptions) of the Liberty Parties under the Spinco Agreement relating to the Spinco;

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    specified transfers in connection with changes in the beneficial ownership of the ultimate parent company of a Liberty Party or a distribution of the equity interests of a Liberty Party or certain similar events; and

    specified transfers relating to certain hedging transactions or stock lending transactions in respect of the Liberty Parties' equity securities in the Spinco, subject to specified restrictions.

        During the first two years following the applicable spin-off, transfers otherwise permitted by the first and third bullets above will be prohibited, and transfers otherwise permitted by the fourth and sixth bullets above in respect of which IAC and the Spinco do not make certain determinations with respect to the transferee will be prohibited, unless such transfers represent no more than one-third of the Spinco Common Stock received by the Liberty Parties in the spin-off.

    Competing Offers

        During the period when Liberty continues to have the right to nominate directors to a Spinco's Board of Directors, if the Spinco's Board of Directors determines to pursue certain types of transactions on a negotiated basis (either through an "auction" or with a single bidder), Liberty is granted certain rights to compete with the bidder or bidders, including the right to receive certain notices and information, subject to specified conditions and limitations. In connection with any such transaction that the Spinco is negotiating with a single bidder, the Spinco's Board must consider any offer for a transaction made in good faith by Liberty but is not obligated to accept any such offer or to enter into negotiations with Liberty.

        If a third party (x) commences a tender or exchange offer for at least 35% of the capital stock of the Spinco other than pursuant to an agreement with the Spinco or (y) publicly discloses that its ownership percentage (based on voting power) exceeds 20% and the Spinco's Board fails to take certain actions to block such third party from acquiring an ownership percentage of the Spinco (based on voting power) exceeding the Applicable Percentage, the Liberty Parties generally will be relieved of the obligations described under "Standstill Restrictions" and "Acquisition Restrictions" above to the extent reasonably necessary to permit Liberty to commence and consummate a competing offer. If Liberty's ownership percentage (based on voting power) as a result of the consummation of a competing offer in response to a tender or exchange offer described in (x) above exceeds 50%, any consent or approval requirements of the Qualified Directors in the Spinco Agreement will be terminated, and, following the later of the second anniversary of the applicable spin-off and the date that Liberty's ownership percentage (based on voting power) exceeds 50%, the obligations described under "Acquisition Restrictions" will be terminated.

    Other

        Following the spin-off of a Spinco, amendments to the Spinco Agreement and determinations required to be made thereunder (including approval of transactions between a Liberty Party and the Spinco that would be reportable under the proxy rules) will require the approval of the Qualified Directors.

    Registration Rights Agreement

        As indicated above under "Spinco Agreement," each Spinco will grant to Liberty the registration rights described below at the time of its spin-off.

        Under the registration rights agreement, the Liberty Parties and their permitted transferees (the "Holders") will be entitled to three demand registration rights (and unlimited piggyback registration rights) in respect of the shares of Spinco common stock received by the Liberty Parties as a result of the Spinco's spin-off and other shares of Spinco common stock acquired by the Liberty Parties

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consistent with the Spinco Agreement (collectively, the "Registrable Shares"). The Holders will be permitted to exercise their registration rights in connection with certain hedging transactions that they may enter into in respect of the Registrable Shares.

        The Spinco will be obligated to indemnify the Holders, and each selling Holder will be obligated to indemnify the Spinco, against specified liabilities in connection with misstatements or omissions in any registration statement.

Relationships Among IAC and the Spincos

        Following the spin-offs, the relationships among IAC and the Spincos will be governed by a number of agreements. These agreements include, among others:

    a Separation and Distribution Agreement;

    a Tax Sharing Agreement;

    an Employee Matters Agreement; and

    a Transition Services Agreement (collectively, the "Spin-Off Agreements").

        The Spin-Off Agreements will be filed as exhibits to the respective registration statement on Form S-1 of each of the Spincos, of which this prospectus is a part, and the summaries of each such agreement are qualified by reference to the full text of the applicable agreement.

    Separation and Distribution Agreement

        The Separation and Distribution Agreement will set forth the arrangements among IAC and each of the Spincos regarding the principal transactions necessary to separate each of the Spincos from IAC, as well as govern certain aspects of the relationship of a Spinco with IAC and other Spincos after the completion of the spin-offs.

        Each Spinco will agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless (and to cause the other members of its respective group to indemnify, defend and hold harmless), under the Separation and Distribution Agreement, IAC and each of the other Spincos, and each of their respective current and former directors, officers and employees, from and against any losses arising out of any breach by such indemnifying companies of the Spin-Off Agreements, any failure by such indemnifying company to assume and perform any of the liabilities allocated to such company and any liabilities relating to the indemnifying company's financial and business information included in filings made with the SEC in connection with the spin-offs. IAC will agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless each of the Spincos, and each of their respective current and former directors, officers and employees, from and against losses arising out of any breach by IAC of the Spin-Off Agreements, and any failure by IAC to perform its obligations under the Separation and Distribution Agreement or any Spin-Off Agreement.

        In addition, the Separation and Distribution Agreement will also govern insurance and related reimbursement arrangements, provision and retention of records, access to information and confidentiality, cooperation with respect to governmental filings and third party consents and access to property.

    Tax Sharing Agreement

        The Tax Sharing Agreement governs the respective rights, responsibilities and obligations of IAC and each Spinco after the spin-off of such Spinco with respect to taxes for periods ending on or before the spin-off of such Spinco. In general, pursuant to the Tax Sharing Agreement, IAC will prepare and file the consolidated federal income tax return, and any other tax returns that include IAC (or any of its subsidiaries) and a Spinco (or any of its subsidiaries) for all taxable periods ending on or prior to, or

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including, the distribution date of such Spinco with the appropriate tax authorities, and, except as otherwise set forth below, IAC will pay any taxes relating thereto to the relevant tax authority (including any taxes attributable to an audit adjustment with respect to such returns; provided that IAC will not be responsible for audit adjustments relating to the business of a Spinco (or any of its subsidiaries) with respect to pre-spin off periods if such Spinco fails to fully cooperate with IAC in the conduct of such audit). Each Spinco will prepare and file all tax returns that include solely such Spinco and/or its subsidiaries and any separate company tax returns for such Spinco and/or its subsidiaries for all taxable periods ending on or prior to, or including, the distribution date of such Spinco, and will pay all taxes due with respect to such tax returns (including any taxes attributable to an audit adjustment with respect to such returns). In the event an adjustment with respect to a pre-spin off period for which IAC is responsible results in a tax benefit to a Spinco in a post-spin off period, such Spinco will be required to pay such tax benefit to IAC. In general, IAC controls all audits and administrative matters and other tax proceedings relating to the consolidated federal income tax return of the IAC group and any other tax returns for which the IAC group is responsible.

        Under the Tax Sharing Agreement a Spinco generally (i) may not take (or fail to take) any action that would cause any representation, information or covenant contained in the separation documents or the documents relating to the IRS private letter ruling and the tax opinion regarding the spin-off of such Spinco to be untrue, (ii) may not take (or fail to take) any other action that would cause the spin-off of such Spinco to lose its tax free status, (iii) may not sell, issue, redeem or otherwise acquire any of its equity securities (or equity securities of members of its group), except in certain specified transactions for a period of 25 months following the spin-off of such Spinco and (iv) may not, other than in the ordinary course of business, sell or otherwise dispose of a substantial portion of its assets, liquidate, merge or consolidate with any other person for a period of 25 months following the spin-off.

        Because IAC has an unrealized loss, for federal income tax purposes, in the stock of Tree.com, it is not necessary to subject Tree.com to the same restrictions as the other Spincos with respect to acquisitions of Spinco equity securities after 12 months following the spin-off. Nonetheless, Tree.com will be subject to other restrictions that apply to the Spincos during the 25-month period following the spin-off (such as disposing certain assets, engaging in mergers and acquisitions, agreeing to be acquired, and, under certain circumstances, acquiring businesses or assets with equity securities), which restrictions are designed to preserve the tax-free nature of the spin-offs to IAC shareholders.

        During the 25-month period, a Spinco may take certain actions prohibited by these covenants if (i) it obtains IAC's prior written consent, (ii) it provides IAC with an IRS private letter ruling or an unqualified opinion of tax counsel to the effect that such actions will not affect the tax free nature of the spin-off of such Spinco, in each case satisfactory to IAC in its sole discretion, or (iii) IAC obtains a private letter ruling at such Spinco's request. In addition, with respect to actions or transactions involving acquisitions of Spinco stock entered into at least 18 months after the distribution of such Spinco, such Spinco will be permitted to proceed with such transaction if it delivers an unconditional officer's certificate establishing facts evidencing that such acquisition satisfies the requirements of a specified safe harbor set forth in applicable U.S. Treasury Regulations, and IAC, after due diligence, is satisfied with the accuracy of such certification.

        Notwithstanding the receipt of any such IRS ruling, tax opinion or officer's certificate, generally each Spinco must indemnify IAC and each other Spinco for any taxes and related losses resulting from (i) any act or failure to act by such Spinco described in the covenants above, (ii) any acquisition of equity securities or assets of such Spinco or any member of its group, and (iii) any breach by such Spinco or any member of its group of any representation or covenant contained in the separation documents or the documents relating to the IRS private letter ruling or tax opinion concerning the spin-off of such Spinco.

        Under U.S. federal income tax law, IAC and the Spincos are severally liable for all of IAC's federal income taxes attributable to periods prior to and including the current taxable year of IAC,

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which ends on December 31, 2008. Thus, if IAC failed to pay the federal income taxes attributable to it under the Tax Sharing Agreement for periods prior to and including the current taxable year of IAC, the Spincos would be severally liable for such taxes. In the event a Spinco is required to make a payment in respect of a spin-off related tax liability of the IAC consolidated federal income tax return group under these rules for which such Spinco is not responsible under the Tax Sharing Agreement and full indemnification cannot be obtained from the Spinco responsible for such payment under the Tax Sharing Agreement, IAC will indemnify the Spinco that was required to make the payment from and against the portion of such liability for which full indemnification cannot be obtained from the Spinco responsible for such payment under the Tax Sharing Agreement.

        The Tax Sharing Agreement also contains provisions regarding the apportionment of tax attributes of the IAC consolidated federal income tax return group, the allocation of deductions with respect to compensatory equity interests, cooperation, and other customary matters. In general, tax deductions arising by reason of exercises of options to acquire IAC or Spinco stock, vesting of "restricted" IAC or Spinco stock, or settlement of restricted stock units with respect to IAC or Spinco stock held by any person will be claimed by the party that employs such person at the time of exercise, vesting or settlement, as applicable (or in the case of a former employee, the party that last employed such person).

    Employee Matters Agreement

        The employee matters agreement covers a wide range of compensation and benefit issues related to the spin-offs. In general, under the employee matters agreement:

    IAC will assume or retain (i) all liabilities with respect to IAC employees, former IAC employees (excluding any former employees of the Spincos) and their dependents and beneficiaries under all IAC employee benefit plans, and (ii) all liabilities with respect to the employment or termination of employment of all IAC employees, former IAC employees (excluding any former employees of the Spincos) and their dependents and beneficiaries.

    Each Spinco will assume or retain (i) all liabilities under its employee benefit plans, and (ii) all liabilities with respect to the employment or termination of employment of all such Spinco's employees, former employees and their dependents and beneficiaries.

        Subject to a transition period through the end of 2008 with respect to health and welfare benefits, after the spin-offs, the Spincos no longer will participate in IAC's employee benefit plans, but will have established their own employee benefit plans that are currently expected to be substantially similar to the plans sponsored by IAC prior to the spin-offs. Through the end of 2008, IAC will continue to provide health and welfare benefits to employees of the Spincos and each Spinco will bear the cost of this coverage with respect to its employees. Assets and liabilities from the IAC Retirement Savings Plan relating to Spinco employees and former employees will be transferred to the applicable, newly established Spinco Retirement Savings Plan as soon as practicable following the spin-offs. For a description of the treatment of outstanding IAC equity awards pursuant to the employee matters agreement, see "The Separation—Treatment of Outstanding IAC Compensatory Equity-Based Awards."

    Transition Services Agreement

        Pursuant to a transition services agreement among IAC and the Spincos, each of IAC and the Spincos currently expect that some combination of the following services, among others, will be provided by/to the parties (and/or their respective businesses) as set forth below on an interim, transitional basis following completion of the spin-offs:

    assistance with certain legal, finance, internal audit, human resources, insurance and tax affairs, including assistance with certain public company functions, from IAC to the Spincos;

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    continued coverage/participation for employees of the Spincos under IAC health and welfare plans on the same basis as immediately prior to the distribution;

    the leasing/subleasing of office and/or data center space by IAC and its businesses to various Spincos (and vice versa);

    assistance with the implementation and hosting of certain software applications by/from IAC and its businesses for various Spincos (and vice versa);

    call center and customer relations services by Ticketmaster to IAC's Reserve America business and Tree.com;

    payroll processing services by Ticketmaster to certain IAC businesses and an ILG business and by HSNi to IAC;

    tax compliance services by HSNi to ILG and accounting services by Ticketmaster to IAC; and

    such other services as to which any Spinco(s) and IAC may agree.

        The charges for these services will be on a cost plus fixed percentage or hourly rate basis to be agreed upon prior to the completion of the spin-offs. In general, the services to be provided by/to the parties (and/or their respective businesses) will begin on the date of the completion of the spin-offs and will cover a period generally not expected to exceed 12 months following the spin-offs. Any party may terminate the agreement with respect to one or more particular services being received by it upon such notice as will be provided for in the transition services agreement.

    Commercial Agreements

        Each of the Spincos currently, and for the foreseeable future, expect to provide certain services to each other pursuant to certain commercial relationships with IAC and/or other Spincos. Additionally, in connection with the spin-offs, each Spinco is expected to enter or has entered into various commercial agreements, primarily in the form of leases and distribution and services agreements, between their subsidiaries, on the one hand, and subsidiaries of IAC and/or one or more other Spincos, on the other hand, many of which will memorialize (in most material respects) pre-existing arrangements in effect prior to the spin-offs and which are intended to reflect arm's length terms and none of which is expected to constitute a material contract to the applicable Spinco. Below is a brief description of such agreements that, individually or together with similar agreements, involve revenues to either IAC or a Spinco in excess of $120,000. Distribution agreements generally involve the payment of fees (usually on a fixed-per-transaction, revenue sharing or commission basis) from the party seeking distribution of the product or service to the party that is providing the distribution.

        HSNi.    Certain subsidiaries of HSNi distribute their respective products and services via arrangements with certain subsidiaries of IAC and/or other Spincos (and vice versa). For example, HSNi sells merchandise on behalf of Shoebuy through HSN and various Cornerstone brands.

        Aggregate revenues earned in respect of commercial agreements between HSNi and IAC by HSNi subsidiaries from businesses that IAC will own following the distribution were approximately $320,000 in 2007. Aggregate payments made by HSNi subsidiaries to IAC subsidiaries in respect of these commercial agreements were approximately $1.8 million in 2007. Such numbers include payments to and received from Entertainment Publications, Inc., which was sold by IAC subsequent to December 31, 2007.

        ILG.    Certain subsidiaries of ILG distribute their respective products and services via arrangements with certain subsidiaries of IAC and/or other Spincos (and vice versa). For example, Interval promotes and distributes ticketing services for certain events, either through advance access or by passing along a deeper discount to its members via a link to the Ticketmaster booking engine.

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        Aggregate revenues earned in respect of commercial agreements between ILG and IAC by ILG subsidiaries from businesses that IAC will own following the distribution were not material in 2007. Aggregate payments made by ILG subsidiaries to IAC subsidiaries in respect of these agreements were approximately $2.1 million in 2007. Such numbers include payments to and received from Entertainment Publications, Inc., which was sold by IAC subsequent to December 31, 2007.

        Ticketmaster.    Certain subsidiaries of Ticketmaster (i) distribute their respective products and services via arrangements with certain subsidiaries of IAC and/or other Spincos (and vice versa), (ii) provide certain subsidiaries of IAC and/or other Spincos with various services (and vice versa) and/or (iii) lease office space from IAC. For example:

    Ticketmaster leases its corporate headquarters in California, as well as office space for its New York City operations at IAC's headquarters, from IAC; and

    IAC's Advertising Solutions business acts as a sales agent for Ticketmaster in connection with the sale of advertising on www.ticketmaster.com and websites of other Ticketmaster businesses.

        Aggregate revenues earned in respect of commercial agreements between Ticketmaster and IAC by Ticketmaster subsidiaries from businesses that IAC will own following the distribution were approximately $12.2 million in 2007. Aggregate payments made by Ticketmaster subsidiaries to IAC and its subsidiaries in respect of commercial agreements were approximately $4.2 million in 2007. Such numbers include payments to and received from Entertainment Publications, Inc., which was sold by IAC subsequent to December 31, 2007.

        Tree.com.    Certain subsidiaries of Tree.com (i) distribute their respective products and services via arrangements with certain subsidiaries of IAC and/or other Spincos (and vice versa), (ii) provide certain subsidiaries of IAC and/or other Spincos with various services (and vice versa) and/or (iii) lease office space from IAC. For example:

    Tree.com licenses certain real estate information to IAC's Ask.com business for use in connection with real estate related search results;

    IAC's Ask.com and Citysearch businesses provide search engine marketing services and advertising to Tree.com businesses; and

    Tree.com has agreed to provide certain mortgage brokerage services to a joint venture in which IAC is a party.

        Aggregate revenues earned in respect of commercial agreements between Tree.com and IAC by Tree.com subsidiaries from businesses that IAC will own following the distribution were approximately $300,000 in 2007. Aggregate payments made by Tree.com subsidiaries to IAC subsidiaries in respect of these commercial agreements were approximately $400,000 in 2007. Such numbers include payments to and received from Entertainment Publications, Inc., which was sold by IAC subsequent to December 31, 2007.

Certain Other Relationships and Related Person Transactions

        We are currently subject to the policies and procedures of IAC regarding the review and approval of related person transactions. Immediately prior to the spin-off, we will adopt a formal written policy governing the review and approval of related person transactions. We expect that the policies we implement will require the management of the Company to determine whether any proposed transaction, arrangement or relationship with a related person fell within the definition of "transaction" set forth in Item 404(a) of Regulation S-K under the Securities Act, and if so, will require management to submit such transaction to the Company's Audit Committee for approval. The Audit Committee, in considering whether to approve related person transactions, would then consider all facts and circumstances that it deemed relevant.

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DESCRIPTION OF THE STOCK AND ANNUAL INCENTIVE PLAN

Introduction

        Prior to the completion of the spin-off, Tree.com expects to adopt the Tree.com, Inc. 2008 Stock and Annual Incentive Plan. The purpose of the plan will be to assist Tree.com in attracting, retaining and motivating officers and employees, and to provide Tree.com with the ability to provide incentives more directly linked to the profitability of our businesses and increases in stockholder value. In addition, the plan is expected to provide for the assumption of awards pursuant to the adjustment of awards granted under current plans of IAC and its subsidiaries. See "The Separation—Treatment of Outstanding IAC Compensatory Equity Based Awards." Tree.com was incorporated in 2008 and has not yet completed its first fiscal year.

Description

        The Stock and Annual Incentive Plan is expected to contain important features that are summarized below.

Administration

        The Stock and Annual Incentive Plan will be administered by the Compensation Committee or such other committee of the Board as the Tree.com Board of Directors may from time to time designate (the "Committee"). Among other things, the Committee will have the authority to select individuals to whom awards may be granted, to determine the type of award as well as the number of shares of Tree.com common stock to be covered by each award, and to determine the terms and conditions of any such awards.

Eligibility

        In addition to individuals who hold outstanding adjusted awards, persons who serve or agree to serve as officers, employees, non-employee directors or consultants of Tree.com and its subsidiaries and affiliates will be eligible to be granted awards under the Stock and Annual Incentive Plan (other than adjusted awards that are assumed in connection with the spin-offs).

Shares Subject to the Plan

        The Stock and Annual Incentive Plan with will authorize the issuance of up to 2,200,000 shares of Tree.com common stock pursuant to new awards under the plan, plus shares to be granted pursuant to the assumption of outstanding adjusted awards. No single participant may be granted awards covering in excess of 1,466,666 shares of Tree.com common stock over the life of the Stock and Annual Incentive Plan.

        The shares of Tree.com common stock subject to grant under the Stock and Annual Incentive Plan are to be made available from authorized but unissued shares or from treasury shares, as determined from time to time by the Tree.com Board. Other than adjusted awards, to the extent that any award is forfeited, or any option or stock appreciation right terminates, expires or lapses without being exercised, or any award is settled for cash, the shares of Tree.com common stock subject to such awards not delivered as a result thereof will again be available for awards under the plan. If the exercise price of any option and/or the tax withholding obligations relating to any award are satisfied by delivering shares of Tree.com common stock (by either actual delivery or by attestation), only the number of shares of Tree.com common stock issued net of the shares of Tree.com common stock delivered or attested to will be deemed delivered for purposes of the limits in the plan. To the extent any shares of Tree.com common stock subject to an award are withheld to satisfy the exercise price (in the case of an option) and/or the tax withholding obligations relating to such award, such shares of Tree.com common

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stock will not generally be deemed to have been delivered for purposes of the limits set forth in the plan.

        In the event of certain extraordinary corporate transactions, the Committee or the Tree.com Board will be able to make such substitutions or adjustments as it deems appropriate and equitable to (1) the aggregate number and kind of shares or other securities reserved for issuance and delivery under the plan, (2) the various maximum limitations set forth in the plan, (3) the number and kind of shares or other securities subject to outstanding awards; and (4) the exercise price of outstanding options and stock appreciation rights.

        As indicated above, several types of stock grants can be made under the Stock and Annual Incentive Plan. A summary of these grants is set forth below. The Stock and Annual Incentive Plan will govern options and restricted stock units that convert from existing IAC options and IAC restricted stock units in connection with the spin-offs, as well as other award grants made following the spin-offs pursuant to such plans. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the terms that govern IAC options and IAC restricted stock units that convert into options and restricted stock units of Tree.com in connection with the spin-offs will govern such options and restricted stock units to the extent inconsistent with the terms described below.

Stock Options and Stock Appreciation Rights

        Stock options granted under the Stock and Annual Incentive Plan may either be incentive stock options or nonqualified stock options. Stock appreciation rights granted under the plan may either be granted alone or in tandem with a stock option. The exercise price of options and stock appreciation rights cannot be less than 100% of the fair market value of the stock underlying the options or stock appreciation rights on the date of grant. Optionees may pay the exercise price in cash or, if approved by the Committee, in Tree.com common stock (valued at its fair market value on the date of exercise) or a combination thereof, or by "cashless exercise" through a broker or by withholding shares otherwise receivable on exercise. The term of options and stock appreciation rights will be as determined by the Committee, but an ISO may not have a term longer than ten years from the date of grant. The Committee will determine the vesting and exercise schedule of options and stock appreciation rights, and the extent to which they will be exercisable after the award holder's employment terminates. Generally, unvested options and stock appreciation rights terminate upon the termination of employment, and vested options and stock appreciation rights will remain exercisable for one year after the award holder's death, disability or retirement, and 90 days after the award holder's termination for any other reason. Vested options and stock appreciation rights will also terminate upon the optionee's termination for cause (as defined in the plan). Stock options and stock appreciation rights are transferable only by will or by the laws of descent and distribution, or pursuant to a qualified domestic relations order or in the case of nonqualified stock options or stock appreciation rights, as otherwise expressly permitted by the Committee including, if so permitted, pursuant to a transfer to the participant's family members, to a charitable organization, whether directly or indirectly or by means of a trust or partnership or otherwise.

Restricted Stock

        Restricted stock may be granted with such restriction periods as the Committee may designate. The Committee may provide at the time of grant that the vesting of restricted stock will be contingent upon the achievement of applicable performance goals and/or continued service. In the case of performance-based awards that are intended to qualify under Section 162(m)(4) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, (i) such goals will be based on the attainment of one or any combination of the following: specified levels of earnings per share from continuing operations, net profit after tax, EBITDA, EBITA, gross profit, cash generation, unit volume, market share, sales, asset quality, earnings per share, operating income, revenues, return on assets, return on operating assets,

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return on equity, profits, total shareholder return (measured in terms of stock price appreciation and/or dividend growth), cost saving levels, marketing-spending efficiency, core non-interest income, change in working capital, return on capital and/or stock price, with respect to Tree.com or any subsidiary, division or department of Tree.com. Such performance goals also may be based upon the attaining of specified levels of Tree.com, subsidiary, affiliate or divisional performance under one or more of the measures described above relative to the performance of other entities, divisions or subsidiaries. Performance goals based on the foregoing factors are hereinafter referred to as "Performance Goals." The terms and conditions of restricted stock awards (including any applicable Performance Goals) need not be the same with respect to each participant. During the restriction period, the Committee may require that the stock certificates evidencing restricted shares be held by Tree.com. Restricted stock may not be sold, assigned, transferred, pledged or otherwise encumbered, and is forfeited upon termination of employment, unless otherwise provided by the Committee. Other than such restrictions on transfer and any other restrictions the Committee may impose, the participant will have all the rights of a stockholder with respect to the restricted stock award.

Restricted Stock Units

        The Committee may grant restricted stock units payable in cash or shares of Tree.com common stock, conditioned upon continued service and/or the attainment of Performance Goals determined by the Committee. The terms and conditions of restricted stock unit awards (including any Performance Goals) need not be the same with respect to each participant.

Other Stock-Based Awards

        Other awards of Tree.com common stock and other awards that are valued in whole or in part by reference to, or are otherwise based upon, Tree.com common stock, including (without limitation), unrestricted stock, dividend equivalents and convertible debentures, may be granted under the plan.

Bonus Awards

        Bonus awards granted to eligible employees of Tree.com and its subsidiaries and affiliates under the Stock and Annual Incentive Plan will be based upon the attainment of the Performance Goals established by the Committee for the plan year or such shorter performance period as may be established by the Committee. Bonus amounts earned by any individual will be limited to $10 million for any plan year, pro rated (if so determined by the Committee) for any shorter performance period. Bonus amounts will be paid in cash or, in the discretion of Tree.com, in Tree.com common stock, as soon as practicable following the end of the plan year. The Committee may reduce or eliminate a participant's bonus award in any year notwithstanding the achievement of Performance Goals.

Change in Control

        In the event of a Change of Control (as defined in the Stock and Annual Incentive Plan), the Committee will have the discretion to determine the treatment of awards granted under the Stock and Annual Incentive Plan, including providing for the acceleration of such awards upon the occurrence of the Change of Control and/or upon a qualifying termination of employment (e.g., without cause or for good reason) following the Change of Control.

Amendment and Discontinuance

        The Stock and Annual Incentive Plan may be amended, altered or discontinued by the Tree.com Board, but no amendment, alteration or discontinuance may impair the rights of an optionee under an option or a recipient of an SAR, restricted stock award, restricted stock unit award or bonus award previously granted without the optionee's or recipient's consent. Amendments to the Stock and Annual

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Incentive Plan will require stockholder approval to the extent such approval is required by law or agreement.

Federal Income Tax Consequences

        The following discussion is intended only as a brief summary of the federal income tax rules that are generally relevant to stock options. The laws governing the tax aspects of awards are highly technical and such laws are subject to change.

        Nonqualified Options.    Upon the grant of a nonqualified option, the optionee will not recognize any taxable income and IAC will not be entitled to a deduction. Upon the exercise of such an option or related SAR, the excess of the fair market value of the shares acquired on the exercise of the option or SAR over the exercise price or the cash paid under an SAR (the "spread") will constitute compensation taxable to the optionee as ordinary income. Tree.com, in computing its U.S. federal income tax, will generally be entitled to a deduction in an amount equal to the compensation taxable to the optionee, subject to the limitations of Code Section 162(m).

        ISOs.    An optionee will not recognize taxable income on the grant or exercise of an ISO. However, the spread at exercise will constitute an item includible in alternative minimum taxable income, and, thereby, may subject the optionee to the alternative minimum tax. Such alternative minimum tax may be payable even though the optionee receives no cash upon the exercise of the ISO with which to pay such tax.

        Upon the disposition of shares of stock acquired pursuant to the exercise of an ISO, after the later of (i) two years from the date of grant of the ISO or (ii) one year after the transfer of the shares to the optionee (the "ISO Holding Period"), the optionee will recognize long-term capital gain or loss, as the case may be, measured by the difference between the stock's selling price and the exercise price. Tree.com is not entitled to any tax deduction by reason of the grant or exercise of an ISO, or by reason of a disposition of stock received upon exercise of an ISO if the ISO Holding Period is satisfied. Different rules apply if the optionee disposes of the shares of stock acquired pursuant to the exercise of an ISO before the expiration of the ISO Holding Period.


USE OF PROCEEDS

        We will not receive any proceeds from the distribution of our common stock in the spin-off. Any proceeds received by us from the exercise of the stock options covered by the Stock and Annual Incentive Plan will be used for general corporate purposes.


DETERMINATION OF OFFERING PRICE

        No consideration will be paid for the shares of common stock distributed in the spin-off.


LEGAL MATTERS

        The validity of the shares of our common stock issued in the spin-off will be passed upon by the General Counsel of IAC/InterActiveCorp. Certain tax matters will be passed upon by Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz.


EXPERTS

        The consolidated financial statements of Tree.com at December 31, 2007 and 2006 and for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2007 and the related financial statements schedule included in this prospectus have been so included in reliance on the reports of Ernst & Young LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, given on the authority of said firm as experts in auditing and accounting.

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WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION

        We have filed a registration statement on Form S-1 with the SEC with respect to the shares of our common stock being registered hereunder. This prospectus, which is a part of such registration statement, does not include all of the information that you can find in such registration statement or the exhibits to such registration statement. You should refer to the registration statement, including its exhibits and schedules, for further information about us and our common stock. Statements contained in this prospectus as to the contents of any contract or document are not necessarily complete and, if the contract or document is filed as an exhibit to a registration statement, is qualified in all respects by reference to the relevant exhibit.

        After the spin-off, we will file annual, quarterly and current reports, proxy statements and other information with the SEC. The registration statement is, and any of these future filings with the SEC will be, available to the public over the Internet on the SEC's website at www.sec.gov. You may read and copy any filed document at the SEC's public reference rooms in Washington, D.C. at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549 and at the SEC's regional offices in New York at 233 Broadway, New York, New York 10279 and in Chicago at Citicorp Center, 500 W. Madison Street, Suite 1400, Chicago, Illinois 60661. Please call the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330 for further information about the public reference rooms.

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TREE.COM, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
  PAGE
Audited Financial Statements:    
 
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

F-2
 
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the years ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005

 

F-3
 
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2007 and 2006

 

F-4
 
Consolidated Statements of Shareholders' Equity for the years ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005

 

F-5
 
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows f