10-K 1 a2014q410-kcarecom.htm 2014 CARE.COM 10-K 2014Q4 10-K Care.com


 
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
 
Form 10-K
 
 
[x]
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 27, 2014
OR
[ ]
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from _______ to _______
   
Commission File Number: 000-24821
 
 
 
Care.com, Inc.
 
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware
20-578-5879
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification Number)
77 Fourth Avenue, Fifth Floor
Waltham, MA
02451
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip Code)
(781) 642-5900
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
 
Name of exchange on which registered
Common Stock, par value $0.001
 
The New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
 
None
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes [ ]  No [x]
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes [ ]  No [x]
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes  [x]    No  [ ]
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  [x ]    No  [ ]
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. [ ]
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer
[ ]
 
Accelerated filer
[ ]
Non-accelerated filer
[x]
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Smaller reporting company
[ ]
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  [ ]    No  [x]
As of March 20, 2015, there were 31,750,837 shares of the registrant's common stock, $0.001 par value, outstanding.
Portions of the Registrant’s proxy statement for its 2015 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated by reference into Part II herein. Such proxy statement will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission 120 days after the end of the Registrant’s fiscal year ended December 27, 2014.





CARE.COM, INC.
FORM 10-K

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART I
Page
Item 1.
Business
Item 1A.
Risk Factors
Item 1B.
Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 2.
Properties
Item 3.
Legal Proceedings
Item 4.
Mine Safety Disclosures
 
 
 
PART II
 
Item 5.
Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Item 6.
Selected Financial Data
Item 7.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 7A.
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 8.
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
 
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 27, 2014 and December 28, 2013
 
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the years ended December 27, 2014, December 28, 2013 and December 31, 2012
 
Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Loss for the years ended December 27, 2014, December 28, 2013 and December 31, 2012
 
Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit) for the years ended December 27, 2014, December 28, 2013 and December 31, 2012
 
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 27, 2014, December 28, 2013 and December 31, 2012
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
Item 9.
Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
Item 9A.
Controls and Procedures
Item 9B.
Other Information
 
 
 
PART III
 
Item 10.
Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11.
Executive Compensation
Item 12.
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
Item 13.
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence
Item 14.
Principal Accounting Fees and Services
 
 
 
PART IV
 
Item 15.
Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules






PART I
ITEM 1.    BUSINESS
This summary highlights information contained elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and does not contain all of the information you should consider in making your investment decision. Before deciding to invest in shares of our common stock, you should read this summary together with the more detailed information, including our consolidated financial statements and the related notes, included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. You should carefully consider, among other things, the matters discussed in "Risk Factors," our consolidated financial statements and related notes, and "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations," in each case included in Item 1A of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Our Mission
Our mission is to improve the lives of families and caregivers by helping them connect in a reliable and easy way. Our solutions help families make informed decisions in one of the most important and highly considered aspects of their family life-finding and managing quality care for their family: their children, parents, pets and other loved ones. In providing families a comprehensive marketplace for care, we are building the largest destination for quality caregivers to find fulfilling employment and career opportunities globally. We strive to help our family and caregiver members pursue their passions and fulfill the basic human need of caring for each other.
Our Company
We are the world’s largest online marketplace for finding and managing family care as well as a leading subscription-based social e-commerce service selling curated products designed for families. As of the date of the filing of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, we had more than 14.1 million members, including 7.9 million families and 6.2 million caregivers, spanning 16 countries. In Fiscal 2014, we had an average of over 6.4 million unique visitors to our platform each month, including approximately 3.8 million visitors per month from mobile devices. We help families address their particular lifecycle of care needs, which includes child care, senior care, special needs care and other non-medical family care needs such as pet care, tutoring and housekeeping. In the process, we also help caregivers find rewarding full-time and part-time employment opportunities. In Fiscal 2014, 59% of all job postings were for part-time care services, with the remaining 41% seeking full-time care. Examples of the various types of care services families find in our marketplace, depending on their diverse and evolving needs, include:
An experienced nanny to care for a new-born child and help with laundry;
A daycare professional seeking to earn additional income by babysitting on occasional ‘‘date nights’’;
A college student helping to pay tuition by watching a 7 and 10-year old and assisting with after-school pick-ups, driving to activities, homework and meal preparation;
A retired nurse to drive an aging parent to routine medical appointments and assist with personal hygiene; and
A pet lover to take the family dog for her daily walk and care for her during family vacations.
We believe the scale and breadth of our services, combined with our commitment to delivering the best possible member experience for families and caregivers, have made us the most trusted and leading brand for finding and managing family care.
Our platform provides families with robust solutions. Our consumer matching solutions allow families to search for, qualify, vet, connect with and ultimately select caregivers in a low-cost, reliable and easy way. Our platform also provides caregivers with solutions to create personal profiles, describe their unique skills and experience, and otherwise differentiate and market themselves in a highly fragmented marketplace.
In addition to our consumer matching solutions, we offer our members innovative products and services to facilitate their interaction with caregivers. We provide solutions intended to improve both the ease and reliability of the care relationship in the home. One product area we are particularly focused on is consumer payments. Through our consumer payments solutions, families can not only electronically pay a caregiver, they can also subscribe for tax preparation services through Care.com HomePay. This offering deepens our relationship with our members and could enhance the lifetime value associated with each member.
Our primary target market is women, who typically take the responsibility of making care decisions for their family-either as mothers or adult daughters-and are a majority of our caregivers. Women represent 95% of our caregivers and 85% of our care-seeking members. As a result of the shared characteristics of both sides of our marketplace, we are able to leverage our marketing investments targeted at families to also attract caregivers.


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Our marketplace extends beyond families and caregivers. We serve employers by providing access to our platform, including online matching, backup care services, care planning services, and Care.com HomePay, to over 655,000 employer-sponsored families. In addition, we serve care-related businesses-such as day care centers, nanny agencies and home care agencies-who wish to market their services to our care-seeking families and recruit our caregiver members. These businesses improve our member experience by providing additional caregiving choices for families and employment opportunities for caregivers.
We have recently expanded our member offerings by adding social e-commerce capabilities through the integration of Citrus Lane on our platform. Citrus Lane provides curated selections of products designed for families. Citrus Lane generates revenue through the sale of subscriptions and other third-party products to customers in the United States.
We have experienced rapid growth in revenue and members. Our members increased to 14.1 million as of December 27, 2014 from 9.7 million as of December 28, 2013, representing a 46% annual growth rate. Our revenue has increased to $116.7 million in fiscal 2014 from $81.5 million in fiscal 2013, representing a 43% annual growth rate, primarily driven by our consumer matching solutions, consumer payment solutions and, to a lesser extent, our Citrus Lane acquisition. We experienced net losses of $80.3 million and $28.4 million in Fiscal 2014 and Fiscal 2013, respectively. Adjusted EBITDA, a non-GAAP financial measure that we define as net loss, plus: federal, state and franchise taxes, other expense, net, depreciation and amortization, stock-based compensation, accretion of contingent consideration, merger and acquisition related costs and other unusual or non-cash significant adjustments increased to a loss of $24.3 million from a loss of $17.2 million as of December 27, 2014 and December 28, 2013, respectively, representing 21% of revenue for each period. See “Item 7, Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - Other Financial and Operational Data” for a reconciliation of net loss to Adjusted EBITDA, a discussion of management’s use of this non-GAAP measure and the limitations of its use.
Our Market Opportunity
The market for care is large and highly fragmented. According to IBIS research, in 2014, an aggregate of $280 billion was spent in the United States on care, including day care, in-home care providers, housekeepers, nursing care facilities, tutoring and pet care. We believe that our target market includes all households with income greater than $50,000 and 15% of households with income less than $50,000, in each case with either a child under the age of 18 or a senior over the age of 65. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, there were 42 million such households in the United States in 2013. The needs of families seeking care are diverse, taking many different forms depending on the circumstances and life stage of the family. These needs include childcare, such as nannies and babysitters, in-home senior care, such as assistance with personal hygiene, meal preparation and transportation, and other family care needs, such as pet care, tutoring and housekeeping.
We believe that the following key trends contribute to the large and growing total addressable market for online care marketplaces:
Significant percentage of dual-income and single-parent households with children;
Aging population with a high preference for in-home care;
The growth in employer sponsored care services; and
Consumers increasingly using the internet and mobile devices for important and highly personal decisions and transactions.
Despite the size and growth of the care market, there has historically been no proven, efficient and cost-effective way for families to connect with quality caregivers and for caregivers or care-related businesses to target a large number of families.
Our Solutions
Our platform features a portfolio of family care-related products and services for our members, including consumer matching services, consumer payments services, and social e-commerce offerings. This breadth of offerings enables us to provide synergistic care-related solutions to our members, which we believe results in greater frequency of member engagement and higher lifetime value.
Our platform also enables caregivers to find jobs and manage their careers, businesses to recruit employees and advertise their business profiles, and employers to offer their employees valuable family care-related benefits that promote increased productivity, loyalty and reduced family care-related absences.

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Efficient, Reliable and Affordable Way for Families and Caregivers to Connect and Manage Their Care and Career Needs
Our comprehensive and differentiated platform provides significant benefits to families seeking caregivers and caregivers seeking quality jobs, including:
Comprehensive solutions. We are the largest online marketplace for finding and managing family care. Through our platform, families have access to a broad range of solutions to address their diverse and evolving care needs, including childcare, tutoring, senior care options and housekeeping. In addition, families can use our solutions for back-up care when primary care arrangements fall through. Similarly, caregivers can apply to jobs in any category of care posted by families or by care-related businesses.
Efficient and reliable way for families to find quality caregivers. Our members have access to easy-to-use job posting tools, powerful search features and detailed caregiver profiles that are designed to allow them to efficiently navigate our vast database of individual caregivers and assess which caregivers best suit their needs. We also provide families with a comprehensive suite of tools and resources to help them make more informed decisions throughout the search and hiring process, including reviews, references, social connections, rate calculators, articles, an online safety center and access to a range of background checking services.
Efficient way for caregivers to target large, qualified audiences and professionalize their careers. Caregivers can easily create detailed profiles that include work history, education, credentials, references, social connections, third-party background check results and information about the specific care services they provide. In addition, we provide caregivers with services, educational resources and content to professionalize and manage their careers, as well as the opportunity to establish their professional reputation and enhance their profile through the reviews and ratings they receive from families.
Cost-effective alternative. Families are provided access to search, post a job and preview detailed caregiver profiles. After an initial review of profiles, families have the option of selecting from a variety of affordable subscription plans to contact caregivers and access background checks. These subscriptions allow families to contact caregivers through our platform during the term of the subscription, including nannies, babysitters, pet sitters and tutors. Our caregiver members can apply to jobs through our platform and target families and care-related businesses at no cost. Caregivers have the option to pay for additional features such as priority notification of newly posted jobs. We are exploring additional subscription packages for families and caregivers that are designed to better meet the needs of the various segments that use Care.com and further monetize our services.
Secure access anytime, anywhere. We provide a cross-platform suite of communication tools to enable easy and efficient communication between families and caregivers. These easy-to-use tools are built around a monitored messaging system that members access through the Care.com website and mobile apps. Families may communicate with caregivers individually or send a broadcast message to a list of ‘‘favorite’’ caregivers. When members receive new messages they can be notified by email, SMS text messages and alert notifications on their mobile devices. For greater security, members can respond to email notifications through our monitored messaging system without exposing their email address to other members. Our services are available across multiple platforms and mobile devices to ensure that our members access Care.com easily and conveniently wherever they go. We provide our services through mobile apps on iOS and Android devices. We also make our website experience available on personal computers and mobile web browsers. Across these platforms, members are able to access our features for finding care and jobs and for paying caregivers.
Easy-to-Use Payment Offerings
We provide Care.com HomePay, a suite of payroll and tax services for families that employ household workers. Unlike most other payroll and tax companies, Care.com HomePay caters only to households, whose needs are typically very different than those of businesses. As a result, our entire service is designed to meet the unique needs of family employers and has natural synergies with our consumer matching services. Care.com HomePay is not only designed to facilitate the management of a family’s financial relationship with a caregiver, but also to enable a caregiver to establish the compliance framework to qualify for important household employee benefits. We also provide a convenience payments service that enables families to make electronic payments to caregivers from a computer or mobile device.

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Destination for Families to Discover New Products, Request Advice from One Another, and Share Experiences
We operate Citrus Lane, a social e-commerce platform selling curated third-party products designed for families. Through Citrus Lane, parents can purchase curated boxes of merchandise and share product recommendations, as well as provide feedback through Citrus Lane’s online community to help other parents decide which products are best for their children. In addition, we operate BigTent, a public groups platform used to host and manage parenting groups and forums, including some of the largest such groups in the United States. Parents regularly engage in these groups to request parenting advice from and share their experiences with other group members.
Comprehensive Care Solution for Employers
We provide a comprehensive suite of care services for employers to offer to their employees, including our consumer matching solutions, payment offerings, back-up care services and care concierge services. In addition to helping employees better manage the balance between work and home life, these services are designed to benefit employers by promoting increased productivity, engagement, loyalty and reduced care-related absences.
Efficient Marketing and Recruiting Channel for Care-Related Businesses
We provide a highly targeted suite of marketing and recruiting solutions for care-related businesses. These solutions enable care-related businesses to advertise their business profiles to millions of families seeking care and to post care jobs and search our database of caregivers seeking employment.
Our Competitive Strengths
We believe the following strengths differentiate us from our competitors and contribute to our success:
Largest Global Marketplace Focused on Care
We are the world’s largest online marketplace for finding and managing family care with more than 14.1 million members, including 7.9 million families and 6.2 million caregivers, spanning 16 countries. Since the launch of our marketplace in 2007, we estimate, based on internal member surveys, that over seven hundred and fifty thousand families have found caregivers and over seven hundred and fifty thousand caregivers have found care jobs through our service in the areas of childcare, senior care, special needs care, tutoring, pet care and housekeeping.
High Quality Match Rate
Based on our high match rate of paying families with caregivers, we believe our breadth of selection and our matching algorithms enhance the effectiveness of our marketplace and the value we offer to both families and caregivers. In the United States, our member surveys indicate that approximately four out of five families that subscribe to our consumer matching solutions successfully find a caregiver. Furthermore, our surveys indicate that families who hire caregivers using our consumer matching solutions have a high degree of satisfaction with the caregivers they find.
Powerful Network Effects
We benefit from significant network effects as the market leader in the highly fragmented and growing market for finding family care online. As more families use our services, we attract more caregivers seeking a large pool of families in need of caregiver services. Similarly, the increasing number of caregivers using our services has attracted more families. This cycle has driven more and more people to use our services and has resulted in a significant percentage of our new members coming from unpaid sources.
Growing and Engaged Membership
Over the last six years, we have expanded from 500,000 members to more than 14.1 million members. As we grow our membership, improve the member experience and offer additional products and features, more members are using our services for longer periods of time and coming back sooner after their initial use. This highly engaged membership helps improve the effectiveness of our services and increases the lifetime value of our members. Our investments in BigTent and Citrus Lane have further increased the level of regular engagement between Care.com and our target market increasing cross-sell opportunities among our service offerings.
Our Platform
Our platform features a portfolio of family care-related products and services for our members, including consumer matching services, consumer payments services, and social e-commerce offerings. This breadth of offerings enables us to provide synergistic care-related solutions to our members, which we believe results in greater frequency of member engagement and higher lifetime value.

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Our platform also enables caregivers to find jobs and manage their careers, businesses to recruit employees and advertise their business profiles, and employers to offer their employees valuable family care-related benefits that promote increased productivity, loyalty and reduced family care-related absences.
Trusted and Recognized Brand
We have invested in building a differentiated member experience for finding and managing care. This investment includes the ongoing prioritization of features and processes that we believe contribute to the quality of our marketplace. Examples of these investments include the manual review of all job and profile postings for suspicious or inappropriate content, tools for members to review and report other members, a monitored messaging system that allows members to communicate without sharing their personal email, the proactive screening of certain member information against various databases and other sources for criminal or other inappropriate activity and the use of technology to help identify and prevent inappropriate activity through our platform. We believe these product investments, combined with our investments in national brand advertising and our domain name itself, have established the Care.com brand as a leading and trusted brand for finding care.
Our Growth Strategy
Attract More Members to Our Platform
In order to grow our membership, we intend to increase the visibility of our services, platform and brand awareness among families and caregivers through our investments in various marketing channels, such as television, online advertising, direct marketing and community groups and forums. These investments also include initiatives such as search engine optimization and content development, which are designed to increase the visibility of our services in organic search result listings. In addition to direct marketing channels, we are also investing in efficient channel relationships for membership growth.
We also intend to increase our member base by selling our services to more employers who will offer our platform as a benefit to their employees. We intend to do this by continuing to promote a comprehensive suite of services to the growing number of employers who are providing family care-related benefits to their employees.
Increase Revenue
As we improve our user experience and expand our product and service offerings, we have seen an increase in revenue from our member base. We intend to further increase revenue from our member base by introducing new products and pricing tiers as well as by optimizing the monetization of our services on mobile devices. We also expect to increase the cross-selling and targeted merchandising of our existing products, such as Care.com HomePay and Citrus Lane, within our membership base and via the employer channel. In addition, we intend to continue to engage our non-paying members with content and resources such as our weekly newsletters and online forums even when they are not actively looking for care so that we remain top of mind when they are. We believe increasing engagement among our members will drive higher conversion of members to paying members, and longer average length of paid time.
Expand and Increase Adoption of Our Payment Offerings
We believe there is significant opportunity for us to grow our consumer payments solutions. Since our acquisition of Breedlove & Associates, L.L.C., or Breedlove (now re-branded as Care.com HomePay) in 2012, an increasing percentage of Care.com members are using our household employer payroll and tax product. We expect this trend to continue. We recently expanded our payments offerings and services to include a lower cost payroll-only product and expect to offer additional related services at tiered pricing and service levels.
Grow Our International Business
We believe the global secular trends of an increasing number of dual-income households with children, and an aging population, provide significant growth opportunities outside the United States. The majority of our international business today occurs in Western Europe, the market served by our Berlin-based subsidiary Care.com Europe GmbH (formerly Besser Betreut GmbH or Betreut), or Care.com Europe. We are currently operating in 16 countries and in 7 languages. We intend to grow our international business by leveraging our learnings from our U.S. consumer matching solutions, such as investing in organic marketing and other efficient marketing channels.
Selectively Pursue Acquisitions and Strategic Relationships
We will continue to explore opportunities to acquire companies that complement our existing business, enhance the user experience of our services, represent a strong cultural fit and are consistent with our overall growth strategy. In addition, we may enter into various strategic relationships to provide a more comprehensive offering to our members.

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Our Products and Services
Our consumer products and services are designed to make it easier for families to find and manage quality caregivers and for caregivers to find satisfying jobs and manage their careers. We also offer products and services that allow families to share experiences, request advice and discover new products. Additionally, we offer services to employers and care-related businesses that are designed to benefit those organizations as well as our family and caregiver members.
Consumer Matching Solutions
Matching the right caregiver with the right family can create tremendous value for our members. Our innovative consumer matching solutions and large member base facilitate quality matches for the diverse and evolving needs of our members. Some of the features and tools we offer to families and caregivers are offered at no cost, others are bundled into one or more subscription packages. In addition, some features and tools are offered on an a la carte basis. Most of our tools and features are accessible on tablets and mobile devices as well as personal computers.
Tools and Features for Families
Job Posting. Families quickly and easily post a detailed job description specifying their care need (e.g., nanny, babysitter, senior care support, tutor, housekeeper, pet sitter, etc.), the frequency, hourly rate, responsibilities and other requirements for the job and any other relevant information they choose to provide.
Search. Families search for potential caregivers based on specific search criteria such as type of care provided, location, hourly rate, whether the caregiver has their own transportation or smokes, comfort with pets and willingness to accept non-cash payments and/or have taxes withheld. The initial search results are based on an algorithm we designed to highlight the most relevant caregivers, but a family can also sort the search results by additional criteria, such as distance from the family, experience, availability, membership length or age.
Detailed Caregiver Profiles. Families review detailed information about the caregivers who apply to their jobs or appear in their search results. This detailed information includes a bio, work history and references, the type of care they provide, any additional services they provide (such as laundry, grocery shopping and errands), their experience, certifications and qualifications (such as college degree and CPR certification or other languages spoken), their availability and hourly rate, the types of payments they accept, whether they are willing to have taxes withheld, caregiver reviews from other members, a caregiver’s verifications, any social connections the caregiver has to other members, and any other relevant information the caregiver chooses to provide. Caregivers also have the option of including a photo and video with their profile.
Messaging. Members may use our messaging system to contact caregivers who have applied to their jobs or appeared in their search results. Unless a caregiver has made a phone number available to paying family members in their profile, this is the only way a family can initiate communication with a caregiver. Because this messaging system is internal to Care.com, members do not have to disclose personal contact or other information to communicate through this system. When a family sends a message to a caregiver through our messaging system, we also send an email to the caregiver’s personal email and an alert to their mobile device (if they have installed our mobile app) to notify them that a family has sent them a message.
Background Check Services. We currently offer four levels of background checks from consumer credit reporting agencies that families may request on caregivers they are interested in hiring: preliminary, preferred, preferred plus and premier. Caregivers must approve background checks requested by a family before they are performed.
Tools and Features for Caregivers
Profile. Caregivers create and post detailed profiles that include their bio, work history and references, the type of care they provide, any additional services they provide (such as laundry, grocery shopping and errands), their experience, certifications and qualifications (such as college degree and CPR certification or other languages spoken), their availability and hourly rate, the types of payments they accept, whether they are willing to have taxes withheld and any other relevant information they choose to provide. To build their credibility with families, caregivers may elect to verify their phone number and email addresses with us and connect to other members. Caregivers also have the option of including a photo and video with their profile.
Search. Caregivers search for specific jobs posted by families, as well as for families based on specific search criteria such as type of care needed, location, hourly rate and number and age of children.
Apply. Caregivers can review and apply to jobs that interest them. When a caregiver applies to a job, the family is notified of the new applicant by email, SMS text message or a mobile alert.

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Messaging. Caregivers can respond to messages from families using our internal messaging system. Based on the caregiver’s subscription package, the caregiver may also initiate contact with a family.
Background Check Services. Caregivers may elect to have a background check run on themselves. We currently offer three levels of background checks from consumer credit reporting agencies that caregivers may request on themselves: preliminary, preferred and preferred plus. Based on the caregiver’s subscription package, these checks may be included or offered on an a la carte basis.
Additional Tools and Features for Families and Caregivers
Email Notifications. Families receive weekly emails highlighting new caregivers near them, and caregivers receive daily emails notifying them of new jobs in their area. We send families and caregivers additional email communications to help them maximize their use of our consumer matching solutions and to inform them of additional products or services that may be appropriate for them.
Safety Center. Our website features a safety center that provides resources and information designed to help families and caregivers make safer and more informed hiring and job selection decisions, including recommendations to families for screening, interviewing and ongoing monitoring of caregivers and recommendations to caregivers for avoiding scams. Members may also contact our member care department directly by phone or email if they have concerns about other members. We also offer an online tool that allows families and caregivers to report other members through our website.
Mobile Apps. Families and caregivers can download our free mobile apps for iOS and Android. These apps provide families and caregivers the same job posting, profile creation, search and messaging features described above.
Consumer Payments Solutions
Our consumer payments solutions provide families several options to manage their financial relationship with their caregiver. These products also help caregivers professionalize and manage their careers.
Household Employer Payroll and Tax Services. Care.com HomePay is our payroll and tax product for families that employ nannies, housekeepers or other domestic employees. Care.com HomePay is a technology-based, turnkey service that includes automated payroll processing and household employer-related tax filings at the federal, state and local levels. In addition, caregivers who are paid through Care.com HomePay may qualify for important benefits such as unemployment insurance and social security. For household employers who only require an automated payroll processing solution, we offer this service separately. In the future, we intend to offer additional payroll and tax services at tiered feature and pricing levels to address a range of market needs. These products are available to anyone, not just paying members of our consumer matching solutions.
Convenience Payments. This offering enables families to make electronic payments to their caregivers using our website or mobile apps. This solution is particularly applicable for families who pay their caregivers at irregular intervals, such as ‘‘date night’’ babysitters, after-school caregivers or tutors, or in varying amounts each time services are performed.
Consumer Social e-Commerce Solutions
Citrus Lane is our social e-commerce service selling curated products designed for families. Citrus Lane offers subscription-based and a la carte products for sale to customers in the United States. The products offered by Citrus Lane are designed to provide enrichment and education for children ages 0 to 5. In addition to selling products, Citrus Lane provides a forum for parents to share product experiences and recommendations with other Citrus Lane members, which we believe results in a highly engaged member community.
Community Platform and Tools
We operate BigTent, a public groups platform used to host and manage parenting groups and forums, including some of the largest such groups in the United States. Parents regularly engage in these groups to request parenting advice and share their experiences with other group members.
Solutions for Employers
We provide a comprehensive suite of services that employers can offer their employees as an employee benefit. Currently, employers can choose a number of services, including:
Our consumer matching solutions;
Our consumer payment solutions;
Back-up care services for employees needing alternative care arrangements for their child or senior due to events such as school closure or the illness of their child or regular caregiver; and

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Care concierge services, which include senior care planning services to assist employees struggling to understand their options for an aging family member as well as hands-on assistance with the caregiver search process.
Employers generally pay for these services on a per employee basis and have access to features that allow them to manage employee access and track aggregate usage. Depending on the service and the employer’s preference, the employer may subsidize all, a portion or none of the service cost for the employee.
Solutions for Care-Related Businesses
We offer care-related businesses a recruiting solution to help them more effectively recruit caregivers and a marketing solution to help them target families at scale. These solutions also provide additional caregiving choices for families and employment opportunities for caregivers.
Recruiting Solutions. Through this offering, businesses can either post jobs or search for candidates directly from our base of caregivers. Businesses pay us either a per job listing fee for each job posted each month or obtain a subscription fee that ranges in duration from monthly to annual.
Marketing Solutions. Through this offering, businesses can list their services on our website, receive referrals and apply to jobs posted by families. Businesses typically pay us either a referral fee for each lead generated through our site or a subscription that ranges in duration from 3-month to annual.
Our Technology
Our technology platform is designed to provide an efficient marketplace experience across our website and mobile apps. Our solution is based on stable and mature technology frameworks that allow us to rapidly scale as our business grows.
Key elements of our technology solution include:
Powerful Search and Ranking. Our search technology has been designed to handle rapid and continuous growth in search queries and members. Our technology enables families and caregivers to run faceted and free-form search queries and receive results ranked by relevance using our sorting algorithm. Members can run searches based on a variety of parameters, including location, type of care, hours of availability and hourly rate.
Targeting. We employ statistical models and algorithms to ensure that we are managing the efficiency of our marketplace and optimizing the experience for both families and caregivers. These models are used to improve our customer acquisition efforts as well as our product experience and leverage our rich and growing data set. For example, we prioritize the order in which caregivers are presented to a family to give more prominence to caregivers we believe are more appropriate for the family based on their profile or job postings. Similarly, we present caregivers with job opportunities that we feel are best suited to their qualifications and interests. We also employ targeting technology to personalize the content that we display for members as they use our website and mobile apps. We refine the techniques we use for targeting on an ongoing basis.
Mobile Solutions. We offer mobile apps designed specifically for the iOS and Android operating systems. In addition, we also provide optimized website. These mobile solutions are built on an interface layer that exposes the core features of our service in a generic manner. We use the same interface layer across all of our mobile solutions and believe this architecture will allow us to easily expand our services to new devices and mobile platforms in the future.
Testing and Optimization. We have developed a solution for testing and optimizing the user experience and member engagement on our websites and in our email communications. This solution allows us to run multiple variations of a website feature or email tactic simultaneously and is supported by robust data collection and reporting. Based on our analysis of the user response to a given test, we are able to dynamically send more users to the experience that produces a better result.
Background Checking. As part of our effort to provide our members with the information they need to make informed hiring decisions, we have built a sophisticated solution to facilitate access to background checking services. This solution includes a suite of tools to handle the requesting, processing and reviewing of various types of third-party background checks.
Infrastructure Management. We have developed a proprietary suite of tools for managing, administering and monitoring our production website and mobile app platforms. These tools are used to streamline the deployment of releases and to help ensure high availability of our consumer-facing service.
Our Customers
Our customers are our family and caregiver members, employers who offer our services as an employee benefit and care-related businesses who subscribe to our marketing and/or our recruiting solutions offerings.

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The typical care seeker for our consumer matching solutions is female (85%), has an average household income of $75,000, and has at least one child under 18 in the house (78%). Our typical caregiver is also female (95%) and well educated (64% indicating they have at least some college education). Currently, we have more than 14.1 million members of which 56% represents families and 44% represents caregivers. We have families in approximately 83% of U.S. zip codes and caregivers in approximately 81% of U.S. zip codes. Our members are in every state, and the geographic distribution of our members by state is roughly equal to the overall population distribution by state.
In addition, we have a diverse range of employers who offer our services as a benefit to their employees, including technology companies, educational institutions, professional services firms and Fortune 500 companies. As of December 27, 2014, these employers employed over 600,000 employees who have full access to some or all of our services.
Additionally, we have a diverse set of local, regional and national child care, senior care and other care-related businesses that use our services to help either find people who need the care they provide or find caregivers to work at their organization.
Our Competition
With respect to our consumer matching solutions, we compete for members with traditional offline consumer resources, online job boards and other online care marketplaces. We also compete for a share of the overall recruiting and advertising budgets of care-related businesses with traditional, offline media companies and other Internet marketing providers. The principal competitive factors in this market include:
network size and quality of caregivers and families;
product reliability, features, effectiveness and efficiency;
the quality and completeness of family job postings and caregiver profiles;
product line breadth and applicability;
affordability and value of the products provided;
reliability of safety and security measures;
the performance and reliability of a mobile solution;
international footprint; and
brand awareness and reputation.
Our principal competitors in this market are other online care marketplaces, such as Sittercity and UrbanSitter, and online classifieds, such as Craigslist. Our principal competitor in our employer channel is Bright Horizons. In the consumer payments market, Care.com HomePay competes with similar products offered by 4nannytaxes.com and GTM Payroll Services, and our convenience payments product competes with other payment solutions such as PayPal. Our social e-commerce platform, which enables sales of curated products designed for families, competes with Bluum. We believe we generally compete favorably with our competitors on the basis of our scale, trusted brand and member experience.
Marketing and Sales
Our marketing strategy is focused on attracting families and caregivers to our marketplace. Our marketing efforts are designed to increase brand awareness, maximize reach and penetration and grow our member base. Marketing activities include demand generation, advertising, conferences, press relations and customer awareness.
Our target market is primarily women on both sides of the marketplace. Women are typically the primary care decision makers for their family-either as mothers or adult daughters-and represent 95% of our caregivers and 85% of our families. As a result of the shared characteristics of both sides of our marketplace, we are able to leverage our marketing investments targeted at families to also attract caregivers, resulting in lower acquisition costs for caregivers.
We acquire consumers through a diverse mix of free and paid acquisition channels. As a result of our strong focus on our member experience and engagement to ensure a successful match for families and caregivers, the majority of our new subscribers come from unpaid channels, including word-of-mouth referrals, SEO, online communities and forums and repeat users.
Our paid direct marketing efforts for both families and caregivers comprise both offline channels such as network cable TV, local radio and direct mail and online channels such as SEM, paid social display ads, affiliates and select paid job board sites. Our marketing spend is weighted towards our high seasons based on the timing of demand from families seeking care.
Our sales organization is responsible for attracting and retaining employers and care-related businesses to grow adoption of our services and offerings to those organizations. We expect to continue to grow our sales headcount to grow these channels.

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Government Regulation
We are subject to numerous U.S. federal and state, and foreign laws and regulations that affect consumer-based businesses and companies that conduct business on the Internet. Many of these laws and regulations are still evolving and being tested in courts, and could be interpreted in ways that could harm our business. These may involve user privacy, information security and data protection, use of consumer background information, intellectual property, electronic contracts and other communications, consumer protection, telecommunications, product liability, taxation, securities law compliance, and online payment services.
For example, in the area of information security and data protection, many states have passed laws requiring notification to users when there is a security breach for personal data, such as the Massachusetts Data Breach Notification Law, or requiring the adoption of minimum information security standards that are often vaguely defined and difficult to practically implement. The costs of compliance with these laws may increase in the future as a result of changes in interpretation. In addition, our operations subject us to certain payment card association operating rules, certification requirements and rules, including the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard, or PCI DSS, a security standard with which companies that collect, store or transmit certain data regarding credit and debit cards, credit and debit card holders, and credit and debit card transactions are required to comply. Our failure to comply fully with the PCI DSS may violate payment card association operating rules, federal and state laws and regulations, and the terms of our contracts with payment processors and merchant banks.
In addition, in the United States we acquire consumer background information about our members from consumer credit reporting agencies, which subjects us to the Fair Credit Reporting Act, or the FCRA. Among other things, the FCRA limits the distribution and use of consumer reports and establishes consumer rights to access and dispute their own credit files, among other rights and obligations. Violation of the FCRA can result in civil and criminal penalties. Many states have enacted laws with requirements similar to the FCRA. Some of these laws impose additional, or more stringent, requirements than the FCRA.
Because our services are accessible worldwide, we are also subject to a number of laws and regulations in foreign jurisdictions. Moreover, in some cases, a foreign jurisdiction may claim that we are required to comply with its laws even if we have no local entity, employees or infrastructure in that jurisdiction.
U.S. federal and state and foreign laws and regulations are constantly evolving and can be subject to significant change. In addition, the application, interpretation, and enforcement of these laws and regulations are often uncertain, particularly in the new and rapidly-evolving industry in which we operate. If we are not in compliance with existing or new laws or regulations that are applicable to our business or if new or existing laws or regulations are interpreted and applied inconsistently with our current policies and practices, our business could be harmed, and we may be forced to modify our policies and practices.
Intellectual Property
Our success depends in part upon our ability to protect our core technology and intellectual property. To accomplish this, we rely on a combination of intellectual property rights, including trade secrets, copyrights and trademarks, as well as contractual restrictions. We enter into confidentiality and assignment of invention agreements with our employees and certain consultants and confidentiality agreements with other third parties. We do not have any patents or pending patent applications.
We pursue the registration of our domain names, trademarks and service marks in the United States and in certain locations outside the United States when we deem such registration to be beneficial and appropriate.
The efforts we have taken to protect our proprietary rights may not be sufficient or effective. Any significant impairment of our intellectual property rights could harm our business or our ability to compete. In addition, Internet, technology and social media companies are frequently subject to litigation based on allegations of infringement, misappropriation or other violations of intellectual property rights. We have received in the past and may in the future receive notices asserting that we have infringed, misappropriated or otherwise violated a third party’s intellectual property rights, and as we face increasing competition, the possibility of intellectual property rights claims against us grows.
Employees
We believe we have assembled an extremely talented group of employees and strive to hire the best employees. As of December 27, 2014, we had 442 full-time employees and 236 part-time employees, not including approximately 175 part-time caregiver employees of our subsidiary Care Concierge, Inc. (“Care Concierge” formerly Parents In A Pinch or “PIAP”), who provide back-up care from time to time. None of our employees is represented by a labor organization or is a party to any collective bargaining arrangement. We have never had a work stoppage, and we consider our relationship with our employees to be good.

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Operating Segments and Geographic Areas
We manage our business on the basis of one operating segment. The majority of our revenue in the year ended December 27, 2014 was from paying members in the United States.
Additional information required by this item can be found in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data - Note 11. Segment and Geographical Information” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and is incorporated by reference herein.
Available Information
We were incorporated in Delaware on October 27, 2006. Our principal executive offices are located at 77 Fourth Avenue, 5th Floor, Waltham, MA 02451, and our telephone number is (781) 642-5900.
Our website is located at www.care.com and our “Investor Relations” website is located at investors.care.com.
We file reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, including annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and any other filings required by the SEC. We make available on our “Investor Relations” website, free of charge, our annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and all amendments to those reports as soon as reasonably practicable after such material is electronically filed with or furnished to the SEC. References to our website and our “Investor Relations” website in this report are intended to be inactive textual references only, and none of the information contained on our website or our “Investor Relations” website is part of this report or incorporated in this report by reference.
The public may read and copy any materials we file with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, DC 20549. The public may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. The SEC maintains an Internet site (http://www.sec.gov) that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC.

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ITEM 1A.    RISK FACTORS
Our business is subject to numerous risks. We caution you that the following important factors, among others, could cause our actual results to differ materially from those expressed in forward-looking statements made by us or on our behalf in filings with the SEC, press releases, communications with investors and oral statements. Any or all of our forward-looking statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and in any other public statements we make may turn out to be wrong. They can be affected by inaccurate assumptions we might make or by known or unknown risks and uncertainties. Many factors mentioned in the discussion below will be important in determining future results. Consequently, no forward-looking statement can be guaranteed. Actual future results may differ materially from those anticipated in forward-looking statements. We undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. You are advised, however, to consult any further disclosure we make in our reports filed with the SEC.
Risks Related to Our Business
We may not maintain our current rate of revenue growth.
Our revenues have grown rapidly, increasing to $116.7 million in 2014 from $81.5 million in 2013, representing an annual growth rate of 43%, including the impact of Citrus Lane, which we acquired in July 2014. Our continued revenue growth and the rate of our revenue growth depend largely on our ability to effectively and efficiently grow our membership, increase the number of members who pay for our products and services, increase the average revenue from our paying members and lengthen the time period existing and new members continue to pay for our products and services. We cannot assure you that we will be successful in continuing to expand our paying member base at the same rates, or at all. In addition, our revenue growth rate may decline if we are not able to grow our paid memberships while managing our acquisition costs within our targeted return on investment range or if we are unsuccessful in cross-selling new and existing products and services to our members, such as our consumer payments solutions, or in continuing to develop new products, services and solutions that members consider valuable, such as our mobile solutions.
You should not rely on our historical rate of revenue growth as an indication of our future performance. If our growth rates were to decline significantly or become negative, it could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.
We have a history of cumulative losses and expect to have operating losses as we continue to grow our business.
During 2014, we experienced net losses of $80.3 million, which includes $36.2 million attributed to the impairment of goodwill and intangible assets related to our Citrus Lane Reporting Unit, and in 2013, we experienced net losses of $28.3 million. We expect our operating expenses to increase over the next several years, which is likely to lead to additional losses. We may not achieve profitability in the immediate future, if ever. In particular, we intend to continue to invest substantial resources in marketing to acquire new, paying members. We also intend to hire additional personnel in marketing, operations, sales and other areas of our business and to introduce new products, services and features, each of which will increase our expenses with no assurance that we will generate sufficient revenue to reduce our losses or achieve profitability. In addition, as a public company we are incurring and will continue to incur additional significant legal, accounting and other expenses that we did not have as a private company.
We have a limited operating history in an evolving industry, which makes it difficult to evaluate our future prospects and may increase the risk that we will not be successful.
We have a limited operating history, and because the market for accessing family care online is rapidly evolving and has not yet reached widespread adoption, it is difficult for us to predict our future operating results. In addition, much of our growth has occurred over the last two years, which makes it difficult for us to predict the expected length of paid memberships, revenue per member, member acquisition costs and other key performance indicators for our business. You should consider our business and prospects in light of the risks and difficulties we may encounter in this rapidly evolving market. These risks and difficulties include those described in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and our ability to, among other things:
attract and retain members and maintain an appropriate family to caregiver ratio of active members;
encourage paying members to stay longer and return as paying members sooner after their paid membership lapses;
cross-sell our products and services to our new and existing members and continue to develop and diversify our product offerings for members;
sell our services to employers and care-related businesses;
provide our members with superior user experiences;
motivate members to contribute additional, timely and accurate content to our marketplace;
anticipate and react to changes in technology and challenges from existing and new competitors;

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maintain the strength and increase awareness of our brand;
integrate and grow the businesses we acquire as anticipated; and
manage and grow our international operations in existing markets.
Failure to adequately address these risks and difficulties could harm our business, impact our ability to reduce our operating losses and achieve profitability, and/or cause our operating losses to grow. In addition, if the demand for online care does not develop as we expect, or if we fail to address the needs of this demand, our business will be harmed.
If the revenue generated by paying members differs significantly from our expectations, or if our membership acquisition costs differ significantly from our expectations, we may not be able to recover our membership acquisition costs or generate profits from these investments.
We had $75.8 million in sales and marketing expenses in 2014 and $55.3 million in sales and marketing expenses in 2013. We expect to continue to make significant investments to acquire additional members, including advertising through television, online, local radio, direct mail, social media and other advertising campaigns. Our decisions regarding these investments are based on our anticipated marketing cost to acquire each additional paying member and our analysis of the revenue we believe we can generate per paying member over the expected lifetime of such membership. Currently, most of our paid memberships are monthly memberships, and the average total paid membership length for our consumer matching solutions is approximately eight months. As a result, we must regularly replace paying members who allow their membership to lapse with new paying members either by converting existing non-paying members or by attracting new members to our service. Our anticipated member acquisition costs and our analysis of the revenue that we expect new paying members to generate over the life of the membership depends upon several estimates and assumptions, including paid memberships lengths and increasing renewal rates, including conversion rates of existing members to paying members, future membership fees and our success in cross-selling existing and new products and services to members.
If our estimates and assumptions regarding either our cost to acquire paying memberships or the revenue we can generate from those memberships over their lifetime prove incorrect, we may be unable to recover our member acquisition costs and our operating losses may increase. Similarly, if our member acquisition costs increase, the return on our investment may be lower than we anticipate irrespective of the revenue generated by new members. If we cannot generate profits from this investment, we may need to alter our growth strategy, and our growth rate and results of operations may be adversely affected.
Many individuals use mobile devices to access online services. If users of these devices do not widely adopt solutions we develop for these devices or if we are unable to effectively operate on mobile devices, our business could be adversely affected.
The number of people who access online services through mobile devices, such as smart phones, handheld tablets and mobile telephones, as opposed to personal computers, has increased dramatically in the past few years and is projected to continue to increase. In 2014, we had an average of over 6.4 million unique visitors to our platform each month, 59% of whom visited our site from mobile devices. In 2015, we expect the percentage of visitors from mobile devices to increase. If the mobile solutions we have developed and develop in the future do not meet the needs of prospective members or current members, they may not register for our services, they may not become paying members of our services and/or they may reduce their usage of our services and our business could suffer. Additionally, we are dependent on the interoperability of Care.com with popular mobile operating systems that we do not control, such as Android and iOS, and any changes in such systems and terms of service that degrade our solutions’ functionality, give preferential treatment to competitive products or prevent our ability to promote our services could adversely affect traffic and monetization on mobile devices.
Growth in access to our services through mobile devices as a substitute for access on personal computers may negatively affect our revenue and operating results.
Our members are increasingly accessing our platforms on mobile devices. While many of our members who use our online services on mobile devices also access our platforms through personal computers, we have seen substantial growth in mobile usage and mobile only usage. We are devoting valuable resources to solutions related to monetization of mobile usage, and cannot assure you that these solutions will be successful. If our members increasingly use mobile devices as a substitute for access to our online services as opposed to personal computers, and if we are unable to successfully implement monetization strategies for our solutions on mobile devices, or these strategies are not as successful as our offerings for personal computers, or if the expenses we incur in this effort are greater than we anticipated, our financial performance and ability to grow revenue would be negatively affected.

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Our business depends on the strength of our brand, which we have built by providing families and caregivers efficient, reliable and affordable services for finding quality caregivers and fulfilling jobs. If the services we provide fail to meet our members’ expectations, the trust members have placed in our brand may be damaged, and we may be unable to maintain or expand our base of members and paying members.
Trust in our brand is essential to the strength of our business. Member awareness, and the perceived value, of our brand depends largely on the success of our marketing efforts and our ability to provide a consistent, high-quality member experience. As a result, we must ensure that our new and existing members are satisfied with all of our products and services. Complaints or negative views of our products or services, caregivers or families, irrespective of their validity, could diminish members’ confidence in and the use of our platform and adversely impact our brand.
In addition, our member experience extends beyond the products and services that we offer through our website and to the point of service. As a result, actions taken by caregivers and families, which are outside of our control, could have a significant impact on our brand, and any illegal or otherwise harmful acts, even if only by one or a small number of our members, may have a significant negative impact on our brand. For example, over the last year there has been an increase in fraud perpetrated against caregivers who seek employment opportunities on sites such as ours, and Care.com has been featured in news reports regarding these scams. In addition, Care.com is currently a party to several lawsuits brought by families relating to alleged criminal acts by caregivers they found through the Care.com site, including acts resulting in death. If our efforts to promote and maintain our brand are not successful or if our member experience is not otherwise positive, our operating results and our ability to attract and retain members may be adversely affected.
Furthermore, an adverse, public event resulting from the actions of a caregiver on a competitor’s platform could adversely affect us-even if the caregiver has no relationship with our platform-and reduce consumer confidence in seeking caregivers through an online platform.
If we fail to manage our growth effectively, our business, operating and financial results may suffer.
We have recently experienced, and expect to continue to experience, significant growth, which has placed, and will continue to place, significant demands on our management and our operational and financial infrastructure. We expect that our growth strategy will require us to commit substantial financial, operational and technical resources. It is important that we appropriately prioritize our efforts and allocate our limited resources effectively. Continued growth also could strain our ability to maintain reliable service levels for our members, to enhance our product offerings, to develop and improve our operational, financial and management controls, to continue to strengthen our reporting systems and procedures and to recruit, train and retain highly skilled personnel. As our operations grow in size, scope and complexity, we will need to scale our systems and infrastructure accordingly and may determine we need to open additional offices, add more network capacity and make other capital investments, which will require significant expenditures and allocation of valuable management resources. If we fail to maintain the necessary level of discipline and efficiency, or if we fail to appropriately prioritize our efforts and allocate limited resources effectively in our organization as it grows, our business, operating results and financial condition may suffer.
We expect our revenue and operating results to fluctuate on a quarterly and annual basis, which may result in a decline in our stock price.
Our revenue and operating results have historically fluctuated from quarter-to-quarter and year-to-year and we expect these fluctuations to continue in the future. These future fluctuations may be significant and unpredictable and may fail to match our projections or the expectations of securities analysts due to a variety of factors, many of which are outside of our control. Any of these events could cause the market price of our stock to fluctuate.
In addition, we generally experience some seasonality fluctuations in our financial results due to heightened demand for caregivers from families at the beginning of the school year and at the beginning of the calendar year. Accordingly, purchases of subscriptions for our consumer matching solutions generally increase in the first and third quarters compared to the second and fourth quarters. Although historically our revenue has increased in each quarter as we have added members, in the future this seasonality may cause fluctuations in our financial results. In addition, other seasonality trends may develop, and the existing seasonality and consumer behavior that we experience may change.
We have based our current and projected future expense levels on our operating plans and sales forecasts, and our operating costs are relatively fixed in the short term. As a result, we may not be able to reduce our costs sufficiently to compensate for an unexpected shortfall in revenue, and even a small shortfall in revenue could disproportionately and adversely affect our financial results for a given quarter.

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In addition to the other risk factors listed in this section, our operating results may be affected by a number of factors, including:
fluctuations in demand for our products and services;
fluctuations in sales cycles for our products and services;
general economic conditions in our domestic and international markets and fluctuations in exchange rates;
our ability to develop and introduce new products and product enhancements that are attractive to our members;
the mix of monthly memberships and annual memberships, as the amount of revenue recognized per month on an annual membership is less than a monthly membership;
member acceptance of new product introductions;
the timing and success of changes in our pricing strategies;
our ability to sell our services to employers and care-related businesses;
costs related to acquisitions of other businesses and our ability to successfully integrate, manage and grow those businesses;
any significant changes in the competitive dynamics of our markets, including new entrants or substantial discounting of products;
any decision to increase or decrease operating expenses in response to changes in the marketplace or perceived marketplace opportunities;
our ability to derive benefits from our investments in sales, marketing, engineering or other activities;
volatility in our stock price, which may lead to higher stock compensation expenses; and
unpredictable fluctuations in our effective tax rate due to disqualifying dispositions of stock from our stock incentive plan, changes in the valuation of our deferred tax assets or liabilities, changes in actual results versus our estimates or changes in tax laws, regulations, accounting principles or interpretations thereof.
We depend on highly skilled personnel to grow and operate our business, particularly our chief executive officer, and if we are unable to hire, retain and motivate our personnel, we may not be able to grow effectively.
Our future success will depend upon our continued ability to identify, hire, develop, motivate and retain highly-skilled personnel. Our ability to execute efficiently depends upon contributions from all of our employees, in particular our senior management team. Key institutional knowledge remains with a small group of long-term employees and directors whom we may not be able to retain. We do not have employment agreements other than offer letters with any key employee, including our chief executive officer, and we do not maintain key person life insurance for any employee other than our chief executive officer. In addition, from time to time, there may be changes in our senior management team that may be disruptive to our business. If our senior management team, including any new hires that we may make, fails to work together effectively and to execute our plans and strategies on a timely basis, our business could be harmed. Our growth strategy also depends on our ability to expand and retain our talent pool. Identifying, recruiting, training and integrating qualified individuals requires significant time, expense and attention. In addition to hiring new employees, we must continue to focus on retaining our best talent. Competition for these resources, particularly in Boston, Austin and Mountain View, three areas where we have offices, is intense. If we are not able to effectively increase and retain our talent, our ability to achieve our strategic objectives will be adversely impacted, and our business will be harmed.
We believe that our culture has the potential to be a key contributor to our success. As we grow, if we do not continue to develop our corporate culture it could harm our ability to foster the innovation, creativity and teamwork we believe we need to support our growth.
Finally, we utilize off-shore resources through third parties over whom we have limited control to assist us in developing certain products and features. If any of these third parties terminates their relationship with us or fails to provide adequate services, it could cause delays in our release of new product offerings and/or features and harm our business.
If the businesses we have acquired or invested in do not perform as expected or we are unable to effectively integrate acquired businesses, our operating results and prospects could be harmed.
We have acquired six businesses since our inception. The benefits that we expect to achieve as a result of our acquisitions or investments depend in part on our ability to realize anticipated growth opportunities and cost savings synergies. Our success in realizing these opportunities and synergies and the timing of this realization depend among other things on the

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successful integration of the acquired companies’ businesses and operations with our businesses and operations and the adoption of our respective best practices. Even if we are able to integrate these businesses and operations successfully and implement those strategic initiatives, it may not result in the realization of the full benefits of the growth opportunities and synergies we currently expect to achieve, within the anticipated time frame or at all. If a company we purchase does not perform as we expected, our investment could become impaired and our financial results could be negatively impacted.
Our mergers and acquisitions involve numerous risks, including the following:
difficulties in integrating and managing the combined operations, technologies, technology platforms and products of the acquired companies and realizing the anticipated economic, operational and other benefits in a timely manner, which could result in substantial costs and delays or other operational, technical or financial problems;
legal or regulatory challenges or litigation post-acquisition, which could result in significant costs or require changes to the businesses or unwinding of the transaction;
failure of the acquired company to achieve anticipated revenue, earnings or cash flow;
diversion of management’s attention or other resources from our existing business;
our inability to maintain the key customers and business relationships and the reputations of acquired businesses;
uncertainty of entry into markets in which we have limited or no prior experience or in which competitors have stronger market positions;
our dependence on unfamiliar affiliates and partners of acquired businesses;
unanticipated costs associated with pursuing acquisitions;
responsibility for the liabilities of acquired businesses, whether such liabilities were disclosed to us or not prior to our acquisition and whether such liabilities meet or exceed our estimates, including, without limitation liabilities arising out of the acquired business’s failure to maintain effective data protection and privacy controls and comply with applicable regulations;
difficulties in assigning or transferring intellectual property licensed by acquired companies from third parties to us or our subsidiaries;
potential loss of key employees of the acquired companies;
challenges in integrating and auditing the financial statements of acquired companies that have not historically prepared financial statements in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles;
difficulties in integrating acquired companies’ systems controls, policies and procedures to comply with the internal control over financial reporting requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002; and
potential accounting charges to the extent intangibles recorded in connection with an acquisition, such as goodwill, trademarks, customer relationships or intellectual property, are later determined to be impaired and written down in value.
Moreover, we rely heavily on the representations and warranties provided to us by the sellers of acquired companies, including as they relate to the financial condition of the company, creation, ownership and rights in intellectual property, and compliance with laws and contractual requirements. If any of these representations and warranties are inaccurate or breached, such inaccuracy or breach could result in costly litigation and assessment of liability for which there may not be adequate recourse against such sellers, in part due to contractual time limitations and limitations of liability.

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We have recorded significant goodwill impairment charges and may be required to record additional charges to future earnings if our goodwill or intangible assets become impaired.
We are required under generally accepted accounting principles to review our intangible assets for impairment when events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value may not be recoverable. Goodwill is required to be tested for impairment at least annually. Factors that may be considered a change in circumstances indicating that the carrying value of our intangible assets may not be recoverable include a decline in stock price and market capitalization, slower growth rates in our industry or our own operations, and/or other materially adverse events that have implications on the profitability of our business. In the fourth quarter of 2014, we recorded a pre-tax goodwill impairment charge of $33.8 million related to our Citrus Lane Reporting Unit. For additional information on this charge, see Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of OperationsCritical Accounting Policies and Estimates” and Note 2, Summary of Significant Accounting Policies—Goodwill, and Note 4—Goodwill and Intangible Assets, of our financial statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. We will need to continue to evaluate the carrying value of our goodwill and may be required to record additional charges to earnings during the period in which any impairment of our goodwill or other intangible assets is determined which could adversely impact our results of operations. As of December 27, 2014, our goodwill balance was $68.7 million, which represented 40% of total consolidated assets.
We may continue to make acquisitions, which could require significant management attention, disrupt our business, result in dilution to our stockholders, and adversely affect our financial results.
As part of our business strategy, we have made, and may in the future make, acquisitions to add specialized employees, complementary companies, products or technologies. The identification of suitable acquisition candidates can be difficult, time-consuming and costly, and we may not be able to successfully complete identified acquisitions. Acquisitions may also involve the entry into geographic or business markets in which we have little or no prior experience. Moreover, the anticipated benefits of any acquisition, investment or business relationship may not be realized or we may be exposed to unknown liabilities. For any such transaction, we may:
issue additional equity securities that would dilute our stockholders;
use cash that we may need in the future to operate our business;
incur debt on terms unfavorable to us or that we are unable to repay;
incur large charges or expenses or assume substantial liabilities;
become subject to new laws and regulations about which we have limited prior experience or knowledge;
encounter difficulties retaining key employees of the acquired companies; and
become subject to adverse tax consequences, substantial depreciation or deferred compensation charges.
Any of these risks could harm our business and operating results. In addition, for legal, technical or business reasons, we may not be able to successfully assimilate and integrate the business, technologies, solutions, personnel or operations of any company we acquire as quickly or fully as we would like. The integration of any acquired company may require, among other things, coordination of administrative, sales and marketing, accounting and finance functions, harmonization of legal terms and privacy policies and expansion of information and management systems.
Acquisitions can also lead to large non-cash charges that can have an adverse effect on our results of operations as a result of write-offs for items such as future impairments of intangible assets or goodwill.
Our international operations are subject to increased challenges and risks.
While we intend to focus most of our international efforts on growing our existing international markets, we also may expand our international operations in the future. We have an even more limited operating history as a company outside the United States, and our ability to manage our business and conduct our operations internationally requires considerable management attention and resources and is subject to the particular challenges of supporting a rapidly growing business in an environment of multiple languages, cultures, customs, legal systems, regulatory systems and commercial infrastructures. This international expansion has required us, and will continue to require us, to invest significant funds and other resources. International expansion also subjects us to risks that we have not previously faced, including risks associated with:
recruiting and retaining talented and capable employees in foreign countries;
providing products and services across a significant distance, in different languages and among different cultures, including potentially modifying our solutions and features to ensure that they are culturally relevant in different countries;

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compliance with applicable foreign laws and regulations, which, in certain areas such as privacy and data protection, may be more restrictive than U.S. laws and regulations;
compliance with anti-bribery laws, including without limitation compliance with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and the United Kingdom Bribery Act;
currency exchange rate fluctuations; and
higher costs of doing business internationally.
If our revenue from our international operations does not exceed the expense of establishing and maintaining these operations, our business and operating results will suffer.
We depend on search engines and job board sites to attract a significant percentage of our members, and if those businesses change their ranking or listings practices, algorithms or increase their pricing, it could impact our ability to attract new members.
Many of our members locate our websites through search engines, such as Google, Yahoo! and Bing. Search engines typically provide two types of search results, algorithmic and purchased listings, and we rely on both types. Algorithmic listings cannot be purchased and are determined and displayed by a set of formulas designed by the search engine. Search engines revise their algorithms from time to time in an attempt to optimize search result listings. If the search engines on which we rely for algorithmic listings modify their algorithms in a manner that reduces the prominence of our listing, fewer potential members may find and click through to our websites. Additionally, our competitors’ search engine optimization efforts may result in their websites receiving greater prominence in search result listings than ours, which could also reduce the number of potential members that visit our websites. We have experienced fluctuations in the prominence of our search result listings in the past and we anticipate fluctuations in the future. In addition, costs for purchased listings on search engines have increased in the past and may continue to increase in the future. Price increases could reduce the number of potential members that visit our websites and increase our costs. Any reduction in the number of users directed to our websites from search engines would harm our business and operating results.
Job board sites are also an important source of our caregiver acquisition efforts. We derive much of that volume from organic search listings within those job boards. Should those job board aggregators deny our listings within their organic search listings, we would have to find alternative paid sources to acquire caregivers, which would increase our acquisition costs.
If we fail to expand and increase adoption of our consumer payments solutions, our future growth could suffer.
As part of our growth strategy, we intend to grow our consumer payments solutions. Although an increasing percentage of our members are using Care.com HomePay, a household employer payroll and tax product, our growth could be adversely affected if this trend does not continue. We also recently introduced a mid-tier payroll product, and we intend to develop other payment and financial solutions to offer to our members as we expand our offerings and services. When we develop a new product, we typically incur expenses and expend resources upfront to market, promote and sell the new offering. Therefore, these new products must achieve high levels of market acceptance in order to justify the amount of our investment in developing and bringing them to market. If we fail to increase adoption of Care.com HomePay, or any other payments solutions we may offer do not achieve adequate acceptance in the market, our competitive position will be impaired, and our growth could be adversely impacted.
Data security and integrity are critically important to our business, and breaches of security, unauthorized disclosure of information about our members, denial of service attacks or the perception that member information is not secure could result in a material loss of business, substantial legal liability or significant harm to our reputation.
We collect, process and store a large amount of consumer information, including financial information and sensitive personal information. This data is often accessed through transmissions over public and private networks, including the Internet. Despite our physical security measures, implementation of technical controls and contractual precautions designed to identify, detect and prevent the unauthorized access, alteration, use or disclosure of our data, there is no guarantee that these measures or any other measures can provide absolute security. Systems that access or control access to our services and databases may be compromised, as a result of criminal activity, including cyber-attacks and other intentional business disruptions, negligence or otherwise. Threats may derive from human error, fraud or malice on the part of employees or third parties, or may result from accidental technological failure. Several recent, highly publicized data security breaches and denial of service attacks at other companies have heightened consumer awareness of this issue and may embolden individuals or groups to target our systems. Unauthorized disclosure or use, or loss or corruption, of our data or inability of our members to access our systems could disrupt our operations, subject us to substantial legal liability, result in a material loss of business, and significantly harm our reputation.

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We are subject to diverse laws and regulations in the United States and foreign countries mandating notification to affected individuals in the event that personal data (as defined in the various governing laws) is accessed or acquired by unauthorized persons. In the United States, federal and state laws provide for more than 40 diverse notification regimes, all of which we are subject to. Germany also has breach notification laws, and the new laws being debated in Europe propose introducing a general mandatory breach notification requirement with which we would have to comply. Complying with such numerous and complex regulations in the event of unauthorized access would be expensive and difficult, and failure to comply with these regulations could subject us to regulatory scrutiny and additional liability.
The number of our registered members is significantly higher than the number of our paying members and substantially all of our revenue is derived from our paying members.
The number of registered members in our marketplace is significantly higher than the number of paying members because some members choose to register, but not become paying members, and others become paying members, but choose not to renew their paid memberships. If we are not able to attract new registered members, convert registered members to paying members or retain our paying members for a longer period of time our business may not grow as fast as we expect, which will harm our operating and financial results and may cause our stock price to decline. Therefore, we must provide features and products that demonstrate the value of our marketplace to our members and motivate them to become paying members. If we fail to successfully motivate our members to do so, our business and operating results could be adversely affected.
Our business may be harmed if users view our marketplace as primarily limited to finding full-time caregivers for children.
Our membership growth and engagement rates could be adversely affected if consumers perceive the utility of our marketplace to be limited to finding full-time caregivers for children. Despite the breadth of care needs that can be met through our platform, including after school care, occasional babysitting, senior care, pet care, tutoring and housekeeping, 41% of job postings in 2014 were for full-time child caregivers. In addition, our convenience payments product, which may be useful to families who employ any type of caregiver part-time or full-time, child care or senior care, is still in the early stages of adoption among our membership base and we cannot be certain what the rate of adoption will be or if enough of our users will find it sufficiently useful for us to continue to support. If families and caregivers fail to utilize the breadth of the family care and other services available through our marketplace, our membership growth and engagement rates could be negatively impacted, and our business will be harmed.
We may not timely and effectively scale and adapt our existing technology and network infrastructure to ensure that our platform is accessible, and our business is subject to risks of events outside of our control.
Our members access information through our websites and mobile apps. Our reputation and ability to acquire, retain and serve our members depend upon the reliable performance of our websites and mobile apps and the underlying network infrastructure. We have previously experienced, and may experience in the future, service disruptions, outages and other performance problems due to a variety of factors, including infrastructure changes, human or software errors, computer viruses or physical or electronic break-ins, denial of service attacks, capacity constraints and fraud or security violations. In some instances, we may not be able to identify the cause or causes of these performance problems within an acceptable period of time. It may become increasingly difficult to maintain and improve the availability of our platform, especially during peak usage times and as our solutions become more complex and if our user traffic increases. If our platform is unavailable when users attempt to access it or it does not load as quickly as they expect, users may use other services and may not return to our platform as often in the future, or at all. This would negatively impact our ability to attract users and increase engagement on our website and mobile apps. We expect to continue to make significant investments to maintain and improve the availability of our platform and to enable rapid releases of new features and products. To the extent that we do not effectively address capacity constraints, upgrade our systems as needed and continually develop our infrastructure to accommodate actual and anticipated changes in our business and in our technology, our business and operating results may be harmed.
Substantially all of our communications, network and computer hardware used to operate our website at www.care.com are co-located in a facility near Chicago, Illinois. We do not own or control the operation of this facility. Our systems and operations are also vulnerable to damage or interruption from tornadoes, floods, fires, power losses, telecommunications failures or acts of war. For example, a significant natural disaster, such as a major snowstorm or flood, could have a material adverse impact on our business, operating results and financial condition, and our insurance coverage may be insufficient to compensate us for such losses that may occur. In addition, acts of terrorism could cause disruptions in our business or the economy as a whole.
We have implemented disaster recovery procedures that allow us to move our platform to a back-up data center in the event of a catastrophe. However, these procedures do not yet provide a real time back-up data center. Therefore, if our primary data center shuts down, there will be a period of time that our platform will remain unavailable while the transition to a back-up data center takes place.

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Interruptions or delays in service arising from our third-party vendors could impair the delivery of our service and harm our business.
We rely upon third-party vendors to provide certain services upon which we rely, including data center and Internet infrastructure services, credit card and payment processing services, background checking services, email management and delivery services, customer relationship management services and other services critical to our business. The operation of our product and service offerings could be impaired if the availability of these services is interrupted or limited in any way. We have contractual relationships with these parties but do not have physical control over their daily operations, which increases our vulnerability to problems with the services they provide. If any of these third-party service providers terminates their relationship with us, or does not provide an adequate level of service to our members, it would be disruptive to our business as we seek to replace the service provider or remedy the inadequate level of service.
In addition, these service providers are vulnerable to damage or interruption from tornadoes, floods, fires, power loss, telecommunications failures and similar events. They also are subject to break-ins, sabotage, acts of vandalism, the failure of physical, administrative, and technical security measures, terrorist acts, human error, financial insolvency and other unanticipated problems or events. The occurrence of any of these events could result in interruptions in our service and unauthorized access to, or alteration of, the content and data contained on our systems and the content and data that these third-party vendors store and deliver on our behalf.
We have experienced, and expect to continue to experience, interruptions and delays in service and availability for such elements. Any errors, failures, interruptions or delays experienced in connection with these third-party technologies and information services could negatively impact our relationship with our members, our brand and reputation and our ability to attract, retain and serve our members.
If we or our service providers fail to process payment transactions effectively and accurately or fail to protect against potential fraudulent activities relating to payment transactions, we may incur expenses and suffer reputational harm.
We offer Care.com HomePay, our household employer payroll and tax services through our subsidiary Breedlove. We also offer an electronic payments solution through a third-party payments processor that allows families to make electronic payments to their caregivers through our website and mobile apps. It is possible that we or our service provider may make errors in processing payments or that funds may be misappropriated due to fraud. We may also make errors in calculating and remitting taxes to the Internal Revenue Service and state tax authorities. In addition, the online tax preparation, payroll administration and online payments industries have increasingly been subject to fraudulent activities by third parties. In addition to any direct damages and potential fines we may incur as a result of payment processing errors or fraud relating to our payments products, negative publicity or a loss of confidence regarding these services could harm our business and damage our brand.
We may not be able to compete successfully against current and future competitors.
We are and will continue to be faced with many competitive challenges, any of which could adversely affect our prospects, results of operations and financial condition.
With respect to our consumer matching solutions, we compete for families, caregivers, employers and care-related businesses with traditional offline consumer resources, online job boards and other, online care marketplaces. We also compete for a share of care-related businesses’ overall recruiting and advertising budgets with traditional, offline media companies and other Internet marketing providers. Our principal competitors are Craigslist, a ‘‘free to consumer’’ website, and Sittercity, Inc., an online care specific marketplace. Our principal competitor in our employer channel is Bright Horizons. In the consumer payments market, Care.com HomePay competes with similar products offered by 4nannytaxes.com and GTM Payroll Services, and our convenience payments product competes with other payment solutions such as PayPal. In the social e-commerce platform, our principal competitor is Bluum. In addition, we may in the future be subject to competition from companies that operate other online marketplaces and that decide to expand into the online care market or other established companies that decide to expand into the consumer payments market. These potential competitors may be larger and have more resources than we do, may enjoy substantial competitive advantages, such as greater name recognition, longer operating histories and larger marketing budgets, as well as substantially greater financial, technical and other resources. As a result, these potential competitors may be able to respond more quickly and effectively than we can to new or changing opportunities or technologies.

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To compete effectively for members, we must continue to invest significant resources in marketing and in the development of our products and services to enhance their value. To compete effectively for revenue from employers and care-related businesses, we must continue to invest in marketing and in growing our membership. Failure to compete effectively against our current or future competitors could result in loss of current or potential members, which could adversely affect our margins, and prevent us from achieving or maintaining profitability. We cannot assure you that we will be able to compete effectively for members in the future against existing or new competitors, and the failure to do so could result in loss of existing or potential members, reduced membership revenue, increased marketing or selling expenses or diminished brand strength, any of which could harm our business.
We may incur liability or other expenses if members do not meet the expectations of other members they connect with through our platform, if caregivers or other users of our services engage in inappropriate, harmful or illegal conduct, or if we do not notify our members of alleged inappropriate or illegal conduct.
Even though U.S. courts have held that online services companies are not responsible for the actions of their website users in many circumstances, and our terms of use state that any screening we perform on families and caregivers is limited, there is a low tolerance for failure when seeking care for a loved one. Therefore, families and caregivers have, and may in the future, seek damages from us if a caregiver or family does not meet their expectations or causes them harm. Currently, Care.com is a party to several lawsuits brought by families relating to alleged criminal acts by caregivers they found through the Care.com site, including acts resulting in death. These types of claims also may be brought under foreign laws, which often do not provide the same protections for online services companies as in the United States. If a decision were rendered against us in a claim of this type, we may incur significant liability and/or negative publicity. Even if these claims do not result in liability to us, they may result in significant investigation or defense costs, as well as negative publicity. In addition, because there is a particularly low tolerance for failure when seeking care for a loved one, any such claims, events or publicity could have a significant adverse effect on our reputation and brand. Any of these results, particularly damages to our brand and reputation, could adversely affect our financial condition, business and operating results.
Our subsidiary Care Concierge provides back-up child and elder care to families by directly assigning caregivers, some of whom are Care Concierge employees, to families in need of temporary care. The caregivers and families involved in these transactions are not required to be members of our consumer matching solutions. To the extent that a caregiver provided through our back-up services does not meet the expectations of a family or causes harm, we may be subject to claims from that family or from the employer that subscribed to this service and offered it as an employee benefit to the family.
From time to time, we become aware of information relating to our members through complaints from other members, publicly available sources or otherwise, which results in our removal of the member from our marketplace. Because of the complex legal and regulatory environment in which our business operates, we generally do not advise other members when we decide to remove a particular member and, when we do advise members that we have removed a member, we generally do not tell them the reason for removal. As a result, a member who hires a caregiver through our platform may not be aware that the caregiver has subsequently been removed from our marketplace or the reason the caregiver was removed, and may seek to make a legal claim against us for failure to notify them of the removal or the reason for the removal. Any such claims, whether or not meritorious, or any claim by a caregiver that he or she should not have been so removed, may be a distraction to management, result in our incurring costs to defend the claim or otherwise harm our business and reputation.
Adverse economic conditions may adversely impact our business.
Our business depends on the overall demand for care. Our prospective members’ employment and income impact their demand for care. Increased unemployment or a reduction in labor force participation could reduce the number of dual-income families-a key component of our target market-and therefore the number of families seeking care. In addition, if consumer spending is reduced due to a weak economy, families may decrease spending on care services they believe to be non-essential, such as housekeeping and tutoring, or reduce or eliminate certain activities that typically require the services of our caregivers, such as date nights that require babysitters and vacations that may require pet sitters. As a result, weakened macroeconomic conditions could decrease the traffic on our platform, reduce sales of our products and services and delay adoption of new offerings.
If we require additional funds from outside sources in the future, those funds may not be available on acceptable terms, or at all.
We may require additional funds from outside sources in the future, and we may not be able to obtain those funds on acceptable terms, or at all. If we raise additional funds by issuing equity securities, our stockholders may experience dilution. Debt financing, if available, may involve covenants restricting our operations or our ability to incur additional debt. Any debt or additional equity financing that we raise may contain terms that are not favorable to us or our stockholders.

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If we do not have, or are not able to obtain, sufficient outside funds, we may have to delay development of new product offerings. If we are unable to raise adequate funds, we may have to liquidate some or all of our assets, or delay, reduce the scope of or eliminate some or all of our development programs. We also may have to reduce marketing or other resources devoted to our products or cease operations. Any of these actions could harm our operating results.
We use, store and, in some instances, share information collected from or about our members and site visitors and their devices, which may subject us to governmental and industry regulation and other legal obligations related to privacy, and our actual or perceived failure to comply with such obligations could harm our business.
We receive, store and process information from and about our members and website visitors and their devices, as well as information about Care.com HomePay and back-up care users, including name, contact information, and in some cases sensitive personal information, such as credit card numbers, tax return information, bank account numbers, social security numbers and other personal information such as criminal background information. In addition, our service enables our members to direct us to share information, including personal and background information, with other members and with third parties.
Diverse legal and industry requirements in the regions where our members and site visitors reside may apply to our collection, use, storage and sharing information about such individuals, including to the extent that our members choose to share data about themselves or family members in connection with potential employment in the home setting. The scope of these privacy and data protection obligations are changing in substantial and unpredictable ways, subject to differing interpretations, and may be inconsistent between different regions or conflict with other rules.
Some industry requirements subject us to payment card association operating rules, certification requirements and rules, including the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard, or PCI DSS, a security standard with which companies that collect, store or transmit certain data regarding credit and debit cards, credit and debit card holders, and credit and debit card transactions are required to comply. Our failure to comply fully with the PCI DSS may violate payment card association operating rules, federal and state laws and regulations, and the terms of our contracts with payment processors and merchant banks. Such failure to comply fully may also subject us to fines, penalties, damages and civil liability, and may result in the loss of our ability to accept credit and debit card payments. In addition, there is no guarantee that PCI DSS compliance will prevent illegal or improper use of our services or the theft, loss or misuse of data pertaining to credit and debit cards, credit and debit card holders and credit and debit card transactions.
We strive to comply with all applicable laws, policies, legal obligations and industry requirements relating to privacy and data protection, to the extent reasonably possible. However, it is possible that these obligations may be interpreted and applied in a manner that is inconsistent from one jurisdiction to another and may conflict with other rules or our practices. Any failure or perceived failure by us to comply with our posted privacy policies, our privacy-related obligations to users or other third parties, or any other privacy-related legal obligations, may result in governmental enforcement actions, litigation or public statements against us by consumer advocacy groups or others and could cause our members and customers to lose trust in us, which could have an adverse effect on our business. Additionally, if third parties we work with, such as customers, vendors or developers, violate applicable laws, their contractual obligations to us or our policies, such violations may also put our members’ information at risk and could in turn have an adverse effect on our business.
Complying with existing and proposed laws, regulations and industry standards applicable to the collection, use, storage and sharing of data about our members and site visitors can be costly and can delay or impede the development of new products, result in negative publicity and reputational harm, increase our operating costs, require significant management time and attention, increase our risk of non-compliance and subject us to claims or other remedies, including fines or demands that we modify or cease existing business practices.
Our business is subject to a variety of U.S. and foreign laws, some of which are unsettled and still developing and which could subject us to claims or otherwise harm our business.
We are subject to numerous U.S. federal and state, and foreign laws and regulations that affect consumer-based businesses and companies that conduct business on the Internet. The regulatory environment for many of these laws is very unsettled in the United States and internationally, especially as it applies to the products and services we offer and to the operation of our business generally.  These may involve user privacy, information security and data protection, use of consumer background information, intellectual property, electronic contracts and other communications,  consumer protection, telecommunications, product liability, taxation, securities law compliance, and online payment services.

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For example, our operations are subject to numerous laws that regulate privacy, information security and data protection, and the use of consumer background information. Certain of these laws provide for civil and criminal penalties for the unauthorized release of, or access to, this protected information or for not adopting processes or procedures for handling reported inaccuracies in this protected information. For example, in the United States we acquire information about our members from consumer credit reporting agencies and other third-party sellers of public data about unique individuals. We use this information in an effort to verify the accuracy of the information members provide about themselves and to further our business objective to maintain a trusted online community for our members. We also facilitate the sharing of third-party consumer reports and criminal background checks between members at the direction of the individual who is the subject of the report. The Fair Credit Reporting Act, or the FCRA, applies to consumer credit reporting agencies as well as data furnishers and users of consumer reports, as those terms are defined in the FCRA. The FCRA promotes the accuracy, fairness and privacy of information in the files of consumer reporting agencies that engage in the practice of assembling or evaluating information relating to consumers for certain specified purposes, including for employment. The FCRA limits the distribution and use of consumer reports and establishes consumer rights to access and dispute their own credit files, among other rights and obligations. Members who access consumer reports about job applicants via our service expressly agree to follow the FCRA requirements for employers. Violation of the FCRA can result in civil and criminal penalties. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and the State Attorneys’ General, acting alone or in cooperation with one another, actively enforce the FCRA as do private litigants. Many states have enacted laws with requirements similar to the FCRA. Some of these laws impose additional, or more stringent, requirements than the FCRA.
In addition, the payment processing and tax preparation industries are receiving heightened attention from federal and state governments. New legislation, regulation, public policy considerations, litigation by the government or private entities or new interpretations of existing laws may subject us to additional legal or regulatory oversight or obligations, restrict the types of products and services that we can offer or the prices we can charge, or otherwise cause us to change the way we operate our payment processing and tax preparation businesses or offer our payment processing and tax products and services. This in turn may increase our cost of doing business and limit our revenue opportunities. In addition, if our practices are not consistent with current or new interpretations of existing laws, we may become subject to lawsuits, penalties and other liabilities.
If we are not able to comply with existing or new laws or regulations or if we become liable under these laws or regulations, we could be directly harmed, and we may be forced to implement new measures to reduce our exposure to this liability. This may require us to expend substantial resources or to discontinue certain solutions, which would negatively affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, the increased attention focused upon liability issues as a result of lawsuits and legislative proposals could harm our reputation or otherwise impact the growth of our business. Any costs incurred as a result of this potential liability could harm our business and operating results.
As we develop and sell new products, services and features, we may be subject to additional and unexpected regulations, which could increase our costs or otherwise harm our business.
As we develop and sell new products, services and features to our members, we may become subject to additional laws and regulations, which could create unexpected liabilities for us, cause us to incur additional costs or restrict our operations. For example, we offer our convenience payments product to our members through a third party. If, in the future, we provide this product directly to our members, we would be subject to complex financial regulations. We may also become subject to financial regulations as we develop additional payment and financial solutions for our members. In addition, if we expand our offerings to include more personalized services, we may become subject to various laws and regulations relating to the protection of children, seniors and/or prospective employees.
Our failure to accurately anticipate the application of laws and regulations that governmental organizations or others may claim are applicable to new products and services we may offer, or other failure to comply, could create liability for us, result in adverse publicity or cause us to alter our business practices, which could cause our revenue to decrease, our costs to increase or our business otherwise to be harmed.
We could face liability or other expenses for information on or accessible through our online marketplace.

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A significant portion of the information available through our online marketplace, including job postings, caregiver profiles and photographs, is submitted by families, caregivers and third parties. We also allow care-related businesses and other third parties to advertise their products and services on our websites and include links to third-party websites. We could be exposed to liability with respect to this information. Members could assert that information concerning them on our website contains errors or omissions and/or seek damages from us for losses incurred if they rely upon incorrect information provided by our members, care-related businesses or others. We could also be subject to claims that the persons posting information on our websites do not have the right to post such information or are infringing the rights of third parties, such as copyrights in photographs and privacy and publicity rights. Among other things, we might be subject to claims that by directly or indirectly providing links to websites operated by third parties, we are liable for wrongful actions by the third parties operating those websites. These claims also may be brought under foreign laws that often do not provide the same protections for online services companies as in the United States. We could incur significant costs in investigating and defending against these claims even if they do not result in liability to us.
We also allow families to submit reviews of caregivers. Our terms of use prohibit members from providing inaccurate, misleading, defamatory or false information to us or to any other user of our website and that all opinions expressed must be genuinely held. However, we do not have a regular practice of verifying the accuracy of all member content. There is a risk that a review or other content posted by a member may be considered defamatory or otherwise offensive, objectionable or illegal under applicable law. Therefore, there is a risk that publication on our website of our ratings and reviews may result in a suit against us for defamation, civil rights infringement, negligence, copyright or trademark infringement, invasion of privacy, personal injury, discrimination, or other legal claims. Even if these claims do not result in liability to us, they may result in costly and time-consuming litigation and/or injury to our reputation.
If we are unable to protect our intellectual property rights, our competitive position could be harmed or we could be required to incur significant expenses to enforce our rights.
We rely on a combination of intellectual property rights, including trade secrets, copyrights and trademarks, as well as contractual restrictions, to safeguard our intellectual property. We do not have any patents or pending patent applications. Despite our efforts to protect our proprietary rights, unauthorized parties may attempt to copy our digital content, aspects of our solutions for members, our technology, software, branding and functionality, or obtain and use information that we consider proprietary. Moreover, policing our proprietary rights is difficult and may not always be effective. As we expand internationally, we may need to enforce our rights under the laws of countries that do not protect proprietary rights to as great an extent as do the laws of the United States.
Our digital content is not protected by any registered copyrights or other registered intellectual property. Rather, our digital content is protected by statutory and common law rights, user agreements that limit access to and use of our data and by technological measures. Compliance with use restrictions is difficult to monitor, and our proprietary rights in our digital content databases may be more difficult to enforce than other forms of intellectual property rights.
We hold several registered trademarks in the United States, including ‘‘Care.com’’, which is registered on the supplemental register. We also hold registered trademarks in the EU, Germany and Canada. Some of our trade names may not be eligible to receive trademark protection. Trademark protection may also not be available, or sought by us, in every country in which our service may become available. Competitors may adopt service names similar to ours, or purchase our trademarks and confusingly similar terms as keywords in Internet search engine advertising programs, thereby impeding our ability to build brand identity and possibly confusing consumers and caregivers.
We currently hold the ‘‘Care.com’’, ‘‘Betreut.de’’, ‘‘Breedlove.com’’ and “CitrusLane.com” Internet domain names and various other related domain names. Domain names generally are regulated by Internet regulatory bodies. If we lose the ability to use a domain name in the United States or any other country, we would be forced to incur significant additional expense to market our solutions, including the development of a new brand and the creation of new promotional materials, which could substantially harm our business and operating results. The regulation of domain names in the United States and in foreign countries is subject to change. Regulatory bodies could establish additional top-level domains, appoint additional domain name registrars or modify the requirements for holding domain names. As a result, we may not be able to acquire or maintain the domain names that utilize the ‘‘Care’’ name or other names we utilize in all of the countries in which we currently intend to conduct business.

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In order to protect our trade secrets and other confidential information, we rely in part on confidentiality agreements with our personnel, consultants and third parties with whom we have relationships. These agreements may not effectively prevent disclosure of trade secrets and other confidential information, and may not provide an adequate remedy in the event of misappropriation of trade secrets or any unauthorized disclosure of trade secrets and other confidential information. In addition, others may independently discover trade secrets and confidential information and, in such cases, we could not assert any trade secret rights against such parties. Costly and time-consuming litigation could be necessary to enforce and determine the scope of our trade secret rights and related confidentiality and nondisclosure provisions, and failure to obtain or maintain trade secret protection, or our competitors being able to obtain our trade secrets or to independently develop technology similar to ours or competing technologies, could adversely affect our competitive business position.
Assertions by third parties of infringement or other violation by us of their intellectual property rights could result in significant costs and substantially harm our business and operating results.
Internet, technology and social media companies are frequently subject to litigation based on allegations of infringement, misappropriation or other violations of intellectual property rights. Some own large numbers of patents, copyrights, trademarks and trade secrets, which they may use to assert claims against us. We have received in the past and may in the future receive notices asserting that we have infringed, misappropriated or otherwise violated a third party’s intellectual property rights, and as we face increasing competition, the possibility of intellectual property rights claims against us grows. We cannot assure you that we are not infringing or violating any third-party intellectual property rights.
We cannot predict whether assertions of third-party intellectual property rights or any infringement or misappropriation claims arising from such assertions will substantially harm our business and operating results. If we are forced to defend against any infringement or misappropriation claims, whether they are with or without merit, are settled out of court or are determined in our favor, we may be required to expend significant time and financial resources on the defense of such claims. Furthermore, an adverse outcome of a dispute may require us to: pay damages, potentially including treble damages and attorneys’ fees, if we are found to have willfully infringed a party’s patent or copyright rights; cease making, licensing or using solutions that are alleged to infringe or misappropriate the intellectual property of others; expend additional development resources to redesign our solutions; enter into potentially unfavorable royalty or license agreements in order to obtain the right to use necessary technologies, content or materials; and to indemnify our partners and other third parties. Royalty or licensing agreements, if required or desirable, may be unavailable on terms acceptable to us, or at all, and may require significant royalty payments and other expenditures. Any of these events could seriously harm our business, operating results and financial condition. In addition, any lawsuits regarding intellectual property rights, regardless of their success, could be expensive to resolve and would divert the time and attention of our management and technical personnel.
If we fail to maintain proper and effective internal controls, our ability to produce accurate financial statements on a timely basis could be impaired, which would adversely affect our business and our stock price.
Ensuring that we have adequate internal financial and accounting controls and procedures in place to produce accurate financial statements on a timely basis is a costly and time-consuming effort that needs to be reevaluated frequently. We have in the past discovered, and may in the future discover, areas of our internal financial and accounting controls and procedures that need improvement.
Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of our financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Our management does not expect that our internal control over financial reporting will prevent or detect all errors and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the control system’s objectives will be met. Due to the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that misstatements due to error or fraud will not occur or that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within our company will be detected.
Our revenue may be negatively affected if we are required to charge sales tax or other transaction taxes on all or a portion of our past and future sales in jurisdictions where we are currently not collecting and reporting tax.
We currently only charge and collect sales or other transaction taxes in certain of the jurisdictions where our members reside. A successful assertion by any state, local jurisdiction or country in which we do not charge and collect such taxes that we should be collecting sales or other transaction taxes on the sale of our products or services, or the imposition of new laws requiring the collection of sales or other transaction taxes on the sale of our products or services, could result in substantial tax liabilities related to past sales, create increased administrative burdens or costs, reduce demand for our products or services, decrease our ability to compete if competitors lower their fees to offset the tax but we do not or otherwise substantially harm our business and results of operations.

26


Changes in our (benefit from) provision for income taxes or adverse outcomes resulting from examination of our income tax returns could adversely affect our results.
Our (benefit from) provision for income taxes is subject to volatility and could be adversely affected by the following:
changes in the valuation of our deferred tax assets;
foreign or domestic income tax assessments and any related tax interest or penalties;
expiration of, or lapses in, the research and development tax credit laws;
tax effects of nondeductible compensation;
adjustments to the pricing of intercompany transactions and transfers of intellectual property or other assets;
changes in accounting principles; or
changes in tax laws and regulations, including changes in taxation of the services provided by our foreign subsidiaries.
Significant judgment is required to determine the recognition and measurement attributes prescribed in the accounting guidance for uncertainty in income taxes. The accounting guidance for uncertainty in income taxes applies to all income tax positions, including the potential recovery of previously paid taxes, that if settled unfavorably could adversely impact our provision for income taxes or additional paid-in capital. In addition, we are subject to the examination of our income tax returns by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service and other tax authorities. We regularly assess the likelihood of adverse outcomes resulting from these examinations to determine the adequacy of our provision for income taxes. The outcomes from these examinations might have a material and adverse effect on our operating results and financial condition.
Our ability to use our net operating loss carryforwards and certain other tax attributes may be limited.
As of December 27, 2014, we had federal net operating loss carryforwards of $98.0 million and state net operating loss carryforwards of $76.8 million. Under Sections 382 and 383 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or the Code, if a corporation undergoes an ‘‘ownership change,’’ the corporation’s ability to use its pre-change net operating loss carryforwards and other pre-change tax attributes, such as research tax credits, to offset its post-change income and taxes may be limited. In general, an ‘‘ownership change’’ generally occurs if there is a cumulative change in our ownership by ‘‘5-percent shareholders’’ that exceeds 50 percentage points over a rolling three-year period. Similar rules may apply under state tax laws. We may have experienced an ownership change in the past and may experience ownership changes in the future as a result of future transactions in our stock, some of which may be outside our control. As a result, if we earn net taxable income, our ability to use our pre-change net operating loss carryforwards, or other pre-change tax attributes, to offset U.S. federal and state taxable income and taxes may be subject to significant limitations.
Our international operations subject us to potentially adverse tax consequences.
We generally conduct our international operations through wholly owned subsidiaries and report our taxable income in various jurisdictions worldwide based upon our business operations in those jurisdictions. Our intercompany relationships are subject to transfer pricing regulations administered by taxing authorities in various jurisdictions. The relevant taxing authorities may disagree with our determinations as to the income and expenses attributable to specific jurisdictions. If such a disagreement were to occur, and our position were not sustained, we could be required to pay additional taxes, interest and penalties, which could result in one-time tax charges, higher effective tax rates, reduced cash flows and lower overall profitability of our operations.
We may not be able to successfully prevent others, including copycat websites and mobile apps, from misappropriating our content in the future.
From time to time, third parties have attempted to misappropriate our content through website scraping, search robots or other means. We have deployed several technologies designed to detect and prevent such efforts. However, we may not be able to successfully detect and prevent all such efforts in a timely manner or assure that no misuse of our content occurs.
In addition, third parties operating ‘‘copycat’’ websites have attempted to imitate our brand or the functionality of our service. When we have become aware of such efforts by other companies, we have employed technological or legal measures in an attempt to halt their operations. However, we may not be able to detect all such efforts in a timely manner, or at all, and even if we could, the technological and legal measures available to us may be insufficient to stop their operations. In some cases, particularly in the case of companies operating outside of the United States, our available remedies may not be adequate to protect us against the damage to our business caused by such websites or mobile apps. Regardless of whether we can successfully enforce our rights against the operation of these third parties, any measures that we may take could require us to expend significant financial or other resources and have a significantly adverse effect on our brand.

27


Some of our solutions contain open source software, which may pose particular risks to our proprietary software and solutions.
We use open source software in our solutions and will use open source software in the future. From time to time, we may face claims from third parties claiming ownership of, or demanding release of, the open source software and/or derivative works that we developed using such software (which could include our proprietary source code), or otherwise seeking to enforce the terms of the applicable open source license. These claims could result in litigation and could require us to purchase a costly license or cease offering the implicated solutions unless and until we can re-engineer them to avoid infringement. This re-engineering process could require significant additional research and development resources. In addition to risks related to license requirements, use of certain open source software can lead to greater risks than use of third-party commercial software, as open source licensors generally do not provide warranties or controls on the origin of software. Any of these risks could be difficult to eliminate or manage and, if not addressed, could have a negative effect on our business and operating results.
We are an ‘‘emerging growth company,’’ and the reduced disclosure requirements applicable to emerging growth companies may make our common stock less attractive to investors.
We are an ‘‘emerging growth company,’’ as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012, or the JOBS Act, and will remain an emerging growth company until the earlier of (1) the last day of the fiscal year (a) following the fifth anniversary of the completion of our initial public offering, (b) in which we have total annual gross revenue of at least $1.0 billion, or (c) in which we become a large accelerated filer and (2) the date on which we have issued more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt during the prior three-year period. For so long as we remain an emerging growth company, we are permitted and intend to rely on exemptions from certain disclosure requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies. These exemptions include not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or Section 404, not being required to comply with any requirement that may be adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board regarding mandatory audit firm rotation or a supplement to the auditor’s report providing additional information about the audit and the financial statements, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation and exemptions from the requirements of holding a nonbinding advisory vote on executive compensation and shareholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. In this Annual Report on Form 10-K, we have not included all of the executive compensation-related information that would be required if we were not an emerging growth company. We cannot predict whether investors will find our common stock less attractive if we rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our common stock less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our common stock and our stock price may be more volatile.
In addition, the JOBS Act provides that an emerging growth company can take advantage of an extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards. This allows an emerging growth company to delay the adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. We irrevocably elected not to avail ourselves of this exemption from new or revised accounting standards and, therefore, we are subject to the same new or revised accounting standards as other public companies that are not emerging growth companies. We have and will continue to incur increased costs as a result of operating as a public company, and our management has and will continue to be required to devote substantial time to new compliance initiatives and corporate governance practices.
As a public company, and particularly after we are no longer an ‘‘emerging growth company,’’ we have and will continue to incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses that we did not incur as a private company. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, the listing requirements of The New York Stock Exchange and other applicable securities rules and regulations impose various requirements on public companies, including establishment and maintenance of effective disclosure and financial controls and corporate governance practices. Our management and other personnel have devoted and will continue to need to devote a substantial amount of time to these compliance initiatives. Moreover, these rules and regulations have increased and will continue to increase our legal and financial compliance costs and make some activities more time-consuming and costly.
We are continually evaluating these rules and regulations and cannot predict or estimate the amount of additional costs we may incur or the timing of such costs. These rules and regulations are often subject to varying interpretations, in many cases due to their lack of specificity, and, as a result, their application in practice may evolve over time as new guidance is provided by regulatory and governing bodies. This could result in continuing uncertainty regarding compliance matters and higher costs necessitated by ongoing revisions to disclosure and governance practices.
Risks Related to Ownership of Our Common Stock
Our stock price may be volatile, and the value of an investment in our common stock may decline.
Shares of our common stock were sold in our initial public offering in January 2014 at a price of $17.00 per share and, from the date our common stock first traded on the New York Stock Exchange through March 20, 2015 our common stock has subsequently traded as high as $29.25 and as low as $6.50. The market price of our common stock could be subject to

28


significant fluctuations in response to various factors, some of which are beyond our control. In addition to the factors discussed in this ‘‘Risk Factors’’ section and elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, these factors include:
our operating performance and the operating performance of similar companies;
the overall performance of the equity markets;
the number of shares of our common stock publicly owned and available for trading;
threatened or actual litigation;
changes in laws or regulations relating to our solutions;
any major change in our board of directors or management;
publication of research reports about us or our industry or changes in recommendations or withdrawal of research coverage by securities analysts;
large volumes of sales of shares of our common stock by existing stockholders; and
general political and economic conditions.
In addition, the stock market in general, and the market for technology companies in particular, has experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations that have often been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of listed companies. Broad market and industry factors may seriously affect the market price of companies’ stock, including ours, regardless of actual operating performance. Securities class action litigation has often been instituted against companies following periods of volatility in the overall market and in the market price of a company’s securities. This litigation, if instituted against us, could result in very substantial costs, divert our management’s attention and resources and harm our business, operating results and financial condition.
If securities or industry analysts publish inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, cease coverage of our company or make projections that exceed our actual results, our stock price and trading volume could decline.
The trading market for our common stock is and will be influenced by the research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us or our business. If one or more of the analysts who cover us downgrades our stock or publishes inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our stock price would likely decline. If one or more of these analysts ceases coverage of our company or fails to publish reports on us regularly, demand for our stock could decrease, which might cause our stock price and trading volume to decline.
Furthermore, such analysts publish their own projections regarding our actual results. These projections may vary widely from one another and may not accurately predict the results we actually achieve. Our stock price may decline if we fail to meet securities and industry analysts’ projections.
Our management has broad discretion over our existing cash resources and might not use such funds in ways that increase the value of your investment.
Our management generally has broad discretion over the use of our cash resources, and you will be relying on the judgment of our management regarding the application of these resources. Our management might not apply these resources in ways that increase the value of your investment.
Concentration of ownership among our officers, directors, large stockholders and their affiliates may prevent new investors, from influencing corporate decisions.
Our officers, directors and their affiliated funds and certain of our pre-IPO stockholders beneficially own or control, directly or indirectly, a majority of the outstanding shares of our common stock. As a result, if some of these persons or entities act together, they will have significant influence over the outcome of matters submitted to our stockholders for approval, including the election of directors and approval of significant corporate transactions, such as a merger or other sale of our company or its assets. This concentration of ownership could limit the ability of other stockholders to influence corporate matters and may have the effect of delaying or preventing an acquisition or cause the market price of our stock to decline. Some of these persons or entities may have interests different from yours. For example, because some of these stockholders purchased their shares at prices substantially below the price at which shares are currently being sold to the public and have held their shares for a relatively longer period, they may be more interested in selling the company to an acquirer than other investors or may want us to pursue strategies that are different from the wishes of other investors.
We do not intend to pay dividends for the foreseeable future.

29


We never have declared or paid any cash dividends on our capital stock and do not intend to pay any cash dividends in the foreseeable future. We anticipate that we will retain any future earnings for use in the development of our business and for general corporate purposes. Any determination to pay dividends in the future will be at the discretion of our board of directors. Accordingly, investors must rely on sales of their shares of our common stock after price appreciation, which may never occur, as the only way to realize any future gains on their investments.
Anti-takeover provisions contained in our certificate of incorporation and by-laws, as well as provisions of Delaware law, could impair a takeover attempt.
Our certificate of incorporation, by-laws and Delaware law contain provisions that could have the effect of rendering more difficult or discouraging an acquisition deemed undesirable by our board of directors. Our corporate governance documents include provisions:
authorizing blank check preferred stock, which could be issued with voting, liquidation, dividend and other rights superior to our common stock;
limiting the liability of, and providing indemnification to, our directors and officers;
limiting the ability of our stockholders to call and bring business before special meetings and to take action by written consent in lieu of a meeting;
requiring advance notice of stockholder proposals for business to be conducted at meetings of our stockholders and for nominations of candidates for election to our board of directors;
controlling the procedures for the conduct and scheduling of board of directors and stockholder meetings;
providing our board of directors with the express power to postpone previously scheduled annual meetings and to cancel previously scheduled special meetings;
establishing a classified board of directors so that not all members of our board are elected at one time;
limiting the determination of the number of directors on our board of directors and the filling of vacancies or newly created seats on the board to our board of directors then in office; and
providing that directors may be removed by stockholders only for cause.
These provisions, alone or together, could delay hostile takeovers and changes in control of our company or changes in our management.
ITEM 1B.    UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
None.
ITEM 2.     PROPERTIES
We lease approximately 108,700 square feet of space in our headquarters in Waltham, Massachusetts under leases that expire in January 2025. We also lease approximately 20,000 square feet of space in Austin, Texas, approximately 19,000 square feet of space in Berlin, Germany and have insignificant rental spaces in various other locations in the United States and Europe. We believe our current and planned office facilities are generally suitable to meet our needs for the foreseeable future. However, we will seek additional space as needed to satisfy our growth.
ITEM 3.    LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
From time to time we are involved in legal proceedings arising in the ordinary course of our business. Although the results of litigation and claims cannot be predicted with certainty, we currently believe that there is no litigation pending that is likely to have a material adverse effect on our business. Regardless of the outcome, legal proceedings can have an adverse impact on us because of defense and settlement costs, diversion of management resources and other factors.
Information pertaining to legal proceedings can be found in Note 6, Commitments and Contingencies of our consolidated financial statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and is incorporated by reference herein.
ITEM 4.     MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
Not applicable.

30


PART II
ITEM 5.
MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
Market Information
Our common stock began trading on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “CRCM” on January 24, 2014. Prior to that time, there was no public market for our common stock.
The following table sets forth the high and low sales prices per share for our Common Stock on the New York Stock Exchange for the indicated periods.
2014
High
 
Low
First Quarter (from January 24, 2014)
$
29.25

 
$
15.02

Second Quarter
$
18.37

 
$
9.57

Third Quarter
$
13.12

 
$
8.00

Fourth Quarter
$
9.46

 
$
7.29

Holders
As of March 20, 2015, there were 79 holders of record of shares of our common stock. Because many of our shares of common stock are held by brokers and other institutions on behalf of stockholders, we are unable to estimate the total number of stockholders represented by these record holders.
Dividend Policy
There were no cash dividends paid on any of our classes of equity during the past two fiscal years. Our board of directors does not currently intend to pay regular dividends on our common stock. We anticipate that we will retain any future earnings for use in the development of our business and for general corporate purposes. Any determination to pay dividends in the future will be at the discretion of our board of directors.
Use of Proceeds from our Initial Public Offering
On January 29, 2014, we closed our initial public offering of our common stock, or IPO, in which we sold 6,152,500 shares of common stock at a price to the public of $17.00 per share. The aggregate offering price for shares sold in the offering was approximately $104.6 million. The offer and sale of all of the shares in the IPO were registered under the Securities Act pursuant to a registration statement on Form S-1 (File No. 333-192791), which was declared effective by the SEC on January 23, 2014. The offering commenced as of January 23, 2014 and did not terminate before all of the securities registered in the registration statement were sold.
Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC, Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner and Smith Incorporated and J.P. Morgan Securities LLC acted as the underwriters. We raised approximately $94.8 million in net proceeds after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions of approximately $7.3 million and other offering expenses of approximately $2.4 million. No payments were made by us to directors, officers or persons owning ten percent or more of our common stock or to their associates, or to our affiliates, other than payments in the ordinary course of business to officers for salaries. The proceeds from the IPO have been used for working capital, sales and marketing activities, acquisitions, as well as other general corporate purposes.
Performance Graph
The following performance graph and related information shall not be deemed “soliciting material” or to be “filed” with the Securities Exchange Commission nor shall any such information be incorporated by reference into any future filing under the Securities Act of 1933 or the Exchange Act of 1934, each as amended, except to the extent that we specifically incorporate it by reference into such filing.
The following graph compares the cumulative total return of our common stock during the period commencing January 24, 2014 (the date our common stock began trading on the NYSE) to December 27, 2014, with the Russell 2000 Index and the NASDAQ Internet Index. The graph depicts the results of investing $100 in our common stock, the Russell 2000 Index and the NASDAQ Internet Index at closing prices on January 24, 2014 and assumes, with respect to the Russell 2000 Index and the NASDAQ Internet Index, that all dividends were reinvested. We did not declare or pay any cash dividends on our stock. Such returns are based on historical results and are not intended to suggest future performance.

31


ITEM 6.    SELECTED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA
The following selected historical consolidated financial data below should be read in conjunction with Item 7, ‘‘Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,’’ our consolidated financial statements, the related notes appearing in Item 8 “Consolidated Financial Statements and Supporting Data” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K to fully understand factors that may affect the comparability of the information presented below. The selected consolidated financial data in this section are not intended to replace the consolidated financial statements and are qualified in their entirety by the consolidated financial statements and related notes included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
The consolidated statements of operations for the fiscal years ended and as of December 27, 2014, December 28, 2013, and December 31, 2012 and the consolidated balance sheets as of December 27, 2014 and December 28, 2013, are derived from our audited consolidated financial statements appearing in Item 8 “Consolidated Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The selected statement of operations data for fiscal year 2011, and selected balance sheet data for fiscal years 2012 and 2011, are derived from our audited consolidated financial statements not included in this report. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected in the future (in thousands, except per share data and revenue per paying family and caregiver):
 
 
Fiscal Year Ended
 
 
December 27, 2014(1)
 
December 28, 2013
 
December 31, 2012(2)
 
December 31, 2011
Revenue
$
116,713

 
$
81,487

 
$
48,493

 
$
26,006

Cost of revenue (3)
30,345

 
18,844

 
10,210

 
6,225

Operating expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Selling and marketing (3)
75,817

 
55,250

 
35,916

 
22,480

Research and development (3)
16,984

 
11,816

 
7,662

 
4,639

General and administrative (3)
30,088

 
18,841

 
13,671

 
4,621

Depreciation and amortization
4,440

 
4,387

 
1,724

 
173

Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets
36,227

 

 

 

Total operating expenses
163,556

 
90,294

 
58,973

 
31,913

Operating loss
(77,188
)
 
(27,651
)
 
(20,690
)
 
(12,132
)
Other expense, net
(3,856
)
 
(291
)
 
(47
)
 
(20
)
Loss before income taxes
(81,044
)
 
(27,942
)
 
(20,737
)
 
(12,152
)
(Benefit from) provision for income taxes
(752
)
 
354

 
(317
)
 

Net loss
(80,292
)
 
(28,296
)
 
(20,420
)
 
(12,152
)

32


 
 
Fiscal Year Ended
 
 
December 27, 2014(1)
 
December 28, 2013
 
December 31, 2012(2)
 
December 31, 2011
Accretion of preferred stock
(4
)
 
(57
)
 
(48
)
 
(41
)
Net loss attributable to common stockholders
$
(80,296
)
 
$
(28,353
)
 
$
(20,468
)
 
$
(12,193
)
Net loss per share attributable to common stockholders:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic and diluted
$
(2.77
)
 
$
(9.45
)
 
$
(7.97
)
 
$
(5.57
)
Weighted-average shares used to compute net loss per share attributable to common stockholders:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic and diluted
28,941

 
3,000

 
2,568

 
2,188

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other Financial and Operational Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adjusted EBITDA (4)
$
(24,345
)
 
$
(17,199
)
 
$
(15,511
)
 
$
(11,431
)
Total members
14,118

 
9,744

 
6,678

 
3,635

Total families
7,942

 
5,281

 
3,509

 
1,706

Total caregivers
6,176

 
4,463

 
3,169

 
1,929

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(1) The results of operations for Citrus Lane, Inc. have been included in our consolidated financial statements since the date of acquisition on July 17, 2014.
(2) The results of operations for Care.com Europe have been included in our consolidated financial statements since the date of acquisition on July 5, 2012. The results of operations for Breedlove & Associates, L.L.C., or Breedlove, have been included in our consolidated financial statements since the date of acquisition on August 3, 2012. The results of operations for Care Concierge, Inc. have been included in our consolidated financial statements since the date of acquisition on December 31, 2012.
(3) Stock-based compensation included in the statements of operations data above was as follows (in thousands):
 
Fiscal Year Ended
 
December 27,
2014
 
December 28,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
 
December 31,
2011
Cost of revenue
$
183

 
$
161

 
$
159

 
$
20

Selling and marketing
763

 
348

 
369

 
264

Research and development
624

 
356

 
213

 
70

General and administrative
4,235

 
997

 
1,211

 
174

Total stock-based compensation
$
5,805

 
$
1,862

 
$
1,952

 
$
528

(4) Adjusted EBITDA is a non-GAAP measure. We define adjusted EBITDA as net loss, plus: federal, state and franchise taxes, other expense, net, depreciation and amortization, stock-based compensation, accretion of contingent consideration, merger and acquisition related costs and other unusual or non-cash significant adjustments. Please see ‘‘Adjusted EBITDA’’ below for more information and for a reconciliation of adjusted EBITDA to net loss, the most directly comparable financial measure calculated and presented in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP.


33


 
As of
 
December 27,
2014
 
December 28,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
 
December 31,
2011
Consolidated Balance Sheet Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
71,881

 
$
29,959

 
$
44,776

 
$
35,663

Working capital
43,834

 
13,201

 
39,688

 
31,445

Total assets
173,104

 
113,829

 
129,402

 
37,444

Total deferred revenue
13,346

 
8,304

 
5,102

 
2,408

Total non-current liabilities
12,828

 
7,063

 
11,020

 
414

Redeemable convertible preferred stock

 
152,251

 
152,194

 
61,078

Total stockholders' equity (deficit)
118,050

 
(68,306
)
 
(43,442
)
 
(29,238
)
Adjusted EBITDA
To provide investors with additional information regarding our financial results, we have disclosed in the table above and within this Annual Report on Form 10-K adjusted EBITDA, a non-GAAP financial measure. The table below represents a reconciliation of adjusted EBITDA to net loss, the most directly comparable GAAP financial measure.
We have included adjusted EBITDA in this Annual Report on Form 10-K because it is a key measure used by our management and board of directors to understand and evaluate our core operating performance and trends, to prepare and approve our annual budget and to develop short- and long-term operational plans. In particular, the exclusion of certain expenses in calculating adjusted EBITDA can provide a useful measure for period-to-period comparisons of our business.
Accordingly, we believe that adjusted EBITDA provides useful information to investors and others in understanding and evaluating our operating results in the same manner as our management and board of directors.
Our use of adjusted EBITDA has limitations as an analytical tool, and you should not consider it in isolation or as a substitute for analysis of our results as reported under GAAP. Some of these limitations are:
• although depreciation and amortization are non-cash charges, the assets being depreciated and amortized may have to be replaced in the future, and adjusted EBITDA does not reflect cash capital expenditure requirements for such replacements or for new capital expenditure requirements;
• adjusted EBITDA does not reflect the impairment of certain acquired goodwill and intangible assets;
• adjusted EBITDA does not reflect changes in, or cash requirements for, our working capital needs;
• adjusted EBITDA does not consider the potentially dilutive impact of equity-based compensation;
• adjusted EBITDA does not reflect tax payments that may represent a reduction in cash available to us; and
• other companies, including companies in our industry, may calculate adjusted EBITDA differently, which reduces its usefulness as a comparative measure.
Because of these limitations, you should consider adjusted EBITDA alongside other financial performance measures, including various cash flow metrics, net loss, and our other GAAP results. The following table presents a reconciliation of adjusted EBITDA for each of the periods indicated (in thousands):

34


 
Fiscal Year Ended
 
December 27,
2014
 
December 28,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
Net loss
$
(80,292
)
 
$
(28,296
)
 
$
(20,420
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Federal, state and franchise taxes
(468
)
 
376

 
(317
)
Other expense, net
3,856

 
291

 
47

Depreciation and amortization
5,401

 
6,702

 
2,440

 
 
 
 
 
 
EBITDA
(71,503
)
 
(20,927
)
 
(18,250
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Stock-based compensation
5,805

 
1,862

 
1,952

Accretion of contingent consideration
900

 
561

 
239

Non-cash rent expense
948

 

 

Merger and acquisition related costs
3,114

 

 
548

Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets
36,227

 

 

IPO related costs
164

 
1,305

 

Adjusted EBITDA
$
(24,345
)
 
$
(17,199
)
 
$
(15,511
)
    

35



ITEM 7.
MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

You should read the following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations together with our consolidated financial statements and the related notes thereto included in Item 8 “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. In addition to historical information, this discussion contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. You should read Item 1A “Risk Factors” of this report for a discussion of important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from our expectations.
Overview
We are the world’s largest online marketplace for finding and managing family care as well as a leading subscription-based social e-commerce service selling curated products designed for families. We have more than 14.1 million members, including 7.9 million families and 6.2 million caregivers, spanning 16 countries. We help families address their particular lifecycle of care needs, which includes child care, senior care, special needs care and other non-medical family care needs such as pet care, tutoring and housekeeping. In the process, we also help caregivers find rewarding full-time and part-time employment opportunities.
Our platform provides families with robust solutions. Our consumer matching solutions allow families to search for, qualify, vet, connect with and ultimately select caregivers in a low-cost, reliable and easy way. Our platform also provides caregivers with solutions to create personal profiles, describe their unique skills and experience, and otherwise differentiate and market themselves in a highly fragmented marketplace.
In addition to our consumer matching solutions, we offer our members innovative products and services to facilitate their interaction with caregivers. We provide solutions intended to improve both the ease and reliability of the care relationship in the home. One product area we are particularly focused on is consumer payments. Through our consumer payments solutions, families can not only electronically pay a caregiver, they can also subscribe for tax preparation services through Care.com HomePay. This offering deepens our relationship with our members and could enhance the lifetime value associated with each member.
We have expanded our marketplace beyond families and caregivers. We also serve employers by providing access to our platform to over 600,000 employer-sponsored families. In addition, we serve care-related businesses—such as day care centers, nanny agencies and home care agencies—who wish to market their services to our care-seeking families and recruit our caregiver members. These businesses improve our member experience by providing additional caregiving choices for families and employment opportunities for caregivers.
In July 2014, we completed our Citrus Lane acquisition, adding social e-commerce capabilities to our platform, including the sales of curated products designed for families. Citrus Lane generates revenue through the sale of subscriptions and other products to customers in the United States. During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014, we determined that indicators of impairment existed in our Citrus Lane Reporting Unit. We performed an assessment of impairment of goodwill and long-lived assets which resulted in $36.2 million of impairment charges. For further information on these charges, refer to “Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates” in this Item 7, as well as Notes 2 and 4 to our consolidated financial statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report.
We have experienced rapid growth in revenue and members. Our members increased to 14.1 million as of December 27, 2014 from 9.7 million as of December 28, 2013, representing a 45% annual growth rate. Our revenue has increased to $116.7 million for the fiscal year ended December 27, 2014 from $81.5 million for the fiscal year ended December 28, 2013, representing a 43% annual growth rate, primarily driven by our consumer matching solutions, consumer payment solutions, and to a lesser extent to our Citrus Lane acquisition. We experienced net losses of $80.3 million and $28.4 million in 2014 and 2013, respectively.
In January 2014, we sold 6.2 million shares of our common stock at a price of $17.00 per share resulting in net proceeds of $94.8 million.

36


Key Business Metrics
In addition to traditional financial and operational metrics, we use the following business metrics to monitor and evaluate results (in thousands, except revenue per paying family and revenue per paying caregiver):
 
Fiscal Year Ended
 
December 27,
2014
 
December 28,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
Total members
14,118

 
9,744

 
6,678

Total families
7,942

 
5,281

 
3,509

Total caregivers
6,176

 
4,463

 
3,169

* Paying members - U.S. matching
208

 
163

 
125

* Paying members - payments
14

 
11

 
8

* Monthly average revenue per member - U.S. matching
$
37

 
$
36

 
$
34

* Monthly average revenue per member - payments
$
97

 
$
93

 
$
76

_________________________________
* We have changed the business metrics we use to monitor and evaluate our results. We believe that these metrics better reflect the underlying trends in our U.S. Matching and Payments business.
Total Members. We define total members as the number of paying and non-paying families, including those who have registered through employer programs, and caregivers who have registered through our websites and mobile apps since the launch of our marketplace in 2007, as well as subscribers of our Care.com HomePay and social e-commerce services. Our total members increased 45% and 46% during the fiscal years ended December 27, 2014 and December 28, 2013, respectively, compared to the corresponding period in the prior fiscal year.
Total Families. We define total families as the number of paying and non-paying families who have registered through our websites and mobile apps, including those who have registered through employer programs, since the launch of our marketplace in 2007, as well as subscribers of our Care.com HomePay and social e-commerce services. Our total families increased 50% and 51% during the fiscal years ended December 27, 2014 and December 28, 2013, respectively, compared to the corresponding period in the prior fiscal year.
Total Caregivers. We define total caregivers as the number of paying and non-paying caregivers who have registered through our websites and mobile apps since the launch of our marketplace in 2007. Our total caregivers increased 38% and 41% during the fiscal years ended December 27, 2014 and December 28, 2013, respectively, compared to the corresponding period in the prior fiscal year.
Paying Members - U.S. Matching. We define paying members - U.S. matching as the number of families located in the United States who have registered through our U.S.-based websites and mobile apps and who are paying subscribers of our U.S.-based matching services as of the end of the fiscal period. The number of paying members in our U.S. matching business increased 28% and 30% as fiscal year ends December 27, 2014 and December 28, 2013, respectively, compared to the corresponding period in the prior fiscal year.
Paying Members - Payments. We define paying members - payments as the number of families who are subscribers of our Care.com HomePay [and other payments] services as of the end of the fiscal period. The number of paying members in our payments business increased 28% and 28% as of fiscal year ends December 27, 2014 and December 28, 2013, respectively, compared to the corresponding period in the prior fiscal year.
Monthly Average Revenue per Member. U.S. Matching. We define monthly average revenue per member, or ARPM, for our U.S. matching business as total U.S. matching revenue, including revenue from subscriptions and products, divided by the average number of U.S. matching paying members in a given fiscal period, expressed on a monthly basis. Our U.S. matching ARPM increased 3% and 6% during the fiscal years ended December 27, 2014 and December 28, 2013, respectively, compared to the corresponding period in the prior fiscal year.
Monthly Average Revenue per Member - Payments. We define ARPM for our payments business as total payments revenue divided by the average number of payments paying members in a given fiscal period, expressed on a monthly basis. Our payments business increased 5% and 23% during the fiscal years ended December 27, 2014 and December 28, 2013, respectively, compared to the corresponding period in the prior fiscal year.

37


Factors and Trends of Our Business
We believe that our performance and future success depend upon a number of factors, including our ability to continue to expand our member base, convert basic members to paying members, introduce innovative new products and enhance existing offerings and our infrastructure. Each of these areas presents significant opportunities for us, but also poses significant risks and challenges that we must successfully address. See the section titled ‘‘Risk Factors’’ for a further discussion on these and other risks to our business.
Lifetime Revenue. Our revenue is impacted by a number of factors, including the pricing and mix of our monthly, quarterly and annual subscriptions, our ability to cross-sell our suite of products and services and the total length of time a member subscribes to the various solutions we offer, which we refer to as length of paid time. This includes both initial and reuse subscription periods, which we define as the duration of subscriptions by the same member, which may not necessarily occur consecutively with the member’s initial subscription. Based on historical data, we estimate that the average total length of paid time for a U.S. consumer matching member is 8.4 months, measured over a four year period. During fiscal 2014, our U.S. consumer matching ARPM was $37. Over time, as we cross-sell Care.com HomePay and other products and services, we expect an increase in the aggregate lifetime revenue of our members. During fiscal 2014, our Care.com HomePay ARPM was $97. Based on historical data, we estimate the average total length of paid time for a Care.com HomePay member is 3.5 years.
Customer Acquisition Costs. We expect to continue to make significant investments to grow our member and enterprise customer bases. Our average cost of acquisition per member and the number of new members we generate depends on a number of factors, including the effectiveness of our marketing campaigns, changes in cost of media, the mix of our media expenditures between television and search advertising, the competitive environment in our markets and publicity about our company. In addition, an increasing percentage of our paying members has come from word-of-mouth referrals, search engine optimization and reuse, reducing our overall per-member customer acquisition cost. Currently, a majority of our marketing expenditures is spent on attracting paying members for our U.S. consumer matching and consumer payments solutions, and in fiscal 2014, we spent an average of $101 per new subscription, including initial and reuse subscriptions. These expenditures included television advertising, search advertising and all other direct marketing expenses.
Impact of Seasonal Demands. We generally experience some seasonality fluctuations in our financial results due to a heightened demand for caregivers at the beginning of a school year and at the beginning of a calendar year. Accordingly, purchases of subscriptions for our consumer matching solutions generally increase in the first and third quarters compared to the second and fourth quarters. Revenue recognition associated with these subscriptions is recognized on a ratable basis over the subscription term, which could result in cash collection and revenue recognition occurring in different fiscal quarters.
Acquisitions. As part of our ongoing growth strategy, we have completed a number of acquisitions since July 2012. Our growth since this time has been significantly affected by these acquisitions. In general, we pursue acquisitions for several reasons, such as acquiring additional products which enhance the user experience of our services and complement our existing business. Our balance sheet includes goodwill of $68.7 million related to various prior acquisitions. We perform our annual goodwill impairment test annually as of the first day of our fiscal fourth quarter , or more frequently if certain events or circumstances warrant. Events or changes in circumstances that might indicate potential impairment in goodwill include the specific factors described in the Risk Factors section of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including a decline in stock price and market capitalization, slower growth rates in our industry or our own operations, and/or other materially adverse events that have implications on the profitability of our business. Management performed a goodwill and long-lived assets impairment analysis as of December 27, 2014, as described in Notes 2 and 4 to our consolidated financial statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and recorded $36.2 million of impairment charges related to goodwill and intangible assets from our acquisition of Citrus Lane. Management continues to evaluate and monitor all key factors impacting the carrying value of our recorded goodwill, as well as other long lived assets. Adverse changes in our expected operating results, market capitalization, business climate, or other negative events could result in a material non-cash impairment charge in the future.

Financial Operations Overview
Revenue
We generate revenue primarily through (a) subscription fees to our suite of products and services, which enable families to manage their diverse and evolving care needs and caregivers to describe their unique skills and experience, and otherwise differentiate and market themselves in a highly fragmented marketplace; (b) annual contracts with corporate employers - providing access to our suite of products and services as an employee benefit and through contractual obligations with businesses to recruit employees and advertise their business profiles; and (c) sales of merchandise through the sale of subscriptions and other products to customers in the United States. Substantially all of our revenue earned is recognized on a ratable basis over the period the service is provided, with the exceptions of merchandise sales and background checks, which are recognized when products or services are delivered to the end customer.

38



Consumer Matching Solutions. Our consumer matching solutions provide families access to job postings, search features, caregiver profiles and content. Access to this platform is free of charge for basic members. Paying family members pay a monthly, quarterly or annual subscription fee to connect directly with caregivers and to utilize enhanced tools such as background checks. Paying caregiver members pay a subscription fee for priority notification of jobs, messaging services and to perform limited third-party background checks on themselves. Subscription payments are received from all paying members at the time of sign-up and are recognized on a daily basis over the subscription term as the services are delivered once the revenue recognition criteria are met (see ‘‘Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates’’ for a description of the revenue recognition criteria).
Additionally, we generate revenue through contracts that provide corporate employers access to a comprehensive suite of products and services that can be offered as an employee benefit. This product offering is typically sold through the use of an annual contract with an automatic renewal clause. Revenue related to this offering is recognized on a daily basis over the subscription term.
Consumer Payments Solutions. Our consumer payments solutions provide families several options to manage their financial relationship with their caregiver through the use of household employer payroll and tax services, as well as electronic convenience payments. Revenue related to our household payment and tax services is primarily generated through quarterly subscriptions and recognized on a daily ratable basis over the period the services are provided. Revenue related to our convenience payment services is primarily generated on a per transaction basis and is typically recognized in the period earned.
Sales of Merchandise. Sales of merchandise revenue relates to the revenue we generate through the sales of curated products designed for families. The majority of sales are through the sale of subscription discovery boxes, whereby customers prepay to receive monthly shipments of a box containing children’s merchandise. The subscriptions offered to our customers are for one, three, six or twelve month terms. The contents of the boxes are changed each month and include four to five different products such as toys, books, snacks and household products. Sales of merchandise are considered to qualify for the proportional performance model, whereby revenue is recognized on a pro rata basis as the boxes are delivered over the term of the subscription. We also offer individual products on an a-la-carte basis through an “add-to-box” and e-commerce shop offerings. “Add-to-box” sales are extra items that customers can add to be shipped with their subscription box or purchased separately from the subscription sales. Shipping and handling charges are included in revenue on a gross basis. Taxes that are collected from customers and remitted to government authorities are presented on a net basis and are excluded from revenue.
Other Revenue. Other revenue includes revenue generated from international markets, as well as revenue generated through our marketing solutions offering, which is designed to provide care-related businesses an efficient and cost-effective way to target qualified families seeking care services, and through our recruiting solutions offering, which allows care-related businesses to recruit caregivers for full-time and part-time employment. Revenue related to these product offerings is typically recognized in the period earned or, in the case of revenue generated from international markets, on a daily ratable basis over the subscription term.
Cost of Revenue and Operating Expenses
Cost of Revenue. Our cost of revenue primarily consists of expenses that are directly related, or closely correlated, to revenue generation, including matching and payments member variable servicing costs such as personnel costs for customer support, transaction fees related to credit card payments and the cost of background checks run on both families and caregivers. Additionally, cost of revenue includes website hosting fees and amortization expense related to caregiver relationships, proprietary software acquired as part of acquisitions and website intangible assets. In addition, we have product fulfillment costs, largely consisting of product and costs associated with our third-party fulfillment providers. We currently expect cost of revenue to increase on an absolute basis in the near term as we continue to expand our related customer base.
Selling and Marketing. Our selling and marketing expenses primarily consist of customer acquisition marketing, including television advertising, branding, other advertising and public relations costs, as well as allocated facilities and other supporting overhead costs. In addition, sales and marketing expenses include salaries, benefits, stock-based compensation, travel expense and incentive compensation for our sales and marketing employees. We plan to continue to invest in sales and marketing to grow our current customer base, continue building brand awareness, and expand our global footprint. In the near term, we expect sales and marketing expenses to increase on an absolute basis and to be our largest expense on an absolute basis but decline as a percentage of revenue.
Research and Development. Our research and development expenses primarily consist of salaries, benefits and stock-based compensation for our engineers, product managers and developers. In addition, product development expenses include third-party resources, as well as allocated facilities and other supporting overhead costs. We believe that continued investment in features, software development tools and code modification is important to attaining our strategic objectives and, as a result, we expect product development expense to increase on an absolute basis in the near term.

39



General and Administrative. Our general and administrative expenses primarily consist of salaries, benefits and stock-based compensation for our executive, finance, legal, information technology, human resources and other administrative employees. In addition, general and administrative expenses include: third-party resources; legal and accounting services; acquisition-related costs; and facilities. We expect that our general and administrative expenses will increase on an absolute basis in the near term as we continue to expand our business to support our operations as a publicly traded company, including expenses related to audit, legal, regulatory and tax-related services associated with maintaining compliance with exchange listing and Securities and Exchange Commission requirements, director and officer insurance premiums and investor relations costs.
Depreciation and Amortization. Depreciation and amortization expenses primarily consist of depreciation of computer equipment, software and leasehold improvements and amortization of acquired intangibles. We expect that depreciation and amortization expenses will increase on an absolute basis as we continue to expand our technology infrastructure.
Other Expense, Net. Other expense, net consists primarily of the interest income earned on our cash and cash equivalents, restricted cash and investments, net of changes in the fair value of redeemable convertible preferred stock warrants, changes in the fair value of contingent consideration payable in preferred stock and foreign exchange gains and losses.
(Benefit From) Provision for Income Taxes. (Benefit from) provision for income taxes consists of federal and state income taxes in the United States and income taxes in certain foreign jurisdictions.

Results of Operations
The following table sets forth our consolidated results of operations for the periods presented. The period-to-period comparison of financial results is not necessarily indicative of future results (in thousands, except per share data):
 
Fiscal Year Ended
 
December 27,
2014
 
December 28,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenue
$
116,713

 
$
81,487

 
$
48,493

Cost of revenue
30,345

 
18,844

 
10,210

Operating expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
Selling and marketing
75,817

 
55,250

 
35,916

Research and development
16,984

 
11,816

 
7,662

General and administrative
30,088

 
18,841

 
13,671

Depreciation and amortization
4,440

 
4,387

 
1,724

Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets
36,227

 

 

Total operating expenses
163,556

 
90,294

 
58,973

Operating loss
(77,188
)
 
(27,651
)
 
(20,690
)
Other expense, net
(3,856
)
 
(291
)
 
(47
)
Loss before income taxes
(81,044
)
 
(27,942
)
 
(20,737
)
(Benefit from) provision for income taxes
(752
)
 
354

 
(317
)
Net loss
(80,292
)
 
(28,296
)
 
(20,420
)
Accretion of preferred stock
(4
)
 
(57
)
 
(48
)
Net loss attributable to common stockholders
$
(80,296
)
 
$
(28,353
)
 
$
(20,468
)
Net loss per share attributable to common stockholders:
 
 
 
 
 
Basic and diluted
$
(2.77
)
 
$
(9.45
)
 
$
(7.97
)
Weighted-average shares used to compute net loss per share attributable to common stockholders:
 
 
 
 
 
Basic and diluted
28,941

 
3,000

 
2,568

Stock-based compensation included in the results of operations data above was as follows (in thousands):

40


 
Fiscal Year Ended
 
December 27,
2014
 
December 28,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
Cost of revenue
$
183

 
$
161

 
$
159

Selling and marketing
763

 
348

 
369

Research and development
624

 
356

 
213

General and administrative
4,235

 
997

 
1,211

The following tables set forth our consolidated results of operations for the periods presented as a percentage of revenue for those periods (certain items may not foot due to rounding).
 
Fiscal Year Ended
 
December 27,
2014
 
December 28,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
Revenue
100
 %
 
100
 %
 
100
 %
Cost of revenue
26

 
23

 
21

Operating expenses:

 

 

Selling and marketing
65

 
68

 
74

Research and development
15

 
15

 
16

General and administrative
26

 
23

 
28

Depreciation and amortization
4

 
5

 
4

Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets
31

 

 

Total operating expenses
140

 
111

 
122

Operating loss
(66
)
 
(34
)
 
(43
)
Other expense, net
(3
)
 

 

Loss before income taxes
(69
)
 
(34
)
 
(43
)
(Benefit from) provision for income taxes
(1
)
 

 
(1
)
Net loss
(69
)%
 
(35
)%
 
(42
)%
Revenue
 
Fiscal Year Ended
 
2014 Compared to 2013
 
2013 Compared to 2012
 
December 27,
2014
 
December 28,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
 
$
Change
 
%
Change
 
$
Change
 
% Change
 
(in thousands, except percentages)
Revenue
$
116,713

 
$
81,487

 
$
48,493

 
$
35,226

 
43
%
 
$
32,994

 
68
%
Fiscal 2014 Compared to Fiscal 2013
The change was primarily attributed to an $18.7 million increase in our consumer matching business, principally related to a higher number of paying members, and higher average revenue per paying member driven by a longer average length of paying subscriptions and growth in non-subscription products. Additionally, the acquisition of Citrus Lane completed during the third quarter of 2014 contributed $6.0 million to the increase. Furthermore, there was an increase in consumer payment solutions and background checks revenue of $3.7 million and $2.1 million, respectively.
Fiscal 2013 Compared to Fiscal 2012
The change was primarily driven by an increase in the number of paying families, which resulted primarily from our increased investments in marketing and by an increase in revenue per paying family, which resulted from increased subscription fees, increased average length of paying subscriptions and background check revenue. Additionally, the acquisitions of Breedlove, Betreut and PIAP completed during the second half of fiscal 2012 contributed $12.4 million to this increase. Furthermore, there was an increase in caregiver related revenue of $1.7 million, primarily related to increased subscription fees and background check revenue.

41


Cost of Revenue
 
Fiscal Year Ended
 
2014 Compared to 2013
 
2013 Compared to 2012
 
December 27,
2014
 
December 28,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
 
$
Change
 
%
Change
 
$
Change
 
% Change
 
(in thousands, except percentages)
Cost of revenue
$
30,345

 
$
18,844

 
$
10,210

 
$
11,501

 
61
%
 
$
8,634

 
85
%
Percentage of revenue
26
%
 
23
%
 
21
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fiscal 2014 Compared to Fiscal 2013
The change was primarily related to an increase in product fulfillment costs of $6.2 million associated with Citrus Lane subscriptions. Additionally, we experienced higher compensation and related expenses of $1.5 million due to expanded headcount to meet the demand associated with our larger network of members and expanded product offerings. We also incurred higher costs related to increased expenditures for hosting costs, background checks and credit card processing fees of $0.9 million, $0.7 million and $0.7 million, respectively, partially offset by lower costs related to the amortization of technology intangible assets with useful lives that ended during fiscal 2013.
Fiscal 2013 Compared to Fiscal 2012
The change was primarily related to higher compensation and related expenses of $4.3 million due to expanded headcount as a result of the acquisitions completed during the second half of fiscal 2012 and, to a lesser extent, to meet the demand associated with our larger network of members and expanded product offerings. Additionally, we incurred higher costs related to the amortization of certain acquired intangible assets of $1.6 million, as well as increased expenditures for credit card processing fees and background checks of $0.5 million and $0.4 million, respectively.
Selling and Marketing

 
Fiscal Year Ended
 
2014 Compared to 2013
 
2013 Compared to 2012
 
December 27,
2014
 
December 28,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
 
$
Change
 
%
Change
 
$
Change
 
% Change
 
(in thousands, except percentages)
Selling and marketing
$
75,817

 
$
55,250

 
$
35,916

 
$
20,567

 
37
%
 
$
19,334

 
54%
Percentage of revenue
65
%
 
68
%
 
74
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fiscal 2014 Compared to Fiscal 2013
The change principally related to higher spending on customer acquisition marketing of $14.7 million, of which $7.1 million was related to increased television advertising, on our consumer matching and payments businesses. Additionally, there was an increase of $3.2 million in compensation and related expenses. Furthermore, there was a $2.3 million increase primarily related to caregiver acquisition costs and selling and marketing costs of the Citrus Lane business.
Fiscal 2013 Compared to Fiscal 2012
The change was primarily attributed to increased spending on customer acquisition marketing of $13.5 million, of which $8.0 million was related to increased spending on television advertising. Additionally, there was an increase of $3.6 million in compensation and related expenses, largely due to the Breedlove and Betreut acquisitions completed in the second half of fiscal 2012. Furthermore, there was a $0.6 million increase in overhead related expenses, largely related to rent and utilities. Overall, selling and marketing expenses as a percentage of revenue decreased. This decrease was primarily the result of both the Breedlove and Betreut acquisitions. During fiscal 2013, both companies contributed to our revenue; however, our television advertising expenditures related to these companies were low.

42


Research and Development
 
Fiscal Year Ended
 
2014 Compared to 2013
 
2013 Compared to 2012
 
December 27,
2014
 
December 28,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
 
$
Change
 
%
Change
 
$
Change
 
% Change
 
(in thousands, except percentages)
Research and development
$
16,984

 
$
11,816

 
$
7,662

 
$
5,168

 
44
%
 
$
4,154

 
54
%
Percentage of revenue
15
%
 
15
%
 
16
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fiscal 2014 Compared to Fiscal 2013
The change was primarily related to higher compensation and related expenses of $3.5 million, largely due to an increase in headcount. Additionally, there was increased spending related to third-party resources of $1.2 million. The increase in both headcount and third-party resources was the result of our focus on developing new features and products, including work on our mobile applications and our international platform, to encourage member growth and engagement.
Fiscal 2013 Compared to Fiscal 2012
The change was primarily related to higher compensation and related expenses of $2.4 million, largely due to an increase in headcount. Additionally, there was increased spending on third-party resources of $1.4 million. The increase in both headcount and third-party resources was related to the increased investment in the development of our platform, principally related to work on new platform features, including work on our mobile applications, convenience payments product and our international platform.
General and Administrative
 
Fiscal Year Ended
 
2014 Compared to 2013
 
2013 Compared to 2012
 
December 27,
2014
 
December 28,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
 
$
Change
 
%
Change
 
$
Change
 
% Change
 
(in thousands, except percentages)
General and administrative
$
30,088

 
$
18,841

 
$
13,671

 
$
11,247

 
60
%
 
$
5,170

 
38
%
Percentage of revenue
26
%
 
23
%
 
28
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fiscal 2014 Compared to Fiscal 2013
The change was primarily related to higher compensation related expenses of $4.4 million as a result of increased headcount and general and administrative costs associated with Citrus Lane. Additionally, there was increased spending on third-party resources of $2.4 million related, $1.4 million in software subscriptions as we transition to a more robust ERP system to sustain growth, as well as recruiting and legal fees of $1.2 million and $0.9 million, respectively. Furthermore, insurance increased by $0.8 million as a result of additional required coverage to meet our obligations as a public company.
Fiscal 2013 Compared to Fiscal 2012
The increase in general and administrative expense was primarily related to higher audit and related expenses of $1.3 million, and to a lesser extent increased spending on compensation related expenses of $0.9 million and third-party resources of $0.8 million. The increases were primarily attributable to increased costs associated with our overall growth and preparation to become a public company partially offset by M&A costs in 2012 which were minimal in 2013. Additionally, we experienced an increase in facilities-related costs of $0.7 million and an increase in contingent acquisition consideration of $1.1 million as a result of the three acquisitions that occurred during the second half of fiscal 2012.
Depreciation and Amortization
 
Fiscal Year Ended
 
2014 Compared to 2013
 
2013 Compared to 2012
 
December 27,
2014
 
December 28,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
 
$
Change
 
%
Change
 
$
Change
 
% Change
 
(in thousands, except percentages)
Depreciation and amortization
$
4,440

 
$
4,387

 
$
1,724

 
$
53

 
1
%
 
$
2,663

 
154
%
Percentage of revenue
4
%
 
5
%
 
4
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

43


Fiscal 2014 Compared to Fiscal 2013
Depreciation and amortization expense was relatively consistent over the applicable measurement periods. Over the next five years, we expect to incur total amortization expense associated with previous acquisitions of $7.8 million.
Fiscal 2013 Compared to Fiscal 2012
The change was primarily related to a full year of amortization of certain intangible assets acquired as part of the Breedlove, Betreut and PIAP acquisitions completed during the second half of fiscal 2012. Over the next five years, we expect to incur total amortization expense associated with the three acquisitions of $8.1 million.
Impairment of Goodwill and Intangible Assets
 
Fiscal Year Ended
 
2014 Compared to 2013
 
2013 Compared to 2012
 
December 27,
2014
 
December 28,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
 
$
Change
 
%
Change
 
$
Change
 
% Change
 
(in thousands, except percentages)
Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets
$
36,227

 
$

 
$

 
$
36,227

 
100
%
 
$

 
%
Percentage of revenue
31
%
 
%
 
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fiscal 2014 Compared to Fiscal 2013
In the fourth quarter of 2014, we recognized a goodwill impairment charge of $33.8 and a pre-tax intangible asset impairment charge of $2.4 million. For additional information on this charge, see “Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates” of this Item 7 as well as Note 2, Significant Accounting Policies, and Note 4, Goodwill and Intangible Assets of our financial statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Other Expense, net
 
Fiscal Year Ended
 
2014 Compared to 2013
 
2013 Compared to 2012
 
December 27,
2014
 
December 28,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
 
$
Change
 
%
Change
 
$
Change
 
% Change
 
(in thousands, except percentages)
Other expense, net
$
(3,856
)
 
$
(291
)
 
$
(47
)
 
$
(3,565
)
 
1,225
%
 
$
(244
)
 
519
%
Percentage of revenue
(3
)%
 
 %
 
 %
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fiscal 2014 Compared to Fiscal 2013
The change was primarily driven by the market-to-market adjustment of redeemable convertible preferred stock associated with contingent acquisition consideration and the preferred stock warrants, as well as changes in foreign currency related to transactions for international entities in denominations other than the functional currency.
Fiscal 2013 Compared to Fiscal 2012
The change was primarily driven by the mark-to-market adjustment of redeemable convertible preferred stock associated with both the Breedlove contingent liability and the outstanding preferred stock warrants.
(Benefit From) Provision for Income Taxes
 
Fiscal Year Ended
 
2014 Compared to 2013
 
2013 Compared to 2012
 
December 27,
2014
 
December 28,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
 
$
Change
 
%
Change
 
$
Change
 
% Change
 
(in thousands, except percentages)
(Benefit from) provision for income taxes
$
(752
)
 
$
354

 
$
(317
)
 
$
(1,106
)
 
(312
)%
 
$
671

 
(212)%
Percentage of revenue
(1
)%
 
%
 
(1
)%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

44


Fiscal 2014 Compared to Fiscal 2013
Our effective tax rate for the year ended December 27, 2014 was a benefit of 1% on a pre-tax loss, compared to a provision of (1)% on a pre-tax loss for the year ended December 28, 2013. The increase was a result of a non-recurring benefit from the release of a portion of the valuation allowance due to taxable temporary differences available as a source of income to realize certain pre-existing deferred tax assets as a result of the acquisition of Citrus Lane, partially offset     by the amortization of goodwill for tax purposes for which there is no corresponding book deduction. Our provision for income taxes in 2013 was primarily comprised of amortization of tax deductible goodwill, which generates a deferred tax liability that cannot be offset by net operating losses or other deferred tax assets since its reversal is considered indefinite in nature and certain state taxes for jurisdictions where taxes are based on a measure other than net pre-tax profit; and partially offset by utilization of foreign net operating losses in jurisdictions with deferred tax liabilities.
Fiscal 2013 Compared to Fiscal 2012
Our effective tax rate for the year ended December 28, 2013 was (1)% compared to an effective tax rate of 2% for the year ended December 31, 2012. The decrease was primarily driven by deferred tax liabilities related to goodwill associated with the acquisition of Breedlove. We recorded a provision for income taxes of $0.4 million for the year ended December 28, 2013 and a benefit of $0.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. Our provision for income taxes for the years ended December 28, 2013 and December 31, 2012, comprised of the following:
Amortization of tax deductible goodwill, which generates a deferred tax liability that cannot be offset by net operating losses or other deferred tax assets since its reversal is considered indefinite in nature.
Certain state taxes for jurisdictions where taxes are based on a measure other than net pre-tax profit; and partially offset by utilization of foreign net operating losses in jurisdictions with deferred tax liabilities.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
The following table summarizes our cash flow activities for the periods indicated (in thousands):
 
Fiscal Year Ended
 
December 27,
2014
 
December 28,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
Cash flow (used in) provided by:
 
 
 
 
 
Operating activities
$
(24,284
)
 
$
(12,661
)
 
$
(15,155
)
Investing activities
(29,269
)
 
(1,818
)
 
(25,860
)
Financing activities
94,585

 
(253
)
 
50,157

Effect of exchange rates on cash balances
890

 
(85
)
 
(29
)
Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
$
41,922

 
$
(14,817
)
 
$
9,113

As of December 27, 2014, we had cash and cash equivalents of $71.9 million. Cash and cash equivalents consist of cash and money market funds. Cash held internationally as of December 27, 2014 was $2.1 million. We did not have any short-term or long-term investments. Additionally, we do not have any outstanding bank loans or credit facilities in place. To date, we have been able to finance our operations through proceeds from the public and private sales of equity, including our IPO in January 2014, and to a lesser extent from the exercise of employee stock options. We believe that our existing cash and cash equivalents balance will be sufficient to meet our working capital expenditure requirements for at least the next 12 months. From time to time, we may explore additional financing sources to develop or enhance our services, to fund expansion, to respond to competitive pressures, to acquire or to invest in complementary products, businesses or technologies, or to lower our cost of capital, which could include equity, equity-linked and debt financing. We cannot assure you that any additional financing will be available to us on acceptable terms, if at all.
Operating Activities
Our primary source of cash from operations was from ongoing subscription fees to our consumer matching solutions. We believe that cash inflows from these fees will grow from our continued penetration into the market for care.
Fiscal 2014
Cash from operating activities was a use of $24.3 million during the fiscal year 2014. This amount resulted from a net loss of $80.3 million, adjusted for non-cash items of $50.2 million, and a net $5.8 million source of cash due to increases in operating liabilities, partially offset by increases in operating assets.

45


Non-cash expenses within net loss consisted primarily of $36.2 million of impairment charges, $5.8 million of stock-based compensation expense, $5.4 million for depreciation and amortization, $2.3 million increase in contingent consideration payable in preferred stock, $0.9 million in contingent consideration payable in cash and $0.6 million in the fair value of stock warrants, partially offset by $0.9 million in deferred taxes.
An increase in operating liabilities and an increase in operating assets contributed $5.8 million to net cash used in operating activities. The cash generated from this change consisted of an increase in deferred revenue of $3.4 million, an increase in accrued expenses and other current liabilities of $2.5 million, an increase in accounts payable of $1.1 million, partially offset by an increase in unbilled accounts receivable of $1.1 million, an increase in accounts receivable of $0.9 million and an increase of $0.4 million in prepaid expenses and other current assets.
Fiscal 2013
Cash from operating activities used $12.7 million during fiscal 2013. This amount resulted from a net loss of $28.3 million, adjusted for non-cash items of $10.3 million, and a net $5.3 million source of cash due to increases in operating liabilities, partially offset by decreases in operating assets.
Non-cash expenses within net loss consisted primarily of $6.7 million for depreciation and amortization expense, $1.9 million of stock-based compensation expense, $1.3 million of contingent acquisition expense and $0.3 million for deferred income taxes.
An increase in operating liabilities and a decrease in operating assets contributed $5.3 million to net cash used in operating activities. The cash generated from this change consisted of an increase in accrued expenses and other current liabilities of $2.9 million, increase in deferred revenue of $2.8 million and an increase in accounts payable of $0.7 million, partially offset by an increase in unbilled accounts receivable of $0.5 million and an increase in prepaid expenses and other assets of $0.5 million.
Fiscal 2012
Cash from operating activities used $15.2 million during fiscal 2012. This amount resulted from a net loss of $20.4 million, adjusted for non-cash items of $4.4 million, and a net $0.9 million source of cash due to increases in operating assets, partially offset by increases in operating liabilities.
Non-cash expenses within net loss consisted primarily of $2.4 million for depreciation and amortization expense and $2.0 million of stock-based compensation expense.
An increase in both operating assets and liabilities contributed $0.9 million to net cash used in operating activities. The cash generated from this change consisted of an increase in deferred revenue of $1.9 million, an increase in accounts payable of $0.7 million and an increase in accrued expenses and other current liabilities of $0.3 million, partially offset by an increase in unbilled receivables of $1.1 million, an increase in prepaid expenses and other assets of $0.6 million and an increase in accounts receivables of $0.5 million.
Investing Activities
Fiscal 2014
During fiscal 2014, we used $29.3 million of cash for investing activities, primarily related to $23.3 million used for the acquisitions of Citrus Lane and Consmr. Additionally, we had an outflow of $3.0 million related to other property and equipment purchased. Furthermore, a $2.8 million outflow related to the security deposit on our new corporate headquarters as discussed in our “Contractual Obligations” below. We are not currently a party to any material purchase contracts related to future purchases of property and equipment.
Fiscal 2013
During fiscal 2013, we used $1.8 million of cash for investing activities. The cash used consisted of $1.4 million, principally related to furniture and fixtures expenditure and $0.4 million used in the acquisition of the assets of the BigTent public groups platform.
Fiscal 2012
During fiscal 2012, we used $25.9 million of cash for investing activities. The cash used consisted primarily of $25.1 million related to the cash portion of the acquisitions of Breedlove, Betreut and PIAP, and $0.4 million related to computer hardware and software expenditures. We are not currently a party to any material purchase contracts related to future purchases of property and equipment.

46


Financing Activities
Fiscal 2014
During fiscal 2014, we generated $94.6 million of cash related to financing activities. $96.0 million was generated as net proceeds from the issuance of common stock upon the closing of our initial public offering and $0.8 million was generated from the exercise of employee stock options, partially offset by $2.2 million used for payments of contingent consideration previously established in purchase accounting.
Fiscal 2013
During fiscal 2013, we used $0.3 million of cash for financing activities. $1.1 million was used for payments of deferred offering costs, partially offset by $0.8 million cash generated from the exercise of employee stock options.
Fiscal 2012
During fiscal 2012, we generated $50.2 million of cash related to financing activities. The cash generated consisted primarily of $49.9 million from the issuance of Series E redeemable convertible preferred stock.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
We did not have any off-balance sheet arrangements, as defined in Item 303(a)(4)(ii) of Regulation S-K of the Securities and Exchange Commission, in fiscal 2014, 2013 or 2012.

Contractual Obligations
Our contractual obligations relate primarily to non-cancelable operating leases and commitments to make potential future milestone payments as part of the Breedlove, PIAP and Citrus Lane acquisitions. For additional information, see Note 3, Business Acquisitions, to our consolidated financial statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
The following table describes our contractual obligations as of December 27, 2014 (in thousands):
 
Payments Due by Period
 
Total
 
Less Than 1 Year
 
1-3 Years
 
4-5 Years
 
Thereafter
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating lease obligations
$
47.3

 
$
4.2

 
$
8.7

 
$
9.6

 
$
24.8

Contingent obligations
19.2

 
11.0

 
8.2

 

 

Inventory purchase commitments
1.1

 
1.1

 

 

 

Total contractual obligations
$
67.6

 
$
16.3

 
$
16.9

 
$
9.6

 
$
24.8

In July 2014, we entered into a lease agreement pursuant to which we agreed to lease office space to be used for our new headquarters, or the Prime Lease. The Prime Lease is initially for 36,174 square feet of office space, comprising of the entire sixth floor of the building located at 77 Fourth Avenue, Waltham, Massachusetts, or the Building. The leased premises under the Prime Lease will increase by an additional 36,395 square feet, comprising of the entire fourth floor of the Building, on March 1, 2019 and by an additional 36,174 square feet, comprising of the entire fifth floor of the Building, on April 1, 2019. The term of the Prime Lease commenced on August 4, 2014 and expires 120 months from the date base rent payments first become due, which date is the earlier of January 1, 2015 and the date we commence operations in the space. The total cash obligation for the base rent over the term of the Prime Lease will be $34.5 million.
Also in July 2014, we entered into two sublease agreements pursuant to which we agreed to lease the entire fourth and fifth floors of the Building. The term of the fourth floor sublease commenced August 4, 2014 and expires on February 15, 2019, after which the space will be leased by us pursuant to the Prime Lease. The total cash obligation for the base rent over the term of this sublease will be $4.3 million. The term of the fifth floor sublease commenced on August 4, 2014 and expires on March 30, 2019, after which the space will be leased by us pursuant to the Prime Lease. The total cash obligation for the base rent over the term of this sublease will be $4.1 million. We have the right to extend the term of the lease agreement for one ten-year period.
In addition to the base rent, we will also be required to pay our pro rata share of any building operating expenses and real estate taxes in excess of the amounts allocable to the leased space as of the applicable base years referenced in the Prime Lease and subleases.

47



In connection with the execution of the Prime Lease, we entered into an amendment to our lease agreement for our previous headquarters pursuant to which that agreement will terminate without penalty on the earlier of (i) ten days after the date we commenced operations under the Prime Lease and (ii) December 31, 2014.
We expect to incur approximately $0.4 million in future capital expenditures related to the relocation of our headquarters to this leased space.

The Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act
On April 5, 2012, the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012, or the JOBS Act, was signed into law. The JOBS Act contains provisions that, among other things, reduce certain reporting requirements for an ‘‘emerging growth company.’’ As an ‘‘emerging growth company,’’ we are electing to not take advantage of the extended transition period afforded by the JOBS Act for the implementation of new or revised accounting standards and, as a result, we will comply with new or revised accounting standards on the relevant dates on which adoption of such standards is required for non-emerging growth companies. Section 107 of the JOBS Act provides that our decision to not take advantage of the extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards is irrevocable.
Subject to certain conditions set forth in the JOBS Act, if as an ‘‘emerging growth company’’ we choose to rely on such exemptions, we may not be required to, among other things, (i) provide an auditor’s attestation report on our system of internal control over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, (ii) provide all of the compensation disclosure that may be required of non-emerging growth public companies under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, (iii) comply with any requirement that may be adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board regarding mandatory audit firm rotation or a supplement to the auditor’s report providing additional information about the audit and the financial statements (auditor discussion and analysis), or (iv) disclose certain executive compensation-related items such as the correlation between executive compensation and performance and comparisons of our chief executive officer’s compensation to median employee compensation. These exemptions will apply for a period of five years following the completion of our IPO or until we no longer meet the requirements of being an ‘‘emerging growth company,’’ whichever is earlier.
Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
Our consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP. The preparation of our consolidated financial statements requires management to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenue, expenses and related disclosures. We base our estimates on historical experience and various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions. We believe that the assumptions and estimates associated with the following critical accounting policies have the greatest potential impact on our consolidated financial statements:
• Revenue recognition;
• Business combinations;
• Software development costs;
• Goodwill;
• Amortization and impairment of intangible assets;
• Income taxes; and
• Stock-based compensation.
For further information on our significant accounting policies, see Note 2, “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies,” in the accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.
Revenue Recognition
In general, we recognize revenue when (i) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, (ii) delivery has occurred or services have been rendered to the customer, (iii) the fee is fixed or determinable, and (iv) collectability is reasonably assured. We derive our revenue primarily from on-going subscription fees. Revenue from subscription fees is recognized on a daily basis over the subscription term or on a pro-rata basis as the services are delivered. Revenue from background checks, lead generation and advertising is recognized in the period earned. For product sales, these criteria are deemed to have been met when the items are delivered to the end customer. Other service revenues are recognized as the services are performed.

48


Certain of our arrangements provide companies the opportunity to purchase Care.com services on behalf of their employees. These arrangements typically include a subscription to our consumer matching solutions for their employees. These arrangements are accounted for as multiple element arrangements. We have concluded that each element in the arrangement has stand-alone value as the individual services can be sold separately. In addition, there is no right of refund once a service has been delivered. Therefore, we have concluded each element of the arrangement is a separate unit of accounting. In accordance with authoritative guidance on revenue recognition, we allocate consideration at the inception of an arrangement to each unit of accounting based on the relative selling price method in accordance with the selling price hierarchy. The objective of the hierarchy is to determine the price at which we would transact a sale if the service were sold on a stand-alone basis, and requires the use of: (1) vendor-specific objective evidence, or VSOE, if available; (2) third-party evidence, or TPE, if VSOE is not available; and (3) best estimate of selling price, or BESP, if neither VSOE nor TPE is available. Since VSOE or TPE are not typically available, BESP is generally used to allocate the selling price to each unit of accounting. We determine BESP for units of account by considering multiple factors including, but not limited to, prices we charge for similar offerings, sales volumes, geographies and other factors contemplated in negotiating multiple element transactions.
Business Combinations
We determine and allocate the purchase price of an acquired company to the tangible and intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed based on their fair values as of the business combination date, including identifiable intangible assets, which either arise from a contractual or legal right or are separable from goodwill. We base the fair value of identifiable intangible assets acquired in a business combination on detailed valuations that use information and assumptions provided by management, which consider management’s best estimates of inputs and assumptions that a market participant would use. We allocate any excess purchase price over the fair value of the net tangible and identifiable intangible assets acquired to goodwill. The use of alternative valuation assumptions, including estimated revenue projections, growth rates, cash flows, discount rates, estimated useful lives and probabilities surrounding the achievement of revenue-based milestones, could result in different purchase price allocations and amortization expense in current and future periods. Transaction costs associated with these acquisitions are expensed as incurred through general and administrative costs.
In those circumstances where an acquisition involves a contingent consideration arrangement, we recognize a liability equal to the fair value of the contingent payments we expect to make as of the acquisition date. We re-measure this liability at each reporting period and record changes in the fair value as a component of operating expenses. Increases or decreases in the fair value of the contingent consideration liability can result from changes in discount periods and rates, as well as changes in the timing and amount of revenue estimates or in the timing or likelihood of achieving revenue-based milestones.
Results of operations and cash flows of acquired companies are included in our operating results from the date of acquisition.
Software Development Costs
Internal and external software development costs associated with the development of software for internal use are expensed to research and development during the preliminary project stage and capitalized during the application development stage. For fiscal year ended December 27, 2014, costs incurred during application development stage and capitalized totaled $0.9 million. During fiscal years ended December 28, 2013 and December 31, 2012, , we believe the substantial majority of our development efforts were either in the preliminary stage of development or were for maintenance of, and minor upgrades and enhancements to internal-use software and, accordingly, application development costs were insignificant.
Goodwill
Goodwill is recorded as the difference, if any, between the aggregate consideration paid for an acquisition and the fair value of the net tangible and intangible assets acquired. We evaluate goodwill and indefinite lived intangible assets for impairment at the reporting unit level (operating segment or one level below an operating segment) annually or more frequently if we believe indicators of impairment exist. In accordance with the guidance, we are permitted to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount. If we conclude that it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, then a two-step goodwill impairment test is performed.
In performing the test, we utilize the two-step approach prescribed under ASC 350. The first step requires a comparison of the reporting unit against its aggregate carrying value, including goodwill. If the carrying amount exceeds the reporting unit’s carrying value to its fair value. We consider a number of factors to determine the fair value of a reporting unit, including an independent valuation. The valuation is based upon expected future discounted operating cash flows of the reporting unit. We base the discount rate on the weighted average cost of capital, or WACC, of market participants. If the carrying value of a reporting unit exceeds its estimated fair value, we will perform the second step of the goodwill impairment test to measure the amount of impairment loss, if any. The second step of the goodwill impairment test compares the implied fair value of a reporting unit’s goodwill to its carrying value. The second step requires us to perform a hypothetical purchase allocation as of

49


the measurement date and estimate the fair value of net tangible and intangible assets. The fair value of intangible assets is determined as described below and is subject to significant judgment.
Since the fair value of our reporting units was determined by use of the DCF, and the key assumptions that drive the fair value in this model are the WACC, terminal values, growth rates, and the amount and timing of expected future cash flows, significant judgment is applied in determining fair value. If the current economic environment were to deteriorate, this would likely result in a higher WACC because market participants would require a higher rate of return. In the DCF as the WACC increases, the fair value decreases. The other significant factor in the DCF is our projected financial information (i.e., amount and timing of expected future cash flows and growth rates) and if these assumptions were to be adversely impacted, this could result in a reduction of the fair value of this reporting unit.
We conducted our fiscal 2014 annual impairment test as of September 28, 2014 (the first day of our fourth fiscal quarter). We utilized discounted cash flows, or DCF, and market approaches to estimate the fair value of our reporting units as of September 28, 2014 and ultimately used the fair value determined by the DCF in making our impairment test conclusions. We believe we used reasonable estimates and assumptions about future revenue, cost projections, cash flows, market multiples and discount rates as of the measurement date. Because Citrus Lane was recently acquired and was operating reasonably close to expectations, we performed only a qualitative screen for impairment of that reporting unit as is allowed under ASC 350. As a result of completing Step 1, all of the reporting units we tested had fair values exceeding their carrying values, and as such, Step 2 of the impairment test was not required for those reporting units.
During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014, primarily as a result of unexpected changes, both internal and external, we determined that indicators of impairment existed with respect to our Citrus Lane Reporting Unit. The fair value of the reporting unit was deemed to be below its carrying value and, as such, we performed Step 2 of the goodwill impairment test. Step 2 of the goodwill impairment test requires the completion of a hypothetical purchase price allocation to determine the fair value of the implied goodwill. Upon completion of the Step 2 analysis we determined that the Citrus Lane goodwill was impaired and recorded a $33.8 million impairment expense.
Amortization and Impairment of Intangible Assets
We amortize our intangible assets that have finite lives over their estimated useful lives. We use a straight-line method of amortization, unless a method that better reflects the pattern in which the economic benefits of the intangible asset are consumed or otherwise used up can be reliably determined. Amortization is recorded over the estimated useful lives ranging from one to ten years. We review our intangible assets subject to amortization to determine if any adverse conditions exist, or a change in circumstances has occurred that would indicate impairment or a change in the remaining useful life. If the carrying value of an asset exceeds its undiscounted cash flows, we will write-down the carrying value of the intangible asset, or asset group, to its fair value in the period identified. In assessing fair value, we must make assumptions regarding estimated future cash flows and discount rates. If these estimates or related assumptions change in the future, we may be required to record impairment charges. We generally calculate fair value as the present value of estimated future cash flows to be generated by the asset using a risk-adjusted discount rate. If the estimate of an intangible asset’s remaining useful life is changed, we will amortize the remaining carrying value of the intangible asset prospectively over the revised remaining useful life.
During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014, in connection with our goodwill impairment analysis related to our Citrus Lane Reporting Unit, we performed a Step 2 test of recoverability of finite lived intangibles in accordance with ASC 360. The results indicated that our undiscounted future cash flows would not recover the carrying value of the Citrus Lane proprietary software and trade name intangible assets. We then performed a Step 3 impairment analysis of finite lived intangible assets under ASC 360 and determined that the carrying value of the Citrus Lane proprietary software and trade name exceeded the fair value of those assets as of the end of the fourth quarter. As a result, we recognized an intangible asset impairment of $2.4 million.
Income Taxes
We account for income taxes in accordance with ASC 740, Income Taxes. ASC 740 is an asset and liability approach that requires recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences attributable to differences between the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities for financial reporting purposes and their respective tax basis, and for operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. ASC 740 requires a valuation allowance against net deferred tax assets if, based upon the available evidence, it is more likely than not that some or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized.
We recognize the tax benefit from an uncertain tax position only if it is more likely than not the tax position will be sustained on examination by the tax authorities, based on the technical merits of the position. The tax benefits recognized in the consolidated financial statements from such position are then measured based on the largest benefit that has a greater than 50% likelihood of being realized upon settlement.
Stock-Based Compensation

50


We account for all stock-based awards to employees and members of our board of directors, to the extent such awards were issued in connection with their services as directors, in accordance with ASC 718, Compensation-Stock Compensation. ASC 718 requires that all share-based payments, including grants of stock options, be recognized in the statement of operations as an operating expense based on their fair value. In accordance with ASC 718, we recognize the compensation cost of share-based awards on a straight-line basis over the vesting period of the award.
We use the Black-Scholes-Merton option-pricing model to determine the fair value for option awards. In valuing our option awards, we make assumptions about risk-free interest rates, dividend yields, volatility, and weighted-average expected lives, including estimated forfeiture rates. Risk-free interest rates are derived from U.S. Treasury securities as of the option award grant date. Expected dividend yield is based on our historical dividend payments, which have been zero to date. The expected volatility for our common stock is estimated by taking the average historic price volatility for a group of similarly situated publicly traded companies based on daily price observations over a period equivalent to the expected term of the stock option grants. These publicly traded companies were selected based on comparable characteristics to us and consist of several companies in the technology industry that are similar in enterprise value, stage of life cycle, risk profile, financial leverage and with historical share price information sufficient to meet the expected life of our stock-based awards. We estimate the weighted-average expected life of the option awards as the average of the option vesting schedule and the term of the award, since we do not have sufficient historical exercise data to provide a reasonable basis upon which to estimate expected term due to the limited period of time that share-based awards have been exercisable. The term of the award is estimated using the simplified method, as awards are plain vanilla option awards. Forfeiture rates are estimated using historical actual forfeiture trends as well as our judgment of future forfeitures. These rates are evaluated at least quarterly and any change in compensation expense is recognized in the period of the change. The estimation of option awards that will ultimately vest requires judgment, and to the extent actual results or updated estimates differ from our current estimates, such amounts will be recorded as a cumulative adjustment in the period the estimates are revised. Actual results, and future changes in estimates, may differ substantially from management’s current estimates.
Stock-based awards issued to non-employees, are accounted for using the fair value method in accordance with ASC 505-50, Equity-Based Payments to Non-Employees. These stock options are typically granted in exchange for consulting services to be rendered, and vest over periods of up to four years. In accordance with authoritative guidance, the fair value of non-employee stock-based awards is estimated on the date of grant, and subsequently revalued at each reporting period over their vesting period using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model.

Recently Issued and Adopted Accounting Pronouncements
In February 2015, the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or the FASB, issued Accounting Standards Update, or ASU, No. 2015-02, "Consolidation (Topic 810)-Amendments to the Consolidation Analysis," which amends the criteria for determining which entities are considered variable interest entities, or VIEs, amends the criteria for determining if a service provider possesses a variable interest in a VIE and ends the deferral granted to investment companies for application of the VIE consolidation model. ASU 2015-02 is effective for annual periods, and interim periods therein, beginning after December 15, 2015. We are currently evaluating the impact the adoption of Topic 810 will have on our financial statements.
In January 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-01, "Income Statement - Extraordinary Items." ASU 2015-01 eliminates the concept of extraordinary items. However, the presentation and disclosure requirements for items that are either unusual or in nature or infrequent in occurrence remain and will be expanded to include items that are both unusual in nature and infrequent in occurrence. ASU 2015-01 is effective for periods beginning after December 15, 2015. We are currently evaluating the impact of adopting this new accounting standard on our financial statements.
In August 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-15, "Presentation of Financial Statements - Going Concern," which requires management to evaluate, at each annual and interim reporting period, whether there are conditions or events that raise substantial doubt about the entity’s ability to continue as a going concern within one year after the date the financial statements are issued and provide related disclosures.  ASU 2014-15 is effective for annual periods ending after December 15, 2016 and interim periods thereafter.  Early application is permitted.  The adoption of ASU 2014-15 is not expected to have a material effect on our condensed consolidated financial statements or disclosures.

51



In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers,” which requires an entity to recognize the amount of revenue to which it expects to be entitled for the transfer of promised goods or services to customers. ASU 2014-09 will replace most existing revenue recognition guidance in U.S. GAAP when it becomes effective. The new standard is effective for us in our fiscal year 2018. Early application is not permitted. We are evaluating the effect that ASU 2014-09 will have on our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures. The standard permits the use of either the retrospective or cumulative effect transition method. We have not yet selected a transition method nor have we determined the effect of the standard on its ongoing financial reporting.
In April 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-08, “Reporting Discontinued Operations and Disclosures of Disposals of Components of an Entity” to reduce diversity in practice for reporting discontinued operations. Under the previous guidance, any component of an entity that was a reportable segment, an operating segment, a reporting unit, a subsidiary, or an asset group was eligible for discontinued operations presentation. The revised guidance only allows disposals of components of an entity that represent a strategic shift (e.g., disposal of a major geographical area, a major line of business, a major equity method investment, or other major parts of an entity) and that have a major effect on a reporting entity’s operations and financial results to be reported as discontinued operations. The revised guidance also requires expanded disclosure in the financial statements for discontinued operations as well as for disposals of significant components of an entity that do not qualify for discontinued operations presentation. The updated guidance is effective for periods beginning after December 15, 2014. We currently do not have operations that are reported as discontinued operations and do not expect the adoption of this guidance to have a material effect our financial position, results of operations, or cash flows.

52



ITEM 7A.    QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
We have operations both within the United States and internationally, and we are exposed to market risks in the ordinary course of our business.
Foreign Currency Exchange Risk
We have foreign currency risks related to our revenue and operating expenses denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, principally the Euro, the British pound sterling, the Canadian dollar and the Swiss franc. The volatility of exchange rates depends on many factors that we cannot forecast with reliable accuracy. We have experienced and will continue to experience fluctuations in our net loss as a result of transaction gains (losses) related to revaluing certain cash balances, trade accounts receivable balances and accounts payable balances that are denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar. In the event our foreign currency denominated cash, accounts receivable, accounts payable, sales or expenses increase, our operating results may be more greatly affected by fluctuations in the exchange rates of the currencies in which we do business. A hypothetical change of 10% in appreciation or depreciation in foreign currency exchange rates from the quoted foreign currency exchange rates at December 27, 2014 would not have a material impact on our revenue, operating results or cash flows in the coming year.
At this time we do not, but we may in the future, enter into derivatives or other financial instruments in an attempt to hedge our foreign currency exchange risk. It is difficult to predict the impact hedging activities would have on our results of operations.
Interest Risk
We did not have any long-term borrowings as of December 27, 2014 or December 28, 2013. Under our current investment policy, we invest our excess cash in money market funds. Our current investment policy seeks first to preserve principal, second to provide liquidity for our operating and capital needs and third to maximize yield without putting our principal at risk. Our investments are exposed to market risk due to the fluctuation of prevailing interest rates that may reduce the yield on our investments or their fair value. As our investment portfolio is short-term in nature, we do not believe an immediate 10% increase in interest rates would have a material effect on the fair market value of our portfolio, and therefore we do not expect our results of operations or cash flows to be materially affected to any degree by a sudden change in market interest rates.
Inflation Risk
We do not believe that inflation has had a material effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations. If our costs were to become subject to significant inflationary pressures, we may not be able to fully offset such higher costs through price increases. Our inability or failure to do so could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

53



ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

CARE.COM, INC.
INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


54


REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
The Board of Directors and Stockholders of Care.com, Inc.

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Care.com, Inc. as of December 27, 2014 and December 28, 2013, and the related consolidated statements of operations, comprehensive loss, redeemable convertible preferred stock and stockholders’ equity (deficit), and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 27, 2014. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. We were not engaged to perform an audit of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Our audits included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, and evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Care.com, Inc. at December 27, 2014 and December 28, 2013, and the consolidated results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 27, 2014, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.
/s/ Ernst & Young LLP
Boston, Massachusetts
March 27, 2015


55



CARE.COM, INC.
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(in thousands, except par value)
 
December 27,
2014
 
December 28,
2013
Assets
 
 
 
Current assets:
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
71,881

 
$
29,959

Restricted cash
85

 
246

Accounts receivable (net of allowance of $0 and $56, respectively)
2,592

 
1,609

Unbilled accounts receivable
3,541

 
2,477

Prepaid expenses and other current assets
7,961

 
1,731

Total current assets
86,060

 
36,022

Property and equipment, net
6,323

 
1,553

Intangible assets, net
8,965

 
11,418

Goodwill
68,685

 
62,686

Other non-current assets
3,071

 
2,150

Total assets
$
173,104

 
$
113,829

 
 
 
 
Liabilities, redeemable convertible preferred stock and stockholders' equity (deficit)
 
 
 
Current liabilities:
 
 
 
Accounts payable
$
5,463

 
$
2,031

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities
12,732

 
7,023

Current contingent acquisition consideration
10,685

 
5,463

Deferred revenue
13,346

 
8,304

Total current liabilities
42,226

 
22,821

Contingent acquisition consideration
7,267

 
5,166

Deferred tax liability
2,119

 
1,112

Other non-current liabilities
3,442

 
785

Total liabilities
55,054

 
29,884

 
 
 
 
Commitment and contingencies (see note 6)

 

 
 
 
 
Redeemable convertible preferred stock  $0.01 par value; 22,632; 21,299 shares issued and outstanding; aggregate liquidation value of $161,666 as of December 28, 2013

 
152,251

 
 
 
 
Stockholders' equity (deficit)

 

Preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 5,000 shares authorized; no shares issued and outstanding

 

Common stock, $0.001 par value; 300,000 shares authorized; 31,615 and 3,197 shares issued and outstanding, respectively
32

 
3

Additional paid-in capital
277,583

 
9,311

Accumulated deficit
(159,859
)
 
(79,563
)
Accumulated other comprehensive income
294

 
1,943

Total stockholders' equity (deficit)
118,050

 
(68,306
)
Total liabilities, redeemable convertible preferred stock and stockholders' equity (deficit)
$
173,104

 
$
113,829


See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements
56



CARE.COM, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(in thousands, except per share data)
 
Fiscal Year Ended
 
December 27,
2014
 
December 28,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenue
$
116,713

 
$
81,487

 
$
48,493

Cost of revenue
30,345

 
18,844

 
10,210

Operating expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
Selling and marketing
75,817

 
55,250

 
35,916

Research and development
16,984

 
11,816

 
7,662

General and administrative
30,088

 
18,841

 
13,671

Depreciation and amortization
4,440

 
4,387

 
1,724

Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets
36,227

 

 

Total operating expenses
163,556

 
90,294

 
58,973

Operating loss
(77,188
)
 
(27,651
)
 
(20,690
)
Other expense, net
(3,856
)
 
(291
)
 
(47
)
Loss before income taxes
(81,044
)
 
(27,942
)
 
(20,737
)
(Benefit from) provision for income taxes
(752
)
 
354

 
(317
)
Net loss
(80,292
)
 
(28,296
)
 
(20,420
)
Accretion of preferred stock
(4
)
 
(57
)
 
(48
)
Net loss attributable to common stockholders
$
(80,296
)
 
$
(28,353
)
 
$
(20,468
)
Net loss per share attributable to common stockholders:
 
 
 
 
 
Basic and diluted
$
(2.77
)
 
$
(9.45
)
 
$
(7.97
)
Weighted-average shares used to compute net loss per share attributable to common stockholders:
 
 
 
 
 
Basic and diluted
28,941

 
3,000

 
2,568




See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements
57



CARE.COM, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE LOSS
(in thousands)
 
Fiscal Year Ended
 
December 27,
2014
 
December 28,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net loss
$
(80,292
)
 
$
(28,296
)
 
$
(20,420
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other comprehensive (loss) income:
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency translation adjustments
(1,649
)
 
806

 
1,137

Comprehensive loss
$
(81,941
)
 
$
(27,490
)
 
$
(19,283
)





See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements
58



CARE.COM, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF REDEEMABLE CONVERTIBLE PREFERRED STOCK AND STOCKHOLDERS’ (DEFICIT) EQUITY
(In thousands, except per share data)

 
Redeemable Convertible Preferred Stock
 
Stockholders' (Deficit) Equity
 
 
Common Stock
 
Additional Paid-In Capital
 
 
 
Accumulated
Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
 
Total
Stockholders'
(Deficit) Equity
 
Number
of Shares
 
Amount
 
Number
of Shares
 
$0.001
Par Value
 
 
Accumulated
Deficit
 
 
Balance at December 31, 2011
13,962

 
$
61,078

 
2,236

 
$
2