10-K 1 kkr-2017123110xk.htm 10-K Document


UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Form 10-K
 
ý     ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934.
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017  
 
or

o     TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934.
For the Transition period from           to           . 
Commission File Number 001-34820
 
KKR & CO. L.P.
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter) 
Delaware
 
26-0426107
(State or other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification Number)
9 West 57th Street, Suite 4200
New York, New York 10019
Telephone: (212) 750-8300
(Address, zip code, and telephone number, including
area code, of registrant's principal executive office.)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common units representing limited partner interests
New York Stock Exchange
6.75% Series A Preferred Units
New York Stock Exchange
6.50% Series B Preferred Units
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ý No o
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o No ý 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 and 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter periods that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ý No o
 Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ý No o
 Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S‑K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10‑K or any amendment to this Form 10‑K.  o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer," "smaller reporting company," and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer ý
 
Accelerated filer o
 
Non-accelerated filer o
 
Smaller reporting company o
 
Emerging growth company o
 
 
 
 
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
 
 
 
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o No ý
The aggregate market value of the common units of the registrant held by non-affiliates as of June 30, 2017, was approximately $8.6 billion. As of February 21, 2018, there were 486,800,395 Common Units of the registrant outstanding.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
None
 



KKR & CO. L.P.
 
FORM 10-K
 
For the Year Ended December 31, 2017
 
INDEX 
 
 
Page No.
 
PART I
 
 
 
 
Item 1.
 
 
 
Item 1A.
 
 
 
Item 1B.
 
 
 
Item 2.
 
 
 
Item 3.
 
 
 
Item 4.
 
 
 
 
PART II
 
 
 
 
Item 5.
 
 
 
Item 6.
 
 
 
Item 7.
 
 
 
Item 7A.
 
 
 
Item 8.
 
 
 
Item 9.
 
 
 
Item 9A.
 
 
 
Item 9B.
 
 
 
 
PART III
 
 
 
 
Item 10.
 
 
 
Item 11.
 
 
 
Item 12.
 
 
Item 13.
 
 
 
Item 14.
 
 
 
 
PART IV
 
 
 
 
Item 15.
 
 
 
Item 16.
 
 
 
 

2


CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
 
This report contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act"), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act"), which reflect our current views with respect to, among other things, our operations and financial performance. You can identify these forward-looking statements by the use of words such as "outlook," "believe," "expect," "potential," "continue," "may," "should," "seek," "approximately," "predict," "intend," "will," "plan," "estimate," "anticipate," the negative version of these words, other comparable words or other statements that do not relate strictly to historical or factual matters. Without limiting the foregoing, statements regarding the declaration and payment of distributions on common or preferred units of KKR, the timing, manner and volume of repurchases of common units pursuant to a repurchase program, and the expected synergies from acquisitions, reorganizations, or strategic partnerships, may constitute forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are subject to various risks and uncertainties. Accordingly, there are or will be important factors that could cause actual outcomes or results to differ materially from those indicated in these statements or cause the benefits and anticipated synergies from transactions to not be realized. We believe these factors include those described under the section entitled "Risk Factors" in this report. These factors should be read in conjunction with the other cautionary statements that are included in this report and in our other filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC"). We do not undertake any obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise, except as required by law.

 
 
 


In this report, references to "KKR," "we," "us," "our" and "our partnership" refer to KKR & Co. L.P. and its consolidated subsidiaries, except where the context requires otherwise. Prior to KKR & Co. L.P. becoming listed on the New York Stock Exchange ("NYSE") on July 15, 2010, KKR Group Holdings L.P. ("Group Holdings") consolidated the financial results of KKR Management Holdings L.P. and KKR Fund Holdings L.P. (together, the "KKR Group Partnerships") and their consolidated subsidiaries. On August 5, 2014, KKR International Holdings L.P. became a KKR Group Partnership. Each KKR Group Partnership has an identical number of partner interests and, when held together, one Class A partner interest in each of the KKR Group Partnerships together represents one "KKR Group Partnership Unit." In connection with KKR's issuance of 6.75% Series A Preferred Units ("Series A Preferred Units") and 6.50% Series B Preferred Units ("Series B Preferred Units"), the KKR Group Partnerships issued preferred units with economic terms designed to mirror those of the Series A Preferred Units and Series B Preferred Units, respectively.

References to our "Managing Partner" are to KKR Management LLC, which acts as our general partner and unless otherwise indicated, references to equity interests in KKR's business, or to percentage interests in KKR's business, reflect the aggregate equity interests in the KKR Group Partnerships and are net of amounts that have been allocated to our principals and other employees and non-employee operating consultants in respect of the carried interest from KKR's business as part of our "carry pool" and certain minority interests. References to "principals" are to our senior employees and non-employee operating consultants who hold interests in KKR's business through KKR Holdings L.P. ("KKR Holdings") and references to our "senior principals" are to our senior employees who hold interests in our Managing Partner entitling them to vote for the election of its directors.

References to "non-employee operating consultants" include employees of KKR Capstone, who are not employees of KKR. KKR Capstone refers to a group of entities that are owned and controlled by their senior management. KKR Capstone is not a subsidiary or affiliate of KKR. KKR Capstone operates under several consulting agreements with KKR and uses the "KKR" name under license from KKR.

Prior to October 1, 2009, KKR's business was conducted through multiple entities for which there was no single holding entity, but were under common control of senior KKR principals, and in which senior principals and KKR's other principals and individuals held ownership interests (collectively, the "Predecessor Owners"). On October 1, 2009, we completed the acquisition of all of the assets and liabilities of KKR & Co. (Guernsey) L.P. (f/k/a KKR Private Equity Investors, L.P) ("KPE") and, in connection with such acquisition, completed a series of transactions pursuant to which the business of KKR was reorganized into a holding company structure. The reorganization involved a contribution of certain equity interests in KKR's business that were held by the Predecessor Owners to the KKR Group Partnerships in exchange for equity interests in the KKR Group Partnerships held through KKR Holdings. We refer to the acquisition of the assets and liabilities of KPE and to our subsequent reorganization into a holding company structure as the "KPE Transaction."

In this report, the term "GAAP" refers to accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

3



We disclose certain financial measures in this report that are calculated and presented using methodologies other than in accordance with GAAP. We believe that providing these performance measures on a supplemental basis to our GAAP results is helpful to unitholders in assessing the overall performance of KKR's businesses. These financial measures should not be considered as a substitute for similar financial measures calculated in accordance with GAAP, if available. We caution readers that these non-GAAP financial measures may differ from the calculations of other investment managers, and as a result, may not be comparable to similar measures presented by other investment managers. Reconciliations of these non-GAAP financial measures to the most directly comparable financial measures calculated and presented in accordance with GAAP, where applicable, are included within Note 14 "Segment Reporting" to our consolidated financial statements and under "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Segment Operating and Performance Measures" and "—Segment Balance Sheet."

This report uses the terms assets under management ("AUM"), fee paying assets under management ("FPAUM"), economic net income ("ENI"), fee related earnings ("FRE"), distributable earnings, capital invested, syndicated capital and book value. You should note that our calculations of these financial measures and other financial measures may differ from the calculations of other investment managers and, as a result, our financial measures may not be comparable to similar measures presented by other investment managers. These and other financial measures are defined in the section "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Segment Operating and Performance Measures" and "—Segment Balance Sheet."

References to our "funds" or our "vehicles" refer to investment funds, vehicles and accounts advised, sponsored or managed by one or more subsidiaries of KKR, including collateralized loan obligations ("CLOs") and commercial real estate mortgage-backed securities ("CMBS") vehicles, unless the context requires otherwise. They do not include investment funds, vehicles or accounts of any hedge fund manager with which we have formed a strategic partnership where we have acquired a non-controlling interest.

Unless otherwise indicated, references in this report to our fully exchanged and diluted common units outstanding, or to our common units outstanding on a fully exchanged and diluted basis, reflect (i) actual common units outstanding, (ii) common units into which KKR Group Partnership Units not held by us are exchangeable pursuant to the terms of the exchange agreement described in this report, (iii) common units issuable in respect of exchangeable equity securities issued in connection with the acquisition of Avoca Capital ("Avoca"), and (iv) common units issuable pursuant to any equity awards actually granted from the KKR & Co. L.P. 2010 Equity Incentive Plan (our "Equity Incentive Plan"). Our fully exchanged and diluted common units outstanding do not include (i) common units available for issuance pursuant to our Equity Incentive Plan for which equity awards have not yet been granted and (ii) common units that we have the option to issue in connection with our acquisition of additional interests in Marshall Wace LLP (together with its affiliates, "Marshall Wace"). 


4


PART I

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

Overview
 
We are a leading global investment firm that manages multiple alternative asset classes including private equity, energy, infrastructure, real estate and credit, with strategic manager partnerships that manage hedge funds. We aim to generate attractive investment returns for our fund investors by following a patient and disciplined investment approach, employing world-class people, and driving growth and value creation with our portfolio companies. We invest our own capital alongside the capital we manage for fund investors and provide financing solutions and investment opportunities through our capital markets business.
Our business offers a broad range of investment management services to our fund investors and provides capital markets services to our firm, our portfolio companies and third parties. Throughout our history, we have consistently been a leader in the private equity industry, having completed more than 320 private equity investments in portfolio companies with a total transaction value in excess of $560 billion as of December 31, 2017. We have grown our firm by expanding our geographical presence and building businesses in areas such as leveraged credit, alternative credit, hedge funds, capital markets, infrastructure, energy, real estate, growth equity and core investments. Our balance sheet has provided a significant source of capital in the growth and expansion of our business, and has allowed us to further align our interests with those of our fund investors. These efforts build on our core principles and industry expertise, allowing us to leverage the intellectual capital and synergies in our businesses, and to capitalize on a broader range of the opportunities we source. Additionally, we have increased our focus on meeting the needs of our existing fund investors and in developing relationships with new investors in our funds.
We conduct our business with offices throughout the world, providing us with a pre-eminent global platform for sourcing transactions, raising capital and carrying out capital markets activities. Our growth has been driven by value that we have created through our operationally focused investment approach, the expansion of our existing businesses, our entry into new lines of business, innovation in the products that we offer investors in our funds, an increased focus on providing tailored solutions to our clients and the integration of capital markets distribution activities.
As a global investment firm, we earn management, monitoring, transaction and incentive fees and carried interest for providing investment management, monitoring and other services to our funds, vehicles, CLOs, managed accounts and portfolio companies, and we generate transaction-specific income from capital markets transactions. We earn additional investment income from investing our own capital alongside that of our fund investors, from other assets on our balance sheet and from the carried interest we receive from our funds and certain of our other investment vehicles. A carried interest entitles the sponsor of a fund to a specified percentage of investment gains that are generated on third-party capital that is invested.
Our investment teams have deep industry knowledge and are supported by a substantial and diversified capital base, an integrated global investment platform, the expertise of operating consultants, senior advisors and other advisors and a worldwide network of business relationships that provide a significant source of investment opportunities, specialized knowledge during due diligence and substantial resources for creating and realizing value for stakeholders. These teams invest capital, a substantial portion of which is of a long duration and not subject to redemption. As of December 31, 2017, approximately 77% of our fee paying assets under management are not subject to redemption for at least 8 years from inception, providing us with significant flexibility to grow investments and select exit opportunities. We believe that these aspects of our business will help us continue to expand and grow our business and deliver strong investment performance in a variety of economic and financial conditions.
Our Firm
With offices around the world, we have established ourselves as a leading global investment firm. We have multilingual and multicultural investment teams with local market knowledge and significant business, investment, and operational experience in the countries in which we invest. We believe that our global capabilities have helped us to raise capital, capture a greater number of investment opportunities, and assist our portfolio companies in their increasing reliance on global markets and sourcing, while enabling us to diversify our operations.
Though our operations span multiple continents and asset classes, our investment professionals are supported by an integrated infrastructure and operate under a common set of principles and business practices that are monitored by a variety of committees. The firm operates with a single culture that rewards investment discipline, creativity, determination and patience

5


and emphasizes the sharing of information, resources, expertise and best practices across offices and asset classes. When appropriate, we staff transactions across multiple offices and businesses in order to take advantage of the industry-specific expertise of our investment professionals, and we hold regular meetings in which investment professionals throughout our offices share their knowledge and experiences. We believe that the ability to draw on the local cultural fluency of our investment professionals while maintaining a centralized and integrated global infrastructure distinguishes us from other investment firms and has been a substantial contributing factor to our ability to raise funds, invest internationally and expand our businesses.
Since our inception, one of our fundamental philosophies has been to align the interests of the firm and our principals with the interests of our fund investors, portfolio companies and other stakeholders. We achieve this by putting our own capital behind our ideas. As of December 31, 2017, we and our employees and other personnel have approximately $16.9 billion invested in or committed to our own funds and portfolio companies, including $8.4 billion funded from our balance sheet, $5.7 billion of additional commitments from our balance sheet to investment funds, $1.8 billion funded from personal investments and $1.0 billion of additional commitments from personal investments.
Our Business

Our Segments

We operate our business in four segments: (1) Private Markets, (2) Public Markets, (3) Capital Markets and (4) Principal Activities. Information about our segments below should be read together with "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" and our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this report.

Private Markets
 
Through our Private Markets segment, we manage and sponsor a group of private equity funds that invest capital for long-term appreciation, either through controlling ownership of a company or strategic minority positions. In addition to our traditional private equity funds, we sponsor investment funds that invest in growth equity and core equity investments. We also manage and sponsor investment funds that invest capital in real assets, such as infrastructure, energy and real estate. Our Private Markets segment includes separately managed accounts that invest in multiple strategies, which may include our credit strategies as well as our private equity and real assets strategies. These funds and accounts are managed by Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. L.P., an SEC-registered investment adviser. As of December 31, 2017, the segment had $97.5 billion of AUM and FPAUM of $61.7 billion, consisting of $46.0 billion in private equity (including growth equity) and $15.7 billion in real assets (including infrastructure, energy and real estate), core investments and other related strategies.


6


Private Markets
Assets Under Management (1) 
($ in billions)
 chart-ecd7ed6204b74c3e9ed.jpg
 
 
 
 
 

(1)
For the years 2006 through 2008, AUM are presented pro forma for the KPE Transaction, and therefore, exclude the net asset value of KPE and its former commitments to our investment funds. In 2015, our definition of AUM was amended to include capital commitments for which we are eligible to receive fees or carried interest upon deployment of capital and our pro rata portion of the AUM managed by strategic partnerships in which we hold a minority ownership interest. AUM for all prior periods has been adjusted to include such changes.

 

7


The table below presents information as of December 31, 2017 relating to our current private equity, growth equity and real asset funds and other investment vehicles for which we have the ability to earn carried interest. This data does not reflect acquisitions or disposals of investments, changes in investment values or distributions occurring after December 31, 2017.
 
 
Investment Period (1)
 
Amount ($ in millions)
 
Start Date
End Date
 
Commitment (2)
Uncalled
Commitments
Percentage
Committed by
General
Partner
Invested
Realized
Remaining
Cost (3)
Remaining
Fair Value
Private Markets
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Private Equity and Growth Equity
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 

 

 

Asian Fund III (4)
4/2017
4/2023
 
$
9,000.0

$
9,000.0

5.6%
$

$

$

$

Americas Fund XII (4)
1/2017
1/2023
 
13,500.0

13,295.3

6.0%
204.7


204.7

224.8

Health Care Strategic Growth Fund (4)
12/2016
12/2021
 
1,331.0

1,331.0

11.3%




Next Generation Technology Growth Fund (4)
3/2016
3/2021
 
658.9

414.4

22.5%
244.5


244.5

350.9

European Fund IV (4)
12/2014
12/2020
 
3,539.2

1,330.7

5.6%
2,276.2

63.1

2,221.5

3,148.8

Asian Fund II (4)
4/2013
4/2017
 
5,825.0

889.5

1.3%
5,936.7

1,891.3

4,666.2

7,015.0

North America Fund XI (4)
9/2012
1/2017
 
8,718.4

874.2

2.9%
9,274.4

5,144.9

6,487.1

12,586.6

China Growth Fund
11/2010
11/2016
 
1,010.0


1.0%
1,010.0

588.1

642.1

798.6

European Fund III
3/2008
3/2014
 
6,167.6

840.2

4.6%
5,327.3

8,117.8

1,411.9

2,368.9

Asian Fund
7/2007
4/2013
 
3,983.3


2.5%
3,945.9

7,868.1

630.6

782.0

2006 Fund
9/2006
9/2012
 
17,642.2

337.7

2.1%
17,304.5

27,121.9

4,676.5

6,331.5

European Fund II
11/2005
10/2008
 
5,750.8


2.1%
5,750.8

8,467.3


60.2

Millennium Fund
12/2002
12/2008
 
6,000.0


2.5%
6,000.0

13,305.4

444.9

765.9

Private Equity and Growth Equity
 
 
 
83,126.4

28,313.0

 
57,275.0

72,567.9

21,630.0

34,433.2

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Co-Investment Vehicles and Other (4)
Various
Various
 
6,072.8

1,624.3

Various
4,599.3

2,829.6

3,215.1

4,596.9

 
 
 
 




 








Total Private Equity and Growth Equity
 
 
 
89,199.2

29,937.3

 
61,874.3

75,397.5

24,845.1

39,030.1

 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 

 

 

Real Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Energy Income and Growth Fund (4)
9/2013
9/2018
 
1,974.2

584.2

12.9%
1,422.4

300.9

1,144.4

1,222.6

Natural Resources Fund
Various
Various
 
887.4

2.8

Various
884.6

113.4

794.9

150.5

Global Energy Opportunities (4)
Various
Various
 
979.2

586.3

Various
434.1

60.9

317.1

333.4

Global Infrastructure Investors (4)
9/2011
10/2014
 
1,040.2

42.4

4.8%
1,029.3

858.3

621.7

830.0

Global Infrastructure Investors II (4)
10/2014
10/2020
 
3,044.3

736.6

4.1%
2,513.1

211.4

2,301.2

2,694.1

Real Estate Partners Americas (4)
5/2013
5/2017
 
1,229.1

357.7

16.3%
999.2

835.0

543.0

587.1

Real Estate Partners Americas II (4)
5/2017
12/2020
 
1,921.2

1,921.2

7.8%




Real Estate Partners Europe (4)
9/2015
6/2020
 
720.1

528.2

9.2%
202.2

15.1

190.4

237.5

Real Estate Credit Opportunity Partners (4)
2/2017
2/2019
 
1,130.0

734.5

4.4%
395.5

5.4

395.5

400.2

Co-Investment Vehicles and Other
Various
Various
 
1,404.9

11.8

Various
1,393.1

528.5

1,389.8

1,781.6

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Real Assets
 
 
 
$
14,330.6

$
5,505.7

 
$
9,273.5

$
2,928.9

$
7,698.0

$
8,237.0

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Core Investment Vehicles
Various
Various
 
9,500.0

8,500.0

36.8%
1,000.0


1,000.0

1,000.0

Unallocated Commitments (5)
 
 
 
3,462.1

3,462.1

Various




 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
Private Markets Total
 
 
 
$
116,491.9

$
47,405.1

 
$
72,147.8

$
78,326.4

$
33,543.1

$
48,267.1

 
 
 
 
 
 
(1)
The start date represents the date on which the general partner of the applicable fund commenced investment of the fund's capital or the date of the first closing. The end date represents the earlier of (i) the date on which the general partner of the applicable fund was or will be required by the fund's governing agreement to cease making investments on behalf of the fund, unless extended by a vote of the fund investors and (ii) the date on which the last investment was made.
(2)
The commitment represents the aggregate capital commitments to the fund, including capital commitments by third-party fund investors and the general partner. Foreign currency commitments have been converted into U.S. dollars based on (i) the foreign exchange rate at the date of purchase for each investment and (ii) the exchange rate that prevailed on December 31, 2017, in the case of uncalled commitments.

(3)
The remaining cost represents the initial investment of the general partner and limited partners, with the limited partners' investment reduced for any return of capital and realized gains from which the general partner did not receive a carried interest.

(4)
The "Invested" and "Realized" columns include the amounts of any realized investments that restored the unused capital commitments of the fund investors, if any.

(5)
"Unallocated Commitments" represent unallocated commitments from our strategic investor partnerships.

8


Performance

We take a long-term approach to Private Markets investing and measure the success of our investments over a period of years rather than months. Given the duration of these investments, the firm focuses on realized multiples of invested capital and internal rates of return ("IRRs") when deploying capital in these transactions. We have more than doubled the value of capital that we have invested in our Private Markets investment funds, turning $85.5 billion of capital into $175.7 billion of value from our inception in 1976 to December 31, 2017. Over this same period, the value of capital that we have invested in our Private Markets investment funds and that has been realized and partially realized has grown from $67.4 billion to $157.2 billion.

Amount Invested and Total Value for
Private Markets Investment Funds
As of December 31, 2017

chart-ba4b5acd0988a39c89b.jpgchart-4d5211782576f369dce.jpg
From our inception in 1976 through December 31, 2017, our investment funds with at least 24 months of investment activity generated a cumulative gross IRR of 25.6%, compared to the 11.9% and 9.1% gross IRR achieved by the S&P 500 Index and MSCI World Index, respectively, over the same period, despite the cyclical and sometimes challenging environments in which we have operated. The S&P 500 Index and MSCI World Index are unmanaged indices and such returns assume reinvestment of distributions and do not reflect any fees or expenses. Our past performance, however, may not be representative of performance in any period other than the period discussed above and is not a guarantee of future results. For example, as of March 31, 2009, the date of the lowest aggregate valuation of our private equity funds during the 2008 and 2009 market downturn, the investments in certain of our private equity funds at the time were marked down to 67% of original cost. For additional information regarding impact of market conditions on the value and performance of our investments, see "Risk Factors—Risks Related to Our Business—Difficult market and economic conditions can adversely affect our business in many ways, including by reducing the value or performance of the investments that we manage or by reducing the ability of our funds to raise or deploy capital, each of which could negatively impact our net income and cash flow and adversely affect our financial prospects and condition" and "Risk Factors—Risks Related to the Assets We Manage—The historical returns attributable to our funds, including those presented in this report, should not be considered as indicative of the future results of our funds or our balance sheet investments, of our future results or the performance of our common units."
The tables below present information as of December 31, 2017 relating to the historical performance of certain of our Private Markets investment vehicles since inception, which we believe illustrates the benefits of our investment approach. The information presented under Total Investments includes all of the investments made by the specified investment vehicle, while the information presented under Realized/Partially Realized Investments includes only those investments that have been

9


disposed of or have otherwise generated disposition proceeds or current income including dividends that have been distributed by the relevant fund. This data does not reflect additional capital raised since December 31, 2017 or acquisitions or disposals of investments, changes in investment values or distributions occurring after that date. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.
 
Amount
 
Fair Value of Investments
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Private Markets Investment Funds
Commitment
Invested
 
Realized (4)
Unrealized
 
Total Value
 
Gross
IRR (5)
Net IRR (5)
 
Gross Multiple of Invested
Capital (5)
($ in millions)
 
 
Total Investments
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 
 

 

 
 

Legacy Funds (1)
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 
 

 

 
 

1976 Fund
$
31.4

$
31.4

 
$
537.2

$

 
$
537.2

 
39.5
 %
35.5
 %
 
17.1

1980 Fund
356.8

356.8

 
1,827.8


 
1,827.8

 
29.0
 %
25.8
 %
 
5.1

1982 Fund
327.6

327.6

 
1,290.7


 
1,290.7

 
48.1
 %
39.2
 %
 
3.9

1984 Fund
1,000.0

1,000.0

 
5,963.5


 
5,963.5

 
34.5
 %
28.9
 %
 
6.0

1986 Fund
671.8

671.8

 
9,080.7


 
9,080.7

 
34.4
 %
28.9
 %
 
13.5

1987 Fund
6,129.6

6,129.6

 
14,949.2


 
14,949.2

 
12.1
 %
8.9
 %
 
2.4

1993 Fund
1,945.7

1,945.7

 
4,143.3


 
4,143.3

 
23.6
 %
16.8
 %
 
2.1

1996 Fund
6,011.6

6,011.6

 
12,476.9


 
12,476.9

 
18.0
 %
13.3
 %
 
2.1

Subtotal - Legacy Funds
16,474.5

16,474.5

 
50,269.3


 
50,269.3

 
26.1
 %
19.9
 %
 
3.1

Included Funds
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 
 

 

 
 

European Fund (1999) (2)
3,085.4

3,085.4

 
8,757.7


 
8,757.7

 
26.9
 %
20.2
 %
 
2.8

Millennium Fund (2002)
6,000.0

6,000.0

 
13,305.4

765.9

 
14,071.3

 
22.0
 %
16.1
 %
 
2.3

European Fund II (2005) (2)
5,750.8

5,750.8

 
8,467.3

60.2

 
8,527.5

 
6.1
 %
4.4
 %
 
1.5

2006 Fund (2006)
17,642.2

17,304.5

 
27,121.9

6,331.5

 
33,453.4

 
11.4
 %
8.8
 %
 
1.9

Asian Fund (2007)
3,983.3

3,945.9

 
7,868.1

782.0

 
8,650.1

 
19.0
 %
13.8
 %
 
2.2

European Fund III (2008) (2)
6,167.6

5,327.3

 
8,117.8

2,368.9

 
10,486.7

 
16.8
 %
11.6
 %
 
2.0

E2 Investors (Annex Fund) (2009) (2)
195.8

195.8

 
195.7

1.6

 
197.3

 
0.2
 %
(0.5
)%
 
1.0

China Growth Fund (2010)
1,010.0

1,010.0

 
588.1

798.6

 
1,386.7

 
11.5
 %
6.0
 %
 
1.4

Natural Resources Fund (2010)
887.4

884.6

 
113.4

150.5

 
263.9

 
(29.8
)%
(32.3
)%
 
0.3

Global Infrastructure Investors (2011) (2) 
1,040.2

1,029.3

 
858.3

830.0

 
1,688.3

 
14.9
 %
12.9
 %
 
1.6

North America Fund XI (2012)
8,718.4

9,274.4

 
5,144.9

12,586.6

 
17,731.5

 
29.4
 %
23.5
 %
 
1.9

Asian Fund II (2013)
5,825.0

5,936.7

 
1,891.3

7,015.0

 
8,906.3

 
24.5
 %
17.8
 %
 
1.5

Real Estate Partners Americas (2013)
1,229.1

999.2

 
835.0

587.1

 
1,422.1

 
20.3
 %
15.0
 %
 
1.4

Energy Income and Growth Fund (2013)
1,974.2

1,422.4

 
300.9

1,222.6

 
1,523.5

 
3.4
 %
0.9
 %
 
1.1

Global Infrastructure Investors II (2014) (2)
3,044.3

2,513.1

 
211.4

2,694.1

 
2,905.5

 
17.5
 %
14.1
 %
 
1.2

European Fund IV (2015) (2)
3,539.2

2,276.2

 
63.1

3,148.8

 
3,211.9

 
32.0
 %
24.0
 %
 
1.4

Real Estate Partners Europe (2015) (2) (3)
720.1

202.2

 
15.1

237.5

 
252.6

 


 

Next Generation Technology Growth Fund (2016) (3)
658.9

244.5

 

350.9

 
350.9

 


 

Health Care Strategic Growth Fund (2016) (3)
1,331.0


 


 

 


 

Americas Fund XII (2017) (3)
13,500.0

204.7

 

224.8

 
224.8

 


 

Real Estate Credit Opportunity Partners
(2017) (3)
1,130.0

395.5


5.4

400.2

 
405.6

 


 

Asian Fund III (2017) (3)
9,000.0


 


 

 


 

Real Estate Partners Americas II (2017) (3)
1,921.2





 

 


 

Core Investment Vehicles (2017) (3)
9,500.0

1,000.0

 

1,000.0

 
1,000.0

 


 

Subtotal - Included Funds
107,854.1

69,002.5

 
83,860.8

41,556.8

 
125,417.6

 
15.8
 %
11.7
 %
 
1.8

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
All Funds
$
124,328.6

$
85,477.0

 
$
134,130.1

$
41,556.8

 
$
175,686.9

 
25.6
 %
18.8
 %
 
2.1

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 











10


 
Amount
 
Fair Value of Investments
 
 
 
 
Private Markets Investment Funds
Commitment
Invested
 
Realized (4)
Unrealized
 
Total Value
 
Gross Multiple of Invested
Capital
(5)
($ in millions)
 
Realized/Partially Realized Investments (4)
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 
 

Legacy Funds (1)
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 
 

1976 Fund
$
31.4

$
31.4

 
$
537.2

$

 
$
537.2

 
17.1

1980 Fund
356.8

356.8

 
1,827.8


 
1,827.8

 
5.1

1982 Fund
327.6

327.6

 
1,290.7


 
1,290.7

 
3.9

1984 Fund
1,000.0

1,000.0

 
5,963.5


 
5,963.5

 
6.0

1986 Fund
671.8

671.8

 
9,080.7


 
9,080.7

 
13.5

1987 Fund
6,129.6

6,129.6

 
14,949.2


 
14,949.2

 
2.4

1993 Fund
1,945.7

1,945.7

 
4,143.3


 
4,143.3

 
2.1

1996 Fund
6,011.6

6,011.6

 
12,476.9


 
12,476.9

 
2.1

Subtotal - Legacy Funds
16,474.5

16,474.5

 
50,269.3


 
50,269.3

 
3.1

Included Funds
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 
 

European Fund (1999) (2)
3,085.4

3,085.4

 
8,757.7


 
8,757.7

 
2.8

Millennium Fund (2002)
6,000.0

5,599.4

 
13,305.4

765.9

 
14,071.3

 
2.5

European Fund II (2005) (2)
5,750.8

5,245.4

 
8,467.3

60.2

 
8,527.5

 
1.6

2006 Fund (2006)
17,642.2

15,439.7

 
27,121.9

4,442.6

 
31,564.5

 
2.0

Asian Fund (2007)
3,983.3

3,418.8

 
7,868.1

563.1

 
8,431.2

 
2.5

European Fund III (2008) (2)
6,167.6

3,939.4

 
8,117.8

918.6

 
9,036.4

 
2.3

E2 Investors (Annex Fund) (2009) (2)
195.8

94.8

 
195.7


 
195.7

 
2.1

China Growth Fund (2010)
1,010.0

510.9

 
588.1

285.0

 
873.1

 
1.7

Natural Resources Fund (2010)
887.4

886.9

 
113.4

150.5

 
263.9

 
0.3

Global Infrastructure Investors (2011) (2)
1,040.2

1,025.7

 
858.3

832.8

 
1,691.1

 
1.6

North America Fund XI (2012)
8,718.4

5,760.0

 
5,144.9

8,810.2

 
13,955.1

 
2.4

Asian Fund II (2013)
5,825.0

2,738.7

 
1,891.3

3,710.1

 
5,601.4

 
2.0

Real Estate Partners Americas (2013)
1,229.1

867.2

 
835.0

471.8

 
1,306.8

 
1.5

Energy Income and Growth Fund (2013)
1,974.2

1,422.4

 
300.9

1,222.6

 
1,523.5

 
1.1

Global Infrastructure Investors II (2014) (2)
3,044.3

895.2

 
211.4

936.4

 
1,147.8

 
1.3

European Fund IV (2015) (2)
3,539.2


 


 

 

Real Estate Partners Europe (2015) (2) (3) (4)
720.1


 


 

 

Next Generation Technology Growth Fund (2016) (3) (4)
658.9


 


 

 

Health Care Strategic Growth Fund (2016) (3) (4)
1,331.0


 


 

 

Americas Fund XII (2017) (3) (4)
13,500.0


 


 

 

Real Estate Credit Opportunity Partners
(2017)
(3) (4)
1,130.0


 


 

 

Asian Fund III (2017) (3) (4)
9,000.0


 


 

 

Real Estate Partners Americas II (2017) (3) (4)
1,921.2


 


 

 

Core Investment Vehicles (2017) (3) (4)
9,500.0


 


 

 

Subtotal - Included Funds
107,854.1

50,929.9

 
83,777.2

23,169.8

 
106,947.0

 
2.1

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
All Realized/Partially Realized Investments
$
124,328.6

$
67,404.4

 
$
134,046.5

$
23,169.8

 
$
157,216.3

 
2.3


(1)
These funds were not contributed to KKR as part of the KPE Transaction.
(2)
The capital commitments of the European Fund, European Fund II, European Fund III, E2 Investors (Annex Fund), European Fund IV, Global Infrastructure Investors, Global Infrastructure Investors II and Real Estate Partners Europe include euro-denominated commitments of €196.5 million, €2,597.5 million, €2,882.8 million, €55.5 million, €1,626.1 million, €30.0 million, €243.8 million and €276.6 million, respectively. Such amounts have been converted into U.S. dollars based on (i) the foreign exchange rate at the date of purchase for each investment and (ii) the exchange rate prevailing on December 31, 2017 in the case of unfunded commitments.
(3)
The gross IRR, net IRR and gross multiple of invested capital are calculated for our investment funds that made their first investment at least 24 months prior to December 31, 2017. None of the Real Estate Partners Europe, Next Generation Technology Growth Fund, Health Care Strategic Growth Fund, Americas Fund XII, Real Estate Credit Opportunity Partners, Asian Fund III, Real Estate Partners Americas II or our Core Investment Vehicles has invested for at least 24 months as of December 31, 2017. We therefore have not calculated gross IRRs, net IRRs and gross multiples of invested capital with respect to those funds.
(4)
An investment is considered fully or partially realized when it has been disposed of or has otherwise generated disposition proceeds or current income that has been distributed by the relevant fund. In periods prior to the three months ended September 30, 2015, realized proceeds excluded current income such as dividends and interest. Realizations have not been shown for those investment funds that have either made their first investment more recently than 24 months prior to December 31, 2017 or have otherwise not had any realizations.

11


(5)
IRRs measure the aggregate annual compounded returns generated by a fund's investments over a holding period. Net IRRs are calculated after giving effect to the allocation of realized and unrealized carried interest and the payment of any applicable management fees and organizational expenses. Gross IRRs are calculated before giving effect to the allocation of carried interest and the payment of any applicable management fees and organizational expenses.
         The gross multiples of invested capital measure the aggregate value generated by a fund's investments in absolute terms. Each multiple of invested capital is calculated by adding together the total realized and unrealized values of a fund's investments and dividing by the total amount of capital invested by the fund. Such amounts do not give effect to the allocation of realized and unrealized carried interest or the payment of any applicable management fees or organizational expenses.

KKR's Private Markets funds may utilize third-party financing facilities to provide liquidity to such funds. The above net and gross IRRs are calculated from the time capital contributions are due from fund investors to the time fund investors receive a related distribution from the fund, and the use of such financing facilities generally decreases the amount of invested capital that would otherwise be used to calculate IRRs, which tends to increase IRRs when fair value grows over time and decrease IRRs when fair value decreases over time. KKR's Private Markets funds also generally provide in certain circumstances, which vary depending on the relevant fund documents, for a portion of capital returned to investors to be restored to unused commitments as recycled capital. For KKR's Private Markets funds that have a preferred return, we take into account recycled capital in the calculation of IRRs and multiples of invested capital because the calculation of the preferred return includes the effect of recycled capital. For KKR's Private Markets funds that do not have a preferred return, we do not take recycled capital into account in the calculation of IRRs and multiples of invested capital. The inclusion of recycled capital generally causes invested and realized amounts to be higher and IRRs and multiples of invested capital to be lower than had recycled capital not been included.  The inclusion of recycled capital would reduce the composite net IRR of all Included Funds by 0.1% and the composite net IRR of all Legacy Funds by 0.5%, and would reduce the composite multiple of invested capital of Included Funds by less than 0.1 and the composite multiple of invested capital of Legacy Funds by 0.4. 

For more information, see "Risk Factors—Risks Related to the Assets We Manage—The historical returns attributable to our funds, including those presented in this report, should not be considered as indicative of the future results of our funds or our balance sheet investments, of our future results or the performance of our common units."
Private Equity
We are a world leader in private equity, having raised 23 funds (including growth equity) with approximately $102.9 billion of capital commitments through December 31, 2017. We invest in industry-leading franchises and attract world-class management teams. Our investment approach leverages our capital base, sourcing advantage, global network and industry knowledge. It also leverages a sizable team of operating consultants, who work exclusively with our investment professionals and portfolio company management teams and otherwise at our direction, as well as senior advisors and other advisors, many of whom are former chief executive officers and leaders of the business community.
Our traditional private equity investment strategy typically seeks to engage primarily in management buyouts, build-ups, or other investments with a view to acquire a controlling or significant influence. Building upon our four decades of private equity investing experience, we have sourced a number of smaller growth equity investment opportunities, and we expanded our business by launching dedicated growth equity funds. Our first dedicated growth equity fund, launched in 2016, pursues growth equity investment opportunities in the technology, media and telecommunications ("TMT") sector, primarily in the United States, Canada, Europe and Israel. In 2016, we also launched our second dedicated growth equity fund to pursue growth equity investment opportunities in the health care sector, primarily in the United States. As of December 31, 2017, we have received $2.0 billion of capital commitments to our TMT and health care growth equity strategies.
In 2017, we further expanded on our private equity business by making our first core equity investment. Through our core investments strategy, we target investments that have a longer holding period and a lower risk profile, which may not be suitable for our traditional private equity funds. See "—Core Investment Strategy."
Portfolio
The following chart presents information concerning the amount of capital invested by traditional private equity funds and growth equity funds by geography through December 31, 2017. We believe that this data illustrates the benefits of our business approach and our ability to source and invest in deals in multiple geographies.

12


chart-164d95af51c62f76645.jpg
As of December 31, 2017, our traditional private equity portfolio consisted of 119 companies with approximately $167 billion of annual revenues. These companies are headquartered in 21 countries and operate in 19 general industries, which take advantage of our broad and deep industry and operating expertise. Many of these companies are leading franchises with global operations, strong management teams and attractive growth prospects, which we believe will provide benefits through a broad range of business conditions.
Investment Approach
Our approach to making private equity investments focuses on achieving multiples of invested capital and attractive risk-adjusted IRRs by selecting high-quality investments that may be made at attractive prices, applying rigorous standards of due diligence when making investment decisions, implementing strategic and operational changes that drive growth and value creation in acquired businesses, carefully monitoring investments, and making informed decisions when developing investment exit strategies.
We believe that we have achieved a leading position in the private equity industry by applying a disciplined investment approach and by building strong partnerships with highly motivated management teams who put their own capital at risk. When making private equity investments, we seek out strong business franchises, attractive growth prospects, leading market positions and the ability to generate attractive returns. In our private equity funds, we do not effect transactions that are "hostile," meaning a target company's board of directors makes an unfavorable recommendation with respect to the transaction or publicly opposes the consummation of the transaction.
Sourcing and Selecting Investments
We have access to significant opportunities for making private equity investments as a result of our sizable capital base, global platform, and relationships with leading executives from major companies, commercial and investment banks, and other investment and advisory institutions. Members of our global network contact us with new investment opportunities, including a substantial number of exclusive investment opportunities and opportunities that are made available to only a limited number of other firms. We also proactively pursue business development strategies that are designed to generate deals internally based on the depth of our industry knowledge and our reputation as a leading financial sponsor.
To enhance our ability to identify and consummate private equity investments, we have organized our investment professionals in industry-specific teams. Our industry teams work closely with our operating consultants and other advisors to identify businesses that can be grown and improved. These teams conduct their own primary research, develop a list of industry themes and trends, identify companies and assets in need of operational improvement, and seek out businesses and assets that

13


they believe will benefit from our involvement. They possess a detailed understanding of the economic drivers, opportunities for value creation and strategies that can be designed and implemented to improve companies across the industries in which we invest.
Due Diligence and the Investment Decision
When an investment team determines that an investment proposal is worth consideration, the proposal is formally presented to the applicable regional investment committee and the due diligence process commences if appropriate. The objective of the due diligence process is to identify attractive investment opportunities based on the facts and circumstances surrounding an investment and to prepare a framework that may be used from the date of an acquisition to drive operational improvement and value creation. When conducting due diligence, investment teams evaluate a number of important business, financial, tax, accounting, environmental, social, governance, legal and regulatory issues in order to determine whether an investment is suitable. While the due diligence process differs depending on the type of investment we make, generally, in connection with the private equity due diligence process, investment professionals spend significant amounts of time meeting with a company's management and operating personnel, visiting plants and facilities, and where appropriate, speaking with other stakeholders interested in and impacted by the investment in order to understand the opportunities and risks associated with the proposed investment. Our investment professionals may also use the services of outside accountants, consultants, lawyers, investment banks and industry experts as appropriate to assist them in this process. Investment committees monitor all due diligence practices, and the applicable investment committee must approve an investment before it may be made.
Building Successful and Competitive Businesses
Portfolio management committees are responsible for working with our investment professionals from the date on which a private equity investment is made until the time it is exited in order to ensure that strategic and operational objectives are accomplished and that the performance of the investment is closely monitored. When investing in a private equity portfolio company, we partner with management teams to execute on our investment thesis, and we rigorously track performance through regular monitoring of detailed operational and financial metrics as well as appropriate environmental, social and governance issues. We have developed a global network of experienced managers and operating executives who assist the private equity portfolio companies in making operational improvements and achieving growth. We augment these resources with operational guidance from operating consultants at KKR Capstone, senior advisors, other advisors and investment teams, and with "100-Day Plans" that focus the firm's efforts and drive our strategies. We seek to emphasize efficient capital management, top-line growth, R&D spending, geographical expansion, cost optimization and investment for the long-term.
Realizing Investments
We have developed substantial expertise for realizing private equity investments. From our inception through December 31, 2017, the firm has generated approximately $134.1 billion of cash proceeds from the sale of our private equity portfolio companies in initial public offerings and secondary offerings, dividends, and sales to strategic buyers. When exiting private equity investments, our objective is to structure the exit in a manner that optimizes returns for fund investors and, in the case of publicly traded companies, minimizes the impact that the exit has on the trading price of the company's securities. We believe that our ability to successfully realize investments is attributable in part to the strength and discipline of our portfolio management committees and capital markets business, as well as the firm's longstanding relationships with corporate buyers and members of the investment banking and investing communities.
Private Equity Fund Structures
The private equity funds that we sponsor and manage have finite lives and investment periods. Each fund is organized as one or more partnerships, and each partnership is controlled by a general partner. Private equity fund investors are limited partners who agree to contribute a specified amount of capital to the fund from time to time for use in qualifying investments during the investment period, which generally lasts up to six years depending on how quickly capital is deployed. The investment period for certain funds may be terminated upon supermajority vote (based on capital commitment) of the fund's limited partners or by the fund's advisory committee. The term of our private equity funds generally last for 10 to 12 years and may last up to 15 years from the date of the fund's first or last investment, subject to a limited number of extensions with the consent of the limited partners or the applicable advisory committee. Given the length of the investment periods and terms of our private equity funds and the limited conditions under which such periods can be terminated and commitments may be withdrawn, the AUM of our private equity funds provide a long-term stable capital base.
Each private equity fund's general partner is generally entitled to a carried interest that allocates to it 20% of the net profits realized by the limited partners from the fund's investments. Our newer private equity funds, the North America Fund XI, Asian Fund II, European Fund IV, Americas Fund XII and Asian Fund III have a performance hurdle which requires that we return 7%, compounded annually, to limited partners in the fund prior to receiving our 20% share of net profits realized by limited

14


partners. Such performance hurdles are subject to a catch-up allocation to the general partner after the hurdle has been reached. Our earlier private equity funds do not include a performance hurdle. The timing of receipt of carried interest in respect of investments of our private equity funds is dictated by the terms of the partnership agreements that govern such funds, and is distributed to the general partner of a private equity fund only after all of the following are met: (i) a realization event has occurred (e.g. sale of a portfolio company, dividend, etc.); (ii) the vehicle has achieved positive overall investment returns since its inception, in excess of performance hurdles where applicable; and (iii) with respect to investments with a fair value below cost, cost has been returned to fund investors in an amount sufficient to reduce remaining cost to the investments' fair value. For a fund that has a fair value above cost, overall, but has one or more investments where fair value is below cost, the shortfall between cost and fair value for such investments is referred to as a "netting hole." See "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity—Sources of Liquidity" for a discussion of netting holes. Net realized profit or loss is not netted between or among funds except for the Annex Fund. In addition, the agreements governing our private equity funds generally include a "clawback" provision that, if triggered, may give rise to a contingent obligation that may require the general partner to return or contribute amounts to the fund for distribution to fund investors at the end of the life of the fund. See "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Critical Accounting Policies—Clawback Provision" and "Risk Factors—The 'clawback' provision in our governing agreements may give rise to a contingent obligation that may require us to return or contribute amounts to our funds and fund investors."
We enter into management agreements with our private equity funds pursuant to which we receive management fees in exchange for providing the funds with management and other services. Gross management fees for our private equity funds generally range from 1% to 2% of committed capital during the fund's investment period and are generally 0.75% to 1.25% of invested capital after the expiration of the fund's investment period with subsequent reductions over time, which causes the fees to be reduced as investments are liquidated. In addition, in connection with the expiration of the investment period, a private equity fund may establish a reserve on its fund investors' capital commitments on which no fee is paid unless such capital is invested. These management fees are paid by private equity fund investors, who generally contribute capital to the fund in order to allow the fund to pay the fees to us. Our private equity funds generally require that management fees be returned to fund investors before a carried interest may be paid.
We also enter into monitoring agreements with our portfolio companies pursuant to which we receive periodic monitoring fees in exchange for providing them with management, consulting and other services, and we typically receive transaction fees for providing portfolio companies with financial, advisory and other services in connection with specific transactions. Monitoring agreements may provide for a termination payment following an initial public offering or change of control, if certain criteria are satisfied. In some cases, we may be entitled to other fees that are paid by an investment target upon closing a transaction or when a potential investment is not consummated. Our newer private equity fund agreements typically require us to share 100% of any monitoring, transaction and other fees that are allocable to a fund (after reduction for expenses incurred allocable to a fund from unconsummated transactions) with fund investors.
In addition, the agreements governing our private equity funds enable investors in those funds to reduce their capital commitments available for further investments, on an investor-by-investor basis, in the event certain "key persons" (for example, both of Messrs. Kravis and Roberts, and, in the case of certain geographically or product focused funds, one or more of the investment professionals focused on such funds) cease to be actively involved in the management of the fund. While these provisions do not allow investors in our funds to withdraw capital that has been invested or cause a fund to terminate, the occurrence of a "key person" event could cause disruption in our business, reduce the amount of capital that we have available for future investments, and make it more challenging to raise additional capital in the future.
Because private equity fund investors typically are unwilling to invest their capital in a fund unless the fund's manager also invests its own capital in the fund's investments, our private equity fund documents generally require the general partners of the funds to make minimum capital commitments to the funds. The amounts of these commitments, which are negotiated by fund investors, generally range from 2% to 8% of a fund's total capital commitments at final closing, but may be greater for certain funds pursuing newer strategies. When investments are made, the general partner contributes capital to the fund based on its fund commitment percentage and acquires a capital interest in the investment that is not subject to a carried interest or management fees.

15


Real Assets
Energy
Our energy business aims to deliver current returns to fund investors through distributions generated by producing and selling oil and natural gas reserves and capital appreciation. The goal is to provide investors with exposure to commodity prices and optionality associated with future drilling and production. Our energy platform targets real asset investment opportunities across the upstream and midstream segments of the oil and gas industry. We have acquired and operated oil and natural gas properties in mature basins located primarily in the United States. In acquiring these properties, which are typically considered to be non-core by their sellers, we seek to generate value through optimizing production, reducing operating costs, and optimizing commercial and marketing arrangements. In addition, we have completed investments in oil and gas drilling development transactions with operating companies and have also acquired mineral and royalty interests. We work closely with external teams of technical and operational experts to assist in the selection, evaluation and operation of investments. We invest in these energy strategies primarily through the KKR Energy Income and Growth Fund. As of December 31, 2017, we have received $2.9 billion of capital commitments to our energy funds and $1.0 billion of capital commitments to this strategy through separately managed accounts.
Infrastructure
Our infrastructure platform seeks to achieve returns including current income through the acquisition and operational improvement of assets important to the functioning of the economy. We believe that the global infrastructure market provides an opportunity for the firm's private investment, operational improvement capabilities and stakeholder engagement. Through this platform we have made investments in parking, alternative energy, district heating and contracted electricity generation, water and wastewater, locomotive transportation, midstream and telecommunications infrastructure. As of December 31, 2017, we had received $4.1 billion of capital commitments to our infrastructure funds and $1.1 billion of capital commitments to this strategy through separately managed accounts and co-investment vehicles.
Real Estate
Our real estate platform targets real estate equity opportunities primarily in the United States and Western Europe, although we have made investments in other areas of the world as well, including Australia and South Korea. Our equity investments include direct investments in real property, debt, special situations transactions and businesses with significant real estate holdings that can benefit from KKR's operational expertise. We seek to partner with real estate owners, lenders, operators, and developers to provide flexible capital to respond to transaction specific needs, including the outright purchase or financing of existing assets or companies and the funding of future development or acquisition opportunities. Through this strategy, we have made real estate equity investments in residential and commercial assets. We have also established investment platforms with strategic partners to invest in commercial real estate in Germany and the United States. As of December 31, 2017, we have received $3.9 billion of capital commitments through our real estate equity investment funds.
Our real estate credit platform provides capital solutions for complex real estate transactions with a focus on commercial mortgage-backed securities, whole loans and subordinated debt. As of December 31, 2017, we managed approximately $2.2 billion of assets in our real estate credit strategy, which include KKR Real Estate Finance Trust Inc. ("KREF"), a NYSE-listed real estate investment trust ("REIT"), and $1.1 billion of capital commitments through our real estate credit fund.

Real Asset Investment Process
Our energy, infrastructure and real estate funds have a similar investment process as that described under "—Private Equity." Investment teams for a particular real asset strategy formally present investments to the applicable strategy oriented investment committee, which monitors all due diligence practices and must approve an investment before it may be made. Most of our real asset strategies also have a portfolio management committee that works with our investment professionals from the date on which an investment is made until the time it is exited in order to ensure that strategic and operational objectives are accomplished and that the performance of the investment is closely monitored. In addition to leveraging the resources of the firm, our energy, infrastructure and real estate investment teams typically partner with technical experts and operators to manage our real asset investments.

16


Real Asset Fund Structures
Our energy, infrastructure and real estate funds generally have investment periods of up to 6 years and generally have a fund term of up to 13 years. Management fees for such funds range from 0.75% to 1.5% on commitments, invested capital or net asset value during the investment period and on invested capital or net asset value for investments thereafter, subject to certain adjustments. These funds generally have performance hurdles of 8% to 10% subject to a catch-up allocation to the general partner after the hurdle has been reached. Thereafter the general partners of such funds generally share in 10% to 20% of net profits realized by limited partners.
Core Investment Strategy
Our core investment strategy targets investments with a longer holding period and a lower risk profile than our traditional private equity or, in certain cases, our real asset investments. The holding periods in core investments are generally longer than 15 years. In 2017, we established core investment vehicles with $6.0 billion of capital commitments from fund investors and a $3.5 billion capital commitment from KKR's balance sheet, through which we aim to make core investments in private equity and real asset opportunities globally.

Public Markets
 
We operate and report our combined credit and hedge funds businesses through the Public Markets segment. Our credit business invests capital in (i) leveraged credit strategies, including leveraged loans, high-yield bonds, opportunistic credit and revolving credit strategies, and (ii) alternative credit strategies, including special situations and private credit strategies such as direct lending and private opportunistic credit (or mezzanine) investment strategies. The funds, CLOs, separately managed accounts, investment companies registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (the "Investment Company Act"), including business development companies ("BDCs"), and alternative investments funds ("AIFs") in our leveraged credit and alternative credit strategies are managed by KKR Credit Advisors (US) LLC, which is an SEC-registered investment adviser, KKR Credit Advisors (Ireland) Unlimited Company, regulated by the Central Bank of Ireland, and KKR Credit Advisors (EMEA) LLP, regulated by the United Kingdom Financial Conduct Authority (the "FCA"). Our Public Markets segment also includes our hedge funds business, which consists of strategic partnerships with third-party hedge fund managers in which KKR owns a minority stake (which we refer to as "strategic manager partnerships"). Our strategic manager partnerships offer a variety of investment strategies, including hedge fund-of-funds, equity hedge funds, credit hedge funds and funds focused on investing in natural catastrophe and weather risks.
We intend to continue to grow the Public Markets business by leveraging our global investment platform, experienced investment professionals and the ability to adapt our investment strategies to different market conditions to capitalize on investment opportunities that may arise at various levels of the capital structure and across market cycles.

On December 11, 2017, we entered into an agreement with FS Investment Corporation ("FS Investments") to form a strategic BDC partnership to provide investment advisory services to Corporate Capital Trust ("CCT") and Corporate Capital Trust II ("CCT II"), which are BDCs currently advised and sub-advised, respectively, by us, and four BDCs that are currently sponsored by FS Investments. This new strategic BDC partnership, if and when it closes, is expected to have $18 billion in combined AUM (based on current valuations). This transaction is subject to stockholder approvals and the satisfaction of certain other closing conditions, and there can be no assurance that it will be consummated as planned or at all or that the combined AUM will be as expected at closing.

    

17


The following chart presents the growth in the AUM of our Public Markets segment from the commencement of its operations in August 2004 through December 31, 2017.



Public Markets
Assets Under Management (1)(2) 
($ in billions)
chart-3a0361ce2aca3baeaa9.jpg
 
 
 
 
 
(1)
For years 2006 through 2008, AUM are presented pro forma for the KPE Transaction and, therefore, exclude the net asset value of KPE and its former commitments to our investment funds. AUM of KKR Prisma and pro rata AUM of PAAMCO Prisma, each as defined below, and AUM of Avoca are included in the years on and after the completion of the respective acquisitions or transactions, as applicable.
(2)
In 2015 our definition of AUM was amended to include (i) KKR's pro rata portion of AUM managed by third-party hedge fund managers in which KKR holds a minority stake and (ii) capital commitments for which we are eligible to receive fees or carried interest upon deployment of capital. AUM for all prior periods has been adjusted to include such changes.

18


Credit
Performance
We generally review our performance in our credit business by investment strategy.

Our leveraged credit strategies principally invest through separately managed accounts, BDCs, CLOs and private equity-like investment funds. In certain cases, these strategies have meaningful track records and may be compared to widely-known indices. The following table presents information regarding larger leveraged credit strategies managed by KKR from inception to December 31, 2017. Our past performance, however, may not be representative of performance in any period other than the period discussed below and is not a guarantee of future results.

Leveraged Credit Strategies: Inception-to-Date Annualized Gross Performance vs. Benchmark by Strategy
($ in millions)
 
Inception Date
 
Gross
Returns
 
Net
Returns
 
Benchmark (1)
 
Benchmark
Gross
Returns
Bank Loans Plus High Yield
 
Jul 2008
 
8.17
%
 
7.53
%
 
65% S&P/ LSTA Loan Index, 35% BoAML HY Master II Index (2)
 
6.39
%
Opportunistic Credit (3)
 
May 2008
 
13.01
%
 
11.00
%
 
BoAML HY Master II Index (3)
 
6.70
%
Bank Loans
 
Apr 2011
 
5.48
%
 
4.86
%
 
S&P/LSTA Loan Index (4)
 
4.25
%
High-Yield
 
Apr 2011
 
7.07
%
 
6.48
%
 
BoAML HY Master II Index (5)
 
6.60
%
Bank Loans Conservative
 
Apr 2011
 
4.78
%
 
4.17
%
 
S&P/LSTA BB-B Loan Index (6)
 
4.25
%
European Leveraged Loans (7)
 
Sep 2009
 
5.48
%
 
4.96
%
 
CS Inst West European Leveraged Loan Index (8)
 
4.78
%
High-Yield Conservative
 
Apr 2011
 
6.44
%
 
5.86
%
 
BoAML HY BB-B Constrained (9)
 
6.49
%
European Credit Opportunities (7)
 
Sept 2007
 
5.68
%
 
4.77
%
 
S&P European Leveraged Loans (All Loans) (10)
 
4.35
%
Revolving Credit (11)
 
May 2015
 
N/A

 
N/A

 
N/A
 
N/A

 
(1)
The benchmarks referred to herein include the S&P/LSTA Leveraged Loan Index (the "S&P/LSTA Loan Index"), S&P/LSTA U.S. B/BB Ratings Loan Index (the "S&P/ LSTA BB-B Loan Index"), the Bank of America Merrill Lynch High Yield Master II Index (the "BoAML HY Master II Index"), the BofA Merrill Lynch BB-B US High Yield Index (the "BoAML HY BB-B Constrained"), the Credit Suisse Institutional Western European Leveraged Loan Index (the "CS Inst West European Leveraged Loan Index"), and S&P European Leveraged Loans (All Loans). The S&P/LSTA Loan Index is a daily tradable index for the U.S. loan market that seeks to mirror the market-weighted performance of the largest institutional loans that meet certain criteria. The S&P/ LSTA BB-B Loan Index is comprised of loans in the S&P/LSTA Loan Index, whose rating is BB+, BB, BB-, B+, B or B-. The BoAML HY Master II Index is an index for high-yield corporate bonds. It is designed to measure the broad high-yield market, including lower-rated securities. The BoAML HY BB-B Constrained is a subset of the BoAML HY Master II Index including all securities rated BB1 through B3, inclusive. The CS Inst West European Leveraged Loan Index contains only institutional loan facilities priced above 90, excluding TL and TLa facilities and loans rated CC, C or are in default. The S&P European Leveraged Loan Index reflects the market-weighted performance of institutional leveraged loan portfolios investing in European credits. While the returns of our leveraged credit strategies reflect the reinvestment of income and dividends, none of the indices presented in the chart above reflect such reinvestment, which has the effect of increasing the reported relative performance of these strategies as compared to the indices. Furthermore, these indices are not subject to management fees, incentive allocations or expenses.
(2)
Performance is based on a blended composite of Bank Loans Plus High Yield strategy accounts. The benchmark used for purposes of comparison for the Bank Loans Plus High Yield strategy is based on 65% S&P/LSTA Loan Index and 35% BoAML HY Master II Index.
(3)
The Opportunistic Credit strategy invests in high-yield securities and corporate loans with no preset allocation. The Benchmark used for purposes of comparison for the Opportunistic Credit strategy presented herein is based on the BoAML HY Master II Index. Funds within this strategy may utilize third-party financing facilities to enhance investment returns. In cases where financing facilities are used, the amounts drawn on the facility are deducted from the assets of the fund in the calculation of net asset value, which tends to increase returns when net asset value grows over time and decrease returns when net asset value decreases over time.
(4)
Performance is based on a composite of portfolios that primarily invest in leveraged loans. The benchmark used for purposes of comparison for the Bank Loans strategy is based on the S&P/LSTA Loan Index.
(5)
Performance is based on a composite of portfolios that primarily invest in high-yield securities. The benchmark used for purposes of comparison for the High Yield strategy is based on the BoAML HY Master II Index.
(6)
Performance is based on a composite of portfolios that primarily invest in leveraged loans rated B-/Baa3 or higher. The benchmark used for purposes of comparison for the Bank Loans Conservative strategy is based on the S&P/LSTA BB-B Loan Index.
(7)
The returns presented are calculated based on local currency.
(8)
Performance is based on a composite of portfolios that primarily invest in higher quality leveraged loans. The benchmark used for purposes of comparison for the European Leveraged Loans strategy is based on the CS Inst West European Leveraged Loan Index.
(9)
Performance is based on a composite of portfolios that primarily invest in high-yield securities rated B or higher. The benchmark used for purposes of comparison for the High-Yield Conservative strategy is based on the BoAML HY BB-B Constrained Index.
(10)
Performance is based on a composite of portfolios that primarily invest in European institutional leveraged loans. The benchmark used for purposes of comparison for the European Credit Opportunities strategy is based on the S&P European Leveraged Loans (All Loans) Index.

19


(11)
This strategy has not called any capital as of December 31, 2017. As a result, the gross and net return performance measures are not meaningful and are not included above.

Our alternative credit strategies primarily invest in more illiquid instruments through private investment funds, BDCs and separately managed accounts. The following table presents information regarding our Public Markets alternative credit commingled funds where investors are subject to capital commitments from inception to December 31, 2017. Some of these funds have been investing for less than 24 months, and thus their performance is less meaningful and not included below. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

Alternative Credit Strategies: Fund Performance
 
 
 
 
Amount
 
Fair Value of Investments
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Public Markets 
Investment Funds
 
Inception Date
 
Commitment
 
Invested (1)
 
Realized (1)
 
Unrealized
 
Total Value
 
Gross
IRR (2)
 
Net
IRR (2)
 
Multiple
 of Invested
Capital (3)
($ in Millions)
 
 
Special Situations Fund
 
Dec 2012
 
$
2,274.3

 
$
2,231.6

 
$
874.1

 
$
1,872.7

 
$
2,746.8

 
7.0
%
 
5.0
 %
 
1.2

Special Situations Fund II
 
Dec 2014
 
3,283.5

 
1,680.1

 

 
1,706.5

 
1,706.5

 
1.5
%
 
(1.4
)%
 
1.0

Mezzanine Partners
 
Mar 2010
 
1,022.8

 
913.9

 
971.3

 
339.1

 
1,310.4

 
12.8
%
 
8.1
 %
 
1.4

Private Credit Opportunities Partners II
 
Dec 2015
 
2,245.1

 
133.8

 

 
168.0

 
168.0

 
29.9
%
 
21.2
 %
 
1.3

Lending Partners
 
Dec 2011
 
460.2

 
405.3

 
341.0

 
176.9

 
517.9

 
7.6
%
 
6.1
 %
 
1.3

Lending Partners II
 
Jun 2014
 
1,335.9

 
1,164.9

 
286.9

 
1,164.7

 
1,451.6

 
13.8
%
 
11.5
 %
 
1.2

Lending Partners III
 
Apr 2017
 
795.8

 
35.8

 

 
45.1

 
45.1

 
N/A

 
N/A

 
N/A

Lending Partners Europe
 
Mar 2015
 
847.6

 
396.5

 
47.3

 
418.2

 
465.5

 
18.7
%
 
11.9
 %
 
1.2

Other Alternative Credit Vehicles
 
Various
 
6,509.9

 
3,845.2

 
2,214.4

 
2,962.3

 
5,176.7

 
N/A

 
N/A

 
N/A

Unallocated Commitments (4)
 
Various
 
1,180.0

 

 

 

 

 
N/A

 
N/A

 
N/A

All Funds
 
 
 
$
19,955.1

 
$
10,807.1

 
$
4,735.0

 
$
8,853.5

 
$
13,588.5

 
 

 
 

 
 

(1)    Recycled capital is excluded from the amounts invested and realized. 

(2)    These credit funds utilize third-party financing facilities to provide liquidity to such funds, and in such event IRRs are calculated from the time capital contributions are due from fund investors to the time fund investors receive a related distribution from the fund. The use of such financing facilities generally decreases the amount of invested capital that would otherwise be used to calculate IRRs, which tends to increase IRRs when fair value grows over time and decrease IRRs when fair value decreases over time. IRRs measure the aggregate annual compounded returns generated by a fund's investments over a holding period and are calculated taking into account recycled capital. Net IRRs presented are calculated after giving effect to the allocation of realized and unrealized carried interest and the payment of any applicable management fees.  Gross IRRs are calculated before giving effect to the allocation of carried interest and the payment of any applicable management fees.
 
(3)    The multiples of invested capital measure the aggregate value generated by a fund's investments in absolute terms. Each multiple of invested capital is calculated by adding together the total realized and unrealized values of a fund's investments and dividing by the total amount of capital invested by the investors. The use of financing facilities generally decreases the amount of invested capital that would otherwise be used to calculate multiples of invested capital, which tends to increase multiples when fair value grows over time and decrease multiples when fair value decreases over time. Such amounts do not give effect to the allocation of any realized and unrealized returns on a fund's investments to the fund's general partner pursuant to a carried interest or the payment of any applicable management fees and are calculated without taking into account recycled capital.

(4)
"Unallocated Commitments" represent unallocated commitments from our strategic investor partnerships.

Such past performance may not be representative of performance in any period other than the period discussed above and is not a guarantee of future results. For additional information regarding impact of market conditions on the value and performance of our investments, see "Risk Factors—Risks Related to Our Business—Difficult market and economic conditions can adversely affect our business in many ways, including by reducing the value or performance of the investments that we manage or by reducing the ability of our funds to raise or deploy capital, each of which could negatively impact our net income and cash flow and adversely affect our financial prospects and condition" and "Risk Factors—Risks Related to the Assets We Manage—The historical returns attributable to our funds, including those presented in this report, should not be considered as indicative of the future results of our funds or our balance sheet investments, of our future results or the performance of our common units."

20


Investment Approach
Our approach to making investments focuses on creating investment portfolios that seek to generate attractive risk-adjusted returns by selecting investments that may be made at attractive prices, subjecting investments to regular monitoring and oversight, and, for more liquid investments, making buy and sell decisions based on price targets and relative value parameters. The firm employs both "top-down" and "bottom-up" analyses when making investments. Our top-down analysis involves, as appropriate, a macro analysis of relative asset valuations, long-term industry trends, business cycles, regulatory trends, interest rate expectations, credit fundamentals and technical factors to target specific industry sectors and asset classes in which to invest. From a bottom-up perspective, our investment decision is predicated on an investment thesis that is developed using our proprietary resources and knowledge and due diligence.
Sourcing and Selecting Investments
We source investment opportunities through a variety of channels, including internal deal generation strategies and the firm's global network of contacts at major companies, corporate executives, commercial and investment banks, financial intermediaries, other private equity sponsors and other investment and advisory institutions. We are also provided with opportunities to invest in certain strategies, where appropriate, in the securities of KKR's private equity portfolio companies, though there are limitations across the platform on the maximum size of such KKR-affiliated investments.
Due Diligence and the Investment Decision
Once a potential investment has been identified, our investment professionals screen the opportunity and make a preliminary determination concerning whether we should proceed with further diligence. When evaluating the suitability of an investment for our funds, we typically employ a relative value framework and subject the investment to due diligence. This review considers many factors including, as appropriate, expected returns, capital structure, credit ratings, historical and projected financial data, the issuer's competitive position, the quality and track record of the issuer's management team, margin stability, and industry and company trends. Investment professionals use the services of outside advisors and industry experts as appropriate to assist them in the due diligence process and, when relevant and permitted, leverage the knowledge and experience of our Private Markets investment professionals. Strategy-specific investment committees monitor all due diligence practices.
Monitoring Investments
We monitor our portfolios of investments using, as applicable, daily, quarterly and annual analyses. Daily analyses include morning market meetings, industry and company pricing runs, industry and company reports and discussions with the firm's Private Markets investment professionals on an as-needed basis. Quarterly analyses include the preparation of quarterly operating results, reconciliations of actual results to projections and updates to financial models (baseline and stress cases). Annual analyses involve conducting internal audits, and testing compliance with monitoring and documentation requirements.
Credit Strategies
Our credit business pursues investments in leveraged credit strategies, such as leveraged loans and high-yield bonds, opportunistic credit and revolving credit strategies, and alternative credit strategies, such as special situations, direct lending and private opportunistic credit. We pursue these investments across a range of vehicles, including investment funds and separately managed accounts, for which we receive a fee and in certain cases an incentive fee or carried interest.
We also manage structured credit vehicles in the form of CLOs that hold leveraged loans, high-yield bonds or a combination of both. CLOs are typically structured as special purpose investment vehicles that acquire, monitor and, to varying degrees, manage a pool of credit assets. The CLOs generally serve as long-term financing for leveraged credit investments and as a way to minimize refinancing risk, minimize maturity risk and secure a fixed cost of funds over an underlying market interest rate. We typically receive a fee for managing certain CLOs.
We also serve as the registered investment adviser or sub-adviser to registered investment companies. The management fees we are paid for managing registered investment companies, including BDCs such as CCT and CCT II, are generally subject to contractual rights that require their board of directors to provide prior notice (or, in the case of a BDC we manage as a sub-adviser, the investment adviser) in order to terminate our investment management services.
    

21


Leveraged Credit. Our leveraged credit strategies are principally directed at investing in leveraged loans, high-yield bonds or a combination of both. Our opportunistic credit strategy seeks to deploy capital across investment themes that take advantage of credit market dislocations, spanning asset types and liquidity profiles. Our revolving credit strategy invests in senior secured revolving credit facilities. We had AUM of $24.8 billion in this strategy as of December 31, 2017 (inclusive of AUM of $2.3 billion in our opportunistic credit strategy and AUM of $1.5 billion in our revolving credit strategy).
Alternative Credit. Our alternative credit strategies consist of special situations and private credit strategies.
Special Situations. We seek to make opportunistic investments largely in distressed companies through our special situations investment strategy. These investments include distressed investments (including post- restructuring equity), control-oriented opportunities, rescue financing (debt or equity investments made to address covenant, maturity or liquidity issues), debtor-in-possession or exit financing, and other event-driven investments in debt or equity. We had AUM of $7.4 billion in this strategy as of December 31, 2017.
Private Credit. Our private credit strategies seek to leverage the knowledge and relationships developed in the leveraged credit business. These strategies include direct lending and private opportunistic credit strategies.
Direct Lending. We seek to make investments in proprietarily sourced primarily senior debt financings for middle-market companies through our direct lending strategy. We had AUM of $7.4 billion in this strategy as of December 31, 2017.
Private Opportunistic Credit. Through this strategy, we seek to make investments in directly sourced third-party mezzanine and mezzanine-like transactions and also seek asset-based credit and structured credit opportunities across financial and hard assets. These investments often consist of mezzanine debt, which generates a current yield, coupled with marginal equity exposure with additional upside potential. We had AUM of $4.4 billion in this strategy as of December 31, 2017.
Hedge Funds
Overview
Our hedge fund business consists of strategic manager partnerships with third-party hedge fund managers in which KKR owns a minority stake. This includes a 29.9% interest in Marshall Wace, a global alternative investment manager specializing in long/short equity products, a 24.9% interest in Nephila Capital Ltd. ("Nephila"), an investment manager focused on investing in natural catastrophe and weather risk, a 24.9% interest in BlackGold Capital Management L.P. ("BlackGold"), a credit-oriented investment manager focused on energy and hard asset investments, and a 39.9% interest in PAAMCO Prisma Holdings, LLC ("PAAMCO Prisma"), an investment manager focused on liquid alternative investment solutions, including hedge fund-of-fund portfolios. We have also seeded Acion Partners Limited ("Acion"), a Hong Kong-based investment manager that manages Asian event-driven investments. As of December 31, 2017, our strategic manager partnerships with third-party hedge fund managers accounted for $26.2 billion of AUM.
Prior to June 1, 2017, our hedge fund business included Prisma Capital Partners LP, formerly known as KKR Prisma ("KKR Prisma"). KKR Prisma constructed and managed customized hedge fund portfolios. On June 1, 2017, KKR completed the transaction to combine Pacific Alternative Asset Management Company, LLC ("PAAMCO") and KKR Prisma to create PAAMCO Prisma. KKR owns 39.9% of, and receives certain other payments from, PAAMCO Prisma, which operates independently from KKR.

22


Public Markets AUM and Vehicle Structures
As of December 31, 2017, our Public Markets segment had $70.9 billion of AUM, comprised of $24.8 billion of assets managed in our leveraged credit strategies (which include $2.3 billion of assets managed in our opportunistic credit strategy and $1.5 billion of assets managed in our revolving credit strategy), $7.4 billion of assets managed in our special situations strategy, $11.8 billion of assets managed in our private credit strategies, $26.2 billion of assets managed through our hedge fund business and $0.7 billion of assets managed in other strategies. Our private credit strategies include $7.4 billion of assets managed in our direct lending strategy and $4.4 billion of assets managed in our private opportunistic credit strategy.
The table below presents information as of December 31, 2017, based on the investment funds, vehicles or accounts offered by our Public Markets segment.  Our funds, vehicles and accounts have been sorted based upon their primary investment strategies. However, the AUM and FPAUM presented for each line in the table includes certain investments from non-primary investment strategies, which are permitted by their investment mandates, for purposes of presenting the fees and other terms for such funds, vehicles and accounts.
($ in millions)
 
AUM
 
FPAUM
 
Typical 
Management
Fee Rate
 
Incentive Fee /
Carried
Interest
 
Preferred
Return
 
Duration
of Capital
Leveraged Credit:
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Leveraged Credit SMAs/Funds
 
$
13,322

 
$
11,643

 
0.33%-1.50%
 
Various (1)
 
Various (1)
 
Subject to redemptions
CLOs
 
10,689

 
10,689

 
0.40%-0.50%
 
Various (1)
 
Various (1)
 
10-14 Years (2)
Total Leveraged Credit
 
24,011

 
22,332

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alternative Credit: (3)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Special Situations
 
8,060

 
4,646

 
0.90%-1.75% (4)
 
10.00-20.00%
 
7.00-12.00%
 
8-15 Years (2)
Private Credit
 
8,504

 
4,105

 
0.50%-1.75%
 
10.00-20.00%
 
5.00-8.00%
 
8-15 Years (2)
Total Alternative Credit
 
16,564

 
8,751

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hedge Funds (5)
 
26,182

 
20,489

 
0.50%-2.00%
 
Various (1)
 
Various (1)
 
Subject to redemptions
BDCs (6)
 
4,187

 
4,187

 
1.00%-1.125%
 
10.00-15.00%
 
7.00%
 
7 years
Total
 
$
70,944

 
$
55,759

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(1)
Certain funds and CLOs are subject to a performance fee in which the manager or general partner of the funds share up to 20% of the net profits earned by investors in excess of performance hurdles (generally tied to a benchmark or index) and subject to a provision requiring the funds and vehicles to regain prior losses before any performance fee is earned.
(2)
Duration of capital is measured from inception. Inception dates for CLOs were between 2005 and 2017 and for separately managed accounts and funds investing in alternative credit strategies from 2009 through 2017.
(3)
Our alternative credit funds generally have investment periods of three to five years and our newer alternative credit funds generally earn fees on invested capital during the investment period.
(4)
Lower fees on uninvested capital in certain vehicles.
(5)
Hedge Funds represent KKR's pro rata portion of AUM and FPAUM of our strategic manager partnerships, which consist of minority stakes in other hedge fund managers.
(6)
Consists of CCT and CCT II, which are BDCs advised and sub-advised, respectively, by KKR. These vehicles invest in both leveraged credit and private credit strategies. On November 14, 2017, shares of CCT's common stock commenced trading on the NYSE and KKR Credit Advisors (US) LLC became CCT's sole investment adviser. On December 11, 2017, we entered into an agreement with FS Investments to form a strategic BDC partnership that will, subject to stockholder approvals and the satisfaction of certain other closing conditions, provide investment advisory services to CCT, CCT II and four BDCs that are currently sponsored by FS Investments.

Fundraising and Composition of Fund Investors
We have a Client & Partner Group that is responsible for raising capital for us globally across all products, expanding our client relationships across asset classes and across types of fund investors, developing products to meet our clients' needs, and servicing existing fund investors and products. We also provide fundraising services to certain third-party fund managers in our strategic manager partnerships. As of December 31, 2017, we had over 70 executives and professionals dedicated to our Client & Partner Group.

23


As of December 31, 2017, we had approximately 900 investors in funds across all our strategies, which reflect the addition of 90 investors during the year, excluding former KKR Prisma clients following the PAAMCO Prisma transaction that closed on June 1, 2017. On average, a fund investor is invested in approximately two of our products as of December 31, 2017. The following charts detail our investor base by type and geography as of December 31, 2017.
Fund Investor Base by Type (1)             Fund Investor Base by Geography(1)         
chart-b2e487fecf51e424c1d.jpgchart-ef391891ac11fbfdd40.jpg
_________________________

(1)
Based on the AUM of our Private Markets investment funds, Private Markets co-investment vehicles, and Public Markets separately managed accounts and investment funds. These charts exclude general partner commitments, assets managed through CLOs, and assets managed by other asset managers with which KKR has formed strategic partnerships where KKR does not hold more than a 50% ownership interest. Allocations are assigned to a type or geographic region according to subscriptions received from a limited partner.

Capital Markets
 
Our Capital Markets segment is comprised of our global capital markets business. Our capital markets business supports our firm, our portfolio companies and third-party clients by developing and implementing both traditional and non-traditional capital solutions for investments or companies seeking financing. These services include arranging debt and equity financing, placing and underwriting securities offerings and providing other types of capital markets services. Our capital markets business underwrites credit facilities and arranges loan syndications and participations. When we are sole arrangers of a credit facility, we may advance amounts to the borrower on behalf of other lenders, subject to repayment. When we underwrite an offering of securities on a firm commitment basis, we commit to buy and sell an issue of securities and generate revenue by purchasing the securities at a discount or for a fee. When we act in an agency capacity or best efforts basis, we generate revenue for arranging financing or placing securities with capital markets investors. We may also provide issuers with capital markets advice on security selection, access to markets, marketing considerations, securities pricing, and other aspects of capital markets transactions in exchange for a fee. Our capital markets business also plays an important role in syndicating private equity co-investment opportunities to both fund investors and other third parties, which may entitle the firm to receive management fees and/or a carried interest.

Our flagship capital markets subsidiary is KKR Capital Markets LLC, an SEC-registered broker-dealer and a member of the Financial Industry Regulation Authority ("FINRA"), which is registered or authorized to carry out certain broker-dealer activities in various countries in North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific and the Middle East.

24


Principal Activities
 
Through our Principal Activities segment, we manage the firm's own assets on our balance sheet and deploy capital to support and grow our businesses. Our Principal Activities segment uses our balance sheet assets to support our investment management and capital markets businesses. Typically, the funds in our Private Markets and Public Markets businesses contractually require us, as general partner of the funds, to make sizable capital commitments from time to time. We believe our general partner commitments are indicative of the conviction we have in a given fund's strategy, which assists us in raising new funds from limited partners. We also use our balance sheet to acquire investments in order to help establish a track record for fundraising purposes in new strategies. We may also use our own capital to seed investments for new funds, to bridge capital selectively for our funds' investments or finance strategic acquisitions and partnerships, although the financial results of an acquired business or strategic manager partnership may be reported in our other segments.

Our Principal Activities segment also provides the required capital to fund the various commitments of our Capital Markets business when underwriting or syndicating securities, or when providing term loan commitments for transactions involving our portfolio companies and for third parties. Our Principal Activities segment also holds assets that may be utilized to satisfy regulatory requirements for our Capital Markets business and risk retention requirements for our CLOs.

We also make opportunistic investments through our Principal Activities segment, which include co-investments alongside our Private Markets and Public Markets funds as well as Principal Activities investments that do not involve our Private Markets or Public Markets funds.

We endeavor to use our balance sheet strategically and opportunistically to generate an attractive risk-adjusted return on equity in a manner that is consistent with our fiduciary duties and in compliance with applicable laws.

The chart below presents the holdings of our Principal Activities segment by asset class as of December 31, 2017.

Holdings by Asset Class (1) 
chart-eb864366b1cf00bc61b.jpg
(1) General partner commitments in our funds are included in the various asset classes shown above. Assets and revenues of other asset managers with which KKR has formed strategic manager partnerships where KKR does not hold more than 50% ownership interest are not included in our Principal Activities segment but are reported in the financial results of our other segments. Private Equity and Other Equity includes KKR private equity funds, co-investments alongside such KKR-sponsored private equity funds, certain core equity investments, and other opportunistic investments. However, equity investments in other asset classes, such as real estate, special situations and energy appear in these other asset classes.  Other Credit consists of certain leveraged credit and specialty finance strategies.


25


Competition
We compete with other investment managers for both fund investors and investment opportunities. The firm's competitors consist primarily of sponsors of public and private investment funds, real estate development companies, BDCs, investment banks, commercial finance companies and operating companies acting as strategic buyers. We believe that competition for fund investors is based primarily on investment performance, investor liquidity and willingness to invest, investor perception of investment managers' drive, focus and alignment of interest, business reputation, duration of relationships, quality of services, pricing, fund terms including fees, and the relative attractiveness of the types of investments that have been or are to be made. We believe that competition for investment opportunities is based primarily on the pricing, terms and structure of a proposed investment and certainty of execution. In addition to these traditional competitors within the global investment management industry, we also face competition from local and regional firms, financial institutions and sovereign wealth funds in the various countries in which we invest. In certain emerging markets, local firms may have more established relationships with the companies in which we are attempting to invest. These competitors often fall into one of the aforementioned categories but in some cases may represent new types of fund investors, including high net worth individuals, family offices and state-sponsored entities.
There are numerous funds focused on private equity, real assets, growth equity, credit and hedge fund strategies that compete for investor capital. Fund managers have also increasingly adopted investment strategies outside of their traditional focus. For example, funds focused on credit and equity strategies have become active in taking control positions in companies, while private equity funds have acquired minority equity or debt positions in publicly listed companies. This convergence could heighten competition for investments. Furthermore, as institutional fund investors increasingly consolidate their relationships for multiple investment products with a few investment firms, competition for capital from such institutional fund investors may become more acute. However, such consolidation may also lead institutional fund investors to prefer more established investment firms, which could help us compete against newer entrants or investment firms that are smaller in size or offer more limited types of investment strategies.
Some of the entities that we compete with as an investment firm may have greater financial, technical, marketing and other resources and more personnel than us and, in the case of some asset classes, longer operating histories, more established relationships or greater experience. Several of our competitors also have raised, or may raise, significant amounts of capital and have investment objectives that are similar to the investment objectives of our funds, which may create additional competition for investment opportunities. Some of these competitors may also have lower costs of capital and access to funding sources that are not available to us, which may create competitive advantages for them. In addition, some of these competitors may have higher risk tolerances, different risk assessments or lower return thresholds, which could allow them to consider a wider range of investments and to bid more aggressively than us for investments. Strategic buyers may also be able to achieve synergistic cost savings or revenue enhancements with respect to a targeted portfolio company, which may provide them with a competitive advantage in bidding for such investments.
Our capital markets business competes primarily with investment banks and independent broker-dealers in North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific and the Middle East. We principally focus our capital markets activities on the firm, our portfolio companies and fund investors, but we also seek to service other third parties. While we generally target customers with whom we have existing relationships, those customers may have similar relationships with the firm's competitors, many of whom will have access to competing securities transactions, greater financial, technical or marketing resources or more established reputations than us.
Competition is also intense for the attraction and retention of qualified employees and consultants. Our ability to continue to compete effectively in our businesses will depend upon our ability to attract new employees and consultants and retain and motivate our existing employees and consultants.

Employees, Consultants and Advisors
As of December 31, 2017, we employed 1,184 people worldwide:
Investment Professionals
378

Other Professionals
548

Support Staff
258

Total Employees (1)
1,184

 
 
(1)    Does not include operating consultants and other consultants who provide services to us or our funds.

26


Investment Professionals
Our 378 investment professionals come from diverse backgrounds in private equity, real assets, credit, hedge funds and other asset classes and include executives with operations, strategic consulting, risk management, liability management and finance experience. As a group, these professionals provide us with a strong global team for identifying attractive investment opportunities, creating value and generating superior returns.
Other Professionals
Our 548 other professionals come from diverse backgrounds in capital markets, economics, capital raising, client services, public affairs, finance, tax, legal, compliance, human resources, and information technology. As a group, these professionals provide us with a strong team for overseeing investments and performing capital markets activities, servicing our existing fund investors and creating relationships with new fund investors globally. Additionally, a majority of these other professionals are responsible for supporting the global infrastructure of KKR.
KKR Capstone
We have developed an institutionalized process for creating value in investments. As part of our effort, we utilize a team of 55 operating consultants at KKR Capstone, who are not KKR employees but work exclusively with our investment professionals and portfolio company management teams or our designees. With professionals in North America, Europe and the Asia-Pacific, KKR Capstone provides additional expertise for assessing investment opportunities and assisting managers of portfolio companies in defining strategic priorities and implementing operational changes. During the initial phases of an investment, KKR Capstone's work seeks to implement our thesis for value creation. These operating consultants may assist portfolio companies in addressing top-line growth, cost optimization and efficient capital allocation and in developing operating and financial metrics. Over time, this work shifts to identifying challenges and taking advantage of business opportunities that arise during the life of an investment. KKR Capstone is consolidated in KKR's financial results for GAAP purposes, but is not a subsidiary or affiliate of KKR.
Senior Advisors and Other Advisors
To complement the expertise of our investment professionals, we have a team of senior advisors and other advisors. While not KKR employees, they provide us with additional operational and strategic insights. The responsibilities of senior advisors and other advisors include serving on the boards of our portfolio companies, helping us source and evaluate individual investment opportunities and assisting portfolio companies with operational matters. These individuals include current and former chief executive officers, chief financial officers and chairpersons of major corporations and others holding leading positions of public agencies worldwide.


27


Organizational Structure

The following simplified diagram illustrates our organizational structure as of December 31, 2017, unless otherwise noted. Certain entities depicted below may be held through intervening entities not shown in the diagram. If our Managing Partner elects to convert KKR into a corporation, the organizational structure illustrated below may significantly change.

orgcharta08.jpg

(1)
KKR Management LLC serves as the general partner of KKR & Co. L.P., which is governed by a board of directors consisting of a majority of independent directors. KKR Management LLC does not hold any economic interests in KKR & Co. L.P. and is owned by senior KKR employees.
(2)
KKR Holdings is the holding vehicle through which certain of our current and former employees and other persons indirectly own their interest in KKR. KKR Group Partnership Units that are held by KKR Holdings are exchangeable for our common units on a one-for-one basis, subject to customary conversion rate adjustments for splits, unit distributions and reclassifications and compliance with applicable vesting and transfer restrictions. As limited partner interests, these KKR Group Partnership Units are non-voting and do not entitle KKR Holdings to participate in the management of our business and affairs. As of December 31, 2017, KKR Holdings had approximately a 40.9% interest in our business indirectly through its limited partner interests in the KKR Group Partnerships.
(3)
Includes holders of 13,800,000 Series A Preferred Units issued on March 17, 2016, 6,200,000 Series B Preferred Units issued on June 20, 2016 and our common units.
(4)
KKR Holdings holds special non-economic voting units in our partnership that entitle it to cast, with respect to those limited matters that may be submitted to a vote of our unitholders, a number of votes equal to the number of KKR Group Partnership Units that it holds from time to time.
(5)
KKR Group Partnerships include KKR Management Holdings L.P., KKR Fund Holdings L.P. and KKR International Holdings L.P. Because the income of KKR Management Holdings L.P. is likely to be primarily non-qualifying income for purposes of the qualifying income exception to the publicly traded partnership rules, we formed KKR Management Holdings Corp., which is subject to taxation as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, to hold our interest in KKR Management Holdings L.P. Accordingly, our allocable share of the taxable income of KKR Management Holdings L.P. will be subject to taxation at a corporate rate. KKR Management Holdings L.P., which is treated as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes, was formed to hold interests in our fee generating businesses and other assets that may not generate qualifying income for purposes of the qualifying income exception to the publicly traded partnership rules. KKR Fund Holdings L.P., which is also treated as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes, was formed to hold interests in our businesses and assets that will generate qualifying income for purposes of the qualifying income exception to the publicly traded partnership rules. KKR International Holdings L.P. was formed generally to hold certain non-U.S. assets that may generate non-qualifying income under the U.S. federal income tax laws applicable to publicly traded partnerships. As of February 21, 2018, KKR International Holdings L.P. held no assets.
(6)
KKR Management Holdings L.P. is the parent company of Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. L.P., the SEC-registered investment adviser, which in turn is generally the parent company for most of KKR's other management and capital markets subsidiaries including KKR Credit Advisors (US) LLC and KKR Capital Markets Holdings L.P., the holding company for KKR Capital Markets LLC. KKR Fund Holdings L.P. is the parent company of KKR Credit Advisors (Ireland) Unlimited Company and KKR Alternative Investment Management Unlimited Company.

28


(7)
40% of the carried interest earned from our investment funds, and, beginning with the quarter ended September 30, 2016, 40% of the management fees that would have been subject to a management fee refund for investment funds that have a preferred return, are allocated to a carry pool, from which carried interest is allocable to our employees and selected other individuals. Beginning with the quarter ended September 30, 2017, 43% of carried interest generated by then-current and future funds is allocated to the carry pool instead of 40% of carried interest. For impacted funds, the incremental 3% replaces the amount of certain management fee refunds that would have been calculated for those funds as performance income compensation. No carried interest has been allocated with respect to co-investments acquired from KPE in the KPE Transaction. Our carry pool is supplemented by allocating for compensation 40% of the incentive fees that do not constitute carried interest that are earned from investment funds. See "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Key Financial Measures Under GAAP—Expenses—Compensation and Benefits."
Regulation
Our operations are subject to regulation and supervision in a number of jurisdictions. The level of regulation and supervision to which we are subject varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and is based on the type of business activity involved. We, in conjunction with our outside advisors and counsel, seek to manage our business and operations in compliance with such regulation and supervision. The regulatory and legal requirements that apply to our activities are subject to change from time to time and may become more restrictive, which may make compliance with applicable requirements more difficult or expensive or otherwise restrict our ability to conduct our business activities in the manner in which they are now conducted. Changes in applicable regulatory and legal requirements, including changes in their enforcement, could materially and adversely affect our business and our financial condition and results of operations. As a matter of public policy, the regulatory bodies that regulate our business activities are generally responsible for safeguarding the integrity of the securities and financial markets and protecting fund investors who participate in those markets rather than protecting the interests of our unitholders.
United States
Regulation as an Investment Adviser
We conduct our advisory business through our investment adviser subsidiaries, including Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. L.P. and its wholly-owned subsidiary KKR Credit Advisors (US) LLC, each of which is registered as an investment adviser with the SEC under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (the "Investment Advisers Act"). The investment advisers are subject to the anti-fraud provisions of the Investment Advisers Act and to fiduciary duties derived from these provisions, which apply to our relationships with our advisory clients globally, including funds that we manage. These provisions and duties impose restrictions and obligations on us with respect to our dealings with our fund investors and our investments, including for example restrictions on agency cross and principal transactions. Our registered investment advisers are subject to periodic SEC examinations and other requirements under the Investment Advisers Act and related regulations primarily intended to benefit advisory clients. These additional requirements relate, among other things, to maintaining an effective and comprehensive compliance program, record-keeping and reporting requirements and disclosure requirements. The Investment Advisers Act generally grants the SEC broad administrative powers, including the power to limit or restrict an investment adviser from conducting advisory activities in the event it fails to comply with federal securities laws. Additional sanctions that may be imposed for failure to comply with applicable requirements include the prohibition of individuals from associating with an investment adviser, the revocation of registrations and other censures and fines.
KKR Credit Advisors (US) LLC is also subject to regulation under the Investment Company Act as an investment adviser to a registered investment company. The KKR Income Opportunities Fund is a closed-end management investment company registered under the Investment Company Act. The closed-end management investment company and KKR Credit Advisors (US) LLC are subject to the Investment Company Act and the rules thereunder, which among other things regulate the relationship between a registered investment company (or BDC) and its investment adviser and prohibit or restrict principal transactions and joint transactions.
Regulation as a Broker-Dealer
KKR Capital Markets LLC, one of our subsidiaries, is registered as a broker-dealer with the SEC under the Exchange Act and in all 50 U.S. States and U.S. territories, and is a member of the FINRA. MCS Capital Markets LLC, one of our subsidiaries, is registered as a broker-dealer with the SEC under the Exchange Act and in 35 U.S. States. As registered broker-dealers, KKR Capital Markets LLC and MCS Capital Markets LLC are subject to periodic SEC and FINRA examinations and reviews. A broker-dealer is subject to legal requirements covering all aspects of its securities business, including sales and trading practices, public and private securities offerings, use and safekeeping of customers' funds and securities, capital structure, record-keeping and retention and the conduct and qualifications of directors, officers, employees and other associated persons. These requirements include the SEC's "uniform net capital rule," which specifies the minimum level of net capital that a broker-dealer must maintain, requires a significant part of the broker-dealer's assets to be kept in relatively liquid form,

29


imposes certain requirements that may have the effect of prohibiting a broker-dealer from distributing or withdrawing its capital and subjects any distributions or withdrawals of capital by a broker-dealer to notice requirements. These and other requirements also include rules that limit a broker-dealer's ratio of subordinated debt to equity in its regulatory capital composition, constrain a broker-dealer's ability to expand its business under certain circumstances and impose additional requirements when the broker-dealer participates in securities offerings of affiliated entities. Violations of these requirements may result in censures, fines, the issuance of cease-and-desist orders, revocation of licenses or registrations, the suspension or expulsion from the securities industry of the broker-dealer or its officers or employees or other similar consequences by regulatory bodies.
United Kingdom
We have several subsidiaries which are authorized and regulated by the FCA under the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 ("FSMA"). FSMA and related rules govern most aspects of investment business, including investment management, sales, research and trading practices, provision of investment advice, corporate finance, use and safekeeping of client funds and securities, regulatory capital, record-keeping, margin practices and procedures, approval standards for individuals, anti-money laundering, periodic reporting and settlement procedures. The FCA is responsible for administering these requirements and our compliance with the FSMA and related rules. Violations of these requirements may result in censures, fines, imposition of additional requirements, injunctions, restitution orders, revocation or modification of permissions or registrations, the suspension or expulsion from certain "controlled functions" within the financial services industry of officers or employees performing such functions or other similar consequences.
KKR Capital Markets Limited has permission to engage in a number of regulated activities regulated under FSMA, including dealing as principal or agent and arranging deals in relation to certain types of specified investments and arranging the safeguarding and administration of assets. KKR Capital Markets Limited also benefits from a passport under the single market directives to offer services cross border into all countries in the European Economic Area and Gibraltar. Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. Partners LLP has permission to engage in a number of regulated activities including advising on and arranging deals relating to corporate finance business in relation to certain types of specified investments. KKR Credit Advisors (EMEA) LLP has permission to engage in a number of regulated activities including managing, advising on and arranging deals in relation to certain types of specified investments.
Other Jurisdictions
Certain other subsidiaries or funds that we advise are registered with, have been licensed by or have obtained authorizations to operate in their respective jurisdictions outside of the United States. These registrations, licenses or authorizations relate to providing investment advice, broker-dealer activities, marketing of securities and other regulated activities. Failure to comply with the laws and regulations governing these subsidiaries and funds that have been registered, licensed or authorized could expose us to liability and/or damage our reputation.
KKR Credit Advisors (Ireland) Unlimited Company and KKR Alternative Investment Management Unlimited Company are regulated by the Central Bank of Ireland. KKR Credit Advisors (Ireland) Unlimited Company is authorized to carry out a number of regulated activities including receiving and transmitting orders, portfolio management and providing investment advice. KKR Alternative Investment Management Unlimited Company is an authorized EU alternative investment manager permitted to conduct portfolio management, risk management and certain administrative activities.
KKR Capital Markets LLC and MCS Capital Markets LLC, respectively, are also registered as an international dealer under the Securities Act (Ontario). This registration permits us to trade in non-Canadian equity and debt securities with certain types of investors located in Ontario, Canada.
KKR Capital Markets Japan Ltd., a joint stock corporation, is registered as a Type I and Type II Financial Instruments Business Operator (broker-dealer) under the Financial Instruments and Exchange Act of Japan, and a money lender under the Money Lending Business Act of Japan.
KKR MENA Limited, a Dubai International Financial Centre company, is licensed to arrange deals in investments, advise on financial products and arrange custody, and is regulated by the Dubai Financial Services Authority.
KKR Saudi Limited is licensed by the Capital Market Authority in Saudi Arabia and is authorized for the activity of arranging in the securities business.

30


KKR Australia Pty Limited and KKR Australia Investment Management Pty Limited are Australian financial services licensed and are authorized to provide advice on and deal in financial products for wholesale clients, and are regulated by the Australian Securities and Investments Commission.
KKR Capital Markets Asia Limited is licensed by the Securities and Futures Commission in Hong Kong to carry on dealing in securities and advising on securities regulated activities.
KKR Singapore Pte. Ltd. holds a capital markets services license to conduct fund management for qualified investors only, and is regulated by Monetary Authority of Singapore.
KKR Holdings Mauritius, Ltd. and KKR Account Adviser (Mauritius), Ltd. are unrestricted investment advisers authorized to manage portfolios of securities and give advice on securities transactions, and are regulated by the Financial Services Commission, Mauritius.
KKR Account Adviser (Mauritius), Ltd. is registered as a Foreign Portfolio Investor with the Securities Exchange Board of India ("SEBI") under the SEBI (Foreign Portfolio Investor) Regulations, 2014 pursuant to which it can make investments in listed and unlisted securities of Indian issuers.
KKR Mauritius Direct Investments I, Ltd. is registered as a Foreign Portfolio Investor with SEBI under the SEBI (Foreign Portfolio Investor) Regulations, 2014 pursuant to which it can make investments in listed and unlisted securities of Indian issuers, and is incorporated as an investment holding company in Mauritius regulated by the Financial Services Commission, Mauritius.
KKR India Financial Services Private Limited is registered with the Reserve Bank of India as a non-deposit taking non-banking financial company and is authorized to undertake lending and financing activities.
KKR Capital Markets India Private Limited is licensed by SEBI as a merchant banker that is authorized to execute capital market mandates, underwrite issues, offer investment advisory and other consultancy/advisory services in connection with securities. In addition, KKR Capital Markets India Private Limited is the investment manager and sponsor of five alternative investment funds, registered with SEBI under the SEBI (Alternative Investment Funds) Regulations, 2012.
Silverview Investments Pte. Ltd., Silverview Portfolio Investments Pte. Ltd. (earlier known as KKR Asia II Portfolio Investors Pte. Ltd.), Moneyline Portfolio Investments Limited are registered as a Foreign Portfolio Investor with SEBI under the SEBI (Foreign Portfolio Investor) Regulations, 2014 pursuant to which they can make investments in listed and unlisted securities of Indian issuers.
KKR India Asset Finance Private Limited (formerly known as Motichand Finance Private Limited) is registered with the Reserve Bank of India as a non-deposit taking non-banking financial company and is authorized to undertake lending and financing activities.
KKR Asia II Venture Investments Pte. Ltd. is registered with SEBI as a foreign venture capital investor, or FVCI, under the SEBI (Foreign Venture Capital Investors) Regulations, 2000 pursuant to which it can make certain investments in securities of Indian issuers and is incorporated as an investment holding company in Singapore.
From time to time, one or more of our investment funds or their related investment vehicles may be regulated as a mutual fund by the Cayman Islands Monetary Authority, regulated as an investment limited partnership by the Central Bank of Ireland, listed on the Irish Stock Exchange, notified with the Financial Services Agency of Japan for sale pursuant to certain private placement exemptions and/or for investment pursuant to certain exemption, registered with the Financial Supervisory Service of the Republic of Korea, licensed by or granted in principal approval from SEBI, subject to the regulatory supervision of the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier of Luxembourg, notified with the Netherlands Authority for Financial Markets for sale pursuant to certain private placement exemptions, or registered under the Investment Company Act.
There are a number of legislative and regulatory initiatives in the United States and in Europe that could significantly affect our business. Please see "Risk Factors—Risks Related to Our Business—Extensive regulation of our businesses affects our activities and creates the potential for significant liabilities and penalties. The possibility of increased regulatory focus or legislative or regulatory changes could materially and adversely affect our business."

31


Website and Availability of SEC Filings
Our website address is www.kkr.com. Information on our website is not incorporated by reference herein and is not a part of this report. We make available free of charge on our website or provide a link on our website to our Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and Current Reports on Form 8-K, and any amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act, as soon as reasonably practicable after those reports are electronically filed with, or furnished to, the SEC. To access these filings, go to the "KKR & Co. L.P." section of our "Investor Center" page on our website, then click on "SEC Filings." You may also read and copy any document we file at the SEC's public reference room located at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, DC 20549. Please call the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330 for further information on the public reference room. In addition these reports and the other documents we file with the SEC are available at a website maintained by the SEC at www.sec.gov.
From time to time, we may use our website as a channel of distribution of material information. Financial and other material information regarding our company is routinely posted on and accessible at www.kkr.com. In addition, you may automatically receive e-mail alerts and other information about our company by enrolling your e-mail address by visiting the "E-mail Alerts" section under the "KKR & Co. L.P." section of the "Investor Center" page at www.kkr.com.

ITEM 1A.  RISK FACTORS
 
Investing in our securities involves risk. Persons investing in our securities should carefully consider the risks described below and the other information contained in this report and other filings that we make from time to time with the SEC, including our consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. Any of the following risks could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations. Our business, financial condition or results of operations could also be materially and adversely affected by additional factors that apply to all companies generally, as well as other risks that are not currently known to us or that we currently view to be immaterial. In any such case, the trading price of our securities could decline and you may lose all or part of your original investment. While we attempt to mitigate known risks to the extent we believe to be practicable and reasonable, we can provide no assurance, and we make no representation, that our mitigation efforts will be successful.
Risks Related to Our Business
Difficult market and economic conditions can adversely affect our business in many ways, including by reducing the value or performance of the investments that we manage or by reducing the ability of our funds to raise or deploy capital, each of which could negatively impact our net income and cash flow and adversely affect our financial prospects and condition.
Our business and the businesses of the companies in which we invest are materially affected by financial markets and economic conditions or events throughout the world, such as interest rates, availability of credit, inflation rates, economic uncertainty, changes in laws (including laws relating to taxation), trade barriers, commodity prices, currency exchange rates and controls and national and international political circumstances (including wars, terrorist acts or security operations). For example, the unprecedented turmoil in the global financial markets during 2008 and 2009 provoked significant volatility of securities prices, contraction in the availability of credit and the failure of a number of companies, including leading financing institutions, and had a material adverse effect on our businesses and the businesses of the companies in which we invest. See "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Business Environment" for a discussion of recent developments in market and business conditions that may affect our business.
Such financial markets and economic conditions are outside our control and may affect the level and volatility of securities prices and liquidity and as a result, the value of our investments and our financial results. In addition, we may not be able to or may choose not to manage our exposure to these conditions and/or events. If not otherwise offset, declines in the equity, commodity and debt in the markets would likely cause us to write down our investments and the investments of our funds. For example, during the global financial crisis in 2008 and 2009, valuations of our private equity funds declined across all geographies, with investments in private equity funds marked down to as low as 67% of original cost and multiples of invested capital reaching as low as 0.5x, 0.6x, 0.7x and 0.8x for the European Fund II, European Fund III, 2006 Fund and Asian Fund, respectively, as of March 31, 2009. Our profitability may also be materially and adversely affected by our fixed costs and the possibility that we would be unable to scale back other costs within a time frame sufficient to match any decreases in net income relating to a downturn in market and economic conditions.
Unfavorable market and economic conditions may reduce opportunities for our funds to make, exit and realize value from their investments. Challenging market and economic conditions, including those caused by changes in tax laws and other regulatory restrictions, may make it difficult for us to find suitable investments for our funds or secure financing for

32


investments on attractive terms. Such conditions may also result in reduced opportunities for our funds to exit and realize value from their existing investments and lower-than-expected returns on existing investments. Although the equity markets are not the only means by which we exit investments, in challenging equity markets, our funds may experience greater difficulty in realizing value from investments. In addition, when financing is not available or becomes too costly, it is difficult for potential buyers to raise sufficient capital to purchase our funds' investments. Consequently, we may earn lower-than-expected returns on investments, which could cause us to realize diminished or no carried interest.
We generally raise capital for a successor fund following the substantial and successful deployment of capital from the existing fund. In the event of poor performance by existing funds, our ability to raise new funds is impaired. During periods of unfavorable fundraising conditions, fund investors may negotiate for lower fees, different fee sharing arrangements for transaction or other fees, and other concessions. The outcome of such negotiations could result in our agreement to terms that are materially less favorable to us than for prior funds we have managed. Our current funds, including all our recent private equity funds, have performance hurdles, which require us to generate a specified return on investment prior to our right to receive carried interest. This requirement will likely be in all our future funds, and the hurdle rate could increase for our future funds. In addition, successor funds raised by us when such unfavorable circumstances described above exist would also likely result in smaller funds than our comparable predecessor funds. Fund investors may also seek to redeploy capital away from certain of our credit or other non-private equity investment vehicles, which permit redemptions on relatively short notice, in order to meet liquidity needs or invest in other asset classes or with other managers. Any of these developments could materially and adversely affect our future revenues, net income, cash flow, financial condition or ability to retain our employees. See "—Our inability to raise additional or successor funds (or raise successor funds of a comparable size as our predecessor funds) could have a material adverse impact on our business" and "—Our investors in future funds may negotiate to pay us lower management fees, reimburse us for fewer expenses or change the economic terms of our future funds, including with respect to transaction fees, management fees or monitoring fees, to be less favorable to us than those of our existing funds, which could materially and adversely affect our revenues or profitability."
During periods of difficult market or economic conditions or slowdowns (which may occur across one or more industries, sectors or geographies), companies in which we have invested may experience decreased revenues, financial losses, credit rating downgrades, difficulty in obtaining access to financing and increased funding costs. These companies may also have difficulty in expanding their businesses and operations or be unable to meet their debt service obligations or pay other expenses as they become due, including amounts payable to us. Negative financial results in our funds' portfolio companies may result in lower investment returns for our investment funds, which could materially and adversely affect our operating results and cash flow. To the extent the operating performance of such portfolio companies (as well as valuation multiples) deteriorate or do not improve, our funds may sell those assets at values that are less than we projected or even at a loss, thereby significantly affecting those funds' performance and consequently our operating results and cash flow and resulting in lower or no carried interest being paid to us. Adverse conditions may also increase the risk of default with respect to private equity, credit and other investments that we manage or the abandonment or foreclosure of our real asset investments. Even if economic and market conditions do improve broadly, adverse conditions in particular sectors may also cause our performance to suffer. Finally, low interest rates related to monetary stimulus, economic stagnation or deflation may negatively impact expected returns on all types of investments as the demand for relatively higher return assets increases and the supply decreases.    
In addition, our Capital Markets segment generates fees through a variety of activities in connection with the issuance and placement of equity and debt securities and credit facilities, with the size of fees generally correlated to overall transaction sizes. As a result, the conditions in financial markets as described above, as well as transaction activity in our Private Markets segment and Public Markets segment, impact both the frequency and size of fees generated by this segment.
Changes in the debt financing markets may negatively impact the ability of our investment funds, their portfolio companies and strategies pursued with our balance sheet assets to obtain attractive financing for their investments or to refinance existing debt and may increase the cost of such financing or refinancing if it is obtained, which could lead to lower-yielding investments and potentially decrease our net income.
In the event that our funds are unable to obtain committed debt financing for potential acquisitions or can only obtain debt at an increased interest rate or on unfavorable terms, our funds may have difficulty completing otherwise profitable acquisitions or may generate profits that are lower than would otherwise be the case, either of which could lead to a decrease in the investment income earned by us. Any failure by lenders to provide previously committed financing can also expose us to potential claims by sellers of businesses that we may have contracted to purchase. Similarly, certain of the strategies pursued with our balance sheet assets rely on the use of leverage, including the issuance of CLOs, and other secured and unsecured borrowings. Our ability to generate returns on these assets and make cash available for distribution to our unitholders would be reduced to the extent that changes in market conditions, including continued increase by the U.S. Federal Reserve of its benchmark interest rate, cause the cost of our financing to increase relative to the income that can be derived from the assets

33


acquired and financed. Similarly, our portfolio companies regularly utilize the corporate debt markets in order to obtain financing for their operations. To the extent that credit markets render such financing difficult to obtain or more expensive, this may negatively impact the operating performance of those portfolio companies and, therefore, the investment returns on our funds. In addition, to the extent that conditions in the credit markets impair the ability of our portfolio companies to refinance or extend maturities on their outstanding debt, either on favorable terms or at all, the operating performance of those portfolio companies may be negatively impacted, which could impair the value of our investment in those portfolio companies and lead to a decrease in the investment income earned by us. In some cases, the inability of our portfolio companies to refinance or extend maturities may result in the inability of those companies to repay debt at maturity or pay interests when due, and may cause the companies to sell assets, undergo a recapitalization or seek bankruptcy protection, any of which would also likely impair the value of our investment and lead to a decrease in investment income earned by us.
We have significant liquidity requirements, and adverse market and economic conditions may adversely affect our sources of liquidity, which could adversely affect our business operations in the future.
We expect that our primary liquidity needs will consist of cash required to:
continue to grow our business, including seeding new strategies, funding our capital commitments made to existing and future funds, co-investments and any net capital requirements of our capital markets companies and otherwise supporting investment vehicles that we sponsor;
warehouse investments in portfolio companies or other investments for the benefit of one or more of our funds, accounts or CLOs pending the contribution of committed capital by the investors in such vehicles, and advancing capital to them for operational or other needs;
service debt obligations including the payment of obligations at maturity, on interest payment dates or upon redemption, as well as any contingent liabilities that may give rise to future cash payments;
fund cash operating expenses and contingencies, including for litigation matters;
pay amounts that may become due under our tax receivable agreement with KKR Holdings;
make cash distributions in accordance with our distribution policy for our common units or the terms of our preferred units;
underwrite commitments, advance loan proceeds and fund syndication commitments within our capital markets business;
make future purchase price payments in connection with our proprietary acquisitions, such as our strategic manager partnership with Marshall Wace, to the extent not paid by newly issued common units;
acquire other assets for our Principal Activities segment, including other businesses, investments and assets, some of which may be required to satisfy regulatory requirements for our capital markets business or risk retention requirements for CLOs (to the extent it continues to apply); and
repurchase our common units pursuant to the unit repurchase program or other securities issued by us.
These liquidity requirements are significant and, in some cases, involve capital that will remain invested for extended periods of time. As of December 31, 2017, we have approximately $5.7 billion of remaining unfunded capital commitments to our investment funds. Our commitments to our funds will require significant cash outlays over time, and there can be no assurance that we will be able to generate sufficient cash flows from realizations of investments to fund them. We have also used our balance sheet to provide credit support to our general partner's obligations to our funds and to support certain transactions by our funds.
In addition, as of December 31, 2017, we had $21.2 billion of indebtedness outstanding under our credit facilities and debt securities on a GAAP basis and $3.1 billion of indebtedness outstanding under our credit facilities and debt securities on a segment basis, and $1.9 billion of cash and short-term investments on a GAAP basis and $3.2 billion of cash and short-term investments on a segment basis. The segment-based measures exclude the assets and liabilities of our investment funds, CLOs and CMBS and other consolidated entities that are not subsidiaries of KKR & Co. L.P., but include KKR Financial Holdings LLC's ("KFN") debt obligations, which as of December 31, 2017, consisted of $764.8 million and KFN's 7.375% Series A LLC

34


preferred shares of $373.8 million, which do not provide for recourse to KKR beyond the assets of KFN. All of KFN's outstanding 7.375% Series A LLC preferred shares were redeemed on January 16, 2018. Our $1.0 billion corporate revolving credit facility will mature in 2019. Depending on market conditions, we may not be able to refinance or renew all or part of these senior notes or our corporate revolving credit facility, or find alternate sources of financing (including issuing equity), on commercially reasonable terms or at all. Furthermore, the incurrence of additional debt by us or our subsidiaries in the future could result in downgrades of our existing corporate credit ratings, which could limit the availability of future financing and increase our costs of borrowing.
In addition, the underwriting commitments for our capital markets business may require significant cash obligations, and these commitments may also put pressure on our liquidity. The holding company for our capital markets business has entered into a credit agreement that provides for revolving borrowings of up to $500 million, which can only be used in connection with our capital markets business, including placing and underwriting securities offerings, and a 364-day revolving credit agreement that provides for revolving borrowing of up to $750 million, which can only be used to facilitate the settlement of debt transaction syndicated by our capital markets business. To the extent we commit to buy and sell an issue of securities in firm commitment underwritings or otherwise, we may be required to borrow under these revolving credit facilities to fund such obligations, which, depending on the size and timing of the obligations, may limit our ability to enter into other underwriting arrangements or similar activities, service existing debt obligations or otherwise grow our business. Further, these facilities are scheduled to mature in 2021 and 2018, respectively, and depending on the market conditions, we may not be able to refinance or renew them on commercially reasonable terms or at all. Regulatory net capital requirements may also limit the ability of our broker-dealer subsidiaries to participate in underwriting or other transactions or to allocate our capital more efficiently across our businesses.
Our other liquidity requirements include potential future purchase price payments in connection with strategic manager partnerships with third-party hedge fund managers like Marshall Wace, based on the respective performance of these businesses or the exercise of certain options. In the fourth quarter of 2017, due to the exercise of one of the options agreed to between Marshall Wace and KKR, we acquired an additional 5.0% interest in Marshall Wace, for which we paid with a combination of cash and common units. In addition, in connection with the development of a new KKR office in New York City, we will be required to pay for the construction of the office, which is expected to be completed in 2020.
In the event that our liquidity requirements were to exceed available liquid assets for the reasons specified above or for any other reasons, we could be forced to sell assets or seek to raise debt or equity capital on unfavorable terms. For further discussion of our liquidity needs see "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity."
The "clawback" provisions in our governing agreements may give rise to a contingent obligation that may require us to return or contribute amounts to our funds and fund investors.
The partnership documents governing our carry-paying funds, including funds relating to private equity, growth equity, infrastructure, energy, real estate, special situations, private credit opportunities, direct lending, revolving credit and core investments, generally include a "clawback" provision that, if triggered, may give rise to a contingent obligation requiring the general partner to return amounts to the fund for distribution to the fund investors at the end of the life of the fund. Under a clawback obligation, upon the liquidation of a fund, the general partner is required to return, typically on an after-tax basis, previously distributed carry to the extent that, due to the diminished performance of later investments, the aggregate amount of carry distributions received by the general partner during the term of the fund exceed the amount to which the general partner was ultimately entitled, including the effects of any performance thresholds. We would continue to be subject to the clawback obligation even if carry has been distributed to current or former employees or other personnel through our carry pool, and we would be required to seek other sources of liquidity to fund such an obligation if such carry is not returned to us by them. Excluding carried interest received by the general partners of funds that were not contributed to us in the KPE Transaction, as of December 31, 2017, $19.2 million of carried interest was subject to this clawback obligation, assuming that all applicable carry-paying funds were liquidated at their December 31, 2017 fair values. Had the investments in such carry-paying funds been liquidated at zero value, the clawback obligation would have been $1,920.9 million.
Carry distributions arising subsequent to the KPE Transaction may give rise to clawback obligations that may be allocated generally to us and our principals who participate in the carry pool. In addition, guarantees of or similar arrangements relating to clawback obligations in favor of third-party investors in an individual investment partnership by entities we own may limit distributions of carried interest more generally.
Strategic investor partnerships have longer investment periods and invest in multiple strategies, which may increase the possibility of a "netting hole," which will result in less carried interest for us, as well as clawback liabilities.

35


We have entered into strategic partnerships with certain investors, generally through separately managed accounts, which have longer investment periods, often of 20 years or more, and provide for investments across different investment strategies (which we refer to as "strategic investor partnerships"). Compared to our traditional private equity fund structure, these partnerships may offer reduced fees for fund investors and may require netting across various funds in which they invest. Generally, if a fund's investments have fair values above cost overall, but one or more of its investments has a fair value that is below cost, the shortfall between cost and fair value for such investment (which we refer to as a "netting hole") must be "filled" by returning invested capital to such fund's limited partners in an amount equal to such shortfall before any realized gains on individual investments can be distributed to the general partner as carried interest. The longer investment period and cross-fund netting feature of the strategic investor partnerships increases the possibility of netting holes compared to our traditional private equity fund structure, which, if present, will reduce the carried interest we otherwise would earn. Similarly, the longer duration of these partnerships can increase the risk of clawback, because over a longer investment period, a period of reduced performance following periods of performance adequate to realize carried interest is more likely to occur. See "—The 'clawback' provisions in our governing agreements may give rise to a contingent obligation that may require us to return or contribute amounts to our funds and fund investors."
Our earnings and cash flow are highly variable due to the nature of our business and we do not intend to provide earnings guidance, each of which may cause the value of interests in our business to be volatile.
Our earnings are highly variable from quarter to quarter due to the volatility of investment returns of most of our funds, other investment vehicles and our balance sheet assets and the fees earned from our businesses. We recognize earnings on investments in our funds based on our allocable share of realized and unrealized gains (or losses) reported by such funds and for certain of our recent funds, when a performance hurdle is achieved. During times of market volatility the fair value of our funds and our balance sheet assets are more variable, and as publicly traded equity securities currently represent a significant proportion of the assets of many of our funds and balance sheet assets, volatility in the equity markets may have a significant impact on our reported results. See "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Critical Accounting Policies—Fair Value Measurements" for a discussion of the impact of equity markets on the value of private equity investments. A decline in realized or unrealized gains, a failure to achieve a performance hurdle or an increase in realized or unrealized losses, would adversely affect our net income.
Fee income, which we recognize when contractually earned, can vary due to fluctuations in AUM, the number of investment transactions made by our funds, the number of portfolio companies we manage, the fee provisions contained in our funds and other investment products and transactions by our capital markets business. In any particular quarter, fee income may vary significantly due to the variances in size and frequency of monitoring fees (including termination payments), transaction fees or fees received by our capital markets business. Our total management, monitoring and transaction fees (net of fee credits) for the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015 were $1,431.0 million, $987.6 million and $874.7 million, respectively, on a GAAP basis, and $1,502.0 million, $1,074.9 million and $1,142.1 million, respectively, on a segment basis. We may create new funds or investment products or vary the terms of our funds or investment products (for example our funds now include performance hurdles), which may alter the composition or mix of our income from time to time. In particular, in our newer private equity and other funds, we have agreed to return to our fund investors all monitoring and transaction fees generated by the fund's investments, which resulted in a decrease of our monitoring and transaction fee income. We may also experience fluctuations in our results from quarter to quarter, including our revenue and net income, due to a number of other factors, including changes in the values of our funds' investments, changes in the amount of distributions or interest earned in respect of investments, changes in our operating expenses, the degree to which we encounter competition and general market and economic conditions. In addition, our earnings and cash flows are dependent in part on the performance of KFN, a specialty finance company that we acquired in 2014, and are subject to the risks to KFN's businesses as described elsewhere in the report. Although KFN is a subsidiary of KKR, KFN has its own indebtedness outstanding. The terms of its indebtedness impose limitations on KFN's current and future operations and may restrict its ability to make distributions to KKR. For the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015, our net income attributable to KKR & Co. L.P. common unitholders on a GAAP basis was $984.9 million, $287.1 million and $488.5 million, respectively, and our economic net income (loss) on a segment basis was $2,435.3 million, $794.4 million and $1,298.0 million, respectively. Such fluctuations may lead to variability in the value of interests in our business and cause our results for a particular period not to be indicative of our performance in future periods. It may be difficult for us to achieve steady growth in net income and cash flow on a quarterly basis, which could in turn lead to large adverse movements in the value of interests in our business.
The timing and receipt of carried interest from our investment funds are unpredictable and will contribute to the volatility of our cash flows. For example, with respect to our private equity funds, carried interest is distributed to the general partner of a private equity fund with a clawback provision only after all of the following are met: (i) a realization event has occurred (e.g., sale of a portfolio company, dividend, etc.); (ii) the fund has achieved positive overall investment returns since its inception, in excess of performance hurdles where applicable; and (iii) with respect to investments with a fair value below cost

36


(which we refer to as a netting hole), cost has been returned to fund investors in an amount sufficient to reduce remaining cost to the investments' fair value. Carried interest payments from investments depend on our funds' performance and opportunities for realizing gains, which may be limited. It takes a substantial period of time to identify attractive investment opportunities, to raise all the funds needed to make an investment and then to realize the cash value (or other proceeds) of an investment through a sale, public offering or other exit. To the extent an investment is not profitable, no carried interest will be received from our funds with respect to that investment and, to the extent such investment remains unprofitable, we will only be entitled to a management fee on that investment. Furthermore, certain vehicles and separately managed accounts may not provide for the payment of any carried interest at all. Even if an investment proves to be profitable, it may be several years before any profits can be realized in cash. We cannot predict when, or if, any realization of investments will occur. In addition, if finance providers, such as commercial and investment banks, make it difficult for potential purchasers to secure financing to purchase companies in our investment funds' portfolio, it may decrease potential realization events and the potential to earn carried interest. A downturn in the equity markets would also make it more difficult to exit investments by selling equity securities. If we were to have a realization event in a particular quarter, the event may have a significant impact on our cash flows during the quarter that may not be replicated in subsequent quarters. A decline in realized or unrealized gains, or an increase in realized or unrealized losses, would adversely affect our investment income, which could further increase the volatility of our quarterly results.
The timing and receipt of carried interest also vary with the life cycle of certain of our funds. Our carry-paying funds that have completed their investment periods and are able to realize mature investments, sometimes referred to as being in a "harvesting period," are more likely to make larger distributions than our carry-paying funds that are in their fund raising or investment periods that precede the harvesting period. During times when a significant portion of our AUM is attributable to carry-paying funds that are not in their harvesting periods, we may receive substantially lower carried interest distributions.
In addition, our hedge funds business consists of strategic manager partnerships with third-party hedge fund managers in which KKR owns a minority stake. These hedge fund managers offer a variety of investment strategies, including hedge fund-of-funds, equity hedge funds, credit hedge funds and funds making investments based on natural catastrophe and weather risks. As a result, we are indirectly exposed to the volatility and fluctuations in financial results of our strategic manager partners. For example, certain funds managed by our strategic manager partners have "high-water mark" provisions whereby if the funds have experienced losses in prior periods, the fund managers will not be able to earn incentive fees with respect to a fund investor's account until the net asset value of the fund investor's account exceeds the highest period end value on which incentive fees were previously paid. The incentive fees our strategic manager partners earn are therefore dependent on the net asset value of these funds, which could add to volatility in our quarterly results and cash flow.
A decline in the pace or size of investment by our funds would result in our receiving less revenue from fees.
The transaction and management or monitoring fees that we earn are driven in part by the pace at which our funds make investments and the size of those investments. Any decline in that pace or the size of investments would reduce our revenue from transaction and management or monitoring fees. Likewise, during an attractive selling environment, our funds may capitalize on increased opportunities to exit investments. Any increase in the pace at which our funds exit investments, if not offset by new commitments and investments, would reduce future management fees. Additionally, in certain of our funds that derive management fees only on the basis of invested capital, the pace at which we make investments, the length of time we hold such investment and the timing of disposition will directly impact our revenues. Many factors could cause such a decline in the pace of investment or the transaction and management or monitoring fees we receive, including:
the inability of our investment professionals to identify attractive investment opportunities;
competition for such opportunities among other potential acquirers;
unfavorable market and economic conditions;
decreased availability of capital or financing on attractive terms;
our failure to consummate identified investment opportunities because of business, regulatory or legal complexities and adverse developments in the U.S. or global economy or financial markets;
terms we may agree with or provide to our fund investors or investors in separately managed accounts with respect to fees such as increasing the percentage of transaction or other fees we may share with our fund investors; and
new regulations, guidance or other actions provided or taken by regulatory authorities.

37


Our inability to raise additional or successor funds (or raise successor funds of a comparable size as our predecessor funds) could have a material adverse impact on our business.
Our current private equity funds and certain other funds and investment vehicles have a finite life and a finite amount of commitments from fund investors. Once a fund nears the end of its investment period, our success depends on our ability to raise additional or successor funds in order to keep making investments and, over the long term, earning management fees (although our funds and investment vehicles continue to earn management fees after the expiration of their investment periods, they are generally at a reduced rate). Even if we are successful in raising successor funds, to the extent we are unable to raise successor funds of a comparable size to our predecessor funds or the extent that we are delayed in raising such successor funds, our revenues may decrease as the investment period of our predecessor funds expire and associated fees decrease. For example, European Fund IV was smaller than its predecessor fund and North America Fund XI was smaller than its predecessor fund. The performance of our funds also impacts our ability to raise capital, and deterioration in the performance of our funds would result in challenges to future fundraising. The evolving preferences of our fund investors may necessitate that alternatives to the traditional investment fund structure, such as separately managed accounts, smaller funds and co-investment vehicles, become a larger part of our business going forward. This could increase our cost of raising capital at the scale we have historically achieved. Furthermore, in order to raise capital for new strategies and products without drawing capital away from our existing products, we will need to seek new sources of capital such as individual investors.
Our ability to raise new funds could also be hampered if the general appeal of private equity and alternative investments were to decline. An investment in a limited partner interest in a private equity fund is less liquid than an exchange traded instrument and the returns on such investment may be more volatile than an investment in securities for which there is a more active and transparent market. Private equity and alternative investments could fall into disfavor as a result of concerns about liquidity and short-term performance. Institutional investors in private equity funds that have suffered from decreasing returns, liquidity pressure, increased volatility or difficulty maintaining target asset allocations may materially decrease or temporarily suspend making new investments in private equity funds. Such concerns could be exhibited, in particular, by public pension funds, which have historically been among the largest investors in alternative assets. Many public pension funds are significantly underfunded and their funding problems have been, and may in the future be, exacerbated by economic downturn. Concerns with liquidity could cause such public pension funds to reevaluate the appropriateness of alternative investments, and other institutional investors may reduce their overall portfolio allocations to alternative investments. This could result in a smaller overall pool of available capital in our industry. There is no assurance that the amount of commitments investors are making to alternative investment funds will continue at recent levels or that our ability to raise capital from investors will not be hampered.
In addition, the asset allocation rules or regulations or investment policies to which such third-party investors are subject could inhibit or restrict the ability of third-party investors to make investments in our investment funds. Coupled with a lack of distributions from their existing investment portfolios, many of these investors may have been left with disproportionately outsized remaining commitments to, and invested capital in, a number of investment funds, which may significantly limit their ability to make new commitments to third-party managed investment funds such as those advised by us.
Fund investors may also seek to redeploy capital away from certain of our credit or other non-private equity investment vehicles, which permit redemptions on relatively short notice in order to meet liquidity needs or invest in other asset classes. We believe that our ability to avoid excessive redemption levels primarily depends on our funds' continued satisfactory performance, although redemptions may also be driven by other factors important to our fund investors, including their need for liquidity and compliance with investment mandates, even if our performance is superior. Investors' liquidity needs tend to be more pronounced during periods of market volatility. Any such redemptions would decrease our AUM and revenues.
In addition, the Dodd Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the "Dodd-Frank Act"), under what has become known as the "Volcker Rule," broadly prohibits depository institution holding companies (including foreign banks with U.S. branches, agencies or commercial lending companies and certain insurance companies), insured depository institutions and their subsidiaries and controlled affiliates, or "banking entities," from investing in "covered funds," including third-party private equity funds like ours. As a result, banking entities, subject to certain limited exemptions, had to conform their existing covered fund investments and relationships to the Volcker Rule, and will be limited in their ability to undertake new contractual commitments to private equity funds like ours.
Banking entities have historically represented an important, although decreasing, class of investors for our funds. It is possible that other institutions will not be available to replace this traditional source of capital for our private equity funds. Furthermore, divestitures by banking entities of interests in private equity funds over the next several years to comply with the Volcker Rule may lead to lower prices in the secondary market for our fund interests, which could have adverse implications for our ability to raise funds from investors who may have considered the availability of secondary market liquidity as a factor

38


in determining whether to invest. In addition to federal law, changes in state and local law may limit investment activities of state pension plans and insurance companies.
The number of funds raising capital varies from year to year, and in years where relatively few funds are raising capital, the growth of our AUM, FPAUM and associated fees may be significantly lower. There is no assurance that fundraises for new strategies or successor funds will experience similar success as our existing or predecessor funds in the future.
Our investors in future funds may negotiate to pay us lower management fees, reimburse us for fewer expenses or change the economic terms of our future funds, including with respect to transaction fees, management fees or monitoring fees, to be less favorable to us than those of our existing funds, which could materially and adversely affect our revenues or profitability.
In connection with raising new funds or securing additional investments in existing funds, we negotiate terms for such funds and investments with our fund limited partners. The outcome of such negotiations could result in our agreement to terms that are materially less favorable to us than the terms of prior funds we have advised or funds advised by our competitors. Such terms could restrict our ability to raise investment funds with investment objectives or strategies that compete with existing funds, reduce fee revenues we earn, reduce the percentage of profits on third-party capital in which we share, increase the performance hurdle required to be generated on investment prior to our right to receive carried interest, add expenses and obligations for us in managing the fund or increase our potential liabilities. Furthermore, as institutional investors increasingly consolidate their relationships with investment firms and competition becomes more acute, we may receive more requests to modify the terms in our new funds. Certain of our newer funds also include more favorable terms for fund investors that commit to early closes for our funds. Additionally, in certain funds, we have agreed to charge management fees based on invested capital or net asset value as opposed to charging management fees based on committed capital. In certain cases, we have provided "fee holidays" to certain investors in which we do not charge management fees for a fixed period of time (such as the first six months).  Agreement to terms that are materially less favorable to us could result in a material decrease in our profitability.
Certain institutional investors have also publicly criticized certain fund fee and expense structures, including monitoring fees and transaction fees. We have received and expect to continue to receive requests from a variety of fund investors and groups representing such investors to decrease fees and to modify our carried interest and incentive fee structures, which could result in a reduction or delay in the timing of receipt of the fees and carried interest and incentive fees we earn. The SEC has focused on certain fund fees and expenses, including whether such fees and expenses were appropriately disclosed to fund limited partners, and such focus may lead to increased publicity that could cause fund investors to further resist our receipt of certain fees and expense reimbursements. In our recent flagship private equity funds, we have increased the percentage of transaction and monitoring fees that are credited against fund management fees to 100% of the amount of the transaction and monitoring fees attributable to that fund.
In addition, certain institutional investors, including sovereign wealth funds and public pension funds, have demonstrated an increased preference for alternatives to the traditional investment fund structure, such as separately managed accounts, specialized funds and co-investment vehicles. We also have entered into strategic investor partnerships with specific investors whereby we manage that investor's capital across a variety of our products on separately negotiated terms. There can be no assurance that such alternatives will be as profitable to us as the traditional investment fund structure, and the impact such a trend could have on our results of operations, if widely implemented, is unclear. Moreover, certain institutional investors are demonstrating a preference to in-source their own investment professionals and to make direct investments in alternative assets without the assistance of investment advisers like us. Such institutional investors may become our competitors and could cease to be our clients.
Any agreement to or changes in terms less favorable to us could materially and adversely affect our revenues and profitability.

39


The investment management business is intensely competitive, which could have a material adverse impact on our business.
We compete as an investment manager for both fund investors and investment opportunities. The investment management business is highly fragmented, with our competitors consisting primarily of sponsors of public and private investment funds, real estate development companies, BDCs, investment banks, commercial finance companies and operating companies acting as strategic buyers of businesses. We believe that competition for fund investors is based primarily on:
investment performance;
investor liquidity and willingness to invest;
investor perception of investment managers' drive, focus and alignment of interest;
business reputation;
the duration of relationships with fund investors;
the quality of services provided to fund investors;
pricing;
fund terms (including fees); and
the relative attractiveness of the types of investments that have been or will be made.
We believe that competition for investment opportunities is based primarily on the pricing, terms and structure of a proposed investment and certainty of execution.
A number of factors serve to increase our competitive risks:
a number of our competitors in some of our businesses may have greater financial, technical, marketing and other resources and more personnel than we do, and, in the case of some asset classes or geographic regions, longer operating histories, more established relationships, greater expertise or better reputation;
fund investors may materially decrease their allocations in new funds due to their experiences following an economic downturn, the limited availability of capital, regulatory requirements or a desire to consolidate their relationships with investment firms;
some of our competitors may have agreed to terms on their investment funds or products that are more favorable to fund investors than our funds or products, such as lower management fees, greater fee sharing or higher performance hurdles for carried interest, and therefore we may be forced to match or otherwise revise our terms to be less favorable to us than they have been in the past;
some of our funds may not perform as well as competitors' funds or other available investment products;
our competitors have raised or may raise significant amounts of capital, and many of them have similar investment objectives and strategies to our funds, which may create additional competition for investment opportunities and may reduce the size and duration of pricing inefficiencies that many alternative investment strategies seek to exploit;
some of these competitors may also have a lower cost of capital and access to funding sources that are not available to us, which may create competitive disadvantages for us with respect to investment opportunities;
some of our competitors may have higher risk tolerances, different risk assessments or lower return thresholds, which could allow them to consider a wider variety of investments and to bid more aggressively than us for investments;
some of our competitors may be subject to less regulation or less regulatory scrutiny and accordingly may have more flexibility to undertake and execute certain businesses or investments than we do and/or bear less expense to comply with such regulations than we do;

40


there are relatively few barriers to entry impeding the formation of new funds, including a relatively low cost of entering these businesses, and the successful efforts of new entrants into our various lines of business, including major commercial and investment banks and other financial institutions, have resulted in increased competition;
some fund investors may prefer to invest with an investment manager that is not publicly traded, is smaller or manages fewer investment products; and
other industry participants will from time to time seek to recruit our investment professionals and other employees away from us.
We may lose investment opportunities in the future if we do not match investment prices, structures and terms offered by competitors. Our competitors that are corporate buyers may be able to achieve synergistic cost savings in respect of an investment, which may provide them with a competitive advantage in bidding for an investment. Alternatively, we may experience decreased investment returns and increased risks of loss if we match investment prices, structures and terms offered by competitors. Moreover, as a result, if we are forced to compete with other investment firms on the basis of price, we may not be able to maintain our current fund fee, carried interest or other terms. There is a risk that fees and carried interest in the alternative investment management industry will decline, without regard to the historical performance of a manager. Fee or carried interest income reductions on existing or future funds, without corresponding decreases in our cost structure, could materially and adversely affect our revenues and profitability.
In addition, if interest rates were to rise or if market conditions for competing investment products become or are more favorable and such products begin to offer rates of return superior to those achieved by our funds, the attractiveness of our funds relative to investments in other investment products could decrease. This competitive pressure could materially and adversely affect our ability to make successful investments and limit our ability to raise future funds, either of which would adversely impact our business, results of operations and cash flow.
Our structure implicates complex provisions of U.S. federal income tax laws for which no clear precedent or authority may be available. These structures also are subject to potential legislative, judicial or administrative change and differing interpretations, possibly on a retroactive basis. In addition, we may elect to change our structure at any time.
The U.S. federal income tax treatment of our unitholders depends in some instances on determinations of fact and interpretations of complex provisions of U.S. federal income tax laws for which no clear precedent or authority may be available. The U.S. federal income tax rules are constantly under review by persons involved in the legislative process, the Internal Revenue Service ("IRS"), and the U.S. Department of the Treasury, frequently resulting in revised interpretations of established concepts, statutory changes, revisions to regulations and other modifications and interpretations. The present U.S. federal income tax treatment of owning our common units may be modified by administrative, legislative or judicial interpretation at any time, and any such action may affect investments and commitments previously made. The maintenance of the structure and tax attributes of the KKR Group Partnerships, which comprise our businesses, requires significant monitoring and resources. Failure to maintain this structure could result in material adverse tax consequences.
Our organizational documents and agreements give our Managing Partner broad authority to modify our limited partnership agreement from time to time as our Managing Partner determines to be necessary or appropriate, without the consent of the unitholders, to address changes in U.S. federal, state and local income tax regulations, legislation or interpretation. Without the consent of the unitholders, our Managing Partner may also elect to convert KKR into a corporation or cause KKR to be taxed as a corporation for U.S. federal tax purposes, if certain conditions have been satisfied. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which was enacted in December 2017 and amends various aspects of U.S. federal income tax legislation (the "2017 Tax Act"), increases the likelihood of such a conversion. On February 8, 2018, we announced that our senior management and our Managing Partner's board of directors are evaluating whether to convert from a partnership to a corporation. Such a conversion could be a taxable event to our unitholders where gain or loss is recognized. In addition, a conversion would subject all of our future net income to a level of corporate tax, which may reduce the amount of cash available for distribution or reinvestment and reduce our reported after-tax earnings. In addition, certain exemptions from certain corporate governance requirements of the NYSE would no longer be available to us if we convert to a corporation, and we may undertake significant internal reorganization of our organizational structure, both of which could result in an increase in costs. See "—Risks Related to Our Common Units—As a limited partnership, we qualify for some exemptions from the corporate governance and other requirements of the NYSE." Finally, following a conversion, certain future payments required under our tax receivable agreement could be materially higher than they would have been had we not converted. See "—Risks Related to Our Organizational Structure—We will be required to pay our principals for most of the benefits relating to any additional tax depreciation or amortization deductions we may claim as a result of the tax basis step-up we receive in connection with subsequent exchanges of our common units and related transactions" and "Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence—Tax Receivable Agreement."

41


The U.S. Congress has considered legislation that would have in some cases after a ten-year period, precluded us from qualifying as a partnership or required us to hold carried interest through taxable subsidiary corporations. If any similar legislation were to be enacted and apply to us, the after-tax income and gain related to our business, as well as the market price of our units, could be reduced.
Some legislative and administrative proposals have provided that, for taxable years beginning after the date of enactment (or in some cases, beginning ten years after the date of enactment), income derived with respect to carried interest would not meet the qualifying income requirements under the publicly traded partnership rules. Therefore, if similar legislation is enacted, following such enactment (or such ten-year period), we would be precluded from qualifying as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes. If we were taxed as a U.S. corporation, our effective tax rate would increase significantly. The federal statutory rate for corporations is 21% effective January 1, 2018. In addition, we could be subject to increased state and local taxes. Furthermore, you could be subject to tax on our conversion into a corporation. See "—Our structure implicates complex provisions of U.S. federal income tax laws for which no clear precedent or authority may be available. These structures also are subject to potential legislative, judicial or administrative change and differing interpretations, possibly on a retroactive basis. In addition, we may elect to change our structure at any time."
States and other jurisdictions have also considered legislation to increase taxes with respect to carried interest. For example, New York has periodically considered legislation under which you could be subject to New York state income tax on income in respect of our common units as a result of certain activities of our affiliates in New York, although it is unclear when or whether such legislation will be enacted.
If the proposed legislation described above or any similar legislation were to be enacted and apply to us, the after-tax income and gain related to our business, our ability to fund cash distributions, as well as the market price of our units, could be reduced.
Additional proposed changes in the U.S. and foreign taxation of businesses could adversely affect us.
The U.S. Congress, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (the "OECD") and other government agencies in jurisdictions in which we and our affiliates invest or do business have maintained a focus on issues related to the taxation of multinational companies. The OECD has made changes to numerous long-standing tax principles through its base erosion and profit shifting ("BEPS") project, which is focused on a number of issues, including the allocation of profits among affiliated entities in different tax jurisdictions. The OECD released the BEPS package in October 2015, which looks at various different ways in which domestic tax rules around the world, and the bilateral double tax treaties that govern the interplay between them, could be amended to address perceived profit shifting among affiliated entities. Several of the proposed measures, including measures covering treaty abuse (including an anti-abuse "principal purpose" test that would deny treaty benefits to the extent that obtaining such benefit was one of the principal purposes of any arrangement or transaction that resulted directly or indirectly in such benefit), the deductibility of interest expense, local nexus requirements, transfer pricing and hybrid mismatch arrangements are potentially relevant to some of our structures and could have an adverse tax impact on our funds, investors and/or our portfolio companies. Some member countries have been moving forward on the BEPS agenda but, because timing of implementation and the specific measures adopted will vary among participating states, significant uncertainty remains regarding the impact of BEPS proposals. If implemented, these proposals could result in a loss of tax treaty benefits and increased taxes on income from our investments.
A number of European jurisdictions have enacted taxes on financial transactions, and the European Commission has proposed legislation to harmonize these taxes under the so-called "enhanced cooperation procedure," which provides for adoption of EU-level legislation applicable to some but not all EU Member States. Several of these proposals for reform, if enacted by the United States or by other countries in which we or our affiliates invest or do business, could materially and adversely affect our investment returns and could reduce the cash we have available for distributions to unitholders or for other uses by us. It is unclear what any actual legislation could provide, when it would be proposed or what its prospects for enactment could be.
We depend on our founders and other key personnel, the loss of whose services could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
We depend on the efforts, skills, reputations and business contacts of our employees, including our founders, Henry Kravis and George Roberts, and other key personnel, the information and deal flow they and others generate during the normal course of their activities and the synergies among the diverse fields of expertise and knowledge held by our professionals. Accordingly, our success depends on the continued service of these individuals, who are not obligated to remain employed with us. The loss of the services of any of them could have a material adverse effect on our revenues, net income and cash flows and could harm our ability to maintain or grow AUM in existing funds or raise additional funds in the future.

42


Our employees and other key personnel possess substantial experience and expertise and have strong business relationships with investors in our funds and other members of the business community. As a result, the loss of these personnel could jeopardize our relationships with investors in our funds and members of the business community and result in the reduction of AUM or fewer investment opportunities. For example, if any of our key personnel were to join or form a competing firm, our business, results of operations and financial condition could suffer.
Furthermore, the agreements governing our committed capital funds generally provide that in the event certain "key persons" (for example, both of Messrs. Kravis and Roberts for our private equity funds, and, in the case of certain geographically or product focused funds, one or more of the executives focused on such funds) cease to actively manage a fund or be substantially involved in KKR activities, investors in the fund will be entitled to reduce, in whole or in part, their capital commitments available for further investments on an investor-by-investor basis. In the case of certain of our fully paid-up funds, investors may be permitted to terminate their investment in the event a "key persons" provision is triggered, which could possibly lead to a liquidation of those funds. In addition, the occurrence of such a "key person" event could cause us to agree to less favorable ongoing terms with respect to the affected fund. Although we periodically engage in discussions with the limited partners of our funds regarding a waiver of such provisions with respect to executives involved in geographically or product focused funds whose departures have occurred or are anticipated, such waiver is not guaranteed, and our limited partners' refusal to provide a waiver may have a material adverse effect on our revenue, net income and cash flow.
If we cannot retain and motivate our employees and other key personnel and recruit, retain and motivate new employees and other key personnel, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be materially and adversely affected.
Our most important asset is our people, and our continued success is highly dependent upon the efforts of our employees and other key personnel, and to a substantial degree on our ability to retain and motivate our employees and other key personnel and to strategically recruit, retain and motivate new talented employees, including qualified investment professionals. However, we may not be successful in these efforts as the market for talented and qualified candidates is extremely competitive. Our ability to recruit, retain and motivate our employees is dependent on our ability to offer highly attractive incentive opportunities. Under the 2017 Tax Act, investments must be held for more than three years, rather than the prior requirement of more than one year, for carried interest to be treated for U.S. federal income tax purposes as capital gain. The longer holding period requirement may result in some of our carried interest being treated as ordinary income, which would materially increase the amount of taxes that our employees and other key personnel would be required to pay, thereby adversely affecting our ability to offer attractive incentive opportunities. See "—Risks Related to U.S. Taxation." Similarly, changes in the United Kingdom with respect to the taxation of carried interest, including the treatment of certain carried interest returns as income, which became effective from April 6, 2016, may impact our ability to recruit, retain and motivate employees and key personnel in the United Kingdom. In addition, there have been proposed laws and regulations that sought to regulate the compensation of certain of our employees. See "—Extensive regulation of our business affects our activities and creates the potential for significant liabilities and penalties. The possibility of increased regulatory focus or legislative or regulatory changes could materially and adversely affect our business." The loss of even a small number of our investment professionals could jeopardize the performance of our funds and other investment products, which would have a material adverse effect on our results of operations. Efforts to retain or attract employees, including our investment professionals, may result in significant additional expenses, which could materially and adversely affect our profitability.
Many of our employees hold interests in our business through KKR Holdings. These individuals historically received financial benefits from our business in the form of distributions and amounts funded by KKR Holdings and through their direct and indirect participation in the value of KKR Group Partnership Units held by KKR Holdings. While all of our employees receive base salaries from us, annual cash bonuses for certain employees were historically borne by KKR Holdings from its cash reserves based upon distributions on a portion of KKR Group Partnership Units held by KKR Holdings. However, many units in KKR Holdings have been allocated to certain employees and non-employee operating consultants, and upon their vesting, distributions on vested units would belong to such unitholders and not be available to fund annual cash bonuses. In addition, under its distribution policy, KKR intends to make equal quarterly distributions to holders of its common units in a fixed amount per common unit per quarter. As a result, to the extent that distributions are made on KKR Group Partnership Units (which are used by KKR to pay such quarterly distributions), the pro rata distributions received by KKR Holdings for KKR Group Partnership Units underlying any unvested KKR Holdings units could be insufficient to fully fund annual cash bonus compensation. In 2017, the amount of such annual cash bonuses borne by KKR Holdings was $5.5 million, and we funded the rest of the cash bonus payments from other sources, including cash from our operations and the carry pool. Although KKR Holdings may fund a larger portion of the cash bonus payments from its cash reserves, if any, in future periods, we likely will continue to utilize our own funds for most, if not all, of the cash bonus payments. In that event, either our profit margins or our employee retention or both may be adversely impacted. There can be no assurance that the carry pool will have sufficient cash available to continue to make such cash payments in the future and fluctuations from the distributions generated from the carry pool, if not offset by funds from other sources, including other performance-based income, could render our

43


compensation less attractive. In any of these circumstances, a higher percentage of our revenue would be paid out in the form of cash compensation, which could have a material adverse impact on our profit margins. Currently 40% or 43%, as applicable, of the carried interest earned from our investment funds is allocated to our carry pool. Our Managing Partner is not permitted under its operating agreement to increase the percentage of carried interest allocable to the carry pool without the consent of a majority of our independent directors. Our carry pool is supplemented by allocating for compensation 40% of the incentive fees that do not constitute carried interest that are earned from investment funds and certain management fee refunds, which percentage may be increased without requiring the consent of a majority of our independent directors under our Managing Partner's operating agreement.
We have granted and expect to grant equity awards from our Equity Incentive Plan, which has caused and will cause dilution. While we evaluate the grant of equity awards from our Equity Incentive Plan to employees on an annual basis, the size of the grants, if any, is made at our discretion, and such grants generally do not require an approval by the independent directors of our Managing Partner's board of directors, except for grants to our executive officers. As we increase the use of equity awards from our Equity Incentive Plan in the future, expense associated with equity-based compensation may increase materially. For example, in connection with compensation in 2017, we allocated equity awards relating to 29.2 million common units under our Equity Incentive Plan and KKR Holdings granted 14.7 million KKR Holdings units to certain senior employees. These KKR Holdings awards were granted from outstanding but previously unallocated units of KKR Holdings, and consequently these grants did not increase the number of KKR Holdings units outstanding or outstanding KKR common units on a fully-diluted basis. See "Executive Compensation—Compensation Discussion and Analysis—Compensation Elements—KKR Holdings Units" for the terms and conditions of such KKR Holdings units. The value of the KKR Holdings units and KKR common units may drop in value or be volatile, which may make our equity less attractive to our employees.
In July 2015, the SEC proposed rules, as mandated by the Dodd-Frank Act, requiring companies to develop and enforce recovery policies that in the event of an accounting restatement, "claw back" from current and former executive officers incentive-based compensation they would not have received based on the restatement. In April and May 2016, the SEC also issued for public comment revised proposed rules designed to prohibit certain incentive-based compensation arrangements deemed to encourage inappropriate risk taking by covered financial institutions by providing "excessive" compensation, fees or benefits or that could lead to material losses. To date, however, the SEC has not adopted the proposed rules. Depending on the outcome of the rule making process, the application of these rules to us could require us to substantially revise our compensation strategy, increase our compensation and other costs, and materially and adversely affect our ability to recruit and retain qualified employees. In addition, less carried interest from the carry pool may be allocated to certain of our employees, which may result in less cash payments to such employees. To the extent our equity incentive or carry pool programs are not effective, we may be limited in our ability to attract, retain and motivate talented employees and other key personnel and we may need to increase the level of cash compensation that we pay.
In addition, there is no guarantee that the confidentiality and restrictive covenant agreements to which our employees and other key personnel are subject, together with our other arrangements with them, will prevent them from leaving us, joining our competitors or otherwise competing with us. Depending on which entity is a party to these agreements and/or the laws applicable to them, we may not be able to, or may choose not to, enforce them or become subject to lawsuits or other claims, and certain of these agreements might be waived, modified or amended at any time without our consent. Even when enforceable, these agreements expire after a certain period of time, at which point each of our employees and other key personnel are free to compete against us and solicit our fund investors and employees. See "Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence—Confidentiality and Restrictive Covenant Agreements."
We strive to maintain a work environment that reinforces our culture of collaboration, motivation and alignment of interests with fund investors. If we do not continue to develop and implement the right processes and tools to manage our changing enterprise and maintain our culture, our ability to compete successfully and achieve our business objectives could be impaired, which could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.
Operational risks and data security breaches may disrupt our businesses, result in losses or limit our growth.
We rely heavily on our financial, accounting and other data processing systems and on the systems of third parties who provide services to us. If any of these systems do not operate properly or are disabled, we could suffer financial loss, a disruption of our businesses, liability to our funds, regulatory intervention or reputational damage. In addition, we operate in businesses that are highly dependent on information systems and technology. For example, we face operational risk from errors made in the execution, confirmation or settlement of transactions. We also face operational risk from transactions not being properly recorded, evaluated or accounted for in our funds. In particular, our Public Markets business is highly dependent on our ability to process and evaluate, on a daily basis, transactions across markets and geographies in a time-sensitive, efficient and accurate manner. Our and our third-party service providers' information systems and technology may not continue to be

44


able to accommodate our growth, may not be suitable for new products and strategies and may be subject to security risks, and the cost of maintaining such systems and technology may increase from our current level. Such a failure to accommodate growth, or an increase in costs related to such information systems and technology, could have a material adverse effect on our business. Furthermore, most of our administrative personnel and our information system and technology infrastructure are located in our New York City office, and any disruption in the operation of, or inability to access, our New York City office could have a significant impact on our business. We are also dependent on an increasingly concentrated group of third-party vendors that we do not control for hosting solutions and technologies. A disaster or a disruption in technology or infrastructure that supports our businesses, including a disruption involving electronic communications or other services used by us, our vendors or third parties with whom we conduct business, or directly affecting our principal offices, could have a material adverse impact on our ability to continue to operate our business without interruption. Our business continuation or disaster recovery programs may not be sufficient to mitigate the harm that may result from such a disaster or disruption. In addition, insurance and other safeguards might only partially reimburse us for our losses, if at all.
Our operations rely on the secure processing, storage and transmission of confidential and other information in our computer systems and networks. We face various security threats on a regular basis, including ongoing cyber-security threats to and attacks on our information technology infrastructure that are intended to gain access to our proprietary information, destroy data or disable, degrade or sabotage our systems. Although we take protective measures and endeavor to modify them as circumstances warrant, our computer systems, software and networks may be vulnerable to unauthorized access, theft, misuse, computer viruses or other malicious code, and other events that could have a security impact. We and our employees have been and expect to continue to be the target of fraudulent calls, emails and other forms of activities. The costs related to cyber or other security threats or disruptions may not be fully insured or indemnified by other means. In addition, cyber-security has become a top priority for regulators around the world. Many jurisdictions in which we operate have laws and regulations relating to data privacy, cyber-security and protection of personal information, including the General Data Protection Regulation in the European Union that goes into effect in May 2018. Some jurisdictions have also enacted laws requiring companies to notify individuals of data security breaches involving certain types of personal data. Breaches in security could potentially jeopardize our, our employees' or our fund investors' or counterparties' confidential and other information processed and stored in, and transmitted through, our computer systems and networks, or otherwise cause interruptions or malfunctions in our, our employees', our fund investors', our counterparties' or third parties' operations, which could result in significant losses, increased costs, disruption of our business, liability to our fund investors and other counterparties, regulatory intervention or reputational damage. Furthermore, if we fail to comply with the relevant laws and regulations, it could result in regulatory investigations and penalties, which could lead to negative publicity and may cause our fund investors and clients to lose confidence in the effectiveness of our security measures. Finally, we rely on third party service providers for certain aspects of our business, including for certain information systems, technology, administration, tax and compliance matters. Any interruption or deterioration in the performance of these third parties could impair the quality of our and our funds' operations and could impact our reputation and materially and adversely affect our businesses and limit our ability to grow.
Our portfolio companies also rely on data processing systems and the secure processing, storage and transmission of information, including payment and health information. A disruption or compromise of these systems could have a material adverse effect on the value of these businesses. Our funds may invest in strategic assets having a national or regional profile or in infrastructure, the nature of which could expose them to a greater risk of being subject to a terrorist attack or security breach than other assets or businesses. Such an event may have material adverse consequences on our investment or assets of the same type or may require portfolio companies to increase preventative security measures or expand insurance coverage.
Our organizational documents do not limit our ability to enter into new lines of businesses, and we may expand into new investment strategies, geographic markets and businesses, each of which may result in additional risks and uncertainties in our businesses.
We intend, to the extent that market conditions warrant, to seek to grow our businesses by increasing AUM in existing businesses, pursuing new investment strategies (including investment opportunities in new asset classes), developing new types of investment structures and products (such as separately managed accounts and structured products), and expanding into new geographic markets and businesses. We have in the past opened offices in Asia, the Mid