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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
______________________________________
FORM 10-Q
______________________________________
(Mark One)
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2021
or
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from                 to                 
Commission file number: 001-38068
______________________________________
ZYMEWORKS INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
______________________________________
British Columbia, Canada
98-1398788
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification Number)
Suite 540—1385 West 8th Avenue
Vancouver, BC V6H 3V9
(Address of principal executive offices, including zip code)
(604) 678-1388
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
N/A
(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)
______________________________________
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
Trading Symbol(s)
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Shares, no par value per share
ZYME
New York Stock Exchange
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes      No  
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes      No  
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer
Accelerated filer
Non-accelerated filer
Smaller reporting company
Emerging growth company
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.    
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934).    Yes      No  
The number of outstanding common shares of the registrant, no par value per share, as of May 3, 2021 was 46,170,034.



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ZYMEWORKS INC.
QUARTERLY REPORT ON FORM 10-Q
For the Quarter Ended March 31, 2021
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CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q includes “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and “forward-looking information” within the meaning of Canadian securities laws, or collectively, forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements include statements that may relate to our plans, objectives, goals, strategies, future events, future revenue or performance, capital expenditures, financing needs and other information that is not historical information. Many of these statements appear, in particular, under the headings “Risk Factors” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations”. Forward-looking statements can often be identified by the use of terminology such as “subject to”, “believe,” “anticipate,” “plan,” “expect,” “intend,” “estimate,” “project,” “may,” “will,” “should,” “would,” “could,” “can,” the negatives thereof, variations thereon and similar expressions, or by discussions of strategy. In addition, any statements or information that refer to expectations, beliefs, plans, projections, objectives, performance or other characterizations of future events or circumstances, including any underlying assumptions, are forward-looking. In particular, these forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to:

the size of our addressable markets and our ability to commercialize product candidates;
the achievement of advances in and expansion of our therapeutic platforms and antibody engineering expertise;
the likelihood of product candidate development and clinical trial progression, initiation or success;
our ability to predict and manage government regulation; and
the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our business and operations.

All forward-looking statements, including, without limitation, those related to our examination of historical operating trends, are based upon our current expectations and various assumptions. Certain assumptions made in preparing the forward-looking statements include:

our ability to manage our growth effectively;
the absence of material adverse changes in our industry or the global economy;
our ability to understand and predict trends in our industry and markets;
our ability to maintain good business relationships with our strategic partners;
our ability to comply with current and future regulatory standards;
our ability to protect our intellectual property rights;
our continued compliance with third-party license terms and the non-infringement of third-party intellectual property rights;
our ability to manage and integrate acquisitions;
our ability to retain key personnel; and
our ability to raise sufficient debt or equity financing to support our continued growth.

We believe there is a reasonable basis for our expectations and beliefs, but they are inherently uncertain. We may not realize our expectations, and our beliefs may not prove correct. Actual results could differ materially from those described or implied by such forward-looking statements. The following uncertainties and factors, among others (including those set forth under “Risk Factors”), could affect future performance and cause actual results to differ materially from those matters expressed in or implied by forward-looking statements:

our ability to obtain regulatory approval for our product candidates without significant delays;
the predictive value of our current or planned clinical trials;
delays with respect to the development and commercialization of our product candidates, which may cause increased costs or delay receipt of product revenue;
our, or any of our partners’, ability to enroll subjects in clinical trials and thereby complete trials on a timely basis;
the design or our execution of clinical trials may not support regulatory approval, including where clinical trials are conducted outside the United States;
the extent to which our business may be adversely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic;
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the Fast Track and Breakthrough Therapy designations for any of our product candidates may not expedite regulatory review or approval;
the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (the “FDA”) may not accept data from trials we conduct outside the United States;
disruptions at the FDA and other government agencies caused by funding shortages or global health concerns;
our discretion to discontinue or reprioritize the development of any of our product candidates;
the potential for our product candidates to have undesirable side effects;
no regulatory agency has made a determination that any of our product candidates are safe or effective for use by the general public or for any indication;
our ability to face significant competition, including biosimilar products;
the likelihood of broad market acceptance of our product candidates;
our ability to obtain Orphan Drug Designation or exclusivity for some or all of our product candidates;
our ability to commercialize products outside of the United States;
the outcome of reimbursement decisions by third-party payors relating to our products;
our expectations with respect to the market opportunities for any product that we or our strategic partners develop;
our ability to pursue product candidates that may be profitable or have a high likelihood of success;
our ability to use and expand our therapeutic platforms to build a pipeline of product candidates;
our ability to meet the requirements of ongoing regulatory review;
the threat of product liability lawsuits against us or any of our strategic partners;
changes in product candidate manufacturing or formulation that may result in additional costs or delay;
the potential disruption of our business and dilution of our shareholdings associated with acquisitions and joint ventures;
the potential for foreign governments to impose strict price controls;
the risk of security breaches or data loss, which could compromise sensitive business or health information;
current and future legislation that may increase the difficulty and cost of commercializing our product candidates;
economic, political, regulatory and other risks associated with international operations;
our exposure to legal and reputational penalties as a result of any of our current and future relationships with various third parties;
our ability to comply with export control and import laws and regulations;
our history of significant losses since inception;
our ability to generate revenue from product sales and achieve profitability;
our requirement for substantial additional funding;
the potential dilution to our shareholders associated with future financings;
restrictions on our ability to seek financing, which may be imposed by future debt;
our ability to maintain existing and future strategic partnerships;
our ability to realize the anticipated benefits of our strategic partnerships;
our ability to secure future strategic partners;
our reliance on third-party manufacturers to produce our clinical product candidate supplies and on other third parties to store, monitor and transport bulk drug substance and drug product;
our reliance on third parties to oversee clinical trials of our product candidates and, in some cases, maintain regulatory files for those product candidates;
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our reliance on third parties for various operational and administrative aspects of our business including our reliance on third parties’ cloud-based software platforms;
our ability to operate without infringing the patents and other proprietary rights of third parties;
our ability to obtain and enforce patent protection for our product candidates and related technology;
our patents could be found invalid or unenforceable if challenged;
our intellectual property rights may not necessarily provide us with competitive advantages;
we may become involved in expensive and time-consuming patent lawsuits;
the risk that the duration of our patents will not adequately protect our competitive position;
our ability to obtain protection under the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act of 1984 (the “Hatch-Waxman Amendments”) and similar foreign legislation;
we may be unable to protect the confidentiality of our proprietary information;
our ability to comply with procedural and administrative requirements relating to our patents;
the risk of claims challenging the inventorship of our patents and other intellectual property;
our intellectual property rights for some of our product candidates are dependent on the abilities of third parties to assert and defend such rights;
patent reform legislation and court decisions can diminish the value of patents in general, thereby impairing our ability to protect our products;
we may not be able to protect our intellectual property rights throughout the world;
we will require FDA approval for any proposed product candidate names and any failure or delay associated with such approval may adversely affect our business;
the risk of employee misconduct including noncompliance with regulatory standards and insider trading;
our ability to market our products in a manner that does not violate the law and subject us to civil or criminal penalties;
if we do not comply with laws regulating the protection of the environment and health and human safety, our business could be adversely affected;
our ability to retain key executives and attract and retain qualified personnel;
our ability to manage organizational growth;
our exposure to potential securities class action litigation; and
if securities or industry analysts do not publish research or publish inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our share price and trading volume could decline.

Consequently, forward-looking statements should be regarded solely as our current plans, estimates and beliefs. You should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. We cannot guarantee future results, events, levels of activity, performance or achievements. We do not undertake and specifically decline any obligation to update, republish or revise forward-looking statements to reflect future events or circumstances or to reflect the occurrences of unanticipated events, except as required by law.

We own or have rights to trademarks, service marks or trade names that we use in connection with the operation of our business. In addition, our names, logos and website names and addresses are our service marks or trademarks. Azymetric, Zymeworks, ZymeCAD, EFECT, ZymeLink and the phrase “Building Better Biologics” are our registered trademarks. The other trademarks, trade names and service marks appearing in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q are the property of their respective owners. Solely for convenience, the trademarks, service marks, tradenames and copyrights referred to in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q are listed without the ©, ® and TM symbols, but we will assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, our rights or the rights of the applicable licensors to these trademarks, service marks and tradenames.

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We express all amounts in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q in U.S. dollars, except where otherwise indicated. References to “$” and “US$” are to U.S. dollars and references to “C$” are to Canadian dollars.

Except as otherwise indicated, references in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q to “Zymeworks,” the “Company,” “we,” “us” and “our” refer to Zymeworks Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries.
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PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1.    Financial Statements
Zymeworks Inc.
Index to Interim Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (unaudited)
As of and for the three months ended March 31, 2021
Page

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ZYMEWORKS INC.
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets
(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars except share data)
March 31,
2021
December 31,
2020
(unaudited)
Assets
Current assets:
Cash and cash equivalents$279,947 $242,036 
Short-term investments (note 5)131,527 184,318 
Accounts receivable4,576 15,293 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets16,718 13,429 
Total current assets432,768 455,076 
Deferred financing fees848 805 
Long-term investments (note 5)886 25,921 
Long-term prepaid assets2,149 2,290 
Deferred tax asset 1,813 1,723 
Property and equipment, net 12,305 12,185 
Operating lease right-of-use assets5,433 5,429 
Intangible assets, net 4,213 5,303 
Acquired in-process research and development (note 6)17,628 17,628 
Goodwill (note 6) 12,016 12,016 
Total assets$490,059 $538,376 
Liabilities and shareholders’ equity
Current liabilities:
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities (note 7)$43,654 $43,655 
Fair value of liability classified stock options (note 12)23,617 39,284 
Current portion of operating lease liability (note 11)2,952 2,710 
Other current liabilities 22 17 
Total current liabilities70,245 85,666 
Long-term portion of operating lease liability (note 11)5,333 5,812 
Deferred revenue (note 9)32,941 32,941 
Other long-term liabilities (note 7)2,880 2,857 
Deferred tax liability 1,515 1,178 
Total liabilities112,914 128,454 
Shareholders’ equity:
Common shares, no par value; unlimited authorized shares at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively; 46,164,888 and 46,035,389 shares issued and outstanding at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively (note 8b)
729,007 724,219 
Additional paid-in capital170,648 163,623 
Accumulated other comprehensive loss(6,659)(6,659)
Accumulated deficit(515,851)(471,261)
Total shareholders’ equity377,145 409,922 
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity$490,059 $538,376 
Research collaboration and licensing agreements (note 9)
Commitments and contingencies (note 13)
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements
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ZYMEWORKS INC.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Loss and Comprehensive Loss
(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars except share and per share data)
(unaudited)
Three Months Ended March 31,
20212020
Revenue
Research and development collaborations (note 9)$644 $8,269 
Operating expenses:
Research and development44,283 36,943 
General and administrative1,296 7,206 
Total operating expenses45,579 44,149 
Loss from operations(44,935)(35,880)
Other income (expense):
Interest income741 1,869 
Other income, net (note 10)129 3,250 
Total other income, net870 5,119 
Loss before income taxes(44,065)(30,761)
Income tax expense(525)(375)
Net loss and comprehensive loss$(44,590)$(31,136)
Net loss per common share (note 4):
Basic and diluted$(0.87)$(0.64)
Weighted-average common shares outstanding (note 4):
Basic and diluted51,367,663 48,686,718 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements
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ZYMEWORKS INC.
Condensed Consolidated Statement of Changes in Shareholders’ Equity
(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars except share data)
(unaudited)
Common sharesAccumulated
deficit
Accumulated
other
comprehensive
loss
Additional
paid-in
capital
Total
shareholders’
equity
SharesAmount
Balance at January 1, 202146,035,389 $724,219 $(471,261)$(6,659)$163,623 $409,922 
Issuance of common shares on exercise of options78,736 2,624 — — (662)1,962 
Issuance of common shares through employee stock purchase plan26,807 1,321 — — — 1,321 
Issuance of common shares upon vesting of restricted stock units ("RSUs")23,956 843 — — (843) 
Stock-based compensation— — — — 8,530 8,530 
Net loss— — (44,590)— — (44,590)
Balance at March 31, 202146,164,888 $729,007 $(515,851)$(6,659)$170,648 $377,145 

Common sharesAccumulated
deficit
Accumulated
other
comprehensive
loss
Additional
paid-in
capital
Total
shareholders’
equity
SharesAmount
Balance at January 1, 202039,564,529 $450,210 $(290,709)$(6,659)$92,839 $245,681 
Issuance of common shares on exercise of options122,492 2,767 — — (754)2,013 
Issuance of common shares through employee stock purchase plan21,451 615 — — — 615 
Fair value adjustments upon reclassification of options to liabilities— — — — (110)(110)
Stock-based compensation— — — — 4,446 4,446 
Issuance of common shares and pre-funded warrants in connection with public offering (Note 8)5,824,729 254,018 — — 46,892 300,910 
Net loss— — (31,136)— — (31,136)
Balance at March 31, 202045,533,201 $707,610 $(321,845)$(6,659)$143,313 $522,419 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements
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ZYMEWORKS INC.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars)
(unaudited)
Three Months Ended March 31,
20212020
Cash flows from operating activities:
Net loss$(44,590)$(31,136)
Items not involving cash:
Depreciation and amortization of property and equipment958 775 
Amortization of intangible assets1,090 980 
Stock-based compensation recovery(6,733)(2,716)
Amortization and impairment of operating lease right-of-use assets572 1,062 
Deferred income tax expense246 351 
Non-cash consideration from licensing agreement (218)
Change in fair value of contingent consideration liability31  
Change in fair value of investments in equity instruments(167) 
Unrealized foreign exchange loss (gain)717 (4,037)
Changes in non-cash operating working capital:
Accounts receivable10,717 (6,467)
Prepaid expenses and other current assets(2,657)2,602 
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities(163)1,065 
Operating lease liabilities(824)252 
Net cash used in operating activities(40,803)(37,487)
Cash flows from financing activities:
Proceeds from public offering, net of issuance costs (note 8a) 300,910 
Issuance of common shares on exercise of stock options (note 8e)1,321 1,447 
Issuance of common shares through employee stock purchase plan829 419 
Deferred financing fees(40)60 
Finance lease payments(4)(4)
Net cash provided by financing activities2,106 302,832 
Cash flows from investing activities:
Net redemptions (purchases) of short-term investments77,542 (203,822)
Acquisition of property and equipment(695)(530)
Acquisition of intangible assets (419)
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities76,847 (204,771)
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents(239)460 
Net change in cash and cash equivalents37,911 61,034 
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period242,036 128,451 
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period$279,947 $189,485 
Supplemental disclosure of non-cash investing and financing items:
Leased assets obtained in exchange for operating lease liabilities$485 $1,982 
Acquisition of property and equipment in accounts payable and accrued liabilities383 570 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements
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ZYMEWORKS INC.
Notes to the Interim Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(unaudited)
(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars except share and per share data)

1. Nature of Operations
Zymeworks Inc. (the “Company” or “Zymeworks”) is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company dedicated to the development of next-generation multifunctional biotherapeutics. Zymeworks was incorporated on September 8, 2003 under the laws of the Canada Business Corporations Act. On October 22, 2003, the Company was registered as an extra-provincial company under the Company Act (British Columbia). On May 2, 2017, the Company continued under the Business Corporations Act (British Columbia).
Since its inception, the Company has devoted substantially all of its resources to research and development activities, including developing its therapeutic platforms, and identifying and developing potential product candidates by undertaking preclinical studies and clinical trials. The Company supports these activities through general and administrative support, as well as by raising capital, conducting business planning and protecting its intellectual property.
2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Basis of Presentation
The accompanying interim condensed consolidated financial statements of the Company have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) and pursuant to the rules and regulations of the SEC for interim financial information. Accordingly, these financial statements do not include all the information and footnotes required for complete financial statements and should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements of the Company and the accompanying notes thereto for the year ended December 31, 2020.
These unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements reflect all adjustments, consisting solely of normal recurring adjustments, which, in the opinion of management, are necessary for a fair presentation of results for the interim periods presented. The results of operations for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 are not necessarily indicative of results that can be expected for a full year. These unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements follow the same significant accounting policies as those described in the notes to the audited consolidated financial statements of the Company for the year ended December 31, 2020.
All amounts expressed in the interim condensed consolidated financial statements of the Company and the accompanying notes thereto are expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars, except for share and per share data and where otherwise indicated. References to “$” are to U.S. dollars and references to “C$” are to Canadian dollars.
Certain prior period amounts have been reclassified from general and administrative expenses to research and development expenses to conform to the current period's presentation. These reclassifications had no effect on previously reported operating expenses, net loss, shareholders equity and cash flows from operating activities.

Use of Estimates
The preparation of consolidated financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP requires the Company to make estimates and judgments in certain circumstances that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenue and expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. On an ongoing basis, the Company evaluates its estimates, most notably those related to revenue recognition including estimated timing of completion of performance obligations required to meet revenue recognition criteria, accrual of expenses including clinical and preclinical study expense accruals, stock-based compensation, valuation allowance for deferred taxes, benefits under the Scientific Research and Experimental Development (“SR&ED”) program, and other contingencies. Management bases its estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that it believes to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results could differ from these estimates.
The full extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic may directly or indirectly impact the Company’s business, results of operations and financial condition, including revenues, expenses, clinical trials, research and development costs and employee-related amounts, will depend on future developments that are evolving and highly uncertain, such as the duration and severity of outbreaks, including potential future waves or cycles, and the effectiveness of actions taken to contain and treat COVID-19. The Company considered the potential impact of COVID-19 when making certain estimates and judgments relating to the preparation
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of these consolidated financial statements. While there was no material impact to the Company’s consolidated financial statements as of and for the three months ended March 31, 2021, the Company’s future assessment of the magnitude and duration of COVID-19, as well as other factors, could result in a material impact to the Company’s consolidated financial statements in future reporting periods.
3. Recent Accounting Pronouncements
Recent accounting pronouncements not yet adopted
The Company has reviewed recent accounting pronouncements and concluded that they are either not applicable to the business, or that no material effect is expected on the consolidated financial statements as a result of future adoption.

4. Net loss per share
Net loss per share for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 was as follows:
Three Months Ended
March 31,
20212020
Numerator:
Net loss attributable to common shareholders:
Basic and diluted$(44,590)$(31,136)
Denominator:
Weighted-average common shares outstanding:
Basic and diluted51,367,663 48,686,718 
Net loss per common share - basic and diluted$(0.87)$(0.64)
Weighted average number of common shares used in the basic and diluted earnings per share calculations include the pre-funded warrants issued in connection with the Company’s June 2019 and January 2020 offerings as the warrants are exercisable at any time for nominal cash consideration.
5. Investments
Short-term Investments
Short-term investments consist of guaranteed investment certificates (“GICs”), term deposits and commercial paper acquired from financial institutions in accordance with the Company’s cash investment policy. Short-term GICs, term deposits and commercial paper bear interest at rates of 0.8%-0.9% per annum, and are classified as held to maturity and are accounted for at amortized cost.
Long-term Investments
Long-term investments at March 31, 2021 consist of equity instruments of $886 acquired for strategic purposes or in connection with licensing and collaboration agreements with changes in fair value recorded through net income.
6. IPR&D and Goodwill
Acquired IPR&D
In-process research and development assets (“IPR&D”) acquired in the 2016 Kairos Therapeutics Inc. (“Kairos”) business combination are classified as indefinite-lived intangible assets and are not currently being amortized. The carrying value of IPR&D, net of impairment was $17,628 at both March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020. The Company concluded that there were no impairment indicators related to IPR&D as of March 31, 2021.
Goodwill
The Company performed its most recent annual impairment test of goodwill as of December 31, 2020. As part of the evaluation of the recoverability of goodwill, the Company identified only one reporting unit to which the total carrying amount of goodwill has been assigned. As at December 31, 2020, the Company performed a qualitative assessment for its annual impairment test of goodwill after concluding that it was not more likely than not that the fair value of the reporting unit was less than its carrying
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value. Consequently, a quantitative impairment test was not required. The Company concluded that there were no impairment indicators related to goodwill as of March 31, 2021.
7. Liabilities
Accounts payable and accrued expenses consisted of the following:
March 31,
2021
December 31,
2020
Trade payables$4,876 $6,244 
Accrued research and development expenses31,527 25,962 
Employee compensation and vacation accruals5,536 9,439 
Accrued legal and professional fees472 859 
Other1,243 1,151 
Total$43,654 $43,655 

Other long-term liabilities consisted of the following:
March 31,
2021
December 31,
2020
Liability for contingent consideration (note 12)$1,316 $1,285 
Liability from in-licensing agreement1,450 1,450 
Finance lease liability (note 11)114 122 
Total$2,880 $2,857 

8. Shareholders’ Equity
a.Equity Offerings
2020 Public Offering
On January 27, 2020, the Company closed a public offering pursuant to which the Company sold 5,824,729 common shares, including the sale of 900,000 common shares to the underwriters upon their full exercise of their over-allotment option, at $46.50 per common share and 1,075,271 Pre-Funded Warrants (note 8d) in lieu of common shares at $46.4999 per Pre-Funded Warrant. Net proceeds were $300,910, after underwriting discounts, commissions and offering expenses of $19,940.
b.Authorized
The Company has an unlimited authorized number of voting Common Shares and Preferred Shares without par value.
c.Preferred Shares
As of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, no preferred shares were issued or outstanding, respectively.

d.Pre-Funded Common Share Warrants
In connection with a public offering completed on June 24, 2019, the Company issued 4,166,690 Pre-Funded Warrants at a price of $17.9999 per Pre-Funded Warrant which granted holders of warrants the right to purchase up to 4,166,690 common shares of the Company, at an exercise price of $0.0001 per share.
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In connection with a public offering completed on January 27, 2020 (note 8a), the Company issued 1,075,271 Pre-Funded Warrants at a price of $46.4999 per Pre-Funded Warrant which granted holders of warrants the right to purchase up to 1,075,271 common shares of the Company, at an exercise price of $0.0001 per share.
The Pre-Funded Warrants are exercisable by the holders at any time on or after the original issue date. The Pre-Funded Warrants do not expire unless they are exercised or settled in accordance with the Pre-Funded Warrant agreement. As the Pre-Funded Warrants meet the condition for equity classification, proceeds from issuance of the Pre-Funded Warrants, net of any transaction costs, are recorded in additional paid-in capital. Upon exercise of the Pre-Funded Warrants, the historical costs recorded in additional paid-in capital along with exercise price collected from holders will be recorded in common shares. No Pre-Funded Warrants have been exercised to date.
e.Stock-Based Compensation
Original Stock Option Plan
On July 14, 2006, the shareholders of the Company approved an employee stock option plan (the “Original Plan”). The Original Plan provides for the granting of options to directors, officers, employees and consultants. Options to purchase common shares may be granted at an exercise price of each option equal to the last private issuance of common shares immediately preceding the date of the grant. The total number of options outstanding is not to exceed 20% of the issued common shares of the Company.
Options granted under the Original Plan are exercisable at various dates over their 10-year life. Common shares are issued from treasury when options are exercised.
Options issued to employees under the Original Plan vest over 4 years, with 25% of the options subject to vesting one year after grant and the remainder of the options vesting monthly over the following three years in equal installments. Options issued to directors under the Original Plan vest over 3 years in equal monthly installments, and options issued to consultants and members of the Scientific Advisory Board under the Original Plan vest immediately upon issuance.
The exercise prices of the Company’s stock options under the Original Plan are denominated in Canadian dollars. The Canadian dollar amounts have been translated to U.S. dollars using the period end rate or the average foreign exchange rate for the period, as applicable, and have been provided for information purposes. Upon the effectiveness of the Company’s New Stock Option Plan described below, no further options were issuable under the Original Plan. However, all outstanding options granted under the Original Plan remain outstanding, subject to the terms of the Original Plan and the applicable grant documents, until such outstanding options are exercised or they terminate or expire by their terms.
New Stock Option and Equity Compensation Plan
On April 10, 2017, the Company’s shareholders approved a new stock option plan, which became effective immediately prior to the consummation of the Company's IPO. This plan allows for the grant of options to directors, officers, employees and consultants in U.S. or Canadian dollars, and also permits the Company to grant incentive stock options (“ISOs”), within the meaning of Section 422 of the Internal Revenue Code, to its employees. On June 7, 2018, the Company’s shareholders approved an amendment and restatement of this plan (this plan, as amended and restated, the “New Plan”), which was further amended on March 4, 2020, that includes an article that allows the Company to grant restricted shares, restricted share units (“RSUs”) and other share-based awards, in addition to stock options. The terms and vesting provisions of options to be granted under the New Stock Option Plan remained same as the Original Stock Option Plan.
The maximum number of common shares reserved for issuance under the New Plan is 10,698,103, which includes 7,393,588 shares issuable upon exercise of options outstanding as of March 31, 2021. Beginning in 2021 and ending in 2028, this maximum number may be increased on the first day of each calendar year by up to 4.0% of the number of outstanding shares on the last day of the immediately preceding calendar year. ISOs may be granted with respect to a maximum fixed amount equal to 20% of the shares reserved for issuance under the New Plan as of June 7, 2018.
Restricted Stock Units (RSUs)
During the three months ended March 31, 2021, the Company granted 109,535 RSUs to certain employees that vest over a period of three years, in the amount of one-third each year on the anniversary of the grant date. RSUs are equity-settled on each vesting date, subject to the grantee’s continued employment with the Company on the vesting date. The fair value of RSUs granted was
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calculated by using the closing stock price on the grant date. As of March 31, 2021, there was $4,977 of unamortized RSU expense that will be recognized over a weighted average period of 1.84 years.
Number of RSUsWeighted-
average grant
date fair value
($)
Outstanding, December 31, 202082,704 35.19 
Granted109,535 37.18 
Vested and settled(23,956)35.20 
Forfeited  
Outstanding, March 31, 2021168,283 36.49 
Stock Options
All options granted under the New Plan will have an exercise price determined and approved by the Board on the date of the grant, which shall not be less than the market price of the common shares at such time. For the purposes of the New Plan, the market price of a common share shall be the closing sale price of a share on the grant date reported by the stock exchange with the greatest trading volume or, if such day is not a trading day, the closing sale price reported for the immediately preceding trading day. The Company may convert a market price denominated in Canadian dollars into United States dollars and vice versa and such converted amount shall be the market price.
An option shall be exercisable during a period established by the Board which shall commence on the date of the grant and shall terminate not later than ten years after the date of the granting of the option. The New Plan provides that the exercise period shall automatically be extended if the date on which it is scheduled to terminate shall fall during a black-out period. In such cases, the extended exercise period shall terminate on the tenth business day after the last day of the black-out period, provided that the exercise period shall in no case be extended beyond the tenth anniversary of the date the option was granted. All options shall vest in accordance with the terms of their grant agreements.
The following table summarizes the Company’s stock options granted in Canadian dollars under the Original Plan and the New Plan:
Number
of Options
Weighted-
Average
Exercise Price
(C$)
Weighted-
Average
Exercise Price
($)
Weighted-
Average
Contractual
Term
(years)
Aggregate
intrinsic value
(C$)
Aggregate
intrinsic value
($)
Outstanding, December 31, 20202,285,569 22.00 17.27 6.4687,545 68,664 
Granted345,867 44.51 35.24 
Exercised(42,187)18.73 14.74 
Forfeited(2,837)52.46 41.19 
Outstanding, March 31, 20212,586,412 25.03 19.92 6.7043,313 34,388 
The following table summarizes the Company’s stock options granted in U.S. dollars under the New Plan:
Number
of Options
Weighted-
Average
Exercise Price
($)
Weighted-
Average
Contractual
Term
(years)
Aggregate
intrinsic value
($)
Outstanding, December 31, 20203,790,326 22.85 8.2092,705 
Granted1,091,065 36.75 
Exercised(36,549)19.25 
Forfeited(37,666)33.35 
Outstanding, March 31, 20214,807,176 25.95 8.4039,833 
During the three months ended March 31, 2021, the Company received cash proceeds of $1,321 from stock options exercised.
The stock options outstanding at March 31, 2021 expire at various dates from July 1, 2021 to March 9, 2031.
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The estimated fair values of options granted to officers, directors, employees and consultants are amortized over the relevant vesting periods. Stock-based compensation expense for equity classified instruments, as well as the financial statement impact of the amortization and periodic revaluation of liability classified instruments (note 12), are recorded in research and development expenses, general and administration expenses and finance expense (income) as follows:
Three Months Ended March 31,
20212020
Research and development expense:
Stock-based compensation for equity classified instruments$4,336 $2,016 
Change in fair value of liability classified instruments(2,513)(1,794)
$1,823 $222 
General and administrative expense:
Stock-based compensation for equity classified instruments$4,192 $2,228 
Change in fair value of liability classified instruments(12,951)(5,379)
$(8,759)$(3,151)
Finance expense (income):
Change in fair value of liability classified instruments(66)(34)
$(66)$(34)
Amounts for equity classified instruments above include stock-based compensation expense relating to RSUs of $606 for the three months ended March 31, 2021 (three months ended March 31, 2020: $91).

The estimated fair value of stock options granted in Canadian dollars under the Original Plan and the New Plan was determined using the Black-Scholes option pricing model with the following weighted-average assumptions:
Three Months Ended March 31,
20212020
Dividend yield0 %0 %
Expected volatility81.6 %75.2 %
Risk-free interest rate1.01 %0.66 %
Expected average life of options6.07 years6.07 years
The estimated fair value of stock options granted in U.S. dollars under the New Plan was determined using the Black-Scholes option pricing model with the following weighted-average assumptions:
Three Months Ended March 31,
20212020
Dividend yield0 %0 %
Expected volatility81.6 %75.3 %
Risk-free interest rate0.96 %0.80 %
Expected average life of options6.07 years6.06 years
Expected Volatility — Volatility is a measure of the amount by which a financial variable such as a share price has fluctuated (historical volatility) or is expected to fluctuate (expected volatility) during a period. As the Company does not yet have sufficient history of its own volatility, the Company has identified several public entities of similar complexity and stage of development and calculates historical volatility using the volatility of these companies.
Risk-Free Interest Rate — This rate is from the Government of Canada and U.S. Federal Reserve marketable bonds for the month prior to each option grant during the year, having a term that most closely resembles the expected life of the option.
Expected Term — This is the period of time that the options granted are expected to remain unexercised. Options granted have a maximum term of ten years. The Company uses the simplified method to calculate the average expected term, which represents the average of the vesting period and the contractual term.
Share Fair Value — Options granted after the Company’s IPO, are issued with exercise price equal to the fair market value of the Company’s stock on the date the grant is approved by the Board. Before the IPO, the Company granted stock options at exercise
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prices not less than the fair value of its common shares as determined by the Board, with input from management. Management estimated the fair value of its common shares based on a number of objective and subjective factors, including the most recently available valuation of common shares prepared by independent valuation specialists, external market considerations affecting the biotechnology industry and the historic prices at which the Company sold common shares.
The weighted-average Black-Scholes option pricing assumptions for liability classified stock options outstanding at March 31, 2021 and 2020 are as follows:
March 31,
2021
March 31,
2020
Dividend yield
0 %0 %
Expected volatility
86.8 %80.2 %
Risk-free interest rate
0.45 %0.51 %
Expected average option term
2.68 years3.20 years
Number of liability classified stock options outstanding
1,011,9651,252,604
At March 31, 2021, the unamortized compensation expense related to unvested options was $52,986 (C$66,737). The remaining unamortized compensation expense as of March 31, 2021 will be recognized over a weighted-average period of 1.99 years.
f.Employee Stock Purchase Plan:
On April 10, 2017, the Company’s shareholders approved an employee stock purchase plan (“ESPP”) which became effective immediately prior to the consummation of the Company’s IPO. On June 7, 2018, certain amendments to the ESPP were approved by shareholders. Prior to these amendments, the ESPP allowed eligible employees to acquire common shares at a discounted purchase price of 85% of the market value of the Company's common shares on the purchase date. The ESPP, as amended, allows eligible employees to acquire common shares at a discounted purchase price of the lesser of (i) 85% of the market price of a common share on the first day of the applicable purchase period and (ii) 85% of the market price of a common share on the purchase date. The ESPP qualifies as an “employee stock purchase plan” within the meaning of Section 423 of the Code for employees who are United States taxpayers.
The Company currently holds offerings consisting of a single six-month purchase period commencing on January 1 and July 1 of each calendar year, with a single purchase date at the end of the purchase period on June 30 and December 31 of each calendar year.
Eligible employees are able to contribute up to 15% of their gross base earnings for purchases under the ESPP through regular payroll deductions. Purchases of shares under the ESPP are limited for each employee at $25 thousand worth of the Company’s common shares (determined using the lesser of (i) the market price of a common share on the first day of the applicable purchase period and (ii) the market price of a common share on the purchase date) for each year such purchase right is outstanding.
As this plan is considered compensatory, the Company recognizes compensation expense on these awards based on their estimated grant date fair value using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. The Company recognizes compensation expense in the consolidated statements of loss and comprehensive loss on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period. For the three months ended March 31, 2021, the Company recorded compensation expense of $269 (2020: $155) in research and development expense and general and administrative expense accounts. As of March 31, 2021, the total amount contributed by ESPP participants and not yet settled is $685 (December 31, 2020: $926).
9. Research, Collaboration and Licensing Agreements
Revenue recognized from the Company’s strategic partnerships is summarized as follows: 
Three Months Ended
March 31,
20212020
BeiGene, Ltd ("BeiGene"):
Milestone revenue$ $5,000 
Research support and other payments644 3,269 
$644 $8,269 
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Since December 31, 2020, there have not been any material changes to the key terms of our collaboration and license agreements. For further information on the terms and conditions of our existing collaboration and license agreements, please refer to the notes to the consolidated financial statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year-ended December 31, 2020.
In March 2020, the Company recognized milestone revenue of $5,000 under a license and collaboration agreement with BeiGene upon BeiGene's dosing of zanidatamab in the first patient in a clinical study in its territory. The Company did not have any performance obligations in relation to this milestone on the date it was achieved. Accordingly, it was recognized as revenue during the three months ended March 31, 2020.

At March 31, 2021, contract assets from research, collaboration and licensing agreements were nil (December 31, 2020: nil) and contract liabilities were $32,941 (December 31, 2020: $32,941). Contract liabilities include deferred revenue relating to an upfront payment received in 2018 under the licensing and collaboration agreement with BeiGene referred to above. During the three months ended March 31, 2021, the Company did not recognize any revenue from performance obligations satisfied in relation to the deferred revenue (three months ended March 31, 2020: nil). Amounts not expected to be recognized as revenue in the next twelve months from March 31, 2021 have been classified as long-term deferred revenue.
10. Other (expense) income , net
Other (expense) income consist of the following:
Three Months Ended
March 31,
20212020
Foreign exchange gain (loss)$(63)$3,223 
Other192 27 
$129 $3,250 

11. Leases

The Company leases separate office and laboratory spaces in Vancouver, British Columbia, with terms of each lease expiring in February 2022. On January 25, 2019, the Company entered into a lease for a new building in Vancouver to serve as the Company’s future headquarters, including both office and laboratory space. The commencement date of this lease depends upon completion of construction of the building and is currently estimated to be no later than the fourth quarter of 2021. This lease has an initial term of ten years, with two five-year extension options. In addition, the Company leases office space in Seattle, Washington with lease terms expiring in February 2022 and September 2025. None of the optional extension periods have been included in the determination of the right-of-use asset or the lease liability for operating leases as the Company did not consider it reasonably certain that the Company would exercise any such options. The Company also leases office equipment under capital lease agreements.
The balance sheet classification of the Company’s lease liabilities was as follows:
March 31,
2021
December 31,
2020
Operating lease liabilities:
Current portion
$2,952 $2,710 
Long-term portion
5,333 5,812 
Total operating lease liabilities
8,285 $8,522 
Finance lease liabilities:
Current portion included in other current liabilities
22 17 
Long-term portion included in other long-term liabilities
114 122 
Total finance lease liabilities
136 139 
Total lease liabilities
$8,421 $8,661 
Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of operating lease liabilities for the three months ended March 31, 2021 was $764 and was included in net cash used in operating activities in the consolidated statement of cash flows.
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As of March 31, 2021, the maturities of the Company’s operating lease liabilities were as follows:
Operating
leases
Within 1 year
$3,065 
1 to 2 years
1,622 
2 to 3 years
1,614 
3 to 4 years
1,556 
4 to 5 years
794 
Thereafter
 
Total operating lease payments
8,651 
Less:
Imputed interest
(366)
Operating lease liabilities
$8,285 
As of March 31, 2021, the weighted average remaining lease term is 3.7 years and the discount rate used to determine the operating lease liability was 4.6% for leases in Canadian dollars and 2.7% for leases in U.S. dollars.
During the three months ended March 31, 2021, the Company incurred total operating lease expenses of $1,003, which included lease expenses associated with fixed lease payments of $886, and variable payments associated with common area maintenance and similar expenses of $117.
In addition to the operating lease liabilities included in the table above, the Company has commitments for future operating lease payments of $27,024 under the terms of the lease for the Company’s future head office, which is expected to commence in fourth quarter of 2021.
12. Financial Instruments
The Company evaluates financial assets and liabilities subject to fair value measurements on a recurring basis to determine the appropriate level of classification each reporting period. This determination requires the Company to make subjective judgments as to the significance of inputs used in determining fair value and where such inputs lie within the fair value hierarchy.

Fair Value Measurements
The Company measures certain financial instruments and other items at fair value.
To determine fair value, the Company uses a fair value hierarchy that prioritizes the inputs, assumptions and valuation techniques used to measure fair value. The three levels of the fair value hierarchy are as follows:
Level 1 inputs are unadjusted quoted market prices for identical instruments available in active markets.
Level 2 inputs are inputs other than Level 1 prices, such as prices for a similar asset or liability that are observable either directly or indirectly. If the asset or liability has a contractual term, the input must be observable for substantially the full term. An example includes quoted market prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets.
Level 3 inputs are unobservable inputs for the asset or liability and will reflect management’s assessment about market assumptions that would be used to price the asset or liability.
Assets and liabilities are classified based on the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurements. Changes in the observability of valuation inputs may result in a reclassification of levels for certain securities within the fair value hierarchy.
The Company’s financial instruments consist of cash and cash equivalents, short-term and long-term investments in marketable and other securities, amounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued liabilities, finance and operating lease obligations, liability classified stock options and other long-term liabilities.

The carrying values of cash and cash equivalents, short-term investments in marketable securities, amounts receivable and accounts payable and accrued liabilities approximate their fair values due to the near-term maturities of these financial instruments. As at March 31, 2021, long-term investments in equity securities of private entities are accounted for as available for
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sale at their fair values. As quoted prices for the liability classified stock options are not readily available, the Company uses a Black-Scholes option pricing model to estimate fair value, which utilizes level 3 inputs as defined above. Other long-term liabilities for contingent consideration related to business acquisitions are recorded at fair value on the acquisition date and are adjusted quarterly for changes in fair value. Changes in the fair value of contingent consideration liabilities can result from changes in anticipated milestone payments and changes in assumed discount periods and rates. These inputs are unobservable in the market and therefore categorized as level 3 inputs as defined above.

The following tables present information about the Company’s liabilities that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis, and indicate the fair value hierarchy of the valuation techniques used to determine such fair value:
March 31,
2021
Level 1Level 2Level 3
Liabilities
Liability classified stock options$23,617 $— $— $23,617 
Liability for contingent consideration (note 13)1,316 — — 1,316 
Total$24,933 $— $— $24,933 

December 31,
2020
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Liabilities
Liability classified stock options
$39,284 $— $— $39,284 
Liability for contingent consideration (note 13)1,285 1,285 
Total
$40,569 $— $— $40,569 
The following table presents the changes in fair value of the liability classified stock options:
Liability at
beginning of
the period
(Decrease) increase in
fair value of liability
classified stock
options
Exercise of
options
Unrealized foreign
currency
loss (gain)
Liability at end of
the period
Three months ended March 31, 2021$39,284 $(15,531)$(641)$505 $23,617 

The change in fair value of liability classified stock options for the period is presented within research and development expenses and general and administrative expenses.
The following table presents the changes in fair value of the Company’s liability for contingent consideration:
Liability at
the beginning
of the period
Increase
(decrease) in
fair value of
liability for
contingent
consideration
Liability at end
of the period
Three months ended March 31, 2021$1,285 $31 $1,316 

Concentration of Credit Risk

Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to a concentration of credit risk consist primarily of cash and cash equivalents, short-term investments, long-term investments and accounts receivable. Cash and cash equivalents and investments in marketable securities are invested in accordance with the Company’s cash investment policy with the primary objective being the preservation of capital and maintenance of liquidity. The cash investment policy includes guidelines on the quality of financial instruments and defines allowable investments that the Company believes minimizes the exposure to concentration of credit risk. The Company limits its exposure to credit loss by placing its cash and cash equivalents, short-term investments and long-term investments with high credit quality financial institutions.

At March 31, 2021, the maximum exposure to credit risk for accounts receivable was $4,576 (December 31, 2020: $15,293) and all accounts receivable are due within the next 12 months. As at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the Company has not recognized any provision for expected credit losses in relation to accounts receivable.
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Liquidity Risk

Liquidity risk is the risk that the Company will encounter difficulty in meeting the obligations associated with its financial liabilities that are settled by delivering cash or another financial asset. The Company’s short-term cash requirements are primarily to settle its financial liabilities, which consist primarily of accounts payable and accrued liabilities falling due within 45 days and current portion of lease obligations falling due within the next 12 months, with medium-term requirements to invest in property and equipment and research and development. The Company’s principal sources of liquidity to settle its financial liabilities are cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments, collection of accounts receivable relating to research collaboration and license agreements and additional public equity offerings as required. The Company believes that these principal sources of liquidity are sufficient to fund its operations for at least the next 12 months.

Foreign Currency Risk

The Company incurs certain operating expenses in currencies other than the U.S. dollar and accordingly is subject to foreign exchange risk due to fluctuations in exchange rates. The Company does not use derivative instruments to hedge exposure to foreign exchange risk due to the low volume of transactions denominated in foreign currencies. At March 31, 2021, the Company’s net monetary assets denominated in Canadian dollars were $22,528 (C$28,401).

The operating results and financial position of the Company are reported in U.S. dollars in the Company’s consolidated financial statements. The fluctuation of the U.S. dollar relative to the Canadian dollar and other foreign currencies will have an impact on the reported balances for net assets, net loss and shareholders’ equity in the Company’s consolidated financial statements.
13. Commitments and Contingencies
Commitments
The Company has entered into research collaboration agreements with strategic partners in the ordinary course of operations that may include contractual milestone payments related to the achievement of pre-specified research, development, regulatory and commercialization events and indemnification provisions, which are common in such agreements. Pursuant to the agreements, the Company is obligated to make research and development and regulatory milestone payments upon the occurrence of certain events and royalty payments based on net sales. The maximum amount of potential future indemnification is unlimited, however, the Company currently holds commercial and product liability insurance that limits the Company’s liability and may enable it to recover a portion of any future amounts paid. Historically, the Company has not made any indemnification payments under such agreements and believes that the fair value of these indemnification obligations is minimal. Accordingly, the Company has not recognized any liabilities relating to indemnification obligations for any period presented in the consolidated financial statements.
In connection with the Company's 2016 Kairos acquisition, the Company may be required to make future payments to CDRD Ventures Inc. (“CVI”) upon the direct achievement of certain development milestones for products incorporating certain Kairos intellectual property, as well as royalty payments on the net sales of such products. For out-licensed products and technologies incorporating certain Kairos intellectual property, the Company may be required to pay CVI a mid-single digit percentage of the future revenue as a result of a revenue sharing agreement. As of March 31, 2021, the contingent consideration had an estimated fair value of $1,316, which has been recorded within other long-term liabilities on the Company's consolidated balance sheet (December 31, 2020: $1,285). The contingent consideration was calculated using a probability weighted assessment of the likelihood of the milestones being met, a probability adjusted discount rate that reflects the stage of the development and time to complete the development. Contingent consideration is a financial liability and measured at its fair value at each reporting period, with any changes in fair value from the previous reporting period recorded in the statement of loss and comprehensive loss.
Contingencies
From time to time, the Company may be subject to various legal proceedings and claims related to matters arising in the ordinary course of business. The Company does not believe it is currently subject to any material matters where there is at least a reasonable possibility that a material loss may be incurred.
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Item 2.    Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
The following discussion should be read in conjunction with the attached financial statements and notes thereto included in Part I, Item 1 of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, as well as our audited financial statements and related notes thereto and management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations for the year ended December 31, 2020 included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) on February 24, 2021 and with the securities commissions in all provinces and territories of Canada on February 24, 2021. This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, including the following sections, contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results and events to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. As a result of many factors, including without limitation those set forth under “Risk Factors” under Item 1A of Part II below, and elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, our actual results may differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements. We caution the reader not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which reflect management’s analysis only as of the date of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. We undertake no obligation to update forward-looking statements which reflect events or circumstances occurring after the date of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, except as required by law. Throughout this discussion, unless the context specifies or implies otherwise, the terms “Zymeworks,” “we,” “us,” and “our” refer to Zymeworks Inc. and its subsidiary.

Overview

Zymeworks is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company dedicated to the development of next-generation multifunctional biotherapeutics. Our suite of complementary therapeutic platforms and our fully integrated drug development engine provide the flexibility and compatibility to precisely engineer and develop highly differentiated product candidates. These capabilities have resulted in multiple product candidates with the potential to drive positive outcomes in large underserved and unaddressed patient populations.
Our lead product candidate, zanidatamab (formerly known as ZW25), is a novel bispecific (dual-targeting) antibody that targets two distinct domains of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (“HER2”). The unique mechanism of action of zanidatamab may enable it to address unmet need in patient populations with HER2-expressing cancers, including those with lower levels of expression, for which there are no approved HER2-targeted agents. In clinical trials, monotherapy zanidatamab and zanidatamab in combination with chemotherapy have been well tolerated with promising antitumor activity in patients with heavily pretreated HER2-expressing cancers that have progressed after having received standard of care, including multiple HER2-targeted regimens. Based on these data, we initiated a number of global multicenter Phase 2 clinical trials to evaluate zanidatamab in specific indications and lines of therapy. These include (i) a pivotal trial in patients with previously treated HER2 gene amplified biliary tract cancer (“BTC”), (ii) the first-line treatment of HER2-positive metastatic gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas (“GEA”) in combination with standard of care chemotherapy, and (iii) previously-treated locally advanced and/or metastatic HER2-positive, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in combination with Pfizer’s Ibrance® (palbociclib) and fulvestrant. Our partner, BeiGene, Ltd. (“BeiGene”), has initiated Phase 1b/2 clinical trials evaluating zanidatamab for (i) the first-line treatment of metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer in combination with docetaxel and for (ii) the first-line treatment of metastatic HER2-positive GEA in combination with tislelizumab and chemotherapy. In addition, zanidatamab continues to be evaluated in several indications including colorectal, endometrial and other HER2-expressing cancers.
Our second product candidate, ZW49, combines the unique design of zanidatamab with our ZymeLink antibody-drug conjugate (“ADC”) platform, comprised of our proprietary cytotoxin (cancer cell-killing compound) and cleavable linker. We designed ZW49 to be a best-in-class HER2-targeting ADC to further address unmet need across a range of HER2-expressing cancers. A Phase 1 clinical trial to establish safety and antitumor activity of ZW49 began in 2019.
We are also advancing a deep pipeline of preclinical product candidates and discovery-stage programs in oncology (including immuno-oncology (“I-O”) agents) and other therapeutic areas.
Our proprietary capabilities and technologies include several modular, complementary therapeutic platforms that can be used in combination with each other and with existing approaches. This ability to layer technologies without compromising manufacturability enables us to engineer next-generation biotherapeutics with synergistic activity, which we believe will result in improved patient outcomes. Our core platforms include:

Azymetric, our bispecific platform, which enables therapeutic antibodies to simultaneously bind multiple distinct locations on a target (known as an epitope) or to multiple targets. This is achieved by tailoring multiple configurations of the antibody’s Fab regions (locations on the antibody to which epitopes bind);
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ZymeLink, our ADC platform, comprised of cytotoxins and the linker technology used to couple these cytotoxins to tumor-targeting antibodies or proteins. This platform can be used in conjunction with our other therapeutic platforms to increase safety and efficacy as compared to existing ADC technologies;
EFECT, which enables finely tuned modulation (both up and down) of immune cell recruitment and function; and
ProTECT, which enables tumor-specific activity that may reduce systemic toxicity, and simultaneously enhances localized immune co-stimulation or checkpoint modulation that may increase efficacy.

Our protein engineering expertise and proprietary structure-guided molecular modeling capabilities enable these therapeutic platforms. Together with our internal antibody discovery and generation technologies, we have established a fully integrated drug development engine and toolkit capable of rapidly delivering a steady pipeline of next-generation product candidates in oncology and other therapeutic areas.
Our Azymetric, EFECT and ZymeLink therapeutic platforms have been further leveraged through multiple revenue-generating strategic partnerships with the following global pharmaceutical companies: Merck Sharp & Dohme Research GmbH (“Merck”), Eli Lilly and Company (“Lilly”), Celgene Corporation and Celgene Alpine Investment Co. LLC (formerly “Celgene” and now a Bristol-Myers Squibb company, “BMS”), GlaxoSmithKline Intellectual Property Development Limited (“GSK”), Daiichi Sankyo Co., Ltd. (“Daiichi Sankyo”), Janssen Biotech, Inc. (“Janssen”), LEO Pharma A/S (“LEO”), BeiGene, and Iconic Therapeutics, Inc. (“Iconic”).
Our goal is to leverage our next-generation therapeutic platforms and proprietary protein engineering capabilities to become a domain dominator in the discovery, development and commercialization of best-in-class multifunctional biotherapeutics for the treatment of cancer and other diseases with high unmet medical need.
We commenced operations in 2003 and have since devoted substantially all of our resources to research and development activities including developing our therapeutic platforms, identifying and developing potential product candidates and undertaking preclinical studies and clinical trials. Additionally, we have supported our research and development activities with general and administrative support, as well as by raising capital, conducting business planning and protecting our intellectual property. We have not generated any revenue from the sale of approved products to date and do not expect to do so until such time as we obtain regulatory approval and commercialize one or more of our product candidates. We cannot be certain of the timing or success of approval of our product candidates.
Since our initial public offering (“IPO”) in 2017, we have funded our operations primarily through follow-on public offerings, including the issuance of pre-funded warrants, and payments received under our license and collaboration agreements. Payments received from our license and collaboration agreements include upfront fees, milestone payments, as well as research support and reimbursement payments. Prior to our IPO, we also received financing from private equity placements and the issuance of convertible debt, which was subsequently converted into equity securities, and a credit facility. From inception to March 31, 2021, we received $795.7 million, net of equity issue costs, from these sources of financing including proceeds from exercises of stock options and employee stock purchase plans. As of March 31, 2021, we had $411.5 million of cash resources consisting of cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments.
Although it is difficult to predict our funding requirements, based upon our current operating plan, we anticipate that our existing cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments as of March 31, 2021, combined with the collaboration payments we anticipate receiving, will enable us to fund our planned operations into the second half of 2022 and potentially beyond.

We reported a net loss of $44.6 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and through March 31, 2021, we had an accumulated deficit of $515.9 million. Over the next several years, we expect to continue to incur losses as we increase our research and development expenditures in connection with the ongoing development of our product candidates and other clinical, preclinical and regulatory activities.


Recent Developments

COVID-19

COVID-19 has impacted our research and development activities, but has not caused significant disruptions to our business operations to date. In March 2020, we transitioned our workforce to a remote working arrangement to protect the health and safety of our employees. In June 2020, we implemented a program to facilitate the phased return of employees to our lab and office facilities pursuant to enhanced health and safety protocols consistent with guidelines issued by local health authorities. Our preclinical research activities were supplemented by support from external contract research organizations (“CROs”) to complement the temporarily reduced capacity at our lab facilities. Certain clinical trial activities, including patient enrollment and site activations, were delayed or otherwise impacted by COVID-19. To date, COVID-19 has not had a material impact on our financial condition, liquidity or longer-term strategic development and commercialization plans.
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The extent to which COVID-19 may cause more significant disruptions to our business and greater impacts to our results of operations will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted with confidence, such as the duration and severity of outbreaks, including potential future waves or cycles, and the effectiveness of actions to contain and treat COVID-19. We cannot predict the duration, scope and severity of any potential business shutdowns or disruptions, including to our ongoing and planned clinical studies and our regulatory approval prospects. Further prolonged shutdowns or other business interruptions could result in material and negative effects to our ability to conduct our business in the manner and on the timelines currently planned, which could have a material adverse impact on our business, results of operations, and financial condition. The COVID-19 pandemic continues to rapidly evolve, and we will continue to monitor the effects of COVID-19 on our business. See Part II - Item 1A, “Risk Factors – Risks Related to Our Business and the Development and Commercialization of Our Product Candidates – Our business has been and may continue to be adversely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.”
Zanidatamab Clinical Program:
In January 2021, we presented updated clinical data at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (“ASCO”) Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium for zanidatamab, in both HER2-expressing biliary tract cancer (“BTC”) and gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma (“GEA”). Overall zanidatamab was well tolerated with the majority of treatment-related adverse events were mild or moderate (Grade 1 or 2) in severity and response rates and median duration of response in refractory BTC and GEA compare favorably to current standard of care and emerging treatments.
ZW49 Clinical Program:

In January 2021, we announced an interim update from the ongoing ZW49 Phase 1 dose-escalation study. In 35 patients who have received ZW49 across all dosing regimens, there have been no dose-limiting toxicities, no treatment-related hematologic, pulmonary, or liver toxicity, and no treatment-related deaths. Over 90% of treatment-related adverse events have been mild or moderate (Grade 1 or 2) in severity, with the most common being keratitis, fatigue, and diarrhea, which have been reversible and manageable in an outpatient setting. There have been no discontinuations due to treatment-related adverse events, and the maximum tolerated dose has not yet been established. ZW49 has demonstrated antitumor activity at all dose levels evaluated in the once every three week regimen including confirmed partial responses and stable disease per RECIST 1.1. Dose escalation is continuing at 3 mg/kg once every three weeks. Three indication-specific expansion cohorts (HER2-positive breast cancer, HER2-positive GEA, and a basket cohort of other HER2-positive cancers) utilizing the 2.5 mg/kg once every three week regimen have also been initiated to better ascertain antitumor activity in more homogeneous patient populations.
Preclinical Programs:
In April 2021, we presented five posters at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting. The presentations highlight preclinical data that reveal new insights into the unique mechanisms of action of lead clinical candidate, zanidatamab, introduce our fourth therapeutic platform, ProTECT, and describe two new preclinical assets focused on the cytokine, IL-12, and the immune-oncology target, 4-1BB.
Executive Team Changes:
In January 2021, Mr. James Priour was promoted to Chief Commercial Officer and named to the Executive Committee. In April 2021, we announced that Dr. Diana Hausman will transition from her role as our Chief Medical Officer and Dr. Neil Josephson, our Senior Vice President, Clinical Research, will assume the role of interim Chief Medical Officer. Dr. Hausman will remain as a clinical advisor through November 15, 2021.
Strategic Partnerships and Collaborations
Our novel therapeutic candidates, together with the unique combination of proprietary protein engineering capabilities and resulting therapeutic platform technologies, have enabled us to enter into a number of strategic partnerships, many of which were subsequently expanded in scope. Our strategic partnerships, including with Merck, Lilly, BMS, GSK, Daiichi Sankyo, Janssen, LEO, BeiGene, and Iconic, provide us with the ability to accelerate clinical development of our therapeutic candidates in certain geographical regions and provide our strategic partners with access to components of our proprietary Azymetric, EFECT, and/or ZymeLink therapeutic platforms for their own therapeutics development. In addition, these strategic partnerships have provided us with non-dilutive funding as well as access to proprietary therapeutic assets, which increase our ability to rapidly advance our product candidates while maintaining commercial rights to our own therapeutic pipeline. Under our existing collaboration agreements, we have received $218.0 million to date in the form of non-refundable upfront payments and milestone payments, and we are also eligible to receive up to $2.8 billion in preclinical and development milestone payments and $5.8 billion in commercial milestone payments, as well as tiered royalties on potential future product sales. It is possible, however, that our strategic partners’ programs will not advance as currently contemplated, which would negatively affect the amount of
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development and commercial milestone payments and royalties on potential future product sales we may receive. Importantly, these partnerships include predominantly non-target-exclusive licenses for any of our therapeutic platforms, so we maintain the ability to develop therapeutics directed to many high-value targets utilizing our platforms.

There have not been any material changes to the key terms of any of our licensing and collaboration agreements, since December 31, 2020. For further information on the terms and conditions of our existing collaboration and license agreements, please refer to “Item 1. Business - Strategic Partnerships and Collaborations” of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020.
Financial Operations Overview
Revenue
Our revenue consists of collaboration revenue, including amounts recognized relating to upfront non-refundable payments for licenses or options to obtain future licenses, research and development funding and milestone payments earned under collaboration and license agreements. We expect that collaboration revenue from our strategic partnerships will be our primary source of revenue for the foreseeable future.
Operating Expenses
Our operating expenses consist primarily of research and development expenses and general and administrative expenses. Personnel costs including salaries, benefits, bonuses and stock-based compensation expense, comprise a significant component of research and development and general and administrative expenses. We allocate certain indirect expenses associated with our facilities, information technology, depreciation and other overhead costs between research and development and general and administrative categories based on employee headcount and the nature of work performed by each employee.
Research and Development Expense
Research and development expenses consist of expenses incurred in performing research and development activities such as conducting clinical trials and preclinical research studies, technical and manufacturing operations, regulatory affairs and other indirect expenses in support of advancing our product candidates and therapeutic platforms. Research and development expenses include third-party program costs, internal personnel costs and other indirect costs as follows:
fees paid to CROs, consultants, subcontractors and other third-party vendors for work performed for our clinical trials, preclinical studies and regulatory activities;
fees paid to third-party manufacturers to produce our clinical product candidate supplies;
amounts paid to vendors and suppliers for laboratory supplies;
fees, milestone payments and other expenses incurred in connection with license agreements and amendments;
employee-related expenses such as salaries and benefits and stock based-compensation;
depreciation of laboratory equipment, computers and leasehold improvements; and
overhead expenses such as facilities, information technology and other allocated items.
It is difficult to determine with certainty the duration and completion costs of our current or future clinical trials and preclinical programs of our product candidates, or if, when or to what extent we will generate revenue from the commercialization and sale of any of our product candidates that obtain regulatory approval. We may never succeed in achieving regulatory approval for any of our product candidates. The duration, costs and timing of clinical trials and development of our product candidates will depend on a variety of factors, including the uncertainties of clinical trials and preclinical studies, uncertainties in clinical trial enrollment rates and significant and changing government regulation. In addition, the probability of success for each product candidate will depend on numerous factors, including competition, manufacturing capability and commercial viability. We will determine which programs to pursue and how much to fund each program in response to the scientific and clinical success of each product candidate, as well as an assessment of each product candidate’s commercial potential.
General and Administrative Expense
General and administrative expenses consist of salaries, benefits and stock-based compensation costs for employees in our executive, finance, legal, intellectual property, business development, human resources and other support functions, as well as legal and professional fees, business insurance, facilities and information technology costs and other expenses. We expect general and administrative expenses to increase as we expand our infrastructure to support our ongoing research and development activities.
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Other Income (Expense)
Other income (expense) primarily consists of interest income and foreign exchange gain (loss).
Critical Accounting Policies and Significant Judgments and Estimates
Our critical accounting policies are those policies that require the most significant judgments and estimates in the preparation of our interim condensed consolidated financial statements. A summary of our critical accounting policies is presented in note 2 of our annual consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2020.

Our management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations is based on our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP. The preparation of these consolidated financial statements requires us to make estimates, judgments and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable. We review and evaluate these estimates on an ongoing basis. These assumptions and estimates form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities and amounts that have been recorded as revenue and expenses. Actual results and experiences may differ from these estimates. The results of any material revisions would be reflected in the consolidated financial statements prospectively from the date of the change in estimate.

There have been no material changes in our critical accounting policies and significant judgments and estimates during the three months ended March 31, 2021 as compared to what has been described in our most recent annual consolidated financial statements.
The full extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic may directly or indirectly impact our business, results of operations and financial condition, including revenues, expenses, clinical trials, research and development costs and employee-related amounts, will depend on future developments that are evolving and highly uncertain, such as the duration and severity of outbreaks, including potential future waves or cycles, and the effectiveness of actions taken to contain and treat COVID-19. We considered the potential impact of COVID-19 when making certain estimates and judgments relating to the preparation of our condensed consolidated financial statements. While there was no material impact to our consolidated financial statements as of and for the three months ended March 31, 2021, our future assessment of the magnitude and duration of COVID-19, as well as other factors, could result in a material impact to our consolidated financial statements in future reporting periods.
Recent Accounting Pronouncements
A summary of recent accounting pronouncements is presented in note 3 of our interim condensed consolidated financial statements for the quarter ended March 31, 2021 within this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.
Results of Operations for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2021 and 2020
Revenue
Three Months Ended
March 31,
Increase/
(Decrease)
20212020
(dollars in millions)
Revenue from research and collaborations$0.6 $8.3 $(7.7)(93)%
Our revenue relates primarily to non-recurring upfront fees, expansion payments or milestone payments from our licensing and collaboration agreements.

Total revenue decreased by $7.7 million in the three months ended March 31, 2021 compared to the same period in 2020. Revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2021 included $0.6 million from our partners for research support and other payments. Revenue for the same period in 2020 included $5.0 million from BeiGene for a development milestone and $3.3 million from our partners for research support, drug supply and other payments. 
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Research and Development Expense 
Three Months Ended
March 31,
Increase/
(Decrease)
20212020
(dollars in millions)
Third-party research and development program expenses:
Clinical development programs:
Zanidatamab$16.6 $19.3 $(2.7)(14)%
ZW494.4 3.6 0.8 22 %
Preclinical and other research programs3.4 3.2 0.2 %
Unallocated departmental research and development expenses:24.4 26.1 (1.7)(7)%
Salaries and benefits13.1 7.8 5.3 68 %
Stock-based compensation expense1.8 0.3 1.5 500 %
Other unallocated expenses5.0 2.7 2.3 85 %
Research and development expense$44.3 $36.9 $7.4 20 %
Research and development expense increased by $7.4 million in the three months ended March 31, 2021 compared to the same period in 2020. The increase related primarily to higher salaries and benefits expense from additional headcount and an increase in unallocated lab and consulting expenses partly offset by slightly lower third-party research and development program expenses. For zanidatamab third-party program expenses, an increase in clinical trial expense was offset by lower drug manufacturing activity. For the three months ended March 31, 2021, research and development expense included non-cash stock-based compensation expense of $1.8 million comprised of $4.3 million from equity classified awards (three months ended March 31, 2020 – $2.0 million) and a $2.5 million recovery related to the non-cash mark-to-market revaluation of certain historical liability classified awards (three months ended March 31, 2020 - recovery of $1.8 million).
General and Administrative Expense
 Three Months Ended
March 31,
Increase/
(Decrease)
 20212020
 (dollars in millions)
Salaries and benefits$6.5 $4.1 $2.4 59 %
Stock based compensation recovery(8.8)(3.1)(5.7)184 %
Professional fees, consulting and business insurance3.1 3.5 (0.4)(11)%
Other general and administrative expenses0.5 2.7 (2.2)(81)%
General and administrative expense$1.3 $7.2 $(5.9)(82)%
General and administrative expense decreased by $5.9 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 compared to the same period in 2020. The decrease was primarily due to the change in stock-based compensation recovery. For the three months ended March 31, 2021, general and administrative expense included non-cash stock-based compensation recovery of $8.8 million comprised of $4.2 million expense from equity classified awards (three months ended March 31, 2020 – $2.2 million) and a $13.0 million recovery related to the non-cash mark-to-market revaluation of certain historical liability classified awards (three months ended March 31, 2020 – recovery of $5.4 million). Excluding stock-based compensation, general and administrative expense decreased by $0.2 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 compared to the same period in 2020. This decrease was primarily due to a sales tax refund recognized in the first quarter of 2021 that related to prior years and a decrease in legal fees partially offset by higher salaries and benefits expense from additional headcount.  
Other Income (Expense), net 
Three Months Ended
March 31,
Increase/
(Decrease)
20212020
(dollars in millions)
Other income, net$0.9 $5.1 $(4.2)(82)%
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Net other income decreased by $4.2 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 compared to the same period in 2020. Net other income for 2021 included $0.7 million in interest income and other miscellaneous amounts. Net other income for the three months ended March 31, 2020 included $1.9 million in interest income and a $3.2 million net foreign exchange gain primarily due to revaluation of stock option liabilities denominated in Canadian dollars.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
Sources of Liquidity
Since our IPO in 2017, we have funded our operations primarily through follow-on public offerings, including the issuance of pre-funded warrants, as well as from upfront fees, milestone payments, and research support payments generated from our strategic collaborations and licensing agreements.
We completed a public offering on January 27, 2020 pursuant to which we sold (i) 5,824,729 common shares (including the sale of 900,000 common shares to the underwriters upon their full exercise of their over-allotment option) and (ii) 1,075,271 pre-funded warrants in lieu of common shares. We received gross proceeds of $320.9 million and net cash proceeds of $300.9 million, after underwriting discounts, commissions and estimated offering expenses.
Funding Requirements
We have not generated any revenue from approved product sales to date and do not expect to do so until such time as we obtain regulatory approval and commercialize one or more of our product candidates. As we are currently in the clinical and preclinical stages of development, it will be some time before we expect to achieve this, and it is uncertain that we ever will. We expect that we will continue to increase our operating expenses in connection with ongoing clinical trials and preclinical activities and the development of product candidates in our pipeline. We expect to continue our strategic partnerships and will look for additional collaborations as well as expanded collaboration opportunities. Although it is difficult to predict our funding requirements, based on our current operating plan, we anticipate that our existing cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments combined with certain anticipated milestone payments from our collaborations will enable us to fund our operating expenses and capital expenditure requirements into the second half of 2022 and potentially beyond. We have based these estimates on assumptions and plans which may change and which could impact the magnitude and/or timing of operating expenses, capital expenditures and our cash runway. These estimates include future milestone payments which are dependent upon the successful completion of specified research and development activities by us and our collaborators and are therefore uncertain at this time. The successful development of our product candidates and the achievement of milestones by our strategic partners is uncertain, and therefore we are unable to estimate the actual funds we will require to complete the research, development and commercialization of product candidates. See Part II - Item 1A, “Risk Factors – Risks Related to Our Dependence on Third Parties – We may not realize the anticipated benefits of our strategic partnerships”.
As of March 31, 2021, we had $411.5 million in cash resources consisting of cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments.
Cash Flows
The following table represents a summary of our cash flows for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020: 
Three Months Ended
March 31,
20212020
(dollars in millions)
Net cash (used in) provided by:
Operating activities$(40.8)$(37.5)
Investing activities76.8 (204.8)
Financing activities2.1 302.8 
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents(0.2)0.5 
Net change in cash and cash equivalents$37.9 $61.0 
Operating Activities
During the three months ended March 31, 2021, cash used in operating activities was $40.8 million compared to $37.5 million for the same period in the prior year. The increase in net cash used in operating activities was primarily due to higher expenditures for expansion of our clinical programs and other research and development activities which were partially offset by an increase in receipts from collaboration partners in the form of milestones and research support payments in the three months ended March 31, 2021.
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Investing Activities
Net cash from investing activities for the three month period ended March 31, 2021 is primarily related to redemptions of short -term investments in marketable securities of $77.5 million partially offset by cash outflows of $0.7 million for the acquisition of property and equipment. Net cash used in investing activities for the three month period ended March 31, 2020 is primarily related to purchases of short and long-term investments in marketable securities. A significant portion of the proceeds from our January 2020 public offering was invested in guaranteed investment certificates (“GICs”), term deposits and commercial paper resulting in a net change in short-term and long-term investments of $203.8 million. The remaining change of $0.9 million related to the acquisition of property and equipment and intangible assets.
Financing Activities
Net cash provided by financing activities for the three months ended March 31, 2021 related primarily to net proceeds of $1.3 million from stock option exercises and $0.8 million from the issuance of common shares in relation to our employee stock purchase plan. Net cash provided by financing activities for the three months ended March 31, 2020 included $300.9 million relating to net proceeds from our January 2020 public offering of equity securities, $1.4 million from stock option exercises, and $0.4 million from the issuance of common shares in relation to our employee stock purchase plan.
Contractual Obligations and Contingent Liabilities
Lease Commitments
We lease separate office and laboratory spaces in Vancouver, British Columbia, with terms of each lease expiring in February 2022. We also entered into a lease on January 25, 2019 to serve as our new Vancouver, British Columbia headquarters, including both office and laboratory space. The commencement date of this lease depends upon completion of construction of the building and is currently estimated to be no later than in the fourth quarter of 2021. This lease has an initial term of ten years, with two five-year extension options. In addition, we lease office space in Seattle, Washington for which the lease terms expire in February 2022 and September 2025, respectively. We also lease office equipment under capital lease agreements.

Future minimum lease payments under the non-cancellable operating leases and capital leases at March 31, 2021 are as follows:
Payments due by period
Less Than
1 Year
1 to 2
Years
2 to 3
Years
3 to 4
Years
ThereafterTotal
(dollars in thousands)
Capital lease obligations$22 $23 $19 $48 $26 $138 
Operating lease obligations4,555 4,176 4,168 4,173 18,603 35,675 
Total contractual obligations$4,577 $4,199 $4,187 $4,221 $18,629 $35,813 
Other Commitments
We have entered into research collaboration agreements with strategic partners, in the ordinary course of operations, that may include contractual milestone payments related to the achievement of pre-specified research, development, regulatory and commercialization events and indemnification provisions, which are common in such agreements. Pursuant to the agreements, we are obligated to make research and development and regulatory milestone payments upon the occurrence of certain events and royalty payments based on net sales. The maximum amount of potential future indemnification is unlimited; however, we currently hold commercial and product liability insurance. This insurance limits our liability and may enable us to recover a portion of any future amounts paid. Historically, we have not made any indemnification payments under such agreements and we believe that the fair value of these indemnification obligations is minimal. Accordingly, we have not recognized any liabilities relating to these obligations for any period presented.
In connection with our 2016 acquisition of Kairos Therapeutics Inc. (“Kairos”), we may be required to make future payments to CDRD Ventures Inc. (“CVI”) upon the direct achievement of certain development milestones for products incorporating certain Kairos intellectual property, as well as royalty payments on the net sales of such products. For out-licensed products and technologies incorporating certain Kairos intellectual property, we may be required to pay CVI a mid-single-digit percentage of the future revenue as a result of a revenue sharing agreement. As of March 31, 2021, the development milestone payments had an estimated fair value of $1.3 million, which has been recorded as contingent consideration within other long-term liabilities on our consolidated balance sheet (December 31, 2020: $1.3 million). The contingent consideration was calculated using a probability weighted assessment of the likelihood the milestones would be met, a probability adjusted discount rate that reflects the stage of the development and time to complete the development. Contingent consideration is a financial liability and measured at its fair
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value at each reporting period, with any changes in fair value from the previous reporting period recorded in the statement of operations and comprehensive loss.
Contingencies
From time to time, we may be subject to various legal proceedings and claims related to matters arising in the ordinary course of business. We do not believe we are currently subject to any matters where there is at least a reasonable possibility that a material loss may be incurred.
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
We have no material undisclosed off-balance sheet arrangements that have, or are reasonably likely to have, a current or future effect on our results of operations or financial condition.
Segment Reporting
We view our operations and manage our business in one segment, which is the development of next-generation multifunctional biotherapeutics.
Outstanding Share Data
As of May 3, 2021, our authorized share capital consisted of an unlimited number of common shares, each without par value, of which 46,170,034 were issued and outstanding, and an unlimited number of preferred shares, each without par value, none of which were issued and outstanding. As of May 3, 2021, we had 5,241,961 common shares issuable pursuant to 5,241,961 pre-funded warrants, 3,630,757 common shares issuable pursuant to 3,630,757 exercisable outstanding stock options and 3,897,501 common shares issuable pursuant to 3,897,501 outstanding options that were not exercisable at that date and 172,942 outstanding restricted stock units.
Item 3.    Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosure About Market Risk

We are exposed to market risks in the ordinary course of our business that may affect our results of operations, cash flows and fair values of assets and liabilities, including interest rate movements, volatility in foreign currency exchange rates, and changes in economic conditions as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The primary market risk inherent in our financial instruments and in our financial position represents the potential loss arising from adverse changes in interest rates and exchange rates.
Interest Rate Risk
Our exposure to interest rate risk relates primarily to our cash, cash equivalent, short-term investment and long-term investment portfolio. At March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, we had cash, cash equivalents, short-term investments and long-term investments of $411.5 million and $451.6 million, respectively, consisting primarily of funds in cash, guaranteed investment certificates and term deposits. The primary objective of our investment activities is to preserve principal while also maintaining liquidity and maximizing investment returns without significantly increasing risk. We do not enter into investments for trading or speculative purposes. Due to the short-term nature of our investment portfolio, a hypothetical 10% increase or decrease in interest rates or in investment returns would not have a material effect on the fair market value of our portfolio or investment income. Our investment portfolio is primarily composed of short-term investments with maturities less than 12 months and our long-term investments in debt securities are held to maturity. Accordingly, we do not expect our operating results or cash flows to be materially affected by a sudden change in market interest rates.
Foreign Currency Exchange Risk
Our functional currency is the U.S. dollar as most of our revenues and operating expenses are denominated in U.S. dollars. We incur certain operating expenses in Canadian dollars and other foreign currencies and accordingly, are subject to foreign currency transaction risk. We do not use derivative instruments to hedge exposure to foreign currency transaction risk due to the low volume of transactions denominated in Canadian dollars and other foreign currencies. We do not anticipate that foreign currency transaction gains or losses will be significant at our current level of operations.
At March 31, 2021, our net monetary assets denominated in Canadian dollars were $22.5 million (C$28.4 million). We are subject to foreign currency translation risk when translating these foreign currency denominated net monetary assets to U.S. dollars for period end financial statement preparation. The fluctuation of the Canadian dollar relative to the U.S. dollar will have an impact on the reported balances for net assets, net loss and shareholders’ equity in our consolidated financial statements. A hypothetical 10% increase or decrease in the value of the Canadian dollar relative to the U.S. dollar would result in a foreign
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exchange gain (loss) of $2.3 million in our Condensed Consolidated Statement of Loss and Comprehensive Loss for the three months ended March 31, 2021.
Item 4.    Controls and Procedures
Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
As of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, our management, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and our Chief Financial Officer, evaluated the design and operating effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the U.S. Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). Our disclosure controls and procedures are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in the reports that the Company files or submits under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Any such information is accumulated and communicated to the Company’s management, including its principal executive and principal financial officers, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.
Management recognizes that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving their objectives and management necessarily applies its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible controls and procedures. Based on our evaluation of our disclosure controls and procedures as of March 31, 2021, our Chief Executive Officer and our Chief Financial Officer concluded that, as of such date, our disclosure controls and procedures were, in design and operation, effective at the reasonable assurance level.
Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during our fiscal quarter ended March 31, 2021 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.
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PART II. OTHER INFORMATION
Item 1.    Legal Proceedings
From time to time, we may become involved in legal proceedings or be subject to claims arising in the ordinary course of our business. As of March 31, 2021, we are not a party to any legal proceedings that, in the opinion of our management, would reasonably be expected to have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results or cash flows if determined adversely to us. Regardless of the outcome, litigation can have an adverse impact on us because of defense and settlement costs, diversion of management resources and other factors.
Item 1A.    Risk Factors
You should carefully consider the following risk factors, in addition to the other information contained in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, including our condensed consolidated financial statements and related notes. If any of the events described in the following risk factors occurs, our business, operating results and financial condition could be seriously harmed. This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q also contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. Our actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in the forward-looking statements as a result of factors that are described below and elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.
Summary of Risk Factors
Below is a summary of the principal factors that make an investment in our common shares speculative or risky. This summary does not address all of the risks that we face. Additional discussion of the risks summarized in this risk factor summary, and other risks that we face, can be found below under the heading “Risk Factors” and should be carefully considered, together with other information in this Form 10-Q and our other filings with the SEC, before making an investment decision regarding our common shares.
We have a limited number of product candidates, all which are still in clinical development. If we do not obtain regulatory approval of one or more of our product candidates, or experience significant delays in doing so, our business will be materially adversely affected.
Clinical trials are expensive, time consuming and difficult to design and implement and involve uncertain outcomes. Furthermore, the results of previous preclinical studies and clinical trials may not be predictive of future results, and the results of our current and planned clinical trials may not satisfy the requirements of the FDA or non-U.S. regulatory authorities.
Our business has been and may continue to be adversely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.
Our product candidates may have undesirable side effects that may delay or prevent marketing approval or, if approval is received, require them to be taken off the market, require them to include safety warnings or otherwise limit their sales; no regulatory agency has made any determination that any of our product candidates are safe or effective for use by the general public for any indication.
We face significant competition and if our competitors develop and market products that are more effective, safer or less expensive than our product candidates, our commercial opportunities will be negatively impacted.
If any of our product candidates receive regulatory approval, the approved products may not achieve broad market acceptance among physicians, patients, the medical community and third-party payors, in which case revenue generated from their sales would be limited.
Reimbursement decisions by third-party payors may have an adverse effect on pricing and market acceptance. If there is not sufficient reimbursement for our products, it is less likely that our products will be widely used.
We may not be successful in our efforts to use and expand our therapeutic platforms to build a pipeline of product candidates.
If any product liability lawsuits are successfully brought against us or any of our strategic partners, we may incur substantial liabilities and may be required to limit commercialization of our product candidates.
Security breaches, loss of data and other disruptions could compromise sensitive information related to our business or protected health information or prevent us from accessing critical information and expose us to liability, which could adversely affect our business and our reputation.
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Current and future legislation may increase the difficulty and cost for us to commercialize any products that we or our strategic partners develop and affect the prices we may obtain.
We have incurred significant losses since inception and anticipate that we will continue to incur losses for the foreseeable future. We have no products approved for commercial sale, and to date we have not generated any revenue or profit from product sales. We may never achieve or sustain profitability.
We will require substantial additional funding, which may not be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all, and, if not available, may require us to delay, scale back, or cease our product development programs or operations.
Our existing strategic partnerships are important to our business, and future strategic partnerships will likely also be important to us. If we are unable to maintain our strategic partnerships, or if these strategic partnerships are not successful, our business could be adversely affected.
We rely on third-party manufacturers to produce our clinical product candidates and on other third parties to store, monitor and transport bulk drug substance and drug product. We and our third-party partners may encounter difficulties with respect to these activities that could delay or impair our ability to initiate or complete our clinical trials or commercialize approved products.
We rely on third parties to monitor, support, conduct and oversee clinical trials of the product candidates that we are developing and, in some cases, to maintain regulatory files for those product candidates. We may not be able to obtain regulatory approval for our product candidates or commercialize any products that may result from our development efforts if we are not able to maintain or secure agreements with such third parties on acceptable terms, if these third parties do not perform their services as required, or if these third parties fail to timely transfer any regulatory information held by them to us.
We rely on third parties for various operational and administrative aspects of our business, including for certain cloud-based software platforms, which impact our financial, operational and research activities. If any of these third parties fail to provide timely, accurate and ongoing service or if the cloud-based platforms suffer outages that we are unable to mitigate, our business may be adversely affected.
Our commercial success depends significantly on our ability to operate without infringing the patents and other proprietary rights of third parties.
If we are unable to obtain, maintain and enforce patent and trade secret protection for our product candidates and related technology, our business could be materially harmed.
We may become involved in lawsuits to protect or enforce our patents and trade secrets, which could be expensive, time consuming and unsuccessful.
If we are unable to protect the confidentiality of our proprietary information, the value of our technology and products could be adversely affected.
Our share price is likely to be volatile and the market price of our common shares may drop below the price paid by shareholders.
We are governed by the corporate laws of Canada, which in some cases have a different effect on shareholders than the corporate laws of the United States.
U.S. civil liabilities may not be enforceable against us, our directors, our officers or certain experts named in our Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Our principal shareholders, in aggregate, could exert substantial control over us which could delay or prevent a change in corporate control or result in the entrenchment of management or the board of directors.
Provisions in our corporate charter documents and Canadian law could make an acquisition of us, which may be beneficial to our shareholders, more difficult and may prevent attempts by our shareholders to replace or remove our current management and/or limit the market price of our common shares.
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Risk Factors
Risks Related to Our Business and the Development and Commercialization of Our Product Candidates
We have a limited number of product candidates, all which are still in clinical development. If we do not obtain regulatory approval of one or more of our product candidates, or experience significant delays in doing so, our business will be materially adversely affected.
We currently have no products approved for sale or marketing in any country, and may never be able to obtain regulatory approval for any of our product candidates. As a result, we are not currently permitted to market any of our product candidates in the United States or in any other country until we obtain regulatory approval from the FDA or regulatory authorities outside the United States. Our product candidates are in clinical development and we have not submitted an application, or received marketing approval, for any of our product candidates. Obtaining regulatory approval of our product candidates will depend on many factors, including: 
completing clinical trials that demonstrate the efficacy and safety of our product candidates;
preparation and submission to the appropriate regulatory authorities of an application for marketing approval that includes substantial evidence of safety, purity and potency from results of nonclinical testing and clinical trials;
establishing commercial manufacturing capabilities;
a potential pre-approval audit of the nonclinical and clinical trial sites that generated the data in support of the marketing application; and
launching commercial sales, marketing and distribution operations.
Many of these factors are wholly or partially beyond our control, including clinical advancement, the regulatory submission process and changes in the competitive landscape. If we do not achieve one or more of these factors in a timely manner, we could experience significant delays or an inability to develop our product candidates at all.
Clinical trials are expensive, time consuming and difficult to design and implement and involve uncertain outcomes. Furthermore, the results of previous preclinical studies and clinical trials may not be predictive of future results, and the results of our current and planned clinical trials may not satisfy the requirements of the FDA or non-U.S. regulatory authorities.
Positive or timely results from preclinical or early-stage trials do not ensure positive or timely results in late-stage clinical trials or product approval by the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities. We will be required to demonstrate with substantial evidence through well-controlled clinical trials that our product candidates are safe and effective for use in a diverse population before we can seek regulatory approvals for their commercial sale. Our clinical trials may produce negative or inconclusive results, and we or any of our current and future strategic partners may decide, or regulators may require us, to conduct additional clinical or preclinical testing. Success in preclinical studies or early-stage clinical trials does not mean that future clinical trials or registration clinical trials will be successful because product candidates in later-stage clinical trials may fail to demonstrate sufficient safety and efficacy to the satisfaction of the FDA and non-U.S. regulatory authorities, despite having progressed through preclinical studies and initial clinical trials. Product candidates that have shown promising results in early clinical trials may suffer significant setbacks in subsequent clinical trials or registration clinical trials. For example, a number of companies in the pharmaceutical industry have suffered significant setbacks in advanced clinical trials, even after obtaining promising results in earlier clinical trials. Similarly, preclinical interim results of a clinical trial do not necessarily predict final results.
If clinical trials for our product candidates are prolonged, delayed or stopped, we may be unable to obtain regulatory approval and commercialize our product candidates on a timely basis, or at all, which would require us to incur additional costs and delay our receipt of any product revenue.
We are currently evaluating zanidatamab in Phase 1 and 2 clinical trials and ZW49 in a Phase 1 clinical trial in patients with recurrent or metastatic HER2-expressing solid tumors. We may experience delays in our ongoing or future preclinical studies or clinical trials, and we do not know whether future preclinical studies or clinical trials will begin on time, need to be redesigned, enroll an adequate number of patients on time or be completed on schedule, if at all. The commencement or completion of these planned clinical trials could be substantially delayed or prevented by many factors, including: 
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further discussions with the FDA or other regulatory agencies regarding the scope or design of our clinical trials;
the limited number of, and competition for, suitable sites to conduct our clinical trials, many of which may already be engaged in other clinical trial programs, including some that may be for the same indication as our product candidates;
any delay or failure to obtain approval or agreement to commence a clinical trial in any of the countries where enrollment is planned;
inability to obtain sufficient funds required for a clinical trial;
clinical holds on, or other regulatory objections to, a new or ongoing clinical trial;
delay or failure to manufacture sufficient supplies of the product candidate for our clinical trials;
delay or failure to reach agreement on acceptable clinical trial agreement terms or clinical trial protocols with prospective sites or CROs, the terms of which can be subject to extensive negotiation and may vary significantly among different sites or CROs;
delay or failure to obtain an institutional review board (“IRB”) approval to conduct a clinical trial at a prospective site;
slower than expected rates of patient recruitment and enrollment;
failure of patients to complete the clinical trial;
the inability to enroll a sufficient number of patients in studies to ensure adequate statistical power to detect statistically significant treatment effects;
unforeseen safety issues, including severe or unexpected drug-related adverse effects experienced by patients, including possible deaths;
lack of efficacy during clinical trials;
termination of our clinical trials by one or more clinical trial sites;
inability or unwillingness of patients or clinical investigators to follow our clinical trial protocols;
inability to monitor patients adequately during or after treatment by us or our CROs;
our CROs or clinical study sites failing to comply with regulatory requirements or meet their contractual obligations to us in a timely manner, or at all, deviating from the protocol or dropping out of a study;
the inability to address any noncompliance with regulatory requirements or safety concerns that arise during the course of a clinical trial;
the need to repeat or terminate clinical trials as a result of inconclusive or negative results or unforeseen complications in testing; and
our clinical trials may be suspended or terminated upon a breach or pursuant to the terms of any agreement with, or for any other reason by, current or future strategic partners that have responsibility for the clinical development of any of our product candidates.
Changes in regulatory requirements, policies and guidelines may also occur and we may need to significantly amend clinical trial protocols to reflect these changes with appropriate regulatory authorities. These changes may require us to renegotiate terms with CROs or resubmit clinical trial protocols to IRBs for re-examination, which may impact the costs, timing or successful completion of a clinical trial. Our clinical trials may be suspended or terminated at any time by the FDA, other regulatory authorities, the IRB overseeing the clinical trial at issue, any of our clinical trial sites with respect to that site, or us.
Any failure or significant delay in commencing or completing clinical trials for our product candidates would adversely affect our ability to obtain regulatory approval, and our commercial prospects and ability to generate product revenue will be diminished.
If we, or any of our partners, are unable to enroll patients in clinical trials, we will be unable to complete these trials on a timely basis.
Patient enrollment, a significant factor in the timing of clinical trials, is affected by many factors including the size and nature of the patient population, the proximity of subjects to clinical sites, the eligibility criteria for the trial, the design of the clinical trial, ability to obtain and maintain patient consents, risk that enrolled subjects will drop out before completion, competing clinical trials and clinicians’ and patients’ perceptions as to the potential advantages of the drug being studied in relation to other available
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therapies, including any new drugs that may be approved for the indications we are investigating. In particular, we are developing certain of our product candidates for the treatment of rare diseases, which have limited pools of patients from which to draw for clinical testing. If we, or any of our strategic partners that perform clinical tests for our product candidates, are unable to enroll a sufficient number of patients to complete clinical testing, we will be unable to gain marketing approval for such product candidates and our business will be harmed.
In addition, the U.S. federal Right to Try Act, among other things, provides a federal framework for patients to access certain investigational new drug products that have completed a Phase 1 clinical trial. Under certain circumstances, eligible patients can seek treatment without enrolling in clinical trials and without obtaining FDA approval under the FDA expanded access program. While there is no obligation to make product candidates available to eligible patients as a result of the Right to Try Act, new and emerging legislation regarding expanded access to unapproved drugs could negatively impact enrollment in our clinical trials and our business in the future.
The design or our execution of clinical trials may not support regulatory approval.
The design or execution of a clinical trial can determine whether its results will support regulatory approval, and flaws in the design or execution of a clinical trial may not become apparent until the clinical trial is well advanced. In some instances, there can be significant variability in safety or efficacy results between different trials of the same product candidate due to numerous factors, including changes in trial protocols, differences in size and type of the patient populations, adherence to the dosing regimen and other trial protocols and the rate of dropout among clinical trial participants. We do not know whether any Phase 2, Phase 3 or other clinical trials we or any of our strategic partners may conduct will demonstrate consistent or adequate efficacy and safety to obtain regulatory approval to market our product candidates.
Further, the FDA and comparable foreign regulatory authorities have substantial discretion in the approval process and in determining when or whether regulatory approval will be obtained for any of our product candidates. Our product candidates may not be approved even if they achieve their primary endpoints in future Phase 3 clinical trials or registration trials. The FDA or other non-U.S. regulatory authorities may disagree with our trial design and our interpretation of data from preclinical studies and clinical trials. In addition, any of these regulatory authorities may change requirements for the approval of a product candidate even after reviewing and providing comments or advice on a protocol for a pivotal Phase 3 clinical trial that has the potential to result in FDA or other agencies’ approval. In addition, any of these regulatory authorities may also approve a product candidate for fewer or more limited indications than we request or may grant approval contingent on the performance of costly post-marketing clinical trials. The FDA or other non-U.S. regulatory authorities may not approve the labeling claims that we believe would be necessary or desirable for the successful commercialization of our product candidates.

Our business has been and may continue to be adversely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.
The COVID-19 pandemic has had a broad adverse impact on the global economy across many industries and has resulted in significant governmental measures being implemented to control the spread of the virus, including quarantines, travel restrictions and business shutdowns, as well as significant volatility in global financial markets. As a result of COVID-19, in March 2020, we transitioned our workforce to a remote working arrangement to protect the health and safety of our employees. In June 2020, we implemented a program to facilitate the phased return of employees to our lab and office facilities pursuant to enhanced health and safety protocols consistent with guidelines issued by local health authorities. Our preclinical research activities were supplemented by support from external CROs to complement the temporarily reduced capacity at our lab facilities. Certain clinical trial activities, including patient enrollment and site activations, were delayed or otherwise impacted by COVID-19.

The extent to which COVID-19 may cause more significant disruptions to our business and greater impacts to our results of operations will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted, such as the duration of the pandemic (including future potential waves or cycles), travel restrictions and social distancing, business closures or business disruptions and the effectiveness of actions taken to contain and treat the disease and to address its impact, including on financial markets.

If the COVID-19 pandemic worsens or continues for a prolonged period of time, particularly in regions where we or our strategic partners and suppliers do business, we could experience disruptions that could significantly impact our current and planned clinical trials, preclinical research and other business activities, including:

disruption to and delays in preclinical research activities due to an extended closure or reduced capacity of lab facilities;
further delays or difficulties in enrolling patients in our ongoing and planned clinical trials;
patients discontinuing their treatment or follow-up visits;
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further delays or difficulties in clinical site initiation, including difficulties in recruiting clinical site investigators and clinical site staff;
disruptions in supply, logistics or other activities related to the procurement of materials, which could have a negative impact on our ability to conduct preclinical research, initiate or complete our clinical trials or commercialize our product candidates;
diversion of healthcare resources away from the conduct of clinical trials, including the diversion of hospitals serving as our clinical trial sites and hospital staff supporting the conduct of clinical trials;
interruption of key clinical trial activities, such as clinical trial site monitoring, due to limitations on travel imposed or recommended by federal or state governments, employers and others;
interruption of key business activities due to illness and/or quarantine of key individuals and delays associated with recruiting, hiring and training new temporary or permanent replacements for such key individuals, both internally and at our third-party service providers and strategic partners;
limitations in resources that would otherwise be focused on the conduct of our business or our current or planned clinical trials or preclinical research, including because of sickness, the desire to avoid contact with large groups of people, restrictions on travel, or prolonged stay-at-home or similar working arrangements;
delays in receiving approvals from regulatory authorities to initiate our planned clinical trials;
changes in regulations as part of a response to the COVID-19 pandemic which may require us to change the ways in which our clinical trials are conducted and incur unexpected costs, or require us to discontinue clinical trials altogether;
delays in necessary interactions with regulators (including the FDA), ethics committees and other important agencies and contractors due to limitations in employee resources or furlough of government or contractor personnel;
disruptions to our strategic partners’ operations, which could delay the development of our product candidates in certain geographical regions and thereby affect the timing of development and commercial milestone payments and royalties on potential future product sales we may receive; and
limitations on our ability to recruit preclinical research, clinical, regulatory and other professional staff on the timeframe required to support our research and development programs.

In addition, COVID-19 could result in the continued significant disruption of global financial markets, reducing our ability to access capital, which could negatively affect our liquidity. COVID-19 has resulted in heightened financial market volatility that may continue, which could adversely impact the value of our common shares.
The Fast Track and Breakthrough Therapy designations we have received for zanidatamab may not result in faster development, regulatory review or approval process.
The FDA has granted two Fast Track designations to zanidatamab for the first-line treatment of patients with HER2-overexpressing GEA in combination with standard of care chemotherapy and for refractory BTC. These Fast Track designations do not ensure that we will experience a faster development, regulatory review or approval process compared to conventional FDA procedures or that we will ultimately obtain regulatory approval. Additionally, the FDA may withdraw Fast Track designation if it believes that the designation is no longer supported by data from our clinical development program.
The FDA also granted Breakthrough Therapy designation for zanidatamab in patients with previously-treated HER2 gene-amplified BTC. The receipt of a Breakthrough Therapy designation for a product candidate may not ultimately result in a faster development process or review, and it does not in any way assure approval of a product candidate by the FDA. In addition, designation as a Breakthrough Therapy is within the discretion of the FDA and the FDA may decide to rescind a Breakthrough Therapy designation if it believes that a designated product candidate no longer meets the conditions for qualification of this program.
We have conducted, and may in the future conduct, clinical trials for existing or future product candidates in sites outside the United States, and the FDA may not accept data from trials conducted in such locations.
We have conducted, and may in the future choose to conduct, clinical trials outside the United States. Although the FDA may accept data from clinical trials conducted outside the United States, acceptance of this data is subject to certain conditions imposed by the FDA. In addition, while these clinical trials are subject to the applicable local laws, FDA acceptance of the data will be dependent upon its determination that the trials also complied with all applicable U.S. laws and regulations. There can be no assurance the FDA will accept data from trials conducted outside the United States. If the FDA does not accept the data from any clinical trials we conduct outside the United States, it would likely result in the need for additional trials, which would be costly and time-consuming and delay or halt our development of any future product candidates.

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Disruptions at the FDA and other government agencies caused by funding shortages or global health concerns could hinder their ability to hire, retain or deploy key leadership and other personnel, or otherwise prevent new or modified product candidates from being developed, or approved or commercialized in a timely manner or at all, which could negatively impact our business.

The ability of the FDA to review and clear or approve new product candidates can be affected by a variety of factors, including government budget and funding levels, statutory, regulatory, and policy changes, the FDA’s ability to hire and retain key personnel and accept the payment of user fees, and other events that may otherwise affect the FDA’s ability to perform routine functions. In addition, government funding of other government agencies that fund research and development activities is subject to the political process, which is inherently fluid and unpredictable. Disruptions at the FDA and other agencies may also slow the time necessary for new product candidates to be reviewed and/or approved by necessary government agencies, which would adversely affect our business. For example, over the last several years, the U.S. government has shut down several times and certain regulatory agencies, such as the FDA, have had to furlough critical FDA employees and stop critical activities. In response to the global COVID-19 pandemic, the FDA postponed most domestic and foreign inspections of manufacturing facilities, and regulatory authorities outside the United States adopted similar restrictions or other policy measures in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. In July 2020, the FDA announced plans to resume domestic on-site inspections in accordance with the FDA’s newly developed Advisory Rating system, which will assess a state’s phase of reopening and the current intensity and risk of COVID-19 infections in order to identify which regulatory activities may occur in a given geographic region. If another prolonged government shutdown occurs, or if global health concerns require the FDA or other regulatory authorities to suspend their regular inspections, reviews, or other regulatory activities again, it could significantly impact the ability of the FDA or other regulatory authorities to timely review and process our regulatory submissions, which could have a material adverse effect on our business.
Successful development of our current and future product candidates is uncertain and we may discontinue or reprioritize the development of any of our product candidates at any time, at our discretion.
Before obtaining regulatory approval for the commercial distribution of our product candidates, we must conduct, at our own expense, extensive preclinical tests and clinical trials to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of our product candidates in humans. Preclinical and clinical testing is expensive, difficult to design and implement, can take many years to complete and is uncertain as to outcome. Additionally, the results from nonclinical testing or early clinical trials of a product candidate may not predict the results that will be obtained in subsequent subjects or in subsequent human clinical trials of that product candidate or any other product candidate. There is a high failure rate for drugs proceeding through clinical studies. A number of companies in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries have suffered significant setbacks in clinical development even after achieving promising results in earlier studies, and any such setbacks in any future clinical development could have a material adverse effect on our business and operating results. Alternatively, management may elect to discontinue development of certain product candidates to accommodate a shift in corporate strategy, despite positive clinical results. Based on our operating results and business strategy, among other factors, we may discontinue the development of any of our product candidates under development or reprioritize our focus on other product candidates at any time and at our discretion.
Our product candidates may have undesirable side effects that may delay or prevent marketing approval or, if approval is received, require them to be taken off the market, require them to include safety warnings or otherwise limit their sales; no regulatory agency has made any determination that any of our product candidates are safe or effective for use by the general public for any indication.
All of our product candidates are still in preclinical or clinical development. Additionally, all of our product candidates are required to undergo ongoing safety testing in humans as part of clinical trials. Consequently, not all adverse effects of drugs can be predicted or anticipated. Unforeseen side effects from any of our product candidates could arise either during clinical development or, if approved by regulatory authorities, after the approved product has been marketed. Zanidatamab and ZW49 continue to be evaluated in clinical trials, and the results of these and future clinical trials may show that zanidatamab, ZW49 or our other product candidates cause undesirable or unacceptable side effects, which could interrupt, delay or halt clinical trials, and result in delay of, or failure to obtain, marketing approval from the FDA and other regulatory authorities, or result in marketing approval from the FDA and other regulatory authorities with restrictive label warnings, limited patient populations or potential product liability claims. Even if we believe that our clinical trials and preclinical studies demonstrate the safety and efficacy of our product candidates, only the FDA and other comparable regulatory agencies may ultimately make such determination. No regulatory agency has made any such determination that any of our product candidates are safe or effective for use by the general public for any indication.
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If any of our product candidates receive marketing approval and we or others later identify undesirable or unacceptable side effects caused by such products: 
regulatory authorities may require us to take our approved product off the market;
regulatory authorities may require the addition of labeling statements, specific warnings, a contraindication or field alerts to physicians and pharmacies, or impose a risk evaluation and mitigation strategy that includes restrictions and conditions on product distribution, prescribing and/or dispensing;
we may be required to change the way the product is administered, conduct additional clinical trials or change the labeling of the product;
we may be subject to limitations on how we may promote the product;
sales of the product may decrease significantly;
we may be subject to litigation or product liability claims; and
our reputation may suffer.
Any of these events could prevent us or our current or future strategic partners from achieving or maintaining market acceptance of the affected product or could substantially increase commercialization costs and expenses, which in turn could delay or prevent us from generating revenue from the sale of any future products.
We face significant competition and if our competitors develop and market products that are more effective, safer or less expensive than our product candidates, our commercial opportunities will be negatively impacted.
The life sciences industry is highly competitive and subject to rapid and significant technological change. We are currently developing biotherapeutics that will compete with other drugs and therapies that currently exist or are being developed. Products we may develop in the future are also likely to face competition from other drugs and therapies, some of which we may not currently be aware. We have competitors both in the United States and internationally, including major multinational pharmaceutical companies, established biotechnology companies, specialty pharmaceutical companies, universities and other research institutions. Many of our competitors have significantly greater financial, manufacturing, marketing, drug development, technical and human resources than we do. Large pharmaceutical companies, in particular, have extensive experience in clinical testing, obtaining regulatory approvals, recruiting patients and in manufacturing pharmaceutical products. These companies also have significantly greater research and marketing capabilities than we do and may also have products that have been approved or are in late stages of development and collaborative arrangements in our target markets with leading companies and research institutions. Established pharmaceutical companies may also invest heavily to accelerate discovery and development of novel compounds or to in-license novel compounds that could make the product candidates that we develop obsolete. As a result of all of these factors, our competitors may succeed in obtaining patent protection or FDA approval or discovering, developing and commercializing products in our field before we do.
Specifically, there are a large number of companies developing or marketing treatments for cancer and autoimmune disorders, including many major pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. These treatments consist both of small-molecule drug products, as well as biologics that work by using next-generation antibody therapeutic platforms to address specific cancer targets. These companies include MacroGenics, Inc., AstraZeneca PLC/Daiichi Sankyo, Roche AG, Seagen, Inc. and others.
Our commercial opportunity could be reduced or eliminated if our competitors develop and commercialize products that are safer, more effective, more convenient or less expensive than any products that we may develop. Our competitors also may obtain FDA or other regulatory approval for their products more rapidly than we may obtain approval for our product candidates, which could result in our competitors establishing a strong market position before we are able to enter the market.
Smaller and other early-stage companies may also prove to be significant competitors, particularly through collaborative arrangements with large and established companies. These third parties compete with us in recruiting and retaining qualified scientific and management personnel, establishing clinical trial sites and patient registration for clinical trials, as well as in acquiring technologies complementary to, or necessary for, our programs. In addition, the biopharmaceutical industry is characterized by rapid technological change. If we fail to stay at the forefront of technological change, we may be unable to compete effectively. Technological advances or products developed by our competitors may render our technologies or product candidates obsolete, less competitive or not economical.
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In addition, we expect to compete with biosimilar versions of already approved products like trastuzumab or pertuzumab, and even if our product candidates achieve marketing approval, they may be challenged to achieve a price premium over competitive biosimilar products and will compete for market share with them.
The Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009, which is included in the PPACA, authorized the FDA to approve similar versions of innovative biologics, commonly known as biosimilars. Under the PPACA, a manufacturer may submit an application for licensure of a biologic product that is “biosimilar to” or “interchangeable with” a previously approved biologic product or “reference product.” Manufacturers may not submit an application for a biosimilar to the FDA until four years following approval of the reference product, and the FDA may not approve a biosimilar product until 12 years from the date on which the reference product was approved. Even if our product candidates, if approved, are deemed to be reference products eligible for exclusivity, another company could market a competing version of that product if the FDA approves a full BLA for such product containing the sponsor’s own preclinical data and data from adequate and well-controlled clinical trials to demonstrate the safety, purity and potency of their product. Additionally, from time to time, there are proposals to repeal or modify the PPACA, including proposals that could significantly shorten the exclusivity period for biologics.
If any of our product candidates receive regulatory approval, the approved products may not achieve broad market acceptance among physicians, patients, the medical community and third-party payors, in which case revenue generated from their sales would be limited.
The commercial success of our product candidates will depend upon their acceptance among physicians, patients and the medical community. The degree of market acceptance of our product candidates will depend on a number of factors, including: 
limitations or warnings contained in the approved labeling for a product candidate;
changes in the standard of care for the targeted indications for any of our product candidates;
limitations in the approved clinical indications for our product candidates;
demonstrated clinical safety and efficacy compared to other products;
sales, marketing and distribution support;
availability of coverage and extent of reimbursement from managed care plans and other third-party payors;
timing of market introduction and perceived effectiveness of competitive products;
the degree of cost-effectiveness of our product candidates;
availability of alternative therapies at similar or lower cost, including generic, biosimilar and over-the-counter products;
the extent to which the product candidate is approved for inclusion on formularies of hospitals and managed care organizations;
whether the product is designated under physician treatment guidelines as a first-line therapy or as a second- or third-line therapy for particular diseases;
whether the product can be used effectively with other therapies to achieve higher response rates;
adverse publicity about our product candidates or favorable publicity about competitive products;
convenience and ease of administration of our products; and
potential product liability claims.
If any of our product candidates are approved, but do not achieve an adequate level of acceptance by physicians, patients and the medical community, we may not generate sufficient revenue from these products, and we may not become or remain profitable. In addition, efforts to educate the medical community and third-party payors on the benefits of our product candidates may require significant resources and may never be successful.
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We may be unable to obtain orphan drug exclusivity in specific indications for zanidatamab or in future product candidates that we may develop. If our competitors are able to obtain orphan product exclusivity for their products in specific indications, we may not be able to have competing products approved in those indications by the applicable regulatory authority for a significant period of time.
The FDA has granted Orphan Drug Designation to zanidatamab for the treatment of BTC, GEA and ovarian cancer and we may seek Orphan Drug Designation for additional indications in the future. Orphan Drug Designation neither shortens the development time or regulatory review time of a drug nor gives the drug any advantage in the regulatory review or approval process.
Generally, if a product candidate with an Orphan Drug Designation subsequently receives the first marketing approval for the indication for which it has such designation, the product is entitled to a period of marketing exclusivity, which precludes the European Medicines Agency (“EMA”) or the FDA from approving another marketing application for the same drug for the same indication for that time period. The applicable period is seven years in the United States and ten years in Europe. The European exclusivity period can be reduced to six years if a product no longer meets the criteria for Orphan Drug Designation or if the product is sufficiently profitable so that market exclusivity is no longer justified. Orphan drug exclusivity may be lost if the FDA or EMA determines that the request for designation was materially defective or if the manufacturer is unable to assure sufficient quantity of the product to meet the needs of patients with the rare disease or condition. The loss of Orphan Drug Designation could have a negative effect on our ability to successfully commercialize our product candidates, earn revenues and achieve profitability.
Even if we obtain orphan drug exclusivity for zanidatamab, or for any other product candidates that receive an Orphan Drug Designation in the future, that exclusivity may not effectively protect the product from competition because different drugs with different active moieties can be approved for the same condition. Further, in the United States, even after an orphan drug is approved, the FDA can subsequently approve the same drug for the same condition submitted by a competitor if the FDA concludes that the later drug is clinically superior in that it is shown to be safer, more effective or makes a major contribution to patient care.
Even if we obtain FDA approval of any of our product candidates, we may never obtain approval or commercialize such products outside of the United States, which would limit our ability to realize their full market potential.
In order to market any products outside of the United States, we must establish and comply with numerous and varying regulatory requirements of other countries regarding safety and efficacy. Clinical trials conducted in one country may not be accepted by regulatory authorities in other countries, and regulatory approval in one country does not mean that regulatory approval will be obtained in any other country. Approval procedures vary among countries and can involve additional product testing and validation and additional administrative review periods. Seeking foreign regulatory approvals could result in significant delays, difficulties and costs for us and may require additional preclinical studies or clinical trials, which would be costly and time consuming. Regulatory requirements can vary widely from country to country and region to region and could delay or prevent the introduction of our products in those countries. Satisfying these and other regulatory requirements is costly, time consuming, uncertain and subject to unanticipated delays. In addition, our failure to obtain regulatory approval in any country may delay or have negative effects on the process for regulatory approval in other countries. We do not have any product candidates approved for sale in any jurisdiction, including international markets, and we do not have experience in obtaining regulatory approval in international markets. If we fail to comply with regulatory requirements in international markets or to obtain and maintain required approvals, our target market will be reduced and our ability to realize the full market potential of our products will be harmed.
Reimbursement decisions by third-party payors may have an adverse effect on pricing and market acceptance. If there is not sufficient reimbursement for our products, it is less likely that our products will be widely used.
Even if our product candidates are approved for sale by the appropriate regulatory authorities, market acceptance and sales of these products will depend on reimbursement policies and may be affected by future healthcare reform measures. Government authorities and third-party payors, such as private health insurers and health maintenance organizations, decide which drugs they will reimburse and establish payment levels. We cannot be certain that reimbursement will be available for any products that we develop. If reimbursement is not available or is available on a limited basis, we may not be able to successfully commercialize any of our approved products.
In the United States, the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003, also called the Medicare Modernization Act (“MMA”), changed the way Medicare covers and pays for pharmaceutical products. The legislation established Medicare Part D, which expanded Medicare coverage for outpatient prescription drug purchases by the elderly but
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provided authority for limiting the number of drugs that will be covered in any therapeutic class. The MMA also introduced a new reimbursement methodology based on average sales prices for physician-administered drugs. We expect to experience pricing pressures in connection with the sale of any products that we develop, due to the trend toward managed healthcare, the increasing influence of health maintenance organizations and additional legislative proposals.
There may be significant delays in obtaining coverage and reimbursement for newly approved drugs, and coverage may be more limited than the purposes for which the drug is approved by the FDA, EMA or other regulatory authorities. Moreover, eligibility for coverage and reimbursement does not imply that a drug will be paid for in all cases or at a rate that covers our costs, including research, development, manufacture, sale and distribution expenses. Interim reimbursement levels for new drugs, if applicable, may also be insufficient to cover our and any collabo