10-Q 1 v358642_10q.htm FORM 10-Q
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 10-Q
 
x
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2013
 
or
 
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the transition period from         to
 
Commission file number: 001-33530
 
BIOFUEL ENERGY CORP.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
Delaware
 
20-5952523
(State of incorporation)
 
(I.R.S. employer
identification number)
 
1600 Broadway, Suite 2200
Denver, Colorado
 
80202
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
 
(303) 640-6500
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x   No ¨
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes x   No ¨
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
 
Large accelerated filer ¨
 
Accelerated filer ¨
 
Non-accelerated filer ¨
 
Smaller reporting company  x
 
 
 
 
(Do not check if a smaller
reporting company)
 
 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ¨ No x
 
Number of shares of Common Stock outstanding as of November 7, 2013: 5,443,292 exclusive of 40,481 shares held in treasury.
 
 
  
 
PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
 
ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
The accompanying interim unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements of BioFuel Energy Corp. (the “Company”) have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The statements are unaudited but reflect all adjustments which, in the opinion of management, are necessary to fairly present the Company’s financial position and results of operations. All such adjustments are of a normal recurring nature. The results of operations for the interim period are not necessarily indicative of the results for the full year. For further information, refer to the financial statements and notes presented in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the twelve months ended December 31, 2012 (filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on April 1, 2013).
 
 
2

 
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Consolidated Balance Sheets
(in thousands, except share data)
(Unaudited)
 
 
 
September 30,
2013
 
 
December 31,
2012
 
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Current assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
 
$
17,290
 
 
$
9,323
 
Accounts receivable
 
 
7,237
 
 
 
9,256
 
Inventories
 
 
11,192
 
 
 
13,443
 
Deposits
 
 
1,958
 
 
 
3,074
 
Prepaid expenses
 
 
829
 
 
 
882
 
Other current assets
 
 
34
 
 
 
78
 
Total current assets
 
 
38,540
 
 
 
36,056
 
Property, plant and equipment, net
 
 
191,154
 
 
 
209,645
 
Debt issuance costs, net
 
 
1,001
 
 
 
1,739
 
Other assets
 
 
2,775
 
 
 
2,983
 
Total assets
 
$
233,470
 
 
$
250,423
 
Liabilities and equity
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Current liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Accounts payable
 
$
4,487
 
 
$
11,638
 
Current portion of long-term debt
 
 
170,642
 
 
 
170,634
 
Current portion of tax increment financing
 
 
415
 
 
 
399
 
Other current liabilities
 
 
7,906
 
 
 
2,500
 
Total current liabilities
 
 
183,450
 
 
 
185,171
 
Long-term debt, net of current portion
 
 
2,653
 
 
 
2,795
 
Tax increment financing, net of current portion
 
 
3,968
 
 
 
4,275
 
Other non-current liabilities
 
 
2,943
 
 
 
3,072
 
Total liabilities
 
 
193,014
 
 
 
195,313
 
Commitments and contingencies
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Equity
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
BioFuel Energy Corp. stockholders’ equity
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Preferred stock, $0.01 par value; 5,000,000 shares authorized and no shares
     outstanding at September 30, 2013 and December 31, 2012
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common stock, $0.01 par value; 10,000,000 shares authorized and 5,483,773
     shares outstanding at September 30, 2013 and December 31, 2012
 
 
54
 
 
 
54
 
Class B common stock, $0.01 par value; 3,750,000 shares authorized and 795,479
     shares outstanding at September 30, 2013 and December 31, 2012
 
 
8
 
 
 
8
 
Less common stock held in treasury, at cost, 40,481 shares at September 30, 2013
     and December 31, 2012
 
 
(4,316)
 
 
 
(4,316)
 
Additional paid-in capital
 
 
190,145
 
 
 
189,604
 
Accumulated deficit
 
 
(142,341)
 
 
 
(129,120)
 
Total BioFuel Energy Corp. stockholders’ equity
 
 
43,550
 
 
 
56,230
 
Noncontrolling interest
 
 
(3,094)
 
 
 
(1,120)
 
Total equity
 
 
40,456
 
 
 
55,110
 
Total liabilities and equity
 
$
233,470
 
 
$
250,423
 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
 
 
3

 
 
 
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Consolidated Statements of Operations
(in thousands, except per share data)
(Unaudited)
 
 
 
Three Months Ended September 30,
 
Nine Months Ended September 30,
 
 
 
2013
 
2012
 
2013
 
2012
 
Net sales
 
$
79,048
 
$
116,149
 
$
259,119
 
$
378,382
 
Cost of goods sold
 
 
82,132
 
 
124,192
 
 
266,357
 
 
401,204
 
Gross loss
 
 
(3,084)
 
 
(8,043)
 
 
(7,238)
 
 
(22,822)
 
General and administrative expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Compensation expense
 
 
1,040
 
 
1,435
 
 
3,439
 
 
4,750
 
Other
 
 
1,527
 
 
629
 
 
5,252
 
 
2,482
 
Operating loss
 
 
(5,651)
 
 
(10,107)
 
 
(15,929)
 
 
(30,054)
 
Other income (expense):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other income
 
 
2,535
 
 
680
 
 
6,590
 
 
680
 
Interest expense
 
 
(2,013)
 
 
(1,901)
 
 
(5,856)
 
 
(5,461)
 
Loss before income taxes
 
 
(5,129)
 
 
(11,328)
 
 
(15,195)
 
 
(34,835)
 
Income tax provision (benefit)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net Loss
 
 
(5,129)
 
 
(11,328)
 
 
(15,195)
 
 
(34,835)
 
Less: Net loss attributable to the noncontrolling interest
 
 
668
 
 
1,498
 
 
1,974
 
 
5,015
 
Net loss attributable to BioFuel Energy Corp.
    common stockholders
 
$
(4,461)
 
$
(9,830)
 
$
(13,221)
 
$
(29,820)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Loss per share – basic and diluted attributable
    to BioFuel Energy Corp. common
    stockholders
 
$
(0.84)
 
$
(1.88)
 
$
(2.48)
 
$
(5.76)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Weighted average shares outstanding – basic
    and diluted
 
 
5,342
 
 
5,224
 
 
5,331
 
 
5,178
 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
 
 
4

 
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity
(in thousands, except share data)
(Unaudited)
 
 
 
Common Stock
 
 
Class B
Common Stock
 
Treasury
 
Additional 
Paid-in
 
Accumulated
 
Total BioFuel 
Energy Corp. 
Stockholders’
 
Noncontrolling 
 
Total 
 
 
 
Shares
 
Amount
 
Shares
 
Amount
 
 Stock
 
Capital
 
Deficit
 
Equity
 
Interest
 
Equity
 
Balance at December
    31, 2011
 
 
5,270,848
 
$
53
 
 
931,154
 
$
9
 
$
(4,316)
 
$
187,841
 
$
(89,277)
 
$
94,310
 
$
5,632
 
$
99,942
 
Stock-based
    compensation
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1,490
 
 
 
 
1,490
 
 
 
 
1,490
 
Exchange of Class B
    shares to common
 
 
135,675
 
 
1
 
 
(135,675)
 
 
(1)
 
 
 
 
273
 
 
 
 
273
 
 
(273)
 
 
 
Issuance of restricted
    stock, (net of forfeitures)
 
 
77,250
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net loss
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(39,843)
 
 
(39,843)
 
 
(6,479)
 
 
(46,322)
 
Balance at December
    31, 2012
 
 
5,483,773
 
 
54
 
 
795,479
 
 
8
 
 
(4,316)
 
 
189,604
 
 
(129,120)
 
 
56,230
 
 
(1,120)
 
 
55,110
 
Stock-based
    compensation
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
541
 
 
 
 
541
 
 
 
 
541
 
Net loss
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(13,221)
 
 
(13,221)
 
 
(1,974)
 
 
(15,195)
 
Balance at September
    30, 2013
 
 
5,483,773
 
$
54
 
 
795,479
 
$
8
 
$
(4,316)
 
$
190,145
 
$
(142,341)
 
$
43,550
 
$
(3,094)
 
$
40,456
 
   
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
 
 
5

 
 
 
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
(in thousands)
(Unaudited)
 
 
 
Nine Months Ended September 30,
 
 
 
2013
 
2012
 
Cash flows from operating activities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net loss
 
$
(15,195)
 
$
(34,835)
 
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash provided by operating activities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Stock-based compensation expense
 
 
541
 
 
1,119
 
Depreciation and amortization
 
 
21,249
 
 
21,174
 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Accounts receivable
 
 
2,019
 
 
(348)
 
Inventories
 
 
2,251
 
 
13,271
 
Prepaid expenses
 
 
53
 
 
1,248
 
Accounts payable
 
 
(7,147)
 
 
3,725
 
Other current liabilities
 
 
5,406
 
 
531
 
Other assets and liabilities
 
 
948
 
 
(3,168)
 
Net cash provided by operating activities
 
 
10,125
 
 
2,717
 
Cash flows from investing activities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Purchases of property, plant and equipment
 
 
(2,024)
 
 
(606)
 
Net cash used in investing activities
 
 
(2,024)
 
 
(606)
 
Cash flows from financing activities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Repayment of debt
 
 
 
 
(6,300)
 
Repayment of notes payable and capital leases
 
 
(134)
 
 
(108)
 
Net cash used in financing activities
 
 
(134)
 
 
(6,408)
 
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
 
 
7,967
 
 
(4,297)
 
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period
 
 
9,323
 
 
15,139
 
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period
 
$
17,290
 
$
10,842
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash paid for income taxes
 
$
7
 
$
6
 
Cash paid for interest
 
$
315
 
$
4,180
 
Non-cash investing and financing activities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Additions to property, plant and equipment unpaid during period
 
$
 
$
2
 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
 
 
6

 
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
1. Organization, Nature of Business, Basis of Presentation, Liquidity, Going Concern, and Subsequent Event
 
Organization and Nature of Business
 
BioFuel Energy Corp. (“we” or “the Company”) produces and sells ethanol and its related co-products, primarily distillers grain and corn oil. We have historically operated our two dry-mill ethanol production facilities located in Wood River, Nebraska and Fairmont, Minnesota. Each of these plants has an undenatured nameplate production capacity of approximately 110 million gallons per year (“Mmgy”). Our operations are subject to changes in commodity prices, specifically, the price of our main commodity input, corn, relative to the price of our main commodity product, ethanol, which is known in the industry as the “crush spread”. Drought conditions in the American Midwest significantly impacted the 2012 corn crop and caused a significant reduction in the corn yield. This led to an increase in the price of corn and a corresponding narrowing in the crush spread as ethanol prices did not rise sufficiently with rising corn prices, due to an oversupply of ethanol. As a result, in September 2012 the Company decided to idle its Fairmont facility and in February 2013 we reduced staffing at the Fairmont facility. Although crush spreads have improved during the first nine months of 2013, our Fairmont facility remains idle. However, we continue to evaluate the economic viability of restarting our Fairmont facility, including the working capital that would be required to restart.
 
We were incorporated as a Delaware corporation on April 11, 2006 to invest solely in BioFuel Energy, LLC (the “LLC”), a limited liability company organized on January 25, 2006 to build and operate ethanol production facilities in the Midwestern United States. The Company’s headquarters are located in Denver, Colorado. We are a holding company with no operations of our own, and are the sole managing member of the LLC, which is itself a holding company and indirectly owns all of our operating assets. As the sole managing member of the LLC, the Company operates and controls all of the business and affairs of the LLC and its subsidiaries. The Company’s ethanol plants are owned and operated by the operating subsidiaries of the LLC (the “Operating Subsidiaries”). Those Operating Subsidiaries are party to a Credit Agreement (the “Senior Debt Facility”) with a group of lenders, for which First National Bank of Omaha acts as Administrative Agent, and substantially all of the assets of the Operating Subsidiaries are pledged as collateral under the Senior Debt Facility. Neither the Company nor the LLC is a party, either as borrower or guarantor, under the Senior Debt Facility, and none of their respective assets, other than the LLC interests in the Operating Subsidiaries themselves, are pledged as collateral under the Senior Debt Facility. The aggregate book value of the assets of the LLC at September 30, 2013 and December 31, 2012 was $242.3 million and $259.7 million, respectively.
 
We work closely with Cargill, one of the world’s leading agribusiness companies, with whom we have an extensive commercial relationship. At each of our plant locations, Cargill has a local grain origination presence and owns adjacent grain storage and handling facilities, which we lease from them. Cargill provides corn procurement services, markets the ethanol we produce and provides transportation logistics for our two plants under long-term contracts.
  
On June 15, 2012, the Company effected a reverse stock split with respect to all outstanding shares of common stock and Class B common stock at a ratio of one-for-twenty. The Company also split the number of authorized shares of common stock at a ratio of one-for-fourteen, thereby reducing the aggregate number of authorized common stock shares to 10,000,000, and also split the number of authorized shares of Class B common stock at a ratio of one-for-twenty, thereby reducing the aggregate number of authorized Class B common stock shares to 3,750,000. All share and per share information and all necessary par value equity adjustments have been retroactively restated in the financial statements to reflect the effect of this reverse stock split.
 
At September 30, 2013, the Company owned 87.3% of the LLC membership units with the remaining 12.7% owned by an individual and by certain investment funds affiliated with one of the original equity investors of the LLC. The Class B common shares of the Company are held by the same individual and investment funds who held 795,479 membership units in the LLC as of September 30, 2013 that, together with the corresponding Class B shares, can be exchanged for newly issued shares of common stock of the Company on a one-for-one basis. The proportionate value of the LLC membership units held by the individual or investment funds other than the Company are recorded as noncontrolling interest on the consolidated balance sheets. Holders of shares of Class B common stock have no economic rights but are entitled to one vote for each share held. Shares of Class B common stock are retired upon exchange of the related membership units in the LLC. 
 
 
7

  
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
1. Organization, Nature of Business, Basis of Presentation, Liquidity, Going Concern, and Subsequent Event – (continued)
 
Basis of Presentation, Liquidity, and Going Concern
 
The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, which contemplate our continuation as a going concern. Our financial results and cash flows are subject to wide and unpredictable fluctuations in the crush spread. The price of our main co-product, distillers grain, is likewise subject to wide, unpredictable fluctuations, typically in conjunction with changes in the price of corn. The prices of these commodities are volatile and beyond our control. As a result of the volatility of the prices for these and other items, our results fluctuate substantially and in ways that are largely beyond our control. As shown in the accompanying consolidated financial statements, during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2013, the Company incurred net losses of $5.1 million and $15.2 million, respectively.
 
Narrow commodity margins present a significant risk to our cash flows and liquidity. We have had, and continue to have, limited liquidity, with $17.3 million of cash and cash equivalents as of September 30, 2013, of which $9.3 million was held at the LLC and $8.0 million was held at the Operating Subsidiaries, which is subject to the lenders’ liens under the Senior Debt Facility. The Operating Subsidiaries have also relied upon extensions of payment terms by Cargill as an additional source of liquidity and working capital. As of September 30, 2013 the Operating Subsidiaries owed Cargill $0.8 million for accounts payable related to corn purchases. Pursuant to an arrangement with Cargill, the Operating Subsidiaries have been permitted to extend corn payment terms beyond the $10.0 million contractual limit so long as the amounts Cargill owes the Operating Subsidiaries for ethanol exceed the accounts payable balance by an amount that is satisfactory to Cargill. This arrangement may be terminated at any time on little or no notice, in which case the Operating Subsidiaries would need to use cash on hand or other sources of liquidity, if available, to fund their operations.
 
In the third quarter of 2012, due to our limited and declining liquidity, our Board of Directors determined that, in order to preserve cash at the LLC, the Operating Subsidiaries would not make the regularly-scheduled payments of principal and interest that were due under the outstanding Senior Debt Facility on September 28, 2012, in an aggregate amount of $3.6 million. As a result, the Operating Subsidiaries received a Notice of Default from First National Bank of Omaha, as Administrative Agent for the lenders under the Senior Debt Facility. Since the initial default, the Operating Subsidiaries have not made any of the regularly-scheduled principal and interest payments, which through September 30, 2013 totaled $22.4 million.
 
On April 11, 2013, the Operating Subsidiaries entered into a definitive agreement (the “Lender Agreement”) with First National Bank of Omaha, as Escrow Agent under the Lender Agreement, and as Administrative Agent and Collateral Agent for the lenders under the Senior Debt Facility. Under the terms of the Lender Agreement, the Administrative Agent and the lenders agreed to provide the Operating Subsidiaries with a grace period until July 30, 2013 to allow the Company to pursue one or more strategic alternatives, including but not limited to a potential sale of one or both of the Company’s ethanol plants. This grace period was subject to the achievement of certain milestones, and could be extended at the sole discretion of the Administrative Agent. The Company engaged Piper Jaffray & Co. to act as its financial advisor and to assist us in exploring these strategic alternatives. In the event of a sale of one or both of our ethanol plants, the proceeds of such sale would first be applied to repay all or a portion of the outstanding indebtedness under the Senior Debt Facility, except for a small portion of such proceeds that, pursuant to the terms of the Lender Agreement, would be allocable to us. Residual proceeds after satisfying the senior indebtedness, if any, would accrue to the Company. Any such sale would also require the consent of the lenders under the Senior Debt Facility.
 
Simultaneously with the execution of the Lender Agreement, the Operating Subsidiaries, the Administrative Agent and the lenders under the Senior Debt Facility also entered into a Deed in Lieu of Foreclosure Agreement and Joint Escrow Instructions (the “Deed in Lieu Agreement”), pursuant to which, among other things, the Operating Subsidiaries would transfer ownership of their respective ethanol plants, including the underlying real property, personal property and all material contracts used to operate the plants, to certain designees of the Administrative Agent and the lenders (“Newco”), in full satisfaction of all outstanding obligations under the Senior Debt Facility and in lieu of the Administrative Agent and the lenders exercising their rights and remedies under the Senior Debt Facility. The Company also made a contingent payment into escrow of $938,000 for the anticipated payment of certain obligations and liabilities of the Operating Subsidiaries that are to be paid or assumed by Newco in conjunction with any such transfer. In conjunction with any such transfer, the Company would receive a full and final release of all known or potential claims of the lenders, as well as a 1% equity interest in Newco, which may be increased, under certain circumstances, to a 2% equity interest in Newco along with, in such circumstances, the right to acquire up to an additional 17.5% of the equity of Newco.
 
Under the terms of the Lender Agreement, the Deed in Lieu Agreement is currently being held in escrow by the Escrow Agent.  At any time, the Administrative Agent may deliver written notice to the Escrow Agent directing the Escrow Agent to take steps necessary to consummate the transfers set forth in the Deed in Lieu Agreement. The Administrative Agent has not, as of the date of this Report, delivered such written notice.
   
 
8

  
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
1. Organization, Nature of Business, Basis of Presentation, Liquidity, Going Concern, and Subsequent Event – (continued) 
 
As of September 30, 2013, the Operating Subsidiaries had $170.5 million of principal indebtedness outstanding under the Senior Debt Facility. The entire amount outstanding under the Senior Debt Facility has been classified as a current liability in the consolidated balance sheets as of September 30, 2013. 
 
The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern; however, the default of our Operating Subsidiaries under the Senior Debt Facility, the cessation of operations at the Fairmont ethanol facility, our limited liquidity, and the lenders’ definitive agreement to sell the Fairmont and Wood River ethanol facilities to Green Plains Renewable Energy, Inc. (“Green Plains”), as more fully discussed below, all raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to do so. The accompanying consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments to reflect the possible future effects on the recoverability and classification of assets or the amounts and classifications of liabilities that may result should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.
  
Subsequent Event
 
On November 5, 2013, the Company was notified by the lenders under the Senior Debt Facility and Green Plains that a definitive agreement has been entered into for the lenders to sell the Company’s ethanol plants plus working capital to Green Plains. The Company has not been provided with a copy of the lenders’ definitive agreement with Green Plains and therefore no further details can be provided at this time.  In the case of a transfer of the assets of the Operating Subsidiaries to Newco and Newco’s subsequent sale of the plants to Green Plains, we cannot assure you as to what value, if any, may be derived for shareholders of the Company from such transfer or sale.  The assets of the Operating Subsidiaries comprise substantially all of the assets of the Company, other than its cash and cash equivalents of the LLC, which totaled $9.3 million at September 30, 2013.  The Company has not yet determined how it will proceed or what strategic alternative it may pursue subsequent to such transfer or sale.

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
 
Principles of Consolidation and Noncontrolling Interest
 
The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the Company, the LLC and its wholly-owned subsidiaries: BFE Holdings, LLC; BFE Operating Company, LLC; Buffalo Lake Energy, LLC; and Pioneer Trail Energy, LLC. All inter-company balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. The Company treats all exchanges of LLC membership units for Company common stock as equity transactions, with any difference between the fair value of the Company’s common stock and the amount by which the noncontrolling interest is adjusted being recognized in equity.
 
Use of Estimates
 
Preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosures in the accompanying notes at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.
 
Revenue Recognition
 
The Company sells its ethanol, distillers grain and corn oil products under the terms of marketing agreements. Revenue is recognized when risk of loss and title transfers upon shipment of ethanol, distillers grain or corn oil. In accordance with our marketing agreements, the Company records its revenues based on the amounts payable to us at the time of our sales of ethanol, distillers grain or corn oil. For our ethanol that is sold within the United States, the amount payable is equal to the average delivered price per gallon received by the marketing pool from Cargill’s customers, less average transportation and storage charges incurred by Cargill, and less a commission. We also sell a portion of our ethanol production to Cargill for export, which sales are shipped undenatured and are excluded from the marketing pool. For exported ethanol sales, the amount payable is equal to the contracted delivered price per gallon, less transportation and storage charges, and less a commission. The amount payable for distillers grain and corn oil is generally equal to the market price at the time of sale less a commission.
 
 
9

 
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies – (continued)
 
Cost of goods sold
 
Cost of goods sold primarily includes costs of materials (primarily corn, natural gas, chemicals and denaturant), electricity, purchasing and receiving costs, inspection costs, shipping costs, lease costs, plant management, certain compensation costs and general facility overhead charges, including depreciation expense.
 
General and administrative expenses
 
General and administrative expenses consist of salaries and benefits paid to our management and administrative employees, expenses relating to third party services, travel, office rent, marketing and other expenses, including certain expenses associated with being a public company, such as fees paid to our independent auditors associated with our annual audit and quarterly reviews, directors’ fees, and listing and transfer agent fees.
 
Cash and Cash Equivalents
 
Cash and cash equivalents include highly-liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less. Cash equivalents are currently comprised of money market mutual funds. At September 30, 2013, we had $17.3 million held at three financial institutions, which is in excess of FDIC insurance limits.
 
Accounts Receivable
 
Accounts receivable are carried at original invoice amount less an estimate made for doubtful accounts based on a review of all outstanding amounts on a monthly basis. Management determines the allowance for doubtful accounts by regularly evaluating individual customer receivables and considering a customer’s financial condition, credit history and current economic conditions. The Company does not charge interest for any past due accounts receivable. Receivables are written off when deemed uncollectible. Recoveries of receivables previously written off are recorded as a reduction to bad debt expense when received. As of September 30, 2013 and December 31, 2012, no allowance was considered necessary.
 
Concentrations of Credit Risk
 
Credit risk represents the accounting loss that would be recognized at the reporting date if counterparties failed completely to perform as contracted. Concentrations of credit risk, whether on- or off-balance sheet, that arise from financial instruments exist for groups of customers or counterparties when they have similar economic characteristics that would cause their ability to meet contractual obligations to be similarly affected by changes in economic or other conditions described below.
 
During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2013, the Operating Subsidiaries recorded sales to Cargill representing 76% and 75%, respectively, of total net sales. During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2012, the Operating Subsidiaries recorded sales to Cargill representing 74% and 76%, respectively, of total net sales. As of September 30, 2013 and December 31, 2012, the Operating Subsidiaries, had receivables from Cargill of $6.1 million and $7.5 million, respectively, representing 85% and 81% of total accounts receivable, respectively.
 
The Operating Subsidiaries purchase corn, its largest cost component in producing ethanol, from Cargill. During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2013, corn purchases from Cargill totaled $61.1 million and $203.7 million, respectively. During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2012, corn purchases from Cargill totaled $95.4 million and $310.8 million, respectively. As of September 30, 2013 and December 31, 2012, the Operating Subsidiaries, had payables to Cargill of $0.8 million and $9.0 million, respectively, related to corn purchases.
 
 
10

 
  BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies – (continued)
 
Inventories
 
Raw materials inventories, which consist primarily of corn, denaturant, supplies and chemicals, and work in process inventories are valued at the lower-of-cost-or-market, with cost determined on a first-in, first-out basis. Finished goods inventories consist of ethanol and distillers grain and are stated at lower of average cost or market.
 
A summary of inventories is as follows (in thousands):
 
 
 
September 30,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
 
Raw materials
 
$
5,902
 
$
8,198
 
Work in process
 
 
2,096
 
 
2,831
 
Finished goods
 
 
3,194
 
 
2,414
 
 
 
$
11,192
 
$
13,443
 
 
Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities
 
Derivatives are recognized on the balance sheet at their fair value and are included in the accompanying balance sheets as “derivative financial instruments”. On the date the derivative contract is entered into, the Company may designate the derivative as a hedge of a forecasted transaction or of the variability of cash flows to be received or paid related to a recognized asset or liability (“cash flow” hedge). Changes in the fair value of a derivative that is highly effective and that is designated and qualifies as a cash flow hedge are recorded in other comprehensive income, net of tax effect, until earnings are affected by the variability of cash flows (e.g., when periodic settlements on a variable rate asset or liability are recorded in earnings). Changes in the fair value of undesignated derivative instruments or derivatives that do not qualify for hedge accounting are recognized in current period operations.
 
Accounting guidance for derivatives requires a company to evaluate contracts to determine whether the contracts are derivatives. Certain contracts that meet the definition of a derivative may be exempted as normal purchases or normal sales. Normal purchases and normal sales are contracts that provide for the purchase or sale of something other than a financial instrument or derivative instrument that will be delivered in quantities expected to be used or sold over a reasonable period in the normal course of business. The Company’s contracts for corn and natural gas purchases and ethanol sales that meet these requirements and are designated as either normal purchase or normal sale contracts are exempted from the derivative accounting and reporting requirements.
 
 
11

 
  BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies – (continued)
 
Property, Plant and Equipment
 
Property, plant and equipment is recorded at cost. All costs related to purchasing and developing land or the engineering, design and construction of a plant are capitalized. Maintenance, repairs and minor replacements are charged to operating expenses while major replacements and improvements are capitalized. Depreciation is computed by the straight line method over the following estimated useful lives:
 
 
 
Years
 
Land improvements
 
20 – 30
 
Buildings and improvements
 
7 – 40
 
Machinery and equipment:
 
 
 
Railroad equipment
 
20 – 39
 
Facility equipment
 
20 – 39
 
Other
 
5 – 7
 
Office furniture and equipment
 
3 – 10
 
 
Debt Issuance Costs
 
Debt issuance costs are stated at cost, less accumulated amortization. Debt issuance costs included in noncurrent assets at September 30, 2013 and December 31, 2012 represent costs incurred related to the Operating Subsidiaries Senior Debt Facility and tax increment financing agreements. These costs are being amortized, using an effective interest method, through interest expense over the term of the related debt. Estimated future debt issuance cost amortization as of September 30, 2013 is as follows (in thousands):
 
Remainder of 2013
 
$
240
 
2014
 
 
704
 
2015
 
 
8
 
2016
 
 
8
 
2017
 
 
8
 
Thereafter
 
 
33
 
Total
 
$
1,001
 
 
 
12

    
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies – (continued)
 
Impairment of Long-Lived Assets
 
The Company has two asset groups, its ethanol facility in Fairmont and its ethanol facility in Wood River, which are evaluated separately when considering whether the carrying value of these assets has been impaired. The Company continually monitors whether or not events or circumstances exist that would warrant impairment testing of its long-lived assets. In evaluating whether impairment testing should be performed, the Company considers several factors including the carrying value of the long-lived assets, projected production volumes at its facilities, projected ethanol and distillers grain prices that we expect to receive, and projected corn and natural gas costs we expect to incur. In the ethanol industry, operating margins, and consequently undiscounted future cash flows, are primarily driven by the crush spread. In the event that the crush spread is sufficiently depressed to result in negative operating cash flow at its facilities for an extended time period, the Company will evaluate whether an impairment of its long-lived assets may have occurred.
  
Recoverability is measured by comparing the carrying value of an asset with the estimated undiscounted future cash flows expected to result from the use of the asset and its eventual disposition. If the carrying value of an asset exceeds the undiscounted future cash flows, then the asset is measured for impairment.  An impairment loss is reflected as the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset exceeds the fair value of the asset. Fair value is determined based on the present value of estimated expected future cash flows using a discount rate commensurate with the risk involved, quoted market prices or appraised values, depending on the nature of the asset. As of September 30, 2013, the Company performed an impairment evaluation of the recoverability of its long-lived assets, which included the assessment of the likelihood of possible outcomes that existed at the balance sheet date, including continued operation of the assets and the assessment of the likelihood of a future sale of the asset, whether by the Company or by the lenders through foreclosure.   As a result of the impairment evaluation, it was determined that the undiscounted future cash flows from the assets exceeded the carrying values, and therefore no further analysis was necessary and no impairment was recorded.  In accordance with accounting pronouncements, the recoverability assessment made as of September 30, 2013 was not revised as a result of the decision by the lenders to transfer or sell both of the plants that occurred subsequent to September 30, 2013.  See Note 1 – Organization, Nature of Business, Basis of Presentation, Liquidity, Going Concern, and Subsequent Event.
 
Stock-Based Compensation
 
Expense associated with stock-based awards and other forms of equity compensation is based on fair value at grant and recognized on a straight line basis in the financial statements over the requisite service period for those awards that are expected to vest.
 
Asset Retirement Obligations
 
Asset retirement obligations are recognized when a contractual or legal obligation exists and a reasonable estimate of the amount can be made. Changes to the asset retirement obligation resulting from revisions to the timing or the amount of the original undiscounted cash flow estimates shall be recognized as an increase or decrease to both the carrying amount of the asset retirement obligation and the related asset retirement cost capitalized as part of the related property, plant and equipment. At September 30, 2013, the Operating Subsidiaries had accrued asset retirement obligation liabilities of $153,000 and $193,000 for its plants at Wood River and Fairmont, respectively. At December 31, 2012, the Operating Subsidiaries had accrued asset retirement obligation liabilities of $149,000 and $188,000 for its plants at Wood River and Fairmont, respectively.
 
The asset retirement obligations accrued for Wood River relate to the obligations in our contracts with Cargill and Union Pacific Railroad (“Union Pacific”). According to the grain elevator lease with Cargill, the equipment that is adjacent to the grain elevator may be required at Cargill’s discretion to be removed at the end of the lease. In addition, according to the contract with Union Pacific, the buildings that are built near their land in Wood River may be required at Union Pacific’s request to be removed at the end of our contract with them. The asset retirement obligations accrued for Fairmont relate to the obligations in our contracts with Cargill and in our water permit issued by the state of Minnesota. According to the grain elevator lease with Cargill, the equipment that is adjacent to the grain elevator being leased may be required at Cargill’s discretion to be removed at the end of the lease. In addition, the water permit in Fairmont requires that we secure all above ground storage tanks whenever we discontinue the use of our equipment for an extended period of time in Fairmont. The estimated costs of these obligations have been accrued at the current net present value of these obligations at the end of an estimated 20 year life for each of the plants. These liabilities have corresponding assets recorded in property, plant and equipment, which are being depreciated over 20 years.
 
 
13

 
  BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies – (continued)  
 
Income Taxes
 
The Company accounts for income taxes using the asset and liability method, under which deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to temporary differences between financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases and operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. The Company regularly reviews historical and anticipated future pre-tax results of operations to determine whether the Company will be able to realize the benefit of its deferred tax assets. A valuation allowance is required to reduce the potential deferred tax asset when it is more likely than not that all or some portion of the potential deferred tax asset will not be realized due to the lack of sufficient taxable income. The Company establishes reserves for uncertain tax positions that reflect its best estimate of deductions and credits that may not be sustained on a more likely than not basis. As the Company has incurred tax losses since its inception and expects to continue to incur tax losses for the foreseeable future, we will continue to provide a valuation allowance against deferred tax assets until the Company believes that such assets will be realized.
 
Fair Value of Financial Instruments
 
The Company’s financial instruments, including cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, and accounts payable are carried at cost, which approximates their fair value because of the short-term maturity of these instruments. Any derivative financial instruments are carried at fair value. The fair value of the Company’s capital lease and notes payable are not materially different from their carrying amounts based on anticipated interest rates that management believes would currently be available to the Company for similar issues of debt, taking into account the current credit risk of the Company and other market factors. The fair value of the Operating Subsidiaries senior debt is not materially different from its carrying amount because of the short-term maturity of the instrument
 
Segment Reporting
 
Operating segments are defined as components of an enterprise for which separate financial information is available and is evaluated regularly by the chief operating decision maker or decision making group in deciding how to allocate resources and in assessing performance. Each of our plants is considered its own unique operating segment under these criteria. However, when two or more operating segments have similar economic characteristics, accounting guidance allows for them to be aggregated into a single operating segment for purposes of financial reporting. Our two plants are very similar in all characteristics and accordingly, the Company presents a single reportable segment, the manufacture of fuel-grade ethanol and the co-products of the ethanol production process.
 
Recent Accounting Pronouncements
 
From time to time, new accounting pronouncements are issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) or other standards setting bodies that are adopted by us as of the specified effective date. Unless otherwise discussed, our management believes that the impact of recently issued standards that are not yet effective will not have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements upon adoption.
 
 
14

 
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
3. Property, Plant and Equipment
 
Property, plant and equipment, stated at cost, consist of the following at September 30, 2013 and December 31, 2012 (in thousands):
 
 
 
September 30,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
 
Land and land improvements
 
$
19,643
 
$
19,643
 
Buildings and improvements
 
 
49,838
 
 
49,838
 
Machinery and equipment
 
 
250,087
 
 
250,042
 
Office furniture and equipment
 
 
6,499
 
 
6,493
 
Construction in progress
 
 
2,266
 
 
297
 
 
 
 
328,333
 
 
326,313
 
Accumulated depreciation
 
 
(137,179)
 
 
(116,668)
 
Property, plant and equipment, net
 
$
191,154
 
$
209,645
 
 
Depreciation expense related to property, plant and equipment was $6,830,000 and $20,511,000 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2013, respectively, and was $6,806,000 and $20,408,000 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2012, respectively.

4. Earnings Per Share
 
Basic earnings per share are computed by dividing net income by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during each period. Diluted earnings per share are calculated using the treasury stock method and includes the effect of all dilutive securities, including stock options, restricted stock and Class B common shares. For those periods in which the Company incurred a net loss, the inclusion of the potentially dilutive shares in the computation of diluted weighted average shares outstanding would have been anti-dilutive to the Company’s loss per share, and, accordingly, all potentially dilutive shares have been excluded from the computation of diluted weighted average shares outstanding in those periods.
 
On June 15, 2012, the Company effected a reverse stock split with respect to all outstanding shares of common stock and Class B common stock at a ratio of one-for-twenty. All share and per share information in these financial statements has been retroactively restated to reflect the effect of this reverse stock split.
 
For both the three and nine months ended September 30, 2013, 65,481 shares issuable upon the exercise of stock options were excluded from the computation of diluted earnings per share as their effect would have been anti-dilutive. For both the three and nine months ended September 30, 2012, 71,509 shares issuable upon the exercise of stock options were excluded from the computation of diluted earnings per share as their effect would have been anti-dilutive.
 
A summary of the reconciliation of basic weighted average shares outstanding to diluted weighted average shares outstanding follows:
 
 
 
Three Months Ended September 30,
 
Nine Months Ended September 30,
 
 
 
2013
 
2012
 
2013
 
2012
 
Weighted average common shares
    outstanding – basic
 
 
5,342,064
 
 
5,224,257
 
 
5,330,887
 
 
5,177,569
 
Potentially dilutive common stock
    equivalents
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Class B common shares
 
 
795,479
 
 
869,301
 
 
795,479
 
 
908,970
 
Restricted stock
 
 
101,228
 
 
146,761
 
 
112,405
 
 
132,519
 
 
 
 
896,707
 
 
1,016,062
 
 
907,884
 
 
1,041,489
 
 
 
 
6,238,771
 
 
6,240,319
 
 
6,238,771
 
 
6,219,058
 
Less anti-dilutive common stock
    equivalents
 
 
(896,707)
 
 
(1,016,062)
 
 
(907,884)
 
 
(1,041,489)
 
Weighted average common shares
    outstanding – diluted
 
 
5,342,064
 
 
5,224,257
 
 
5,330,887
 
 
5,177,569
 
 
 
15

 
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
5. Long-Term Debt
 
The following table summarizes long-term debt as of September 30, 2013 and December 31, 2012 (in thousands):
 
 
 
September 30,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
 
Term loans
 
$
170,480
 
$
170,480
 
Capital lease
 
 
2,466
 
 
2,475
 
Notes payable
 
 
349
 
 
474
 
 
 
 
173,295
 
 
173,429
 
Less current portion
 
 
(170,642)
 
 
(170,634)
 
Long-term portion
 
$
2,653
 
$
2,795
 
 
Senior Debt Facility
 
In September 2006, the Operating Subsidiaries entered into the Senior Debt Facility to finance the construction of and provide working capital to operate our ethanol plants. Neither the Company nor the LLC is a borrower or a guarantor under the Senior Debt Facility, although the equity interests and assets of our subsidiaries are pledged as collateral to secure the debt under the facility. Principal payments under the Senior Debt Facility are payable quarterly at a minimum amount of $3,150,000, with additional pre-payments to be made out of available cash flow. These term loans mature in September 2014.
 
The Operating Subsidiaries did not make the regularly-scheduled payments of principal and interest that were due under the outstanding Senior Debt Facility on September 28, 2012, in an aggregate amount of $3.6 million. As a result, the Operating Subsidiaries received a Notice of Default from First National Bank of Omaha, as Administrative Agent for the lenders under the Senior Debt Facility. Since the initial default the Operating Subsidiaries have not made any of the regularly-scheduled principal and interest payments, which through September 30, 2013 totaled $22.4 million.
 
On April 11, 2013, the Operating Subsidiaries entered into a Lender Agreement with First National Bank of Omaha, as Escrow Agent under the Lender Agreement, and as Administrative Agent and Collateral Agent for the lenders under the Senior Debt Facility. Under the terms of the Lender Agreement, the Administrative Agent and the lenders agreed to provide the Operating Subsidiaries with a grace period until July 30, 2013 to allow the Company to pursue one or more strategic alternatives, including but not limited to a potential sale of one or both of the Company’s ethanol plants. This grace period was subject to the achievement of certain milestones, and could be extended at the sole discretion of the Administrative Agent. The Company engaged Piper Jaffray & Co. to act as its financial advisor and to assist us in exploring these strategic alternatives. In the event of a sale of one or both of our ethanol plants, the proceeds of such sale would first be applied to repay all or a portion of the outstanding indebtedness under the Senior Debt Facility, except for a small portion of such proceeds that, pursuant to the terms of the Lender Agreement, would be allocable to us. Residual proceeds after satisfying the senior indebtedness, if any, would accrue to the Company. Any such sale would also require the consent of the lenders under the Senior Debt Facility.
 
Simultaneously with the execution of the Lender Agreement, the Operating Subsidiaries, the Administrative Agent and the lenders under the Senior Debt Facility also entered into a Deed in Lieu Agreement, pursuant to which, among other things, the Operating Subsidiaries would transfer ownership of their respective ethanol plants, including the underlying real property, personal property and all material contracts used to operate the plants, to Newco, in full satisfaction of all outstanding obligations under the Senior Debt Facility and in lieu of the Administrative Agent and the lenders exercising their rights and remedies under the Senior Debt Facility. The Company also made a contingent payment into escrow of $938,000 for the anticipated payment of certain obligations and liabilities of the Operating Subsidiaries that are to be paid or assumed by Newco in conjunction with any such transfer. In conjunction with any such transfer, the Company would receive a full and final release of all known or potential claims of the lenders, as well as a 1% equity interest in Newco, which may be increased, under certain circumstances, to a 2% equity interest in Newco along with, in such circumstances, the right to acquire up to an additional 17.5% of the equity of Newco.
 
Under the terms of the Lender Agreement, the Deed in Lieu Agreement is currently being held in escrow by the Escrow Agent.  At any time, the Administrative Agent may deliver written notice to the Escrow Agent directing the Escrow Agent to take steps necessary to consummate the transfers set forth in the Deed in Lieu Agreement. The Administrative Agent has not, as of the date of this Report, delivered such written notice.
 
 
16

 
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
5. Long-Term Debt – (continued)
 
As of September 30, 2013, the Operating Subsidiaries had $170.5 million of principal indebtedness outstanding under the Senior Debt Facility. The entire amount outstanding under the Senior Debt Facility has been classified as a current liability in the September 30, 2013 consolidated balance sheet.
 
Interest rates on the Senior Debt Facility are, at management’s option, set at: i) a base rate, which is the higher of the federal funds rate plus 0.5% or the administrative agent’s prime rate, in each case plus a margin of 2.0%; or ii) at LIBOR plus 3.0%. Interest on base rate loans is payable quarterly and, depending on the LIBOR rate elected, as frequently as monthly on LIBOR loans, but no less frequently than quarterly. In addition, since the Operating Subsidiaries defaulted on their payments of principal and interest in September 2012, those unpaid balances have accrued interest at a penalty rate of 8.3%. The interest rate in effect on the borrowings at both September 30, 2013 and December 31, 2012 was 3.2%.
 
The Senior Debt Facility is secured by a first priority lien on all right, title and interest in and to the Wood River and Fairmont plants and any accounts receivable or property associated with those plants and a pledge of all of our equity interests in the Operating Subsidiaries. The Operating Subsidiaries have established collateral deposit accounts maintained by an agent of the banks, into which their revenues are deposited, subject to security interests to secure any outstanding obligations under the Senior Debt Facility. These funds are then allocated into various sweep accounts held by the collateral agent, including accounts that provide funds for the operating expenses of the Operating Subsidiaries. The collateral accounts have various provisions, including historical and prospective debt service coverage ratios and debt service reserve requirements, which determine whether there is, and the amount of, cash available to the LLC from the collateral accounts each month. The terms of the Senior Debt Facility also include covenants that impose certain limitations on, among other things, the ability of the Operating Subsidiaries to incur additional debt, grant liens or encumbrances, declare or pay dividends or distributions, conduct asset sales or other dispositions, merge or consolidate, and conduct transactions with affiliates. The terms of the Senior Debt Facility also include customary events of default including failure to meet payment obligations, failure to pay financial obligations when due, failure of the Operating Subsidiaries to remain solvent and failure to obtain or maintain required governmental approvals. Under the terms of separate management services agreements between our Operating Subsidiaries and the LLC, the Operating Subsidiaries were paying a monthly management fee of $884,000 to the LLC to cover salaries, rent, and other operating expenses of the LLC. Due to the Senior Debt Facility payment default, the lenders required the Operating Subsidiaries to reduce their monthly management fee to $260,000 per month effective October 2012.
 
Debt issuance fees and expenses of $7.9 million ($0.9 million, net of accumulated amortization as of September 30, 2013) have been incurred in connection with the Senior Debt Facility. These costs have been deferred and are being amortized and expensed as interest over the term of the Senior Debt Facility. 
 
On November 5, 2013, the Company was notified by the lenders under the Senior Debt Facility and Green Plains that a definitive agreement has been entered into for the lenders to sell the Company’s ethanol plants plus working capital to Green Plains. The Company has not been provided with a copy of the lenders’ definitive agreement with Green Plains and therefore no further details can be provided at this time.  In the case of a transfer of the assets of the Operating Subsidiaries to Newco and Newco’s subsequent sale of the plants to Green Plains, we cannot assure you as to what value, if any, may be derived for shareholders of the Company from such transfer or sale.  The assets of the Operating Subsidiaries comprise substantially all of the assets of the Company, other than its cash and cash equivalents of the LLC, which totaled $9.3 million at September 30, 2013.  The Company has not yet determined how it will proceed or what strategic alternative it may pursue subsequent to such transfer or sale.
 
Capital Lease
 
The operating subsidiary that constructed the Fairmont plant has entered into an agreement with the local utility pursuant to which the utility has built and owns and operates a substation and distribution facility in order to supply electricity to the plant. The operating subsidiary is paying a fixed facilities charge based on the cost of the substation and distribution facility of $34,000 per month, over the 30-year term of the agreement. This fixed facilities charge is being accounted for as a capital lease in the accompanying financial statements. The agreement also includes a $25,000 monthly minimum energy charge that also began in the first quarter of 2008.
 
Notes Payable
 
Notes payable relate to certain financing agreements in place at our Wood River facility. The operating subsidiary entered into a note payable for $419,000 with the City of Wood River for special assessments related to street, water, and sanitary improvements at our Wood River facility. This note requires annual payments of $52,000, including interest at 4.0% per annum, and matures in 2018. In addition, the operating subsidiary for the Wood River facility entered into a financing agreement in the fourth quarter of 2012 for the purchase of certain rolling stock equipment to be used at the facility for $208,000. This note requires 24 monthly payments of $9,000, including interest at 6.0% per annum, and matures in 2014.
 
The following table summarizes the aggregate maturities of our long-term debt as of September 30, 2013 (in thousands):
 
Remainder of 2013
 
$
170,509
 
2014
 
 
146
 
2015
 
 
56
 
2016
 
 
59
 
2017
 
 
63
 
Thereafter
 
 
2,462
 
Total
 
$
173,295
 
 
 
17

 
 
 
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
6. Tax Increment Financing
 
In February 2007, the operating subsidiary that constructed the Wood River plant received $6.0 million from the proceeds of a tax increment revenue note issued by the City of Wood River, Nebraska. The proceeds funded improvements to property owned by the operating subsidiary. The City of Wood River will pay the principal and interest of the note from the incremental increase in the property taxes related to the improvements made to the property. The interest rate on the note is 7.85%. The proceeds have been recorded as a liability which is reduced as the operating subsidiary remits property taxes to the City of Wood River, which began in 2008 and will continue through 2021. The LLC has guaranteed the principal and interest of the tax increment revenue note if, for any reason, the City of Wood River fails to make the required payments to the holder of the note or the operating subsidiary fails to make the required payments to the City of Wood River.
 
The following table summarizes the aggregate maturities of the tax increment financing debt as of September 30, 2013 (in thousands):
 
Remainder of 2013
$
200
2014
 
431
2015
 
464
2016
 
501
2017
 
540
Thereafter
 
2,247
Total
$
4,383
 

7. Stockholders’ Equity
 
Reverse Stock Split
 
On June 15, 2012, the Company effected a reverse stock split with respect to all outstanding shares of common stock and Class B common stock at a ratio of one-for-twenty. The Company also split the number of authorized shares of common stock at a ratio of one-for-fourteen, thereby reducing the aggregate number of authorized common stock shares to 10,000,000, and also split the number of authorized shares of Class B common stock at a ratio of one-for-twenty, thereby reducing the aggregate number of authorized Class B common stock shares to 3,750,000. All share and per share information and all necessary par value adjustments have been retroactively restated in the financial statements to reflect the effect of this reverse stock split. 
Stock Repurchase Plan
 
On October 15, 2007, the Company announced the adoption of a stock repurchase plan authorizing the repurchase of up to $7.5 million of the Company’s common stock. Purchases will be funded out of cash on hand and made from time to time in the open market. From the inception of the buyback program through September 30, 2013, the Company had repurchased 40,481 shares at an average price of $106.62 per share, leaving $3,184,000 available under the repurchase plan. The shares repurchased are being held as treasury stock. As of September 30, 2013, there were no plans to repurchase any additional shares.
 
Dividends
 
The Company has not declared any dividends on its common stock and does not anticipate paying dividends in the foreseeable future. In addition, the terms of the Senior Debt facility contain restrictions on the ability of the Operating Subsidiaries to pay dividends or other distributions, which will restrict the Company’s ability to pay dividends in the future.
 
 
18

 
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
8. Derivative Financial Instruments
 
The Company offsets amounts of cash collateral deposited with counterparties arising from certain derivative instruments executed with the same counterparty against the fair value amounts reported for those derivative instruments. The Company had no derivative instruments as of September 30, 2013 and December 31, 2012. The effects of derivative instruments on our consolidated financial statements were as follows for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2013 and 2012 (in thousands) (amounts presented exclude any income tax effects).
 
Effects of Derivative Instruments on Income
 
 
 
 
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
 
Nine Months Ended
September 30,
 
Consolidated Statements of Operations Location
 
2013
 
2012
 
2013
 
2012
 
 
 
 
 
gain (loss)
 
gain (loss)
 
gain (loss)
 
gain (loss)
 
Derivative not designated as hedging instrument:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Commodity contract
 
Net Sales
 
$
 
$
(592)
 
$
 
$
(1,498)
 
Commodity contract
 
Cost of Goods Sold
 
 
 
 
(1,365)
 
 
 
 
(1,886)
 
 
 
Net amount recognized in earnings
 
$
 
$
(1,957)
 
$
 
$
(3,384)
 
 
In accordance with these provisions, we have categorized our financial assets and liabilities, based on the priority of the inputs to the valuation technique, into a three-level fair value hierarchy as set forth below. If the inputs used to measure the financial instruments fall within different levels of the hierarchy, the categorization is based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement of the instrument.
 
Financial assets and liabilities recorded on the Company’s consolidated balance sheets are categorized based on the inputs to the valuation techniques as follows:
 
Level 1 — Financial assets and liabilities whose values are based on unadjusted quoted prices for identical assets or liabilities in an active market that the Company has the ability to access at the measurement date.
 
Level 2 — Financial assets and liabilities whose values are based on quoted prices in markets where trading occurs infrequently or whose values are based on quoted prices of instruments with similar attributes in active markets. Level 2 inputs include the following:
 
 
Quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in non-active markets (examples include corporate and municipal bonds which trade infrequently);
 
 
Inputs other than quoted prices that are observable for substantially the full term of the asset or liability (examples include interest rate and currency swaps); and
 
 
Inputs that are derived principally from or corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the asset or liability (examples include certain securities and derivatives).
  
As of September 30, 2013, we do not have any level 2 financial assets and liabilities.
 
 
19

  
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
8. Derivative Financial Instruments – (continued)
 
Level 3 — Financial assets and liabilities whose values are based on prices or valuation techniques that require inputs that are both unobservable and significant to the overall fair value measurement. These inputs reflect management’s own assumptions about the assumptions a market participant would use in pricing the asset or liability. As of September 30, 2013, we do not have any Level 3 financial assets or liabilities.
 
There were no transfers between the various financial asset and liability levels during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2013.

9. Stock-Based Compensation
 
The following table summarizes the stock-based compensation expense incurred by the Company (in thousands):
 
 
 
Three Months Ended September 30,
 
Nine Months Ended September 30,
 
 
 
2013
 
2012
 
2013
 
2012
 
Stock options
 
$
 
$
219
 
$
90
 
$
710
 
Restricted stock
 
 
141
 
 
150
 
 
451
 
 
409
 
Total
 
$
141
 
$
369
 
$
541
 
$
1,119
 
 
2007 Equity Incentive Compensation Plan
 
Immediately prior to the Company’s initial public offering, the Company adopted the 2007 Equity Incentive Compensation Plan (“2007 Plan”). The 2007 Plan provides for the grant of options intended to qualify as incentive stock options, non-qualified stock options, stock appreciation rights or restricted stock awards and any other equity-based or equity-related awards. The 2007 Plan is administered by the Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors. Subject to adjustment for changes in capitalization, the aggregate number of shares that may be delivered pursuant to awards under the 2007 Plan is currently 355,000. The term of the 2007 Plan is ten years, expiring in June 2017.
 
Stock Options — Except as otherwise directed by the Compensation Committee, the exercise price for options cannot be less than the fair market value of our common stock on the grant date. Other than the stock options issued to Directors, the options will generally vest and become exercisable with respect to 30%, 30% and 40% of the shares of our common stock subject to such options on each of the first three anniversaries of the grant date. Compensation expense related to these options is expensed on a straight line basis over the three year service period. Options issued to Directors generally vest and become exercisable on the first anniversary of the grant date. All stock options have a five year term from the date of grant. During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2013 and 2012, the Company did not issue any stock options under the 2007 Plan.
 
 
20

 
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
9. Stock-Based Compensation – (continued)
 
A summary of stock option activity under the 2007 Plan as of September 30, 2013, and the changes during the nine months ended September 30, 2013 is as follows:
 
 
 
Shares
 
Weighted
Average
Exercise
Price
 
Weighted
Average
Remaining
Life
(years)
 
Aggregate
Intrinsic
Value
 
Options outstanding, January 1, 2013
 
 
71,237
 
$
61.72
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Granted
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Exercised
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Forfeited
 
 
(5,756)
 
 
93.30
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Options outstanding, September 30, 2013
 
 
65,481
 
$
58.94
 
 
1.3
 
$
0.00
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Options exercisable, September 30, 2013
 
 
65,481
 
$
58.94
 
 
1.3
 
$
0.00
 
  
A summary of the status of our unvested stock options as of September 30, 2013, and the changes during the nine months ended September 30, 2013 is as follows:
 
 
 
Shares
 
Weighted
Average
Grant Date
Fair Value
 
Unvested, January 1, 2013
 
 
10,074
 
$
46.01
 
Granted
 
 
 
 
 
Vested
 
 
(10,074)
 
 
46.01
 
Forfeited
 
 
 
 
 
Unvested, September 30, 2013
 
 
 
$
 
 
 
21

 
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
9. Stock-Based Compensation – (continued)
 
Restricted Stock  — Other than restricted stock issued to Directors, the restricted stock issued will generally vest in equal increments of 25% on each of the first four anniversaries of the grant date. Compensation expense related to restricted stock issued is expensed on a straight line basis over the four year vesting period. Restricted stock issued to Directors generally vests on the first anniversary of the grant date with compensation expense being expensed on a straight line basis over the one year vesting period. During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2013, the Company did not issue any restricted stock shares under the 2007 Plan. During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2012, the Company granted 0 and 78,850 restricted stock shares, respectively, under the 2007 Plan to certain of our employees and our non-employee Directors.
 
A summary of restricted stock activity under the 2007 Plan as of September 30, 2013, and the changes during the nine months ended September 30, 2013 is as follows:
 
 
 
Shares
 
Weighted
Average
Grant Date
Fair Value
per Award
 
Aggregate
Intrinsic
Value
 
Restricted stock outstanding, January 1, 2013
 
 
143,026
 
$
13.82
 
 
 
 
Granted
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Vested
 
 
(41,798)
 
 
14.40
 
 
 
 
Cancelled or expired
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Restricted stock outstanding, September 30, 2013
 
 
101,228
 
$
13.58
 
$
369,482
 
 
As of September 30, 2013, there was $1,064,000 of unrecognized compensation expense related to the unvested portion of restricted stock outstanding. This expense is expected to be recognized over 2.5 years.
 
After considering the stock option and restricted stock awards issued and outstanding, the Company had 113,365 shares of common stock available for future grant under our 2007 Plan at September 30, 2013.
 
 
22

 
 
 
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
10. Income Taxes
 
The Company has not recognized any income tax provision (benefit) for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2013 and 2012 due to continuing losses from operations.
 
The U.S. statutory federal income tax rate is reconciled to the Company’s effective income tax rate as follows (in thousands):
 
 
 
Three Months Ended September 30,
 
Nine Months Ended September 30,
 
 
 
2013
 
2012
 
2013
 
2012
 
Tax benefit at 35% federal statutory rate
 
$
1,795
 
$
3,965
 
$
5,318
 
$
12,192
 
State tax benefit, net of federal benefit
 
 
26
 
 
57
 
 
76
 
 
174
 
Noncontrolling interest
 
 
(237)
 
 
(532)
 
 
(701)
 
 
(1,780)
 
Valuation allowance
 
 
(1,693)
 
 
(3,736)
 
 
(4,650)
 
 
(10,519)
 
Other
 
 
109
 
 
246
 
 
(43)
 
 
(67)
 
Total
 
$
 
$
 
$
 
$
 
 
The effects of temporary differences and other items that give rise to deferred tax assets and liabilities are presented below (in thousands):
 
 
 
September 30,
2013
 
December 31,
2012
 
Deferred tax assets:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Capitalized start up costs
 
$
2,922
 
$
3,253
 
Stock-based compensation
 
 
965
 
 
965
 
Net operating loss carryover
 
 
91,034
 
 
86,913
 
Other
 
 
(36)
 
 
(38)
 
Deferred tax assets
 
 
94,885
 
 
91,093
 
Valuation allowance
 
 
(52,194)
 
 
(47,587)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Deferred tax liabilities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Property, plant and equipment
 
 
(42,691)
 
 
(43,506)
 
Deferred tax liabilities
 
 
(42,691)
 
 
(43,506)
 
Net deferred tax asset
 
$
 
$
 
 
The Company assesses the recoverability of deferred tax assets and the need for a valuation allowance on an ongoing basis. In making this assessment, management considers all available positive and negative evidence to determine whether it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will be realized in future periods. This assessment requires significant judgment and estimates involving current and deferred income taxes, tax attributes relating to the interpretation of various tax laws, historical bases of tax attributes associated with certain assets and limitations surrounding the realization of deferred tax assets.
 
As of September 30, 2013, the net operating loss carryforward was $255.8 million, which will begin to expire if not used by December 31, 2028. The U.S. federal statute of limitations remains open for our 2010 and subsequent tax years.

11. Employee Benefit Plans
 
The LLC sponsors a 401(k) profit sharing and savings plan for its employees. Employee participation in this plan is voluntary and the LLC matches 50% of eligible employee contributions, up to an amount equal to 3% of employee compensation, on a biweekly basis. For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2013, contributions to the plan by the LLC totaled $33,000 and $119,000, respectively. For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2012, contributions to the plan by the LLC totaled $50,000 and $192,000, respectively.
 
 
23

 
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
12. Commitments and Contingencies
 
The Operating Subsidiaries entered into two operating lease agreements with Cargill. Cargill’s grain handling and storage facilities, located adjacent to the Wood River and Fairmont plants, are being leased for 20 years, which began in September 2008 for both plants. Minimum annual payments initially were $800,000 for the Fairmont plant and $1,000,000 for the Wood River plant so long as the associated corn supply agreements with Cargill remain in effect. Should the Operating Subsidiaries not maintain its corn supply agreements with Cargill, the minimum annual payments under each lease increase to $1,200,000 and $1,500,000, respectively. The leases contain escalation clauses that are based on the percentage change in the Midwest Consumer Price Index. The escalation clauses are considered to be contingent rent and, accordingly, are not included in minimum lease payments. Rent expense is recognized on a straight line basis over the terms of the leases. Events of default under the leases include failure to fulfill monetary or non-monetary obligations and insolvency. Effective September 1, 2009, the Operating Subsidiaries and Cargill entered into Omnibus Agreements whereby the two operating lease agreements were modified, for a period of one year, to defer a portion of the monthly lease payments. The deferred lease payments were to be paid back to Cargill over a two year period beginning September 1, 2010. On September 23, 2010, the Operating Subsidiaries and Cargill entered into a letter agreement (“Letter Agreement”) whereby (i) effective October 2010 the minimum annual payments under the leases were reduced to $50,000 for the Fairmont plant and $250,000 for the Wood River plant and (ii) repayment of the deferred lease payments have been deferred for an indefinite period of time. As of September 30, 2013, the deferred lease payments totaled $1.5 million and are included in other non-current liabilities.
 
Beginning in the second quarter of 2008, the Operating Subsidiaries entered into agreements to lease railroad cars over a period of ten years. Pursuant to these lease agreements, the Operating Subsidiaries are currently leasing 785 railroad cars for approximately $6.7 million per year. Monthly rental charges escalate if modifications of the cars are required by governmental authorities or mileage exceeds 30,000 miles in any calendar year. Rent expense is recognized on a straight line basis over the terms of the leases. Events of default under the leases include failure to fulfill monetary or non-monetary obligations.
 
In April 2008, the LLC entered into a 64 month lease that began July 1, 2008 for office space for its corporate headquarters. Rent expense is being recognized on a straight line basis over the term of the lease.
 
In October 2011, the Operating Subsidiaries entered into two operating lease agreements to lease corn oil extraction systems, one for each of its plants. Each lease agreement is for a period of two years and commenced in April 2012 when funding was completed. Pursuant to these lease agreements, the Operating Subsidiaries are paying approximately $4.3 million per year for the corn oil extraction systems. Rent expense is recognized on a straight line basis over the terms of the leases. Events of default under the leases include failure to fulfill monetary or non-monetary obligations under either lease, as well as any payment default under any of the Company’s other material debt obligations, including the Senior Debt Facility. The Company has informed Farnam Street Financial, Inc. (“Farnam”) of the default notice it received from its senior lenders, and Farnam has elected not to declare a default under either lease agreement so long as the Operating Subsidiaries continue to make timely lease payments.` 
 
Future minimum operating lease payments at September 30, 2013 are as follows (in thousands):
 
Remainder of 2013
 
$
2,852
 
2014
 
 
8,481
 
2015
 
 
6,972
 
2016
 
 
6,972
 
2017
 
 
6,972
 
Thereafter
 
 
5,197
 
Total
 
$
37,446
 
 
Rent expense recorded for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2013 totaled $2,833,000 and $8,583,000, respectively. Rent expense recorded for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2012 totaled $2,915,000 and $8,554,000, respectively.
 
Pursuant to long-term agreements, Cargill is the exclusive supplier of corn to the Wood River and Fairmont plants for twenty years commencing September 2008. The price of corn purchased under these agreements is based on a formula including cost plus an origination fee of $0.048 per bushel. The minimum annual origination fee payable to Cargill per plant under the agreements is $1.2 million. The agreements contain events of default that include failure to pay, willful misconduct, purchase of corn from another supplier, insolvency or the termination of the associated grain facility lease. Effective September 1, 2009, the Operating Subsidiaries and Cargill entered into Omnibus Agreements whereby the two corn supply agreements were modified, for a period of one year, extending payment terms for our corn purchases which were to revert to the original terms on September 1, 2010. On September 23, 2010, the Operating Subsidiaries and Cargill entered into a Letter Agreement whereby the extended payment terms for our corn purchases will remain in effect for the remainder of the two corn supply agreements. As a result of the Company’s Fairmont facility being idled, Cargill has been invoicing the Company for the minimum origination fees payable to Cargill. As of September 30, 2013, the minimum origination fees payable to Cargill totaled $1.3 million and are included in accounts payable.
 
 
24

 
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
12. Commitments and Contingencies – (continued)  
 
At September 30, 2013, the Operating Subsidiaries had contracted to purchase 55,000 bushels of corn to be delivered during October 2013 at our Fairmont location, and 4,256,000 bushels of corn to be delivered between October 2013 and March 2015 at our Wood River location. The purchase commitment for the Wood River location represents 8% of the projected corn requirements during that period. The purchase price of the corn will be determined at the time of delivery.
 
Cargill has agreed to purchase all ethanol produced at the Wood River and Fairmont plants through September 2016. Under the terms of the ethanol marketing agreements, the Wood River and Fairmont plants generally participate in a marketing pool in which all parties receive the same net price. That price is generally the average delivered price per gallon received by the marketing pool less average transportation and storage charges and less a commission. In certain circumstances, the plants may elect not to participate in the marketing pool. Minimum annual commissions are payable to Cargill equal to 1% of Cargill’s average selling price for 82.5 million gallons of ethanol from each plant. The ethanol marketing agreements contain events of default that include failure to pay, willful misconduct and insolvency. Effective September 1, 2009, the subsidiaries and Cargill entered into Omnibus Agreements whereby the two ethanol marketing agreements were modified, for a period of one year, to defer a portion of the monthly ethanol commission payments. The deferred commission payments were to be paid to Cargill over a two year period beginning September 1, 2010. On September 23, 2010, the subsidiaries and Cargill entered into a Letter Agreement whereby (i) effective September 24, 2010 the ethanol commissions were reduced and (ii) repayment of the deferred commission payments have been deferred for an indefinite period of time with any repayment at the discretion of the Operating Subsidiaries. As of September 30, 2013, the deferred ethanol commissions totaled $1.0 million and are included in other non-current liabilities. As a result of the Company’s Fairmont facility being idled, Cargill has been invoicing the Company for the minimum ethanol commissions payable to Cargill, As of September 30, 2013, the minimum ethanol commissions payable to Cargill totaled $0.8 million and are included in accounts payable.
 
The Company is not currently a party to any material legal, administrative or regulatory proceedings that have arisen in the ordinary course of business or otherwise that would result in loss contingencies.
 
 
25

 
 
 
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
13. Noncontrolling Interest
 
Noncontrolling interest consists of equity issued to members of the LLC upon the Company’s initial public offering in June 2007. As provided in the LLC agreement, the exchange ratio of the various existing classes of equity of the LLC for the single class of equity at the time of the Company’s initial public offering was based on the Company’s initial public offering price of $210.00 per share and the resulting implied valuation of the Company. The exchange resulted in the issuance of 897,903 LLC membership units and Class B common shares. Each LLC membership unit combined with a share of Class B common stock is exchangeable at the holder’s option into one share of Company common stock. The LLC may make distributions to members as determined by the Company.
   
At the time of its initial public offering, the Company owned 28.9% of the LLC membership units of the LLC. At September 30, 2013, the Company owned 87.3% of the LLC membership units. The noncontrolling interest will continue to be reported until all Class B common shares and LLC membership units have been exchanged for the Company’s common stock.
 
The table below shows the effects of the changes in BioFuel Energy Corp.’s ownership interest in the LLC on the equity attributable to BioFuel Energy Corp.’s common stockholders for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2013 and 2012 (in thousands):
 
Net Loss Attributable to BioFuel Energy Corp.’s Common Stockholders and
Transfers from the Noncontrolling Interest
 
 
 
Three Months Ended September 30,
 
Nine Months Ended September 30,
 
 
 
2013
 
2012
 
2013
 
2012
 
Net loss attributable to BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
$
(4,461)
 
$
(9,830)
 
$
(13,221)
 
$
(29,820)
 
Increase in BioFuel Energy Corp.
    stockholders’ equity from issuance of
    common shares in exchange for Class B
    common shares and units of BioFuel
    Energy, LLC
 
 
 
 
227
 
 
 
 
273
 
Change in equity from net loss attributable to
    BioFuel Energy Corp. and transfers from
    noncontrolling interest
 
$
(4,461)
 
$
(9,603)
 
$
(13,221)
 
$
(29,547)
 
 
 
26

 
BioFuel Energy Corp.
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
13. Noncontrolling Interest – (continued)
 
Tax Benefit Sharing Agreement
 
Membership units in the LLC combined with the related Class B common shares held by the historical equity investors may be exchanged in the future for shares of our common stock on a one-for-one basis, subject to customary conversion rate adjustments for stock splits, stock dividends and reclassifications. The LLC will make an election under Section 754 of the IRS Code effective for each taxable year in which an exchange of membership units and Class B shares for common shares occurs, which may result in an adjustment to the tax basis of the assets owned by the LLC at the time of the exchange. Increases in tax basis, if any, would reduce the amount of tax that the Company would otherwise be required to pay in the future, although the IRS may challenge all or part of the tax basis increases, and a court could sustain such a challenge. The Company has entered into tax benefit sharing agreements with its historical LLC investors that will provide for a sharing of these tax benefits, if any, between the Company and the historical LLC equity investors. Under these agreements, the Company will make a payment to an exchanging LLC member of 85% of the amount of cash savings, if any, in U.S. federal, state and local income taxes the Company actually realizes as a result of this increase in tax basis. The Company and its common stockholders will benefit from the remaining 15% of cash savings, if any, in income taxes realized. For purposes of the tax benefit sharing agreement, cash savings in income tax will be computed by comparing the Company’s actual income tax liability to the amount of such taxes the Company would have been required to pay had there been no increase in the tax basis in the assets of the LLC as a result of the exchanges. The term of the tax benefit sharing agreement commenced on the Company’s initial public offering in June 2007 and will continue until all such tax benefits have been utilized or expired, unless a change of control occurs and the Company exercises its resulting right to terminate the tax benefit sharing agreement for an amount based on agreed payments remaining to be made under the agreement.
 
True Up Agreement
 
At the time of formation of the LLC, the founders agreed with certain of our principal stockholders as to the relative ownership interests in the Company of our management members and affiliates of Greenlight Capital, Inc. (“Greenlight”) and Third Point LLC (“Third Point”). Certain management members and affiliates of Greenlight and Third Point agreed to exchange LLC membership interests, shares of common stock or cash at a future date, referred to as the “true-up date”, depending on the Company’s performance. This provision functioned by providing management with additional value if the Company’s value improved and by reducing management’s interest in the Company if its value decreased, subject to a predetermined rate of return accruing to Greenlight and Third Point. In particular, if the value of the Company increased from the time of the initial public offering to the “true-up date”, the management members were entitled to receive LLC membership units, shares of common stock or cash from the affiliates of Greenlight and Third Point. On the other hand, if the value of the Company decreased from the time of the initial public offering to the “true-up date” or if a predetermined rate of return was not met, the affiliates of Greenlight and Third Point were entitled to receive LLC membership units or shares of common stock from the management members.
 
The “true-up date” occurred on June 19, 2012, which was five years from the date of the initial public offering. Since the value of the Company decreased from the time of the initial public offering to the “true-up date”, the affiliates of Greenlight and Third Point received 69,382 and 34,691 LLC membership units, respectively, from certain members or former members of our management group during the third quarter of 2012 as a result of the “true-up”. No new shares were issued as a result of the “true-up” but rather a redistribution of shares occurred among certain members or former members of our management group and our two largest investors, Greenlight and Third Point.
 
 
27

 
ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
 
You should read the following discussion in conjunction with the unaudited consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes included in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. This discussion contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. Specifically, forward-looking statements may be preceded by, followed by or may include such words as “estimate”, “plan”, “project”, “forecast”, “intend”, “expect”, “is to be”, “anticipate”, “goal”, “believe”, “seek”, “target” or other similar expressions. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this Form 10-Q, or in the case of a document incorporated by reference, as of the date of that document. Except as required by law, we undertake no obligation to publicly update or release any revisions to these forward-looking statements to reflect any events or circumstances after the date of this Form 10-Q or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events. Our actual results may differ materially from those discussed in or implied by any of the forward-looking statements as a result of various factors, including but not limited to those listed elsewhere in this Form 10-Q and those listed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2012 or in any other documents we have filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
 
Overview
 
BioFuel Energy Corp. (“we” or “the Company”) produces and sells ethanol and its related co-products, primarily distillers grain and corn oil. We have historically operated our two dry-mill ethanol production facilities located in Wood River, Nebraska and Fairmont, Minnesota. Each of these plants has an undenatured nameplate production capacity of approximately 110 million gallons per year (“Mmgy”). Our operations are subject to changes in commodity prices, specifically, the price of our main commodity input, corn, relative to the price of our main commodity product, ethanol, which is known in the industry as the “crush spread”. Drought conditions in the American Midwest significantly impacted the 2012 corn crop and caused a significant reduction in the corn yield. This led to an increase in the price of corn and a corresponding narrowing in the crush spread as ethanol prices did not rise sufficiently with rising corn prices, due to an oversupply of ethanol. As a result, in September 2012 the Company decided to idle its Fairmont facility and in February 2013 we reduced staffing at the Fairmont facility. Although crush spreads have improved during the first nine months of 2013, our Fairmont facility remains idle. However, we continue to evaluate the economic viability of restarting our Fairmont facility, including the working capital that would be required to restart.
 
We are a holding company with no operations of our own, and are the sole managing member of BioFuel Energy, LLC (the “LLC”), which is itself a holding company and indirectly owns all of our operating assets. As the sole managing member of the LLC, BioFuel Energy Corp. operates and controls all of the business and affairs of the LLC and its subsidiaries. The Company’s ethanol plants are owned and operated by the operating subsidiaries of the LLC (the “Operating Subsidiaries”). Those Operating Subsidiaries are party to a Credit Agreement (the “Senior Debt Facility”) with a group of lenders, for which First National Bank of Omaha acts as Administrative Agent, and substantially all of the assets of the Operating Subsidiaries are pledged as collateral under the Senior Debt Facility. Neither the Company nor the LLC is a party, either as borrower or guarantor, under the Senior Debt Facility, and none of their respective assets, other than the LLC interests in the Operating Subsidiaries themselves, are pledged as collateral under the Senior Debt Facility.
 
We work closely with Cargill, one of the world’s leading agribusiness companies, with whom we have an extensive commercial relationship. At each of our plant locations, Cargill has a local grain origination presence and owns adjacent grain storage and handling facilities, which we lease from them. Cargill provides corn procurement services, markets the ethanol we produce and provides transportation logistics for our two plants under long-term contracts. We have also from time to time relied upon extensions of payment terms by Cargill as a source of liquidity and working capital. See – “Liquidity and capital resources”. 
 
 
28

 
Liquidity and Going Concern
 
Our financial results and cash flows are subject to wide and unpredictable fluctuations in the crush spread. The price of our main co-product, distillers grain, is likewise subject to wide, unpredictable fluctuations, typically in conjunction with changes in the price of corn. The prices of these commodities are volatile and beyond our control. As a result of the volatility of the prices for these and other items, our results fluctuate substantially and in ways that are largely beyond our control. As shown in the accompanying consolidated financial statements, during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2013, the Company incurred net losses of $5.1 million and $15.2 million, respectively. Narrow commodity margins present a significant risk to our cash flows and liquidity. We have had, and continue to have, limited liquidity, with $17.3 million of cash and cash equivalents as of September 30, 2013, of which $9.3 million was held at the LLC and $8.0 million was held at the Operating Subsidiaries, which is subject to the lenders’ liens under the Senior Debt Facility. 
 
In the third quarter of 2012, due to our limited and declining liquidity, our Board of Directors determined that, in order to preserve cash at the LLC, the Operating Subsidiaries would not make the regularly-scheduled payments of principal and interest that were due under the outstanding Senior Debt Facility on September 28, 2012, in an aggregate amount of $3.6 million. As a result, the Operating Subsidiaries received a Notice of Default from First National Bank of Omaha, as Administrative Agent for the lenders under the Senior Debt Facility. Since the initial default, the Operating Subsidiaries have not made any of the regularly-scheduled principal and interest payments, which through September 30, 2013 totaled $22.4 million.
 
On April 11, 2013, the Operating Subsidiaries entered into a definitive agreement (the “Lender Agreement”) with First National Bank of Omaha, as Escrow Agent under the Lender Agreement, and as Administrative Agent and Collateral Agent for the lenders under the Senior Debt Facility. Under the terms of the Lender Agreement, the Administrative Agent and the lenders agreed to provide the Operating Subsidiaries with a grace period until July 30, 2013 to allow the Company to pursue one or more strategic alternatives, including but not limited to a potential sale of one or both of the Company’s ethanol plants. This grace period was subject to the achievement of certain milestones, and could be extended at the sole discretion of the Administrative Agent. The Company engaged Piper Jaffray & Co. to act as its financial advisor and to assist us in exploring these strategic alternatives. In the event of a sale of one or both of our ethanol plants, the proceeds of such sale would first be applied to repay all or a portion of the outstanding indebtedness under the Senior Debt Facility, except for a small portion of such proceeds that, pursuant to the terms of the Lender Agreement, would be allocable to us. Residual proceeds after satisfying the senior indebtedness, if any, would accrue to the Company. Any such sale would also require the consent of the lenders under the Senior Debt Facility.
 
Simultaneously with the execution of the Lender Agreement, the Operating Subsidiaries, the Administrative Agent and the lenders under the Senior Debt Facility also entered into a Deed in Lieu of Foreclosure Agreement and Joint Escrow Instructions (the “Deed in Lieu Agreement”), pursuant to which, among other things, the Operating Subsidiaries would transfer ownership of their respective ethanol plants, including the underlying real property, personal property and all material contracts used to operate the plants, to certain designees of the Administrative Agent and the lenders (“Newco”), in full satisfaction of all outstanding obligations under the Senior Debt Facility and in lieu of the Administrative Agent and the lenders exercising their rights and remedies under the Senior Debt Facility. The Company also made a contingent payment into escrow of $938,000 for the anticipated payment of certain obligations and liabilities of the Operating Subsidiaries that are to be paid or assumed by Newco in conjunction with any such transfer. In conjunction with any such transfer, the Company would receive a full and final release of all known or potential claims of the lenders, as well as a 1% equity interest in Newco, which may be increased, under certain circumstances, to a 2% equity interest in Newco along with, in such circumstances, the right to acquire up to an additional 17.5% of the equity of Newco.
 
Under the terms of the Lender Agreement, the Deed in Lieu Agreement is currently being held in escrow by the Escrow Agent.  At any time, the Administrative Agent may deliver written notice to the Escrow Agent directing the Escrow Agent to take steps necessary to consummate the transfers set forth in the Deed in Lieu Agreement. The Administrative Agent has not, as of the date of this Report, delivered such written notice.
 
As of September 30, 2013, the Operating Subsidiaries had $170.5 million of principal indebtedness outstanding under the Senior Debt Facility. The entire amount outstanding under the Senior Debt Facility has been classified as a current liability in the September 30, 2013 consolidated balance sheet.
 
The consolidated financial statements that are included elsewhere in this report have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern; however, the default of our Operating Subsidiaries under the Senior Debt Facility, the cessation of operations at the Fairmont ethanol facility, our limited liquidity, and the lenders’ definitive agreement to sell the Fairmont and Wood River ethanol facilities to Green Plain Renewable Energy, Inc. (“Green Plains”), as more fully discussed below, all raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to do so. Our financial statements do not include any adjustments to reflect the possible future effects on the recoverability and classification of assets or the amounts and classifications of liabilities that may result should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.
 
Subsequent Event
 
On November 5, 2013, the Company was notified by the lenders under the Senior Debt Facility and Green Plains that a definitive agreement has been entered into for the lenders to sell the Company’s ethanol plants plus working capital to Green Plains. The Company has not been provided with a copy of the lenders’ definitive agreement with Green Plains and therefore no further details can be provided at this time.  In the case of a transfer of the assets of the Operating Subsidiaries to Newco and Newco’s subsequent sale of the plants to Green Plains, we cannot assure you as to what value, if any, may be derived for shareholders of the Company from such transfer or sale.  The assets of the Operating Subsidiaries comprise substantially all of the assets of the Company, other than its cash and cash equivalents of the LLC, which totaled $9.3 million at September 30, 2013.  The Company has not yet determined how it will proceed or what strategic alternative it may pursue subsequent to such transfer or sale. 
 
 
29

 
Basis for Consolidation
 
At September 30, 2013, the Company owned 87.3% of the LLC membership units with the remaining 12.7% owned by an individual and by certain investment funds affiliated with one of the original equity investors of the LLC. As a result, the Company consolidates the results of the LLC. The amount of income or loss allocable to the 12.7% holders is reported as noncontrolling interest in our consolidated statements of operations. The Class B common shares of the Company are held by the same individual and investment funds who held 795,479 membership units in the LLC as of September 30, 2013 that, together with the corresponding Class B shares, can be exchanged for newly issued shares of common stock of the Company on a one-for-one basis. The proportionate value of the LLC membership units held by the individual or investment funds other than the Company are recorded as noncontrolling interest on the consolidated balance sheets.
 
Revenues
 
Our primary source of revenue is the sale of ethanol. The selling prices we realize for our ethanol are largely determined by the market supply and demand for ethanol, which, in turn, is influenced by industry and other factors, including government policy and regulations, over which we have little control. Ethanol prices are extremely volatile.  Ethanol revenues are recorded net of transportation and storage charges, and net of marketing commissions we pay to Cargill.
 
We also receive revenue from the sale of distillers grain, which is a residual co-product of the processed corn used in the production of ethanol and is sold as animal feed. The selling prices we realize for our distillers grain are largely determined by the market supply and demand, primarily from livestock operators and marketing companies in the U.S. and internationally. Distillers grain is sold by the ton and, based upon the amount of moisture retained in the product, can either be sold “wet” or “dry”.
 
The Company installed corn oil extraction systems at its plant in Wood River in December 2011 and at its plant in Fairmont in January 2012. Both Operating Subsidiaries began generating revenues from corn oil sales in the first quarter of 2012. The corn oil produced at our plants is non-food grade and is used primarily as a feedstock for the production of biodiesel and as an animal feed ingredient. We market the corn oil produced in Wood River ourselves, although a portion is often sold to the same third party marketer that purchases our dried distillers grain from that facility. Most of the corn oil produced in Fairmont was being sold to a biodiesel producer under an off-take agreement.
 
 
30

 
Cost of goods sold and gross profit (loss)
 
Our gross profit (loss) is derived from our revenues less our cost of goods sold. Our cost of goods sold is affected primarily by the cost of corn and natural gas. The prices of both corn and natural gas are volatile and can vary as a result of a wide variety of factors, including weather, market demand, regulation and general economic conditions, all of which are outside of our control.
 
Corn is our most significant raw material cost. Rising corn prices may result in lower profit margins because changes in ethanol prices are not necessarily correlated with changes in corn prices and therefore producers are not always able to pass along increased corn costs to customers. The price and availability of corn is influenced by weather conditions and other factors affecting crop yields, farmer planting decisions and general economic, market and regulatory factors. These factors include government policies and subsidies with respect to agriculture and international trade, and global and local demand and supply for corn and for other agricultural commodities for which it may be substituted, such as soybeans. Historically, the cash price we pay for corn, relative to the spot price of corn, tends to rise during the spring planting season in April and May as the local basis (i.e., discount) contracts, and tends to decrease relative to the spot price during the fall harvest in October and November as the local basis expands.
 
We also purchase natural gas to power steam generation in our ethanol production process and as fuel for our dryers to dry our distillers grain. Natural gas represents our second largest operating cost after corn, and natural gas prices are extremely volatile. Historically, the spot price of natural gas tends to be highest during the heating and cooling seasons and tends to decrease during the spring and fall.
 
Corn procurement fees paid to Cargill are included in our cost of goods sold. Other cost of goods sold primarily consists of our cost of chemicals and enzymes, electricity, depreciation, manufacturing overhead and rail car lease expense.
 
General and administrative expenses
 
General and administrative expenses consist of salaries and benefits paid to our management and administrative employees, expenses relating to third party services, travel, office rent, marketing and other expenses, including expenses associated with being a public company, such as fees paid to our independent auditors associated with our annual audit and quarterly reviews, directors’ fees, and listing and transfer agent fees. 
 
Results of operations
 
The following discussion summarizes the significant factors affecting the consolidated operating results of the Company for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2013 and September 30, 2012. This discussion should be read in conjunction with the unaudited consolidated financial statements and notes to the unaudited consolidated financial statements contained in this Form 10-Q.
 
The following table sets forth net sales, expenses and net loss, as well as the percentage relationship to net sales of certain items in our consolidated statements of operations:
 
 
 
Three Months Ended September 30,
 
 
Nine Months Ended September 30,
 
 
 
2013
 
 
2012
 
 
2013
 
 
2012
 
 
 
(dollars in thousands)
 
 
(dollars in thousands)
 
Net sales
 
$
79,048
 
100.0
%
 
$
116,149
 
100.0
%
 
$
259,119
 
100.0
%
 
$
378,382
 
100.0
%
Cost of goods sold
 
 
82,132
 
103.9
 
 
 
124,192
 
106.9
 
 
 
266,357
 
102.8
 
 
 
401,204
 
106.0
 
Gross loss
 
 
(3,084)
 
(3.9)
 
 
 
(8,043)
 
(6.9)
 
 
 
(7,238)
 
(2.8)
 
 
 
(22,822)
 
(6.0)
 
General and administrative
    expenses
 
 
2,567
 
3.2
 
 
 
2,064
 
1.8
 
 
 
8,691
 
3.3
 
 
 
7,232
 
1.9
 
Operating loss
 
 
(5,651)
 
(7.1)
 
 
 
(10,107)
 
(8.7)
 
 
 
(15,929)
 
(6.1)
 
 
 
(30,054)
 
(7.9)
 
Other income
 
 
2,535
 
3.2
 
 
 
680
 
0.6
 
 
 
6,590
 
2.5
 
 
 
680
 
0.2
 
Interest expense
 
 
(2,013)
 
(2.5)
 
 
 
(1,901)
 
(1.7)
 
 
 
(5,856)
 
(2.3)
 
 
 
(5,461)
 
(1.5)
 
Net loss
 
 
(5,129)
 
(6.4)
 
 
 
(11,328)
 
(9.7)
 
 
 
(15,195)
 
(5.9)
 
 
 
(34,835)
 
(9.2)
 
Less: Net loss attributable
    to the noncontrolling interest
 
 
668
 
0.8
 
 
 
1,498
 
1.3
 
 
 
1,974
 
0.8
 
 
 
5,015
 
1.3
 
Net loss attributable to
    BioFuel Energy Corp.
    common stockholders
 
$
(4,461)
 
(5.6)
%
 
$
(9,830)
 
(8.4)
%
 
$
(13,221)
 
(5.1)
%
 
$
(29,820)
 
(7.9)
%
 
 
31

 
The following table sets forth key operational data for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2013 and September 30, 2012 that we believe are important indicators of our results of operations:
 
 
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
 
Nine Months Ended
September 30,
 
 
 
2013
 
2012
 
2013
 
2012
 
Ethanol sold (gallons, in thousands)
 
 
25,947.6
 
 
36,270.8
 
 
81,810.1
 
 
134,786.0
 
Dry distillers grains sold (tons, in thousands)
 
 
31.1
 
 
32.6
 
 
55.5
 
 
131.9
 
Wet distillers grains sold (tons, in thousands)
 
 
138.9
 
 
170.8
 
 
537.3
 
 
654.0
 
Corn oil sold (pounds, in thousands)
 
 
7,154.0
 
 
11,466.0
 
 
21,390.0
 
 
28,626.0
 
Corn ground (bushels, in thousands)
 
 
9,261.7
 
 
12,632.2
 
 
29,095.1
 
 
48,119.7
 
  
Three Months Ended September 30, 2013 Compared to the Three Months Ended September 30, 2012
 
Net Sales:   Net Sales were $79.0 million for the three months ended September 30, 2013 compared to $116.1 million for the three months ended September 30, 2012, a decrease of $37.1 million or 31.9%. This decrease was primarily attributable to a decrease in ethanol revenues of $26.1 million and a decrease in co-products revenue of $11.0 million. The decrease in both ethanol and co-products revenue was primarily attributable to a decrease in the quantity of ethanol and co-products produced and sold. Lower production and sales as compared to the prior year resulted from the continued shutdown of our Fairmont plant, which occurred in September 2012.
 
Cost of goods sold:   The following table sets forth the components of cost of goods sold for the three months ended September 30, 2013 and September 30, 2012:
 
 
 
Three Months Ended September 30,
 
 
 
2013
 
2012
 
 
 
Amount
 
Per Gallon
of Ethanol
 
Amount
 
Per Gallon
of Ethanol
 
 
 
(amounts in thousands, except per gallon amounts)
 
Corn
 
$
62,066
 
$
2.39
 
$
100,204
 
$
2.76
 
Natural gas
 
 
2,730
 
$
0.11
 
 
2,835
 
$
0.08
 
Denaturant
 
 
1,288
 
$
0.05
 
 
1,665
 
$
0.05
 
Electricity
 
 
1,729
 
$
0.07
 
 
3,299
 
$
0.09
 
Chemicals and enzymes
 
 
2,324
 
$
0.09
 
 
2,565
 
$
0.07
 
General operating expenses
 
 
5,414
 
$
0.21
 
 
7,083
 
$
0.19
 
Depreciation
 
 
6,581
 
$
0.25
 
 
6,541
 
$
0.18
 
Cost of goods sold
 
$
82,132
 
 
 
 
$
124,192
 
 
 
 
 
Cost of goods sold was $82.1 million for the three months ended September 30, 2013 compared to $124.2 million for the three months ended September 30, 2012, a decrease of $42.1 million or 33.9%. The decrease was primarily attributable to a $38.1 million decrease in the cost of corn. The decrease in corn cost was primarily attributable to a decrease in the amount of corn ground as compared to the year ago period, resulting from the Fairmont plant shutdown. General operating expenses and depreciation increased on a per gallon of ethanol basis from the three months ended September 30, 2012 to the three months ended September 30, 2013. These costs are mostly fixed costs and therefore as production volumes decreased, their cost per gallon of ethanol increased.
 
General and administrative expenses:   General and administrative expenses increased $0.5 million or 23.8%, to $2.6 million for the three months ended September 30, 2013 , compared to $2.1 million for the three months ended September 30, 2012. The increase was primarily due to the Company incurring $0.9 million of legal and financial advisory expenses related to negotiations with the lenders under the Senior Debt Facility during the three months ended September 30, 2013, while no such costs were incurred during the three months ended September 30, 2012.
 
Other income:   Other income was $2.5 million for the three months ended September 30, 2013, compared to $0.7 million for the three months ended September 30, 2012, an increase of $1.8 million. Other income relates to the subleasing of excess ethanol tanker cars and increased as a result of the subleasing of excess ethanol tanker cars due to the shutdown of our Fairmont plant.
 
Interest expense: Interest expense did not change significantly from the three months ended September 30, 2013, compared to the three months ended September 30, 2012.
 
 
32

  
Nine Months Ended September 30, 2013 Compared to the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2012
 
Net Sales:   Net Sales were $259.1 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 compared to $378.4 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2012, a decrease of $119.3 million or 31.5%. This decrease was primarily attributable to a decrease in ethanol revenues of $93.6 million and a decrease in co-products revenue of $25.7 million. The decrease in both ethanol and co-products revenue was primarily attributable to a decrease in the quantity of ethanol and co-products produced and sold, which was partially offset by higher per unit prices received for both our ethanol and co-products. Lower production and sales as compared to the prior year resulted from the continued shutdown of our Fairmont plant, which occurred in September 2012.
 
Cost of goods sold:   The following table sets forth the components of cost of goods sold for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 and September 30, 2012:
 
 
 
Nine Months Ended September 30,
 
 
 
2013
 
2012
 
 
 
Amount
 
Per Gallon
of Ethanol
 
Amount
 
Per Gallon
of Ethanol
 
 
 
(amounts in thousands, except per gallon amounts)
 
Corn
 
$
206,235
 
$
2.52
 
$
324,824
 
$
2.41
 
Natural gas
 
 
7,898
 
$
0.10
 
 
10,396
 
$
0.08
 
Denaturant
 
 
3,847
 
$
0.05
 
 
5,562
 
$
0.04
 
Electricity
 
 
4,934
 
$
0.06
 
 
9,895
 
$
0.07
 
Chemicals and enzymes
 
 
6,453
 
$
0.08
 
 
9,414
 
$
0.07
 
General operating expenses
 
 
17,247
 
$
0.21
 
 
21,503
 
$
0.16
 
Depreciation
 
 
19,743
 
$
0.24
 
 
19,610
 
$
0.15
 
Cost of goods sold
 
$
266,357
 
 
 
 
$
401,204
 
 
 
 
 
Cost of goods sold was $266.4 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 compared to $401.2 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2012, a decrease of $134.8 million or 33.6%. The decrease was primarily attributable to a $118.6 million decrease in the cost of corn and a $16.2 million decrease in all other cost of goods sold expenses. The decreases were primarily attributable to a decrease in the amount of production and sales as compared to the year ago period, resulting from the Fairmont plant shutdown, which occurred in September 2012. The decrease in corn cost was partially offset by an increase in the per bushel cost of corn. General operating expenses and depreciation increased on a per gallon of ethanol basis from the nine months ended September 30, 2012 to the nine months ended September 30, 2013. These costs are mostly fixed costs and therefore as production volumes decreased, their cost per gallon of ethanol increased.
 
General and administrative expenses: General and administrative expenses increased $1.5 million or 20.8%, to $8.7 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 , compared to $7.2 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2012. The increase was primarily due to the Company incurring $3.0 million of legal and financial advisory expenses related to negotiations with the lenders under the Senior Debt Facility during the nine months ended September 30, 2013, while no such costs were incurred during the nine months ended September 30, 2012.
 
Other income:  Other income was $6.6 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2013, compared to $0.7 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2012, an increase of $5.9 million. Other income relates to the subleasing of excess ethanol tanker cars and increased as a result of the subleasing of excess ethanol tanker cars due to the shutdown of our Fairmont plant.
 
Interest expense: Interest expense did not change materially from the nine months ended September 30, 2013, compared to the nine months ended September 30, 2012.
 
Liquidity and capital resources
 
Our cash flows from operating, investing and financing activities during the nine months ended September 30, 2013 and September 30, 2012 are summarized below (in thousands):
 
 
 
Nine Months Ended September 30,
 
 
 
2013
 
2012
 
Cash provided by (used in):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating activities
 
$
10,125
 
$
2,717
 
Investing activities
 
 
(2,024)
 
 
(606)
 
Financing activities
 
 
(134)
 
 
(6,408)
 
Net increase (decrease) in cash and equivalents
 
$
7,967
 
$
(4,297)
 
 
Cash provided by operating activities.   Net cash provided by operating activities was $10.1 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2013, compared to $2.7 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2012.  For the nine months ended September 30, 2013, the amount was primarily comprised of a net loss of $15.2 million, which was offset by working capital sources of $3.5 million and non-cash charges of $21.8 million, which were primarily depreciation and amortization. For the nine months ended September 30, 2012, the amount was primarily comprised of a net loss of $34.8 million which was offset by working capital sources of $12.5 million and non-cash charges of $22.3 million, which were primarily depreciation and amortization.
 
Cash used in investing activities.   Net cash used in investing activities was $2.0 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2013, compared to $0.6 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2012. The net cash used in investing activities during both periods was for capital expenditures related to various plant improvement projects.
 
Cash used in financing activities.   Net cash used in financing activities was $0.1 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2013, compared to $6.4 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2012. For the nine months ended September 30, 2012, the amount was mostly comprised of our $6.3 million principal payments under our Senior Debt Facility. No such payments were made during the nine months ended September 30, 2013. 
 
 
33

  
The LLC’s principal source of liquidity at September 30, 2013 consisted of cash generated from its management services agreements between the LLC and our Operating Subsidiaries, which totals $0.3 million per month, and its cash and cash equivalents of $9.3 million. The LLC has no obligation to fund any of the Operating Subsidiaries cash flow needs. The Operating Subsidiaries principal source of liquidity at September 30, 2013 consisted of cash generated from operations and cash and cash equivalents of $8.0 million. The Operating Subsidiaries have also relied upon extensions of payment terms by Cargill as an additional source of liquidity and working capital. As of September 30, 2013, the Operating Subsidiaries owed Cargill $0.8 million for accounts payable related to corn purchases. Pursuant to an arrangement with Cargill, the Operating Subsidiaries have been permitted to extend corn payment terms beyond the $10.0 million contractual limit so long as the amounts Cargill owes the Operating Subsidiaries for ethanol exceed their accounts payable balance by an amount that is satisfactory to Cargill. This arrangement may be terminated by Cargill at any time on little or no notice, in which case the Operating Subsidiaries would need to use cash on hand or other sources of liquidity, if available, to fund their operations.
 
Our principal liquidity needs are expected to be funding our plant operations, capital expenditures and general corporate purposes. As noted elsewhere in this report, during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2013, the Company incurred net losses of $5.1 million and $15.2 million, respectively. We have had, and continue to have, limited liquidity. We cannot predict when or if crush spreads will fluctuate again or if the current commodity margins will improve or worsen. As described in “Overview ” above, we idled our Fairmont facility in September 2012, and as described in “Liquidity and Going Concern” the Operating Subsidiaries have not made their regularly-scheduled payments of principal and interest that were due under the outstanding Senior Debt Facility since September 28, 2012, which caused the Administrative Agent under the Senior Debt Facility to issue a notice of default.
 
Senior Debt Facility
 
In September 2006, the Operating Subsidiaries entered into the Senior Debt Facility to finance the construction of and provide working capital to operate our ethanol plants. Neither the Company nor the LLC is a borrower or a guarantor under the Senior Debt Facility, although the equity interests and assets of our subsidiaries are pledged as collateral to secure the debt under the facility. Principal payments under the Senior Debt Facility are payable quarterly at a minimum amount of $3,150,000, with additional pre-payments to be made out of available cash flow. These term loans mature in September 2014.
 
The Operating Subsidiaries did not make the regularly-scheduled payments of principal and interest that were due under the outstanding Senior Debt Facility on September 28, 2012, in an aggregate amount of $3.6 million. As a result, the Operating Subsidiaries received a Notice of Default from First National Bank of Omaha, as Administrative Agent for the lenders under the Senior Debt Facility. Since the initial default the Operating Subsidiaries have not made any of the regularly-scheduled principal and interest payments, which through September 30, 2013 totaled $22.4 million. See—“Liquidity and Going Concern” above.
 
As of September 30, 2013, the Operating Subsidiaries had $170.5 million of principal indebtedness outstanding under the Senior Debt Facility. The entire amount outstanding under the Senior Debt Facility has been classified as a current liability in the September 30, 2013 consolidated balance sheet.
 
Interest rates on the Senior Debt Facility are, at management’s option, set at: i) a base rate, which is the higher of the federal funds rate plus 0.5% or the administrative agent’s prime rate, in each case plus a margin of 2.0%; or ii) at LIBOR plus 3.0%. Interest on base rate loans is payable quarterly and, depending on the LIBOR rate elected, as frequently as monthly on LIBOR loans, but no less frequently than quarterly. In addition, since the Operating Subsidiaries defaulted on their payments of principal and interest in September 2012, those unpaid balances have accrued interest at a penalty rate of 8.3%. The interest rate in effect on the borrowings at both September 30, 2013 and December 31, 2012 was 3.2%.
 
 
34

 
The Senior Debt Facility is secured by a first priority lien on all right, title and interest in and to the Wood River and Fairmont plants and any accounts receivable or property associated with those plants and a pledge of all of our equity interests in the Operating Subsidiaries. The Operating Subsidiaries have established collateral deposit accounts maintained by an agent of the banks, into which their revenues are deposited, subject to security interests to secure any outstanding obligations under the Senior Debt Facility. These funds are then allocated into various sweep accounts held by the collateral agent, including accounts that provide funds for the operating expenses of the Operating Subsidiaries. The collateral accounts have various provisions, including historical and prospective debt service coverage ratios and debt service reserve requirements, which determine whether there is, and the amount of, cash available to the LLC from the collateral accounts each month. The terms of the Senior Debt Facility also include covenants that impose certain limitations on, among other things, the ability of the Operating Subsidiaries to incur additional debt, grant liens or encumbrances, declare or pay dividends or distributions, conduct asset sales or other dispositions, merge or consolidate, and conduct transactions with affiliates. The terms of the Senior Debt Facility also include customary events of default including failure to meet payment obligations, failure to pay financial obligations when due, failure of the Operating Subsidiaries to remain solvent and failure to obtain or maintain required governmental approvals. Under the terms of separate management services agreements between our Operating Subsidiaries and the LLC, the Operating Subsidiaries were paying a monthly management fee of $884,000 to the LLC to cover salaries, rent, and other operating expenses of the LLC. Due to the Senior Debt Facility payment default, the lenders required the Operating Subsidiaries to reduce their monthly management fee to $260,000 per month effective October 2012.
 
Debt issuance fees and expenses of $7.9 million ($0.9 million, net of accumulated amortization as of September 30, 2013) have been incurred in connection with the Senior Debt Facility. These costs have been deferred and are being amortized and expensed as interest over the term of the Senior Debt Facility. 
 
On November 5, 2013, the Company was notified by the lenders under the Senior Debt Facility and Green Plains that a definitive agreement has been entered into for the lenders to sell the Company’s ethanol plants plus working capital to Green Plains. The Company has not been provided with a copy of the lenders’ definitive agreement with Green Plains and therefore no further details can be provided at this time.  In the case of a transfer of the assets of the Operating Subsidiaries to Newco and Newco’s subsequent sale of the plants to Green Plains, we cannot assure you as to what value, if any, may be derived for shareholders of the Company from such transfer or sale.  The assets of the Operating Subsidiaries comprise substantially all of the assets of the Company, other than its cash and cash equivalents of the LLC, which totaled $9.3 million at September 30, 2013.  The Company has not yet determined how it will proceed or what strategic alternative it may pursue subsequent to such transfer or sale.
 
Capital lease
 
The operating subsidiary that constructed the Fairmont plant, has entered into an agreement with the local utility pursuant to which the utility has built and owns and operates a substation and distribution facility in order to supply electricity to the plant. The operating subsidiary is paying a fixed facilities charge based on the cost of the substation and distribution facility of $34,000 per month, over the 30-year term of the agreement. This fixed facilities charge is being accounted for as a capital lease in the accompanying financial statements. The agreement also includes a $25,000 monthly minimum energy charge that also began in the first quarter of 2008.
 
Notes payable
 
Notes payable relate to certain financing agreements in place at our Wood River facility. The operating subsidiary entered into a note payable for $419,000 with the City of Wood River for special assessments related to street, water, and sanitary improvements at our Wood River facility. This note requires ten annual payments of $58,000, including interest at 6.5% per annum, and matures in 2018. In addition, the operating subsidiary for the Wood River facility entered into a financing agreement in the fourth quarter of 2012 for the purchase of certain rolling stock equipment to be used at the facility for $208,000. This note requires 24 monthly payments of $9,000, including interest at 6.0% per annum, and matures in 2014.
 
 
35

 
Tax increment financing
 
In February 2007, the operating subsidiary that constructed the Wood River plant received $6.0 million from the proceeds of a tax increment revenue note issued by the City of Wood River, Nebraska. The proceeds funded improvements to property owned by the operating subsidiary. The City of Wood River will pay the principal and interest of the note from the incremental increase in the property taxes related to the improvements made to the property. The interest rate on the note is 7.85%. The proceeds have been recorded as a liability which is reduced as the operating subsidiary remits property taxes to the City of Wood River, which began in 2008 and will continue through 2021. The LLC has guaranteed the principal and interest of the tax increment revenue note if, for any reason, the City of Wood River fails to make the required payments to the holder of the note or the operating subsidiary fails to make the required payments to the City of Wood River.
  
Off-balance sheet arrangements
 
Except for our operating leases, we do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a material current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources.
 
Summary of critical accounting policies and significant estimates
 
The consolidated financial statements of BioFuel Energy Corp. included in this Form 10-Q have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. Note 2 to these consolidated financial statements contains a summary of