10-Q 1 hsgx-10q_20180930.htm 10-Q hsgx-10q_20180930.htm

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2018

OR

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Commission File Number 001-36751

 

Histogenics Corporation

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)

 

 

Delaware

 

04-3522315

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

830 Winter Street, 3rd Floor

Waltham, Massachusetts

 

02451

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

 

(781) 547-7900

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Not Applicable

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes  No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes  No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act

 

Large accelerated filer

 

 

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer

 

 

Smaller reporting company

 

 

 

 

Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).Yes No

As of November 6, 2018, there were 62,025,398 outstanding shares of the registrant’s common stock, $0.01 par value per share.

 

 

 

 

 


HISTOGENICS CORPORATION

QUARTERLY REPORT ON FORM 10-Q

FOR THE QUARTERLY PERIOD ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

Page

 

 

PART I—FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

 

Item 1.

 

Financial Statements

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Balance Sheets as of September 30, 2018 (unaudited) and December 31, 2017

 

5

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Three and Nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017 (unaudited)

 

6

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017 (unaudited)

 

7

 

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

8

Item 2.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

23

Item 3.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

28

Item 4.

 

Controls and Procedures

 

28

 

 

PART II—OTHER INFORMATION

 

30

Item 1.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

30

Item 1A.

 

Risk Factors

 

30

Item 2.

 

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

 

62

Item 3.

 

Defaults Upon Senior Securities

 

62

Item 4.

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

 

62

Item 5.

 

Other Information

 

62

Item 6.

 

Exhibits

 

63

Signatures

 

64

 

2


INFORMATION REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

As used in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, the terms “Histogenics,” “Company,” “registrant,” “we,” “us,” and “our” mean Histogenics Corporation and its subsidiaries unless the context indicates otherwise. This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains “forward-looking statements” that involve substantial risks and uncertainties. All statements other than statements of historical facts contained in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, including statements regarding our future results of operations and financial position, strategy and plans, and our expectations for future operations, are forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. The words “anticipate,” “believe,” “contemplates,” “continue,” “could,” “design,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “likely,” “may,” “ongoing,” “plan,” “potential,” “predict,” “project,” “will,” “would,” “seek,” “should,” “target,” or the negative version of these words and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements about:

 

expectations regarding the timing and success of discussions with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regarding the submission of a Biologics License Application (BLA) for NeoCart to the FDA;

 

the ability to obtain and maintain regulatory approval of our product candidates and the labeling for any approved products, including the timing of a submission of a BLA to the FDA, the FDA’s response to such submission and any requirement by the FDA to complete additional clinical trials or supply other data in advance of any approval;

 

our need for additional financing, our ability to raise additional funds on commercially reasonable terms and our ability to obtain stockholder approval to increase authorized shares as our ability to raise capital through the issuance of additional shares of our common stock or convertible securities is restricted by the limited number of our residual authorized shares of common stock;

 

our expectations regarding our expenses and revenues, the sufficiency of our cash resources, the timing of our future profitability, if at all;

 

the scope, progress and costs of developing and commercializing NeoCart or any future product candidates;

 

our ability to establish and maintain development and commercialization partnerships;

 

our ability to adequately manufacture our product candidates and the raw materials utilized therein;

 

our technology, manufacturing capacity, location and partners;

 

the rate and degree of reimbursement and market acceptance of any of our product candidates;

 

our expectations regarding competition, including the actions of competitors and the perceived relative performance in the marketplace of NeoCart as compared to competitive products;

 

the size and growth of the potential markets for our product candidates, our ability to serve those markets and our ability to gain market share;

 

our ability to manufacture our product candidates at an acceptable cost and scale to serve those markets;

 

our ability to obtain and maintain intellectual property protection for our product candidates and our cell therapy technology platform;

 

the timing and success of preclinical studies and clinical trials conducted by us or our development partners, including the timing of commencement, enrollment, completion and regulatory filings;

 

updated or refined data based on continuing review and quality control analysis of clinical data, including the NeoCart Phase 3 clinical trial data;

 

our anticipated growth strategies;

 

our securities’ or industry analysts’ expectations regarding the commercial success of NeoCart, if approved, and the timing and success of any clinical trials we may initiate in the future;

 

the anticipated trends and challenges in our business and the market in which we operate;

 

our ability to attract and retain key personnel;

 

regulatory developments in the United States and foreign countries; and

 

our plans for the use of our cash and cash equivalents.

Any forward-looking statements in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q reflect our current views with respect to future events or to our future financial performance and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. Factors that may cause actual results to differ materially from current expectations include, among other things, those described in the sections titled “Risk Factors” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and those described in the sections titled “Risk Factors” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 15,

3


2018. Given these uncertainties, you should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. We specifically disclaim any obligation to update these forward-looking statements in the future, except as required by law.

HISTOGENICS (and design), our logo design and NEOCART are our registered trademarks, and BIOCART is our trademark. Any other trademarks, registered marks and trade names appearing in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q are the property of their respective holders. All other trademarks, trade names and service marks appearing in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q are the property of their respective owners.

4


 

HISTOGENICS CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(in thousands, except share and per share data)

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

 

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

 

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

5,192

 

 

$

7,081

 

Marketable securities

 

 

 

 

 

900

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

825

 

 

 

194

 

Total current assets

 

 

6,017

 

 

 

8,175

 

Property and equipment, net

 

 

4,352

 

 

 

2,723

 

Other assets, long-term

 

 

375

 

 

 

 

Restricted cash

 

 

137

 

 

 

137

 

Total assets

 

$

10,881

 

 

$

11,035

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$

1,690

 

 

$

776

 

Accrued expenses

 

 

1,973

 

 

 

2,705

 

Current portion of deferred revenue

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

 

Current portion of deferred rent

 

 

42

 

 

 

35

 

Current portion of deferred lease incentive

 

 

238

 

 

 

111

 

Current portion of equipment loan

 

 

 

 

 

178

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

8,943

 

 

 

3,805

 

Accrued expenses due to Intrexon Corporation

 

 

3,040

 

 

 

3,040

 

Deferred revenue, net of current portion

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

 

Deferred rent, net of current portion

 

 

334

 

 

 

280

 

Deferred lease incentive, net of current portion

 

 

1,085

 

 

 

499

 

Warrant liability

 

 

2,155

 

 

 

14,679

 

Total liabilities

 

 

20,557

 

 

 

22,303

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commitments and contingencies (Note 5)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Convertible preferred stock and stockholders’ equity (deficit):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Convertible preferred stock, $0.01 par value; 30,000 shares authorized, 400.4910 and

   4,605.6533 shares issued and outstanding at September 30, 2018 and December 31,

   2017, respectively

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock, $0.01 par value; 100,000,000 shares authorized, 35,002,742 and

   24,571,029 shares issued and outstanding at September 30, 2018 and December 31,

   2017, respectively

 

 

221

 

 

 

159

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

206,115

 

 

 

196,760

 

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(216,012

)

 

 

(208,187

)

Total stockholders’ deficit

 

 

(9,676

)

 

 

(11,268

)

Total liabilities and stockholders’ deficit

 

$

10,881

 

 

$

11,035

 

 

See accompanying notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements.

5


HISTOGENICS CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(unaudited)

(in thousands, except share and per share data)

 

 

 

Three Months Ended September 30,

 

 

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

Revenue

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

 

4,563

 

 

 

3,488

 

 

 

12,307

 

 

 

12,200

 

General and administrative

 

 

2,426

 

 

 

2,225

 

 

 

8,059

 

 

 

6,717

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

6,989

 

 

 

5,713

 

 

 

20,366

 

 

 

18,917

 

Loss from operations

 

 

(6,989

)

 

 

(5,713

)

 

 

(20,366

)

 

 

(18,917

)

Other income (expense):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest income, net

 

 

19

 

 

 

39

 

 

 

88

 

 

 

114

 

Other expense, net

 

 

(21

)

 

 

(52

)

 

 

(71

)

 

 

(142

)

Change in fair value of warrant liability

 

 

17,776

 

 

 

(269

)

 

 

12,524

 

 

 

(673

)

Total other income (expense), net

 

 

17,774

 

 

 

(282

)

 

 

12,541

 

 

 

(701

)

Net income (loss)

 

$

10,785

 

 

$

(5,995

)

 

$

(7,825

)

 

$

(19,618

)

Other comprehensive income (loss):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unrealized gain from available for sale securities

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive income (loss)

 

$

10,785

 

 

$

(5,994

)

 

$

(7,825

)

 

$

(19,618

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income (loss) attributable to common stockholders—basic

 

$

10,650

 

 

$

(5,080

)

 

$

(7,657

)

 

$

(16,380

)

Net (loss) attributable to common stockholders—diluted

 

$

(7,126

)

 

$

(5,080

)

 

$

(20,181

)

 

$

(16,380

)

Net income (loss) per common share—basic

 

$

0.36

 

 

$

(0.23

)

 

$

(0.27

)

 

$

(0.74

)

Net loss per common share—diluted

 

$

(0.24

)

 

$

(0.23

)

 

$

(0.68

)

 

$

(0.74

)

Weighted-average shares used to compute income (loss) per

   common share—basic

 

 

29,737,632

 

 

 

22,552,341

 

 

 

28,723,500

 

 

 

22,219,666

 

Weighted-average shares used to compute income (loss) per

   common share—diluted

 

 

29,737,632

 

 

 

22,552,341

 

 

 

29,515,700

 

 

 

22,219,666

 

 

See accompanying notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements.

6


HISTOGENICS CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(unaudited)

(in thousands)

 

 

 

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(7,825

)

 

$

(19,618

)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation

 

 

364

 

 

 

1,178

 

Amortization of discount of investments

 

 

 

 

 

24

 

Deferred rent and lease incentive

 

 

774

 

 

 

(407

)

Stock-based compensation

 

 

1,249

 

 

 

1,233

 

Change in fair value of warrant

 

 

(12,524

)

 

 

673

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

(631

)

 

 

(85

)

Other assets, long-term

 

 

(375

)

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

 

861

 

 

 

(761

)

Accounts payable due to Intrexon Corporation

 

 

 

 

 

(360

)

Accrued expenses

 

 

(732

)

 

 

(578

)

Deferred revenue

 

 

10,000

 

 

 

 

Net cash used in operating activities

 

 

(8,839

)

 

 

(18,701

)

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchases of property and equipment

 

 

(1,940

)

 

 

(132

)

Proceeds from maturities of marketable securities

 

 

900

 

 

 

6,159

 

Purchases of marketable securities

 

 

 

 

 

(8,004

)

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 

(1,040

)

 

 

(1,977

)

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Repayments on equipment term loan

 

 

(178

)

 

 

(437

)

Net proceeds from issuance of common stock

 

 

8,164

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from exercise of warrants

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from exercise of stock options

 

 

2

 

 

 

5

 

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities

 

 

7,990

 

 

 

(432

)

Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash

 

 

(1,889

)

 

 

(21,110

)

Cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash—Beginning of period

 

 

7,218

 

 

 

32,045

 

Cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash—End of period

 

$

5,329

 

 

$

10,935

 

Supplemental cash flow disclosures from investing and financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchases of property and equipment in accounts payable and accrued expenses

 

$

53

 

 

$

 

Public offering costs in accounts payable and accrued expenses

 

$

160

 

 

$

 

 

See accompanying notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements

7


HISTOGENICS CORPORATION

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(unaudited)

1. NATURE OF BUSINESS

Organization

Histogenics Corporation (the “Company”) was incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts on June 28, 2000 and has its principal operations in Waltham, Massachusetts. In 2006, the Company’s board of directors approved a corporate reorganization pursuant to which the Company incorporated as a Delaware corporation. The Company is a leader in the development of restorative cell therapies (“RCTs”).  RCTs refer to a new class of products the Company is developing that are designed to offer patients rapid-onset pain relief and restored function through the repair of damaged or worn tissue. NeoCart, the Company’s lead investigational product, is an innovative cell therapy that utilizes various aspects of the Company’s RCT technology platform to treat tissue injury in the field of orthopedics, specifically cartilage damage in the knee. NeoCart is designed to rebuild a patient’s own knee cartilage to treat pain at the source, improve function and potentially prevent a patient’s progression to osteoarthritis. NeoCart is one of the most rigorously studied restorative cell therapies for orthopedic use and is currently in a 249 patient, Phase 3 clinical trial in the United States (the “U.S.”) under a special protocol assessment with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (the “FDA”). In the third quarter of 2018, the Company announced that its Phase 3 clinical trial of NeoCart did not meet the primary endpoint of a statistically significant improvement in pain and function in a dual threshold responder analysis one year after treatment as compared to microfracture. However, NeoCart did demonstrate statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements on the dual threshold responder analysis six months after treatment and on nearly all individual pain and function measures when compared to microfracture one and two years after treatment. As a result, the Company met with the FDA on October 30, 2018 to discuss the data and a potential Biologics License Application (“BLA”) submission. The FDA has not made a final decision regarding a potential BLA submission. The Company and the FDA are continuing to discuss the clinical data generated to date, the potential need for any additional supplemental clinical data (which may include longer-term data from the ongoing Phase 3 clinical trial or additional studies) and potential alternative regulatory pathways for the BLA to be accepted.  

On December 18, 2014, the Company formed a wholly owned subsidiary, Histogenics Securities Corporation, under the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

On September 29, 2016, the Company closed a private placement of common stock, preferred stock and warrants, contemplated by a securities purchase agreement dated September 15, 2016, with certain institutional and accredited investors. The net proceeds after deducting placement agent fees and other transaction-related expenses was $27.6 million. See Note 6, Capital Stock, for further discussion of the private placement.

In January 2018, the Company completed an underwritten registered direct offering of 2,691,494 shares of common stock. The total net proceeds of the offering were $5.7 million after deducting underwriter’s discounts and commissions, and expenses related to the offering.

In March 2018, the Company entered into an equity distribution agreement (“ATM Agreement”) with Canaccord Genuity Inc. (“Canaccord”), pursuant to which the Company may, from time to time, sell shares of its common stock having an aggregate offering price of up to $10.0 million (the “Shares”) through Canaccord, as sales agent. During the nine months ended September 30, 2018, the Company sold an aggregate of 5,766,247 shares of common stock and received $4.0 million after deducting commissions related to the ATM Agreement and other offering costs. From October 1, 2018 through November 6, 2018, the Company sold an aggregate of 867,656 shares of its common stock and received $0.5 million after deducting commissions related to the ATM Agreement.

On October 10, 2018, the Company closed an underwritten public offering of 26,155,000 shares of its common stock and warrants to purchase up to 19,616,250 shares of common stock, at a combined purchase price of $0.65 per share of common stock and accompanying warrant. The gross proceeds from this offering were $17.0 million, before deducting underwriting discounts and commissions, and offering expenses payable by the Company.  The warrants are exercisable immediately upon issuance at a price of $0.70 per share of common stock and have a term of five years commencing on the date of issuance.

Since its inception, the Company has devoted substantially all of its efforts to product development, recruiting management and technical staff, raising capital, starting up production and building infrastructure and has not yet generated revenues from its planned principal operations. Expenses have primarily been for research and development and related administrative costs.

The Company is subject to a number of risks. The developmental nature of its activities is such that significant inherent risks exist in the Company’s operations. Principal among these risks are the successful development of therapeutics, ability to obtain adequate financing, obtaining regulatory approval for any of its product candidates in any jurisdiction, obtaining adequate reimbursement rates for any of its approved product candidates, compliance with government regulations, protection of proprietary therapeutics, fluctuations in operating results, dependence on key personnel and collaborative partners, adoption of the Company’s products by the physician community, rapid technological changes inherent in the markets targeted, the introduction of substitute products and competition from larger companies.

8


Liquidity

The consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a going-concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. As shown in the accompanying consolidated financial statements, the Company had an accumulated deficit at September 30, 2018 of $216.0 million and has incurred losses and cash flow deficits from operations for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017. The Company has financed operations to date primarily through public and private placements of equity securities, and borrowings under debt agreements. The Company anticipates that it will continue to incur net losses for the next several years. The Company believes that its existing cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities will only be sufficient to fund its projected cash needs into the middle of 2019. Accordingly, these factors, among others, raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. The Company will require additional capital to sustain operations through FDA approval of NeoCart and to commercialize NeoCart, if approved. To meet its capital needs, the Company intends to raise additional capital through debt or equity financing or other strategic transactions. However, such financing may not be on favorable terms or available to the Company. The failure of the Company to obtain sufficient funds on commercially acceptable terms when needed will have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, results of operations and financial condition. The forecast of cash resources is forward-looking information that involves risks and uncertainties, and the actual amount of our expenses could vary materially and adversely as a result of a number of factors. The Company has based its estimates on assumptions that may prove to be wrong, and the Company’s expenses could prove to be significantly higher than it currently anticipates.

Basis of Accounting

The consolidated financial statements are unaudited and have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”). However, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by GAAP for complete financial statements. These interim consolidated financial statements, in the opinion of the Company’s management, reflect all normal recurring adjustments necessary for a fair presentation of the Company’s financial position and results of operations for the interim periods ended September 30, 2018 and 2017. The results of operations for the interim periods are not necessarily indicative of the results of operations to be expected for the full year. These interim financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2017, and the notes thereto, which are included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) on March 15, 2018.

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries, ProChon and Histogenics Securities Corporation. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions are eliminated in consolidation.

2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

During the nine months ended September 30, 2018, there have been no material changes to the significant accounting policies described in the Company’s audited financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2017, and the notes thereto, which are included in the Annual Report on Form 10-K, except as noted below.

Fair Value Measurements

The carrying amounts reported in the Company’s consolidated financial statements for cash and cash equivalents, marketable securities, accounts payable, equipment loan, and accrued liabilities approximate their respective fair values because of the short-term nature of these accounts.

Fair value is defined as the price that would be received if selling an asset or paid to transfer a liability in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date.

Additionally, from time to time, the Company may be required to record at fair value other assets on a nonrecurring basis, such as assets held for sale and certain other assets. These nonrecurring fair value adjustments typically involve the application of lower-of-cost-or-market accounting or write-downs of individual assets.

The fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets (Level 1), and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3). The Company’s financial assets are classified within the fair value hierarchy based on the lowest level of inputs that is significant to the fair value measurement. The three levels of the fair value hierarchy, and their applicability to the Company’s financial assets, are described below.

Level 1 : Unadjusted quoted prices in active markets that are accessible at the measurement date of identical, unrestricted assets.

Level 2 : Quoted prices for similar assets, or inputs that are observable, either directly or indirectly, for substantially the full term through corroboration with observable market data. Level 2 includes investments valued at quoted prices adjusted for legal or contractual restrictions specific to the security.

9


Level 3 : Pricing inputs are unobservable for the assets. Level 3 assets include private investments that are supported by little or no market activity. Level 3 valuations are for instruments that are not traded in active markets or are subject to transfer restrictions and may be adjusted to reflect illiquidity and/or non-transferability, with such adjustment generally based on available market evidence. In the absence of such evidence, management’s best estimate is used.

An adjustment to the pricing method used within either Level 1 or Level 2 inputs could generate a fair value measurement that effectively falls in a lower level in the hierarchy. The Company had no material re-measurements of fair value with respect to financial assets and liabilities, during the periods presented, other than those assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis. Other than the warrants issued in connection with the private placement transaction which closed on September 29, 2016, the Company had no assets or liabilities classified as Level 3 as of September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017. Transfers are calculated on values as of the transfer date. There were no transfers between Levels 1, 2 and 3 during the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and twelve months ended December 31, 2017.

The fair value of the warrants is considered a Level 3 valuation and was determined using a Monte Carlo simulation model. This model incorporated several assumptions at each valuation date including: the price of the Company’s common stock on the date of valuation, the historical volatility of the price of the Company’s common stock, the remaining contractual term of the warrant and estimates of the probability of a fundamental transaction occurring (See Note 6 for further discussion of the private placement).

The Company’s financial instruments as of September 30, 2018 consisted primarily of cash and cash equivalents and warrant liability. The Company’s financial instruments as of December 31, 2017 consisted primarily of cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities and warrant liability. As of September 30, 2018, and December 31, 2017, the Company’s financial assets recognized at fair value consisted of the following:

 

Description

 

Total

 

 

Quoted

prices in

active markets

(Level 1)

 

 

Significant

other

observable

inputs

(Level 2)

 

 

Significant

unobservable

inputs

(Level 3)

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

September 30, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash Equivalents

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Money market funds

 

$

3,933

 

 

$

3,933

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

Total

 

$

3,933

 

 

$

3,933

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

Liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Warrant liability

 

$

2,155

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

2,155

 

December 31, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash Equivalents

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Money market funds

 

$

5,547

 

 

$

5,547

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

Marketable securities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Asset-backed securities

 

$

900

 

 

$

 

 

$

900

 

 

$

 

Liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Warrant liability

 

$

14,679

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

14,679

 

 

The following table provides a reconciliation of all liabilities measured at fair value using Level 3 significant unobservable inputs:

 

 

 

September 30, 2018

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Beginning balance, December 31, 2017

$

 

14,679

 

Change in fair value of warrant liability

 

 

(12,524

)

Ending balance

$

 

2,155

 

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

The Company considers all highly liquid securities with original maturities of three months or less from the date of purchase to be cash equivalents. Cash and cash equivalents are comprised of funds in money market accounts. In addition, the Company has recorded restricted cash of $0.1 million as of September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017. Restricted cash consist of security provided for lease obligation.

10


Marketable Securities

The Company classifies marketable securities with a remaining maturity of greater than three months when purchased as available for sale. The Company considers all available for sale securities, including those with maturity dates beyond 12 months, as available to support current operational liquidity needs and therefore classifies all securities including those with maturity dates beyond 90 days at the date of purchase as current assets within the consolidated balance sheets. Available for sale securities are maintained by the Company’s investment managers and may consist of commercial paper, high-grade corporate notes, U.S. Treasury securities, U.S. government agency securities, and certificates of deposit. Available for sale securities are carried at fair value with the unrealized gains and losses included in other comprehensive income (loss) as a component of stockholders’ equity (deficit) until realized. Any premium or discount arising at purchase is amortized and/or accreted to interest income and/or expense over the life of the instrument. Realized gains and losses are determined using the specific identification method and are included in other income (expense).

If any adjustment to fair value reflects a decline in value of the investment, the Company considers all available evidence to evaluate the extent to which the decline is “other-than-temporary” and, if so, marks the investment to market through a charge to the Company’s consolidated statement of operations and comprehensive loss.

The amortized cost of available for sale securities is adjusted for amortization of premiums and accretion of discounts to maturity. There were no available for sale securities as of September 30, 2018.

Revenue Recognition

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (the “FASB”) issued a new standard related to revenue recognition, Accounting Standard Update (“ASU”) No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers. This new accounting standard will replace most current U.S. GAAP guidance on this topic and eliminate most industry-specific guidance. It provides a unified model to determine when and how revenue is recognized. The core principle is that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration for which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services.  Entities may adopt the new standard either retrospectively to all periods presented in the financial statements (the full retrospective method) or as a cumulative-effect adjustment as of the date of adoption (modified retrospective method) in the year of adoption without applying to comparative years’ financial statements.  Further, in August 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-14, Revenue from Contracts with Customers: Deferral of the Effective Date, to defer the effective adoption date by one year to December 15, 2017 for annual reporting periods beginning after that date and permitted early adoption of the standard, but not before fiscal years beginning after the original effective date of December 15, 2016.  The Company elected to early adopt the guidance in 2017 using the modified retrospective method. There was no cumulative impact due to the adoption of this standard.

Revenue is recognized when, or as, performance obligations are satisfied, which occurs when control of the promised products or services is transferred to customers.  Revenue is measured as the amount of consideration the Company expects to receive in exchange for transferring products or services to a customer (“transaction price”). To the extent that the transaction price includes variable consideration, the Company estimates the amount of variable consideration that should be included in the transaction price utilizing the most likely amount method.  Variable consideration is included in the transaction price if, in the Company’s judgment, it is probable that a significant future reversal of cumulative revenue under the contract will not occur.  Estimates of variable consideration and determination of whether to include estimated amounts in the transaction price are based largely on an assessment of the Company’s anticipated performance and all information (historical, current and forecasted) that is reasonably available. 

If the contract contains a single performance obligation, the entire transaction price is allocated to the single performance obligation. Contracts that contain multiple performance obligations require an allocation of the transaction price to each performance obligation based on a relative standalone selling price basis unless the transaction price is variable and meets the criteria to be allocated entirely to a performance obligation or to a distinct service that forms part of a single performance obligation. The Company currently generates revenue primarily through collaborative research, development and commercialization agreements. The terms of these agreements may contain multiple promises which may include:  (i) licenses to the Company’s technology; (ii) services related to the transfer and update of know-how; and (iii) manufacturing supply services. Payments to the Company under these arrangements typically include one or more of the following: non-refundable upfront license fees; milestone payments; royalties on future product sales; and fees for manufacturing supply services. None of the Company's contracts as of September 30, 2018 contained a significant financing component. 

The Company assesses the promises to determine if they are distinct performance obligations. Once the performance obligations are determined, the transaction price is allocated based on a relative standalone selling price basis. Milestone payments and royalties are typically considered variable consideration at the outset of the contract and are recognized in the transaction price either upon occurrence or when the constraint of a probable reversal is no longer applicable.

Collaboration Revenue

While no revenue has been recognized as of September 30, 2018, the Company expects to generate revenue through collaboration and license agreements with strategic partners for the development and commercialization of product candidates. The collaboration and license agreements are within the scope of Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC 606”) Revenue from Contracts with Customers. 

11


In determining the appropriate amount of revenue to be recognized as it fulfills its obligations under the agreements, the Company performs the following steps: (i) identification of the promised goods or services in the contract; (ii) determination of whether the promised goods or services are performance obligations including whether they are distinct in the context of the contract; (iii) measurement of the transaction price, including the constraint on variable consideration; (iv) allocation of the transaction price to the performance obligations; and (v) recognition of revenue when (or as) the Company satisfies each performance obligation.  As part of the accounting for the arrangement, the Company must develop assumptions that require judgment to determine the stand-alone selling price for each performance obligation identified in the contract.  The Company uses key assumptions to determine the stand-alone selling price, which may include market conditions, reimbursement rates for personnel costs, development timelines and probabilities of regulatory success. 

Licenses of intellectual property: If the license to the Company’s intellectual property is determined to be distinct from the other performance obligations identified in the arrangement, the Company recognizes revenues from non-refundable, up-front fees allocated to the license when the license is transferred to the customer and the customer is able to use and benefit from the license.  For licenses that are bundled with other promises, the Company utilizes judgment to assess the nature of the combined performance obligation to determine whether the combined performance obligation is satisfied over time or at a point in time and, if over time, the appropriate method of measuring progress for purposes of recognizing revenue from non-refundable, up-front fees.  The Company evaluates the measure of progress each reporting period and, if necessary, adjusts the measure of performance and related revenue recognition. 

Manufacturing Supply Services: If the promise to supply products for clinical and/or commercial development are determined to be distinct from the other performance obligations identified in the arrangement, the Company recognizes revenues from the fees allocated to the supply when or as the supply is transferred to the customer, generally upon delivery to the customer. If the promise to supply products for clinical and/or commercial development are not determined to be distinct from the other performance obligations identified in the arrangement, the Company utilizes judgement to assess the nature of the combined performance obligation to determine whether the combined performance obligation is satisfied over time or at a point in time and, if over time, the appropriate method of measuring progress for purposes of recognizing revenue , including amounts from non-refundable, up-front fees.  The Company evaluates the measure of progress each reporting period and, if necessary, adjusts the measure of performance and related revenue recognition. 

Milestone Payments: At the inception of each arrangement that includes developmental and regulatory milestone payments, the Company evaluates whether the achievement of each milestone specifically relates to the Company’s efforts to satisfy a performance obligation or transfer a distinct good or service within a performance obligation. If the achievement of a milestone is considered a direct result of the Company’s efforts to satisfy a performance obligation or transfer a distinct good or service and the receipt of the payment is based upon the achievement of the milestone, the associated milestone value is allocated to that distinct good or service and revenue is recognized in the period in which the milestone is achieved. If the milestone payment is not specifically related to the Company’s effort to satisfy a performance obligation or transfer a distinct good or service, the Company evaluates the milestone to determine whether the milestone is considered probable of being reached and estimates the amount to be included in the transaction price using either the most likely amount or the expected value method.  If it is probable that a significant revenue reversal would not occur, the associated milestone value is included in the transaction price to be allocated.  At the end of each subsequent reporting period, the Company re-evaluates the probability of achievement of such development milestones and any related constraint, and if necessary, adjusts its estimate of the overall allocation.  Any such adjustments are recorded on a cumulative catch-up basis, which would affect license, collaboration and other revenues and earnings in the period of adjustment. 

Royalties: For arrangements that include sales-based or usage-based royalties, including milestone payments based on the level of sales, and the license is deemed to be the predominant item to which the royalties relate, the Company will recognize revenue at the later of:  (i) when the related sales occur; or (ii) when the performance obligation to which some or all of the royalty has been allocated has been satisfied (or partially satisfied).  

License and Collaboration Arrangements 

MEDINET Co., Ltd.

In December 2017, the Company entered into a License and Commercialization Agreement (the “License Agreement”) with MEDINET Co., Ltd. (“MEDINET”) to grant MEDINET a license under certain patents, patent applications, know-how, and technology to develop and commercialize certain therapeutic products to replace or repair damaged, worn, or defective cartilage.

In exchange for the license, MEDINET agreed to pay the Company an upfront cash payment of $10.0 million which the Company received in January 2018. As of September 30, 2018, the contract with MEDINET was wholly unperformed and all revenue under the License Agreement has been deferred and has not been recognized. As of September 30, 2018, the aggregate amount of the transaction price allocated to remaining performance obligations was $10.0 million. The Company expects to recognize revenue on approximately 50% and 100% of the remaining performance obligations over the next 12 months and the following 12 months, respectively.

MEDINET also agreed to pay the Company tiered royalties, at percentages ranging from the low single digits to low double digits, of net sales of MEDINET products governed by the License Agreement. Over the life of the License Agreement, the Company is eligible to receive up to ¥330 million ($2.9 million as of September 30, 2018) in development milestone payments, $1.0 million and ¥720 million ($7.4 million as of September 30, 2018) in regulatory payments and up to an aggregate of ¥7,300 million ($64.1 million as of September 30, 2018) for the achievement of certain commercial milestones related to the sales of MEDINET products governed by the License Agreement.

12


As a condition of the License Agreement, the Company agreed to supply NeoCart for MEDINET’s planned Phase 3 clinical trial in Japan. The Company assessed its promised goods and services under the License Agreement to determine if they are distinct. Due to the unique nature of the clinical manufacturing services to be provided by the Company, there are currently no other third-party vendors from which MEDINET can obtain such supply.  The Company expects to be the only vendor capable of providing the manufacturing services for a period of at least one to two years, which is approximately the estimated length of time for the Japanese clinical trial period. After this point, if the Company were to transfer to a third-party its technology and know-how related to the manufacturing services, the third-party vendor would be capable of providing the commercial manufacturing services, and therefore MEDINET would be able to choose whether to utilize the Company for such services or another vendor. The Company determined that MEDINET’s option to obtain commercial manufacturing services does not represent a material right, as the fees charged to MEDINET by the Company are expected to approximate the fair market value for manufacturing services. As noted, with the assistance of the Company, third-party vendors could have the capability to perform commercial manufacturing services by this time, and the Company expects the contract value to approximate the market price. Due to MEDINET’s limitations in obtaining the clinical manufacturing services from a third-party, as well as MEDINET’s limited ability to obtain the benefits of the licensed intellectual property without the clinical manufacturing services, the licensed intellectual property and clinical manufacturing services are determined to be a combined performance obligation. Based on this assessment, the Company determined that the promised goods and services do not have standalone value and are highly interrelated. Accordingly, the promised goods and services represent one performance obligation.

Based on the assessment of the combined performance obligation, the Company determined that the predominant promise in the arrangement is the transfer of the license and associated know-how expected to occur over the length of the clinical trial. The Company determined that MEDINET will be simultaneously receiving and consuming the benefits of the Company’s performance related to the supply of the clinical trial. Therefore, the revenue associated with the combined performance obligation will be recognized over time.

In determining the correct measure of progress to use when recognizing revenue over time, the Company assessed whether an input or output based measure of progress would be appropriate. The Company determined that an output based measure of progress would be appropriate to use when recognizing revenue associated with the combined performance obligation. The Company will recognize revenue under the License Agreement as the clinical manufacturing services are performed. At the outset of the clinical trials to be conducted by MEDINET, the Company will have quantifiable estimates of total clinical candidates, and therefore, of total estimated performance. The Company will recognize revenue based on performance completed to date, as evidenced by the estimated number of clinical trial enrollees. The Company expects to provide the clinical manufacturing services to MEDINET over the estimated time to enroll the Japanese Phase 3 clinical trial which is currently estimated to be 12 months, beginning in the fourth quarter of 2018. Therefore, the estimated one - year clinical manufacturing period is the appropriate timing of revenue recognition for the combined performance obligation. Management will re-evaluate that estimate at each reporting period.

Revenue will be recognized using the output method over the length of the clinical trial enrollment, as the clinical manufacturing services are delivered, over the estimated one-year service period. Upon the conclusion of the clinical manufacturing period, the Company expects other third-party vendors to have the capabilities to provide similar services. At this point, the license would effectively become a distinct performance obligation, with no remaining undelivered obligations. Therefore, the Company determined that the up-front payment associated with the licensed intellectual property should be fully recognized by the conclusion of the clinical manufacturing service period.

At contract inception, the Company determined that the $10.0 million non-refundable upfront amount constituted the entirety of the consideration to be included in the transaction price as the development, regulatory, and commercial milestones represent variable consideration and were fully constrained. As part of its evaluation of the constraint, the Company considered numerous factors, including that receipt of the milestones is outside the control of the Company and contingent upon success in future clinical trials and the licensees’ efforts. Any consideration related to sales-based milestones (including royalties) will be recognized when the related sales occur. The Company will re-evaluate the transaction price in each reporting period and as uncertain events are resolved or other changes in circumstances occur. The Company also determined that consideration associated with the clinical trials, which are payable by MEDINET on per-patient basis represent variable consideration, will be included in the transaction price upon occurrence, or once the associated clinical manufacturing service(s) for the patient are concluded.

The Company incurred cost of $0.9 million related to the License Agreement with MEDINET, of which $0.8 million was recorded as an asset that will be expensed proportionally over the performance service period.

Stock-Based Compensation

The Company accounts for stock options and restricted stock based on their grant date fair value and recognizes compensation expense on a straight-line basis over their vesting period. The Company estimates the fair value of stock options as of the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option pricing model, with the exception of stock options that include a market condition, and restricted stock based on the fair value of the underlying common stock as of the date of grant or the value of the services provided, whichever is more readily determinable. The Company, in conjunction with adoption of ASU 2016-09- Stock Compensation: Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting has elected to estimate forfeitures at the time of grant, and revise those estimates in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from its estimates. The Company uses historical data to estimate pre-vesting option forfeitures and records stock-based compensation expense only for those awards that are expected to vest. To the extent that actual forfeitures differ from the Company’s estimates, the differences are recorded as a cumulative adjustment in the period the estimates were revised. Stock-based compensation expense is classified as research and development or general and administrative based on the grantee’s respective compensation classification.

13


For stock option grants with vesting triggered by the achievement of performance-based milestones, the expense is recorded over the remaining service period after the point when the achievement of the milestone is probable or the performance condition has been achieved. For stock option grants with both performance-based milestones and market conditions, expense is recorded over the derived service period after the point when the achievement of the performance-based milestone is probable or the performance condition has been achieved. For stock option grants with market conditions, the expense is calculated using the Monte Carlo model based on the grant date fair value of the option and is recorded on a straight line basis over the requisite service period, which represents the derived service period and accelerated when the market condition is satisfied. The Company did not issue awards with market conditions during the nine months ended September 30, 2018. The Company accounts for stock options and restricted stock awards to non-employees using the fair value approach. Stock options and restricted stock awards to non-employees are subject to periodic revaluation over their vesting terms.

Warrant Accounting

As noted in Note 6, Capital Stock, the Company classifies a warrant to purchase shares of its common stock as a liability on its consolidated balance sheet if the warrant is a free-standing financial instrument that may require the Company to transfer consideration upon exercise. Each warrant of this type is initially recorded at fair value on date of grant using the Monte Carlo simulation model net of issuance costs, and is subsequently re-measured to fair value at each subsequent balance sheet date. Changes in fair value of the warrant are recognized as a component of other income (expense), net in the consolidated statement of operations and comprehensive loss. The Company will continue to adjust the liability for changes in fair value until the earlier of the exercise or expiration of the warrant.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU No. 2018-13, Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820): Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement. The amendments in this update modify the disclosure requirements on fair value measurements based on the concepts in the Concepts Statement, including the consideration of costs and benefits. The amendments in this update are effective for all entities for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2019 with early adoption permitted upon issuance of this Update. The Company is currently evaluating the impact that the adoption of this guidance will have on the Company’s consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.

In June 2018, the FASB issued ASU No. 2018-07, Compensation-Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Nonemployee Share- Based Payment Accounting. This update is to simplify the aspects of accounting for nonemployee shared based payment transactions for acquiring goods or services from nonemployees. The amendments in this update are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within that year. The Company is currently evaluating the impact that the adoption of this guidance will have on the Company’s consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.

In July 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-11, Earnings Per Share (Topic 260): Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity (Topic 480); Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815): (PART I) Accounting for certain financial instruments with down round features. This update addresses the complexity of accounting for certain financial instruments with down round features. The guidance is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2018. The Company has concluded that this guidance has no impact on the presentation of its results of operations, financial position and disclosures.

In May 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-09, Compensation-Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Scope of Modification Accounting. This standard provides guidance on changes to the terms or conditions of a share based payment award that requires an entity to apply modification accounting. The guidance is effective prospectively for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, and for interim periods and annual periods thereafter. There were no modifications to the Company’s share based payment awards during the nine months ended September 30, 2018.

In November 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-18, Statement of Cash Flows: Restricted Cash (“ASU 2016-18”). The amendments in this update require that amounts generally described as restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents be included within cash and cash equivalents when reconciling the beginning-of-period and end-of-period total amounts shown on the statement of cash flows. ASU 2016-18 was effective January 1, 2018.  As a result of adopting ASU 2016-18, the Company includes its restricted cash balance in the cash and cash equivalents reconciliation of operating, investing and financing activities.  The following table provides a reconciliation of cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash within the statement of financial position that sum to the total of the same such amounts shown in the statement of cash flows.

 

 

As of September 30,

 

 

2018

 

2017

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Cash and cash equivalents

$

5,192

 

$

10,798

 

Restricted cash

 

137

 

 

137

 

Total cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash shown in the statement of cash flows

$

5,329

 

$

10,935

 

14


In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02- Leases (Topic 842). This standard requires companies to recognize on the balance sheet the assets and liabilities for the rights and obligations created by leased assets. ASU 2016-02 will be effective for the Company in the first quarter of 2019, with early adoption permitted. The Company estimates that it will recognize approximately $8 million to $10 million of right-of-use assets and corresponding lease liabilities on the balance sheet upon adoption. However, the population of contracts subject to balance sheet recognition and their initial measurement remains under evaluation; final balance sheet impacts will depend on the lease portfolio as the time of adoption. The Company does not expect that adoption will have a material impact on its results of operations or statement of cash flows.

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (“Topic 606”), which requires an entity to recognize the amount of revenue to which it expects to be entitled for the transfer of promised goods or services to customers. In the fourth quarter of 2017, the Company early adopted ASC 606 and this standard applies to all contracts with customers, except for contracts that are within the scope of other standards, such as leases, insurance, collaboration arrangements and financial instruments. The Company had only one revenue arrangement as of the adoption date. Topic 606 requires an entity to recognize the amount of revenue to which it expects to be entitled for the transfer of promised goods or services to customers. Topic 606 provides a five-step model for determining revenue recognition for arrangements that are within the scope of the standard: (i) identify the contract(s) with a customer; (ii) identify the performance obligations in the contract; (iii) determine the transaction price; (iv) allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract; and (v) recognize revenue when (or as) the entity satisfies a performance obligation. The Company only applies the five-step model to contracts when it is probable that the entity will collect the consideration it is entitled to in exchange for the goods or services it transfers to the customer. At contract inception, once the contract is determined to be within the scope of Topic 606, the Company assesses the goods or services promised within each contract and determines those that are performance obligations, and assesses whether each promised good or service is distinct. The Company then recognizes as revenue the amount of the transaction price that is allocated to the respective performance obligation when (or as) the performance obligation is satisfied. For a complete discussion of accounting for revenues, see Note 2, Revenue Recognition.

3. LOSS PER COMMON SHARE

The Company computes basic and diluted loss per share using a methodology that gives effect to the impact of outstanding participating securities (the “two-class method”). For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018, there was dilution attributed to the weighted-average shares outstanding in the calculation of diluted loss per share.

 

 

 

Three Months Ended September 30,

 

 

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

 

(In thousands, except share and per share data)

 

Numerator:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net Income (loss)

 

$

10,785

 

 

$

(5,995

)

 

$

(7,825

)

 

$

(19,618

)

Net income (loss) attributable to Series A Preferred Stock (a)

 

 

135

 

 

 

(915

)

 

 

(168

)

 

 

(3,238

)

Income (loss) attributable to common stockholders - basic

 

$

10,650

 

 

$

(5,080

)

 

$

(7,657

)

 

$

(16,380

)

Effect of dilutive securities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deduct change in fair value of warrant liability

 

 

(17,776

)

 

 

 

 

 

(12,524

)

 

 

 

Numerator for dilutive EPS-Earnings(loss) attributable to common stockholders after assumed conversions

 

$

(7,126

)

 

$

(5,080

)

 

$

(20,181

)

 

$

(16,380

)

Denominator:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted-average number of common shares used in earnings (loss) per

   share - basic

 

 

29,737,632

 

 

 

22,552,341

 

 

 

28,723,500

 

 

 

22,219,666

 

Effect of dilutive securities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nonparticipating warrants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

792,200

 

 

 

 

Denominator for diluted EPS-Adjusted weighted average shares

 

 

29,737,632

 

 

 

22,552,341

 

 

 

29,515,700

 

 

 

22,219,666

 

Earnings (loss) per share - basic

 

$

         0.36

 

 

$

        (0.23

)

 

$

        (0.27

)

 

$

        (0.74

)

Loss per share - diluted

 

$

         (0.24

)

 

$

        (0.23

)

 

$

        (0.68

)

 

$

        (0.74

)

(a)

The Series A Preferred Stock participates in income and losses.

The following potentially dilutive securities have been excluded from the computation of diluted weighted-average shares outstanding, as they would be anti-dilutive (in common stock equivalent shares):

 

 

 

Three and Nine months ended September 30,

 

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

Unvested restricted stock and options to purchase common stock

 

 

3,655,578

 

 

 

2,194,630

 

Series A preferred stock unconverted

 

 

177,996

 

 

 

3,826,920

 

Warrants exercisable into common stock

 

 

13,528,978

 

 

 

13,633,070

 

 

15


4. PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

Property and equipment consisted of the following:

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Office equipment

 

$

279

 

 

$

279

 

Laboratory equipment

 

 

4,670

 

 

 

4,565

 

Leasehold improvements

 

 

7,711

 

 

 

7,712

 

Construction in progress

 

 

2,876

 

 

 

990

 

Software

 

 

96

 

 

 

96

 

Total property and equipment

 

 

15,632

 

 

 

13,642

 

Less:  B depreciation

 

 

(11,280

)

 

 

(10,919

)

Property and equipment, net

 

$

4,352

 

 

$

2,723

 

 

Depreciation expense related to property and equipment amounted to $0.1 million and $0.4 million for the three months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively, and $0.4 million and $1.2 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

 

On September 5, 2018, the Company experienced a drop in stock price of 73%. As a result, the Company applied the multi-step process as described in FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 360, “Property, Plant, and Equipment”. The first step requires the Company to determine whether there are indicators of impairment of its long-lived assets. It concluded that the drop in stock price was a triggering event for impairment. Step 2 of the process is to determine whether the carrying amount of the asset group is recoverable, based on a comparison of the total undiscounted future cash flows from the asset group to the carrying amount of the asset group. It was determined that the undiscounted cash flows are less than the carrying value of the net asset group. Step 3 is to measure the impairment loss by determining if the if the carrying value of the long-lived asset group exceeds its fair value. The Company concluded that the carrying value of the asset group did not exceed its fair value and therefore there is no impairment charge.  

5. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

Operating Leases

The Company leases its office and research facilities in Waltham and Lexington, Massachusetts under non-cancellable operating leases. The Lexington, Massachusetts facility lease expires in June 2023. The Waltham, Massachusetts facility lease was extended in April 2017. The effective date of the extension is January 2018. Under the terms of the extension, the lease will expire in December 2024 with one extension term of five years. Terms of the agreements generally provide for an initial rent-free period and future rent escalation and provide that in addition to minimum lease rental payments, the Company is responsible for a pro-rata share of common area operating expenses.

Rent expense under operating lease agreements amounted to approximately $0.4 million and $0.2 million for the three months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively, and $1.2 million and $0.7 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

As an inducement to enter into its Lexington facility lease, the lessor agreed to provide the Company with a construction allowance of up to $1.0 million towards the total cost of tenant improvements. As an inducement to enter into the Waltham lease extension, the lessor agreed to provide the Company with a tenant improvement allowance not to exceed $0.9 million, of which $0.5 million can be applied to future rental payments. The Company has recorded these costs in the consolidated balance sheets as leasehold improvements, with the corresponding liability as deferred lease incentive. The liability is amortized on a straight-line basis over the term of the leases as a reduction of rent expense.

License Agreements

From time to time, the Company enters into various licensing agreements whereby the Company may use certain technologies in conjunction with its product research and development. Licensing agreements and the Company’s commitments under the agreements are as follows:

Hydrogel License

In May 2005, the Company entered into an exclusive license agreement with Angiotech Pharmaceuticals (US), Inc. for the use of certain patents, patent applications, and knowledge related to the manufacture and use of a hydrogel material in conjunction with NeoCart and certain other products (“Hydrogel License Agreement”). As of September 30, 2018, the Company has paid an aggregate $3.2 million in commercialization milestones under the terms of the Hydrogel License Agreement, which have been expensed to research and development.

16


Under the terms of the Hydrogel License Agreement, the Company’s future commitments include:

 

A one-time $3.0 million payment upon approval of an eligible product by the FDA; and

 

Single digit royalties on the net sales of NeoCart and certain other future products.

Tissue Regeneration License

In April 2001, the Company entered into an exclusive license agreement with The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University (“Stanford University”) for the use of certain technology to develop, manufacture and sell licensed products in the field of growth and regeneration of cartilage (“Tissue Regeneration License Agreement”). The term of the Tissue Regeneration License Agreement extends to the expiration date of Stanford University’s last to expire domestic or foreign patents. As of September 30, 2018, the Company has paid an aggregate $0.8 million in patent reimbursement costs, royalty fees, and commercialization milestone payments under the terms of the Tissue Regeneration License Agreement, which have been recorded to research and development expense.

Under the terms of the Tissue Regeneration License Agreement, the Company’s future commitments include:

 

A one-time $0.3 million payment upon approval of an eligible product by the FDA;

 

An annual minimum non-refundable royalty fee of $10 thousand for the life of the license that may be used to offset up to 50% of the earned royalty below; and

 

Low single digit royalties on net sales.

Honeycomb License

In March 2013, the Company entered into a license agreement with Koken Co., Ltd. (“Koken”) and paid a fee for a non-exclusive, non-transferable and non-sublicensable right to use its know-how related to the process for manufacturing atelocollagen honeycomb sponge materials, which is used in scaffolds (the “Honeycomb License Agreement”). Under the terms of the Honeycomb License Agreement, future commitments will be based on the amount of materials supplied to the Company and may vary from period to period over the term of the agreement.

Tissue Processor Sub-License

In December 2005, the Company entered into an exclusive agreement to sub-license certain technology from Purpose, Co. (“Purpose”), which is owned by a stockholder of the Company (“Sub-License Agreement”). Purpose entered into the original license agreement (“Original Agreement”) with Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Inc. (“Brigham and Women’s”) in August 2001. The Original Agreement shall remain in effect for the term of the licensed patents owned by Brigham and Women’s unless extended or terminated as provided for in the agreement. The technology is to be used to develop, manufacture, use and sell licensed products that cultivate cell or tissue development. The Sub-License Agreement extends to the expiration date of the last to expire domestic or foreign patents covered by the agreement. As of September 30, 2018, the Company has paid an aggregate $1.1 million in royalty and sub-license payments under the terms of the Sub-License Agreement.

The Sub-License Agreement was amended and restated in June 2012. Under the amended and restated agreement, the Company made Purpose the sole supplier of equipment the Company uses in its manufacturing processes and granted Purpose distribution rights of the Company’s products for certain territories. In exchange, Purpose allowed for the use of its technology (owned or licensed) and manufactured and serviced exogenous tissue processors used by the Company. Under the terms of the agreement, as amended, Purpose granted the Company: (a) exclusive rights to all of Purpose’s technology (owned or licensed) related to the exogenous tissue processors, (b) continued supply of exogenous tissue processors during the Company’s clinical trials, and (c) rights to manufacture the exogenous tissue processors at any location the Company chooses. In exchange for such consideration, the Company granted Purpose an exclusive license in Japan for the use of all of the Company’s technology and made a payment of $0.3 million to reimburse Purpose for development costs on a next generation tissue processor.

In May 2016, the Original Agreement was amended whereby the Company acquired the development and commercialization rights to NeoCart for the Japanese market from Purpose. Under the terms of the amended agreement, the Company assumes sole responsibility for and rights to the development and commercialization of NeoCart in Japan. In exchange for the transfer of development and commercialization rights, the Company will pay a success-based milestone to Purpose upon conditional approval of NeoCart in Japan, as well as commercial milestones and a low single digit royalty on Japanese sales of NeoCart, upon full approval, if any, in Japan.

In addition to the above, the Company’s future commitments under the terms of the Original Agreement and Sub-License Agreement include:

 

A minimum non-refundable annual royalty fee of $20 thousand, for the life of the license;

 

An additional, non-refundable annual royalty fee of $30 thousand from 2016 through 2019;

 

$10.2 million in potential milestone payments; and

17


 

Low single digit royalties on net sales of a licensed product.

The OCS Agreement

In connection with its research and development, the Company received grants from the Office of Chief Scientist of the Ministry of Industry and Trade in Israel (“OCS”) in the aggregate of $1.1 million for funding the fibroblast growth factor (“FGF”) program. In consideration for this grant, the Company is committed to pay royalties at a rate of 3% to 5% of the sales of sponsored products developed using the grant money, up to the amount of the participation payments received. The Company committed to pay up to 100% of grants received plus interest according to the LIBOR interest rate if the sponsored product is produced in Israel. If the manufacturing of the sponsored product takes place outside of Israel, the royalties can increase up to, but no more than, 300% of grants received plus interest based on the LIBOR interest rate, depending on the percentage of the manufacturing of sponsored product that takes place outside of Israel.

Collagen Supply Agreement

In September 2015, the Company entered into an agreement with Collagen Solutions (UK) Limited (the “Supplier”) to purchase soluble collagen that meets specifications provided by the Company. The initial term of the agreement is three years and will automatically renew from year to year thereafter unless otherwise terminated with at least 180 days’ notice by either party. In February 2017, the Company entered into an amendment with the Supplier. Pursuant to the amendment, the Company agreed to pay the Supplier approximately $0.1 million in exchange for eliminating the minimum annual order of material and/or services and any other amounts due to Supplier. As of September 30, 2018, the Company has paid $0.1 million under the terms of the amendment. There is no remaining obligation to be paid. 

6. CAPITAL STOCK

In March 2018, the Company entered into an equity distribution agreement (“ATM Agreement”) with Canaccord Genuity Inc. (“Canaccord”), pursuant to which the Company may, from time to time, sell shares of its common stock having an aggregate offering price of up to up to $10.0 million (the “Shares”) through Canaccord, as sales agent. The Shares will be offered and sold by the Company pursuant to its previously filed and currently effective Registration Statement on Form S-3 (Reg. No. 333-216741) (the “Registration Statement”). The Shares may only be offered and sold by means of a prospectus, including a prospectus supplement, forming part of the effective Registration Statement. Sales of the common stock, if any, will be made at market prices by methods deemed to be an “at the market offering” as defined in Rule 415 promulgated under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), including sales made directly on The Nasdaq Capital Market, on any other existing trading market for the common stock, or to or through a market maker other than on an exchange. During the nine months ended September 30, 2018, the Company sold an aggregate of 5,766,247 shares of common stock and received $4.0 million after deducting commissions related to the ATM Agreement.

In January 2018, the Company completed an underwritten registered direct offering of 2,691,494 shares of common stock at a price of $2.35 per share. The total net proceeds of the offering were $5.7 million after deducting underwriter’s discounts and commissions, and expenses related to the offering.

On September 29, 2016, the Company closed a private placement with certain institutional and accredited investors in which the Company received gross proceeds of $30.0 million (the “Private Placement”). The net proceeds after deducting placement agent fees and other transaction-related expenses was $27.6 million. At the closing, the Company issued 2,596,059 shares of the Company’s common stock at a per share price of $2.25 and 24,158.8693 shares of the Company’s newly-created Series A Convertible Preferred Stock (“Series A Preferred Stock”), which are convertible into approximately 10,737,275 shares of common stock. As of September 30, 2018, there were 400.4910 shares of Series A Preferred Stock outstanding, which remain convertible into 177,996 shares of the Company’s common stock. As part of the Private Placement, the investors received warrants to purchase up to 13,333,334 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $2.25 per share. The placement agent for the Private Placement, H.C. Wainwright & Co. LLC (“HCW”), and certain of its affiliates were also granted warrants to purchase 133,333 shares of the Company’s common stock with an exercise price of $2.25 per share in exchange for the services provided by HCW. The placement agent warrants were considered a financing cost of the Company and included in warrant expense within the consolidated statements of operations.

The warrants include a cashless-exercise feature that may be exercised solely in the event there is no effective registration statement, or no current prospectus available for, the resale of the shares of common stock underlying the warrants as of the six-month anniversary of the closing of the Private Placement. Upon a fundamental transaction, the holders of the warrant may require the Company to purchase any unexercised warrants in an amount equal to the Black-Scholes value of the warrant. A fundamental transaction is defined as a merger, sale of assets, sale of the Company, recapitalization of stock and a sale of stock whereby any owner after the transaction would own greater than 50% of the outstanding common stock in the Company. The warrants became exercisable following approval of the Private Placement by our stockholders in November 2016 and expire five years after the date of such stockholder approval. The Company determined the warrants are classified as a liability on the consolidated balance sheet because they contain a provision whereby in a fundamental transaction (as described above), the holder can elect to receive either the amount they are entitled to on an as-if-exercised basis or an amount based on the Black-Scholes value of the warrants at the time of the fundamental transaction. At the issuance date, the warrants were recorded at the fair value of $30.7 million and approximately $0.4 million

18


excess of the fair value of the liability recorded for these warrants over the proceeds received was recorded as a charge to earnings in the third quarter of 2016 and included in warrant expense within the consolidated statement of operations.

Concurrent with the closing of the Private Placement, the Company’s Certificate of Incorporation was amended by the filing of a Certificate of Designation to create the Series A Preferred Stock. The Series A Preferred Stock has a par value of $0.01 and each share is convertible into 444.44 shares of common stock, at a conversion price of $2.25 per share, at the option of the holder. The Series A Preferred Stock has no voting rights and is only entitled to dividends as declared on an as-converted basis. The Series A Preferred Stock contains no liquidation preferences or redemption rights and shares in distributions of the Company on an as-converted basis with the common stock. The Series A Preferred Stock shall not be converted if, after giving effect to the conversion, the holder and its affiliated persons would own beneficially more than 4.99% of our common stock (subject to adjustment up to 9.99% solely at the holder’s discretion upon 61 days’ prior notice to us or, solely as to a holder, if such limitation is waived by such holder upon execution of the private placement agreement).

As part of the Private Placement, affiliates of certain members of the Company’s Board of Directors purchased an aggregate of 283,046 shares of common stock, an aggregate of 2,563.1439 shares of Series A Preferred Stock and received warrants to purchase up to 1,422,221 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $2.25 per share in the Private Placement. These amounts are included in the amounts noted above.

7. WARRANTS

The Company has warrants to purchase its common stock outstanding as of September 30, 2018, as follows:

 

Issued

 

     Classification

 

            Warrants Outstanding

 

 

     Exercise Price

 

 

                          Expiration

September 2016

 

Liability

 

 

13,466,667

 

 

$

2.25

 

 

November 2021

March 2015

 

Equity

 

 

3,699

 

 

 

9.75

 

 

March 2025

July 2014

 

Equity

 

 

6,566

 

 

 

7.99

 

 

July 2024

July 2012

 

Equity

 

 

52,046

 

 

 

0.01

 

 

July 2022

 

8. STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION

Stock option activity under the Company’s 2012 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2012 Plan”) and 2013 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2013 Plan”) for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 is summarized as follows:

 

 

 

Number

of Options

 

 

Weighted-

Average

Exercise

Price

 

 

Weighted-

Average

Remaining

Contractual

Term (in years)

 

 

Aggregate

Intrinsic

Value

(in thousands)

 

Outstanding at December 31, 2017

 

 

2,158,348

 

 

$

4.40

 

 

 

8.1

 

 

$

436

 

Granted

 

 

1,530,150

 

 

 

2.38

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercised

 

 

(919

)

 

 

2.56

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cancelled

 

 

(32,001

)

 

 

2.71

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outstanding at September 30, 2018

 

 

3,655,578

 

 

$

3.57

 

 

 

8.3

 

 

$

 

Vested and expected to vest at September 30, 2018

 

 

3,288,917

 

 

$

3.69

 

 

 

8.2

 

 

$

 

Exercisable at September 30, 2018

 

 

1,460,898

 

 

$

4.86

 

 

 

7.2

 

 

$

 

 

As of September 30, 2018, the unrecognized compensation cost related to outstanding options was $2.5 million and is expected to be recognized as expense over approximately 2.51 years. As of September 30, 2018, the weighted average grant date fair value of vested options was $3.25 and the weighted average grant date fair value of options outstanding was $2.33. On October 1, 2018, the Company approved a repricing of 2,774,140 stock options granted prior to September 1, 2018. See Note 12 for further discussion of the repricing.

The weighted average grant date fair value per share of employee option grants was $1.06 and $1.14 for the three months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively, and $1.77 and $1.01 for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

Stock-Based Compensation Expense

The Company granted stock options to employees during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017. The Company estimates the fair value of stock options as of the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option pricing model and restricted stock based on the stock price, with the exception of those stock options that included a market condition. The Company estimates the fair value of stock options that include a market condition using a Monte-Carlo model. Stock options and restricted stock issued to non-board member, non-employees are accounted for using the fair value approach and are subject to periodic revaluation over their vesting terms.

19


Stock-based compensation expense amounted to $0.4 million and $0.4 million for the three months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively, and $1.2 million and $1.2 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

The allocation of stock-based compensation for all options granted and restricted stock awards is as follows:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended September 30,

 

 

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Research and development

 

$

131

 

 

$

86

 

 

$

352

 

 

$

326

 

General and administrative

 

 

307

 

 

 

283

 

 

 

897

 

 

 

907

 

Total stock-based compensation expense

 

$

438

 

 

$

369

 

 

$

1,249

 

 

$

1,233

 

 

The weighted-average assumptions used in the Black-Scholes option pricing model to determine the fair value of the employee stock option grants were as follows:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended September 30,

 

 

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

Risk-free interest rate

 

 

2.92

%

 

 

1.95

%

 

 

2.77

%

 

 

2.03

%

Expected volatility

 

 

86.4

%

 

 

60.0

%

 

 

87.5

%

 

 

63.1

%

Expected term (in years)