10-K 1 g12363ke10vk.htm YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Table of Contents

 
 
U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
Washington, DC 20549
FORM 10-K
     
þ   ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2007.
     
o   TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
FOR THE TRANSITION PERIOD FROM                     TO                     
Commission File Number 0001366367
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
     
North Carolina   20-4495993
     
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
209 North Bridge Street
Elkin, North Carolina 28621-3404
(Address of principal executive offices)
(336) 526-6300
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act:
     
Title of each class   Exchange on which registered
     
Common Stock, Par Value $1.00 Per Share   The NASDAQ Stock Market, LLC
Securities registered under Section 12(g) of the Act: None
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes o No þ
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o No þ
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes þ No o
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers in response to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
             
Large accelerated filer o    Accelerated filer þ    Non-accelerated filer   o
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
  Smaller reporting company o 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes o No þ
The aggregate market value of the registrant’s Common Stock at June 30, 2007, held by those persons deemed by the registrant to be non-affiliates, was approximately $183 million.
As of March 1, 2008 (the most recent practicable date), the registrant had outstanding 10,564,306 shares of Common Stock.
Documents Incorporated By Reference
         
    Document   Where Incorporated
1.
  Portions of Registrant’s definitive Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held May 22, 2008 to be mailed to shareholders within 120 days of December 31, 2007.   Part III
 
 

 


 

Form 10-K Table of Contents
         
Index   PAGE
       
 
       
    3  
    11  
    14  
    14  
    15  
    16  
 
       
       
 
       
    16  
    17  
    17  
    32  
    32  
    64  
    64  
    68  
 
       
       
 
       
    68  
    68  
    68  
    68  
    68  
 
       
       
 
       
    68  
 Exhibit 10.7
 Exhibit 21
 Exhibit 23
 Exhibit 31.1
 Exhibit 31.2
 Exhibit 32

2


Table of Contents

PART I
Item 1 — Business
     Corporate history and address. Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation (the “Company” or “Yadkin”) is a bank holding company incorporated under the laws of North Carolina to serve as the holding company for Yadkin Valley Bank and Trust Company (the “Bank”), a North Carolina chartered commercial bank with its deposits insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) up to applicable limits. The Bank is not a member of the Federal Reserve System (“Federal Reserve”). The Bank began operations in 1968. Effective July 1, 2006 the Bank was reorganized and the Bank became the Company’s wholly owned subsidiary.
     On July 31, 2002, the Bank acquired Main Street BankShares, Inc. and its subsidiary, Piedmont Bank, of Statesville, North Carolina and continues to operate the former Piedmont Bank offices under the assumed name “Piedmont Bank, a division of Yadkin Valley Bank and Trust Company.” On January 1, 2004, the bank acquired High Country Financial Corporation, and its subsidiary, High Country Bank, of Boone, North Carolina and continues to operate the former High Country Bank offices in Watauga County, North Carolina, under the assumed name “High Country Bank, a division of Yadkin Valley Bank and Trust Company.” On October 1, 2004 the Bank acquired Sidus Financial, LLC (“Sidus”), a mortgage lender that continues to operate as a wholly owned subsidiary. The Bank expects to acquire Cardinal State Bank, of Durham, North Carolina, (“Cardinal”) effective March 31, 2008 and intends to continue to operate the former Cardinal State Bank offices in Durham and Orange Counties, North Carolina, under the assumed name “Cardinal State Bank, a division of Yadkin Valley Bank and Trust Company.” We operate in the central Piedmont and the northwestern region of North Carolina. Our common stock is listed on The Nasdaq Global Select Market under the trading symbol “YAVY.”
     On November 1, 2007, the Company established a Delaware trust subsidiary, Yadkin Valley Statutory Trust I (“the Trust”), which completed the sale of $25,000,000 of trust preferred securities. The Trust issued the trust preferred securities at a rate equal to the three-month LIBOR rate plus 1.32%. The trust preferred securities mature in 30 years, and can be called by the Trust without penalty after five years. Yadkin Valley Statutory Trust I used the proceeds from the sale of the securities to purchase the Company’s junior subordinated deferrable interest notes due 2037 (the “Debenture”). The net proceeds from the offering will be used by the Company in connection with the previously announced acquisition of Cardinal State Bank, and for general corporate purposes.
     The Debenture was issued pursuant to a Junior Subordinated Deferrable Interest Debenture between the Company and Wilmington Trust Company dated November 1, 2007 (the “Indenture”), which has been previously filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). The terms of the Debenture are substantially the same as the terms of the trust preferred securities. Interest payments by the Company will be used by the trust to pay the quarterly distributions to the holders of the trust preferred securities. The Indenture permits the Company to redeem the Debenture after five years.
     The terms of the trust preferred securities are governed by an Amended and Restated Declaration of Trust, dated November 1, 2007, between the Company, as sponsor, Wilmington Trust Company, as institutional trustee, Wilmington Trust Company, as Delaware trustee, and the Administrators named therein, a copy of which has been previously filed with the SEC.
     Pursuant to a Guarantee Agreement dated November 1, 2007, between the Company and Wilmington Trust Company, the Company has guaranteed the payment of distributions and payments on liquidation or redemption of the trust preferred securities. The obligations of the Company under the Guarantee Agreement, a copy of which has been filed with the SEC, are subordinate to all of the Company’s senior debt.
     The Company’s principal executive offices are located at 209 North Bridge Street, Elkin, North Carolina 28621-3404, and the telephone number is (336) 526-6300. Our periodic securities reports on Forms 10-Q and 10-K are available on our website at www.yadkinvalleybank.com.
     Business. The Bank’s operations are primarily retail oriented and directed toward individuals and small and medium-sized businesses located in our banking market and, to a lesser extent, areas surrounding our immediate banking market. We provide most traditional commercial and consumer banking services, but our principal activities are the taking of demand and time deposits and the making of consumer and commercial loans. The Bank’s primary source of revenue is the interest income derived from its lending activities.

3


Table of Contents

     At December 31, 2007, we had total assets of $1.2 billion, net loans held for investment of $886.3 million, deposits of $963.4 million, and shareholders’ equity of $133.3 million. We had net income of $14.7 million and $13.8 million and diluted earnings per share of $1.37 and $1.28 for the years ended December 31, 2007 and 2006, respectively. We had net income of $11.2 million and diluted earnings per share of $1.03 for the year ended December 31, 2005.
     Business Offices. Yadkin operates 24 full-service banking offices including the newest location in Pfafftown, which opened in April 2007, and is headquartered in Elkin, North Carolina. We operate the offices in Jefferson and West Jefferson (Ashe County), Wilkesboro and North Wilkesboro (Wilkes County), Elkin (Surry County), and East Bend, Jonesville and Yadkinville (Yadkin County), and Pfafftown (Forsyth County) under the Yadkin name. The Bank has a loan production office in Wilmington, NC (New Hanover County) operating under the Yadkin name. The offices in Statesville and Mooresville (Iredell County), and Cornelius and Huntersville (Mecklenburg County) are operated under the Piedmont Bank assumed name. The offices in Boone (Watauga County) and Linville (Avery County) are operated under the High Country Bank assumed name. Following the acquisition of Cardinal State Bank, we expect to operate three offices in Durham (Durham County) and one office in Hillsborough (Orange County) under the Cardinal State Bank assumed name
     Banking Market. The Bank’s current banking market consists of the central piedmont counties (July 2006 population) of Mecklenburg (827,000) and Iredell (145,000), and the northwestern counties of Ashe (26,000), Avery (18,000), Forsyth (332,000), Surry (73,000), Watauga (43,000), Wilkes (67,000) and Yadkin (38,000) in North Carolina and, to a lesser extent, the surrounding areas (the “Yadkin Market”). The Yadkin Market is located along Interstate 77 north of the Charlotte metropolitan area, and west of the “Piedmont Triad” area of North Carolina to the northwestern border with Virginia and Tennessee. The expected acquisition of Cardinal State Bank will add Orange and Durham Counties along Interstates 40 and 85 in the “Triangle” area of central North Carolina to our market area.
     Yadkin’s market area is well diversified and strong. The nine counties in which our branches are located had an estimated 2006 population of almost 1.57 million people. Median family income in 2005 for these counties ranged from a low of $32,000 in mostly rural Ashe County to a high of over $50,000 in urban Mecklenburg County. Approximately 98% of the work force is employed in nonagricultural wage and salary positions. Government employs approximately 12% of the work force. The major non-governmental employment sectors were retail trade (12%), health and social assistance (11%), manufacturing (11%), accommodation and food services (10%), construction services (7%) and administrative and waste services (8%). The expected acquisition of Cardinal State Bank will add urban Orange and Durham Counties with a combined 2006 population of 370,000 and an average 2005 median family income of over $45,500. (Source-NC Dept of Commerce).
     Competition. Commercial banking in North Carolina is extremely competitive due to state laws that allow statewide branching. North Carolina is the home of two of the ten largest commercial banks in the United States, each of which has branches located in the Yadkin Market. The following table summarizes Yadkin’s share of the deposit market in each of the nine counties.
                                         
            Yadkin Valley           Yadkin Valley   Yadkin Valley
    Total Number   Bank   Total Amount of   Bank Deposits   Bank % of Market
County   of Branches   Branches   Deposits (000’s)   (000’s)   Deposits
Ashe
    13       3     $ 549,917     $ 164,479       30 %
Avery
    9       1     $ 243,925     $ 6,146       3 %
Forsyth
    105       1     $ 14,299,900     $ 2,992       <1 %
Iredell
    51       6     $ 2,123,013     $ 250,830       12 %
Mecklenburg
    231       2     $ 90,353,028     $ 53,319       <1 %
Surry
    28       2     $ 1,206,527     $ 98,414       8 %
Watauga
    20       4     $ 868,344     $ 131,254       15 %
Wilkes
    19       2     $ 788,368     $ 100,923       13 %
Yadkin
    11       3     $ 446,731     $ 134,547       30 %
     The new market area represented by Cardinal State Bank (expected merger date March 31, 2008) also has significant competition for deposits. As of June 30, 2007, there were 68 branches in Durham County operated by 12

4


Table of Contents

commercial banks, including Cardinal State Bank, and three savings institutions, holding approximately $3.82 billion in deposits. On that date, there were 34 branches in Orange County operated by nine commercial banks, including Cardinal State Bank, and one savings institutions, holding approximately $1.77 billion in deposits.
     Many of these competing banks have capital resources and legal lending limits substantially in excess of those available to us. Thus we have significant competition in our market for deposits from other depository institutions.
     The Bank also competes for deposits in the Yadkin Market with other financial institutions such as credit unions, consumer finance companies, insurance companies, brokerage companies, agencies issuing United States government securities and other financial institutions with varying degrees of regulatory restrictions. In its lending activities, Yadkin competes with all other financial institutions as well as consumer finance companies, mortgage companies and other lenders. Credit unions have been permitted to expand their membership criteria and expand their loan services to include such traditional bank services as commercial lending. We expect competition in the Yadkin Market to continue to be significant.
     We believe we have sufficient capital to support our operations for the foreseeable future. We intend to continue to serve the financial needs of consumers and small-to-medium size businesses located primarily in the Yadkin Market. Our lending efforts will be focused on making quality consumer loans, commercial loans to small to medium sized businesses, and home equity loans. While our deposits and loans are derived primarily from customers in our banking market, we make loans and have deposit relationships with individual and business customers in areas surrounding our immediate banking market. We offer a full range of deposit products to include checking and savings accounts, money market accounts, certificates of deposit and individual retirement accounts. We rely on offering competitive interest rates and unmatched customer service to accomplish our deposit objectives.
     The Bank strives to offer its products and services in the manner that meets its customers’ expectations. For those customers who prefer to do their banking in a hands-on, face-to-face manner, the Bank offers exceptional personal service. Customers who want to do their banking when and where they choose are able to utilize the automated teller machines, credit and debit card programs, and a full range of internet-based banking options.
     Supervision and Regulation. Banking is a complex, highly regulated industry. The primary goals of banking regulations are to maintain a safe and sound banking system and to facilitate the conduct of sound monetary policy. In furtherance of these goals, Congress and the North Carolina General Assembly have created largely autonomous regulatory agencies and enacted numerous laws that govern banks, their holding companies and the banking industry. The descriptions of and references to the statutes and regulations below are brief summaries and do not purport to be complete. The descriptions are qualified in their entirety by reference to the specific statutes and regulations discussed.
     Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation.
     As a bank holding company under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended, Yadkin is registered with and subject to regulation by the Federal Reserve. Yadkin is required to file annual and other reports with, and furnish information to, the Federal Reserve. The Federal Reserve conducts periodic examinations of Yadkin and may examine any of its subsidiaries, including the Bank.
     The Bank Holding Company Act provides that a bank holding company must obtain the prior approval of the Federal Reserve for the acquisition of more than five percent of the voting stock or substantially all the assets of any bank or bank holding company. In addition, the Bank Holding Company Act restricts the extension of credit to any bank holding company by its subsidiary bank. The Bank Holding Company Act also provides that, with certain exceptions, a bank holding company may not engage in any activities other than those of banking or managing or controlling banks and other authorized subsidiaries or own or control more than five percent of the voting shares of any company that is not a bank. The Federal Reserve has deemed limited activities to be closely related to banking and therefore permissible for a bank holding company.
     The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Financial Services Modernization Act of 1999 significantly expanded the types of activities in which a bank holding company may engage. Subject to various limitations, the Modernization Act generally permits a bank holding company to elect to become a “financial holding company.” A financial holding company may affiliate with securities firms and insurance companies and engage in other activities that are “financial in nature.” Among the activities that are deemed “financial in nature” are, in addition to traditional

5


Table of Contents

lending activities, securities underwriting, dealing in or making a market in securities, sponsoring mutual funds and investment companies, insurance underwriting and agency activities, certain merchant banking activities as well as activities that the Federal Reserve considers to be closely related to banking.
     A bank holding company may become a financial holding company under the Modernization Act if each of its subsidiary banks is “well-capitalized” under the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvement Act prompt corrective action provisions, is well managed and has at least a satisfactory rating under the Community Reinvestment Act. In addition, the bank holding company must file a declaration with the Federal Reserve that the bank holding company wishes to become a financial holding company. A bank holding company that falls out of compliance with these requirements may be required to cease engaging in some of its activities.
     Under the Modernization Act, the Federal Reserve serves as the primary “umbrella” regulator of financial holding companies, with supervisory authority over each parent company and limited authority over its subsidiaries. Expanded financial activities of financial holding companies generally will be regulated according to the type of such financial activity: banking activities by banking regulators, securities activities by securities regulators and insurance activities by insurance regulators. The Modernization Act also imposes additional restrictions and heightened disclosure requirements regarding private information collected by financial institutions.
     Enforcement Authority. Yadkin will be required to obtain the approval of the Federal Reserve prior to engaging in or, with certain exceptions, acquiring control of more than 5% of the voting shares of a company engaged in, any new activity. Prior to granting such approval, the Federal Reserve must weigh the expected benefits of any such new activity to the public (such as greater convenience, increased competition, or gains in efficiency) against the risk of possible adverse effects of such activity (such as undue concentration of resources, decreased or unfair competition, conflicts of interest, or unsound banking practices). The Federal Reserve has cease-and-desist powers over bank holding companies and their nonbanking subsidiaries where their actions would constitute a serious threat to the safety, soundness or stability of a subsidiary bank. The Federal Reserve also has authority to regulate debt obligations (other than commercial paper) issued by bank holding companies. This authority includes the power to impose interest ceilings and reserve requirements on such debt obligations. A bank holding company and its subsidiaries are also prohibited from engaging in certain tie-in arrangements in connection with any extension of credit, lease or sale of property or furnishing of services.
     Interstate Acquisitions. Federal banking law generally provides that a bank holding company may acquire or establish banks in any state of the United States, subject to certain aging and deposit concentration limits. In addition, North Carolina banking laws permit a bank holding company which owns stock of a bank located outside North Carolina to acquire a bank or bank holding company located in North Carolina. Federal banking law will not permit a bank holding company to own or control banks in North Carolina if the acquisition would exceed 20% of the total deposits of all federally-insured deposits in North Carolina.
     Capital Adequacy. The Federal Reserve has promulgated capital adequacy regulations for all bank holding companies with assets in excess of $150 million. The Federal Reserve’s capital adequacy regulations are based upon a risk-based capital determination, whereby a bank holding company’s capital adequacy is determined in light of the risk, both on- and off-balance sheet, contained in the company’s assets. Different categories of assets are assigned risk weightings and are counted at a percentage of their book value.
     The regulations divide capital between Tier 1 capital (core capital) and Tier 2 capital. For a bank holding company, Tier 1 capital consists primarily of common stock, related surplus, noncumulative perpetual preferred stock, minority interests in consolidated subsidiaries and a limited amount of qualifying cumulative preferred securities. Goodwill and certain other intangibles are excluded from Tier 1 capital. Tier 2 capital consists of an amount equal to the allowance for loan and lease losses up to a maximum of 1.25% of risk-weighted assets, limited other types of preferred stock not included in Tier 1 capital, hybrid capital instruments and term subordinated debt. Investments in and loans to unconsolidated banking and finance subsidiaries that constitute capital of those subsidiaries are excluded from capital. The sum of Tier 1 and Tier 2 capital constitutes qualifying total capital. The Tier 1 component must comprise at least 50% of qualifying total capital.
     Every bank holding company has to achieve and maintain a minimum Tier 1 capital ratio of at least 4.0% and a minimum total capital ratio of at least 8.0%. In addition, banks and bank holding companies are required to maintain a minimum leverage ratio of Tier 1 capital to average total consolidated assets (leverage capital ratio) of at least 3.0% for the most highly-rated, financially sound banks and bank holding companies and a minimum leverage ratio of at least 4.0% for all other banks. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and the Federal Reserve define

6


Table of Contents

Tier 1 capital for banks in the same manner for both the leverage ratio and the risk-based capital ratio. However, the Federal Reserve defines Tier 1 capital for bank holding companies in a slightly different manner. As of December 31, 2007, the Bank’s Tier 1 leverage capital ratio and total capital were 8.41% and 10.36%, respectively. As of December 31, 2007, the bank holding company’s Tier 1 leverage capital ratio and total capital were 10.67% and 12.75%, respectively.
     The guidelines also provide that banking organizations experiencing internal growth or making acquisitions will be expected to maintain strong capital positions substantially above the minimum supervisory level, without significant reliance on intangible assets. The guidelines also indicate that the Federal Reserve will continue to consider a “Tangible Tier 1 Leverage Ratio” in evaluating proposals for expansion or new activities. The Tangible Tier 1 Leverage Ratio is the ratio of Tier 1 capital, less intangibles not deducted from Tier 1 capital, to quarterly average total assets. As of December 31, 2007, the Federal Reserve had not advised Yadkin of any specific minimum Tangible Tier 1 Leverage Ratio applicable to it.
     Source of Strength for Subsidiary. Bank holding companies are required to serve as a source of financial strength for their depository institution subsidiaries, and, if their depository institution subsidiaries become undercapitalized, bank holding companies may be required to guarantee the subsidiaries’ compliance with capital restoration plans filed with their bank regulators, subject to certain limits.
     Dividends. As a holding company that does not, as an entity, currently engage in separate business activities of a material nature, our ability to pay cash dividends depends upon the cash dividends received from our subsidiary bank and management fees paid by the bank. We must pay our operating expenses from funds we receive from the bank. Therefore, shareholders may receive cash dividends from us only to the extent that funds are available after payment of operating expenses. In addition, the Federal Reserve generally prohibits bank holding companies from paying cash dividends except out of operating earnings, provided that the prospective rate of earnings retention appears consistent with the bank holding company’s capital needs, asset quality and overall financial condition. As a North Carolina corporation, our payment of cash dividends is subject to the restrictions under North Carolina law on the declaration of cash dividends. Under such provisions, cash dividends may not be paid if a corporation will not be able to pay its debts as they become due in the usual course of business after paying such a cash dividend or if the corporation’s total assets would be less than the sum of its total liabilities plus the amount that would be needed to satisfy certain liquidation preferential rights.
     Change of Control. State and federal banking law restricts the amount of voting stock of a bank that a person may acquire without the prior approval of banking regulators. The Bank Holding Company Act requires that a bank holding company obtain the approval of the Federal Reserve before it may merge with a bank holding company, acquire a subsidiary bank, acquire substantially all of the assets of any bank, or before it may acquire ownership or control of any voting shares of any bank or bank holding company if, after such acquisition, it would own or control, directly or indirectly, more than 5% of the voting shares of that bank or bank holding company. The overall effect of such laws is to make it more difficult to acquire Yadkin by tender offer or similar means than it might be to acquire control of another type of corporation. Consequently, Yadkin shareholders may be less likely to benefit from rapid increases in stock prices that often result from tender offers or similar efforts to acquire control of other types of companies.
     Yadkin Valley Bank and Trust Company
     As a North Carolina bank, the Bank is subject to regulation, supervision and regular examination by the North Carolina Banking Commission (the “Commission”) through the North Carolina Commissioner of Banks (the “Commissioner”) and its applicable federal regulator is the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”). The North Carolina Banking Commission and the FDIC have the power to enforce compliance with applicable banking statutes and regulations.
Federal regulation
     As a North Carolina chartered bank, we are subject to regulation, supervision and regular examination by the FDIC. The FDIC is required to conduct regular on-site examinations of the operations of the Bank and enforces federal laws that set specific requirements for bank capital, the payment of dividends, loans to officers and directors, and types and amounts of loans and investments made by commercial banks. Among other things, the FDIC must approve the establishment of branch offices, conversions, mergers, assumption of deposit liabilities between insured

7


Table of Contents

banks and uninsured banks or institutions, and the acquisition or establishment of certain subsidiary corporations. The FDIC can also prevent capital or surplus diminution in transactions where the deposit accounts of the resulting, continuing or assumed bank are insured by the FDIC.
     Transactions with Affiliates. A bank may not engage in specified transactions (including, for example, loans) with its affiliates unless the terms and conditions of those transactions are substantially the same or at least as favorable to the Bank as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with or involving other nonaffiliated entities. In the absence of comparable transactions, any transaction between a bank and its affiliates must be on terms and under circumstances, including credit standards, which in good faith would be offered or would apply to nonaffiliated companies. In addition, transactions referred to as “covered transactions” between a bank and its affiliates may not exceed 10% of the bank’s capital and surplus per affiliate and an aggregate of 20% of its capital and surplus for covered transactions with all affiliates. Certain transactions with affiliates, such as loans, also must be secured by collateral of specific types and amounts. The Bank is also prohibited from purchasing low quality assets from an affiliate. Every company under common control with the Bank is deemed to be an affiliate of the bank.
     Loans to Insiders. Federal law also constrains the types and amounts of loans that the Bank may make to its executive officers, directors and principal shareholders. Among other things, these loans are limited in amount, must be approved by the Bank’s board of directors in advance, and must be on terms and conditions as favorable to the Bank as those available to an unrelated person.
     Regulation of Lending Activities. Loans made by the bank are also subject to numerous federal and state laws and regulations, including the Truth-In-Lending Act, Federal Consumer Credit Protection Act, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act and Home Mortgage Disclosure Act. Remedies to the borrower or consumer and penalties to the Bank are provided if the Bank fails to comply with these laws and regulations. The scope and requirements of these laws and regulations have expanded significantly in recent years.
     Branch Banking. All banks located in North Carolina are authorized to branch statewide. Accordingly, a bank located anywhere in North Carolina has the ability, subject to regulatory approval, to establish branch facilities near any of our facilities and within our market area. If other banks were to establish branch facilities near our facilities, it is uncertain whether these branch facilities would have a material adverse effect on our business. Federal law provides for nationwide interstate banking and branching, subject to certain aging and deposit concentration limits that may be imposed under applicable state laws. Applicable North Carolina statutes permit regulatory authorities to approve de novo branching in North Carolina by institutions located in states that would permit North Carolina institutions to branch on a de novo basis into those states. Federal regulations prohibit an out-of-state bank from using interstate branching authority primarily for the purpose of deposit production. These regulations include guidelines to insure that interstate branches operated by an out-of-state bank in a host state are reasonably helping to meet the credit needs of the host state communities served by the out-of-state bank.
     Reserve Requirements. Pursuant to regulations of the Federal Reserve, the Bank must maintain average daily reserves against its transaction accounts. During 2007, no reserves were required to be maintained on the first $8.5 million of transaction accounts, but reserves equal to 3.0% were required on the aggregate balances of those accounts between $8.5 million and $45.8 million, and additional reserves were required on aggregate balances in excess of $45.8 million in an amount equal to 10.0% of the excess. These percentages are subject to annual adjustment by the Federal Reserve, which has advised that for 2008, no reserves will be required to be maintained on the first $9.3 million of transaction accounts, but reserves equal to 3.0% will be required on the aggregate balances of those accounts between $9.3 million and $43.9 million, and additional reserves are required on aggregate balances in excess of $43.9 million in an amount equal to 10.0% of the excess. Because required reserves must be maintained in the form of vault cash or in a non-interest bearing account at a Federal Reserve Bank, the effect of the reserve requirement is to reduce the amount of the institution’s interest-earning assets. As of December 31, 2007, the Bank met its reserve requirements.
     Community Reinvestment. Under the Community Reinvestment Act (“CRA”), as implemented by regulations of the federal bank regulatory agencies, an insured bank has a continuing and affirmative obligation, consistent with its safe and sound operation, to help meet the credit needs of its entire community, including low and moderate income neighborhoods. The CRA does not establish specific lending requirements or programs for banks, nor does it limit a bank’s discretion to develop the types of products and services that it believes are best suited to its particular community, consistent with the CRA. The CRA requires the federal bank regulatory agencies, in

8


Table of Contents

connection with their examination of insured banks, to assess the banks’ records of meeting the credit needs of their communities, using the ratings of “outstanding,” “satisfactory,” “needs to improve,” or “substantial noncompliance,” and to take that record into account in its evaluation of certain applications by those banks. All banks are required to make public disclosure of their CRA performance ratings. The Bank received a “satisfactory” rating in its most recent CRA examination.
     Governmental Monetary Policies. The commercial banking business is affected not only by general economic conditions but also by the monetary policies of the Federal Reserve, a federal banking regulatory agency that regulates the money supply in order to mitigate recessionary and inflationary pressures. Among the techniques used to implement these objectives are open market transactions in United States government securities, changes in the rate paid by banks on bank borrowings, and changes in reserve requirements against bank deposits. These techniques are used in varying combinations to influence overall growth and distribution of bank loans, investments, and deposits, and their use may also affect interest rates charged on loans or paid for deposits. The monetary policies of the Federal Reserve have had a significant effect on the operating results of commercial banks in the past and are expected to continue to do so in the future. In view of changing conditions in the national economy and money markets, as well as the effect of actions by monetary and fiscal authorities, no prediction can be made as to possible future changes in interest rates, deposit levels, loan demand or the business and earnings of the Bank.
     Dividends. Under federal banking law, no cash dividend may be paid if a bank is undercapitalized or insolvent or if payment of the cash dividend would render the bank undercapitalized or insolvent, and no cash dividend may be paid by the bank if it is in default on any deposit insurance assessment due to the FDIC.
     Deposit Insurance Assessments. The Bank’s deposits are insured up to $100,000 per insured non-IRA account and up to $250,000 per IRA account by the Deposit Insurance Fund of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. The Bank is required to pay deposit insurance assessments set by the FDIC. The FDIC determines the Bank’s deposit insurance assessment rates on the basis of four risk categories. The Bank’s assessment will range from 0.02% to 0.04% at the lowest assessment category up to a maximum assessment of 0.40% of the Bank’s average deposit base, with the exact assessment determined by the Bank’s assets, its capital and the FDIC’s supervisory opinion of its operations. The insurance assessment rate may change periodically and was significantly increased for all depository institutions during 2007. Increases in the assessment rate may have an adverse effect on the Bank’s operating results. The FDIC has the authority to terminate deposit insurance.
     Changes in Management. Any depository institution that has been chartered less than two years, is not in compliance with the minimum capital requirements of its primary federal banking regulator (currently the FDIC), or is otherwise in a troubled condition must notify its primary federal banking regulator of the proposed addition of any person to the board of directors or the employment of any person as a senior executive officer of the institution at least 30 days before such addition or employment becomes effective. During this 30-day period, the applicable federal banking regulatory agency may disapprove of the addition of such director or employment of such officer. The Bank is not subject to any such requirements.
     Enforcement Authority. The federal banking laws also contain civil and criminal penalties available for use by the appropriate regulatory agency against certain “institution-affiliated parties” primarily including management, employees and agents of a financial institution, as well as independent contractors such as attorneys and accountants and others who participate in the conduct of the financial institution’s affairs and who caused or are likely to cause more than minimum financial loss to or a significant adverse affect on the institution, who knowingly or recklessly violate a law or regulation, breach a fiduciary duty or engage in unsafe or unsound practices. These practices can include the failure of an institution to timely file required reports or the submission of inaccurate reports. These laws authorize the appropriate banking agency to issue cease and desist orders that may, among other things, require affirmative action to correct any harm resulting from a violation or practice, including restitution, reimbursement, indemnification or guarantees against loss. A financial institution may also be ordered to restrict its growth, dispose of certain assets or take other action as determined by the primary federal banking agency to be appropriate.
     Capital Adequacy. The Bank is subject to capital requirements and limits on activities established by the FDIC. Under the capital regulations, the Bank generally is required to maintain Tier 1 risk-based capital, as such term is defined therein, of 4% and total risk-based capital, as such term is defined therein, of 8%. In addition, the Bank is required to provide a minimum leverage ratio of Tier 1 capital to adjusted average quarterly assets (“leverage ratio”) equal to 3%, plus an additional cushion of 1% to 2% if the Bank has less than the highest regulatory rating. The Bank is not permitted to engage in any activity not permitted for a national bank unless (i) it

9


Table of Contents

is in compliance with its capital requirements and (ii) the FDIC determines that the activity would not pose a risk to the deposit insurance fund. With certain exceptions, the Bank also is not permitted to acquire equity investments of a type, or in an amount, not permitted for a national bank.
     Prompt Corrective Action. Banks are subject to restrictions on their activities depending on their level of capital. Federal “prompt corrective action” regulations divide banks into five different categories, depending on their level of capital. Under these regulations, a bank is deemed to be “well capitalized” if it has a total risk-based capital ratio of 10% or more, a core capital ratio of six percent or more and a leverage ratio of five percent or more, and if the bank is not subject to an order or capital directive to meet and maintain a certain capital level. Under these regulations, a bank is deemed to be “adequately capitalized” if it has a total risk-based capital ratio of eight percent or more, a core capital ratio of four percent or more and a leverage ratio of four percent or more (unless it receives the highest composite rating at its most recent examination and is not experiencing or anticipating significant growth, in which instance it must maintain a leverage ratio of three percent or more). Under these regulations, a bank is deemed to be “undercapitalized” if it has a total risk-based capital ratio of less than eight percent, a core capital ratio of less than four percent or a leverage ratio of less than four percent. Under these regulations, a bank is deemed to be “significantly undercapitalized” if it has a risk-based capital ratio of less than six percent, a core capital ratio of less than three percent and a leverage ratio of less than three percent. Under such regulations, a bank is deemed to be “critically undercapitalized” if it has a tangible equity ratio of less than or equal to two percent. In addition, the applicable federal banking agency has the ability to downgrade a bank’s classification (but not to “critically undercapitalized”) based on other considerations even if the bank meets the capital guidelines. As of December 31, 2007 the Bank was well capitalized within the meaning of the capital guidelines.
     If a state bank is classified as undercapitalized, the bank is required to submit a capital restoration plan to the FDIC and the FDIC may also take certain actions to correct the capital position of the bank. An undercapitalized bank is prohibited from increasing its assets, engaging in a new line of business, acquiring any interest in any company or insured depository institution, or opening or acquiring a new branch office, except under certain circumstances, including the acceptance by the FDIC of a capital restoration plan for the bank.
     If a state bank is classified as significantly undercapitalized, the FDIC would be required to take one or more prompt corrective actions. These actions would include, among other things, requiring sales of new securities to bolster capital, changes in management, limits on interest rates paid, prohibitions on transactions with affiliates, termination of certain risky activities and restrictions on compensation paid to executive officers. If a bank is classified as critically undercapitalized, the bank must be placed into conservatorship or receivership within 90 days, unless the FDIC determines otherwise.
     The capital classification of a bank affects the frequency of regulatory examinations of the bank and impacts the ability of the bank to engage in certain activities and affects the deposit insurance premiums paid by the bank. The FDIC is required to conduct a full-scope, on-site examination of every bank on a periodic basis.
     Banks also may be restricted in their ability to accept brokered deposits, depending on their capital classification. “Well capitalized” banks are permitted to accept brokered deposits, but all banks that are not well capitalized are not permitted to accept such deposits. The FDIC may, on a case-by-case basis, permit banks that are adequately capitalized to accept brokered deposits if the FDIC determines that acceptance of such deposits would not constitute an unsafe or unsound banking practice with respect to the bank.
State regulation.
     As a North Carolina-chartered bank, the Bank is also subject to extensive supervision and regulation by the Commissioner. The Commissioner enforces state laws that set specific requirements for bank capital, the payment of dividends, loans to officers and directors, record keeping, and types and amounts of loans and investments made by commercial banks. Among other things, the approval of the Commissioner is generally required before a North Carolina-chartered commercial bank may establish branch offices. North Carolina banking law requires that any merger, liquidation or sale of substantially all of the assets of the Bank must be approved by the Commissioner and the holders of two thirds of the Bank’s outstanding common stock.
     Change of control. North Carolina banking laws provide that no person may directly or indirectly purchase or acquire voting stock of the Bank that would result in the change in control of the Bank unless the Commissioner has

10


Table of Contents

approved the acquisition. A person will be deemed to have acquired “control” of the Bank if that person directly or indirectly (i) owns, controls or has power to vote 10% or more of the voting stock of the Bank, or (ii) otherwise possesses the power to direct or cause the direction of the management and policy of the Bank.
     Loans. In its lending activities, the Bank is subject to North Carolina usury laws which generally limit or restrict the rates of interest, fees and charges and other terms and conditions in connection with various types of loans. North Carolina banking law also limits the amount that may be loaned to any one borrower.
     Dividends. The ability of the Bank to pay dividends is restricted under applicable law and regulations. Under North Carolina banking law, dividends must be paid out of retained earnings and no cash dividends may be paid if payment of the dividend would cause the Bank’s surplus to be less than 50% of its paid-in capital.
Future legislation and regulations.
     Yadkin cannot predict what new legislation might be enacted or what regulations might be adopted or amended, or if enacted, adopted or amended, their effect on its operations. Any change in applicable law or regulation, state or federal, may have a material adverse effect on its business.
Number of Employees
     At December 31, 2007, the Company had 337 full-time employees (including our executive officers) and 93 part-time employees. None of the employees are represented by any unions or similar groups, and we have not experienced any type of strike or labor dispute. We consider our relationship with our employees to be good.
Item 1A. Risk Factors
     An investment in our common stock involves risks. Shareholders should carefully consider the risks described below in conjunction with the other information in this Form 10K and information incorporated by reference in this Form 10K, including our consolidated financial statements and related notes. If any of the following risks or other risks which have not been identified or which we may believe are immaterial or unlikely, actually occur, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be harmed. This could cause the price of our stock to decline, and shareholders could lose part or all of their investment. This Form 10K contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties, including statements about our future plans, objectives, intentions and expectations. Many factors, including those described below, could cause actual results to differ materially from those discussed in our forward-looking statements.
Our business strategy includes the continuation of significant growth plans, and our financial condition and results of operations could be negatively affected if we fail to grow or fail to manage our growth effectively.
     We intend to continue pursuing a significant growth strategy for our business. Our prospects must be considered in light of the risks, expenses and difficulties frequently encountered by companies in significant growth stages of development. We cannot assure you we will be able to expand our market presence in our existing markets or successfully enter new markets or that any such expansion will not adversely affect our results of operations. Failure to manage our growth effectively could have a material adverse effect on our business, future prospects, financial condition or results of operations, and could adversely affect our ability to successfully implement our business strategy. Also, if our growth occurs more slowly than anticipated or declines, our operating results could be materially adversely affected. Our ability to successfully grow will depend on a variety of factors including the continued availability of desirable business opportunities, the competitive responses from other financial institutions in our market areas and our ability to manage our growth
We may face risks with respect to future expansion.
     As a strategy, we have sought to increase the size of our franchise by aggressively pursuing business development opportunities, and we have grown rapidly in the last four years. We have purchased two other financial institutions and a mortgage lending company as a part of that strategy. We may acquire other financial institutions or parts of those entities in the future. Acquisitions and mergers involve a number of risks, including:

11


Table of Contents

    the time and costs associated with identifying and evaluating potential acquisitions and merger partners;
 
    the estimates and judgments used to evaluate credit, operations, management and market risks with respect to the target entity may not be accurate;
 
    the time and costs of evaluating new markets, hiring experienced local management and opening new offices, and the time lags between these activities and the generation of sufficient assets and deposits to support the costs of the expansion;
 
    our ability to finance an acquisition and possible ownership and economic dilution to our current shareholders;
 
    the diversion of our management’s attention to the negotiation of a transaction, and the integration of the operations and personnel of the combining businesses;
 
    entry into new markets where we lack experience;
 
    the introduction of new products and services into our business;
 
    the incurrence and possible impairment of goodwill associated with an acquisition and possible adverse short-term effects on our results of operations; and
 
    the risk of loss of key employees and customers.
     We may incur substantial costs to expand, and we can give no assurance such expansion will result in the levels of profits we seek. There can be no assurance integration efforts for any future mergers or acquisitions will be successful. Also, we may issue equity securities, including common stock, and securities convertible into shares of our common stock in connection with future acquisitions, which could cause ownership and economic dilution to our current shareholders at such time. There is no assurance that, following any future mergers or acquisition, our integration efforts will be successful or our company, after giving effect to the acquisition, will achieve profits comparable to or better than our historical experience.
If the value of real estate in our core market areas were to decline materially, a significant portion of our loan portfolio could become under-collateralized, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
          With most of our loans concentrated in the central Piedmont and Northwestern region of North Carolina, a decline in local economic conditions could adversely affect the values of our real estate collateral. Consequently, a decline in local economic conditions may have a greater effect on our earnings and capital than on the earnings and capital of larger financial institutions whose real estate loan portfolios are geographically diverse. In addition to the financial strength and cash flow characteristics of the borrower in each case, the Bank often secures loans with real estate collateral. At December 31, 2007, approximately 77.3% of the Bank’s loans had real estate as a primary or secondary component of collateral. The real estate collateral in each case provides an alternate source of repayment in the event of default by the borrower and may deteriorate in value during the time the credit is extended. If we are required to liquidate the collateral securing a loan to satisfy the debt during a period of reduced real estate values, our earnings and capital could be adversely affected.
Interest rate volatility could significantly harm our business.
          Our results of operations are affected by the monetary and fiscal policies of the federal government and the regulatory policies of governmental authorities. A significant component of Bank’s earnings is our net interest income. Net interest income is the difference between income from interest-earning assets, such as loans, and the expense of interest-bearing liabilities, such as deposits. We may not be able to effectively manage changes in what we charge as interest on our earning assets and the expense we must pay on interest-bearing liabilities, which may significantly reduce our earnings. The Federal Reserve has made significant changes in interest rates during the last few years. Since rates charged on loans often tend to react to market conditions faster than do rates paid on deposit accounts, these rate changes may have a negative impact on our earnings until we can make appropriate adjustments in our deposit rates. In addition, there are costs associated with our risk management techniques, and these costs could be material. Fluctuations in interest rates are not predictable or controllable and, therefore, there can be no assurances of our ability to continue to maintain a consistent positive spread between the interest earned on our earning assets and the interest paid on our interest-bearing liabilities.
We may have higher loan losses than our allowance for loan losses.
          Our loan losses could exceed the allowance for loan losses that we have set aside. Our average loan size continues to increase and reliance on historic allowances for loan losses may not be adequate. Approximately

12


Table of Contents

69.7% of our loan portfolio is composed of construction, commercial mortgage and commercial loans. Repayment of such loans is generally considered more subject to market risk than residential mortgage loans. Industry experience shows that a portion of loans will become delinquent and a portion of the loans will require partial or entire charge-off. Regardless of the underwriting criteria we utilize, losses may be experienced as a result of various factors beyond our control, including, among other things, changes in market conditions affecting the value of our loan collateral and problems affecting the credit of our borrowers.
The building of market share through our de novo branching strategy could cause our expenses to increase faster than our revenues.
          We intend to continue to build market share through our de novo branching strategy. New branches generally do not generate sufficient revenues to offset their costs until they have been in operation for at least a year or more. Accordingly, our new branches can be expected to negatively impact our earnings for some period of time until the branches reach certain economies of scale. Our expenses could be further increased if we encounter delays in the opening of any of our new branches. Cardinal State Bank, which will merge with the Bank on March 31, 2008, has regulatory approval to open new branches in Creedmoor and Hillsborough, which we intend to do in 2008. Finally, we have no assurance our new branches will be successful even after they have been established.
If we lose key employees with significant business contacts in our market area, our business may suffer.
          Our success is dependent on the personal contacts of our officers and employees in our market area. If we lose key employees temporarily or permanently, our business could be hurt. We could be particularly hurt if our key employees went to work for competitors. Our future success depends on the continued contributions of our existing senior management personnel, particularly on the efforts of our President and CEO, William A. Long, who has significant local experience and contacts in our market area.
Government regulations may prevent or impair our ability to pay dividends, engage in acquisitions, or operate in other ways.
          Current and future legislation and the policies established by federal and state regulatory authorities will affect our operations. We are subject to supervision and periodic examination by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and the North Carolina Commissioner of Banks. Banking regulations, designed primarily for the protection of depositors, may limit our growth and the return to you as an investor in the Bank, by restricting our activities, such as:
    the payment of dividends to shareholders;
 
    possible transactions with or acquisitions by other institutions;
 
    desired investments;
 
    loans and interest rates;
 
    interest rates paid on deposits; and
 
    the possible expansion of branch offices
          We cannot predict what changes, if any, will be made to existing federal and state legislation and regulations or the effect that such changes may have on our business. The cost of compliance with regulatory requirements may adversely affect our ability to operate profitably.
Our trading volume has been low compared with larger banks and bank holding companies and the sale of substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market could depress the price of our common stock.
          The average daily trading volume of our shares on The Nasdaq Global Select Market for the three months ended March 1, 2008 was approximately 9,131 shares. Lightly traded stock can be more volatile than stock trading in an active public market like that for the large bank holding companies. We cannot predict the extent to which an active public market for our common stock will develop or be sustained. In recent years, the stock market has experienced a high level of price and volume volatility, and market prices for the stock of many companies have experienced wide price fluctuations that have not necessarily been related to their operating performance. Therefore, our shareholders may not be able to sell their shares at the volumes, prices, or times that they desire. We cannot predict the effect, if any, that future sales of our common stock in the market, or availability of shares of our

13


Table of Contents

common stock for sale in the market, will have on the market price of our common stock. We therefore can give no assurance that sales of substantial amounts of our common stock in the market, or the potential for large amounts of sales in the market, would not cause the price of our common stock to decline or impair our ability to raise capital through sales of our common stock.
We face strong competition in our market area, which may limit our asset growth and profitability.
          The banking business in our primary market area, which is currently concentrated in the central Piedmont and Northwestern area of North Carolina, is very competitive, and the level of competition we face may increase further, which may limit our asset growth and profitability. We experience competition in both lending and attracting funds from other banks and nonbank financial institutions located within our market area, some of which are significantly larger, well-established institutions. Nonbank competitors for deposits and deposit-type accounts include savings associations, credit unions, securities firms, money market funds, life insurance companies and the mutual funds industry. For loans, we encounter competition from other banks, savings associations, finance companies, mortgage bankers and brokers, insurance companies, small loan and credit card companies, credit unions, pension trusts and securities firms. We may face a competitive disadvantage as a result of our smaller size, lack of multi-state geographic diversification and inability to spread our marketing costs across a broader market.
Our Articles of Incorporation include anti-takeover provisions that may prevent shareholders from receiving a premium for their shares or effecting a transaction favored by a majority of shareholders.
     Our Articles of Incorporation include certain anti-takeover provisions, such as being subject to the Shareholder Protection Act and Control Share Acquisition Act under North Carolina law, which may have the effect of preventing shareholders from receiving a premium for their shares of common stock and discouraging a change of control of the Company by allowing minority shareholders to prevent a transaction favored by a majority of the shareholders. The primary purpose of these provisions is to encourage negotiations with our management by persons interested in acquiring control of the Company. These provisions may also tend to perpetuate present management and make it difficult for shareholders owning less than a majority of the shares to be able to elect even a single director.
Our common stock is not FDIC insured.
          Our common stock is not a savings or deposit account or other obligation of the bank and is not insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Bank Insurance Fund or any other governmental agency and is subject to investment risk, including the possible loss of principal.
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
None.
Item 2 — Properties
     The Company currently operates out of 24 full-service banking offices, 13 mortgage lending offices operated by Sidus and 6 administrative offices as set forth below:
                 
    Approximate Square   Year Established/
Office location   Footage   Acquired
110 West Market Street, Elkin, NC
    2,350       1968  
1318 North Bridge Street Elkin, NC
    4,550       1989  
101 North Bridge Street, Jonesville, NC
    2,275       1971  
117 Paulines Street, East Bend, NC
    2,400       1998  
1404 West D Street, North Wilkesboro, NC
    3,178       1984  
301 West Main Street, Wilkesboro, NC
    2,400       1991  
709 East Main Street, Jefferson, NC
    4,159       1986  
107 North Fifth Avenue, West Jefferson, NC
    2,400       1988  
1488 Mount Jefferson Road, West Jefferson, NC
    4,900       2001  
516 Hawthorne Drive, Yadkinville, NC
    4,532       2007  
4611 Yadkinville Road, Pfafftown, NC
    2,400       2007  
3804 Peachtree Ave #220E, Wilmington, NC (LPO)
    1,200       2007  

14


Table of Contents

                 
    Approximate Square   Year Established/
Office location   Footage   Acquired
Offices doing business as Piedmont Bank -
               
325 East Front Street, Statesville, NC
    4,990       1998  
127 North Cross Lane, Statesville, NC
    2,485       1997  
165 Williamson Road, Mooresville, NC
    5,093       1998  
520 East Plaza Drive, Mooresville, NC
    3,689       2000  
19525 West Catawba Avenue, Cornelius, NC
    2,834       2000  
100 North Statesville Road, Huntersville, NC
    2,923       2000  
197 Medical Park Road, Mooresville, NC
    13,800       2005  
3475 East Broad St, Statesville, NC
    1,800       2006  
 
               
Offices doing business as High Country Bank-
               
149 Jefferson Road, Boone, NC
    4,600       1998  
176 Shadowline Drive, Boone, NC
    1,700       2000  
520 Church Road, Boone, NC
    215       2001  
783 W. King Street Ste A, Boone, NC
    1,200       2004  
3618 Mitchell Ave, Linville, NC
    3,000       2005  
 
               
Offices operated by Sidus Financial, LLC
               
1905 Turnberry Drive, Greenville, NC
    10,000       2004  
1073 13th Street SE, Hickory, NC
    750       2004  
350 South Cox Ste D, Asheboro, NC
    800       2004  
611 N. Courthouse Rd, Richmond, VA
    2,847       2004  
1824 E. Main St, Easley, SC
    1,000       2004  
4915 Water Edge Drive Ste 295, Raleigh, NC
    1,000       2005  
6511 Creedmoor Road Ste 207, Raleigh, NC
    1,150       2006  
2308 Cedar Run Place, Wilson, NC
    950       2006  
#16 Causeway Shopping Center, Atlantic Beach, NC
    600       2006  
3804 Peachtree Ave. #220E, Wilmington, NC
    1,200       2007  
1004 N. Berkley Blvd, Goldsboro, NC
    150       2007  
502 Hodges Street Unit 1, Oriental, NC
    371       2007  
1415 Freeway Drive, Reidsville, NC
    1900       2007  
 
               
Offices housing administration and operations-
               
209 North Bridge Street, Elkin, NC
    6,120       1979  
290 North Bridge Street, Elkin, NC
    2,516       1995  
204 South Elm Street, Statesville, NC
    5,435       2000  
120 South Elm Street, Statesville, NC
    2,381       2001  
482 State Farm Road, Boone, NC
    2,900       2003  
101 West Main Street, Elkin
    13,480       2004  
 
               
Offices expected to do business as Cardinal State Bank-
               
100 South Churton Street, Hillsborough, NC
            2008  
5309 Highgate Drive, Durham, NC
            2008  
115 East Carver Street, Durham, NC
            2008  
3400 Westgate Drive, Durham, NC
            2008  
 
               
Offices expected to house administration and operations, pending the acquisition of Cardinal State Bank-
3710 University Drive, Durham, NC
            2008  
Item 3 — Legal Proceedings
     Although the Company is a defendant in various legal proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business, there are no legal proceedings pending or, to the best knowledge of management, threatened which, in the opinion of management, will have a material adverse affect on the financial condition or results of operation of the Company.

15


Table of Contents

Item 4 — Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders
     None.
PART II
Item 5 —Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters, and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
     Market for the Common Stock of the Bank. Yadkin first issued common stock during 1968 in connection with its initial incorporation and the commencement of its banking operations. Yadkin’s common stock is listed on The Nasdaq Global Select Markey under the trading symbol “YAVY.” As of March 1, 2008, the Bank had 4,193 shareholders of record.
The following table lists high and low published closing prices of Yadkin’s common stock (as reported on The Nasdaq Global Select) for the calendar quarters indicated:
                                                         
Year                           Year        
2007   Price           2006   Price    
Quarterly Period   High   Low   Dividends   Quarterly Period   High   Low   Dividends
First quarter
  $ 21.15     $ 17.75     $ 0.12     First quarter   $ 15.00     $ 14.05     $ 0.11  
Second quarter
    19.49       18.19       0.13     Second quarter     15.23       13.58       0.12  
Third quarter
    18.64       15.01       0.13     Third quarter     16.00       14.16       0.12  
Fourth quarter
    17.25       14.00       0.13     Fourth quarter     19.95       15.17       0.12  
     Dividends. In the future, any declaration and payment of cash dividends will be subject to Yadkin’s Board of Directors’ evaluation of its operating results, financial condition, future growth plans, general business and economic conditions, and tax and other relevant considerations. Also, the payment of cash dividends by Yadkin in the future will be subject to certain other legal and regulatory limitations (including the requirement that Yadkin’s capital be maintained at certain minimum levels) and will be subject to ongoing review by banking regulators. There is no assurance that, in the future, Yadkin will have funds available to pay cash dividends, or, even if funds are available, that it will pay dividends in any particular amount or at any particular times, or that it will pay dividends at all.
     Regulatory restrictions on cash dividends. As a holding company, we are dependent upon our subsidiary, the bank, to provide funding for our operating expenses and dividends. North Carolina banking law requires that cash dividends be paid out of retained earnings and prohibits the payment of cash dividends if payment of the dividend would cause the bank’s surplus to be less than 50% of its paid-in capital. Also, under federal banking law, no cash dividend may be paid if the bank is undercapitalized or insolvent or if payment of the cash dividend would render the bank undercapitalized or insolvent, and no cash dividend may be paid by the bank if it is in default of any deposit insurance assessment due to the FDIC.
Issuer Purchase of Equity Securities
                                 
    Total Number           Total Number of Shares   Maximum Number of Shares that
    of Shares   Average Price   Purchased as Part of Publicly   May Yet Be Purchased Under the
Period   Purchased   Paid per Share   Announced Plans or Programs   Plans or Programs
10/1-10/31/07
    1,000     $ 15.64       1,000       41,399  
11/1-11/30/07
                      41,399  
12/1-12/31/07
    12,680       15.72       12,680       28,719  

16


Table of Contents

Item 6 — Selected Financial Data
                                         
Years Ended December 31,   2007     2006     2005     2004     2003  
Total interest income
  $ 75,192,850     $ 67,305,890     $ 53,250,997     $ 42,663,346     $ 33,126,834  
Total interest expense
    33,300,736       26,429,344       18,586,196       12,211,296       10,281,115  
 
                             
Net interest income
    41,892,114       40,876,546       34,664,801       30,452,050       22,845,719  
Provision for loan losses
    2,488,620       2,165,000       1,724,000       1,620,000       1,280,000  
 
                             
Net interest income after provision for loan losses
    39,403,494       38,711,546       32,940,801       28,832,050       21,565,719  
Total other income
    15,444,159       14,345,158       13,243,530       9,227,890       7,290,556  
Total other expense
    32,959,103       32,092,847       29,626,962       24,015,608       15,811,009  
 
                             
Income before income taxes
    21,888,550       20,963,856       16,557,369       14,044,332       13,045,266  
 
                             
Income taxes
    7,200,818       7,171,959       5,398,905       4,559,800       4,125,936  
 
                             
Net Income
  $ 14,687,732     $ 13,791,897     $ 11,158,464     $ 9,484,532     $ 8,919,330  
 
                             
 
                                       
Net income per share information:
                                       
Basic
  $ 1.39     $ 1.30     $ 1.04     $ 0.90     $ 1.02  
Diluted
  $ 1.37     $ 1.28     $ 1.03     $ 0.89     $ 1.00  
Cash dividends
  $ 0.51     $ 0.47     $ 0.43     $ 0.40     $ 0.40  
 
                                       
Weighted average shares
                                       
Basic
    10,594,567       10,607,650       10,685,457       10,531,774       8,724,515  
Diluted
    10,712,667       10,788,798       10,828,799       10,694,761       8,902,108  
                                         
Key Balance Sheet Data                    
As of December 31,   2007   2006   2005   2004   2003
Loans, net
  $ 939,061,408     $ 846,431,886     $ 759,483,119     $ 720,297,551     $ 474,769,820  
 
                                       
Deposits
    963,442,084       907,846,899       814,352,588       728,708,104       563,518,017  
 
                                       
Total assets
    1,211,077,241       1,120,864,544       1,024,294,504       959,790,276       683,807,059  
 
                                       
Stockholders’ equity
    133,268,994       124,399,141       116,322,897       111,640,237       72,870,703  
 
                                       
Selected Ratios
                                       
Return on average assets
    1.38 %     1.31 %     1.14 %     1.07 %     1.39 %
Return on average equity
    11.99       11.52       9.79       9.20       12.69  
Dividend payout
    36.69       36.15       41.34       44.44       39.22  
Average equity to average assets
    11.54       11.69       11.61       11.81       11.04  
Item 7 — Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
     Management’s Discussion and Analysis is provided to assist in understanding and evaluating Yadkin’s results of operations and financial condition. The following discussion should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and related notes included elsewhere herein.
Critical Accounting Policies
     The accounting and reporting policies of the Company and its subsidiaries are in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States and conform to general practices within the banking industry. The more critical accounting and reporting policies include the Bank’s accounting for loans, the provision and allowance for loan losses and goodwill. In particular, the Bank’s accounting policies relating to the provision and allowance for loan losses and possible impairment of goodwill involve the use of estimates and require significant judgments to be made by management. Different assumptions in the application of these policies could result in material changes

17


Table of Contents

in the consolidated financial position or consolidated results of operations. Please see the discussion below under “Loans,” “Provision for Allowance for Loan Losses,” and “Goodwill.” Also, please refer to Note 1 in the “Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements” for additional information regarding all of the Bank’s critical and significant accounting policies.
     LOANS — Loans that management has the intent and ability to hold for the foreseeable future are reported at their outstanding principal balances adjusted for any deferred fees or costs. Substantially all loans earn interest on the simple interest method based on the outstanding principal balance.
     Loans that are deemed to be impaired (i.e. probable that the Bank will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the terms of the loan agreement) are measured based on the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate or as a practical matter, at the loan’s observable market value or fair value of the collateral if the loan is collateral dependent. A valuation reserve is established as part of the allowance for loan losses to record the difference between the stated loan amount and the present value or market value of the impaired loan. Impaired loans may be valued on a loan-by-loan basis (e.g., loans with risk characteristics unique to an individual borrower) or on an aggregate basis (e.g. loans with similar risk characteristics). The Bank’s policy for recognition of interest income on impaired loans is the same as its interest income recognition policy for non-impaired loans. The Bank discontinues the accrual of interest when the collectability of such interest becomes doubtful.
     PROVISIONS AND ALLOWANCE FOR LOAN LOSSES — The provision for loan losses charged to operations is an amount sufficient to bring the allowance for loan losses to an estimated balance considered adequate to absorb probable incurred losses in the portfolio. Management’s determination of the adequacy of the allowance is based on an evaluation of the portfolio, current economic conditions, historical loan loss experience and other risk factors. Recovery of the carrying value of loans is dependent to some extent on future economic, operating, and other conditions that may be beyond the Bank’s control. Unanticipated future adverse changes in such conditions could result in material adjustments to the allowance for loan losses.
     GOODWILL — Goodwill, which represents the excess of the purchase price over the fair value of net assets acquired in a business combination, is tested at least annually for impairment. The impairment test is a two-step process that begins with an initial impairment evaluation. If the initial evaluation suggests that an impairment of the asset value exists, the second step would determine the amount of the impairment, if any. If the tests conclude that goodwill is impaired, the carrying value would be adjusted, and an impairment loss would be recorded.
Financial Condition
          The Bank’s total assets increased 8.1% from $1,120.9 million at December 31, 2006 to $1,211.1 million at December 31, 2007. Total gross loans held for investment increased 10.3% from $814.9 million at December 31, 2006 to $898.8 million at December 31, 2007. Deposits grew 6.1% from $907.8 million at December 31, 2006 to $963.4 million at December 31, 2007.
          The loan growth was concentrated in the last six months of the year throughout the Bank’s market area. The leading growth categories for the year 2007 were construction and land development loans which increased by $43.7 million (39.4% increase), commercial real estate which increased by $29.6 million (9.1% increase), and commercial and industrial loans which grew by $14.0 million (9.5%). Loan composition includes commercial real estate loans which account for 39% of total loans, followed by commercial and industrial loans (18%), construction and land development (17%), equity lines (11%), residential 1-4 family first liens (8%), consumer (4%), multifamily (2%). The weighted average rate for loans held for investment at December 31, 2007 was 7.43% as compared to 7.82% at December 31, 2006. Fixed rate loans comprised 52% of total loans held for investment at December 31, 2007, an increase from 50% at the prior year end. Fixed rate loans held at the end of the current and prior years yielded 7.25% and 7.04%, respectively, an increase of 21 basis points. At December 31, 2007, and 2006, the aggregate yields of variable rate loans were 7.62% and 8.61%, respectively, a decrease of 99 basis points which was attributable to the decrease in the prime rate of 100 basis points during the year.
          Mortgage loans held for sale increased by $10.4 million (24.6%) as year-to-date loan closings at December 31, 2007 exceeded year-to-date loan closings at December 31, 2006 by $37.0 million. These loans are closed, managed, and sold by Sidus. The increase was due to the volume and timing of the closings. The Bank continued its strategy of selling mortgage loans mostly to various investors with servicing released and to a lesser extent to the

18


Table of Contents

Federal National Mortgage Association and Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation with servicing rights retained. Loans held for sale are normally sold to investors within two to three weeks after closing. Loans closed by Sidus in 2007 totaled $909 million with monthly volumes ranging from $55 million in September to $102 million in June.
          The securities portfolio increased by $15.0 million (11.7%), resulting from a $13.2 million increase in amortized cost and a $1.8 million increase in the fair market value adjustment. All securities were held in the available-for-sale category and included U.S. Government agency securities of $47.5 million (33.3%), state and municipal securities of $38.0 million (26.6%), mortgage-backed securities of $51.0 million (35.8%), U.S. Treasury securities of $3.0 million (2.1%), and other securities of $1.9 million (1.3%). The fair market value adjustment increased to an unrealized gain of $1.1 million from an unrealized loss of $700,000 as a result of decreases in market rates. The tax equivalent yield of securities held at December 31, 2007 was 5.26%, an increase from 5.03% a year earlier.
          There was an increase in other assets of $2.3 million dollars. The majority of the increase was related to the deferred tax asset and the current income taxes receivable that were increased from $960,000 to $1,667,000 and the new investment in the Trust of $774,000. There were additional merger costs capitalized during 2007 for the pending Cardinal merger in the amount of $360,000. Other assets also included prepaid expenses ($632,000), mortgage servicing rights ($2.0 million) and investment in unlisted stocks ($688,000).
          Deposits grew by $55.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2007. Products were designed to attract deposits to checking, savings, and money market accounts with charges for checking accounts being lower than competitors’ charges. The largest contributors to deposit growth were certificates of deposit (CDs), which increased by a total of $52.6 million or 10.1% and NOW accounts, which increased by $4.9 million or 7.3%. These deposit increases were offset slightly by declines in money market accounts of $890,000 and in savings accounts of $900,000. CDs were offered at rates in line with competitors’ rates and at one or more special rates and priced at 25-50 basis points higher than competitors’ rates for limited periods. These rates were needed in order to build a deposit base sufficient to fund loans. Although there is no concentration of deposits from one individual or entity, the Bank does have $267.5 million or 27.8% of its total deposits in the $100,000 or greater CDs (“jumbo CDs”) category. Jumbo CDs increased by $39.0 million or 17.1% over the balance at December 31, 2006. Due to the merger of many banks in the market, there were fewer places for individuals to open accounts and be insured above $100,000 by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. These deposits reflect the rates that have been paid and the financial strength of the customers. The weighted average rate (WAR) for CDs outstanding on December 31, 2007 was 4.73%, up from 4.21% at the end of the prior year. During the first nine months of 2007, the aggregate CD rate increased as competition remained strong and as the federal funds rate was unchanged at 5.25% until mid-September. During the fourth quarter, CD offering rates began to decrease following the three decreases in the federal funds rate totaling 100 basis points which began with a 50 basis point drop in mid-September. The WAR paid on outstanding jumbo CDs at December 31, 2007 was 17 basis points higher than on other CDs, a decrease from the prior year-end spread of 19 basis points. Most jumbo CDs were issued at the special rates offered by the Bank mostly for terms that were less than one year. The weighted average remaining term on jumbo CDs at December 31, 2007 was 7.6 months, down from 8.8 months a year earlier. The CD rate increases were attributable to the market rate increase, while the average terms decreased as investors selected shorter maturities due to the declining slope of the yield curve and to the special rates offered by the bank for shorter terms. Jumbo CDs were concentrated in the $100,000 to $200,000 range which comprised 54.6% of the total jumbo CD principal balance at December 31, 2007 as compared to 53.5% at the end of the previous year.
          In addition to deposits, funding for the Bank’s assets was obtained from overnight repurchase agreements with businesses in the local market area. Funds borrowed under repurchase agreements decreased from $28.8 million at December 31, 2006 to $26.0 million at December 31, 2007. Advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank at December 31, 2006 totaled $35.2 million compared to $12.0 million at December 31, 2007, a decrease of $23.2 million. Short-term advances decreased by $23.2 million and long-term advances remained constant. On November 1, 2007 the Company issued $25 million in trust preferred securities at the floating interest rate of three month LIBOR plus 132 basis points. The initial interest rate was 6.21% for the period beginning November 1 and ending December 15, 2007 followed by a rate of 6.31% that will be effective until March 15, 2008. The rate will adjust quarterly, thereafter. These securities are classified as long term debt and mature in the year 2032. The Company has the option to call for redemption of the securities in 2012. The proceeds will be used to provide funding for the acquisition of Cardinal State Bank which is expected to be completed by the end of the first quarter of 2008.

19


Table of Contents

          There was little change in other liabilities. Accrued expenses and accounts payable made up the largest portion of other liabilities in the amount of $4.6 million. Dividends payable accounted for $ 1.4 million of the remaining balance.
Results of Operations
          The Bank’s net income for 2007 was $14,687,732, a 6.5% increase over 2006 net income of $13,791,897. Basic net income per common share was $1.39 in 2007 compared to $1.30 and $1.04 in 2006 and 2005, respectively. Diluted net income per common share was $1.37 in 2007 compared to $1.28 and $1.03 in 2006 and 2005, respectively. Return on average assets was 1.31% in 2007, 1.31% in 2006, and 1.14% in 2005. Return on average equity was 11.32% in 2007, 11.52% in 2006, and 9.79% in 2005. Return on tangible equity was 15.90% in 2007, 16.80% in 2006 and 14.65% in 2005. The return on assets remained constant in 2007 as a result of loan growth offset by margin contraction as interest rates declined later in the year. The return on equity declined as average equity grew at a faster rate than both earnings and average assets. As the Rate/Volume Variance Analysis table of earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities shows, the increase in net interest income was a combination of an increase attributable to volume or asset growth and a decrease attributable to declining interest rates. The increase in volume contributed net interest income of $2.8 million, which was partially offset by the interest rate decreases which reduced net interest income by $1.8 million.
Net Interest Income
          Net interest income is the primary source of operating income for the Bank. Net interest income is the difference between interest and fee income generated from earning assets and the interest paid on deposits and borrowed funds. The factors that influence net interest income include both changes in interest rates and changes in volume and mix of loans and deposits.
          For analytical purposes, net interest income may be reported on a tax equivalent basis, which illustrates the tax savings on loans and investments exempt from state and/or federal income taxes. The tables that follow, Interest Rates Earned and Paid, and Interest Rate/Volume Analysis, represent components of net interest income for the

20


Table of Contents

years 2007, 2006, and 2005. These tables detail changes in interest income and expense and net interest income changes caused by rate and/or volume.
          Taxable equivalent net interest income increased $1.1 million or 2.6% in 2007 over 2006 compared to an increase of $6.2 million or 17.7% in 2006 from 2005. Average earning assets increased $80.8 million or 8.7% in 2007 over 2006 after increasing $73.4 million or 8.5% in 2006. Average loans increased $64.4 million or 8.0% in 2007 compared with an increase of $62.6 million or 8.4% in 2006. Average investment securities increased $13.2 million or 10.6% from 2006 to 2007 compared to an increase of $12.7 million or 11.4% from 2005 to 2006.
          The net interest margin (taxable equivalent net interest income as a percentage of average interest earning assets) decreased to 4.20% from 4.45% comparing 2007 to 2006 after increasing to 4.45% from 4.10% for the prior comparative periods. The decrease in net interest margin in 2007 was attributable the Company’s asset sensitivity, whereby assets adjust more quickly than liabilities to interest rate changes resulting in net interest margin expansion during a period of increasing rates and interest margin compression during a period of declining rates. Two series of events illustrated this condition, rate decreases in the last four months of 2007 and rate increases in the first six months of 2006. As the Interest Rate/Volume Variance Analysis table (page 22) shows, the increase in net interest income during 2007 attributable to volume (asset and liability growth) was $2.8 million while rate decreases reduced net interest income by $1.8 million. While the net interest margin declined, the Company was able to fund a higher percentage of earning assets with non-interest bearing funds in 2007 (17.8%) as compared to 2006 (16.7%).
          Interest spread was 3.49% in 2007 compared to 3.88% in 2006 and 3.71% in 2005. Interest spread measures the difference between net yield on interest earning assets (taxable equivalent interest income as percentage of average interest earning assets) and the interest paid on interest-bearing liabilities. Increases in the earning asset rate and the interest-bearing liability rate during 2007 by 20 basis points and 59 basis points, respectively, were driven by the prime rate remaining steady then increasing steadily during the first half of 2006 and then remaining steady during most of 2007. The rate decreases during the last four months of 2007 were too late in the year to completely offset the effect of the previous interest rate trends on both assets and liabilities.
          The following table presents the daily average balances, interest income and expense, and average rates earned and paid on interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities of the Bank for the last three years.
Interest Rates Earned and Paid
Net Interest Income Analysis-Fully Taxable Equivalent (dollars in thousands)
                                                                         
    For Years Ended December 31,  
    2007     2006     2005  
    Average             Yield/     Average             Yield/     Average             Yield/  
    Balance     Interest     Rate     Balance     Interest     Rate     Balance     Interest     Rate  
INTEREST EARNING ASSETS
                                                                       
Federal funds sold
  $ 5,825     $ 298       5.12 %   $ 3,799     $ 191       5.03 %   $ 4,766     $ 163       3.42 %
Interest-bearing deposits
    3,213       148       4.61 %     2,047       92       4.49 %     2,978       84       2.82 %
Investment securities (1)
    137,839       7,067       5.13 %     124,632       5,726       4.59 %     111,911       4,671       4.17 %
Total loans (1) (2)
    867,725       68,377       7.88 %     803,336       61,930       7.71 %     740,719       48,932       6.61 %
 
                                                           
Total average earning assets (1)
    1,014,602       75,890       7.48 %     933,814       67,939       7.28 %     860,374       53,850       6.26 %
 
                                                                 
Non earning assets
    110,230                       118,240                       122,221                  
 
                                                                 
Total average assets
    1,124,832                       1,052,054                     $ 982,595                  
 
                                                                 
 
INTEREST BEARING LIABILITIES
                                                                       
NOW and money market
  $ 188,909       4,196       2.22 %   $ 192,516       3,791       1.97 %   $ 208,083       3,218       1.55 %
Savings
    36,152       343       0.95 %     39,370       393       1.00 %     42,880       454       1.06 %
Time Certificates
    550,448       26,453       4.81 %     468,108       19,662       4.20 %     376,888       11,968       3.18 %
 
                                                           
Total interest bearing deposits
    775,509       30,992       4.00 %     699,994       23,846       3.41 %     627,851       15,640       2.49 %
Repurchase agreements sold
    36,171       1,223       3.38 %     30,655       878       2.86 %     34,984       757       2.16 %
Borrowed funds
    21,980       1,086       4.94 %     47,263       1,705       3.61 %     66,694       2,189       3.28 %
 
                                                                 

21


Table of Contents

                                                                         
    For Years Ended December 31,  
    2007     2006     2005  
    Average             Yield/     Average             Yield/     Average             Yield/  
    Balance     Interest     Rate     Balance     Interest     Rate     Balance     Interest     Rate  
Total interest bearing liabilities
    833,660       33,301       3.99 %     777,912       26,429       3.40 %     729,529       18,586       2.55 %
 
                                                                 
 
                                                                       
Non-interest bearing deposits
    154,838                       145,453                       131,395                  
Stockholders’ equity
    129,722                       119,749                       114,033                  
Other liabilities
    6,612                       8,940                       7,638                  
 
                                                                 
Total average liabilities and stockholders’ equity
  $ 1,124,832                     $ 1,052,054                     $ 982,595                  
 
                                                                 
 
                                                                       
NET INTEREST INCOME/MARGIN (3,4)
          $ 42,589       4.20 %           $ 41,510       4.45 %           $ 35,264       4.10 %
 
                                                                       
INTEREST SPREAD (5)
                    3.49 %                     3.88 %                     3.71 %
 
1.   Yields related to investment securities and loans exempt from Federal income taxes are stated on a fully tax-equivalent basis, assuming a Federal income tax rate of 34%. The calculation includes an adjustment for nondeductible portion of interest expense used to fund tax exempt assets.
 
2.   The loan average includes loans on which accrual of interest has been discontinued.
 
3.   The net interest income is the difference between income from earning assets and interest expense.
 
4.   Net interest margin is net interest income divided by total average earning assets.
 
5.   Interest spread is the difference between the average interest rate received on earning assets and the average interest paid on interest-bearing liabilities.
The following table analyzes the dollar amount of changes in interest income and interest expense for major components of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities. The table distinguishes between (i) changes attributable to volume (changes in volume multiplied by the current period’s volume), and (ii) changes attributable to rate (changes in rate multiplied by the prior period’s volume).
Interest Rate/Volume Variance Analysis (in thousands)
                                                 
    2007-2006     2006-2005  
    Net Increase (Decrease)     Net Increase (Decrease)  
    due to change in:     due to change in:  
    Average     Average     Increase     Average     Average     Increase  
    Balance     Rate     (Decrease)     Balance     Rate     (Decrease)  
INTEREST EARNING ASSETS:
                                               
Federal funds sold
  $ 104     $ 3     $ 107     $ (49 )   $ 77     $ 28  
Investment securities
    625       672       1,297       533       501       1,034  
Other Investments
    54       2       56       (42 )     50       8  
Total loans
    5,063       1,363       6,426       4,817       8,167       12,984  
 
                                   
Interest earning assets
  $ 5,845     $ 2,041     $ 7,886     $ 5,260     $ 8,794     $ 14,054  
 
                                   
 
                                               
INTEREST BEARING LIABILITIES
                                               
NOW and money market
  $ (80 )   $ 485     $ 405     $ (307 )   $ 880     $ 573  
Savings
    (31 )     (20 )     (51 )     (35 )     (26 )     (61 )
Time certificates
    3,957       2,833       6,790       3,832       3,862       7,694  
 
                                   
Total interest bearing deposits
    3,846       3,298       7,144       3,490       4,716       8,206  
Borrowed funds
    (785 )     510       (275 )     (788 )     425       (363 )
 
                                   
Total interest bearing liabilities
  $ 3,061     $ 3,808     $ 6,869     $ 2,702     $ 5,141     $ 7,843  
 
                                   
 
Note:   Variances caused by the changes in rate times the changes in volume are allocated equally.
 
Tax effect of tax-exempt income from securities disregarded due to immateriality.
 
Income on nonaccrual loans is included in the volume and rate variance analysis table only to the extent that it represents interest payments received.

22


Table of Contents

Market Risk, Asset/Liability Management and
Interest Rate Sensitivity
          The Bank’s principal business is the origination or purchase of loans, funded by customer deposits, loan sales, and, to the extent necessary, other borrowed funds. Consequently, a significant portion of the Bank’s assets and liabilities are monetary in nature and fluctuations in interest rates will affect the Bank’s future net interest income and cash flows. Interest rate risk is the Bank’s primary market risk exposure. The Bank has not entered into derivative financial instruments such as futures, forwards, swaps, and options. Also, the Bank has no market risk-sensitive instruments held for trading purposes. The Bank’s exposure to market risk is reviewed on a regular basis by its management.
          The Bank measures interest rate sensitivity as the difference between amounts of interest-earning assets and interest- bearing liabilities that either reprice or mature within a given period of time. The difference or the interest rate repricing “gap” provides an indication of the extent to which an institution’s interest rate spread will be affected by changes in interest rates. Generally, during a period of rising interest rates, a negative gap within shorter maturities would adversely affect net interest income, while a positive gap within shorter maturities would result in an increase in net interest income. During a period of falling interest rates, a negative gap within shorter maturities would result in an increase in net interest income while a positive gap within shorter maturities would have the opposite effect.
          The interest rate sensitivity management function is designed to maintain consistent growth of net interest income with acceptable levels of risk to interest rate changes generally on a one year horizon. The net interest margin declined by 10 basis points from 4.34% for the quarter ended December 31, 2006 to 4.24% for the quarter ended September 30, 2007. As rates decreased by 100 basis points during the last four months of 2007, net interest margin declined in the fourth quarter by 21 basis points to 4.03%. Three basis points of the decrease can be attributed to the issuance of trust preferred securities which bears an interest rate of about 130 basis points over the average overnight earning/funding rate. The net interest margin increased from 2005 following a period of increasing interest rates beginning in mid-2004 and continuing to mid-2006. Management uses various resources to measure interest rate risk, including simulating net interest income under different rate scenarios, monitoring changes in asset and liability values under similar rate scenarios and monitoring the gap between rate sensitive assets and liabilities over different time periods.
          The rate sensitivity table that follows indicates the volume of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities as of December 31, 2007 that mature or are expected to reprice within the listed time periods. Even though the analysis shows that the balance sheet is liability sensitive over a one year period by $79,621,000 in principal balances, management projects that net interest income over that period will reflect that the Company is asset sensitive because the assets reprice more quickly as shown by the table in the “Three Months or Less” column. The asset sensitivity of the Company’s net interest income is reflected in the “Income Shock Summary” table following the “Gap Analysis” table.
GAP Analysis
                                                         
    Repricing  
                            Over 1                    
    Three     Over 3             Year     Over 3 Yrs              
    Months     Months to     Total     Thru     Thru     Over        
(IN THOUSANDS)   Or Less     12 Months     1 Year     3 Years     5 Years     5 Years     Total  
Earning Assets
                                                       
Loans:
                                                       
Commercial
  $ 138,317     $ 19,665     $ 157,982     $ 26,698     $ 26,564     $ 11,782     $ 223,026  
Real estate – construction
    73,898       11,907       85,805       9,464       6,206       17,380       118,855  
Real estate – mortgage
    253,056       43,050       296,106       90,615       94,976       21,162       502,859  
Consumer
    10,460       16,775       27,235       16,966       6,582       3,230       54,013  
 
                                         
 
                                                       
Total
    475,731       91,397       567,128       143,743       134,328       53,554       898,753  
 
                                         
 
                                                       
Securities:
                                                       
U. S. Treasuries and other agencies
    8,000       13,996       21,996       26,600       1,907             50,503  
State and municipal securities
    1,815       1,625       3,440       8,365       10,025       16,122       37,952  
Mortgage backed debt securities
          25       25       2,926       879       47,214       51.044  

23


Table of Contents

                                                         
    Repricing  
                            Over 1                    
    Three     Over 3             Year     Over 3 Yrs              
    Months     Months to     Total     Thru     Thru     Over        
(IN THOUSANDS)   Or Less     12 Months     1 Year     3 Years     5 Years     5 Years     Total  
Mutual funds/equities
    1       884       885                   2,100       2,985  
 
                                         
Total
    9,816       16,530       26,346       37,891       12,811       65,436       142,484  
 
                                         
 
                                                       
Interest bearing due from banks
    2,058             2,058                         2,058  
 
                                         
Earning assets
  $ 487,605     $ 107,927     $ 595,532     $ 181,634     $ 147,139     $ 118,991     $ 1,043,296  
 
                                         
 
                                                       
Paying Liabilities:
                                                       
NOW accounts
  $ 10,254       3,686       13,940     $ 7,972     $ 55,771           $ 77,683  
Money market accounts
    28,141       52,525       80,666       19,271       19,244             119,181  
Savings
    3,837       8,079       11,916       12,029       12,030       6       35,981  
Certificates:
                                                       
Over $100,000
    97,853       125,685       223,538       42,610       1,382             267,530  
Other certificates
    117,681       130,986       248,667       57,661       1,759             308,087  
 
                                         
 
                                                       
Total deposits
    257,766       320,961       578,727       139,543       90,186       6       808,462  
 
                                         
 
                                                       
TT& L Notes
    236             236                         236  
Repurchase Agreements/Fed funds purchased
    66,190             66,190                         66,190  
FHLB borrowing
          5,000       5,000       5,000             2,000       12,000  
Junior Subordinated Debentures
    25,774             25,774                         25,774  
 
                                         
Total paying liabilities
  $ 349,192     $ 325,961     $ 675,927     $ 144,543     $ 90,186     $ 2,006     $ 912,662  
 
                                         
 
                                                       
GAP
  $ 138,413     $ (218,034 )   $ (79,621 )   $ 37,091     $ 56,953     $ 116,985     $ 131,408  
GAP %
    139.6 %     33.1 %     88.2 %     125.7 %     163.2 %     5,931.8 %     114.4 %
Additional information regarding loans with maturity dates that exceed one year
         
Fixed rate loans with maturities that exceed one year
  $410.7 million
Variable rate loans with maturities that exceed one year
  $220.3 million
Net interest earnings at risk is the potential adverse change in net interest income arising from assumed changes in interest rates. The potential change is measured over a one year forecast time horizon. The table below illustrates net interest earnings at risk using a +/- 200 basis point change in interest rates; assuming a parallel shift in the treasury yield curve. The model simulates changes in repricing, prepayments, call-options, and other rate-driven parameters that affect the level and timing of cash flows.
Income Shock Summary
(in thousands)
                                         
    January 1, 2008 - December 31, 2008  
    Base     Rates UP (+200 bp)     Rates DN (-200bp)  
    Amount     Amount     % Change     Amount     % Change  
Short-term investments
  $ 123     $ 253       106.06     $ 16       (86.87 )
Securities
    7,538       8,391       11.32       6,619       (12.19 )
Loans
    71,955       84,062       16.83       58,598       (18.56 )
 
                                 
Interest income
    79,616       92,706       16.44       65,233       (18.07 )
 
                                 
 
                                       
Non-maturing deposits
    3,437       7,789       126.62       1,781       (48.19 )
Certificates of deposit
    24,663       30,906       25.32       18,855       (23.55 )
Borrowed money
    2,461       3,775       53.38       1,298       (47.25 )
 
                                 
Interest expense
    30,561       42,470       38.97       21,934       (28.23 )
 
                                 
 
                                       
Net interest income
  $ 49,055     $ 50,236       2.41     $ 43,299       (11.73 )
 
                                 

24


Table of Contents

Liquidity Management
          The primary goal of liquidity management is to provide for the availability of adequate funds to meet the needs of loan demand, deposit withdrawals, maturing liabilities, and to satisfy reserve requirements. This goal is achieved through a combination of deposits, borrowing through unpledged securities, federal funds purchased lines, Federal Home Loan Bank line of credit, junior subordinated debentures and availability at the Federal Reserve discount window. Liquidity needs have been met primarily through federal funds purchased and the use of a line of credit at the Federal Home Loan Bank. Deposits from consumer and business customers, both time and demand, are the primary source of funds for the Bank. In November 2005, the Bank opened a brokered deposit NOW account to add municipal deposits and averaged $1,629,206 during 2007. The custodian pools the funds from each public depositor and distributes a portion of those funds to the Bank up to $100,000 on behalf of each depositor. Since security pledges are not required and the accounts are non-maturing, these deposits have enhanced the Bank’s liquidity. The Bank expects to continue to increase this balance over the next twelve months. Otherwise, the Bank has not solicited deposits from outside its primary market area and has not engaged in the placement of deposits with nonmarket institutional customers.
          Comparing 2007 to 2006, average total deposits increased 10.0% or $84.9 million. At December 31, 2007, total deposits reflected a 6.1% increase or $55.6 million compared to December 31, 2006. Commercial sweep accounts, a noninsured product invested in repurchase agreements were $26.0 million at year-end 2007 compared to $28.8 million at year-end 2006. Deposit sources are available to the Bank both within and outside its primary market area based on a function of price. Deposit competition comes from other banks, both regional and community institutions, as well as nonbank competition, including mutual funds, annuities, and other nondeposit investments. Subject to certain conditions, unused availability from the Federal Home Loan Bank at December 31, 2007 was $110.6 million. At end of year 2007, unpledged securities totaled $85.1 million or 59.7% of the securities portfolio.
OTHER BORROWED FUNDS
See Note 8 under “Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements”.
Investment Securities
          At December 31, 2007, the securities classified as available for sale, carried at market value, totaled $142.5 million with an amortized cost of $141.4 million. Securities available for sale are securities that will be held for an indefinite period of time, including securities that management intends to use as a part of its asset/liability strategy. These securities may be sold in response to changes in interest rates, to changes in prepayment risk, or to the need to increase regulatory capital. Securities available for sale consist of U.S. treasury notes with an average life of 1.00 years, U.S. government agencies with an average life of 1.34 years, municipal securities with an average life of 6.48 years, and mortgage backed securities with an average life of 4.14 years. Management has determined that it has both the ability and intent to hold these securities until maturity. The proceeds from maturities and sales were invested along with funds in excess of loan demand. Refer to Note 3 in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.
Maturities and Yields of Debt Securities
As of December 31, 2007
                                                                         
    Within 1 year     1 to 5 years     5 to 10 years     After 10 years        
Dollars in thousands   Amount     Yield     Amount     Yield     Amount     Yield     Amount     Yield     Total  
Available for sale securities
                                                                       
U.S. Treasuries
  $             $ 3,037       4.76 %   $             $             $ 3,037  
U.S. Government agencies
    18,992       4.12 %     25,069       5.17 %     4,109       5.35 %                   48,170  
Mortgage backed securities
    25       4.93 %     3,786       4.29 %     1,738       4.16 %     45,849       5.50 %     51,398  
Municipals
    1,757       5.59 %     14,789       5.77 %     9,776       5.66 %     11,826       5.83 %     38,148  
Other
    881       3.75 %                                 850       5.84 %     1,731  
 
                                                             
Total available for sale securities
  $ 21,655             $ 46,681             $ 15,623             $ 58,525             $ 142,484  
 
                                                             

25


Table of Contents

Time Deposits
The following table presents time deposits in two categories, (1) time deposits of $100,000 or more, and (2) other time deposits.
Maturities of Time Deposits
As of December 31, 2007
                                                 
    Within   Three to   Six to   Within   One To    
    Three   Six   Twelve   One   Five    
Dollars in thousands   Months   Months   Months   Year   Years   Total
Time deposits of $100,000 or more
  $ 97,853     $ 40,874     $ 84,811     $ 223,538     $ 43,992     $ 267,530  
Other time deposits
  $ 100,760     $ 42,492     $ 105,373     $ 248,625     $ 59,420     $ 308,045  
Capital Adequacy
          Stockholders’ equity at December 31, 2007, totaled $133.3 million, an increase of 7.1% over 2006 year-end equity of $124.4 million. The 2007 equity total includes an unrealized net gain on available for sale securities of $632,270 compared to an unrealized net loss of $470,968 at December 31, 2006. The Bank’s internal capital generation rate (net income less cash dividends declared, as a percentage of average equity) was 7.2% in 2007 and 7.3% in 2006. Dividends in 2007 were 36.8% of after tax earnings compared to 36.2% in 2006 and 41.2% in 2005. The Bank had pursued a policy of increasing the dividend payout as a percentage of after tax earnings in earlier years until 2002. The current dividend policy is a payout of approximately 40% of earnings up to a policy maximum of 50% of earnings.
          The table below details the plans and number of shares repurchased. Shares repurchased must, by North Carolina law, be cancelled and the number of shares outstanding reduced. The table below details the stock repurchase activity from inception of the plans through December 2007. The 2002 through 2005 plans were approved by a vote of the shareholders of Yadkin Valley Bank and Trust Company. Following reorganization as a holding company on July 1, 2006, the Board of Directors of Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation approved stock repurchases of up to 100,000 shares for the 2006 plan. For the 2007 plan, 100,000 shares were approved to be repurchased.
                         
Approved by Shareholders   Shares Repurchased & Cancelled   Average Cost   Total Reduction of Capital
2003 and prior plans
    508,950     $ 12.37       6,297,036  
850,000 shares approved
                       
 
                       
2004 Plan
    80,621       14.09       1,135,554  
300,000 shares approved
                       
 
                       
2005 Plan
    54,648       14.35       784,107  
300,000 shares approved
                       
 
                       
2006 Plan
    100,000       17.42       1,741,886  
100,000 shares approved
                       
 
                       
2007 Plan
    71,281       17.10       1,219,251  
100,000 shares approved
                       
 
                       
Total Repurchased
    815,500       13.71       11,177,834  
          The Company’s tangible equity ratio was 8.21%, 8.01% and 7.94% at end of year 2007, 2006, and 2005, respectively. These ratios exceed all minimum regulatory capital requirements. The detail for the calculation of these ratios is in the following table.

26


Table of Contents

                         
Capital Adequacy Ratios            
December 31,   2007   2006   2005
Tangible assets
  $ 1,173,345,226     $ 1,082,166,964     $ 986,307,496  
Tangible equity*
    96,310,979       86,664,532       78,335,889  
Tangible equity ratio*
    8.21 %     8.01 %     7.94 %
 
                       
Regulatory guidelines
    3 %     3 %     3 %
 
*Note:   Tangible assets and tangible equity exclude goodwill and core deposit intangibles.
Loans
          Net loans held for investment (total loans held for investment less allowance for loan losses) as of December 31, 2007 were $886.3 million as compared with $804.1 million as of December 31, 2006, an increase of 10.2% or $82.2 million. In addition, the Bank’s residential mortgage loans classified as held for sale totaled $52.7 million and $42.3 million at December 31, 2007 and 2006, respectively, representing an increase of 24.6% or $10.4 million. The Bank places emphasis on commercial loans to small and medium-sized businesses, consumer based installment loans, and residential mortgage lending. The Bank adheres to regulatory guidelines that limit exposure to any one borrower. The commercial portfolio has concentrations in business loans secured by real estate and real estate development loans. Primary concentrations in the consumer portfolio include home equity lines and other types of residential real estate loans. The amounts and types of loans outstanding for the past five years ended December 31 are shown on the following table.
Loans (dollars in thousands)
As of December 31,
                                                                                 
    2007     2006     2005     2004     2003  
            % of             % of             % of             % of             % of  
            Total             Total             Total             Total             Total  
    Amount     Loans     Amount     Loans     Amount     Loans     Amount     Loans     Amount     Loans  
Loans
                                                                               
Construction real estate
  $ 155,043       17.25 %   $ 111,353       13.66 %   $ 92,447       12.53 %   $ 80,000       11.64 %   $ 48,360       10.07 %
Commercial real estate
    352,568       39.23 %     323,041       39.65 %     245,079       31.03 %     228,759       33.28 %     138,401       28.81 %
 
                                                                               
Mortgage loans
    196,329       21.84 %     183,310       22.49 %     179,632       28.62 %     188,096       27.37 %     143,222       29.81 %
1-4 family 1st liens
    71,379       7.94 %     61,639       7.56 %     61,924       12.66 %     71,286       10.37 %     76,708       15.97 %
1-4 family Jr. liens
    4,361       0.49 %     3,473       0.43 %     2,536       0.34 %     1,928       0.28 %     1,176       0.24 %
1-4 family equity lines
    100,012       11.12 %     94,650       11.61 %     91,759       12.45 %     88,388       12.86 %     54,519       11.35 %
Multifamily
    20,577       2.29 %     23,548       2.89 %     23,413       3.17 %     26,494       3.86 %     10,819       2.25 %
Commercial, other
    161,507       17.97 %     147,473       18.10 %     163,857       22.22 %     154,740       22.51 %     120,580       25.10 %
Consumer
    33,306       3.71 %     49,733       6.10 %     41,300       5.60 %     35,750       5.20 %     29,852       6.21 %
 
                                                                     
 
    898,753       100.00 %     814,910       100.00 %     737,529       100.00 %     687,345       100.00 %     480,415       100.00 %
 
                                                                               
Allowance for loan losses
    (12,445 )             (10,829 )             (9,473 )             (8,654 )             (6,188 )        
 
                                                                     
 
Net loans
  $ 886,308             $ 804,081             $ 728,056             $ 678,691             $ 474,227          
 
                                                                     

27


Table of Contents

Nonperforming Assets
          Nonperforming assets include loans classified as nonaccrual, foreclosures and repossessions, and loans past due 90 days or more on which interest is still being accrued. It is the general policy of the Bank to stop accruing interest when any loan is past due as to principal or interest and the collection of either is in doubt. Unsecured consumer loans are usually charged off when payments are more than 90 days delinquent. When a loan is placed on nonaccrual status, any interest previously accrued but not collected is reversed against current income.
          Nonperforming assets as of December 31, 2007 totaled $2.6 million or 0.29% of total loans compared with $2.4 million or 0.30% in 2006 and $4.0 million or 0.54% in 2005. The Bank assertively pursues the liquidation of nonperforming assets through its collection department.
Nonperforming Assets
December 31,
                                         
    2007     2006     2005     2004     2003  
Loans 90 days past due-still accruing
  $ 0     $ 0     $ 0     $ 0     $ 158,525  
Loans on nonaccrual
    1,961,538       1,829,947       3,199,282       3,039,575       1,489,207  
Other real estate
    602,000       574,345       763,210       1,125,427       381,546  
 
                             
 
                                     
Total nonperforming assets
  $ 2,563,538     $ 2,404,292     $ 3,962,492     $ 4,165,002     $ 2,029,278  
 
                             
Loans 90 days past due-still accruing/ total loans
    0.0 %     0.0 %     0.0 %     0.0 %     0.03 %
Total nonperforming assets/total loans
    0.29 %     0.30 %     0.54 %     0.61 %     0.42 %
Provision and Allowance for Loan Losses
          The risks inherent in the Bank’s loan portfolio, including the adequacy of the allowance or reserve for loan losses, are significant estimates that are based on management’s assumptions regarding, among other factors, general and local economic conditions, which are difficult to predict and are beyond the Bank’s control. In estimating these risks, and the related loss reserve levels, management also considers the financial conditions of specific borrowers and credit concentrations with specific borrowers, groups of borrowers, and industries.
          The provision for loan losses was $2,488,620 in 2007 compared to $2,165,000 in 2006 and $1,724,000 in 2005. This provision reflects management’s assessment of the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses to absorb losses inherent in the loan portfolio due to credit deterioration or changes in the risk profile. The assessment primarily considers the allowance for loan loss levels relative to risk grades assigned by credit administration to loan types. The risk grades are based on several factors including historical data, current economic factors, composition of the portfolio, and evaluations of the total loan portfolio and assessments of individual credits within specific loan types. Because these factors are dynamic, the provision for loan losses can fluctuate. Credit quality reviews are based primarily on analysis of borrowers’ cash flows, with asset values considered only as a second source of payment.
          Management uses several measures to assess and monitor the credit risks in the loan portfolio, including a loan grading system that begins upon loan origination and continues for the entire life of the loan. Upon loan origination, the Bank’s originating loan officer evaluates the quality of the loan and assigns one of eight risk levels. The loan officer monitors the loan’s performance and credit quality and makes changes to the risk grade as conditions warrant. The Chief Lending Officer coordinates the loan approval process for loans not involving the Board by delegating authority to certain lenders and by appointing the members and chairman of the Bank Loan Committee. The Bank Loan Committee is comprised of bank officers and approves new loans and relationship exposures over certain dollar amounts. The Chief Lending Officer either approves or delegates the loan authority for the approval and renewal of all other loans. Officer loan approval limits are reviewed and approved by the Board of Directors. The Chief Credit Officer writes credit policy which includes underwriting guidelines and procedures. The Chief Credit Officer and the Chief Lending Officer are voting members of the Bank Loan Committee.
          Management uses the information developed from the procedures above in evaluating and grading the loan portfolio. This continual grading process is used to monitor the credit quality of the loan portfolio and to assist management in determining the appropriate levels of the allowance for loan losses.

28


Table of Contents

          As a part of the continual grading process, loans over $20,000 are assigned a credit risk grade based on their credit quality, which is subject to change as conditions warrant. Any changes in risk assessments as determined by loan officers, credit administrators, regulatory examiners and management are also considered. Management considers certain loans graded “doubtful” or “loss” to be individually impaired and may consider “substandard” loans individually impaired depending on an evaluation of the probability of repayment of loan and the strength of any collateral. The Bank measures impairment based upon probable cash flows and the value of the collateral. Impaired loans are identified in a periodic analysis of the adequacy of the reserve. In estimating reserve levels, the Bank aggregates the remaining loans and reviews the historical loss experience as well as environmental factors by type of loan as additional criteria to allocate the allowance. The historical loss experience factors applied to “watch list” and “substandard” loans that are not individually impaired are given additional weighting in assessing probable losses inherent in the portfolio. Internal environmental factors applied to non-impaired loan pools include past-due and nonaccrual trends, risk grade migration trends and the assessment of underwriting and servicing. External environmental factors include interest rate trends, unemployment rate trends, and real estate loan concentrations.
          Management considers the allowance for loan losses adequate to cover the estimated losses inherent in the Bank’s loan portfolio as of December 31, 2007. Management believes it has established the allowance in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America and will consider future additions to the allowance that may be necessary based on changes in economic and other conditions. Additionally, various regulatory agencies, as an integral part of their examination process, periodically review the Bank’s allowance for loan losses. Such agencies may require the recognition of adjustments to the allowances based on their judgments of information available to them at the time of their examinations.
          The allowance for loan losses is created by direct charges to provision expense. Losses on loans are charged against the allowance for loan losses in the accounting period in which they are determined by management to be uncollectible. Recoveries during the period are credited to the allowance for loan losses.
          Management realizes that general economic trends greatly affect loan losses. Assurances cannot be made either (1) that further charges to the allowance account will not be significant in relation to the normal activity or (2) that further evaluation of the loan portfolio based on prevailing conditions may not require sizable additions to the allowance, thus necessitating similarly sizable charges to provision expense. Net loan charge offs were $872,000 or 0.10% of average loans in 2007 compared to $810,000 or 0.10% of average loans in 2006 and $905,000 or 0.12% of average loans in 2005. Loan charge-offs in 2007 were comprised of numerous loans, mostly in the real estate and installment loan classifications. As of December 31, 2007, the allowance for loan losses was $12.4 million or 1.38% of year end loans. This allowance level compares with $10.8 million or 1.33% of loans held for investment at December 31, 2006 and $9.5 million or 1.28% at December 31, 2005. Management considers the allowance for loan losses at December 31, 2007 to be adequate.
          The following table presents a reconciliation of the allowance for loan losses and reflects charge-offs and recoveries by loan category.
                                         
(Dollars in thousands)   2007   2006   2005   2004   2003
     
Balance at beginning of year
  $ 10,828     $ 9,473     $ 8,654     $ 6,188     $ 6,218  
Charge-offs:
                                       
Real estate loans
    328       419       430       285       398  
Installment loans
    338       252       396       164       304  
Credit card and related plans
    85       49       70       72       31  
Commercial and all other
    351       280       387       1,048       776  
Leases
                             
     
Total charge-offs
    1,102       1,000       1,283       1,569       1,509  
     
Recoveries:
                                       
Real estate loans
    63       69       145       91       57  
Installment loans
    90       60       84       60       57  
Credit card and related plans
    22       3       8       27       6  

29


Table of Contents

                                         
(Dollars in thousands)   2007   2006   2005   2004   2003
     
Commercial and all other
    55       58       141       199       79  
     
Total recoveries
    230       190       378       377       199  
     
Net Chargeoffs
    872       810       905       1,192       1,310  
Additions added to operations
    2,489       2,165       1,724       1,620       1,280  
Allowance acquired from High Country Bank *
                      2,038        
     
Balance at end of year
  $ 12,445     $ 10,828     $ 9,473     $ 8,654     $ 6,188  
     
 
*   Allowance was assigned to reduce High Country Bank loans to fair market value at January 1, 2004.
The following table presents the allocation of the allowance for loan losses by category.
Allocation of the Allowance for Loan Losses
                                                                                 
    2007     2006     2005     2004     2003  
            Percent of             Percent of             Percent of             Percent of             Percent of  
            Loans In Each             Loans In Each             Loans In Each             Loans In Each             Loans In Each  
            Category             Category             Category             Category             Category  
            To Total             To Total             To Total             To Total             To Total  
(Dollars in thousands)   Amount     Loans     Amount     Loans     Amount     Loans     Amount     Loans     Amount     Loans  
Real estate
  $ 8,248       66 %   $ 7,076       76 %   $ 2,918       72 %   $ 1,369       73 %   $ 1,552       69 %
Commercial, agricultural, other
    3,622       29 %     2,869       18 %     5,424       24 %     3,100       22 %     2,416       25 %
Consumer
    575       5 %     189       6 %     243       4 %     4,089       5 %     1,269       6 %
Unallocated
    -0-               695               888               96               950          
 
                                                           
 
                                                                               
 
  $ 12,445       100 %   $ 10,829       100 %   $ 9,473       100 %   $ 8,654       100 %   $ 6,187       100 %
 
                                                           
Noninterest Income
          Noninterest income is derived primarily from activities such as service fees on deposit and loan accounts, commissions earned from the sale of insurance and investment products, income from the mortgage banking operations, gains or losses sustained from the sale of investment securities or mortgage loans and income earned from bank owned life insurance (BOLI).
          Noninterest income increased 7.7% or $1.1 million in 2007. The increase was due primarily to BOLI death benefits and increased return on investment in BOLI, which together resulted in an increase in non-interest income of $911,000 in 2007. The principal value of all bank owned life insurance on December 31, 2007 was $22.7 million compared to $22.8 million at December 31, 2006. Net gain on sales of investment securities was $45,000 in 2007 compared to a loss of $86,000 in 2006 and a gain of $8,100 in 2005.
          Service charges on deposit accounts increased 5.0% or $187,000 from 2006 to 2007 as total NSF fees increased $73,000 or 2.6% due to an increase in per transaction charge of 6.3%. ATM service charge income rose $36,000 or 14.9%. Outside fees paid in connection with the overdraft protection product decreased as the contract terminated, resulting in a net increase of overdraft income of $81,000. NOW and Money Market Account fees increased 28.9% as maintenance fees on the NOW products increased 50% and the average balance of these accounts increase over last year by $900,000. Other service fees income increased by $160,000 or 4.7% compared to an increase of $49,000 or 1.5% in 2006. Part of the 2007 increase was attributable to an increase of commissions and fees from Main Street Investment Services, the Company’s brokerage subsidiary, up by 9.1% or $69,000. Also increasing were merchant processing and credit card user fees (up $149,000 or 28.1%).
          Gains on sales of mortgage loans decreased $143,000 or 2.4% in 2007 due to margin compression for the loans sold by Sidus, the Bank’s mortgage lending subsidiary. Gains on sales of mortgage loans increased $805,000 or 15.4% in 2006. Income from investment in bank-owned life insurance (BOLI) increased $347,000 (49.7%) in 2007, as additional policies were purchased at higher earning rates during August 2006. The BOLI investment income increased $118,000 (20.3%) in 2006. Mortgage banking income increased $194,000 or 75.5% in 2007 after a decrease of $106,000 or 29.1% in 2006, as a result of a smaller decline in the value of the mortgage servicing rights in 2007. Servicing fees on mortgage loans decreased 4.8% or $29,000 in 2007 after a 9.5% decrease in 2006. This was due to the Bank’s average servicing portfolio decrease of $22.2 million or 9.2% in 2007 following a

30


Table of Contents

decrease of $14.2 million or 5.1% in 2006.
          Exposure to changing interest rates is expected to affect gains on mortgage sales because the mortgage origination volume is expected to increase when market rates decline and to decrease when rates rise. Since the Bank maintains a stable profit margin on mortgage loans sold, volume is the primary factor for determining gains on sales of mortgages. The impact of interest rates on the gain of a single mortgage loan is negligible because the Company secures a price commitment from its investor when it agrees to lock a rate for a borrower.
Noninterest Expense
          Noninterest expense includes salaries and employee benefits, occupancy and equipment expenses, and all other operating costs. Total noninterest expenses increased 2.7% comparing 2007 to 2006 and 8.3% comparing 2006 to 2005. Noninterest expense to average assets for 2007 was 2.93%, and for 2006 was 3.05%. Efficiency ratios for 2007 and 2006 were 55.45% and 56.16%, respectively. The efficiency ratio is the ratio of noninterest expenses less amortization of intangibles to the total of the taxable equivalent net interest income and noninterest income. The improvement in the efficiency ratio was due to maintaining noninterest expenses at a slower growth rate than the growth rate for net revenue (net interest income plus non-interest income). Amortization of core deposit intangible, an expense attributable to the 2004 acquisition of High Country Bank, totaled $777,000 in 2007 and $813,000 in 2006, a noncash expense that will continue until 2022 and is being amortized under an accelerated method.
          Salaries and employee benefits constitute the largest component of noninterest expense. Comparing 2007 to 2006, salaries and benefits increased by $467,000 or 2.5%. These increases are due to normal annual increases. Comparing 2006 to 2005, salaries and employee benefits increased 7.3%. Occupancy and equipment expense increased $16,000 or 0.4%, comparing 2007 to 2006. These expenses increased 18.4% comparing 2006 to 2005. The increase in the 2006 occupancy expenses was due mainly to the two new branches opening in early 2006 and late 2005.
          Data processing expense decreased by 4.6% over 2006 and printing and supplies expenses decreased 6.9%. Communications expense rose 9.3% over 2006 due the one-time additional expense of switching service providers.
          Other operating expenses increased $383,000 or 5.8% comparing 2007 to 2006, down from 18.3% comparing 2006 to 2005. The largest increases in the categories under other operating expenses were loan collection and repossessed property expense up $ 68,000, ATM/Debit card service fees up $125,000, and advertising up $ 54,000. Loan collection and repossessed property expense increased as $1.6 million of real estate was foreclosed and sold. ATM/Debit card service fees continue to climb as service providers increase fees. Advertising expense increased as expected, due to the implementation of various campaigns throughout the different regions as planned. Other operating expenses include items such as computer supplies, meeting and travel, directors fees, postage, mortgage origination related expenses and professional fees.
Contractual Obligations, Commitments and Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
     In the normal course of business, the Bank has various outstanding contractual obligations that will require future cash outflows. The Bank’s contractual obligations for maturities of deposits and borrowings are presented in the Gap Analysis included herein under Item 7. In addition, in the normal course of business, the Bank enters into purchase obligations for goods or services. The dollar amount of such purchase obligations at December 31, 2007 is not material. The following table reflects contractual obligations of the Bank as of December 31, 2007.
                                         
                    Three Years        
Contractual Obligations   Within One   One Year to   to   After Five    
(in thousands)   Year   Three Years   Five Years   Years   Total
     
Short-term borrowings
  $ 66,425     $     $     $     $ 66,425  
Long-term borrowings
          5,000       2,000       30,774       37,774  
Operating Leases
    267       351       42       22       682  
     
Total contractual obligations excluding deposits
    66,692       5,351       2,042       30,796       104,881  
Deposits
    860,030       100,271       3,141               963,442  
     
Total contractual obligation
  $ 926,722     $ 105,622     $ 5,183     $ 30,796       1,068,323  
     

31


Table of Contents

          In addition to the contractual obligations described above, the Bank, in the normal course of business, issues various financial instruments, such as loan commitments, guarantees and standby letters of credit, to meet the financing needs of its customers. Such commitments for the Bank, as of December 31, 2007, are presented in Note 14 to the consolidated financial statements.
          As part of its ongoing business, the Bank does not participate in transactions that generate relationships with unconsolidated entities or financial partnerships, such as entities often referred to as special purpose entities (SPEs), which generally are established for the purpose of facilitating off-balance sheet arrangements or other contractually narrow or limited purposes. As of December 31, 2007, the Bank is not involved in any unconsolidated SPE transactions.
New Accounting Standards
          See Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements for a discussion of new accounting standards and management’s assessment of the potential impact on the Bank’s consolidated financial statements.
Inflation
          Since the assets and liabilities of a bank are primarily monetary in nature (payable in fixed, determinable amounts), the performance of a bank is affected more by changes in interest rates than by inflation. Interest rates generally increase as the rate of inflation increases, but the magnitude of the change in rates may not be the same.
          While the effect of inflation is normally not as significant as is the influence on those businesses that have large investments in plant and inventories, it does have an effect. There are normally corresponding increases in the money supply, and banks will normally experience above average growth in assets, loans, and deposits. Also, general increases in the prices of goods and services will result in increased operating expenses.
Forward Looking Statement
          The discussions presented in this annual report contain statements that could be deemed forward looking statements within the meaning of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, which statements are inherently subject to risks and uncertainties. Forward looking statements are statements that include projections, predictions, expectations or beliefs about future events or results or otherwise are not statements of historical fact. Such statements are often characterized by the use of qualifying words (and their derivatives) such as “expect,” “believe,” “estimate,” “plan,” “project,” or other statements concerning opinions or judgments of the Bank and its management about future events. Factors that could influence the accuracy of such forward looking statements include, but are not limited to, the financial success or changing strategies of the Bank’s customers or vendors, actions of government regulators, the level of market interest rates, and general economic conditions.
Item 7A — Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
     See “MARKET RISK” under Item 7.
Item 8 — Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

32


Table of Contents

(DIXON HUGHES LOGO)
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
To the Stockholders and the Board of Directors
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Elkin, North Carolina
We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation and subsidiaries (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2007 and 2006 and the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, stockholders’ equity and cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2007. These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits.
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation and subsidiaries at December 31, 2007 and 2006, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2007, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.
We have also audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2007, based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission, and our report dated March 31, 2008 expressed an adverse opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.
(DIXON HUGHES PLLC)
Charlotte, North Carolina
March 31, 2008

33


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
December 31, 2007 and 2006
                 
    2007     2006  
ASSETS
               
Cash and cash equivalents:
               
Cash and due from banks
  $ 24,267,806     $ 42,387,101  
Interest-bearing deposits
    2,058,069       1,669,033  
 
           
TOTAL CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
    26,325,875       44,056,134  
 
           
 
               
Securities available for sale — At fair value (Amortized cost $141,439,626 in 2007 and $128,278,242 in 2006)
    142,483,720       127,520,514  
Loans — Less allowance for loan losses of $12,445,555 in 2007 and $10,828,882 in 2006
    886,307,501       804,080,971  
Loans held for sale
    52,753,907       42,350,915  
Accrued interest receivable
    6,054,982       5,796,450  
Premises and equipment, net
    26,779,889       27,098,420  
Foreclosed real estate
    602,000       574,345  
Federal home loan bank stock, at cost
    2,557,300       3,632,600  
Investment in bank-owned life insurance
    22,682,702       22,796,932  
Goodwill
    32,696,900       32,696,900  
Core deposit intangible (net of accumulated amortization of $4,218,393 and $3,441,799 at December 31, 2007 and 2006)
    4,261,115       5,037,709  
Other assets
    7,571,350       5,222,654  
 
           
 
               
TOTAL ASSETS
  $ 1,211,077,241     $ 1,120,864,544  
 
           
 
               
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
               
 
               
Deposits :
               
Noninterest-bearing demand deposits
  $ 154,979,227     $ 151,811,660  
Interest-bearing deposits:
               
NOW, savings and money market accounts
    232,888,349       233,031,838  
Time certificates:
               
$100,000 or more
    267,529,772       228,553,689  
Other
    308,044,736       294,449,712  
 
           
TOTAL DEPOSITS
    963,442,084       907,846,899  
 
               
Short-term borrowings
    66,425,129       62,062,598  
Long-term borrowings
    37,774,000       17,000,000  
Accrued interest payable
    3,434,832       2,975,097  
Other liabilities
    6,732,202       6,580,809  
 
           
 
               
TOTAL LIABILITIES
    1,077,808,247       996,465,403  
 
           
 
               
Stockholders’ Equity:
               
Common stock, $1 par value, 20,000,000 shares authorized; 10,563,356 shares issued in 2007 and 10,611,052 shares issued in 2006
    10,563,356       10,611,052  
Preferred stock, no par value, 1,000,000 shares authorized: no shares issued
           
Surplus
    70,986,684       71,151,626  
Retained earnings
    51,086,684       43,107,431  
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)
    632,270       (470,968 )
 
           
 
               
TOTAL STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
    133,268,994       124,399,141  
 
           
 
               
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
  $ 1,211,077,241     $ 1,120,864,544  
 
           
See notes to consolidated financial statements.

34


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME
Years Ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
                         
    2007     2006     2005  
INTEREST INCOME:
                       
Interest and fees on loans
  $ 68,224,654     $ 61,798,938     $ 48,814,541  
Interest on federal funds sold
    298,233       191,342       162,755  
Interest and dividends on securities:
                       
Taxable
    5,285,770       4,093,326       3,109,693  
Non-taxable
    1,235,727       1,130,512       1,079,957  
Interest-bearing deposits
    148,466       91,772       84,051  
 
                 
TOTAL INTEREST INCOME
    75,192,850       67,305,890       53,250,997  
 
                 
INTEREST EXPENSE:
                       
Time deposits of $100,000 or more
    11,984,295       8,569,185       4,673,489  
Other time and savings deposits
    19,008,193       15,277,302       10,966,925  
Borrowed funds
    2,308,248       2,582,857       2,945,782  
 
                 
TOTAL INTEREST EXPENSE
    33,300,736       26,429,344       18,586,196  
 
                 
 
                       
NET INTEREST INCOME
    41,892,114       40,876,546       34,664,801  
 
                       
PROVISION FOR LOAN LOSSES
    2,488,620       2,165,000       1,724,000  
 
                 
 
                       
NET INTEREST INCOME AFTER PROVISION FOR LOAN LOSSES
    39,403,494       38,711,546       32,940,801  
 
                 
 
                       
NON-INTEREST INCOME:
                       
Service charges on deposit accounts
    3,945,533       3,758,369       3,505,792  
Other service fees
    3,560,456       3,400,043       3,350,816  
Net gain on sales of mortgage loans
    5,882,495       6,025,837       5,220,456  
Net gain(loss) on sales of investment securities
    45,418       (85,596 )     8,082  
Income on investment in bank-owned life insurance
    1,045,482       698,434       580,542  
Mortgage banking income
    451,287       257,185       362,742  
Bank owned life insurance death benefits
    563,907              
Other income (loss)
    (50,419 )     290,886       215,100  
 
                 
TOTAL NON-INTEREST INCOME
    15,444,159       14,345,158       13,243,530  
 
                 
 
                       
NON-INTEREST EXPENSES:
                       
Salaries and employee benefits
    19,160,711       18,693,212       17,428,029  
Occupancy and equipment expenses
    3,916,852       3,900,516       3,294,350  
Printing and supplies
    550,386       591,200       665,218  
Data processing
    398,961       418,056       666,863  
Amortization of core deposit intangible
    776,594       813,117       852,960  
Communications expense
    1,127,422       1,031,131       1,102,393  
Other
    7,028,177       6,645,615       5,617,149  
 
                 
TOTAL NON-INTEREST EXPENSES
    32,959,103       32,092,847       29,626,962  
 
                 
 
                       
INCOME BEFORE INCOME TAXES
    21,888,550       20,963,856       16,557,369  
 
                       
INCOME TAXES
    7,200,818       7,171,959       5,398,905  
 
                 
 
                       
NET INCOME
  $ 14,687,732     $ 13,791,897     $ 11,158,464  
 
                 
 
                       
INCOME PER COMMON SHARE:
                       
Basic
  $ 1.39     $ 1.30     $ 1.04  
Diluted
  $ 1.37     $ 1.28     $ 1.03  
 
                       
CASH DIVIDENDS PER COMMON SHARE
  $ 0.51     $ 0.47     $ 0.43  
See notes to consolidated financial statements.

35


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
Years Ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
                         
    2007     2006     2005  
NET INCOME
  $ 14,687,733     $ 13,791,897     $ 11,158,464  
 
                 
 
                       
OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS):
                       
 
                       
Unrealized holding gains (losses) on securities available for sale
    1,847,241       619,218       (2,519,691 )
Tax effect
    (716,070 )     (238,419 )     970,313  
 
                 
 
                       
Unrealized holding gains (losses) on securities available for sale, net of tax amount
    1, 131,171       380,799       (1,549,378 )
 
                 
 
                       
Reclassification adjustment for realized (gains) losses
    (45,418 )     85,596       (8,082 )
Tax effect
    17,485       (32,955 )     3,112  
 
                 
 
                       
Reclassification adjustment for realized (gains) losses, net of tax amount
    (27,933 )     52,641       (4,970 )
 
                 
 
                       
OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS), NET
    1,103,238       433,440       (1,554,348 )
 
                 
 
                       
COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
  $ 15,790,971     $ 14,225,337     $ 9,604,116  
 
                 
See notes to consolidated financial statements.

36


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Years Ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
                                                 
                                    Accumulated        
                                    other com-        
                                    prehensive     Total  
    Common Stock             Retained     income     stockholders’  
    Shares     Amount     Surplus     earnings     (loss)     equity  
BALANCE, JANUARY 1, 2005
    10,688,401       10,688,401       72,083,580       28,218,316       649,940       111,640,237  
 
                                               
Net income
                      11,158,464             11,158,464  
Shares issued under stock option plan
    25,930       25,930       165,322                   191,252  
Cash dividends declared
                      (4,594,887 )           (4,594,887 )
Shares repurchased
    (34,171 )     (34,171 )     (228,210 )     (227,062 )           (489,443 )
Exercise of stock appreciation rights
                (26,826 )                 (26,826 )
Fractional shares retired
    (99 )     (99 )     (654 )     (799 )           (1,552 )
Other comprehensive loss
                            (1,554,348 )     (1,554,348 )
 
                                   
 
                                               
BALANCE, DECEMBER 31, 2005
    10,680,061       10,680,061       71,993,212       34,554,032       (904,408 )     116,322,897  
 
                                               
Net income
                      13,791,897             13,791,897  
Shares issued under stock option plan
    18,111       18,111       150,804                   168,915  
Cash dividends declared
                      (4,997,731 )           (4,997,731 )
Shares repurchased
    (87,085 )     (87,085 )     (992,425 )     (240,810 )           (1,320,320 )
Fractional shares retired
    (35 )     (35 )     35       43               43  
Other comprehensive income
                            433,440       433,440  
 
                                   
 
                                               
BALANCE, DECEMBER 31, 2006
    10,611,052     $ 10,611,052     $ 71,151,626     $ 43,107,431     $ (470,968 )   $ 124,399,141  
 
                                   
 
                                               
Net income
                      14,687,733             14,687,733  
Shares issued under stock option plan
    72,076       72,076       495,306                   567,382  
Stock option compensation
                69,165                   69,165  
Cash dividends declared
                      (5,400,776 )           (5,400,776 )
Shares repurchased
    (119,772 )     (119,772 )     (729,413 )     (1,307,704 )           (2,156,889 )
Other comprehensive income
                            1,103,238       1,103,238  
 
                                   
 
                                               
BALANCE, DECEMBER 31, 2007
    10,563,356     $ 10,563,356     $ 70,986,684     $ 51,086,684     $ 632,270     $ 133,268,994  
 
                                   
See notes to consolidated financial statements.

37


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
Years Ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
                         
    2007     2006     2005  
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
                       
Net income
  $ 14,687,732     $ 13,791,897     $ 11,158,464  
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
                       
Net amortization of premiums on investment securities
    49,684       368,979       602,721  
Provision for loan losses
    2,488,620       2,165,000       1,724,000  
Net gain on sales of mortgage loans
    (5,882,495 )     (6,025,837 )     (5,220,456 )
Net (gain) loss on sale of available-for-sale securities
    (45,418 )     85,596       (8,082 )
Increase in cash surrender value of life insurance
    (1,045,481 )     (698,434 )     (580,542 )
Gain on Bank-owned life insurance
    (563,907 )            
Depreciation and amortization
    1,854,608       1,948,901       1,673,511  
(Gain) loss on sale of premises and equipment
    (66,680 )     50,299       38,725  
Net (gain) loss on sale of other real estate owned
    286,730              
Amortization of core deposit intangible
    776,594       813,117       852,960  
Deferred tax (benefit) provision
    (1,196,351 )     (958,870 )     (1,180,361 )
Stock based compensation expense
    69,165       13,622        
Originations of mortgage loans held-for-sale
    (908,549,045 )     (865,992,983 )     (833,789,865 )
Proceeds from sales of mortgage loans
    904,028,548       861,094,634       849,190,163  
Increase in accrued interest receivable
    (258,532 )     (993,560 )     (344,737 )
(Increase) decrease in other assets
    (1,850,927 )     (292,041 )     330,164  
Increase in accrued interest payable
    459,735       1,159,292       680,111  
Increase in other liabilities
    54,398       442,293       2,652,499  
 
                 
 
                       
NET CASH PROVIDED BY OPERATING ACTIVITIES
    5,296,978       6,971,905       27,779,275  
 
                 
 
                       
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
                       
Purchases of available-for-sale securities
    (55,248,915 )     (50,674,494 )     (27,191,892 )
Proceeds from sales of available-for-sale securities
    35,648,265       15,180,679       13,554,070  
Proceeds from maturities of available-for-sale securities
    6,435,000       21,940,000       11,265,000  
Net increase in loans
    (86,070,781 )     (78,189,581 )     (51,089,410 )
Acquisition of Sidus Financial, LLC, net
          (560,717 )     (464,052 )
Purchases of premises and equipment
    (3,064,340 )     (1,753,356 )     (7,020,334 )
Purchase of Federal Home Loan Bank stock
    1,075,300       (3,213,700 )     (766,300 )
Proceeds from redemption of Federal Home Loan Bank stock
          3,879,100       1,395,000  
Proceeds from sales of premises and equipment
    1,594,943       28,791       1,996,687  
Proceeds from the sale of other real estate owned
    1,041,246              
Proceeds from bank-owned life insurance
    1,723,618              
Investment in bank-owned life insurance
          (5,500,000 )      
 
                 
 
                       
NET CASH USED IN INVESTING ACTIVITIES
    (96,865,664 )     (98,863,278 )     (58,321,231 )
 
                 
See notes to consolidated financial statements.

38


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
Years Ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
                         
    2007     2006     2005  
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
                       
Net increase (decreasing) in checking, NOW, money market and savings accounts
  $ 3,024,078     $ (2,491,140 )   $ 6,803,555  
Net increase in time certificates
    52,571,106       95,985,451       78,840,929  
Net increase (decrease) in borrowed funds
    25,136,532       (6,927,114 )     (27,001,742 )
Purchases of common stock
    (2,156,889 )     (1,320,320 )     (489,443 )
Dividends paid
    (5,303,782 )     (4,997,731 )     (4,594,887 )
Tax benefit from exercise of stock options
          35,914        
Retired fractional shares
          43       (1,552 )
Payment of stock appreciation rights
                (26,826 )
Proceeds from exercise of stock options
    567,382       168,915       191,252  
 
                 
 
                       
NET CASH PROVIDED BY FINANCING ACTIVITIES
    73,838,427       80,454,018       53,721,286  
 
                 
 
                       
NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
    (17,730,259 )     (11,437,355 )     23,179,330  
 
                       
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS:
                       
Beginning of year
    44,056,134       55,493,489       32,314,157  
 
                 
 
                       
End of year
  $ 26,325,875     $ 44,056,134     $ 55,493,487  
 
                 
 
                       
SUPPLEMENTARY CASH FLOW INFORMATION:
                       
Cash paid for interest
  $ 32,832,851     $ 25,270,052     $ 17,906,085  
 
                 
 
                       
Cash paid for income taxes
  $ 8,386,742     $ 9,322,595     $ 5,097,596  
 
                 
 
                       
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF NONCASH INVESTING AND FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
                       
 
                       
Transfer from loans to foreclosed real estate
  $ 1,397,021     $ 868,171     $ 959,032  
 
                 
 
                       
Unrealized gain (loss) on investment securities
                       
Available for sale, net
  $ 1,103,328     $ 433,440     $ (1,554,348 )
 
                 
See notes to consolidated financial statements.

39


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
1. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
Organization – Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation (the “Company”) was formed July 1, 2006 as a holding company for Yadkin Valley Bank and Trust Company (the “Bank”). The Bank has three wholly owned subsidiaries, Main Street Investment Services, Inc., which provides investment services to the Company’s customers, Sidus Financial LLC, which provides mortgage brokerage services throughout North Carolina and surrounding states, and PBRE, Inc. PBRE, Inc. is a shell company that serves as a trustee on real estate loans. The Bank’s state charter was incorporated in North Carolina on September 16, 1968, and the Bank is a member of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”). As a result, the Bank is regulated by the state and the FDIC. The Bank is also a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta. The Company is headquartered in Elkin, North Carolina and the Bank provides consumer and commercial banking services in northwestern North Carolina through 24 full-service banking offices. Sidus offers mortgage-banking services to its customers in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, Maryland, Alabama, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, West Virginia, Delaware, Mississippi, Arkansas, Pennsylvania and Tennessee. The Company and its subsidiaries are collectively referred to herein as the “Company.” Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation formed Yadkin Valley Statutory Trust I (the “Trust”) during November 2007 in order to facilitate the issuance of trust preferred securities. The Trust is a statutory business trust formed under the laws of the state of Delaware. All of the common securities of the Trust are owned by Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation.
Basis of Presentation - The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation and its wholly owned subsidiary, Yadkin Valley Bank and Trust Company. Yadkin Valley Bank and Trust Company includes its wholly owned subsidiaries, Main Street Investment Services, Inc., PBRE, Inc. and Sidus Financial, LLC. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. The investment in Yadkin Valley Statutory Trust I, in accordance with FIN 46R, has been recorded by the Company in other assets with the corresponding increase to long-term debt. The Company records the income from the trust as a noninterest income item and the expense as additional interest expense.
Cash and Cash Equivalents - Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand, amounts due from banks, interest bearing deposits, and federal funds sold. Generally, federal funds are purchased and sold for one-day periods.
Investment Securities - Debt securities that the Bank has the positive intent and ability to hold to maturity are classified as “held to maturity” securities and reported at amortized cost. Debt and equity securities that are bought and held principally for the purpose of selling in the near term are classified as “trading” securities and reported at fair value with unrealized gains and losses included in earnings. Debt and equity securities not classified as either held to maturity or trading securities are classified as “available for sale” securities and reported at fair value with unrealized gains and losses excluded from earnings and reported, net of related tax effects, as a separate component of equity and as an item of other comprehensive income. Gains and losses on the sale of available for sale securities are determined using the specific identification method. Declines in the fair value of individual held to maturity and available for sale securities below their cost that are other than temporary result in write-downs of the individual securities to their fair value. The related write-downs are included in earnings as realized losses. Premiums and discounts are recognized in interest income using the interest method over the period to maturity. Transfers of securities between classifications are accounted for at fair value. All securities held at December 31, 2006 and 2007 are classified as available for sale.
Loans and Allowance for Loan Losses - Loans that management has the intent and ability to hold for the foreseeable future are stated at their outstanding principal balances adjusted for any deferred fees and costs. Interest on loans is calculated by using the simple interest method on daily balances of the principal amount outstanding. Loan origination and other fees, net of certain direct origination costs, are deferred and recognized as an adjustment of the related loan yield using the interest method.
Loans that are deemed to be impaired (i.e., probable that the Company will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the terms of the loan agreement) are measured based on the present value of expected future cash flows, discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate or, as a practical matter, at the loan’s observable market value or fair value of the collateral if the loan is collateral dependent. A valuation reserve is established to record the difference between the secured loan amount and the present value or market value of the impaired loan. Impaired loans may be valued on a loan-by-loan basis (e.g., loans with risk characteristics unique to an individual borrower)

40


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
1. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)
or on an aggregate basis (e.g., loans with similar risk characteristics). The Company’s policy for recognition of interest income on impaired loans is the same as its policy for recognizing interest income on non-impaired loans. The company discontinues the accrual of interest income when the loans are either at least 90 days past due or less than 90 days past due and doubtful that interest will be collected during the current period. Interest on nonaccrual loans is accounted for on the cash-basis or cost-recovery method until qualifying for return to accrual. Loans are returned to accrual status when all principle and interest amounts contractually due are brought current and future payments are reasonable. The total of the impaired loans, impaired loans on non-accrual basis, the related allowance for loan losses and interest income recognized on impaired loans is disclosed in Note 5.
The provision for loan losses charged to operations is an amount sufficient to bring the allowance for loan losses to an estimated balance considered adequate to absorb potential losses in the portfolio resulting from events that occurred as of the balance sheet date. Management’s determination of the adequacy of the allowance is based on an evaluation of the portfolio, current economic conditions, historical loan loss experience and other risk factors. Recovery of the carrying value of loans is dependent to some extent on future economic, operating and other conditions that may be beyond the control of the Bank. Unanticipated future adverse changes in such conditions could result in material adjustments to the allowance for loan losses. In addition, regulatory examiners may require the Bank to recognize changes to the allowance for loan losses based on their judgments about information available to them at the time of their examination.
Loans Held for Sale - Loans held for sale primarily consist of one to four family residential loans originated for sale in the secondary market and are carried at the lower of cost or fair value determined on an aggregate basis. Gains and losses on sales of loans held for sale are included in other income in the consolidated statements of income. Gains and losses on loan sales are determined by the difference between the selling price and the carrying value of the loans sold.
Foreclosed Real Estate Foreclosed real estate is stated at the lower of carrying amount or fair value less estimated cost to sell. Any initial losses at the time of foreclosure are charged against the allowance for loan losses with any subsequent losses or write-downs included in the consolidated statements of income as a component of other expenses.
Business Combinations - The Company accounts for all business combinations by the purchase method of accounting whereby acquired assets and liabilities are recorded at fair value on the date of acquisition with the remainder of the purchase price allocated to identified intangible assets and goodwill.
Mortgage Banking Activities - The Bank originates and sells to investors, loans secured by mortgages on single-family residential property. Mortgage loans held-for-sale are reported at the lower of cost or fair value as determined on an aggregate basis. Gains or losses resulting from loan sales are recognized at the time of sale, generally on the settlement date. If the Bank retains the right to service the loan, the previous book-carrying amount is allocated between the loan sold and the retained mortgage servicing right based on their relative fair values on the date of transfer.
Servicing assets are recognized as separate assets when rights are acquired through purchase or through sale of financial assets. Mortgage servicing rights are recorded at fair value and periodically evaluated for impairment based on changes in assumptions used to estimate fair value of those rights.
At December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005, the Bank was servicing loans for others of approximately $207,072,346, $231,189,795, and $251,197,500, respectively. The Bank carries fidelity bond insurance coverage of $8,000,000 and errors and omissions insurance coverage of $1,000,000 per occurrence. Custodial escrow balances maintained in connection with the loan servicing were $77,946 and $83,620 at December 31, 2007 and 2006, respectively.
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

41


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
1. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)
Mortgage servicing rights with a fair value of $2,000,770 and $2,070,689 at December 31, 2007 and 2006, respectively, are included in other assets. Amortization/market value adjustments related to mortgage servicing rights were $120,532, $343,420 and $378,634 for 2007, 2006 and 2005, respectively. The Bank recorded a valuation adjustment to mortgage servicing rights of $69,919 during the year ended December 31, 2007. A valuation of the fair value of the mortgage servicing rights is performed using a pooling methodology. Similar loans are “pooled” together and evaluated on a discounted earnings basis to determine the present value of future earnings. The present value of future earnings is the estimated market value for the pool, calculated using consensus assumptions that a third party purchaser would utilize in evaluating potential acquisition of the servicing.
Premises and Equipment - Premises and equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and amortization. Additions and major replacements or betterments, which extend the useful lives of premises and equipment, are capitalized. Maintenance, repairs and minor improvements are expensed as incurred. Depreciation and amortization is provided based on the estimated useful lives of the assets using both straight-line and accelerated methods. The estimated useful lives for computing depreciation and amortization are 10 years for land improvements, 30 to 50 years for buildings, and 3 to 22 years for furniture and equipment. Gains or losses on dispositions of premises and equipment are reflected in income.
The Company reviews long-lived assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of such assets may not be recoverable. If the sum of the expected future cash flows is less than the carrying amount of the asset, an impairment loss is recognized.
Goodwill and Other Intangibles - Goodwill represents the excess of the cost of an acquisition in a business combination over the fair value of the net assets acquired. The company allocates goodwill to the segment that receives significant benefits from the acquisition. Other intangible assets represent purchased intangible assets that can be separately distinguished from goodwill. Goodwill is not amortized but is tested for impairment annually, or more frequently if events or circumstances indicate possible impairment. No impairment was identified as a result of the testing performed during 2007 or 2006. Intangible assets with finite lives include core deposits. Intangible assets are subject to impairment testing whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may not be recoverable. Core deposit intangibles are amortized on the sum-of-years digits method (intangibles acquired in 2002) and the straight-line method (intangibles acquired in 2004) over a period not to exceed 20 years.
The Bank’s projected amortization expense for the core deposit intangible for the years ending December 31, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012 is $733,430, $693,587, 653,743, $613,900, and $577,078, respectively. The weighted average amortization period is 8.0 years.
Income Taxes - Provisions for income taxes are based on amounts reported in the statements of income and include changes in deferred taxes. Deferred taxes are computed using the asset and liability approach. The tax effects of differences between the tax and financial accounting basis of assets and liabilities are reflected in the balance sheets at the tax rates expected to be in effect when the differences reverse.
Net Income Per Common Share - Basic net income per common share is calculated on the basis of the weighted average number of shares outstanding. Common stock equivalents arising from stock options outstanding are included in diluted net income per common share.
Stock Based Compensation - Effective January 1, 2006, the Company adopted the provisions of, and began accounting for stock-based compensation in accordance with, the Financial Accounting Standards Board’s (“FASB”) Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 123-revised 2004 (“SFAS No. 123(R)”), “Share-Based Payment” which was issued in December 2004 and replaced Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 123 (“SFAS No. 123”), “Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation” and supersedes APB Opinion No. 25 (“APB No. 25”), “Accounting for Stock Issued to Employees.” SFAS No. 123(R) requires recognition of the cost of employee services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments in the financial statements over the period the
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

42


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
1. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)
employee is required to perform the services in exchange for the award (presumptively the vesting period). SFAS No. 123(R) also requires measurement of the cost of employee services received in exchange for an award based on the grant-date fair value of the award. SFAS No. 123(R) also amends SFAS No. 95, “Statement of Cash Flows,” to require that excess tax benefits be reported as financing cash inflows, rather than as a reduction of taxes paid, which is included within operating cash flows. The Company adopted SFAS No. 123R using the modified prospective application as permitted under SFAS No. 123R. Accordingly, prior period amounts have not been restated. Under this application, the Company is required to record compensation expense for all awards granted after the date of adoption and for the unvested portion of previously granted awards that remain outstanding at the date of adoption. Prior to the adoption of SFAS No. 123R, the Company used the Intrinsic value method as prescribed by APB No. 25 and thus recognized no compensation expense for options granted with exercise prices equal to the fair market value of the Company’s common stock on the date of grant.
Non-marketable equity securities - As a requirement for membership, the Bank invests in stock of Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta (“FHLB”), and Silverton Bank, formerly Bankers Bank. Due to the redemption provisions of the FHLB, the Bank estimated that fair value of the FHLB stock equals its cost and that this investment was not impaired at December 31, 2007. In addition, the Company holds equity investments in three other entities. These investments are discussed further in Note 4.
Use of Estimates - The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Such estimates include, for example, the allowance for loan losses and purchase accounting. Actual results could differ from those estimates.
New Accounting Standards – In July 2006, the FASB issued Financial Interpretation No. 48, “Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes-an interpretation of FASB Statement No. 109” (“FIN 48”), which is a change in accounting for income taxes. FIN 48 specifies how tax benefits for uncertain tax positions are to be recognized, measured, and derecognized in financial statements; requires certain disclosures of uncertain tax matters; specifies how reserves for uncertain tax positions should be classified on the balance sheet; and provides transition and interim period guidance, among other provisions. FIN 48 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2006 and as a result, was effective for the Company in the first quarter of fiscal 2007. The adoption of FIN 48 did not have a material impact on the Company’s financial statements.
In the first quarter of 2006, the FASB issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (“SFAS”) 156, “Accounting for Servicing of Financial Assets” (“SFAS No. 156”). SFAS No.156 sets accounting requirements for separately recognizing a servicing asset or a servicing liability when a company undertakes an obligation to service a financial asset under a servicing contract in certain situations. Such servicing assets or servicing liabilities are required to be initially measured at fair value, if practicable. SFAS No. 156 also allows an entity to choose one of two methods when subsequently measuring its servicing assets and servicing liabilities (1) the amortization method or (2) the fair value measurement method. The amortization method existed under Statement 140 and remains unchanged in (1) allowing entities to amortize their servicing assets or servicing liabilities in proportion to and over the period of estimated net servicing income or net servicing loss and (2) requiring the assessment of those servicing assets or servicing liabilities for impairment or increased obligation based on fair value at each reporting date. The fair value measurement method allows entities to measure their servicing assets or servicing liabilities at fair value each reporting date and report changes in fair value in earnings in the period the change occurs. SFAS No. 156 permits a one-time reclassification of available-for-sale securities to trading securities by entities with recognized servicing rights upon initial adoption, provided certain criteria are met. The Company adopted SFAS No. 156 in the first quarter of 2007 using the fair value measurement method. The adoption of SFAS No. 156 did not have a material impact on its financial position and results of operations, including the valuation methods and support for the assumptions that underlie the valuation.
In September 2006, the FASB issued FASB Statement No. 157, “Fair Value Measurements” (“FASB No. 157”), which
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

43


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
1. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)
enhances existing guidance for measuring assets and liabilities using fair value and requires additional disclosure about the use of fair value for measurement. The Statement is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after November 15, 2007, and interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company will be required to adopt SFAS No.157 in the first quarter of 2008, and is currently evaluating the impact of the adoption of SFAS No. 157 on its financial position and results of operations, including the valuation methods and support for the assumptions that underlie the valuation.
In September 2006, the Emerging Issues task Force (EITF) issued EITF Issue 06-04, “Accounting for Deferred Compensation and Postretirement Benefit Aspects of Endorsement Split-Dollar Life Insurance Arrangements” (“EITF Issue 06-4”). EITF Issue 06-4 requires that for endorsement split-dollar insurance arrangements that provide a benefit to an employee that extends to postretirement periods, an employer should recognize a liability for future benefits in accordance with FASB Statement No. 106 or Accounting Principles Board (APB) Opinion No. 12 based on the substantive agreement of the employee. If the employee has effectively agreed to maintain a life insurance policy during postretirement periods, the costs of the life insurance policy during the postretirement periods should be accrued in accordance with either FASB Statement No. 106 or APB Opinion No. 12. EITF Issue 06-04 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2007. The Company does not expect the adoption of EITF Issue 06-04 to have a material effect on it’s balance sheet and results of operations.
In February 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 159, “The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Liabilities” (SFAS No. 159). SFAS No. 159 allows an entity to elect to measure certain financial assets and liabilities at fair value with changes in fair value recognized in the income statement each period. The statement also requires additional disclosures to identify the effects of an entity’s fair value election on its earnings. The Company did not elect the fair value option as of January 1, 2008 for any of its financial assets or financial liabilities and, accordingly, the adoption of the statement did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.
In December 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 141(R), “Business Combinations”. SFAS No. 141(R) will significantly change how entities apply the acquisition method to business combinations. The most significant changes affecting how the Corporation will account for business combinations under this Statement include: the acquisition date will be the date the acquirer obtains control; all (and only) identifiable assets acquired, liabilities assumed, and noncontrolling interests in the acquiree will be stated at fair value on the acquisition date; assets or liabilities arising from noncontractual contingencies will be measured at their acquisition date fair value only if it is more likely than not that they meet the definition of an asset or liability on the acquisition date; adjustments subsequently made to the provisional amounts recorded on the acquisition date will be made retroactively during a measurement period not to exceed one year; acquisition-related restructuring costs that do not meet the criteria in SFAS No. 146, ‘Accounting for Costs Associated with Exit or Disposal Activities”, will be expensed as incurred; transaction costs will be expensed as incurred; reversals of deferred income tax valuation allowances and income tax contingencies will be recognized in earnings subsequent to the measurement period; and the allowance for loan losses of an acquiree will not be permitted to be recognized by the acquirer. Additionally, SFAS No. 141(R) will require new and modified disclosures surrounding subsequent changes to acquisition-related contingencies, contingent consideration, noncontrolling interests, acquisition-related transaction costs, fair values and cash flows not expected to be collected for acquired loans, and an enhanced goodwill rollforward.
The Company will be required to prospectively apply SFAS No. 141(R) to all business combinations completed on or after January 1, 2009. Early adoption is not permitted. For business combinations in which the acquisition date was before the effective date, the provisions of SFAS No. 141(R) will apply to the subsequent accounting for deferred income tax valuation allowances and income tax contingencies and will require any changes in those amounts to be recorded in earnings. Management is currently evaluating the effects that SFAS No. 141(R) will have on the financial condition, results of operations, liquidity, and the disclosures that will be presented in the consolidated financial statements.
In November 2007, the SEC issued Staff Accounting Bulletin (SAB) No. 109, which addresses the valuation of written loan commitments accounted for at fair value through earnings. The guidance in SAB No. 109 expresses the staff’s
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

44


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
1. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)
view that the measurement of fair value for a written loan commitment accounted for at fair value through earnings should incorporate the expected net future cash flows related to the associated servicing of the loan. Previously, under SAB No. 105, Application of Accounting Principles to Loan Commitments, this component of value was not incorporated into the fair value of the loan commitment. The Corporation adopted the provisions of SAB 109 for written loan commitments entered into or modified after December 31, 2007 related to residential and commercial real estate loans held for sale that are accounted for as derivatives under SFAS 133. The Corporation does not account for any other written loan commitments at fair value through earnings. The impact of SAB 109 will be to accelerate the recognition of the estimated fair value of the servicing inherent in the loan to the commitment date.
From time to time, the FASB issues exposure drafts for proposed statements of financial accounting standards. Such exposure drafts are subject to comment from the public, to revisions by the FASB and to final issuance by the FASB as statements of financial accounting standards. Management considers the effect of the proposed statements on the consolidated financial statements of the Corporation and monitors the status of changes to and proposed effective dates of exposure drafts.
Reclassifications - Certain amounts in the 2006 financial statements have been reclassified to conform to the 2007 presentation. The reclassifications had no effect on net income or stockholders’ equity, as previously reported.
2. BUSINESS COMBINATION
The Company has entered into a definitive merger agreementsubject to regulatory and stockholder approval to merge Cardinal State Bank (“Cardinal”), headquartered in Durham, NC, into the Bank. Cardinal stockholders will receive $17.62 per share in a total transaction value of approximately $41.8 million. Cardinal stockholders may elect to receive either Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation stock or cash subject to the following allocation: 42% of Cardinal stock will be exchanged for Yadkin stock and 58% exchanged for cash. On September 19, 2007, the North Carolina Commissioner of Banks approved the application for merger submitted by the Bank and Cardinal. The Company currently expects this merger to close in the first quarter of 2008.
3. INVESTMENT SECURITIES
Investment securities at December 31, 2007 and 2006 are summarized as follows:
                                 
    2007  
    Amortized     Unrealized     Unrealized     Fair  
    Cost     Gains     Losses     Value  
Available-for-sale, securities:
                               
Securities of other U.S. government agencies due:
                               
Within 1 year
  $ 18,994,000     $ 16,356     $ 18,793     $ 18,991,563  
After 1 but within 5 years
    24,512,338       557,037             25,069,375  
After 5 but within 10 years
    4,001,057       107,693             4,108,750  
 
                       
 
    47,507,395       681,086       18,793       48,169,688  
 
                       
U.S. Treasury securities due:
                               
Within 1 year
                       
After 1 but within 5 years
    2,996,159       40,873             3,037,032  
 
                       
 
    2,996,159       40,873             3,037,032  
 
                       
Mortgage-backed securities due:
                               
Within 1 year
    24,915       77             24,992  
After 1 but within 5 years
    3,823,586       2,206       39,633       3,786,159  
After 5 but within 10 years
    1,755,533       7,123       24,535       1,738,121  
After 10 years
    45,440,070       523,584       114,789       45,848,865  
 
                       
 
    51,044,104       532,990       178,957       51,398,137  
 
                       
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

45


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
3. INVESTMENT SECURITIES (Continued)
                                 
State and municipal securities due:
                               
Within 1 year
    1,753,611       4,330       572       1,757,369  
After 1 but within 5 years
    14,582,621       250,971       44,579       14,789,013  
After 5 but within 10 years
    9,711,166       128,557       63,606       9,776,117  
After 10 years
    11,904,178       45,532       123,641       11,826,069  
 
                       
 
    37,951,576       429,390       232,398       38,148,568  
 
                       
 
                               
Other securities due:
                               
Within 1 year
    1,143                   1,143  
After 1 but within 5 years
    883,627             3,893       879,734  
After 10 years
    1,055,622       8,476       214,680       849,418  
 
                       
 
                               
 
    1,940,392       8,476       218,573       1,730,295  
 
                       
Total available-for-sale securities
  $ 141,439,626     $ 1,692,815     $ 648,721     $ 142,483,720  
 
                       
                                 
    2006  
    Amortized     Unrealized     Unrealized     Fair  
    Cost     Gains     Losses     Value  
Available-for-sale, securities:
                               
Securities of other U.S. government agencies due:
                               
Within 1 year
  $ 5,516,721     $     $ 35,136     $ 5,481,585  
After 1 but within 5 years
    45,425,796       64,332       340,433       45,149,695  
After 5 but within 10 years
                       
 
                       
 
    50,942,517       64,332       375,569       50,631,280  
 
                       
 
                               
U.S. Treasury securities due:
                               
Within 1 year
                       
After 1 but within 5 years
    2,991,961             46       2,991,915  
 
                       
 
    2,991,961             46       2,991,915  
 
                       
 
                               
Mortgage-backed securities due:
                               
Within 1 year
    677             1       676  
After 1 but within 5 years
    4,023,816       2,773       82,495       3,944,094  
After 5 but within 10 years
    4,015,666       4,148       119,340       3,900,474  
After 10 years
    33,183,931       107,445       242,979       33,048,397  
 
                       
 
    41,224,090       114,366       444,815       40,893,641  
 
                       
 
                               
State and municipal securities due:
                               
Within 1 year
    936,615       1,389       1,122       936,882  
After 1 but within 5 years
    12,224,311       115,826       130,401       12,209,736  
After 5 but within 10 years
    12,583,124       183,032       175,338       12,590,818  
After 10 years
    5,408,664       6,844       90,879       5,324,629  
 
                       
 
    31,152,714       307,091       397,740       31,062,065  
 
                       
 
                               
Other securities due:
                               
Within 1 year
    1,088                   1,088  
After 1 but within 5 years
    910,249             20,593       889,656  
After 10 years
    1,055,623       6,204       10,958       1,050,869  
 
                       
 
                               
 
    1,966,960       6,204       31,551       1,941,613  
 
                       
Total available-for-sale securities
  $ 128,278,242     $ 491,993     $ 1,249,721     $ 127,520,514  
 
                       
Mortgage-backed securities are included in maturity groups based upon stated maturity date. At December 31, 2007
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

46


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
3. INVESTMENT SECURITIES (Continued)
and 2006, the Bank’s mortgage-backed securities were pass-through securities. Actual maturity will vary based on repayment of the underlying mortgage loans.
Gross realized gains on sales of available for sale securities in 2007, 2006 and 2005 were $127,168, $18,602, and $11,588, respectively. Gross realized losses on sales of available-for-sale securities in 2007, 2006 and 2005 were $81,750, $104,198, and $3,506, respectively.
Investment securities with carrying values of approximately $57,433,049 and $68,478,293 at December 31, 2007 and 2006, respectively, were pledged as collateral for public deposit and for other purposes as required or permitted by law.
The following table shows investments’ gross unrealized losses and fair value, aggregated by investment category and length of time that individual securities have been in a continuous unrealized loss position, at December 31, 2007 and 2006. Securities that have been in a loss position for twelve months or more at December 31, 2007 include twenty-four mortgage-backed securities, six federal agency bonds, two corporate securities and forty-nine municipal bonds. Securities that have been in a loss position for twelve months or more at December 31, 2006 include twenty-nine mortgage-backed securities, fifteen federal agency bonds and fifty-six municipal bonds. The unrealized losses relate to debt securities that have incurred fair value reductions due to higher market interest rates since the securities were purchased. The unrealized losses are not likely to reverse unless and until market interest rates decline to the levels that existed when the securities were purchased. Since none of the unrealized losses relate to the marketability of the securities or the issuer’s ability to honor redemption obligations, none of the securities are deemed to be other than temporarily impaired.
                                                 
    Less Than 12 Months     12 Months or More     Total  
    Fair     Unrealized     Fair     Unrealized     Fair     Unrealized  
December 31, 2007   value     losses     value     losses     value     losses  
Securities available for sale:
                                               
U.S. government agencies
  $     $     $ 11,983,438     $ 18,793     $ 11,983,438     $ 18,793  
U.S. Treasury securities
                                   
Mortgage backed securities
    818,793       604       12,052,785       178,353       12,871,578       178,957  
State and municipal securities
    4,465,758       82,493       13,509,346       149,906       17,975,104       232,398  
Other securities
    800,000       200,000       879,734       18,572       1,679,734       218,573  
 
                                   
Total temporarily impaired securities
  $ 5,364,551     $ 283,097     $ 38,425,303     $ 365,624     $ 43,832,071     $ 648,721  
 
                                   
                                                 
    Fair     Unrealized     Fair     Unrealized     Fair     Unrealized  
December 31, 2006   value     losses     value     losses     value     losses  
Securities available for sale:
                                               
U.S. government agencies
  $ 11,478,750     $ 16,021     $ 26,138,467     $ 359,548     $ 37,617,217     $ 375,569  
U.S. Treasury securities
    2,991,915       46                   2,991,915       46  
Mortgage backed securities
    11,909,013       43,322       13,117,901       401,493       25,026,914       444,815  
State and municipal securities
    2,165,840       18,232       15,131,481       379,508       17,297,321       397,740  
Other securities
                889,656       31,551       900,615       31,551  
 
                                   
Total temporarily impaired securities
  $ 28,545,518     $ 77,621     $ 55,277,505     $ 1,172,100     $ 83,833,982       $1,249,721  
 
                                   
4. NON-MARKETABLE EQUITY SECURITIES CARRIED AT COST
The aggregate cost of the Company’s cost method investments totaled $3,245,783 at December 31, 2007. Investments with an aggregate cost of $536,761 were not evaluated for impairment because (a) the company did not estimate the fair value of those investments in accordance with paragraphs 14 and 15 of Statement 107 and (b) the Company did not identify any events or changes in circumstances that may have had a significant adverse effect on the fair value of those investments. Of the remaining $2,709,022 of investments, consisting of securities in Federal Home Loan Bank and the Silverton Bank carried at $2,557,300 and $151,722, respectively at December 31, 2007,
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

47


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
4. NON-MARKETABLE EQUITY SECURITIES CARRIED AT COST (Continued)
the Company estimated that the fair value equaled or exceeded the cost of these investments (that is, the investments were not impaired) on the basis of the redemption provisions of the issuing entities.
5. LOANS AND ALLOWANCE FOR LOAN LOSSES
Loans at December 31, 2007 and 2006 classified by type are as follows:
                 
    2007     2006  
Commercial, financial and agricultural
  $ 515,354,445     $ 471,751,273  
Real estate — construction
    155,043,145       111,353,033  
Real estate — mortgage
    196,329,911       183,310,489  
Installment loans to individuals
    33,305,008       49,733,156  
 
           
Total
    900,032,509       816,147,951  
 
               
Less: Net deferred loan origination fees
    (1,279,453 )     (1,238,098 )
Allowance for loan losses
    (12,445,555 )     (10,828,882 )
 
           
Loans, net
  $ 886,307,501     $ 804,080,971  
 
           
Substantially all of the Company’s loans have been granted to customers in the piedmont and north western regions of North Carolina.
In the normal course of business, the Company has made loans to directors and officers of the Company and its subsidiaries. All loans and commitments made to such officers and directors and to companies in which they are officers, or have significant ownership interest, have been made on substantially the same terms and conditions, including interest rates and collateral, as those prevailing at the same time for comparable transactions with other customers. In the opinion of management, they do not involve more than the normal credit risk or present other unfavorable features. An analysis of these related party loans for the year ended December 31, 2007 is as follows:
         
Balance at beginning of year
  $ 11,539,559  
New loans
    3,604,637  
Retirement and terminations of directors and officers
    (4,081,665 )
Repayments
    (1,458,844 )
 
     
Balance at end of year
  $ 9,603,687  
 
     
Changes in the allowance for loan losses for the years ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005 are as follows (in thousands):
                         
    2007     2006     2005  
Balance, beginning of year
  $ 10,828     $ 9,473     $ 8,654  
 
                 
Charge-offs:
                       
Commercial, financial and agricultural
    (348 )     (280 )     (387 )
Real estate — construction
    (118 )           (50 )
Real estate — mortgage
    (210 )     (418 )     (380 )
Installment loans to individuals
    (426 )     (302 )     (466 )
 
                 
 
    (1,102 )     (1,000 )     (1,283 )
 
                 
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

48


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
5. LOANS AND ALLOWANCE FOR LOAN LOSSES (continued)
                         
    2007     2006     2005  
Recoveries:
                       
Commercial, financial and agricultural
    55       58       141  
Real estate — construction
                 
Real estate — mortgage
    63       69       145  
Installment loans to individuals
    112       63       92  
 
                 
 
    230       190       378  
 
                 
Net charge-offs
    (872 )     (810 )     (905 )
 
                       
Provision for loan losses
    2,489       2,165       1,724  
 
                 
Balance, end of year
  $ 12,445     $ 10,828     $ 9,473  
 
                 
 
                       
Ratio of net charge-offs during the year to average loans outstanding during the year
    0.10 %     0.10 %     0.12 %
The following table presents the Bank’s investment in loans considered to be impaired and related information on those impaired loans:
                 
    December 31,  
    2007     2006  
Impaired loans without a related allowance for loan loss
  $ 1,610,836     $ 1,574,350  
Impaired loans with a related allowance for loan loss
    6,191,025       267,553  
 
           
Total impaired loans
  $ 7,801,861     $ 1,841,903  
 
           
Allowance for loan loss related to impaired loans
    2,022,764       107,744  
Loans on which the accrual of interest has been discontinued amounted to approximately $1,962,000, $1,829,000, and $3,199,000 at December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005, respectively. For the years ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005 the company recognized interest income on impaired loans of $77,000, $46,000, and $99,259, respectively. If interest on those loans had been accrued in accordance with the original terms, interest income would have increased by approximately $170,000, $82,000, and $139,000 for 2007, 2006 and 2005, respectively.
It is the general policy of the Company to stop accruing interest when any loan is past due 90 days as to principal or interest.
6. PREMISES AND EQUIPMENT
Premises and equipment at December 31, 2007 and 2006 are as follows:
                         
            Accumulated        
            depreciation        
            and     Net book  
    Cost     amortization     value  
December 31, 2007:
                       
Land
  $ 8,809,153     $     $ 8,809,153  
Land improvements
    1,441,664       610,902       830,763  
Buildings
    16,809,336       3,477,700       13,331,637  
Furniture and equipment
    13,099,650       9,464,027       3,635,624  
Construction in process
    172,713             172,713  
 
                 
Total
  $ 40,332,517     $ 13,552,628     $ 26,779,889  
 
                 
 
                       
December 31, 2006:
                       
Land
  $ 9,990,137     $     $ 9,990,137  
Land improvements
    1,147,524       582,043       565,481  
Buildings
    15,909,991       3,074,030       12,835,961  
Furniture and equipment
    12,642,450       9,168,519       3,473,931  
Construction in process
    232,910             232,910  
 
                 
Total
  $ 39,923,012     $ 12,824,592     $ 27,098,420  
 
                 
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

49


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
6. PREMISES AND EQUIPMENT (Continued)
Depreciation and amortization expense for the years ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005 was $1,854,608, $1,948,901, and $1,673,511, respectively.
7. LOAN SERVICING
Mortgage loans serviced for others consists of loans sold to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are not included in the accompanying statements of financial condition. Mortgage loan portfolios serviced for Fannie Mae were $207,072,346 and $231,189,795 at December 31, 2007 and 2006, respectively.
Servicing loans for others generally consists of collecting mortgage payments, maintaining escrow accounts, disbursing payments to investors and foreclosure processing. The carrying value of mortgage servicing rights is included as other assets in the Consolidated Balance Sheets. At December 31, 2007 and 2006, mortgage servicing rights were $2,000,770 and $2,070,689, respectively.
                         
    2007     2006     2005  
Mortgage servicing asset, beginning of year
  $ 2,070,689     $ 2,320,839     $ 2,585,784  
Capitalized
    50,613     93,270     113,419
Change in fair value
    (120,532 )     (343,420 )     (378,364 )
 
                 
Mortgage servicing assets, end of year
  $ 2,000,770     $ 2,070,689     $ 2,320,839  
 
                 
8. DEPOSITS
At December 31, 2007, the scheduled maturities of time certificates are as follows:
         
2008
  $ 471,601,698  
2009
    73,131,014  
2010
    27,650,950  
2011
    2,143,043  
2012
    1,047,803  
 
     
Total
  $ 575,574,508  
 
     
9. BORROWED FUNDS
Short term borrowings at December 31, 2007 and 2006 are illustrated within the tables below. Borrowings from the United States Treasury are payable on demand and are collateralized by state, county and municipal securities (see Note 3). Interest under this arrangement is payable monthly at 25 basis points below the average federal funds rate as quoted by the Federal Reserve Board. Unused lines of credit from various correspondent banks totaled $44.8 million at December 31, 2007.
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

50


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
9. BORROWED FUNDS (Continued)
                                         
SHORT-TERM           Weighted average     Maximum amount     Average Daily        
BORROWINGS           interest rate at     outstanding at any     Balance outstanding     Average annual  
December 31, 2007   Balance at year end     end of year     month-end     during year     interest rate paid  
Overnight borrowings from Federal Reserve Bank
  $ 235,746       4.00 %   $ 1,577,353     $ 788,000       4.11 %
Securities sold under agreement to repurchase
    25,987,583       3.07 %     31,401,809       29,667,000       3.03 %
Federal Funds Purchased
    35,202,000       4.52 %     35,202,000       1,505,000       5.56 %
Wholesale securities sold under agreement to repurchase
    4,999,800       4.80 %     4,999,800       4,999,800       4.42 %
 
                                     
Total borrowings
  $ 66,425,129                                  
 
                                     
                                         
SHORT-TERM           Weighted average     Maximum amount     Average Daily        
BORROWINGS           interest rate at     outstanding at any     Balance outstanding     Average annual  
December 31, 2006   Balance at year end     end of year     month-end     during year     interest rate paid  
Overnight borrowings from Federal Reserve Bank
  $ 1,957,910       5.04 %   $ 1,957,910     $ 1,265,000       4.27 %
Securities sold under agreement to repurchase
    28,803,888       2.96 %     30,128,759     $ 30,587,000       2.87 %
Federal Funds Purchased
    8,101,000       5.63 %     29,284,030     $ 2,386,000       5.25 %
Wholesale securities sold under agreement to repurchase
    4,999,800       4.36 %     4,999,800     $ 4,999,800       4.42 %
FHLB advances
    18,200,000       5.45 %   $ 52,900,000     $ 30,701,000       5.22 %
 
                                     
Total borrowings
  $ 62,062,598                                  
 
                                     
Long-Term Borrowings
Long-term borrowings at December 31, 2007 consisted of the junior subordinated debentures of $25,774,000 with an average annual interest rate of 6.31%, and an average daily balance outstanding during the year of $4,178,000, and the FHLB advances listed below.
Pursuant to a collateral agreement with the FHLB, advances are collateralized by all of the Bank’s FHLB stock and qualifying first mortgage, commercial, and home equity line loans. The balance of the lendable collateral value of all
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

51


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
9. BORROWED FUNDS (Continued)
loans as of December 31, 2007 was approximately $123 million with $111 million remaining available. This agreement with the FHLB provides for a line of credit up to 20% of the Bank’s assets.
Long term advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta consist of the following at December 31, 2007 and 2006:
                         
    Maturity   Interest Rate     2007     2006  
  1/03/2008
    5.35 %           5,000,000  
12/10/2008
    3.90 %     5,000,000       5,000,000  
12/10/2009
    4.06 %     5,000,000       5,000,000  
  2/28/2011
    5.37 %     2,000,000       2,000,000  
 
                   
 
          $ 12,000,000     $ 17,000,000  
 
                   
Federal Home Loan Bank advances, both short and long term, had average annual interest rate paid during the year for 2007 and 2006 of 4.64% and 4.58%, respectively. The weighted average interest rate at year end 2007 and 2006 was 4.21% and 5.04%, respectively. Maximum amount outstanding during the years at any month end for 2007 and 2006 was $22,000,000 and $56,000,000, respectively.
On November 1, 2007, the Company created Yadkin Valley Statutory Trust I (“the Trust”) to issue trust preferred securities in conjunction with the Company issuing junior subordinated debentures to the Trust. The terms of the junior subordinated debentures are substantially the same as the terms of the trust preferred securities. The interest rate in effect is the three-month LIBOR plus 1.32%. At December 31, 2007, the effective interest rate was 6.31%. The Company’s obligations under the debentures and a separate guarantee agreement constitute a full and unconditional guarantee by the Company of the obligations of the Trust.
     On November 1, 2007, the Trust completed the sale of $25,000,000 of trust preferred securities. The trust preferred securities mature in 30 years, and can be called by the Trust without penalty after five years.   Yadkin Valley Statutory Trust I used the proceeds from the sale of the securities to purchase the Company’s junior subordinated deferrable interest notes due 2037 (the “Debenture”).  The net proceeds from the offering will be used by the Company in connection with the previously announced acquisition of Cardinal State Bank, and for general corporate purposes.
Under FIN 46R the Company’s $774,000 investment in the common equity of the trust is included in the consolidated balance sheets as other assets with a corresponding increase to long-term debt. The income and interest expense received from and paid to the trust, respectively, is being included in the consolidated statements of income and comprehensive income as other noninterest income and interest expense.
Currently, regulatory capital rules allow trust preferred securities to be included as a component of regulatory capital for the Company up to certain limits. This treatment has continued despite the deconsolidation of these instruments for financial reporting purposes.
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

52


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
10. INCOME TAXES
The provision for income taxes for the years ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005 is summarized as follows:
                 
    2007     2006  
Current:
               
Federal
  $ 7,164,609     $ 6,850,497  
State
    1,232,560       1,280,332  
 
           
 
    8,397,169       8,130,829  
Deferred
               
Federal
    (1,028,985 )     (820,119 )
State
    (167,366 )     (138,751 )
 
           
 
    (1,196,351 )     (958,870 )
 
               
Total Income Taxes
  $ 7,200,818     $ 7,171,959  
 
           
The tax effects of significant items comprising the Company’s net deferred tax assets as of December 31, 2007 and 2006 are as follows:
                 
    2007     2006  
Deferred tax assets:
               
Unrealized loss on available for sale securities
  $     $ 282,006  
Bad debt reserve
    4,918,699       4,251,840  
Deferred fees associated with merger
          7,237  
Deferred loan costs
    2,127       27,642  
Core deposit amortization
    93,930       127,080  
State Tax Credits
    40,653       81,305  
Other
    488,701       253,151  
 
           
 
  $ 5,544,110     $ 5,030,261  
 
           
                 
    2007     2006  
Deferred tax liabilities:
               
Unrealized gain on purchased securities
  $ (148,164 )   $ (149,083 )
Unrealized gain on available for sale securities
    (411,825 )      
Depreciation
    (877,123 )     (969,053 )
Prepaid expenses
    (226,275 )     (159,982 )
Core deposit intangible
    (1,682,713 )     (1,989,390 )
Other
    (378,029 )     (445,292 )
 
           
 
    (3,724,129 )     (3,712,800 )
 
           
 
               
Net deferred tax asset
  $ 1,819,981     $ 1,317,461  
 
           
A reconciliation of applicable income taxes for the years ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005 to the amount of tax expense computed at the statutory federal income tax rate of 35% is as follows:
                         
    2007     2006     2005  
Tax expense at statutory rate on income before income taxes
  $ 7,660,993     $ 7,337,349     $ 5,629,505  
Increases (decreases) resulting from:
                       
Tax-exempt interest on investments
    (476,415 )     (441,541 )     (423,820 )
State income tax, net of federal benefits
    692,376       742,028       485,024  
Income from bank-owned life insurance
    (563,286 )     (244,452 )     (197,384 )
Other
    (112,850 )     (221,425 )     (94,420 )
 
                 
Total income taxes
  $ 7,200,818     $ 7,171,959     $ 5,398,905  
 
                 
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

53


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
10. INCOME TAXES (Continued)
The Company has adopted the provisions of Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Interpretation No. 48 (“FIN 48”). There was no material impact from the adoption of FIN 48. It is the Company’s policy to recognize interest and penalties associated with uncertain tax positions as components of income taxes. The Company’s federal tax returns are subject to examination for years 2004, 2005 and 2006. The Company’s state income tax returns are subject to examination for year 2006.
         
Balance at January 1, 2007
  $ 340,281  
Positions taken during the current year
    40,652  
 
     
Balance at December 31, 2007
  $ 380,933  
 
     
The interest associated with the uncertain tax positions amounts to approximately $38,000 at December 31, 2007. The Company recognizes interest and penalties associated with uncertain tax positions in income tax expense.
11. EARNINGS PER SHARE
Basic earnings per share (“EPS”) are computed by dividing net income by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding for the year. Diluted EPS includes the effect of dilutive common stock equivalents. Following is the reconciliation of EPS for the years ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005:
                         
    2007   2006   2005
Basic earnings per share:
                       
Net income
  $ 14,687,732     $ 13,791,897     $ 11,158,464  
Weighted average shares outstanding
    10,594,567       10,640,819       10,685,457  
Basic earnings per share
  $ 1.39     $ 1.30     $ 1.04  
 
                       
Diluted earnings per share:
                       
Net income
  $ 14,687,732     $ 13,791,897     $ 11,158,464  
Weighted average shares outstanding
    10,594,567       10,640,819       10,685,457  
Dilutive effect of stock options
    118,100       147,979       143,342  
Weighted average shares, as adjusted
    10,712,667       10,788,798       10,828,799  
Diluted earnings per share
  $ 1.37     $ 1.28     $ 1.03  
On December 31, 2007 there were 52,500 options to purchase shares of common stock at a range of $19.07 that were not included in the computation of diluted EPS because the options’ exercise price was greater than the average market price of $17.70 per common shares. On December 31, 2006 there were 47,975 options to purchase shares at $15.50-17.10 that were not included in the computation of diluted EPS. On December 31, 2005 there were 213,775 options outstanding to purchase shares at $14.97-$17.10 per share that were not included in the computation of diluted EPS.
12. BENEFIT PLANS
The Company maintains profit-sharing and 401(k) plans for substantially all employees. Contributions to the profit-sharing plan are at the discretion of the Board of Directors but are limited to amounts deductible in accordance with the Internal Revenue Code. Under the Company’s 401(k) plan, employees are permitted to contribute up to 60% of pre-tax compensation. The Company will match 50% of an employee’s contribution, up to a maximum of 3% of pre-tax employee compensation. The Company’s policy is to fund the profit-sharing/401(k) costs as incurred. Employer contributions in 2007, 2006 and 2005 to the 401(k) plan were $285,056, $279,713, and $261,193, respectively. There were no contributions to the profit-sharing plan for the years ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005.
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

54


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
12. BENEFIT PLANS (continued)
In 2005, the Company paid $26,826 in stock appreciation rights under a High Country Financial Corporation plan for one participant following the merger with High Country Financial Corporation in 2004. There are no other stock appreciation rights.
During 2001 and 2000, the Company created an Officer Supplemental Insurance Plan (“OSIP”) and entered into Life Insurance Endorsement Method Split Dollar Agreements with certain officers. Under the plan, upon death of the officer, the Company first recovers the cash surrender value of the contract and then shares the remaining death benefits from insurance contracts, which are written with different carriers, with the designated beneficiaries of the officers. The death benefit to the officer’s beneficiaries is a multiple of base salary at the time of the agreements. The Company, as owner of the policies, retains an interest in the life insurance proceeds and a 100% interest in the cash surrender value of the policies. The OSIP contains a five-year vesting requirement and certain provisions relating to change of control and termination of service.
The Company funded the OSIP through the purchase of bank-owned life insurance (“BOLI”) during the first quarter of 2000 and the second quarter of 2001 with initial investments of $4,807,000 and $5,000,000, respectively. Additional investments in BOLI were made in August of 2006 in the amount of $5,500,000. The corresponding cash surrender values of BOLI policies as of December 31, 2007 and 2006 was $22,682,702 and $22,796,932, respectively.
During 2007 the Company created the 2007 Group Term Carve Out Plan and entered into Life Insurance Endorsement Method Split Dollar Agreements with certain officers who did not participate in the 2001 Plan discussed in the previous paragraph. Under the plan, upon death of the officer, the Company first recovers the cash surrender value of the contract and then shares the remaining death benefits from the insurance contracts which are written with New York Life Insurance and Annuity Corporation, with the designated beneficiaries of the officers.
The death benefit to the officer’s beneficiaries is a multiple of base salary at the time of the agreements, subject to the limit of total death proceeds less cash surrender value. The Company, as owner of the policies, retains an interest in the life insurance proceeds and a 100% interest in the cash surrender value of the policies. The 2007 plan contains a five-year vesting requirement and certain provisions related to change of control and termination of service.
Incentive compensation is provided for certain officers of the Bank based on defined levels of earnings performance. Expenses related to such compensation during 2007, 2006 and 2005 totaled approximately $425,664, $513,341, and $387,520, respectively.
13. STOCK OPTIONS
The Company has stock option plans for directors, selected executive officers and other key employees. The plans provide for the granting of options to purchase shares of the Company’s common stock at a price not less than the fair market value at the time of grant of the option. Option exercise prices are established at market value on the grant date. Vesting schedules are determined by the Board of Directors. Upon termination, unexercised options held by employees are forfeited and made available for future grants.
During 2007, 2,283 options were vested and 52,500 options were granted resulting in 60,584 unvested options at December 31, 2007. There was no intrinsic value of 2007 option grants since options are granted at the market price of the stock on date of grant. The intrinsic values of options exercised in 2007 and 2006 were $751,649 and $167,453, respectively. The Bank recorded compensation expense totaling $69,165 in 2007 and $13,622 in 2006 for the options in the process of vesting based on amortization of the fair value of options granted (See “Stock Based Compensation” under Note 1). Deferred expense totaling $157,722 will be recognized over the remaining vesting period, 2008 through 2011. During the year ended December 31, 2007, there were 52,500 shares granted and 3,511 shares were forfeited. Of the shares forfeited, 3,463 shares were available to be reissued.
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

55


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
13. STOCK OPTIONS (continued)
The Company recorded compensation expense in 2007 and 2006 as previously discussed. Had compensation costs for the Company’s stock option plans been determined using the fair value method in 2005, the Company’s pro forma net income and earnings per share would have been as follows:
         
    Year Ended December 31,  
    2005  
Net income:
       
As reported
  $ 11,158,464  
Less — stock-based compensation expense determined under fair-value-based methods for all awards, net of related income tax effects
    (289,182 )
 
     
 
       
Pro forma
  $ 10,869,282  
Basic earnings per share:
       
As reported
  $ 1.04  
Pro forma
    1.02  
Diluted earnings per share:
       
As reported
  $ 1.03  
Pro forma
    1.00  
The fair value of each option grant is estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option pricing model with the following weighted-average assumptions used for grants in 2007, 2006, and 2005: dividend yield of 2.52, 3.07 and 3.06 percent, respectively; expected volatility of 11.80, 11.50 and 15.46 percent, respectively; risk-free interest rate of 5.25, 5.25 and 3.17 percent, respectively, and expected life of 7, 7 and 7 years, respectively.
The weighted-average fair value of options granted during 2007, 2006 and 2005 was approximately $3.53, $2.49, and $1.89 respectively, at the grant date. Certain option information for the years ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005 follows:
                                         
                        EXERCISABLE OPTIONS
                    WEIGHTED           WEIGHTED
    SHARES           AVERAGE   NUMBER   AVERAGE
    AVAILABLE FOR   NUMBER   EXERCISE   OF   EXERCISE
    GRANTS FUTURE   OUTSTANDING   PRICE   OPTIONS   PRICE
     
At December 31, 2006
    140,144       453,207     $ 10.73       442,839     $ 10.63  
Options Authorized
                             
Options Granted/Vested
    (52,500 )     52,500       19.07       2,283       15.57  
Options Exercised
          (72,076 )     7.87       (72,078 )     7.87  
Options Forfeited
    3,463       (3,511 )     14.61       (3,511 )     14.61  
     
 
                                       
At December 31, 2007
    91,107       430,118     $ 12.20       369,533     $ 11.19  
     
At December 31, 2006 and 2007, weighted average remaining contractual life of options outstanding and options exercisable in years was 4.56 and 3.93, respectively.
The aggregate intrinsic values of options outstanding and exercisable at December 31, 2006 and 2007 were $3.8 million and $1.3 million, respectively. The table below segregates the shares outstanding at December 31, 2007 into meaningful ranges:
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

56


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005
13. STOCK OPTIONS (continued)
                                     
                Weighted average           Shares
                remaining   Weighted   exercisable
        Option price   contractual   average   December 31,
Shares   per share   life (years)   exercise price   2007
  60,163     $ 5.62       0.33     $ 5.62       60,163  
  58,742       6.87       1.71       6.87       58,742  
  35,256       7.44 – 7.85       3.57       7.72       35,256  
  14,992       8.66       2.33       8.66       14,992  
  10,333       10.75-11.24       4.54       10.77       10,332  
  2,000       13.06       5.54       13.06       2,000  
  8,000       14.00-14.24       6.11       14.06       8,000  
  141,782       14.97       5.41       14.97       135,787  
  38,850       15.50-15.65       0.57       15.50       38,450  
  7,500       17.10       5.01       17.10       5,816  
  52,500       19.07       9.06       19.07       -0-  
                                     
  430,118                               369,533  
                                     
No option may be exercised more than ten years after the date of grant.
14. LEASES
Rental expense was approximately $532,000 in 2007, $498,000 in 2006 and $370,000 in 2005 and primarily represents rentals of real estate. Future minimum lease payments for the next five years are as follows:
         
2008
  $ 266,772  
2009
    209,390  
2010
    142,019  
2011
    33,600  
2012
    8,100  
 
     
 
  $ 659,881  
 
     
15. OFF-BALANCE SHEET RISK, COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
The Bank is a party to financial instruments with off-balance sheet risk in the normal course of business to meet the financing needs of its customers. These financial instruments include commitments to extend credit and standby letters of credit. Those instruments involve, to varying degrees, elements of credit and interest rate risk in excess of the amount recognized in the balance sheets. The contract or notional amounts of those instruments reflect the extent of involvement the Bank has in particular classes of financial instruments. The Bank uses the same credit policies in making commitments and conditional obligations as it does for on-balance-sheet instruments.
Commitments to extend credit are agreements to lend to a customer as long as there is no violation of conditions established in the contract. Commitments generally have fixed expiration dates or other termination clauses and may require payment of a fee. Since some of the commitments are expected to expire without being drawn upon, the total commitment amounts do not necessarily represent future cash requirements. The Bank evaluates each customer’s creditworthiness on a case-by-case basis. The amount of collateral obtained, if deemed necessary by the Bank, upon extension of credit is based on management’s credit evaluation of the borrower. Collateral obtained varies but may include real estate, stocks, bonds, and certificates of deposit.
A summary of the contract amount of the Bank’s exposure to off-balance sheet risk as of December 31, 2007 and 2006 is as follows:.
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

57


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006
15. OFF-BALANCE SHEET RISK, COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (continued)
                 
    2007   2006
Financial instruments whose contract amounts represent credit risk:
               
Loan commitments and undisbursed lines of credit
  $ 217,761,148     $ 179,521,000  
Undisbursed standby letters of credit
    4,434,128       4,431,000  
Undisbursed portion of construction loans
    36,108,631       33,318,000  
Commitments to close first mortgages
    92,374,000       139,282,000  
Commitments to sell first mortgages
    92,374,000       135,409,000  
The Company is a party to legal proceedings and potential claims arising in the normal conduct of business. The Company has been sued for damages in excess of $850,000 for 3.99 years of severance, continued benefits and fringe benefits by two former employees who allege breach of contract. In addition, the plaintiffs seek liquidated damages and costs (including reimbursement for reasonable attorney fees) under their wage and hour claims. They also assert that non-compete provisions of the employment agreements do not apply to their separation. Both plaintiffs filed for judgment on the pleadings in state court and prevailed. The Company appealed the orders before the trial court had determined damages. All parties are currently awaiting a decision from the appellate court. The Company expects rulings in the cases to be issued within the next several months. The Company maintains a reserve for these claims that it considers to be adequate and does not believe that the outcome will have a material adverse effect on our financial position or results of operations. However the Company cannot make any assurances regarding the outcome.
16. REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS
The Bank is subject to various regulatory capital requirements administered by the federal banking agencies. Failure to meet minimum capital requirements can initiate certain mandatory, and possibly, additional discretionary — actions by regulators that, if undertaken, could have a direct material effect on the Company’s financial statements. Under capital adequacy guidelines and the regulatory framework for prompt corrective action, the Bank must meet specific capital guidelines that involve quantitative measures of the Bank’s assets, liabilities, and certain off-balance-sheet items calculated under regulatory accounting practices. The Bank’s capital amounts and classification are also subject to qualitative judgments by the regulators about components, risk weightings, and other factors.
Quantitative measures established by regulation to ensure capital adequacy require the Company to maintain minimum amounts and ratios (set forth in the table below) of total and Tier I capital (as defined in the regulations) to risk-weighted assets (as defined), and of Tier I capital (as defined) to average assets (as defined). Management believes that, as of December 31, 2007, the Company meets all capital adequacy requirements to which it is subject.
As of December 31, 2007, the most recent notification from the FDIC categorized the Bank as well capitalized under the regulatory framework for prompt corrective action. To be categorized as well capitalized the Company must maintain minimum total risk-based, Tier I risk-based, and Tier I leverage ratios as set forth in the table. There are no conditions or events since that notification that management believes have changed in the Company’s category. Dollar amounts in the table below are in thousands:
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

58


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006
16. REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS (Continued)
                                                 
                                    To be well
                                    capitalized under
                    For capital   prompt corrective
    Actual   adequacy purposes   action provisions
    Amount   Ratio   Amount   Ratio   Amount   Ratio
Yadkin Valley Bank and Trust
                                               
As of December 31, 2007:
                                               
Total Capital (to risk-weighted assets)
  $ 107,225       10.4 %   $ 82,481       8.0 %   $ 103,101       10.0 %
Tier I Capital (to risk-weighted assets)
    94,779       9.2 %     41,208       4.0 %     61,812       6.0 %
Tier I Capital (to average assets)
    94,779       8.4 %     45,133       4.0 %     56,416       5.0 %
 
                                               
As of December 31, 2006:
                                               
Total Capital (to risk-weighted assets)
  $ 96,679       10.4 %   $ 74,368       8.0 %   $ 92,960       10.0 %
Tier I Capital (to risk-weighted assets)
    85,850       9.2 %     37,326       4.0 %     55,989       6.0 %
Tier I Capital (to average assets)
    85,850       8.2 %     41,878       4.0 %     52,348       5.0 %
 
                                               
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
                                               
As of December 31, 2007:
                                               
Total Capital (to risk-weighted assets)
  $ 131,944       12.7 %   $ 83,114       8.0 %   $ 103,893       10.0 %
Tier I Capital (to risk-weighted assets)
    120,273       11.6 %     41,473       4.0 %     62,210       6.0 %
Tier I Capital (to average assets)
    120,273       10.7 %     44,962       4.0 %     56,202       5.0 %
 
                                               
As of December 31, 2006:
                                               
Total Capital (to risk-weighted assets)
  $ 97,752       10.5 %   $ 74,407       8.0 %   $ 93,009       10.0 %
Tier I Capital (to risk-weighted assets)
    86,923       9.4 %     37,186       4.0 %     55,779       6.0 %
Tier I Capital (to average assets)
    86,923       8.3 %     41,891       4.0 %     41,891       5.0 %
The Bank, as a North Carolina banking corporation, may pay dividends only out of undivided profits as determined pursuant to North Carolina General Statutes Section 53-87. At December 31, 2007, $51,086,684 was legally available for dividend payments.
For the reserve maintenance period in effect at December 31, 2007, the Bank was required by the Federal Reserve Bank to maintain average daily reserves of $688,000 on deposit.
17. FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS
The estimated fair value amounts have been determined by the Company using available market information and appropriate valuation methodologies. However, considerable judgment is necessary to interpret market data to develop the estimates of fair value. Accordingly, the estimates presented herein are not necessarily indicative of the amounts the Company could realize in a current market exchange. The use of different market assumptions and/or estimation methodologies may have a material effect on the estimated fair values (in thousands):
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

59


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006
17. FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS (Continued)
                                 
    2007   2006
    Carrying   Estimated   Carrying   Estimated
    amount   fair value   amount   fair value
Assets:
                               
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 26,326     $ 26,326     $ 44,056     $ 44,056  
Investment securities
    142,484       142,484       127,521       127,521  
Loans and loans held for sale, net
    939,061       962,883       846,432       857,661  
Accrued interest receivable
    6,055       6,055       5,796       5,796  
Federal Home Loan Bank Stock
    2,557       2,557       3,633       3,633  
Investment in Bank owned life insurance
    22,683       22,683       22,797       22,797  
Liabilities:
                               
Demand deposits, NOW, savings and money market accounts
  $ 387,868     $ 387,868     $ 384,846     $ 384,843  
Time deposits
    575,575       582,593       523,004       523,149  
Borrowed funds
    104,199       101,146       79,063       78,885  
Accrued interest payable
    3,434       3,434       2,975       2,975  
The carrying amounts of cash and cash equivalents approximate their fair value.
The fair value of marketable securities is based on quoted market prices and prices obtained from independent pricing services.
For certain categories of loans, such as installment and commercial loans, the fair value is estimated by discounting the future cash flows using the current rates at which similar loans would be made to borrowers with similar credit ratings and for the same remaining maturities. The cost of fixed rate mortgage loans held-for-sale approximates the fair values as these loans are typically sold within 60 days of origination. Fair values for adjustable rate mortgages are based on quoted market prices of similar loans adjusted for differences in loan characteristics.
The carrying value of Federal Home Loan Bank Stock approximates fair value based on the redemption provisions of the Federal Home Loan Bank Stock.
The fair value of demand deposits and savings accounts is the amount payable on demand at December 31, 2007 and 2006, respectively. The fair value of fixed-maturity certificates of deposit and individual retirement accounts is estimated using the present value of the projected cash flows using rates currently offered for similar deposits with similar maturities.
The fair values of borrowings are based on discounting expected cash flows at the interest rate for debt with the same or similar remaining maturities and collateral requirements. Short-term borrowings, including overnight, securities sold under agreements to repurchase, federal funds purchased and FHLB advances, are carried at approximate fair value because of the short maturities of those instruments.
The investment in bank owned life insurance represents the cash value of the policies at December 31, 2007 and 2006. The rates are adjusted annually thereby minimizing market fluctuations.
The fair value of accrued interest receivable and accrued interest payable approximates book values because of their short-term duration.
18. PARENT COMPANY CONDENSED FINANCIAL INFORMATION
During the May 24, 2006 annual meeting, the shareholders approved the formation of a holding company, Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation, (“the Company”) whereby each share of Yadkin Valley Bank was automatically converted to one share of Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation. The Company’s authorized capital consists of 20,000,000 shares of common stock, par value $1.00 per share, and 1,000,000 shares of preferred stock, no par value, whose rights, privileges, and preferences will be established by the Board of Directors on issuance. As of the conversion date, 10,648,300 common shares and no preferred shares were issued and outstanding. This share exchange was effective July 1, 2006.
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

60


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006
18. PARENT COMPANY CONDENSED FINANCIAL INFORMATION (Continued)
Condensed financial data for Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation (parent company only) follows:
                 
    2007     2006  
Condensed Balance Sheets
               
Assets:
               
Cash on deposit with bank subsidiary
  $ 25,127,841     $ 1,069,323  
Investment in subsidiary
    132,775,398       123,326,382  
Other investments
    429,530       151,722  
Other assets
    2,150,191       1,276,761  
 
           
Total
  $ 160,482,960     $ 125,824,188  
 
           
 
               
Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity:
               
Dividends payable
  $ 1,373,236     $ 1,273,325  
Other liabilities
    25,840,730       151,722  
Shareholders’ equity
    133,268,994       124,399,141  
 
           
Total
  $ 160,482,960     $ 125,824,188  
 
           
                 
    2007     2006  
Condensed Results of Operations
               
Equity in earnings of subsidiary bank:
               
Dividends received
  $ 6,505,508     $ 5,673,328  
Undistributed earnings
    8,374,106       8,196,649  
Income (expenses), net
    (191,882 )     (78,080 )
 
           
Net income
  $ 14,687,732     $ 13,791,897  
 
           
 
               
Condensed Statement of Cash Flows
               
Cash flows from operating activities:
               
Net income (loss) from continuing operations
  $ 14,687,732     $ 13,791,897  
Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash from operating activities:
               
Equity in undistributed earnings of subsidiaries
    (8,374,106 )     (8,196,649 )
Gain from sale of assets
          (35,044 )
Change in other assets
    2,653,946       (1,428,483 )
Change in other liabilities
    (2,737,957 )     1,425,048  
 
           
 
    6,229,615       5,556,769  
Cash flows from investing activities:
               
Purchase of investments
    (1,051,808 )     (217,018 )
Proceeds from sale of investment
          252,062  
 
           
 
    (1,051,808 )     35,044  
Cash flows from financing activities:
               
Long-term borrowings
    25,774,000        
Purchases of common stock
    (2,156,889 )     (804,257 )
Dividends paid
    (5,303,782 )     (3,824,414 )
Proceeds from exercise of stock options
    567,382       106,181  
 
           
 
    18,880,711       (4,522,490 )
Cash at beginning of year
    1,069,323        
 
           
Cash at end of year
  $ 25,127,841     $ 1,069,323  
 
           
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

61


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006
19. BUSINESS SEGMENT INFORMATION
Sidus Financial, LLC (“Sidus”) was acquired October 1, 2004 as a single member LLC with the Bank as the single member. Sidus is headquartered in Greenville, North Carolina and offers mortgage banking services to its customers in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, Maryland, Alabama, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, West Virginia, Delaware, Mississippi, Arkansas, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee. The following table details the results of operations for the twelve months of 2006 and 2007 for the Bank and Sidus using the purchase method of accounting.
                                 
December 31, 2007   Company     Sidus     Other     Total  
Interest income
  $ 72,710,866     $ 2,481,984     $     $ 75,192,850  
Interest expense
    31,259,750       1,972,077       68,909       33,300,736  
 
                       
 
                               
Net interest income
    41,451,116       509,907       (68,909 )     41,892,114  
Provision for loan losses
    2,488,620                   2,488,620  
 
                       
Net interest income after provision for loan losses
    38,962,496       509,907       (68,909 )     39,403,494  
Net gain on sales of investment securities
    45,418                   45,418  
Other income
    9,512,056       5,882,495       4,190       15,398,741  
Other expense
    27,926,428       4,905,514       127,161       32,959,103  
 
                       
Income before income taxes
    20,593,542       1,486,888       (191,880 )     21,888,550  
Income taxes
    6,620,932       579,886             7,200,818  
 
                       
 
                               
Net Income
  $ 13,972,610     $ 907,002     $ (191,880 )   $ 14,687,732  
 
                       
 
                               
Total Assets
  $ 1,213,314,722     $ 60,102,587     $ (63,114,068 )   $ 1,210,303,241  
Net Loans
    886,307,501                   886,307,501  
Loans held for sale
          52,753,907             52,753,907  
Goodwill
    32,696,900       4,943,872       (4,943,872 )     32,696,900  
                                 
December 31, 2006   Company     Sidus     Other     Total  
Interest income
  $ 65,249,981     $ 2,324,758     $ (268,849 )   $ 67,305,890  
Interest expense
    24,790,754       1,907,439       (268,849 )     26,429,344  
 
                       
 
                               
Net interest income
    40,459,227       417,319             40,876,546  
Provision for loan losses
    2,165,000                   2,165,000  
 
                       
Net interest income after provision for loan losses
    38,294,227       417,319             38,711,546  
Net loss on sales of investment securities
    (85,596 )                 (85,596 )
Other income
    8,362,596       6,032,139       36,018       14,430,753  
Other expense
    26,953,554       5,025,194       114,099       32,092,847  
 
                       
Income before income taxes
    19,617,673       1,424,264       (78,081 )     20,963,856  
Income taxes
    6,623,617       548,342             7,171,959  
 
                       
 
                               
Net Income
  $ 12,994,056     $ 875,922     $ (78,081 )   $ 13,791,897  
 
                       
 
                               
Total Assets
  $ 1,133,519,216     $ 49,266,949     $ (62,884,592 )   $ 1,119,901,573  
Net Loans
    804,080,971                   804,080,971  
Loans held for sale
    103,500       42,247,415             42,350,915  
Goodwill
    32,696,900       4,943,872       (4,943,872 )     32,696,900  
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

62


Table of Contents

YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2007, 2006
20. SELECTED QUARTERLY FINANCIAL DATA (UNAUDITED)
The following table presents unaudited, summarized quarterly data for the years ended December 31, 2007 and 2006 (in thousands):
                                 
    Three Months Ended  
2007   December 31     September 30     June 30     March 31  
Interest income
  $ 19,339     $ 19,231     $ 18,647     $ 17,975  
Interest expense
    8,800       8,504       8,238       7,759  
 
                       
Net interest income
    10,539       10,727       10,409       10,216  
Provision for loan losses
    1,689       300       200       300  
 
                       
Net interest income after provision for loan losses
    8,850       10,427       10,209       9,916  
Net gain (loss) on sales of investment securities
    1       45              
Other income
    3,695       3,511       4,112       4,078  
Other expense
    7,995       8,016       8,683       8,264  
 
                       
Income before income taxes
    4,551       5,967       5,638       5,730  
Income taxes
    1,485       2,045       1,852       1,818  
 
                       
Net income
  $ 3,066     $ 3,922     $ 3,786     $ 3,912  
 
                       
 
                               
Net income per common share — basic
  $ 0.29     $ 0.37     $ 0.36     $ 0.37  
Net income per common share — diluted
  $ 0.29     $ 0.37     $ 0.35     $ 0.36  
                                 
    Three Months Ended  
2006   December 31     September 30     June 30     March 31  
Interest income
  $ 18,055     $ 17,453     $ 16,762     $ 15,036  
Interest expense
    7,676       7,064       6,449       5,241  
 
                       
Net interest income
    10,379       10,389       10,313       9,795  
Provision for loan losses
    525       525       550       565  
 
                       
Net interest income after provision for loan losses
    9,854       9,864       9,763       9,230  
Net gain (loss) on sales of investment securities
    (104 )           7       11  
Other income
    3,892       3,926       3,482       3,131  
Other expense
    8,053       8,212       7,905       7,922  
 
                       
Income before income taxes
    5,589       5,578       5,347       4,450  
Income taxes
    1,782       1,941       1,927       1,522  
 
                       
Net income
  $ 3,807     $ 3,637     $ 3,420     $ 2,928  
 
                       
 
                               
Net income per common share — basic
  $ 0.36     $ 0.34     $ 0.32     $ 0.27  
Net income per common share — diluted
  $ 0.35     $ 0.34     $ 0.32     $ 0.27  
Item 9 — Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
None.
Item 9A — Controls and Procedures
Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

63


Table of Contents

As of December 31, 2007, the end of the period covered by this Annual Report on Form 10-K, an evaluation of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13(a)-15(e) and 15(d)-15(e) promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”)) was performed under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and our Chief Financial Officer. Our disclosure controls and procedures are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is (i) recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms, and (ii) accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosures.
Based upon that evaluation, the Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of December 31, 2007, because of the material weakness in internal control over financial reporting discussed in the report below.
Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
Management of Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation and subsidiaries (“The Company”) is responsible for preparing the Company’s annual consolidated financial statements and for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting for the Company. Management has evaluated the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting, including controls over the preparation of financial statements in accordance with the instructions to the Consolidated Financial Statements for Bank Holding Companies (Form FR Y-9C), as of December 31, 2007 based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on this assessment, management concluded that its internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2007, was not effective because of the material weaknesses described below. Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate due to changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the company’s annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. In connection with a recent review of its credit administration practices, management concluded there were material weaknesses in internal controls over financial reporting. Specifically, the Company did not have adequate controls over (1) the accuracy and completeness of the assignment of risk grades to loans; (2) the approval of new loans or modifications to existing loans; (3) underwriting practices in regard to loan documentation, appraisals and lien perfection; and (4) obtaining support for the various components of the model used to estimate the allowance for loan losses.
The Company’s independent registered public accounting firm that audited the Company’s consolidated financial statements included in this annual report has issued an attestation report on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting, which is included elsewhere herein.
Management is also responsible for compliance with laws and regulations relating to safety and soundness, which are designated by the FDIC and the appropriate federal banking agency. Management assessed its compliance with these designated laws and regulations relating to safety and soundness and believes that the Company complied, in all significant respects, with such laws and regulations during the year ended December 31, 2007.
Remediation Plan
In response to the material weaknesses identified, we have developed the following remediation plan to address the material weaknesses, and we are proceeding expeditiously with the following measures to enhance internal controls.
    We have enhanced and re-emphasized the importance of procedures for underwriting, lien perfection, and documentation for both residential and commercial loan renewals.
 
    We have emphasized the importance of risk grade completeness and accuracy at loan origination and throughout the life of the loans. Lenders and loan operations personnel have been informed of the
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

64


Table of Contents

      requirement to assign risk grades to loans upon origination. The importance of periodic review of risk grades has been emphasized to ensure that changes are made as warranted due to the changes in the condition of the borrower, the collateral, or general economic conditions. The controls over pre-and post-origination review of loans in loan operations have been strengthened to ensure the accuracy and completeness of loan data, including assignment of risk grades.
 
    We have modified the allowance for loan loss model to add support for assumptions and to correct impaired loan data and charged-off loan balances.
 
    We will continue to assess current lending and credit administration policies and procedures, and are revising them as necessary to develop and implement policies and procedures that will promote a culture that expects reliability and integrity of data.
Our Board of Directors is actively monitoring these remediation efforts and may direct additional measures as deemed appropriate from time to time. We cannot be certain how long it will take to fully implement the remediation plan, whether the remediation plan will be effective to maintain adequate controls over our financial reporting process in the future, or whether the remediation plan will be sufficient to address and eliminate the material weaknesses.
Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting
There were no changes in the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting during the fourth quarter of 2007 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. The only changes in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred subsequent to the period covered by this report that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting, relate to the material weaknesses in internal control over financial reporting described above.
March 31, 2008
             
/s/ William A. Long
 
William A. Long
President & Chief Executive Officer
      /s/ Edwin E. Laws
 
Edwin E. Laws
Vice President &
   
 
      Chief Financial Officer    
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

65


Table of Contents

(DIXON HUGHES LOGO)
REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
To the Board of Directors and Stockholders
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Elkin, North Carolina
We have audited Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation and subsidiaries’ (the “Company”) internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2007, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. The Company’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.
We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audit also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Because management’s assessment and our audit were conducted to also meet the reporting requirements of Section 112 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvement Act (FDICIA), management’s assessment and our audit of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting included controls over the preparation of financial statements in accordance with the instructions to the Consolidated Financial Statements for Bank Holding Companies (form FR Y-9 C). A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
A material weakness is a deficiency, or combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the Company’s annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.
Management has identified and included in management’s assessment material weaknesses in internal controls over financial reporting relating to inadequate controls over (1) the accuracy and completeness of the assignment of risk grades to loans; (2) the approval of new loans or modifications to existing loans; (3) underwriting practices in regard to loan documentation, appraisals and lien perfection; and (4) obtaining support for the various components of the model used to estimate the allowance for loan losses. These
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

66


Table of Contents

material weaknesses were considered in determining the nature, timing, and extent of audit tests applied in our audit of the 2007 consolidated financial statements, and this report does not affect our report dated March 31, 2008, on those consolidated financial statements.
In our opinion, because of the effect of the material weaknesses described above on the achievement of the objectives of the control criteria, Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation and subsidiaries has not maintained effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2007, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission.
We have also audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated balance sheets of Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation and subsidiaries as of December 31, 2007 and 2006, and the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period December 31, 2007, and our report dated March 31, 2008 expressed an unqualified opinion.
We do not express an opinion or any other form of assurance on management’s statement referring to compliance with designated laws and regulations related to safety and soundness.
(DIXON HUGHES PLLC)
Charlotte, North Carolina
March 31, 2008
Item 9B —Other Information
None.
PART III
Item 10 — Directors and Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
and
Item 11 — Executive Compensation
and
Item 12 — Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
Omitted, per general instruction G. The information required by Part III is incorporated by reference from the Registrant’s definitive proxy statement pursuant to Regulation 14A for the annual shareholder’s meeting to be held May 22, 2008, to be mailed to shareholders within 120 days of December 31, 2007, as filed with the SEC, which is incorporated herein by reference.
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

67


Table of Contents

The following table sets forth equity compensation plan information at December 31, 2007.
                         
    Equity Compensation Plan Information        
                    Number of securities
    Number of securities           remaining available for
    to be issued   Weighted-average   future issuance under
    upon exercise of   exercise price of   equity compensation plans
    outstanding options,   outstanding options,   (excluding securities
Plan Category   warrants and rights   warrants and rights   reflected in column(a))
    (a)   (b)   (c)
Equity compensation plans approved by shareholders
    430,118     $ 12.20       91,107  
Equity compensation plans not approved by shareholders
  NA     NA     NA  
 
                       
     
Total
    430,118     $ 12.20       91,107  
     
A description of Yadkin’s equity compensation plans is presented in Note 11 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements.
Item 13 — Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
and
Item 14 — Principal Accounting Fees and Services
Omitted, per general instruction G. The information required by Part III is incorporated by reference from the Registrant’s definitive proxy statement pursuant to Regulation 14A for the annual shareholder’s meeting to be held May 22, 2008, to be mailed to shareholders within 120 days of December 31, 2007, as filed with the SEC, which is incorporated herein by reference.
PART IV
Item 15 — Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules
(a)(1)   Financial Statements. The following financial statements and supplementary data are included in Item 8 of this report.
(a)(2) Financial Statement Schedules. All applicable financial statement schedules required under Regulation S-X have been included in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
(a)(3) Exhibits. The exhibits required by Item 601 of Regulation S-K are listed below.
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

68


Table of Contents

     
Exhibit No.   Description
 
   
Exhibit 3.1:
  Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3(i) to the Current Report on Form 8K dated July 1, 2006)
 
   
Exhibit 3.2:
  Bylaws (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.2 to the Annual Report on Form 10K for the year ended December 31, 2006
 
   
Exhibit 4.1:
  Specimen certificate for Common Stock (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.2 to the Annual Report on Form 10K for the year ended December 31, 2006)
 
   
Exhibit 10.1:
  Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation 1998 Employees Incentive Stock Option Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4 to Registration Statement on Form S-8 filed August 8, 2006 (file number 333-136967))
 
   
Exhibit 10.2:
  Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation 1999 Stock Option Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4 to Registration Statement on Form S-8 filed August 8, 2006 (file number 333-136968))
 
   
Exhibit 10.3:
  Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation 1998 Non-Statutory Stock Option Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4 to Registration Statement on Form S-8 filed August 8, 2006 (file number 333-136969))
 
   
Exhibit 10.3:
  Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation 1998 Incentive Stock Option Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4 to Registration Statement on Form S-8 filed August 8, 2006 (file number 333-136970))
 
   
Exhibit 10.4:
  Employment Agreement with William A. Long (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.4 to the Annual Report on Form 10K for the year ended December 31, 2006)
 
   
Exhibit 10.6:
  Employment Agreement with Edwin E. Laws (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.4 to the Annual Report on Form 10K for the year ended December 31, 2006)
 
   
Exhibit 10.7
  2007 Group Term Carve Out Plan
 
   
Exhibit 21:
  Subsidiaries of the Registrant
 
   
Exhibit 23:
  Consent of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
 
   
Exhibit 31.1:
  Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) Certification of Chief Executive Officer
 
   
Exhibit 31.2:
  Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) Certification of Chief Financial Officer Rule
 
   
Exhibit 32:
  Section 1350 Certification
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

69


Table of Contents

Signatures
In accordance with Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act, the Registrant has caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.
YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
             
By:
  /s/ William A. Long
 
William A. Long
      Date: March 31, 2008
 
  President and Chief Executive Officer        
 
           
By:
  /s/ Edwin E. Laws
 
Edwin E. Laws
      Date: March 31, 2008
 
  Vice President and Chief Financial Officer        
     In accordance with the Exchange Act, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.
     
 
   
/s/ William A. Long
 
William A. Long
  Date: March 31, 2008 
President, Chief Executive Officer, and Director
   
 
   
/s/ Ralph L. Bentley
 
Ralph L. Bentley
  Date: March 31, 2008 
Director
   
 
   
/s/ Nolan G. Brown
 
Nolan G. Brown
  Date: March 31, 2008 
Director
   
 
   
/s/ Harry M. Davis
 
Harry M. Davis
  Date: March 31, 2008 
Director
   
 
   
/s/ James A. Harrell, Jr.
 
James A. Harrell, Jr.
  Date: March 31, 2008 
Director
   
 
   
/s/ Daniel J. Park
 
Daniel J. Park
  Date: March 31, 2008 
Director
   
 
   
/s/ James L. Poindexter
 
James L. Poindexter
  Date: March 31, 2008 
Director
   
 
   
/s/ Harry C. Spell
 
Harry C. Spell
  Date: March 31, 2008 
Director
   
 
   
/s / James N. Smoak
 
James N. Smoak
  Date: March 31, 2008 
Director
   
 
   
/s/ J. T. Alexander, Jr..
 
J.T. Alexander, Jr.
  Date: March 31, 2008 
Director
   
Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation
Form 10K 2007

70