10-K 1 orcl-10k_20190531.htm 10-K orcl-10k_20190531.htm

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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF

THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended May 31, 2019

OR

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF

THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from         to        

Commission File Number: 001-35992

 

Oracle Corporation

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware

54-2185193

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

 

500 Oracle Parkway

 

Redwood City, California

(Address of principal executive offices)

94065

(Zip Code)

(650) 506-7000

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

Trading Symbol(s)

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share

2.25% senior notes due January 2021

3.125% senior notes due July 2025

ORCL

 

New York Stock Exchange

New York Stock Exchange

New York Stock Exchange

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    YES      NO  

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    YES     NO  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    YES      NO  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    YES      NO  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer  

Accelerated filer    

Non-accelerated filer  

Smaller reporting company  

Emerging growth company  

 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    YES      NO  

The aggregate market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant was $107,968,269,000 based on the number of shares held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of May 31, 2019, and based on the closing sale price of common stock as reported by the New York Stock Exchange on November 30, 2018, which is the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter. This calculation does not reflect a determination that persons are affiliates for any other purposes.

Number of shares of common stock outstanding as of June 17, 2019: 3,335,819,000.

Documents Incorporated by Reference:

Portions of the registrant's definitive proxy statement relating to its 2019 annual stockholders' meeting are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K where indicated.

 

 

 


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ORACLE CORPORATION

FISCAL YEAR 2019

FORM 10-K

ANNUAL REPORT

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

 

 

Page

 

 

 

 

 

PART I.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

 

Business

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1A.

 

Risk Factors

 

16

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1B.

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

 

32

 

 

 

 

 

Item 2.

 

Properties

 

32

 

 

 

 

 

Item 3.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

32

 

 

 

 

 

Item 4.

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

 

32

 

 

 

 

 

PART II.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 5.

 

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

33

 

 

 

 

 

Item 6.

 

Selected Financial Data

 

35

 

 

 

 

 

Item 7.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

36

 

 

 

 

 

Item 7A.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

59

 

 

 

 

 

Item 8.

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

61

 

 

 

 

 

Item 9.

 

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

 

61

 

 

 

 

 

Item 9A.

 

Controls and Procedures

 

61

 

 

 

 

 

Item 9B.

 

Other Information

 

62

 

 

 

 

 

PART III.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 10.

 

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

 

63

 

 

 

 

 

Item 11.

 

Executive Compensation

 

63

 

 

 

 

 

Item 12.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

 

63

 

 

 

 

 

Item 13.

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

 

63

 

 

 

 

 

Item 14.

 

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

 

63

 

 

 

 

 

PART IV.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 15.

 

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

 

64

 

 

 

 

 

Item 16.

 

Form 10-K Summary

 

118

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signatures

 

124

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Cautionary Note on Forward-Looking Statements

For purposes of this Annual Report, the terms “Oracle,” “we,” “us” and “our” refer to Oracle Corporation and its consolidated subsidiaries. This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains statements that are not historical in nature, are predictive in nature, or that depend upon or refer to future events or conditions or otherwise contain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 21 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These include, among other things, statements regarding:

 

our expectation that we will continue to acquire companies, products, services and technologies to further our corporate strategy;

 

our belief that our acquisitions enhance the products and services that we can offer to customers, expand our customer base, provide greater scale to accelerate innovation, grow our revenues and earnings, and increase stockholder value;

 

our expectation that, on a constant currency basis, our total cloud and license revenues generally will continue to increase due to expected growth in our cloud services and our license support offerings, continued demand for our cloud license and on-premise license offerings, and contributions from acquisitions;

 

our belief that our Oracle Cloud Software-as-a-Service and Infrastructure-as-a-Service (SaaS and IaaS, respectively, and collectively, Oracle Cloud Services) offerings are opportunities for us to expand our cloud and license business, and that demand for our Oracle Cloud Services will continue to increase;

 

our belief that we can market and sell our SaaS and IaaS offerings together to help customers migrate their extensive installed base of on-premise applications and infrastructure technologies to the Oracle Cloud while at the same time reaching a broader ecosystem of developers and partners;

 

our belief that we can market our SaaS and IaaS services to small and medium-sized businesses and non-IT lines of business purchasers;

 

our expectation that substantially all of our customers will renew their license support contracts annually;

 

our belief that our cloud ERP offerings drive adoption of our other SaaS offerings as our customers realize benefits of a common data model utilized across our SaaS offerings;

 

our expectations regarding the performance of our Oracle Autonomous Database, including its ability to reduce customer downtime and cost;

 

our expectation that our hardware business will have lower operating margins as a percentage of revenues than our cloud and license business;

 

our expectation that we will continue to make significant investments in research and development, and our belief that research and development efforts are essential to maintaining our competitive position;

 

our expectation that our international operations will continue to provide a significant portion of our total revenues and expenses;

 

the sufficiency of our sources of funding for working capital, capital expenditures, contractual obligations, acquisitions, dividends, stock repurchases, debt repayments and other matters;

 

our expectation that the U.S. Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 will continue to have a meaningful impact on our provision for income taxes;

 

our belief that we have adequately provided under U.S. generally accepted accounting principles for outcomes related to our tax audits and that the final outcome of our tax related examinations, agreements or judicial proceedings will not have a material effect on our results of operations, and our belief that our net deferred tax assets will be realized in the foreseeable future;

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our belief that the outcome of certain legal proceedings and claims to which we are a party will not, individually or in the aggregate, result in losses that are materially in excess of amounts already recognized, if any;

 

the possibility that certain legal proceedings to which we are a party could have a material impact on our future cash flows and results of operations;

 

our expectations regarding the timing and amount of expenses relating to the Fiscal 2019 Oracle Restructuring Plan and the improved efficiencies in our operations that such a plan will create;

 

the timing and amount of future cash dividend payments and stock repurchases, including our expectation that the levels of our future stock repurchase activity may be modified in comparison to past periods in order to use available cash for other purposes;

 

our expectations regarding the impact of recent accounting pronouncements on our consolidated financial statements;

 

our expectation that, to the extent customers renew support contracts or cloud SaaS and IaaS contracts from companies that we have acquired, we will recognize revenues for the full contracts’ values over the respective renewal periods;

 

our ability to predict quarterly hardware revenues;

 

the percentage of remaining performance obligations that we expect to recognize as revenues over the next twelve months;

as well as other statements regarding our future operations, financial condition and prospects, and business strategies. Forward-looking statements may be preceded by, followed by or include the words “expects,” “anticipates,” “intends,” “plans,” “believes,” “seeks,” “strives,” “endeavors,” “estimates,” “will,” “should,” “is designed to” and similar expressions. We claim the protection of the safe harbor for forward-looking statements contained in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 for all forward-looking statements. We have based these forward-looking statements on our current expectations and projections about future events. These forward-looking statements are subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions about our business that could affect our future results and could cause those results or other outcomes to differ materially from those expressed or implied in the forward-looking statements. Factors that might cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, those discussed in “Risk Factors” included elsewhere in this Annual Report and as may be updated in filings we make from time to time with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the SEC), including our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q to be filed by us in our fiscal year 2020, which runs from June 1, 2019 to May 31, 2020.

We have no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or risks, except to the extent required by applicable securities laws. If we do update one or more forward-looking statements, no inference should be drawn that we will make additional updates with respect to those or other forward-looking statements. New information, future events or risks could cause the forward-looking events we discuss in this Annual Report not to occur. You should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which reflect our expectations only as of the date of this Annual Report.

 

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PART I

Item 1.

Business

Oracle provides products and services that address enterprise information technology (IT) environments. Our products and services include applications and infrastructure offerings that are delivered worldwide through a variety of flexible and interoperable IT deployment models. These models include on-premise deployments, cloud-based deployments, and hybrid deployments (an approach that combines both on-premise and cloud-based deployment) such as our Oracle Cloud at Customer offering (an instance of Oracle Cloud in a customer’s own data center). Accordingly, we offer choice and flexibility to our customers and facilitate the product, service and deployment combinations that best suit our customers’ needs. Our customers include businesses of many sizes, government agencies, educational institutions and resellers that we market and sell to directly through our worldwide sales force and indirectly through the Oracle Partner Network.

Oracle Cloud Software-as-a-Service and Infrastructure-as-a-Service (SaaS and IaaS, respectively, and collectively, Oracle Cloud Services) offerings provide a comprehensive and integrated stack of applications and infrastructure services delivered via a cloud-based deployment model. Oracle Cloud Services integrate the software, hardware and services on a customer’s behalf in a cloud-based IT environment that Oracle deploys, upgrades, supports and manages for the customer. Oracle Cloud Services are designed to be rapidly deployable to enable customers shorter time to innovation; intuitive for casual and experienced users; easily maintainable to reduce upgrade, integration and testing work; connectable among differing deployment models to enable interchangeability and extendibility between IT environments; compatible to easily move workloads between the Oracle Cloud and other IT environments; cost-effective by requiring lower upfront customer investment; and secure, standards-based and reliable.

Oracle cloud license and on-premise license deployment offerings include Oracle Applications, Oracle Database and Oracle Middleware software offerings, among others, which customers deploy using IT infrastructure from the Oracle Cloud or their own cloud-based or on-premise IT environments. Substantially all customers, at their option, purchase license support contracts when they purchase an Oracle license.

Oracle hardware product offerings include Oracle Engineered Systems, servers, storage and industry-specific products, among others, and customers generally opt to purchase hardware support contracts when they purchase Oracle hardware.

Oracle also offers services to assist our customers and partners to maximize the performance of their Oracle purchases.

Providing choice and flexibility to Oracle customers as to when and how they deploy Oracle applications and infrastructure technologies is an important element of our corporate strategy. We believe that offering customers broad, comprehensive, flexible and interoperable deployment models for Oracle applications and infrastructure technologies is important to our growth strategy and better addresses customer needs relative to our competitors, many of whom provide fewer offerings and more restrictive deployment models.

Our investments in, and innovation with respect to, Oracle products and services that we offer through our cloud and license, hardware and services businesses (described further below) are another important element of our corporate strategy. In fiscal 2019, 2018 and 2017, we invested $6.0 billion, $6.1 billion and $6.2 billion, respectively, in research and development to enhance our existing portfolio of offerings and products and to develop new technologies and services. We have a deep understanding as to how applications and infrastructure technologies interact and function with one another. We focus our development efforts on improving the performance, security, operation and integration of our technologies to improve the computing performance of our products and services relative to our competitors’ offerings, to be more cost-effective, and to be easier for customers to deploy, manage and maintain. For example, we believe that Oracle applications and platform technologies, such as the Oracle Database, when combined with other Oracle infrastructure technologies deliver improved performance at a lower cost relative to competing infrastructure technologies and provide customers flexibility through a choice of cloud-based and on-premise deployment models. After the initial purchase of Oracle products and services, our customers can continue to benefit from our research and development efforts and deep IT expertise by electing to purchase and renew Oracle support offerings for their license and hardware deployments, which may include product enhancements that we periodically deliver to our products, and by renewing their Oracle Cloud Services contracts with us.

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Our selective and active acquisition program is another important element of our corporate strategy. We believe that our acquisitions enhance the products and services that we can offer to customers, expand our customer base, provide greater scale to accelerate innovation, grow our revenues and earnings, and increase stockholder value. In recent years, we have collectively invested billions of dollars to acquire a number of companies, products, services and technologies that add to, are complementary to, or have otherwise enhanced our existing offerings. We expect to continue to acquire companies, products, services and technologies to further our corporate strategy.

We have three businesses:

 

our cloud and license business, which is comprised of a single operating segment and includes our Oracle Cloud Services offerings, cloud license and on-premise license offerings, and license support offerings, represented 83%, 81% and 80% of our total revenues in fiscal 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively;

 

our hardware business, which is comprised of a single operating segment and includes our hardware products and related hardware support services offerings, represented 9%, 10% and 11% of our total revenues in fiscal 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively; and

 

our services business, which is comprised of a single operating segment, represented 8% of our total revenues in fiscal 2019 and 9% of our total revenues in each of fiscal 2018 and 2017.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and Note 15 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, both included elsewhere in this Annual Report, provide additional information related to our businesses and operating segments.

Oracle Corporation was incorporated in 2005 as a Delaware corporation and is the successor to operations originally begun in June 1977.

Applications and Infrastructure Technologies

Oracle’s comprehensive portfolio of applications and infrastructure technologies is designed to address an organization’s IT environment needs including business process, infrastructure and applications development requirements, among others. Oracle technologies are based upon industry standards and are designed to be enterprise-grade, reliable, scalable and secure. Oracle applications and infrastructure technologies including database and middleware software as well as enterprise applications, virtualization, clustering, large-scale systems management and related infrastructure products and services are the building blocks of Oracle Cloud Services, our partners’ cloud services, and our customers’ cloud IT environments. Oracle applications and infrastructure offerings are marketed and sold through our cloud and license, hardware, and services businesses and are delivered through the Oracle Cloud, or through other IT deployment models including cloud-based, hybrid and on-premise. We believe Oracle applications and infrastructure offerings enable flexibility, interoperability and choice to best meet customer IT needs.

We believe that our Oracle Cloud Services offerings are opportunities for us to expand our cloud and license business. We believe that our customers increasingly recognize the value of access to cloud-based applications and infrastructure capabilities via a lower cost, rapidly deployable, flexible and interoperable services model that Oracle manages and maintains on the customer’s behalf. We believe that we can market and sell our SaaS and IaaS offerings together to help customers migrate their extensive installed base of on-premise applications and infrastructure technologies to the Oracle Cloud while at the same time reaching a broader ecosystem of developers and partners. We also believe we can market our SaaS and IaaS services to small and medium-sized businesses and non-IT lines of business purchasers due to the highly available, intuitive design, low touch and low cost characteristics of the Oracle Cloud.

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In recent periods, customer demand for our applications and infrastructure technologies delivered through our Oracle Cloud Services deployment models has increased. To address customer demand and enable customer choice, we have introduced certain programs for customers to pivot their applications and infrastructure licenses and license support contracts to the Oracle Cloud for new deployments and to migrate to and expand with the Oracle Cloud for their existing workloads. We expect these trends to continue.

Oracle License Support

Oracle license support offerings are marketed and sold as a part of our cloud and license business. Substantially all of our customers opt to purchase license support contracts when they purchase Oracle applications and infrastructure licenses to run within the Oracle Cloud or other cloud-based and on-premise IT environments. We believe our license support offerings protect and enhance our customers’ investments in Oracle applications and infrastructure technologies because they provide proactive and personalized support services including Oracle Lifetime Support and unspecified license enhancements and upgrades during the term of the support period. Substantially all license support customers renew their support contracts with us upon expiration in order to continue to benefit from technical support services and the periodic issuance of unspecified updates and enhancements, which current license support customers are entitled to receive. Our license support contracts are generally priced as a percentage of the net fees paid by the customer to access the license and are typically one year in duration.

Applications Technologies

Oracle applications technologies are marketed, sold and delivered through our cloud and license business and represented 35%, 34% and 33% of our cloud and license business revenues during fiscal 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Oracle applications technologies consist of comprehensive cloud-based offerings including our Oracle Cloud SaaS offerings, which are available for customers as a subscription, and Oracle Applications license offerings, which are available for customers to purchase for use in Oracle Cloud IaaS, other cloud-based, and on-premise IT environments with the option to purchase related license support. Regardless of the deployment model selected, our applications technologies are designed to reduce the risk, cost and complexity of our customers’ IT infrastructures, while supporting customer choice with flexible deployment models that readily enable performance, agility, compatibility and extendibility. Our applications technologies are generally designed using industry standard architectures to manage and automate core business functions across the enterprise, as well as to help customers differentiate and innovate in those processes unique to their industries or organizations. We offer applications that are deployable to meet a number of business automation requirements across a broad range of industries. We also offer industry-specific applications through a focused strategy of investments in internal development and strategic acquisitions, which provide solutions to customers in communications, construction and engineering, financial services, health sciences, hospitality, manufacturing, public sector, retail and utilities, among other industries.

Oracle Cloud Software as a Service (SaaS)

Oracle’s broad spectrum of Oracle Cloud SaaS offerings provides customers a choice of software applications that are delivered via a cloud-based IT environment that we host, manage, upgrade and support, and that customers access by entering into a subscription agreement with us for a stated period. Our SaaS offerings are built upon open industry standards such as SQL, Java and HTML5 for easier application accessibility, integration and development. Our SaaS offerings include a broad suite of modular, next-generation cloud software applications that span core business functions including enterprise resource planning (ERP), human capital management (HCM), customer experience (CX), and supply chain management (SCM), among others. We also offer a number of cloud-based industry solutions to address specific customer needs within certain industries.

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We believe that the comprehensiveness and breadth of our SaaS offerings differentiate us from many of our competitors that offer more limited or specialized applications. Our SaaS offerings are designed to support connected business processes in the cloud and are centered on a responsive and flexible business core and a common data model. We believe our cloud ERP offerings drive adoption of our other SaaS offerings as our customers realize benefits of a common data model utilized across our SaaS offerings. Our SaaS offerings are designed to deliver a secure data isolation architecture and flexible upgrades; self-service access controls for users; a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA); built-in social, mobile and business insight capabilities; and a high performance, high availability infrastructure based on our infrastructure technologies, including Oracle Engineered Systems. These SaaS capabilities are designed to simplify IT environments, reduce time to implementation and risk, provide an intuitive user experience for casual and experienced users, and enable customers to focus resources on business growth opportunities. Our SaaS offerings are also designed to incorporate emerging technologies such as Internet-of-Things (IoT), Artificial Intelligence (AI), Machine Learning (ML), blockchain, and advances in the “human interface” and how users interact with Oracle Cloud SaaS offerings.

Our Oracle Cloud SaaS offerings include, among others:

 

Oracle ERP Cloud, which is designed to be a complete, global and integrated ERP solution to help organizations improve decision making and workforce productivity, and to optimize back-office operations by utilizing a single data and security model with a common user interface. We also offer NetSuite ERP, which is a cloud-based ERP product that is generally marketed to small to medium-sized organizations and is designed to run back-office operations and financial processes and includes financial management, revenue management and billing, inventory, supply chain and warehouse management capabilities, among others;

 

Oracle HCM Cloud, which is designed to help organizations find, develop and retain their talent, enable collaboration, provide complete workforce insights, improve business process efficiency, and enable users to connect to an integrated suite of HCM applications from any device;

 

Oracle CX Cloud, which is designed to be a complete and integrated solution to help organizations deliver consistent and personalized customer experiences across their customer channels, touch points and interactions;

 

Oracle SCM Cloud, which is designed to help organizations create, optimize and digitize their supply chains and innovate products quickly; and

 

Oracle Data Cloud, which is designed to enable organizations to leverage their own data and consumer data to inform and measure marketing strategies and programs.

Oracle Applications

Customers have the ability to license Oracle Applications for use within the Oracle Cloud or within their own cloud-based or on-premise IT environments. Oracle Applications are designed to manage and automate core business functions across the enterprise, including HCM; ERP; financial management and governance, risk and compliance; procurement; project portfolio management; SCM; business analytics and enterprise performance management; CX and customer relationship management; and industry-specific applications, among others.

As described above, we provide customers with an option to purchase license support contracts in connection with the purchase of Oracle Applications licenses.

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Infrastructure Technologies

Oracle infrastructure technologies are marketed, sold and delivered through our cloud and license business and through our hardware business.

Our cloud and license business’ infrastructure technologies include the Oracle Database, which is the world’s most popular enterprise database; Java, which is the computer industry’s most widely-used software development language; middleware; and development tools, among others. These technologies are available through subscription to our Oracle Cloud IaaS offerings or with the purchase of a license to run within the Oracle Cloud or other cloud-based and on-premise IT environments and related license support at the customer’s option. Our infrastructure technologies are designed to provide cost-effective, standards-based, high-performance platforms and infrastructure to develop, run, integrate, manage and extend business applications. Our cloud and license infrastructure technologies also provide cloud-based compute, storage and networking capabilities through our Oracle Cloud IaaS offerings. Our customers are increasingly focused on developing innovations and reducing the total cost of their IT infrastructure, and we believe that Oracle infrastructure technologies help them achieve this goal.

In addition to utilizing our cloud and license business’ infrastructure technologies to modernize approaches to their IT environments, customer interest is increasing for emerging technologies such as IoT, chatbots and AI/ML to automate business processes, reduce human error and provide a platform to build new and innovative applications. We deliver emerging technologies through certain of our applications and infrastructure technologies, including as a part of Oracle Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud Service, which is described further below.

Our hardware business’ infrastructure technologies include hardware products and certain unique hardware-related software offerings, such as Oracle Engineered Systems, servers, storage, industry-specific hardware, virtualization software, operating systems, management software, and related hardware services including support at the customer’s option.

We design our infrastructure technologies to work in customer environments that may include other Oracle or non-Oracle hardware or software components. Our flexible and open approach provides Oracle customers a choice as to how they can utilize and deploy Oracle infrastructure technologies: through the use of Oracle Cloud offerings; in our customers’ data centers; or a hybrid combination of these two deployment models, such as in the Oracle Cloud at Customer deployment model. We focus on the operation and integration of Oracle infrastructure technologies to make them easier to deploy, extend, interconnect, manage and maintain for our customers and to improve computing performance relative to our competitors’ offerings. For example, we design Oracle Engineered Systems to integrate multiple Oracle technology components to work together to deliver improved performance, availability, security and operational efficiency relative to our competitors’ products.

Oracle Infrastructure Technologies – Cloud and License Business Offerings

Oracle infrastructure technologies are marketed, sold and delivered through our cloud and license business and represented 65%, 66% and 67% of our cloud and license business’ total revenues in fiscal 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

Oracle Cloud Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)

Oracle Cloud IaaS is based upon Oracle’s Generation 2 Cloud technology and is designed to deliver platform, compute, storage and networking services, among others, that Oracle runs, manages, upgrades and supports on behalf of the customer for a fee for a stated time period, or for certain of our IaaS services, on a “pay-as-you-go” basis for services at a specified rate. By utilizing Oracle Cloud IaaS, customers leverage the Oracle Cloud for enterprise-grade, scalable, cost-effective and secure infrastructure technologies that are designed to be rapidly deployable while reducing the amount of time and resources normally consumed by IT processes within on-premise environments. Oracle Generation 2 Cloud infrastructure technology is designed to be differentiated from other cloud vendors to provide better security by separating control code from customer data on separate

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computers with a different architecture. We continue to invest in Oracle Cloud IaaS to expand the catalog of tools and services we provide to simplify the process of migrating workloads to the Oracle Cloud, as well as to provide customers with the ability to run workloads across on-premise IT environments and the Oracle Cloud in a hybrid deployment model. Customers use Oracle Cloud IaaS offerings to build and operate new cloud-native applications, to run new workloads and to move their existing Oracle or non-Oracle workloads to the Oracle Cloud from their data centers or from other cloud-based IT environments, among other uses.

Oracle customers and partners utilize Oracle’s open, standards-based IaaS offerings for platform related services that are based upon the Oracle Database, Oracle Middleware including Java, open source, and other tools for a variety of use cases across data management, applications development, integration, content and experience, business analytics, IT operations management and security.

Oracle customers and partners also utilize Oracle Cloud IaaS for enterprise-grade compute, storage and networking services. Our Oracle Cloud IaaS offerings’ compute services range from virtual machines to GPU-based offerings to bare metal servers and include options for dense I/O workloads and high performance computing. Oracle Cloud IaaS also includes a range of storage offerings including block, object and archive storage services, as well as containers, networking and edge services to help mitigate denial of service attacks on customer networks.

Oracle Cloud at Customer offerings are a direct response to restrictions imposed upon cloud-based IT environment adoption by businesses that operate within certain regulated industries or jurisdictions. Oracle Cloud at Customer enables customers to access certain IaaS capabilities of the Oracle Cloud in their own data centers behind their firewalls while having the services managed by Oracle. Oracle Cloud at Customer offerings allow customers to take advantage of the agility, innovation and subscription-based pricing of Oracle Cloud Services while meeting data sovereignty, data residency, data protection and regulatory business policy requirements.

Oracle also offers Oracle Managed Cloud Services, which are designed to provide comprehensive software and hardware management, maintenance and security services for customer cloud-based, hybrid or other infrastructure for a fee for a stated term. Oracle Managed Cloud Services may be hosted at our Oracle data center facilities, select partner data centers or physically at our customers’ facilities.

Oracle Database

The Oracle Database is the world’s most popular enterprise database and is designed to enable reliable and secure storage, retrieval and manipulation of all forms of data. The Oracle Database is licensed throughout the world by businesses and organizations of different sizes for a multitude of purposes, including, among others: for use within the Oracle Cloud to deliver our Cloud SaaS and Cloud IaaS offerings; for use by a number of cloud-based vendors in offering their cloud services; for packaged and custom applications for transactions processing; and for data warehousing and business intelligence. The Oracle Database may be deployed within different IT environments including Oracle Cloud and Oracle Cloud at Customer environments, other cloud-based IT environments, and on-premise data centers, among others. Customers may elect to purchase license support for Oracle Database licenses that are purchased at their option.

Oracle Database Enterprise Edition is available with a number of optional add-on products to address specific customer requirements. In addition to the Oracle Database, we also offer a portfolio of specialized database products to address particular customer requirements including MySQL, Oracle TimesTen In-Memory Database, Oracle Berkeley DB and Oracle NoSQL Database.

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Oracle Autonomous Database

Oracle Autonomous Database is an Oracle Cloud IaaS offering that utilizes Oracle’s Generation 2 Cloud infrastructure and is designed to deliver performance and scale with automated database operations and policy-driven optimization implemented with machine learning to lower labor costs and reduce human error for routine database administration tasks including maintenance, tuning, patching, security and backup, among others. Oracle Autonomous Database uses self-driving diagnostics for fault prediction and error handling. We believe Oracle Autonomous Database can deliver rapid insights and innovation by enabling organizations to quickly provision a data warehouse that automatically and elastically scales to millions of transactions per second while enabling organizations to pay only for the capacity used. Oracle Autonomous Database offerings include:

 

Oracle Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud Service (ADW), which is designed to be a fully managed, high-performance and elastic service optimized for data warehouse workloads. ADW’s self-patching and self-tuning capabilities are designed to enable upgrades while the database is running, eliminating human error. Oracle ADW automates manual IT tasks such as storing, securing, scaling and backing-up. In addition, the machine learning based technology of ADW is designed to enable customers to deploy new or move existing data marts and data warehouses to the cloud; and

 

Oracle Autonomous Transaction Processing Cloud Service (ATP), which is designed to enable businesses to safely run a complex mix of high-performance transactions, reporting and batch processing using instant, elastic compute and storage through an Oracle Database running on an Oracle Exadata cloud-based instance. Oracle ATP is designed to enable organizations to conduct real-time transactional data analysis for faster results and lower administration costs, and to eliminate cyber-attacks on unpatched or unencrypted databases. Oracle ATP is designed to be simple and agile to develop and deploy new applications because no complex management or tuning is required. The integration of Oracle ATP with other Oracle Cloud services, such as Java Cloud and Oracle APEX, and the open interfaces and integrations of Oracle ATP provide developers with a modern, open platform to develop new innovative applications.

Oracle Big Data and Analytics

Big data generally refers to a massive amount of unstructured, streaming and structured data that is so large that it is difficult to process using traditional IT techniques. Oracle offers big data and analytics solutions to complement and extend Oracle applications and infrastructure technologies. We believe that most businesses view big data as a potentially high-value source of analytics that can be used to gain new insights into their customers’ behaviors, to anticipate future demand more accurately, to align workforce deployment with business activity forecasts and to accelerate the pace of operations, among other benefits. We offer a broad portfolio of offerings to address an organization’s big data requirements including, among others, cloud-based services for data integration, data management, analytics and integrated machine learning.

Oracle Middleware

We license our Oracle Middleware, which is a broad family of integrated application infrastructure software, for use in the Oracle Cloud, other cloud-based environments, on-premise data centers and related IT environments. Oracle Middleware is designed to form a reliable and scalable foundation on which customers can build, deploy, secure, access, extend and integrate business applications and automate their business processes. Built with Oracle’s Java technology platform, Oracle Middleware products are designed to be flexible across different deployment environments—cloud, on-premise or hybrid—as a foundation for custom, packaged and composite applications, thereby simplifying and reducing time to deployment. Oracle Middleware is designed to protect customers’ IT investments and work with both Oracle and non-Oracle database, middleware and applications software through an open architecture and adherence to industry standards. Specifically, Oracle Middleware is designed to enable customers to integrate Oracle and non-Oracle business applications, automate business processes, scale applications to meet customer demand, simplify security and compliance, manage lifecycles of documents and get actionable, targeted business intelligence. In addition, Oracle Middleware supports multiple development languages and tools, which enables developers to flexibly build and deploy web services, websites, portals and web-based applications globally across different IT environments.

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Among our other middleware license offerings, we license a wide range of development tools, such as identity management and business analytics software for mobile computing development that are designed to address the needs of businesses that are increasingly focused on delivering mobile device applications to their customers. We also offer certain of these mobile development capabilities as a cloud service, including Oracle Mobile Cloud Service, among others.

Customers may elect to purchase license support, as described above, for Oracle Middleware licenses at their option.

Java

Java is the computer industry’s most widely-used software development language and is viewed as a global standard. We believe the Java programming language and platform together represent one of the most popular and powerful development environments in the world, one that is used by millions of developers globally to develop embedded applications, web content, enterprise software and games. Oracle Middleware software products and certain of our Oracle Applications are built using the Oracle Java technology platform, which we believe is a key advantage for our business. Customers may license the use of Java or access Java through Oracle Java Cloud Service.

Java is designed to enable developers to write software on a single platform and run it on many other different platforms, independent of operating system and hardware architecture. Java has been adopted by both independent software vendors (ISVs) that have built their products on Java and by enterprise organizations building custom applications or consuming Java-based ISV products.

Oracle Infrastructure Technologies – Hardware Business Offerings

Oracle infrastructure technologies are also marketed, sold and delivered through our hardware business, including a broad selection of hardware products and related hardware support services for cloud-based IT environments, data centers and related IT environments.

Oracle Engineered Systems

Oracle Engineered Systems are core to our cloud-based and on-premise data center infrastructure offerings. Oracle Engineered Systems are pre-integrated products, combining multiple unique Oracle technology components, including database, storage, operating system or middleware software with server, storage and networking hardware and other technologies. Oracle Engineered Systems are designed to work together to deliver improved performance, scalability, availability, security and operational efficiency relative to our competitors’ products; to be upgraded effectively and efficiently; and to simplify maintenance cycles by providing a single solution for software patching. For example, Oracle Exadata Database Machine is a computing platform that is designed to be optimized for running Oracle Database to achieve higher performance and availability at a lower cost by combining Oracle Database, storage and operating system software with Oracle server, storage and networking hardware. We offer certain of our Oracle Engineered Systems, including Oracle Exadata Database Machine, among others, through flexible deployment options, including on-premise, and as an infrastructure cloud service and cloud at customer service.

Servers

We offer a wide range of server products that are designed for mission-critical enterprise environments and that are key components of our engineered systems offerings and cloud offerings. We have two families of server products: those based on the Oracle SPARC microprocessor, which are designed to be differentiated by their reliability, security and scalability for UNIX environments; and those using microprocessors from Intel Corporation. By offering a range of server sizes and microprocessors, customers are offered the flexibility to choose the types of servers that they believe will be most appropriate and valuable for their particular IT environments. We believe the combination of Oracle server systems with Oracle software enhances our customers’ ability to shift data and workloads between data center and cloud deployments based on business requirements.

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Storage

Oracle storage products are engineered for the cloud and designed to securely store, manage, protect and archive customers’ mission-critical data assets generated by any database or application. Oracle storage products combine flash, disk, tape and server technologies with optimized software and unique integrations with Oracle Database designed to offer greater performance and efficiency, and lower total cost relative to our competitors’ storage products. Certain of our storage products are also offered as cloud-based services through the Oracle Cloud. Our storage offerings include, among others, Oracle ZFS Storage Appliance, a unified storage system that combines network attached storage, storage area network and object storage capabilities; Oracle’s Zero Data Loss Recovery Appliance that provides unique, recovery-focused data protection for Oracle Database; and Oracle’s StorageTek tape storage and automation product line which includes tape drives, tape libraries, media and software packages that provide lifecycle data management and security for enterprise backup and archive requirements.

Industry-Specific Hardware Offerings

We offer hardware products and services designed for certain specific industries including our point-of-sale terminals and related hardware that are designed for managing businesses within the food and beverage, hotel and retail industries; and hardware products and services for communications networks including network signaling, policy control and subscriber data management solutions, and session border control technology, among others.

Operating Systems, Virtualization, Management and Other Hardware-Related Software

We offer a portfolio of operating systems, including Oracle Linux and Oracle Solaris, virtualization software including Oracle VM, and other hardware-related software including development, management and file systems tools that are designed to optimize the performance, efficiency, and security of customers’ hardware products while providing customers with high levels of flexibility, reliability and availability. We also offer a range of management technologies and products, including Oracle Enterprise Manager, designed to help customers efficiently operate complex IT environments, including both end users’ and service providers’ cloud environments.

Hardware Support

Our hardware support offerings provide customers with unspecified software updates for software components that are essential to the functionality of our hardware products and associated software products such as Oracle Solaris. These offerings can also include product repairs, maintenance services and technical support services. We continue to evolve hardware support processes that are intended to proactively identify and solve quality issues and to increase the amount of new and renewed hardware support contracts sold in connection with the sales of our hardware products. Hardware support contracts are generally priced as a percentage of the net hardware products fees.

Services

We offer services solutions to help customers and partners maximize the performance of their investments in Oracle applications and infrastructure technologies. We believe that our services are differentiated based on our focus on Oracle technologies, extensive experience and broad sets of intellectual property and best practices. Our services offerings include, among others:

 

consulting services, which are designed to help our customers and global system integrator partners more successfully architect and deploy our cloud and license offerings, including IT strategy alignment, enterprise architecture planning and design, initial software implementation and integration, application development and integration services, security assessments and ongoing software enhancements and upgrades. We utilize a global, blended delivery model to optimize value for our customers and partners, consisting of consultants from local geographies, industry specialists and consultants from our global delivery and solution centers;

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advanced customer support services, which are provided at customer facilities and remotely to enable increased performance and higher availability of their Oracle products and services; and

 

education services for Oracle’s cloud and license offerings, including training and certification programs that are offered to customers, partners and employees through a variety of formats including instructor-led classes, live virtual training, video-based training on demand, online learning subscriptions, private events and custom training.

Oracle Cloud Operations

Oracle Cloud Operations deliver our Oracle Cloud Services to customers through a secure, reliable, scalable, enterprise grade cloud infrastructure platform managed by our employees within a global network of data centers, which we refer to as the Oracle Cloud. Oracle Cloud Operations leverage automated software tools to enable the rapid delivery of the latest cloud technology capabilities to the Oracle Cloud as they become available. The Oracle Cloud enables secure and isolated cloud-based instances for each of our customers to access the functionality of our Oracle Cloud Services via a broad spectrum of devices.

Manufacturing

To produce our hardware products that we market and sell to third-party customers and that we utilize internally to deliver as a part of our Oracle Cloud operations, we rely on both our internal manufacturing operations as well as third-party manufacturing partners. Our internal manufacturing operations consist primarily of materials procurement, assembly, testing and quality control of our Oracle Engineered Systems and certain of our enterprise and data center servers and storage products. For all other manufacturing, we generally rely on third-party manufacturing partners to produce our hardware-related components and hardware products and we may involve our internal manufacturing operations in the final assembly, testing and quality control processes for these components and products. We distribute most of our hardware products from either our facilities or partner facilities. Our manufacturing processes are substantially based on standardization of components across product types, centralization of assembly and distribution centers and a “build-to-order” methodology in which products generally are built only after customers have placed firm orders. Production of our hardware products requires that we purchase materials, supplies, product subassemblies and full assemblies from a number of vendors. For most of our hardware products, we have existing alternate sources of supply or such sources are readily available. However, we do rely on sole sources for certain of our hardware products. As a result, we continue to evaluate potential risks of disruption to our supply chain operations. Refer to “Risk Factors” included in Item 1A within this Annual Report for additional discussion of the challenges we encounter with respect to the sources and availability of supplies for our products and the related risks to our business.

Sales and Marketing

We directly market and sell our cloud, license, hardware and services offerings to businesses of many sizes and in many industries, government agencies and educational institutions. We also market and sell our offerings through indirect channels. No single customer accounted for 10% or more of our total revenues in fiscal 2019, 2018 and 2017.

In the United States (U.S.), our sales and services employees are based in our headquarters and in field offices throughout the country. Outside the U.S., our international subsidiaries sell, support and service our offerings in their local countries as well as within other foreign countries where we do not operate through a direct sales subsidiary. Our geographic coverage allows us to draw on business and technical expertise from a global workforce, provides stability to our operations and revenue streams to offset geography specific economic trends and offers us an opportunity to take advantage of new markets for our offerings. Our international operations subject us to certain risks, which are more fully described in “Risk Factors” included in Item 1A of this Annual Report. A summary of our domestic and international revenues and long-lived assets is set forth in Note 15 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report.

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We also market our product offerings worldwide through indirect channels. The companies that comprise our indirect channel network are members of the Oracle Partner Network. The Oracle Partner Network is a global program that manages our business relationships with a large, broad-based network of companies, including independent software and hardware vendors, system integrators and resellers that deliver innovative solutions and services based upon our product offerings. By offering our partners access to our product offerings, educational information, technical services, marketing and sales support, the Oracle Partner Network program extends our market reach by providing our partners with the resources they need to be successful in delivering solutions to customers globally. The majority of our hardware products are sold through indirect channels including independent distributors and value-added resellers.

Research and Development

We develop the substantial majority of our product offerings internally. In addition, we have extended our product offerings and intellectual property through acquisitions of businesses and technologies. We also purchase or license intellectual property rights in certain circumstances. Internal development allows us to maintain technical control over the design and development of our products. We have a number of U.S. and foreign patents and pending applications that relate to various aspects of our products and technology. While we believe that our patents have value, no single patent is essential to us or to any of our principal businesses. Rapid technological advances in hardware and software development, evolving standards in computer hardware and software technology, changing customer needs and frequent new product introductions, offerings and enhancements characterize the markets in which we compete. We plan to continue to dedicate a significant amount of resources to research and development efforts to maintain and improve our current product and service offerings.

Employees

As of May 31, 2019, we employed approximately 136,000 full-time employees, including approximately 39,000 in sales and marketing, approximately 18,000 in our cloud services and license support operations, approximately 4,000 in hardware, approximately 24,000 in services, approximately 38,000 in research and development and approximately 13,000 in general and administrative positions. Of these employees, approximately 48,000 were employed in the U.S. and approximately 88,000 were employed internationally. None of our employees in the U.S. is represented by a labor union; however, in certain foreign subsidiaries, labor unions or workers’ councils represent some of our employees.

Seasonality and Cyclicality

Our quarterly revenues have historically been affected by a variety of seasonal factors, including the structure of our sales force incentive compensation plans, which are common in the technology industry. In each fiscal year, our total revenues and operating margins are typically highest in our fourth fiscal quarter and lowest in our first fiscal quarter. The operating margins of our businesses (in particular, our cloud and license business and hardware business) are generally affected by seasonal factors in a similar manner as our revenues because certain expenses within our cost structure are relatively fixed in the short term. See “Cloud and License Business” and “Selected Quarterly Financial Data” in Item 7 of this Annual Report for more information regarding the seasonality and cyclicality of our revenues, expenses and margins.

Competition

We face intense competition in all aspects of our business. The nature of the IT industry creates a competitive landscape that is constantly evolving as firms emerge, expand or are acquired, as technology evolves and as customer demands and competitive pressures otherwise change.

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Our customers are demanding less complexity and lower total cost in the implementation, sourcing, integration and ongoing maintenance of their enterprise software and hardware. Our enterprise cloud license and on-premise license, and hardware offerings compete directly with certain offerings from some of the largest and most competitive companies in the world, including Amazon.com, Inc., Microsoft Corporation, International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), Intel Corporation, Cisco Systems, Inc., Adobe Systems Incorporated, Alphabet Inc. and SAP SE, as well as other companies like Hewlett-Packard Enterprise, salesforce.com, inc. and Workday, Inc. In addition, due to the low barriers to entry in many of our market segments, new technologies and new and growing competitors frequently emerge to challenge our offerings. Our competitors range from companies offering broad IT solutions across many of our lines of business to vendors providing point solutions, or offerings focused on a specific functionality, product area or industry. In addition, as we expand into new market segments, we face increased competition as we compete with existing competitors, as well as firms that may be partners in other areas of our business and other firms with whom we have not previously competed. Moreover, we or our competitors may take certain strategic actions—including acquisitions, partnerships and joint ventures, or repositioning of product lines—which invite even greater competition in one or more product offering categories.

Key competitive factors in each of the segments in which we currently compete and may compete in the future include: total cost of ownership, performance, scalability, reliability, security, functionality, efficiency, speed to production and quality of technical support. Our product and service sales (and the relative strength of our products and services versus those of our competitors) are also directly and indirectly affected by the following, among other things:

 

the adoption of cloud-based IT offerings including SaaS and IaaS offerings;

 

ease of deployment, use and maintenance of our products and services offerings;

 

compatibility between Oracle products and services deployed within local IT environments and public cloud IT environments, including our Oracle Cloud environments;

 

the adoption of commodity servers and microprocessors;

 

the broader “platform” competition between our industry standard Java technology platform and the .NET programming environment of Microsoft;

 

operating system competition among our Oracle Solaris and Linux operating systems, with alternatives including Microsoft’s Windows Server, and other UNIX and Linux operating systems;

 

the adoption of open source alternatives to commercial software by enterprise software customers;

 

products, features and functionality developed internally by customers and their IT staff;

 

products, features and functionality customized and implemented for customers by consultants, systems integrators or other third parties; and

 

attractiveness of offerings from business processing outsourcers.

For more information about the competitive risks we face, refer to Item 1A. “Risk Factors” included elsewhere in this Annual Report.

Available Information

Our Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed pursuant to Sections 13(a) and 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, are available, free of charge, on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov and our Investor Relations website at www.oracle.com/investor as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such materials with, or furnish it to, the SEC. We use our Investor Relations website as a means of disclosing material non-public information. Accordingly, investors should monitor our Investor Relations website, in addition to following our press releases, SEC filings and public conference calls and webcasts. In addition, information regarding our environmental policy and global sustainability initiatives and solutions are also available on our website www.oracle.com/corporate/citizenship. The information posted on or accessible through our website is not incorporated into this Annual Report.

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Information about our Executive Officers

Our executive officers are listed below.

 

Name

 

Office(s)

Lawrence J. Ellison

 

Chairman of the Board of Directors and Chief Technology Officer

Safra A. Catz

 

Chief Executive Officer and Director

Mark V. Hurd

 

Chief Executive Officer and Director

Jeffrey O. Henley

 

Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors

Edward Screven

 

Executive Vice President, Chief Corporate Architect

Dorian E. Daley

 

Executive Vice President and General Counsel

William Corey West

 

Executive Vice President, Corporate Controller and Chief Accounting Officer

Mr. Ellison, 74, has been our Chairman of the Board and Chief Technology Officer since September 2014. He served as our Chief Executive Officer from June 1977, when he founded Oracle, until September 2014. He has served as a Director since June 1977. He previously served as our Chairman of the Board from May 1995 to January 2004. He currently serves as a director of Tesla, Inc.

Ms. Catz, 57, has been our Chief Executive Officer since September 2014. She served as our President from January 2004 to September 2014, our Chief Financial Officer most recently from April 2011 until September 2014 and a Director since October 2001. She was previously our Chief Financial Officer from November 2005 until September 2008 and our Interim Chief Financial Officer from April 2005 until July 2005. Prior to being named our President, she held various other positions with us since joining Oracle in 1999. She currently serves as a director of The Walt Disney Company and she previously served as a director of HSBC Holdings plc.

Mr. Hurd, 62, has been our Chief Executive Officer since September 2014. He served as our President from September 2010 to September 2014 and a Director since September 2010. Prior to joining us, he served as Chairman of the Board of Directors of Hewlett-Packard Company from September 2006 to August 2010 and as Chief Executive Officer, President and a member of the Board of Directors of Hewlett-Packard Company from April 2005 to August 2010.

Mr. Henley, 74, has served as our Vice Chairman of the Board since September 2014. He previously served as our Chairman of the Board from January 2004 to September 2014 and has served as a Director since June 1995. He served as our Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer from March 1991 to July 2004.

Mr. Screven, 54, has been Executive Vice President, Chief Corporate Architect since May 2015. He served as our Senior Vice President, Chief Corporate Architect from November 2006 to April 2015 and as Vice President, Chief Corporate Architect from January 2003 to November 2006. He held various other positions with us since joining Oracle in 1986.

Ms. Daley, 60, has been our Executive Vice President and General Counsel since April 2015. She served as our Secretary from October 2007 until October 2017 and she was our Senior Vice President, General Counsel from October 2007 to April 2015. She served as our Vice President, Legal, Associate General Counsel and Assistant Secretary from June 2004 to October 2007, as Associate General Counsel and Assistant Secretary from October 2001 to June 2004 and as Associate General Counsel from February 2001 to October 2001. She held various other positions with us since joining Oracle’s Legal Department in 1992.

Mr. West, 57, has been our Executive Vice President, Corporate Controller and Chief Accounting Officer since April 2015. He served as our Senior Vice President, Corporate Controller and Chief Accounting Officer from February 2008 to April 2015 and served as our Vice President, Corporate Controller and Chief Accounting Officer from April 2007 to February 2008. His previous experience includes 14 years with Arthur Andersen LLP, most recently as a partner.

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Item 1A.

Risk Factors

We operate in rapidly changing economic and technological environments that present numerous risks, many of which are driven by factors that we cannot control or predict. The following discussion, as well as our “Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates” discussion in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (Item 7), highlights some of these risks. The risks described below are not exhaustive and you should carefully consider these risks and uncertainties before investing in our securities.

Our success depends upon our ability to develop new products and services, integrate acquired products and services and enhance our existing products and services.     Rapid technological advances, intense competition, changing delivery models and evolving standards in computer hardware and software development and communications infrastructure, changing and increasingly sophisticated customer needs and frequent new product introductions and enhancements characterize the industries in which we compete. If we are unable to develop new or sufficiently differentiated products and services, enhance and improve our product offerings and support services in a timely manner or position and price our products and services to meet demand, customers may not purchase or subscribe to our license, hardware or cloud offerings or renew license support, hardware support or cloud subscriptions contracts. Renewals of these contracts are important to the growth of our business. In addition, we cannot provide any assurance that the standards on which we choose to develop new products will allow us to compete effectively for business opportunities in emerging areas.

We have continued to refresh and release new offerings of our cloud products and services, including the launch of the Oracle Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud Service. The Oracle Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud Service offers automation based on machine learning and we have guaranteed, among other matters, that it will reduce customer downtime to less than 30 minutes a year and that Amazon Data Warehouse customers will see a significant cost reduction if they migrate their workloads to our offering. Machine learning and artificial intelligence are increasingly driving innovations in technology but if they fail to operate as anticipated or the Oracle Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud Service or our other products do not perform as promised, our business and reputation may be harmed.

In addition, our business may be adversely affected if:

 

we do not continue to develop and release new or enhanced products and services within the anticipated time frames;

 

infrastructure costs to deliver new or enhanced products and services take longer or result in greater costs than anticipated;

 

there is a delay in market acceptance of and difficulty in transitioning new and existing customers to new, enhanced or acquired product lines or services;

 

there are changes in information technology (IT) trends that we do not adequately anticipate or address with our product development efforts;

 

we do not optimize complementary product lines and services in a timely manner; or

 

we fail to adequately integrate, support or enhance acquired product lines or services.

Our Oracle Cloud strategy, including our Oracle Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) and Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) offerings, may adversely affect our revenues and profitability.     We provide our cloud and other offerings to customers worldwide via deployment models that best suit their needs, including via our cloud-based SaaS and IaaS offerings. As these business models continue to evolve, we may not be able to compete effectively, generate significant revenues or maintain the profitability of our cloud offerings. Additionally, the increasing prevalence of cloud and SaaS delivery models offered by us and our competitors may unfavorably impact the pricing of our cloud and license offerings. If we do not successfully execute our cloud computing strategy or anticipate the cloud computing needs of our customers, our reputation as a cloud services provider could be harmed and our revenues and profitability could decline.

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As customer demand for our cloud offerings increases, we experience volatility in our reported revenues and operating results due to the differences in timing of revenue recognition between our cloud license and on-premise license, and hardware product arrangements relative to our cloud offering arrangements. Customers generally purchase our cloud offerings on a subscription basis and revenues from these offerings are generally recognized ratably over the terms of the subscriptions. Consequently, any deterioration in sales activity associated with our cloud offerings may not be immediately observable in our consolidated statement of operations. This is in contrast to revenues associated with our license and hardware product arrangements, which are generally recognized in full at the time of delivery of the related licenses and hardware products.

We have also acquired a number of cloud computing companies, and the integration of these companies into our Oracle Cloud strategy may not be as efficient or scalable as anticipated, which could adversely affect our ability to fully realize the benefits anticipated from these acquisitions.

We might experience significant coding, manufacturing or configuration errors in our cloud, license and hardware offerings.     Despite testing prior to the release and throughout the lifecycle of a product or service, our cloud, license and hardware offerings sometimes contain coding or manufacturing errors that can impact their function, performance and security, and result in other negative consequences. The detection and correction of any errors in released cloud, license or hardware offerings can be time consuming and costly. Errors in our cloud, license or hardware offerings could affect their ability to properly function, integrate or operate with other cloud, license or hardware offerings, could delay the development or release of new products or services or new versions of products or services, could create security vulnerabilities in our products or services, and could adversely affect market acceptance of our products or services. This includes third-party software products or services incorporated into our own. If we experience errors or delays in releasing our cloud, license or hardware offerings or new versions of these offerings, our sales could be affected and revenues could decline. In addition, we run Oracle’s business operations as well as cloud and other services that we offer to our customers on our products and networks. Therefore, any flaws could affect our and our customers’ abilities to conduct business operations and to ensure accuracy in financial processes and reporting, and may result in unanticipated costs. Enterprise customers rely on our cloud, license and hardware offerings and related services to run their businesses and errors in our cloud, license and hardware offerings and related services could expose us to product liability, performance and warranty claims as well as significant harm to our brand and reputation, which could impact our future sales.

If our security measures for our products and services are compromised and as a result, our data, our customers’ data or our IT systems are accessed improperly, made unavailable, or improperly modified, our products and services may be perceived as vulnerable, our brand and reputation could be damaged, the IT services we provide to our customers could be disrupted, and customers may stop using our products and services, all of which could reduce our revenue and earnings, increase our expenses and expose us to legal claims and regulatory actions.     We are in the IT business, and our products and services, including our Oracle Cloud Services, store, retrieve, manipulate and manage our customers’ information and data, external data, as well as our own data. We have a reputation for secure and reliable product offerings and related services and we have invested a great deal of time and resources in protecting the integrity and security of our products, services and the internal and external data that we manage. At times, we encounter attempts by third parties (which may include individuals or groups of hackers and sophisticated organizations, such as state-sponsored organizations, nation states and individuals sponsored by them) to identify and exploit product and service vulnerabilities, penetrate or bypass our security measures, and gain unauthorized access to our or our customers’, partners’ and suppliers’ software, hardware and cloud offerings, networks and systems, any of which could lead to the compromise of personal information or the confidential information or data of Oracle or our customers. Computer hackers and others may be able to develop and deploy IT related viruses, worms, and other malicious software programs that could attack our networks, systems, products and services, exploit potential security vulnerabilities of our networks, systems, products and services, create system disruptions and cause shutdowns or denials of service. This is also true for third-party data, products or services incorporated into our own. Our products and services, including our Oracle Cloud Services may also be accessed or modified improperly as a result of customer, partner, employee or supplier error or malfeasance and third parties may attempt to fraudulently induce customers, partners, employees or suppliers into disclosing sensitive information such as user names, passwords or other information in order to gain access to our data, our customers’, suppliers’ or partners’ data or the IT systems of Oracle, our customers, suppliers or partners.

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Security industry experts and government officials have warned about the risks of hackers and cyber-attacks targeting IT products and businesses. Although this is an industry-wide problem that affects software and hardware companies generally, it affects Oracle in particular because computer hackers tend to focus their efforts on the most prominent IT companies, and they may focus on Oracle because of our reputation for, and marketing efforts associated with, having secure products and services. These risks will increase as we continue to grow our cloud offerings and store and process increasingly large amounts of data, including personal information and our customers’ confidential information and data, and host or manage parts of our customers’ businesses in cloud-based IT environments, especially in customer sectors involving particularly sensitive data such as health sciences, financial services, retail, hospitality and the government. We also have an active acquisition program and have acquired a number of companies, products, services and technologies over the years. While we make significant efforts to address any IT security issues with respect to our acquired companies, we may still inherit such risks when we integrate these companies within Oracle.

Because the techniques used to obtain unauthorized access to, or sabotage IT systems change frequently, grow more complex over time, and often are not recognized until launched against a target, we may be unable to anticipate or implement adequate measures to prevent against such techniques. Our internal IT systems continue to evolve and we are often early adapters of new technologies. However, our business policies and internal security controls may not keep pace with these changes as new threats emerge. In addition, we may not discover any security breach and loss of information for a significant period of time after the security breach.

We could suffer significant damage to our brand and reputation if a cyber-attack or other security incident were to allow unauthorized access to or modification of our customers’ or suppliers’ data, other external data, or our own data or our IT systems or if the services we provide to our customers were disrupted, or if our products or services are reported to have or are perceived as having security vulnerabilities. Customers could lose confidence in the security and reliability of our products and services, including our cloud offerings, and perceive them to not be secure. This could lead to fewer customers using our products and services and result in reduced revenues and earnings. The costs we would incur to address and fix these security incidents would increase our expenses. These types of security incidents could also lead to loss or destruction of information, inappropriate use of proprietary and sensitive data, lawsuits, indemnity obligations, regulatory investigations and financial penalties, and claims and increased legal liability, including in some cases contractual costs related to customer notification and fraud monitoring.

Our products operate in conjunction with and are dependent on products and components across a broad ecosystem. If there is a security vulnerability in one of these components, and if there is a security exploit targeting it, we could face increased costs, liability claims, customer dissatisfaction, reduced revenue, or harm to our reputation or competitive position.

Our business practices with respect to data could give rise to operational interruption, liabilities or reputational harm as a result of governmental regulation, legal requirements or industry standards relating to consumer privacy and data protection.     As regulatory focus on privacy issues continues to increase and worldwide laws and regulations concerning the handling of personal information expand and become more complex, potential risks related to data collection and use within our business will intensify. In addition, U.S. and foreign governments have enacted or are considering enacting legislation or regulations, or may in the near future interpret existing legislation or regulations, in a manner that could significantly impact our ability, as well as the ability of our customers, partners and data providers, to collect, augment, analyze, use, transfer and share personal and other information that is integral to certain services we provide. For example, certain data transfer mechanisms are currently subject to challenges in European courts, which may lead to uncertainty about the legal basis for data transfers to the U.S. or interruption of such transfers. In the event any court blocks transfers to or from a particular jurisdiction on the basis that no transfer mechanisms are legally adequate, this could give rise to operational interruption in the performance of services for customers and internal processing of employee information, regulatory liabilities or reputational harm. This impact could also occur in those jurisdictions where privacy laws or regulators take a broader view of how personal information is defined, therefore subjecting the handling of such data to heightened restrictions that may be obstructive to our operations and the operations of our customers, partners and data providers. This impact could be acute in countries that have passed or are considering passing legislation that requires data to remain localized “in country,” as this imposes financial costs on any service provider that is required to store data in jurisdictions not of its choosing and nonstandard operational processes that are difficult and costly to integrate with global processes.

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In the wake of the European Union General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the rate of global consideration and adoption of privacy laws has increased, giving rise to more global jurisdictions in which regulatory inquiries and audits may be requested of Oracle, and if not deemed to be in compliance, could result in enforcement actions and/or fines. This is true in the U.S. where California recently enacted the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) effective in January 2020, Congress is considering several privacy bills at the federal level, and other state legislatures are considering privacy laws. Regulators globally are also imposing greater monetary fines for privacy violations. The GDPR, which became effective in May 2018, provides for monetary penalties of up to 4% of an organization’s worldwide revenue. One European data protection regulator has fined a major U.S. technology company EUR 50 million for its data handling practices. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission continues to fine companies on a regular basis for unfair and deceptive data protection practices, and these fines may increase in size. The CCPA provides for statutory damages on a per violation basis that could be very large in the event of a significant data security breach or other CCPA violation. Taken together, the changes in laws or regulations associated with the enhanced protection of personal and other types of data could greatly increase the size of potential fines related to data protection, and our cost of providing our products and services could result in changes to our business practices or even prevent us from offering certain services in jurisdictions in which we operate. Although we have implemented contracts, policies and procedures designed to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations, there can be no assurance that our employees, contractors, partners, data providers or agents will not violate such laws and regulations or our contracts, policies and procedures. Additionally, public perception and standards related to the privacy of personal information can shift rapidly, in ways that may affect our reputation or influence regulators to enact regulations and laws that may limit our ability to provide certain products.

We make statements about our use and disclosure of personal information through our privacy policy, information provided on our website and press statements. Any failure, or perceived failure, by us to comply with these public statements or with U.S. federal, state, or foreign laws and regulations, including laws and regulations regulating privacy, data security, or consumer protection, public perception, standards, self-regulatory requirements or legal obligations, could result in lost or restricted business, proceedings, actions or fines brought against us or levied by governmental entities or others, or could adversely affect our business and harm our reputation.

Economic, political and market conditions can adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition, including our revenue growth and profitability, which in turn could adversely affect our stock price.      Our business is influenced by a range of factors that are beyond our control and that we have no comparative advantage in forecasting. These include:

 

general economic and business conditions;

 

overall demand for enterprise cloud, license and hardware products and services;

 

governmental budgetary constraints or shifts in government spending priorities; and

 

general legal, regulatory and political developments.

Macroeconomic developments like the developments associated with the United Kingdom’s vote to exit the EU (Brexit), evolving trade policies between the U.S. and international trade partners, or the occurrence of similar events in other countries that lead to uncertainty or instability in economic, political or market conditions could negatively affect our business, operating results, financial condition and outlook, which, in turn, could adversely affect our stock price. Any general weakening of, and related declining corporate confidence in, the global economy or the curtailment of government or corporate spending could cause current or potential customers to reduce or eliminate their IT budgets and spending, which could cause customers to delay, decrease or cancel purchases of our products and services or cause customers not to pay us or to delay paying us for previously purchased products and services.

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In addition, international, regional or domestic political unrest and the related potential impact on global stability, terrorist attacks and the potential for other hostilities in various parts of the world, potential public health crises and natural disasters continue to contribute to a climate of economic and political uncertainty that could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition, including our revenue growth and profitability. These factors generally have the strongest effect on our sales of cloud license and on-premise license, hardware and related services and, to a lesser extent, also may affect our renewal rates for license support and our subscription-based cloud offerings.

If we are unable to compete effectively, the results of operations and prospects for our business could be harmed.     We face intense competition in all aspects of our business. The nature of the IT industry creates a competitive landscape that is constantly evolving as firms emerge, expand or are acquired, as technology evolves and as delivery models change. Many vendors spend amounts in excess of what Oracle spends to develop and market applications and infrastructure technologies including databases, middleware products, application development tools, business applications, collaboration products and business intelligence, compute, storage and networking products, among others, which compete with Oracle applications and infrastructure offerings. Use of our competitors’ technologies may influence a customer’s purchasing decision or create an environment that makes it less efficient to utilize or migrate to Oracle products and services. Our competition may also adopt business practices that provide customers access to competing products and services at a risk profile that we may not generally find acceptable, which may convince customers to purchase competitor products and services. We could lose customers if our competitors introduce new competitive products, add new functionality, acquire competitive products, reduce prices, better execute on their sales and marketing strategies, offer more flexible business practices or form strategic alliances with other companies. We may also face increasing competition from open source software initiatives in which competitors may provide software and intellectual property for free. Existing or new competitors could gain sales opportunities or customers at our expense.

We may need to change our pricing models to compete successfully.     The intense competition we face in the sales of our products and services and general economic and business conditions can put pressure on us to change our prices. If our competitors offer deep discounts on certain products or services or develop products that the marketplace considers more valuable, we may need to lower prices or offer other favorable terms in order to compete successfully. Any such changes may reduce margins and could adversely affect operating results. Additionally, the increasing prevalence of cloud delivery models offered by us and our competitors may unfavorably impact the pricing of our other cloud and license, hardware and services offerings, and we may also incur increased cloud delivery expenses as we expand our cloud operations and update our infrastructure, all of which could reduce our revenues and/or profitability. Our license support fees and hardware support fees are generally priced as a percentage of our net license fees and net new hardware products fees, respectively. Our competitors may offer lower pricing on their support offerings, which could put pressure on us to further discount our offerings.

We introduced Oracle Bring Your Own License (BYOL) and Universal Credit Pricing to simplify the way customers purchase and consume our cloud services. Oracle BYOL enables customers to maintain their existing software licenses for Oracle Infrastructure while expanding their platform technology footprint at a discounted price. Oracle Universal Credit Pricing provides a flexible model for customers to access Oracle Infrastructure services on demand via a single contract. Any future changes to our prices and pricing policies could cause our revenues to decline or be delayed as our sales force implements and our customers adjust to the new pricing policies. Some of our competitors may bundle products for promotional purposes or as a long-term pricing strategy, commit to large customer deployments at prices that are unprofitable, or provide guarantees of prices and product implementations. These practices could, over time, significantly constrain the prices that we can charge for certain of our products. If we do not adapt our pricing models to reflect changes in customer use of our products or changes in customer demand, our revenues could decrease. The increase in open source software distribution may also cause us to change our pricing models.

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Our international sales and operations subject us to additional risks that can adversely affect our operating results.     We derive a substantial portion of our revenues from, and have significant operations, outside of the U.S. Our international operations include cloud operations, cloud, software and hardware development, manufacturing, assembly, sales, customer support, consulting and other services and shared administrative service centers.

Compliance with international and U.S. laws and regulations that apply to our international operations increases our cost of doing business in foreign jurisdictions. These laws and regulations include U.S. laws and local laws which include data privacy requirements, labor relations laws, tax laws, foreign currency-related regulations, anti-competition regulations, prohibitions on payments to governmental officials, market access, tariffs, import, export and general trade regulations, including but not limited to economic sanctions and embargos. Violations of these laws and regulations could result in fines and penalties, criminal sanctions against us, our officers or our employees, and prohibitions on the conduct of our business, including the loss of trade privileges. Any such violations could result in prohibitions on our ability to offer our products and services in one or more countries, could delay or prevent potential acquisitions and could also materially damage our reputation, our brand, our international expansion efforts, our ability to attract and retain employees, our business and our operating results. Compliance with these laws requires a significant amount of management attention and effort, which may divert management’s attention from running our business operations and could harm our ability to grow our business, or may increase our expenses as we engage specialized or other additional resources to assist us with our compliance efforts. Our success depends, in part, on our ability to anticipate these risks and manage these difficulties. We monitor our operations and investigate allegations of improprieties relating to transactions and the way in which such transactions are recorded. Where circumstances warrant, we provide information and report our findings to government authorities, but no assurance can be given that action will not be taken by such authorities.

We are also subject to a variety of other risks and challenges in managing an organization operating globally, including those related to:

 

general economic conditions in each country or region;

 

fluctuations in currency exchange rates and related impacts on customer demand and our operating results;

 

difficulties in transferring funds from or converting currencies in certain countries that could lead to a devaluation of our net assets, in particular our cash assets, in that country’s currency;

 

regulatory changes, including government austerity measures in certain countries that we may not be able to sufficiently plan for or avoid that may unexpectedly impair bank deposits or other cash assets that we hold in these countries or that impose additional taxes that we may be required to pay in these countries;

 

political unrest, terrorism and the potential for other hostilities;

 

common local business behaviors that are in direct conflict with our business ethics, practices and conduct policies;

 

natural disasters;

 

the effects of climate change (such as sea level rise, drought, flooding, wildfires and increased storm sensitivity);

 

longer payment cycles and difficulties in collecting accounts receivable;

 

overlapping tax regimes;

 

public health risks, social risks and supporting infrastructure stability risks, particularly in areas in which we have significant operations; and

 

reduced protection for intellectual property rights in some countries.

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The variety of risks and challenges listed above could also disrupt or otherwise negatively impact the supply chain operations for our hardware business and the sales of our products and services in affected countries or regions.

As the majority shareholder of Oracle Financial Services Software Limited, a publicly traded company in India, and Oracle Corporation Japan, a publicly traded company in Japan, we are faced with several additional risks, including being subject to local securities regulations and being unable to exert full control that we would otherwise have if these entities were wholly-owned subsidiaries.

Any failure to offer high-quality technical support services may adversely affect our relationships with our customers and our financial results.     Our customers depend on our support organization to resolve technical issues relating to our applications and infrastructure offerings. We may be unable to respond quickly enough to accommodate short-term increases in customer demand for support services. Increased customer demand for these services, without corresponding revenues, could increase costs and adversely affect our operating results. Any failure to maintain high-quality technical support, or a market perception that we do not maintain high-quality technical support, could adversely affect our reputation, our ability to sell our applications to existing and prospective customers, and our business, operating results, and financial position.

We may fail to achieve our financial forecasts due to inaccurate sales forecasts or other factors.     Our revenues, particularly certain of our cloud license and on-premise license revenues and hardware revenues, can be difficult to forecast. As a result, our quarterly operating results can fluctuate.

For our Oracle Cloud Services, our actual conversion or renewal rates may differ from those used in our forecasts because this business is continuing to evolve and such rates may be unpredictable which could have an adverse effect on our long-term results. For our license business, we use a “pipeline” system, a common industry practice, to forecast sales and trends in that business. Our sales personnel monitor the status of all proposals and estimate when a customer will make a purchase decision and the dollar amount of the sale. These estimates are aggregated periodically to generate a sales pipeline. Our pipeline estimates can be unreliable both in a particular quarter and over a longer period of time, in part because the conversion rate or closure rate of the pipeline into contracts can be very difficult to estimate. A reduction in the conversion rates, renewal rates, or in the pipeline itself, could adversely affect our business or results of operations. In particular, a slowdown in IT spending or economic conditions generally can unexpectedly reduce the conversion rates and renewal rates in particular periods as purchasing decisions are delayed, reduced in amount or cancelled. The conversion rates can also be affected by the tendency of some of our customers to wait until the end of a fiscal period in the hope of obtaining more favorable terms, which can also impede our ability to negotiate, execute and deliver upon these contracts in a timely manner. In addition, for newly acquired companies, we have limited ability to predict how their pipelines will convert into sales or revenues for a number of quarters following the acquisition. Conversion rates and renewal rates post-acquisition may be quite different from the acquired companies’ historical conversion rates. Differences in conversion rates and renewal rates can also be affected by changes in business practices that we implement in our newly acquired companies. These changes may negatively affect customer behavior.

A substantial portion of the revenue value of our cloud license and on-premise license, and hardware contracts is completed in the latter part of a quarter and a significant percentage of these are larger value orders. Because a significant portion of our cost structure is largely fixed in the short term, sales and revenue shortfalls tend to have a disproportionately negative impact on our profitability. The number of large license transactions and, to a lesser extent, hardware products transactions increases the risk of fluctuations in our quarterly results because a delay in even a small number of these transactions could cause our quarterly sales, revenues and profitability to fall significantly short of our predictions.

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We may experience foreign currency gains and losses. Changes in currency exchange rates can adversely affect customer demand and our revenue and profitability.     We conduct a significant number of transactions and hold cash in currencies other than the U.S. Dollar. Changes in the values of major foreign currencies, particularly the Euro, Japanese Yen and British Pound, relative to the U.S. Dollar can significantly affect our total assets, revenues, operating results and cash flows, which are reported in U.S. Dollars. In particular, the economic uncertainties relating to Brexit and European sovereign and other debt obligations may cause the value of the British Pound and Euro to fluctuate relative to the U.S. Dollar. Fluctuations in foreign currency rates, including the strengthening of the U.S. Dollar against the Euro and most other major international currencies, adversely affects our revenue growth in terms of the amounts that we report in U.S. Dollars after converting our foreign currency results into U.S. Dollars and in terms of actual demand for our products and services as certain of these products may become relatively more expensive for foreign currency-based enterprises to purchase. In addition, currency variations can adversely affect margins on sales of our products in countries outside of the U.S. Generally, our reported revenues and operating results are adversely affected when the dollar strengthens relative to other currencies and are positively affected when the dollar weakens. In addition, our reported assets generally are adversely affected when the dollar strengthens relative to other currencies as a portion of our consolidated cash and bank deposits, among other assets, are held in foreign currencies.

In addition, we incur foreign currency transaction gains and losses, primarily related to sublicense fees and other intercompany agreements among us and our subsidiaries that we expect to cash settle in the near term, which are charged against earnings in the period incurred. We have a program which primarily utilizes foreign currency forward contracts designed to offset the risks associated with certain foreign currency exposures. We may suspend the program from time to time. As part of this program, we enter into foreign currency forward contracts so that increases or decreases in our foreign currency exposures are offset at least in part by gains or losses on the foreign currency forward contracts in an effort to mitigate the risks and volatility associated with our foreign currency transaction gains or losses. A large portion of our consolidated operations are international, and we expect that we will continue to realize gains or losses with respect to our foreign currency exposures, net of gains or losses from our foreign currency forward contracts. For example, we will experience foreign currency gains and losses in certain instances if it is not possible or cost-effective to hedge our foreign currency exposures, if our hedging efforts are ineffective, or should we suspend our foreign currency forward contract program. Our ultimate realized loss or gain with respect to currency fluctuations will generally depend on the size and type of cross-currency exposures that we enter into, the currency exchange rates associated with these exposures and changes in those rates, whether we have entered into foreign currency forward contracts to offset these exposures and other factors. All of these factors could materially impact our results of operations, financial position and cash flows.

We have incurred foreign currency losses associated with the devaluation of currencies in certain highly inflationary economies relative to the U.S. Dollar. We could incur future losses in emerging market countries where we do business should their currencies become designated as highly inflationary.

Our periodic workforce restructurings and reorganizations can be disruptive.     We have in the past restructured or made other adjustments to our workforce in response to management changes, product changes, performance issues, change in strategies, acquisitions and other internal and external considerations. In the past, these types of restructurings have resulted in increased restructuring costs and temporary reduced productivity while the employees adjusted to their new roles and responsibilities. In addition, we may not achieve or sustain the expected growth, resource redeployment or cost savings benefits of these restructurings, or may not do so within the expected timeframe. These effects could recur in connection with future acquisitions and other restructurings and our revenues and other results of operations could be negatively affected.

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We may lose key employees or may be unable to hire enough qualified employees.     We rely on hiring qualified employees and the continued service of our senior management, including our Chairman of the Board of Directors, Chief Technology Officer and founder; our Chief Executive Officers; other members of our executive team; and other key employees. In the technology industry, there is substantial and continuous competition for highly skilled business, product development, technical and other personnel. We may also experience increased compensation costs that are not offset by either improved productivity or higher sales. We may not be successful in recruiting new personnel and in retaining and motivating existing personnel. With rare exceptions, we do not have long-term employment or non-competition agreements with our employees. Members of our senior management team have left Oracle over the years for a variety of reasons, and we cannot guarantee that there will not be additional departures, which may be disruptive to our operations.

We continually focus on improving our cost structure by hiring personnel in countries where advanced technical expertise and other expertise are available at lower costs. When we make adjustments to our workforce, we may incur expenses associated with workforce reductions that delay the benefit of a more efficient workforce structure. We may also experience increased competition for employees in these countries as the trend toward globalization continues, which may affect our employee retention efforts and increase our expenses in an effort to offer a competitive compensation program. In addition, changes to immigration and labor law policies may adversely impact our access to technical and professional talent.

Our general compensation program includes restricted stock units and performance-based equity, which are important tools in attracting and retaining employees in our industry. If our stock price performs poorly, it may adversely affect our ability to retain or attract employees. We continually evaluate our compensation practices and consider changes from time to time, such as reducing the number of employees granted equity awards or the number of equity awards granted per employee and granting alternative forms of stock-based compensation, which may have an impact on our ability to retain employees and the amount of stock-based compensation expense that we record. Any changes in our compensation practices or those of our competitors could affect our ability to retain and motivate existing personnel and recruit new personnel.

Our sales to government clients expose us to business volatility and risks, including government budgeting cycles and appropriations, procurement regulations, governmental policy shifts, early termination of contracts, audits, investigations, sanctions and penalties.     We derive revenues from contracts with the U.S. government, state and local governments, and foreign governments and are subject to procurement laws and regulations relating to the award, administration and performance of those contracts.

Governmental entities are variously pursuing policies that affect our ability to sell our products and services. Changes in government procurement policy, priorities, technology initiatives, and/or contract award criteria may negatively impact our potential for growth in the government sector.

We are also subject to early termination of our contracts. Many governmental entities have the right to terminate contracts at any time, without cause. For example, the U.S. federal government may terminate any of our government contracts and subcontracts at its convenience, or for default based on our performance.

U.S. federal contracts are subject to the congressional approval of appropriations to fund the expenditures under these contracts. Similarly, our contracts with U.S. state and local governments, foreign governments and their agencies are generally subject to government funding authorizations. Contracts may be terminated based upon a lack of appropriated funds.

There is increased pressure on governments and their agencies, both domestically and internationally, to reduce spending as governments continue to face significant deficit reduction pressures. This may adversely impact spending on government programs.

Government contracts laws and regulations impose certain risks, and contracts are generally subject to audits and investigations. If violations of law are found, they could result in civil and criminal penalties and administrative sanctions, including termination of contracts, refund of a portion of fees received, forfeiture of profits, suspension of payments, fines and suspensions or debarment from future government business.

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Acquisitions present many risks and we may not achieve the financial and strategic goals that were contemplated at the time of a transaction.     We continue to make strategic acquisitions of companies, products, services and technologies. We have a selective and active acquisition program and we expect to continue to make acquisitions in the future because acquisitions are an important element of our overall corporate strategy. Risks we may face in connection with our acquisition program include:

 

our ongoing business may be disrupted and our management’s attention may be diverted by acquisition, transition or integration activities;

 

we may have difficulties (1) managing an acquired company’s technologies or lines of business; (2) entering new markets where we have no, or limited, direct prior experience or where competitors may have stronger market positions; or (3) retaining key personnel from the acquired companies;

 

an acquisition may not further our business strategy as we expected, we may not integrate an acquired company or technology as successfully as we expected, we may impose our business practices or alter go-to-market strategies that adversely impact the acquired business or we may overpay for, or otherwise not realize the expected return on our investments, which could adversely affect our business or operating results and potentially cause impairment to assets that we recorded as a part of an acquisition including intangible assets and goodwill;

 

our operating results or financial condition may be adversely impacted by (1) claims or liabilities that we assume from an acquired company or technology or that are otherwise related to an acquisition, including, among others, claims from government agencies, terminated employees, current or former customers, former stockholders or other third parties; (2) pre-existing contractual relationships that we assume from an acquired company that we would not have otherwise entered into, the termination or modification of which may be costly or disruptive to our business; (3) unfavorable revenue recognition or other accounting treatment as a result of an acquired company’s practices; and (4) intellectual property claims or disputes;

 

we may fail to identify or assess the magnitude of certain liabilities, shortcomings or other circumstances prior to acquiring a company or technology, which could result in (1) unexpected litigation or regulatory exposure, (2) unfavorable accounting treatment, unexpected increases in taxes due, (3) the loss of anticipated tax benefits or (4) other adverse effects on our business, operating results or financial condition;

 

we may not realize any anticipated increase in our revenues from an acquisition for a number of reasons, including (1) if a larger than predicted number of customers decline to renew cloud-based subscription contracts or license support or hardware support contracts, (2) if we are unable to sell the acquired products or service offerings to our customer base, (3) if acquired customers do not elect to purchase our technologies due to differing business practices or (4) if contract models utilized by an acquired company do not allow us to recognize revenues on a timely basis;

 

we may have difficulty incorporating acquired technologies, products, services and their related supply chain operations with our existing lines of business and supply chain infrastructure and maintaining uniform standards, architecture, controls, procedures and policies;

 

we may have multiple product lines or services offerings as a result of our acquisitions that are offered, priced, delivered and supported differently, which could cause customer confusion and delays;

 

we may incur higher than anticipated costs (1) to support, develop and deliver acquired products or services, (2) for general and administrative functions that support new business models, or (3) to comply with regulations applicable to an acquired business that are more complicated than we had anticipated;

 

we may be unable to obtain timely approvals from, or may otherwise have certain limitations, restrictions, penalties or other sanctions imposed on us by worker councils or similar bodies under applicable employment laws as a result of an acquisition, which could adversely affect our integration plans in certain jurisdictions and potentially increase our integration and restructuring expenses;

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we may be unable to obtain required approvals from governmental authorities under competition and antitrust laws on a timely basis, if at all, which could, among other things, (1) delay or prevent us from completing a transaction, (2) adversely affect our integration plans in certain jurisdictions, (3) restrict our ability to realize the expected financial or strategic goals of an acquisition, or (4) have other adverse effects on our current business and operations;

 

our use of cash to pay for acquisitions may limit other potential uses of our cash, including (1) stock repurchases, (2) dividend payments and (3) retirement of outstanding indebtedness, among others;

 

we may significantly increase our interest expense, leverage and debt service requirements if we incur additional debt to pay for an acquisition and we may have to delay or not proceed with a substantial acquisition if we cannot obtain the necessary funding to complete the acquisition in a timely manner or on favorable terms;

 

to the extent that we issue a significant amount of equity securities in connection with future acquisitions, existing stockholders may be diluted and earnings per share may decrease; and

 

we may experience additional or unexpected changes in how we are required to account for our acquisitions pursuant to U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, including arrangements that we may assume in an acquisition.

The occurrence of any of these risks could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition or cash flows, particularly in the case of a larger acquisition or several concurrent acquisitions.

Our hardware revenues and profitability have declined and could continue to decline.     Our hardware business may adversely affect our overall profitability. We may not achieve our estimated revenue, profit or other financial projections with respect to our hardware business in a timely manner or at all due to a number of factors, including:

 

our changes in hardware strategies, offerings and technologies which could adversely affect demand for our hardware products;

 

our hardware business has higher expenses as a percentage of revenues, and thus has been less profitable, than our cloud and license business;

 

our focus on our more profitable Oracle Engineered Systems and the de-emphasis of our lower profit margin commodity hardware products could adversely affect our hardware revenues;

 

changes in strategies and frequency for the development and introduction of new versions or next generations of our hardware products could adversely affect our hardware revenues;

 

a greater risk of material charges that could adversely affect our operating results, such as potential write-downs and impairments of our inventories; higher warranty expenses than what we experience in our cloud and license and services businesses; and amortization and potential impairment of intangible assets associated with our hardware business;

 

decreased customer demand for related hardware support as hardware products approach the end of their useful lives could adversely affect our hardware revenues; and

 

we may acquire hardware companies that are strategically important to us but (1) operate in hardware businesses with historically lower operating margins than our own; (2) have different legacy business practices and go-to-market strategies than our own that we may alter as a part of our integration efforts, which may significantly impact our estimated revenues and profits from the acquired company; (3) leverage different platforms or competing technologies that we may encounter difficulties in integrating; or (4) utilize unique manufacturing processes that affect our ability to scale these acquired products within our own manufacturing operations.

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Our hardware offerings are complex products, and if we cannot successfully manage this complexity, the results of our hardware business will suffer.     We depend on suppliers to develop, manufacture and deliver on a timely basis the necessary technologies and components for our hardware products, and there are some technologies and components that can only be purchased from a single vendor due to price, quality, technology, availability or other business constraints. As a result, our supply chain operations could be disrupted or negatively impacted by industry consolidation and component constraints or shortages, natural disasters, political unrest, port stoppages or other transportation disruptions or slowdowns, or other factors affecting the countries or regions where these single source component vendors are located or where the products are being shipped. We may be unable to purchase these items from the respective single vendors on acceptable terms or may experience significant shortages, delays or quality issues in the delivery of necessary technologies, parts or components from a particular vendor. If one or more of the risks described above occurs, our hardware business and related operating results could be materially and adversely affected.

We are susceptible to third-party manufacturing and logistics delays, which could result in the loss of sales and customers.     We outsource the manufacturing, assembly, delivery and technology or component design of certain of our hardware products to a variety of companies, many of which are located outside the U.S. If these partners experience production problems or delays or cannot meet our demand for products, we may not be able to find alternate manufacturing sources in a timely or cost-effective manner, if at all. Therefore, we continue to explore additional third-party manufacturing partners to drive supply chain continuity. This could cause the loss of sales and existing or potential customers, delayed revenue recognition or an increase in our hardware products expenses, all of which could adversely affect the margins of our hardware business.

These challenges and risks also exist when we acquire companies with hardware products and related supply chain operations. In some cases, we may be dependent, at least initially, on these acquired companies’ supply chain operations that we are less familiar with and thus we may be slower to adjust or react to these challenges and risks.

Our cloud and license, and hardware indirect sales channel could affect our future operating results.     Our cloud and license, and hardware indirect channel network is comprised primarily of resellers, system integrators/implementers, consultants, education providers, internet service providers, network integrators and independent software vendors. Our relationships with these channel participants are important elements of our cloud, software and hardware marketing and sales efforts. Our financial results could be adversely affected if our contracts with channel participants were terminated, if our relationships with channel participants were to deteriorate, if any of our competitors enter into strategic relationships with or acquire a significant channel participant, if the financial condition or operations of our channel participants were to weaken or if the level of demand for our channel participants’ products and services were to decrease. There can be no assurance that we will be successful in maintaining, expanding or developing our relationships with channel participants. If we are not successful, we may lose sales opportunities, customers and revenues.

We may not be able to protect our intellectual property rights.     We rely on copyright, trademark, patent and trade secret laws, confidentiality procedures, controls and contractual commitments to protect our intellectual property rights. Despite our efforts, these protections may be limited. Unauthorized third parties may try to copy or reverse engineer portions of our products or otherwise obtain and use our intellectual property. Any patents owned by us may be invalidated, circumvented or challenged. Any of our pending or future patent applications, whether or not being currently challenged, may not be issued with the scope of the claims we seek, if at all. In addition, the laws of some countries do not provide the same level of protection of our intellectual property rights as do the laws and courts of the U.S. If we cannot protect our intellectual property rights against unauthorized copying or use, or other misappropriation, we may not remain competitive.

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Third parties have claimed, and in the future may claim, infringement or misuse of intellectual property rights and/or breach of license agreement provisions.     We periodically receive notices from, or have lawsuits filed against us by, others claiming infringement or other misuse of their intellectual property rights and/or breach of our agreements with them. These third parties include entities that do not have the capabilities to design, manufacture, or distribute products or services or that acquire intellectual property like patents for the sole purpose of monetizing their acquired intellectual property through asserting claims of infringement and misuse. We expect to continue to receive such claims as:

 

we continue to expand into new businesses and acquire companies;

 

the number of products and competitors in our industry segments grows;

 

the use and support of third-party code (including open source code) becomes more prevalent in the industry;

 

the volume of issued patents continues to increase; and

 

non-practicing entities continue to assert intellectual property infringement in our industry segments.

Responding to any such claim, regardless of its validity, could:

 

be time consuming, costly and result in litigation;

 

divert management’s time and attention from developing our business;

 

require us to pay monetary damages or enter into royalty and licensing agreements that we would not normally find acceptable;

 

require us to stop selling or to redesign certain of our products;

 

require us to release source code to third parties, possibly under open source license terms;

 

require us to satisfy indemnification obligations to our customers; or

 

otherwise adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition or cash flows.

We may not receive significant revenues from our current research and development efforts for several years, if at all.     Developing our various product offerings is expensive and the investment in the development of these offerings often involves a long return on investment cycle. An important element of our corporate strategy is to continue to dedicate a significant amount of resources to research and development and related product and service opportunities both through internal investments and the acquisition of intellectual property from companies that we have acquired. Accelerated product and service introductions and short life cycles require high levels of expenditures for research and development that could adversely affect our operating results if not offset by revenue increases. We believe that we must continue to dedicate a significant amount of resources to our research and development efforts to maintain our competitive position. However, we do not expect to receive significant revenues from these investments for several years, if at all.

Business disruptions could adversely affect our operating results.     A significant portion of our critical business operations are concentrated in a few geographic areas, some of which include emerging market international locations that may be less stable relative to running such business operations solely within the U.S. We are a highly automated business and a disruption or failure of our systems and processes could cause delays in completing sales, providing services, including some of our cloud offerings, and enabling a seamless customer experience with respect to our customer facing back office processes. A major earthquake or fire, political, social or other disruption to infrastructure that supports our operations or other catastrophic event or the effects of climate change (such as increased storm severity, drought and pandemics) that results in the destruction or disruption of any of our critical business or IT systems could severely affect our ability to conduct normal business operations and, as a result, our future operating results could be materially and adversely affected.

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Adverse litigation results could affect our business.     We are subject to various legal proceedings. Litigation can be lengthy, expensive and disruptive to our operations, and can divert our management’s attention away from running our core business. The results of our litigation also cannot be predicted with certainty. An adverse decision could result in monetary damages or injunctive relief that could affect our business, operating results or financial condition. Additional information regarding certain of the lawsuits we are involved in is discussed under Note 17 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report.

We may have exposure to additional tax liabilities.     As a multinational corporation, we are subject to income taxes as well as non-income based taxes, in both the U.S. and various foreign jurisdictions. Significant uncertainties exist with respect to the amount of our tax liabilities, including those arising from potential changes in laws in the countries in which we do business and the possibility of adverse determinations with respect to the application of existing laws. Many judgments are required in determining our worldwide provision for income taxes and other tax liabilities, and we are regularly under audit by tax authorities, which often do not agree with positions taken by us on our tax returns. Any unfavorable resolution of these uncertainties may have a significant adverse impact on our tax rate.

Increasingly, countries around the world are actively considering or have enacted changes in relevant tax, accounting and other laws, regulations and interpretations. In particular, the U.S. Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (the Tax Act) significantly changed how corporations are taxed in the U.S., which has had and we expect will continue to have a meaningful impact on our provision for income taxes. Due to the complexity involved in applying the provisions of the Tax Act, we made reasonable estimates of the effects and recorded provisional amounts in our financial statements for the year ended May 31, 2018. The U.S. Treasury Department and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), and other standards-setting bodies may issue guidance on how the provisions of the Tax Act will be applied that is different from our interpretation. The Tax Act requires complex computations not previously required or produced, and significant judgments and assumptions in the interpretation of the law were made in producing our provisional estimates. We have adjusted the provisional amounts and reflected the adjustments in our financial statements for the year ended May 31, 2019 based on the regulatory and other guidance issued to date by the Treasury Department and IRS, but also on judgments and assumptions where uncertainty continues to exist. Such uncertainty in the application of the Tax Act to our ongoing operations as well as possible adverse future law changes attributable to changes in the U.S. political environment could have an adverse impact on our future tax rate.

Other countries also continue to consider enacting changes to their tax laws that could adversely affect us by increasing taxes imposed on our foreign subsidiaries, including changes in withholding tax regimes and the imposition of taxes targeted at certain technology businesses. More fundamentally, longstanding international tax principles that determine each country’s right to tax cross-border transactions are being reconsidered, creating significant uncertainty as to the future level of corporate income tax on our international operations. This re-examination is driven by a perceived need to provide greater taxing rights to market jurisdictions where customers or users are located. Various measures are being discussed, including adjustments to transfer pricing rules, limitations on deductions, and imposition of additional withholding taxes.

As a part of our income tax structure, there are many intercompany transactions and calculations made in the ordinary course of business where the ultimate tax determination is uncertain. Our intercompany transfer pricing has been and is currently being reviewed by the IRS and by foreign tax jurisdictions and will likely be subject to additional audits in the future. Although we have negotiated a number of agreements with certain taxing jurisdictions, these agreements do not cover substantial elements of our transfer pricing. In recent periods, transfer pricing audits in many foreign jurisdictions have become increasingly contentious. Similarly, certain jurisdictions are increasingly raising concerns about certain withholding tax matters under current law. In addition, our provision for income taxes could be adversely affected by shifts of earnings from jurisdictions or regimes that have relatively lower statutory tax rates to those in which the rates are relatively higher.

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We are also subject to non-income based taxes, such as payroll, sales, use, value-added, net worth, property and goods and services taxes, in both the U.S. and various foreign jurisdictions that have uncertain applicability to the businesses in which we are engaged. Although we believe that our income and non-income based tax estimates are reasonable, there is no assurance that the final determination of tax audits or tax disputes will not be different from what is reflected in our historical income tax provisions and accruals.

Charges to earnings resulting from acquisitions may adversely affect our operating results.     Under business combination accounting standards pursuant to Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) 805, Business Combinations, we recognize the identifiable assets acquired, the liabilities assumed and any non-controlling interests in acquired companies generally at their acquisition date fair values and, in each case, separately from goodwill. Goodwill as of the acquisition date is measured as the excess amount of consideration transferred, which is also generally measured at fair value, and the net of the acquisition date amounts of the identifiable assets acquired and the liabilities assumed. Our estimates of fair value are based upon assumptions believed to be reasonable but which are inherently uncertain. After we complete an acquisition, the following factors could result in material charges and adversely affect our operating results and may adversely affect our cash flows:

 

costs incurred to combine the operations of companies we acquire, such as transitional employee expenses and employee retention, redeployment or relocation expenses;

 

impairment of goodwill or impairment of intangible assets;

 

amortization of intangible assets acquired;

 

a reduction in the useful lives of intangible assets acquired;

 

identification of, or changes to, assumed contingent liabilities, both income tax and non-income tax related, after our final determination of the amounts for these contingencies or the conclusion of the measurement period (generally up to one year from the acquisition date), whichever comes first;

 

charges to our operating results to maintain certain duplicative pre-merger activities for an extended period of time or to maintain these activities for a period of time that is longer than we had anticipated, charges to eliminate certain duplicative pre-merger activities, and charges to restructure our operations or to reduce our cost structure;

 

charges to our operating results due to expenses incurred to effect the acquisition; and

 

charges to our operating results due to the expensing of certain stock awards assumed in an acquisition.

Substantially all of these costs will be accounted for as expenses that will adversely impact our operating results for the periods in which those costs are incurred. Charges to our operating results in any given period could differ substantially from other periods based on the timing and size of our future acquisitions and the extent of integration activities. A more detailed discussion of our accounting for business combinations and other items is presented in the “Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates” section of Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (Item 7) included elsewhere in this Annual Report.

There are risks associated with our outstanding and future indebtedness.     As of May 31, 2019, we had an aggregate of $56.3 billion of outstanding indebtedness that will mature between calendar year 2019 and calendar year 2055 and we may incur additional indebtedness in the future. Our ability to pay interest and repay the principal for our indebtedness is dependent upon our ability to manage our business operations, generate sufficient cash flows to service such debt and the other factors discussed in this section. There can be no assurance that we will be able to manage any of these risks successfully.

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We may also need to refinance a portion of our outstanding debt as it matures. There is a risk that we may not be able to refinance existing debt or that the terms of any refinancing may not be as favorable as the terms of our existing debt. Furthermore, if prevailing interest rates or other factors at the time of refinancing result in higher interest rates upon refinancing, then the interest expense relating to that refinanced indebtedness would increase.

Should we incur future increases in interest expense, our ability to utilize certain of our foreign tax credits to reduce our U.S. federal income tax could be limited, which could unfavorably affect our provision for income taxes and effective tax rate. In addition, changes by any rating agency to our outlook or credit rating could negatively affect the value of both our debt and equity securities and increase the interest amounts we pay on certain outstanding or future debt. These risks could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Environmental and other related laws and regulations subject us to a number of risks and could result in significant liabilities and costs.     Some of our cloud and hardware operations are subject to state, federal and international laws governing protection of the environment, proper handling and disposal of materials used for these products, human health and safety, the use of certain chemical substances and the labor practices of suppliers, as well as local testing and labelling requirements. Compliance with these ever-changing environmental and other laws in a timely manner could increase our product design, development, procurement, manufacturing, delivery, cloud operations and administration costs, limit our ability to manage excess and obsolete non-compliant inventory, change our sales activities, or otherwise impact future financial results of our cloud and hardware businesses. Any violation of these laws can subject us to significant liability, including fines, penalties and possible prohibition of sales of our products and services into one or more states or countries and result in a material adverse effect on the financial condition or results of operations of our cloud and hardware businesses. Regulatory, market, and competitive pressures regarding the energy intensity and energy mix for our data center operations may also grow.

The SEC has adopted disclosure requirements for companies that use certain “conflict minerals” (tantalum, tin, tungsten and gold) in their products. Our supply chain is multi-tiered, global and highly complex. As a provider of hardware end-products, we are several steps removed from the mining and smelting or refining of any conflict minerals in our supply chain. Accordingly, our ability to determine with certainty the origin and chain of custody of conflict minerals is limited. Our relationships with customers and suppliers could suffer if we are unable to describe our products as “conflict-free.” We may also face increased costs in complying with conflict minerals disclosure requirements.

A significant portion of our hardware revenues come from international sales. Environmental legislation, such as the EU Directive on Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS), the EU Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive (WEEE Directive) and China’s regulation on Management Methods for Controlling Pollution Caused by Electronic Information Products, may increase our cost of doing business internationally and impact our hardware revenues from the EU, China and other countries with similar environmental legislation as we endeavor to comply with and implement these requirements. The cumulative impact of international environmental legislation could be significant.

Our stock price could become more volatile and your investment could lose value.    All of the factors discussed in this section could affect our stock price. The timing of announcements in the public market by us or by our competitors regarding new products, product enhancements, technological advances, acquisitions or major transactions could also affect our stock price. Changes in the amounts and frequency of share repurchases or dividends could affect our stock price. Our stock price could also be affected by factors, some of which are beyond our control, including, among others: speculation in the press and the analyst community, changes in recommendations or earnings estimates by financial analysts, changes in investors’ or analysts’ valuation measures for our stock, earnings announcements where our financial results differ from our guidance or investors’ expectations, our credit ratings and market trends unrelated to our performance. A significant drop in our stock price could also expose us to the risk of securities class action lawsuits, which could result in substantial costs and divert management’s attention and resources, which could adversely affect our business.

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We cannot guarantee that our stock repurchase program will be fully implemented or that it will enhance long-term stockholder value.   In fiscal 2019, our Board of Directors approved expansions of our stock repurchase program totaling $24.0 billion. The repurchase program does not have an expiration date and we are not obligated to repurchase a specified number or dollar value of shares. Our repurchase program may be suspended or terminated at any time and, even if fully implemented, may not enhance long-term stockholder value.

Item 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

None.

Item 2.

Properties

Our properties consist of owned and leased office facilities for sales, support, research and development, services, manufacturing, cloud operations and administrative and other functions. Our headquarters facility consists of approximately 2.1 million square feet in Redwood City, California, substantially all of which we own. We also own or lease other facilities for current use consisting of approximately 27.7 million square feet in various other locations in the U.S. and abroad. Approximately 3.1 million square feet, or 10%, of our total owned and leased space is sublet or is being actively marketed for sublease or disposition. We lease our principal internal manufacturing facility for our hardware products in Hillsboro, Oregon. Our cloud operations deliver our Oracle Cloud Services through the use of global data centers including those that we own and operate and those that we utilize through colocation suppliers. We believe that our facilities are in good condition and suitable for the conduct of our business.

Item 3.

Legal Proceedings

The material set forth in Note 14 (pertaining to information regarding contingencies related to our income taxes) and Note 17 (pertaining to information regarding legal contingencies) of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 15 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K is incorporated herein by reference.

Item 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

Not applicable.

 

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PART II

Item 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Our common stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “ORCL.” According to the records of our transfer agent, we had 8,970 stockholders of record as of May 31, 2019.

For equity compensation plan information, please refer to Item 12 in Part III of this Annual Report.

Stock Repurchase Program

Our Board of Directors has approved a program for us to repurchase shares of our common stock. On September 17, 2018 and February 15, 2019, we announced that our Board of Directors approved expansions of our stock repurchase program totaling $24.0 billion. As of May 31, 2019, approximately $5.8 billion remained available for stock repurchases pursuant to our stock repurchase program.

Our stock repurchase authorization does not have an expiration date and the pace of our repurchase activity will depend on factors such as our working capital needs, our cash requirements for acquisitions and dividend payments, our debt repayment obligations or repurchases of our debt, our stock price, and economic and market conditions. Our stock repurchases may be effected from time to time through open market purchases or pursuant to a Rule 10b5-1 plan. Our stock repurchase program may be accelerated, suspended, delayed or discontinued at any time.

The following table summarizes the stock repurchase activity for the three months ended May 31, 2019 and the approximate dollar value of shares that may yet be purchased pursuant to our stock repurchase program:

 

(in millions, except per share amounts)

 

Total Number of

Shares

Purchased

 

 

Average Price

Paid per

Share

 

 

Total Number of

Shares Purchased as

Part of Publicly

Announced

Program

 

 

Approximate Dollar

Value of Shares that

May Yet Be

Purchased

Under the Program

 

March 1, 2019—March 31, 2019

 

 

58.0

 

 

$

52.93

 

 

 

58.0

 

 

$

8,780.5

 

April 1, 2019—April 30, 2019

 

 

29.1

 

 

$

54.41

 

 

 

29.1

 

 

$

7,198.4

 

May 1, 2019—May 31, 2019

 

 

24.9

 

 

$

54.11

 

 

 

24.9

 

 

$

5,848.4

 

Total

 

 

112.0

 

 

$

53.57

 

 

 

112.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Stock Performance Graph and Cumulative Total Return

The graph below compares the cumulative total stockholder return on our common stock with the cumulative total return of the S&P 500 Index and the S&P Information Technology Index for each of the last five fiscal years ended May 31, 2019, assuming an investment of $100 at the beginning of such period and the reinvestment of any dividends. The comparisons in the graphs below are based upon historical data and are not indicative of, nor intended to forecast, future performance of our common stock.

 

*$100 INVESTED ON MAY 31, 2014 IN STOCK OR

INDEX-INCLUDING REINVESTMENT OF DIVIDENDS

 

 

 

5/14

 

 

5/15

 

 

5/16

 

 

5/17

 

 

5/18

 

 

5/19

 

Oracle Corporation

 

 

100.0

 

 

 

104.8

 

 

 

98.4

 

 

 

112.8

 

 

 

118.0

 

 

 

129.9

 

S&P 500 Index

 

 

100.0

 

 

 

111.8

 

 

 

113.7

 

 

 

133.6

 

 

 

152.8

 

 

 

158.6

 

S&P Information Technology Index

 

 

100.0

 

 

 

118.8

 

 

 

122.5

 

 

 

163.9

 

 

 

210.2

 

 

 

219.4

 

 

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Item 6.

Selected Financial Data

The following table sets forth selected financial data as of and for our last five fiscal years. This selected financial data should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and related notes included in Item 15 of this Annual Report. Over our last five fiscal years, we have acquired a number of companies, including NetSuite Inc. (NetSuite) in fiscal 2017. The results of our acquired companies have been included in our consolidated financial statements since their respective dates of acquisition and have contributed to our revenues, income, earnings per share and total assets.

 

 

 

As of and for the Year Ended May 31,

 

(in millions, except per share amounts)

 

2019

 

 

2018(4)

 

 

2017(4)

 

 

2016(4)

 

 

2015(4)

 

Consolidated Statements of Operations Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total revenues

 

$

39,506

 

 

$

39,383

 

 

$

37,792

 

 

$

37,047

 

 

$

38,226

 

Operating income

 

$

13,535

 

 

$

13,264

 

 

$

12,913

 

 

$

12,604

 

 

$

13,871

 

Net income(1)

 

$

11,083

 

 

$

3,587

 

 

$

9,452

 

 

$

8,901

 

 

$

9,938

 

Earnings per share—diluted(1)

 

$

2.97

 

 

$

0.85

 

 

$

2.24

 

 

$

2.07

 

 

$

2.21

 

Diluted weighted average common shares outstanding

 

 

3,732

 

 

 

4,238

 

 

 

4,217

 

 

 

4,305

 

 

 

4,503

 

Cash dividends declared per common share

 

$

0.81

 

 

$

0.76

 

 

$

0.64

 

 

$

0.60

 

 

$

0.51

 

Consolidated Balance Sheets Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working capital(2)

 

$

27,756

 

 

$

57,035

 

 

$

50,995

 

 

$

47,105

 

 

$

47,314

 

Total assets(2)

 

$

108,709

 

 

$

137,851

 

 

$

136,003

 

 

$

112,180

 

 

$

110,903

 

Notes payable and other borrowings(3)

 

$

56,167

 

 

$

60,619

 

 

$

57,909

 

 

$

43,855

 

 

$

41,958

 

 

(1)

Our net income and diluted earnings per share were impacted in fiscal 2019 and 2018 by the effects of the U.S. Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (the Tax Act). The more significant provisions of the Tax Act as applicable to us are described below under “Impacts of the U.S. Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017”.

(2)

Working capital and total assets decreased in fiscal 2019 primarily due to $36.1 billion of cash used for repurchases of our common stock during fiscal 2019 and also due to dividend payments, partially offset by the favorable impacts to our net current assets resulting from our fiscal 2019 net income. Working capital and total assets sequentially increased in nearly all of the fiscal 2015 to 2018 periods presented primarily due to the favorable impacts to our net current assets resulting from our net income generated during the periods presented and the issuances of long-term senior notes of $10.0 billion in fiscal 2018, and $14.0 billion in fiscal 2017. These working capital and total assets increases were partially offset by cash used for acquisitions, repurchases of our common stock and dividend payments in the fiscal 2015 to 2018 periods presented. In addition, our total assets were also affected in all periods presented by the repayments of notes payable and other borrowings as discussed further below.

(3)

Our notes payable and other borrowings, which represented the summation of our notes payable and other borrowings, current, and notes payable and other borrowings, non-current, as reported per our consolidated balance sheets as of the dates listed in the table above, decreased during fiscal 2019 primarily due to repayments of certain short-term borrowings and senior notes. Notes payable and other borrowings increased between fiscal 2015 and 2018 primarily due to the fiscal 2018 issuance of long-term senior notes of $10.0 billion and short-term borrowings of $2.5 billion, the fiscal 2017 issuance of long-term senior notes of $14.0 billion and short-term borrowings of $3.8 billion, and the fiscal 2016 short-term borrowings of $3.8 billion. See Note 7 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report for additional information regarding our notes payable and other borrowings.

(4)

The summary consolidated financial data for the fiscal years ended and as of May 31, 2018 and 2017 have been retrospectively restated to reflect the adoption of Accounting Standards Update ("ASU") No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers: Topic 606 and subsequent amendments to the initial guidance: ASU 2015-14, ASU 2016-08, ASU 2016-10, ASU 2016-12, ASU 2016-20, ASU 2017-10, ASU 2017-13 and ASU 2017-14 (collectively, Topic 606), and ASU 2017-07, Compensation—Retirement Benefits (Topic 715): Improving the presentation of Net Periodic Pension Costs and Net Periodic Postretirement Benefit Costs (ASU 2017-07). See Note 1 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report for a summary of adjustments related to Topic 606 and ASU 2017-07. The summary consolidated financial data for the fiscal years ended and as of May 31, 2016 and 2015 have not been updated to reflect the adoption of Topic 606 or ASU 2017-07.

 

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Item 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

We begin Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations with an overview of our businesses and significant trends. This overview is followed by a summary of our critical accounting policies and estimates that we believe are important to understanding the assumptions and judgments incorporated in our reported financial results. We then provide a more detailed analysis of our results of operations and financial condition.

Business Overview

Oracle provides products and services that address enterprise information technology (IT) environments. Our products and services include applications and infrastructure offerings that are delivered worldwide through a variety of flexible and interoperable IT deployment models. These models include on-premise deployments, cloud-based deployments, and hybrid deployments (an approach that combines both on-premise and cloud-based deployment) such as our Oracle Cloud at Customer offering (an instance of Oracle Cloud in a customer’s own data center). Accordingly, we offer choice and flexibility to our customers and facilitate the product, service and deployment combinations that best suit our customers’ needs. Our customers include businesses of many sizes, government agencies, educational institutions and resellers that we market and sell to directly through our worldwide sales force and indirectly through the Oracle Partner Network.

We have three businesses: cloud and license; hardware; and services; each of which comprises a single operating segment. The descriptions set forth below as a part of Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and the information contained within Note 15 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report provide additional information related to our businesses and operating segments and align as to how our chief operating decision makers (CODMs), which include our Chief Executive Officers and Chief Technology Officer, view our operating results and allocate resources.

Cloud and License Business

Our cloud and license line of business, which represented 83%, 81% and 80% of our total revenues in fiscal 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively, markets, sells and delivers a broad spectrum of applications and infrastructure technologies through our cloud and license offerings.

Cloud services and license support revenues include:

 

license support revenues, which are earned by providing Oracle license support services to customers that have elected to purchase support services in connection with the purchase of Oracle applications and infrastructure software licenses for use in cloud, on-premise and other IT environments. Substantially all license support customers renew their support contracts with us upon expiration in order to continue to benefit from technical support services and the periodic issuance of unspecified updates and enhancements, which current license support customers are entitled to receive. License support contracts are generally priced as a percentage of the net fees paid by the customer to purchase a cloud license and/or on-premise license; are generally billed in advance of the support services being performed; are generally renewed at the customer’s option; and are generally recognized as revenues ratably over the contractual period that the support services are provided, which is generally one year; and

 

cloud services revenues, which provide customers access to Oracle Cloud applications and infrastructure technologies via cloud-based deployment models that Oracle develops, provides unspecified updates and enhancements for, hosts, manages and supports and that customers access by entering into a subscription agreement with us for a stated period. The majority of our Oracle Cloud Services arrangements are generally billed in advance of the cloud services being performed; have durations of one to three years; are generally renewed at the customer’s option; and are generally recognized as revenues ratably over the contractual period of the cloud contract or, in the case of usage model contracts, as the cloud services are consumed over time.

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Cloud license and on-premise license revenues include revenues from the licensing of our software products including Oracle Applications, Oracle Database, Oracle Middleware and Java, among others, which our customers deploy within cloud-based, on-premise and other IT environments. Our cloud license and on-premise license transactions are generally perpetual in nature and are generally recognized upfront at the point in time when the software is made available to the customer to download and use. Revenues from usage-based royalty arrangements for distinct cloud licenses and on-premise licenses are recognized at the point in time when the software end user usage occurs. The timing of a few large license transactions can substantially affect our quarterly license revenues due to the point in time for revenue recognition of license transactions, which is different than the typical revenue recognition pattern for our cloud services and license support revenues in which revenues are generally recognized ratably over the contractual terms. Cloud license and on-premise license customers have the option to purchase and renew license support contracts, as described above.

Providing choice and flexibility to our customers as to when and how they deploy our applications and infrastructure technologies is an important element of our corporate strategy. In recent periods, customer demand for our applications and infrastructure technologies delivered through our Oracle Cloud Services has increased. To address customer demand and enable customer choice, we have introduced certain programs for customers to pivot their applications and infrastructure licenses and the related license support to the Oracle Cloud for new deployments and to migrate to and expand with the Oracle Cloud for their existing workloads. We expect these trends to continue.

Our cloud and license business’ revenue growth is affected by many factors, including the strength of general economic and business conditions; governmental budgetary constraints; the strategy for and competitive position of our offerings; our acquisitions; the continued renewal of our cloud services and license support customer contracts by the customer contract base; substantially all customers continuing to purchase license support contracts in connection with their license purchases; the pricing of license support contracts sold in connection with the sales of licenses; the pricing, amounts and volumes of licenses and cloud services sold; and foreign currency rate fluctuations.

On a constant currency basis, we expect that our total cloud and license revenues generally will continue to increase due to:

 

expected growth in our cloud services and license support offerings;

 

continued demand for our cloud license and on-premise license offerings; and

 

contributions from our acquisitions.

We believe all of these factors should contribute to future growth in our cloud and license revenues, which should enable us to continue to make investments in research and development to develop and improve our cloud and license products and services.

Our cloud and license business’ margin has historically trended upward over the course of the four quarters within a particular fiscal year due to the historical upward trend of our cloud and license business’ revenues over those quarterly periods and because the majority of our costs for this business are generally fixed in the short term. The historical upward trend of our cloud and license business’ revenues over the course of the four quarters within a particular fiscal year is primarily due to the addition of new cloud services and license support contracts to the customer contract base that we generally recognize as revenues ratably; the renewal of existing customers’ cloud services and license support contracts over the course of each fiscal year that we generally recognize as revenues ratably; and the historical upward trend of our cloud license and on-premise license revenues, which we generally recognize at a point in time upon delivery, over those four quarterly periods.

Hardware Business

Our hardware business, which represented 9%, 10% and 11% of our total revenues in fiscal 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively, provides a broad selection of hardware products and hardware-related software products including Oracle Engineered Systems, servers, storage, industry-specific hardware, operating systems, virtualization,

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management and other hardware related software, and related hardware support. Each hardware product and its related software, such as an operating system or firmware, are highly interdependent and interrelated and are accounted for as a combined performance obligation. The revenues for this combined performance obligation are generally recognized at the point in time that the hardware product and its related software are delivered to the customer and ownership is transferred to the customer. We expect to make investments in research and development to improve existing hardware products and services and to develop new hardware products and services. The majority of our hardware products are sold through indirect channels, including independent distributors and value-added resellers. Our hardware support offerings provide customers with unspecified software updates for software components that are essential to the functionality of our hardware products and associated software products such as Oracle Solaris. Our hardware support offerings can also include product repairs, maintenance services and technical support services. Hardware support contracts are entered into and renewed at the option of the customer, are generally priced as a percentage of the net hardware products fees and are generally recognized as revenues ratably as the hardware support services are delivered over the contractual terms.

We generally expect our hardware business to have lower operating margins as a percentage of revenues than our cloud and license business due to the incremental costs we incur to produce and distribute these products and to provide support services, including direct materials and labor costs.

Our quarterly hardware revenues are difficult to predict. Our hardware revenues, cost of hardware and hardware operating margins that we report are affected by, among others: our ability to timely manufacture or deliver a few large hardware transactions; our strategy for and the position of our hardware products relative to competitor offerings; customer demand for competing offerings, including IaaS; the strength of general economic and business conditions; governmental budgetary constraints; whether customers decide to purchase hardware support contracts at or in close proximity to the time of hardware product sale; the percentage of our hardware support contract customer base that renews its support contracts and the close association between hardware products, which have a finite life, and customer demand for related hardware support as hardware products age; customer decisions to either maintain or upgrade their existing hardware infrastructure to newly developed technologies that are available; certain of our acquisitions; and foreign currency rate fluctuations.

Services Business

Our services business, which represented 8% of our total revenues in fiscal 2019 and 9% of our total revenues in each of fiscal 2018 and 2017, helps customers and partners maximize the performance of their investments in Oracle applications and infrastructure technologies. We believe that our services are differentiated based on our focus on Oracle technologies, extensive experience, broad sets of intellectual property, and best practices. Our services offerings include consulting services, advanced customer support services and education services. Our services business has lower margins than our cloud and license and hardware businesses. Our services revenues are impacted by, among others: our strategy for, and the competitive position of, our services; customer demand for our cloud and license and hardware offerings and the associated services for these offerings; certain of our acquisitions; general economic conditions; governmental budgetary constraints; personnel reductions in our customers’ IT departments; and tighter controls over customer discretionary spending.

Acquisitions

Our selective and active acquisition program is another important element of our corporate strategy. In recent years, we have invested billions of dollars to acquire a number of complementary companies, products, services and technologies, including NetSuite in fiscal 2017.

We expect to continue to acquire companies, products, services and technologies in furtherance of our corporate strategy. Note 2 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report provides additional information related to our recent acquisitions.

We believe that we can fund our future acquisitions with our internally available cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities, cash generated from operations, additional borrowings or from the issuance of additional

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securities. We estimate the financial impact of any potential acquisition with regard to earnings, operating margin, cash flow and return on invested capital targets before deciding to move forward with an acquisition.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

Our consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) as set forth in the Financial Accounting Standards Board’s (FASB), ASC, and we consider the various staff accounting bulletins and other applicable guidance issued by the SEC. Note 1 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report includes a description of our significant accounting policies. GAAP, as set forth within the ASC, requires us to make certain estimates, judgments and assumptions as we apply our significant accounting policies. The accounting policies that reflect estimates, judgments and assumptions that we believe are the most critical to aid in fully understanding and evaluating our reported financial results and for which we include additional discussion below are:

 

Revenue Recognition;

 

Business Combinations;

 

Goodwill and Intangible Assets—Impairment Assessments;

 

Accounting for Income Taxes; and

 

Legal and Other Contingencies.

Our senior management has reviewed our critical accounting policies and related disclosures with the Finance and Audit Committee of the Board of Directors.

Revenue Recognition

The most critical judgments required in applying Topic 606 and our revenue recognition policy relate to the determination of distinct performance obligations and the evaluation of the standalone selling price (SSP) for each performance obligation.

Many of our customer contracts include multiple performance obligations. Judgment is required in determining whether each performance obligation within a customer contract is distinct. Oracle products and services generally do not require a significant amount of integration or interdependency. Therefore, multiple products and services contained within a customer contract are generally considered to be distinct and are not combined for revenue recognition purposes. We allocate the transaction price for each customer contract to each performance obligation based on the relative SSP (the determination of SSP is discussed below) for each performance obligation within each contract. We recognize the amount of transaction price allocated to each performance obligation within a customer contract as revenue as each performance obligation is delivered.

We use judgment in determining the SSP for products and services. For substantially all performance obligations except cloud licenses and on-premise licenses, we are able to establish the SSP based on the observable prices of products or services sold separately in comparable circumstances to similar customers. We typically establish an SSP range for our products and services, which is reassessed on a periodic basis or when facts and circumstances change. SSP for our products and services can evolve over time due to changes in our pricing practices that are influenced by intense competition, changes in demand for our products and services, and economic factors, among others. Our cloud licenses and on-premise licenses have not historically been sold on a standalone basis, as substantially all customers elect to purchase license support contracts at the time of a cloud license and on-premise license purchase. License support contracts are generally priced as a percentage of the net fees paid by the customer to access the license. We are unable to establish the SSP for our cloud licenses and on-premise licenses based on observable prices given the same products are sold for a broad range of amounts (that is, the selling price is highly variable) and a representative SSP is not discernible from past transactions or other observable evidence. As a result, the SSP for a cloud license and an on-premise license included in a contract with multiple performance obligations is determined by applying a residual approach whereby all other performance

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obligations within a contract are first allocated a portion of the transaction price based upon their respective SSPs, with any residual amount of transaction price allocated to cloud license and on-premise license revenues.

Business Combinations

We apply the provisions of ASC 805, Business Combinations, in accounting for our acquisitions. ASC 805 requires that we evaluate whether a transaction pertains to an acquisition of assets, or to an acquisition of a business. A business is defined as an integrated set of assets and activities that is capable of being conducted and managed for the purpose of providing a return to investors. Asset acquisitions are accounted for by allocating the cost of the acquisition to the individual assets and liabilities assumed on a relative fair value basis; whereas the acquisition of a business requires us to recognize separately from goodwill the assets acquired and the liabilities assumed at the acquisition date fair values. Goodwill as of the acquisition date is measured as the excess of consideration transferred over the net of the acquisition date fair values of the assets acquired and the liabilities assumed. While we use our best estimates and assumptions to accurately value assets acquired and liabilities assumed at the acquisition date as well as any contingent consideration, where applicable, our estimates are inherently uncertain and subject to refinement. As a result, during the measurement period, which may be up to one year from the acquisition date, we record adjustments to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed with the corresponding offset to goodwill. Upon the conclusion of the measurement period or final determination of the values of assets acquired or liabilities assumed, whichever comes first, any subsequent adjustments are recorded to our consolidated statements of operations.

Accounting for business combinations requires our management to make significant estimates and assumptions, especially at the acquisition date, including our estimates for intangible assets, contractual obligations assumed, pre-acquisition contingencies and any contingent consideration, where applicable. Although we believe that the assumptions and estimates we have made in the past have been reasonable and appropriate, they are based in part on historical experience and information obtained from the management of the acquired companies and are inherently uncertain. Unanticipated events and circumstances may occur that may affect the accuracy or validity of such assumptions, estimates or actual results.

For a given acquisition, we may identify certain pre-acquisition contingencies as of the acquisition date and may extend our review and evaluation of these pre-acquisition contingencies throughout the measurement period in order to obtain sufficient information to assess whether we include these contingencies as a part of the fair value estimates of assets acquired and liabilities assumed and, if so, to determine their estimated amounts.

If we cannot reasonably determine the fair value of a non-income tax related pre-acquisition contingency by the end of the measurement period, which is generally the case given the nature of such matters, we will recognize an asset or a liability for such pre-acquisition contingency if: (1) it is probable that an asset existed or a liability had been incurred at the acquisition date and (2) the amount of the asset or liability can be reasonably estimated. Subsequent to the measurement period, changes in our estimates of such contingencies will affect earnings and could have a material effect on our results of operations and financial position.

In addition, uncertain tax positions and tax related valuation allowances assumed in connection with a business combination are initially estimated as of the acquisition date. We reevaluate these items quarterly based upon facts and circumstances that existed as of the acquisition date with any adjustments to our preliminary estimates being recorded to goodwill if identified within the measurement period. Subsequent to the measurement period or our final determination of the tax allowance’s or contingency’s estimated value, whichever comes first, changes to these uncertain tax positions and tax related valuation allowances will affect our provision for income taxes in our consolidated statement of operations and could have a material impact on our results of operations and financial position.

Goodwill and Intangible AssetsImpairment Assessments

We review goodwill for impairment annually and whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate its carrying value may not be recoverable. We make certain judgments and assumptions to determine our reporting units and in allocating shared assets and liabilities to determine the carrying values for each of our reporting units.

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Judgment in the assessment of qualitative factors of impairment include cost factors; financial performance; legal, regulatory, contractual, political, business, and other factors; entity specific factors; industry and market considerations, macroeconomic conditions, and other relevant events and factors affecting the reporting unit. To the extent we determine that it is more likely than not that the fair value of the reporting unit is less than its carrying value, a quantitative test is then performed.

Determining the fair value of a reporting unit involves the use of significant estimates and assumptions. These estimates and assumptions include, among others, revenue growth rates and operating margins used to calculate projected future cash flows, risk-adjusted discount rates, future economic and market conditions, and the determination of appropriate market comparables.

We make judgments about the recoverability of purchased finite lived intangible assets whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that impairment may exist. In such situations, we are required to evaluate whether the net book values of our finite lived intangible assets are recoverable. We determine whether finite lived intangible assets are recoverable based upon the forecasted future cash flows that are expected to be generated by the lowest level associated asset grouping. Assumptions and estimates about future values and remaining useful lives of our intangible assets are complex and subjective and include, among others, forecasted undiscounted cash flows to be generated by certain asset groupings. These assumptions and estimates can be affected by a variety of factors, including external factors such as industry and economic trends and internal factors such as changes in our business strategy and our internal forecasts.

Accounting for Income Taxes

Judgment is required in determining our worldwide income tax provision. In the ordinary course of a global business, there are many transactions and calculations where the ultimate tax outcome is uncertain. Some of these uncertainties arise as a consequence of revenue sharing and cost reimbursement arrangements among related entities, the process of identifying items of revenues and expenses that qualify for preferential tax treatment, and the segregation of foreign and domestic earnings and expenses to avoid double taxation. Although we believe that our estimates are reasonable, the final tax outcome of these matters could be different from that which is reflected in our historical income tax provisions and accruals. Such differences could have a material effect on our income tax provision and net income in the period in which such determination is made.

We record a valuation allowance to reduce our deferred tax assets to the amount that is more likely than not to be realized. In order for us to realize our deferred tax assets, we must be able to generate sufficient taxable income in those jurisdictions where the deferred tax assets are located. We consider future growth, forecasted earnings, future taxable income, the mix of earnings in the jurisdictions in which we operate, historical earnings, taxable income in prior years, if carryback is permitted under the law, and prudent and feasible tax planning strategies in determining the need for a valuation allowance. In the event we were to determine that we would not be able to realize all or part of our net deferred tax assets in the future, an adjustment to the deferred tax assets valuation allowance would be charged to earnings in the period in which we make such a determination, or goodwill would be adjusted at our final determination of the valuation allowance related to an acquisition within the measurement period. If we later determine that it is more likely than not that the net deferred tax assets would be realized, we would reverse the applicable portion of the previously provided valuation allowance as an adjustment to our provision for income taxes at such time.

We calculate our current and deferred tax provision based on estimates and assumptions that could differ from the actual results reflected in income tax returns filed during the subsequent year. Adjustments based on filed returns are generally recorded in the period when the tax returns are filed and the global tax implications are known, which can materially impact our effective tax rate.

The amount of income tax we pay is subject to ongoing audits by federal, state and foreign tax authorities, which often result in proposed assessments. Our estimate of the potential outcome for any uncertain tax issue may require certain judgments. A description of our accounting policies associated with tax related contingencies assumed as a part of a business combination is provided under “Business Combinations” above. For those tax related contingencies that are not a part of a business combination, we account for these uncertain tax issues

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pursuant to ASC 740, Income Taxes, which contains a two-step approach to recognizing and measuring uncertain tax positions taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. The first step is to determine if the weight of available evidence indicates that it is more likely than not that the tax position will be sustained in an audit, including resolution of any related appeals or litigation processes. The second step is to measure the tax benefit as the largest amount that is more than 50% likely to be realized upon ultimate settlement. Although we believe that we have adequately reserved for our uncertain tax positions, no assurance can be given with respect to the final outcome of these matters. We adjust reserves for our uncertain tax positions due to changing facts and circumstances, such as the closing of a tax audit, judicial rulings, and refinement of estimates or realization of earnings or deductions that differ from our estimates. To the extent that the final outcome of these matters is different than the amounts recorded, such differences generally will impact our provision for income taxes in the period in which such a determination is made. Our provisions for income taxes include the impact of reserve provisions and changes to reserves that are considered appropriate and also include the related interest and penalties.

Legal and Other Contingencies

We are currently involved in various claims and legal proceedings. Quarterly, we review the status of each significant matter and assess our potential financial exposure. A description of our accounting policies associated with contingencies assumed as a part of a business combination is provided under “Business Combinations” above. For legal and other contingencies that are not a part of a business combination, we accrue a liability for an estimated loss if the potential loss from any claim or legal proceeding is considered probable, and the amount can be reasonably estimated. Significant judgment is required in both the determination of probability and the determination as to whether the amount of an exposure is reasonably estimable. Because of uncertainties related to these matters, accruals are based only on the best information available at the time the accruals are made. As additional information becomes available, we reassess the potential liability related to our pending claims and litigation and may revise our estimates. Such revisions in the estimates of the potential liabilities could have a material impact on our results of operations and financial position.

Results of Operations

Impacts of the U.S. Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017

The comparability of our operating results in fiscal 2019 compared to the corresponding prior year periods, and of our consolidated balance sheets as of May 31, 2019 relative to May 31, 2018, was impacted by the U.S. Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (the Tax Act), which was effective for us in our third quarter of fiscal 2018. Information regarding our adoption and the impacts of the Tax Act are included in Notes 1 and 14 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report.

Impacts of Acquisitions

The comparability of our operating results in fiscal 2019 compared to fiscal 2018 was impacted by our recent acquisitions. In our discussion of changes in our results of operations from fiscal 2019 compared to fiscal 2018, we may qualitatively disclose the impact of our acquired products and services revenues (for the one-year period subsequent to the acquisition date) to certain of our businesses’ revenues where such qualitative discussions would be meaningful for an understanding of the factors that influenced the changes in our results of operations. When material, we may also provide quantitative disclosures related to such acquired products and services. Expense contributions from our recent acquisitions for each of the respective period comparisons may not be separately identifiable due to the integration of these businesses into our existing operations, and/or were insignificant to our results of operations during the periods presented.

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We caution readers that, while pre- and post-acquisition comparisons, as well as any quantified amounts themselves, may provide indications of general trends, any acquisition information that we provide has inherent limitations for the following reasons:

 

any qualitative and quantitative disclosures cannot specifically address or quantify the substantial effects attributable to changes in business strategies, including our sales force integration efforts. We believe that if our acquired companies had operated independently and sales forces had not been integrated, the relative mix of products and services sold would have been different; and

 

the amounts shown as cloud services and license support deferred revenues in our “Supplemental Disclosure Related to Certain Charges” (presented below) are not necessarily indicative of revenue improvements we will achieve upon contract renewals to the extent customers do not renew.

Presentation of Operating Segment Results and Other Financial Information

In our fiscal 2019 compared to fiscal 2018 results of operations discussion below, we provide an overview of our total consolidated revenues, total consolidated expenses and total consolidated operating margin, all of which are presented on a GAAP basis. We also present a GAAP-based discussion below for substantially all of the other expense items as presented in our consolidated statement of operations that are not directly attributable to our three businesses.

In addition, we discuss below the fiscal 2019 compared to fiscal 2018 results of each our three businesses—cloud and license, hardware and services—which are our operating segments as defined pursuant to ASC 280, Segment Reporting. The financial reporting for our three businesses that is presented below is presented in a manner that is consistent with that used by our CODMs. Our operating segment presentation below reflects revenues, direct costs and sales and marketing expenses that correspond to and are directly attributable to each of our three businesses. We also utilize these inputs to calculate and present a segment margin for each business in the discussion below.

Consistent with our internal management reporting processes, the below operating segment presentation includes revenues adjustments related to cloud services and license support contracts that would have otherwise been recorded by the acquired businesses as independent entities but were not recognized in our consolidated statements of operations for the periods presented due to business combination accounting requirements. Refer to “Supplemental Disclosure Related to Certain Charges” below for additional discussion of these items and Note 15 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report for a reconciliation of the summations of our total operating segment revenues as presented in the discussion below to total revenues as presented per our consolidated statements of operations for all periods presented.

In addition, research and development expenses, general and administrative expenses, stock-based compensation expenses, amortization of intangible assets, certain other expense allocations, acquisition related and other expenses, restructuring expenses, interest expense, non-operating income, net and provision for income taxes are not attributed to our three operating segments because our management does not view the performance of our three businesses including such items and/or it is impractical to do so. Refer to “Supplemental Disclosure Related to Certain Charges” below for additional discussion of certain of these items and Note 15 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report for a reconciliation of the summations of total segment margin as presented in the discussion below to total income before provision of income taxes as presented per our consolidated statements of operations for all periods presented.

A discussion regarding our financial condition and results of operations for fiscal 2019 compared to fiscal 2018 is presented below and the results for both fiscal 2019 and 2018 have been accounted for and presented to reflect our adoption of Topic 606 and ASU 2017-07, neither of which materially impacted our financial condition or results of operations for fiscal 2019 or 2018. A discussion regarding our financial condition and results of operations for fiscal 2018 compared to fiscal 2017 can be found under Item 7 in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended May 31, 2018, filed with the SEC on June 22, 2018, which is available free of charge on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov and our Investor Relations website at www.oracle.com/investor. Our consolidated

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financial statements for the fiscal years ended and as of May 31, 2018 and 2017 included elsewhere in this Annual Report have been retrospectively restated to reflect the adoption of Topic 606 and ASU 2017-07. The adoption of Topic 606 and ASU 2017-07 did not have a material impact on the comparability of our financial condition and results of operations for fiscal 2018 relative to fiscal 2017 as presented in Item 7 of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended May 31, 2018. Additional information regarding our adoption of Topic 606 and ASU 2017-07 is included in Note 1 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report.

Constant Currency Presentation

Our international operations have provided and are expected to continue to provide a significant portion of each of our businesses’ revenues and expenses. As a result, each businesses’ revenues and expenses and our total revenues and expenses will continue to be affected by changes in the U.S. Dollar against major international currencies. In order to provide a framework for assessing how our underlying businesses performed excluding the effects of foreign currency rate fluctuations, we compare the percent change in the results from one period to another period in this Annual Report using constant currency disclosure. To present this information, current and comparative prior period results for entities reporting in currencies other than U.S. Dollars are converted into U.S. Dollars at constant exchange rates (i.e., the rates in effect on May 31, 2018, which was the last day of our prior fiscal year) rather than the actual exchange rates in effect during the respective periods. For example, if an entity reporting in Euros had revenues of 1.0 million Euros from products sold on May 31, 2019 and 2018, our financial statements would reflect reported revenues of $1.11 million in fiscal 2019 (using 1.11 as the month-end average exchange rate for the period) and $1.16 million in fiscal 2018 (using 1.16 as the month-end average exchange rate for the period). The constant currency presentation, however, would translate the fiscal 2019 results using the fiscal 2018 exchange rate and indicate, in this example, no change in revenues during the period. In each of the tables below, we present the percent change based on actual, unrounded results in reported currency and in constant currency.

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Total Revenues and Operating Expenses

 

 

 

Year Ended May 31,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Percent Change

 

 

 

 

(Dollars in millions)

 

2019

 

 

Actual

 

Constant

 

2018

 

Total Revenues by Geography:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Americas

 

$

21,856

 

 

1%

 

2%

 

$

21,648

 

EMEA(1)

 

 

11,270

 

 

-1%

 

3%

 

 

11,409

 

Asia Pacific

 

 

6,380

 

 

1%

 

5%

 

 

6,326

 

Total revenues

 

 

39,506

 

 

0%

 

3%

 

 

39,383

 

Total Operating Expenses

 

 

25,971

 

 

-1%

 

2%

 

 

26,119

 

Total Operating Margin

 

$

13,535

 

 

2%

 

5%

 

$

13,264

 

Total Operating Margin %

 

34%

 

 

 

 

 

 

34%

 

% Revenues by Geography:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Americas

 

55%

 

 

 

 

 

 

55%

 

EMEA

 

29%

 

 

 

 

 

 

29%

 

Asia Pacific

 

16%

 

 

 

 

 

 

16%

 

Total Revenues by Business:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cloud and license

 

$

32,562

 

 

2%

 

4%

 

$

31,994

 

Hardware

 

 

3,704

 

 

-7%

 

-5%

 

 

3,994

 

Services

 

 

3,240

 

 

-5%

 

-2%

 

 

3,395

 

Total revenues

 

$

39,506

 

 

0%

 

3%

 

$

39,383

 

% Revenues by Business:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cloud and license

 

83%

 

 

 

 

 

 

81%

 

Hardware

 

9%

 

 

 

 

 

 

10%

 

Services

 

8%

 

 

 

 

 

 

9%

 

 

(1)

Comprised of Europe, the Middle East and Africa

Excluding the effects of currency rate fluctuations, our total revenues increased in fiscal 2019 relative to fiscal 2018 due to growth in our cloud and license revenues, partially offset by decreases in our hardware revenues and services revenues. The constant currency increase in our cloud and license revenues during fiscal 2019 relative to fiscal 2018 was attributable to growth in our cloud services and license support revenues as customers purchased our applications and infrastructure technologies via cloud deployment models and license deployment models and renewed their related cloud and license support contracts to continue to gain access to our latest technology and support services, and was also attributable to growth in our cloud license and on-premise license revenues. The constant currency decreases in our hardware revenues during fiscal 2019 relative to fiscal 2018 were due to a reduction in our hardware products revenues and hardware support revenues primarily due to the emphasis we placed on the marketing and sale of our cloud-based infrastructure technologies, which resulted in reduced sales volumes of certain of our hardware product lines and also impacted the volume of customers that purchased hardware support contracts. The constant currency decrease in our services revenues during fiscal 2019 relative to fiscal 2018 was attributable to declines in our consulting and education services revenues. In constant currency, the Americas, EMEA and Asia Pacific regions contributed 40%, 33% and 27%, respectively, to the growth in our fiscal 2019 total revenues.

Excluding the effects of currency rate fluctuations, our total operating expenses increased during fiscal 2019 relative to fiscal 2018 primarily due to higher expenses related to our cloud and license business, which resulted primarily from increased headcount and infrastructure expenses to support the increase in our cloud and license business’ revenues. This constant currency expense increase was partially offset by certain expense decreases in fiscal 2019 relative to fiscal 2018, primarily lower expenses related to our hardware business and lower restructuring expenses.

In constant currency, our total operating margin increased during fiscal 2019 relative to fiscal 2018 primarily due to the increase in revenues and total operating margin as a percentage of total revenues remained flat.

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Supplemental Disclosure Related to Certain Charges

To supplement our consolidated financial information, we believe that the following information is helpful to an overall understanding of our past financial performance and prospects for the future. You should review the introduction under “Impacts of Acquisitions” (above) for a discussion of the inherent limitations in comparing pre- and post-acquisition information.

Our operating results reported pursuant to GAAP included the following business combination accounting adjustments and expenses related to acquisitions and certain other expense and income items that affected our GAAP net income:

 

 

 

Year Ended May 31,

 

(in millions)

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

Cloud services and license support deferred revenues(1)

 

$

20

 

 

$

47

 

Acquired deferred sales commissions amortization(2)

 

 

 

 

 

(22

)

Amortization of intangible assets(3)

 

 

1,689

 

 

 

1,620

 

Acquisition related and other(4)(6)

 

 

44

 

 

 

52

 

Restructuring(5)

 

 

443

 

 

 

588

 

Stock-based compensation, operating segments(6)

 

 

518

 

 

 

505

 

Stock-based compensation, R&D and G&A(6)

 

 

1,135

 

 

 

1,101

 

Income tax effects(7)

 

 

(1,406

)

 

 

(1,431

)

Income tax reform(8)

 

 

(389

)

 

 

6,870

 

 

 

$

2,054

 

 

$

9,330

 

 

(1)

In connection with our acquisitions, we have estimated the fair values of the cloud services and license support contracts assumed. Due to our application of business combination accounting rules, we did not recognize the cloud services and license support revenue amounts as presented in the above table that would have otherwise been recorded by the acquired businesses as independent entities upon delivery of the contractual obligations. To the extent customers for which these contractual obligations pertain renew these contracts with us, we expect to recognize revenues for the full contracts’ values over the respective contracts’ renewal periods.

(2)

Certain acquired companies capitalized sales commissions associated with subscription agreements and amortized these amounts over the related contractual terms. Business combination accounting rules generally require us to eliminate these acquired capitalized sales commissions balances as of the acquisition date and our post-combination GAAP sales and marketing expenses generally do not reflect the amortization of these acquired deferred sales commissions balances. This adjustment is intended to include, and thus reflect, the full amount of amortization related to such balances as though the acquired companies operated independently in the periods presented.

(3)

Represents the amortization of intangible assets, substantially all of which were acquired in connection with our acquisitions. As of May 31, 2019, estimated future amortization related to intangible assets was as follows (in millions):

 

Fiscal 2020

 

$

1,583

 

Fiscal 2021

 

 

1,339

 

Fiscal 2022

 

 

1,090

 

Fiscal 2023

 

 

668

 

Fiscal 2024

 

 

440

 

Thereafter

 

 

159

 

Total intangible assets, net

 

$

5,279

 

(4)

Acquisition related and other expenses primarily consist of personnel related costs and stock-based compensation expenses for transitional and certain other employees, integration related professional services, certain business combination adjustments including certain adjustments after the measurement period has ended and certain other operating items, net.

(5)

Restructuring expenses during fiscal 2019 primarily related to employee severance in connection with our Fiscal 2019 Oracle Restructuring Plan (2019 Restructuring Plan). Restructuring expenses during fiscal 2018 primarily related to employee severance in connection with our Fiscal 2017 Oracle Restructuring Plan (2017 Restructuring Plan). Additional information regarding certain of our restructuring plans is provided in the discussion below under “Restructuring Expenses” and in Note 8 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report.

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(6)

Stock-based compensation was included in the following operating expense line items of our consolidated statements of operations (in millions):

 

 

 

Year Ended May 31,

 

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

Cloud services and license support

 

$

99

 

 

$

82

 

Hardware

 

 

10

 

 

 

10

 

Services

 

 

49

 

 

 

52

 

Sales and marketing

 

 

360

 

 

 

361

 

Stock-based compensation, operating segments

 

 

518

 

 

 

505

 

Research and development

 

 

963

 

 

 

921

 

General and administrative

 

 

172

 

 

 

180

 

Acquisition related and other

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

Total stock-based compensation

 

$

1,653

 

 

$

1,607

 

Stock-based compensation included in acquisition related and other expenses resulted from unvested stock options and restricted stock-based awards assumed from acquisitions whose vesting was accelerated generally upon termination of the employees pursuant to the terms of those stock options and restricted stock-based awards.

(7)

For fiscal 2019 and 2018, the applicable jurisdictional tax rates applied to our income before provision for income taxes after excluding the tax effects of items within the table above such as for stock-based compensation, amortization of intangible assets, restructuring, and certain other acquisition related items; after excluding the effects of income tax reform (see footnote (8) below); and, for fiscal 2019, after excluding a tax benefit arising from the increase of a deferred tax asset associated with a partial realignment of our legal structure; resulted in an effective tax rate of 18.5% and 20.8% in fiscal 2019 and 2018, respectively, instead of 9.7% and 71.1%, respectively, which represented our effective tax rates as derived per our consolidated statements of operations.

(8)

The income tax reform adjustments presented in the table above were due to the enactment of the Tax Act (refer to Note 1 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report), which was effective for us in fiscal 2018, and also due to subsequent income tax expense adjustments made pursuant to SAB 118 during fiscal 2019.

Cloud and License Business

Our cloud and license business engages in the sale, marketing and delivery of our applications and infrastructure technologies through various deployment models, including Oracle Cloud Services offerings, cloud license and on-premise license offerings and license support offerings. Oracle Cloud Services deliver certain of our applications and infrastructure technologies on a subscription basis via cloud-based deployment models that we develop, provide unspecified updates and enhancements for, host, manage, upgrade and support. Our cloud services revenues are generally recognized over the contractual term, which is generally one to three years, or in the case of usage model contracts, as the cloud services are consumed. Cloud license and on-premise license revenues represent fees earned from granting customers licenses, generally on a perpetual basis, to use our database and middleware and our applications software products within cloud and on-premise IT environments and are generally recognized upfront at the point in time when the software is made available to the customer to download and use. License support revenues are typically generated through the sale of license support contracts related to cloud licenses and on-premise licenses purchased and renewed by our customers at their option and are generally recognized as revenues ratably over the contractual term, which is generally one year. We continue to place significant emphasis, both domestically and internationally, on direct sales through our own sales force. We also continue to market certain of our offerings through indirect channels. Costs associated with our cloud and license business are included in cloud services and license support expenses, and sales and marketing expenses. These costs are largely personnel and infrastructure related including the cost of providing our cloud services and license support offerings, salaries and commissions earned by our sales force for the sale of our cloud and license offerings, and marketing program costs.

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Table of Contents

Index to Financial Statements

 

 

 

 

Year Ended May 31,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Percent Change

 

 

 

 

(Dollars in millions)

 

2019

 

 

Actual

 

Constant

 

2018

 

Cloud and License Revenues:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Americas(1)

 

$

18,410

 

 

2%

 

3%

 

$

18,030

 

EMEA(1)

 

 

9,168

 

 

0%

 

4%

 

 

9,163

 

Asia Pacific(1)

 

 

5,004

 

 

3%

 

7%

 

 

4,848

 

Total revenues(1)

 

 

32,582

 

 

2%

 

4%

 

 

32,041

 

Expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cloud services and license support(2)

 

 

3,597

 

 

5%

 

6%

 

 

3,441

 

Sales and marketing(2)

 

 

7,398

 

 

3%

 

5%

 

 

7,213

 

Total expenses(2)

 

 

10,995

 

 

3%

 

6%

 

 

10,654

 

Total Margin

 

$

21,587

 

 

1%

 

3%

 

$

21,387

 

Total Margin %

 

66%

 

 

 

 

 

 

67%

 

% Revenues by Geography:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Americas

 

57%

 

 

 

 

 

 

56%

 

EMEA

 

28%

 

 

 

 

 

 

29%

 

Asia Pacific

 

15%

 

 

 

 

 

 

15%

 

Revenues by Offerings:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cloud services and license support(1)

 

$

26,727

 

 

2%

 

4%

 

$

26,269

 

Cloud license and on-premise license

 

 

5,855

 

 

1%

 

4%

 

 

5,772

 

Total revenues(1)

 

$

32,582

 

 

2%

 

4%

 

$

32,041

 

Revenues by Ecosystem:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

App