10-Q 1 mlfb_10q.htm FORM 10-Q mlfb_10q.htm

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

_____________________

 

FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

x QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended October 31, 2018

 

Commission File Number: 000-51132

 

Major League Football, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware

 

20-1568059

(State or other jurisdiction of

Incorporation or Organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

 

 

7319 Riviera Cove #7

Lakewood Ranch, FL

 

34202

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (847) 924-4332

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x No ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes x No ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer or a non-accelerated filer. See definition of “accelerated filer and large accelerated filer” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act (check one).

 

Large accelerated filer

¨

Accelerated filer

¨

Non-accelerated filer

¨

Smaller Reporting Company

x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ¨ No x

 

The number of shares of the registrant’s common stock issued and outstanding as of January 9, 2019 is 69,819,160.

 

 
 
 
 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

Page

 

 

 

 

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

Financial Statements

 

F-1

 

 

 

 

Item 2.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

3

 

 

 

 

Item 4.

Controls and Procedures

 

4

 

 

 

 

PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

Legal Proceedings

 

9

 

 

 

 

Item 2.

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

 

10

 

 

 

 

Item 6.

Exhibits

 

11

 

 

 

2

 
 

 

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1.  Financial Statements 

 

MAJOR LEAGUE FOOTBALL, INC.

 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

October 31, 2018

 

(UNAUDITED)

 

CONTENTS

 

 

PAGE

 

 

 

 

BALANCE SHEETS

 

F-2

 

 

 

 

 

STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS (Unaudited)

 

F-3

 

 

 

STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (Unaudited)

 

F-4

 

 

 

 

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Unaudited)

 

F-5 – F-21

 

 

 
F-1
 

 

MAJOR LEAGUE FOOTBALL, INC.

BALANCE SHEETS

 

 

 

October 31,

2018

(Unaudited)

 

 

April 30,

2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSETS 

CURRENT ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash

 

$ 797

 

 

$ 525

 

Prepaid legal

 

 

7,500

 

 

 

7,500

 

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS

 

 

8,297

 

 

 

8,025

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT 

CURRENT LIABILITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$ 1,534,863

 

 

$ 1,603,062

 

Accounts payable - related parties

 

 

71,025

 

 

 

60,596

 

Accrued former officer compensation

 

 

740,000

 

 

 

740,000

 

Accrued expenses

 

 

281,264

 

 

 

271,841

 

State income taxes payable

 

 

110,154

 

 

 

110,154

 

Convertible unsecured promissory note

 

 

50,000

 

 

 

50,000

 

Convertible secured promissory notes, net of $49,754 debt discount

 

 

120,246

 

 

 

100,000

 

Conversion option liability

 

 

53,968

 

 

 

-

 

Notes payable

 

 

230,000

 

 

 

230,000

 

Notes payable, related parties

 

 

2,300

 

 

 

2,300

 

Accrued former officer payroll taxes

 

 

37,111

 

 

 

37,111

 

Accrued interest

 

 

127,368

 

 

 

106,421

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES

 

 

3,358,299

 

 

 

3,311,485

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (NOTE 6)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock, $0.001 par value, 200,000,000 shares authorized;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

59,819,160 and 57,999,488 shares issued and outstanding at

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 31, 2018 and April 30, 2018, respectively

 

 

58,819

 

 

 

57,999

 

Common stock issuable, 6,000,000 and zero shares at October 31, 2018 and

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 30, 2018, respectively

 

 

6,000

 

 

 

-

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

23,248,809

 

 

 

23,189,494

 

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(26,663,630 )

 

 

(26,550,953 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT

 

 

(3,350,002 )

 

 

(3,303,460 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT

 

$ 8,297

 

 

$ 8,025

 

 

See accompanying condensed notes to these unaudited financial statements.

 

 
F-2
 
Table of Contents

 

MAJOR LEAGUE FOOTBALL, INC.

STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(UNAUDITED)

 

 

 

For the Three Months Ended

 

 

For the Six Months Ended

 

 

 

October 31,

2018

 

 

October 31,

2017

 

 

October 31,

2018

 

 

October 31,

2017

 

Operating Expenses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salaries and wages

 

$ -

 

 

$ -

 

 

$ -

 

 

$ 900

 

Professional fees

 

 

31,250

 

 

 

130,886

 

 

 

60,882

 

 

 

156,011

 

General and administrative

 

 

7,903

 

 

 

4,555

 

 

 

12,210

 

 

 

49,801

 

Total Operating Expenses

 

 

39,153

 

 

 

135,441

 

 

 

73,092

 

 

 

206,712

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Loss

 

 

(39,153 )

 

 

(135,441 )

 

 

(73,092 )

 

 

(206,712 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Income (Expense)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tax penalties and interest

 

 

(4,748 )

 

 

(4,471 )

 

 

(9,424 )

 

 

(8,876 )

Write-off of furniture, fixtures and equipment

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(2,494 )

Other income

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

34,980

 

Interest expense

 

 

(31,079 )

 

 

(6,831 )

 

 

(51,193 )

 

 

(43,080 )

Initial fair value and gain from change in fair value of conversion option liability

 

 

122,105

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

21,032

 

 

 

-

 

Total Other Income (Expense)

 

 

86,278

 

 

 

(11,302 )

 

 

(39,585 )

 

 

(19,470 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net Income (Loss)

 

$ 47,125

 

 

$ (146,743 )

 

$ (112,677 )

 

$ (226,182 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic Net Income (Loss) Per Share

 

$ 0.00

 

 

$ (0.00 )

 

$ (0.00 )

 

$ (0.00 )

Diluted Net Income (Loss) Per Share

 

$ 0.00

 

 

$ (0.00 )

 

$ (0.00 )

 

$ (0.00 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted Average Shares - Basic

 

 

61,286,551

 

 

 

55,698,734

 

 

 

61,998,241

 

 

 

56,405,575

 

Weighted Average Shares - Diluted

 

 

86,388,659

 

 

 

55,698,734

 

 

 

61,998,241

 

 

 

56,405,575

 

 

See accompanying condensed notes to these unaudited financial statements.

 

 
F-3
 
Table of Contents

 

MAJOR LEAGUE FOOTBALL, INC.

STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(UNAUDITED)

 

 

 

For the Six Months Ended,

 

 

 

October 31,

2018

 

 

October 31,

2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$ (112,677 )

 

$ (226,182 )

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Write-off of furniture, fixtures and equipment

 

 

-

 

 

 

2,494

 

Issuance of common stock to employees for services

 

 

-

 

 

 

900

 

Revaluation of stock options issued for consulting services over service period

 

 

(3,865 )

 

 

8,165

 

Amortization of debt discount on convertible secured promissory note

 

 

30,246

 

 

 

-

 

Amortization of debt discount on stock warrant issued for forbearance agreement

 

 

-

 

 

 

11,829

 

Amortization of debt discount on common stock issued for forbearance agreement

 

 

-

 

 

 

12,384

 

Initial fair value of conversion option liability

 

 

39,132

 

 

 

-

 

Gain from change in fair value of conversion option liability

 

 

(60,164

)

 

 

-

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prepaid audit

 

 

-

 

 

 

(14,500 )

Prepaid consulting

 

 

-

 

 

 

83

 

Accounts payable

 

 

(68,199 )

 

 

165,140

 

Accounts payable - related parties

 

 

10,429

 

 

 

11,695

 

Accrued expenses

 

 

9,423

 

 

 

8,876

 

Accrued interest

 

 

20,947

 

 

 

18,867

 

Net cash used in operating activities

 

 

(134,728 )

 

 

(249 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from issuance of note payable

 

 

75,000

 

 

 

-

 

Proceeds from issuance of common stock

 

 

60,000

 

 

 

-

 

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

 

135,000

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH

 

 

272

 

 

 

(249 )

CASH - BEGINNING OF PERIOD

 

 

525

 

 

 

249

 

CASH - END OF PERIOD

 

$ 797

 

 

$ -

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF CASH FLOWS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CASH PAID FOR INCOME TAXES

 

$ -

 

 

$ -

 

CASH PAID FOR INTEREST

 

$ -

 

 

$ -

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NON-CASH INVESTING AND FINANCING ACTIVITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issuance of common stock to employees previously unvested

 

$ -

 

 

$ 8.165

 

Cashless exercise of stock warrant for consulting services from related party

 

$ -

 

 

$ 10,000

 

Conversion of convertible secured promissory note

 

$ 10,000

 

 

$ 70,000

 

 

See accompanying condensed notes to these unaudited financial statements.

 

 
F-4
 
Table of Contents

 

MAJOR LEAGUE FOOTBALL, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

October 31, 2018

 

NOTE 1- NATURE OF OPERATIONS, BASIS OF PRESENTATION, GOING CONCERN, AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Major League Football, Inc. (the “Company”) is seeking to establish, develop and operate MLFB as a professional spring/summer football league. Our anticipated launch is a training camp in March of 2019 with a regular eight team season commencing in late April of 2019 with playoffs and a championship game in July of 2019. In conjunction with the 2019 season, we intend to establish franchises in cities overlooked by existing professional sports leagues and provide fans with professional football in the NFL off-seasons, which will enable us to take a totally non-adversarial approach towards the National Football League (“NFL”). Our spring and early summer schedule ensures no direct competition with autumn/winter football, including the 32 NFL, 9 Canadian Football League, 627 NCAA, 91 NAIA, 142 JUCO’s, 27 Canadian Universities, and thousands of high school and collegiate institution teams.

 

Unless the context otherwise requires, all references to the “Company,” “we,” “our” or “us” and other similar terms collectively means Major League Football, Inc., a Delaware corporation. Our principal offices are presently located at 7319 Riviera Cove #7, Lakewood Ranch, Florida, 34202. Our telephone number is (847) 924-4332. Our Internet website, currently under construction, will be located at: www.mlfb.com.

 

Going Concern

 

The accompanying unaudited financial statements have been prepared assuming the Company will continue as a going concern. As reflected in the accompanying unaudited financial statements, the Company had no revenues and net cash used in operating activities of $134,278 and $249 for the six months ended October 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Additionally, at October 31, 2018, the Company has a working capital deficit of $3,350,002, an accumulated deficit of $26,663,630 and a stockholders' deficit of $3,350,002, which could have a material impact on the Company's financial condition and operations.

 

In view of these matters, recoverability of any asset amounts shown in the accompanying unaudited financial statements is dependent upon the Company’s ability to achieve a level of profitability. These matters raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern for a period of one year from the date of the filing of the Company’s Form 10-Q with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Since inception, the Company has financed its activities from the sale of equity securities and from loans. The Company intends on financing its future development activities and its working capital needs largely from the sale of public equity securities and convertible debt securities, until such time that funds provided by operations, if ever, are sufficient to fund working capital requirements. We expect we will require additional short-term financing as well as $20 million of financing over the next 12 months to position our Company for its anticipated launch in March of 2019, to cover our operating expenses for our 2019 full training camp and playing season in our designated cities. The unaudited financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability or classification of recorded assets and liabilities that might result should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

 
F-5
 
Table of Contents

 

MAJOR LEAGUE FOOTBALL, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

October 31, 2018

 

NOTE 1 – NATURE OF OPERATIONS AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The accompanying unaudited interim period financial statements of the Company are unaudited pursuant to certain rules and regulations of the SEC and include, in the opinion of management, all adjustments (consisting of only normal recurring accruals) necessary for a fair statement of the results of the periods indicated. Such results, however, are not necessarily indicative of results that may be expected for the full year. Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in the financial statements prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States have been condensed or omitted pursuant to such rules and regulations. The accompanying unaudited financial statements should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and notes thereto included in the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended April 30, 2018, as filed with the SEC on November 19, 2018. The interim operating results for the six months ending October 31, 2018 are not necessarily indicative of operating results expected for the full year.

 

SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying disclosures. Although these estimates are based on management’s best knowledge of current events and actions the Company may undertake in the future, actual results could differ from the estimates.

 

Significant estimates in the accompanying financial statements include the valuation of collateral on certain receivables, valuation of derivative liabilities, valuation of equity-based instruments issued for other than cash and valuation allowance on deferred tax assets.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

For purposes of the statement of cash flows, the Company considers all highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less when purchased to be cash equivalents. There were no cash equivalents at October 31, 2018 and April 30, 2018.

 

Concentrations

 

Concentration of Credit Risk

 

Certain financial instruments potentially subject the Company to concentrations of credit risk. These financial instruments consist primarily of cash. At October 31, 2018 and April 30, 2018, the Company did not have deposits with a financial institution that exceeded the FDIC deposit insurance coverage and determined that it had no cash equivalents.

 
 
F-6
 
Table of Contents

 

MAJOR LEAGUE FOOTBALL, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

October 31, 2018

 

NOTE 1 – NATURE OF OPERATIONS AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

 

Convertible Promissory Notes and Related Embedded Derivatives

 

We account for the embedded conversion option contained in convertible instruments under the provisions of FASB ASC Topic No. 815-40, “Derivatives and Hedging – Contracts in an Entity’s Own Stock”. The embedded conversion option contained in the convertible instruments were accounted for as derivative liabilities at the date of issuance and shall be adjusted to fair value through earnings at each reporting date. The fair value of the embedded conversion option derivatives was determined using the Binomial Option Pricing model. On the initial measurement date, the fair value of the embedded conversion option derivative was recorded as a derivative liability and was allocated as debt discount up to the proceeds of the notes with the remainder charged to current period operations as initial derivative expense. Any gains and losses recorded from changes in the fair value of the liability for derivative contract was recorded as a component of other income (expense) in the accompanying unaudited statements of operations.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

ASC 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. ASC 820 establishes a fair value hierarchy based on the level of independent, objective evidence surrounding the inputs used to measure fair value. A financial instrument’s categorization within the fair value hierarchy is based upon the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. ASC 820 prioritizes the inputs into three levels that may be used to measure fair value:

 

Level 1

Level 1 applies to assets or liabilities for which there are quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.

 

Level 2

Level 2 applies to assets or liabilities for which there are inputs other than quoted prices that are observable for the asset or liability such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets; quoted prices for identical assets or liabilities in markets with insufficient volume or infrequent transactions (less active markets); or model-derived valuations in which significant inputs are observable or can be derived principally from, or corroborated by, observable market data. If the asset or liability has a specified (contractual) term, the Level 2 input must be observable for substantially the full term of the asset or liability.

 

Level 3

Level 3 applies to assets or liabilities for which there are unobservable inputs to the valuation methodology that are significant to the measurement of the fair value of the assets or liabilities.

 

The Company’s financial instruments consist principally of cash, amounts receivable, accounts payable, unsecured convertible notes payable, secured convertible notes payable, notes payable, notes payable – related party and an embedded conversion option liability. Pursuant to ASC 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures and ASC 825, Financial Instruments, the Company believes that the recorded values of the other financial instruments approximate their current fair values because of their nature and respective maturity dates or durations.

 

Assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring/non-recurring basis consist of the following at October 31, 2018:

 

 

 

Carrying Value

 

 

 

 

 

At

October 31,

 

 

Fair Value Measurements at

October 31, 2018

 

 

 

2018

 

 

Level 1

 

 

Level 2

 

 

Level 3

 

Conversion option liability

 

$ 53,968

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$ 53,968

 

 
 
F-7
 
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MAJOR LEAGUE FOOTBALL, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

October 31, 2018

 

NOTE 1 – NATURE OF OPERATIONS AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

 

The following is a summary of activity of Level 3 assets and liabilities for the six months ended October 31, 2018:

 

Embedded Conversion Option Liability

 

 

 

Balance – April 30, 2018

 

$

 

Initial value of conversion option liability

 

 

114,132

 

Gain from change in the fair value of conversion option liability

 

 

(60,164 )

Balance – October 31, 2018

 

$ 53,968

 

 

Changes in fair value of the conversion option liability are included as a separate Other Income (Expense) item in the accompanying unaudited Statement of Operations.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

League Tryout Camps

 

The Company recognizes league tryout camp revenue on the dates that the tryout camps were held. There were no tryout camps held by the Company during the six months ended October 31, 2018 or 2017, respectively.

 

Football League Operations

 

The Company will recognize revenue from future football league operations including gate, parking and concessions, stadium advertising and merchandising, licensing fees, sponsorships, naming rights, broadcast and cable, franchise fees, social media and on-line digital media including merchandising, advertising and subscriptions. Since the football operations have not commenced, there was no revenue from football league operations during the six months ended October 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

 

Stock Based Compensation

 

Stock-based compensation is accounted for based on the requirements of the Share-Based Payment Topic of ASC 718 which requires recognition in the financial statements of the cost of employee and director services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments over the period the employee or director is required to perform the services in exchange for the award (presumptively, the vesting period). The ASC also requires measurement of the cost of employee and director services received in exchange for an award based on the grant-date fair value of the award.

 

Pursuant to ASC 505-50, for share-based payments to consultants and other third-parties, compensation expense is determined at the “measurement date.” The expense is recognized over the service period of the award. Until the measurement date is reached, the total amount of compensation expense remains uncertain. The Company initially records compensation expense based on the fair value of the award at the reporting date.

 

Net Loss per Share of Common Stock

 

The Company computes net earnings (loss) per share in accordance with ASC 260-10, “Earnings per Share.” ASC 260-10 requires presentation of both basic and diluted earnings per share (“EPS”) on the face of the income statement. Basic EPS is computed by dividing net income (loss) available to common stockholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted EPS gives effect to all dilutive potential common shares outstanding during the period and the Company’s diluted EPS excludes all dilutive potential common shares because their effect is anti-dilutive. At October 31, 2018, there were options to purchase 1,240,000 shares of the Company’s common stock, 3,732,500 warrants to purchase shares of the Company's common stock, 166,667 shares of the Company’s common stock reserved for issuance related to convertible unsecured notes payable and 26,190,476 shares of the Company’s common stock reserved for issuance related to convertible secured notes payable which may dilute future earnings per share.

 

 
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Table of Contents

 

MAJOR LEAGUE FOOTBALL, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

October 31, 2018

 

NOTE 1 – NATURE OF OPERATIONS AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

 

Related Parties

 

Parties are considered to be related to the Company if the parties, directly or indirectly, through one or more intermediaries, control, are controlled by, or are under common control with the Company. Related parties also include principal owners of the Company, its management, members of the immediate families of principal owners of the Company and its management and other parties with which the Company may deal with if one party controls or can significantly influence the management or operating policies of the other to an extent that one of the transacting parties might be prevented from fully pursuing its own separate interests. The Company discloses all related party transactions. All transactions are recorded at fair value of the goods or services exchanged.

 

NOTE 2 – DEBT

 

 

 

October 31,

2018

 

 

April 30,

 2018

 

Notes Payable:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note payable – January 6, 2016. Interest at 8% and principal payable on demand.

 

$

100,000

 

 

$ 100,000

 

Note payable – June 6, 2016. Interest at 4% and principal payable on demand.

 

 

10,000

 

 

 

10,000

 

Note payable – August 4, 2016. Interest at 8% and principal payable on demand.

 

 

35,000

 

 

 

35,000

 

Note payable – September 27, 2016. Interest at 4% and principal payable on demand.

 

 

30,000

 

 

 

30,000

 

Note payable – September 29, 2016. Interest at 4% and principal payable on demand.

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

5,000

 

Note payable – September 29, 2016. Interest at 4% and principal payable on demand.

 

 

30,000

 

 

 

30,000

 

Note payable – October 3, 2016. Interest at 4% and principal payable on demand.

 

 

20,000

 

 

 

20,000

 

Total Notes payable

 

$ 230,000

 

 

$ 230,000

 

 

On January 6, 2016, the Company received $100,000 of proceeds from the issuance of a promissory note and recorded as Note Payable. The terms of the promissory note include interest accrued at 8% annually and the principal and interest payable on demand. Through October 31, 2018, the Company has accrued $20,693 of interest related to the promissory note and included in accrued interest in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet.

 

On June 6, 2016, the Company received $10,000 of proceeds from the issuance of a promissory note and recorded as Note Payable. The terms of the promissory note include interest accrued at 4% annually and the principal and interest payable on demand. Through October 31, 2018, the Company has accrued $963 of interest related to the promissory note and included in accrued interest in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet.

 

On August 4, 2016, the Company received $130,000 of proceeds from the issuance of a promissory note and recorded as Note Payable. The terms of the promissory note include interest accrued at 8% annually and the principal and interest payable on demand. On (1) January 26, 2017, (2) February 16, 2017, (3) March 2, 2017 and (4) March 6, 2017, the Company repaid (1) $25,000, (2) $25,000 and (3) $20,000 and (4) $25,000 of principal and the outstanding balance of the promissory note is $35,000 at October 31, 2018. Through October 31,2018, the Company has accrued $9,446 of interest related to the promissory note and included in accrued interest in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet.

 

On September 27, 2016, the Company received $30,000 of proceeds from the issuance of a promissory note and recorded as Note Payable. The terms of the promissory note include interest accrued at 4% annually and the principal and interest payable on demand. Through October 31, 2018, the Company has accrued $2,515 of interest related to the promissory note and included in accrued interest in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet.

 

On September 29, 2016, the Company received $5,000 of proceeds from the issuance of a promissory note and recorded as Note Payable. The terms of the promissory note include interest accrued at 4% annually and the principal and interest payable on demand. Through October 31, 2018, the Company has accrued $418 of interest related to the promissory note and included in accrued interest in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet.

 
 
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MAJOR LEAGUE FOOTBALL, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

October 31, 2018

 

NOTE 2 – DEBT (CONTINUED)

 

On September 29, 2016, the Company received $30,000 of proceeds from the issuance of a promissory note and recorded as Note Payable. The terms of the promissory note include interest accrued at 4% annually and the principal and interest payable on demand. Through October 31, 2018, the Company has accrued $2,509 of interest related to the promissory note and included in accrued interest in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet.

 

On October 3, 2016, the Company received $20,000 of proceeds from the issuance of a promissory note and recorded as Note Payable. The terms of the promissory note include interest accrued at 4% annually and the principal and interest payable on demand. Through October 31, 2018, the Company has accrued $1,663 of interest related to the promissory note and included in accrued interest in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet.

 

 

 

October 31,

2018

 

 

April 30,

2018

 

Notes Payable, Related Party:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes payable, related party. Seven (7) separate loans beginning on February 11, 2015 with last loan on August 28, 2015. No interest and principal payable on demand.

 

$ 2,300

 

 

$ 2,300

 

 

From February to July 2015, an officer of the Company provided $15,300 of funds for working capital requirements. There is no formal agreement and no interest is being accrued by the Company with the principal due on demand. During the three months ending October 31, 2015, the Company repaid $15,000 of these funds leaving a balance outstanding of $300. Additionally, on August 28, 2015, the officer personally repaid $20,000 of notes payable (see below). As a result, the outstanding balance owed to the officer was $20,300 at April 30, 2016. On (1) January 17, 2017, (2) February 1, 2017 and (3) February 2, 2017, the Company repaid (1) $5,000, (2) $2,000 and (3) $11,000 of principal and the outstanding balance of the note payable is $2,300 at October 31, 2018, recorded as Notes Payable – Related Parties in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet. See Note 5 – Related Party Transactions.

 

 

 

October 31,

2018

 

 

April 30,

2018

 

Convertible Unsecured Notes Payable:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unsecured convertible promissory note payable – Interest accrued at 5% and principal and interest due 12 months from the issuance date.

 

$ 50,000

 

 

$ 50,000

 

 

On April 14, 2016, the Company received $50,000 of proceeds from the issuance of an unsecured convertible promissory note for working capital purposes. The terms include interest accrued at 5% annually and the principal and interest payable in one year on April 14, 2017. The note holder at its sole discretion, has the right to convert the principal amount, along with all accrued interest, into shares of the Company’s common stock at the conversion price of $0.30 per share. Through October 31, 2018, the Company has accrued $6,376 of interest related to the unsecured convertible promissory note and included in accrued interest in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet. The unsecured convertible promissory note is in default at October 31, 2018 and the note holder has several remedies including calling the principal amount and accrued interest due and payable immediately.

 

 

 

October 31,

2018

 

 

April 30,

2018

 

Convertible Secured Note Payable:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Secured convertible promissory note payable – originally issued March 9, 2016 - Interest accrued at 22% default rate - principal and interest due June 9, 2017

 

$ 90,000

 

 

$ 100,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Secured convertible promissory note payable – originally issued May 17, 2018 - Interest accrued at 8% - principal and interest due May 17, 2019

 

 

80,000

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Less: debt discount

 

 

(49,754 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Convertible Secured Notes Payable, net of debt discount

 

$ 120,246

 

 

$ 100,000

 

 

 
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MAJOR LEAGUE FOOTBALL, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

October 31, 2018

 

NOTE 2 – DEBT (CONTINUED)

 

Convertible Secured Note Payable - #1

 

On March 9, 2016 (the Original Issue Date (OID), the Company received $445,000 of net proceeds for working capital purposes from the issuance of a $550,000 face value convertible secured promissory note with debt issue costs paid to or on behalf of the lender of $55,000. The terms include interest accrued at 10% annually and the principal and interest payable are payable in one year on March 9, 2017. Any amount of the principal or interest which is not paid when due shall bear Interest at the rate of the lower of Twenty-Two Percent (22%) per annum, or the highest rate permitted by law, from the due date thereof until the same is paid. At October 31, 2018, $80,908 of accrued interest was recorded in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet.

 

The lender has the right at any time after the effective date, at its election, to convert all or part of the outstanding and unpaid principal sum and accrued interest into shares of common stock of the Company, subject to certain conversion limitations set forth in the promissory note and certain price protection described below, as per the conversion formula: Number of shares receivable upon conversion equals the dollar conversion amount divided by the Conversion Price. The Conversion Price is equal to seventy percent (70%) of the average of the lowest three VWAPs of the Common Stock during the twenty (20) Trading Days immediately preceding a Conversion Date. The promissory note contains customary affirmative and negative covenants of the Company. The Conversion Price is subject to “full ratchet” and other customary anti-dilution protections.

 

As collateral security, the promissory note is secured by all collateral granted by a former officer of the Company to the Holder, including but not limited to two million (2,000,000) shares of Common Stock, in accordance with the terms and conditions of a Pledge Agreement by and between the former officer and the lender, dated as of the OID.

 

The Company evaluated the secured convertible promissory note and the related warrants in accordance with ASC 815 “Derivatives and Hedging” and due to the price protection in the promissory note, determined that there was a conversion option feature that should be bifurcated and accounted for as a derivative liability in the balance sheet at fair value. The initial valuation and recording of this derivative liability was $929,577 using the Binomial Lattice Option Pricing Model with the following assumptions; stock price $0.93, conversion price $0.47, expected term of 1 year, expected volatility of 247% and discount rate of 0.30%. The initial $929,577 derivative liability assumed that 1,161,972 shares would be issued upon conversion of the promissory note.

 

The Company evaluated the warrants and determined that there was no embedded conversion feature as the warrants contained a set exercise price with an adjustment only based upon customary items including stock dividends and splits, subsequent rights offerings and pro rata distributions. The Company calculated the relative fair value between the note and the warrants on the issue date utilizing the Black Scholes Pricing Model for the warrants. As a result, the Company allocated $239,069 to the warrants and was recorded as a debt discount with an offset to additional paid in capital in the accompanying financial statements. The warrant fair value calculation used the following assumptions; stock price $0.93, Class A warrant exercise price $1.02, Class B warrant exercise $1.19, expected term of 3 years, expected volatility of 287% and discount rate of 0.30%.

 

On the note issue date of March 9, 2016, the Company recorded the following debt discounts as offsets to the $550,000 note payable and were amortized over the one-year term of the note: (1) OID of $50,000, (2) debt issue costs of $55,000, (3) warrant fair value of $239,069 and (4) conversion option liability of $205,931.

 

On (1) September 13, 2016, (2) September 30, 2016 and (3) October 26, 2016, the lender elected to exercise their right to convert $15,000 on each of the above dates or a total conversion amount of $45,000 of the principal balance and the note payable balance was $505,000 at October 31, 2016.

 

On (1) February 1, 2017, (2) February 6, 2017, (3) February 8, 2017, (4) February 14, 2017, (5) February 21, 2017, (6) March 7, 2017, (7) March 9, 2017, (8) March 13, 2017, (9) March 15, 2017, (10) March 28, 2017 and (11) April 12, 2017, the lender elected to exercise their right to convert on each of the above dates for an aggregate total conversion amount of $185,000 of the principal balance and the note payable balance was $170,000 at April 30, 2017.

 
 
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MAJOR LEAGUE FOOTBALL, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

October 31, 2018

 

NOTE 2 – DEBT (CONTINUED)

 

On (1) November 2, 2016, (2) November 15, 2016, (3) December 13, 2016, (4) December 16, 2016, (5) December 23, 2016, (6) December 29, 2016, (7) January 6, 2017, (8) January 12, 2017, (9) January 23, 2017 and (10) January 24, 2017, the lender elected to exercise their right to convert on each of the above dates for an aggregate total conversion amount of $150,000 of the principal balance and the note payable principal balance.

 

The one-year term of the note matured on March 9, 2017 and the original debt discounts recorded as offsets to the note were amortized in full including: (1) OID of $50,000, (2) debt issue costs of $55,000, (3) warrant fair value of $239,069 and (4) conversion option liability of $205,931.

 

The Company evaluated the conversion option liability at April 30, 2017 and determined that the embedded feature qualifies for the exception from derivative accounting pursuant to ASC 815-10-15-74(a) because the Company has subsequently increased its number of authorized and unissued shares sufficient to cover the settlement of the embedded feature.

 

For the year ended April 30, 2017, the Company recorded $471,643 for amortization of the four debt discounts discussed above to interest expense in the accompanying unaudited Statement of Operations.

 

On March 9, 2017, the Company and the Lender of the above convertible secured promissory note with a remaining principal balance of $215,000 on that date, executed a forbearance agreement extending the note expiration date from March 9, 2017 to June 9, 2017. The terms of the forbearance agreement included that the Company (1) will have paid all remaining principal and accrued interest by June 9, 2017, (2) will issue 500,000 shares of common stock to the lender, (3) will pay the lender’s legal fees estimated to be approximately $2,000 before April 30, 2017, (4) will issue the lender 500,000 warrants to purchase common stock at $0.10 per share with a three-year term and (5) the outstanding principal balance of the note will bear interest at the “Default Interest” rate of twenty-two percent (22%), as defined in the note agreement.

 

The Company evaluated the forbearance agreement as to whether it was an extinguishment or modification of debt. In concluding on the accounting, the Company evaluated ASC 470-50, Debtor’s Accounting for a Modification or Exchange of Debt Instruments. The Company determined that the forbearance agreement was not an extinguishment of debt or a material modification. The Company adjusted the carrying amount of the debt for any discount, including stock and warrant issuances, and was amortized over the modification period of three months through June 9, 2017 as described below.

 

The Company evaluated the warrant and determined that there was no derivative treatment required as the warrant contained a fixed exercise price with an adjustment only based upon customary items including stock dividends and splits, subsequent rights offerings and pro rate distributions. The Company calculated the relative fair value between the outstanding principal of the note ($215,000) and the warrant on March 9, 2017 utilizing the Black Scholes Pricing Model for the warrant. The Company allocated $28,015 to the warrant which was recorded as a debt discount with an offset to additional paid in capital in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet.

 

The Company valued the 500,000 shares of common stock issued to the lender based upon the quoted market price of $0.08 on March 9, 2017, the date of grant, or $40,000, recorded as a debt discount with an offset to additional paid in capital.

 

In total on the forbearance date of March 9, 2017, the Company recorded the following debt discounts as offsets to the note which were amortized over the 90-day term of the forbearance agreement through June 9, 2017: (1) warrant relative fair value of $28,015 and (2) common stock relative fair value effective March 9, 2017. From March 9, 2017 through April 30, 2017, the Company recorded amortization of the debt discount to interest expense in the amounts of (1) $16,187 against the warrant relative fair value of $28,015 and (2) $16,947 against the common stock relative fair value. At April 30, 2017, the remaining combined warrant and stock unamortized debt discount was $24,213 and classified as an offset to the $170,000 note balance.

 

From May 1, 2017 through April 30, 2018, the Company recorded amortization of the remaining debt discount of $24,213 to interest expense in the accompanying unaudited Statement of Operations in amounts of (1) $11,829 against the warrant relative fair value $12,384 against the common stock relative fair value. As a result, the debt discount was amortized in full at April 30, 2018.

 

 
F-12
 
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MAJOR LEAGUE FOOTBALL, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

October 31, 2018

 

NOTE 2 – DEBT (CONTINUED)

 

From March 9, 2016 through April 30, 2017, the lender elected to convert $380,000 of the principal amount of the note into 5,409,226 shares of common stock resulting in a note balance of $170,000 at April 30, 2017. From May 1, 2017 through April 30, 2018, the lender elected to convert $70,000 of the principal amount of the note into 2,168,193 shares of common stock resulting in a note balance of $100,000 at April 30, 2018. On May 18, 2018, the lender elected to convert $10,000 of the principal amount of the note into 819,672 shares of common stock resulting in a note balance of $90,000 at October 31, 2018.

 

The promissory note was due and payable on June 9, 2017 and as a result, is in default at October 31, 2018. However, the lender has not notified the Company of the default in writing but, the lender has several remedies including calling the principal amount and accrued interest due and payable immediately.

 

The promissory note includes customary affirmative and negative covenants of the Company and at October 31, 2018, the Company is in default of a covenant to (1) be quoted or listed on at least one of the OTC Markets (OTCQX, OTCQB or OTC-Pink) or an equivalent replacement exchange, the Nasdaq National Market, the Nasdaq Small-Cap Market, the New York Stock Exchange, or the American Stock Exchange and (2) the Company shall be in compliance with (as “current”), or otherwise comply with the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act. On January 8, 2019, the Company received a waiver from the lender for these items through March 31, 2019 and is no longer in default of these specific items.

 

Convertible Secured Note Payable - #2

 

On May 17, 2018, the Company received $75,000 of net proceeds for working capital purposes from the issuance of a $80,000 face value convertible secured promissory note with debt issue costs paid to or on behalf of the lender of $5,000. The terms include interest accrued at 8% annually and the principal and interest payable are payable in one year on May 17, 2019. Any amount of the principal or interest which is not paid when due shall bear Interest at the rate of Eighteen Percent (18%), from the due date thereof until the same is paid.

 

The lender has the right at any time after the effective date, at its election, to convert all or part of the outstanding and unpaid principal sum and accrued interest into shares of common stock of the Company, subject to certain conversion limitations set forth in the promissory note and certain price protection described below, as per the conversion formula: Number of shares receivable upon conversion equals the dollar conversion amount divided by the Conversion Price. The Conversion Price is equal to Sixty Percent (60%) of the of the lowest trade of the Common Stock during the ten (10) trading Days immediately preceding a conversion date. The Conversion Price is subject to “full ratchet” and other customary anti-dilution protections.

 

The promissory note includes customary affirmative and negative covenants of the Company and at October 31, 2018, the Company is in default of a covenant to (1) be quoted on or before July 17, 2018 or listed on at least one of the OTC Markets (OTCQX, OTCQB or OTC-Pink) or an equivalent replacement exchange, the Nasdaq National Market, the Nasdaq Small-Cap Market, the New York Stock Exchange, or the American Stock Exchange and (2) after July 17, 2018, the Company shall be in compliance with (as “current”), or otherwise comply with the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act. On January 8, 2019, the Company received a waiver from the lender for these items through March 31, 2019 and is no longer in default.

 

The Company evaluated the secured convertible promissory note in accordance with ASC 815 “Derivatives and Hedging” and due to the price protection in the promissory note, determined that there was a conversion option feature that should be bifurcated and accounted for as a conversion option liability in the balance sheet at fair value. The initial valuation and recording of the conversion option liability was $114,132, using the Binomial Lattice Option Pricing Model with the following assumptions; stock price $0.02, conversion price $0.012, expected term of 1 year, expected volatility of 263% and discount rate of 0.82%. The initial $114,132 conversion option liability assumed that 6,666,667 shares would be issued upon conversion of the promissory note.

 

On the note issue date of May 17, 2018, the Company recorded the following debt discounts as offsets to the $80,000 promissory note and will be amortized over the one-year term of the promissory note: (1) debt issue costs of $5,000 and (2) debt discount from conversion option liability of $75,000. As a result, the Company recorded $39,132 for the initial fair value of the conversion option liability in Other Income (Expense) in the accompanying unaudited Statement of Operations.

 
 
F-13
 
Table of Contents

 

MAJOR LEAGUE FOOTBALL, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

October 31, 2018

 

NOTE 2 – DEBT (CONTINUED)

 

For the period from the note issue date of May 17, 2018 to October 31, 2018, the Company recorded $30,246 for amortization of the debt discounts discussed above and recorded to interest expense in the accompanying unaudited Statement of Operations.

 

The Company performed a revaluation of the conversion option liability using the Binomial Lattice Pricing Model at October 31, 2018 that resulted in a calculated value of $53,968. As a result, the Company recorded $21,032 of income for the change in the fair value of conversion option liability, and recorded in Other Income (Expense) in in the accompanying unaudited Statement of Operations.

 

The revaluation of the conversion option liability at October 31, 2018 was calculated using the Binomial Lattice option pricing model with the following assumptions; stock price $0.01, conversion price $0.006, expected term of 0.50 years, expected volatility of 326% and discount rate of 2.29%. The change in the conversion option liability assumed that 13,333,333 shares would be issued upon conversion of the promissory note at October 31, 2018.

 

NOTE 3 – STOCK

 

Common Stock:

 

The Company is authorized to issue up to 200,000,000 shares of common stock at $0.001 par value per share. Effective August 23, 2018, the Company amended its Articles of Incorporation such that all 200,000,000 shares shall be designated as common stock and the prior authorized designated 50,000,000 shares of convertible preferred stock, par value $0.001 per share were converted to common stock. As a result, the Company has no authorized preferred stock. At October 31, 2018, 59,819,160 shares were issued and outstanding. Additionally, there are 1,500,000 shares of stock issued to former officers that were terminated prior to the vesting period of four years through July 14, 2018 and excluded from the shares issued and outstanding at October 31, 2018. In accordance with their employment agreements, if the Employee’s employment is terminated by Employee or the Company, any shares not yet released to Employee upon the termination date shall be returned to the treasury of the Company, and Employee shall be entitled to no compensation for such shares. The Company plans to pursue the return of the 1,500,000 unvested shares held by the employees to be returned to treasury.

 

Common Stock Issued

 

On July 18, 2018, the lender of a convertible secured promissory, elected to exercise their right to convert $10,000 of the remaining $100,000 convertible secured promissory note at April 30, 2018 (See Note 2 – Debt). The lender has the right at any time after the effective date, at its election, to convert all or part of the outstanding and unpaid principal sum and accrued interest into shares of common stock of the Company, subject to certain conversion limitations set forth in the promissory note and certain price protection described below, as per the conversion formula: Number of shares receivable upon conversion equals the dollar conversion amount divided by the Conversion Price. The Conversion Price is equal to seventy percent (70%) of the average of the lowest three VWAPs of the Common Stock during the twenty (20) Trading Days immediately preceding a Conversion Date. Based upon the calculated Conversion Price of $0.02 per share on the conversion date, the Company issued 819,672 shares of common stock to the lender.

 

Common Stock Issuable

 

On June 8, 2018, the Company received $10,000 of proceeds from a private placement offering, representing 1,000,000 shares of stock at a sales price of $0.01 per share. However, the underlying common stock had not been issued by the transfer agent and was recorded as Common Stock Issuable in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet at October 31, 2018.

 

On October 5, 2018, the Company received $50,000 of proceeds from a private placement offering, representing 5,000,000 shares of stock at a sales price of $0.01 per share. However, the underlying common stock had not been issued by the transfer agent and was recorded as Common Stock Issuable in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet at October 31, 2018.

 
 
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MAJOR LEAGUE FOOTBALL, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

October 31, 2018

 

NOTE 4 – STOCK BASED COMPENSATION

 

Stock Options to Consultants

 

Effective July 14, 2014, the Company granted 4,150,000 stock options to purchase common stock to consultants pursuant to the 2014 Plan and shall vest pursuant to the vesting provision contained in each of the stock option agreements. The exercise price of the stock options is $0.05 per share. At April 30, 2018, only 1,200,000 of these options were outstanding and were held by the Senior Executive Vice President of the Company as the other stock options were either forfeited or terminated since being granted. For the 1,200,000 stock options held by the Senior Vice President of the Company, 450,000 vested on the grant date of July 14, 2014 and the remaining 750,000 had a four (4) year vesting period through July 14, 2018.

 

The 750,000 unvested stock options held by the Senior Executive Vice President of the Company were re-measured for the final time at July 14, 2018 (fully vested) and the Company recorded $3,865 as a credit to consulting expense during the six months ended October 31, 2018 in the accompanying unaudited Statement of Operations.

 

The Company used the following assumptions in estimating fair value:

 

Stock Price (re-measurement date of July 14, 2018)

 

$ 0.02

 

Exercise Price

 

$ 0.05

 

Expected Remaining Term

 

5.95 years

 

Volatility

 

 

82 %

Annual Rate of Quarterly Dividends

 

 

0.00 %

Risk Free Interest Rate

 

 

1.94 %

 

The following table summarizes employee and consultant stock option activity of the Company for the six months ended October 31, 2018:

 

 

 

Stock Options Outstanding

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted

 

 

Average

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Average

 

 

Remaining

 

 

Aggregate

 

 

 

Number of

 

 

Exercise

 

 

Contractual

 

 

Intrinsic

 

 

 

Options

 

 

Price

 

 

Life (Years)

 

 

Value

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outstanding, April 30, 2018

 

 

1,240,000

 

 

$ 0.08

 

 

 

6.04

 

 

$

 

No activity

 

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

$

 

Outstanding, October 31, 2018

 

 

1,240,000

 

 

$ 0.08

 

 

 

5.53

 

 

$

 

Exercisable, October 31, 2018

 

 

1,240,000

 

 

$ 0.08

 

 

 

5.53

 

 

$

 

 

In August 2018, 1,800,000 warrants expired as they were not exercised before the end of the exercise period.

 

The following table summarizes stock warrants activity of the Company for the six months ended October 31, 2018:

 

 

 

Stock Warrants Outstanding

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted

 

 

Average

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Average

 

 

Remaining

 

 

Aggregate

 

 

 

Number of

 

 

Exercise

 

 

Contractual

 

 

Intrinsic

 

 

 

Warrants

 

 

Price

 

 

Life (Years)

 

 

Value

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outstanding, April 30, 2018

 

 

5,532,500

 

 

$ 0.25

 

 

 

0.70

 

 

$ 116,000

 

Expired August 2018

 

 

(1,800,000 )

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

$

 

Outstanding, October 31, 2018

 

 

3,732,500

 

 

$ 0.30

 

 

 

0.62

 

 

$ 1,500

 

Exercisable, October 31, 2018

 

 

3,732,500

 

 

$ 0.30

 

 

 

0.62

 

 

$ 1,500

 

 
 
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MAJOR LEAGUE FOOTBALL, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

October 31, 2018

 

NOTE 5 – RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

At October 31, 2018, the Company has accrued $740,000 for unpaid former officer compensation and accrued $37,111 for the employers share of payroll taxes related to the unpaid former officer compensation in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet. The accrued compensation is related to two former officers and the Company believes that because of the termination of all officers, there is no employment agreement or compensation due to the former officers.

 

At October 31, 2018, the Company has a $2,300 remaining unpaid balance on a promissory note due to a former officer that originally $15,300 of funds for working capital requirements. There is no formal agreement and no interest is being accrued by the Company with the principal due on demand. The Company is classified the promissory note as Notes Payable – Related Parties in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet. See Note 2 – Debt.

 

At October 31, 2018, the Company has recorded $71,025 of accounts payable – related parties for Company related expenses. This includes $46,775 paid by the Senior Executive Vice President on behalf of the Company, $19,758 paid by the Director of Services and Procurement on behalf of the Company, $1,815 paid by the Company’s former authorized house counsel on behalf of the Company and $125 paid by a former officer of the Company on behalf of the Company. The $46,775 owed to the Senior Vice President of the Company includes a reduction of $10,000 on December 10, 2017 from the exercise of 1,000,000 stock warrants at an exercise price of $0.01 per share. The Senior Executive Vice President paid for the exercise price of $10,000 by electing to reduce the balance due under outstanding expenses owed by the Company.

 

NOTE 6 – COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

Office Lease

 

On July 31, 2015, the Company executed a lease agreement for its new corporate headquarters and training facility in Lakewood Ranch, Manatee County, Florida. The term of the lease is two (2) years at a monthly rental rate of $11,918. At closing, the Company paid an $11,918 security deposit, which was originally recorded as a deposit by the Company.

 

On June 2, 2016, the Company received a notice of default letter related to the corporate office lease in Florida. The letter demanded payment for the full amount outstanding within seven days or the Landlord may pursue all legal remedies including termination of the lease. On June 22, 2016, the Company received a complaint notice as the defendant in a lawsuit filed related to the corporate office lease in Florida.

 

On August 5, 2016, the Company paid $100,000 for the settlement of the lawsuit filed by the landlord and discussed above. The $100,000 payment was for outstanding rent of $98,173, which included $3,699 in attorney’s fees and the August 1, 2016 rent.

 

On August 28, 2017, the Company was served with a Motion for Final Judgment. The Landlord filed a Motion for Summary Judgment for back rent, attorney’s fees and foreclosure of a Landlord’s Lien. The Company responded, and the court granted the Motion as to liability for back rent without assessing an amount and denied the remainder of the Motion. As second Motion for Summary Judgment was filed as to the remaining issues. While pending, the parties reached a settlement on February 5, 2018. The terms of the settlement agreement included:

 

 

1.

The Company immediately gives up all right, title and interest to business equipment and office furniture in the premises;

 

2.

The Company immediately gives up all right, title and interest to its deposit in the sum of $11,918;

 

3.

The landlord will continue to store the Company’s football equipment until June 7, 2018;

 

4.

The Company will pay the landlord $40,000 on June 1, 2018 by TCA $40,000;

 

5.

If the Company makes the required $40,000 payment, then it will be entitled to possession of all its football equipment free of any landlord encumbrance and;

 

6.

If the Company fails to make the $40,000 payment, it shall relinquish all right, title and interest in the football equipment to the landlord.

 

 
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MAJOR LEAGUE FOOTBALL, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

October 31, 2018

 

NOTE 6 – COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

Effective May 31, 2018, the landlord and the Company executed a first amendment to the February 5, 2018 settlement discussed above which specified:

 

 

a. In lieu of making the payment of $40,000 on June 1, 2018, the Company will pay the landlord a $5,000 installment of the $40,000 payment on June 4, 2018;

 

b. The Company will pay the landlord $503 on June 4, 2018, as reimbursement for an additional month of storage space rental; and

 

c. The Company will pay the landlord the $35,000 balance of the original $40,000 payment on or before June 30, 2018.

 

If the Company fails timely to make any payment specified above, the Company unconditionally and irrevocably transfers all right, title and interest in and to the football equipment in landlord’s possession and landlord may immediately dispose of same as it chooses.

 

On June 4, 2018, the Company made the required $5,000 installment of the $40,000 payment and the $503 reimbursement for an additional month of storage space rental.

 

Effective June 28, 2018, the landlord and the Company executed a second amendment to the February 5, 2018 settlement discussed above which specified:

 

 

d. In lieu of making the payment of $35,000 on June 30, 2018, the Company paid the landlord a $5,000 installment of the $35,000 payment on June 29, 2018;

 

e. The Company paid the landlord $503 on June 29, 2018, as reimbursement for an additional month of storage space rental; and

 

f. The Company will pay the landlord the $30,000 balance of the original $40,000 payment on or before July 31, 2018.

 

Effective July 31, 2018, the landlord and the Company executed a third amendment to the February 5, 2018 settlement discussed above, as modified by the second amendment dated June 28, 2018, which specified:

 

 

g. In lieu of making the payment of $30,000 on July 31, 2018, the Company paid the landlord a $1,000 installment of the $30,000 payment on August 10, 2018;

 

h. The Company paid the landlord $503 on August 10, 2018, as reimbursement for an additional month of storage space rental; and

 

i. The Company will pay the landlord the $29,000 balance of the original $40,000 payment on or before August 15, 2018.

 

Effective September 21, 2018, the landlord and the Company executed a fourth amendment to the February 5, 2018 settlement discussed above, as modified by the second amendment dated June 28, 2018 and the third amendment dated July 31, 2018, which specified:

 

 

a. In lieu of making the remaining balance payment of $29,000 on August 15, 2018, the Company paid the landlord a $1,000 installment of the $29,000 payment on September 21, 2018;

 

b. The Company paid the landlord $503 on September 21, 2018, as reimbursement for an additional month of storage space rental; and

 

c. The Company will pay the landlord the $28,000 balance of the original $40,000 payment on or before October 31, 2018.

 

d. If the Company fails to make any payment specified in the fourth amendment, the Company unconditionally and irrevocable transfers all right, title and interest in and to Football Equipment that it is holding in storage and may immediately dispose of same as it chooses.

 

 
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MAJOR LEAGUE FOOTBALL, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

October 31, 2018

 

NOTE 6 – COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

 

Effective October 31, 2018, the landlord and the Company executed a fifth amendment to the February 5, 2018 settlement discussed above, which specified:

 

 

a. In lieu of making the remaining balance payment of $28,000 on October 31, 2018, the Company paid the landlord a $1,000 installment of the $28,000 payment on November 5, 2018;

 

b. The Company paid the landlord $1,006 on November 5, 2018, as reimbursement for two months of storage space rental; and

 

c. The Company will pay the landlord the $27,000 balance of the original $40,000 payment on or before November 30, 2018.

 

d. If the Company fails to make any payment specified in the fifth amendment, the Company unconditionally and irrevocable transfers all right, title and interest in and to Football Equipment that it is holding in storage and may immediately dispose of same as it chooses.

 

The Company has adjusted payments made against the balance which is $28,000 at October 31, 2018 in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet.

 

Effective November 30, 2018, the landlord and the Company executed a sixth amendment to the February 5, 2018 settlement discussed above, which specified:

 

 

e. In lieu of making the remaining balance payment of $27,000 on November 30, 2018, the Company paid the landlord a $1,000 installment of the $27,000 payment on November 30, 2018;

 

f. The Company paid the landlord $503 on November 30, 2018, as reimbursement for one month of storage space rental; and

 

g. The Company will pay the landlord the $26,000 balance of the original $40,000 payment on or before December 31, 2018.

 

h. If the Company fails to make any payment specified in the sixth amendment, the Company unconditionally and irrevocable transfers all right, title and interest in and to Football Equipment that it is holding in storage and may immediately dispose of same as it chooses.

 

Effective December 20, 2018, the landlord and the Company executed a seventh amendment to the February 5, 2018 settlement discussed above, which specified:

 

 

i. In lieu of making the remaining balance payment of $26,000 on December 31, 2018, the Company paid the landlord a $1,000 installment of the $26,000 payment on December 20, 2018;

 

j. The Company paid the landlord $503 on December 20, 2018, as reimbursement for one month of storage space rental; and

 

k. The Company will pay the landlord the $25,000 balance of the original $40,000 payment on or before January 31, 2019.

 

l. If the Company fails to make any payment specified in the seventh amendment, the Company unconditionally and irrevocable transfers all right, title and interest in and to Football Equipment that it is holding in storage and may immediately dispose of same as it chooses.

 

The Company is currently in discussions for new corporate headquarters.

 

Lawsuit for Legal Fees

 

On May 9, 2009, Stradley Ronon Stevens & Young, LLP, filed a lawsuit against the Company in the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware for failure of the Company to pay legal fees owed in the amount of $166,129. On April 2, 2009, to avoid the cost of litigation, the Company agreed to a Consent of Judgment against it in the amount of $166,129 and the Company continues to carry this amount as accounts payable in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet at July 31, 2018.

 

 
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MAJOR LEAGUE FOOTBALL, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

October 31, 2018

 

NOTE 6 – COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Contingencies)

 

The Company negotiated with Stradley and in July 2014, issued Stradley 100,000 shares of common stock valued at $0.05 per share, the quoted market price on the date of grant, as a sign of good faith towards a resolution. The Company is still in discussions with the law firm related to this Judgment and anticipates a resolution in the future.

 

Vendor Lawsuits

 

H&J Ventures, LLC (“H&J”) is a debtor in a chapter 7 bankruptcy proceeding. On October 4, 2016, the chapter 7 trustee (the “Trustee”) of the bankruptcy estate of H&J sent a letter to the Company claiming that the Company owed $7,800,000 to H&J relating to an October 1, 2014 agreement between the Company and H&J, and that the Trustee would accept a settlement payment of $6,630,000 to resolve the matter. The Company disputes this claim in its entirety. On December 9, 2016, the Trustee served the Company with a subpoena relating to this matter. The Company has retained counsel with respect to this matter and will respond to the subpoena as it is lawfully required to do; however, the Company considers this claim to be without merit. The Company engaged a law firm to assist in the matter and on January 23, 2017, paid a $7,500 retainer, which continues to be classified as prepaid legal fees in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet at October 31, 2018.

 

On August 24, 2017, the Company and H&J agreed to a $50,000 settlement payment by the Company to the bankruptcy trustee to resolve the matter. The settlement required the Company to make the payment by September 7, 2017 and failure to pay as per the terms of the settlement would probably result in sanctions of some type, and result in the settlement being set aside, to allow the trustee to pursue the full range of damages. It was represented at the mediation that an expert for the Trustee would opine that services rendered by H&J under the contract had a current value of the approximate sum of $2,000,000.

 

The former CEO of the Company at that time, submitted the required $50,000 payment in a timely fashion to the trustee. However, on September 15, 2017, the trustee notified the Company that the payment made was returned for insufficient funds. The former CEO was given an opportunity by the trustee to rectify the issue with a valid payment on or before September 18, 2017, which payment did not occur. The trustee was willing to accept a $50,000 payment by the Company to settle the matter but is under no obligation to accept such payment and the trustee may pursue the full range of damages against Company.

 

On December 29, 2017, the trustee for H&J filed a second lawsuit against the Company and the former CEO, individually. The lawsuit requests damages for not consummating the settlement described above and for submission of an invalid $50,000 payment which was returned for insufficient funds. The Company has properly responded to the lawsuit in a timely manner. However, the former CEO did not respond in a timely manner and the Trustee moved for a Default Judgment against the former CEO only. On May 9, 2018, the Court denied the Trustee’s Motion and dismissed the second lawsuit against both the former CEO and the Company. As to the former CEO, the Court found that since he signed the check in a clearly designated representative capacity for the Company, he had no personal liability. As to the Company, the Court found that the first lawsuit was still ongoing and that any claims for the bad check should be brought by amending the first lawsuit to make the claims rather than in a second lawsuit.

 

On May 16, 2018, the Court conducted a scheduling conference in which the Court granted leave to the Trustee to amend the pleadings to assert the bad check claims in the first lawsuit. The Court also gave the parties 90 days to conduct discovery. As of the date of this report, the Trustee has yet to file an amended pleading. A trial date was set for October 3, 2018.

 

On August 13, 2018, the Company and the Trustee executed a Stipulation and Consent Order specifying that the Company would pay the Trustee $50,000 by August 31, 2018. If payment was not made timely by the Company and was not cured within three (3) days of the August 31, 2018 date, a consent judgment in the amount of $70,000 would be entered against the Company. The Company did not make the required payment within the timeframe and as a result, a judgment in the amount of $70,000 was entered against the Company. The Company has recorded accrued expenses of $70,000 for the potential settlement in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet at October 31, 2018.

 

On August 4, 2017, Interactive Liquid LLC (Interactive”), a vendor of the Company, filed a lawsuit in the amount of $153,016 related to unpaid invoices for logo design and website development services provided. On December 18, 2017, MLFB received a settlement demand for payment of consideration with a total value of $153,016, consisting of stock valued at $26,016 and periodic cash payments to be completed on or before June 1, 2018 totaling $127,000. Further negotiations ensued and ultimately the case was settled on or about March 5, 2018. The settlement called for MLFB to make payment to Interactive in the sum of $10,000 immediately upon receipt of an initial tranche of funding. MLFB was then required to make an additional payment of $30,000 on or before June 1, 2018. MLFB’s failure to make the payments as outlined would result in the entry of a judgment in favor of Interactive against MLFB in the sum of $153,016, said sum representing the full amount of Interactive’s claimed damages. The Company has recorded accounts payable to Interactive of $153,016 in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet at October 31, 2018. The Company failed to make the required payment due to lack of funding and as such, on June 4, 2018, Interactive filed the stipulated judgment.

 

 
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MAJOR LEAGUE FOOTBALL, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

October 31, 2018

 

NOTE 6 – COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Contingencies)

 

The Company previously entered into a contract with Lamnia International (“Lamnia”) for investor relations services. On December 7, 2017, the Company received a demand for payment in the sum of $153,000. Per the demand letter, the sum was to be paid on or before December 15, 2017 and if not paid, collections and or legal actions could be instituted. The Company has recorded accounts payable to Lamnia of $124,968 in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet at October 31, 2018. The difference in amounts is because the Company terminated the agreement in writing to the vendor whereas the vendor continued to charge for services after the date of termination for which the Company disagrees.

 

The Company retained Herm Edwards, a former NFL player and coach, as a consultant to promote the new football league. On September 19, 2017, Mr. Edwards agent contacted the Company and indicated that under the contract, Mr. Edwards was still owed the sum of $216,668. The Company has recorded accounts payable to Mr. Edwards of $191,667 in the accompanying Unaudited Balance Sheet at October 31, 2018. The amount recorded by the Company is $25,000 less than the claim because services were terminated by both parties prior to amounts invoiced which the Company disputes.

 

Unpaid Taxes and Penalties

 

At October 31, 2018, the Company owed the State of Delaware $110,154 for unpaid state income taxes from the tax year ended April 30, 2007. The unpaid state income taxes are included as state income taxes payable in accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet at October 31, 2018. Additionally, the Company owes the State of Delaware for penalties and interest from the tax year ending April 30, 2007 of $209,500, which is included as accrued expenses in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet at October 31, 2018. The Company has an agreement with the State of Delaware to pay a minimum per month. However, due to cash flow constraints, the Company has been unable to pay the minimum monthly amounts and is in default of the agreement that may cause additional interest and penalties and lead to other collection efforts by the State of Delaware.

 

In September 2015, the Company reached an offer in compromise (“OIC”) settlement with the IRS for unpaid penalties and interest from the tax year ended April 30, 2007. The settlement was in the amount of $13,785 and was to be paid by the Company with a $1,000 payment upon the execution of settlement, then the balance of $1,757 paid in November 2015 and making up the 20% down payment of $2,757, a second installment payment of $2,208, and then four monthly payments of $2,205. The Company made all required payments in accordance with the settlement except for the final payment of $2,205.

 

The Company received correspondence from the IRS that because of an application fee note being paid with the original OIC, the Company was required to submit a new OIC and the required application fee. In October 2016, the Company had a telephone call with an IRS representative and were informed to offer the last payment that was due on the original OIC of $2,205 as discussed above and pay 20% of that balance. On October 5, 2016, the Company sent to the IRS by certified mail two checks in the amount of $186 (application fee for the new OIC) and $449 (20% or $441 of the $2,205 remaining original OIC payment and an $8 processing fee). The Company applied $441 against the remaining payment owed and the balance of $1,764 is included in accrued expenses in the accompanying unaudited Balance Sheet at October 31, 2018. As of the date of these financial statements, the Company has not received any further correspondence form the IRS and the Company is considered in default of the settlement agreement and the IRS could void or restructure the agreement.

 

Attorney Lien

 

On August 2, 2017, David Bovi, the Company’s former legal counsel, submitted correspondence reflecting a “charging lien” for non-payment relate to $243,034 of legal services provided to the Company. The amount included interest on unpaid invoices. The “retaining lien” states that Mr. Bovi will retain all documents in his possession unless paid the amount outstanding as described above.

 
 
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MAJOR LEAGUE FOOTBALL, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

October 31, 2018

 

NOTE 6 – COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Contingencies)

 

Stock Delisting

 

On September 14, 2017, the OTC Markets Group notified the Company of its delisting from the OTCQB due to its delinquency in filings, specifically with the SEC.

 

SEC Correspondence

 

On April 19, 2018, the Company received correspondence from the SEC Division of Corporate Finance related to non-compliance with the reporting requirements under Section 13(a) of the Securities Act of 1934. The Company responded to the SEC on April 30, 2018 providing information that its past due April 30, 2017 Form 10-K was filed on April 25, 2018 and that it was actively preparing past due 10-Q filings for the periods ended July 31, 2017, October 31, 2017 and January 31, 2018. The Company requested a sixty (60) day extension to file the past due 10-Q reports. The Company filed the past due 10-Q reports with the SEC on June 11, 2018.

 

The Company filed its Form 10-K and the financial statements for the year ended April 30, 2018 on November 19, 2018 but, were not timely filed. As the Company had not timely filed its Form 10-K for the year ended April 30, 2018, the Company may be subject, without further notice, to an administrative proceeding to revoke its registration under the Securities Act of 1934. Additionally, the Company had not timely filed its Form 10-Q for the three months ended July 31, 2018. As of the date of these unaudited financial statements for the six months ended October 31, 2018, the Company has received no further correspondence from the SEC.

 

NOTE 7 – SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

On December 7, 2018, the Company received $50,000 of proceeds from a private placement offering, representing 5,000,000 shares of stock at a sales price of $0.01 per share.

 

 
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Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

Introduction

 

The following discussion contains forward-looking statements. The words “anticipate,” “believe,” “expect,” “plan,” “intend,” “estimate,” “project,” “will,” “could,” “may” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Such statements reflect our Company's current views with respect to future events and financial performance and involve risks and uncertainties. Should one or more risks or uncertainties occur, or should underlying assumptions prove incorrect, actual results may vary materially and adversely from those anticipated, believed, expected, planned, intended, estimated, projected or otherwise indicated. Readers should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements.

 

The following discussion is qualified by reference to, and should be read in conjunction with our Company's financial statements and the notes thereto.

 

Financial Condition

 

As reflected in the accompanying unaudited financial statements, the Company had no revenues, a net loss of $112,677 and net cash used in operating activities of $134,728 for the six months ended October 31, 2018. Additionally, at October 31, 2018, the Company has a working capital deficit of $3,350,002, an accumulated deficit of $26,663,630 and a stockholders' deficit of $3,350,002, which could have a material impact on the Company's financial condition and operations.

 

Results of Operations

 

Three months ending October 31, 2018, compared to the three months ended October 31, 2017

 

For the three months ended October 31, 2018 and 2017, we had no revenue. The Company is working through its business plan whereby it is seeking to establish, develop and operate MLFB as a professional spring football league with an anticipated launch with an anticipated launch date in a full season with training camp in March of 2019 with a regular eight team season commencing in late April of 2019 with playoffs and a championship game in July of 2019.

 

Total operating expenses for the three months ended October 31, 2018 were $39,153 as compared to total operating expenses for the three months ended October 31, 2017 of $135,441 or a change of $96,288. The decrease in expense from 2017 to 2018 was primarily from a $99,636 decrease in professional fees, primarily from a decrease in legal and consulting fees from 2017 to 2018.

 

Other income (expense) for the three months ended October 31, 2018 was $86,278 of income compared to $11,302 of expense for the three months ended October 31, 2017 or a change of $97,580. The increase in income from 2017 to 2018 was primarily from $122,105 of income from change in fair value of conversion option liability in 2018 with no comparable amount in 2017. This was offset by a $24,248 increase in interest expense, primarily from the amortization of debt discounts related to a secured promissory note payable.

 

Because of the above, we had net income of $47,125 as compared to a net loss of $146,743 for the three months ended October 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

 

Six months ending October 31, 2018, compared to the six months ended October 31, 2017

 

For the six months ended October 31, 2018 and 2017, we had no revenue. The Company is working through its business plan whereby it is seeking to establish, develop and operate MLFB as a professional spring football league with an anticipated launch with an anticipated launch date in a full season with training camp in March of 2019 with a regular eight team season commencing in late April of 2019 with playoffs and a championship game in July of 2019.

 

Total operating expenses for the six months ended October 31, 2018 were $73,092 as compared to total operating expenses for the six months ended October 31, 2017 of $206,712, or a decrease of $133,620. The decrease in expense from 2017 to 2018 was primarily from a $95,129 decrease in professional fees, primarily from a decrease in legal and accounting fees from 2017 to 2018.

 

 
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Other income (expense) for the six months ended October 31, 2018 was $39,585 of expense compared to $19,470 of expense for the six months ended October 31, 2017 or a change of $20,115. The increase in expense from 2017 to 2018 was primarily from a $34,980 decrease in other income from a prior year adjustment of accounts payable in 2017 with no comparable amount in 2018. Additionally, there was an $8,113 increase in interest expense primarily related to amortization of debt discounts related to a secured promissory note payable. This was offset by $21,032 of income from change in fair value of conversion option liability in 2018 with no comparable amount in 2017.

 

Because of the above, we had a net loss of $112,677 as compared to a net loss of $226,182 for the six months ended October 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

From inception, our Company has relied upon the infusion of capital through equity transactions and the issuance of debt to obtain liquidity. We had only $797 of cash at October 31, 2018. Consequently, payment of operating expenses will have to come similarly from either equity capital to be raised from investors or from borrowed funds. There is no assurance that we will be successful in raising such additional equity capital or additional borrowings or if we can, that we can do so at a cost that management believes to be appropriate.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Our Company’s accounting policies are more fully described in Note 1 of Notes to Financial Statements. As disclosed in Note 1 of Notes to Financial Statements, the preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying disclosures. Although these estimates are based on our management’s best knowledge of current events and actions our Company may undertake in the future, actual results could differ from the estimates.

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures. 

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

As of the end of the period covered by this report, our Company evaluated the effectiveness and design and operation of its disclosure controls and procedures. Our Company's disclosure controls and procedures are the controls and other procedures that we designed to ensure that our Company records, processes, summarizes, and reports in a timely manner the information that it must disclose in reports that our Company files with or submits to the Securities and Exchange Commission. Our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures as of October 31, 2018 and concluded that the disclosure controls and procedures were not effective, because certain deficiencies involving internal controls over financial reporting constituted a material weakness as discussed below.

 

 

1. Our Company does not have a full time Controller or Chief Financial Officer and utilizes a part time consultant to perform these critical responsibilities. This lack of full time accounting staff results in a lack of segregation of duties and accounting technical expertise necessary for an effective system of internal control. Additionally, the Company determined that certain transactions may have been allowed without proper authority and Board of Director approval. The Company has analyzed these transactions and believes that the internal controls required to safeguard company assets from unauthorized transactions were not present.

 

 

 

 

2. Additionally, management determined during its internal control assessment the following weakness(s), while not considered material, are items that should be considered by the Board of Directors for resolution immediately: (i) our Company IT process should be strengthened as there is no disaster recovery plan, no server, and the company accounting records are maintained through a consultant. The Company should consider the purchase and implementation of a server and proper back-ups off site to ensure that accounting information is safeguarded; and (ii) our Company should take steps to implement a policies and procedures manual.

 

To mitigate the above weaknesses(s), to the fullest extent possible, our Company has engaged a financial consultant with significant accounting and reporting experience to assist in becoming and remaining current with its reporting responsibilities. Additionally, as soon as our finances allow, we will hire sufficient accounting staff and implement appropriate procedures to mitigate the weaknesses discussed above. Additionally, the Company plans on hiring a fulltime Controller or Chief Financial Officer when funds are sufficient.

 

 
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Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting.

 

No change in our Company's internal control over financial reporting occurred during our fourth fiscal quarter that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

Plan of Operation

 

Major League Football, Inc. (the “Company”) is seeking to establish, develop and operate Major League Football ("MLFB") as a professional spring/summer football league. We intend to fill a void by establishing franchises in cities overlooked by existing professional sports leagues and provide fans with professional football in the NFL off-seasons, which will enable it to take a totally non-adversarial approach towards the National Football League ("NFL"). Our spring and early summer schedule ensures no direct competition with autumn/winter sports, including the 32 NFL, 9 Canadian Football League, 627 NCAA, 91 NAIA, 142 JUCO's, 27 Canadian Universities, and thousands of high school and collegiate institution teams.

 

During Spring 2017, the Company determined to reschedule its inaugural year of professional, spring-league football from Spring 2017 to Spring 2018 but was again delayed due to a continued lack of adequate funding. The Company now intends to launch a full season of professional, spring-league football during 2019.

 

We expect we will need additional short-term financing as well as financing over the next 12 months in order to position our Company for its anticipated launch in April 2019 with a regular eight team season commencing in May of 2019 with playoffs and a championship game in July of 2019. Specifically, we will need to raise approximately $3 million between January and April 2019 and a subsequent raise and offerings of $20 million between April 2019 and July 2019, to cover our operating expenses for a full 2019 training camp and playing season in our designated cities.

 

Single Entity Structure

 

We intend to operate the league as a single entity owned, stand alone, dominant independent sports league. The single entity structure will be based on the design of Major League Soccer (MLS), where a single entity sports league owns and operates all of its teams. This corporate structure provides several compelling benefits, including:

 

 

· Centralized contracting for players’ services that result in controlled player payrolls without violating antitrust laws

 

· Greater parity among teams

 

· Focus on the bottom line

 

· Controlled costs

 

· Centralized management and oversight
 

Management believes that this structure will also promote efficiency by depoliticizing decisions on league policies and allowing decisions to be made with consistency and in a timely fashion. Economies of scale will be achieved through centralizing contract negotiations and handling business affairs in the league office to ensure that individual teams are unified in their decision-making. Further, under this structure, we expect teams will operate in the best interest of the league.

 

MLFB Market Opportunity

 

Major League Football intends to establish a brand that is fan-friendly, exciting, affordable and interactive, but most importantly provides consumers real value for their sports dollars. MLFB will underscore the fans’ access to team members, coaches, league officials and other fans, something no other existing or previous football league has ever delivered to its viewing audience. Although Major League Football’s ticket pricing will be a fraction to that of the established professional leagues (NBA, MLB, NHL and NFL), its ultimate goal will be to offer its fans an incomparable value-added experience for their entertainment dollar.

 

 
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Additionally, as a result of a carefully crafted study, we will not locate teams in any established NFL cities and more importantly in any Major League Baseball cities, thus avoiding direct in-season competition with an established sports entity. By positioning teams in prime emerging and under-represented markets throughout the contiguous 48 states (including placing teams in well respected and football fan friendly metropolitan markets in the country), our research suggests that an exciting sports entity like Major League Football will be viewed in a positive light by sports fans throughout the US, many of whom are already experiencing post Super Bowl withdrawal. Of equal or greater importance to Major League Football is the fact that both established and peripheral football fans in these exciting new markets will finally be afforded the opportunity of establishing their own personal sports identity while at the same time fostering strong community pride. Lastly, although Major League Football’s long range vision is to maintain a positive working relationship with the NFL, its ultimate intent is to function as an independent, stand-alone entity that captures sports content needed during off season.

 

Major League Football intends to disseminate its message using a comprehensive marketing strategy that employs both traditional and new media marketing channels. MLFB’s marketing plans are anticipated to create multiple revenue streams and engage sports fans over a variety of mediums, many of which have only emerged during the past few years. Specifically, Major League Football intends to develop a far-reaching Internet and mobile strategy that will serve as the backbone of its marketing strategy. This will include developing a mobile initiative, where fans can interact with the league, its players, its coaches, and other fans using their mobile phones all while taking advantage of the player name recognition that comes with fantasy football.

 

Major League Football also intends to create an interactive website that includes a social networking aspect, podcasts, live video, and more. Along with this new media strategy, cross promotions will also be an important part of the MLFB’s marketing strategy. Major League Football plans to work with businesses involved in video, television, print media and the Internet to promote its business. We believe that the cumulative effect of this marketing plan will help it achieve its early objectives, which include the following:

 

 

· Establish itself as a recognized professional football league

 

· Build a base of teams and fans that is broad enough to sustain business over the critical first five years of operation

 

· Generate enough revenue to expand its operations in years three through six

 

· Build successful teams located in regions where there are no existing MLB franchises

 

· Adopt a spring schedule to avoid competing with professional, collegiate and prep football

 

· Provide year-round cash flow from multi-functioning revenue streams

 

· Build a positive image for the league through year-round community relations campaigns

 

Professional Sports Market

 

Major League Football recognizes the NFL is the dominant professional sports league in the United States. Although it clearly respects the success of the NFL business model, its defined objective is to position itself as an independent, non-adversarial football league. Major League Football believes that its own business model encompasses innovations that will be viewed positively by NFL officials, resulting in a strong working relationship between the two leagues.

 

Major League Football will endeavor to maximize ticket vendor technology and enhance its services to patrons with innovative ticketing procedures that include:

 

 

· Average ticket prices targeted at approximately one fourth the prices of NFL, NBA, NHL & MLB tickets

 

· Year-round cash flow derived from multiple revenue streams utilizing new technologies that didn’t exist as recently as a few years ago

 

· A highly developed marketing strategy that uses both traditional and new media to attract existing football fans as well as an entirely untapped market of potential new fans

 

· A more interactive, informative website in professional sports using cutting edge technologies that help preserve fan loyalty

 

· Proven executive staff members with considerable practical experience in professional football, including the NFL

 

· Player and coaching costs projected at 65-80% less than those of the NFL, NBA, NHL or MLB and other leagues

 

 
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Initially, Major League Football teams will operate in either existing collegiate or municipal stadiums during the spring and early summer season,

 

We believe that our business model and long range vision possesses many innovations that will be viewed in a positive light by NFL owners and league officials, and will also lend itself to the potential of establishing a strong working relationship with our venture by positioning ourselves in a 100% non-adversarial position to the established NFL.

 

Audience

 

Major League Football believes that today’s market demands a controlled deliverable to a targeted demographic viewing audience as well as controlled advertising deliverables to specific targeted demographic audiences as well. Other sports attract audiences that are only a fraction of that number, in producing the sponsor and advertiser concerns. Therefore, retaining the mass appeal needed to attract such an audience is an over-arching consideration that shapes much of what we do and what concerns the Company.

 

Merchandising & Licensing Overview

 

The thrust of our licensing and co-branding strategy is to create an increase in brand value for MLFB and the partners we align with. In order for the league to have a robust licensing and co-branding business, we have created a 3-tier approach that focuses on generating strong revenue streams for the league and initiating value based collaborative efforts that further enhance the MLFB brand.

 

The main benefits of the program are:

 

 

· Fans will find quality items at more favorable price points

 

· Teams will gain more profit on each item and stop tying up money on inventory they can’t properly sell.

 

· More fans will be wearing and supporting the team and league branded merchandise, which is the number one way to brand outside the stadium

 

We also intend to develop private label products where we will feature products that are core fan favorites (hats, shirts, popular novelties and gifts, etc.) all manufactured at the highest level, and priced far below traditional licensed sports merchandise programs. All merchandise, when league sanctioned, will be pre-ticketed and priced.

 

Timeline of Significant Events

 

On or about March 5, 2018 the parties in the Interactive Liquid, LLC v. Major League Football, Inc litigation reached a settlement. The settlement called for MLFB to make payment to the Plaintiff in the sum of $10,000 immediately upon receipt of an initial tranche of funding. MLFB must then make an additional payment of $30,000 on or before June 1, 2018. MLFB’s failure to make the payments as outlined will result in the entry of a judgment in favor of the plaintiff and against MLFB in the sum of $153,016 (less payment of $10,000 if made before June 1, 2018), said sum representing the full amount of Plaintiff’s claimed damages.

 

On May 9, 2018, the Court in the John M. McDonnell, as Chapter 7 Trustee for the Estate of H&J Ventures, LLC v. Major League Football and Jerry C. Craig case denied the Trustee’s Motion for Default Judgment against Jerry C. Craig and dismissed the second lawsuit against both Craig and the Company. As to Craig, the Court found that since he signed the check in a clearly designated representative capacity for the Company, he had no personal liability. As to the Company, the Court found that the first lawsuit was still ongoing and that any claims for the bad check should be brought by amending the first lawsuit to make the claims rather than in a second lawsuit.

 

On May 16, 2018, the Court in John M. McDonnell, as Chapter 7 Trustee for the Estate of H&J Ventures, LLC v. Major League Football, conducted a scheduling conference in which the Court granted leave to the Trustee to amend the pleadings to assert the bad check claims in the first lawsuit. The Court also gave the parties 90 days to conduct discovery. As of the date of this report, the Trustee has yet to file an amended pleading.

 

 
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On May 17, 2018, the Company and SBI Investments LLC, 2014-1 entered into a Securities Purchase Agreement and Convertible Promissory Note in the principal sum of $80,000. The agreement provides, inter alia, that the principal and interest are to be paid in full on or before May 17, 2019 with interest at the rate of 8% per annum. Effective November 17, 2018, SBI has the right to convert any or all of the outstanding and unpaid balance of the loan into common stock.

 

On May 31, 2018, the parties in the TCA12, LLC, a Florida limited liability company v. Major League Football agreed to amend the Settlement Agreement. Pursuant to the amendment, the Company paid the sum of $5,503 on June 4, 2018. That figure represents a good faith deposit of $5,000 and payment of an additional month’s storage charge of $503. An additional payment of $35,000 is to be made on or before June 30, 2018. As before, failure to make the payment shall be deemed a conveyance of MLFB’s right, title, and interest in football equipment currently in Plaintiff’s possession.

 

On June 1, 2018, due to lack of funding, the Company in the Interactive Liquid, LLC v. Major League Football, Inc failed to make the required payment of $40,000 and effective June 2, 2018, Interactive filed the stipulated judgment on June 4, 2018 in the amount of $153,016. There has been no full or partial satisfaction of the judgment and the full amount remains due and owing.

 

On June 8, 2018, the Company received $10,000 of proceeds from a private placement offering, representing 1,000,000 shares of stock at a sales price of $0.01 per share.

 

On June 28, 2018, the parties agreed to a second amendment to the Settlement agreement in the TCA12, LLC, a Florida limited liability company v. Major League Football. On June 29, MLFB once again paid the sum of $5,503. That figure represented a good faith deposit of $5,000 and payment of an additional month’s storage charge of $503. An additional payment of $30,000 is to be made on or before July 31, 2018. As before, failure to make the payment is be deemed a conveyance of MLFB’s right, title, and interest in football equipment currently in Plaintiff’s possession.

 

On July 18, 2018, pursuant to the Secured Convertible Promissory Note of March 9, 2016, SBI Investments LLC, 2014-1, converted $10,000 of principal debt under the note to 819,672 shares of common stock, leaving a remaining principal balance of $90,000 under the note.

 

On July 31, 2018, the parties in the TCA12, LLC, a Florida limited liability company v. Major League Football agreed to amend the Settlement Agreement. Pursuant to the amendment, the Company paid the sum of $1,503 on July 31, 2018. That figure represents a good faith deposit of $1,000 and payment of an additional month’s storage charge of $503. An additional payment of $29,000 is to be made on or before August 15, 2018. As before, failure to make the payment shall be deemed a conveyance of MLFB’s right, title, and interest in football equipment currently in Plaintiff’s possession

 

On September 21, 2018, the parties in the TCA12, LLC, a Florida limited liability company v. Major League Football agreed to amend the Settlement Agreement. Pursuant to the amendment, the Company paid the sum of $1,503 on September 21, 2018. That figure represents a good faith deposit of $1,000 and payment of an additional month’s storage charge of $503. An additional payment of $28,000 is to be made on or before October 31, 2018. As before, failure to make the payment shall be deemed a conveyance of MLFB’s right, title, and interest in football equipment currently in Plaintiff’s possession

 

On October 5, 2018, the Company received $50,000 of proceeds from a private placement offering, representing 5,000,000 shares of stock at a sales price of $0.01 per share.

 

On October 31, 2018, the parties in the TCA12, LLC, a Florida limited liability company v. Major League Football agreed to amend the Settlement Agreement. Pursuant to the amendment, the Company paid the sum of $2,006 on November 5, 2018. That figure represents a good faith deposit of $1,000 and payment of two additional month’s storage charge of $1,006. An additional payment of $27,000 is to be made on or before November 30, 2018. As before, failure to make the payment shall be deemed a conveyance of MLFB’s right, title, and interest in football equipment currently in Plaintiff’s possession

 

On November 30, 2018, the parties in the TCA12, LLC, a Florida limited liability company v. Major League Football agreed to amend the Settlement Agreement. Pursuant to the amendment, the Company paid the sum of $1,003 on November 30, 2018. That figure represents a good faith deposit of $1,000 and payment of an additional month’s storage charge of $503. An additional payment of $26,000 is to be made on or before December 31, 2018. As before, failure to make the payment shall be deemed a conveyance of MLFB’s right, title, and interest in football equipment currently in Plaintiff’s possession

 

On December 7, 2018, the Company received $50,000 of proceeds from a private placement offering, representing 5,000,000 shares of stock at a sales price of $0.01 per share.

 

On December 20, 2018, the parties in the TCA12, LLC, a Florida limited liability company v. Major League Football agreed to amend the Settlement Agreement. Pursuant to the amendment, the Company paid the sum of $1,003 on December 20, 2018. That figure represents a good faith deposit of $1,000 and payment of an additional month’s storage charge of $503. An additional payment of $25,000 is to be made on or before January 31, 2019. As before, failure to make the payment shall be deemed a conveyance of MLFB’s right, title, and interest in football equipment currently in Plaintiff’s possession

 

 
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PART II – OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings 

 

John M. McDonnell, as Chapter 7 Trustee for the Estate of H&J Ventures, LLC v. Major League Football- This is an adversary proceeding arising out of a contract for ticketing services between the Debtor in Bankruptcy, H&J Ventures d/b/a Turnstiles, and Major League Football. A mediation took place on August 24, 2017 whereby a settlement agreement was entered into in which the Company agreed to pay $50,000 in full and final settlement. Jerry Craig, then CEO, authorized the settlement and personally issued a draft to the Trustee in that amount. On September 15, 2017, the Trustee advised that the draft tendered by Mr. Craig was returned due to insufficient funds. Mr. Craig was given an opportunity to substitute a new, valid, draft in settlement of the case but failed to do so. The case remains pending. On December 29. 2017 the Trustee in Bankruptcy filed a second suit against MLFB and Jerry Craig, Case number 17- 1709-MBK. This second suit arose out of the aforementioned bad check issued by Mr. Craig. The suit seeks payment of the outstanding debt represented by the $50,000 settlement, and damages under New Jersey state statute 2A:32-1 pertaining to bad checks. The statute allows for a judgment in the amount of the check, $500 in statutory damages, and attorney’s fees and costs. MLFB filed a timely answer to the second lawsuit; Mr. Craig did not, and the Trustee filed a Motion for Default Judgment and scheduled a hearing to assess damages against Mr. Craig only for May 2, 2018. At that time the Court dismissed the entirety of the second suit finding that Craig could not be individually liable for the dishonored draft when he signed it in a representative capacity. The Court also found that the claims against MLFB for the dishonored draft could be brought in the original suit and as such, there was no need for the second suit. On May 16, 2018, the Court held a scheduling conference. The court extended the time for discovery to August 31, 2018 and granted leave for the Trustee to amend its pleadings to assert claims for the dishonored check. A trial has been set for October 3, 2018. To date the pleadings in the original suit have not been amended to assert claims for the dishonored check. The parties are currently engaging in settlement negotiations. On August 13, 2018, the Company and the Trustee executed a Stipulation and Consent Order specifying that the Company would pay the Trustee $50,000 by August 31, 2018. If payment was not made timely by the Company and was not cured within three (3) days of the August 31, 2018 date, a consent judgment in the amount of $70,000 would be entered against the Company. The Company did not make the required payment within the timeframe and as a result, a judgment in the amount of $70,000 was entered against the Company.

 

TCA12, LLC, a Florida limited liability company v. Major League Football, Inc.- this is an action by the landlord for past due rent, attorney’s fees, and foreclosure of a landlord lien, in conjunction with Company’s former offices located at 6230 University Parkway, Suite 301, Lakewood Ranch, Florida. The Plaintiff obtained possession of the premises on September 5 and at the same time took possession of property belonging to the company with an estimated original retail value of $325,000. Plaintiff filed a Motion for Summary Judgment seeking a judgment for $122,194 in past due rent, foreclosure on a landlord lien allowing the sale of the Company’s property, and a judgment for attorney’s fees, the amount of which would be determined later. The Company filed a timely, written opposition. On November 30, 2017, the court heard oral argument and granted the Plaintiff’s motion on the issue of whether the Company was liable for past due rent. It denied the Motion on the issues of the amount of past due rent owed, foreclosure of the landlord lien, and an award of attorney fees. Plaintiff was granted leave to file a second Motion for Summary Judgment on those issues and did so. Before the matter was heard, the parties reached a settlement in which MLFB agreed to immediately conveyed all right title and interest in office furniture located on the premises to the Plaintiff and MLFB released all right title and interest in its security deposit in the sum of $11,918 to the Plaintiff. Moreover, on or before June 1, 2018, MLFB was to pay Plaintiff an additional $40,000. If it failed to do so, the failure would be deemed a conveyance of MLFB’s right, title, and interest in football equipment currently in Plaintiff’s possession. Effective May 31, 2018, the parties agreed to amend the Settlement Agreement. Pursuant to the amendment, the Company paid the sum of $5,503 on June 4, 2018. That figure represented a good faith deposit of $5,000 and payment of an additional month’s storage charge of $503. An additional payment of $35,000 was to be made on or before June 30, 2018. As before, failure to make the payment was to be deemed a conveyance of MLFB’s right, title, and interest in football equipment currently in Plaintiff’s possession. On June 28, 2018, the parties agreed to a second amendment to the Settlement agreement. On June 29, MLFB once again paid the sum of $5,503. That figure represented a good faith deposit of $5,000 and payment of an additional month’s storage charge of $503. An additional payment of $30,000 is to be made on or before July 31, 2018. As before, failure to make the payment is be deemed a conveyance of MLFB’s right, title, and interest in football equipment currently in Plaintiff’s possession. On July 31, 2018, the parties agreed to a third amendment to the Settlement agreement. On July 31, 2018, MLFB paid the sum of $1,503. That figure represented a good faith deposit of $1,000 and payment of an additional month’s storage charge of $503. An additional payment of $29,000 is to be made on or before August 15, 2018. As before, failure to make the payment is be deemed a conveyance of MLFB’s right, title, and interest in football equipment currently in Plaintiff’s possession. On September 21, 2018, the parties agreed to a fourth amendment to the Settlement agreement. On September 21, 2018, MLFB paid the sum of $1,503. That figure represented a good faith deposit of $1,000 and payment of an additional month’s storage charge of $503. An additional payment of $28,000 is to be made on or before October 31, 2018. As before, failure to make the payment is be deemed a conveyance of MLFB’s right, title, and interest in football equipment currently in Plaintiff’s possession. On October 31, 2018, the parties agreed to a fifth amendment to the Settlement agreement. On November 5, 2018, paid the sum of $2,006. That figure represented a good faith deposit of $1,000 and payment of an additional two month’s storage charge of $1,006. An additional payment of $27,000 is to be made on or before November 30, 2018. As before, failure to make the payment is be deemed a conveyance of MLFB’s right, title, and interest in football equipment currently in Plaintiff’s possession. On November 30, 2018, the parties agreed to a sixth amendment to the Settlement agreement. On November 30, 2018, MLFB paid the sum of $1,503. That figure represented a good faith deposit of $1,000 and payment of an additional month’s storage charge of $503. An additional payment of $26,000 is to be made on or before December 31, 2018. As before, failure to make the payment is be deemed a conveyance of MLFB’s right, title, and interest in football equipment currently in Plaintiff’s possession. On December 20, 2018, the parties agreed to a seventh amendment to the Settlement agreement. On December 20, 2018, MLFB paid the sum of $1,503. That figure represented a good faith deposit of $1,000 and payment of an additional month’s storage charge of $503. An additional payment of $25,000 is to be made on or before January 31, 2019. As before, failure to make the payment is be deemed a conveyance of MLFB’s right, title, and interest in football equipment currently in Plaintiff’s possession.

 

 
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Interactive Liquid, LLC v. Major League Football, Inc. - This is an action for breach of contract, account payable, and Quantum Meruit arising out of a contract between the Plaintiff and the Company for logo design and website development services. On December 18, 2017, MLFB received a settlement demand for payment of consideration with a total value of $153,016, consisting of stock valued at $26,016 and periodic cash payments to be completed on or before June 1, 2018 totaling $127,000. Further negotiations ensued and ultimately the case was settled on or about March 5, 2018. The settlement called for MLFB to make payment to the Plaintiff in the sum of $10,000 immediately upon receipt of an initial tranche of funding. MLFB was to then make an additional payment of $30,000 on or before June 1, 2018. MLFB’s failure to make the payments as outlined would result in the entry of a judgment in favor of the plaintiff and against MLFB in the sum of $153,016 (less payment of $10,000 if made before June 1.), said sum representing the full amount of Plaintiff’s claimed damages. The Company failed to make the payment on June 1, 2018 due to lack of funding and effective June 2, 2018, Interactive was free to file the stipulated judgment. On June 4, 2018, Interactive filed the stipulated judgment with the court. No subsequent action has been taken.

 

David M. Bovi, P.A. Attorney Lien- Mr. Bovi, the Company’s former Securities attorney, has asserted an attorney lien in the sum of $243,034. This sum includes 12% interest for past due balances. No further demands have been made.

 

Herm Edwards- The Company retained Mr. Edwards, a former NFL player and coach, as a consultant and to promote the new league. On September 19, 2017, Mr. Edwards agent contacted the Company and indicated that under the contract, Mr. Edwards was still owed the sum of $216,668. No further demands have been made and Mr. Edwards is now the head coach of Arizona State University.

 

Lamnia International/John Matteo- The Company entered into a contract with Lamnia International for the provision of investor relations services. On December 7, 2017, the Company received a demand for payment in the sum of $153,000. Per the demand letter, the sum was to be paid on or before December 15, 2017 and if not paid, collections and or legal actions would be instituted. No subsequent demands or contact has been received.

 

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds. 

 

Our Company sold the following securities without registering the securities under the Securities Act:

 

On October 5, 2018, the Company received $50,000 of proceeds from a private placement offering, representing 5,000,000 shares of common stock at a sales price of $0.01 per share.

 

On December 7, 2018, the Company received $50,000 of proceeds from a private placement offering, representing 5,000,000 shares of common stock at a sales price of $0.01 per share.

 

No underwriters were utilized and no commissions or fees were paid with respect to any of the above transactions. These persons were the only offerees in connection with these transactions. We relied on Section 4(a)(2), 4(a)(5) and Regulation D of the Securities Act since the transactions do not involve any public offering.

 

 
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Item 6. Exhibits. 

 

The following exhibits are included herein:

 

31

 

Certification pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, executed by the Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer of the Company.

 

 

 

32

 

Certification pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, executed by the Principal Executive Officer and Financial Officer of the Company.

 

 
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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

Major League Football, Inc.

 

 

 

January 9, 2019

By:

/s/ Francis J. Murtha

 

 

Francis J. Murtha

Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer

 

 

 

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