10-K 1 pbh10kmarch312015.htm 10-K PBH 10K March 31, 2015


UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K
(Mark One)
 
x
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 2015

OR

 
o
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 FOR THE TRANSITION PERIOD FROM ______ TO ______

Commission File Number: 001-32433

PRESTIGE BRANDS HOLDINGS, INC.
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
20-1297589
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 
660 White Plains Road
Tarrytown, New York 10591
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)


 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
(914) 524-6800
(Registrant's telephone number, including area code)
 
Title of each class:
 
Name of each exchange on which registered:
Common Stock, par value $.01 per share
 
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:  None
Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.           Yes x No o
Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.           Yes o No x
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes x No o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes x No o
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of Registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  x
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer
x
 
 
 
Accelerated filer
o
Non-accelerated filer
o
 
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
Smaller reporting company
o
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).  Yes o No x
The aggregate market value of voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was last sold as of the last business day of the Registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter ended September 30, 2014 was $1,684.6 million.
As of May 1, 2015, the Registrant had 52,296,021 shares of common stock outstanding.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the Registrant’s Definitive Proxy Statement for the 2015 Annual Meeting of Stockholders (the “2015 Proxy Statement”) are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K to the extent described herein.




TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
 
 
 
Page
Part I
 
 
Item 1.
Business
Item 1A.
Risk Factors
Item 1B.
Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 2.
Properties
Item 3.
Legal Proceedings
Item 4. 
Mine Safety Disclosures
 
 
 
Part II
 
 
Item 5.
Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Item 6.
Selected Financial Data
Item 7.
Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 7A.
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 8.
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Item 9.
Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
Item 9A.
Controls and Procedures
Item 9B.
Other Information
 
 
 
Part III
 
 
Item 10.
Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11.
Executive Compensation
Item 12.
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
Item 13.
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
Item 14.
Principal Accounting Fees and Services
 
 
 
Part IV
 
 
Item 15.
Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules
 
 
 
 
TRADEMARKS AND TRADE NAMES
 
 
Trademarks and trade names used in this Annual Report on Form 10-K are the property of Prestige Brands Holdings, Inc. or its subsidiaries, as the case may be.  We have italicized our trademarks or trade names when they appear in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 




Part I.

CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (the “PSLRA”), including, without limitation, information within Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.  The following cautionary statements are being made pursuant to the provisions of the PSLRA and with the intention of obtaining the benefits of the “safe harbor” provisions of the PSLRA.  Although we believe that our expectations are based on reasonable assumptions, actual results may differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements.

Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.  Except as required under federal securities laws and the rules and regulations of the SEC, we do not intend to update any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances arising after the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.  As a result of these risks and uncertainties, readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K or that may be made elsewhere from time to time by, or on behalf of, us.  All forward-looking statements attributable to us are expressly qualified by these cautionary statements.

These forward-looking statements generally can be identified by the use of words or phrases such as "believe," "anticipate," "expect," "estimate," "plan," "project," "intend," "strategy," "goal," "objective," "future," "seek," "may," "might," "should," "would," "will," "will be," or other similar words and phrases.  Forward-looking statements are based on current expectations and assumptions that are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those anticipated, including, without limitation:

The high level of competition in our industry and markets;
Our ability to increase organic growth via new product introductions or line extensions;
Our ability to invest successfully in research and development;
Our dependence on a limited number of customers for a large portion of our sales;
Changes in inventory management practices by retailers;
Our ability to grow our international sales;
General economic conditions affecting sales of our products and their respective markets;
Business, regulatory and other conditions affecting retailers;
Changing consumer trends, additional store brand competition or other pricing pressures which may cause us to lower our prices;
Our dependence on third-party manufacturers to produce the products we sell;
Price increases for raw materials, labor, energy and transportation costs and for other input costs;
Disruptions in our distribution center;
Acquisitions, dispositions or other strategic transactions diverting managerial resources, the incurrence of additional liabilities or integration problems associated with such transactions;
Actions of government agencies in connection with our products or regulatory matters governing our industry;
Product liability claims, product recalls and related negative publicity;
Our ability to protect our intellectual property rights;
Our dependence on third parties for intellectual property relating to some of the products we sell;
Our assets being comprised virtually entirely of goodwill and intangibles and possible changes in their value based on adverse operating results;
Our dependence on key personnel and the transition to a new CEO and CFO;
Shortages of supply of sourced goods or interruptions in the manufacturing of our products;
The costs associated with any claims in litigation or arbitration and any adverse judgments rendered in such litigation or arbitration;
Our level of indebtedness, and possible inability to service our debt;
Our ability to obtain additional financing; and
The restrictions imposed by our financing agreements on our operations.

For more information, see “Risk Factors” contained in Part I Item 1A of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 

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ITEM 1. BUSINESS
       
            
Overview

Unless otherwise indicated by the context, all references in this Annual Report on Form 10-K to “we,” “us,” “our,” the “Company” or “Prestige” refer to Prestige Brands Holdings, Inc. and our subsidiaries.  Similarly, reference to a year (e.g., “2015”) refers to our fiscal year ended March 31 of that year.

We are engaged in the marketing, sales and distribution of well-recognized, brand name, over-the-counter (“OTC”) healthcare and household cleaning products to mass merchandisers, drug stores, supermarkets, and club, convenience, and dollar stores in North America (the United States and Canada) and in Australia and certain other international markets.  We use the strength of our brands, our established retail distribution network, a low-cost operating model and our experienced management team to our competitive advantage.  Our ultimate success is dependent on several factors, including our ability to:

Develop and execute effective sales, advertising and marketing programs;

Integrate acquired brands;

Grow our existing product lines;

Develop innovative new products;

Respond to the technological advances and product introductions of our competitors; and

Continue to grow our presence in the United States and international markets.

We engaged in strategic mergers and acquisitions over the last three years as follows:

2015 Acquisitions

Acquisition of Insight Pharmaceuticals

On September 3, 2014, the Company completed the acquisition of Insight Pharmaceuticals Corporation ("Insight"), a marketer and distributor of feminine care and other OTC healthcare products, for $753.2 million in cash. The closing followed the Federal Trade Commission’s (“FTC”) approval of the acquisition and was finalized pursuant to the terms of the purchase agreement announced on April 25, 2014. Pursuant to the Insight purchase agreement, the Company acquired 27 OTC brands sold in North America (including related trademarks, contracts and inventory), which extended the Company's portfolio of OTC brands to include a leading feminine care platform in the United States and Canada anchored by Monistat, the leading North American brand in OTC yeast infection treatment. The acquisition also added brands to the Company's cough & cold, pain relief, ear care and dermatological platforms. In connection with the FTC's approval of the Insight acquisition, we sold one of the competing brands that we acquired from Insight on the same day as the Insight closing. Insight is primarily included in our North America OTC Healthcare segment. This acquisition was accounted for in accordance with the Business Combinations topic of the Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") Accounting Standards Codification ("ASC") 805, which requires that the total cost of an acquisition be allocated to the tangible and intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed based upon their respective fair values at the date of acquisition.

Acquisition of Hydralyte

On April 30, 2014, we completed the acquisition of Hydralyte in Australia and New Zealand from The Hydration Pharmaceuticals Trust of Victoria, Australia. Hydralyte is the leading OTC brand in oral rehydration in Australia, and is marketed and sold through our Care Pharmaceuticals Pty Ltd. subsidiary. Hydralyte is available in pharmacies in multiple forms and is indicated for oral rehydration following diarrhea, vomiting, fever, heat and other ailments. We funded this acquisition with a combination of cash on the balance sheet and our existing credit facility. This acquisition was accounted for in accordance with the Business Combinations topic of the FASB ASC 805, which requires that the total cost of an acquisition be allocated to the tangible and intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed based upon their respective fair values at the date of acquisition.


2



2014 Acquisition

Acquisition of Care Pharmaceuticals Pty Ltd.

On July 1, 2013, we completed the acquisition of Care Pharmaceuticals Pty Ltd. (“Care Pharma”), which included brands that complemented our OTC Healthcare portfolio and was funded through a combination of our existing senior secured credit facility and cash on hand. The Care Pharma brands include the Fess line of cold/allergy and saline nasal health products, which is the leading saline spray for both adults and children in Australia. Other key brands include Painstop analgesic, Rectogesic for rectal discomfort, and the Fab line of nutritional supplements. Care Pharma also carries a line of brands for children including Little Allergies, Little Eyes, and Little Coughs. This acquisition was accounted for in accordance with the Business Combinations topic of the FASB ASC 805, which requires that the total cost of an acquisition be allocated to the tangible and intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed based upon their respective fair values at the date of acquisition.

2013 Divestiture

In 2013, we divested the Phazyme gas treatment brand, which was a non-core OTC brand that we acquired from GlaxoSmithKline plc ("GSK") in January 2012. We received $21.7 million from the divestiture on October 31, 2012 and the remaining $0.6 million on January 4, 2013. The proceeds were used to repay debt. No significant gain or loss was recorded as a result of the sale.

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Major Brands

Our major brands, set forth in the table below, have strong levels of consumer awareness and retail distribution across all major channels.  These brands accounted for approximately 86.8%, 86.3%, and 83.6% of our net revenues for 2015, 2014, and 2013, respectively, during the period the respective brands were owned by us.

Major Brands
 
Market
Position(1)
 
Market Segment(2)
 
Market
Share(3)
(%)
 
ACV(4)
(%)
North American and International Over-the-Counter Healthcare:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chloraseptic®
 
#1
 
Sore Throat Liquids/Lozenges
 
47.4
 
94.8
Clear Eyes®
 
#2
 
Eye Allergy/Redness Relief
 
20.5
 
97.4
Compound W®
 
#1
 
Wart Removal
 
34.8
 
89.0
Dramamine®
 
#1
 
Motion Sickness
 
41.1
 
93.8
Efferdent®
 
#2
 
Denture Cleanser Tablets
 
27.2
 
98.4
Little Remedies®
 
#9
 
Pediatric Healthcare
 
3.4
 
91.3
Luden's®
 
#3
 
Cough Drops
 
6.7
 
94.5
The Doctor’s® NightGuard®
 
#2
 
Bruxism (Teeth Grinding)
 
24.0
 
65.4
The Doctor’s® Brushpicks®
 
#2
 
Disposable Dental Picks
 
15.3
 
60.8
BC®/Goody's®
 
#1
 
Analgesic Powders
 
98.9
 
81.1
Beano®
 
#1
 
Gas Prevention
 
82.2
 
94.6
Debrox®
 
#1
 
Ear Wax Removal
 
55.4
 
85.9
Gaviscon® (5)
 
#1
 
Upset Stomach Remedies
 
16.3
 
94.0
Dermoplast®
 
#3
 
Pain Relief Sprays
 
17.3
 
74.7
New-Skin®
 
#1
 
Liquid Bandages
 
68.2
 
91.6
Fiber Choice®
 
#5
 
Fiber Laxative Supplements
 
4.3
 
86.0
Ecotrin®
 
#2
 
Aspirin
 
3.3
 
88.4
Fess® (6)
 
#1
 
Nasal Saline Spray
 
64.0
 
Hydralyte® (6)
 
#1
 
Oral Rehydration
 
85.5
 
Monistat®
 
#1
 
Vaginal Treatment-Anti-Fungal
 
53.4
 
90.3
e.p.t™
 
#3
 
Pregnancy Test Kits
 
10.0
 
75.4
Nix®
 
#2
 
Lice/Parasite Treatments
 
13.3
 
79.8
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Household Cleaning:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chore Boy®
 
#2
 
Soap Free Metal Scrubbers
 
8.6
 
27.1
Comet®
 
#1
 
Abrasive Tub and Tile Cleaner
 
37.9
 
90.2
Spic and Span®
 
#8
 
Dilutable All Purpose Cleaner
 
1.4
 
46.3

(1)
We have prepared the information included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K with regard to the market share and ranking for our brands based in part on data generated by Information Resources, Inc., an independent market research firm (“IRI”). IRI reports total U.S. Multi-Outlet retail sales data in the food, drug, mass merchandise markets (including Walmart), dollar stores (Dollar General, Family Dollar, Fred's), selected warehouse clubs (BJ's and Sam's) and DeCA military commissaries, representing approximately 90% of Prestige Brands' categories for retail sales. 

(2)
“Market segment” is defined by us and is either a standard IRI category or a segment within a standard IRI category and is based on our product offerings and the categories in which we compete. 

(3)
“Market share” is based on sales dollars in the United States, as calculated by IRI for the 52 weeks ended March 22, 2015.


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(4)
“ACV” refers to the All Commodity Volume Food Drug Mass Index, as calculated by IRI for the 52 weeks ended March 22, 2015.  ACV measures the ratio of the weighted sales volume of stores that sell a particular product to all the stores that sell products in that market segment generally.  For example, if a product is sold by 50% of the stores that sell products in that market segment, but those stores account for 85% of the sales volume in that market segment, that product would have an ACV of 85%.  We believe that a high ACV evidences a product’s attractiveness to consumers, as major national and regional retailers will carry products that are attractive to their customers.  Lower ACV measures would indicate that a product is not as available to consumers because the major retailers generally would not carry products for which consumer demand is not as high.  For these reasons, we believe that ACV is an important measure for investors to gauge consumer awareness of the Company’s product offerings and of the importance of those products to major retailers.

(5)
Gaviscon is distributed by us in Canada only and the market information was generated by Nielsen, an independent third party market research firm for the period ending February 7, 2015. Figures represent national, all channel retail sales data in the food, drug, mass merchandise (e.g. Walmart), general merchandise (e.g. Dollarama), and warehouse club stores (e.g. Costco). Data reported for warehouse club and general merchandise is calculated based on home scan panel data, and not direct point of sale data.

(6)
The Care Pharma brands include the Fess line of cold/allergy and saline nasal health products, which is the leading saline spray for both adults and children in Australia, and Hydralyte, which is the leading OTC brand in oral rehydration in Australia. Market information was generated by IMS Australian Proprietary Index, an independent market research firm, for the period ending March 31, 2015.

Our products are sold through multiple channels, including mass merchandisers and drug, grocery, dollar, convenience, and club stores, which reduces our exposure to any single distribution channel.  

We have developed our brand portfolio through the acquisition of strong and well-recognized brands from larger consumer products and pharmaceutical companies, as well as growth brands from smaller private companies.  While the brands we have purchased from larger consumer products and pharmaceutical companies have long histories of support and brand development, we believe that at the time we acquired them they were considered “non-core” by their previous owners.  Consequently, these brands did not benefit from the focus of senior level personnel or strong marketing support.  We also believe that the brands we have purchased from smaller private companies were constrained by the limited financial resources of their prior owners.  After adding a core brand to our portfolio, we seek to increase its sales, market share and distribution in both new and existing channels through our established retail distribution network.  We pursue this growth through increased advertising and promotion, new sales and marketing strategies, improved packaging and formulations, and innovative new products.  Our business, business model, competitive strengths and growth strategy face various risks that are described in “Risk Factors” in Part I, Item 1A of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Competitive Strengths

Diversified Portfolio of Well-Recognized and Established Consumer Brands
We own and market well-recognized consumer brands, some of which were established over 60 years ago.  Our diverse portfolio of products provides us with multiple sources of growth and minimizes our reliance on any one product or category. We provide significant marketing support to our core brands that is designed to enhance our sales growth and our long-term profitability.  The markets in which we sell our products, however, are highly competitive and include numerous national and global manufacturers, distributors, marketers and retailers.  Many of these competitors have greater research and development and financial resources than us and may be able to spend more aggressively on sales, advertising and marketing programs and research and development, which may have an adverse effect on our competitive position.

Strong Competitor in Attractive Categories
We compete in product categories that address recurring consumer needs.  We believe we are well positioned in these categories due to the long history and consumer awareness of our brands, our strong market positions, and our low-cost operating model.  However, a significant increase in the number of product introductions or increased advertising, marketing and trade support by our competitors in these markets could have a material adverse effect on our results from operations.

Proven Ability to Develop and Introduce New Products
We focus our marketing and product development efforts on the identification of under-served consumer needs, the design of products that directly address those needs, and the ability to extend our highly recognizable brand names to other products.  As an example of this philosophy, in 2015 we launched Dramamine Naturals, Compound W Freeze Off Advanced, Fiber Choice Immunity Support and Fiber Choice Metabolism and Energy. In 2014, we launched Goody's Headache Relief Shot, Efferdent Fresh Guard and Beano Plus Dairy Defense. In 2013, we launched PediaCare Nighttime Multi-Symptom Cold reliever, Little

5



Remedies Soothing Syrup, Luden's Moisture Drops, Chloraseptic Warming Spray for sore throat, BC Powder in a new cherry flavor and Fiber Choice Fruity Bites fiber gummies. Although line extensions and new product introductions are important to the overall growth of a brand, our efforts may reduce sales of existing products within that brand.  In addition, certain of our product introductions may not be successful.

Efficient Operating Model
To gain operating efficiencies, we oversee the production planning and quality control aspects of the manufacturing, warehousing and distribution of our products, while we outsource the operating elements of these functions to well-established third-party providers.  This approach allows us to benefit from their core competencies and maintain a highly variable cost structure, with low overhead, limited working capital requirements, and minimal investment in capital expenditures, as evidenced by the following:
 
Gross
Margin %
G&A %
To Total Revenues
CapEx %
To Total Revenues
2015
56.8
11.4
0.9
2014
56.2
8.1
0.5
2013
55.4
8.3
1.7

In 2015, our gross margin percentage was comparable to the prior year with a slight increase of 60 basis points from the prior year. In 2014, our gross margin percentage was comparable over the prior year with a slight increase of 80 basis points over 2013. General and administrative costs, as a percentage of total revenues, increased 330 basis points in 2015 versus 2014, primarily as a result of costs associated with the acquisition of the Hydralyte brand and Insight. General and administrative costs, as a percentage of total revenues, decreased 20 basis points in 2014 versus 2013. In 2015, our capital expenditures remained consistent as a percentage of revenues with an increase of 40 basis points versus 2014.

Management Team with Proven Ability to Acquire, Integrate and Grow Brands
Our business has grown through acquisition, integration and expansion of the many brands we have purchased.  Our management team has significant experience in consumer product marketing, sales, legal and regulatory compliance, product development and customer service.  Unlike many larger consumer products companies, which we believe often entrust their smaller brands to successive junior employees, we dedicate experienced managers to specific brands.  We seek more experienced personnel to bear the substantial responsibility of brand management and to effectuate our growth strategy.  These managers nurture the brands to allow the brands to grow and evolve.

Growth Strategy

In order to continue to enhance our brands and drive growth, we focus our growth strategy on our core competencies:

Effective Marketing and Advertising;

Sales Excellence;

Extraordinary Customer Service; and

Innovation and Product Development.


6



We execute this strategy through the following efforts:

Investments in Advertising and Promotion

We invest in advertising and promotion to drive the growth of our core brands.  Our marketing strategy is focused primarily on consumer-oriented programs that include targeted coupon programs, media, in-store and digital advertising.  While the absolute level of marketing expenditures differs by brand and category, we have often increased the amount of investment in our brands after acquiring them. Advertising and promotion spend on our top five selling brands was approximately 13.4% of the revenues associated with these brands in 2015. In 2015 and 2014, advertising and promotional spend on the core brands acquired from GSK, which are BC, Goody’s, Beano, Gaviscon and Debrox, was approximately 16.9% and 21.2%, respectively, of the revenues associated with these brands. In 2015, advertising and promotional spend for the newly acquired Hydralyte brand and Insight brands was approximately 20.6% of revenues associated with those brands. Given the competition in our industry, there is a risk that our marketing efforts may not result in increased sales and profitability.  Additionally, we can offer no assurance that we can maintain any increased sales and profitability levels once attained.

Growing our Categories and Market Share with Innovative New Products

One of our strategies is to broaden the categories in which we participate and increase our share within those categories through ongoing product innovation.  In 2015, we launched Dramamine Naturals, Compound W Freeze Off Advanced, Fiber Choice Immunity Support and Fiber Choice Metabolism and Energy. In 2014, we launched Goody's Headache Relief Shot, PediaCare Single Dose Fever Packet, Efferdent Fresh Guard and Beano Plus Dairy Defense. In 2013, we launched PediaCare Nighttime Multi-Symptom Cold reliever, Little Remedies Soothing Syrup, Luden's Moisture Drops, Chloraseptic Warming Spray for sore throat, BC Powder in a new cherry flavor and Fiber Choice Fruity Bites fiber gummies. While there is always a risk that sales of existing products may be reduced by new product introductions, our goal is to grow the overall sales of our brands.

Increasing Distribution Across Multiple Channels

Our broad distribution base attempts to ensure that our products are well positioned across all available channels and that we are able to participate in changing consumer retail trends.  In an effort to ensure continued sales growth, we have altered our focus by expanding our reliance on direct sales while reducing our reliance on brokers.  We believe this philosophy allows us to better:

Know our customer;

Service our customer; and

Support our customer.

While we make great efforts to both maintain our customer base and grow in new markets, there is a risk that we may not be able to maintain or enhance our relationships across distribution channels, which could adversely impact our business, and results from operations.

Growing Our International Business

International sales beyond the borders of North America represented 8.9%, 5.4% and 2.7% of revenues in 2015, 2014, and 2013, respectively, and international sales have increased as a result of the acquisition of Care Pharma in 2014 and the acquisition of Hydralyte in 2015.  International sales beyond the borders of North America also grew 93.0% and 93.2% in 2015 and 2014, respectively. We have designed and developed both products and packaging for specific international markets and expect that our international revenues will continue to grow.  In addition to Clear Eyes, Murine and Chloraseptic, which are currently sold internationally, we have licensed to an international consumer packaged goods company (the "licensee") the right to use the Comet, Spic and Span and Chlorinol® trademarks in the commercial/institutional/industrial business throughout the world (excluding Russia and specified Eastern European countries).  We have also licensed to the licensee the Comet and Chlorinol brands in Russia and specified Eastern European countries. These agreements were amended in December 2014 to allow the licensee to obtain the trademarks in certain specified Eastern European countries for $10.0 million. The amended agreement expires December 31, 2025, and includes an option for the licensee to buy out the remaining commercial/institutional/industrial business at any time after July 1, 2016 for an exercise price of $10.0 million.

7



A number of our other brands have previously been sold internationally and we seek to expand the number of brands sold through our existing international distribution network and continue to identify additional distribution partners for further expansion into other international markets.

Pursuing Strategic Acquisitions

Acquisitions are an important part of our overall strategy for growing revenue.  We have a history of growth through acquisition (see "Our History and Accomplishments" below). In 2015, we acquired Insight, including a leading feminine care platform in the United States and Canada anchored by Monistat, the leading North American brand in OTC yeast infection treatment. The acquisition also added brands to the Company's cough & cold, pain relief, ear care and dermatological platforms. Additionally, in 2015, we acquired the Hydralyte brand in Australia and New Zealand. Hydralyte is the leading OTC brand in oral rehydration in Australia. In 2014, we acquired Care Pharma, including the Fess line of cold/allergy and saline nasal health products. Other key brands acquired from Care Pharma include Painstop analgesic, Rectogesic for rectal discomfort, and the Fab line of nutritional supplements. Care Pharma also includes a line of brands for children including Little Allergies, Little Eyes, and Little Coughs. While we believe that there will continue to be a pipeline of acquisition candidates for us to investigate, strategic fit and relative cost are of the utmost importance in our decision to pursue such opportunities.  We believe our business model allows us to integrate acquisitions in an efficient manner, while also providing opportunities to realize significant cost savings.  However, there is a risk that our financial condition and operating results could be adversely affected in the event we (i) do not realize all of the anticipated operating synergies and cost savings from acquisitions, (ii) do not successfully integrate acquisitions or (iii) pay too much for these acquisitions. In the past, we utilized various debt offerings to help us acquire certain brands or businesses. For example, in 2010, we refinanced our long-term debt and significantly improved our liquidity position, debt maturities and covenants, all of which better positioned us to pursue the Blacksmith Brands, Inc. ("Blacksmith") and Dramamine acquisitions we consummated that year and potential future acquisition targets. In 2012, we completed an offering of senior notes, entered into new senior secured term loan and revolving credit facilities and ratably secured our existing senior notes with the new term loan facility. We used the net proceeds from the senior notes offering, together with borrowings under the new senior secured term loan facility, to finance the acquisition of the 17 OTC brands acquired from GSK that year, to repay our existing senior secured credit facilities, to pay fees and expenses incurred in connection with these transactions and for general corporate purposes. In 2013, we sold one of the acquired GSK Brands, Phazyme, and used the proceeds to repay debt. In 2014, we amended our credit facilities and used the net proceeds to repay existing senior secured credit facilities, to pay fees and expenses incurred in connection with Care Pharma transactions and for general corporate purposes. In 2015, we further amended our credit facilities and used the net proceeds to finance the acquisition of Insight and to pay fees and expenses incurred in connection with the Insight and Hydralyte transactions.

Market Position

During 2015, approximately 73.0% of our net revenues were from brands with a number one or number two market position, compared with approximately 71.5% and 68.8% during 2014 and 2013, respectively.  These brands included Chloraseptic, Clear Eyes, Chore Boy, Comet, Compound W, The Doctor’s, New-Skin, Dramamine, Efferdent, BC/Goody's, Beano, Debrox, Gaviscon, Ecotrin, Fess, Hydralyte, Monistat, and Nix.

See “Major Brands” above for information regarding market share and ACV calculations.

Our History and Accomplishments

We were originally formed in 1996 as a joint venture of Medtech Labs and The Shansby Group (a private equity firm), to acquire certain OTC drug brands from American Home Products.  Since 2001, our portfolio of brand name products has expanded from OTC brands to include household cleaning products.  We have added brands to our portfolio principally by acquiring strong and well-recognized brands from larger consumer products and pharmaceutical companies.  In February 2004, GTCR Golder Rauner II, LLC (“GTCR”), a private equity firm, acquired our business from the owners of Medtech Labs and The Shansby Group.  In addition, we acquired the Spic and Span business in March 2004.

In April 2004, we acquired Bonita Bay Holdings, Inc. (“Bonita Bay”), the parent holding company of Prestige Brands International, Inc., which conducted its business under the “Prestige” name.  After we completed the Bonita Bay acquisition, we began to conduct our business under the “Prestige” name as well.  The Bonita Bay brand portfolio included Chloraseptic, Comet, Clear Eyes and Murine.

Prestige Brands Holdings, Inc. was incorporated in the State of Delaware in June 2004.


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In October 2004, we acquired the Little Remedies brand of pediatric OTC products through our purchase of Vetco, Inc.  Products offered under the Little Remedies brand included Little Noses® nasal products, Little Tummys® digestive health products, Little Colds® cough & cold remedies, and Little Remedies New Parents Survival Kit.  

In February 2005, we raised $448.0 million through an initial public offering of 28.0 million shares of common stock.  We used the net proceeds of the offering ($416.8 million), plus $3.0 million from our revolving credit facility and $8.8 million of cash on hand, to (i) repay $100.0 million of our existing senior indebtedness, (ii) redeem $84.0 million in aggregate principal amount of our existing 9.25% senior subordinated notes, (iii) repurchase an aggregate of 4.7 million shares of our common stock held by the investment funds affiliated with GTCR and TCW/Crescent Mezzanine, LLC for $30.2 million, and (iv) redeem all outstanding senior preferred units and class B preferred units of one of our subsidiaries for $199.8 million.

In October 2005, we acquired the Chore Boy brand of metal cleaning pads, scrubbing sponges, and non-metal soap pads, which had over 84 years of history in the scouring pad and cleaning accessories categories.

In November 2005, we acquired Dental Concepts LLC, a marketer of therapeutic oral care products sold under The Doctor’s brand.  The brand is driven primarily by two niche segments, bruxism (nighttime teeth grinding) and interdental cleaning.  Products marketed under The Doctor’s brand include The Doctor’s NightGuard Dental Protector, the first Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) cleared OTC treatment for bruxism, and The Doctor’s BrushPicks, disposable interdental toothpicks.

In September 2006, we acquired Wartner USA B.V., the owner of the Wartner brand of OTC wart treatment products in the United States and Canada.  The Wartner brand, which is the number three brand in the U.S. OTC wart treatment category, has enhanced our market position in the category, complementing Compound W.

On October 28, 2009, we sold our three shampoo brands - Prell Shampoo, Denorex Dandruff Shampoo and Zincon Dandruff Shampoo.  The terms of the sale included an upfront receipt of $8.0 million in cash, with a subsequent receipt of $1.0 million in cash on October 28, 2010.   We used the proceeds from the sale to reduce outstanding bank indebtedness.

In March 2010, we refinanced our outstanding long-term indebtedness through entry into a $150.0 million senior term loan facility due April 1, 2016 (the “2010 Senior Term Loan”), and the issuance of $150.0 million in senior notes with an 8.25% interest rate due 2018 (the "2010 Senior Notes").  Proceeds from the new indebtedness were used to retire our senior term loan facility originally due April 1, 2011 and 9.25% senior subordinated notes originally due April 15, 2012.  Additionally, our new credit agreement included a $30.0 million revolving credit facility due April 1, 2015. The refinancing and new credit facility improved our liquidity, extended maturities, and improved covenant ratios, all of which better positioned us to pursue strategic acquisitions.

On September 1, 2010, we sold certain assets related to the Cutex nail polish remover brand for $4.1 million.

On November 1, 2010, we acquired 100% of the capital stock of Blacksmith for $190.0 million in cash, plus a working capital adjustment of $13.4 million. Additionally, we paid $1.1 million on behalf of Blacksmith for the sellers' transaction costs. As a result of this acquisition, we acquired five OTC brands: Efferdent, Effergrip, PediaCare, Luden's and NasalCrom. In connection with the acquisition of Blacksmith, in November 2010, we (i) executed an Increase Joinder to our existing credit agreement pursuant to which we entered into an incremental term loan in the amount of $115.0 million and increased our revolving credit facility by $10.0 million to $40.0 million; and (ii) issued an additional $100.0 million aggregate principal amount of 2010 Senior Notes. The purchase price for Blacksmith was funded from the incremental term loan and the issuance of the 2010 Senior Notes and cash on hand.

On January 6, 2011, we completed the acquisition of certain assets comprising the Dramamine brand in the United States for $77.1 million in cash, including transaction costs incurred in the acquisition of $1.2 million. The purchase price was funded by cash on hand.

On January 31, 2012, we completed the acquisition of the 15 GSK brands (the "GSK Brands I"), including the related contracts, trademarks and inventory, for $615.0 million in cash, subject to a post-closing inventory and apportionment adjustment. The GSK Brands I include BC, Goody's and Ecotrin brands of pain relievers; Beano, Gaviscon, Phazyme, Tagamet and Fiber Choice gastrointestinal brands; and the Sominex sleep aid brand. On March 30, 2012, we completed the acquisition from GSK of Debrox and Gly-Oxide (the "GSK Brands II") in the United States, including the related contracts, trademarks and inventory, for $45.0 million in cash, subject to a post-closing inventory and apportionment adjustment.

On January 31, 2012, in connection with the acquisition of the GSK Brands I, we (i) issued 8.125% senior notes due in 2020 in an aggregate principal amount of $250.0 million (the “2012 Senior Notes”), and (ii) entered into a new senior secured credit facility, which consists of a $660.0 million term loan facility with a seven-year maturity (the “2012 Term Loan”) and a $50.0

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million asset-based revolving credit facility with a five-year maturity (the “2012 ABL Revolver”). In September 2012, we utilized a portion of our accordion feature to increase the amount of our borrowing capacity under the 2012 ABL Revolver by $25.0 million to $75.0 million. Additionally, in connection with the entry into the new senior secured credit facilities, we repaid the outstanding balance of and terminated our 2010 Senior Term Loan.

On October 31, 2012, we divested the Phazyme gas treatment brand, which was a non-core OTC brand that we acquired from GSK in January 2012. We received $21.7 million from the divestiture on October 31, 2012 and the remaining $0.6 million on January 4, 2013. The proceeds were used to repay debt. No significant gain or loss was recorded as a result of the sale.

On February 21, 2013, we entered into Amendment No. 1 ("Term Loan Amendment No. 1") to the 2012 Term Loan. Term Loan Amendment No. 1 provided for the refinancing of all of our existing Term B Loans with new Term B-1 Loans. The interest rate on the Term B-1 Loans was based, at our option, on a LIBOR rate plus a margin of 2.75% per annum, with a LIBOR floor of 1.00%, or an alternate base rate, with a floor of 2.00%, plus a margin. The new Term B-1 Loans will mature on the same date as the Term B Loans' original maturity date. In addition, Term Loan Amendment No. 1 provides us with certain additional capacity to prepay subordinated debt, the 2012 Senior Notes and certain other unsecured indebtedness permitted to be incurred under the credit agreement governing the 2012 Term Loan and the 2012 ABL Revolver. 

On July 1, 2013, we completed the acquisition of Care Pharma, which was funded through a combination of our existing senior secured credit facilities and cash on hand. The Care Pharma brands include the Fess line of cold/allergy and saline nasal health products, which is the leading saline spray for both adults and children in Australia. Other key brands include Painstop analgesic, Rectogesic for rectal discomfort, and the Fab line of nutritional supplements. Care Pharma also carries a line of brands for children including Little Allergies, Little Eyes, and Little Coughs. The brands acquired are complementary to our OTC Healthcare portfolio.

On December 17, 2013, we issued $400.0 million aggregate principal amount of senior unsecured notes, with an interest rate of 5.375% and a maturity date of December 15, 2021 (the "2013 Senior Notes"). We may redeem some or all of the 2013 Senior Notes at redemption prices set forth in the indenture governing the 2013 Senior Notes. As a result of this issuance, we redeemed $201.7 million of the 2010 Senior Notes in December 2013 and the balance of $48.3 million in January 2014 and repaid approximately $120.0 million toward our 2012 Term Loan.
On September 3, 2014, the Company completed its previously announced acquisition of Insight, a marketer and distributor of feminine care and other OTC healthcare products, for $753.2 million in cash. The closing followed the FTC approval of the acquisition and was finalized pursuant to the terms of the purchase agreement announced on April 25, 2014. Pursuant to the Insight purchase agreement, the Company acquired 27 OTC brands sold in North America (including related trademarks, contracts and inventory), which extended the Company's portfolio of OTC brands to include a leading feminine care platform in the United States and Canada anchored by Monistat, the leading North American brand in OTC yeast infection treatment. The acquisition also added brands to the Company's cough & cold, pain relief, ear care and dermatological platforms. In connection with the FTC's approval of the Insight acquisition, we sold one of the competing brands that we acquired from Insight on the same day as the Insight closing. Insight is primarily included in our North American OTC Healthcare segment.

On September 3, 2014, the Borrower entered into Amendment No. 2 ("Term Loan Amendment No. 2") to the 2012 Term Loan. Term Loan Amendment No. 2 provides for (i) the creation of a new class of Term B-2 Loans under the 2012 Term Loan (the "Term B-2 Loans") in an aggregate principal amount of $720.0 million, (ii) increased flexibility under the credit agreement governing the 2012 Term Loan and 2012 ABL Revolver, including additional investment, restricted payment and debt incurrence flexibility and financial maintenance covenant relief, and (iii) an interest rate on (x) the Term B-1 Loans that is based, at the Borrower’s option, on a LIBOR rate plus a margin of 3.125% per annum, with a LIBOR floor of 1.00%, or an alternate base rate, with a floor of 2.00%, plus a margin, and (y) the Term B-2 Loans that is based, at the Borrower’s option, on a LIBOR rate plus a margin of 3.50% per annum, with a LIBOR floor of 1.00%, or an alternate base rate, with a floor of 2.00%, plus a margin (with a margin step-down to 3.25% per annum, based upon achievement of a specified secured net leverage ratio).
The 2012 Term Loan, as amended, bears interest at a rate per annum equal to an applicable margin plus, at the Borrower's option, either (i) a base rate determined by reference to the highest of (a) the Federal Funds rate plus 0.50%, (b) the prime rate of Citibank, N.A., (c) the LIBOR rate determined by reference to the cost of funds for U.S. dollar deposits for an interest period of one month, adjusted for certain additional costs, plus 1.00% and (d) a floor of 2.00% or (ii) a LIBOR rate determined by reference to the costs of funds for U.S. dollar deposits for the interest period relevant to such borrowing, adjusted for certain additional costs, with a floor of 1.00%.
On September 3, 2014, the Borrower entered into Amendment No. 3 (“ABL Amendment No. 3”) to the 2012 ABL Revolver. ABL Amendment No. 3 provided for (i) a $40.0 million increase in revolving commitments under the 2012 ABL Revolver and (ii) increased flexibility under the credit agreement governing the 2012 Term Loan and 2012 ABL Revolver, including additional

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investment, restricted payment and debt incurrence flexibility. Borrowings under the 2012 ABL Revolver, as amended, bear interest at a rate per annum equal to an applicable margin, plus, at the Borrower's option, either (i) a base rate determined by reference to the highest of (a) the Federal Funds rate plus 0.50%, (b) the prime rate of Citibank, N.A., (c) the LIBOR rate determined by reference to the cost of funds for U.S. dollar deposits for an interest period of one month, adjusted for certain additional costs, plus 1.00% or (ii) a LIBOR rate determined by reference to the costs of funds for U.S. dollar deposits for the interest period relevant to such borrowing, adjusted for certain additional costs. The initial applicable margin for borrowings under the 2012 ABL Revolver is 1.75% with respect to LIBOR borrowings and 0.75% with respect to base-rate borrowings. The applicable margin for borrowings under the 2012 ABL Revolver may be increased to 2.00%or 2.25% for LIBOR borrowings and 1.00% or 1.25% for base-rate borrowings, depending on average excess availability under the 2012 ABL Revolver during the prior fiscal quarter. In addition to paying interest on outstanding principal under the 2012 ABL Revolver, we are required to pay a commitment fee to the lenders under the 2012 ABL Revolver in respect of the unutilized commitments thereunder. The initial commitment fee rate is 0.50% per annum. The commitment fee rate will be reduced to 0.375% per annum at any time when the average daily unused commitments for the prior quarter is less than a percentage of total commitments by an amount set forth in the credit agreement covering the 2012 ABL Revolver. We may voluntarily repay outstanding loans under the 2012 ABL Revolver at any time without a premium or penalty.

Products

We conduct our operations through three reportable segments:

North American Over-the-Counter ("OTC") Healthcare;

International Over-the-Counter ("OTC") Healthcare; and

Household Cleaning.

North American and International OTC Healthcare Segments

Our portfolio of OTC Healthcare products includes 15 core brands. Our core OTC brands are: Chloraseptic sore throat remedies, Clear Eyes eye drops, Compound W wart removers, Little Remedies pediatric products, The Doctor’s brand of oral care products, Efferdent and Effergrip denture products, Luden's cough drops, Dramamine motion sickness products, BC and Goody's analgesic powders, Beano gas prevention, Gaviscon antacids, Debrox ear drops, and two new core OTC brands from our recent Insight acquisition, including Monistat vaginal treatments and feminine care products, and Nix lice treatments. Our other significant brands include Dermoplast first-aid products, New-Skin liquid bandage, Fiber Choice fiber laxative supplements, Ecotrin aspirin, and the recently acquired e.p.t family planning products and Uristat urinary tract infection treatments.  Our significant international brands include Fess nasal saline spray and Hydralyte for dehydration and electrolyte replacement. In 2015, the North American OTC Healthcare segments accounted for 78.9% of our net revenues, compared to 80.3% and 83.8% in 2014 and 2013, respectively. In 2015, the International OTC Healthcare segment accounted for 8.6% of our net revenues, compared to 5.0% and 2.3% in 2014 and 2013, respectively.

Chloraseptic
Chloraseptic was originally developed by a dentist in 1957 to relieve sore throats and mouth pain.  Chloraseptic’s 6 oz. cherry liquid sore throat spray is the number one selling product in the U.S. sore throat liquids/sprays market and the number one U.S. pharmacist recommended spray according to Pharmacy Times. The Chloraseptic brand has an ACV of 94.8% and is number one in the U.S. Sore Throat Liquids/Lozenges category with a 47.4% U.S. market share.

Clear Eyes
Clear Eyes, with an ACV of 97.4%, has been marketed as an effective eye care product that helps eliminate redness and helps moisturize the eye.  Clear Eyes is among the leading brands in the U.S. OTC personal eye care category.  Clear Eyes is the number one U.S. brand in the Redness Relief category with 20.5% U.S. market share.

Compound W
Compound W has a long heritage, with its wart removal products having been introduced more than 50 years ago.  Compound W products are specially designed to provide relief from common and plantar warts and are sold in multiple forms of treatment depending on the consumer’s need, including Fast-Acting Liquid, Fast-Acting Gel, One Step Pads and Freeze Off®, a cryogenic-based wart removal system that works in as little as one application.  Compound W is the number one U.S. pharmacist recommended wart remover according to Pharmacy Times. Additionally, Compound W is the number one wart removal brand in the United States with a 34.8% U.S. market share and an ACV of 89%.  


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Dramamine
Dramamine is the number one brand and the number one pharmacist recommended brand, according to Pharmacy Times, in the $82.3 million U.S. Motion Sickness category with a 41.1% U.S. market share and distribution of over 93.8% ACV. The product line includes the new Dramamine for Kids, and a Less Drowsy formula and Chewable form in addition to the top selling Dramamine original product.

Efferdent and Effergrip
Efferdent Denture Cleanser holds a 27.2% U.S. market share and the number two position in the $152.4 million U.S. Denture Cleanser Tablets category. The January 2011 introduction of Efferdent PM extended the brand into the growing overnight cleanser market. In 2012, we introduced Efferdent Power Clean Crystals denture cleanser. In its introductory year, Power Clean Crystals garnered a 1.9% share of the U.S. market and successfully brought new consumers into the Efferdent franchise. In 2014, we extended the Efferdent franchise into the oral appliance cleanser segment with the introduction of Fresh GuardTM by Efferdent. This product is designed specifically for the cleaning of mouth guards, retainers, removable braces and mouth guard appliances. Efferdent enjoys distribution of over 98.4% ACV. Effergrip denture adhesive competes in the $306.6 million U.S. Adhesives category and has a 0.3% share of the U.S. market.

Little Remedies
Little Remedies is a line of gentle and soothing pediatric OTC products made specifically for little ones and their symptoms like gas, colic or a stuffy nose. The products contain safe ingredients needed to help children feel better, at just the right strength for their growing bodies, and never any alcohol, dyes, or artificial flavors. The portfolio includes: (i) an assortment of nasal saline products; (ii) products for coughs & cold; (iii) products for tummy relief, which include gas relief drops and gripe water, an herbal supplement used to ease discomfort often associated with colic and hiccups; and (iv) fever and pain relievers. Little Remedies holds a 3.4% market share of the competitive U.S. Pediatric Healthcare market, and ACV of 91.3%.

Luden's
Luden's throat drops heritage spans more than 130 years. Among the fastest growing brands in the $547.8 million U.S. Cough Drops category, Luden's has a 6.7% share of the market and distribution of more than 94.5% ACV. Luden's Wild Cherry is the number one selling item in the U.S. Cough Drop category, and a Sugar Free line extension was launched in 2011. In 2014, Luden’s continued to expand its product portfolio with the introduction of deliciously soothing Sugar Free Black Cherry, Watermelon and Blue Raspberry throat drops.

The Doctor’s
The Doctor’s is a line of products designed to help consumers maintain good oral hygiene in between dental office visits.  The market is driven primarily by two niche segments: bruxism (nighttime teeth grinding) and interdental cleaning.  The Doctor’s NightGuard dental protector was designed to "Protect your smile while you sleepTM" and was the first FDA cleared OTC treatment for bruxism. The Doctor's NightGuard currently holds a 24% share of the U.S. market and the number two position in the U.S. Teeth Grinding market. The Doctor's NightGuard also has a distribution of 65.4% ACV. The Doctor's Brushpicks is number two in the Disposable Dental Picks market, with a 15.3% share of the market.

BC/Goody's
BC and Goody's compete in the $3.1 billion U.S. Adult Analgesic category. They are the top two U.S. OTC pain reliever brands in a powder form. Developed in the Southeast region over 80 years ago, their unique form delivers fast pain relief. The combined brands have a 2.7% share of the Adult Analgesic category nationally according to IRI, but are the number one Adult Analgesic product in convenience stores according to IRI. BC is available in Original, Cherry and Arthritis formulas. Goody's includes Extra Strength, Back & Body, PM, Cool Orange, and the single dose liquid pain reliever, Headache Relief Shot.

Beano
Beano commands an 82.2% share and the number one position in the U.S. Gas Prevention category and the number two overall position in the larger $219.0 million U.S. Anti-gas category. The product is formulated with a unique digestive enzyme that works naturally with the body to prevent gas symptoms before they start. In 2010, the brand developed a proprietary delivery system and launched Beano Meltaways, a dissolvable tablet that fills the consumer need for a more discreet way to manage the condition. In 2014, the brand developed and launched Beano Plus Dairy Defense, a chewable tablet that adds a second digestive enzyme to help break down lactose.

Debrox
Debrox is the number one brand of U.S. OTC ear wax removal aids, with a 55.4% share of the U.S. Ear Wax Removal market, and an 85.9% ACV. The product line consists of two items: an ear wax removal kit containing liquid drops and an ear washer bulb, and a second item containing just the liquid drops as a refill. With Debrox, consumers have a safe, gentle method for removing

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ear wax build up while in the privacy of their homes. Debrox is the number one recommended brand with doctors and pharmacists in the United States according to Encuity Research LLC and Pharmacy Times.

Gaviscon
Gaviscon is currently the number one brand in the $147.9 million Canadian Upset Stomach Remedy category with a 16.3% market share. The brand grew 3.3% in 2015, outperforming the category, which grew 2.6%. Gaviscon's success is partly attributed to a differentiated method of action versus traditional antacid products, as it creates a foam barrier to keep stomach acid from backing up into the esophagus.

Dermoplast
Dermoplast is currently the number three brand and the number one pharmacist recommended brand, according to Pharmacy Times, in the $33.9 million U.S. Pain Relief Sprays market. Dermoplast brings hospital-strength pain and itch relief to consumers’ homes. It’s available in Original Burn & Itch and Antibacterial First Aid Sprays. Widely used in hospitals, it is sold in institutions, in addition to retail stores. The brand holds a 17.3% U.S. market share and a distribution of 74.7% ACV.

New-Skin
New-Skin is the number one brand in the $18.7 million U.S. Liquid Bandages market with a 68.2% market share. It provides a flexible, antiseptic seal to prevent infections and friction injuries in hard-to-cover areas. New-Skin has a distribution of 91.6% ACV.

Fiber Choice
Fiber Choice currently holds the number five position in the $456.0 million U.S. Fiber Laxative Supplements category with a 4.3% market share. The brand has a distribution of 86.0% ACV. In 2013, the brand developed and launched Fiber Choice Fruity Bites gummy fiber to compete in the rapidly expanding gummies segment of the category.

Ecotrin
Ecotrin is the number one cardiologist recommended aspirin in the United States, according to Encuity Research LLC, and currently holds the number two position in the $481.5 million U.S. Aspirin category with a 3.3% market share. The brand has a distribution of 88.4% ACV.

Fess
In the Australasia market, Fess is currently the number one brand in the Nasal Saline Spray market with a 64.0% market share.

Hydralyte
Hydralyte is the leading OTC brand in oral rehydration in Australia with an 85.5% market share.

Monistat®
Monistat®, the #1 OB/GYN recommended U.S. OTC brand for yeast infection treatment, came to Prestige Brands as part of the Insight acquisition and is currently the largest brand in the Company. The active ingredient, miconazole, is just as effective at curing yeast infections as the leading prescription pill. Monistat® comes in 3 different doses: 1-day, 3-day and 7-day; in 3 different forms: cream, ovule® and suppository; and with or without symptom relief accessories: external cream and wipes. As the #1 brand in the U.S. OTC Yeast Infection category, Monistat® holds a 53.4% share of the market and has a distribution of 90.3% ACV. The Monistat® Complete Care™ line of products was introduced in 2014 and includes 4 products in feminine care including an Instant Itch Relief cream, Vaginal Health Test, Chafing Relief Powder Gel®, and Stay Fresh Feminine Freshness Gel. The Complete Care™ line holds a 13.0% share of the U.S. feminine care market and has a distribution of 77.7% ACV.

e.p.t™
The first U.S. brand to market an over the counter pregnancy test kit, e.p.t™ has been on the market for over 35 years. e.p.t™ provides over 99% accuracy and can be used up to five days before the expected period.  e.p.t™ features advanced technology available in both analog and digital tests.  Both provide easy to read and clear results.  e.p.t™ is the number three brand in the U.S. Pregnancy Test Kits category and holds a 10.0% share of the market and has a distribution of 75.4% ACV.

Nix
Nix is the number two brand in the $150.0 million U.S. pediculicides (Head Lice Treatment) category with a 13.3% market share. Nix kills lice and their eggs while also protecting against lice re-infestation for up to 14 days. It is safe for use on children as young as 2 months old and is the number one pediatrician recommended brand in the United States.



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Household Cleaning Segment

Our portfolio of Household Cleaning brands includes the Chore Boy, Comet and Spic and Span brands.  During 2015, the Household Cleaning segment accounted for 12.6% of our revenues, compared with 14.7% and 13.9% in 2014 and 2013, respectively.

Chore Boy
Chore Boy scrubbing pads and sponges were initially launched in the 1920s.  Over the years, the line has grown to include metal and non-metal scrubbers that are used for a variety of household cleaning tasks.  Chore Boy has an 8.6% share of the U.S. market and a number two position in the U.S. Soap Free Metal Scrubbers market.

Comet
Comet was originally introduced in 1956 and is one of the most widely recognized Household Cleaning brands with an ACV of 90.2%Comet is the number one brand with a 37.9% market share in the U.S. Abrasive Tub and Tile Cleaner sub-category of the Household Cleaning category that includes non-scratch, abrasive powders, creams, and liquids.  Comet products include several varieties of cleaning powders, spray and cream, both abrasive and non-abrasive.  

Spic and Span
Spic and Span was introduced in 1925 and is marketed as the complete home cleaner, with three product lines consisting of (i) dilutables, (ii) an anti-bacterial hard surface spray for counter tops and (iii) glass cleaners.  Each of these products can be used for multi-room and multi-surface cleaning.  

For additional information concerning our business segments, please refer to Part II, Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and Note 19 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Marketing and Sales

Our marketing strategy is based on the acquisition and the rejuvenation of established consumer brands that possess what we believe to be significant brand value and unrealized potential.  Our marketing objective is to increase sales and market share by developing innovative new products and line extensions and executing creative and cost-effective advertising and promotional programs.  After we acquire a brand, we implement a brand building strategy that uses the brand’s existing consumer awareness to maximize sales of current products and provides a vehicle to drive growth through product innovation.  This brand building process involves the evaluation of the existing brand name, the development and introduction of innovative new products, and the execution of support programs.  Recognizing that financial resources are limited, we allocate our resources to focus on our core brands with the most impactful, consumer-relevant initiatives, which we believe have the greatest opportunities for growth and financial success.  Brand priorities vary from year-to-year and generally revolve around new product introductions.

Customers

Our senior management team and dedicated sales force strive to maintain long-standing relationships with our top 50 domestic customers.  We also contract with third-party sales management enterprises that interface directly with our remaining customers and report directly to members of our sales management team.

We enjoy broad distribution across each of the major retail channels, including mass merchandisers, food, drug, dollar, convenience and club stores.  The following table sets forth the percentage of gross sales across our six major distribution channels during each of the past three years ended March 31:

 
Percentage of
Gross Sales(1)
Channel of Distribution
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Mass
30.1
 
29.6
 
32.2
Drug
26.5
 
23.5
 
22.7
Food
18.4
 
19.6
 
19.4
Dollar
9.3
 
9.0
 
9.3
Convenience
5.7
 
7.3
 
5.9
Club
2.0
 
3.0
 
3.1
Other
8.0
 
8.0
 
7.4

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(1)
Includes estimates for some of our wholesale customers that service more than one distribution channel.

Due to the diversity of our product lines, we believe that each of these channels is important to our business, and we continue to seek opportunities for growth in each channel.

Our principal customer relationships include Walmart, Walgreens, CVS, Target, and Dollar Tree. During 2015, 2014, and 2013, Walmart accounted for approximately 18.1%, 19.5%, and 15.9%, respectively, of our gross revenues. We expect that for future periods, our top ten customers, including Walmart, will, in the aggregate, continue to account for a large portion of our sales.

Our strong customer relationships and product recognition allow us to attempt to capitalize on a number of important strategic opportunities, including (i) minimization of slotting fees, (ii) maximization of new product introductions, (iii) maximization of shelf space prominence, and (iv) minimization of cash collection days.  We believe that our emphasis on strong customer relationships, speed and flexibility and leading sales technology capabilities, combined with consistent marketing support programs and ongoing product innovation, will continue to maximize our competitiveness in the increasingly complex retail environment.

The following table sets forth a list of our primary distribution channels and our principal customers for each channel:
Distribution Channel
 
Customers
 
Distribution Channel
 
Customers
Mass
 
Kmart
 
Drug
 
CVS
 
 
Meijer
 
 
 
Rite Aid
 
 
Target
 
 
 
Walgreens
 
 
Walmart
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Food
 
Ahold
 
Dollar
 
Dollar General
 
 
Kroger
 
 
 
Dollar Tree
 
 
Publix
 
 
 
Family Dollar
 
 
Safeway
 
 
 
 
 
 
Supervalu
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Convenience
 
McLane
 
Club
 
BJ’s Wholesale Club
 
 
HT Hackney
 
 
 
Costco
 
 
Core Mark
 
 
 
Sam’s Club


Outsourcing and Manufacturing

In order to maximize our competitiveness and efficiently allocate our resources, third-party manufacturers fulfill all of our manufacturing needs.  We have found that contract manufacturing maximizes our flexibility and responsiveness to industry and consumer trends while minimizing the need for capital expenditures.  We select contract manufacturers based on their core competencies and our perception of the best overall value, including factors such as (i) depth of services, (ii) professionalism and integrity of the management team, (iii) manufacturing agility and capacity, (iv) regulatory compliance, and (v) competitive pricing.  We also conduct thorough reviews of each potential manufacturer’s facilities, quality standards, capacity and financial stability.  We generally purchase only finished products from our manufacturers.

Our primary contract manufacturers provide comprehensive services from product development through the manufacturing of finished goods.  They are responsible for such matters as (i) production planning, (ii) product research and development, (iii) procurement, (iv) production, (v) quality testing, and (vi) almost all capital expenditures.  In most instances, we provide our contract manufacturers with guidance in the areas of (i) product development, (ii) performance criteria, (iii) regulatory guidance, (iv) sourcing of packaging materials, and (v) monthly master production schedules.  This management approach results in minimal capital expenditures and maximizes our cash flow, which allows us to reinvest to support our marketing initiatives, fund brand acquisitions or repay outstanding indebtedness.

At March 31, 2015, we had relationships with 95 third-party manufacturers.  Of those, we had long-term contracts with 44 manufacturers that produced items that accounted for approximately 82.9% of our gross sales for 2015, compared to 24 manufacturers with long-term contracts that accounted for approximately 82.4% of our gross sales in 2014.  The fact that we do

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not have long-term contracts with certain manufacturers means that they could cease manufacturing our products at any time and for any reason or initiate arbitrary and costly price increases, which could have a material adverse effect on our business and results from operations.

At March 31, 2015, suppliers for our key brands included GlaxoSmithKline, Denison Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Aspen Pharmacare, Olds Products Company, Tower Laboratories Ltd., and Contract Pharmaceuticals Corp. We enter into manufacturing agreements for a majority of our products by sales volume, each of which vary based on the capabilities of the third-party manufacturer and the products being supplied.  These agreements explicitly outline the manufacturer’s obligations and product specifications with respect to the brand or brands being produced.  The purchase price of products is subject to change pursuant to the terms of these agreements due to fluctuations in raw material, packaging and labor costs.  Other products are manufactured on a purchase order basis, which is generally based on batch sizes and results in no long-term obligations or commitments.

Warehousing and Distribution

We receive orders from retailers and/or brokers primarily by electronic data interchange, which automatically enters each order into our computer systems and then routes the order to our distribution center.  The distribution center will, in turn, send a confirmation that the order was received, fill the order and ship the order to the customer, while sending a shipment confirmation to us.  Upon receipt of the shipment confirmation, we send an invoice to the customer.

We manage product distribution in the continental United States primarily through one facility located in St. Louis, which is owned and operated by a third-party provider.  Our U.S. warehouse provider provides warehouse services including storage, handling and shipping, as well as transportation services, with respect to our full line of products, including (i) complete management services, (ii) claims administration, (iii) proof of delivery, (iv) procurement, (v) report generation, and (vi) automation and freight payment services.

If our warehouse provider abruptly stopped providing warehousing or transportation services to us, our business operations could suffer a temporary disruption while we engage new service providers.  We believe this process could be completed quickly and any resulting temporary disruption would not be likely to have a significant adverse effect on our business, operating results or financial condition.  However, a serious disruption, such as a flood or fire, to our distribution center could damage our inventory and could materially impair our ability to distribute our products to customers in a timely manner or at a reasonable cost.  We could incur significantly higher costs and experience longer lead times associated with the distribution of our products to our customers during the time required to reopen or replace our distribution center.  As a result, any such serious or prolonged disruption could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results from operations.

Competition

The business of selling brand name consumer products in the OTC Healthcare and Household Cleaning categories is highly competitive.  These markets include numerous national and global manufacturers, distributors, marketers and retailers that actively compete for consumers’ business both in the United States and abroad.  In addition, like most companies that market products in these categories, we are experiencing increased competition from “private label” products introduced by major retail chains.  While we believe that our branded products provide superior quality and benefits, we are unable to predict the extent to which consumers will purchase “private label” products as an alternative to branded products.

Our principal competitors vary by industry category.  Competitors in the OTC Healthcare category include: Johnson & Johnson, maker of Visine®, which competes with our Clear Eyes and Murine brands; McNeil-PPC (owned by Johnson & Johnson), maker of Children's Tylenol®, and Novartis Consumer Healthcare, maker of Triaminic®, each of which competes with our PediaCare and Little Remedies brands; The Procter & Gamble Company, maker of Vicks®, Reckitt Benckiser, maker of Cepacol®, and Kraft Foods, maker of Halls®, each of which competes with our Chloraseptic and Luden's brands; and The Procter & Gamble Company, maker of Fixodent®, and GlaxoSmithKline, maker of Polident®, each of which competes with our Efferdent brand. Sunstar America, Inc., maker of the GUM® line of oral care products, as well as DenTek® Oral Care, Inc., which markets a dental protector for nighttime teeth grinding and interdental toothpicks, compete with our The Doctor's oral care brand. Top competitors of our acquired GSK Brands categories include: McNeil-PPC (owned by Johnson & Johnson), maker of Tylenol®, Pfizer, maker of Advil®, and Novartis Consumer Healthcare, maker of Excedrin®, each of which competes with our BC, Goody's and Ecotrin brands. The Procter & Gamble Company, maker of Metamucil®, competes with our Fiber Choice brand; Novartis Consumer Healthcare, maker of Gas X®, competes with our Beano brand; and GSK, maker of Tums®, competes with our Gaviscon and Tagamet brands.

Competitors in the Household Cleaning category include: Henkel AG & Co., maker of Soft Scrub®, Colgate-Palmolive Company, maker of Ajax® Cleanser, and The Clorox Company, maker of Tilex®, each of which competes with our Comet brand.  Additionally,

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Clorox’s Pine Sol® and The Procter & Gamble Company’s Mr. Clean® compete with our Spic and Span brand, while 3M Company, maker of Scotch-Brite®, O-Cel-O® and Dobie® brands, and Clorox’s SOS® compete with our Chore Boy brand.

We compete on the basis of numerous factors, including brand recognition, product quality, performance, value to customers, price, and product availability at the retail level.  Advertising, promotion, merchandising and packaging, the timing of new product introductions, and line extensions also have a significant impact on customers’ buying decisions and, as a result, on our sales.  The structure and quality of our sales force, as well as sell-through of our products, affect in-store position, wall display space and inventory levels in retail outlets.  If we are unable to maintain the inventory levels and in-store positioning of our products in retail stores, our sales and operating results would be adversely affected.  Our markets are also highly sensitive to the introduction of new products, which may rapidly capture a significant share of the market.  An increase in the amount of new product introductions and the levels of advertising spending by our competitors could have a material adverse effect on our business results from operations.

Many of the competitors noted above are larger and have substantially greater research and development and financial resources than we do, and may therefore have the ability to spend more aggressively and consistently on research and development, advertising and marketing, and to respond more effectively to changing business and economic conditions. See “Competitive Strengths” above for additional information regarding our competitive strengths and Part I, Item 1A “Risk Factors” below for additional information regarding competition in our industry.
 
Regulation

Product Regulation
The formulation, manufacturing, packaging, labeling, distribution, importation, sale and storage of our products are subject to extensive regulation by various U.S. federal agencies, including the FDA, FTC, the Consumer Product Safety Commission (“CPSC”), and the Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”), and various agencies of the states, localities and foreign countries in which our products are manufactured, distributed and sold.  Our Regulatory Team is guided by a senior member of management and staffed by individuals with appropriate legal and regulatory experience.  Our Regulatory and Operations teams work closely with our third-party manufacturers on quality-related matters, while we monitor their compliance with FDA and foreign regulations and perform periodic audits to ensure compliance.  This continual evaluation process is designed to ensure that our manufacturing processes and products are of the highest quality and in compliance with known regulatory requirements.  If the FDA or a foreign governmental authority chooses to audit a particular manufacturing facility, we require the third-party manufacturer to notify us immediately and update us on the progress of the audit as it proceeds.  If we or our manufacturers fail to comply with applicable regulations, we could become subject to significant claims or penalties or be required to discontinue the sale of the non-compliant product, which could have a material adverse effect our business, financial condition and results from operations.  These circumstances occur from time to time. For example, we are currently evaluating our failure to appropriately register a single product, which may result in us temporarily discontinuing sales of the product and other claims. In addition, the adoption of new regulations or changes in the interpretations of existing regulations may result in significant additional compliance costs or discontinuation of product sales and may also have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results from operations.

Most of our U.S. OTC drug products are regulated pursuant to the FDA’s monograph system.  The monographs set out the active ingredients and labeling indications that are permitted for certain broad categories of U.S. OTC drug products.  When the FDA has finalized a particular monograph, it has concluded that a properly labeled product formulation is generally recognized as safe and effective and not misbranded.  A tentative final monograph indicates that the FDA has not made a final determination about products in a category to establish safety and efficacy for a product and its uses.  However, unless there is a serious safety or efficacy issue, the FDA typically will exercise enforcement discretion and permit companies to sell products conforming to a tentative final monograph until the final monograph is published.  Products that comply with either final or tentative final monograph standards do not require pre-market approval from the FDA.

Certain of our U.S. OTC drug products are New Drug Applications (“NDA”) or Abbreviated New Drug Applications (“ANDA”) products and are manufactured and labeled in accordance with an FDA-approved submission. These products are subject to reporting requirements as set forth in FDA regulations.

Certain of our U.S. OTC Healthcare products are medical devices regulated by the FDA through a system which usually involves pre-market clearance.  During the review process, the FDA makes an affirmative determination as to the sufficiency of the label directions, cautions and warnings for the medical devices in question.

In accordance with the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (“FDC Act”) and FDA regulations, we and our third-party manufacturers of U.S. products must also comply with the FDA’s current Good Manufacturing Practices (“GMPs”).  The FDA

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inspects our facilities and those of our third-party manufacturers periodically to determine that both we and our third-party manufacturers are complying with GMPs.

A number of our products are regulated by the CPSC under the Federal Hazardous Substances Act (the “FHSA”), the Poison Prevention Packaging Act of 1970 (the “PPPA”) and the Consumer Products Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (the “CPSIA”).  Certain of our household products are considered to be hazardous substances under the FHSA and therefore require specific cautionary warnings to be included in their labeling for such products to be legally marketed.  In addition, a small number of our products are subject to regulation under the PPPA and can only be legally marketed if they are dispensed in child-resistant packaging or labeled for use in households where there are no children.  The CPSIA requires us to make available to our customers certificates stating that we are in compliance with any applicable regulation administered by the CPSC.  

Nix spray and certain Household Cleaning products are considered pesticides under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (“FIFRA”).  Generally speaking, any substance intended for preventing, destroying, repelling, or mitigating any pest is considered to be a pesticide under FIFRA.  We market and distribute certain household products under our Comet and Spic and Span brands that make antibacterial and/or disinfectant claims governed by FIFRA.  Due to the antibacterial and/or disinfectant claims on certain of the Comet and Spic and Span products and the lice killing claims on Nix spray, such products are considered to be pesticides under FIFRA and are required to be registered with the EPA and contain certain disclosures on the product labels.  In addition, the contract manufacturers from which we source these products must be registered with the EPA.  Our EPA registered products are also subject to state regulations and the rules and regulations of the various jurisdictions where these products are sold.

Our international business is also subject to product regulations by local regulatory authorities in the various regions these businesses operate, including regulations regarding manufacturing, labeling, distribution, sale and storage.

Other Regulations
We are also subject to a variety of other regulations in various foreign markets, including regulations pertaining to import/export regulations and antitrust issues.  To the extent we decide to commence or expand operations in additional countries, we may be required to obtain an approval, license or certification from the country’s ministry of health or comparable agency.  We must also comply with product labeling and packaging regulations that may vary from country to country.  Government regulations in both our domestic and international markets can delay or prevent the introduction, or require the reformulation or withdrawal, of some of our products.  Our failure to comply with these regulations can also result in a product being removed from sale in a particular market, either temporarily or permanently.  In addition, we are subject to FTC and state regulations, as well as foreign regulations, relating to our product claims and advertising.  If we fail to comply with these regulations, we could be subject to enforcement actions and the imposition of penalties, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results from operations.

Intellectual Property
We own a number of trademark registrations and applications in the United States, Canada and other foreign countries.  The following are some of the most important registered trademarks we own in the United States and/or Canada:  Chloraseptic, Chore Boy, Cinch®, Clear Eyes, Comet, Compound W, Dermoplast, Dramamine, Efferdent, Effergrip, Freeze Off, Little Remedies, Luden's, Momentum®, Murine, NasalCrom, New-Skin, PediaCare, Percogesic®, Spic and Span, The Doctor’s Brushpicks, The Doctor’s NightGuard, Wartner, BC, Goody's, Ecotrin, Beano, Gaviscon, Tagamet, Fiber Choice, Sominex, Debrox Gly-Oxide, Monistat, e.p.t and Nix.

Our trademarks and trade names are how we convey that the products we sell are “brand name” products.  Our ownership of these trademarks and trade names is very important to our business, as it allows us to compete based on the value and goodwill associated with these marks.  We may also license others to use these marks.  Additionally, we own or license patents on innovative and proprietary technology.  The patents evidence the unique nature of our products, provide us with exclusivity, and afford us protection from the encroachment of others.  None of the patents that we own or license, however, is material to us on a consolidated basis. Enforcing our rights, or the rights of any of our licensors, represented by these trademarks, trade names and patents is critical to our business but is expensive.  If we are not able to effectively enforce our rights, others may be able to dilute our trademarks, trade names and patents and diminish the value associated with our brands and technologies, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results from operations.

We do not own all of the intellectual property rights applicable to our products.  In those cases where our third-party manufacturers own patents that protect our products, we are dependent on them as a source of supply for our products.  Unless other non-infringing technologies are available, we must continue to purchase patented products from our suppliers who sell patented products to us.  In addition, we rely on our suppliers for their enforcement of their intellectual property rights against infringing products.


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We have licensed to an international consumer packaged goods company the right to use the Comet, Spic and Span and Chlorinol® trademarks in the commercial/institutional/industrial business throughout the world (excluding Russia and specified Eastern European countries).  We have also licensed to the licensee the Comet and Chlorinol brands in Russia and specified Eastern European countries. These agreements were amended in December 2014 to allow the licensee to obtain the rights to sell in certain specified Eastern European countries for $10.0 million. The amended agreement expires December 31, 2025, and includes an option for the licensee to buy out the remaining commercial/institutional/industrial business at any time after July 1, 2016 for an exercise price of $10.0 million.

Seasonality
The first quarter of our fiscal year typically has the lowest level of revenue due to the seasonal nature of certain of our brands relative to the summer and winter months.  In addition, the first quarter generally is the least profitable quarter due to the increased advertising and promotional spending to support those brands with a summer selling season, such as Clear Eyes products, Compound W, Wartner and New-Skin.  The level of advertising and promotional campaigns in the third quarter influences sales of our cough/cold products such as Chloraseptic, Little Remedies, Luden's and PediaCare, during the fourth quarter cough & cold winter months.  Additionally, the fourth quarter typically has the lowest level of advertising and promotional spending as a percent of revenue.

Employees
We employed approximately 187 full time individuals at March 31, 2015.  None of our employees is a party to a collective bargaining agreement.  Management believes that our relations with our employees are good.

Backlog Orders
We define backlog as orders with requested delivery dates prior to March 31, 2015 that were not shipped as of March 31, 2015. We had no significant backlog orders at March 31, 2015 or 2014.

Available Information
Our Internet address is www.prestigebrands.com.  We make available free of charge on or through our Internet website our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports, as well as the Proxy Statement for our annual stockholders’ meetings, as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”).  Information on our Internet website does not constitute a part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K and is not incorporated herein by reference, including any general statement incorporating by reference this Annual Report on Form 10-K into any filing under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), or under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”).

You may read and copy any materials that we file with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, DC 20549. You may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. The SEC also maintains an Internet site (http://www.sec.gov) that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC.

We have adopted a Code of Conduct Policy, Code of Ethics for Senior Financial Employees, Policy and Procedures for Complaints Regarding Accounting, Internal Controls and Auditing Matters, Corporate Governance Guidelines, Audit Committee Pre-Approval Policy, and Charters for our Audit, Compensation and Nominating and Corporate Governance Committees, as well as a Related Persons Transaction Policy and Stock Ownership Guidelines.  We will provide to any person without charge, upon request, a copy of the foregoing materials.  Any requests for the foregoing documents from us should be made in writing to:

Prestige Brands Holdings, Inc.
660 White Plains Road
Tarrytown, New York 10591
Attention: Secretary

We intend to disclose future amendments to the provisions of the foregoing documents, policies and guidelines and waivers therefrom, if any, on our Internet website and/or through the filing of a Current Report on Form 8-K with the SEC, to the extent required under the Exchange Act.

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ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS
                 
The high level of competition in our industry, much of which comes from competitors with greater resources, could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results from operations.

The business of selling brand name consumer products in the OTC Healthcare and Household Cleaning categories is highly competitive.  These markets include numerous manufacturers, distributors, marketers and retailers that actively compete for consumers’ business both in the United States and abroad.  Many of these competitors are larger and have substantially greater resources than we do, and may therefore have the ability to spend more aggressively on research and development, advertising and marketing, and to respond more effectively to changing business and economic conditions.  If this were to occur, it could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results from operations.

Certain of our product lines that account for a large percentage of our sales have a smaller market share relative to our competitors.  For example, while Clear Eyes has a number two market share position of 20.5% within the U.S. Eye Allergy/Redness Relief category, its top competitor, Visine®, has a market share of 21.6% in the same segment.  In contrast, certain of our brands with number one market positions have a similar market share relative to our competitors.  For example, Compound W has a number one market position of 34.8% of the U.S. Wart Removal segment and its top competitor, Dr. Scholl’s®, has a market position of 34.8% in the same category.   See “Part I, Item 1. Business - Major Brands” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for information regarding market share calculations.

We compete for customers’ attention based on a number of factors, including brand recognition, product quality, performance, value to customers, price and product availability at the retail level.  Advertising, promotion, merchandising and packaging and the timing of new product introductions and line extensions also have a significant impact on consumer buying decisions and, as a result, on our sales.  If our advertising, marketing and promotional programs are not effective, our sales may decline. New product innovations by our competitors or the failure to develop new products or the failure of a new product launch by the Company could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results from operations. In addition, the introduction or expansion of store brand products that compete with our products has impacted and could in the future impact our sales and results from operations. Additionally, the return to the market of previously recalled competitive products has impacted and could continue to impact our sales. The structure and quality of our sales force, as well as sell-through of our products, affect in-store position, wall display space and inventory levels in retail stores.  If we are unable to maintain our current distribution network, product offerings in retail stores, inventory levels and in-store positioning of our products, our sales and operating results will be adversely affected. Our markets are highly sensitive to the introduction of new products, which may rapidly capture a significant share of the market.

In addition, competitors may attempt to gain market share by offering products at prices at or below those typically offered by us.  Competitive pricing may require us to reduce prices, which may result in lost sales revenue or a reduction of our profit margins.  Future price adjustments by our competitors or our inability to react with price adjustments of our own could result in a loss of market share, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results from operations.

We depend on a limited number of customers with whom we have no long-term agreements for a large portion of our gross sales, and the loss of one or more of these customers could reduce our gross sales and have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

For the three and twelve months ended March 31, 2015, Walmart, which accounted for approximately 19.8% and 18.1%, respectively, of our gross sales, was our only customer that accounted for 10% or more of our gross sales.  We expect that for future periods, our top five and top ten customers, including Walmart, will, in the aggregate, continue to account for a large and potentially increasing portion of our sales.  The loss of one or more of our top customers, any significant decrease in sales to these customers based on changes in their strategies including a reduction in the number of brands they carry, the amount of shelf space they dedicate to store brand products, inventory management, or a significant decrease in our retail display space in any of these customers’ stores, could reduce our sales and have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results from operations.

In addition, our business is based primarily upon individual sales orders.  We typically do not enter into long-term contracts with our customers.  Accordingly, our customers could cease buying products or reduce the number of items they buy from us at any time and for any reason.  The fact that we do not have long-term contracts with our customers means that we have no recourse in the event a customer no longer wants to purchase products from us or reduces the number of items purchased.  If a significant number of our smaller customers, or any of our significant customers, elect not to purchase products from us, our financial condition and results from operations could be adversely affected.


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We depend on third-party manufacturers to produce the products we sell.  If we are unable to maintain these manufacturing relationships or fail to enter into additional relationships, as necessary, we may be unable to meet customer demand and our business, sales and profitability could suffer as a result.

All of our products are produced by a limited number of third-party manufacturers.  Our ability to retain our current manufacturing relationships and engage in and successfully transition to new relationships is critical to our ability to deliver quality products to our customers in a timely manner.  Without adequate supplies of quality merchandise, our sales would decrease materially and our business would suffer.  In the event that our primary third-party manufacturers are unable or unwilling to ship products to us in a timely manner, we would have to rely on secondary manufacturing relationships or, to the extent unavailable, identify and qualify new manufacturing relationships.  Because of the unique manufacturing requirements of certain products, the Company may be unable to qualify new suppliers in a timely way or at the quantities, quality and price levels needed. Certain of the Company's manufacturers are having difficulty meeting demand, which is causing shortages of certain of our most popular products. We might not be able to identify or qualify secondary manufacturers for such products in a timely manner, and such manufacturers may not allocate sufficient capacity to allow us to meet our commitments to customers.  In addition, identifying alternative manufacturers without adequate lead times may involve additional manufacturing expense, delay in production or product disadvantage in the marketplace.  In general, the consequences of not securing adequate, high quality and timely supplies of merchandise would negatively impact inventory levels, which could damage our reputation and result in lost customers and sales, and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results from operations.

The manufacturers we use have increased the cost of the products we purchase, which could adversely affect our margins in the event we are unable to pass along these increased costs to our customers or identify and qualify new manufacturers.  Increased costs could also have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results from operations.

At March 31, 2015, we had relationships with 95 third-party manufacturers.  Of those, we had long-term contracts with 44 manufacturers that produced items that accounted for approximately 82.9% of our gross sales for 2015, compared to 24 manufacturers with long-term contracts that produced approximately 82.4% of gross sales in 2014.  The fact that we do not have long-term contracts with certain manufacturers means that they could cease manufacturing these products at any time and for any reason or initiate arbitrary and costly price increases, either of which could have a material adverse effect on our business and results from operations. Although we are in the process of negotiating long-term contracts with certain key manufacturers, we may not be able to reach agreement which could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Price increases for raw materials, labor, energy, transportation costs and other manufacturer demands could have an adverse impact on our margins.

The costs to manufacture and distribute our products are subject to fluctuation based on a variety of factors. Increases in commodity raw material (including resins), packaging component prices, and labor, energy and fuel costs and other input costs could have a significant impact on our financial condition and results from operations.  If we are unable to increase the price for our products or continue to achieve cost savings in a rising cost environment, such cost increases would reduce our gross margins and could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results from operations. If we increase the price for our products in order to maintain our current gross margins for our products, such increase may adversely affect demand for, and sales of, our products, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Disruption in our St. Louis distribution center may prevent us from meeting customer demand, and our sales and profitability may suffer as a result.

We manage our product distribution in the continental United States through one primary distribution center near St. Louis, Missouri.  A serious disruption, such as a flood or fire, to our primary distribution center could damage our inventory and could materially impair our ability to distribute our products to customers in a timely manner or at a reasonable cost.  We could incur significantly higher costs and experience longer lead times during the time required to reopen or replace our primary distribution center.  As a result, any serious disruption could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results from operations.

Achievement of our strategic objectives requires the acquisition, or potentially the disposition, of certain brands or product lines, and these acquisitions and dispositions may not be successful.  

The majority of our growth has been driven by acquiring other brands and companies.  At any given time, we may be engaged in discussions with respect to possible acquisitions that are intended to enhance our product portfolio, enable us to realize cost savings and further diversify our category, customer and channel focus.  Our ability to successfully grow through acquisitions depends on our ability to identify, negotiate, complete and integrate suitable acquisition candidates and to obtain any necessary

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financing.  However, we may not be able to identify and successfully negotiate suitable strategic acquisitions at attractive valuations, obtain financing for future acquisitions on satisfactory terms or otherwise complete future acquisitions. These efforts could divert the attention of our management and key personnel from our business operations.  All acquisitions entail various risks such that after completing an acquisition, we may also experience:

Difficulties achieving our expected returns;

Difficulties in integrating any acquired companies, suppliers, personnel and products into our existing business;

Difficulties in realizing the benefits of the acquired company or products;

Higher costs of integration than we anticipated;

Exposure to unexpected liabilities of the acquired business;

Difficulties in retaining key employees of the acquired business who are necessary to operate the business;

Difficulties in maintaining uniform standards, controls, procedures and policies throughout our acquired companies; or

Adverse customer or stockholder reaction to the acquisition.

As a result, any acquisitions we pursue or complete could adversely impact our financial condition and results from operations.
In addition, any acquisition could adversely affect our operating results as a result of higher interest costs from any acquisition-related debt and higher amortization expenses related to the acquired intangible assets.  

In the event that we decide to divest of a brand or product line, we may encounter difficulty finding, or be unable to find, a buyer on acceptable terms in a timely manner.  The pursuit of divestitures could also divert management's attention from our business operations and result in a delay in our efforts to achieve our strategic objectives.

Our risks associated with doing business internationally increase as we expand our international footprint.

During 2015, 2014, and 2013, approximately 8.9%, 5.4% and 2.7%, respectively, of our total revenues were attributable to our international business. As of July 1, 2013, we acquired Care Pharmaceuticals, which markets and sells healthcare products in Australia. In addition, on April 30, 2014, we acquired the Hydralyte brand in Australia and New Zealand. We generally rely on brokers and distributors for the sale of our products in the foreign countries.  Risks of doing business internationally include:

Political instability or declining economic conditions in the countries or regions where we operate that adversely affect sales of our products;

Currency controls that restrict or prohibit the payment of funds or the repatriation of earnings to the United States;

Fluctuating foreign exchange rates that result in unfavorable increases in the price of our products or cause increases in the cost of certain products purchased from our foreign third-party manufacturers;

Compliance with laws and regulations concerning ethical business practices;

Trade restrictions and exchange controls;

Difficulties in staffing and managing international operations:

Difficulty in protecting our intellectual property rights in these markets; and

Increased costs of compliance with general business and tax regulations in these countries or regions.

If new products and product line extensions do not gain widespread customer acceptance or are otherwise discontinued, the Company's financial performance could be impacted.

The Company's future performance and growth depends on its ability to successfully develop and introduce new products and product line extensions. We cannot be certain that we will achieve our innovation goals. The successful development and

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introduction of new products involves substantial research, development, marketing and promotional expenditures, which the Company may be unable to recover if the new products do not gain widespread market acceptance. New product development and marketing efforts, including efforts to enter markets or product categories in which the Company has limited or no prior experience, have inherent risks. These risks include product development or launch delays, competitor actions, regulatory approval hurdles and the failure of new products and line extensions to achieve anticipated levels of market acceptance.

Regulatory matters governing our industry could have a significant negative effect on our sales and operating costs.

In both the United States and in our foreign markets, our operations are affected by extensive laws, governmental regulations, administrative determinations, court decisions and similar constraints.  Such laws, regulations and other constraints exist at the federal, state and local levels in the United States and at analogous levels of government in foreign jurisdictions.

The formulation, manufacturing, packaging, labeling, distribution, importation, marketing, sale and storage of our products are subject to extensive regulation by various U.S. federal agencies, including the FDA, the FTC, the CPSC, the EPA, and by various agencies of the states, localities and foreign countries in which our products are manufactured, distributed, stored and sold. The FDC Act and FDA regulations require that the manufacturing processes of our third-party manufacturers of U.S. products must also comply with the FDA’s GMPs.  The FDA inspects our facilities and those of our third-party manufacturers periodically to determine if we and our third-party manufacturers are complying with GMPs.  A history of general compliance in the past is not a guarantee that future GMPs will not mandate other compliance steps and associated expense.

If we or our third-party manufacturers or distributors fail to comply with applicable regulations, we could become subject to enforcement actions, significant penalties or claims, which could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results from operations.  In addition, we could be required to:

Suspend manufacturing operations;

Modify product formulations or processes;

Suspend the sale of products with non-complying specifications; or

Change product labeling, packaging, marketing, or advertising, recall non-compliant products, or take other corrective action.

The adoption of new regulations or changes in the interpretations of existing regulations may result in significant compliance costs or the cessation of product sales and may adversely affect the marketing of our products, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results from operations.

In addition, we could be required for a variety of reasons to initiate product recalls, which we are currently conducting for a minor product and have done on several other occasions. Any product recalls could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results from operations.

In addition, our failure to comply with FTC or any other federal and state regulations, or with similar regulations in foreign markets, that cover our product claims and advertising, including direct claims and advertising by us, may result in enforcement actions and imposition of penalties, litigation by private parties, or otherwise materially adversely affect the distribution and sale of our products, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results from operations.

Product liability claims and product recalls and related negative publicity could adversely affect our sales and operating results.

From time to time we are subjected to various product liability claims.  Claims could be based on allegations that, among other things, our products contain contaminants, include inadequate instructions or warnings regarding their use or include inadequate warnings concerning side effects and interactions with other substances.  Whether or not successful, product liability claims could result in negative publicity that could adversely affect the reputation of our brands and our business, sales and operating results.  Additionally, we may be required to pay for losses or injuries purportedly caused by our products. Also, if one of our products is found to be defective, we may be required to recall it, which we have done on several occasions.  Recalls may result in substantial costs and negative publicity, as well as negatively impact inventory levels, which may adversely affect our business, sales and operating results.  

We are dependent on consumers’ perception of the safety and quality of our products. Negative consumer perception may arise from product liability claims and product recalls, regardless of whether such claims or recalls involve us or our products. The

23



mere publication of information asserting concerns about the safety of our products or the ingredients used in our products could have a material adverse effect on our business and results from operations. For example, several of our products contain the active ingredient acetaminophen, which is a pain reliever and fever reducer. Products containing acetaminophen have been the subject of recent negative publicity. We believe our products are safe and effective when used in accordance with label directions. However, adverse publicity about acetaminophen or other ingredients used in our products may discourage consumers from buying our products containing those ingredients, which would have an adverse impact on our sales.

In addition, although we maintain, and require our suppliers and third-party manufacturers to maintain, product liability insurance coverage, potential product liability claims may exceed the amount of insurance coverage or may be excluded under the terms of the policy, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition.  In addition, in the future we may not be able to obtain adequate insurance coverage or we may be required to pay higher premiums and accept higher deductibles in order to secure adequate insurance coverage.

If we are unable to protect our intellectual property rights, our ability to compete effectively in the market for our products could be negatively impacted.

The market for our products depends to a significant extent upon the goodwill associated with our trademarks, trade names and patents.  Our trademarks and trade names convey that the products we sell are “brand name” products.  We believe consumers ascribe value to our brands, some of which are over 100 years old.  We own or license the material trademarks, trade names and patents used in connection with the packaging, marketing and sale of our products.  These rights prevent our competitors or new entrants to the market from using our valuable brand names and technologies.  Therefore, trademark, trade name and patent protection is critical to our business.  Although most of our material intellectual property is registered in the United States and in applicable foreign countries, we may not be successful in asserting protection.  If we were to lose the exclusive right to use one or more of our intellectual property rights, the loss of such exclusive right could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results from operations.

In addition, other parties may infringe on our intellectual property rights and may thereby dilute the value of our brands in the marketplace.  Brand dilution could cause confusion in the marketplace and adversely affect the value that consumers associate with our brands, which could negatively impact our business and sales.  In addition, third parties may assert claims against our intellectual property rights, and we may not be able to successfully resolve those claims, which would cause us to lose the right to use the intellectual property subject to those claims.  Such loss could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results from operations.  Furthermore, from time to time, we may be involved in litigation in which we are enforcing or defending our intellectual property rights, which could require us to incur substantial fees and expenses and have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results from operations.
 
We license certain of our trademarks to third party licensees, who are bound by their respective license agreements to protect our trademarks from infringement and adhere to defined quality requirements.  If a licensee of our trademarks fails to adhere to the contractually defined quality requirements, our business and financial results could be negatively impacted if one of our brands suffers a substantial impairment to its reputation due to real or perceived quality issues.  Further, if a licensee fails to protect one of our licensed trademarks from infringement, we might be required to take action, which could require us to incur substantial fees and expenses.

Virtually all of our assets consist of goodwill and intangibles and are subject to impairment risk.

As our financial statements indicate, virtually all of our assets consist of goodwill and intangibles, principally the trademarks, trade names and patents that we have acquired.  On an annual basis, and otherwise when there is evidence that events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value of intangible assets might not be recoverable, we assess the potential impairment of our goodwill and other intangible assets. Upon any such evaluation, we may be required to record a significant charge in our financial statements, which would negatively impact our financial condition and results of operations. We recorded impairment charges in 2010 and 2009 for certain assets.  If any of our brands sustain significant or prolonged declines in performance, we may be required to perform an interim impairment analysis. For example, if the Company’s brand performance is weaker than projections used in valuation calculations, the value of such brands may become impaired. In the event that such analysis would result in the fair value being lower than the carrying value, we would be required to record an impairment charge. Should the value of those assets or other assets become further impaired or our financial condition is materially adversely affected in any way, we would not have tangible assets that could be sold to repay our liabilities. As a result, our creditors and investors may not be able to recoup the amount of the indebtedness that they have extended to us or the amount they have invested in us.


24



We have experienced declines in revenues and profitability of certain brands in the North American OTC Healthcare segment during the year ended March 31, 2015, compared to the same periods during the prior year. Sustained or significant future declines in revenue, profitability, other adverse changes in expected operating results, and/or unfavorable changes in other economic factors used to estimate fair values of certain brands, could indicate that fair value no longer exceeds the carrying value, in which case a non-cash impairment charge may be recorded in future periods. In particular, we continue to experience increasing competitive pressures for certain brands within our pediatric cough & cold and gastrointestinal product groups. Specifically, in the cough & cold product group, although we expected revenues to decline with the return to the market of competing products, such declines have been steeper than expected. Revenues from our Pediacare brand have declined significantly as compared to the corresponding periods in the prior year, due primarily to competition in the category, including new product introductions and lost distribution. As a result, we performed an interim impairment analysis during our third quarter ended December 31, 2014 and concluded that no impairment existed. Additionally, in conjunction with a strategic review of our brands during the fourth quarter ended March 31, 2015 and our annual impairment review, we have reassessed the useful life of the Pediacare brand as of February 28, 2015 and determined it to be 20 years.

The aggregate fair value of the indefinite-lived intangible assets exceeded the carrying value by 42.4%. Three of the individual indefinite-lived trade names exceeded their carrying values by less than 10%. The associated carrying values of the three tradenames amount to $146.5 million and the aggregate fair value exceeded the carrying value by 8.4%. None of the fair values of these individual trade names was less than 5% higher than their respective carrying values. Additionally, certain of our North American OTC healthcare brands have experienced recent declines in revenues and profitability. While the fair value of these reporting units exceeds the carrying value by more than 10%, should such declines continue, the fair value of the corresponding reporting units may no longer exceed their carrying value and we would be required to record an impairment charge.

The aggregate fair value of our reporting units exceeded the carrying value by 45.2%, with no reporting unit's fair value exceeding the carrying value by less than 10%. Significant judgment, and the use of estimates and assumptions, is required to estimate the fair value of reporting units, including estimating future cash flows, future market conditions, and determining the appropriate discount rates, growth rates, and operating margins, among others. Our discounted cash flow analyses take into account our assumptions on various items such as revenue and expense growth rates, which are based upon our historical experience and projections of future activity, factoring in customer demand, and a cost structure necessary to achieve the related revenues. Additionally, these discounted cash flow analyses take into account our expected amounts of working capital and weighted average cost of capital. To the extent that a reporting unit or intangible asset exceeds its fair value, we will recognize an impairment loss in an amount necessary to reduce the carrying value of the asset to its fair value. We will continue to assess intangible assets of our entire portfolio of brands at the product group level to identify conditions that indicate the carrying value may not be recoverable and perform impairment analysis as deemed prudent. We believe our assumptions are reasonable; however, there can be no assurance that our estimates and assumptions made for purposes of our impairment testing, at the annual date and the interim testing date, will prove to be accurate predictions of the future. Continued declines in revenues, higher advertising and promotional costs or a strategic change in direction could result in an impairment. Additionally, changes in the estimates and assumptions noted above, could result in a significant impairment charge in the future. It is not possible at this time to determine if any such future impairment charge would result.

We depend on third parties for intellectual property relating to some of the products we sell, and our inability to maintain or enter into future license agreements may result in our failure to meet customer demand, which would adversely affect our operating results.

We have licenses or manufacturing agreements with third parties that own intellectual property (e.g., formulae, copyrights, trademarks, trade dress, patents and other technology) used in the manufacture and sale of certain of our products.  In the event that any such license or manufacturing agreement expires or is otherwise terminated, we will lose the right to use the intellectual property covered by such license or agreement and will have to develop or obtain rights to use other intellectual property.  Similarly, our rights could be reduced if the applicable licensor or third-party manufacturer fails to maintain or protect the licensed intellectual property because, in such event, our competitors could obtain the right to use the intellectual property without restriction.  If this were to occur, we might not be able to develop or obtain replacement intellectual property in a timely or cost effective manner.  Additionally, any modified products may not be well-received by customers.  The consequences of losing the right to use or having reduced rights to such intellectual property could negatively impact our sales due to our failure to meet consumer demand for the affected products or require us to incur costs for development of new or different intellectual property, either of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results from operations.  In addition, development of replacement products may be time-consuming and ultimately may not be feasible.




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We depend on our key personnel, and the loss of the services provided by any of our executive officers or other key employees could harm our business and results of operations.

On April 22, 2015, the Company announced that Matthew M. Mannelly will retire from the Company as President and Chief Executive Officer and a member of the Board of Directors, effective June 1, 2015. Our success depends to a significant degree upon the transition to our new Chief Executive Officer and the continued contributions of our senior management, many of whom would be difficult to replace.  These employees may voluntarily terminate their employment with us at any time.  We may not be able to successfully retain existing personnel or identify, hire and integrate new personnel.  While we believe we have developed depth and experience among our key personnel, our business may be adversely affected if one or more of these key individuals were to leave.  We do not maintain any key-man or similar insurance policies covering any of our senior management or key personnel.

Our indebtedness could adversely affect our financial condition, and the significant amount of cash we need to service our debt will not be available to reinvest in our business.

At March 31, 2015, our total indebtedness, including current maturities, is approximately $1,593.6 million.

Our indebtedness could:

Increase our vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions;

Limit our ability to engage in strategic acquisitions;

Require us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations toward repayment of our indebtedness, thereby reducing the availability of our cash flow to fund working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions and investments and other general corporate purposes;

Limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the markets in which we operate;

Place us at a competitive disadvantage compared to our competitors that have less debt; and

Limit, among other things, our ability to borrow additional funds on favorable terms or at all.

The terms of the indentures governing the 2012 Senior Notes and the 2013 Senior Notes, and the credit agreement governing the 2012 Term Loan and 2012 ABL Revolver, allow us to issue and incur additional debt only upon satisfaction of the conditions set forth in those respective agreements.  If new debt is added to current debt levels, the related risks described above could increase.

At March 31, 2015, we had $44.9 million of borrowing capacity available under the 2012 ABL Revolver to support our operating activities.

Our operating flexibility is limited in significant respects by the restrictive covenants in our senior credit facility and the indentures governing our senior notes.
 
Our senior credit facility and the indentures governing our senior notes impose restrictions that could impede our ability to enter into certain corporate transactions, as well as increase our vulnerability to adverse economic and industry conditions, by limiting our flexibility in planning for, and reacting to, changes in our business and industry.  These restrictions limit our ability to, among other things:

Borrow money or issue guarantees;

Pay dividends, repurchase stock from, or make other restricted payments to, stockholders;

Make investments or acquisitions;

Use assets as security in other transactions;

Sell assets or merge with or into other companies;

Enter into transactions with affiliates;

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Sell stock in our subsidiaries; and

Direct our subsidiaries to pay dividends or make other payments to us.

Our ability to engage in these types of transactions is generally limited by the terms of the senior credit facility and the indentures governing the senior notes, even if we believe that a specific transaction would positively contribute to our future growth, operating results or profitability.  

In addition, our senior credit facility requires us to maintain certain leverage, interest coverage and fixed charge ratios.  Although we believe we can continue to meet and/or maintain the financial covenants contained in our credit agreement, our ability to do so may be affected by events outside our control.  Covenants in our senior credit facility also require us to use 100% of the proceeds we receive from debt issuances to repay outstanding borrowings under our senior credit facility.  Any failure by us to comply with the terms and conditions of the credit agreement and the indentures governing the senior notes could result in an event of default, which may allow our creditors to accelerate our debt and therefore have a material adverse effect on our financial condition.

The senior credit facility and the indentures governing the senior notes contain cross-default provisions that could result in the acceleration of all of our indebtedness.

The senior credit facility and the indentures governing the senior notes contain provisions that allow the respective creditors to declare all outstanding borrowings under one agreement to be immediately due and payable as a result of a default under another agreement.  Consequently, failure to make a payment required by the indentures governing the senior notes, among other things, may lead to an event of default under the senior credit facility.  Similarly, an event of default or failure to make a required payment at maturity under the senior credit facility, among other things, may lead to an event of default under the indentures governing the senior notes.  If the debt under the senior credit facility and indentures governing the senior notes were to both be accelerated, the aggregate amount immediately due and payable as of March 31, 2015 would have been approximately $1,593.6 million.  We presently do not have sufficient liquidity to repay these borrowings in the event they were to be accelerated, and we may not have sufficient liquidity in the future to do so.  Additionally, we may not be able to borrow money from other lenders to enable us to refinance our indebtedness.  At March 31, 2015, the book value of our current assets was $201.7 million.  Although the book value of our total assets was $2,669.4 million, approximately $2,425.4 million was in the form of intangible assets, including goodwill of $290.7 million, a significant portion of which may not be available to satisfy our creditors in the event our debt is accelerated.

Any failure to comply with the restrictions of the senior credit facility, the indentures governing the senior notes or any other subsequent financing agreements may result in an event of default.  Such default may allow the creditors to accelerate the related debt, as well as any other debt to which the cross-acceleration or cross-default provisions apply.  In addition, the lenders may be able to terminate any commitments they had made to supply us with additional funding.  As a result, any default by us under our credit agreement, indentures governing the senior notes or any other financing agreement could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition.

Litigation may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our business is subject to the risk of, and from time to time in the ordinary course of business we are involved in, litigation by employees, customers, consumers, suppliers, stockholders or others through private actions, class actions, administrative proceedings, regulatory actions or other litigation.  The outcome of litigation, particularly class action lawsuits and regulatory actions, is difficult to assess or quantify.  Plaintiffs in these types of lawsuits may seek recovery of very large or indeterminate amounts, and the magnitude of the potential loss relating to such lawsuits may remain unknown for substantial periods of time.  The cost to defend current and future litigation may be significant.  There may also be adverse publicity associated with litigation that could decrease customer acceptance of our products, regardless of whether the allegations are valid or whether we are ultimately found liable.  Conversely, we may be required to initiate litigation against others to protect the value of our intellectual property and the related goodwill or enforce an agreement or contract that has been breached.  These matters are extremely time consuming and expensive, but may be necessary to protect our assets and realize the benefits of the agreements and contracts that we have negotiated.  As a result, litigation may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The trading price of our common stock may be volatile.

The trading price of our common stock could be subject to significant fluctuations in response to several factors, some of which are beyond our control, including (i) general stock market volatility, (ii) variations in our quarterly operating results, (iii) our leveraged financial position, (iv) potential sales of additional shares of our common stock, (v) perceptions associated with the identification of material weaknesses in internal control over financial reporting, (vi) general trends in the consumer products

27



industry, (vii) changes by securities analysts in their estimates or investment ratings, (viii) the relative illiquidity of our common stock, (ix) voluntary withdrawal or recall of products, (x) news regarding litigation in which we are or become involved, and (xi) general marketplace conditions brought on by economic recession.


We have no current intention of paying dividends to holders of our common stock.

We presently intend to retain our earnings, if any, for use in our operations, to facilitate strategic acquisitions, or to repay our outstanding indebtedness and have no current intention of paying dividends to holders of our common stock.  In addition, our debt instruments limit our ability to declare and pay cash dividends on our common stock.  As a result, your only opportunity to achieve a return on your investment in our common stock will be if the market price of our common stock appreciates and you sell your shares at a profit.

Our annual and quarterly results from operations may fluctuate significantly and could fall below the expectations of securities analysts and investors due to a number of factors, many of which are beyond our control, resulting in a decline in the price of our securities.

Our annual and quarterly results from operations may fluctuate significantly because of numerous factors, including:

The timing of when we make acquisitions or introduce new products;

Our inability to increase the sales of our existing products and expand their distribution;

The timing of the introduction or return to the market of competitive products and the introduction of store brand products;

Adverse regulatory or market events in the United States or in our international markets;

Changes in consumer preferences, spending habits and competitive conditions, including the effects of competitors’ operational, promotional or expansion activities;

Seasonality of our products;

Fluctuations in commodity prices, product costs, utilities and energy costs, prevailing wage rates, insurance costs and other costs;

The discontinuation and return of our products from retailers;

Our ability to recruit, train and retain qualified employees, and the costs associated with those activities;

Changes in advertising and promotional activities and expansion to new markets;

Negative publicity relating to us and the products we sell;

Litigation matters;

Unanticipated increases in infrastructure costs;

Impairment of goodwill or long-lived assets;

Changes in interest rates; and

Changes in accounting, tax, regulatory or other rules applicable to our business.

Our quarterly operating results and revenues may fluctuate as a result of any of these or other factors. Accordingly, results for any one quarter are not necessarily indicative of results to be expected for any other quarter or for any year, and revenues for any particular future period may decrease.  In the future, operating results may fall below the expectations of securities analysts and investors.  In that event, the market price of our outstanding securities could be adversely impacted.


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Provisions in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and Delaware law may discourage potential acquirers of our company, which could adversely affect the value of our securities.

Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation provides that our Board of Directors is authorized to issue from time to time, without further stockholder approval, up to five million shares of preferred stock in one or more series of preferred stock issuances.  Our Board of Directors may establish the number of shares to be included in each series of preferred stock and determine, as applicable, the voting and other powers, designations, preferences, rights, qualifications, limitations and restrictions for such series of preferred stock.  The shares of preferred stock could have preferences over our common stock with respect to dividends and liquidation rights.  We may issue additional preferred stock in ways which may delay, defer or prevent a change in control of the Company without further action by our stockholders.  The shares of preferred stock may be issued with voting rights that may adversely affect the voting power of the holders of our common stock by increasing the number of outstanding shares having voting rights, and by the creation of class or series voting rights.

Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation, as amended, contains additional provisions that may have the effect of making it more difficult for a third party to acquire or attempt to acquire control of our company.  In addition, we are subject to certain provisions of Delaware law that limit, in some cases, our ability to engage in certain business combinations with significant stockholders.

These provisions, either alone, or in combination with each other, give our current directors and executive officers the ability to significantly influence the outcome of a proposed acquisition of the Company.  These provisions would apply even if an acquisition or other significant corporate transaction was considered beneficial by some of our stockholders.  If a change in control or change in management is delayed or prevented by these provisions, the market price of our outstanding securities could be adversely impacted.

We rely significantly on information technology. Any inadequacy, interruption, theft or loss of data, malicious attack, integration failure, failure to maintain the security, confidentiality or privacy of sensitive data residing on our systems or other security failure of that technology could harm our ability to effectively operate our business and damage the reputation of our brands.

The Company relies extensively on information technology systems, some of which are managed by third-party service providers, to conduct its business. These systems include, but are not limited to, programs and processes relating to internal communications and communications with other parties, ordering and managing materials from suppliers, converting materials to finished products, shipping product to customers, billing customers and receiving and applying payment, processing transactions, summarizing and reporting results of operations, complying with regulatory, legal or tax requirements, collecting and storing customer, consumer, employee, investor, and other stakeholder information and personal data, and other processes necessary to manage the Company's business.

Increased information technology security threats and more sophisticated computer crime, including advanced persistent threats, pose a potential risk to the security of the information technology systems, networks, and services of the Company, its customers and other business partners, as well as the confidentiality, availability, and integrity of the data of the Company, its customers and other business partners. As a result, the Company's information technology systems, networks or service providers could be damaged or cease to function properly or the Company could suffer a loss or disclosure of business, personal or stakeholder information, due to any number of causes, including catastrophic events, power outages and security breaches. The Company has conducted regular security audits by an outside firm to address any potential service interruptions or vulnerabilities. However, if these plans do not provide effective protection, the Company may suffer interruptions in its ability to manage or conduct its operations, which may adversely affect its business. The Company may need to expend additional resources in the future to continue to protect against, or to address problems caused by, any business interruptions or data security breaches.

Any business interruptions or data security breaches, including cyber security breaches resulting in private data disclosure, could result in lawsuits or regulatory proceedings, damage the Company's reputation or adversely impact the Company's results of operations and financial condition.

Our information technology systems may be susceptible to disruptions.

We utilize information technology systems to improve the effectiveness of our operations and support our business, including systems to support financial reporting and an enterprise resource planning system. During post-production and future enterprise resource planning phases, we could be subject to transaction errors, processing inefficiencies and other business disruptions that could lead to the loss of revenue or inaccuracies in our financial information. The occurrence of these or other challenges could disrupt our information technology systems and adversely affect our operations.


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Changes in our provision for income taxes or adverse outcomes resulting from examination of our income tax returns could adversely affect our results.

Our provision for income taxes is subject to volatility and could be adversely affected by several factors, some of which are outside of our control, including:

changes in the income allocation methods for state taxes, and the determination of which states or countries have jurisdiction to tax our Company;

an increase in non-deductible expenses for tax purposes, including certain stock-based compensation, executive compensation and impairment of goodwill;

transfer pricing adjustments;

tax assessments resulting from income tax audits or any related tax interest or penalties that could significantly affect our income tax provision for the period in which the settlement takes place;

a change in our decision to indefinitely reinvest foreign earnings;

changes in accounting principles; and
  
changes in tax laws or related interpretations, accounting standards, regulations, and interpretations in multiple tax jurisdictions in which we operate.

Significant judgment is required to determine the recognition and measurement attribute prescribed in FASB ASC 740. As a multinational corporation, we conduct our business in many countries and are subject to taxation in many jurisdictions. The taxation of our business is subject to the application of multiple and sometimes conflicting tax laws and regulations as well as multinational tax conventions. Our effective tax rate is dependent upon the availability of tax credits and carryforwards. The application of tax laws and regulations is subject to legal and factual interpretation, judgment and uncertainty. Tax laws themselves are subject to change as a result of changes in fiscal policy, changes in legislation, and the evolution of regulations and court rulings. Consequently, taxing authorities may impose tax assessments or judgments against us that could materially impact our tax liability and/or our effective income tax rate.

In addition, we may be subject to examination of our income tax returns by the Internal Revenue Service and other tax authorities. If tax authorities challenge the relative mix of our U.S. and international income, or successfully assert the jurisdiction to tax our earnings, our future effective income tax rates could be adversely affected.

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
 
None.

 

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ITEM 2. PROPERTIES
                    
Our corporate headquarters is located in Tarrytown, New York, a suburb of New York City.  Primary functions performed at the Tarrytown facility include senior management, marketing, sales, operations, quality control and regulatory affairs, finance and legal.  We believe our Tarrytown facility is adequate for these functions, and the lease expires on September 30, 2020.  We also have an administrative center in Jackson, Wyoming, which we also believe is adequate for our needs there.  Primary functions performed at the Jackson facility include back office functions, such as invoicing, credit and collection, general ledger and customer service.  The lease on the Jackson facility expires on December 31, 2015; however, we have the option to renew the lease on an annual basis. All of our facilities serve the North American OTC Healthcare, International OTC Healthcare, and Household Cleaning segments.
  
ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

We are involved from time to time in routine legal matters and other claims incidental to our business.  We review outstanding claims and proceedings internally and with external counsel as necessary to assess probability and amount of potential loss.  These assessments are re-evaluated at each reporting period and as new information becomes available to determine whether a reserve should be established or if any existing reserve should be adjusted.  The actual cost of resolving a claim or proceeding ultimately may be substantially different than the amount of the recorded reserve.  In addition, because it is not permissible under GAAP to establish a litigation reserve until the loss is both probable and estimable, in some cases there may be insufficient time to establish a reserve prior to the actual incurrence of the loss (upon verdict and judgment at trial, for example, or in the case of a quickly negotiated settlement).  We believe the resolution of routine matters and other incidental claims, taking our reserves into account, will not have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results from operations.

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

None.

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Part II


ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Market Information

Our common stock is listed on The New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) under the symbol “PBH.”  The high and low sales prices of our common stock as reported by the NYSE for the two most recently completed fiscal years on a quarterly basis and the current year through April 30, 2015 are as follows:

 
 
High
 
Low
Year Ending March 31, 2016
 
 
 
 
April 1, 2015 - April 30, 2015
 
$
45.00

 
$
39.10

 
 
 
 
 
Year Ended March 31, 2015
 
 
 
 
Quarter Ended:
 
 
 
 
June 30, 2014
 
$
35.95

 
$
25.94

September 30, 2014
 
35.84

 
30.55

December 31, 2014
 
38.15

 
30.02

March 31, 2015
 
43.36

 
33.25

 
 
 
 
 
Year Ended March 31, 2014
 
 
 
 
Quarter Ended:
 
 
 
 
June 30, 2013
 
$
35.21

 
$
25.51

September 30, 2013
 
35.98

 
29.02

December 31, 2013
 
36.69

 
29.34

March 31, 2014
 
36.02

 
24.94


Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

There were no equity securities sold by us during the years ended March 31, 2015, 2014, or 2013 that were not registered under the Securities Act.

There were no purchases of shares of our common stock made during the quarter ended March 31, 2015, by or on behalf of us or any “affiliated purchaser,” as defined by Rule 10b-18(a)(3) of the Exchange Act.

Holders

As of May 1, 2015, there were 39 holders of record of our common stock.  The number of record holders does not include beneficial owners whose shares are held in the names of banks, brokers, nominees or other fiduciaries.

Dividend Policy

Common Stock
We have not in the past paid, and do not expect for the foreseeable future to pay, cash dividends on our common stock.  Instead, we anticipate that all of our earnings in the foreseeable future will be used in our operations, to facilitate strategic acquisitions, or to pay down our outstanding indebtedness.  Any future determination to pay dividends will be at the discretion of our Board of Directors and will depend, among other factors, on our results from operations, financial condition, capital requirements and contractual restrictions limiting our ability to declare and pay cash dividends, including restrictions under our 2012 Term Loan and the indentures governing our senior notes, and any other considerations our Board of Directors deems relevant.




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Adjustments to Executive Compensation
In May 2015, the Compensation Committee (the "Compensation Committee") of the Board of Directors of the Company approved the following additional equity grants under the Company's 2005 Long-Term Equity Incentive Plan (the "Plan") for outstanding performance in connection with the integration of the Hydralyte and Insight acquisitions, respectively: (i) Mr. Parkinson, 7,500 restricted stock units and (ii) Mr. Migaki, 7,500 restricted stock units, all of which will vest in three approximately equal annual installments beginning on the first anniversary of the date of the grant.

The Compensation Committee also approved the following additional equity grants under the Plan in connection with retention of key executives: (i) Mr. Connors, 50,000 restricted stock units, (ii) Mr. Migaki, 40,000 restricted stock units, (iii) Mr. Parkinson, 17,500 restricted stock units, (iv) Mr. Cowley, 10,000 restricted stock units and (v) Ms. Boyko, 5,000 restricted stock units, all of which vest entirely on the third anniversary of the date of grant.


Part III, Item 12 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K is incorporated herein by reference.

33



PERFORMANCE GRAPH

The following graph (“Performance Graph”) compares our cumulative total stockholder return since March 31, 2010, with the cumulative total stockholder return for the Standard & Poor's SmallCap 600 Index, the Russell 2000 Index and our peer group index. The Company is included in each of the Standard & Poor's SmallCap 600 Index and the Russell 2000 Index.  The Performance Graph assumes that the value of the investment in the Company’s common stock and each index was $100.00 on March 31, 2010.  The Performance Graph was also prepared based on the assumption that all dividends paid, if any, were reinvested.  The peer group index was established in 2015 by the Company in connection with research regarding improvements to our executive compensation program in light of the significant recent growth of the Company.  Based on the Company’s use of the peer group for executive compensation benchmarking purposes, we believe the peer group should be included in the Performance Graph.
 
 
March 31,
Company/Market/Peer Group
2010
 
2011
 
2012
 
2013
 
2014
 
2015
Prestige Brands Holdings, Inc.
$
100.00

 
$
127.78

 
$
194.22

 
$
285.44

 
$
302.78

 
$
476.56

Russell 2000 Index
100.00

 
125.79

 
125.56

 
146.03

 
182.39

 
197.37

S&P SmallCap 600 Index
100.00

 
125.27

 
131.56

 
152.80

 
195.29

 
212.32

New Peer Group Index (1)
100.00

 
130.68

 
190.40

 
200.61

 
263.89

 
405.49

Old Peer Group Index (2)
100.00

 
129.52

 
149.82

 
197.24

 
290.64

 
340.83


(1)
The New Peer Group Index is a self-constructed peer group consisting of companies in the consumer products industry with comparable revenues and market capitalization, from which the Company has been excluded.  The new peer group index was constructed in 2015 in connection with the Company’s analysis of its compensation program in light of the Company's significant recent growth. The new peer group index is comprised of: (i) B&G Food Holdings Corp., (ii) Hain Celestial Group, Inc., (iii) Church & Dwight Co., Inc., (iv) Helen of Troy, Ltd., (v) Monster Beverage Corp., (vi) Impax Laboratories, Inc., (vii) Snyders-Lance Inc., (viii) Revlon, Inc., (ix) Lancaster Colony Corp, and (x) Akorn, Inc.

(2)
The Old Peer Group Index is a self-constructed peer group consisting of companies in the consumer products industry with comparable revenues and market capitalization, from which the Company has been excluded.  The old peer group index was constructed in 2013 in connection with the Company’s analysis of its executive compensation program. The

34



old peer group index is comprised of: (i) B&G Food Holdings Corp., (ii) Hain Celestial Group, Inc., (iii) Hi Tech Pharmacal Co. Inc., (iv) Helen of Troy, Ltd., (v) Inter Parfums, Inc., (vi) Lifetime Brands, Inc., (vii) Maidenform Brands, Inc., (viii) Blyth Inc., (ix) Elizabeth Arden Inc., (x) WD-40 Company, (xi) Zep, Inc., (xii) Libbey Inc., (xiii) Seneca Foods Corp., (xiv) Par Pharmaceutical Companies Inc., (xv) Snyders-Lance Inc., and (xvi) Lancaster Colony Corp.

The Performance Graph shall not be deemed incorporated by reference by any general statement incorporating by reference this Annual Report on Form 10-K into any filing under the Securities Act or the Exchange Act, except to the extent that we specifically incorporate this information by reference, and shall not otherwise be deemed filed under such Acts.

35



ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
                   
Prestige Brands Holdings, Inc.
(In thousands, except per share data)
Year Ended March 31,
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
Income Statement Data
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total revenues
$
714,623

 
$
597,381

 
$
620,118

 
$
437,819

 
$
332,905

Cost of sales (1)
308,400

 
261,830

 
276,381

 
213,701

 
165,632

Gross profit
406,223

 
335,551

 
343,737

 
224,118

 
167,273

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Advertising and promotion
99,651

 
84,968

 
87,151

 
53,861

 
39,292

General and administrative (2)
81,273

 
48,481

 
51,467

 
56,700

 
41,960

Depreciation and amortization
17,740

 
13,486

 
13,235

 
10,734

 
9,876

Interest expense, net
81,234

 
68,582

 
84,407

 
41,320

 
27,317

Gain on sale of asset
(1,133
)
 

 

 

 

Gain on settlement

 

 

 
(5,063
)
 

Loss on extinguishment of debt

 
18,286

 
1,443

 
5,409

 
300

Income from continuing operations before income taxes
127,458

 
101,748

 
106,034

 
61,157

 
48,528

Provision for income taxes
49,198

 
29,133

 
40,529

 
23,945

 
19,349

Income from continuing operations
78,260

 
72,615

 
65,505

 
37,212

 
29,179

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Discontinued Operations
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of income tax

 

 

 

 
591

(Loss) gain on sale of discontinued operations, net of income tax

 

 

 

 
(550
)
Net income available to common stockholders
$
78,260

 
$
72,615

 
$
65,505

 
$
37,212

 
$
29,220

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic earnings per share:
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income from continuing operations
$
1.50

 
$
1.41

 
$
1.29

 
$
0.74

 
$
0.58

Income (loss) from discontinued operations and gain (loss) from sale of discontinued operations

 

 

 

 

Net income
$
1.50

 
$
1.41

 
$
1.29

 
$
0.74

 
$
0.58

Diluted earnings per share:
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income from continuing operations
$
1.49

 
$
1.39

 
$
1.27

 
$
0.73

 
$
0.58

Income (loss) from discontinued operations and gain (loss) from sale of discontinued operations

 

 

 

 

Net income
$
1.49

 
$
1.39

 
$
1.27

 
$
0.73

 
$
0.58

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Weighted average shares outstanding:
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Basic
52,170

 
51,641

 
50,633

 
50,270

 
50,081

Diluted
52,670

 
52,349

 
51,440

 
50,748

 
50,338

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other comprehensive income (loss)
(24,151
)
 
843

 
(91
)
 
(13
)
 

Comprehensive income
$
54,109

 
$
73,458

 
$
65,414

 
$
37,199

 
$
29,220

 

36



 
Year Ended March 31,
Other Financial Data
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
Capital expenditures
$
6,101

 
$
2,764

 
$
10,268

 
$
606

 
$
655

Cash provided by (used in):
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Operating activities
156,255

 
111,582

 
137,605

 
67,452

 
86,670

Investing activities
(805,258
)
 
(57,976
)
 
11,221

 
(662,206
)
 
(275,680
)
Financing activities
643,265

 
(41,153
)
 
(152,117
)
 
600,434

 
161,247

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
March 31,
Balance Sheet Data
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
Cash and cash equivalents
$
21,318

 
$
28,331

 
$
15,670

 
$
19,015

 
$
13,334

Total assets
2,669,405

 
1,795,663

 
1,739,799

 
1,758,276

 
1,056,918

Total long-term debt, including current maturities
1,593,600

 
937,500

 
978,000

 
1,135,000

 
492,000

Stockholders’ equity
627,624

 
563,360

 
477,943

 
402,728

 
361,832


(1)
For 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, and 2011, cost of sales included $2.2 million, $0.6 million, $6.1 million, $1.8 million and $7.3 million, respectively, of charges related to inventory step-up and other costs associated with acquisitions.
(2)
For 2015, 2014, 2012, and 2011, general and administrative expense included $13.9 million, $1.1 million, $13.8 million, and $7.7 million, respectively, of costs related to acquisitions. For 2012, an additional $1.7 million of unsolicited offer defense costs was included in general and administrative expense.

37



ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion of our financial condition and results of operations should be read together with the “Selected Financial Data” and the Consolidated Financial Statements and related notes included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.  This discussion and analysis may contain forward-looking statements that involve certain risks, assumptions and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those implied or described by the forward-looking statements.  Future results could differ materially from the discussion that follows for many reasons, including the factors described in Part I, Item 1A “Risk Factors” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, as well as those described in future reports filed with the SEC.

General
We are engaged in the marketing, sales and distribution of well-recognized, brand name OTC healthcare and household cleaning products to mass merchandisers, drug stores, supermarkets, and club, convenience, and dollar stores in North America (the United States and Canada) and in Australia and certain other international markets.  We use the strength of our brands, our established retail distribution network, a low-cost operating model and our experienced management team to our competitive advantage.

We have grown our brand portfolio both organically and through acquisitions. We develop our existing brands by investing in new product lines, brand extensions and strong advertising support. Acquisitions of OTC brands have also been an important part of our growth strategy. We have acquired strong and well-recognized brands from consumer products and pharmaceutical companies. While many of these brands have long histories of brand development and investment, we believe that, at the time we acquired them, most were considered “non-core” by their previous owners. As a result, these acquired brands did not benefit from adequate management focus and marketing support during the period prior to their acquisition, which created significant opportunities for us to reinvigorate these brands and improve their performance post-acquisition. After adding a core brand to our portfolio, we seek to increase its sales, market share and distribution in both existing and new channels through our established retail distribution network.  We pursue this growth through increased spending on advertising and promotional support, new sales and marketing strategies, improved packaging and formulations, and innovative development of brand extensions.

Acquisitions

Acquisition of Insight Pharmaceuticals
On September 3, 2014, the Company completed the acquisition of Insight, a marketer and distributor of feminine care and other OTC healthcare products, for $753.2 million in cash. The closing followed the FTC's approval of the acquisition and was finalized pursuant to the terms of the purchase agreement announced on April 25, 2014. Pursuant to the Insight purchase agreement, the Company acquired 27 OTC brands sold in North America (including related trademarks, contracts and inventory), which extended the Company's portfolio of OTC brands to include a leading feminine care platform in the United States and Canada anchored by Monistat, the leading North American brand in OTC yeast infection treatment. The acquisition also added brands to the Company's cough/cold, pain relief, ear care and dermatological platforms. In connection with the FTC's approval of the Insight acquisition, we sold one of the competing brands that we acquired from Insight on the same day as the Insight closing. Insight is primarily included in our North American OTC Healthcare segment.

The Insight acquisition was accounted for in accordance with the Business Combinations topic of the FASB ASC 805, which requires that the total cost of an acquisition be allocated to the tangible and intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed based upon their respective fair values at the date of acquisition.

We prepared an analysis of the fair values of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed as of the date of acquisition. The following table summarizes our preliminary allocation of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed as of the September 3, 2014 acquisition date.


38



(In thousands)
September 3, 2014
 
 
Cash acquired
$
3,507

Accounts receivable
25,784

Inventories
23,559

Deferred income tax assets - current
860

Prepaids and other current assets
1,407

Property, plant and equipment
2,308

Goodwill
103,255

Intangible assets
724,374

Total assets acquired
885,054

 
 
Accounts payable
16,079

Accrued expenses
8,003

Deferred income tax liabilities - long term
107,799

Total liabilities assumed
131,881

Total purchase price
$
753,173


Based on this analysis, we allocated $599.6 million to indefinite-lived intangible assets and $124.8 million to finite-lived intangible assets. We are amortizing the purchased finite-lived intangible assets on a straight-line basis over an estimated weighted average useful life of 16.2 years. The weighted average remaining life for finite-lived intangible assets at March 31, 2015 was 15.6 years.

We also recorded goodwill of $103.3 million based on the amount by which the purchase price exceeded the fair value of the net assets acquired. The full amount of goodwill is not deductible for income tax purposes.

The operating results of Insight have been included in our Consolidated Financial Statements beginning September 3, 2014. Revenues of the acquired Insight operations for the year ended March 31, 2015 were $97.1 million. On September 3, 2014, we sold one of the brands we acquired from the Insight acquisition for $18.5 million, for which we had allocated $17.7 million, $0.6 million and $0.2 million to intangible assets, inventory and property, plant and equipment, respectively.

The following table provides our unaudited pro forma revenues, net income and net income per basic and diluted common share had the results of Insight's operations been included in our operations commencing on April 1, 2013, based upon available information related to Insight's operations. This pro forma information is not necessarily indicative either of the combined results of operations that actually would have been realized by us had the Insight acquisition been consummated at the beginning of the period for which the pro forma information is presented, or of future results.

 
Year Ended March 31,
(In thousands, except per share data)
2015
 
2014
 
(Unaudited)
Revenues
$
783,217

 
$
767,897

Net income
$
86,844

 
$
82,762

 
 
 
 
Earnings per share:
 
 
 
Basic
$
1.66

 
$
1.60

 
 
 
 
Diluted
$
1.65

 
$
1.58



Acquisition of the Hydralyte brand
On April 30, 2014, we completed the acquisition of the Hydralyte brand in Australia and New Zealand from The Hydration Pharmaceuticals Trust of Victoria, Australia, which was funded through a combination of cash on hand and our existing senior secured credit facility.

39




Hydralyte is the leading OTC brand in oral rehydration in Australia and is marketed and sold through our Care Pharma subsidiary. Hydralyte is available in pharmacies in multiple forms and is indicated for oral rehydration following diarrhea, vomiting, fever, heat and other ailments. Hydralyte is included in our International OTC Healthcare segment.

The Hydralyte acquisition was accounted for in accordance with the Business Combinations topic of the FASB ASC 805, which requires that the total cost of an acquisition be allocated to the tangible and intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed based upon their respective fair values at the date of acquisition.

We prepared an analysis of the fair values of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed as of the date of acquisition. The following table summarizes our allocation of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed as of the April 30, 2014 acquisition date.

(In thousands)
April 30, 2014
 
 
Inventories
$
1,970

Property, plant and equipment, net
1,267

Goodwill
1,224

Intangible assets, net
73,580

Total assets acquired
78,041

 
 
Accrued expenses
38

Other long term liabilities
12

Total liabilities assumed
50

Net assets acquired
$
77,991


Based on this analysis, we allocated $73.6 million to indefinite-lived intangible assets and no allocation was made to finite-lived intangible assets.

We also recorded goodwill of $1.2 million based on the amount by which the purchase price exceeded the fair value of the net assets acquired. The full amount of goodwill is not deductible for income tax purposes.

The pro forma effect of this acquisition on revenues and earnings was not material.

Acquisition of Care Pharmaceuticals Pty Ltd.
On July 1, 2013, we completed the acquisition of Care Pharma, which was funded through a combination of our existing senior secured credit facility and cash on hand.

The Care Pharma brands include the Fess line of cold/allergy and saline nasal health products, which is the leading saline spray for both adults and children in Australia. Other key brands include Painstop analgesic, Rectogesic for rectal discomfort, and the Fab line of nutritional supplements. Care Pharma also carries a line of brands for children including Little Allergies, Little Eyes, and Little Coughs. The brands acquired are complementary to our OTC Healthcare portfolio.

This acquisition was accounted for in accordance with the Business Combinations topic of the FASB ASC 805, which requires that the total cost of an acquisition be allocated to the tangible and intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed based upon their respective fair values at the date of acquisition.

We prepared an analysis of the fair values of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed as of the date of acquisition. The following table summarizes our allocation of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed as of the July 1, 2013 acquisition date.

40



(In thousands)
July 1, 2013

 
 
Cash acquired
$
1,546

Accounts receivable
1,658

Inventories
2,465

Deferred income tax assets
283

Prepaids and other current assets
647

Property, plant and equipment
163

Goodwill
23,122

Intangible assets
31,502

Total assets acquired
61,386

 
 
Accounts payable
1,537

Accrued expenses
2,788

Other long term liabilities
300

Total liabilities assumed
4,625

 
 
Net assets acquired
$
56,761


Based on this analysis, we allocated $29.8 million to indefinite-lived intangible assets and $1.7 million to finite-lived intangible assets. We are amortizing the purchased finite-lived intangible assets on a straight-line basis over an estimated weighted average useful life of 15.1 years. The weighted average remaining life for finite-lived intangible assets at March 31, 2015 was 11.8 years.

We also recorded goodwill of $23.1 million based on the amount by which the purchase price exceeded the fair value of the net assets acquired. The full amount of goodwill is deductible for income tax purposes.

The pro-forma effect of this acquisition on revenues and earnings was not material.

Sale of the Phazyme Brand

On October 31, 2012, we divested the Phazyme gas treatment brand, which was a non-core OTC brand that we acquired from GSK in January 2012. We received $21.7 million from the divestiture on October 31, 2012 and the remaining $0.6 million on January 4, 2013. The proceeds were used to repay debt. No significant gain or loss was recorded as a result of the sale.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

Our significant accounting policies are described in the notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.  While all significant accounting policies are important to our Consolidated Financial Statements, certain of these policies may be viewed as being critical.  Such policies are those that are both most important to the portrayal of our financial condition and results from operations and require our most difficult, subjective and complex estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues, expenses or the related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities.  These estimates are based on our historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances.  Actual results may differ materially from these estimates. The most critical accounting policies are as follows:

Revenue Recognition
We recognize revenue when the following revenue recognition criteria are met: (i) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists; (ii) the selling price is fixed or determinable; (iii) the product has been shipped and the customer takes ownership and assumes the risk of loss; and (iv) collection of the resulting receivable is reasonably assured.  We have determined that these criteria are met and the transfer of risk of loss generally occurs when product is received by the customer, and, accordingly we recognize revenue at that time.  Provision is made for estimated discounts related to customer payment terms and estimated product returns at the time of sale based on our historical experience.


41



As is customary in the consumer products industry, we participate in the promotional programs of our customers to enhance the sale of our products.  The cost of these promotional programs varies based on the actual number of units sold during a finite period of time.  These promotional programs consist of direct-to-consumer incentives, such as coupons and temporary price reductions, as well as incentives to our customers, such as allowances for new distribution, including slotting fees, and cooperative advertising. Estimates of the costs of these promotional programs are based on (i) historical sales experience, (ii) the current promotional offering, (iii) forecasted data, (iv) current market conditions, and (v) communication with customer purchasing/marketing personnel.  We recognize the cost of such sales incentives by recording an estimate of such cost as a reduction of revenue, at the later of (a) the date the related revenue is recognized, or (b) the date when a particular sales incentive is offered. At the completion of the promotional program, these estimated amounts are adjusted to actual amounts. Our related promotional expense for 2015, 2014, and 2013 was $53.2 million, $33.4 million, and $35.6 million, respectively. In 2015, 2014, and 2013, we participated in over 14,000, 10,000, and 9,000 promotional campaigns, respectively. Of those campaigns, approximately 1,900, 1,700, and 1,400 payments were in excess of $5,000 in 2015, 2014, and 2013, respectively. For all three years, the average cost per campaign was less than $5,000. We believe that the estimation methodologies employed, combined with the nature of the promotional campaigns, make the likelihood remote that our obligation would be misstated by a material amount.  However, for illustrative purposes, had we underestimated the promotional program rate by 10% for each of 2015, 2014, and 2013, our operating income would have been reduced by approximately $5.3 million, $3.3 million, and $3.6 million, respectively. Net income would have been adversely affected by approximately $3.4 million, $2.1 million, and $2.2 million, respectively.

We also periodically run coupon programs in Sunday newspaper inserts, on our product websites, or as on-package instant redeemable coupons.  We utilize a national clearing house to process coupons redeemed by customers.  At the time a coupon is distributed, a provision is made based upon historical redemption rates for that particular product, information provided as a result of the clearing house’s experience with coupons of similar dollar value, the length of time the coupon is valid, and the seasonality of the coupon drop, among other factors.  During 2015, we had 341 coupon events.  The amount recorded against revenues and accrued for these events during the year was $5.2 million. Cash settlement of coupon redemptions during the year was $3.6 million.

Allowances for Product Returns
Due to the nature of the consumer products industry, we are required to estimate future product returns.  Accordingly, we record an estimate of product returns concurrent with recording sales.  Such estimates are made after analyzing (i) historical return rates, (ii) current economic trends, (iii) changes in customer demand, (iv) product acceptance, (v) seasonality of our product offerings, and (vi) the impact of changes in product formulation, packaging and advertising.

We construct our returns analysis by looking at the previous year’s return history for each brand.  Subsequently, each month, we estimate our current return rate based upon an average of the previous twelve months’ return rate and review that calculated rate for reasonableness, giving consideration to the other factors described above.  Our historical return rate has been relatively stable; for example, for the years ended March 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013, returns represented 4.2%, 2.2% and 2.9%, respectively, of gross sales.  At March 31, 2015 and 2014, the allowance for sales returns was $8.6 million and $7.0 million, respectively.

While we utilize the methodology described above to estimate product returns, actual results may differ materially from our estimates, causing our future financial results to be adversely affected.  Among the factors that could cause a material change in the estimated return rate would be significant unexpected returns with respect to a product or products that comprise a significant portion of our revenues.  Based on the methodology described above and our actual returns experience, management believes the likelihood of such an event remains remote.  As noted, over the last three years our actual product return rate has stayed within a range of 4.2% to 2.2% of gross sales.  A hypothetical increase of 0.1% in our estimated return rate as a percentage of gross sales would have decreased our reported sales and operating income for 2015 by approximately $0.8 million.  Net income would have been reduced by approximately $0.5 million.

Lower of Cost or Market for Obsolete and Damaged Inventory
We value our inventory at the lower of cost or market value.  Accordingly, we reduce our inventories for the diminution of value resulting from product obsolescence, damage or other issues affecting marketability, equal to the difference between the cost of the inventory and its estimated market value.  Factors utilized in the determination of estimated market value include (i) current sales data and historical return rates, (ii) estimates of future demand, (iii) competitive pricing pressures, (iv) new product introductions, (v) product expiration dates, and (vi) component and packaging obsolescence.

Many of our products are subject to expiration dating.  As a general rule, our customers will not accept goods with expiration dating of less than 12 months from the date of delivery.  To monitor this risk, management utilizes a detailed compilation of inventory with expiration dating between zero and 15 months and reserves for 100% of the cost of any item with expiration dating of 12 months or less.  Inventory obsolescence costs charged to operations for 2015, 2014, and 2013 were $2.9 million, $2.5 million and $3.2 million, respectively, or 0.4%, 0.1% and 0.5%, respectively, of net sales.  


42



Allowance for Doubtful Accounts
In the ordinary course of business, we grant non-interest bearing trade credit to our customers on normal credit terms.  We maintain an allowance for doubtful accounts receivable, which is based upon our historical collection experience and expected collectability of the accounts receivable.  In an effort to reduce our credit risk, we (i) establish credit limits for all of our customer relationships, (ii) perform ongoing credit evaluations of our customers’ financial condition, (iii) monitor the payment history and aging of our customers’ receivables, and (iv) monitor open orders against an individual customer’s outstanding receivable balance.

We establish specific reserves for those accounts which file for bankruptcy, have no payment activity for 180 days, or have reported major negative changes to their financial condition.  The allowance for bad debts amounted to 1.3% and 1.6% of accounts receivable at March 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively.  Bad debt expense in each of the years 2015, 2014, and 2013 was approximately $0.1 million, $0.1 million, $0.3 million, respectively, representing less than 0.1% of net sales for each of 2015, 2014, and 2013.

While management believes that it is diligent in its evaluation of the adequacy of the allowance for doubtful accounts, an unexpected event, such as the bankruptcy filing of a major customer, could have an adverse effect on our financial results.  A hypothetical increase of 0.1% in our bad debt expense as a percentage of net sales in 2015 would have resulted in a decrease of less than $0.1 million in reported operating income and reported net income.

Valuation of Intangible Assets and Goodwill
Goodwill and intangible assets amounted to $2,425.4 million and $1,585.7 million at March 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively.  At March 31, 2015 and 2014, goodwill and intangible assets were apportioned among similar product groups within our three operating segments as follows:

43



 
March 31, 2015
(In thousands)
North American OTC
Healthcare
 
International OTC
Healthcare
 
Household
Cleaning
 
Consolidated
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Goodwill
$
263,411

 
$
20,440

 
$
6,800

 
$
290,651

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Intangible assets, net
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Indefinite-lived:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Analgesics
341,122

 
2,077

 

 
343,199

Cough & Cold
138,946

 
19,305

 

 
158,251

Women's Health
532,300

 
1,692

 

 
533,992

Gastrointestinal
213,639

 
61,068

 

 
274,707

Eye & Ear Care
172,319

 

 

 
172,319

Dermatologicals
217,227

 
1,999

 

 
219,226

Oral Care
61,438

 

 

 
61,438

Other OTC

 

 

 

Household Cleaning

 

 
110,272

 
110,272

Total indefinite-lived intangible assets, net
1,676,991

 
86,141

 
110,272

 
1,873,404

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Finite-lived:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Analgesics
10,001

 

 

 
10,001

Cough & Cold
78,846

 
689

 

 
79,535

Women's Health
38,139

 
317

 

 
38,456

Gastrointestinal
21,039

 
225

 

 
21,264

Eye & Ear Care
30,219

 

 

 
30,219

Dermatologicals
25,915

 

 

 
25,915

Oral Care
15,845

 

 

 
15,845

Other OTC
15,638

 

 

 
15,638

Household Cleaning

 

 
24,423

 
24,423

Total finite-lived intangible assets, net
235,642

 
1,231

 
24,423

 
261,296

Total intangible assets, net
1,912,633

 
87,372

 
134,695

 
2,134,700

Total goodwill and intangible assets, net
$
2,176,044

 
$
107,812

 
$
141,495

 
$
2,425,351



44



 
March 31, 2014
(In thousands)
North American OTC
Healthcare
 
International OTC
Healthcare
 
Household
Cleaning
 
Consolidated
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Goodwill
$
160,157

 
$
23,365

 
$
7,389

 
$
190,911

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Intangible assets, net
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Indefinite-lived:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Analgesics
341,123

 
2,498

 

 
343,621

Cough & Cold
185,452

 
23,223

 

 
208,675

Women's Health

 
2,035

 

 
2,035

Gastrointestinal
213,639

 

 

 
213,639

Eye & Ear Care
172,318

 

 

 
172,318

Dermatologicals
149,927

 
2,405

 

 
152,332

Oral Care
61,438

 

 

 
61,438

Other OTC

 

 

 

Household Cleaning

 


 
119,820

 
119,820

Total indefinite-lived intangible assets, net
1,123,897

 
30,161

 
119,820

 
1,273,878

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Finite-lived:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Analgesics
4,111

 

 

 
4,111

Cough & Cold
20,704

 
817

 

 
21,521

Women's Health
1,874

 
428

 

 
2,302

Gastrointestinal
12,126

 
285

 

 
12,411

Eye & Ear Care
8,038

 

 

 
8,038

Dermatologicals
12,623

 

 

 
12,623

Oral Care
17,198

 

 

 
17,198

Other OTC
16,568

 

 

 
16,568

Household Cleaning

 

 
26,167

 
26,167

Total finite-lived intangible assets, net
93,242

 
1,530

 
26,167

 
120,939

Total intangible assets, net
1,217,139

 
31,691

 
145,987

 
1,394,817

Total goodwill and intangible assets, net
$
1,377,296

 
$
55,056

 
$
153,376

 
$
1,585,728


The increase in goodwill of $99.7 million for 2015 was primarily due to the acquisition of Insight and Hydralyte, which increased goodwill by $103.3 million and $1.2 million, respectively, offset partially by the effects of foreign currency of $4.1 million and a decrease of $0.7 million resulting from the sale of rights to use of the Comet brand in certain Eastern European countries. The increase in the indefinite-lived intangible assets of $599.5 million for 2015 was due to the acquisition of Insight and Hydralyte, which increased indefinite-lived intangible assets by $599.6 million and $73.6 million, respectively, offset by a reclassification of the Pediacare brand to finite-lived of $46.5 million, a reduction of $9.5 million due to the sale of certain Eastern European rights of the Comet brand, and the effects of foreign currency of $17.7 million. The increase in the finite-lived intangible assets of $140.4 million for 2015 was primarily due to the acquisition of Insight, which increased finite-lived brands by $107.1 million, the reclassification of the Pediacare brand of $46.5 million from indefinite-lived, offset by amortization of $13.0 million and the effects of foreign currency of $0.2 million.

Our Chloraseptic, Clear Eyes, Compound W, Dramamine, Efferdent, Luden's, PediaCare, BC, Goody's, Ecotrin, Beano, Gaviscon, Tagamet, Fiber Choice, Dermoplast, New-Skin, Sominex, and Debrox brands comprise the majority of the value of the intangible assets within the OTC Healthcare segments.  The Chore Boy, Comet and Spic and Span brands comprise substantially all of the intangible asset value within the Household Cleaning segment.

Goodwill and intangible assets comprise substantially all of our assets.  Goodwill represents the excess of the purchase price over the fair value of assets acquired and liabilities assumed in a purchase business combination.  Intangible assets generally represent

45



our trademarks, brand names and patents.  When we acquire a brand, we are required to make judgments regarding the value assigned to the associated intangible assets, as well as their respective useful lives.  Management considers many factors both prior to and after the acquisition of an intangible asset in determining the value, as well as the useful life, assigned to each intangible asset that we acquire or continue to own and promote.  The most significant factors are:

Brand History
A brand that has been in existence for a long period of time (e.g., 25, 50 or 100 years) generally warrants a higher valuation and longer life (sometimes indefinite) than a brand that has been in existence for a very short period of time.  A brand that has been in existence for an extended period of time generally has been the subject of considerable investment by its previous owner(s) to support product innovation and advertising and promotion.

Market Position
Consumer products that rank number one or two in their respective market generally have greater name recognition and are known as quality product offerings, which warrant a higher valuation and longer life than products that lag in the marketplace.

Recent and Projected Sales Growth
Recent sales results present a snapshot as to how the brand has performed in the most recent time periods and represent another factor in the determination of brand value.  In addition, projected sales growth provides information about the strength and potential longevity of the brand.  A brand that has both strong current and projected sales generally warrants a higher valuation and a longer life than a brand that has weak or declining sales.  Similarly, consideration is given to the potential investment, in the form of advertising and promotion, required to reinvigorate a brand that has fallen from favor.

History of and Potential for Product Extensions
Consideration is given to the product innovation that has occurred during the brand’s history and the potential for continued product innovation that will determine the brand’s future.  Brands that can be continually enhanced by new product offerings generally warrant a higher valuation and longer life than a brand that has always “followed the leader”.

After consideration of the factors described above, as well as current economic conditions and changing consumer behavior, management prepares a determination of an intangible asset’s value and useful life based on its analysis.  Under accounting guidelines, goodwill is not amortized, but must be tested for impairment annually, or more frequently if an event occurs or circumstances change that would more likely than not reduce the fair value of the reporting unit below the carrying amount.  In a similar manner, indefinite-lived assets are not amortized.  They are also subject to an annual impairment test, or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that the asset may be impaired.  Additionally, at each reporting period an evaluation must be made to determine whether events and circumstances continue to support an indefinite useful life.  Intangible assets with finite lives are amortized over their respective estimated useful lives and must also be tested for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value of the asset may not be recoverable and exceeds its fair value.

On an annual basis, during the fourth fiscal quarter, or more frequently if conditions indicate that the carrying value of the asset may not be recovered, management performs a review of both the values and, if applicable, useful lives assigned to goodwill and intangible assets and tests for impairment.

We report goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets in three operating segments: North American OTC Healthcare, International OTC Healthcare and Household Cleaning.  We identify our reporting units in accordance with the FASB ASC Subtopic 280. The carrying value and fair value for intangible assets and goodwill for a reporting unit are calculated based on key assumptions and valuation methodologies previously discussed.  As a result, any material changes to these assumptions could require us to record additional impairment in the future. In the past, we have experienced declines in revenues and profitability of certain brands in the North American OTC Healthcare and Household Cleaning segments.  Sustained or significant future declines in revenue, profitability, other adverse changes in expected operating results, and/or unfavorable changes in other economic factors used to estimate fair values of certain brands could indicate that fair value no longer exceeds carrying value, in which case a non-cash impairment charge may be recorded in future periods.


46



Goodwill
As of February 28 and March 31, 2015, we had 15 reporting units with goodwill. As part of our annual test for impairment of goodwill, management estimates the discounted cash flows of each reporting unit to estimate their respective fair values.  In performing this analysis, management considers current information and future events, such as competition, technological advances and reductions in advertising support for our trademarks and trade names, that could cause subsequent evaluations to utilize different assumptions.  In the event that the carrying amount of the reporting unit exceeds the fair value, management would then be required to allocate the estimated fair value of the assets and liabilities of the reporting unit as if the unit was acquired in a business combination, thereby revaluing the carrying amount of goodwill.  

Indefinite-Lived Intangible Assets
At each reporting period, management analyzes current events and circumstances to determine whether the indefinite life classification for a trademark or trade name continues to be valid.  If circumstances warrant a change to a finite life, the carrying value of the intangible asset would then be amortized prospectively over the estimated remaining useful life.

Management tests the indefinite-lived intangible assets for impairment by comparing the carrying value of the intangible asset to its estimated fair value.  Since quoted market prices are seldom available for trademarks and trade names such as ours, we utilize present value techniques to estimate fair value.  Accordingly, management’s projections are utilized to assimilate all of the facts, circumstances and expectations related to the trademark or trade name and estimate the cash flows over its useful life.   In a manner similar to goodwill, future events, such as competition, technological advances and reductions in advertising support for our trademarks and trade names, could cause subsequent evaluations to utilize different assumptions. Once that analysis is completed, a discount rate is applied to the cash flows to estimate fair value. In connection with this analysis, management:

Reviews period-to-period sales and profitability by brand;

Analyzes industry trends and projects brand growth rates;

Prepares annual sales forecasts;

Evaluates advertising effectiveness;

Analyzes gross margins;

Reviews contractual benefits or limitations;

Monitors competitors’ advertising spend and product innovation;

Prepares projections to measure brand viability over the estimated useful life of the intangible asset; and

Considers the regulatory environment, as well as industry litigation.

Finite-Lived Intangible Assets
When events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value of the assets may not be recoverable, management performs a review similar to indefinite-lived intangible assets to ascertain the impact of events and circumstances on the estimated useful lives and carrying values of our trademarks and trade names.  

If the analysis warrants a change in the estimated useful life of the intangible asset, management will reduce the estimated useful life and amortize the carrying value prospectively over the shorter remaining useful life.  Management’s projections are utilized to assimilate all of the facts, circumstances and expectations related to the trademark or trade name and estimate the cash flows over its useful life. Future events, such as competition, technological advances and reductions in advertising support for our trademarks and trade names, could cause subsequent evaluations to utilize different assumptions. In the event that the long-term projections indicate that the carrying value is in excess of the undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use of the intangible assets, management is required to record an impairment charge.  Once that analysis is completed, a discount rate is applied to the cash flows to estimate fair value.  The impairment charge is measured as the excess of the carrying amount of the intangible asset over fair value as calculated using the discounted cash flow analysis.  


47



Impairment Analysis
During the fourth quarter of each fiscal year, we perform our annual impairment analysis. In prior years, we performed the analysis as of March 31. However, beginning with fiscal year 2015, we changed the date of our analysis to February 28 to better align with our annual operating plan preparation and to help facilitate our financial reporting process. We do not believe that a one-month change in the date of our analysis will significantly impact the results of our analysis or our financial statements.

We utilized the discounted cash flow method to estimate the fair value of our reporting units as part of the goodwill impairment test and the excess earnings method to estimate the fair value of our individual indefinite-lived intangible assets.   The discount rate utilized in the analyses, as well as future cash flows, may be influenced by such factors as changes in interest rates and rates of inflation.  Additionally, should the related fair values of goodwill and intangible assets be adversely affected as a result of declining sales or margins caused by competition, changing consumer preferences, technological advances or reductions in advertising and promotional expenses, we may be required to record impairment charges in the future. In addition, we considered our market capitalization at February 28, 2015, as compared to the aggregate fair values of our reporting units, to assess the reasonableness of our estimates pursuant to the discounted cash flow methodology. As a result of our analysis, we did not record an impairment charge in 2015.

Based on our analysis, the aggregate fair value of our reporting units exceeded the carrying value by 45.2%, with no reporting unit's fair value exceeding the carrying value by less than 10%. The aggregate fair value of the indefinite-lived intangible assets exceeded the carrying value by 42.4%. Three of the individual indefinite-lived trade names exceeded their carrying values by less than 10%. The fair value of Debrox, New Skin and Ecotrin, exceed their carrying values of $76.3 million, $37.2 million and $32.9 million, by 8.3%, 9.2% and 7.9%, respectively.

The significant assumptions underpinning the fair value of Debrox include a discount rate of 10%, coupled with modest revenue growth, and advertising and promotion investments that are in line with historical performance. A decrease in the annual cash flow of approximately 7.7% compared to the projected cash flow utilized in our analysis, or an increase in the discount rate of approximately 62 basis points could result in the carrying value of our trade name exceeding its fair value, resulting in an impairment charge.

The significant assumptions supporting the fair value of New Skin and Ecotrin, include a discount rate of 10% and cash flow projections that assume stabilizing revenue declines followed by modest revenue growth. Gross margin and advertising and promotion investments behind the brands are expected to be consistent with historic trends. Continued revenue declines in each of the brands, or changes in assumptions utilized in our quantitative indefinite lived asset impairment analysis may result in the fair value no longer exceed their carrying values. For example, a decrease in the annual cash flow of approximately 8.4% and 7.3% for New Skin and Ecotrin, respectively, compared to the projected cash flow utilized in our analysis, or an increase in the discount rate of approximately 77 and 72 basis points, respectively, could result in the carrying value of our trade name exceeding its fair value, resulting in an impairment charge. We will continue to review our results against forecasts and assess our assumptions to ensure they continue to be appropriate.

Additionally, certain of our North American OTC Healthcare and Household Cleaning brands, have experienced recent declines in revenues and profitability. While the fair value of these reporting units exceeds the carrying value by more than 10%, should such revenue declines continue, the fair value of the corresponding reporting units may no longer exceed their carrying value and we would be required to record an impairment charge.

Revenues from our Pediacare brand have declined significantly as compared to the corresponding periods in the prior year, due primarily to competition in the category, including new product introductions and lost distribution. Although we had expected revenues to decline with the return to the market of competing products, such declines have been steeper than expected. As a result, we performed an interim impairment analysis during our third quarter ended December 31, 2014 and concluded that no impairment existed. Additionally, in conjunction with a strategic review of our brands during the fourth quarter ended March 31, 2015 and our annual impairment review, we have reassessed the useful life of the Pediacare brand as of February 28, 2015 and determined it to be 20 years.

Stock-Based Compensation
The Compensation and Equity topic of the FASB ASC 718 requires us to measure the cost of services to be rendered based on the grant-date fair value of the equity award.  Compensation expense is to be recognized over the period during which an employee is required to provide service in exchange for the award, generally referred to as the requisite service period.  Information utilized in the determination of fair value includes the following:

Type of instrument (i.e., restricted shares, stock options, warrants or performance shares);
Strike price of the instrument;

48



Market price of our common stock on the date of grant;
Discount rates;
Duration of the instrument; and
Volatility of our common stock in the public market.

Additionally, management must estimate the expected attrition rate of the recipients to enable it to estimate the amount of non-cash compensation expense to be recorded in our financial statements.  While management prepares various analyses to estimate the respective variables, a change in assumptions or market conditions, as well as changes in the anticipated attrition rates, could have a significant impact on the future amounts recorded as non-cash compensation expense.  We recorded net non-cash compensation expense of $6.9 million, $5.1 million and $3.8 million during 2015, 2014, and 2013, respectively.  Assuming no changes in assumptions and no new awards authorized by the Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors, we expect to record non-cash compensation expense of approximately $4.2 million during 2016. 

Loss Contingencies
Loss contingencies are recorded as liabilities when it is probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount of such loss is reasonably estimable.  Contingent losses are often resolved over longer periods of time and involve many factors including:

Rules and regulations promulgated by regulatory agencies;
Sufficiency of the evidence in support of our position;
Anticipated costs to support our position; and
Likelihood of a positive outcome.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements
In April 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-03, Simplifying the Presentation of Debt Issuance Costs. The amendments in this update require that debt issuance costs related to a recognized debt liability be presented in the balance sheet as a direct deduction from that carrying amount of that debt liability, consistent with debt discounts. The amendments in this update are effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2015, and interim periods within those fiscal years. The adoption of ASU 2015-03 is not expected to have a material impact on our Consolidated Financial Statements.

In February 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-02, Amendments to the Consolidation Analysis. Update 2015-02 amended the process that a reporting entity must perform to determine whether it should consolidate certain types of legal entities. The amendments in this update are effective for public business entities for fiscal years, and for interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2015. The adoption of ASU 2015-02 is not expected to have a material impact on our Consolidated Financial Statements.

In January 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-01, Income Statement - Extraordinary and Unusual Items. The amendments in this update eliminate the concept of extraordinary items in Subtopic 225-20, which required entities to consider whether an underlying event or transaction is extraordinary. However, the amendments retain the presentation and disclosure guidance for items that are unusual in nature or occur infrequently. The amendments in this update are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2015. The adoption of ASU 2015-01 is not expected to have a material impact on our Consolidated Financial Statements.

In November 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-17, Pushdown Accounting, which clarifies whether and at what threshold an acquired entity that is a business or nonprofit activity can apply pushdown accounting in its separate financial statements. This ASU provides companies with the option to apply pushdown accounting in its separate financial statements upon occurrence of an event in which an acquirer obtains control of the acquired entity. The election to apply pushdown accounting can be made either in the period in which the change of control occurred, or in a subsequent period. The amendments in this update were effective November 18, 2014. The adoption of ASU 2014-17 did not have a material impact on our Consolidated Financial Statements.

In August 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-15, Disclosure of Uncertainties about an Entity’s Ability to Continue as a Going Concern. This amendment states that in connection with preparing financial statements for each annual and interim reporting period, an entity's management should evaluate whether there are conditions or events that raise substantial doubt about the entity's ability to continue as a going concern within one year after the date that the financial statements are issued (or within one year after the date that the financial statements are available to be issued, when applicable). The amendments in this update are effective for the annual reporting period beginning after December 15, 2016, and for annual periods and interim periods thereafter. Early application is permitted. The adoption of ASU 2014-15 is not expected to have a material impact on our Consolidated Financial Statements.


49



In June 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-12, Accounting for Share-Based Payments When the Terms of an Award Provide that a Performance Target Could Be Achieved after the Requisite Service Period, which requires that a performance target that affects vesting and that could be achieved after the requisite service period be treated as a performance condition. As such, the new guidance does not allow for a performance target that affects vesting to be reflected in estimating the fair value of the award at the grant date. The amendments to this update are effective for annual periods, and interim periods within those annual periods, beginning after December 15, 2015. Early adoption is permitted. Entities may apply the amendments in this update either prospectively to all awards granted or modified after the effective date or retrospectively to all awards with performance targets that are outstanding as of the beginning of the earliest annual period presented in the financial statements and to all new or modified awards thereafter. We currently do not have any outstanding share-based payments with a performance target. The adoption of ASU 2014-12 is not expected to have a material impact on our Consolidated Financial Statements.

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers - Topic 606, which supersedes the revenue recognition requirements in FASB ASC 605. The new guidance primarily states that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods and services. The amendments in this update are effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim periods within that reporting period. Early application is not permitted. We are evaluating the impact of adopting this prospective guidance on our Consolidated Financial Statements.

In April 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-08, Reporting Discontinued Operations and Disclosures of Disposals of Components of an Entity. Under the new guidance, only disposals representing a strategic shift in operations should be presented as discontinued operations. Those strategic shifts should have a major effect on the organization’s operations and financial results. Examples include a disposal of a major geographic area, a major line of business, or a major equity method investment. In addition, the new guidance requires expanded disclosures about discontinued operations that will provide financial statement users with more information about the assets, liabilities, income, and expenses of discontinued operations. Early adoption is permitted, but only for disposals (or classifications as held for sale) that have not been reported in financial statements previously issued or available for issuance. The amendments in this update must be applied prospectively to all disposals (or classifications as held for sale) of components of an entity that occur within annual periods beginning on or after December 15, 2014, and interim periods within those years. The adoption of ASU 2014-08 is not expected to have a material impact on our Consolidated Financial Statements.

Management has reviewed and continues to monitor the actions of the various financial and regulatory reporting agencies and is currently not aware of any other pronouncement that could have a material impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows.


50



Results of Operations

2015 compared to 2014

Total Segment Revenues
The following table represents total revenue by segment, including product groups, for each of the fiscal years ended March 31, 2015 and 2014.

 
 
 
 
 
Increase (Decrease)
(In thousands)
2015
%
2014
%
Amount
%
North American OTC Healthcare
 
 
 
 
 
Analgesics
$
111,954

15.7
$
108,101

18.1
$
3,853

3.6

Cough & Cold
103,686

14.5
100,060

16.7
3,626

3.6

Women's Health
71,506

10.0
1,960

0.3
69,546

(*)

Gastrointestinal
77,596

10.9