10-K 1 cck-12312015x10xk.htm 2015 FORM 10-K 10-K


UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, DC 20549

FORM 10-K
(Mark One)
[X]
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2015
 
[ ]
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from ___ to ___
COMMISSION FILE NUMBER 000-50189
CROWN HOLDINGS, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Pennsylvania
 
75-3099507
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
 
 
 
One Crown Way, Philadelphia, PA
 
19154-4599
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: 215-698-5100
____________________
SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OF THE ACT:
Title of each class
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock $5.00 Par Value
 
New York Stock Exchange
7  3/8% Debentures Due 2026
 
New York Stock Exchange
 1/2% Debentures Due 2096
 
New York Stock Exchange
SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(g) OF THE ACT: NONE
(Title of Class)
 ____________________

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  [X]    No [ ]

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act.    Yes [ ]    No  [X]

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filings requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  [X]    No  [ ]

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes  [X]    No  [ ]

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  [X]

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
 
Large accelerated filer
 
[X]
  
Accelerated filer
 
[ ]
Non-accelerated filer
 
[ ] (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
  
Smaller reporting company
 
[ ]
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  [ ]    No  [X]
As of June 30, 2015, 139,400,803 shares of the Registrant’s Common Stock, excluding shares held in Treasury, were issued and outstanding, and the aggregate market value of such shares held by non-affiliates of the Registrant on such date was $7,375,696,487 based on the New York Stock Exchange closing price for such shares on that date.
As of February 24, 2016, 139,610,299 shares of the Registrant’s Common Stock were issued and outstanding. 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Document
 
Parts Into Which Incorporated
Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held April 28, 2016
 
Part III to the extent described therein




Crown Holdings, Inc.


2015 FORM 10-K ANNUAL REPORT
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
PART I
 
 
 
 
Item 1
Business
1

 
 
 
Item 1A
Risk Factors
6

 
 
 
Item 1B
Unresolved Staff Comments
20

 
 
 
Item 2
Properties
20

 
 
 
Item 3
Legal Proceedings
22

 
 
 
Item 4
Mine Safety Disclosures
22

 
 
 
 
PART II
 
 
 
 
Item 5
Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
22

 
 
 
Item 6
Selected Financial Data
24

 
 
 
Item 7
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
25

 
 
 
Item 7A
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
40

 
 
 
Item 8
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
41

 
 
 
Item 9
Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
98

 
 
 
Item 9A
Controls and Procedures
98

 
 
 
Item 9B
Other Information
99

 
 
 
 
PART III
 
 
 
 
Item 10
Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
99

 
 
 
Item 11
Executive Compensation
99

 
 
 
Item 12
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
100

 
 
 
Item 13
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
100

 
 
 
Item 14
Principal Accounting Fees and Services
100

 
 
 
 
PART IV
 
 
 
 
Item 15
Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules
101

 
 
 
SIGNATURES
107





Crown Holdings, Inc.

PART I
ITEM 1.
BUSINESS

Crown Holdings, Inc. (the “Company” or the “Registrant”) (where the context requires, the “Company” shall include reference to the Company and its consolidated subsidiary companies) is a Pennsylvania corporation.

The Company is a worldwide leader in the design, manufacture and sale of packaging products for consumer goods. The Company’s primary products include steel and aluminum cans for food, beverage, household and other consumer products, glass bottles for beverage products and metal vacuum closures and caps. These products are manufactured in the Company’s plants both within and outside the U.S. and are sold through the Company’s sales organization to the soft drink, food, citrus, brewing, household products, personal care and various other industries. At December 31, 2015, the Company operated 147 plants along with sales and service facilities throughout 37 countries and had approximately 24,000 employees. Consolidated net sales for the Company in 2015 were $8.8 billion with 77% derived from operations outside the U.S.

DIVISIONS AND OPERATING SEGMENTS

The Company’s business is organized geographically within three divisions, Americas, Europe and Asia Pacific. Within each Division, the Company is generally organized along product lines. The Company’s reportable segments within the Americas Division are Americas Beverage and North America Food. The Company’s reportable segments within the European Division are European Beverage and European Food. The Company's Asia Pacific Division is a reportable segment which primarily consists of beverage can operations and also includes the Company's non-beverage can operations, primarily food cans and specialty packaging. The Company's non-reportable segments include its European aerosol and specialty packaging business, its North American aerosol can business and its tooling and equipment operations in the U.S. and U.K.

Financial information concerning the Company’s operating segments is set forth within “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” of this Annual Report and under Note W to the consolidated financial statements.

AMERICAS DIVISION

The Americas Division includes operations in the U.S., Brazil, Canada, the Caribbean, Colombia and Mexico. These operations manufacture beverage, food and aerosol cans and ends, glass bottles, specialty packaging and metal vacuum closures and caps. At December 31, 2015, the division operated 49 plants in 7 countries and had approximately 7,000 employees. In 2015, the Americas Division had net sales of $3.7 billion.

Americas Beverage

The Americas Beverage segment manufactures aluminum beverage cans and ends, glass bottles, steel crowns and aluminum caps. Manufacturing facilities are located in the U.S., Brazil, Canada, Colombia and Mexico. Americas Beverage had net sales in 2015 of $2.8 billion and segment income (as defined under Note W to the consolidated financial statements) of $427 million.

North America Food

The North America Food segment manufactures steel and aluminum food cans and ends and metal vacuum closures in the U.S. and Canada. North America Food had net sales in 2015 of $680 million and segment income (as defined under Note W to the consolidated financial statements) of $86 million.

 EUROPEAN DIVISION

The European Division includes operations in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. These operations manufacture beverage, food and aerosol cans and ends, specialty packaging and metal vacuum closures and caps. At December 31, 2015, the division operated 68 plants in 24 countries and had approximately 12,000 employees. Net sales in 2015 were $3.8 billion.

European Beverage

The European Beverage segment manufactures steel and aluminum beverage cans and ends in Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. European Beverage had net sales in 2015 of $1.5 billion and segment income (as defined under Note W to the consolidated financial statements) of $228 million.


Crown Holdings, Inc.


European Food

The European Food segment manufactures steel and aluminum food cans and ends, and metal vacuum closures, in Europe and Africa. European Food had net sales in 2015 of $2.0 billion and segment income (as defined under Note W to the consolidated financial statements) of $246 million.

ASIA PACIFIC DIVISION

The Asia Pacific Division is a reportable segment which primarily consists of beverage can operations in Cambodia, China, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam and also includes the Company's non-beverage can operations, primarily food cans and specialty packaging in China, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam. At December 31, 2015, the division operated 30 plants in 6 countries and had approximately 5,000 employees. Net sales in 2015 were $1.2 billion.

PRODUCTS

Beverage Cans and Glass Bottles

The Company supplies beverage cans, ends and other packaging products to a variety of beverage and beer companies, including Anheuser-Busch InBev, Carlsberg, Coca-Cola, Cott Beverages, Dr Pepper Snapple Group, Heineken, Molson Coors, Pepsi-Cola and SAB Miller among others. The Company’s beverage can business is built around local, regional and global markets, which has served to develop the Company’s understanding of global consumer expectations. The Company's glass bottle business is based in Mexico and serves customers in the local market.

The beverage market is dynamic and highly competitive, with each packaging manufacturer working together with its customers to satisfy consumers’ ever-changing needs. The Company competes by offering its customers broad market knowledge, resources at all levels of its worldwide organization and extensive research and development capabilities that have enabled the Company to provide its customers with innovative products. The Company meets its customers’ beverage packaging needs with an array of two-piece beverage cans and ends and metal bottle caps. Innovations include the SuperEnd® and 360 End™ beverage can ends, shaped beverage cans which include size differentiation, such as slim cans for low calorie products or larger sizes for high volume consumption. The Company expects to continue to add capacity in many of the growth markets around the world.

Beverage can and glass bottle manufacturing is capital intensive, requiring significant investment in tools and machinery. The Company seeks to effectively manage its invested capital and is continuing its efforts to reduce the metal content of its cans and reduce non-metal costs, including water and energy usage, while improving production processes.

Food Cans and Closures

The Company manufactures a variety of food cans and ends, including two-piece and three-piece cans in diverse shapes and sizes, and sells food cans to food marketers such as Abbot Laboratories, Bonduelle, Cecab, Faribault Foods, Mars, Morgan Foods, Nestlé, Princes Group and Simmons Foods, among others. The Company offers a wide variety of metal vacuum closures and sealing equipment solutions to leading marketers such as Abbot Laboratories, Danone, H. J. Heinz, Kraft, Nestlé, and Unilever, among others, from a network of metal vacuum closure plants around the world. The Company supplies total packaging solutions, including metal and composite closures, capping systems and services while working closely with customers, retailers and glass and plastic container manufacturers to develop innovative closure solutions and meet customer requirements.

Technologies used to produce food cans include three-piece welded, two-piece drawn and wall-ironed and two-piece drawn and redrawn. The Company also offers its LIFTOFF™ series of food ends, including its Easylift™ full aperture steel food can ends, and PeelSeam™, a flexible aluminum foil laminated end. The Company offers expertise in closure design and decoration, ranging from quality printing of the closure in up to nine colors, to inside-the-cap printing, which offers customers new promotional possibilities, to better product protection through Ideal Closures™, Orbit™ and Superplus™. The Company’s commitment to innovation has led to developments in packaging materials, surface finishes, can shaping, lithography, filling, retorting, sealing and opening techniques and environmental performance. The Company manufactures easy open, vacuum and conventional ends
for a variety of heat-processed and dry food products including fruits and vegetables, meat and seafood, soups, ready-made meals, infant formula, coffee and pet food.


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Crown Holdings, Inc.


Aerosol Cans

The Company’s customers for aerosol cans and ends include manufacturers of personal care, food, household and industrial products, including Colgate Palmolive, Friesland Campina, Procter & Gamble, SC Johnson and Unilever, among others. The aerosol can business is highly competitive. The Company competes by offering its customers a broad range of products including multiple sizes, multiple color schemes and shaped packaging.

Specialty Packaging

The Company’s specialty packaging business is primarily located in Europe and Asia. The Company produces a wide variety of specialty containers with numerous lid and closure variations. The Company’s specialty packaging customers include Britvic, Mars, Nestlé and United Biscuits, among others.

SALES AND DISTRIBUTION

Global marketers qualify suppliers on the basis of their ability to provide global service, innovative designs and technologies in a cost-effective manner.

With its global reach, the Company markets and sells products to customers through its own sales and marketing staffs. In some instances, contracts with customers are centrally negotiated, but products are ordered through and distributed directly by the Company’s local facilities. The Company’s facilities are generally located in proximity to their respective major customers. The Company works closely with customers in order to develop new business and to extend the terms of its existing contracts.

Many customers provide the Company with quarterly or annual estimates of product requirements along with related quantities pursuant to which periodic commitments are given. Such estimates assist the Company in managing production and controlling use of working capital. The Company schedules its production to meet customer requirements. Because the production time for the Company’s products is short, any backlog of customer orders in relation to overall sales is not significant.

SEASONALITY

The food packaging business is somewhat seasonal with the first quarter tending to be the slowest period as the autumn packing period in the Northern Hemisphere has ended and new crops are not yet planted. The industry generally enters its busiest period in the third quarter when the majority of fruits and vegetables are harvested. Due to this seasonality, inventory levels increase in the first half of the year to meet peak demand in the second and third quarters. Weather represents a substantial uncertainty in the yield of food products and is a major factor in determining the demand for food cans in any given year. Generally, beverage products are consumed in greater amounts during the warmer months of the year in the Northern Hemisphere and sales and earnings have generally been higher in the second and third quarters of the calendar year.

The Company’s other businesses primarily include aerosol and specialty packaging and canmaking equipment, which tend not to be as significantly affected by seasonal variations.

COMPETITION

Most of the Company’s products are sold in highly competitive markets, primarily based on price, quality, service and performance. The Company competes with other packaging manufacturers as well as with fillers, food processors and packers, some of whom manufacture containers for their own use and for sale to others. The Company’s competitors include, but are not limited to, Ardagh Group, Ball Corporation, BWAY Corporation, Can-Pack S.A., Metal Container Corporation, Rexam PLC and Silgan Holdings Inc.

CUSTOMERS

The Company’s largest customers consist of many of the leading manufacturers and marketers of packaged consumer products in the world. Consolidation trends among beverage and food marketers have led to a concentrated customer base. The Company’s top ten global customers represented in the aggregate approximately 33% of its 2015 net sales. In each of the years in the period 2013 through 2015, no one customer accounted for more than ten percent of the Company’s net sales. Each operating segment of the Company has major customers and the loss of one or more of these major customers could have a material adverse effect on an individual segment or the Company as a whole. Major customers include those listed above under the Products discussion. In addition to sales to Coca-Cola and Pepsi-Cola, the Company also supplies independent licensees of Coca-Cola and Pepsi-Cola.

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Crown Holdings, Inc.


RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

The Company's principal Research, Development & Engineering (RD&E) Centers are located in Alsip, Illinois and Wantage, United Kingdom. The Company utilizes its centralized RD&E capabilities to advance and deliver technologies for the Company's worldwide packaging activities that (1) promote development of value-added metal packaging systems for its customers, (2) design cost-efficient manufacturing processes, systems and materials that further the sustainability of metal packaging, (3) provide continuous quality and/or production efficiency improvements in its manufacturing facilities, (4) advance customer and vendor relationships, and (5) provide value-added engineering services and technical support. These capabilities facilitate (1) the identification of new and/or expanded market opportunities by working directly with customers to develop new packaging products or enhance existing packaging products through the application of new technologies that better differentiate our customers' products in the retail environment (for example, the creation of new packaging shapes or novel decoration methods) and/or the incorporation of consumer-valued features (for example, improved openability and/or ease of use) and (2) the reduction of manufacturing costs by reducing the material content of the Company's products (while retaining necessary performance characteristics), reducing spoilage, and increasing operating efficiencies in our manufacturing facilities.

The Company maintains a substantial portfolio of patents and other intellectual property (IP) in the field of metal packaging systems and seeks strategic partnerships to extend its IP in existing and emerging markets. As a result, the Company has licensed IP in geographic regions where the Company has a limited market presence today. Existing technologies such as SuperEnd® beverage ends, the 360 End™ beverage end and can shaping have been licensed in Australia, Japan, and Africa to provide customers with global access to Crown's brand building innovations.

The Company spent $39 million in 2015 and 2014 and $36 million in 2013 in its centralized RD&E activities. Certain of these activities are expected to improve and expand the Company's product lines in the future. These expenditures include projects within the Company's RD&E facilities to improve manufacturing efficiencies, reduce unit costs, and develop new and improved value-added packaging systems. These expenditures do not include related product and process developments occurring within the Company's decentralized business units.

MATERIALS AND SUPPLIERS

The Company uses various raw materials, primarily aluminum and steel, in its manufacturing operations. In general, these raw materials are purchased in highly competitive, price-sensitive markets which have historically exhibited price and demand cyclicality. These and other materials used in the manufacturing process have historically been available in adequate supply from multiple sources.

Generally, the Company’s principal raw materials are obtained from the major suppliers in the countries in which it operates plants. Some plants in less developed countries, which do not have local mills, obtain raw materials from more developed countries. The Company has agreements for what it considers adequate supplies of raw materials. However, sufficient quantities may not be available in the future due to, among other things, shortages due to excessive demand, weather or other factors, including disruptions in supply caused by raw material transportation or production delays. From time to time, some of the raw materials have been in short supply but, to date, these shortages have not had a significant impact on the Company’s operations.

In 2015, consumption of steel and aluminum represented 23% and 41%, respectively, of consolidated cost of products sold, excluding depreciation and amortization. Due to the significance of these raw materials to overall cost of products sold, raw material efficiency is a critical cost component of the products manufactured. Supplier consolidations, changes in ownership, government regulations, political unrest and increased demand for raw materials in the packaging and other industries, among other risk factors, provide uncertainty as to the availability of and the level of prices at which the Company might be able to source such raw materials in the future. Moreover, the prices of aluminum and steel can be subject to significant volatility. The Company’s raw material supply contracts vary as to terms and duration, with steel contracts typically one year in duration with fixed prices or set repricing dates, and aluminum contracts typically multi-year in duration with fluctuating prices based on aluminum ingot costs. The Company generally attempts to mitigate its steel and aluminum price risk by matching its purchase obligations with its sales agreements; however, there can be no assurance that the Company will be able to fully mitigate that risk.

The Company, in agreement with customers in many cases, also uses commodity and foreign currency forwards in an attempt to manage its exposure to aluminum price volatility.

There can be no assurance that the Company will be able to fully recover from its customers the impact of aluminum and steel price increases or that the use of derivative instruments will effectively manage the Company’s exposure to price volatility. In addition, if the Company is unable to purchase steel and aluminum for a significant period of time, its operations would be disrupted and if the Company were unable to fully recover the higher cost of steel and aluminum, its financial results may be adversely

4

Crown Holdings, Inc.


affected. The Company continues to monitor this situation and the effect on its operations. As a result of continuing global supply and demand pressures, other commodity-related costs affecting the Company’s business may increase as well, including natural gas, electricity and freight-related costs. The Company will attempt to increase prices on its products accordingly in order to recover these costs.

In response to the volatility of raw material prices, ongoing productivity and cost reduction efforts in recent years have focused on improving raw material cost management.

The Company’s manufacturing facilities are dependent, in varying degrees, upon the availability of water and processed energy, such as natural gas and electricity. Certain of these may become difficult or impossible to obtain on acceptable terms due to external factors which could increase the Company’s costs or interrupt its business.

Aluminum and steel, by their very nature, can be recycled at high effectiveness and can be repeatedly reused to form new consumer packaging with minimal or no degradation in performance, quality or safety. By recycling these metals, large amounts of energy can be saved and significant water use and carbon dioxide emissions avoided.

SUSTAINABILITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL, HEALTH AND SAFETY MATTERS

The Company’s operations are subject to numerous laws and regulations governing the protection of the environment, disposal of waste, discharges into water, emissions into the atmosphere and the protection of employee health and safety. Future regulations may impose stricter environmental requirements on the packaging industry and may require additional capital investment. Anticipated future restrictions in some jurisdictions on the use of certain coatings may require the Company to employ additional control equipment or process modifications. The Company has a Corporate Sustainability Policy and a Corporate Environmental Protection Policy. Environmental awareness is a key component of sustainability. Environmental considerations are among the criteria by which the Company evaluates projects, products, processes and purchases. The Company is committed to continuous improvement in product design and manufacturing practices to provide the best outcome for the human and natural environment, both now and in the future. By reducing the per-unit amount of raw materials used in manufacturing its products, the Company can significantly reduce the amount of energy, water and other resources and associated emissions necessary to manufacture metal containers. The Company aims to continue that process of improvement in its manufacturing process to assure that consumers and the environment are best served through the use of metal packaging. The Company is also committed to providing a safe work environment for its employees through programs that emphasize safety awareness and the elimination of injuries and incidents. There can be no assurance that current or future environmental laws or liabilities will not have a material effect on the Company’s financial condition, liquidity or results of operations. Discussion of the Company’s environmental matters is contained within “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” of this Annual Report under the caption “Environmental Matters,” and under Note M to the consolidated financial statements.
 
WORKING CAPITAL

The Company generally uses cash during the first nine months of the year to finance seasonal working capital needs. The Company’s working capital requirements are funded by cash flows from operations, revolving credit facilities and receivables securitization and factoring programs.

Further information relating to the Company’s liquidity and capital resources is set forth within “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” of this Annual Report under the caption “Liquidity” and under Note Q to the consolidated financial statements.

EMPLOYEES

At December 31, 2015, the Company had approximately 24,000 employees. Collective bargaining agreements with varying terms and expiration dates cover approximately 16,000 employees. The Company does not expect that renegotiation of the agreements expiring in 2016 will have a material adverse effect on its consolidated results of operations, financial position or cash flow.

AVAILABLE INFORMATION

The Company’s internet website address is www.crowncork.com. Information on the Company’s website is not incorporated by reference in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and all amendments to those reports filed by the Company with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission pursuant to sections 13(a) and 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, are accessible free of charge through the Company’s website as soon as reasonably practicable after the documents are filed with, or otherwise furnished to,

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Crown Holdings, Inc.


the U. S. Securities and Exchange Commission. The Company’s SEC filings are also available for reading and copying at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, D.C. 20549. Information on the operation of the Public Reference room may be obtained by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. In addition, the SEC maintains an internet site (http://www.sec.gov) containing reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC.
The Company’s Code of Business Conduct and Ethics, its Corporate Governance Guidelines, and the charters of its Audit, Compensation and Nominating and Corporate Governance committees are available on the Company’s website. These documents are also available in print to any shareholder who requests them. Amendments to and waivers of the Code of Business Conduct and Ethics requiring disclosure under applicable SEC rules will be disclosed on the Company's website.
ITEM 1A.
RISK FACTORS

In addition to factors discussed elsewhere in this Annual Report and in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” the following are some of the important factors that could materially and adversely affect the Company’s business, financial condition and results of operations.

The Company's international operations, which generated approximately 77% of its consolidated net sales in 2015, are subject to various risks that may lead to decreases in its financial results.

The Company is an international company, and the risks associated with operating in foreign countries may have a negative impact on the Company's liquidity and net income. The Company's international operations generated approximately 77%, 76% and 74%, of its consolidated net sales in the years ended 2015, 2014 and 2013. In addition, the Company's business strategy includes continued expansion of international activities, including within developing markets and areas, such as the Middle East, South America, and Asia, that may pose greater risk of political or economic instability. Approximately 37%, 32% and 34% of the Company's consolidated net sales in the years ended 2015, 2014 and 2013 were generated outside of the developed markets in Western Europe, the United States and Canada. Furthermore, if economic conditions in Europe deteriorate, there will likely be a negative effect on the Company's European business, as well as the businesses of the Company's European customers and suppliers. If this crisis ultimately leads to a significant devaluation of the euro, the value of the Company's financial assets that are denominated in euros would be significantly reduced when translated to U.S. dollars for financial reporting purposes. Any of these conditions could ultimately harm the Company's overall business, prospects, operating results, financial condition and cash flows.

Emerging markets are a focus of the Company's international growth strategy. The developing nature of these markets and the nature of the Company's international operations generally are subject to various risks, including:

foreign government's restrictive trade policies;
inconsistent product regulation or policy changes by foreign agencies or governments;
duties, taxes or government royalties, including the imposition or increase of withholding and other taxes on remittances and other payments by non-U.S. subsidiaries;
customs, import/export and other trade compliance regulations;
foreign exchange rate risks;
difficulty in collecting international accounts receivable and potentially longer payment cycles;
increased costs in maintaining international manufacturing and marketing efforts;
non-tariff barriers and higher duty rates;
difficulties associated with expatriating cash generated or held abroad in a tax-efficient manner and changes in tax laws;
difficulties in enforcement of contractual obligations and intellectual property rights and difficulties in protecting intellectual property or sensitive commercial and operations data or information technology systems generally;
exchange controls;
national and regional labor strikes;
geographic, language and cultural differences between personnel in different areas of the world;
high social benefit costs for labor, including costs associated with restructurings;
civil unrest or political, social, legal and economic instability, such as recent political turmoil in the Middle East;
product boycotts, including with respect to the products of the Company's multi-national customers;
customer, supplier, and investor concerns regarding operations in areas such as the Middle East;
taking of property by nationalization or expropriation without fair compensation;

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Crown Holdings, Inc.


imposition of limitations on conversions of foreign currencies into dollars or payment of dividends and other payments by non-U.S. subsidiaries;
hyperinflation and currency devaluation in certain foreign countries where such currency devaluation could affect the amount of cash generated by operations in those countries and thereby affect the Company's ability to satisfy its obligations;
war, civil disturbance, global or regional catastrophic events, natural disasters, including in emerging markets, and acts of terrorism;
geographical concentration of the Company's factories and operations and regional shifts in its customer base;
periodic health epidemic concerns;
the complexity of managing global operations; and
compliance with applicable anti-corruption or anti-bribery laws.

There can be no guarantee that a deterioration of economic conditions in countries in which the Company operates or may seek to operate in the future would not have a material impact on the Company's results of operations.

The Company is subject to the effects of fluctuations in foreign exchange rates, which may reduce its net sales and cash flow.

The Company is exposed to fluctuations in foreign currencies as a significant portion of its consolidated net sales, costs, assets and liabilities, are denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar. For the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013, the Company derived approximately 77%, 76% and 74% of its consolidated net sales from its international operations. In its consolidated financial statements, the Company translates local currency financial results into U.S. dollars based on average exchange rates prevailing during a reporting period. During times of a strengthening U.S. dollar, its reported international revenue and earnings will be reduced because the local currency will translate into fewer U.S. dollars. Conversely, a weakening U.S. dollar will effectively increase the dollar-equivalent of the Company's expenses and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies. See “Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations-Liquidity and Capital Resources-Market Risk” and “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk” in this Annual Report. Although the Company may use financial instruments such as foreign currency forwards from time to time to reduce its exposure to currency exchange rate fluctuations in some cases, it may not elect or have the ability to implement hedges or, if it does implement them, there can be no assurance that such agreements will achieve the desired effect.

For the year-ended December 31, 2015, a 0.10 movement in the average Euro rate would have reduced net income by $14 million.

As the Company seeks to expand its business globally, growth opportunities may be impacted by greater political, economic and social uncertainty and the continuing and accelerating globalization of businesses could significantly change the dynamics of the Company's competition, customer base and product offerings.

The Company's efforts to grow its businesses depend to a large extent upon access to, and its success in developing market share and operating profitably in, geographic markets including but not limited to the Middle East, South America, Eastern Europe and Asia. In some cases, countries in these regions have greater political and economic volatility, greater vulnerability to infrastructure and labor disruptions and differing local customer product preferences and requirements than the Company's other markets. Operating and seeking to expand business in a number of different regions and countries exposes the Company to multiple and potentially conflicting cultural practices, business practices and legal and regulatory requirements that are subject to change, including those related to tariffs and trade barriers, investments, property ownership rights, taxation, repatriation of earnings and regulation of advanced technologies. Such expansion efforts may also use capital and other resources of the Company that could be invested in other areas. Expanding business operations globally also increases exposure to currency fluctuations which can materially affect the Company's financial results. As these emerging geographic markets become more important to the Company, its competitors are also seeking to expand their production capacities and sales in these same markets, which may lead to industry overcapacity that could adversely affect pricing, volumes and financial results in such markets. Although the Company is taking measures to adapt to these changing circumstances, the Company's reputation and/or business results could be negatively affected should these efforts prove unsuccessful.

The Company may not be able to manage its anticipated growth, and it may experience constraints or inefficiencies caused by unanticipated acceleration and deceleration of customer demand.

Unanticipated acceleration and deceleration of customer demand for the Company's products may result in constraints or inefficiencies related to the Company's manufacturing, sales force, implementation resources and administrative infrastructure, particularly in emerging markets where the Company is seeking to expand production. Such constraints or inefficiencies may adversely affect the Company as a result of delays, lost potential product sales or loss of current or potential customers due to their

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dissatisfaction. Similarly, over-expansion, including as a result of overcapacity due to expansion by the Company's competitors, or investments in anticipation of growth that does not materialize, or develops more slowly than the Company expects, could harm the Company's financial results and result in overcapacity.

To manage the Company's anticipated future growth effectively, the Company must continue to enhance its manufacturing capabilities and operations, information technology infrastructure, and financial and accounting systems and controls. Organizational growth and scale-up of operations could strain its existing managerial, operational, financial and other resources. The Company's growth requires significant capital expenditures and may divert financial resources from other projects, such as
the development of new products or enhancements of existing products or reduction of the Company's outstanding indebtedness. If the Company's management is unable to effectively manage the Company's growth, its expenses may increase more than expected, its revenue could grow more slowly than expected and it may not be able to achieve its research and development and production goals. The Company's failure to manage its anticipated growth effectively could have a material effect on its business, operating results or financial condition.

The Company's profits will decline if the price of raw materials or energy rises and it cannot increase the price of its products, and the Company's financial results could be adversely affected if the Company was not able to obtain sufficient quantities of raw materials.

The Company uses various raw materials, such as steel, aluminum, tin, water, natural gas, electricity and other processed energy, in its manufacturing operations. Sufficient quantities of these raw materials may not be available in the future or may be available only at increased prices. The Company's raw material supply contracts vary as to terms and duration, with steel contracts typically one year in duration with fixed prices and aluminum contracts typically multi-year in duration with fluctuating prices based on aluminum ingot costs. The availability of various raw materials and their prices depends on global and local supply and demand forces, governmental regulations (including tariffs), level of production, resource availability, transportation, and other factors, including natural disasters such as floods and earthquakes. In particular, in recent years the consolidation of steel suppliers, shortage of raw materials affecting the production of steel and the increased global demand for steel, including in China and other developing countries, have contributed to an overall tighter supply for steel, resulting in increased steel prices and, in some cases, special surcharges and allocated cut backs of products by steel suppliers. In addition, future steel supply contracts may provide for prices that fluctuate or adjust rather than provide a fixed price during a one-year period. As a result of continuing global supply and demand pressures, other commodity-related costs affecting the Company's business may increase as well, including natural gas, electricity and freight-related costs.

The prices of certain raw materials used by the Company, such as steel, aluminum and processed energy, have historically been subject to volatility. In 2015, consumption of steel and aluminum represented 23% and 41%, respectively, of the Company's consolidated cost of products sold, excluding depreciation and amortization. While certain, but not all, of the Company's contracts pass through raw material costs to customers, the Company may be unable to increase its prices to offset increases in raw material costs without suffering reductions in unit volume, revenue and operating income. In addition, any price increases may take effect after related cost increases, reducing operating income in the near term. Significant increases in raw material costs may increase the Company's working capital requirements, which may increase the Company's average outstanding indebtedness and interest expense and may exceed the amounts available under the Company's senior secured credit facilities and other sources of liquidity. In addition, the Company hedges raw material costs on behalf of certain customers and may suffer losses if such customers are unable to satisfy their purchase obligations.

If the Company is unable to purchase steel, aluminum or other raw materials for a significant period of time, the Company's operations would be disrupted and any such disruption may adversely affect the Company's financial results. If customers believe that the Company's competitors have greater access to raw materials, perceived certainty of supply at the Company's competitors may put the Company at a competitive disadvantage regarding pricing and product volumes.

The substantial indebtedness of the Company could prevent it from fulfilling its obligations under its indebtedness.

The Company has substantial outstanding indebtedness. As a result of the Company's substantial indebtedness, a significant portion of the Company's cash flow will be required to pay interest and principal on its outstanding indebtedness, and the Company may not generate sufficient cash flow from operations, or have future borrowings available under its senior secured credit facilities, to enable it to repay its indebtedness or to fund other liquidity needs. As of December 31, 2015, the Company and its subsidiaries had approximately $5.5 billion of indebtedness. The Company's ratio of earnings to fixed charges was 3.2 times for the year ended December 31, 2015.

The Company’s current sources of liquidity include securitization facilities with program limits that expire as follows: $150 million in January 2017, $200 million in December 2018 and $173 million in 2019. Additional sources of liquidity include borrowings

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that mature as follows: its $1,200 million revolving credit facilities in December 2018; its $700 million 6.25% senior notes in February 2021 (which the Company intends to redeem effective February 28, 2016); its €650 million ($706 million at December 31, 2015) 4.0% senior notes in July 2022; its $1,000 million 4.50% senior notes in January 2023; its €600 million ($652 million at December 31, 2015) 3.375% senior notes in May 2025; its $350 million 7.375% senior notes in December 2026; its $45 million 7.5% senior notes in December 2096; and its $166 million of other indebtedness in various currencies at various dates through 2036. In addition, the Company's term loan and farm credit facilities mature as follows: $167 million in December 2016, $249 million in December 2017, $1,149 million in December 2018 and $344 million in December 2019. In February 2016, the Company amended its credit agreement to provide for an additional $300 million of term loan borrowings, the proceeds of which, along with borrowings under the revolving credit facilities and cash on hand were used to redeem the Company's $700 million 6.25% senior notes due 2021.

The substantial indebtedness of the Company could:
 
increase the Company's vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions, including rising interest rates;
restrict the Company from making strategic acquisitions or exploiting business opportunities, including any planned expansion in emerging markets;
limit the Company's ability to make capital expenditures both domestically and internationally in order to grow the Company's business or maintain manufacturing plants in good working order and repair;
limit, along with the financial and other restrictive covenants under the Company's indebtedness, the Company's ability to obtain additional financing, dispose of assets or pay cash dividends;
require the Company to dedicate a substantial portion of its cash flow from operations to service its indebtedness, thereby reducing the availability of its cash flow to fund future working capital, capital expenditures, research and development expenditures and other general corporate requirements;
require the Company to sell assets used in its business;  
limit the Company's ability to refinance its existing indebtedness, particularly during periods of adverse credit market conditions when refinancing indebtedness may not be available under interest rates and other terms acceptable to the Company or at all;
increase the Company's cost of borrowing;
limit the Company's flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in its business and the industry in which it operates; and
place the Company at a competitive disadvantage compared to its competitors that have less debt.

If its financial condition, operating results and liquidity deteriorate, the Company's creditors may restrict its ability to obtain future financing and its suppliers could require prepayment or cash on delivery rather than extend credit which could further diminish the Company's ability to generate cash flows from operations sufficient to service its debt obligations. In addition, the Company's ability to make payments on and refinance its debt and to fund its operations will depend on the Company's ability to generate cash in the future.

Some of the Company's indebtedness is subject to floating interest rates, which would result in the Company's interest expense increasing if interest rates rise.

As of December 31, 2015, approximately $1.9 billion of the Company's $5.5 billion of total indebtedness and other outstanding obligations were subject to floating interest rates. Changes in economic conditions could result in higher interest rates, thereby increasing the Company's interest expense and reducing funds available for operations or other purposes. The Company's annual interest expense was $270 million, $253 million and $236 million for 2015, 2014 and 2013. Based on the amount of variable rate debt outstanding at December 31, 2015, a 1% increase in variable interest rates would increase its annual interest expense by $19 million. Accordingly, the Company may experience economic losses and a negative impact on earnings as a result of interest rate fluctuation. The actual effect of a 1% increase could be more than $19 million as the Company's average borrowings on its variable rate debt may be higher during the year than the amount at December 31, 2015. In addition, the cost of the Company's securitization and factoring facilities would also increase with an increase in floating interest rates. Although the Company may use interest rate protection agreements from time to time to reduce its exposure to interest rate fluctuations in some cases, it may not elect or have the ability to implement hedges or, if it does implement them, there can be no assurance that such agreements will achieve the desired effect. See “Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations-Liquidity and Capital Resources-Market Risk” and “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk” in this Annual Report.

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Notwithstanding the Company's current indebtedness levels and restrictive covenants, the Company may still be able to incur substantial additional debt or make certain restricted payments, which could exacerbate the risks described above.

The Company may be able to incur additional debt in the future, including in connection with acquisitions or joint ventures. Although the Company's senior secured credit facilities and indentures governing certain of its outstanding notes contain restrictions on the Company's ability to incur indebtedness, those restrictions are subject to a number of exceptions, and, under certain circumstances, indebtedness incurred in compliance with these restrictions could be substantial. The Company may also consider investments in joint ventures or acquisitions or increased capital expenditures, which may increase the Company's indebtedness.
Moreover, although the Company's senior secured credit facilities and indentures governing its outstanding notes contain restrictions on the Company's ability to make restricted payments, including the declaration and payment of dividends and the repurchase of the Company's common stock, the Company is able to make such restricted payments under certain circumstances which may increase indebtedness, and the Company may in the future establish a regular dividend on the Company common stock. Adding new debt to current debt levels or making otherwise restricted payments could intensify the related risks that the Company and its subsidiaries now face.

Restrictive covenants in the debt agreements governing the Company's current or future indebtedness could restrict the Company's operating flexibility.

The indentures and agreements governing the Company's senior secured credit facilities and outstanding notes contain affirmative and negative covenants that limit the ability of the Company and its subsidiaries to take certain actions. These restrictions may limit the Company's ability to operate its businesses and may prohibit or limit its ability to enhance its operations or take advantage of potential business opportunities as they arise. The Company's senior secured credit facilities require the Company to maintain specified financial ratios and satisfy other financial conditions. The agreements or indentures governing the Company's senior secured credit facilities and certain of its outstanding notes restrict, among other things, the ability of the Company and the ability of all or substantially all of its subsidiaries to:

incur additional debt;
pay dividends or make other distributions, repurchase capital stock, repurchase subordinated debt and make certain investments or loans;
create liens and engage in sale and leaseback transactions;
create restrictions on the payment of dividends and other amounts to the Company from subsidiaries;
make loans, investments and capital expenditures;
change accounting treatment and reporting practices;
enter into agreements restricting the ability of a subsidiary to pay dividends to, make or repay loans to, transfer property to, or guarantee indebtedness of, the Company or any of its subsidiaries;
sell or acquire assets, enter into leaseback transactions and merge or consolidate with or into other companies; and
engage in transactions with affiliates.

In addition, the indentures and agreements governing the Company's senior secured credit facilities and certain of its outstanding notes limit, among other things, the ability of the Company to enter into certain transactions, such as mergers, consolidations, joint ventures, asset sales, sale and leaseback transactions and the pledging of assets. Furthermore, if the Company or certain of its subsidiaries experience specific kinds of changes of control, the Company's senior secured credit facilities will be due and payable and the Company will be required to offer to repurchase outstanding notes.

The breach of any of these covenants by the Company or the failure by the Company to meet any of these ratios or conditions could result in a default under any or all of such indebtedness. If a default occurs under any such indebtedness, all of the outstanding obligations thereunder could become immediately due and payable, which could result in a default under the Company's other outstanding debt and could lead to an acceleration of obligations related to the Company's senior secured credit facilities, outstanding notes and other outstanding debt. The ability of the Company to comply with these covenants or indentures governing other indebtedness it may incur in the future and its outstanding notes can be affected by events beyond its control and, therefore, it may be unable to meet these ratios and conditions.


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Crown Holdings, Inc.


Pending and future asbestos litigation and payments to settle asbestos-related claims could reduce the Company's cash flow and negatively impact its financial condition.

Crown Cork, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company, is one of many defendants in a substantial number of lawsuits filed throughout the United States by persons alleging bodily injury as a result of exposure to asbestos. In 1963, Crown Cork acquired a subsidiary that had two operating businesses, one of which is alleged to have manufactured asbestos-containing insulation products. Crown Cork believes that the business ceased manufacturing such products in 1963.

The Company recorded pre-tax charges of $26 million, $45 million and $32 million to increase its accrual for asbestos-related liabilities in 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively. As of December 31, 2015, Crown Cork's accrual for pending and future asbestos-related claims and related legal costs was $271 million, including $231 million for unasserted claims. Crown Cork's accrual includes estimated probable costs for claims through the year 2025. Crown Cork's accrual excludes potential costs for claims beyond 2025 because the Company believes that the key assumptions underlying its accrual are subject to greater uncertainty as the projection period lengthens. Assumptions underlying the accrual include that claims for exposure to asbestos that occurred after the sale of the subsidiary's insulation business in 1964 would not be entitled to settlement payouts and that state statutes described under Note L to the Company's audited consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report, including Texas and Pennsylvania statutes, are expected to have a highly favorable impact on Crown Cork's ability to settle or defend against asbestos-related claims in those states and other states where Pennsylvania law may apply.

Crown Cork had approximately 54,500 asbestos-related claims outstanding at December 31, 2015. Of these claims, approximately 16,000 claims relate to claimants alleging first exposure to asbestos after 1964 and approximately 38,500 relate to claimants alleging first exposure to asbestos before or during 1964, of which approximately 13,000 were filed in Texas, 2,000 were filed in Pennsylvania, 6,000 were filed in other states that have enacted asbestos legislation and 17,500 were filed in other states. The outstanding claims at December 31, 2015 also exclude approximately 19,000 inactive claims. Due to the passage of time, the Company considers it unlikely that the plaintiffs in these cases will pursue further action. The exclusion of these inactive claims had no effect on the calculation of the Company's accrual as the claims were filed in states where the Company's liability is limited by statute. The Company devotes significant time and expense to defend against these various claims, complaints and proceedings, and there can be no assurance that the expenses or distractions from operating the Company's businesses arising from these defenses will not increase materially.

During the year ended December 31, 2015, Crown Cork received approximately 2,500 new claims, settled or dismissed approximately 2,000 claims, and had approximately 54,500 claims outstanding at the end of the period.

On October 22, 2010, the Texas Supreme Court, in a 6-2 decision, reversed a lower court decision, Barbara Robinson v. Crown Cork & Seal Company, Inc., No. 14-04-00658-CV, Fourteenth Court of Appeals, Texas, which had upheld the dismissal of an asbestos-related case against Crown Cork. The Texas Supreme Court held that the Texas legislation was unconstitutional under the Texas Constitution when applied to asbestos-related claims pending against Crown Cork when the legislation was enacted in June of 2003. The Company believes that the decision of the Texas Supreme Court is limited to retroactive application of the Texas legislation to asbestos-related cases that were pending against Crown Cork in Texas on June 11, 2003 and therefore continues to assign no value to claims filed after June 11, 2003.

Crown Cork made cash payments of $30 million, $30 million and $28 million in 2015, 2014 and 2013 for asbestos-related claims including settlement payments and legal fees. These payments have reduced and any such future payments will reduce the cash flow available to Crown Cork for its business operations and debt payments.

Asbestos-related payments including defense costs may be significantly higher than those estimated by Crown Cork because the outcome of this type of litigation (and, therefore, Crown Cork's reserve) is subject to a number of assumptions and uncertainties, such as the number or size of asbestos-related claims or settlements, the number of financially viable responsible parties, the extent to which state statutes relating to asbestos liability are upheld and/or applied by the courts, Crown Cork's ability to obtain resolution without payment of asbestos-related claims by persons alleging first exposure to asbestos after 1964, and the potential impact of any pending or future asbestos-related legislation. Accordingly, Crown Cork may be required to make payments for claims substantially in excess of its accrual, which could reduce the Company's cash flow and impair its ability to satisfy its obligations.

As a result of the uncertainties regarding its asbestos-related liabilities and its reduced cash flow, the ability of the Company to raise new money in the capital markets is more difficult and more costly, and the Company may not be able to access the capital markets in the future. Further information regarding Crown's Cork's asbestos-related liabilities is presented within “Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” under the headings, “Provision for Asbestos” and “Critical Accounting Policies”and under Note L to the Company's audited consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report.

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Crown Holdings, Inc.


The Company has significant pension plan obligations worldwide and significant unfunded postretirement obligations, which could reduce its cash flow and negatively impact its results of operations and its financial condition.

The Company sponsors various pension plans worldwide, with the largest funded plans in the U.K., U.S. and Canada. In 2015, 2014 and 2013, the Company contributed $79 million, $81 million and $84 million, respectively, to its pension plans. Pension expense was $48 million in 2015 and is expected to be $36 million in 2016, including $9 million of settlement charges related to the Company's defined benefit plans. A 0.25% change in the 2016 expected rate of return assumptions would change 2016 pension expense by approximately $11 million. A 0.25% change in the discount rates assumptions as of December 31, 2015 would change 2016 pension expense by approximately $4 million. The Company may be required to accelerate the timing of its contributions under its pension plans. The actual impact of any accelerated funding will depend upon the interest rates required for determining the plan liabilities and the investment performance of plan assets. An acceleration in the timing of pension plan contributions could decrease the Company's cash available to pay its outstanding obligations and its net income and increase the Company's outstanding indebtedness.

Based on current assumptions, the Company expects to make pension contributions of $112 million in 2016, $82 million in 2017, $82 million in 2018, $90 million in 2019 and $87 million in 2020 including to its supplemental executive retirement plan. Future changes to mortality tables or other factors used to determine pension contributions could have a significant impact on the Company’s future contributions and its cash flow available for debt reduction, capital expenditures or other purposes.  In addition, any increase in required U.S. pension contributions will reduce U.S. taxable income and could negatively impact the Company’s ability to use its existing foreign tax credits, resulting in a charge to tax expense to write off credits that would expire prior to being used.

The difference between pension plan obligations and assets, or the funded status of the plans, significantly affects the net periodic benefit costs of the Company's pension plans and the ongoing funding requirements of those plans. Among other factors, significant volatility in the equity markets and in the value of illiquid alternative investments, changes in discount rates, investment returns and the market value of plan assets can substantially increase the Company's future pension plan funding requirements and could have a negative impact on the Company's results of operations and profitability. See Note U to the Company's audited consolidated financial statements in this Annual Report. As long as the Company continues to maintain its various pension plans, the Company will continue to incur additional pension obligations. The Company's pension plan assets consist primarily of common stocks and fixed income securities and also includes alternative investments such as interests in private equity and hedge funds. If the performance of plan assets does not meet the Company's assumptions or discount rates continue to decline, the underfunding of the pension plan may increase and the Company may have to contribute additional funds to the pension plan, and its pension expense may increase. In addition, the Company's supplemental executive retirement plan and retiree medical plans are unfunded.

The Company's U.S. funded pension plan is subject to the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, or ERISA. Under ERISA, the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, or PBGC, has the authority to terminate an underfunded plan under certain circumstances. In the event its U.S. pension plan is terminated for any reason while the plan is underfunded, the Company will incur a liability to the PBGC that may be equal to the entire amount of the underfunding, which under certain circumstances may be senior to the notes. In addition, as of December 31, 2015 the unfunded accumulated postretirement benefit obligation, as calculated in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, for retiree medical benefits was approximately $151 million, based on assumptions set forth under Note U to the Company's audited consolidated financial statements in this Annual Report.

Acquisitions or investments that the Company is considering or may pursue could be unsuccessful, consume significant resources and require the incurrence of additional indebtedness.

The Company may consider acquisitions and investments that complement its existing business. These possible acquisitions and investments involve or may involve significant cash expenditures, debt incurrence (including the incurrence of additional indebtedness under the Company's senior secured revolving credit facilities or other secured or unsecured debt), operating losses and expenses that could have a material effect on the Company's financial condition and operating results.

In particular, if the Company incurs additional debt, the Company's liquidity and financial stability could be impaired as a result of using a significant portion of available cash or borrowing capacity to finance an acquisition. Moreover, the Company may face an increase in interest expense or financial leverage if additional debt is incurred to finance an acquisition, which may, among other things, adversely affect the Company's various financial ratios and the Company's compliance with the conditions of its existing indebtedness. In addition, such additional indebtedness may be incurred under the Company's senior secured credit facilities or otherwise secured by liens on the Company's assets.

Acquisitions involve numerous other risks, including:

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Crown Holdings, Inc.


diversion of management time and attention;
failures to identify material problems and liabilities of acquisition targets or to obtain sufficient indemnification rights to fully offset possible liabilities related to the acquired businesses;
difficulties integrating the operations, technologies and personnel of the acquired businesses;
inefficiencies and complexities that may arise due to unfamiliarity with new assets, businesses or markets;
disruptions to the Company's ongoing business;
inaccurate estimates of fair value made in the accounting for acquisitions and amortization of acquired intangible assets which would reduce future reported earnings;
the inability to obtain required financing for the new acquisition or investment opportunities and the Company's existing business;
the need or obligation to divest portions of an acquired business;
challenges associated with operating in new geographic regions;
difficulties in achieving anticipated cost savings, synergies, business opportunities and growth prospects;
potential loss of key employees, contractual relationships, suppliers or customers of the acquired businesses or of the Company; and
inability to obtain required regulatory approvals.

To the extent the Company pursues an acquisition that causes it to incur unexpected costs or that fails to generate expected returns, the Company's financial position, results of operations and cash flows may be adversely affected, and the Company's ability to service its indebtedness may be negatively impacted.

Anti-takeover provisions in the Company's organizational documents and under Pennsylvania law could prevent or delay a change in control of the Company.

Provisions of Pennsylvania law and of the Company's Articles of Incorporation and By-Laws could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire control of the Company or have the effect of discouraging a third party from attempting to acquire control of the Company. The Company's Articles of Incorporation and By-Laws and Pennsylvania law include certain provisions which may be considered to be “anti-takeover” in nature because they may have the effect of discouraging or making more difficult the acquisition of control over the Company by means of a hostile tender offer, exchange offer, proxy contest or similar transaction. For example, the Company's Articles and By-Laws or Pennsylvania law:

provide that shareholders may not act by written consent in lieu of a shareholder meeting;
do not permit shareholders to call a special meeting of shareholders;
limit the ability of shareholders to modify the authority of the Company's Board of Directors or create a committee on the Board of Directors by amending the By-Laws;
limit the size of the Company's Board of Directors;
require advance notice for shareholder business and nominations at a shareholder meeting;
do not provide for cumulative voting by shareholders;
authorize the issuance of “blank check” preferred shares by the Company's Board of Directors;
impose certain requirements on business combinations that could delay for five years and impose conditions upon business combinations between an interested shareholder and the Company, unless the transaction is approved by the Company's Board of Directors;
include a statute regarding disgorgement of profits arising from the sale of Company common stock by certain controlling shareholders following attempts to acquire control; and
require disinterested shareholder approval of certain business combinations with interested shareholders.

These provisions are intended to protect the Company's shareholders by providing a measure of assurance that the Company's shareholders will be treated fairly in the event of an unsolicited takeover bid and by preventing a successful takeover bidder from exercising its voting control to the detriment of the other shareholders. To the extent that these provisions actually discourage a transaction, holders of the Company's common stock may not have an opportunity to dispose of part or all of their stock at a higher price than that prevailing in the market. In addition, some of these provisions make it more difficult to remove the Company's incumbent directors and officers, even if their removal would be regarded by some shareholders as desirable.

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Crown Holdings, Inc.


The Company has authorized and unissued approximately 391 million shares of common stock, including treasury shares, and 30 million shares of preferred stock. The shares of preferred stock may be issued at any time or from time to time and the board of directors has authority to fix the designations, number and voting rights, preferences, privileges, limitations, restrictions, conversion rights and other special or relative rights, if any, of any class or series of any class of preferred stock that may be desired, provided the shares of any such class or series of preferred stock shall not be entitled to more than one vote per share when voting as a class with holders of the Company's common stock. The Company does not have a policy limiting the issuance of the preferred stock for corporate purposes such as corporate financings or acquisitions. One of the effects of the existence of authorized but unissued shares of the Company's common stock or preferred stock may be to enable the Company's board of directors to render it more difficult or to discourage an attempt to obtain control of the Company and thereby protect the continuity of the Company's management, which may adversely affect the market price of the Company's common stock. If in the due exercise of its fiduciary obligations, for example, the Company's board of directors were to determine that a takeover proposal were not in the Company's best interests, such shares could be issued by the board of directors without stockholder approval in one or more private placements or other transactions that might prevent, render more difficult or make more costly the completion of any attempted takeover transaction by diluting voting or other rights of the proposed acquirer or insurgent stockholder group, by creating a substantial voting bloc in institutional or other hands that might support the position of the incumbent board of directors, by effecting an acquisition that might complicate or preclude the takeover, or otherwise.

The Company's principal markets may be subject to overcapacity and intense competition, which could reduce the Company's net sales and net income.

Food and beverage cans are standardized products, allowing for relatively little differentiation among competitors. This could lead to overcapacity and price competition among food and beverage can producers, if capacity growth outpaced the growth in demand for food and beverage cans and overall manufacturing capacity exceeded demand. These market conditions could reduce product prices and contribute to declining revenue and net income and increasing debt balances. As a result of industry overcapacity (including in developed markets and certain emerging markets, such as China) and price competition, the Company may not be able to increase prices sufficiently to offset higher costs or to generate sufficient cash flow. The North American and Western Europe food and beverage can markets, in particular, are considered to be mature markets, characterized by slow growth and a sophisticated distribution system. In China, the current industry supply of beverage cans exceeds demand, which has resulted in pricing pressure and negative impacts on the Company's profitability. Competitive pricing pressures, overcapacity, the failure to develop new product designs and technologies for products, as well as other factors, such as consolidation among our competitors, could cause the Company to lose existing business or opportunities to generate new business and could result in decreased cash flow and net income.

The Company is subject to competition from substitute products and decreases in demand for its products, which could result in lower profits and reduced cash flows.

The Company is subject to substantial competition from producers of alternative packaging made from glass, paper, flexible materials and plastic. The Company's sales depend heavily on the volumes of sales by the Company's customers in the food and beverage markets. Changes in preferences for products and packaging by consumers of prepackaged food and beverage cans significantly influence the Company's sales. Changes in packaging by the Company's customers may require the Company to re-tool manufacturing operations, which could require material expenditures. In addition, a decrease in the costs of, or a further increase in consumer demand for, alternative packaging could result in lower profits and reduced cash flows for the Company. For example, increases in the price of aluminum and steel and decreases in the price of plastic resin, which is a petrochemical product and may fluctuate with prices in the oil and gas market, may increase substitution of plastic food and beverage containers for metal containers or increases in the price of steel may increase substitution of aluminum packaging for aerosol products. Moreover, due to its high percentage of fixed costs, the Company may be unable to maintain its gross margin at past levels if it is not able to achieve high capacity utilization rates for its production equipment. In periods of low world-wide demand for its products or in situations where industry expansion created excess capacity, the Company experiences relatively low capacity utilization rates in its operations, which can lead to reduced margins during that period and can have an adverse effect on the Company's business.

The Company's business results depend on its ability to understand its customers' specific preferences and requirements, and to develop, manufacture and market products that meet customer demand.

The Company's ability to develop new product offerings for a diverse group of global customers with differing preferences, while maintaining functionality and spurring innovation, is critical to its success. This requires a thorough understanding of the Company's existing and potential customers on a global basis, particularly in potential high growth emerging markets, including the Middle East, South America, Eastern Europe and Asia. Failure to deliver quality products that meet customer needs ahead of competitors could have a significant adverse effect on the Company's business.

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Crown Holdings, Inc.


The loss of a major customer and/or customer consolidation could reduce the Company's net sales and profitability.

Many of the Company's largest customers have acquired companies with similar or complementary product lines. This consolidation has increased the concentration of the Company's business with its largest customers. In many cases, such consolidation has been accompanied by pressure from customers for lower prices, reflecting the increase in the total volume of product purchased or the elimination of a price differential between the acquiring customer and the company acquired. Increased pricing pressures from the Company's customers may reduce the Company's net sales and net income.

The majority of the Company's sales are to companies that have leading market positions in the sale of packaged food, beverages and household products to consumers. Although no one customer accounted for more than 10% of its net sales in the years ended 2015, 2014 or 2013, the loss of any of its major customers, a reduction in the purchasing levels of these customers or an adverse change in the terms of supply agreements with these customers could reduce the Company's net sales and net income. A continued consolidation of the Company's customers could exacerbate any such loss.

The Company's business is seasonal and weather conditions could reduce the Company's net sales.

The Company manufactures packaging primarily for the food and beverage can market. Its sales can be affected by weather conditions. Due principally to the seasonal nature of the soft drink, brewing, iced tea and other beverage industries, in which demand is stronger during the summer months, sales of the Company's products have varied and are expected to vary by quarter. Shipments in the U.S. and Europe are typically greater in the second and third quarters of the year. Unseasonably cool weather can reduce consumer demand for certain beverages packaged in its containers. In addition, poor weather conditions that reduce crop yields of packaged foods can decrease customer demand for its food containers.

The Company is subject to certain restrictions that may limit its ability to make payments on its debt out of the cash reserves shown on the Company's consolidated financial statements.

The ability of the Company's subsidiaries and joint ventures to pay dividends, make distributions, provide loans or make other payments to the Company may be restricted by applicable state and foreign laws, potentially adverse tax consequences and their agreements, including agreements governing their debt.

In addition, the equity interests of the Company's joint venture partners or other shareholders in the Company's non-wholly owned subsidiaries in any dividend or other distribution made by these entities would need to be satisfied on a proportionate basis with the Company. As a result, the Company may not be able to access their cash flow to service the Company's debt and the Company cannot assure you that the amount of cash and cash flow reflected on the Company's financial statements will be fully available to the Company.

The Company is subject to costs and liabilities related to stringent environmental and health and safety standards.

Laws and regulations relating to environmental protection and health and safety may increase the Company's costs of operating and reduce its profitability. The Company's operations are subject to numerous U.S. federal and state and non-U.S. laws and regulations governing the protection of the environment, including those relating to treatment, storage and disposal of waste, the use of chemicals in the Company's products and manufacturing process, discharges into water, emissions into the atmosphere, remediation of soil and groundwater contamination and protection of employee health and safety. Future regulations may impose stricter environmental or employee safety requirements affecting the Company's operations or may impose additional requirements regarding consumer health and safety, such as potential restrictions on the use of bisphenol-A, a starting material used to produce internal and external coatings for some food, beverage, and aerosol containers and metal closures. Although the U.S. FDA currently permits the use of bisphenol-A in food packaging materials and confirmed in a January 2010 update that studies employing standardized toxicity tests have supported the safety of current low levels of human exposure to bisphenol-A, the FDA in that January 2010 update noted that more research was needed, and further suggested reasonable steps to reduce exposure to bisphenol-A. The FDA subsequently entered into a consent decree under which it agreed to issue, by March 31, 2012, a final decision on a citizen's petition requesting the agency take further regulatory steps with regard to bisphenol-A. On March 30, 2012, the FDA denied the request, responding, in part, that the appropriate course of action was to continue scientific study and review of all new evidence regarding the safety of bisphenol-A. In March 2010, the EPA issued an action plan for bisphenol-A, which includes, among other things, consideration of whether to add bisphenol-A to the chemical concern list on the basis of potential environmental effects and use of the EPA's Design for the Environment program to encourage reductions in bisphenol-A manufacturing and use. Moreover, certain U.S. Congressional bodies, states and municipalities, as well as certain foreign nations and some member states of the European Union, such as Denmark, Belgium and France, have considered, proposed or already passed legislation banning or suspending the use of bisphenol-A in certain products or requiring warnings regarding bisphenol-A. In July 2012, the FDA

15

Crown Holdings, Inc.


banned the use of bisphenol-A in baby bottles and children's drinking cups, and in July 2013, the FDA banned the use of bisphenol-A in epoxy resins that coat infant formula cans. In the fourth quarter of 2012, the French Parliament passed a law suspending the use of bisphenol-A in food packaging beginning in 2013 for food intended for children under 3 and in 2015 for all other foods. The law also includes certain product labeling requirements. In the first quarter of 2014, the European Food Safety Authority recommended that the tolerable daily intake of bisphenol-A be lowered. Further, the U.S. or additional international, federal, state or other regulatory authorities could restrict or prohibit the use of bisphenol-A in the future. For example, in 2015, the State of California declared bisphenol-A a reproductive system hazard and listed BPA as a hazardous chemical under California's Safe Water and Toxic Environment Act, which may trigger a requirement to include warning labels on consumer items containing bisphenol-A. In addition, recent public reports, litigation and other allegations regarding the potential health hazards of bisphenol-A could contribute to a perceived safety risk about the Company's products and adversely impact sales or otherwise disrupt the Company's business. While the Company is exploring various alternatives to the use of bisphenol-A and conversion to alternatives is underway in some applications, there can be no assurance the Company will be completely successful in its efforts or that the alternatives will not be more costly to the Company.

Also, for example, future restrictions in some jurisdictions on air emissions of volatile organic compounds and the use of certain paint and lacquering ingredients may require the Company to employ additional control equipment or process modifications. The Company's operations and properties, both in the U.S. and abroad, must comply with these laws and regulations. In addition, a number of governmental authorities in the U.S. and abroad have introduced or are contemplating enacting legal requirements, including emissions limitations, cap and trade systems or mandated changes in energy consumption, in response to the potential impacts of climate change. Given the wide range of potential future climate change regulations in the jurisdictions in which the Company operates, the potential impact to the Company's operations is uncertain. In addition, the potential impact of climate change on the Company's operations is highly uncertain. The impact of climate change may vary by geographic location and other circumstances, including weather patterns and any impact to natural resources such as water.

A number of governmental authorities both in the U.S. and abroad also have enacted, or are considering, legal requirements relating to product stewardship, including mandating recycling, the use of recycled materials and/or limitations on certain kinds of packaging materials such as plastics. In addition, some companies with packaging needs have responded to such developments, and/or to perceived environmental concerns of consumers, by using containers made in whole or in part of recycled materials. Such developments may reduce the demand for some of the Company's products, and/or increase its costs. See “Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations-Liquidity and Capital Resources-Environmental Matters” in this Annual Report.

The Company has a significant amount of goodwill that, if impaired in the future, would result in lower reported net income and a reduction of its net worth.

Impairment of the Company's goodwill would require a write down of goodwill, which would reduce the Company's net income in the period of any such write down. At December 31, 2015, the carrying value of the Company's goodwill was $3,003 million. The Company is required to evaluate goodwill reflected on its balance sheet at least annually, or when circumstances indicate a potential impairment. If it determines that the goodwill is impaired, the Company would be required to write off a portion or all of the goodwill.

If the Company fails to retain key management and personnel, the Company may be unable to implement its business plan.

Members of the Company's senior management have extensive industry experience, and it might be difficult to find new personnel with comparable experience. Because the Company's business is highly specialized, the Company believes that it would also be difficult to replace its key technical personnel. The Company believes that its future success depends, in large part, on its experienced senior management team. Losing the services of key members of its management team could limit the Company's ability to implement its business plan. In addition, under the Company's unfunded Senior Executive Retirement Plan certain members of senior management are entitled to lump sum payments upon retirement or other termination of employment and a lump sum death benefit of five times the annual retirement benefit.

A significant portion of the Company's workforce is unionized and labor disruptions could increase the Company's costs and prevent the Company from supplying its customers.

A significant portion of the Company's workforce is unionized and a prolonged work stoppage or strike at any facility with unionized employees could increase its costs and prevent the Company from supplying its customers. In addition, upon the expiration of existing collective bargaining agreements, the Company may not reach new agreements without union action and any such new agreements may not be on terms satisfactory to the Company. If the Company is unable to negotiate acceptable collective bargaining agreements, it may become subject to union-initiated work stoppages, including strikes. Moreover,   additional groups of

16

Crown Holdings, Inc.


currently non-unionized employees may seek union representation in the future. The National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) has adopted new regulations concerning the procedures for conducting employee representation elections that could make it significantly easier for labor organizations to prevail in elections. The regulations became effective on April 14, 2015, although court challenges to those regulations remain pending.

Failure by the Company's joint venture partners to observe their obligations could adversely affect the business and operations of the joint ventures and, in turn, the business and operations of the Company.

A portion of the Company's operations, including certain joint venture beverage can operations in Asia, the Middle East and South America, is conducted through certain joint ventures. The Company participates in these ventures with third parties. In the event that the Company's joint venture partners do not observe their obligations or are unable to commit additional capital to the joint ventures, it is possible that the affected joint venture would not be able to operate in accordance with its business plans or that the Company would have to increase its level of commitment to the joint venture.

If the Company fails to maintain an effective system of internal control, the Company may not be able to accurately report financial results or prevent fraud.

Effective internal controls are necessary to provide reliable financial reports and to assist in the effective prevention of fraud. Any inability to provide reliable financial reports or prevent fraud could harm the Company's business. The Company must annually evaluate its internal procedures to satisfy the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, which requires management and auditors to assess the effectiveness of internal controls. If the Company fails to remedy or maintain the adequacy of its internal controls, as such standards are modified, supplemented or amended from time to time, the Company could be subject to regulatory scrutiny, civil or criminal penalties or shareholder litigation.

In addition, failure to maintain adequate internal controls could result in financial statements that do not accurately reflect the Company's financial condition. There can be no assurance that the Company will be able to complete the work necessary to fully comply with the requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act or that the Company's management and external auditors will continue to conclude that the Company's internal controls are effective.

The Company is subject to litigation risks which could negatively impact its operations and net income.

The Company is subject to various lawsuits and claims with respect to matters such as governmental, environmental and employee benefits laws and regulations, securities, labor, and actions arising out of the normal course of business, in addition to asbestos-related litigation described under the risk factor titled “Pending and future asbestos litigation and payments to settle asbestos-related claims could reduce the Company's cash flow and negatively impact its financial condition.” The Company is currently unable to determine the total expense or possible loss, if any, that may ultimately be incurred in the resolution of such legal proceedings. Regardless of the ultimate outcome of such legal proceedings, they could result in significant diversion of time by the Company's management. The results of the Company's pending legal proceedings, including any potential settlements, are uncertain and the outcome of these disputes may decrease its cash available for operations and investment, restrict its operations or otherwise negatively impact its business, operating results, financial condition and cash flow.

In March 2015, the Bundeskartellamt, or German Federal Cartel Office (“FCO”), conducted unannounced inspections of the premises of several metal packaging manufacturers, including one of the Company’s German subsidiaries. The local court order authorizing the inspection cited FCO suspicions of anti-competitive agreements in the market for the supply of metal packaging products. The FCO’s investigation is ongoing. To date, the FCO has not officially charged the Company or any of its subsidiaries with any violations of competition law. The Company has commenced an internal investigation into the matter and has discovered instances of inappropriate conduct by certain employees of German subsidiaries of the Company. The Company is cooperating with the FCO and submitted a leniency application which disclosed the findings of its internal investigation to date and which may lead to the reduction of penalties that the FCO may impose. If the FCO finds that the Company or any of its subsidiaries violated competition law, the FCO has wide discretion to levy fines. At this stage of the investigation the Company believes that a loss is probable. The Company is unable to predict the ultimate outcome of the FCO’s investigation and any additional losses that could be incurred, which could be material to the Company’s operating results and cash flows for the periods in which they are resolved or become reasonably estimable.

17

Crown Holdings, Inc.


The downturn in certain global economies could have adverse effects on the Company.

The downturn in certain global economies could have significant adverse effects on the Company's operations, including as a result of any the following:

downturns in the business or financial condition of any of the Company's key customers or suppliers, potentially resulting in customers' inability to pay the Company's invoices as they become due, or at all, or suppliers' failure to fulfill their commitments;
potential losses associated with hedging activity by the Company for the benefit of the Company's customers including counterparty risk associated with such hedging activity, or costs associated with changing suppliers;
a decline in the fair value of the Company's pension assets or a decline in discount rates used to measure the Company's pension obligations, potentially requiring the Company to make significant additional contributions to its pension plans to meet prescribed funding levels;
the deterioration of any of the lending parties under the Company's senior secured revolving credit facilities or the creditworthiness of the counterparties to the Company's derivative transactions, which could result in such parties' failure to satisfy their obligations under their arrangements with the Company;
noncompliance with the covenants under the Company's indebtedness as a result of a weakening of the Company's financial position or results of operations; and
the lack of currently available funding sources, which could have a negative impact upon the liquidity of the Company as well as that of its customers and suppliers.

The Company relies on its information technology and the failure or disruption of its information technology could disrupt its operations and adversely affect its results of operations.

The Company's business increasingly relies on the successful and uninterrupted functioning of its information technology systems to process, transmit, and store electronic information. A significant portion of the communication between the Company's personnel around the world, customers, and suppliers depends on information technology. As with all large systems, the Company's information technology systems may be susceptible to damage, disruptions or shutdowns due to failures during the process of upgrading or replacing software, databases or components thereof, power outages, hardware failures, computer viruses, attacks by computer hackers, telecommunication failures, user errors or catastrophic events. In addition, security breaches could result in unauthorized disclosure of confidential information.

The concentration of processes in shared services centers means that any disruption could impact a large portion of the Company's business within the operating zones served by the affected service center. If the Company does not allocate, and effectively manage, the resources necessary to build, sustain and protect the proper technology infrastructure, the Company could be subject to transaction errors, processing inefficiencies, loss of customers, business disruptions, the loss of or damage to intellectual property through security breach, as well as potential civil liability and fines under various states' laws in which the Company does business. The Company's information technology system could also be penetrated by outside parties intent on extracting information, corrupting information or disrupting business processes. In addition, if the Company's information technology systems suffer severe damage, disruption or shutdown and the Company's business continuity plans do not effectively resolve the issues in a timely manner, the Company may lose revenue and profits as a result of its inability to timely manufacture, distribute, invoice and collect payments from its customers, and could experience delays in reporting its financial results, including with respect to the Company's operations in emerging markets. Furthermore, if the Company is unable to prevent security breaches, it may suffer financial and reputational damage because of lost or misappropriated confidential information belonging to the Company or to its customers or suppliers. Failure or disruption of these systems, or the back-up systems, for any reason could disrupt the Company's operations and negatively impact the Company's cash flows or financial condition.

Potential U.S. tax law changes could increase the Company's U.S. tax expense on its overseas earnings which could have a negative impact on its after-tax income and cash flow.

Legislative proposals have been made to reform the deferral of U.S. taxes on non-U.S. earnings (including as part of President Obama's Budget of the United States Government for 2017), which could significantly change the timing and extent of taxation on the Company's unrepatriated non-U.S earnings. Past proposals, as set out in various draft Congressional legislative proposals which were not enacted, would defer interest expense and other deductions allocable to non-U.S earnings until earnings are repatriated that, if enacted, could result in the Company not being able to currently deduct a significant portion of its interest expense. It is unclear whether these proposed tax revisions will be enacted or reintroduced by Congress, or, if enacted, what the

18

Crown Holdings, Inc.


precise scope of the revisions will be. However, depending on their content, such proposals could have a material adverse effect on the Company's after-tax income and cash flow.

The Company may not be able to use all of its foreign tax credit carryforwards in the event it undergoes an ownership change as defined by the U.S. Internal Revenue Code of 1986.

The Company has substantial foreign tax carryforwards that can, subject to complex limitations, reduce U.S. taxes owed on foreign income. In the event the Company undergoes an ownership change as determined, its use of those foreign tax credit carryovers may be severely curtailed under section 383 of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code of 1986. An ownership change may occur if the percentage of the Company's stock owned by one or more 5% shareholders increases by more than 50 percentage points over the lowest percentage of the Company's stock owned by those shareholders, measured over a three year period.

Changes in accounting standards, taxation requirements and other law could negatively affect the Company's financial results.

New accounting standards or pronouncements that may become applicable to the Company from time to time, or changes in the interpretation of existing standards and pronouncements, could have a significant effect on the Company's reported results for the affected periods. The Company is also subject to income tax in the numerous jurisdictions in which the Company operates. Increases in income tax rates or other changes to tax laws could reduce the Company's after-tax income from affected jurisdictions or otherwise affect the Company's tax liability. In addition, the Company's products are subject to import and excise duties and/or sales or value-added taxes in many jurisdictions in which it operates. Increases in indirect taxes could affect the Company's products' affordability and therefore reduce demand for its products.

The Company may experience significant negative effects to its business as a result of new federal, state or local taxes, increases to current taxes or other governmental regulations specifically targeted to decrease the consumption of certain types of beverages.

Public health officials and government officials have become increasingly concerned about the public health consequences associated with over-consumption of certain types of beverages, such as sugar beverages and including those sold by certain of the Company's significant customers. Possible new federal, state or local taxes, increases to current taxes or other governmental regulations specifically targeted to decrease the consumption of these beverages may significantly reduce demand for the beverages of the Company's customers, which could in turn affect demand of the Company's customers for the Company's products. For example, Mexico recently implemented a tax on certain sugar sweetened beverages and members of the U.S. Congress have raised the possibility of a federal tax on the sale of certain beverages, including non-diet soft drinks, fruit drinks, teas and flavored waters. Some state governments are also considering similar taxes. If enacted, such taxes could materially adversely affect the Company's business and financial results.

The Company's senior secured credit facilities provide that certain change of control events constitute an event of default. In the event of a change of control, the Company may not be able to satisfy all of its obligations under the senior secured credit facilities or other indebtedness.

The Company may not have sufficient assets or be able to obtain sufficient third-party financing on favorable terms to satisfy all of its obligations under the Company's senior secured credit facilities or other indebtedness in the event of a change of control. The Company's senior secured credit facilities provide that certain change of control events constitute an event of default under the senior secured credit facilities. Such an event of default entitles the lenders thereunder to, among other things, cause all outstanding debt obligations under the senior secured credit facilities to become due and payable and to proceed against the collateral securing the senior secured credit facilities. Any event of default or acceleration of the senior secured credit facilities will likely also cause a default under the terms of other indebtedness of the Company. In addition, the indentures governing certain of the Company's outstanding notes require that the Company offer to repurchase the notes at an offer price of 101% of principal upon certain change of control repurchase events.

The loss of the Company's intellectual property rights may negatively impact its ability to compete.

If the Company is unable to maintain the proprietary nature of its technologies, its competitors may use its technologies to compete with it. The Company has a number of patents covering various aspects of its products, including its SuperEnd® beverage can end, whose primary patent expires in 2016, Easylift™ full aperture steel food can ends, PeelSeam™ flexible lidding and Ideal™ product line. The Company's patents may not withstand challenge in litigation, and patents do not ensure that competitors will not develop competing products or infringe upon the Company's patents. Moreover, the costs of litigation to defend the Company's patents could be substantial and may outweigh the benefits of enforcing its rights under its patents. The Company markets its products internationally and the patent laws of foreign countries may offer less protection than the patent laws of the United States. Not all of the Company's domestic patents have been registered in other countries. The Company also relies on trade secrets, know-how

19

Crown Holdings, Inc.


and other unpatented proprietary technology, and others may independently develop the same or similar technology or otherwise obtain access to the Company's unpatented technology. In addition, the Company has from time to time received letters from third parties suggesting that it may be infringing on their intellectual property rights, and third parties may bring infringement suits against the Company, which could result in the Company needing to seek licenses from these third parties or refraining altogether from use of the claimed technology.

Demand for the Company's products could be affected by changes in laws and regulations applicable to food and beverages and changes in consumer preferences.

The Company manufactures and sells packaging primarily for the food and beverage can market. As a result, many of the Company's products come into direct contact with food and beverages. Accordingly, the Company's products must comply with various laws and regulations for food and beverages applicable to its customers. Changes in such laws and regulations could negatively impact customers' demand for the Company's products as they comply with such changes and/or require the Company to make changes to its products. Such changes to the Company's products could include modifications to the coatings and compounds that the Company uses, possibly resulting in the incurrence of additional costs. Additionally, because many of the Company's products are used to package consumer goods, the Company is subject to a variety of risks that could influence consumer behavior and negatively impact demand for the Company's products, including changes in consumer preferences driven by various health-related concerns and perceptions.
ITEM 1B.
UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
There are no unresolved written comments that were received from the SEC staff 180 days or more before the end of the Company’s fiscal year relating to its periodic or current reports under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
ITEM 2.
PROPERTIES

As of December 31, 2015, the Company operated 147 manufacturing facilities of which 26 were leased. The Company has three divisions, defined geographically, within which it manufactures and markets its products. The Americas Division had 49 operating facilities of which 9 are leased. Within the Americas Division, 32 facilities operated in the U.S. of which 7 were leased. The European Division had 68 operating facilities of which 12 were leased and the Asia Pacific Division had 30 operating facilities of which 4 were leased. The Company also has canmaking and spare part operations in the U.S. and the U.K., one of which was a leased facility. Certain leases provide renewal or purchase options. The principal manufacturing facilities at December 31, 2015 are listed below and are grouped by product and by division.

The Company’s Americas and Corporate headquarters are in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, its European headquarters is in Baar, Switzerland and its Asia Pacific headquarters is in Singapore. The Company maintains research facilities in Alsip, Illinois and Wantage, England.

The Company’s manufacturing and support facilities are designed according to the requirements of the products to be manufactured. Therefore, the type of construction may vary from plant to plant. Warehouse space is generally provided at each of the manufacturing locations, although the Company also leases outside warehouses.

Ongoing productivity improvements and cost reduction efforts in recent years have focused on upgrading and modernizing facilities to reduce costs, improve efficiency and productivity and phase out uncompetitive facilities. The Company has also opened new facilities to meet increases in market demand for its products. These actions reflect the Company’s continued commitment to realign manufacturing facilities to maintain its competitive position in its markets. The Company continually reviews its operations and evaluates strategic opportunities. Further discussion of the Company’s recent restructuring actions is contained within “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” under the caption “Provision for Restructuring,” and under Note N to the consolidated financial statements.

Utilization of any particular facility varies based upon product demand. While not possible to measure with any degree of certainty or uniformity the productive capacity of these facilities, management believes that, if necessary, production can be increased at several existing facilities through the addition of personnel, capital equipment and, in some facilities, square footage available for production. In addition, the Company may from time to time acquire additional facilities or dispose of existing facilities.

Excluded from the list below are operating facilities in unconsolidated subsidiaries as well as service or support facilities. The service or support facilities include machine shop operations, plant operations dedicated to printing for cans and closures, coil shearing, coil coating and RD&E operations. Some operating facilities produce more than one product but have been presented below under the product with the largest contribution to sales.

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Crown Holdings, Inc.


 
  
 
Americas
Europe
Asia Pacific
Beverage
and
Closures
 
Kankakee, IL
Teresina, Brazil
Custines, France
Sevilla, Spain
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
 
Lawrence, MA
Estancia, Brazil
Korinthos, Greece
El Agba, Tunisia
Sihanoukville, Cambodia
 
Mankato, MN
Manaus, Brazil
Patras, Greece
Izmit, Turkey
Beijing, China
 
Batesville, MS
Ponta Grossa, Brazil
Amman, Jordan
Osmaniye, Turkey
Huizhou, China
 
 
Dayton, OH
Calgary, Canada
Dammam, Saudi Arabia
Dubai, UAE
Hangzhou, China
 
 
Cheraw, SC
Weston, Canada
Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Botcherby, UK
Heshan, China
 
 
Conroe, TX
Santafe de Bogota,
Kosice, Slovakia
Braunstone, UK
Putian, China
 
 
Fort Bend, TX
Colombia
Agoncillo, Spain
 
Shanghai, China
 
 
Winchester, VA
Ensenada, Mexico
 
 
Ziyang, China
 
 
Olympia, WA
Guadalajara,
 
 
Bangi, Malaysia
 
 
La Crosse, WI
Mexico
 
 
Singapore
 
 
Worland, WY
Monterrey, Mexico
 
 
Nong Khae, Thailand 
 
 
Cabreuva, Brazil
Orizaba, Mexico
 
 
Danang, Vietnam
 
 
 
Toluca, Mexico
 
 
Dong Nai, Vietnam
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hanoi, Vietnam
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
 
 
Winter Garden, FL
Hanover, PA
Carpentras, France
Toamasina, Madagascar
Bangpoo, Thailand
Food
and
Closures 
 
Crawfordsville, IN
Suffolk, VA
Chatillon-sur-Seine, France
Agadir, Morocco
Haadyai, Thailand
 
Owatonna, MN
Seattle, WA
Concarneau, France
Casablanca, Morocco
Samrong, Thailand
 
Omaha, NE
Oshkosh, WI
Laon, France
Pisco, Peru
Songkhla, Thailand
 
 
Lancaster, OH
Kingston, Jamaica
Nantes, France
Goleniow, Poland
 
 
 
Massillon, OH
La Villa, Mexico
Outreau, France
Pruszcz, Poland
 
 
 
Mill Park, OH
Barbados, West Indies
Perigueux, France
Alcochete, Portugal
 
 
 
Connellsville, PA
 
Lubeck, Germany
Novotitarovskaya,
 
 
 
 
 
Mühldorf, Germany
Russia
 
 
 
 
 
Seesen, Germany (2)
Timashevsk, Russia
 
 
 
 
 
Thessaloniki, Greece
Bellville, South Africa
 
 
 
 
 
Tema, Ghana
Aldeanuevra De Ebro, Spain
 
 
 
 
 
Kornye, Hungary
Las Torres De Cotillas,
 
 
 
 
 
Nagykoros, Hungary
Spain
 
 
 
 
 
Athy, Ireland
Llanera, Spain
 
 
 
 
 
Aprilia, Italy
Merida, Spain
 
 
 
 
 
Battipaglia, Italy
Osuna, Spain
 
 
 
 
 
Calerno S. Ilario d’Enza,
Pontavedra, Spain
 
 
 
 
 
Italy
Sevilla, Spain
 
 
 
 
 
Nocera Superiore, Italy
Karacabey, Turkey
 
 
 
 
 
Parma, Italy
Neath, UK
 
 
 
 
 
Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Wisbech, UK
 
Aerosol
 
Alsip, IL
Faribault, MN
Spilamberto, Italy (2)
Sutton, UK
 
 
 
Decatur, IL
Spartanburg, SC
Mijdrecht, Netherlands 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Specialty
 
Belcamp, MD
 
Vourles, France
Carlisle, UK
Chengdu, China
Packaging
 
 
 
Chignolo Po, Italy
Mansfield, UK
Huizhou, China
 
 
 
 
Hoorn, Netherlands
 
Kunshan, China
 
 
 
 
 
 
Langfang, China
 
 
 
 
 
 
Shanghai, China
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tianjin, China
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tongxiang, China
 
 
 
 
 
 
Zhengzhou, China
 
 
 
 
 
 
Singapore
 
 
 
 
 
 
Binh Duong, Vietnam
Canmaking
Norwalk, CT
Chippewa Falls, WI
Shipley, UK (2)
 
 
Equipment
Trevose, PA
Acayucan, Mexico
 
 
 
and Other
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

21

Crown Holdings, Inc.


ITEM 3.
LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

Crown Cork & Seal Company, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company (“Crown Cork”), is one of many defendants in a substantial number of lawsuits filed throughout the U.S. by persons alleging bodily injury as a result of exposure to asbestos. These claims arose from the insulation operations of a U.S. company, the majority of whose stock Crown Cork purchased in 1963. Approximately ninety days after the stock purchase, this U.S. company sold its insulation assets and was later merged into Crown Cork. At December 31, 2015, the accrual for pending and future asbestos claims and related legal costs that are probable and estimable was $271 million.

The Company has been identified by the Environmental Protection Agency as a potentially responsible party (along with others, in most cases) at a number of sites.
Further information on these matters and other legal proceedings is presented within “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” under the captions “Provision for Asbestos” and “Environmental Matters” and under Note L and Note M to the consolidated financial statements.

ITEM 4.
MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
Not applicable.

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE REGISTRANT

Information concerning the principal executive officers of the Company, including their ages and positions, is set forth in “Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance” of this Annual Report.

PART II

ITEM 5.
MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

The Registrant’s common stock is listed on the New York Stock Exchange. On February 24, 2016 there were 4,183 registered shareholders of the Registrant’s common stock, including 1,226 participants in the Company’s Employee Stock Purchase Plan. The market price of the Registrant’s common stock at December 31, 2015 is set forth in Part II of this Annual Report under Quarterly Data (unaudited). The foregoing information regarding the number of registered shareholders of common stock does not include persons holding stock through clearinghouse systems. Details regarding the Company’s policy as to payment of cash dividends and repurchase of shares are set forth under Note O to the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report. Information with respect to shares of common stock that may be issued under the Company’s equity compensation plans is set forth in “Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters,” of this Annual Report.

Quarterly Stock Prices

Quarterly prices for the Company's common stock, as reported on the New York Stock Exchange composite tape, in 2015 and 2014 were:
(in millions)
 
2015
 
2014
 
 
First Quarter
 
Second Quarter
 
Third Quarter
 
Fourth Quarter
 
First Quarter
 
Second Quarter
 
Third Quarter
 
Fourth Quarter
High
 
$
54.03

 
$
57.08

 
$
55.16

 
$
54.39

 
$
45.14

 
$
50.89

 
$
51.56

 
$
52.52

Low
 
43.85

 
52.25

 
44.76

 
45.15

 
37.29

 
44.11

 
44.24

 
42.50


Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

The Company made no purchases of its equity securities as part of publicly announced programs during the year ended December 31, 2015.

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Crown Holdings, Inc.


COMPARATIVE STOCK PERFORMANCE (a)
Comparison of Five-Year Cumulative Total Return (b)
Crown Holdings, S&P 500 Index, Dow Jones “U.S. Containers & Packaging” Index (c)
December 31,
 
2010
 
2011
 
2012
 
2013
 
2014
 
2015
Crown Holdings
 
$
100

 
$
101

 
$
110

 
$
134

 
$
152

 
$
152

S&P 500 Index
 
100

 
102

 
118

 
157

 
178

 
181

Dow Jones “U.S. Containers & Packaging” Index
 
100

 
100

 
114

 
161

 
184

 
177


(a)
The preceding Comparative Stock Performance Graph is not deemed filed with the SEC and shall not be incorporated by reference in any of the Company's filings under the Security Act of 1933 or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, whether made before or after the date hereof and irrespective of any general incorporation language in any such filing.

(b)
Assumes that the value of the investment in Crown Holdings common stock and each index was $100 on December 31, 2010 and that all dividends were reinvested.

(c) Industry index is weighted by market capitalization and, as of December 31, 2015, was composed of Crown Holdings, AptarGroup, Avery Dennison, Ball, Bemis, Berry Plastics, Graphic Packaging, International Paper, Owens-Illinois, Packaging Corp. of America, Sealed Air, Silgan, Sonoco and WestRock.

23

Crown Holdings, Inc.


ITEM 6.
SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 
(in millions, except per share, ratios and other statistics)
 
2015 (a)
 
2014 (b)
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
Summary of Operations
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net sales
 
$
8,762

 
$
9,097

 
$
8,656

 
$
8,470

 
$
8,644

Cost of products sold, excluding depreciation and amortization
 
7,116

 
7,525

 
7,180

 
7,013

 
7,120

Depreciation and amortization
 
237

 
190

 
134

 
180

 
176

Selling and administrative expense
 
390

 
398

 
425

 
382

 
395

Provision for asbestos
 
26

 
45

 
32

 
35

 
28

Restructuring and other
 
66

 
129

 
34

 

 
83

Loss from early extinguishments of debt
 
9

 
34

 
41

 

 
32

Interest expense, net of interest income
 
259

 
246

 
231

 
219

 
221

Foreign exchange
 
20

 
14

 
3

 
(1
)
 
2

Income before income taxes and equity earnings
 
639

 
516

 
576

 
642

 
587

Provision for/(benefit from) income taxes
 
178

 
41

 
148

 
(17
)
 
194

Equity earnings
 

 

 

 
5

 
3

Net income
 
461

 
475

 
428

 
664

 
396

Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests
 
(68
)
 
(88
)
 
(104
)
 
(105
)
 
(114
)
Net income attributable to Crown Holdings
 
$
393

 
$
387

 
$
324

 
$
559

 
$
282

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Financial Position at December 31
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Working capital
 
$
141

 
$
695

 
$
256

 
$
224

 
$
314

Total assets
 
10,020

 
9,643

 
7,993

 
7,468

 
6,829

Total cash and cash equivalents
 
717

 
965

 
689

 
350

 
342

Total debt
 
5,518

 
5,194

 
3,805

 
3,633

 
3,493

Total equity/(deficit)
 
435

 
387

 
289

 
129

 
(239
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common Share Data (dollars per share)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Earnings:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
 
$
2.85

 
$
2.82

 
$
2.32

 
$
3.83

 
$
1.86

Diluted
 
2.82

 
2.79

 
2.30

 
3.77

 
1.83

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Market price on December 31
 
50.70

 
50.90

 
44.57

 
36.81

 
33.58

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Number of shares outstanding at year-end
 
139.4

 
139.0

 
138.2

 
143.1

 
148.4

Average shares outstanding
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
 
137.9

 
137.2

 
139.5

 
146.1

 
151.7

Diluted
 
139.1

 
138.5

 
140.7

 
148.4

 
154.3

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Capital expenditures
 
$
354

 
$
328

 
$
275

 
$
324

 
$
401


(a) Includes the results of the Empaque acquisition from February 18, 2015 through December 31, 2015.
(b) Includes the results of the Mivisa acquisition from April 23, 2014 through December 31, 2014.





24

Crown Holdings, Inc.


ITEM 7.
MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
(in millions, except per share, average settlement cost per asbestos claim, employee, shareholder and statistical data)

INTRODUCTION

The following discussion summarizes the significant factors affecting the results of operations and financial condition of Crown Holdings, Inc. (the "Company") as of and during the three-year period ended December 31, 2015. This discussion should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report.

BUSINESS STRATEGY AND TRENDS

The Company's strategy is to grow its businesses in targeted international growth markets, while improving operations and results in more mature markets through disciplined pricing, cost control and careful capital allocation.

In recent years, beverage can sales unit volumes in the Company's mature markets have been stable to slightly declining in North America and slightly increasing in Europe. Beverage can volume has generally continued to grow in emerging markets including Asia, Brazil, Mexico and Eastern Europe driven by increased per capita incomes and consumption, combined with an increased preference for cans over other forms of beverage packaging. Global food and aerosol can sales unit volumes have been stable to declining in recent years primarily due to lower consumer spending. While the opportunity for organic volume growth in the Company's mature markets is not comparable to that in targeted international growth markets, the Company continues to generate strong returns on invested capital and significant cash flow from these businesses. The Company monitors capacity across all of its businesses and, where necessary, may take action such as closing a plant or reducing headcount to better manage its costs. Any or all of these actions may result in additional restructuring charges in the future which may be material.

As part of the Company's efforts to manage cost, it attempts to pass-through increases in the cost of aluminum and steel to its customers. In the Americas Beverage segment, the Company has generally been able to pass-through increases in aluminum premium costs to its customers. In the European Beverage segment, the Company has generally been unable to pass-through increases in aluminum premium costs to its customers. There can be no assurance that the Company will be able to recover from its customers the impact of any such increased costs. Aluminum and steel prices can be subject to significant volatility and there has not been a consistent and predictable trend in pricing.

In April 2014, the Company completed its acquisition of Mivisa, the largest food can producer in both the Iberian Peninsula and Morocco; primarily serving vegetable, fruit, fish and meat markets. The acquisition significantly increased the Company's presence in Spain, one of Europe's leading agricultural economies.

In February 2015, the Company completed its acquisition of Empaque, a leading manufacturer for the beverage industry in Mexico, from Heineken N.V.. Accompanying the transaction were long-term supply agreements with Heineken affiliates which are expected to provide a stable cash flow base. The addition of Empaque significantly increased the Company's presence in the growing Mexican market and substantially enhances the Company's strategic position in beverage cans, both regionally and globally.

In 2016, the Company expects to utilize cash flow to reduce leverage. The Company will also continue to identify and evaluate select growth opportunities through capacity additions in existing plants, new plants in markets that it already knows and understands, and potential strategic acquisitions in geographic areas and product lines in which it already operates or that complement its existing businesses. In response to increasing global customer demand for beverage cans in non-standard sizes, commonly called "specialty cans", the Company intends to continue to make investments in converting existing capacity or adding new capacity for non-standard can sizes. The Company rigorously evaluates each investment opportunity against a variety of metrics and every approved project is undertaken with an eye toward creating long-term shareholder value. Cash flows generated from the Company's operations may be reinvested in the business, used for acquisitions, used to repay debt or returned to shareholders through share repurchases or possible future dividends.

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

In assessing performance, the key performance measure used by the Company is segment income, a non-GAAP measure generally defined by the Company as income from operations adjusted to add back provisions for asbestos and restructuring and other, the impact of fair value adjustments related to the sale of inventory acquired in an acquisition and the timing impact of hedge ineffectiveness.

25

Crown Holdings, Inc.


The foreign currency translation impacts referred to in the discussion below were primarily due to changes in the euro and pound sterling in the Company's European segments, the Brazlian real, Canadian dollar and Mexican peso in the Company's Americas segments and the Chinese renminbi and Thai baht in the Company's Asia Pacific segment.

NET SALES AND SEGMENT INCOME    
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Net sales
$
8,762

 
$
9,097

 
$
8,656

Beverage cans and ends as a percentage of net sales
57
%
 
53
%
 
56
%
Food cans and ends as a percentage of net sales
28
%
 
30
%
 
27
%

Year ended December 31, 2015 compared to 2014

Net sales decreased primarily due to the impact of foreign currency translation, partially offset by the acquisitions of Empaque and Mivisa. Net sales would have been $855 higher using exchange rates in effect during 2014.

Year ended December 31, 2014 compared to 2013
Net sales increased primarily due to the impact of the Mivisa acquisition and increased global beverage can volumes, partially offset by $52 of unfavorable currency translation.

Discussion and analysis of net sales and segment income by segment follows.

Americas Beverage

The Americas Beverage segment manufactures aluminum beverage cans, ends, steel crowns, glass bottles and aluminum closures and supplies a variety of customers from its operations in the U.S., Brazil, Canada, Colombia and Mexico. The U.S. and Canadian beverage can markets are mature markets which have experienced stable to slightly declining volumes in recent years. In Mexico, the Company's sales unit volumes have increased primarily due to market growth and the acquisition of Empaque in February 2015. In Brazil, the Company's sales unit volumes have increased in recent years primarily due to market growth driven by increased per capita incomes and consumption, combined with an increased preference for cans over other forms of beverage packaging.

The Company has announced plans to construct new beverage can plants in Nichols, New York and Monterrey, Mexico. To meet customers’ demand for specialty beverage cans in North America, the Nichols plant will be capable of producing multiple can sizes and is expected to be operational in the first quarter of 2017. The Monterrey plant will also be capable of producing multiple can sizes and is expected to be operational late in the fourth quarter of 2016.

Net sales and segment income in the Americas Beverage segment are as follows:
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Net sales
$
2,771

 
$
2,335

 
$
2,289

Segment income
427

 
334

 
327


Year ended December 31, 2015 compared to 2014

Net sales increased $545 due to the acquisition of Empaque and $27 from increased sales unit volumes, partially offset by the impact of foreign currency translation. Sales unit volumes were higher in the U.S., Canada and Mexico, partially offset by lower unit volume in Brazil.

Segment income increased $94 due to the acquisition of Empaque, partially offset by the impact of foreign currency translation.

Year ended December 31, 2014 compared to 2013

Net sales increased primarily due to $52 from increased sales unit volumes and $47 from the pass-through of higher raw material costs, primarily higher aluminum premiums, partially offset by $31 from the impact of foreign currency translation and $22 of lower sales from the closure of a manufacturing facility in Puerto Rico. In 2014, sales unit volumes were up slightly due to increases in Brazil which were partially offset by lower sales in the U.S.

26

Crown Holdings, Inc.


Segment income increased primarily due to $11 from organic growth in Brazil including the impact of the World Cup, partially offset by inefficiencies in plant operations.

North America Food

The North America Food segment manufactures steel and aluminum food cans and ends and metal vacuum closures and supplies a variety of customers from its operations in the U.S. and Canada. The North American food can and closures market is a mature market which has experienced stable to slightly declining volumes in recent years. In 2015, the Company announced the closure of two North America food can plants to more appropriately align capacity with customer demand and reduce costs.

Net sales and segment income in the North America Food segment are as follows:
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Net sales
$
680

 
$
809

 
$
845

Segment income
86

 
127

 
119


Year ended December 31, 2015 compared to 2014

Net sales decreased primarily due to an 18% decline in sales unit volumes largely attributable to the loss of a certain customer and $16 from the impact of foreign currency translation.

Segment income decreased primarily due to lower sales unit volumes and higher costs.

Year ended December 31, 2014 compared to 2013

Net sales decreased primarily due to $21 from lower sales unit volumes, $7 from lower customer pricing and $9 from the impact of foreign currency translation.

Segment income increased primarily due to a charge of $18 in 2013 to record a reserve against an outstanding customer receivable balance that did not recur in 2014, partially offset by the impact of competitive price compression.

European Beverage

The Company's European Beverage segment manufactures steel and aluminum beverage cans and ends and supplies a variety of customers from its operations throughout Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. In recent years, the European beverage can market has been growing.

In 2015, the Company announced plans to install a second line at its Osmaniye, Turkey plant in response to growing demand. The new line will be capable of producing multiple can sizes and is expected to be operational late in the fourth quarter of 2016.

Net sales and segment income in the European Beverage segment are as follows:
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Net sales
$
1,504

 
$
1,708

 
$
1,731

Segment income
228

 
265

 
257


Year ended December 31, 2015 compared to 2014

Net sales and segment income decreased primarily due to the impact of foreign currency translation and a 1% decline in sales unit volumes, primarily in the Middle East due to ongoing conflicts in the region. Net sales and segment income would have been $182 and $23 higher, respectively, using exchange rates in effect during 2014.

Year ended December 31, 2014 compared to 2013

Net sales decreased primarily due to a 1% decline in sales unit volumes and $12 from the impact of foreign currency translation. Sales unit volumes were down in the Company's Middle Eastern businesses primarily due to the ongoing conflicts in the region.
Segment income increased primarily due to improved cost performance which more than offset $18 of higher aluminum premiums.

27

Crown Holdings, Inc.


European Food

The European Food segment manufactures steel and aluminum food cans, ends and metal vacuum closures, and supplies a variety of customers from its operations throughout Europe and Africa. The European food can market is a mature market which has experienced stable to slightly declining volumes in recent years. In April 2014, the Company completed its acquisition of Mivisa and in June 2014 divested certain Crown and Mivisa operations as required for regulatory approval. In 2015, the Company announced the closure of two European Food facilities in an effort to reduce cost by eliminating excess capacity and consolidating manufacturing processes. The Company expects these actions to result in annual cost savings of approximately $14 when completed in 2017. However, there can be no assurance that any such pre-tax savings will be realized.

Net sales and segment income in the European Food segment are as follows:
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Net sales
$
1,984

 
$
2,197

 
$
1,751

Segment income
246

 
221

 
144


Year ended December 31, 2015 compared to 2014

Net sales decreased primarily due to the impact of foreign currency translation, partially offset by increased sales unit volumes and $145 for an additional four months of Mivisa. Net sales would have been $362 higher using exchange rates in effect during 2014.

Segment income increased primarily due to an additional four months of Mivisa and improved cost performance partially offset by the impact of foreign currency translation. Segment income would have been $45 higher using exchange rates in effect during 2014.

Year ended December 31, 2014 compared to 2013

Net sales increased primarily due to a 25% increase in sales unit volumes including the impact of the Mivisa acquisition and strong unit volumes across many countries including France, Germany and Italy.

Segment income increased primarily due to contributions from the Mivisa acquisition, $11 from improved cost performance and a charge of $21 in 2013 to record a reserve against a portion of an outstanding customer receivable balance that did not recur in 2014.

Asia Pacific

The Company's Asia Pacific segment primarily consists of beverage can operations in Cambodia, China, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam and also includes the Company's non-beverage can operations, primarily food cans and specialty packaging in China, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam. In recent years, the beverage can market in Asia has been growing. In 2015, the Company announced that it began construction of a third beverage can plant in Cambodia. The Company currently expects the plant to begin commercial production late in the second quarter of 2016. In China, the current industry supply of beverage cans exceeds demand, which has resulted in pricing pressure and negative impacts on the Company's profitability.

Net sales and segment income in the Asia Pacific segment are as follows:
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Net sales
$
1,202

 
$
1,226

 
$
1,189

Segment income
145

 
142

 
133


Year ended December 31, 2015 compared to 2014

Net sales decreased $49 from lower selling prices primarily due to the pass-through of lower raw material costs, the impact of competitive price compression and $38 from the impact of foreign currency translation, partially offset by an 8% increase in beverage can sales unit volumes.

Segment income increased primarily due to increased beverage cans sales unit volumes, partially offset by the impact of competitive price compression in China.

28

Crown Holdings, Inc.


Year ended December 31, 2014 compared to 2013

Net sales increased primarily due to $110 from increased sales unit volumes due to recent capacity expansion and market growth partially offset by $56 from lower selling prices primarily due to the pass-through of lower raw material costs and the impact of competitive price compression and $17 from the impact of foreign currency translation.

Segment income increased primarily due to $17 from increased sales unit volumes, partially offset by $7 from the impact of competitive price compression.

Non-reportable Segments

The Company's non-reportable segments include its European aerosol can and specialty packaging business, its North American aerosol can business and its tooling and equipment operations in the U.S. and U.K. In recent years, the Company's aerosol can and specialty packaging businesses have experienced slightly declining volumes. In 2015, the Company completed the sale of four of its European industrial specialty packaging plants.

Net sales and segment income in non-reportable segments are as follows:
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Net sales
$
621

 
$
822

 
$
851

Segment income
83

 
92

 
102


Year ended December 31, 2015 compared to 2014

Net sales decreased primarily due to $148 from the sale of four industrial specialty packaging plants and the transfer of production from a European specialty packaging plant to the European food business and $51 from the impact of foreign currency translation. Higher sales from the Company's can-making equipment operations were offset by lower sales in its global aerosol and specialty packaging businesses.

Segment income decreased primarily due to $11 from the sale of four industrial specialty packaging plants and the transfer of production from a European specialty packaging plant to the European food business, $7 from lower sales in the Company's global aerosol and specialty packaging businesses and $3 from the impact of foreign currency translation, partially offset by $9 from higher equipment sales.

Year ended December 31, 2014 compared to 2013

Net sales decreased primarily due to $40 from lower sales in the Company's aerosol and specialty packaging businesses, partially offset by $10 from the impact of foreign currency translation.

Segment income decreased primarily due to $8 from lower sales in the Company's aerosol and specialty packaging businesses.


Corporate and unallocated
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Corporate and unallocated
$
(196
)
 
$
(197
)
 
$
(165
)

Corporate and unallocated items in 2015 included charges of $6 for fair value adjustments for the sale of inventory acquired in the acquisition of Empaque, $5 for the write-off of non-productive inventory related to plant closures and higher general corporate costs compared to 2014.

Corporate and unallocated items increased in 2014 compared to 2013 due to higher general corporate costs including technology and incentive compensation, higher hedge ineffectiveness and a charge of $19 related to the impact of fair value adjustments for the sale of inventory acquired in the acquisition of Mivisa.


29

Crown Holdings, Inc.


COST OF PRODUCTS SOLD (EXCLUDING DEPRECIATION AND AMORTIZATION)

Cost of products sold (excluding depreciation and amortization) decreased from $7,525 in 2014 to $7,116 in 2015 primarily due to the impact of foreign currency translation, partially offset by the impact of the acquisitions of Mivisa and Empaque. Cost of products sold would have been $700 higher using exchange rates in effect during 2014.

Cost of products sold (excluding depreciation and amortization) increased from $7,180 in 2013 to $7,525 in 2014 primarily due to the acquisition of Mivisa and increased global beverage can volumes, partially offset by $49 of foreign currency translation.

Cost of products sold (excluding depreciation and amortization) as a percentage of net sales was 81% in 2015 and 83% in 2014 and 2013.

DEPRECIATION AND AMORTIZATION

For the year ended December 31, 2015 compared to 2014, depreciation and amortization increased from $190 to $237 primarily due to depreciation and amortization of fixed assets and intangible assets recorded in connection with the Company's acquisitions of Mivisa and Empaque.

For the year ended December 31, 2014 compared to 2013, depreciation and amortization increased from $134 to $190 primarily due to the depreciation and amortization of fixed assets and intangible assets recorded in connection with the Company's acquisition of Mivisa.

SELLING AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSE

Selling and administrative expense decreased from $398 in 2014 to $390 in 2015, primarily due to the impact of foreign currency translation, partially offset by higher general corporate costs.

Selling and administrative expense decreased from $425 in 2013 to $398 in 2014, primarily due to charges of $39 in 2013 to record reserves against two customer receivable balances that did not recur in 2014, partially offset by higher incentive compensation costs and the impact of the Mivisa acquisition.

PROVISION FOR ASBESTOS

Crown Cork & Seal Company, Inc. is one of many defendants in a substantial number of lawsuits filed throughout the U.S. by persons alleging bodily injury as a result of exposure to asbestos. During 2015, 2014 and 2013 the Company recorded charges of $26, $45 and $32 to increase its accrual for asbestos-related costs and made asbestos-related payments of $30 in both 2015 and 2014 and $28 in 2013. The Company currently expects 2016 payments to be approximately $30. See Note L to the consolidated financial statements for additional information regarding the provision for asbestos-related costs. Also see the Critical Accounting Policies section of this “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” for a discussion of the Company’s policies with respect to asbestos liabilities.

INTEREST EXPENSE

For the year ended December 31, 2015 compared to 2014, interest expense increased from $253 to $270 primarily due to higher average debt outstanding from the acquisitions of Mivisa and Empaque, partially offset by lower borrowing rates and the impact of foreign currency translation.

For the year ended December 31, 2014 compared to 2013, interest expense increased from $236 to $253 primarily due to higher average debt outstanding from the Mivisa acquisition.

TAXES ON INCOME
    
The Company's effective income tax rates are as follows:
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Income before income taxes
$
639

 
$
516

 
$
576

Provision for income taxes
178

 
41

 
148

Effective income tax rate
27.9
%
 
7.9
%
 
25.7
%

30

Crown Holdings, Inc.


The low effective tax rate in 2014 was primarily due to benefits of $86 to fully release the valuation allowance against the Company's net deferred tax assets in France and $16 related to a tax law change in Spain.

For additional information regarding income taxes, see Note V to the consolidated financial statements and the Critical Accounting Policies section of this “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” for a discussion of the Company’s policies with respect to valuation allowances.

NET INCOME ATTRIBUTABLE TO NONCONTROLLING INTERESTS

Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests decreased from $88 in 2014 to $68 in 2015 primarily due to lower earnings in the Company's beverage can operations in Brazil.

Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests decreased from $104 in 2013 to $88 in 2014 primarily due to the acquisition of additional ownership interests in subsidiaries in Jordan and Tunisia and lower earnings in certain beverage can operations in the Middle East, partially offset by higher earnings in the Company's beverage can operations in Brazil.


LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Cash provided by operating activities increased from $912 in 2014 to $956 in 2015 primarily due to higher income from operations driven by the acquisitions of Mivisa and Empaque, partially offset by a lower benefit from working capital.

Receivables decreased from $1,031 in 2014 to $912 in 2015 primarily due to increased securitization and factoring, declining raw material costs and the impact of foreign currency translation, partially offset by the impact of the Empaque acquisition. Receivables provided cash of $45 in 2014 compared to $34 in 2015.

Days sales outstanding for trade receivables improved from 36 in 2014 to 33 in 2015 primarily due to a benefit of 5 days related to increased securitization and factoring of receivables.

Inventories decreased from $1,324 in 2014 to $1,213 in 2015 primarily due to the impact of foreign currency translation and lower raw material costs, partially offset by the impact of the acquisition of Empaque. Inventories used cash of $62 in 2014 and provided cash of $60 in 2015.

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities decreased from $2,651 in 2014 to $2,645 in 2015 primarily due to the impact of foreign currency translation and declining raw material costs, partially offset by the impact of the acquisition of Empaque. Accounts payable and accrued liabilities provided cash of $219 in 2014 compared to $59 in 2015 primarily due to extended supplier payment terms granted in 2015.

INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Cash used for investing activities increased from $1,021 in 2014 to $1,548 in 2015. The Company paid $733 in 2014 to acquire Mivisa and $1,207 in 2015 to acquire Empaque. Cash used for capital expenditures increased from $328 in 2014 to $354 in 2015. The Company currently expects capital expenditures in 2016 of approximately $400.
At December 31, 2015, the Company had $84 of capital commitments, primarily related to its Americas Beverage segment. The Company expects to fund these commitments primarily through cash generated from operations.

FINANCING ACTIVITIES

Cash provided by financing activities decreased from $445 in 2014 to $406 in 2015. Financing activities in 2015 were primarily used to fund the acquisition of Empaque while financing activities in 2014 were primarily used to fund the acquisition of Mivisa and repay certain of Mivisa's existing debt.


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Crown Holdings, Inc.


LIQUIDITY

As of December 31, 2015, $580 of the Company's $717 in cash and cash equivalents was located outside the U.S. The Company is not currently aware of any legal restrictions under foreign law that materially impact its access to cash held outside the U.S.

The Company funds its cash needs in the U.S. through a combination of cash flows from operations in the U.S., dividends from certain foreign subsidiaries, borrowings under its revolving credit facility and the acceleration of cash receipts under its receivable securitization and factoring facilities. The Company records current or deferred U.S. taxes for the earnings of these foreign subsidiaries. For certain other foreign subsidiaries, the Company considers earnings indefinitely reinvested and has not recorded any U.S. taxes. Of the cash and cash equivalents located outside the U.S., $327 was held by subsidiaries for which earnings are considered indefinitely reinvested. While based on current operating plans the Company does not foresee a need to repatriate these funds, if such earnings were repatriated the Company may be required to record incremental U.S. taxes on the repatriated funds.

The Company funds its worldwide cash needs through a combination of cash flows from operations, borrowings under its revolving credit facilities and the acceleration of cash receipts under its receivables securitization and factoring facilities. As of December 31, 2015, the Company has available capacity of $124 under its various securitization facilities and $1,157 under its revolving credit facilities. The Company has current maturities of long-term debt of $209 due in 2016 and is not required to refinance or renegotiate any of its current sources of liquidity in 2016.

The Company has substantial debt outstanding. The ratio of total debt, less cash and cash equivalents, to total capitalization was 90.9% and 90.8% at December 31, 2015 and 2014. Total capitalization is defined by the Company as total debt plus total equity, less cash and cash equivalents.

The Company's debt agreements contain covenants that limit the ability of the Company and its subsidiaries to, among other things, incur additional debt, pay dividends or repurchase capital stock, make certain other restricted payments, create liens and engage in sale and leaseback transactions. These restrictions are subject to a number of exceptions, however, which allow the Company to incur additional debt, create liens or make otherwise restricted payments. The amount of restricted payments permitted to be made, including dividends and repurchases of the Company's common stock, may be limited to the cumulative excess of $200 plus 50% of adjusted net income plus proceeds from the exercise of employee stock options over the aggregate of restricted payments made since July 2004. Adjustments to net income may include, but are not limited to, items such as asset impairments, gains and losses from asset sales and early extinguishments of debt.

The Company’s revolving credit facility and term loans also contain various financial covenants. The interest coverage ratio is calculated as Adjusted EBITDA divided by interest expense. Adjusted EBITDA is calculated as the sum of net income attributable to Crown Holdings, net income attributable to noncontrolling interests, income taxes, interest expense, depreciation and amortization, and certain non-cash charges. The Company’s interest coverage ratio of 4.71 to 1.0 at December 31, 2015 was in compliance with the covenant requiring a ratio of at least 2.85 to 1.0. The total net leverage ratio is calculated as total net debt divided by Adjusted EBITDA, as defined above. Total net debt is defined in the credit agreement as total debt less cash and cash equivalents. The Company’s total net leverage ratio of 3.74 to 1.0 at December 31, 2015 was in compliance with the covenant requiring a ratio no greater than 4.75 to 1.0. The ratios are calculated at the end of each quarter using debt and cash balances as of the end of the quarter and Adjusted EBITDA and interest expense for the most recent twelve months. Failure to meet the financial
covenants could result in the acceleration of any outstanding amounts due under the revolving credit facilities, term loan facilities and farm credit facility.

The Company’s current sources of liquidity include securitization facilities with program limits that expire as follows: $150 in January 2017, $200 in December 2018 and $173 in December 2019. Additional sources of liquidity include borrowings that mature as follows: its $1,200 revolving credit facilities in December 2018; its $700 6.25% senior notes in February 2021; its €650 ($706 at December 31, 2015) 4.0% senior notes in July 2022; its $1,000 4.50% senior notes in January 2023; its €600 ($652 at December 31, 2015) 3.375% senior notes in May 2025; its $350 7.375% senior notes in December 2026; its $45 7.5% senior notes in December 2096; and its $166 of other indebtedness in various currencies at various dates through 2036. In addition, the Company's term loan and farm credit facilities mature as follows: $167 in December 2016, $249 in December 2017, $1,149 in December 2018 and $344 in December 2019.

In February 2016, the Company amended its credit agreement to provide for an additional $300 of term loan borrowings, the proceeds of which, along with borrowings under the revolving credit facilities and cash on hand were used to redeem the Company’s $700 6.25% senior notes due 2021.


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Crown Holdings, Inc.


CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS

Contractual obligations as of December 31, 2015 are summarized in the table below. 
 
 
Payments Due by Period
 
 
2016
 
2017
 
2018
 
2019
 
2020
 
2021 &
after
 
Total
Long-term debt
 
$
211

 
$
282

 
$
1,180

 
$
366

 
$
18

 
$
3,471

 
$
5,528

Interest on long-term debt
 
212

 
206

 
200

 
178

 
170

 
169

 
1,135

Operating leases
 
47

 
33

 
19

 
10

 
7

 
46

 
162

Projected pension contributions
 
112

 
82

 
82

 
90

 
87

 

 
453

Postretirement obligations
 
14

 
13

 
13

 
12

 
12

 
53

 
117

Purchase obligations
 
2,688

 
1,209

 
787

 
148

 

 

 
4,832

Total contractual cash obligations
 
$
3,284

 
$
1,825

 
$
2,281

 
$
804

 
$
294

 
$
3,739

 
$
12,227


All amounts due in foreign currencies are translated at exchange rates as of December 31, 2015.

The Company expects to fund its obligations through a combination of cash flows from operations, borrowings under its revolving credit facilities and the acceleration of cash receipts under its receivables securitization and factoring programs.

Interest on long-term debt is presented through 2021 only and represents the interest that will accrue by year based on debt outstanding and interest rates in effect as of December 31, 2015.

Projected pension contributions represent the Company's expected funding contributions for the next five years. Future changes to mortality tables or other factors used to determine pension contributions could have a significant impact on the Company’s future contributions and its cash flow available for debt reduction, capital expenditures or other purposes.  In addition, any increase in required U.S. pension contributions will reduce U.S. taxable income and could negatively impact the Company’s ability to use its existing foreign tax credits, resulting in a charge to tax expense to write off credits that would expire prior to being used.

Postretirement obligations represent expected payments to retirees for medical and life insurance coverage for the next ten years. These projections require the use of numerous estimates and assumptions such as discount rates, rates of return on plan assets, compensation increases, health care cost increases, mortality and employee turnover and have therefore been provided for only five years for pension and ten years for postretirement.

Purchase obligations include commitments for raw materials and utilities at December 31, 2015. These commitments specify significant terms, including fixed or minimum quantities to be purchased; fixed, minimum or variable pricing provisions; and the approximate timing of transactions.

The table above excludes $28 of liabilities for unrecognized tax benefits because the Company is unable to estimate when these amounts may be paid, if at all. See Note V to the consolidated financial statements for additional information on the Company’s unrecognized tax benefits.

In order to reduce leverage and future interest payments, the Company may from time to time repurchase outstanding notes and debentures with cash, exchange shares of its common stock for the Company’s outstanding notes and debentures, or seek to refinance its existing credit facilities and other indebtedness. The Company will evaluate any such transactions in light of then existing market conditions and may determine not to pursue such transactions.

MARKET RISK

In the normal course of business the Company is subject to risk from adverse fluctuations in foreign exchange rates, interest rates and commodity prices. The Company manages these risks through a program that includes the use of derivative financial instruments, primarily swaps and forwards. Counterparties to these contracts are major financial institutions. These instruments are viewed as risk management tools, involve little complexity, and are not used for trading or speculative purposes. The extent to which the Company uses such instruments is dependent upon its access to them in the financial markets and its use of other methods, such as netting exposures for foreign exchange risk and establishing sales arrangements that permit the pass-through to customers of changes in commodity prices and foreign exchange rates, to effectively achieve its goal of risk reduction. The Company’s objective in managing its exposure to market risk is to limit the impact on earnings and cash flow.

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Crown Holdings, Inc.


The Company manages foreign currency exposures at the operating unit level. Exposures that cannot be naturally offset within an operating unit may be hedged with derivative financial instruments where possible and cost effective in the Company’s judgment. Foreign exchange contracts generally mature within twelve months.

The table below provides information in U.S. dollars as of December 31, 2015 about the Company’s forward currency exchange contracts. The contracts primarily hedge anticipated transactions, unrecognized firm commitments and intercompany debt. The contracts with no amounts in the fair value column have a fair value of less than $1.
Buy/Sell
 
Contract
amount
 
Contract
fair value
gain/(loss)
 
Average
contractual
exchange rate
U.S. dollars/Euro
 
$
70

 
$
1

 
1.11

Sterling/Euro
 
697

 
(26
)
 
0.72

Euro/Sterling
 
150

 
37

 
1.40

Euro/U.S. dollars
 
197

 
3

 
0.93

U.S. dollars/Sterling
 
80

 
2

 
1.52

Singapore dollars/U.S. dollars
 
73

 
(1
)
 
1.40

Polish Zloty/Euro
 
176

 
(1
)
 
4.28

U.S. dollars/Turkish Lira
 
71

 

 
0.33

Euro/Singapore dollars
 
83

 
1

 
0.66

Euro/Polish Zloty
 
19

 
1

 
0.23

 
 
$
1,616

 
$
17

 
 

At December 31, 2015, the Company had additional contracts with an aggregate notional value of $104 to purchase or sell other currencies, primarily Asian currencies, including the Malaysian Ringgit, the Thai Baht, and the Hong Kong Dollar; European currencies, including the Hungarian Florint; African currencies, including the Moroccan Dirham and the Tunisian Dinar; and the Canadian Dollar. The aggregate fair value of these contracts was a loss of $3.

The Company, from time to time, may manage its interest rate risk associated with fluctuations in variable interest rates through interest rate swaps. The use of interest rate swaps and other methods of mitigating interest rate risk may increase overall interest expense.

The table below presents principal cash flows and related interest rates by year of maturity for the Company’s debt obligations as of December 31, 2015. Variable interest rates disclosed represent the weighted average rates at December 31, 2015. 
 
 
Year of Maturity
Debt
 
2016
 
2017
 
2018
 
2019
 
2020
 
Thereafter
Fixed rate
 
$
51

 
$
32

 
$
29

 
$
19

 
$
16

 
$
3,469

Average interest rate
 
4.3
%
 
5.6
%
 
5.6
%
 
5.9
%
 
5.6
%
 
4.9
%
Variable rate
 
$
214

 
$
250

 
$
1,151

 
$
346

 
$
3

 
2

Average interest rate
 
2.1
%
 
1.8
%
 
1.8
%
 
2.0
%
 
3.4
%
 
3.4
%

Total future payments at December 31, 2015 include $3,477 of U.S. dollar-denominated debt, $2,094 of euro-denominated debt and $10 of debt denominated in other currencies.

The Company uses various raw materials, such as steel and aluminum in its manufacturing operations, which expose it to risk from adverse fluctuations in commodity prices. In 2015, consumption of steel and aluminum represented 23% and 41%, respectively, of the Company’s consolidated cost of products sold, excluding depreciation and amortization. The Company primarily manages its risk to adverse commodity price fluctuations and surcharges through contracts that pass through raw material costs to customers.
The Company may, however, be unable to increase its prices to offset increases in raw material costs without suffering reductions in unit volume, revenue and operating income, and any price increases may take effect after related cost increases, reducing operating income in the near term.

In addition, the Company's manufacturing facilities are dependent, to varying degrees, upon the availability of water and processed energy, such as natural gas and electricity.

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Crown Holdings, Inc.


Aluminum, a basic raw material used by the Company, is subject to the risk of significant price fluctuations which may be hedged by the Company through forward commodity contracts. Current contracts involve aluminum forwards with a notional value of $381 and a net loss of $26. The maturities of the commodity contracts closely correlate to the anticipated purchases of those commodities.

See Note R to the consolidated financial statements for further information on the Company’s derivative financial instruments.

OFF-BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS

The Company has certain guarantees and indemnification agreements that could require the payment of cash upon the occurrence of certain events. The guarantees and agreements are further discussed under Note M to the consolidated financial statements. The Company also utilizes receivables securitization and factoring facilities and derivative financial instruments as further discussed under Note D and Note R, respectively, to the consolidated financial statements.

ENVIRONMENTAL MATTERS

Compliance with the Company’s Environmental Protection Policy is mandatory and the responsibility of each employee of the Company. The Company is committed to the protection of human health and the environment and is operating within the increasingly complex laws and regulations of national, state, and local environmental agencies or is taking action to achieve compliance with such laws and regulations. Environmental considerations are among the criteria by which the Company evaluates projects, products, processes and purchases.
 
The Company is dedicated to a long-term environmental protection program and has initiated and implemented many pollution prevention programs with an emphasis on source reduction. The Company continues to reduce the amount of metal used in the manufacture of steel and aluminum containers through “lightweighting” programs. The Company recycles nearly 100% of scrap aluminum, steel and copper used in its manufacturing processes. Many of the Company’s programs for pollution prevention reduce operating costs and improve operating efficiencies.

The potential impact on the Company’s operations of climate change and potential future climate change regulation in the jurisdictions in which the Company operates is highly uncertain. See the risk factor entitled “The Company is subject to costs and liabilities related to stringent environmental and health and safety standards” in Part I, Item 1A of this Annual Report.

See Note M to the consolidated financial statements for additional information on environmental matters including the Company's accrual for environmental remediation costs.
 
INFLATION

Inflation has not had a significant impact on the Company over the past three years and the Company does not expect it to have a significant impact on the results of operations or financial condition in the foreseeable future.

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America which require that management make numerous estimates and assumptions. Actual results could differ from those estimates and assumptions, impacting the reported results of operations and financial position of the Company. The Company’s significant accounting policies are more fully described under Note A to the consolidated financial statements. Certain accounting policies, however, are considered to be critical in that (i) they are most important to the depiction
of the Company’s financial condition and results of operations and (ii) their application requires management’s most subjective judgment in making estimates about the effect of matters that are inherently uncertain.

Asbestos Liabilities

The Company’s potential liability for asbestos cases is highly uncertain due to the difficulty of forecasting many factors, including the level of future claims, the rate of receipt of claims, the jurisdiction in which claims are filed, the nature of future claims (including the seriousness of alleged disease, whether claimants allege first exposure to asbestos before or during 1964 and the alleged link to Crown Cork), the terms of settlements of other defendants with asbestos-related liabilities, bankruptcy filings of other defendants (which may result in additional claims and higher settlement demands for non-bankrupt defendants), potential liabilities for claims filed after the Company’s ten-year projection period and the effect of state asbestos legislation (including the validity and applicability of the Pennsylvania legislation to non-Pennsylvania jurisdictions, where the substantial majority of the

35

Crown Holdings, Inc.


Company’s asbestos cases are filed). See Note L to the consolidated financial statements for additional information regarding the provision for asbestos-related costs.

At the end of each quarter, the Company considers whether there have been any material developments that would cause it to update its asbestos accrual calculations. Absent any significant developments in the asbestos litigation environment in general or with respect to the Company specifically, the Company updates its accrual calculations in the fourth quarter of each year. The Company’s asbestos accrual is an estimate of the amounts expected to be paid over the next ten years including outstanding claims, projected future claims and legal costs. Outstanding claims used in the accrual calculation are adjusted for factors such as claims filed in those states where the Company’s liability is limited by statute, claims alleging first exposure to asbestos after 1964 which are assumed to have no value and claims which are projected will never be paid which are assumed to have a reduced or nominal value based on the length of time outstanding. Projected future claims are calculated based on actual data for the most recent five years and are adjusted to account for the expectation that a percentage of these claims will never be paid. Outstanding and projected claims are multiplied by the average settlement cost of those claims for the most recent five years.
 
Because the Company’s asbestos liability is an estimate of the amounts expected to be paid over the next ten years, the Company expects to record a charge each year to account for projected claims in the new tenth year. As claims are not submitted or settled evenly throughout the year, it is difficult to predict at any time during the year whether the number of claims or average settlement cost over the five year period ending December 31 of such year will increase compared to the prior five year period.

In 2015, the Company recorded a charge of $26 to increase its asbestos liability compared to charges of $45 in 2014 and $32 in 2013. As described above, each year's charge includes the impact of an additional year of settlement and legal costs in the Company’s projection period. The charge decreased in 2015 primarily due to lower settlement costs per claim. In 2015, the five year average settlement cost per claim decreased to $12,200 from $12,800 in 2014 and $12,100 in 2013. While settlement costs were lower in 2015, Crown Cork's experience continues to be settling a higher percentage of claims alleging serious disease (primarily mesothelioma) at higher dollar amounts. Accordingly, a higher percentage of claims projected into the future continue to relate to serious diseases and are therefore valued at higher dollar amounts. For example, of the projected claims related to claimants alleging first exposure to asbestos before or during 1964 and filed in states that have not enacted asbestos legislation, 57%, 57% and 56% in 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively, relate to claims alleging serious diseases such as mesothelioma.

If the recent trend of settling a higher percentage of claims alleging serious disease (primarily mesothelioma) which are settled for higher amounts continues, average settlement costs per claim are likely to increase and, if not offset by a reduction in overall claims and settlements, the Company will record additional charges in the future. A 10% change in either the average cost per claim or the number of projected claims would increase or decrease the estimated liability at December 31, 2015 by $27 for the following ten-year period. A 10% increase in these two factors at the same time would increase the estimated liability at December 31, 2015 by $57 for the following ten-year period. A 10% decrease in these two factors at the same time would decrease the estimated liability at December 31, 2015 by $51 for the following ten-year period.

Goodwill Impairment

The Company performs a goodwill impairment review in the fourth quarter of each year or when facts and circumstances indicate goodwill may be impaired. In accordance with the accounting guidance, the Company may first perform a qualitative assessment on none, some, or all of its reporting units to determine whether further quantitative impairment testing is necessary. Factors that the Company may consider in its qualitative assessment include, but are not limited to, general economic conditions, changes in the markets in which the Company operates, changes in input costs that may affect earnings and cash flows, trends over multiple
periods and the difference between the reporting unit's fair value and carrying amount as determined in the most recent fair value calculation.

The quantitative impairment test involves a number of assumptions and judgments, including the calculation of fair value for the Company’s identified reporting units. The Company determines the estimated fair value for each reporting unit based on the average of the estimated fair values calculated using market values for comparable businesses and discounted cash flow projections. The Company uses an average of the two methods in estimating fair value because it believes they provide an equal probability of yielding an appropriate fair value for the reporting unit. The Company’s estimates of future cash flows include assumptions concerning future operating performance and economic conditions and may differ from actual future cash flows. Under the first method of calculating estimated fair value, the Company obtains available information regarding multiples used in recent transactions, if any, involving transfers of controlling interests in the packaging industry. The Company also reviews publicly available trading multiples based on the enterprise value of companies in the packaging industry whose shares are publicly traded. The appropriate multiple is applied to the forecasted Adjusted EBITDA (a non-GAAP item defined by the Company as net customer sales, less cost of products sold excluding depreciation and amortization, less selling and administrative expenses) of the reporting unit to obtain an estimated fair value. Under the second method, fair value is calculated as the sum of the projected discounted

36

Crown Holdings, Inc.


cash flows of the reporting unit over the next five years and the terminal value at the end of those five years. The projected cash flows generally include moderate to no growth unless there has recently been a material change in the business or a material change
is forecasted. The discount rate used is based on the average weighted-average cost of capital of companies in the packaging industry, which information is available through various sources.

The terminal value at the end of five years is the product of forecasted Adjusted EBITDA at the end of the five year period and the trading multiple. The Company used an EBITDA multiple of 8.0 times in its 2015 which was consistent with 2014. The Company used a discount rate of 7.5% in its 2015 review which is an increase from the discount rate used in the 2014 review of 6.8% and is supported by the weighted average cost of capital of companies in the packaging industry.

The Company completed its annual review for 2015 and determined that no adjustments to the carrying value of goodwill were necessary. Although no goodwill impairment was recorded, there can be no assurances that future goodwill impairments will not occur. Based upon the Company’s qualitative and quantitative assessment including consideration of the sensitivity of the assumptions made and methods used to determine fair value, industry trends and other relevant factors, the Company did not have any reporting unit at the end of 2015 whose fair value did not materially exceed its carrying value except for the European Aerosols and Specialty Packaging reporting unit discussed below.

As of December 31, 2015, the estimated fair value of the European Aerosols and Specialty Packaging reporting unit, using the methods and assumptions described above, was 23% higher than its carrying value, and the reporting unit had $100 of goodwill. The maximum potential effect of weighting the two valuation methods other than equally would have been to increase or decrease the estimated fair value by $10. Assuming all other factors remain the same, a $1 change in forecasted annual Adjusted EBITDA changes the excess of estimated fair value over carrying value by $11; a change of 0.5 in the assumed EBITDA multiple changes the excess of estimated fair value over carrying value by $5; and an increase in the discount rate from 7.5% to 8.5% changes the excess of estimated fair value over carrying value by $15. Under each of these scenarios, the reporting unit's fair value exceeded its carrying value. If future operating results were to decline causing the estimated fair value to fall below its carrying value, it is possible that an impairment charge of up to $100 could be recorded.

Long-lived Assets Impairment

The Company performs an impairment review of its long-lived assets, including definite-lived intangible assets and property, plant and equipment, when facts and circumstances indicate the carrying value may not be recoverable from its undiscounted cash flows. Any impairment loss is measured by comparing the carrying amount of the asset to its fair value. The Company’s estimates of future cash flows involve assumptions concerning future operating performance, economic conditions and technological changes that may affect the future useful lives of the assets. These estimates may differ from actual cash flows or useful lives.

Tax Valuation Allowance

The Company records a valuation allowance to reduce its deferred tax assets when it is more likely than not that a portion of the tax assets will not be realized. The estimate of the amount that will not be realized requires the use of assumptions concerning the Company’s future taxable income. These estimates are projected through the life of the related deferred tax assets based on assumptions that management believes are reasonable. The Company considers all sources of taxable income in estimating its
valuation allowances, including taxable income in any available carry back period; the reversal of taxable temporary differences; tax-planning strategies; and taxable income expected to be generated in the future other than from reversing temporary differences.
Should the Company change its estimate of the amount of deferred tax assets that it would be able to realize, an adjustment to the valuation allowance would result in an increase or decrease in tax expense in the period such a change in estimate was made. See Note V to the consolidated financial statements for additional information on the Company’s valuation allowances.

Pension and Postretirement Benefits

Accounting for pensions and postretirement benefit plans requires the use of estimates and assumptions regarding numerous factors, including discount rates, rates of return on plan assets, compensation increases, health care cost increases, future rates of inflation, mortality and employee turnover. Actual results may differ from the Company’s actuarial assumptions, which may have an impact on the amount of reported expense or liability for pensions or postretirement benefits. The Company recorded pension expense of $48 in 2015 and currently projects its 2016 pension expense to be $36, including $9 of settlement charges related to the Company's defined benefit plans, using foreign currency exchange rates in effect at December 31, 2015. The decrease is primarily due to a change in approach to measuring service and interest costs. For 2015, the Company measured service and interest costs utilizing a single weighted-average discount rate derived from the yield curve used to measure the plan obligations. For 2016, the Company elected to measure service and interest costs by applying the specific spot rates along that yield curve to the plans’ liability cash flows. The Company believes the new approach provides a more precise measurement of service and interest costs by aligning

37

Crown Holdings, Inc.


the timing of the plans’ liability cash flows to the corresponding spot rates on the yield curve. This change does not affect the measurement of plan obligations nor the funded status of the plans. The Company has accounted for this change as a change in accounting estimate. The rate of return assumptions are reviewed at each measurement date based on the pension plans’ investment policies, current asset allocations and an analysis of the historical returns of the capital markets.

The U.S. plan’s assumed rate of return was 8.0 % in 2015 and is 8.0% in 2016. The U.K. plan’s assumed rate of return was 5.0% in 2015 and is 5.25% in 2016. The assumed rate of return for 2016 was calculated on a similar basis to 2015 as described in Note U to the consolidated financial statements. A 0.25% change in the expected rates of return would change 2016 pension expense by approximately $11.

Discount rates were selected using a method that matches projected payouts from the plans with zero-coupon AA bond yield curves in the respective currencies. The yield curves were constructed from the underlying bond price and yield data collected as of the plans’ measurement date and are represented by a series of annualized, individual discount rates with durations ranging from six months to thirty years. Each discount rate in the curve was derived from an equal weighting of the AA bond universe, apportioned into distinct maturity groups. These individual discount rates were then converted into a single equivalent discount rate. To assure that the resulting rates can be achieved by the plan, only bonds with sufficient capacity that satisfy certain criteria and are expected to remain available through the period of maturity of the plan benefits were used to develop the discount rate. A 0.25% change in the discount rates from those used at December 31, 2015 would change 2016 pension expense by approximately $4 and postretirement expense by approximately $1. A 0.25% change in the discount rates from those used at December 31, 2015 would have changed the pension benefit obligation by approximately $150 and the postretirement benefit obligation by $4 as of December 31, 2015. See Note U to the consolidated financial statements for additional information on pension and postretirement benefit obligations and assumptions.

As of December 31, 2015, the Company had pre-tax unrecognized net losses in other comprehensive income of $2,320 related to its pension plans and $47 related to its other postretirement benefit plans. Unrecognized gains and losses arise each year primarily due to changes in discount rates, differences in actual plan asset returns compared to expected returns, and changes in actuarial assumptions such as mortality. For example, the unrecognized net loss in the Company’s pension plans included a current year loss of $229 due to actual asset returns lower than expected returns and a gain of $133 primarily due to higher discount rates at the end of 2015 compared to 2014. Unrecognized gains and losses are accumulated in other comprehensive income and the portion in each plan that exceeds 10% of the greater of that plan’s assets or projected benefit obligation is amortized to income over future periods. The Company’s pension expense for the year ended December 31, 2015 included charges of $105 for the amortization of unrecognized net losses, and the Company estimates charges of $102 in 2016. The unrecognized net losses in the pension plans as of December 31, 2015 primarily include $1,223 in the U.K. defined benefit plan, $955 in the U.S defined benefit plans and $127 in the Canadian defined benefit plans. Amortizable losses in the U.K. plan are being recognized over 21 years, representing the average expected life of inactive employees as over 90% of the plan participants are inactive and the fund is closed to new participants. Amortizable losses in the U.S. and Canadian plans are being recognized over either the average expected life of inactive employees or the remaining service life of active participants depending on the status of the individual plans. The weighted average amortization period for both the U.S. and Canadian plans is 16 years. An increase of 10% in the number of years used to amortize unrecognized losses in each plan would decrease estimated charges for 2016 by $9. A decrease of 10% in the number of years would increase the estimated 2016 charge by $11.

Unrecognized net losses of $47 in the Company’s other postretirement benefit plans as of December 31, 2015, primarily include $50 in the U.S. plans, with the amortizable portion being recognized over the average remaining service life of active participants of 10 years. The Company’s other postretirement benefits expense for the year ended December 31, 2015 included a loss of $4 for the amortization of unrecognized net losses, and the Company estimates losses of $4 in 2016. An increase or decrease of 10% in the number of years used to amortize the unrecognized losses in each plan would impact the estimated charge for 2016 by less than $1.

RECENT ACCOUNTING GUIDANCE

In May 2014, the FASB issued new guidance related to how an entity should recognize revenue. The guidance specifies that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods and services. In addition, the guidance expands the required disclosures related to revenue and cash flows from contracts with customers. The guidance is effective for the Company beginning in the first quarter of 2018 with early adoption permitted beginning in the first quarter of 2017. The Company will adopt this standard on a modified retrospective basis and is currently evaluating the impact of adopting this guidance on its financial position and results of operations.


38

Crown Holdings, Inc.


In July 2015, the FASB issued new guidance related to the subsequent measurement of inventory. Under existing guidance, inventory is measured at the lower of cost or market, where market is defined as replacement cost, with a ceiling of net realizable value and floor of net realizable value less a normal profit margin. The new guidance requires an entity to subsequently measure
inventory at the lower of cost or net realizable value, which is defined as the estimated selling prices in the ordinary course of business, less reasonably predictable costs of completion, disposal and transportation. The guidance will be effective for the Company on January 1, 2017 and early adoption is permitted. The guidance is not expected to have a material effect on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

See Note A to the consolidated financial statements for information on recently adopted accounting guidance.

FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS

Statements in this Annual Report, including those in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” in the discussions of the provision for asbestos under Note L and other contingencies under Note M to the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report and in discussions incorporated by reference into this Annual Report (including, but not limited to, those in “Compensation Discussion and Analysis” in the Company’s Proxy Statement), which are not historical facts (including any statements concerning plans and objectives of management for future operations or economic performance, or assumptions related thereto), are “forward-looking statements,” within the meaning of the federal securities laws. In addition, the Company and its representatives may from time to time make other oral or written statements which are also “forward-looking statements.” Forward-looking statements can be identified by words, such as “believes,” “estimates,” “anticipates,” “expects” and other words of similar meaning in connection with a discussion of future operating or financial performance. These may include, among others, statements relating to (i) the Company’s plans or objectives for future operations, products or financial performance, (ii) the Company’s indebtedness and other contractual obligations, (iii) the impact of an economic downturn or growth in particular regions, (iv) anticipated uses of cash, (v) cost reduction efforts and expected savings, (vi) the Company’s policies with respect to executive compensation and (vii) the expected outcome of contingencies, including with respect to asbestos-related litigation and pension and postretirement liabilities.

These forward-looking statements are made based upon management’s expectations and beliefs concerning future events impacting the Company and, therefore, involve a number of risks and uncertainties. Management cautions that forward-looking statements are not guarantees and that actual results could differ materially from those expressed or implied in the forward-looking statements.

Important factors that could cause the actual results of operations or financial condition of the Company to differ include, but are not necessarily limited to, the ability of the Company to expand successfully in international and emerging markets; whether the acquisition of Empaque will be accretive to the Company’s earnings; whether sales and profits of Empaque will continue to grow; whether the combination of the Company and Empaque will provide benefits to customers and shareholders; whether the operations of Empaque can be successfully integrated into the Company’s operations; the ability of the Company to repay, refinance or restructure its short and long-term indebtedness on adequate terms and to comply with the terms of its agreements relating to debt; the impact of the recent European Sovereign debt crisis; the Company’s ability to generate significant cash to meet its obligations and invest in its business and to maintain appropriate debt levels; restrictions on the Company’s use of available cash under its debt agreements; changes or differences in U.S. or international economic or political conditions, such as inflation or fluctuations in interest or foreign exchange rates (and the effectiveness of any currency or interest rate hedges), tax rates and tax laws (including with respect to taxation of unrepatriated non-U.S. earnings or as a result of the depletion of net loss or foreign tax credit carryforwards); the impact of health care reform in the U.S.; the impact of foreign trade laws and practices; the collectability of receivables; war or acts of terrorism that may disrupt the Company’s production or the supply or pricing of raw materials, including in the Company’s Middle East operations, impact the financial condition of customers or adversely affect the Company’s ability to refinance or restructure its remaining indebtedness; changes in the availability and pricing of raw materials(including aluminum can sheet, steel tinplate, energy, water, inks and coatings) and the Company’s ability to pass raw material, energy and freight price increases and surcharges through to its customers or to otherwise manage these commodity pricing risks; the Company’s ability to obtain and maintain adequate pricing for its products, including the impact on the Company’s revenue, margins and market share and the ongoing impact of price increases; energy and natural resource costs; the cost and other effects of legal and administrative cases and proceedings, settlements and investigations; the outcome of asbestos-related litigation (including the number and size of future claims and the terms of settlements, and the impact of bankruptcy filings by other companies with asbestos-related liabilities, any of which could increase Crown Cork’s asbestos-related costs over time, the adequacy of reserves established for asbestos-related liabilities, Crown Cork’s ability to obtain resolution without payment of asbestos-related claims by persons alleging first exposure to asbestos after 1964, and the impact of state legislation dealing with asbestos liabilities and any litigation challenging that legislation and any future state or federal legislation dealing with asbestos liabilities); the Company’s ability to realize deferred tax benefits; changes in the Company’s critical or other accounting policies or the assumptions underlying those policies; labor relations and workforce and social costs, including the Company’s pension and postretirement obligations and other employee or retiree costs; investment performance of the Company’s pension plans; costs and difficulties related to the

39

Crown Holdings, Inc.


acquisition of a business and integration of acquired businesses; the impact of any potential dispositions, acquisitions or other strategic realignments, which may impact the Company’s operations, financial profile, investments or levels of indebtedness; the Company’s ability to realize efficient capacity utilization and inventory levels and to innovate new designs and technologies for
its products in a cost-effective manner; competitive pressures, including new product developments, industry overcapacity, or changes in competitors’ pricing for products; the Company’s ability to achieve high capacity utilization rates for its equipment; the Company’s ability to maintain, develop and capitalize on competitive technologies for the design and manufacture of products and to withstand competitive and legal challenges to the proprietary nature of such technology; the Company’s ability to protect its information technology systems from attacks or catastrophic failure; the strength of the Company’s cyber-security; the Company’s ability to generate sufficient production capacity; the Company’s ability to improve and expand its existing product and product lines; the impact of overcapacity on the end-markets the Company serves; loss of customers, including the loss of any significant customers; changes in consumer preferences for different packaging products; the financial condition of the Company’s vendors and customers; weather conditions, including their effect on demand for beverages and on crop yields for fruits and vegetables stored in food containers; the impact of natural disasters, including in emerging markets; changes in governmental regulations or enforcement practices, including with respect to environmental, health and safety matters and restrictions as to foreign investment or operation; the impact of increased governmental regulation on the Company and its products, including the regulation or restriction of the use of bisphenol-A; the impact of the Company’s recent initiatives to generate additional cash, including the reduction of working capital levels and capital spending; the ability of the Company to realize cost savings from its restructuring programs; the Company’s ability to maintain adequate sources of capital and liquidity; costs and payments to certain of the Company’s executive officers in connection with any termination of such executive officers or a change in control of the Company; the impact of existing and future legislation regarding refundable mandatory deposit laws in Europe for non-refillable beverage containers and the implementation of an effective return system; and changes in the Company’s strategic areas of focus, which may impact the Company’s operations, financial profile or levels of indebtedness.

Some of the factors noted above are discussed elsewhere in this Annual Report and prior Company filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), including within Part I, Item 1A, “Risk Factors” in this Annual Report. In addition, other factors have been or may be discussed from time to time in the Company’s SEC filings.

While the Company periodically reassesses material trends and uncertainties affecting the Company’s results of operations and financial condition in connection with the preparation of “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and certain other sections contained in the Company’s quarterly, annual or other reports filed with the SEC, the Company does not intend to review or revise any particular forward-looking statement in light of future events.

ITEM 7A.
QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
The information set forth within “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” under the caption “Market Risk” in this Annual Report is incorporated herein by reference.



40

Crown Holdings, Inc.


ITEM 8.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
 
INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
 
 
Financial Statements
 
 
 
Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
42

 
 
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
43

 
 
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013
44

 
 
Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013
45

 
 
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2015 and 2014
46

 
 
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013
47

 
 
Consolidated Statements of Changes in Shareholders' Equity for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013
48

 
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
49

 
 
Supplementary Information
97

 
 
Financial Statement Schedule
 
 
 
Schedule II – Valuation and Qualifying Accounts and Reserves
98




41

Crown Holdings, Inc.


Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended). The Company’s system of internal control over financial reporting is designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.
Because of the inherent limitations, a system of internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
Management assessed the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2015. In making this assessment, management used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (“COSO”) in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013). Based on its assessment, management has concluded that, as of December 31, 2015, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting was effective based on those criteria.
The scope of management's assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting includes all of the Company's consolidated operations except for the operations of Empaque, which the Company acquired through a purchase business combination during the year ended December 31, 2015. Empaque represents approximately 6% of the Company's consolidated revenues for the year ended December 31, 2015 and 8% of the Company's consolidated total assets as of December 31, 2015.
The effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2015 has been audited by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, as stated in their report which appears herein.




42

Crown Holdings, Inc.


Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
To the Board of Directors and Shareholders of Crown Holdings, Inc.:
In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements listed in the accompanying index present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Crown Holdings, Inc. and its subsidiaries at December 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2015 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. In addition, in our opinion, the financial statement schedule listed in the accompanying index presents fairly, in all material respects, the information set forth therein when read in conjunction with the related consolidated financial statements. Also in our opinion, the Company maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2015, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). The Company's management is responsible for these financial statements and financial statement schedule, for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management's Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express opinions on these financial statements, on the financial statement schedule, and on the Company's internal control over financial reporting based on our integrated audits. We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement and whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audits of the financial statements included examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, and evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. Our audit of internal control over financial reporting included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audits also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinions.
As discussed in Note A to the consolidated financial statements, the Company changed the manner in which it presents deferred income taxes and debt issuance costs in 2015.
A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (ii) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
As described in Management's Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting, management has excluded Empaque from its assessment of internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2015 because it was acquired by the Company in a purchase business combination during 2015. We have also excluded Empaque from our audit of internal control over financial reporting. Empaque is a wholly-owned subsidiary whose total assets and total revenues represent 8% and 6%, respectively, of the related consolidated financial statement amounts as of and for the year ended December 31, 2015.

/s/ PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
February 29, 2016



43

Crown Holdings, Inc.


CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(in millions except per share data)


For the Years Ended December 31
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Net sales
$
8,762

 
$
9,097

 
$
8,656

Cost of products sold, excluding depreciation and amortization
7,116

 
7,525

 
7,180

Depreciation and amortization
237

 
190

 
134

Selling and administrative expense
390

 
398

 
425

Provision for asbestos
26

 
45

 
32

Restructuring and other
66

 
129

 
34

Income from operations
927

 
810

 
851

Loss from early extinguishments of debt
9

 
34

 
41

Interest expense
270

 
253

 
236

Interest income
(11
)
 
(7
)
 
(5
)
Foreign exchange
20

 
14

 
3

Income before income taxes
639

 
516

 
576

Provision for income taxes
178

 
41

 
148

Net income
461

 
475

 
428

Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests
(68
)
 
(88
)
 
(104
)
Net income attributable to Crown Holdings
$
393

 
$
387

 
$
324

 
 
 
 
 
 
Earnings per common share attributable to Crown Holdings:
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
$
2.85

 
$
2.82

 
$
2.32

Diluted
$
2.82

 
$
2.79

 
$
2.30


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.


44


CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
(in millions)

For the Years Ended December 31
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Net income
$
461

 
$
475

 
$
428

Other comprehensive income / (loss), net of tax
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency translation adjustments
(469
)
 
(323
)
 
(10
)
Pension and other postretirement benefits
91

 
47

 
126

Derivatives qualifying as hedges
(15
)
 
25

 
(17
)
Total other comprehensive income / (loss)
(393
)
 
(251
)
 
99

Total comprehensive income
68

 
224

 
527

Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests
(68
)
 
(88
)
 
(104
)
Translation adjustments attributable to noncontrolling interests
3

 
1

 

Derivatives qualifying as hedges attributable to noncontrolling interests
1

 
(2
)
 
2

Comprehensive income attributable to Crown Holdings
$
4

 
$
135

 
$
425


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.


45

Crown Holdings, Inc.


CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(in millions, except share data)


December 31
2015
 
2014
Assets
 
 
 
Current assets
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
717

 
$
965

Receivables, net
912

 
1,031

Inventories
1,213

 
1,324

Prepaid expenses and other current assets
207

 
251

Assets held for sale

 
48

Total current assets
3,049

 
3,619

 
 
 
 
Goodwill and intangible assets
3,580

 
2,926

Property, plant and equipment, net
2,699

 
2,437

Other non-current assets
692

 
661

Total
$
10,020

 
$
9,643

 
 
 
 
Liabilities and equity
 
 
 
Current liabilities
 
 
 
Short-term debt
$
54

 
$
75

Current maturities of long-term debt
209

 
175

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
2,645

 
2,651

Liabilities related to assets held for sale

 
23

Total current liabilities
2,908

 
2,924

 
 
 
 
Long-term debt, excluding current maturities
5,255

 
4,944

Postretirement and pension liabilities
767

 
871

Other non-current liabilities
655

 
517

Commitments and contingent liabilities (Note M)

 

 
 
 
 
Equity
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Noncontrolling interests
291

 
268

 
 
 
 
Preferred stock, authorized: 30,000,000; none issued (Note O)

 

Common stock, par value: $5.00; authorized: 500,000,000 shares; issued:
 
 
 
    185,744,072 shares (Note O)
929

 
929

Additional paid-in capital
426

 
407

Accumulated earnings
2,175

 
1,782

Accumulated other comprehensive loss
(3,154
)
 
(2,765
)
Treasury stock at par value (2015 - 46,302,744 shares; 2014 - 46,743,601 shares)
(232
)
 
(234
)
Crown Holdings shareholders’ equity
144

 
119

Total equity
435

 
387

Total
$
10,020

 
$
9,643

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

46

Crown Holdings, Inc.


CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(in millions)
For the Years Ended December 31
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Cash flows from operating activities
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
$
461

 
$
475

 
428

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
 
 
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
237

 
190

 
134

Restructuring and other
66

 
129

 
34

Provision for bad debts
4

 

 
41

Pension expense
48

 
56

 
75

Pension contributions
(79
)
 
(81
)
 
(84
)
Stock-based compensation
27

 
22

 
21

Deferred income taxes
25

 
(83
)
 
50

Changes in assets and liabilities:
 
 
 
 
 
Receivables
34

 
45

 
(51
)
Inventories
60

 
(62
)
 
(45
)
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
59

 
219

 
246

Other, net
14

 
2

 
36

Net cash provided by operating activities
956

 
912

 
885

Cash flows from investing activities
 
 
 
 
 
Capital expenditures
(354
)
 
(328
)
 
(275
)
Acquisition of businesses, net of cash acquired
(1,207
)
 
(733
)
 
(16
)
Proceeds from sale of businesses, net of cash sold