10-K 1 kmx-20140228x10k.htm 10-K 92dd48791f49433

 

  

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

x   ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended February 28, 2014

 

OR

 

¨   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from  to

 

Commission File Number: 1-31420

 

CARMAX, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

VIRGINIA

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

54-1821055

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

 

12800 TUCKAHOE CREEK PARKWAY, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA

(Address of principal executive offices)

23238

(Zip Code)

 

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (804) 747-0422

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Title of each class

Common Stock, par value $0.50

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

New York Stock Exchange

 

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

 

None

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

Yes x No ¨

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.

Yes ¨ No x

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Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes x No ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).

Yes x No ¨

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer or a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

Large accelerated filer xAccelerated filer ¨

Non-accelerated filer ¨ (do not check if a smaller reporting company)Smaller reporting company ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).

Yes ¨ No x

 

The aggregate market value of the registrant’s common stock held by non-affiliates as of August 31, 2013, computed by reference to the closing price of the registrant’s common stock on the New York Stock Exchange on that date, was $10,621,543,601.

On March 31, 2014, there were 220,805,697 outstanding shares of CarMax, Inc. common stock.

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

 

Portions of the CarMax, Inc. Notice of 2014 Annual Meeting of Shareholders and Proxy Statement are incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K.

 

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CARMAX, INC.

FORM 10-K

FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDED FEBRUARY 28, 2014

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

Page No.

 

 

 

 

 

PART I

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

 

Business

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1A.

 

Risk Factors

 

12 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1B.

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

 

17 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 2.

 

Properties

 

18 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 3.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

19 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 4.

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

 

20 

 

 

 

 

 

PART II

 

 

 

 

 

Item 5.

 

Market for the Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases

of Equity Securities

 

21 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 6.

 

Selected Financial Data

 

23 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 7.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

24 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 7A.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

 

39 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 8.

 

Consolidated Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

40 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 9.

 

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

 

76 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 9A.

 

Controls and Procedures

 

76 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 9B.

 

Other Information

 

76 

 

 

 

 

 

PART III

 

 

 

 

 

Item 10.

 

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

 

76 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 11.

 

Executive Compensation

 

77 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 12.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder

Matters

 

78 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 13.

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence

 

78 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 14.

 

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

 

78 

 

 

 

 

 

PART IV

 

 

 

 

 

Item 15.

 

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

 

78 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signatures

 

79 

 

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PART I

In this document, “we,” “our,” “us,” “CarMax” and “the company” refer to CarMax, Inc. and its wholly owned subsidiaries, unless the context requires otherwise.

 

FORWARD-LOOKING AND CAUTIONARY STATEMENTS

This Annual Report on Form 10-K and, in particular, the description of our business set forth in Item 1 and our Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations set forth in Item 7 contain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, including statements regarding:

 

·

Our projected future sales growth, comparable store unit sales growth, margins, earnings, CarMax Auto Finance income and earnings per share.

 

·

Our expectations of factors that could affect CarMax Auto Finance income.

 

·

Our expected future expenditures, cash needs and financing sources.

 

·

The projected number, timing and cost of new store openings.

 

·

Our sales and marketing plans.

 

·

Our assessment of the potential outcome and financial impact of litigation and the potential impact of unasserted claims.

 

·

Our assessment of competitors and potential competitors.

 

·

Our assessment of the effect of recent legislation and accounting pronouncements.

 

In addition, any statements contained in or incorporated by reference into this report that are not statements of historical fact should be considered forward-looking statements.  You can identify these forward-looking statements by use of words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “could,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “may,” “outlook,” “plan,” “predict,” “should,” “will” and other similar expressions, whether in the negative or affirmative.  We cannot guarantee that we will achieve the plans, intentions or expectations disclosed in the forward-looking statements.  There are a number of important risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those indicated by our forward-looking statements.  These risks and uncertainties include, without limitation, those set forth in Item 1A under the heading “Risk Factors.”  We caution investors not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements as these statements speak only as of the date when made.  We disclaim any intent or obligation to update any forward-looking statements made in this report.

Item 1.  Business.

BUSINESS OVERVIEW

CarMax Background.  CarMax, Inc. was incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of Virginia in 1996.  CarMax, Inc. is a holding company and our operations are conducted through our subsidiaries.  Our home office is located at 12800 Tuckahoe Creek Parkway, Richmond, Virginia.

Under the ownership of Circuit City Stores, Inc. (“Circuit City”), we began operations in 1993 with the opening of our first CarMax superstore in Richmond, Virginia.  On October 1, 2002, the CarMax business was separated from Circuit City through a tax-free transaction, becoming an independent, publicly traded company.

CarMax Business.  We operate in two reportable segments:  CarMax Sales Operations and CarMax Auto Finance (“CAF”).  Our CarMax Sales Operations segment consists of all aspects of our auto merchandising and service operations, excluding financing provided by CAF.  Our CAF segment consists solely of our own finance operation that provides vehicle financing through CarMax superstores.

CarMax Sales Operations:  We are the nation’s largest retailer of used cars, based on the 526,929 used vehicles we retailed during the fiscal year ended February 28, 2014.  As of the end of fiscal 2014, we operated 131 used car

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superstores in 64 metropolitan markets.  In addition, we are one of the nation’s largest wholesale vehicle auction operators, based on the 342,576 wholesale vehicles we sold through our on-site auctions in fiscal 2014. 

We were the first used vehicle retailer to offer a large selection of high quality used vehicles at low, “no-haggle” prices using a customer-friendly sales process in an attractive, modern sales facility.  Our consumer offer allows customers to shop for vehicles the same way they shop for items at other “big-box” retailers.  We provide low, no-haggle prices; a broad selection of CarMax Quality Certified vehicles; and superior customer service.  Our strategy is to revolutionize the auto retailing market by addressing the major sources of customer dissatisfaction with traditional auto retailers and to maximize operating efficiencies through the use of standardized operating procedures and store formats enhanced by sophisticated, proprietary management information systems.

Our consumer offer enables customers to evaluate separately each component of the sales process, including the purchase of a vehicle, the financing of that vehicle, the purchase of extended service plans for that vehicle and the sale of the customer’s current vehicle to CarMax. Customers can make informed decisions based on comprehensive information about the options, terms and associated prices of each component and can accept or decline any individual element of the offer without affecting the price or terms of any other component of the offer.  Our no-haggle pricing and our commission structure, which is generally based on a fixed dollars-per-unit standard, allow sales consultants to focus solely on meeting customer needs.

All of the used vehicles we retail are thoroughly reconditioned to meet our high standards, and each vehicle must pass a comprehensive inspection before being offered for sale.  In fiscal 2014, 85% of the used vehicles we retailed were 0 to 6 years old. 

Vehicles purchased through our in-store appraisal process that do not meet our retail standards are sold to licensed dealers through our on-site wholesale auctions.  Unlike many other auto auctions, we own all the vehicles that we sell in our auctions, which allows us to maintain a high auction sales rate.  This high sales rate, combined with dealer-friendly practices, makes our auctions an attractive source of vehicles for independent used car dealers.  As of February 28, 2014, we conducted weekly or bi-weekly auctions at 60 of our 131 used car superstores.

In addition, we sell new vehicles at four locations under franchise agreements with three new car manufacturers.  In fiscal 2014, new vehicles comprised only 1% of our total retail vehicle unit sales. 

Our finance program provides customers financing alternatives through CAF, our own finance operation, and third-party financing providers.  This program provides access to credit for customers across a wide range of the credit spectrum.  We believe the company’s processes and systems, transparency of pricing, vehicle quality and the integrity of the information collected at the time the customer applies for credit provide a unique and ideal environment in which to originate and procure high quality auto loans.  CAF originates loans solely through CarMax stores, customizing its offers based on the customer’s risk profile, to support CarMax retail vehicle unit sales.  All of the finance offers by CAF and our third-party providers are backed by a 3‑day payoff offer whereby a customer can refinance their loan within three business days at no charge.

We provide customers with a range of other related products and services, including the appraisal and purchase of vehicles directly from consumers; the sale of extended service plans (“ESP”) and guaranteed asset protection (“GAP”); and vehicle repair service.

We have separated the practice of trading in a used vehicle in conjunction with the purchase of another vehicle into two distinct and independent transactions.  We will appraise a consumer’s vehicle and make an offer to buy that vehicle regardless of whether the owner is purchasing a vehicle from us.  We acquire a significant percentage of our retail used vehicle inventory through our in-store appraisal process.  We also acquire a large portion of our used vehicle inventory through wholesale auctions and, to a lesser extent, directly from other sources, including wholesalers, dealers and fleet owners.

Our proprietary inventory management and pricing system tracks each vehicle throughout the sales process.  Using the information provided by this system and applying statistical modeling techniques, we are able to optimize our inventory mix, anticipate future inventory needs at each store, evaluate sales consultant and buyer performance and refine our vehicle pricing strategy.  Because of the pricing discipline afforded by the inventory management and pricing system, generally more than  99% of the entire used car inventory offered at retail is sold at retail.

 

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CarMax Auto Finance:  CAF provides financing to qualified customers purchasing vehicles at CarMax.  Because the purchase of a vehicle is generally reliant on the consumer’s ability to obtain on-the-spot financing, it is important to our business that financing be available to creditworthy customers.  CAF offers financing solely to customers purchasing vehicles at CarMax. CAF offers qualifying customers an array of competitive rates and terms, allowing them to choose the one that best fits their needs.  We believe CAF enables us to capture additional sales, profits and cash flows while managing our reliance on third-party finance sources.  After the effect of 3-day payoffs and vehicle returns, CAF financed 41% of our retail vehicle unit sales in fiscal 2014.  As of February 28, 2014, CAF serviced approximately 532,000 customer accounts in its $7.18 billion portfolio of managed receivables.

Industry and Competition.    CarMax Sales Operations:  The U.S. used car marketplace is highly fragmented and competitive.  According to industry sources, as of December 31, 2013, there were approximately 17,900 franchised automotive dealerships, which sell both new and used vehicles.  In addition, used vehicles were sold by approximately 37,000 independent used vehicle dealers, as well as millions of private individuals.  Our primary retail competitors are the franchised auto dealers, who sell the majority of late-model used vehicles.  Independent used car dealers predominantly sell older, higher mileage cars than we do.  The number of franchised and independent auto dealers has declined over the last decade, in large part due to manufacturers’ franchise and brand terminations, as well as dealership closures caused by the stress of the recession.  Despite this reduction in the number of dealers, the automotive retail environment remains highly fragmented.

Based on industry data, there were approximately 39 million used cars sold in the U.S. in calendar year 2013, of which approximately 22 million were estimated to be 0- to 10-year old vehicles.  While we are the largest retailer of used vehicles in the U.S., selling more than two times as many used vehicles as the next largest retailer in calendar 2013, we represented approximately 5% of the 0- to 10-year old used units sold in the markets in which we operate and less than 3% of the total 0- to 10-year old used units sold nationwide.  Over the last several years, competition has been affected by the increasing use of Internet-based marketing for both used vehicles and vehicle financing.  We seek to distinguish ourselves from traditional dealerships through our consumer offer, sales approach and other innovative operating strategies.

We believe that our principal competitive advantages in used vehicle retailing include our ability to provide a high degree of customer satisfaction with the car-buying experience by virtue of our low, no-haggle prices and our customer-friendly sales process; our breadth of selection of the most popular makes and models available both on site and via our website, carmax.com; the quality of our vehicles; our proprietary information systems; CAF; and the locations of our retail superstores.  In addition, we believe our willingness to appraise and purchase a customer’s vehicle, whether or not the customer is buying a car from us, provides us a competitive sourcing advantage for retail vehicles.  Our large volume of appraisal purchases supplies not only a large portion of our retail inventory, but also provides the scale that enables us to conduct our own wholesale auctions to dispose of vehicles that don’t meet our retail standards.  Upon request by a customer, we will transfer virtually any used vehicle in our nationwide inventory to a local superstore.  Transfer fees may apply, depending on the distance the vehicle needs to travel.  In fiscal 2014, approximately 30% of our vehicles sold were transferred at customer request.  Every vehicle we offer for sale is CarMax Quality Certified and meets our stringent standards.  We back every vehicle with a 5-day, money-back guarantee and at least a 30-day limited warranty.  We maintain an ability to offer or arrange customer financing with competitive terms, and all financing is backed by our 3‑day payoff offer.  Additionally, we offer comprehensive and competitively priced ESP and GAP products.  We believe that we are competitive in all of these areas and that we enjoy advantages over competitors that employ traditional high-pressure, negotiation-oriented sales techniques.

Our sales consultants play a significant role in ensuring a customer-friendly sales process.  A sales consultant is paid a commission, generally based on a fixed dollars-per-unit standard, thereby earning the same dollar sales commission regardless of the gross profit on the vehicle being sold.  In addition, sales consultants do not receive commissions based on the number of credit approvals or the amount a customer finances.  This pay structure aligns our sales associates’ interests with those of our customers, in contrast to other dealerships where sales and finance personnel may receive higher commissions for negotiating higher prices and interest rates or steering customers to vehicles with higher gross profits.

In our wholesale auctions, we compete with other automotive auction houses.  In contrast with the highly fragmented used vehicle market, the automotive auction market has two primary competitors, Manheim, a subsidiary of Cox Enterprises, and KAR Auction Services, Inc., representing an estimated 70% of the U.S. whole car auction market.  These competitors auction vehicles of all ages, while CarMax predominantly sells older, higher mileage vehicles.  We believe the principal competitive advantages of our wholesale auctions include our high vehicle sales rate, our vehicle condition disclosures and arbitration policies, our broad geographic distribution and our dealer-friendly practices.  Because we own the cars that we auction, we generally sell more than 95% of the

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vehicles offered, which is substantially higher than the sales rate at most other auto auctions.  Our policy of making vehicle condition disclosures, noting mechanical and other issues found during our appraisal process, is also not a typical practice used at other auctions of older, higher mileage vehicles.  Together, these factors make our auctions attractive to dealers, resulting in a high dealer-to-car attendance ratio.

CarMax Auto Finance: CAF operates in the auto finance sector of the consumer finance market.  This sector is primarily comprised of banks, captive finance divisions of new car manufacturers, credit unions and independent finance companies.  According to industry sources, this sector represented approximately $800 billion in outstanding receivables as of December 31, 2013.  As of February 28, 2014, CAF had $7.18 billion in managed receivables, having originated $4.18 billion in loans during the fiscal year.  For loans originated during the calendar quarter ended December 31, 2013,  industry sources ranked CAF 7th in market share for used vehicle loans and 17th in market share for all vehicle loans.

We believe that CAF’s principal competitive advantage is its strategic position as the primary finance source in CarMax stores.  We believe the company’s processes and systems, transparency of pricing, vehicle quality and the integrity of the information collected at the time the customer applies for credit provide a unique and ideal environment in which to procure high quality auto loans.  CAF utilizes proprietary scoring models based upon the credit history of the customer along with CAF’s historical experience to predict the likelihood of customer repayment.  Because CAF offers financing solely through CarMax stores, scoring models are optimized for the CarMax channel.

CAF’s primary competitors are banks and credit unions that offer direct financing to customers purchasing cars from dealers.  Some of our customers have already obtained financing prior to shopping for a vehicle and do not apply for financing in the store.  We also offer customers the ability to pay off their loans within three days without penalty.  The percentage of customers exercising this option can be an indication of the competitiveness of our rates.

Marketing and Advertising.  Our marketing strategies are focused on developing awareness of the advantages of shopping at our stores and on carmax.com and on attracting customers who are already considering buying or selling a vehicle.  Our marketing strategies are implemented primarily through traditional and digital methods, including national and local television and radio broadcasts, carmax.com, Internet search engines and online classified listings.  We also reach out to customers and potential customers to build awareness and loyalty through Facebook, Twitter and other social media.  Television and radio advertisements are designed to build consumer awareness of the CarMax name, carmax.com and key components of the CarMax offer.  Broadcast and Internet advertisements are designed to drive customers to our stores and to carmax.com. We also build awareness and drive traffic to our stores and carmax.com by listing retail vehicles on various online automotive classified sites.  Our advertising on the Internet also includes advertisements on search engines, such as Google and Yahoo!, as well as online properties such as Pandora and Hulu.

We strive to adjust our marketing programs in response to the evolving media landscape.  We have customized our marketing program based on awareness levels in each market.  We have transitioned a portion of our television and radio advertising to national cable network and national radio programming and we will continue to seek to optimize our media mix between local and national distribution.  In addition to providing cost savings, this transition allows us to build awareness of CarMax prior to our entrance into new markets.  Our carmax.com website and related mobile apps are marketing tools for communicating the CarMax consumer offer in detail, sophisticated search engines for finding the right vehicle and a sales channel for customers who prefer to initiate part of the shopping and sales process online.  The website and mobile apps offer complete inventory and pricing search capabilities.  Information on the thousands of cars available in our nationwide inventory is updated several times per day.  Carmax.com includes detailed information, such as vehicle photos, prices, features, specifications and store locations, as well as advanced feature-based search capabilities, and sorting and comparison tools that allow consumers to easily compare vehicles.  The site also includes features such as detailed vehicle reviews, payment calculators and email alerts when new inventory arrives.  Customers can contact sales consultants in a variety of ways, including online via carmax.com.  Customers can also schedule appointments, hold a vehicle for up to seven days and initiate a vehicle transfer using online tools.  Our survey data indicates that during fiscal 2014, approximately 80% of customers who purchased a vehicle from us had first visited us online.

We also maintain a website, carmaxauctions.com, that supports our wholesale auctions.  This website, which is accessible only by authorized dealers, provides listings of all vehicles that will be available in upcoming auctions.  It also has many features similar to our retail website, including vehicle photos, free vehicle history reports and vehicle search and alert capabilities.

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Suppliers for Used Vehicles.  We acquire used vehicle inventory directly from consumers through our appraisal process, as well as through other sources, including local, regional and online auctions, wholesalers, franchised and independent dealers and fleet owners, such as leasing companies and rental companies.  The supply of late-model used vehicles is influenced by a variety of factors, including the total number of vehicles in operation; the rate of new vehicle sales, which in turn generate used-car trade-ins; and the number of used vehicles sold or remarketed through retail channels, wholesale transactions and at automotive auctions. 

During the recession, retail vehicle sales dropped sharply, with new car sales falling from between 16 million and 17 million vehicles to 10 million vehicles and used car sales falling from between 40 million to 45 million vehicles to 35 million vehicles in 2009.  This decline in new car sales, combined with a decrease in lease originations and a reduction in trade-in activity, resulted in a tighter supply of late-model used vehicles in recent years. The number of vehicles in operation that were 0 to 6 years old fell from approximately 100 million vehicles prior to the recession to approximately 77 million vehicles as of December 31, 2013.  New vehicle industry sales and leasing activity have improved in recent years, and we anticipate these improvements will gradually increase the supply of late-model used vehicles.

Our used vehicle inventory acquired directly from consumers through our appraisal process helps provide an inventory of makes and models that reflects the consumer preferences in each market.  We have replaced the traditional “trade-in” transaction with a process in which a CarMax-trained buyer appraises a customer’s vehicle and provides the owner with a written, guaranteed offer that is good for seven days.  An appraisal is available to every customer free of charge, whether or not the customer purchases a vehicle from us.  Based on their age, mileage or condition, fewer than half of the vehicles acquired through this in-store appraisal process meet our high-quality retail standards.  Those vehicles that do not meet our retail standards are sold to licensed dealers through our on-site wholesale auctions.

The inventory purchasing function is primarily performed at the store level and is the responsibility of the buyers, who handle both on-site appraisals and off-site auction purchases.  Our buyers evaluate all used vehicles based on internal and external auction data and market sales, as well as estimated reconditioning costs and, for off-site purchases, transportation costs.  Our buyers, in collaboration with our home office staff, utilize the extensive inventory and sales trend data available through the CarMax information system to decide which inventory to purchase at off-site auctions.  Our inventory and pricing models help the buyers tailor inventories to the buying preferences at each superstore, recommend pricing adjustments and optimize inventory turnover to help maintain gross profit per unit.

Based on consumer acceptance of the in-store appraisal process, our experience and success in acquiring vehicles from auctions and other sources, and the large size of the U.S. auction market relative to our needs, we believe that sources of used vehicles will continue to be sufficient to meet our current and future needs.

Suppliers for New Vehicles.  Our new car operations are governed by the terms of the sales, service and dealer agreements.  Among other things, these agreements generally impose operating requirements and restrictions, including inventory levels, working capital, monthly financial reporting, signage and cooperation with marketing strategies. 

Seasonality.  Historically, our business has been seasonal.  Typically, our superstores experience their strongest traffic and sales in the spring and summer quarters.  Sales are typically slowest in the fall quarter, when used vehicles generally experience proportionately more of their annual depreciation.  We believe this is partly the result of a decline in customer traffic, as well as discounts on model year closeouts that can pressure pricing for late-model used vehicles.  Customer traffic generally tends to slow in the fall as the weather changes and as customers shift their spending priorities.  We typically experience an increase in subprime traffic and sales in February and March, coincident with tax refund season.

Products and Services

Merchandising.  We offer customers a broad selection of makes and models of used vehicles, including both domestic and imported vehicles, at competitive prices.  Our primary focus is vehicles that are 0 to 6 years old and generally range in price from $12,000 to $34,000.  For the more cost-conscious consumer, we also offer used cars that are generally between 7 and 11 years old.  The mix of our used vehicle inventory by make, model and age will vary from time to time, depending on consumer preferences.

We have implemented an everyday low-price strategy under which we set no-haggle prices on both our used and new vehicles.  We believe that our pricing is competitive.  Prices on all vehicles are clearly displayed on each

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vehicle’s information sticker, on carmax.com and on applicable online classified sites on which they are listed.  We extend our no-haggle philosophy to every component of the vehicle transaction, including vehicle appraisal offers, financing rates and ESP and GAP pricing.

Wholesale Auctions.  Vehicles purchased through our in-store appraisal process that do not meet our retail standards are sold through on-site wholesale auctions.  As of February 28, 2014, wholesale auctions were conducted at 60 of our 131 superstores and were generally held on a weekly or bi-weekly basis.  Auction frequency at a given superstore is determined by the number of vehicles to be auctioned, which depends on the number of stores in that market and the consumer awareness of CarMax and our in-store appraisal offer.  The typical wholesale vehicle is approximately 10 years old and has more than 100,000 miles.  Participants in CarMax auctions must be licensed automobile dealers, who are required to register with our centralized auction support group.  The majority of the participants are independent automobile dealers.  We provide condition disclosures on each vehicle, including those for vehicles with major mechanical issues, possible frame or flood damage, branded titles, salvage history and unknown true mileage.  Professional, licensed auctioneers conduct our auctions.  The average auction sales rate was 97% in fiscal 2014.  Dealers pay a fee to us based on the sales price of the vehicles they purchase.

 

Extended Service Plans and Guaranteed Asset Protection.  At the time of the sale, we offer the customer an ESP.  We sell these plans on behalf of unrelated third parties that are the primary obligors.  We have no contractual liability to the customer for claims under the service agreements.  The ESPs we offer on all used vehicles provide coverage up to 72 months (subject to mileage limitations) and include multiple mileage and deductible options, depending on the vehicle odometer reading, make and model.  We offer ESPs at competitive, fixed prices, which take into consideration the historical repair record of the vehicle make and model, the mileage option selected and the deductible chosen.  All ESPs that we sell (other than manufacturer programs) have been designed to our specifications and are administered by the third parties through private-label arrangements.  Periodically, we may receive additional commissions based upon the level of underwriting profits of the third parties who administer the products.  In fiscal 2014, more than 60% of the customers who purchased a used vehicle also purchased an ESP.

Our ESP customers have access to vehicle repair service at each CarMax store and at thousands of independent and franchised service providers.  We believe that the quality of the services provided by this network, as well as the broad scope of our ESPs, helps promote customer satisfaction and loyalty, and thus increases the likelihood of repeat and referral business.

We also offer GAP at the time of the sale.  GAP is a product that will pay the difference between the customer’s insurance settlement and the finance contract payoff amount on their vehicle in the case of a total loss or unrecovered theft.  We sell this product on behalf of an unrelated third party that is the primary obligor.  GAP has been designed to our specifications and is administered by the third party through a private-label arrangement.  We receive a commission from the administrator at the time of sale.  In fiscal 2014, more than 25% of customers who purchased a used vehicle also purchased GAP.

Reconditioning and Service.  An integral part of our used car consumer offer is the renewal process used to make sure every car meets our high standards before it can become a CarMax Quality Certified vehicle.  This process includes a comprehensive CarMax Quality Inspection of the engine and all major systems, including cooling, fuel, drivetrain, transmission, electronics, suspension, brakes, steering, air conditioning and other equipment, as well as the interior and exterior of the vehicle.  Based on this quality inspection, we determine the reconditioning necessary to bring the vehicle up to our quality standards.  We perform most routine mechanical and minor body repairs in-house; however, for some reconditioning services, we engage third parties specializing in those services.  Many superstores depend upon nearby, typically larger, superstores for reconditioning, which increases efficiency and reduces overhead.

All CarMax used car superstores provide vehicle repair service, including repairs of vehicles covered by our ESPs.  We also provide factory-authorized service at all new car franchises.  We have developed systems and procedures that are intended to ensure that our retail repair service is conducted in the same customer-friendly and efficient manner as our other operations.

We believe that the efficiency of our reconditioning and service operations is enhanced by our modern facilities, our information systems and our technician training and development process.  The training and development process and our compensation programs are designed to increase the productivity of technicians, identify opportunities for waste reduction and achieve high-quality repairs.  Our information systems allow us to track repair history and enable trend analysis, which guides our continuous improvement efforts.

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Customer Credit.  We offer financing alternatives for retail customers across a wide range of the credit spectrum through CAF and our arrangements with several industry-leading financial institutions.  We believe our program enables us to capture additional sales and enhances the CarMax consumer offer.  Credit applications are initially reviewed by CAF.  Customers who are not approved by CAF may be evaluated by the other financial institutions.  Having an array of finance sources increases discrete approvals, expands finance opportunities for our customers and mitigates risk to CarMax.  In fiscal 2014, 91% of our applicants received an approval from one or more of our sources.  We periodically test additional third-party providers.

Retail customers applying for financing provide credit information that is electronically submitted by sales consultants through our proprietary information system.  A majority of applicants receive a response within five minutes.  Vehicles are financed using retail installment contracts secured by the vehicles.  Customers are permitted to refinance or pay off their contract within three business days of a purchase without incurring any finance or related charges.  Depending on the credit profile of the customer, third-party finance providers generally either pay us or are paid a fixed, pre-negotiated fee per contract.  The fee amount is independent of any finance term offered to the customer; it does not vary based on the amount financed, the term of the loan, the interest rate or the loan-to-value ratio.  We refer to the providers who pay us a fee as prime and nonprime providers, and we refer to the providers to whom we pay a fee as subprime providers.  We have no recourse liability for credit losses on retail installment contracts arranged with third-party providers.

We do not offer financing to dealers purchasing vehicles at our wholesale auctions.  However, we have made arrangements to have third-party financing available to our auction customers.

Systems

Our stores are supported by an advanced, proprietary information system that improves the customer experience, while providing tightly integrated automation of all operating functions.  Customers can search our entire vehicle inventory through our website, carmax.com, and our mobile apps.  They can also print a detailed listing for any vehicle, which includes the vehicle’s features and specifications and its location on the display lot. Our integrated inventory management system tracks every vehicle through its life from purchase through reconditioning and test-drives to ultimate sale.  Using radio frequency identification (“RFID”) tags and bar codes, all vehicles are scanned and tracked daily as a loss prevention measure.  Test-drive information is captured using RFID tags, linking the specific vehicle and the sales consultant.  We also capture data on vehicles we wholesale, which helps us track market pricing.  A computerized finance application process and computer-assisted document preparation ensure rapid completion of the sales transaction.  Behind the scenes, our proprietary store technology provides our management with real-time information about many aspects of store operations, such as inventory management, pricing, vehicle transfers, wholesale auctions and sales consultant productivity.  In addition, our store system provides a direct link to our proprietary credit processing information system to facilitate the credit review and approval process.

Our proprietary inventory management and pricing system is centralized and allows us to buy the mix of makes, models, age, mileage and price points tailored to customer buying preferences at each CarMax location.  This system also generates recommended initial retail price points, as well as retail price markdowns for specific vehicles based on complex algorithms that take into account factors including sales history, consumer interest and seasonal patterns.  We believe this systematic approach to vehicle pricing allows us to optimize inventory turns, which minimizes the depreciation risk inherent in used cars and helps us to achieve our targeted gross profit dollars per unit.

Our Electronic Repair Order system (“ERO”) is used to sequence reconditioning procedures.  ERO provides information that helps increase quality and reduce costs, which further enhances our customer service and profitability.

Through our centralized systems, we are able to quickly integrate new stores into our store network.  We continue to enhance and refine our information systems, which we believe to be a core competitive advantage.  The design of our information systems incorporates off-site backups, redundant processing and other measures to reduce the risk of significant data loss in the event of an emergency or disaster.

Associates

On February 28, 2014, we had a total of 20,171 full- and part-time associates, including 15,050 hourly and salaried associates and 5,121 sales associates, who worked on a commission basis.  We employ additional associates during peak selling seasons.  As of February 28, 2014, our location general managers averaged 10 years of CarMax

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experience, in addition to prior retail management experience.  We staff each newly opened store with associates who have extensive CarMax training.

We believe we have created a unique corporate culture and maintain good employee relations.  No associate is subject to a collective bargaining agreement.  We focus on providing our associates with the information and resources they need to offer exceptional customer service.  We reward associates whose behavior exemplifies our culture, and we believe that our favorable working conditions and compensation programs allow us to attract and retain highly qualified individuals.  We have been recognized for the success of our efforts by a number of external organizations.

Training.  To further support our emphasis on attracting, developing and retaining qualified associates, we have made a commitment to providing exceptional training programs.  Store associates receive many hours of structured, self-paced training that introduces them to company policies and their specific job responsibilities through KMX University (“KMXU”) – our intranet-based, on-premises learning management system.  KMXU is comprised of customized applications hosted within a learning management system that allow us to author, deliver and track training events and to measure associate competency after training.  KMXU also provides a variety of learning activities and collaborative discussions delivered through an integrated virtual classroom system.  Most new store associates are also assigned mentors who provide on-the-job guidance and support.

We also provide comprehensive, facilitator-led classroom training courses at the associate and manager levels.  All new sales consultants go through an on-boarding process in which they are partnered with a mentor; combining self-paced online training with shadowing and role-playing.  Our professional selling principles (“PSPs”) provide all sales associates the opportunity to learn and practice customer-oriented selling techniques.  This online training program contains modules on a variety of skill sets, including building confidence, connecting with the customer, and listening and persuasion techniques.  KMXU also provides access to hundreds of short video-based learning modules that provide focused behavioral examples supporting the PSPs.  We also have a call recording and review program to provide constructive feedback to associates on how to improve their interactions with customers. 

Buyers-in-training undergo a 6‑ to 18‑month apprenticeship under the supervision of experienced buyers, and they generally will assist with the appraisal of more than 1,000 cars before making their first independent purchase.  Business office associates undergo a 3‑ to 6‑month, on-the-job certification process in order to be fully cross-trained in all functional areas of the business office.  All business office associates and managers also receive regular training through facilitated competency-based training courses.  Reconditioning and service technicians attend in-house and vendor-sponsored training programs designed to develop their skills in performing repairs on the diverse makes and models of vehicles we sell and service.  Technicians at our new car franchises also attend manufacturer-sponsored training programs to stay abreast of current diagnostic, repair and maintenance techniques for those manufacturers’ vehicles.  New managers complete intensive training where they meet with senior leaders, participate in hands-on activities and learn fundamental CarMax leadership skills.

Laws and Regulations

Vehicle Dealer and Other Laws and Regulations.    We operate in a highly regulated industry.  In every state in which we operate, we must obtain various licenses and permits in order to conduct business, including dealer, service, sales and finance licenses issued by state and local regulatory authorities.  A wide range of federal, state and local laws and regulations govern the manner in which we conduct business, including advertising, sales, financing and employment practices.  These laws include consumer protection laws, privacy laws and state franchise laws, as well as other laws and regulations applicable to new and used motor vehicle dealers.  These laws also include federal and state wage-hour, anti-discrimination and other employment practices laws.  Our financing activities with customers are subject to federal truth-in-lending, consumer leasing, equal credit opportunity and fair credit reporting laws and regulations, all of which are subject to enforcement by the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau or Federal Trade Commission, as well as state and local motor vehicle finance, collection, repossession and installment finance laws.

Claims arising out of actual or alleged violations of law could be asserted against us by individuals or governmental authorities and could expose us to significant damages or other penalties, including revocation or suspension of the licenses necessary to conduct business and fines.

Environmental Laws and Regulations.  We are subject to a variety of federal, state and local laws and regulations that pertain to the environment.  Our business involves the use, handling and disposal of hazardous materials and wastes, including motor oil, gasoline, solvents, lubricants, paints and other substances.  We are subject to

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compliance with regulations concerning the operation of underground and above-ground gasoline storage tanks, gasoline dispensing equipment, above-ground oil tanks and automotive paint booths.

AVAILABILITY OF REPORTS AND OTHER INFORMATION

The following items are available free of charge through the “Corporate Governance” link on our investor information home page at investor.carmax.com, shortly after we file them with, or furnish them to, the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”): annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, proxy statements on Schedule 14A, and any amendments to those reports.  The following documents are also available free of charge on our website: Corporate Governance Guidelines, Code of Business Conduct, and the charters of the Audit, Nominating and Governance, and Compensation and Personnel Committees.  We publish any changes to these documents on our website.  We also promptly disclose reportable waivers of the Code of Business Conduct on our website.  The contents of our website are not, however, part of this report.

Printed copies of these documents are also available to any shareholder, without charge, upon written request to our corporate secretary at the address set forth on the cover page of this report.

Item 1A.  Risk Factors.

We are subject to a variety of risks, the most significant of which are described below.  Our business, sales, results of operations and financial condition could be materially adversely affected by any of these risks.

We operate in a highly competitive industry.  Failure to develop and execute strategies to remain the nation’s preferred retailer of used vehicles and to adapt to the increasing use of the Internet to market, buy and sell used vehicles could adversely affect our business, sales and results of operations.

 

Automotive retailing is a highly competitive and highly fragmented business.  Our competition includes publicly and privately owned new and used car dealers, as well as millions of private individuals.   Competitors buy and sell the same or similar makes of vehicles that we offer in the same or similar markets at competitive prices.  New car dealers in particular, including publicly-traded auto retailers, have increased their sales of used vehicles since the recession.  If this trend continues, it could result in increased acquisition costs for used vehicles and lower-than-expected retail sales and margins. 

Some of our competitors have recently announced plans for rapid expansion, including into markets with CarMax locations.  Some of our competitors have also borrowed or attempted to borrow portions of the consumer offer that we pioneered when we opened our first used car superstore in 1993, including our use of low, no-haggle prices and our commitment to buy a customer’s vehicle even if they do not purchase one from us.  In addition, competitors who have franchise relationships with automotive manufacturers brand certain used cars as “certified pre-owned,” which could provide those competitors with an advantage over CarMax.  This competitive activity could result in increased acquisition costs for used vehicles and lower-than-expected retail sales and margins.

The increasing use of the Internet to market, buy and sell used vehicles and to provide vehicle financing could have a material adverse effect on our sales and results of operations.  The increasing on-line availability of used vehicle information, including pricing information, could make it more difficult for us to differentiate our customer offering from competitors’ offerings, could result in lower-than-expected retail margins, and could have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations. In addition, our competitive standing is affected by companies, including search engines and online classified sites, that are not direct competitors but that may direct on-line traffic to the websites of competing automotive retailers.  The increasing activities of these companies could make it more difficult for carmax.com to attract traffic.  These companies could also make it more difficult for CarMax otherwise to market its vehicles on-line (for example, by declining to list CarMax Quality Certified vehicles as “certified” on their classified sites).  This could have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations.

The increasing use of the Internet to facilitate consumers’ sales or trade-ins of their current vehicles could have a material adverse effect on our ability to source vehicles through our appraisal process, which in turn could have a material adverse effect on our vehicle acquisition costs and results of operations.  For example, certain websites provide on-line appraisal tools to consumers that generate offers and facilitate purchases by dealers other than CarMax.  The popularity of these tools appears to be increasing.  

In addition to the direct competition and increasing use of the Internet described above, there are companies that sell software solutions to new and used car dealers to enable those dealers to, among other things, more efficiently

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source inventory.  Although these companies do not compete with CarMax, the increasing use of such products by dealers who compete with CarMax could reduce the relative competitive advantage of CarMax’s internally developed proprietary systems and could result in increased acquisition costs for used vehicles and lower-than-expected retail sales and margins.

Our wholesale activities are also subject to competition.  Since we sell vehicles that do not meet our retail standards through on-site wholesale auctions, our competition includes automotive wholesalers such as Manheim, a subsidiary of Cox Enterprises, and KAR Auction Services, Inc.  These competitors sell the same or similar makes of vehicles that we sell in the same or similar markets at competitive prices.  This competitive activity could result in decreased wholesale margins and could adversely affect our results of operations. 

Our CAF segment is subject to competition from various financial institutions, including banks and credit unions, which provide vehicle financing to consumers.  If we were unable to continue providing competitive finance offers to our customers through CAF, it could result in a greater percentage of sales financed through our third-party financing providers, which financings are generally less profitable to CarMax.  In addition, we believe that CAF allows us to capture additional sales.  Accordingly, if CAF was unable to continue making competitive finance offers to our customers, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations.

The automotive retail industry in general and our business in particular are sensitive to economic conditions.  These conditions could adversely affect our business, sales, results of operations and financial condition.

We are subject to national and regional U.S. economic conditions.  These conditions include, but are not limited to, recession, inflation, interest rates, unemployment levels, the state of the housing market, gasoline prices, consumer credit availability, consumer credit delinquency and loss rates, personal discretionary spending levels, and consumer sentiment about the economy in general. These conditions and the economy in general could be affected by significant national or international events such as acts of terrorism.  When these economic conditions worsen or stagnate, it can have a material adverse effect on consumer demand for vehicles generally, including the used vehicles that we sell, and the availability of consumer credit to finance vehicle purchases.  This could result in lower sales, decreased margins on units sold, and decreased profits for our CAF segment. Worsening or stagnating economic conditions can also have a material adverse effect on the supply of late-model used vehicles, as automotive manufacturers produce fewer new vehicles and consumers retain their current vehicles for longer periods of time. This could result in increased costs to acquire used vehicle inventory and decreased margins on units sold.

 

These dynamics were apparent in the difficult U.S. economic environment during the most recent recession, which adversely affected the automotive retail industry in general, including CarMax. While many of these indicators have improved more recently, there can be no assurance that they will continue to do so or that improvements will result in benefits to our sales and results of operations. Any significant change or deterioration in economic conditions could have a material adverse effect on our business, sales, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Our business is dependent upon capital to fund growth and to support the activities of our CAF segment.  Changes in capital and credit markets could adversely affect our business, sales, results of operations and financial condition.

Changes in the availability or cost of capital and working capital financing, including the long-term financing to support our geographic expansion, could adversely affect sales, operating strategies and store growth.  Although we have financed recent geographic expansion with internally generated cash flows, there can be no assurance that we will continue to generate sufficient cash flows to fund growth.  Failure to do so—or our decision to put our cash to other uses—would make us more dependent on external sources of financing to fund our geographic expansion.

Changes in the availability or cost of the long-term financing to support the origination of auto loan receivables through CAF could adversely affect sales and results of operations.  We use a securitization program to fund substantially all of the auto loan receivables originated by CAF.  Initially, we sell most of these receivables into our warehouse facilities.  We periodically refinance receivables through term securitizations.  Changes in the condition of the asset-backed securitization market could lead us to incur higher costs to access funds in this market or require us to seek alternative means to finance CAF’s loan originations.  In the event that this market ceased to exist and there were no immediate alternative funding sources available, we might be forced to curtail our lending practices for some period of time.  The impact of reducing or curtailing CAF’s loan originations could have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations.

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Our revolving credit facility and certain securitization and sale-leaseback agreements contain covenants and performance triggers.  Any failure to comply with these covenants or performance triggers could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Disruptions in the capital and credit markets could adversely affect our ability to draw on our revolving credit facility.  If our ability to secure funds from the facility were significantly impaired, our access to working capital would be impacted, our ability to maintain appropriate inventory levels could be affected and these conditions—especially if coupled with a failure to generate significant cash flows—could have a material adverse effect on our business, sales, results of operations and financial condition.

We rely on third-party financing providers to finance a significant portion of our customers’ vehicle purchases.  Accordingly, our sales and results of operations are partially dependent on the actions of these third parties.

We provide financing to qualified customers through CAF and a number of third-party financing providers.  If one or more of these third-party providers cease to provide financing to our customers, provide financing to fewer customers or no longer provide financing on competitive terms, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations.  Additionally, if we were unable to replace the current third-party providers upon the occurrence of one or more of the foregoing events, it could also have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations.

CarMax was founded on the fundamental principle of integrity.  Failure to maintain a reputation of integrity and to otherwise maintain and enhance our brand could adversely affect our business, sales and results of operations.

Our reputation as a company that is founded on the fundamental principle of integrity is critical to our success. Our reputation as a retailer offering low, no-haggle prices, a broad selection of CarMax Quality Certified used vehicles and superior customer service is also critical to our success.  If we fail to maintain the high standards on which our reputation is built, or if an event occurs that damages this reputation, it could adversely affect consumer demand and have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations.  Such an event could include an isolated incident at a single store, particularly if such incident results in adverse publicity, governmental investigations, or litigation.  Even the perception of a decrease in the quality of our brand could impact results. 

The growing use of social media increases the speed with which information and opinions can be shared and thus the speed with which reputation can be affected.  We monitor social media and attempt to address customer concerns, provide accurate information and protect our reputation, but there can be no guarantee that our efforts will succeed.  If we fail to correct or mitigate misinformation or negative information, including information spread through social media or traditional media channels, about the vehicles we offer, our customer experience, or any aspect of our brand, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations.

Our success depends upon the continued contributions of our more than 20,000 associates.

 

Our associates are the driving force behind our success.  We believe that one of the things that sets CarMax apart is a culture centered on valuing all associates.  Our failure to maintain this culture or to continue recruiting, developing and retaining the associates that drive our success could have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations.  Our ability to recruit associates while controlling related costs is subject to numerous external and internal factors, including unemployment levels, prevailing wage rates, our growth plans, changes in employment legislation, and competition for qualified employees in the industry and regions in which we operate and for qualified service technicians in particular.  Our ability to recruit associates while controlling related costs is also subject to our ability to maintain positive associate relations.  If we are unable to do so, or if despite our efforts we become subject to successful unionization efforts, it could increase costs, limit our ability to respond to competitive threats and have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations.

 

Our success also depends upon the continued contributions of our store, region and corporate management teams.  Consequently, the loss of the services of any of these associates could have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations.  In addition, an inability to build our management bench strength to support store growth could have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations.

We collect sensitive confidential information from our customers.  A breach of this confidentiality, whether due to a cyber-security or other incident, could result in harm to our customers and damage to our brand.

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We collect, process and retain sensitive and confidential customer information in the normal course of business and may share that information with our third-party service providers.  This information includes the information customers provide when purchasing a vehicle and applying for vehicle financing.  We also collect, process and retain sensitive and confidential associate information in the normal course of business and may share that information with our third-party service providers.  Although we have taken measures designed to safeguard such information and have received assurances from our third-party providers, our facilities and systems, and those of third-party providers, could be vulnerable to external or internal security breaches, acts of vandalism, computer viruses, misplaced or lost data, programming or human errors or other similar events.  Several national retailers have recently disclosed security breaches involving sophisticated cyber-attacks which were not recognized or detected until after such retailers had been affected, notwithstanding the preventive measures such retailers had in place.  Any security breach involving the misappropriation, loss or other unauthorized disclosure of confidential customer or associate information, whether experienced by us or by our third-party service providers, and whether due to an external cyber-security incident, a programming error, or other cause, could damage our reputation, expose us to mitigation costs and the risks of private litigation and government enforcement, disrupt our business, and otherwise have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations.  In addition, our failure to respond quickly and appropriately to such a security breach could exacerbate the consequences of the breach.

Our business is sensitive to changes in the prices of new and used vehicles.

Any significant changes in retail prices for new and used vehicles could have a material adverse effect on our sales and results of operations.  For example, if retail prices for used vehicles rise relative to retail prices for new vehicles, it could make buying a new vehicle more attractive to our customers than buying a used vehicle, which could have a material adverse effect on sales and results of operations and could result in decreased used margins.  Manufacturer incentives could contribute to narrowing this price gap.  In addition, any significant changes in wholesale prices for used vehicles could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations by reducing wholesale margins.

Our business is dependent upon access to vehicle inventory.  Obstacles to acquiring inventory—whether because of supply, competition, or other factors—or a failure to expeditiously liquidate that inventory could have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations.

A reduction in the availability of or access to sources of inventory could have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations.  Although the supply of late-model used vehicles appears to be increasing recently, there can be no assurance that this trend will continue or that it will benefit CarMax.

We source a significant percentage of our vehicles though our appraisal process and these vehicles are generally more profitable for CarMax.  Accordingly, if we fail to adjust appraisal offers to stay in line with broader market trade-in offer trends, or fail to recognize those trends, it could adversely affect our ability to acquire inventory.  It could also force us to purchase a greater percentage of our inventory from third-party auctions, which is generally less profitable for CarMax.  Our ability to source vehicles through our appraisal process could also be affected by competition, both from new and used car dealers directly and through third-party websites driving appraisal traffic to those dealers.  See the risk factor above titled “We operate in a highly competitive industry” for discussion of this risk.

Used vehicle inventory is subject to depreciation risk.  Accordingly, if we develop excess inventory, the inability to liquidate such inventory at prices that allow us to meet margin targets or to recover our costs could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.     

We operate in a highly regulated industry and are subject to a wide range of federal, state and local laws and regulations.  Changes in these laws and regulations, or our failure to comply, could have a material adverse effect on our business, sales, results of operations and financial condition.

 

We are subject to a wide range of federal, state and local laws and regulations.  Our sale of used vehicles is subject to state and local licensing requirements, federal and state laws regulating vehicle advertising, and state laws regulating vehicle sales and service.  Our provision of vehicle financing is subject to federal and state laws regulating the provision of consumer finance.  Our facilities and business operations are subject to laws and regulations relating to environmental protection and health and safety.  In addition to these laws and regulations that apply specifically to our business, we are also subject to laws and regulations affecting public companies and large employers generally, including federal employment practices, securities and tax laws.  For additional discussion of these laws and regulations, see the section of this Form 10-K titled “Laws and Regulations.

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The violation of any of these laws or regulations could result in administrative, civil or criminal penalties or in a cease-and-desist order against our business operations, any of which could damage our reputation and have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations.  We have incurred and will continue to incur capital and operating expenses and other costs to comply with these laws and regulations. 

Recent federal legislative and regulatory initiatives and reforms may result in an increase in expenses or a decrease in revenues, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.  For example, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (the “Dodd-Frank Act”) regulates, among other things, the provision of consumer financing.  The Dodd-Frank Act established a new consumer financial protection agency, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”), with broad regulatory powers.  The CFPB is responsible for administering and enforcing laws and regulations related to consumer financial products and services.  The evolving regulatory environment in the wake of the Dodd-Frank Act and the creation of the CFPB may increase the cost of regulatory compliance or result in changes to business practices that could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, as it is phased in over time, significantly affects the provision of health care services and will increase the costs we incur to provide our associates with health coverage.  Current federal labor policy could lead to increased unionization efforts, which could increase labor costs, disrupt store operations, and have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations.

Private plaintiffs and federal, state and local regulatory and law enforcement authorities continue to scrutinize advertising, sales, financing and insurance activities in the sale and leasing of motor vehicles.  If, as a result, other automotive retailers adopt more transparent, consumer-oriented business practices, our differentiation versus those retailers could be reduced.  See the risk factor titled “We operate in a highly competitive industry” for discussion of this risk.

We are a growth retailer.  Our failure to manage our growth and the related challenges could have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations.

The expansion of our store base places significant demands on our management team, our associates and our information systems.  If we fail to effectively or efficiently manage our growth, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations.  The expansion of our store base also requires us to recruit and retain the associates necessary to support that expansion.  See the risk factor above titled “Our success depends upon the continued contributions of our more than 20,000 associates” for discussion of this risk.  The expansion of our store base also requires real estate.  Our inability to acquire or lease suitable real estate at favorable terms could limit our expansion and could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

If we are forced to curtail or stop growth, as we did during the recession, it could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

We rely on sophisticated information systems to run our business.  The failure of these systems could have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations.

Our business is dependent upon the integrity and efficient operation of our information systems.  In particular, we rely on our information systems to manage sales, inventory, our customer-facing websites (carmax.com and carmaxauctions.com), consumer financing and customer information.  The failure of these systems to perform as designed, or the failure to maintain or update these systems as necessary, could disrupt our business operations and have a material adverse effect on our sales and results of operations. 

In addition, despite our ongoing efforts to maintain and enhance the integrity and security of these systems, we could be subjected to attacks by hackers, including denial-of-service attacks directed at our websites or other system breaches or malfunctions due to associate error or misconduct or other disruptions.  Such incidents could disrupt our business and have a material adverse effect on sales and results of operations.  See the risk factor above titled “We collect sensitive confidential information from our customers” for the risks associated with a breach of confidential customer or associate information.

We are subject to numerous legal proceedings.  If the outcomes of these proceedings are adverse to CarMax, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We are subject to various litigation matters from time to time, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.  Claims arising out of actual or alleged violations of law

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could be asserted against us by individuals, either individually or through class actions, or by governmental entities in civil or criminal investigations and proceedings.  These claims could be asserted under a variety of laws, including but not limited to consumer finance laws, consumer protection laws, intellectual property laws, privacy laws, labor and employment laws, securities laws and employee benefit laws.  These actions could expose us to adverse publicity and to substantial monetary damages and legal defense costs, injunctive relief and criminal and civil fines and penalties, including but not limited to suspension or revocation of licenses to conduct business.

Our business is sensitive to conditions affecting automotive manufacturers.

Adverse conditions affecting one or more automotive manufacturers could have a material adverse effect on our sales and results of operations and could impact the supply of vehicles, including the supply of late-model used vehicles.  In addition, manufacturer recalls are a common occurrence.  Recalls could adversely affect used vehicle sales or valuations and could expose us to litigation and adverse publicity related to the sale of a recalled vehicle, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations.

Our results of operations and financial condition are subject to management’s accounting judgments and estimates, as well as changes in accounting policies.

The preparation of our financial statements requires us to make estimates and assumptions affecting the reported amounts of CarMax’s assets, liabilities, revenues, earnings and expenses. If these estimates or assumptions are incorrect, it could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations or financial condition. We have identified several accounting policies as being “critical” to the fair presentation of our financial condition and results of operations because they involve major aspects of our business and require us to make judgments about matters that are inherently uncertain.  These policies are described in Item 7, Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, and the notes to consolidated financial statements included in Item 8.

The implementation of new accounting requirements or other changes to U.S. generally accepted accounting principles could have a material adverse effect on our reported results of operations and financial condition.

Our business is subject to seasonal fluctuations.

Our business is subject to seasonal fluctuations.  We generally realize a higher proportion of revenue and operating profit during the first and second fiscal quarters.  If conditions arise that impair vehicle sales during the first or second fiscal quarters, these conditions could have a disproportionately large adverse effect on our annual results of operations.

Our business is sensitive to weather events.

The occurrence of severe weather events, such as rain, snow, wind, storms, hurricanes, extended periods of unusually cold weather or natural disasters, could cause store closures or affect the timing of consumer demand, either of which could adversely affect consumer traffic and could have a material adverse effect on our sales and results of operations in a given period.

We are subject to local conditions in the geographic areas in which we are concentrated.

Our performance is subject to local economic, competitive and other conditions prevailing in geographic areas where we operate.  Since a large portion of our sales is generated in the Southeastern U.S., including Florida, and in Texas, Southern California and Washington, D.C./Baltimore, our results of operations depend substantially on general economic conditions and consumer spending habits in these markets.  In the event that any of these geographic areas experienced a downturn in economic conditions, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, sales and results of operations.

 

Item 1B.  Unresolved Staff Comments.

None.

17


 

 

Item 2.  Properties.

We conduct our retail vehicle operations in two basic formats – production and non-production superstores.  Production superstores are those locations at which vehicle reconditioning is performed.  Production superstores have more service bays and require additional space for work-in-process inventory and, therefore, are generally larger than non-production stores.  In determining whether to construct a production or a non-production superstore on a given site, we take several factors into account, including the anticipated long-term regional reconditioning needs and the available acreage of the sites in that market.  As a result, some superstores that are constructed to accommodate reconditioning activities may initially be operated as non-production superstores until we expand our presence in that market.  As of February 28, 2014, we operated 73 production superstores and 58 non-production superstores. 

As of February 28, 2014, we operated 60 wholesale auctions, most of which were located at production superstores.  Stores at which auctions are conducted generally have additional space to store wholesale inventory.  As of February 28, 2014, we also operated one new car store, which was located adjacent to our used car superstore in Laurel, Maryland.  Our remaining three new car franchises are operated as part of our used car superstores.

Production superstores are generally on 10 to 25 acres, but a few range from 20 to 35 acres, and non-production superstores are generally on 4 to 12 acres.

Used Car Superstores as of February 28, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alabama

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arizona

 

 

 

 

 

 

California

18 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Colorado

 

 

 

 

 

 

Connecticut

 

 

 

 

 

 

Delaware

 

 

 

 

 

 

Florida

13 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Georgia

 

 

 

 

 

 

Illinois

 

 

 

 

 

 

Iowa

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indiana

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kansas

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kentucky

 

 

 

 

 

 

Louisiana

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maryland

 

 

 

 

 

 

Massachusetts

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mississippi

 

 

 

 

 

 

Missouri

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nebraska

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nevada

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Mexico

 

 

 

 

 

 

North Carolina

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ohio

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oklahoma

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pennsylvania

 

 

 

 

 

 

South Carolina

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tennessee

 

 

 

 

 

 

Texas

13 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Utah

 

 

 

 

 

 

Virginia

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wisconsin

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

131 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18


 

 

As of February 28, 2014, we leased 57 of our 131 used car superstores, our new car store and our CAF office building in Atlanta, Georgia.  We owned the remaining 74 stores currently in operation.  We also owned our home office building in Richmond, Virginia, and land associated with planned future store openings. 

Expansion

Since opening our first used car superstore in 1993, we have grown organically, through the construction and opening of company-operated stores.  We do not franchise our operations.  As of February 28, 2014, we operated 131 used car superstores in 64 U.S. markets, which represented approximately 57% of the U.S. population.  We believe that further geographic expansion and additional fill-in opportunities in existing markets will provide a foundation for future sales and earnings growth.

In December 2008, we temporarily suspended store growth due to the weak economic and sales environment.  We resumed store growth in fiscal 2011, opening 3 superstores that year, 5 superstores in fiscal 2012, 10 superstores in fiscal 2013 and 13 superstores in fiscal 2014.  We currently plan to open 13 superstores in fiscal 2015 and between 10 and 15 in each of the following two fiscal years.

For additional details on our future expansion plans, see “Fiscal 2014 Planned Superstore Openings,” included in Part II, Item 7, of this Form 10-K.

Item 3.  Legal Proceedings.

On April 2, 2008, Mr. John Fowler filed a putative class action lawsuit against CarMax Auto Superstores California, LLC and CarMax Auto Superstores West Coast, Inc. in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles.  Subsequently, two other lawsuits, Leena Areso et al. v.  CarMax Auto Superstores California, LLC and Justin Weaver v. CarMax Auto Superstores California, LLC, were consolidated as part of the Fowler case.  The allegations in the consolidated case involved: (1) failure to provide meal and rest breaks or compensation in lieu thereof; (2) failure to pay wages of terminated or resigned employees related to meal and rest breaks and overtime; (3) failure to pay overtime; (4) failure to comply with itemized employee wage statement provisions; (5) unfair competition; and (6) California’s Labor Code Private Attorney General Act.  The putative class consisted of sales consultants, sales managers, and other hourly employees who worked for the company in California from April 2, 2004, to the present.  On May 12, 2009, the court dismissed all of the class claims with respect to the sales manager putative class.  On June 16, 2009, the court dismissed all claims related to the failure to comply with the itemized employee wage statement provisions.  The court also granted CarMax's motion for summary adjudication with regard to CarMax's alleged failure to pay overtime to the sales consultant putative class.  The plaintiffs appealed the court's ruling regarding the sales consultant overtime claim.  On May 20, 2011, the California Court of Appeal affirmed the ruling in favor of CarMax.  The plaintiffs filed a Petition of Review with the California Supreme Court, which was denied.  As a result, the plaintiffs’ overtime claims are no longer a part of the lawsuit.

The claims currently remaining in the lawsuit regarding the sales consultant putative class are: (1) failure to provide meal and rest breaks or compensation in lieu thereof; (2) failure to pay wages of terminated or resigned employees related to meal and rest breaks; (3) unfair competition; and (4) California’s Labor Code Private Attorney General Act.  On June 16, 2009, the court entered a stay of these claims pending the outcome of a California Supreme Court case involving unrelated third parties but related legal issues.  Subsequently, CarMax moved to lift the stay and compel the plaintiffs’ remaining claims into arbitration on an individual basis, which the court granted on November 21, 2011.  The plaintiffs appealed the court’s ruling to the California Court of Appeal.  On March 26, 2013, the California Court of Appeal reversed the trial court’s order granting CarMax’s motion to compel arbitration.  On October 8, 2013, CarMax filed a petition for a writ of certiorari seeking review in the United States Supreme Court. On February 24, 2014, the United States Supreme Court granted CarMax's petition for certiorari, vacated the California Court of Appeal decision and remanded the case to the California Court of Appeal for further consideration. The Fowler lawsuit seeks compensatory and special damages, wages, interest, civil and statutory penalties, restitution, injunctive relief and the recovery of attorneys’ fees.  We are unable to make a reasonable estimate of the amount or range of loss that could result from an unfavorable outcome in these matters.

The Company is a class member in a consolidated and settled class action lawsuit (In Re Toyota Motor Corp. Unintended Acceleration Marketing, Sales Practices, and Products Liability Litig., Case No. 10-2151 (C.D. Cal.), consolidated as of April 9, 2010) against Toyota Motor Corp. and Toyota Motor Sales, USA, Inc. (collectively, “Toyota”) related to the economic loss associated with certain Toyota vehicles equipped with electronic throttle controls systems and the potential unintended acceleration of these vehicles. On April 3, 2014, the claims administrator in this matter provided notice to the Company that the Company may recover approximately $20 million (net of attorney’s fees and expenses) as its share of the settlement proceeds in the third calendar quarter of

19


 

 

2014. The estimated recovery: (1) may be reduced to the extent that the total claims made exceed the settlement pool; (2) is subject to final approval of supporting documentation; and (3) remains subject to the entry of a final approval order from the district court judge. We will recognize these proceeds when funds are received from the claims administrator.

 

We are involved in various other legal proceedings in the normal course of business.  Based upon our evaluation of information currently available, we believe that the ultimate resolution of any such proceedings will not have a material adverse effect, either individually or in the aggregate, on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

 

Item 4.  Mine Safety Disclosures.

None.

20


 

 

PART II

Item 5.  Market for the Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

Our common stock is listed and traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol KMX.  We are authorized to issue up to 350,000,000 shares of common stock and up to 20,000,000 shares of preferred stock.  As of February 28, 2014, there were 221,685,984 shares of CarMax common stock outstanding and we had approximately 4,200 shareholders of record.  As of that date, there were no preferred shares outstanding.

The following table presents the quarterly high and low sales prices per share for our common stock for each quarter during the last two fiscal years, as reported on the New York Stock Exchange composite tape.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1st Quarter

 

2nd Quarter

 

3rd Quarter

 

4th Quarter

 

 

Fiscal 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

High

 

$

48.86 

 

$

50.00 

 

$

52.47 

 

$

53.08 

 

 

Low

 

$

38.13 

 

$

42.21 

 

$

45.91 

 

$

43.90 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiscal 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

High

 

$

35.17 

 

$

30.68 

 

$

36.55 

 

$

40.22 

 

 

Low

 

$

27.28 

 

$

24.83 

 

$

28.04 

 

$

34.21 

 

 

 

To date, we have not paid a cash dividend on CarMax common stock.

During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014, we sold no CarMax equity securities that were not registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

The following table provides information relating to the company’s repurchase of common stock during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014.  The table does not include transactions related to employee equity awards or the exercises of employee stock options.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approximate

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dollar Value

 

 

 

 

Total Number

 

of Shares that

 

Total Number

Average

of Shares Purchased

 

May Yet Be

 

of Shares

Price Paid

as Part of Publicly

 

Purchased Under

Period

Purchased

per Share

Announced Programs

 

 

the Programs (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 1-31, 2013

255,300 

$

47.26 
255,300 

 

$

387,934,741 

January 1-31, 2014

1,327,815 

$

45.15 
1,327,815 

 

$

327,983,025 

February 1-28, 2014

971,110 

$

47.28 
971,110 

 

$

282,073,267 

Total

2,554,225 

 

 

2,554,225 

 

 

 

 

(1)

In fiscal 2013, our board of directors authorized the repurchase of up to $800 million of our common stock, of which approximately $282 million remained outstanding as of February 28, 2014. Subsequent to the end of fiscal 2014, in March 2014, our board of directors authorized the repurchase of up to an additional $1.0 billion of our common stock through December 31, 2015. 

21


 

 

Performance Graph

The following graph compares the cumulative total shareholder return (stock price appreciation plus dividends, as applicable) on our common stock for the last five fiscal years with the cumulative total return of the S&P 500 Index and the S&P 500 Retailing Index.  The graph assumes an original investment of $100 in CarMax common stock and in each index on February 28, 2009, and the reinvestment of all dividends, as applicable.

Picture 11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As of February 28 or 29

 

 

 

2009

 

 

2010

 

 

2011

 

 

2012

 

 

2013

 

 

2014

 

 

CarMax

 

 

$     100.00

 

 

$     214.10

 

 

$     375.08

 

 

$     325.45

 

 

$   407.32

 

 

$   513.57

 

 

S&P 500 Index

 

 

$     100.00

 

 

$     153.62

 

 

$     188.30

 

 

$     197.94

 

 

$   224.58

 

 

$   281.57

 

 

S&P 500 Retailing Index

 

 

$     100.00

 

 

$     170.19

 

 

$     209.79

 

 

$     240.83

 

 

$   296.17

 

 

$   397.86

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22


 

 

Item 6.  Selected Financial Data.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Dollars and shares in millions, except per share)

 

FY14

 

FY13

 

FY12

 

FY11 (1)

 

FY10

 

FY09

Income statement information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Used vehicle sales

$

10,306.3 

$

8,747.0 

$

7,826.9 

$

7,210.0 

$

6,192.3 

$

5,690.7 

New vehicle sales

 

212.0 

 

207.7 

 

200.6 

 

198.5 

 

186.5 

 

261.9 

Wholesale vehicle sales

 

1,823.4 

 

1,759.6 

 

1,721.6 

 

1,301.7 

 

844.9 

 

779.8 

Other sales and revenues

 

232.6 

 

248.6 

 

254.5 

 

265.3 

 

246.6 

 

241.6 

Net sales and operating revenues

 

12,574.3 

 

10,962.8 

 

10,003.6 

 

8,975.6 

 

7,470.2 

 

6,974.0 

Gross profit

 

1,648.7 

 

1,464.4 

 

1,378.8 

 

1,301.2 

 

1,098.9 

 

968.2 

CarMax Auto Finance income

 

336.2 

 

299.3 

 

262.2 

 

220.0 

 

175.2 

 

15.3 

SG&A 

 

1,155.2 

 

1,031.0 

 

940.8 

 

878.8 

 

792.2 

 

856.1 

Interest expense

 

30.8 

 

32.4 

 

33.7 

 

34.7 

 

36.0 

 

38.6 

Earnings before income taxes

 

797.3 

 

701.4 

 

666.9 

 

608.2 

 

446.5 

 

90.5 

Income tax provision

 

304.7 

 

267.1 

 

253.1 

 

230.7 

 

168.6 

 

35.2 

Net earnings

 

492.6 

 

434.3 

 

413.8 

 

377.5 

 

277.8 

 

55.2 

Share and per share information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average diluted shares outstanding

 

227.6 

 

231.8 

 

230.7 

 

227.6 

 

222.2 

 

219.4 

Diluted net earnings per share

$

2.16 

$

1.87 

$

1.79 

$

1.65 

$

1.24 

$

0.25 

Balance sheet information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total current assets

$

2,643.2 

$

2,310.1 

$

1,853.4 

$

1,410.1 

$

1,556.4 

$

1,287.8 

Auto loan receivables, net

 

7,147.8 

 

5,895.9 

 

4,959.8 

 

4,320.6 

 

 ―

 

 ―

Total assets

 

11,707.2 

 

9,888.6 

 

8,331.5 

 

7,125.5 

 

2,856.4 

 

2,693.6 

Total current liabilities

 

875.5 

 

684.2 

 

646.3 

 

522.7 

 

490.5 

 

502.7 

Short-term debt and current portion:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-recourse notes payable

 

223.9 

 

182.9 

 

174.3 

 

132.5 

 

 ―

 

 ―

Other

 

19.0 

 

16.5 

 

15.1 

 

13.6 

 

133.6 

 

168.2 

Non-current debt:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-recourse notes payable

 

7,024.5 

 

5,672.2 

 

4,509.8 

 

3,881.1 

 

 ―

 

 ―

Other

 

315.9 

 

337.5 

 

353.6 

 

367.6 

 

378.5 

 

539.6 

Total shareholders’ equity

 

3,317.0 

 

3,019.2 

 

2,673.1 

 

2,239.2 

 

1,884.6 

 

1,547.9 

Unit sales information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Used vehicle units sold

 

526,929 

 

447,728 

 

408,080 

 

396,181 

 

357,129 

 

345,465 

Wholesale vehicle units sold

 

342,576 

 

324,779 

 

316,649 

 

263,061 

 

197,382 

 

194,081 

Percent changes in

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comparable store used vehicle unit sales

 

12 

 

 

 

10 

 

 

(16)

Total used vehicle unit sales

 

18 

 

10 

 

 

11 

 

 

(8)

Wholesale vehicle unit sales

 

 

 

20 

 

33 

 

 

(13)

Net sales and operating revenues

 

15 

 

10 

 

11 

 

20 

 

 

(15)

Net earnings

 

13 

 

 

10 

 

36 

 

403 

 

(69)

Diluted net earnings per share

 

16 

 

 

 

33 

 

396 

 

(69)

Other year-end information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Used car superstores

 

131 

 

118 

 

108 

 

103 

 

100 

 

100 

Associates

 

20,171 

 

18,111 

 

16,460 

 

15,565 

 

13,439 

 

13,035 

 

 

 

(1)Reflects the adoption in fiscal 2011 of ASU Nos. 2009-16 and 2009-17 effective March 1, 2010, to recognize the transfers of auto loan receivables and the related non-recourse notes payable on our consolidated balance sheets.

 

 

 

 

 

23


 

 

Item 7.  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

The following Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (“MD&A”) is provided as a supplement to, and should be read in conjunction with, our audited consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes presented in Item 8, Consolidated Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.  Note references are to the notes to consolidated financial statements included in Item 8.  Certain prior year amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current year’s presentation.  All references to net earnings per share are to diluted net earnings per share.  Amounts and percentages may not total due to rounding.

BUSINESS OVERVIEW

General

CarMax is the nation’s largest retailer of used vehicles.  We operate in two reportable segments:  CarMax Sales Operations and CarMax Auto Finance (“CAF”).  Our CarMax Sales Operations segment consists of all aspects of our auto merchandising and service operations, excluding financing provided by CAF.  Our CAF segment consists solely of our own finance operation that provides vehicle financing through CarMax superstores.

We pioneered the used car superstore concept, opening our first store in 1993.  Our strategy is to revolutionize the auto retailing market by addressing the major sources of customer dissatisfaction with traditional auto retailers and to maximize operating efficiencies through the use of standardized operating procedures and store formats enhanced by sophisticated, proprietary management information systems.  As of February 28, 2014, we operated 131 used car superstores in 64 markets, comprising 46 mid-sized markets, 15 large markets and 3 small markets.  We define mid-sized markets as those with television viewing populations generally between 600,000 and 2.5 million people.  We also operated four new car franchises.  During fiscal 2014, we sold 526,929 used cars, representing 99% of the total 534,690  vehicles we sold at retail.

We believe the CarMax consumer offer is distinctive within the auto retailing marketplace.  Our offer provides customers the opportunity to shop for vehicles the same way they shop for items at other big box retailers.  Our consumer offer features low, no-haggle prices; a broad selection of CarMax Quality Certified used vehicles; and superior customer service.  Our website, carmax.com, and related mobile apps are valuable tools for communicating the CarMax consumer offer, as well as sophisticated search engines and efficient channels for customers who prefer to start their shopping online.  Our financial results are driven by retailing used vehicles and associated items including vehicle financing, extended service plans (“ESPs”), a guaranteed asset protection (“GAP”) product and vehicle repair service.  GAP is designed to cover the unpaid balance on an auto loan in the event of a total loss of the vehicle or unrecovered theft.

We seek to build customer satisfaction by offering high-quality vehicles.  Fewer than half of the vehicles acquired from consumers through the appraisal purchase process meet our standards for reconditioning and subsequent retail sale.  Those vehicles that do not meet our standards are sold through on-site wholesale auctions. Vehicles repossessed and liquidated by CAF are also generally sold through our wholesale auctions. Wholesale auctions are generally held on a weekly or bi-weekly basis, and as of February 28, 2014, we conducted auctions at 60 used car superstores.  During fiscal 2014, we sold 342,576 wholesale vehicles.  On average, the vehicles we wholesale are approximately 10 years old and have more than 100,000 miles.  Participation in our wholesale auctions is restricted to licensed automobile dealers, the majority of whom are independent dealers and licensed wholesalers.

We sell ESPs and GAP on behalf of unrelated third parties who are the primary obligors.  As of February 28, 2014, the used vehicle third-party ESP providers were CNA National Warranty Corporation and The Warranty Group, and the third-party GAP provider was Safe-Guard Products International, LLC.  ESP revenue represents commissions earned on the sale of ESPs and GAP from the unrelated third parties.

We provide financing to qualified retail customers through CAF and our arrangements with several industry-leading financial institutions.  As of February 28, 2014, these third parties included Santander Consumer USA, Wells Fargo Dealer Services, Capital One Auto Finance, American Credit Acceptance, Westlake Financial Services and Exeter Finance Corp.  Depending on the credit profile of the customer, the third-party finance providers generally either pay us or are paid a fixed, pre-negotiated fee per contract.  The fee amount is independent of any finance term offered to the customer; it does not vary based on the amount financed, the term of the loan, the interest rate or the loan-to-value ratio.  We refer to the third-party providers who pay us a fee as prime and nonprime providers, and we refer to the providers to whom we pay a fee as subprime providers.  We have no recourse liability for credit losses on retail installment contracts arranged with third-party providers.

24


 

 

We offer financing through CAF to qualified customers purchasing vehicles at CarMax.  CAF utilizes proprietary customized scoring models based upon the credit history of the customer, along with CAF’s historical experience, to predict the likelihood of customer repayment.  CAF offers customers an array of competitive rates and terms, allowing them to choose the ones that best fit their needs.  In addition, customers are permitted to refinance or pay off their contract with CAF or a third-party provider within three business days of a purchase without incurring any finance or related charges.  We randomly test different credit offers and closely monitor acceptance rates, 3-day payoffs and the effect on sales to assess market competitiveness.  After the effect of 3-day payoffs and vehicle returns, CAF financed 41% of our retail vehicle unit sales in fiscal 2014.  As of February 28, 2014, CAF serviced approximately 532,000 customer accounts in its $7.18 billion portfolio of managed receivables.

Over the long term, we believe the primary driver for earnings growth will be vehicle unit sales growth from both new stores and stores included in our comparable store base.  We also believe that increased used vehicle unit sales will drive increased sales of wholesale vehicles and ancillary products and, over time, increased CAF income.  We target a dollar range of gross profit per used unit sold.  The gross profit dollar target for an individual vehicle is based on a variety of factors, including its probability of sale and its mileage relative to its age; however, it is not primarily based on the vehicle’s selling price

In December 2008, we temporarily suspended store growth due to the weak economic and sales environment.  We resumed store growth in fiscal 2011, opening 3 superstores in that year, 5 superstores in fiscal 2012, 10 superstores in fiscal 2013 and 13 superstores in fiscal 2014.  We currently plan to open 13 superstores in fiscal 2015 and between 10 and 15 superstores in each of the following two fiscal yearsWhile we currently have more than 130 superstores, we are still in the midst of the national rollout of our retail concept, and as of February 28, 2014, we had used car superstores located in markets that comprised approximately 57% of the U.S. population.

The principal challenges we face in expanding our store base include our ability to hire qualified associates and build our management bench strength to support our store growth, and our ability to procure suitable real estate at favorable terms.  We staff each newly opened store with associates who have extensive CarMax trainingTherefore, we must recruit, train and develop managers and associates to fill the pipeline necessary to support future store openings.

Fiscal 2014 Highlights

·

Net sales and operating revenues increased 15% to $12.57 billion from $10.96 billion in fiscal 2013.  Net earnings grew 13% to $492.6 million from $434.3 million in fiscal 2013, while net earnings per diluted share grew 16% to $2.16, compared with $1.87 in the prior year.

·

Used vehicle revenues increased 18% to $10.31 billion versus $8.75 billion in fiscal 2013Used vehicle unit sales rose 18%, reflecting the combination of a 12% increase in comparable store used unit sales and sales from newer stores not yet included in the comparable store base. 

·

Wholesale vehicle revenues increased 4% to $1.82 billion versus $1.76 billion in fiscal 2013.  Wholesale vehicle unit sales increased 5%, primarily due to the growth in our store base.

·

Other sales and revenues declined 6% to $232.6 million from $248.6 million in fiscal 2013, reflecting a reduction in net third-party finance fees and only modest growth in ESP revenue.  During fiscal 2014, we corrected our accounting related to cancellation reserves for ESP and GAP, with resulting increases in reserves related to activity for fiscal 2014, fiscal 2013, and fiscal 2012.  The increase in the cancellation reserves largely offset the growth in ESP revenues resulting from our increase in used unit sales and a higher ESP penetration rate. 

·

Total gross profit increased 13% to $1.65 billion compared with $1.46 billion in fiscal 2013, primarily reflecting the increased sales of used vehicles

·

Selling, general and administrative (“SG&A”) expenses rose 12% to $1.16 billion from $1.03 billion in fiscal 2013.  The increase reflected the 11%  increase in our store base during fiscal 2014 (representing the addition of 13 stores) and higher variable selling costs resulting from the 12% increase in comparable store used unit sales.  SG&A per retail unit declined $102 to $2,161 versus $2,263 in fiscal 2013, as our comparable store used unit sales growth generated overhead leverage.

·

CAF income increased 12% to $336.2 million compared with $299.3 million in fiscal 2013.  The improvement resulted from a 23% increase in average managed receivables, partially offset by a lower total interest margin rate, which declined to 6.9% of average managed receivables from 7.4% in fiscal 2013.  The allowance for loan losses as a percent of ending managed receivables remained consistent at 0.97% as of the end of both fiscal 2014 and fiscal 2013. 

·

Net cash used in operating activities totaled $613.2 million in fiscal 2014 compared with $778.4 million in fiscal 2013.  These amounts included increases in auto loan receivables of $1.32 billion and $992.2 million,

25


 

 

respectively.  The majority of the increases in auto loan receivables are accompanied by increases in non-recourse notes payable, which are reflected as cash provided by financing activities.  Excluding the increases in auto loan receivables, net cash provided by operating activities would have been $711.0 million in fiscal 2014 versus $213.8 million in fiscal 2013, with the increase primarily driven by changes in inventory, accounts payable and net income.

 

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Our results of operations and financial condition as reflected in the consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.  Preparation of financial statements requires management to make estimates and assumptions affecting the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues, expenses and the disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities.  We use our historical experience and other relevant factors when developing our estimates and assumptions.  We regularly evaluate these estimates and assumptions.  Note 2 includes a discussion of significant accounting policies.  The accounting policies discussed below are the ones we consider critical to an understanding of our consolidated financial statements because their application places the most significant demands on our judgment.  Our financial results might have been different if different assumptions had been used or other conditions had prevailed.

Financing and Securitization Transactions

We maintain a revolving securitization program composed of two warehouse facilities (“warehouse facilities”) that we use to fund auto loan receivables originated by CAF until we elect to fund them through a term securitization or alternative funding arrangement.  We recognize transfers of auto loan receivables into the warehouse facilities and term securitizations as secured borrowings, which result in recording the auto loan receivables and the related non-recourse notes payable on our consolidated balance sheets.  CAF income included in the consolidated statements of earnings primarily reflects the interest and fee income generated by the auto loan receivables less the interest expense associated with the debt issued to fund these receivables, a provision for estimated loan losses and direct CAF expenses.

Auto loan receivables include amounts due from customers related to retail vehicle sales financed through CAF.  The receivables are presented net of an allowance for estimated loan losses.  The allowance for loan losses represents an estimate of the amount of net losses inherent in our portfolio of managed receivables as of the applicable reporting date and anticipated to occur during the following 12 months.  The allowance is primarily based on the credit quality of the underlying receivables, historical loss trends and forecasted forward loss curves.  We also take into account recent trends in delinquencies and losses, recovery rates and the economic environment.  The provision for loan losses is the periodic expense of maintaining an adequate allowance.

See Notes 2(F), 2(I) and 4 for additional information on securitizations and auto loan receivables.

Revenue Recognition

We recognize revenue when the earnings process is complete, generally either at the time of sale to a customer or upon delivery to a customer.  As part of our customer service strategy, we guarantee the retail vehicles we sell with a 5‑day, money-back guarantee.  We record a reserve for estimated returns based on historical experience and trends, and results could be affected if future vehicle returns differ from historical averages.

We also sell ESPs and GAP on behalf of unrelated third parties, who are the primary obligors, to customers who purchase a vehicle.  The ESPs we offer on all used vehicles provide coverage up to 72 months (subject to mileage limitations), while GAP covers the customer for the term of their finance contract.  We recognize commission revenue at the time of sale, net of a reserve for estimated customer cancellations. Periodically, we may receive additional commissions based upon the level of underwriting profits of the third parties who administer the products.  These additional commissions are recognized as revenue when received.  The reserve for cancellations is evaluated for each product, and is based on forecasted forward cancellation curves utilizing historical experience, recent trends and credit mix of the customer base.  Our risk related to customer cancellations is limited to the commissions that we receive.  Cancellations fluctuate depending on the volume of ESP and GAP sales, customer financing default or prepayment rates, and shifts in customer behavior related to changes in the coverage or term of the product.  Results could be affected if actual events differ from our estimates. A 10% change in the estimated cancellation rates would have changed cancellation reserves by approximately $7.2 million as of February 28, 2014.  See Note 8 for additional information on cancellation reserves.

Customers applying for financing who are not approved by CAF may be evaluated by other financial institutions.  Depending on the credit profile of the customer, third-party finance providers generally either pay us or are paid a fixed, pre-negotiated fee per contract.  We recognize these fees at the time of sale.

26


 

 

We collect sales taxes and other taxes from customers on behalf of governmental authorities at the time of sale.  These taxes are accounted for on a net basis and are not included in net sales and operating revenues or cost of sales.

Income Taxes

Estimates and judgments are used in the calculation of certain tax liabilities and in the determination of the recoverability of certain deferred tax assets.  In the ordinary course of business, transactions occur for which the ultimate tax outcome is uncertain at the time of the transactions.  We adjust our income tax provision in the period in which we determine that it is probable that our actual results will differ from our estimates.  Tax law and rate changes are reflected in the income tax provision in the period in which such changes are enactedSee Note 9 for additional information on income taxes.

We evaluate the need to record valuation allowances that would reduce deferred tax assets to the amount that will more likely than not be realized.  When assessing the need for valuation allowances, we consider available carrybacks, future reversals of existing temporary differences and future taxable income.  Except for a valuation allowance recorded for capital loss carryforwards that may not be utilized before their expiration, we believe that our recorded deferred tax assets as of February 28, 2014, will more likely than not be realized.  However, if a change in circumstances results in a change in our ability to realize our deferred tax assets, our tax provision would be affected in the period when the change in circumstances occurs.

In addition, the calculation of our tax liabilities involves dealing with uncertainties in the application of complex tax regulations.  We recognize potential liabilities for anticipated tax audit issues in the U.S. and other tax jurisdictions based on our estimate of whether, and the extent to which, additional taxes will be due.  If payments of these amounts ultimately prove to be unnecessary, the reversal of the liabilities would result in tax benefits being recognized in the period when we determine the liabilities are no longer necessary.  If our estimate of tax liabilities proves to be less than the ultimate assessment, a further charge to expense would result in the period of determination.

 

RESULTS OF OPERATIONSCARMAX SALES OPERATIONS

 

Net Sales and Operating Revenues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Years Ended February 28 or 29

(In millions)

 

2014

Change

2013

Change

 

2012

Used vehicle sales

 

$

10,306.3 

 

17.8 

%

$

8,747.0 

 

11.8 

%

 

$

7,826.9 

 

New vehicle sales

 

 

212.0 

 

2.1 

%

 

207.7 

 

3.6 

%

 

 

200.6 

 

Wholesale vehicle sales

 

 

1,823.4 

 

3.6 

%

 

1,759.6 

 

2.2 

%

 

 

1,721.6 

 

Other sales and revenues:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Extended service plan revenues

 

 

208.9 

 

3.0 

%

 

202.9 

 

13.0 

%

 

 

179.6 

 

Service department sales

 

 

106.4 

 

4.6 

%

 

101.8 

 

3.2 

%

 

 

98.6 

 

Third-party finance fees, net

 

 

(82.8)

 

(47.6)

%

 

(56.1)

 

(136.0)

%

 

 

(23.8)

 

Total other sales and revenues

 

 

232.6 

 

(6.4)

%

 

248.6 

 

(2.3)

%

 

 

254.5 

 

Total net sales and operating revenues

 

$

12,574.3 

 

14.7 

%

$

10,962.8 

 

9.6 

%

 

$

10,003.6 

 

 

 

Unit Sales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Years Ended February 28 or 29

 

 

2014

2013

2012

Used vehicles

 

 

526,929 

 

 

447,728 

 

 

408,080 

 

New vehicles

 

 

7,761 

 

 

7,855 

 

 

7,679 

 

Wholesale vehicles

 

 

342,576 

 

 

324,779 

 

 

316,649 

 

 

Average Selling Prices

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Years Ended February 28 or 29

 

 

2014

2013

2012

Used vehicles

 

$

19,408 

 

$

19,351 

 

$

18,995 

 

New vehicles

 

$

27,205 

 

$

26,316 

 

$

25,986 

 

Wholesale vehicles

 

$

5,160 

 

$

5,268 

 

$

5,291 

 

27


 

 

 

 

Used Vehicle Sales Changes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Years Ended February 28 or 29

 

 

 

2014

2013

2012

Used vehicle units

 

 

 

18 

%

 

10 

%

 

%

Used vehicle dollars

 

 

 

18 

%

 

12 

%

 

%

 

Comparable store used unit sales growth is one of the key drivers of our profitability.  A store is included in comparable store retail sales in the store’s fourteenth full month of operation.

 

Comparable Store Used Vehicle Sales Changes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Years Ended February 28 or 29

 

 

 

2014

2013

2012

Used vehicle units

 

 

 

12 

%

 

%

 

%

Used vehicle dollars

 

 

 

12 

%

 

%

 

%

 

Wholesale Vehicle Sales Changes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Years Ended February 28 or 29

 

 

 

2014

2013

2012

Wholesale vehicle units

 

 

 

%

 

%

 

20 

%

Wholesale vehicle dollars

 

 

 

%

 

%

 

32 

%

 

Change in Used Car Superstore Base

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Years Ended February 28 or 29

 

 

 

2014

2013

2012

Used car superstores, beginning of period

 

 

 

118 

 

 

108 

 

 

103 

 

Superstore openings

 

 

 

13 

 

 

10 

 

 

 

Used car superstores, end of period

 

 

 

131 

 

 

118 

 

 

108 

 

 

Used Vehicle Sales

Fiscal 2014 Versus Fiscal 2013.  The 18% increase in used vehicle revenues in fiscal 2014 resulted from a corresponding increase in used unit sales.  The increase in unit sales included a 12% increase in comparable store used unit sales and sales from newer stores not yet included in the comparable store base.  The comparable store used unit growth was primarily driven by improved conversion, as well as a modest increase in store traffic.  We believe the strong conversion reflected continued improvements in execution in our stores and the attractive credit environment experienced during fiscal 2014. 

Our data indicates that in our markets, we increased our share of the 0- to 10-year old used vehicle market by approximately 16% in fiscal 2014.  We believe our ability to grow market share year after year is a reflection of the strength of our consumer offer, the skill of our associates and the preference for our brand.

Fiscal 2013 Versus Fiscal 2012.  The 12% increase in used vehicle revenues in fiscal 2013 resulted from a 10% increase in used unit sales and a 2% increase in average retail selling price.  The increase in used unit sales included a 5% increase in comparable store used unit sales and sales from newer stores not yet included in the comparable store base.  The comparable store unit growth was driven by improved conversion, which we believe benefited from a variety of factors, including more compelling credit offers from third-party finance providers and CAF, increased inventory selection and continued strong in-store execution. 

The increase in average retail selling price primarily reflected changes in our sales mix by vehicle age, with an increased mix of ages 0-2 vehicles and a reduced mix of ages 3-4 vehicles, which corresponds to the model years in shortest supply.  The overall supply of late-model used vehicles being remarketed has been constrained following four years of new car industry sales at rates significantly below pre-recession levels.  During much of the period from 2009 through 2011, wholesale vehicle industry values rose, which increased our vehicle acquisition costs and average selling prices compared with pre-recession periods.  We believe the constrained supply of late-model used vehicles and the resulting increase in

28


 

 

selling prices had an adverse effect on our used vehicle sales in recent years.  As new car industry sales return to historical levels, the supply of late-model used vehicles should gradually improve, which we believe will benefit our business.

Our data indicated that in our markets, we increased our share of the 0- to 10-year old used vehicle market by approximately 7% in fiscal 2013. 

Wholesale Vehicle Sales

Our wholesale auction prices usually reflect the trends in the general wholesale market for the types of vehicles we sell, although they can also be affected by changes in vehicle mix or the average age, mileage or condition of the vehicles bought through our appraisal process and sold in our auctions.

Fiscal 2014 Versus Fiscal 2013.  The 4% increase in wholesale vehicle revenues in fiscal 2014 resulted from a 5% increase in wholesale unit sales, partially offset by a 2% reduction in average wholesale vehicle selling price.  The wholesale unit growth primarily reflected the growth in our store base, as well as an increase in the appraisal buy rate.  However, we experienced a reduced mix of wholesale vehicles in our appraisal traffic that partially offset the benefit of our store growth and increased buy rate.

Fiscal 2013 Versus Fiscal 2012.  The 2% increase in wholesale vehicle revenues in fiscal 2013 resulted from a 3% increase in wholesale unit sales offset by a slight reduction in average wholesale vehicle selling price.  The wholesale unit growth included the combined effects of the growth in our store base and higher appraisal traffic, offset by a lower appraisal buy rate.  The modest growth in wholesale unit sales also reflected the challenging comparisons with fiscal 2012 and fiscal 2011, when wholesale unit sales grew 20% and 33%, respectively. 

Other Sales and Revenues

Other sales and revenues include commissions on the sale of ESPs and GAP (collectively reported in ESP revenues, net of a reserve for estimated customer cancellations), service department sales and net third-party finance fees.  The fixed, per-vehicle fees paid to us by prime and nonprime third-party finance providers may vary, reflecting the providers’ differing levels of credit risk exposure.  The fixed, per-vehicle fees that we pay to the subprime providers are reflected as an offset to finance fee revenues received from prime and nonprime providers.  In previous years, the percentage of our retail unit sales financed by subprime providers excluded sales associated with a third-party referral program.  These sales are now included in this percentage for current and prior periods.

Fiscal 2014 Versus Fiscal 2013.  Other sales and revenues declined 6% in fiscal 2014, reflecting a reduction in net third-party finance fees and only modest growth in ESP revenue.  The decrease in net third-party finance fees was driven by a mix shift among providers, including an increase in the percentage of our retail unit sales financed by the subprime providers to 19% in fiscal 2014 versus 16% in fiscal 2013.  Throughout fiscal 2013 and for most of fiscal 2014, the volume and share of financing originated by the third-party subprime providers increased on a year-over-year basis, as these providers made more attractive offers to customers.  In the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014, however, the subprime providers moderated their credit offerings, and as a result, their share of financings for the fourth quarter was flat with fiscal 2013. 

During fiscal 2014, we corrected our accounting related to cancellation reserves for ESP and GAP, with resulting increases in reserves related to activity for fiscal 2014, fiscal 2013, and fiscal 2012.  The portion of the increase in reserves related to prior fiscal years totaled $19.5 million.  The effect of the increase in the cancellation reserves largely offset the growth in ESP revenues resulting from our increase in used unit sales and a higher ESP penetration rate.

 

Fiscal 2013 Versus Fiscal 2012.  Other sales and revenues declined 2% in fiscal 2013, as an increase in ESP revenues was more than offset by a decrease in net third-party finance fees.  ESP revenues increased 13%, primarily reflecting the growth in our retail vehicle unit sales and an increase in ESP penetration.  The decrease in net third-party finance fees was driven by a mix shift among providers, including an increase in the percentage of our retail unit sales financed by the subprime providers to 16% in fiscal 2013 versus 10% in fiscal 2012.  The growth in the subprime sales mix primarily resulted from more compelling credit offers being made by the subprime providers. 

 

29


 

 

 

Gross Profit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Years Ended February 28 or 29

(In millions)

2014

 

Change

2013

Change

2012

Used vehicle gross profit

 

$

1,143.9 

 

17.7 

%

$

971.5 

 

9.3 

%

$

888.6 

 

New vehicle gross profit

 

 

4.5 

 

(9.5)

%

 

5.0 

 

(23.8)

%

 

6.5 

 

Wholesale vehicle gross profit

 

 

313.9 

 

1.9 

%

 

308.1 

 

2.1 

%

 

301.8 

 

Other gross profit

 

 

186.5 

 

3.7 

%

 

179.8 

 

(1.2)

%

 

181.9 

 

Total

 

$

1,648.7 

 

12.6 

%

$

1,464.4 

 

6.2 

%

$

1,378.8 

 

 

 

Gross Profit per Unit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Years Ended February 28 or 29

 

2014

 

2013

 

2012

 

$ per unit (1)

%(2)

 

$ per unit (1)

%(2)

 

$ per unit (1)

%(2)

Used vehicle gross profit

$

2,171 

 

11.1 

 

$

2,170 

 

11.1 

 

$

2,177 

 

11.4 

New vehicle gross profit

$

577 

 

2.1 

 

$

630 

 

2.4 

 

$

847 

 

3.2 

Wholesale vehicle gross profit

$

916 

 

17.2 

 

$

949 

 

17.5 

 

$

953 

 

17.5 

Other gross profit

$

349 

 

80.2 

 

$

395 

 

72.3