10-K 1 bwen-20191231x10k.htm 10-K bwen_Current folio_10K

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549


FORM 10-K


(Mark One)

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019

Or

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                          to                        

Commission File Number 001- 34278

 

Picture 2

BROADWIND ENERGY, INC.

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

Delaware
(State of or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)

 

88-0409160
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

3240 S. Central Avenue
Cicero, Illinois
(Address of principal executive offices)

 

60804
(Zip code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12 (g) of the Exchange Act:

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (708) 780-4800

 

 

 

 

Title of Class

Trading Symbol

Name of Exchange on which Registered

Common Stock, $0.001 par value

BWEN

The Nasdaq Capital Market

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ☐    No ☒

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act. Yes ☐    No ☒

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒  No ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to submit such files). Yes ☒  No ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer ☐

Accelerated filer ☐

Non-accelerated filer ☐

Smaller reporting company ☒

Emerging growth company ☐

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period to comply with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company, as defined in Rule 12b‑2 of the Exchange Act. Yes ☐ No ☒

As of June 30, 2019 the aggregate market value of the Registrant’s voting common stock held by non‑affiliates of the Registrant was approximately $26,772,000, based upon the $2.22 per share closing sale price of the Registrant’s common stock as reported on the NASDAQ Capital Market. For purposes of this calculation, the Registrant’s directors and executive officers and holders of 5% or more of the Registrant’s outstanding shares of voting common stock have been assumed to be affiliates, with such affiliates holding an aggregate of 4,104,000 shares of the Registrant’s voting common stock on June 30, 2019.

The number of shares of the Registrant’s common stock, par value $0.001, outstanding as of February 21, 2020,  was 16,556,993.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the Registrant’s Proxy Statement for the Registrant’s 2020 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K.

 

 

BROADWIND ENERGY, INC.

FORM 10‑K

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

Page

PART I 

 

 

 

ITEM 1. 

BUSINESS

 

4

ITEM 1A. 

RISK FACTORS

 

11

ITEM 1B. 

UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

24

ITEM 2. 

PROPERTIES

 

25

ITEM 3. 

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

25

ITEM 4. 

MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

25

PART II 

 

 

 

ITEM 5. 

MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

26

ITEM 6. 

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

27

ITEM 7. 

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

27

ITEM 7A. 

QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

36

ITEM 8. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

36

ITEM 9. 

CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

 

37

ITEM 9A. 

CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

37

ITEM 9B. 

OTHER INFORMATION

 

37

PART III 

 

 

 

ITEM 10. 

DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

38

ITEM 11. 

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

38

ITEM 12. 

SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

 

38

ITEM 13. 

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

 

39

ITEM 14. 

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

 

39

PART IV 

 

 

 

ITEM 15. 

EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

 

40

ITEM 16. 

FORM 10-K SUMMARY

 

40

 

 

2

PART I

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward‑Looking Statements

This Annual Report on Form 10-K (“Annual Report”) contains “forward looking statements”— that is, statements related to future, not past, events—as defined in Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), that reflect our current expectations regarding our future growth, results of operations, financial condition, cash flows, performance, business prospects and opportunities, as well as assumptions made by, and information currently available to, our management. We have tried to identify forward looking statements by using words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “expect,” “intend,” “will,” “should,” “may,” “plan” and similar expressions, but these words are not the exclusive means of identifying forward looking statements. Forward looking statements include any statement that does not directly relate to a current or historical fact. Our forward-looking statements may include or relate to our beliefs, expectations, plans and/or assumptions with respect to the following:  (i) state, local and federal regulatory frameworks affecting the industries in which we compete, including the wind energy industry, and the related extension, continuation or renewal of federal tax incentives and grants and state renewable portfolio standards as well as new or continuing tariffs on steel or other products imported into the United States; (ii) our customer relationships and our substantial dependency on a few significant customers and our efforts to diversify our customer base and sector focus and leverage relationships across business units; (iii) our ability to continue to grow our business organically and through acquisitions; (iv) the production, sales, collections, customer deposits and revenues generated by new customer orders and our ability to realize the resulting cash flows; (v) the sufficiency of our liquidity and alternate sources of funding, if necessary; (vi) our ability to realize revenue from customer orders and backlog; (vii) our ability to operate our business efficiently, comply with our debt obligations, manage capital expenditures and costs effectively, and generate cash flow; (viii) the economy and the potential impact it may have on our business, including our customers; (ix) the state of the wind energy market and other energy and industrial markets generally and the impact of competition and economic volatility in those markets; (x) the effects of market disruptions and regular market volatility, including fluctuations in the price of oil, gas and other commodities;(xi) competition from new or existing industry participants including, in particular, increased competition from foreign tower manufacturers; (xii) the effects of the change of administrations in the U.S. federal government; (xiii) our ability to successfully integrate and operate acquired companies and to identify, negotiate and execute future acquisitions; (xiv) the potential loss of tax benefits if we experience an “ownership change” under Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended;  (xv) the limited trading market for our securities and the volatility of market price for our securities; and (xvi) the impact of future sales of our common stock or securities convertible into our common stock on our stock price. These statements are based on information currently available to us and are subject to various risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause our actual growth, results of operations, financial condition, cash flows, performance, business prospects and opportunities to differ materially from those expressed in, or implied by, these statements. We are under no duty to update any of these statements. You should not consider any list of such factors to be an exhaustive statement of all of the risks, uncertainties or other factors that could cause our current beliefs, expectations, plans and/or assumptions to change. Accordingly, forward-looking statements should not be relied upon as a predictor of actual results.

(Dollar amounts are presented in thousands, except per share data and unless otherwise stated)

3

ITEM 1.  BUSINESS

As used in this Annual Report, the terms “we,” “us,” “our,” “Broadwind” and the “Company” refer to Broadwind Energy, Inc., a Delaware corporation headquartered in Cicero, Illinois, and its wholly‑owned subsidiaries (the “Subsidiaries”). Dollars are presented in thousands unless otherwise stated.

Business Overview

Broadwind is a precision manufacturer of structures, equipment and components for clean tech and other specialized applications.  We provide technologically advanced high value products to customers with complex systems and stringent quality standards that operate in energy, mining and infrastructure sectors, primarily in the United States of America (the “U.S.”). Our capabilities include, but are not limited to the following: heavy fabrications, welding, metal rolling, coatings, gear cutting and shaping, heat treat, assembly, engineering and packaging solutions.

We were incorporated in 1996 in Nevada as Blackfoot Enterprises, Inc., and through a series of subsequent transactions, became Broadwind Energy, Inc., a Delaware corporation, in 2008. Through acquisitions in 2007 and 2008, we focused on expanding upon our core platform as a wind tower manufacturer, established our Gearing segment, and developed and broadened our industrial fabrications capabilities. In early 2017, we acquired Red Wolf Company, LLC (“Red Wolf”), a kitter and assembler of industrial components primarily supporting the global gas turbine market. In early 2020, we rebranded to Broadwind Energy, Inc. doing business as Broadwind, a reflection of our diversification progress to date and our continued strategy to expand our product and customer diversification outside of wind energy.  Effective with this rebranding, we renamed certain segments.  Our Towers and Heavy Fabrications segment was renamed to Heavy Fabrications and our Process Systems segment was renamed to Industrial Solutions.  Our Gearing segment name remained the same.  This Annual Report on Form 10-K incorporates these changes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Segment

   

Heavy Fabrications

   

Gearing

   

Industrial Solutions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Key Markets Served

 

-Wind Power Generation

 

-Onshore & Offshore

 

-Combined Cycle Natural

 

 

-Surface and Underground Mining

 

 Oil and Gas Fracking/Drilling

 

 Gas Power Generation

 

 

-Construction

 

-Surface and Underground Mining

 

-Solar Power Generation

 

 

-Material Handling

 

-Wind Power Generation

 

 

 

 

-Oil and Gas

 

-Steel Production

 

 

 

 

-Infrastructure

 

-Pulp and Paper

 

 

 

 

 

 

-Waste Processing

 

 

 

 

 

 

-Material Handling

 

 

 

 

 

 

-Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Products

 

-Wind Towers

 

-Custom Gearboxes

 

-Supply Chain Solutions

 

 

-Industrial Fabrications

 

-Loose Gearing

 

-Inventory Management

 

 

  Mining Components

 

-Heat Treat Services

 

-Kitting and Assembly

 

 

  Crane Components

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Pressure Vessels

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Other Frames/Structures

 

 

 

 

 

Heavy Fabrications

We provide large, complex and precision fabrications to customers in a broad range of industrial markets.  Our most significant presence is within the U.S. wind energy industry, although we have diversified into other industrial markets in order to improve our capacity utilization, reduce our

4

customer concentration, and reduce our exposure to uncertainty related to governmental policies currently impacting the U.S. wind energy industry. Within the U.S. wind energy industry, we provide steel towers and repowering adapters primarily to wind turbine manufacturers.  Our production facilities, located in Manitowoc, Wisconsin and Abilene, Texas, are situated in close proximity to the primary U.S. domestic wind energy and equipment manufacturing hubs. The two facilities have a combined annual tower production capacity of up to approximately 550 towers (1650 tower sections), sufficient to support turbines generating more than 1,100 MW of power. We have expanded our production capabilities and leveraged our manufacturing competencies, including welding, lifting capacity and stringent quality practices, into aftermarket and original equipment manufacturer (“OEM”) components utilized in surface and underground mining, construction, material handling, oil and gas (“O&G”) and other infrastructure markets.  We manufacture components for buckets, shovels, car bodies, drill masts and other products that support mining and construction markets. In other industrial markets, we provide crane components, pressure vessels, frames and other utility structures. 

Gearing

We provide gearing and gearboxes to a broad set of customers in diverse markets including; onshore and offshore O&G fracking and drilling, surface and underground mining, wind energy, steel, material handling and other industrial markets.  We have manufactured loose gearing, gearboxes and systems, and provided heat treat services for aftermarket and OEM applications for nearly a century.  While a significant portion of our business is manufactured to our customer’s specifications, we employ design and metallurgical engineers, to meet our customer’s stringent quality requirements, to improve product performance, and reliability and to develop custom products that are integrated into our customer’s product offerings. 

Industrial Solutions

We provide supply chain solutions, inventory management, kitting and assembly services, primarily serving the combined cycle natural gas turbine market.  We have recently expanded our market reach into the solar power generation market by leveraging our existing core competencies.  We leverage a global supply chain to provide instrumentation & controls, valve assemblies, sensor devices, fuel system components, electrical junction boxes & wiring, energy storage services and electromechanical devices.  We also provide packaging solutions and fabricate panels and sub-assemblies to reduce our customers’ costs, improve manufacturing velocity and reliability. 

Business and Operating Strategy

We intend to capitalize on the markets for wind energy, gas turbines, O&G, mining, and other industrial verticals in North America by leveraging our core competencies in welding, manufacturing, assembling and kitting. Our strategic objectives include the following:

·

Diversify our customer and product line concentrations.  In 2019, sales derived from our top five customers represented 79% of total sales and sales into the wind energy industry represented 66% of total sales.  This is an improvement as compared to 2016, when our top five customers comprised 91% of total sales and sales in the wind energy industry represented 92% of total sales.  To reduce the concentration of our sales, we have focused our market research activities and our sales force on expanding and diversifying our customer base and product lines. We are leveraging existing customer relationships within each of our segments to cross sell our broad portfolio of capabilities.  We have introduced a new product development process, a stage gate model, which provides a framework for evaluating opportunities and

5

commercialization. Additionally, we have adopted new customer and product revenues as metrics within our variable executive compensation programs.

·

Improve capacity utilization and broaden our manufacturing capabilities.  We have manufacturing capacity available that could support a significant increase in our annual revenues for heavy fabrications, gearing and industrial solutions. We are working to improve our capacity utilization and financial results by leveraging our existing manufacturing capacity and adjusting capacity where we can, in response to changing market conditions. In our Heavy Fabrications segment, we are expanding production capabilities and leveraging our fabrication competencies to support growth in mining, material handling, and other industrial markets.

·

Improve production technology and operational efficiency.  We believe that the proper coordination and integration of the supply chain, consistent use of systems to manage our production activities and “Continuous Improvement” initiatives are key factors that enable high operating efficiencies, increased reliability, better delivery and lower costs. We have introduced robust Advanced Product Quality Processes (APQP) to support the introduction of new products. We have developed better supply chain expertise, worked with lean enterprise resources, upgraded and improved systems utilization and invested capital to  enhance our operational efficiency and flexibility. We have implemented scheduling software and have expanded our engineering organization to support the growing complexity of our expanded customer base and product lines.  We have staffed our operations with Continuous Improvement experts in order to optimize our production processes to increase output, leverage our scale and lower our costs while maintaining product quality.

·

Reduce fixed manufacturing costs and operating expenses to improve profitability. In 2018, we completed a multi-year rationalization of our operational footprint, which significantly reduced our cumulative square footage through the sale or exit of several operational locations.  We lease approximately 74% of our manufacturing square footage, which has allowed us to negotiate flexible lease structure and terms.  During periods of lower tower demand, we have reduced our capital spending and labor to optimize our cost structure.  In our Gearing segment, after several years of reducing workforce and selling excess gear cutting and grinding equipment, we have been modestly increasing our production capabilities in response to improved market conditions.  We have focused on reducing professional fees and expenses, lowering our administrative costs and eliminating non-critical overhead positions.

SALES AND MARKETING

We market our heavy fabrications, gearing, and industrial solutions primarily through a direct sales force, supplemented with independent sales agents in certain markets. Our sales and marketing strategy is to develop and maintain long-term relationships with our existing customers, and seek opportunities to expand these relationships across our business units.  Our business development team uses market data, including marketing databases, information gathered at industry and trade shows, internet research and website marketing to identify and target new customers. We sell our products through our trained sales force or through manufacturers’ representatives to a wide variety of customers.

6

CUSTOMERS

We manufacture products for a variety of customers in the wind energy, O&G, mining and other industrial markets. The majority of our wind energy industry customer base consists of wind turbine manufacturers who supply wind farm operators and wind farm developers with completed wind turbines. The wind turbine market is very concentrated. According to Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables 2018 industry data, the top five wind turbine manufacturers constituted approximately 97% of the U.S. market. As a result, although we have historically produced towers for a broad range of wind turbine manufacturers, in any given year a limited number of customers have accounted for the majority of our revenues. Within the wind energy industry, our customer base consists primarily of wind turbine manufacturers who supply end users and wind farm operators with wind turbines, and wind gearbox re-manufacturers who use our replacement gears in their replacement gearboxes.  Within the O&G and mining industries, our customer base consists of manufacturers of hydraulic fracturing and mud pumps, drilling and production equipment, mining equipment, and off highway vehicles. Within the gas turbine industry, our customers supply end-users with natural gas turbines and after-market replacement and efficiency upgrade packages. Within our other industrial markets served, our customer base includes steel producers, ship builders, and manufacturers of material handling, pulp and paper and other power generation equipment. Sales to Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy (“SGRE”) represented greater than 10% of our consolidated revenues for the year ended December 31, 2019. Sales to SGRE and Gardner Denver represented greater than 10% of our consolidated revenues for the year ended December 31, 2018. The loss of one of these customers could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operation or financial condition. As a result, we have an ongoing initiative to diversify our customer base. 

COMPETITION

Each of our businesses faces competition from both domestic and international companies. The December 2015 extension of the PTC attracted additional investment and competition for wind towers.  In recent years, the industrial gearing industry has experienced consolidation of producers and acquisitions by strategic buyers in response to strong international competition, although recent tariff and trade uncertainties have caused buyers to shift more of their purchases to domestic gear manufacturers.

Within the wind tower product line of our Heavy Fabrications segment, the largest North American based competitor is Arcosa Inc., which was formerly a Trinity Industries company. Other competitors include Vestas Wind Systems, which has periodically produced towers for third party customers in addition to meeting the majority of its own captive tower requirements, Marmen Industries, a Canadian company and GRI, a Spanish company, which both have production facilities in the U.S.  We also face competition from imported towers, although imports from China and Vietnam have declined following a determination by the U.S. International Trade Commission (“USITC”) in 2013 that wind towers from those countries were being sold in the U.S. at less than fair value. As a result of the determination, the U.S. Department of Commerce (“USDOC”) issued antidumping and countervailing duty orders on imports of wind towers from China and an antidumping duty order on imports of towers from Vietnam.  In May 2018, the U.S. Court of Appeals affirmed the decision from the U.S. Court of International trade resulting in CS Wind Vietnam being excluded from the antidumping order. In April 2019, the USDOC extended the term of these duties for an additional five-year period.  Following a renewed surge of tower imports from countries not impacted by existing tariffs, in July 2019, a new trade case was brought before the USDOC and USITC, to assess whether wind towers imported from Canada, Indonesia, South Korea and Vietnam were being sold in the U.S.

7

at less than fair value.  This case includes a reassessment of CS Wind Vietnam. On December 6, 2019, the USDOC issued an affirmative preliminary determination in the countervailing duty investigations against Canada, Indonesia and Vietnam.  Subsequently, on February 5, 2020, the USDOC issued an affirmative preliminary determination in the anti-dumping investigations against Canada, Indonesia, Korea and Vietnam. A final determination in the antidumping and countervailing duties investigations is expected to be issued by the USITC no later than August 2020. 

Within our industrial fabrications product line of our Heavy Fabrications segment, our competitors in a fragmented market includes Weldall and AT&F, along with a large number of other regional competitors. The primary differentiator among fabricators is the range of manufacturing and machining capabilities, including lifting capacity, precision machining, heat treatment capacity and the sophistication of quality systems. 

In our Gearing segment, which is focused on the O&G, wind energy, mining and steel markets, we compete with domestic and international manufacturers who produce gears greater than one meter in diameter.  Our key competitors include Overton Chicago Gear, Cincinnati Gearing Systems, Merit Gear, Milwaukee Gear and Horsburgh & Scott. In addition, we compete with the internal gear manufacturing capacity of relevant equipment manufacturers and face competition from foreign competitors.

In our Industrial Solutions segment, which is currently primarily focused on the gas turbine market, we primarily compete with electrical supply distributors.  Our key competitors include Gexpro and other small independent companies.

REGULATION

Production Tax Credit

The highest impact development incentive has been the production tax credit (“PTC”) for new wind energy projects, which provides a supplemental payment based on electricity produced from each qualifying wind turbine. Legislative support for the PTC has been intermittent since its introduction in 1992, which has caused volatility in the demand for new wind energy projects.  In 2015, the PTC was extended for a five-year period, with a time-based phase-out based on the year the wind project is started.  This legislation has provided some longer-term stability in the market because the subsidy supports construction activity over the medium term. The phase-out schedule legislated in 2015 provided for:  100% extension of the credit for projects commenced before the end of 2016, 80% for projects commenced in 2017, 60% in 2018 and 40% in 2019. As part of a year-end tax extenders bill in 2019, the PTC was extended for an additional year, allowing for a 60% credit for projects commenced before the end of 2020. In order to benefit from the PTC, qualifying projects must either be completed within three years from their commencement, or the developer must demonstrate that their projects are in continuous construction between commencement and completion.  As a result of the new legislation, the PTC will subsidize wind projects commenced as late as 2020 and completed by 2024, or later if continuous construction can be demonstrated.  

Occupational Safety and Health Administration

Our operations are subject to regulation of health and safety matters by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration.  We believe that we take appropriate precautions to protect our employees and third parties from workplace injuries and harmful exposure to materials handled and managed at our facilities.  However, claims asserted in the future against the Company for work-related injury or illnesses could increase our costs. 

8

Environmental

Our operations are subject to numerous federal, state and local environmental laws and regulations. Although it is our objective to maintain compliance with these laws and regulations, it may not be possible to quantify with certainty the potential impact of actions regarding environmental matters, particularly remediation and other compliance efforts that we may undertake in the future.

BACKLOG

We sell our towers under either supply agreements or individual purchase orders (“POs”), depending on the size and duration of the purchase commitment. Under the supply agreements, we typically receive a purchase commitment for towers to be delivered in future fiscal quarters, then receive POs on a periodic basis depending upon the customer’s forecast of production volume requirements within the contract terms. For our Gearing and Industrial Solutions segments, sales are generally based on individual POs. As of December 31, 2019, the dollar amount of our backlog believed to be firm was approximately $142 million. This represents a 48% increase from the backlog at December 31, 2018, primarily due to an increase in demand for wind towers in our Heavy Fabrications segment, combined with growth in orders for other industrial fabrications and in our Industrial Solutions segment.  

SEASONALITY

The majority of our business is not affected by seasonality.

EMPLOYEES

We had 521 U.S. based employees at December 31, 2019, of which 466 were in manufacturing related functions and 55 were in administrative functions. As of December 31, 2019, approximately 18% of our employees were covered by collective bargaining agreements with local unions in our Cicero, Illinois and Neville Island, Pennsylvania locations. The five-year collective bargaining agreement with the Neville Island union was renegotiated in November 2017, and is expected to remain in effect through October 2022. A new four-year collective bargaining agreement with the Cicero union was negotiated in the third quarter of 2018 and is expected to remain in effect through February 2022. We believe that our relationship with our employees is generally positive. The table below summarizes our employees as of December 31, 2019:

 

 

 

 

 

Number of Employees As of

Segment

 

December 31, 2019

Heavy Fabrications

 

339

Gearing

 

133

Industrial Solutions

 

34

Corporate

 

15

     Total

 

521

 

RAW MATERIALS

The primary raw material used in the construction of heavy fabrication and gearing products is steel in the form of plate, bar stock, forgings and castings.  The market for tower steel and internal packages has become increasingly globalized. Although we are generally responsible for procurement of the raw materials, our global tower customers often negotiate the prices and terms for purchases, and, through a “directed buy”, we purchase under these agreements. We then pass the raw material cost through to our end customer plus a conversion margin. 

9

Outside of these directed buys, we operate a multiple supplier sourcing strategy and source our raw materials through various suppliers located throughout the U.S. and abroad. We generally do not have long term supply agreements with our raw material suppliers, and closely match terms with those of our customers to limit our exposure to commodity price fluctuations. Our business has been impacted by steel plate availability and pricing issues primarily attributable to steel tariffs introduced in early 2018. We have made modifications to our supply chain management practices to deal more effectively with potential disruptions arising from these purchasing practices.

We believe that we will be able to obtain an adequate supply of steel and other raw materials in 2020 to meet our manufacturing requirements, although from time to time we have faced shortages of specific grades of steel and delays associated of other materials from foreign sources.

QUALITY CONTROL

We have a long standing focus on processes for ensuring the manufacture of high quality products. To achieve high standards of production and operational quality, we implement strict and extensive quality control and inspections throughout our production processes. We maintain internal quality controls over all core manufacturing processes and carry out quality assurance inspections at the completion of each major manufacturing step to ensure the quality of our products. The manufacturing process at our Gearing segment, for example, involves transforming forged steel into precision gears through cutting, heat treating, testing and finishing. We inspect and test raw materials before they enter the assembly process, retest the raw materials after rough machining, test the functioning of gear teeth and cores after thermal treatment and accuracy test final outputs for compliance with product specifications. We believe our investment in industry leading heat treatment, high precision machining, specialized grinding technologies and cutting edge welding has contributed to our high product reliability and the consistent performance of our products under varying operating conditions. All of our core operating facilities are ISO 9001:2015 certified.

WORKING CAPITAL

We sell to a broad range of industrial customers. In general, we produce to order rather than to stock. For wind towers, currently our largest product line, the industry has historically used customized contracts with varying terms and conditions between suppliers and customers, depending on the specific objectives of each party. Our practices mirror this historical industry practice of negotiating agreements on a case by case basis. As a result, working capital needs, including levels of accounts receivable (“A/R”), accounts payable (“A/P”), and inventory, can vary significantly from quarter to quarter based on the contractual terms associated with each quarter’s sales, such as whether and when we are required to purchase and supply steel to meet our contractual obligations.  Customer deposits can vary significantly from quarter to quarter based on customer mix, contractual terms associated with each quarter’s sales and the timing impacts associated with customers placing orders for future production.  In recent years, our larger customers have increasingly used supplier financing programs, whereby a third party lender advances customer payments to us net of an interest charge. The combination of customer deposits and supplier financing programs arrangements may significantly reduce our working capital requirements.

In analyzing our liquidity, an important short-term metric is our use of operating working capital (“OWC”) in relationship to revenue. OWC is comprised of A/R and inventories, net of A/P and customer deposits. Our OWC at December 31, 2019 was $5,580 or 3% of trailing three months of sales annualized, in line with December 31, 2018, when OWC was $5,000, or 5% of trailing three months of sales annualized. Although OWC was relatively flat on a percent of trailing three months sales

10

annualized basis year over year, OWC fluctuated materially during the year, driven primarily by the timing and level of customer deposits received for future scheduled production. 

CORPORATE INFORMATION

Our principal executive office is located at 3240 South Central Avenue, Cicero, IL 60804. Our phone number is (708) 780‑4800 and our website address is www.bwen.com.

OTHER INFORMATION

On our website at www.bwen.com, we make available under the “Investors” menu selection, free of charge, our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8 K, and amendments to these reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act as soon as reasonably practicable after such reports or amendments are electronically filed with, or furnished to, the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). Also, the SEC maintains an Internet site at www.sec.gov that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information that we file electronically with the SEC.

ITEM 1A.  RISK FACTORS

Our financial and operating performance is subject to certain factors out of our control, including the state of the wind energy market in North America.

Our results of operations (like those of our customers) are subject to general economic conditions, and specifically to the state of the wind energy market. In addition to the state and federal government policies supporting renewable energy described above, the growth and development of the larger wind energy market in North America is subject to a number of factors, including, among other things:

·

the availability and cost of financing for the estimated pipeline of wind energy development projects;

·

the cost of electricity, which may be affected by a number of factors, including government regulation, power transmission, seasonality, fluctuations in demand, and the cost and availability of fuel, particularly natural gas;

·

the general demand for electricity or “load growth”;

·

the costs of competing power sources, including natural gas, nuclear power, solar power and other power sources;

·

the development of new power generating technology, advances in existing technology or discovery of power generating natural resources;

·

the development of electrical transmission infrastructure;

·

state and federal laws and regulations regarding avian protection plans and noise or turbine setback requirements;

·

other state and federal laws and regulations, particularly those favoring low carbon energy generation alternatives;

·

administrative and legal challenges to proposed wind energy development projects;

11

·

the effects of global climate change such as more frequent or more extreme weather events, changes in temperature and precipitation patterns, changes to ground and surface water and other related phenomena;

·

the improvement in efficiency and cost of wind energy, as influenced by advances in turbine design and operating efficiencies; and

·

public perception and localized community responses to wind energy projects.

In addition, while some of the factors listed above may only affect individual wind energy project developments or portions of the market, in the aggregate they may have a significant effect on the successful development of the wind energy market as a whole, and thus affect our operating and financial results.

We may have difficulty maintaining our current financing arrangements or obtaining additional financing when needed or on acceptable terms, and there can be no assurance that our operations will generate cash flows in an amount sufficient to enable us to pay our indebtedness.

We rely on banks and capital markets as a source of liquidity for capital requirements not satisfied by cash flows from operations or asset sales. We have experienced operating losses for most periods during which we have operated, and our committed sources of liquidity may be inadequate to satisfy our operational needs. There can be no assurance that, even if we were to achieve any or all of our strategic objectives, we would be successful in obtaining and improving profitability. If we are not able to access capital at competitive rates, our ability to implement our business plans may be adversely affected. Without access to capital resources, we could face substantial liquidity problems and might be required to dispose of material assets or operations at times when the prices for such assets or operations are depressed. In such event, we may not be able to consummate those dispositions. Furthermore, the proceeds of any such dispositions may not be adequate to meet our debt service obligations when due.

Our ability to comply with the restrictive covenants contained in our debt instruments, to make scheduled payments on our existing or future debt obligations, and to fund our operations will depend on our future financial and operating performance.  Such performance is, to a significant extent, subject to general economic, financial, competitive and other factors that are beyond our control.  If assumptions regarding our production, sales and subsequent collections from certain of our large customers, as well as customer deposits and revenues generated from new customer orders, are materially inconsistent with actual results, or any future restructuring efforts are not successful, we may encounter cash flow and liquidity issues.  Additionally, new or existing customers may request acceleration of production or we may accept new orders or modify existing orders to purchase steel opportunistically or to build products with deposits, which will reduce our liquidity. There can be no assurance that our operations will generate sufficient cash flows to enable us to maintain compliance with the restrictive covenants contained in our debt instruments, pay our remaining indebtedness or to fund our other liquidity needs. If we cannot make scheduled payments on our debt, we will be in default and, as a result, among other things, our debt holders could declare all outstanding principal and interest to be due and payable, which could force us to liquidate certain assets or alter our business operations or debt obligations, and we could be forced into a restructuring, bankruptcy or liquidation.  We cannot assure you that we will be able to do any of the foregoing on commercially reasonable terms or at all, or on terms that would be advantageous to our stockholders. In addition, raising capital in the equity capital markets could result in limitations on our ability to use our net operating loss carryforwards. 

12

Borrowings under our credit facility and other variable rate indebtedness may use the London Interbank Offering Rate (“LIBOR”) as a benchmark for establishing the applicable interest rate. LIBOR is the subject of recent regulatory guidance and proposals for reform, which may cause LIBOR to disappear entirely or to perform differently than in the past. The consequences of these developments with respect to LIBOR cannot be entirely predicted, but could result in an increase in the cost of our variable rate indebtedness causing a negative impact on our financial position and operating results. 

We are substantially dependent on a few significant customers.

Historically, the majority of our revenues are highly concentrated with a limited number of customers. In 2019,  one customer,  SGRE, accounted for more than 10% of our consolidated revenues, and our five largest customers accounted for 79% of our consolidated revenues. Certain of our customers have periodically expressed their intent to scale back, delay or restructure existing customer agreements, which has led to reduced revenues from these customers. It is possible that this may occur again in the future. As a result, our operating profits and gross margins have historically been negatively affected by significant variability in production levels, which has created production volume inefficiencies in our operations and cost structures.

The U.S. wind energy industry is significantly impacted by tax and other economic incentives. A significant change in these incentives could significantly impact our results of operations and growth.  

We sell towers to wind turbine manufacturers who supply wind energy generation facilities. The U.S. wind energy industry is significantly impacted by federal tax incentives and state Renewable Portfolio Standards (“RPSs”). Despite recent reductions in the cost of wind energy, due to variability in wind quality and consistency, and other regional differences, wind energy may not be economically viable in certain parts of the country absent such incentives. These programs have provided material incentives to develop wind energy generation facilities and thereby impact the demand for our products. The increased demand for our products that generally results from the credits and incentives could be impacted by the expiration or curtailment of these programs.

One such federal government program, the PTC, provides economic incentives to the owners of wind energy facilities in the form of a tax credit. The PTC has been extended several times since its initial introduction in 1992. The FY16 Omnibus Appropriations Bill, passed on December 18, 2015, included a five-year extension and phase-down of the PTC, as well as providing the option to elect the ITC for wind energy projects. As a result, the PTC was extended at full value for projects commenced by the end of 2016, was reduced to 80% of full value for projects commenced in 2017, 60% for projects commenced in 2018, and 40% for projects commenced in 2019. As part of a year-end tax extenders bill in 2019, the PTC was extended for an additional year, allowing for a 60% credit for projects commenced before the end of 2020. Similarly, for the ITC election, projects that started construction in 2015 and 2016 are eligible for a full 30% ITC, and projects that start construction in 2017, 2018 and 2019 are eligible for an ITC of 24%, 18% and 12%, respectively. As before, the rules allow wind energy projects to qualify so long as construction is started before the end of the applicable period and is either completed within three years, or under continuous construction between the start date and completion. The PTC tax benefits are available for the first ten years of operation of a wind energy facility, and also applies to significant redevelopment of existing wind energy facilities.  

RPSs generally require or encourage state regulated electric utilities to supply a certain proportion of electricity from renewable energy sources or to devote a certain portion of their plant

13

capacity to renewable energy generation. Typically, utilities comply with such standards by qualifying for renewable energy credits evidencing the share of electricity that was produced from renewable sources. Under many state standards, these renewable energy credits can be unbundled from their associated energy and traded in a market system, allowing generators with insufficient credits to meet their applicable state mandate. These standards have spurred significant growth in the wind energy industry and a corresponding increase in the demand for our products. Currently, the majority of states have RPSs in place and certain states have voluntary utility commitments to supply a specific percentage of their electricity from renewable sources. The enactment of RPSs in additional states or any changes to existing RPSs (including changes due to the failure to extend or renew the federal incentives described above), or the enactment of a federal RPS or imposition of other greenhouse gas regulations, may impact the demand for our products. We cannot assure that government support for renewable energy will continue. The elimination of, or reduction in, state or federal government policies that support renewable energy could have a material adverse impact on our business, results of operations, financial performance and future development efforts. 

Changes to trade regulation, quotas, duties or tariffs, and sanctions caused by changing U.S. and geopolitical policies, may impact our competitive position or adversely impact our margins.

New tariffs have resulted in increased prices, including with respect to certain steel products, and could adversely affect our consolidated results of operations, financial position and cash flows. These tariffs, along with any additional tariffs or trade restrictions that may be implemented by the U.S. or other countries, could result in further increased prices and a decreased available supply of steel and other imported components and inputs. We may not be able to pass price increases on to our customers and may not be able to secure adequate alternative sources of steel on a timely basis.

The existence of government subsidies available to our competitors in certain countries may affect our ability to compete on a price basis. In 2013, the U.S. International Trade Commission (“USITC”) determined that wind towers from China and Vietnam were being sold in the U.S. at less than fair value. As a result of that determination, the U.S. Department of Commerce (“USDOC”) issued antidumping and countervailing duty orders on imports of wind towers from China and an antidumping duty order on imports of towers from Vietnam. In May 2018, the U.S. Court of Appeals affirmed the decision from the U.S. Court of International trade resulting in CS Wind Vietnam being excluded from the antidumping order.   In April 2019, the USDOC extended the term of these duties for an additional five-year period.  Following a renewed surge of tower imports from countries not impacted by existing tariffs, in July 2019, a new trade case was brought before the USDOC and USITC, to assess if wind towers imported from Canada, Indonesia, South Korea and Vietnam were being sold in the U.S. at less than fair value. This case includes a reassessment of CS Wind Vietnam. A final determination of whether to assess antidumping and countervailing duties in this case is expected to be issued by the USITC in August 2020. On August 22, 2019, the USITC determined that there is a reasonable indication that a U.S. industry is materially injured by reason of imports of utility scale wind towers from Canada, Indonesia, South Korea and Vietnam sold in the U.S. at less than fair value, and voted to continue its antidumping and countervailing duty investigations into those countries. On December 6, 2019, the USDOC issued an affirmative preliminary determination in the countervailing duty investigations against Canada, Indonesia and Vietnam. Subsequently, on February 5, 2020, the USDOC issued an affirmative preliminary determination in the anti-dumping investigations against Canada, Indonesia, Korea and Vietnam. A final determination in the antidumping and countervailing duties investigations is expected to be issued by the USITC no later than August 2020. There can be no assurance that antidumping and/or countervailing duty orders will be issued, renewed or extended. Additionally, producers in other countries not subject to those orders may benefit from government

14

subsidies (particularly with respect to the price of steel, the primary raw material used in the production of wind towers) which could lead to increased competition from those producers in the U.S. market, causing us to lose market share and/or reducing our margins. 

Consolidation among wind turbine manufacturers could increase our customer concentration and/or disrupt our supply chain relationships.

Wind turbine manufacturers are among our primary customers. There has been consolidation among these manufacturers, and more consolidation may occur in the future. For example, both Siemens Energy, Inc. and Gamesa Wind US, LLC, were customers for our tower business until early 2017, at which time they merged into SGRE and became our largest customer. Customer consolidation may result in pricing pressures, leading to downward pressure on our margins and profits, and may also disrupt our supply chain relationships.

We face competition from industry participants who may have greater resources than we do.

Our businesses are subject to risks associated with competition from new or existing industry participants who may have more resources and better access to capital. Certain of our competitors and potential competitors may have substantially greater financial resources, customer support, technical and marketing resources, larger customer bases, longer operating histories, greater name recognition and more established relationships in the industry than we do. Among other things, these industry participants compete with us based upon price, quality, location and available capacity. We cannot be sure that we will have the resources or expertise to compete successfully in the future. We also cannot be sure that we will be able to match cost reductions by our competitors or that we will be able to succeed in the face of current or future competition.

We face significant risks associated with uncertainties resulting from changes to policies and laws with the periodic changes in the U.S. administration as well as risks associated with changes in our relationship with our significant customers.  

Changes of administration in the U.S. federal government may affect our business in a manner that currently cannot be reliably predicted, especially given the potentially significant changes to various laws and regulations that affect us. These uncertainties may include changes in laws and policies in areas such as corporate taxation, taxation on imports of internationally-sourced products, international trade including trade treaties such as the North American Free Trade Agreement, environmental protection and workplace safety laws, labor and employment law, immigration and health care, which individually or in the aggregate could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition.

Additionally, if our relationships with significant customers should change materially, it could be difficult for us to immediately and profitably replace lost sales in a market with such concentration, which could have a material adverse effect on our operating and financial results. We could be adversely impacted by decreased customer demand for our products due to (i) the impact of current or future economic conditions on our customers, (ii) our customers’ loss of market share to their competitors that do not use our products, and (iii) our loss of market share with our customers. We could lose market share with our customers to our competitors or to our customers themselves, should they decide to become more vertically integrated and produce the products that we currently provide.

15

In addition, even if our customers continue to do business with us, we could be adversely affected by a number of other potential developments with our customers. For example:

·

The inability or failure of our customers to meet their contractual obligations could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position and results of operations.

·

Certain customer contracts provide the customer with the opportunity to cancel a substantial portion of its volume obligation by providing us with notice of such election prior to commencement of production. Such contracts generally require the customer to pay a sliding cancelation fee based on how far in advance of commencement of production such notice is provided.

·

If we are unable to deliver products to our customers in accordance with an agreed-upon schedule, we may become subject to liquidated damages provisions in certain supply agreements for the period of time we are unable to deliver finished products. Although the liquidated damages provisions are generally capped, they can become significant and may have a negative impact on our profit margins and financial results.

·

A material change in payment terms with a significant customer could have a material adverse effect on our short term cash flows.    

Our plans for growth, diversification, and restructuring may not be successful, and could result in poor financial performance.

The Company continues to strategically diversify, restructure and grow the business to improve operational efficiency and meet customer demand. Our diversification efforts into the natural gas turbine power generation, O&G, mining and other industries, particularly within our gearing and industrial fabrication product lines and through our 2017 acquisition of Red Wolf, may require additional investments in personnel, equipment and operational infrastructure. Moreover, although we have historically participated in most of these lines of business, there is no assurance that we will be able to grow our presence in these markets at a rate sufficient to compensate for a potentially weaker wind energy market. If we are unable to further penetrate these markets, our plans to diversify our operations may not be successful and our anticipated future growth may be adversely affected.

Any restructuring efforts may involve occasionally opening or closing facilities to rationalize facility capacity and management structure, and consolidating and increasing efficiencies in certain operations. If the Company is unable to generate anticipated cost savings or successfully implement its strategies, the Company’s financial results could suffer. These efforts and strategies could also have a negative impact on the Company’s relationships, including those with its employees or customers, which could also adversely affect the Company’s financial results.

Our growth efforts through increased production levels at existing facilities, acquisitions and continuous improvement activities such as the proper coordination and integration of the supply chain, the consistent use of systems with respect to production activities, the Advanced Product Quality Processes (APQP) to support the introduction of new products, and the hiring of continuous improvement experts to optimize our production processes, will require coordinated efforts across the Company and continued enhancements to our current operating infrastructure. If the cost of making these changes increases or if our efforts are unsuccessful, the Company may not realize anticipated benefits and our future earnings may be adversely affected.

16

If our projections regarding the future market demand for our products are inaccurate, our operating results and our overall business may be adversely affected.

We have previously made significant capital investments in anticipation of rapid growth in the U.S. wind energy market. However, the growth in the U.S. wind energy market has not kept pace with our expectations when some of these capital investments were made, and there can be no assurance that the U.S. wind energy market will grow and develop in a manner consistent with our expectations, or that we will be able to fill our capacity through the further diversification of our operations. Our internal manufacturing capabilities have required significant upfront capital costs. If market demand for our products does not increase at the pace we have anticipated and align with our manufacturing capacity, we may be unable to offset these costs and achieve economies of scale, and our operating results may continue to be adversely affected by high fixed costs, reduced margins and underutilization of capacity which may cause us to continue to incur significant losses and may prevent us from achieving or maintaining profitability. In light of these considerations, we may be forced to reduce our labor force and production to minimum levels, as was done at certain operating locations in both 2017 and 2018, temporarily idle existing capacity or sell to third parties manufacturing capacity that we cannot utilize in the near term, in addition to the steps that we have already taken to adjust our capacity more closely to demand. Alternatively, if we experience rapid increased demand for our products in excess of our estimates, or we reduce our manufacturing capacity, our installed capital equipment and existing workforce may be insufficient to support higher production volumes, which could adversely affect our customer relationships and overall reputation. In addition, we may not be able to expand our workforce and operations in a timely manner, procure adequate resources or locate suitable third party suppliers to respond effectively to changes in demand for our existing products or to the demand for new products requested by our customers, and our business could be adversely affected. Our ability to meet such excess customer demand could also depend on our ability to raise additional capital and effectively scale our manufacturing operations.

Additionally, most of our customers do not commit to long-term contracts or firm production schedules, and accordingly, we frequently experience volatile lead-times in customer orders. Additionally, customers may change production quantities or delay production with little advance notice. Therefore, we rely on and plan our production and inventory levels based on our customers’ advance orders, commitments and/or forecasts, as well as our internal assessments and forecasts of customer demand. The variations in volume and timing of sales make it difficult to schedule production and optimize utilization of manufacturing capacity. This uncertainty may require us to increase staffing and incur other expenses in order to meet an unexpected increase in customer demand, potentially placing a significant burden on our resources. An inability to respond to such changes in a timely manner may also cause customer dissatisfaction, which may negatively affect our customer relationships.  

Disruptions in the supply of parts and raw materials, or changes in supplier relations, may negatively impact our operating results.

We are dependent upon the supply of certain raw materials used in our production process, and these raw materials are exposed to price fluctuations on the open market. Raw material costs for materials such as steel, our primary raw material, have fluctuated significantly and may continue to fluctuate. To reduce price risk caused by market fluctuations, we have generally tried to match raw material purchases to our sales contracts or incorporated price adjustment clauses in our contracts. However, limitations on availability of raw materials or increases in the cost of raw materials (including steel), energy, transportation and other necessary services may impact our operating results

17

if our manufacturing businesses are not able to fully pass on the costs associated with such increases to their respective customers. Alternatively, we will not realize material improvements from any decline in steel prices as the terms of our contracts generally require that we pass these cost savings through to our customers. In addition, we may encounter supplier constraints, be unable to maintain favorable supplier arrangements and relations or be affected by disruptions in the supply chain caused by events such as natural disasters, shipping delays, power outages and labor strikes. Additionally, our supply chain has become more global in nature and, thus, more complex from a shipping and logistics perspective. In the event of limitations on availability of raw materials or significant changes in the cost of raw materials, particularly steel, our margins and profitability could be negatively impacted.

Our growth strategies could be ineffective due to the risks of acquisitions and risks relating to integration.

Our growth strategy has historically included acquiring complementary businesses. In regards to any other future acquisitions, we could fail to identify, finance or complete suitable acquisitions on acceptable terms and prices. Acquisitions and the related integration processes could increase a number of risks, including diversion of operations personnel, financial personnel and management’s attention, difficulties in integrating systems and operations, potential loss of key employees and customers of the acquired companies and exposure to unanticipated liabilities. The price we pay for a business may exceed the value realized and we cannot provide any assurance that we will realize the expected synergies and benefits of any acquisitions. Our discovery of, or failure to discover, material issues during due diligence investigations of acquisition targets, either before closing with regard to potential risks of the acquired operations, or after closing with regard to the timely discovery of breaches of representations or warranties, could materially harm our business. Our failure to meet the challenges involved in integrating a new business to realize the anticipated benefits of an acquisition could cause an interruption or loss of momentum in our existing activities and could adversely affect our profitability. Acquisitions also may result in the recording of goodwill and other intangible assets which are subject to potential impairments in the future that could diminish our reported earnings and operating results.

Our diversification outside of the wind energy market exposes us to business risks associated with the gas turbine, oil and gas, and mining industries, among others, which may slow our growth or penetration in these markets.

Although we have experience in the gas turbine, oil and gas and mining industry markets, these markets have not historically been our primary focus. In further diversifying our business to serve these markets, we face competitors who may have more resources, longer operating histories and more well-established relationships than we do, and we may not be able to successfully or profitably generate additional business opportunities in these industries. Moreover, if we are able to successfully diversify into these markets, our businesses may be exposed to risks associated with these industries, which could adversely affect our future earnings and growth. These risks include, among other things:

·

Variability in the prices and relative demand for oil, gas, minerals and other commodities;

·

Changes in domestic and global political and economic conditions affecting the O&G and mining industries;

·

Changes in technology;

·

Changes in the price and availability of alternative fuels and energy sources and changes in energy consumption or supply; and

18

·

Changes in federal, state and local regulations, including, among other regulations, relating to hydraulic fracturing and greenhouse gas emissions.

We have substantially generated net losses since our inception.

We have experienced operating losses since inception, except that we were profitable in 2016. We have incurred significant costs in connection with the development of our businesses, and because we have operated at low capacity utilization in certain facilities, there is no assurance that we will generate sufficient revenues to offset anticipated operating costs. Although we anticipate deriving revenues from the sale of our products, no assurance can be given that these products can be sold on a profitable basis. We cannot give any assurance that we will be able to sustain or increase profitability on a quarterly or annual basis in the future.

We may continue to incur significant losses in the future for a number of reasons, including other risks described in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and we may encounter unforeseen expenses, difficulties, complications, delays, and other unknown factors. 

We rely on unionized labor, the loss of which could adversely affect our future success.

We depend on the services of unionized labor and have collective bargaining agreements with certain of our operations workforce at our Cicero, Illinois and Neville Island, Pennsylvania Gearing facilities. The loss of the services of these and other personnel, whether through terminations, attrition, labor strike or otherwise, or a material change in our collective bargaining agreements, could have a material adverse impact on us and our future profitability. In November 2017, a five-year collective bargaining agreement was ratified by the collective bargaining union in our Neville Island facility and is expected to remain in effect through October 2022. A  new four-year collective bargaining agreement with the Cicero union was negotiated in the third quarter of 2018 and is expected to remain in effect through February 2022. As of December 31, 2019, these collective bargaining units represented approximately 18% of our workforce. 

We could incur substantial costs to comply with environmental, health and safety (“EHS”) laws and regulations and to address violations of or liabilities under these requirements.

Our operations are subject to a variety of EHS laws and regulations in the jurisdictions in which we operate and sell products governing, among other things, health, safety, pollution and protection of the environment and natural resources, including the use, handling, transportation and disposal of non-hazardous and hazardous materials and wastes, as well as emissions and discharges into the environment, including discharges to air, surface water, groundwater and soil, product content, performance and packaging. We cannot guarantee that we have been, or will at all times be in compliance with such laws and regulations. Changes in existing EHS laws and regulations, or their application, could cause us to incur additional or unexpected costs to achieve or maintain compliance. Failure to comply with these laws and regulations, obtain the necessary permits to operate our business, or comply with the terms and conditions of such permits may subject us to a variety of administrative, civil and criminal enforcement measures, including the imposition of civil and criminal sanctions, monetary fines and penalties, remedial obligations, and the issuance of compliance requirements limiting or preventing some or all of our operations. The assertion of claims relating to regulatory compliance, on or off site contamination, natural resource damage, the discovery of previously unknown environmental liabilities, the imposition of criminal or civil fines or penalties and/or other sanctions, or the obligation to undertake investigation, remediation or monitoring activities could result in potentially significant costs and expenditures to address contamination or resolve claims or liabilities. Such costs and expenditures could have a material adverse effect on our

19

business, financial condition or results of operations. Under certain circumstances, violation of such EHS laws and regulations could result in us being disqualified from eligibility to receive federal government contracts or subcontracts under the federal government’s debarment and suspension system.

We also are subject to laws and regulations that impose liability and cleanup responsibility for releases of hazardous substances into the environment. Under certain of these laws and regulations, such liabilities can be imposed for cleanup of currently and formerly owned, leased or operated properties, or properties to which hazardous substances or wastes were sent by current or former operators at our current or former facilities, regardless of whether we directly caused the contamination or violated any law at the time of discharge or disposal. Several of our facilities have a history of industrial operations, and contaminants have been detected at some of our facilities. The presence of contamination from hazardous substances or wastes could interfere with ongoing operations or adversely affect our ability to sell, lease or use our properties as collateral for financing. We also could be held liable under third-party claims for property damage, natural resource damage or personal injury and for penalties and other damages under such environmental laws and regulations, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our ability to comply with regulatory requirements is critical to our future success, and there can be no guarantee that our businesses are in full compliance with all such requirements.

As a manufacturer and distributor of wind and other energy industry products we are subject to the requirements of federal, state, local and foreign regulatory authorities. In addition, we are subject to a number of authorities setting industry standards, such as the American Gear Manufacturers Association and the American Welding Society. Changes in the standards and requirements imposed by such authorities could have a material adverse effect on us. In the event we are unable to meet any such standards when adopted, our businesses could be adversely affected. We may not be able to obtain all regulatory approvals, licenses and permits that may be required in the future, or any necessary modifications to existing regulatory approvals, licenses and permits, or maintain all required regulatory approvals, licenses and permits. There can be no guarantee that our businesses are fully compliant with such standards and requirements.

We may be unable to keep pace with rapidly changing technology in wind turbine and other industrial component manufacturing.

The global markets for wind turbines and our other manufactured industrial components are rapidly evolving technologically. Our component manufacturing equipment and technology may not be suited for future generations of products being developed by wind turbine companies. As turbines grow in size, particularly to support the development of offshore windfarms, tower manufacturing becomes more complicated and may require investments in new manufacturing equipment. For example, some wind turbine manufacturers are using wind turbine towers made partially or wholly from concrete instead of steel. To maintain a successful business in our field, we must keep pace with technological developments and the changing standards of our customers and potential customers and meet their constantly evolving demands. If we fail to adequately respond to the technological changes in our industry, make the necessary capital investments or are not suited to provide components for new types of wind turbines, our business, financial condition and operating results may be adversely affected.

20

If our estimates for warranty expenses differ materially from actual claims made, or if we are unable to reasonably estimate future warranty expense for our products, our business and financial results could be adversely affected.

We provide warranty terms generally ranging between one and five years to our customers depending upon the specific product and terms of the customer agreement. We reserve for warranty claims based on prior experience and estimates made by management based upon a percentage of our sales revenues related to such products. From time to time, customers have submitted warranty claims to us. However, we have a limited history on which to base our warranty estimates for certain of our manufactured products. Our assumptions could materially differ from the actual performance of our products in the future and could exceed the levels against which we have reserved. In some instances, our customers have interpreted the scope and coverage of certain of our warranty provisions differently from our interpretation of such provisions. The expenses associated with remediation activities in the wind energy industry can be substantial, and if we are required to pay such costs in connection with a customer’s warranty claim, we could be subject to additional unplanned cash expenditures. If our estimates prove materially incorrect, or if we are required to cover remediation expenses in addition to our regular warranty coverage, we could be required to incur additional expenses and could face a material unplanned cash expenditure, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Market disruptions and volatility may result in an increased likelihood of our customers asserting warranty or remediation claims in connection with our products that they would not ordinarily assert in a more stable economic environment. In the event of such a claim, we may incur costs if we decide to compensate the affected customer or to engage in litigation with the affected customer regarding the claim. We maintain product liability insurance, but there can be no guarantee that such insurance will be available or adequate to protect against such claims. A successful claim against us could have a material adverse effect on our business.

If we are unable to produce, maintain and disseminate relevant and/or reliable data and information pertaining to our business in an efficient, cost-effective, secure and well-controlled fashion and avoid security breaches affecting our information technology systems, such inability may have significant negative impacts on our confidentiality obligations, and proprietary needs and therefore on our future operations, profitability and competitive position. 

Management relies on information technology infrastructure and architecture, including hardware, network, software, people and processes, to provide useful and confidential information to conduct our business in the ordinary course, including correspondence and commercial data and information interchange with customers, suppliers, consultants, advisors and governmental agencies, and to support assessments and conclusions about future plans and initiatives pertaining to market demands, operating performance and competitive positioning.  

There has been an increase in global cybersecurity threats, computer viruses and more sophisticated and targeted cyber-related attacks as well as cybersecurity failures resulting from human and technological errors. While we attempt to mitigate these risks, including through the use of protective systems, monitoring and testing and employee training, any material failure, interruption of service, compromised data security, computer virus or cybersecurity threat or attack could adversely affect our relations with suppliers and customers, place us in violation of confidentiality and data protection laws, rules and regulations, and result in negative impacts to our reputation, market share, operations and profitability. Despite our use of measures to protect our systems and confidential information, security breaches, human or technological error or other failures in our information

21

technology could result in theft, destruction, loss, misappropriation or release of confidential data or intellectual property which could materially and adversely impact our future results.

There is a limited trading market for our securities and the market price of our securities is subject to volatility.

Our common stock trades on the Nasdaq Capital Market. The absence of an active trading market increases price volatility and reduces the liquidity of our common stock. The market price and level of trading of our common stock could be subject to wide fluctuations in response to numerous factors, many of which are beyond our control. These factors include, among other things, our limited trading volume, actual or anticipated variations in our operating results and cash flow, the nature and content of our earnings releases, announcements or events that impact our business and the general state of the securities market, as well as general economic, political and market conditions and other factors that may affect our future results.  In 2019, the price of our common stock varied from a high of $2.36 per share to a low of $1.30 per share. Stockholders may have incurred substantial losses with regard to any investment in our common stock adversely affecting stockholder confidence.

Limitations on our ability to utilize our net operating losses (“NOLs”) may negatively affect our financial results.

We may not be able to utilize all of our NOLs. For financial statement presentation, all benefits associated with the NOL carryforwards have been reserved; therefore, this potential asset is not reflected on our balance sheet. To the extent available, we will use any NOL carryforwards to reduce the U.S. corporate income tax liability associated with our operations. However, if we do not achieve profitability prior to their expiration, we will not be able to fully utilize our NOLs to offset income. Section 382 of the IRC (“Section 382”) generally imposes an annual limitation on the amount of NOL carryforwards that may be used to offset taxable income when a corporation has undergone certain changes in stock ownership. Our ability to utilize NOL carryforwards and built in losses may be limited, under Section 382 or otherwise, by our issuance of common stock or by other changes in ownership of our stock. After analyzing Section 382 in 2010 we determined that aggregate changes in our stock ownership had triggered an annual limitation of NOL carryforwards and built in losses available for utilization to $14,284 per annum. Although this event limited the amount of pre ownership change date NOLs and built in losses we can utilize annually, it does not preclude us from fully utilizing our current NOL carryforwards prior to their expiration. However, subsequent changes in our stock ownership could further limit our ability to use our NOL carryforwards and our income could be subject to taxation earlier than it would if we were able to use NOL carryforwards and built in losses without an annual limitation, which could result in lower profits. To address these concerns, in February 2013 we adopted a Section 382 Stockholder Rights Plan, which was subsequently approved by our stockholders and extended in 2016 for an additional three-year period (as amended, the “Rights Plan”), designed to preserve our substantial tax assets associated with NOL carryforwards under Section 382. The Rights Plan is intended to deter any person or group from being or becoming the beneficial owner of 4.9% or more of our common stock and thereby triggering a further limitation of our available NOL carryforwards. On February 7, 2019, the Board of Directors (the “Board”) approved an amendment extending the Rights Plan for an additional three years, which was approved by our stockholders at the 2019 Annual Meeting of Stockholders held on April 23, 2019.  See Note 13, “Income Taxes” of our consolidated financial statements for further discussion of our Rights Plan. There can be no assurance that the Rights Plan will be effective in protecting our NOL carryforwards.

Additionally, because the Rights Plan subjects any person that acquires 4.9% of our common stock without the Board’s permission to significant dilution, it could make it harder for a third party to

22

acquire us without the consent of the Board. In particular, the Rights Plan may deter a third party from completing or even initiating an acquisition of the Company, which may prevent stockholders from realizing a control premium from a potential acquirer, or from otherwise maximizing stockholder value.

Equipment failures or extensive damage to our facilities, including those that might occur as a result of natural disasters, could lead to production, delivery or service curtailments or shutdowns, loss of revenue or higher expenses.

We operate a substantial amount of equipment at our production facilities. Operation of this equipment may be subject to interruption due to equipment failure or acts of nature. Any such interruption in production capabilities at our facilities could reduce or prevent the production, delivery, service, or repair of our products and increase our costs and expenses. A halt of production at any of our manufacturing facilities could severely affect delivery times to our customers. While we maintain emergency response and business recovery plans that are intended to allow us to recover from natural disasters that could disrupt our business, we cannot provide assurance that these plans would fully protect us from the effects of all such disasters. In addition, insurance may not adequately compensate us for any losses incurred as a result of natural or other disasters, which may adversely affect our financial condition. Any significant delay in deliveries not otherwise contractually mitigated by favorable force majeure or other provisions could result in cancellation of all or a portion of our orders, cause us to lose future sales, and negatively affect our reputation and results of operations.

Because our industry is capital intensive and we have significant fixed and semi-fixed costs, our profitability is sensitive to changes in volume.

The property, plants and equipment needed to manufacture products for our customers and provide our processes and solutions can be very expensive. We must spend a substantial amount of capital to purchase and maintain such property, plant and equipment. Although we believe our current cash balance, along with our projected internal cash flows and available financing sources, will provide sufficient cash to support our currently anticipated operating and capital needs, if we are unable to generate sufficient cash to purchase and maintain the property, plant and equipment necessary to operate our business, we may be required to reduce or delay planned capital expenditures or to incur additional indebtedness.

If our intangible assets and other long-lived assets or inventory become impaired, we may be required to record a significant charge to earnings.

We may be required to record a significant charge to operations in our financial statements should we determine that our long-lived assets or inventory are impaired. Such a charge might have a significant impact on our reported financial position and results of operations. We review inventory, long-lived assets and project assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying amount may not be recoverable. In conjunction with the rebranding initiative, during 2019 we decided we would no longer utilize the Red Wolf trade name and subsequently accelerated the amortization of the trade name by $871 so that it was fully amortized in 2019.   

Any failure to protect our customers’ intellectual property that we use in the products we manufacture for them could harm our customer relationships and subject us to liability.

The products we manufacture for our customers often contain our customers’ intellectual property, including copyrights, patents, trade secrets and know-how. Our success depends, in part, on our ability to protect our customers’ intellectual property. The steps we take to protect our customers’

23

intellectual property may not adequately prevent its disclosure or misappropriation. If we fail to protect our customers’ intellectual property, our customer relationships could be harmed and we may experience difficulty in establishing new customer relationships. Additionally, our customers might pursue legal claims against us for any failure to protect their intellectual property, possibly resulting in harm to our reputation and our business, financial condition and operating results.

We may not be able to protect important intellectual property and we could incur substantial costs defending against claims that our products infringe on the proprietary rights of others.

Our ability to compete effectively will depend, in part, on our ability to protect our proprietary system level technologies, systems designs and manufacturing processes. While we have attempted to safeguard and maintain our proprietary rights, we do not know whether we have been or will be completely successful in doing so.

Further, our competitors may independently develop or patent technologies or processes that are substantially equivalent or superior to ours. If we are found to be infringing third-party patents, we could be required to pay substantial royalties and/or damages, and we do not know whether we will be able to obtain licenses to use such patents on acceptable terms, if at all. Failure to obtain needed licenses could delay or prevent the development, manufacture or sale of our products, and could necessitate the expenditure of significant resources to develop or acquire non infringing intellectual property.

We may need to pursue lawsuits or legal action in the future to enforce our intellectual property rights and to determine the validity and scope of the proprietary rights of others. Litigation and other proceedings, even if they are successful, are expensive to pursue and time consuming, and we could use a substantial amount of our management and financial resources in either case.

Confidentiality agreements to which we are party may be breached, and we may not have adequate remedies for any breach. Our trade secrets may also be known without breach of such agreements or may be independently developed by competitors. Our inability to maintain the proprietary nature of our technology and processes could allow our competitors to limit or eliminate any competitive advantages we may have.

ITEM 1B.  UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

24

ITEM 2.  PROPERTIES

Our corporate headquarters is located in Cicero, Illinois, a suburb located west of Chicago, Illinois. In addition, the Subsidiaries own or lease operating facilities, which are presented by operating segment as follows (information below is as of December 31, 2019).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

    

Owned /

    

Approximate

 

Operating Segment and Facility Type

 

Location

 

Leased

 

Square Footage

 

Heavy Fabrications (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tower Manufacturing

 

Manitowoc, WI

 

Leased

 

213,000

 

Tower Manufacturing

 

Abilene, TX

 

Owned

 

175,000

 

Industrial Fabrications Manufacturing

 

Manitowoc, WI

 

Leased

 

30,000

 

Gearing and Corporate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gearing System Manufacturing—Machining and Corporate Administration

 

Cicero, IL

 

Leased

 

301,000

 

Gearing System Manufacturing—Heat Treatment and Gearbox Repair

 

Neville Island, PA

 

Owned

 

52,000

 

Industrial Solutions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Industrial Solutions Manufacturing

 

Sanford, NC

 

Leased

 

105,000

 

 


(1)

The Heavy Fabrications segment listing does not include the tower storage yards of 40 acres in Manitowoc, WI and 25 acres in Abilene, TX.

We consider our active facilities to be in good condition and adequate for our present and future needs.

ITEM 3.  LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

We are party to a variety of legal proceedings that arise in the ordinary course of our business. While the results of these legal proceedings cannot be predicted with certainty, management believes that the final outcome of these proceedings will not have a material adverse effect, individually or in the aggregate, on our results of operations, financial condition or cash flows. Due to the inherent uncertainty of litigation, there can be no assurance that the resolution of any particular claim or proceeding would not have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition or cash flows. It is possible that if one or more of such matters were decided against us, the effects could be material to our results of operations in the period in which we would be required to record or adjust the related liability and could also be material to our financial condition and cash flows in the period in which we would be required to pay such liability.

ITEM 4.  MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not Applicable.

25

PART II

(Dollar amounts are presented in thousands, except per share data and unless otherwise stated)

ITEM 5.  MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Our common stock is traded on the NASDAQ Capital Market (“NASDAQ”) under the symbol “BWEN.” The following table sets forth the high and low bid prices of our common stock traded on the NASDAQ.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Stock

 

 

 

High

 

Low

 

2019

    

 

    

    

 

    

 

First quarter

 

$

1.75

 

$

1.30

 

Second quarter

 

 

2.35

 

 

1.60

 

Third quarter

 

 

2.36

 

 

1.62

 

Fourth quarter

 

 

1.85

 

 

1.45

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Stock

 

 

 

High

 

Low

 

2018

    

 

    

    

 

    

 

First quarter

 

$

2.85

 

$

2.20

 

Second quarter

 

 

3.15

 

 

2.11

 

Third quarter

 

 

2.54

 

 

2.07

 

Fourth quarter

 

 

2.22

 

 

1.20

 

 

The closing price for our common stock as of February 21, 2020 was $2.15. As of February 21, 2020, there were 46 holders of record of our common stock.

Dividends

We have never paid cash dividends on our common stock and have no current plan to do so in the foreseeable future. The declaration and payment of dividends on our common stock are subject to the discretion of our Board and are further limited by our credit agreement and other contractual agreements we may have in place from time to time. The decision of our Board to pay future dividends will depend on general business conditions, the effect of a dividend payment on our financial condition, and other factors our Board may consider relevant. The current policy of our Board is to reinvest cash generated in our operations to promote future growth and to fund potential investments.

Repurchases

There were no repurchases of our equity securities under our repurchase program made during the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018.  

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities

There were no unregistered sales of equity securities for the years ended December 31, 2019 or 2018.

Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans

See Part III, Item 12 “Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for information as of December 31, 2019 with respect to shares of our common stock that may be issued under our existing share‑based compensation plans.

26

ITEM 6.  SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

We are a smaller reporting company as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act and as such are not required to provide information under this item.

 

ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

As used in this Annual Report, the terms “we,” “us,” “our,” “Broadwind,” and the “Company” refer to Broadwind Energy, Inc., a Delaware corporation headquartered in Cicero, Illinois, and its Subsidiaries.

(Dollar amounts are presented in thousands, except per share data and unless otherwise stated)

On January 1, 2020, we rebranded as Broadwind Energy, Inc. doing business as Broadwind, a reflection of our diversification progress to date and our continued strategy to diversify our product and customer mix outside of wind energy. Effective with that rebranding, we renamed certain segments. Our Towers and Heavy Fabrications segment was renamed as Heavy Fabrications and our Process Systems segment was renamed as Industrial Solutions. Our Gearing segment name remained the same.

We booked $221,549 in net new orders in 2019, up sharply from $83,241 in 2018.  The significant increase in orders was driven by growth in each of our primary markets, except for the market for O&G production equipment. We realized a $145,371 increase in tower orders within our Heavy Fabrications segment, as tower customers secured 2020 production capacity in support of an expected increase in wind turbine tower installations.  During 2018, our largest customer fulfilled orders under a three-year framework agreement in which minimum contract orders were reported in backlog at the onset of the agreement in 2016 and is now placing orders on a project-by-project basis; this change in ordering patterns also contributed to the year-over-year increase. Other industrial fabrication orders, also included in the Heavy Fabrications segment, increased $5,682 or 37%, reflecting an expansion of our customer base and the results of the investments we have made to broaden our manufacturing capabilities. Gearing orders declined $16,110, primarily due to a reduction from O&G customers due to excess fracking and drilling equipment capacity.  Lower demand from aftermarket wind customers, which can fluctuate based on customer order patterns and repair activity, was partially offset by an increase in orders from other industrial customers. Our Industrial Solutions segment had $16,426 in orders in 2019, an increase of $3,365 over 2018, primarily due to higher customer demand for gas turbine components and initial orders resulting from our entry into the market to support solar energy installation. This was partially offset by lower customer demand for gas turbine aftermarket content. At December 31, 2019, total backlog was $142,302, up 48% from $96,456 at December 31, 2018 due to the aforementioned surge in tower orders.

We recognized revenue of $178,220 in 2019, up 42% from revenue of $125,380 in 2018 due to the growth in orders described above. 

We reported a net loss of $4,523, or $0.28 per share in 2019, compared to a net loss of $24,146 or $1.56 per share in 2018. The improvement in earnings was primarily due to the absence of a $12,585 impairment charge recognized in the prior year, as well as higher capacity utilization in our Heavy Fabrications segment and improved margins in our other segments. Partially offsetting these increases was the impact of increased price competition from foreign tower manufacturers which depressed tower product line margins, higher incentive compensation expense, the absence of a $2,249

27

gain recognized upon extinguishment of the New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) loan and the $1,140 benefit associated with the reversal of the final Red Wolf earn-out reserve, which were both recognized in the prior year.

During 2018, we conducted a review of our business strategies and product plans given the outlook of the industries we serve and our business environment. As a result, we executed a restructuring plan to rationalize our facility capacity and management structure, and to consolidate and increase the efficiencies in our Abilene facility operations. We exited the market for natural gas compression units and transferred remaining operations from a leased facility in Abilene, TX into other production locations. We vacated the leased Abilene facility in 2018 and incurred costs totaling $12 and $668 for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. In conjunction with this initiative, all costs associated with this vacated facility have been recorded as restructuring expenses within the Towers and Heavy Fabrications segment. Our restructuring activities concluded in 2019.

We use our credit facility to fund working capital requirements and believe that our credit facility, together with the operating cash generated by our businesses, and any potential proceeds from access to the public or private debt or equity markets, are sufficient to meet all cash obligations over the next twelve months.  On December 31, 2019, we had $11,517 drawn under our $35,000 line of credit, and $2,416 of cash on hand,  resulting in $18,993 of available liquidity.  For a further discussion of our capital resources and liquidity, including a description of recent amendments and waivers under our credit facility, please see the discussion under “Liquidity, Financial Position and Capital Resources” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

KEY METRICS USED BY MANAGEMENT TO MEASURE PERFORMANCE

In addition to measures of financial performance presented in our consolidated financial statements in accordance with GAAP, we use certain other financial measures to analyze our performance. These non-GAAP financial measures primarily consist of adjusted EBITDA and free cash flow which help us evaluate growth trends, establish budgets, assess operational efficiencies, oversee our overall liquidity, and evaluate our overall financial performance. 

Key Financial Measures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Twelve Months Ended

 

 

December 31,

 

 

2019

 

2018

Net revenues

    

$

178,220

    

$

125,380

Net loss

 

$

(4,523)

 

$

(24,146)

Adjusted EBITDA (1)

 

$

7,226

 

$

(1,019)

Capital expenditures

 

$

1,844

 

$

2,324

Free cash flow (2)

 

$

4,803

 

$

3,709

Operating working capital (3)

 

$

5,580

 

$

5,000

Total debt

 

$

13,422

 

$

13,338

Total orders

 

$

221,549

 

$

83,241

Backlog at end of period

 

$

142,302

 

$

96,456

Book-to-bill

 

 

1.2

 

 

0.7


(1)

We provide non-GAAP adjusted EBITDA (earnings before interest, income taxes, depreciation, amortization, share based compensation, and other stock payments, restructuring costs, impairment charges, and other non-cash gains and losses) as supplemental information regarding our business performance. Our management uses adjusted EBITDA when they internally evaluate the performance of our business, review financial trends and make operating and strategic decisions. We believe that this non-GAAP financial measure is useful to investors because it provides a better understanding of our past financial performance and future results, and it allows investors to evaluate our performance

28

using the same methodology and information as used by our management. Our definition of adjusted EBITDA may be different from similar non-GAAP financial measures used by other companies and/or analysts.

(2)

We define free cash flow as adjusted EBITDA plus or minus changes in operating working capital less capital expenditures net of any proceeds from disposals of property and equipment. We believe free cash flow is a useful measure for investors because it portrays our ability to generate cash from our business for purposes such as repaying maturing debt and funding business acquisitions.

(3)

We define operating working capital as accounts receivable and inventory net of accounts payable and customer deposits.

The following table reconciles our non-GAAP key financial measures to the most directly comparable GAAP measure:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Twelve Months Ended

 

 

December 31,

 

 

2019

 

2018

Net loss from continuing operations

    

$

(4,586)

    

$

(24,000)

Interest expense

 

 

2,309

 

 

1,494

Income tax provision (benefit)

 

 

39

 

 

(204)

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

7,497

 

 

9,183

Share-based compensation and other stock payments

 

 

1,955

 

 

1,504

Restructuring costs

 

 

12

 

 

668

Impairment charges

 

 

 —

 

 

12,585

NMTC extinguishment gain

 

 

 —

 

 

(2,249)

     Adjusted EBITDA

 

 

7,226

 

 

(1,019)

Changes in operating working capital

 

 

(580)

 

 

6,376

Capital expenditures

 

 

(1,844)

 

 

(2,324)

Proceeds from disposal of property and equipment

 

 

 1

 

 

676

     Free Cash Flow

 

$

4,803

 

$

3,709

 

29

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Year Ended December 31, 2019 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2018

The summary of selected financial data table below should be referenced in connection with a review of the following discussion of our results of operations for the year ended December 31, 2019 compared to the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

2019 vs. 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

% of Total

 

 

 

 

% of Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2019

 

Revenue

 

2018

 

Revenue

 

$ Change

 

% Change

 

Revenues

    

$

178,220

    

100.0

%  

$

125,380

 

100.0

%  

$

52,840

    

42.1

%  

Cost of sales

 

 

162,796

 

91.3

%  

 

121,684

 

97.1

%  

 

41,112

 

33.8

%  

Restructuring

 

 

12

 

0.0

%  

 

631

 

0.5

%  

 

(619)

 

(98.1)

%  

Gross profit

 

 

15,412

 

8.6

%  

 

3,065

 

2.4

%  

 

12,347

 

402.8

%  

Operating expenses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses

 

 

16,086

 

9.0

%  

 

13,625

 

10.9

%  

 

2,461

 

18.1

%  

Impairment charges

 

 

 —

 

 —

%  

 

12,585

 

10.0

%  

 

(12,585)

 

(100.0)

%  

Intangible amortization

 

 

1,683

 

0.9

%  

 

1,884

 

1.5

%  

 

(201)

 

(10.7)

%  

Restructuring

 

 

 —

 

 —

%  

 

37

 

0.0

%  

 

(37)

 

(100.0)

%  

Total operating expenses

 

 

17,769

 

10.0

%  

 

28,131

 

22.4

%  

 

(10,362)

 

(36.8)

%  

Operating loss

 

 

(2,357)

 

(1.3)

%  

 

(25,066)

 

(20.0)

%  

 

22,709

 

90.6

%  

Other expense, net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense, net

 

 

(2,309)

 

(1.3)

%  

 

(1,496)

 

(1.2)

%  

 

(813)

 

(54.3)

%  

Other, net

 

 

118

 

0.1

%  

 

2,355

 

1.9

%  

 

(2,237)

 

(95.0)

%  

Total other expense, net

 

 

(2,191)

 

(1.2)

%  

 

859

 

0.7

%  

 

(3,050)

 

(355.1)

%  

Net loss before provision (benefit) for income taxes

 

 

(4,548)

 

(2.6)

%  

 

(24,207)

 

(19.3)

%  

 

19,659

 

81.2

%  

Provision (benefit) for income taxes

 

 

38

 

0.0

%  

 

(205)

 

(0.2)

%  

 

243

 

118.5

%  

Loss from continuing operations

 

 

(4,586)

 

(2.6)

%  

 

(24,002)

 

(19.1)

%  

 

19,416

 

80.9

%  

Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of tax

 

 

63

 

0.0

%  

 

(144)

 

(0.1)

%  

 

207

 

143.8

%  

Net loss

 

$

(4,523)

 

(2.5)

%  

$

(24,146)

 

(19.3)

%  

$

19,623

 

81.3

%  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated

Revenues increased by $52,840 during the year ended December 31, 2019.   This increase was driven by higher capacity utilization in the Heavy Fabrications segment as tower sections sold increased 73% in support of a strengthening wind turbine installation market, and due to $3,482 of growth in other industrial fabrications sales.  Partially offsetting this improvement was a decrease in Gearing segment revenues of $3,499 due to lower demand from O&G customers. The Industrial Solutions segment recognized revenue of $14,664 in 2019 as compared to $12,467 in 2018 primarily due to increased demand for gas turbine components and because of our entry into the solar power generation market. Gross profit increased by $12,347 during the year ended December 31, 2019. The increase in gross profit reflects improved capacity utilization in the Heavy Fabrications segment and improved manufacturing efficiencies in all segments. These benefits were partially offset by the adverse impact of margin pressure associated with lower prices driven by increased competition from foreign tower manufacturers. As a result, our gross margin more than tripled from 2.4% for the year ended December 31, 2018, to 8.6% for the year ended December 31, 2019.

Operating expenses decreased $10,362 during the year ended December 31, primarily due to the absence of a $12,585 impairment charge recognized in the prior year. Partially offsetting this was increased incentive compensation and the absence of a $1,140 benefit associated with the reversal of the final earn-out reserve associated with the Red Wolf acquisition, which was recorded in 2018. As a result, operating expenses as a percentage of sales decreased from 22.4% to 10.0% in 2019.

30

Loss from continuing operations improved significantly from $24,002 for the year ended December 31, 2018 to $4,586 for the year ended December 31, 2019, primarily as a result of the factors described above.

Heavy Fabrications Segment

The following table summarizes the Heavy Fabrications segment operating results for the twelve months ended December 31, 2019 and 2018:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Twelve Months Ended

 

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2019

 

2018

 

Orders

 

$

179,657

    

$

28,604

 

Tower sections sold

 

 

934

 

 

540

 

Revenues

 

 

128,686

 

 

74,667

 

Operating income (loss)

 

 

1,861

 

 

(5,440)

 

Operating margin

 

 

1.4

%  

 

(7.3)

%  

 

The $151,053 increase in orders was driven primarily by tower customers securing 2020 production capacity in support of increased wind turbine installations.  During 2018, our largest customer fulfilled orders under a three-year framework agreement in which minimum contract orders were reported in backlog at the onset of the agreement in 2016 and is now placing orders on a project-by-project basis; this change in ordering also impacted the year-over-year comparison. Other industrial fabrication orders increased $5,682. Segment revenues increased by 72% during the year ended December 31, 2019 primarily due to a 73% increase in tower sections sold and a $3,482 increase in other industrial fabrication revenue, reflecting an expansion of our customer base and investments to broaden our manufacturing capabilities.

Heavy Fabrications segment operating results improved by $7,301 versus the prior year. The improvement in capacity utilization, the expansion of other industrial fabrications and the absence of plant start-up costs incurred in the prior year were partially offset by the negative impacts from increased competitive tower pricing pressure in the current year. Operating profit margin was 1.4% during the year ended December 31, 2019 compared to a loss of 7.3% during the year ended December 31, 2018.

Gearing Segment

The following table summarizes the Gearing segment operating results for the twelve months ended December 31, 2019 and 2018:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Twelve Months Ended

 

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2019

 

2018

 

Orders

 

$

25,466

    

$

41,576

 

Revenues

 

 

34,877

 

 

38,376

 

Operating income

 

 

3,237

 

 

51

 

Operating margin

 

 

9.3

%  

 

0.1

%  

 

Gearing segment orders decreased 39% from the year ended December 31, 2018, primarily due to a decrease in demand from O&G customers. The prior year period included the benefit of the industry’s expansion of fracking capacity and earlier than normal receipt of customer orders due to significantly longer lead times caused by  steel availability issues. Also demand was lower from aftermarket wind customers, which can fluctuate based on customer order patterns and repair activity levels. These reductions were partially offset by an increase in orders from other industrial customers.

31

Revenue decreased 9% during the year ended December 31, 2019 primarily due to a decrease in shipments to O&G customers, partially offset by an increase in sales to mining and aftermarket wind customers; custom gearbox revenue was double the prior year.

The Gearing segment operating income improved significantly to $3,237 during the year ended December 31, 2019 primarily due to a higher margin sales mix and improved manufacturing efficiencies, including lower scrap and warranty costs. The operating margin was 9.3% for the year ended December 31, 2019 compared to 0.1% during the year ended December 31, 2018.

Industrial Solutions Segment

The following table summarizes the Industrial Solutions segment operating results for the twelve months ended December 31, 2019 and 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Twelve Months Ended

 

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2019

 

2018

 

Orders

 

$

16,426

 

$

13,061

 

Revenues

 

 

14,664

 

 

12,467

 

Impairment charges

 

 

 -

 

 

12,585

 

Operating loss

 

 

(1,059)

 

 

(15,348)

 

Operating margin

 

 

(7.2)

%  

 

(123.1)

%  

 

Industrial Solutions segment orders increased 26% during the year ended December 31, 2019 primarily due to higher customer demand for new gas turbine content and diversification efforts linked to our solar market strategy, partially offset by lower customer demand for gas turbine aftermarket products. The same factors resulted in an 18% increase in revenues to $14,664 for the year ended December 31, 2019.

The Industrial Solutions segment operating results improved by $14,289 during the year ended December 31, 2019 primarily due to the absence of $12,585 in impairment charges recognized during 2018, lower related amortization expense, improved labor efficiency and higher prices.  This was partially offset by accelerated amortization of $871 in 2019 associated with the Red Wolf trade name.  Operating margin decreased from a loss of 123.1% during the year ended December 30, 2018, to a loss of 7.2% during the year ended December 31, 2019.

Corporate and Other

Corporate and Other expenses increased by $2,067 during the year ended December 31, 2019.  The increase was primarily attributable to the absence of a $1,140 benefit recognized in the prior year associated with the reversal of an earn-out reserve associated with the acquisition of Red Wolf, as well as higher incentive compensation recognized in the current year.

SUMMARY OF CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The methods, estimates and judgments that we use in applying our critical accounting policies have a significant impact on the results that we report in our financial statements. Some of our accounting policies require us to make difficult and subjective judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates regarding matters that are inherently uncertain.

We have identified the accounting policies listed below to be critical to obtain an understanding of our consolidated financial statements. This section should also be read in conjunction with Note 1, “Description of Business and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies” in the notes to our

32

consolidated financial statements for further discussion of these and other significant accounting policies.

Revenue Recognition

We recognize revenue when control of the promised goods or services is transferred to customers, in an amount that reflects the consideration the Company expects to be entitled to in exchange for those goods or services. Customer deposits and other receipts are deferred and recognized when the revenue is realized and earned. Cash payments to customers, like those made for liquidated damages, are presumed to be classified as reductions of revenue in our statement of operations.

In many instances within our Heavy Fabrications segment, wind towers are sold under terms included in bill and hold sales arrangements that result in different timing for revenue recognition versus shipment, due to our customers’ preference to ship products in batches to support efficient construction of wind farms. We recognize revenue under these arrangements when there is a substantive reason for the arrangement (i.e. the buyer requests the arrangement), the ordered goods are segregated from inventory and not available to fill other orders, the goods are currently ready for physical transfer to the customer, and we do not have the ability to use the product or to direct it to another customer. Assuming these required revenue recognition criteria are met, revenue is recognized upon completion of product manufacture and customer acceptance.

We adopted the provisions of Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, for the fiscal year beginning January 1, 2018 and elected the modified retrospective approach. Through our assessment of the ASC 606, we identified minimal changes to the assumptions utilized for the year ending December 31, 2017 and the adoption of the guidance did not result in a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

Warranty Liability

We provide warranty terms that generally range from one to five years for various products relating to workmanship and materials supplied by us. In certain contracts, we have recourse provisions for items that would enable us to seek recovery from third parties for amounts paid to customers under warranty provisions. We estimate the warranty accrual based on various factors, including historical warranty costs, current trends, product mix and sales.

Inventories

Inventories consist of raw materials, work-in-process and finished goods. Raw materials consist of components and parts for general production use. Work-in-process consists of labor and overhead, processing costs, purchased subcomponents, and materials purchased for specific customer orders. Finished goods consist of components purchased from third parties as well as components manufactured by us.

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Where necessary, we have recorded a reserve for the excess of cost over market value in our inventory allowance. Market value of inventory, and management’s judgment concerning the need for reserves, encompasses consideration of many business factors including physical condition, inventory holding period, contract terms and usefulness. Inventories are valued based either on actual cost or using a first‑in, first out method.

Long-Lived Assets

We review property and equipment and other long-lived assets (“long-lived assets”) for impairment whenever events or circumstances indicate that their carrying amounts may not be

33

recoverable. Due to the Industrial Solutions’ segment recent operating losses, we continue to evaluate the recoverability of certain of the long-lived assets associated with that segment. In accordance with GAAP, we compared the  carrying value of the Industrial Solutions asset group to the forecast undiscounted cash flows associated with this asset group. Based on the analysis performed, the forecast undiscounted cash flows exceeded the carrying value resulting in no indicated or recorded impairment of this group. However, in conjunction with our rebranding initiative, during 2019 we decided we would no longer utilize the Red Wolf trade name.  As a result, we accelerated the amortization of the trade name by $871 so that it was fully amortized in 2019.

Income Taxes

We account for income taxes based upon an asset and liability approach. Deferred tax assets and liabilities represent the future tax consequences of the differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of assets and liabilities versus the tax basis of assets and liabilities. Under this method, deferred tax assets are recognized for deductible temporary differences, and operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax liabilities are recognized for taxable temporary differences. Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance when, in the opinion of management, it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. The impact of tax rate changes on deferred tax assets and liabilities is recognized in the year that the change is enacted.

In connection with the preparation of our consolidated financial statements, we are required to estimate our income tax liability for each of the tax jurisdictions in which we operate. This process involves estimating our actual current income tax expense and assessing temporary differences resulting from differing treatment of certain income or expense items for income tax reporting and financial reporting purposes. We also recognize the expected future income tax benefits of net operating loss (“NOL”) carryforwards as deferred income tax assets. In evaluating the realizability of deferred income tax assets associated with NOL carryforwards, we consider, among other things, expected future taxable income, the expected timing of the reversals of existing temporary reporting differences, and the expected impact of tax planning strategies that may be implemented to prevent the potential loss of future income tax benefits. Changes in, among other things, income tax legislation, statutory income tax rates or future taxable income levels could materially impact our valuation of income tax assets and liabilities and could cause our income tax provision to vary significantly among financial reporting periods.

We also account for the uncertainty in income taxes related to the recognition and measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in an income tax return. We follow the applicable pronouncement guidance on derecognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure, and transition related to the uncertainty in these income tax positions.

Health Insurance Reserves

We self‑insure for our health insurance liabilities, including establishing reserves for self‑retained losses. Historical loss experience combined with actuarial evaluation methods and the application of risk transfer programs are used to determine required health insurance reserves. We take into account claims incurred but not reported when determining our health insurance reserves. Health insurance reserves are included in accrued liabilities. While we believe that we have adequately reserved for these claims, the ultimate outcome of these matters may exceed the amounts recorded and additional losses may be incurred.

34

LIQUIDITY, FINANCIAL POSITION AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

As of December 31, 2019, cash and cash equivalents totaled $2,416, an increase of $1,239 from December 31, 2018. We have in place a line of credit with CIBC Bank (the “Credit Facility”) under which we can borrow up to $35,000, depending on our borrowing base. Debt and finance lease obligations at December 31, 2019 totaled $14,641, and we had the ability to borrow up to $16,577 under the Credit Facility. We anticipate that we will be able to satisfy the cash requirements associated with, among other things, working capital needs, capital expenditures and lease commitments through at least the next twelve months primarily through cash generated from operations, available cash balances, our Credit Facility, additional equipment financing, and access to the public or private debt equity markets, including under a “shelf” registration statement on Form S-3, which was declared effective by the SEC on October 10, 2017.  

We also utilize supply chain financing arrangements as a component of our funding for working capital, which accelerates receivable collections and helps to better manage cash flow. Under these agreements, we have agreed to sell certain of our accounts receivable balances to banking institutions who have agreed to advance amounts equal to the net accounts receivable balances due, less a discount as set forth in the respective agreements. The balances under these agreements are accounted for as sales of accounts receivable, as they are sold without recourse. Cash proceeds from these agreements are reflected as operating activities included in the change in accounts receivable in the consolidated statements of cash flows. Fees incurred in connection with the agreements are recorded as interest expense.

On January 16, 2019, we executed the Sixth Amendment to Loan and Security Agreement which increased our capability to issue letters of credit under the Credit Facility.

On February, 25, 2019, we executed an Amended and Restated Loan and Security Agreement (the “Amended and Restated Loan Agreement”) which expanded our Credit Facility to $35,000 and extended the term to February 25, 2022. The Amended and Restated Loan Agreement included minimum EBITDA covenants through September 30, 2019 which has been replaced by a Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio.  We are in compliance with all covenants under the Credit Facility as of December 31, 2019. 

While we believe that we will continue to have sufficient cash available to operate our businesses and to meet our financial obligations and amended debt covenants, there can be no assurance that our operations will generate sufficient cash, that we will be able to comply with applicable loan covenants or that credit facilities will be available in an amount sufficient to enable us to repay our indebtedness or to fund our other liquidity needs. 

Sources and Uses of Cash

The following table summarizes our cash flows from operating, investing, and financing activities for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Twelve Months Ended

 

 

December 31,

 

 

2019

 

2018

Total cash provided by (used in):

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Operating activities

    

$

4,521

    

$

2,045

    Investing activities

 

 

(1,843)

 

 

(1,648)

    Financing activities

 

 

(1,444)

 

 

807

    Discontinued operations

 

 

 5

 

 

(105)

Net increase in cash

 

$

1,239

 

$

1,099

 

35

Operating Cash Flows

During the year ended December 31, 2019, net cash provided by operations was $4,521 compared to net cash provided by operating activities of $2,045 for the year ended December 31, 2018. The operating cash flow improvement was due primarily to the improved capacity utilization in the current year which resulted in a significantly improved operating results.  Partially offsetting this was a build of working capital in response to the higher production levels within the Heavy Fabrications segment, versus the prior year when working capital decreased primarily as a result of the significant collections of deposits related to new tower orders.

Investing Cash Flows

During the year ended December 31, 2019, net cash used in investing activities was $1,843 compared to net cash used in investing activities of $1,648 for the year ended December 31, 2018. The increase was primarily due to the absence of proceeds from property disposals in the prior year period.

Financing Cash Flows

During the year ended December 31, 2019, net cash used in financing activities totaled $1,444 compared to net cash provided by financing activities of $807 for the year ended December 31, 2018.  The decrease in net cash provided by financing activities was primarily due to the absence of financing activity resulting in $2,060 of proceeds on long-term debt that occurred in the prior year.

Other

In  2016, we entered into a $570 loan agreement with the Development Corporation of Abilene which is included in long-term debt, less current maturities. The loan is forgivable upon us meeting and maintaining specific employment thresholds. During each of the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, $114 of the loan was forgiven. As of December 31, 2019, the loan balance was $342. In addition, we have outstanding notes payable for capital expenditures in the amount of $1,563 and  $1,882 as of December 31, 2019  and 2018, respectively, with $1,400 and $930 included in the “Line of credit and other notes payable” line item of our consolidated financial statements as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. The notes payable have monthly payments that range from $1 to $36 and an interest rate of 5%. The equipment purchased is utilized as collateral for the notes payable. The outstanding notes payable have maturity dates that range from April 2020 to August 2022.

Contractual Obligations

We are a smaller reporting company as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act and as such are not required to provide information under this item. 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We have no off-balance sheet arrangements.

 

ITEM 7A.  QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

We are a smaller reporting company as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act and as such are not required to provide information under this item.

ITEM 8.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

The financial information required by Item 8 is contained in Part IV, Item 15 “EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES” of this Annual Report.

36

ITEM 9.  CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

None.

ITEM 9A.  CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

(a)Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

We seek to maintain disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act) that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. This information is also accumulated and communicated to management, including our Chief Executive Officer (“CEO”) and Chief Financial Officer (“CFO”), as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Our management, under the supervision and with the participation of our CEO and CFO, evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the most recent fiscal year reported on herein. Based on that evaluation, our CEO and CFO concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures are effective as of December 31, 2019.

(b)Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during our last fiscal quarter that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

(c)Report of Management on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

Our management, including our CEO and CFO, is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act).

Our management, including our CEO and CFO, assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2019. Management based this assessment on criteria for effective internal control over financial reporting described in “Internal Control—Integrated Framework (2013)” issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on this assessment, management determined that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of December 31, 2019.  

We are a smaller reporting company as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act and are not required to include an attestation report of our independent registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting.

ITEM 9B.  OTHER INFORMATION

None.    

37

PART III

ITEM 10.  DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

With the exception of the description of our Code of Ethics and Business Conduct below, the information required by this item is incorporated herein by reference from the discussion under the headings “Directors and Director Compensation,” “Corporate Governance,” “Executive Officers” and “Other Matters—Delinquent Section 16(a) Reports” in our definitive Proxy Statement to be filed in connection with our 2020 Annual Meeting of Stockholders (the “2020 Proxy Statement”).

Code of Ethics and Business Conduct

We have adopted a Code of Ethics and Business Conduct (the “Code”) that applies to all of our directors, executive officers and senior financial officers (including our principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer, controller, and any person performing similar functions). The Code is available on our website at www.bwen.com under the caption “Investors” and is available in print, free of charge, to any stockholder who sends a request for a paper copy to Broadwind Energy, Inc., Attn: Investor Relations, 3240 South Central Avenue, Cicero, IL 60804. We intend to include on our website any amendment to, or waiver from, a provision of the Code that applies to our principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer or controller, or persons performing similar functions, that relates to any element of the code of ethics definition enumerated in Item 406(b) of Regulation S‑K.

ITEM 11.  EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

Information regarding director and executive compensation is incorporated by reference from the discussion under the headings “Directors and Director Compensation” and “Executive Officers and Executive Compensation” in the 2020 Proxy Statement.

ITEM 12.  SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

Certain of the information required by this item is incorporated herein by reference from the discussion under the heading “Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Holders and Management” in the 2020 Proxy Statement.

The following table provides information as of December 31, 2019, with respect to shares of our common stock that may be issued under our existing equity compensation plans:

38

EQUITY COMPENSATION PLAN INFORMATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

(a)

    

(b)

    

(c)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of securities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

remaining available for

 

 

 

Number of securities

 

 

 

 

future issuances under

 

 

 

to be issued upon

 

Weighted-average

 

equity compensation

 

 

 

exercise of

 

exercise price of

 

plans (excluding

 

 

 

outstanding options,

 

outstanding options,

 

securities reflected in

 

Plan Category

 

warrants, and rights

 

warrants, and rights

 

column (a))

 

Equity compensation plans approved by stockholders

 

1,411,277

(1)

$

2.73

 

414,270

 

Total

 

1,411,277

 

$

2.73

 

414,270

 


(1)

Includes outstanding stock options to purchase shares of our common stock and outstanding restricted stock awards pursuant to the Amended and Restated Broadwind Energy, Inc. 2007 Equity Incentive Plan, the Broadwind Energy, Inc. 2012 Equity Incentive Plan, and the Broadwind Energy, Inc. 2015 Equity Incentive Plan. Each of these plans has been approved by our stockholders.

 

ITEM 13.  CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

The information required by this item is incorporated herein by reference from the discussion under the headings “Certain Transactions and Business Relationships” and “Corporate Governance” in the 2020 Proxy Statement.

ITEM 14.  PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

The information required by this item is incorporated herein by reference from the discussion under the heading “Ratification of Appointment of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm” in the 2020 Proxy Statement.

 

39

PART IV

ITEM 15.  EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

1.  Financial Statements

The financial statements listed on the Index to Financial Statements (page 41) are filed as part of this Annual Report.

2.  Financial Statement Schedules

These schedules have been omitted because the required information is included in the consolidated financial statements or notes thereto or because they are not applicable or not required.

3.  Exhibits

The exhibits listed on the Index to Exhibits (pages 77 through 80) are filed as part of this Annual Report.

ITEM 16.  FORM 10-K SUMMARY

None. 

40

41

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

To the Stockholders and the Board of Directors of Broadwind Energy, Inc.

Opinion on the Financial Statements

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Broadwind Energy, Inc. (the Company) as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, the related consolidated statements of operations, stockholders’ equity and cash flows for the years then ended, and the related notes to the consolidated financial statements (collectively, the financial statements). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the years then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

Basis for Opinion

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits we are required to obtain  an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

/s/ RSM US LLP

We have served as the Company's auditor since 2016.

Chicago, Illinois

February 27, 2020

42

BROADWIND ENERGY, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(In thousands, except share data)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As of December 31,

 

 

    

 

2019

    

2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CURRENT ASSETS:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash

 

 

$

2,416

 

$

1,177

 

Accounts receivable, net

 

 

 

18,310

 

 

17,455

 

Inventories, net

 

 

 

31,863

 

 

22,670

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

 

2,124

 

 

1,776

 

Total current assets

 

 

 

54,713

 

 

43,078

 

LONG-TERM ASSETS:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Property and equipment, net

 

 

 

46,940

 

 

49,087

 

Operating lease right-of-use assets

 

 

 

15,980

 

 

 —

 

Other intangible assets, net

 

 

 

4,919

 

 

6,602

 

Other assets

 

 

 

314

 

 

398

 

TOTAL ASSETS

 

 

$

122,866

 

$

99,165

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CURRENT LIABILITIES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Line of credit and other notes payable

 

 

$

12,917

 

$

11,930

 

Current portion of finance lease obligations

 

 

 

546

 

 

967

 

Current portion of operating lease obligations

 

 

 

1,326

 

 

 —

 

Accounts payable

 

 

 

21,876

 

 

11,618

 

Accrued liabilities

 

 

 

4,911

 

 

3,806

 

Customer deposits

 

 

 

22,717

 

 

23,507

 

Current liabilities held for sale

 

 

 

 —

 

 

27

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

 

64,293

 

 

51,855

 

LONG-TERM LIABILITIES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long-term debt, net of current maturities

 

 

 

505

 

 

1,408

 

Long-term finance lease obligations, net of current portion

 

 

 

673

 

 

571

 

Long-term operating lease obligations, net of current portion

 

 

 

16,591

 

 

 —

 

Other

 

 

 

44

 

 

1,969

 

Total long-term liabilities

 

 

 

17,813

 

 

3,948

 

COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 10,000,000 shares authorized; no shares issued or outstanding

 

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

Common stock, $0.001 par value; 30,000,000 shares authorized; 16,830,930 and 15,982,622 shares issued as of December 31, 2019, and December 31, 2018, respectively

 

 

 

17

 

 

16

 

Treasury stock, at cost, 273,937 shares as of December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018

 

 

 

(1,842)

 

 

(1,842)

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

 

383,361

 

 

381,441

 

Accumulated deficit

 

 

 

(340,776)

 

 

(336,253)

 

Total stockholders’ equity

 

 

 

40,760

 

 

43,362

 

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

 

$

122,866

 

$

99,165

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

43

BROADWIND ENERGY, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(In thousands, except per share data)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the Years Ended December 31,

 

 

 

 

 

 

2019

    

2018

    

 

Revenues

 

 

 

 

$

178,220

 

$

125,380

 

 

Cost of sales

 

 

 

 

 

162,796

 

 

121,684

 

 

Restructuring

 

 

 

 

 

12

 

 

631

 

 

Gross profit

 

 

 

 

 

15,412

 

 

3,065

 

 

OPERATING EXPENSES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Selling, general and administrative

 

 

 

 

 

16,086

 

 

13,625

 

 

Impairment charges

 

 

 

 

 

 —

 

 

12,585

 

 

Intangible amortization

 

 

 

 

 

1,683

 

 

1,884

 

 

Restructuring

 

 

 

 

 

 —