485BPOS 1 csis485bfiled0612.htm csis485bfiled0612.htm - Generated by SEC Publisher for SEC Filing

 

SEC Registration Nos.
Nos. 811-09877 and 333-34122 

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549 

FORM N-1A 

REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER THE
SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 

Post-Effective Amendment No. 20            XX

and/or

REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER THE
INVESTMENT ACT OF 1940 

Amendment No. 22                         XX 

Calvert Social Index Series, Inc.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Charter) 

4550 Montgomery Avenue
Bethesda, Maryland 20814
(Address of Principal Executive Offices) 

Registrant's Telephone Number: (301) 951-4800 

William M. Tartikoff
4550 Montgomery Avenue
Bethesda, Maryland 20814
(Name and Address of Agent for Service)


 

It is proposed that this filing will become effective (check appropriate box):

o

 

immediately upon filing pursuant to paragraph (b)

þ

 

on July 13, 2012 pursuant to paragraph (b)

o

 

60 days after filing pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)

o

 

on (date) pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)

o

 

75 days after filing pursuant to paragraph (a)(2)

o

 

on (date) pursuant to paragraph (a)(2) of Rule 485.

 


 

 

EXPLANATORY NOTE

 

 

This Post-Effective Amendment is being filed solely for the purpose of registering Class Y Shares of Calvert Social Index Fund, a series of the Registrant.

 

This filing is being made pursuant to Rule 485(b)(1)(vii) following grant of a request for permission to file pursuant to Rule 485(b)(1)(vii) made on May 21, 2012.

 

Pursuant to the provisions of Rule 24f-2 under the Investment Company Act of 1940, Registrant declares that an indefinite number of its shares of beneficial interest are being registered under the Securities Act of 1933 by this registration statement.

 


 

 

 

July 13, 2012
    Class (Ticker)  
Calvert Signature Strategies®      
  Calvert Social Index Fund A (CSXAX) B (CSXBX) C (CSXCX)  Y (CISYX)

 

 
 
These securities have not been approved or disapproved by the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) or any State Securities Commission, and neither the SEC nor any State Securities Commission has determined that this Prospectus is accurate or adequate. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

Calvert Social Index Fund Prospectus
Class Y
July 13 ,2012

 



 



 


Class (Ticker): Y (CISYX)

INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE

The Fund seeks to match the performance of the Calvert Social Index®, which measures the investment return of large- and mid-capitalization stocks. This objective may be changed by the Fund's Board of Directors without shareholder approval.

FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND

This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund.

Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)    
  Class Y  
Maximum sales charge (load) on None  
purchases (as a % of offering price)    
Maximum deferred sales charge (load) (as a % of amount None  
purchased or redeemed, whichever is lower) 1    
Redemption fee (as a % of amount redeemed or exchanged 2.00 %
within 30 days of purchase)    
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a  
% of the value of your investment)    
  Class Y  
Management fees 1 0.40 %
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees None  
Other expenses 0.47 %
Total annual fund operating expenses 0.87 %
Less fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement 2 0.27 %
Net expenses 0.60 %

 

1 Management fees are restated to reflect current fiscal year fees rather than the fees in effect during the previous fiscal year.

2 The investment advisor has agreed to contractually limit direct net annual fund operating expenses through January 31, 2014. Direct net operating expenses will not exceed 0.60% for Class Y. Only the Board of Directors of the Fund may terminate the Fund's expense cap before the contractual period expires.

Example

This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that:

• you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated
• your investment has a 5% return each year;
• the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same; and
• any Calvert expense limitation is in effect for the period indicated in the fee table above.

Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, under these assumptions your costs would be:

1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
$61 $251 $456 $1,048

 

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (“turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the “Example”, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 8% of its portfolio’s average value.

INVESTMENTS, RISKS AND PERFORMANCE

Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund employs a passive management strategy designed to track, as closely as possible, the performance of the Calvert Social Index. The Fund uses a replication index method, investing in the common stock of each company in the Index in about the same proportion as represented in the Index itself. The Fund will normally invest at least 95% of its net assets, including borrowings for investment purposes, in securities contained in the Index. The Fund will provide shareholders with at least 60 days’ notice before changing this policy.

Calvert Social Index. The Calvert Social Index measures the performance of those companies that meet the sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria and that are selected from the universe of approximately the 1,000 largest U.S. companies, based on total market capitalization, included in the Dow Jones Total Market Index (the “Dow Jones TMI”). The Dow Jones TMI represents the top 95% of U.S. companies based on float-adjusted market capitalization, excluding the very smallest and least-liquid stocks. As of December 31, 2011, the capitalization range of the Calvert Social Index was $502 million to $376 billion, and the weighted average capitalization was $81.4 billion. The Fund seeks to have a weighted average capitalization that approximates that of the Index. As of December 31, 2011, there were 671 companies in the Index, though this number will change over time due to company mergers or changes due to Calvert’s evaluation of an issuer’s conduct relative to the Fund’s sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria. The Index is reconstituted once a year based on an updated list of the 1,000 largest U.S. companies. The Index is also reviewed quarterly to adjust for sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria and other factors.

CALVERT SOCIAL INDEX FUND PROSPECTUS CLASS Y 4


 

Sustainable and Socially Responsible Investing. The Fund’s sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria are described in this Prospectus under “About Sustainable and Socially Responsible Investing.” Calvert continuously evaluates the performance of companies included in the Calvert Social Index to ensure compliance with these criteria.

Principal Risks

You could lose money on your investment in the Fund, or the Fund could underperform, because of the risks described below. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency.

Index Tracking Risk. An index fund has operating expenses; a market index does not. Although expected to track its target index as closely as possible while satisfying its investment criteria, including financial, sustainability and social responsibility factors, the Fund will not be able to match the performance of the index exactly.

Stock Market Risk. The stock market or the Calvert Social Index may fall in value, causing prices of stocks held by the Fund to fall.

Common Stock Risk. Although common stocks have a history of long-term growth in value, their prices fluctuate based on changes in a company’s financial condition, on overall market and economic conditions, and on investors’ perception of a company’s well-being.

Large-Cap Company Risk. Large-cap companies may be unable to respond quickly to new competitive challenges such as changes in technology, and also may not be able to attain the high growth rate of successful smaller companies, especially during extended periods of economic expansion.

Mid-Cap Company Risk. Prices of mid-cap stocks can be more volatile than those of larger, more established companies. Mid-cap companies are more likely to have more limited product lines, fewer capital resources and less depth of management than larger companies.

Performance

The following bar chart and table show the Fund’s annual returns and its long-term performance, which give some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows how the performance of the Class Y shares has varied from year to year. The table compares the Fund’s performance over time with that of an index and an average.

The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) does not necessarily indicate how the Fund will perform in the future. For updated performance information, visit www.calvert.com.

Performance results for Class Y shares prior to July 13, 2012 (the Class Y shares’ inception date) reflect the performance of Class A shares at net asset value. Actual Class Y share performance would have been higher than Class A share performance because Class Y, unlike Class A, has no Rule 12b-1 fees.


  Quarter Total  
  Ended Return  
Best Quarter (of periods shown) 6/30/09 18.19 %
Worst Quarter (of periods shown) 12/31/08 -25.52 %

 

After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates, and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on your tax situation and may differ from those shown. The after-tax returns shown are not relevant to you if you hold your Fund shares through a tax-deferred arrangement such as a 401(k) plan or individual retirement account. The return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares may be higher than the return before taxes because the calculation assumes that shareholders receive a tax benefit for capital losses incurred on the sale of their shares.

Average Annual Total Returns            
(as of 12/31/11) 1 year 5 years   10 years  
Class Y:            
Return before taxes -0.51 % -1.44 % 1.16 %
Return after taxes on distributions -0.64 % -1.59 % 1.02 %
Return after taxes on distributions -0.15 % -1.23 % 0.98 %
     and sale of Fund shares            
Calvert Social Index 0.22 % -0.28 % 2.16 %
(reflects no deduction for fees,            
expenses or taxes)            
Lipper Multi-Cap Core Funds Avg. -2.68 % -0.65 % 3.50 %
(reflects no deduction for taxes)            

 

CALVERT SOCIAL INDEX FUND PROSPECTUS CLASS Y 5


 

PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT

Investment Advisor. Calvert Investment Management, Inc. ("Calvert" or the "Advisor")

Investment Subadvisor. World Asset Management, Inc. ("World Asset")

Portfolio Manager Title Length of Time
Name   Managing Fund
Eric R. Lessnau Senior Portfolio Manager, World Asset Since December 2008
David J. Jones Portfolio Manager, Since March 2009
  World Asset  

 

BUYING AND SELLING SHARES

You can buy, sell (redeem) or exchange shares of the Fund through a financial professional on any day that the New York Stock Exchange is open. The share price is based on the Fund’s net asset value, determined after receipt of your request in good order.

Minimum Investments        
Account Type   Initial   Subsequent
Regular Accounts $ 5,000 $ 250
IRA Accounts $ 2,000 $ 250

 

For automatic investment plans, the minimum initial investment requirements are waived if you establish a $100 monthly investment plan. For an account that has met the minimum initial investment requirement described above, you may make subsequent automatic investments of $50.

The Fund may waive investment minimums and applicable service fees for certain investors.

To buy or sell shares, contact your financial professional.

TAX INFORMATION

Unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account, any dividends and distributions made by the Fund are taxable to you as ordinary income or capital gains and may also be subject to state and local taxes.

PAYMENTS TO BROKER/DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES

If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker/dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker/dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s Web site for more information.

CALVERT SOCIAL INDEX FUND PROSPECTUS CLASS Y 6


 

MORE INFORMATION ON FEES AND EXPENSES

REDEMPTION FEE

The redemption fee applies to redemptions, including exchanges, within 30 days of purchase. This fee is intended to ensure that the portfolio trading costs are borne by investors making the transactions and not by shareholders already in the Fund. The fee is deducted from the redemption proceeds. It is payable to the Class of the Fund from which the redemption is made and is accounted for as an addition to paid-in capital. The fee will not be charged directly on certain retirement account platforms and other similar omnibus-type accounts, but rather on their participants by the subtransfer agent and remitted to the Fund. See “How to Sell Shares/Redemption Fee” in this Prospectus for situations where the fee may be waived.

MANAGEMENT FEES

Management fees include the advisory fee paid by the Fund to the Advisor and the administrative fee paid by the Fund to Calvert Investment Administrative Services, Inc., an affiliate of the Advisor.

With respect to the amount of the Fund’s advisory fee, see “Advisory Fees” in this Prospectus. The administrative fees (as a percentage of the Fund's net assets) paid by the Fund for the most recent fiscal year were 0.208%.1

1 Effective February 1, 2011, the administrative fee was changed to 0.20% of the Fund's average daily net assets.

OTHER EXPENSES

“Other expenses” include custodial, transfer agent and subtransfer agent/recordkeeping payments, as well as various other expenses. Subtransfer agent/recordkeeping payments may be made to third parties (including affiliates of the Advisor) that provide recordkeeping and other administrative services.

CONTRACTUAL FEE WAIVERS AND/OR EXPENSE REIMBURSEMENTS

Where Calvert has contractually agreed to a fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement, the expense limitation does not limit any acquired fund fees and expenses paid indirectly by a shareholder. The Example in the Fund Summary reflects the expense limits set forth in the fee table but only through the contractual date. Under the terms of the contractual expense limitation, operating expenses do not include interest expense, brokerage commissions, extraordinary expenses, performance fee adjustments (if applicable), and taxes. The Fund does not expect to incur a material amount of interest expense in the fiscal year.

The Fund has an expense offset arrangement with the custodian bank whereby the custodian fees may be paid indirectly by credits on the Fund’s uninvested cash balances. These credits are used to reduce the Fund’s expenses. Under those circumstances where the Advisor has provided to the Fund a contractual expense limitation, and to the extent any expense offset credits are earned, the Advisor may benefit from the expense offset arrangement and the Advisor’s obligation under the contractual limitation may be reduced by the credits earned. Expense offset credits, if applicable, are included in the line item “Less fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement” in the fee table in the Fund Summary. The amount of this credit received by the Fund, if any, during the most recent fiscal year is reflected in the “Financial Highlights” in this Prospectus as the difference between the line items “Expenses Before Offsets” and “Net Expenses.” See “Investment Advisor and Subadvisors” in the Fund’s SAI for more information.

EXAMPLE

The example in the fee table for the Fund also assumes that you reinvest all dividends and distributions.

CALVERT SOCIAL INDEX FUND PROSPECTUS CLASS Y 7


 

MORE INFORMATION ON INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RISKS

A concise description of the Fund’s principal investment strategies and principal risks is under the earlier Fund Summary for the Fund. On the following pages are further descriptions of these principal investment strategies and techniques, as well as certain non-principal investment strategies and techniques of the Fund, along with their associated risks. The Fund has additional non-principal investment policies and restrictions, which are discussed under “Non-Principal Investment Policies and Risks” in the Fund’s SAI.

For certain investment strategies listed, the table below shows the Fund’s limitations as a percentage of either its net or total assets. Numbers in this table show maximum allowable amount only; for actual usage, consult the Fund’s annual/semi-annual reports. (Please see the pages of this Prospectus following the table for descriptions of the investment strategies and definitions of the principal types of risks involved. Explanatory information about certain investment strategies of the Fund is also provided below.)


1 Calvert Social Index Fund may invest in foreign securities to the extent necessary to carry out its investment strategy of investing at least 95% of its net assets in securities contained in the Calvert Social Index. The Index (and therefore the Fund) may include securities issued by companies located outside the U.S. but only if they are traded primarily on a major U.S. exchange.

2 Based on initial margin required to establish position.

CALVERT SOCIAL INDEX FUND PROSPECTUS CLASS Y 8


 

Description of Investment Strategies and Associated Risks

The investment strategies listed in the table above are described below, and the principal types of risk involved with each strategy are listed. See the “Glossary of Certain Investment Risks” for definitions of these risk types.

Investment Techniques and Associated Risks  
Active Trading Strategy/Turnover involves selling a security soon after purchase. An active trading strategy causes a Fund to have higher portfolio turnover compared to other funds, exceeding 100%, and may translate to higher transaction costs, such as commissions and custodian and settlement fees. Because this strategy may cause the Fund to have
a relatively high amount of short-term capital gains, which generally are taxable at the ordinary income tax rate, it may increase an investor’s tax liability.
Risks: Opportunity, Market and Transaction
Temporary Defensive Positions. During adverse market, economic or political conditions, the Fund may depart from its principal investment strategies by holding cash and investing in cash equivalents. During times of any temporary defensive position, a Fund may not be able to achieve its investment objective. Risks: Opportunity
Exchange-Traded Funds (“ETFs”) are shares of other investment companies that can be traded in the secondary market (e.g., on an exchange) but whose underlying assets are stocks selected to track a particular index. ETFs are used for the limited purpose of managing a Fund’s cash position consistent with the Fund’s applicable benchmark to
reduce deviations from the benchmark while enabling the Fund to accommodate its need for periodic liquidity.
Risks: Correlation and Market
 
Conventional Securities and Associated Risks  
Stocks in General. Common stocks represent an ownership interest in a company. They may or may not pay dividends or carry voting rights. Common stock occupies the most junior position in a company’s capital structure. Debt securities and preferred stocks have rights senior to a company’s common stock. Stock prices overall may decline over short or even long periods. The type of stock (large-cap, mid-cap, growth, value, etc.) purchased pursuant to a Fund’s investment style tends to go through cycles of doing better or worse than the stock market in general, and its returns may trail returns of other asset classes. Finally, individual stocks may lose value for a variety of reasons, even when the overall stock market has increased. Factors which can negatively impact the value of common stocks include economic factors such as interest rates, and non-economic factors such as political events. Risks: Market
Foreign securities. Foreign securities are securities issued by entities whose principal place of business is located outside the U.S. Risks: Market, Currency,
Transaction, Liquidity, Information and Political
Illiquid securities. Securities which cannot be readily sold because there is no active market. Special Equities (venture capital private placements) and High Social Impact Investments are illiquid. Risks: Liquidity, Market and Transaction
 
Leveraged Derivative Instruments and Associated Risks  
 
Futures contracts. Agreements to buy or sell a specific amount of a commodity or financial instrument at a particular price on a specific future date. Risks: Interest Rate, Currency,
Market, Leverage, Correlation,
Liquidity and Opportunity
 
Glossary of Certain Investment Risks  
Correlation risk The risk that when a Fund “hedges,” two investments may not behave in relation to one another the way Fund managers expect them to, which may have unexpected or undesired results. For example, a hedge may reduce potential gains or may exacerbate losses instead of reducing them. For ETFs, there is a risk of tracking error. An ETF may not be able to exactly replicate the performance of the underlying index due to operating expenses and other factors (e.g., holding cash even though the underlying benchmark index is not composed of cash), and because transactions occur at market prices instead of at net asset value.
Currency risk The risk that when a Fund buys, sells or holds a security denominated in foreign currency, adverse changes in foreign currency rates may cause investment losses when a Fund’s investments are converted to U.S. dollars. Currency risk may be hedged or unhedged. Unhedged currency exposure may result in gains or losses as a result of a change in the relationship between the U.S. dollar and the respective foreign currency.
Information risk The risk that information about a security or issuer or the market might not be available, complete, accurate, or comparable.
Liquidity risk The risk that occurs when investments cannot be readily sold. A Fund may have to accept a less-than-desirable price to complete the sale of an illiquid security or may not be able to sell it at all.
Market risk The risk that securities prices in a market, a sector or an industry will fluctuate, and that such movements might reduce an investment’s value.
Opportunity risk The risk of missing out on an investment opportunity because the assets needed to take advantage of it are committed to less advantageous investments or strategies.

 

CALVERT SOCIAL INDEX FUND PROSPECTUS CLASS Y 9


 

Political risk The risk that may occur when the value of a foreign investment may be adversely affected by nationalization, taxation, war, government instability or other economic or political actions or factors, including risk of expropriation.
Transaction risk The risk that a Fund may be delayed or unable to settle a transaction or that commissions and settlement expenses may be higher than usual.

 

Explanation of Investment Strategies Used by Certain Funds

Indexing. An index is a group of securities whose overall performance is used as a standard to measure investment performance. An index (or “passively managed”) fund tries to match, as closely as possible, the performance of an established target index. An index fund’s goal is to mirror the target index whether the index is going up or down. Therefore, index funds do not need the costly research and analysis employed by active fundamental asset managers. The sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria used by the Calvert Social Index may result in economic sector weightings that are significantly different from those of the overall market, and those overweightings/underweightings may be out of favor in the market. To track its target index as closely as possible, the Fund attempts to remain fully invested in stocks. To help stay fully invested, and to reduce transaction costs, the Fund may invest to a limited extent in stock futures contracts, or other registered investment companies. The Fund may purchase U.S. Treasury securities in connection with its hedging activities.

The Fund uses a replication method of indexing. If assets should ever decline to below $20 million, it may use the sampling method. The replication method involves holding every security in the Calvert Social Index in about the same proportion as the Index. The sampling method involves selecting a representative number of securities that will resemble the Index in terms of key risk and other characteristics.

Although index funds by their nature tend to be tax-efficient investment vehicles, the Fund generally is managed without regard to tax ramifications.

Futures Contracts. A futures contract is an agreement between two parties to buy and sell a security on a future date which has the effect of establishing the current price for the security. Many futures contracts by their terms require actual delivery and acceptance of securities, but some allow for cash settlement of the difference between the futures price and the market value of the underlying security or index at time of delivery. The value of a futures contract tends to increase and decrease in tandem with the value of the underlying instrument. The price of futures can be highly volatile; using them could lower total return, and the potential loss from futures can exceed a Fund's initial investment in such contracts.

PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS

The Fund’s portfolio holdings are included in Semi-Annual and Annual Reports that are distributed to shareholders of the Fund. The Fund also discloses its portfolio holdings in its Schedule of Investments on Form N-Q, which is filed with the SEC no later than 60 days after the close of the first and third fiscal quarters. These filings are publicly available at the SEC.

A description of the Fund’s policies and procedures with respect to disclosure of the Fund’s portfolio securities is available under “Portfolio Holdings Disclosure” in the Fund’s SAI.

ABOUT SUSTAINABLE AND SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE INVESTING

CALVERT SIGNATURE STRATEGIES®

Investment Selection Process

In seeking to achieve the Fund’s investment objective, investments are first selected for financial soundness and then evaluated according to the Fund’s sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria. Only companies that meet all of the Fund’s environment, social, and governance (“ESG”) criteria are eligible for investment. To the greatest extent possible, the Fund seeks to invest in companies that exhibit positive performance with respect to one or more of the ESG criteria. Investments for the Fund must be consistent with the Fund’s current investment criteria, including financial, sustainability and social responsibility factors, the application of which is in the economic interest of the Fund and its shareholders.

CALVERT SOCIAL INDEX FUND PROSPECTUS CLASS Y 10


 

Investments in fixed-income securities may be made prior to the application of the sustainability and social responsibility analysis, due to the nature of the fixed-income market. Unlike equities, fixed-income securities are not available on exchange traded markets, and the window of availability may not be sufficient to permit Calvert to perform sustainability and social responsibility analysis prior to purchase. However, following purchase, the fixed-income security is evaluated according to the Fund’s sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria and if it is not found to meet the standards for the Fund’s sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria, the security will be sold per Calvert’s procedures, at a time that is in the best interests of the shareholders.

Investment decisions on whether a company meets the Fund’s sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria typically apply to all securities issued by that company. In rare instances, however, different decisions can be made on a company’s equity and its debt.

Although the Fund’s sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria tend to limit the availability of investment opportunities more than is customary with other investment companies and may overweight certain sectors or types of investments that may or may not be in favor in the market, Calvert and the Subadvisor of the Fund believe there are sufficient investment opportunities to permit full investment among issuers which satisfy the Fund’s investment objective and its sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria.

The Fund may invest in ETFs for the limited purpose of managing the Fund’s cash position consistent with the Fund’s benchmark. The ETFs in which the Fund may invest will not be subject to sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria and will not be required to meet such criteria otherwise applicable to investments made by the Fund. In addition, the ETFs in which the Fund may invest may hold securities of companies or entities that the Fund could not invest in directly because such companies or entities do not meet the Fund’s sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria. The principal purpose of investing in ETFs is not to meet the sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria by investing in individual companies, but rather to help the Fund meet its investment objective by obtaining market exposure to securities in the Fund’s benchmark while enabling it to accommodate its need for periodic liquidity.

The selection of an investment by the Fund does not constitute endorsement or validation by the Fund, nor does the exclusion of an investment necessarily reflect failure to satisfy the Fund’s sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria. Investors are invited to send to Calvert a brief description of companies they believe might be suitable for investment.

Sustainable and Socially Responsible Investment Criteria

The Fund seeks to invest in companies and other enterprises that demonstrate positive ESG performance as they address corporate responsibility and sustainability challenges. Calvert believes that there are long-term benefits in an investment philosophy that attaches material weight to the environment, workplace relations, human rights, Indigenous Peoples’ rights, community relations, product safety and impact, and corporate governance and business ethics. Calvert also believes that managing risks and opportunities related to these issues can contribute positively to company performance as well as to investment performance.

The Fund has developed sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria, detailed below. These criteria represent ESG standards which few, if any, organizations totally satisfy. As a matter of practice, evaluation of a particular organization in the context of these criteria will involve subjective judgment by Calvert and the Subadvisors, drawing on the Fund’s longstanding commitment to economic and social justice. All sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria may be changed by the Board of Directors without shareholder approval.

The Fund seeks to invest in companies that:

• Take positive steps to improve environmental management and performance, advance sustainable development, or provide innovative and effective solutions to environmental problems through their products and services.

• Maintain positive diversity, labor relations, and employee health and safety practices, including inclusive and robust diversity policies, programs and training, and disclosure of workforce diversity data; have strong labor codes ideally consistent with the International Labor Organization (“ILO”) core standards, comprehensive benefits and training opportunities, and sound employee relations, as well as strong employee health and safety policies, safety management systems and training, and positive safety performance records.

• Observe appropriate international human rights standards in operations in all countries. • Respect Indigenous Peoples and their lands, cultures, knowledge, environment, and livelihoods.

• Produce or market products and services that are safe and enhance the health or quality of life of consumers.

• Contribute to the quality of life in the communities where they operate, such as through stakeholder engagement with local com-munities, corporate philanthropy and employee volunteerism.

• Uphold sound corporate governance and business ethics policies and practices, including independent and diverse boards, and

CALVERT SOCIAL INDEX FUND PROSPECTUS CLASS Y 11


 

respect for shareholder rights; align executive compensation with corporate performance, maintain sound legal and regulatory compliance records, and disclose environmental, social and governance information.

The Fund seeks to avoid investing in companies that:

• Demonstrate poor environmental performance or compliance records, or contribute significantly to local or global environmental problems; or own or operate nuclear power plants or have substantial contracts to supply key components in the nuclear power process.

• Are the subject of serious labor-related actions or penalties by regulatory agencies or demonstrate a pattern of employing forced, compulsory or child labor.

• Exhibit a pattern and practice of human rights violations or are directly complicit in human rights violations committed by govern-ments or security forces, including those that are under U.S. or international sanction for grave human rights abuses, such as genocide and forced labor.

• Exhibit a pattern and practice of violating the rights and protections of Indigenous Peoples.

• Demonstrate poor corporate governance or engage in harmful or unethical business practices.

• Manufacture tobacco products.

• Are significantly involved in the manufacture of alcoholic beverages. • Have direct involvement in gambling operations.

• Manufacture, design, or sell weapons or the critical components of weapons that violate international humanitarian law; or manu-facture, design, or sell inherently offensive weapons, as defined by the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe and the UN

Register on Conventional Arms, or the munitions designed for use in such inherently offensive weapons.

• Manufacture or sell firearms and/or ammunition.

• Abuse animals, cause unnecessary suffering and death of animals, or whose operations involve the exploitation or mistreatment of animals.

• Develop genetically-modified organisms for environmental release without countervailing social benefits such as demonstrating lead-ership in promoting safety, protection of Indigenous Peoples’ rights, the interests of organic farmers and the interests of developing countries generally.

Shareholder Advocacy and Corporate Responsibility

As the Fund’s Advisor, Calvert takes a proactive role to make a tangible positive contribution to our society and that of future generations. Calvert uses strategic engagement and shareholder advocacy to encourage positive change in companies in virtually every industry, both to establish certain commitments and to encourage concrete progress. Calvert’s activities may include but are not limited to:

Dialogue with companies

Calvert regularly initiates dialogue with company management as part of its sustainability research process. After the Fund has become a shareholder, Calvert often continues its dialogue with management through phone calls, letters and in-person meetings. Through its interaction, Calvert learns about management’s successes and challenges and presses for improvement on issues of concern.

Proxy voting

As a shareholder in the various portfolio companies, the Fund is guaranteed an opportunity each year to express its views on issues of corporate governance and sustainability at annual stockholder meetings. Calvert votes all proxies consistent with the sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria of the Fund.

Shareholder resolutions

Calvert proposes resolutions on a variety of sustainability and social responsibility issues. It files shareholder resolutions to help establish dialogue with corporate management and to encourage companies to take action. In most cases, Calvert’s efforts have led to negotiated settlements with positive results for shareholders and companies alike. For example, one of its shareholder resolutions resulted in a company’s first-ever disclosure of its equal employment policies, programs and workforce demographics.

CALVERT SOCIAL INDEX FUND PROSPECTUS CLASS Y 12


 

SPECIAL INVESTMENT PROGRAMS

As part of Calvert’s and Fund shareholders’ ongoing commitment to providing and fostering innovative initiatives, the Fund may invest a small percentage of its assets through special investment programs that are non-principal investment strategies pioneered by Calvert –High Social Impact Investments, Special Equities, and the Calvert Manager Discovery Program.

High Social Impact Investments

High Social Impact Investments is a program that targets up to 1% of the Fund’s assets. High Social Impact Investments offer a rate of return below the then-prevailing market rate and present attractive opportunities for furthering the Fund’s sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria.

These investments may be either debt or equity investments. These types of investments are illiquid. High Social Impact debt investments are unrated and below-investment grade, and involve a greater risk of default or price decline than investment grade securities. The Fund believes that these investments have a significant sustainability and social responsibility return through their impact in our local communities.

The Fund’s High Social Impact Investments are fair valued by a fair value team consisting of officers of the Fund and of the Fund’s Advisor, as determined in good faith under consistently applied valuation procedures adopted by the Fund’s Board and under the ultimate supervision of the Board. See “How Shares Are Priced” in this Prospectus. The Fund’s High Social Impact Investments can be made through direct investments, or placed through intermediaries, such as the Calvert Social Investment Foundation (as discussed below).

Pursuant to an exemptive order issued by the SEC, the Fund may invest those assets allocated for investment through the High Social Impact Investments program with the purchase of Community Investment Notes issued by the Calvert Social Investment Foundation. The Calvert Social Investment Foundation is a non-profit organization, legally distinct from the Fund and Calvert Investments, Inc., organized as a charitable and educational foundation for the purpose of increasing public awareness and knowledge of the concept of socially responsible investing. It has instituted the Calvert Community Investments program to raise assets from individual and institutional investors and then invest these assets in non-profit or not-for-profit community development organizations, community development banks, cooperatives and social enterprises that focus on low income housing, economic development, business development and other social and environmental considerations in urban and rural communities that may lead to a more just and sustainable society in the U.S. and around the globe.

The Fund may also invest in high social impact issuers through social enterprises in conjunction with the Special Equities investment program (see “Special Equities” below).

Investments in High Social Impact Investments may hinder the Fund’s ability to track the Index. High Social Impact Investments will be limited to 1% of the Fund’s assets if it commences the program.

Special Equities

The Fund may invest in the Special Equities investment program that allows the Fund to promote especially promising approaches to sustainable and socially responsible investment goals through privately placed investments. Special Equities investments are subject to the Fund’s limit on illiquid securities (which is no more than 15% of the Fund’s net assets). The investments are generally venture capital privately placed investments in small, untried enterprises. These include pre-IPO companies and private funds, including limited partnerships. Most Special Equities investments are expected to have a projected market-rate risk-adjusted return. A small percentage of the program may be invested in Social Enterprises, issues that have a projected below-market risk-adjusted rate of return, but are expected to have a high degree of positive impact on societal change. The Special Equities Committee of the Fund identifies, evaluates, and selects the Special Equities investments. Special Equities involve a high degree of risk and are all subject to liquidity, information and transaction risk. Special Equities foreign investments are also subject to foreign securities risk, while Special Equities debt securities, which are generally below-investment grade, are also subject to credit risk. The risks associated with a Special Equities investment may cause the value of the investment to decline below its cost and, in some instances, to lose its value entirely. The Fund’s Special Equities investments are valued under the direction of the Fund’s Board.

Pursuant to approval by the Fund’s Board of Directors, the Fund has retained Stephen Moody and Daryn Dodson as consultants to provide investment research for the Special Equities Program.

Special Equities investments for the Fund will be limited to 1% of the Fund’s net assets if it commences the program.

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Manager Discovery Program

As part of the ongoing commitment of Calvert to promote equal opportunity, Calvert has introduced the Manager Discovery Program. The program allocates up to 5% of a Fund’s assets to strong-performing yet often overlooked minority and women-owned money management firms. These firms must have a proven track record and investment discipline that mirror the investment objectives of a Fund. The Manager Discovery Program seeks to bring a dynamic new perspective to a Fund, while maintaining Calvert’s long-standing commitment to seeking financial performance and societal impact. The Fund does not currently participate in the program.

MANAGEMENT OF FUND INVESTMENTS

ABOUT CALVERT

Calvert Investment Management, Inc. (Calvert or the Advisor), 4550 Montgomery Avenue, Suite 1000N, Bethesda, MD 20814, is the investment advisor for the Fund. Calvert provides the Fund with investment supervision and management and office space, furnishes executive and other personnel to the Funds, and pays the salaries and fees of all Directors who are affiliated persons of and employed by Calvert. It has been managing mutual funds since 1976. As of May 31, 2012, Calvert was the investment advisor for 43 mutual fund portfolios and had over $11 billion in assets under management.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE ADVISOR, SUBADVISOR AND PORTFOLIO MANAGERS

Additional information is provided below regarding each individual and/or member of a team who is employed by or associated with the Advisor and Subadvisor of the Fund, and who is primarily (and jointly, as applicable) responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund (each a “Portfolio Manager”). The Fund’s SAI provides additional information about each Portfolio Manager’s management of other accounts, compensation and ownership of securities in the Fund.

World Asset Management, Inc. (World Asset), 255 E. Brown St., Birmingham, MI 48009, is the Subadvisor for Calvert Social Index Fund. World Asset is an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of Comerica Incorporated. World Asset has been in the index business since the mid-1970s and specializes in passive portfolio management techniques. It has managed the assets of the Fund since its inception in 2000.

Portfolio Manager Business Experience During Last 5 Years Role on Management Team
Eric R. Lessnau July 2011-present: World Asset as Senior Portfolio Manager. Portfolio Manager
  December 2008-July 2011: World Asset as Portfolio Manager.  
  January-December 2008: World Asset as Portfolio Analyst.  
  2003-January 2008: Comerica Securities as Senior Analyst.  
David J. Jones April 2010-present: World Asset as Portfolio Manager. Portfolio Manager
  March 2009-April 2010: World Asset as Portfolio Analyst.  
  2002-March 2009: Munder Capital Management as Equity Trader.  

 

Calvert and the Fund have obtained an exemptive order from the SEC to permit Calvert and the Fund, pursuant to approval by the Fund's Board of Directors, to enter into and materially amend contracts with the Fund’s Subadvisor (that is not an “affiliated person” as defined under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”)) without shareholder approval. See “Investment Advisor and Subadvisors” in the Fund’s SAI for further details.

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ADVISORY FEES

The aggregate annual advisory fee paid by the Fund for the most recent fiscal year as a percentage of the Fund’s average daily net assets was 0.208%.1 This figure is the total of all advisory fees (paid to Calvert) and subadvisory fees paid directly by the Fund. (Subadvisory fees paid by Calvert to a Subadvisor are reflected in the total advisory fees paid by the Fund to Calvert.) The advisory fee does not include administrative fees.

1 Effective February 1, 2011, the advisory fee was changed to 0.20% of the Fund's average daily net assets.

A discussion regarding the basis for the approval by the Fund’s Board of Directors of the investment advisory agreement and subadvi-sory agreement with respect to the Fund is available in the most recent Semi-Annual Report of the Fund covering the fiscal period that ends on March 31 each year.

SHAREHOLDER INFORMATION

For more information on buying and selling shares, please contact your financial professional or Calvert’s client services department at 800-368-2748.

How to Open an Account (Class Y Shares)

Class Y shares are generally available only to wrap or similar fee-based programs offered by financial intermediaries that have entered into an agreement with CID, the Fund’s distributor, to offer Class Y shares to their clients. A financial intermediary includes a broker, dealer, bank (including a bank trust department), registered investment adviser, financial planner, retirement plan administrator, third-party administrator, insurance company and any other institution having a selling or administration agreement with CID.

The use of Class Y shares by a financial intermediary will depend on, among other things, the structure of the particular fee-based program. CID will make, in its sole discretion, all determinations as to eligibility to purchase Class Y shares of the Fund.

Please see the Fund Summary with respect to the minimum initial investment amount and the minimum amount for subsequent investments. The Fund may charge a $2 service fee on additional purchases of less than $250. All Class Y purchases must be made by bank-wire or via the National Securities Clearing Corporation (“NSCC”), in U.S. dollars. For additional information and wire instructions, call Calvert at 800-368-2746.

Federal Holidays

There are some federal holidays, i.e., Columbus Day and Veterans Day, when the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) is open and the Fund is open but electronic funds transfers (i.e., bank wires) cannot be received because the banks are closed.

Customer Identification

Federal regulations require all financial institutions to obtain, verify and record information that identifies each person who opens an account. In order to verify your identity, the Fund requires your name, date of birth, residential street address or principal place of business, social security number and employer identification number or other governmental issued identification when you open an account. The Fund may place limits on account transactions while it is in the process of attempting to verify your identity. If the Fund is unable to verify your identity, the Fund may be required to redeem your shares and close your account.

Through your Broker/Dealer

Your broker/dealer must receive your purchase request before the close of regular trading (generally 4 p.m. ET) on the NYSE to receive that day’s NAV. Your broker/dealer will be responsible for furnishing all necessary documentation to Calvert and may charge you for services provided.

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HOW SHARES ARE PRICED

The price of shares is based on the Fund’s NAV. The NAV is computed by adding the value of the Fund’s securities holdings plus other assets, subtracting liabilities, and then dividing the result by the number of shares outstanding. The NAV of each class will be calculated separately.

The NAV is calculated as of the close of each business day, which coincides with the closing of the regular session of the NYSE (generally 4 p.m. ET). The Fund is open for business each day the NYSE is open.

The Fund may hold securities that are primarily listed on foreign exchanges that trade on days when the NYSE is closed. The Fund does not price shares on days when the NYSE is closed, even if foreign markets may be open. As a result, the value of the Fund’s shares may change on days when you will not be able to buy or sell your shares.

Generally, portfolio securities and other assets are valued based on market quotations. Debt securities are valued utilizing the average of bid prices or at bid prices based on a matrix system (which considers such factors as security prices, yields, maturities and ratings) furnished by dealers through an independent pricing service. Debt securities that will mature in 60 days or less are valued at amortized cost, which approximates fair value.

Under the oversight of the Board of Directors and pursuant to the Fund’s valuation procedures adopted by the Board, the Advisor determines when a market quotation is not readily available or reliable for a particular security.

Investments for which market quotations are not readily available or reliable are fair valued by a fair value team consisting of officers of the Fund and of the Advisor, as determined in good faith under consistently applied procedures under the general supervision of the Board of Directors. No single standard exists for determining fair value, which depends on the circumstances of each investment, but in general fair value is deemed to be the amount an owner might reasonably expect to receive for a security upon its current sale.

In making a fair value determination, under the ultimate supervision of the Board, the Advisor, pursuant to the Fund’s valuation procedures, generally considers a variety of qualitative and quantitative factors relevant to the particular security or type of security. These factors may change over time and are reviewed periodically to ascertain whether there are changes in the particular circumstances affecting an investment which may warrant a change in either the valuation methodology for the investment, or the fair value derived from that methodology, or both. The general factors considered typically include, for example, fundamental analytical data relating to the investment, the nature and duration of restrictions, if any, on the security, and the forces that influence the market in which the security is purchased and sold, as well as the type of security, the size of the holding and numerous other specific factors. Foreign securities are valued based on quotations from the principal market in which such securities are normally traded. If events occur after the close of the principal market in which securities are traded, and before the close of business of the Fund, that are expected to materially affect the value of those securities, then they are valued at their fair value taking these events into account. In addition, fair value pricing may be used for high-yield debt securities or in other instances where a portfolio security is not traded in significant volume for a substantial period.

The values assigned to fair value investments are based on available information and do not necessarily represent amounts that might ultimately be realized. Further, because of the inherent uncertainty of valuation, the fair values may differ significantly from the value that would have been used had a ready market for the investment existed, and these differences could be material.

WHEN YOUR ACCOUNT WILL BE CREDITED

Your purchase will be processed at the next NAV calculated after your request is received in good order, as defined below.

All of your purchases must be made in U.S. dollars. No cash or third-party checks will be accepted. No credit card or credit loan checks will be accepted. The Fund reserves the right to suspend the offering of shares for a period of time or to reject any specific purchase order. All purchase orders must be sent to the Transfer Agent. Any purchase less than the $250 minimum for subsequent investments may be charged a service fee of $2. All purchases will be confirmed and credited to your account in full and fractional shares (rounded to the nearest 1/1000th of a share). See “Request in Good Order” below.

Request in Good Order

All requests (both purchase orders and redemption requests) must be received by the Transfer Agent in “good order.” This means that your request must include:

• The Fund name and account number.
• The amount of the transaction (in dollars or shares).
• Signature guarantees (if required).*
• Any supporting legal documentation that may be required.
• Any outstanding certificates representing shares to be redeemed.

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* For instance, a signature guarantee must be provided by all registered account shareholders when redemption proceeds are sent to a different person or address. A signature guarantee can be obtained from most commercial and savings banks, credit unions, trust companies, or member firms of a U.S. stock exchange. Notarization is not the equivalent of a signature guarantee.

Transactions are processed at the NAV next computed after the Transfer Agent has received all required information. Requests received in good order before the close of regular NYSE trading (generally 4 p.m. ET) will receive that day’s closing NAV; otherwise you will receive the next business day’s NAV.

Purchase and Redemption of Shares through a Financial Intermediary

The Fund has authorized one or more broker/dealers to receive purchase and redemption orders on the Fund’s behalf. Such broker/dealers are authorized to designate other intermediaries to receive purchase and redemption orders on the Fund’s behalf. The Fund will be deemed to have received a purchase or redemption order when an authorized broker/dealer, or if applicable, a broker/dealer’s authorized designee, receives the order in good order. The customer orders will be priced at the Fund’s NAV next computed after they are received by an authorized broker/dealer or the broker/dealer’s authorized designee.

HOW TO SELL SHARES

You may redeem all or a portion of the shares from your account on any day your Fund is open for business.

Your shares will be redeemed at the next NAV calculated after your redemption request is received by the Transfer Agent in good order (less any applicable CDSC and/or redemption fee). The proceeds will normally be sent to you on the next business day, but if making immediate payment could adversely affect your Fund, it may take up to seven (7) days to make payment.

The Fund has the right to redeem shares in assets other than cash for redemption amounts exceeding, in any 90-day period, $250,000 or 1% of the NAV of the Fund, whichever is less, by making redemptions-in-kind (distributions of a pro rata share of the portfolio securities, rather than cash). A redemption-in-kind transfers the transaction costs associated with redeeming the security from the Fund to the shareholder. The shareholder will also bear any market risks associated with the portfolio security until the security can be sold. The Fund reserves the right to suspend or postpone redemptions during any period when: (a) trading on the NYSE is restricted, as determined by the SEC, or the NYSE is closed all day for other than customary weekend and holiday closings; (b) the SEC has granted an order to the Fund permitting such suspension; or (c) an emergency, as determined by the SEC, exists, making disposal of portfolio securities or valuation of net assets of the Fund not reasonably practicable.

There are some federal holidays, however, i.e., Columbus Day and Veterans Day, when the NYSE is open and the Fund is open but redemptions cannot be made by electronic funds transfer because the banks are closed.

Through your Broker/Dealer

Your broker/dealer must receive your request before the close of regular trading on the NYSE to receive that day’s NAV. Your broker/ dealer will be responsible for furnishing all necessary documentation to Calvert and may charge you for services provided.

Redemption Fee

In its effort to detect and prevent market timing, the Fund charges a 2% redemption fee on redemptions, including exchanges, within 30 days of purchase into the Fund unless the shares are held through an intermediary that has been authorized by Fund management to apply its own redemption fee policy, as described under “Other Calvert Features/Policies -- Market Timing Policy” below. In the event of any such authorization, shareholders should contact the intermediary through which the Fund shares are held for more information on the redemption fee policy that applies to those shares, including any applicable waivers.

For those shares to which the Fund’s redemption fee policy is applicable, the redemption fee will only be waived in the following circumstances:

• Redemption upon the death or disability of the shareholder, plan participant, or beneficiary. “Disability” means a total disability as evidenced by a determination by the U.S. Social Security Administration.

• Minimum required distributions from retirement plan accounts for shareholders 70 1/2 and older. The maximum amount subject to this waiver is based only upon the shareholder’s Calvert retirement accounts.

• The return of an excess contribution or deferral amount, pursuant to sections 408(d)(4) or (5), 401(k)(8), 402(g)(2), or 401(m)(6) of the Code.

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• Involuntary redemptions of accounts under procedures set forth by the Fund’s Board of Directors.

• Redemption for the reallocation of purchases received under a systematic investment plan for rebalancing purposes, or by a discretionary platform for mutual fund wrap programs for rebalancing purposes.

• Redemption of shares purchased with reinvested dividends or capital gain distributions.

• Shares transferred from one retirement plan to another in the same Fund.

• Shares redeemed as part of a retirement plan termination or restructuring.

• Redemption of shares of a Fund held as a default investment option in a retirement plan.

• Exchange or redemption transactions by an account that the Fund or its Transfer Agent reasonably believes is maintained in an omnibus account by a service provider that does not have the systematic capability of assessing the redemption fee at the individual or participant account level. For this purpose, an omnibus account is a Fund account where the ownership of, or interest in, Fund shares by more than one individual or participant is held through the account and the subaccounting for such Fund account is done by the service provider, not the Fund’s Transfer Agent.

In order to determine your eligibility for a redemption fee waiver, it may be necessary to notify your broker/dealer or the Fund of the qualifying circumstances and to provide any applicable supporting documentation.

For shares held through an intermediary in an omnibus account, Calvert relies on the intermediary to assess any applicable redemption fee on underlying shareholder accounts. There are no assurances that intermediaries will properly assess the fee.

OTHER CALVERT FEATURES / POLICIES

Website

For 24-hour performance and pricing information, visit www.calvert.com.

The information on our website is not incorporated by reference into this prospectus; our website address is included as an inactive textual reference only.

Exchanges

Calvert offers a wide variety of investment options that include common stock funds, tax-exempt and corporate bond funds, and money market funds; call your broker/dealer or Calvert representative for more information. We make it easy for you to purchase shares in other Calvert Funds if your investment goals change. The exchange privilege offers flexibility by allowing you to exchange shares on which you have already paid a sales charge from one mutual fund to another at no additional charge.

Before you make an exchange, please note the following:

Each exchange represents the sale of shares of one Fund and the purchase of shares of another. Therefore, you could realize a taxable gain or loss on an exchange. Shares may only be exchanged for shares of the same class of another Calvert Fund, except that Class A or Class C shares of a Fund may be exchanged for Class Y shares of the same Fund (no sales charges or other charges will apply to any such exchange), if offered by the Fund, provided you meet the Fund’s eligibility requirements for purchasing Class Y shares; the Class C shares you wish to exchange must not currently be subject to a CDSC.

An exchange must satisfy the minimum investment amount for that Calvert Fund. You may exchange shares acquired by reinvestment of dividends or distributions into another Calvert Fund at no additional charge.

No CDSC is imposed on exchanges of shares subject to a CDSC at the time of the exchange. The applicable CDSC is imposed at the time the shares acquired by the exchange are redeemed.

Exchange requests will not be accepted on any day when Calvert is open but the Fund’s custodian bank is closed (i.e., Columbus Day and Veterans Day); these exchange requests will be processed the next day the Fund’s custodian bank is open.

The Fund reserves the right to terminate or modify the exchange privilege with 60 days’ written notice.

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Market Timing Policy

In general, the Fund is designed for long-term investment and not as frequent or short-term trading (“market timing”) vehicle. The Fund discourages frequent purchases and redemptions of Fund shares by Fund shareholders. Further, the Fund does not accommodate frequent purchases and redemptions of fund shares by fund shareholders. Accordingly, the Fund’s Board of Directors has adopted policies and procedures in an effort to detect and prevent market timing in the Fund, which may require you to pay a redemption fee, as described under “How to Sell Shares - Redemption Fee” in this Prospectus. The Fund believes that market timing activity is not in the best interest of shareholders. Market timing can be disruptive to the portfolio management process and may adversely impact the ability of the Advisor and Subadvisor to implement the Fund’s investment strategies. In addition, market timing can disrupt the management of the Fund and raise its expenses through: increased trading and transaction costs; forced and unplanned portfolio turnover; time-zone arbitrage for securities traded on foreign markets; and large asset swings that decrease the Fund’s ability to provide maximum investment return to all shareholders. This in turn can have an adverse effect on Fund performance. In addition to seeking to limit market timing by imposition of redemption fees, a Fund or Calvert at its discretion may reject any purchase or exchange request (purchase side only) it believes to be market timing. However, there is no guarantee that Calvert will detect or prevent market timing activity.

Shareholders may hold the shares of the Fund through a service provider, such as a broker/dealer or a retirement plan, which has adopted market timing policies that differ from the market timing policies adopted by the Fund’s Board of Directors. In formulating their market timing policies, these service providers may or may not seek input from Calvert regarding certain aspects of their market timing policies, such as the amount of any redemption fee, the minimum holding period or the applicability of trading blocks. As a result, the market timing policies adopted by service providers may be quite dissimilar from the policies adopted by the Fund’s Board of Directors. The Board of Directors of the Fund has authorized Fund management to defer to the market timing and redemption fee policies of any service provider that distributes shares of the Fund through an omnibus account if the service provider’s policies, in Fund management’s judgment, are reasonably designed to detect and deter market timing transactions. Shareholders may contact Calvert to determine if the service provider through which the shareholder holds shares of the Fund has been authorized by Fund management to apply its own market timing and redemption fee policies in lieu of the policies adopted by the Fund’s Board of Directors. In the event of any such authorization, shareholders should contact the service provider through which the Fund shares are held for more information on the market timing policies and any redemption fees that apply to those shares.

As stated under “How to Sell Shares” in this Prospectus, a redemption fee will not be assessed on Fund shares held through an omnibus account if the service provider maintaining that account: (i) does not have the systematic capability of assessing the redemption fee at the individual or participant account level, or (ii) as described above, implements its own policies and procedures to detect and prevent market timing and such policies do not provide for the assessment of a redemption fee.

If a significant percentage of the Fund’s shareholder accounts are held through omnibus accounts that are not subject to a redemption fee, then the Fund would be more susceptible to the risks of market timing activity in the Fund. Even if an omnibus account is not subject to a redemption fee, if the Fund or its Transfer Agent or shareholder servicing agent suspects there is market timing activity in the account, Calvert will seek full cooperation from the service provider maintaining the account to identify the underlying participant. Calvert expects the service provider to take immediate action to stop any further market timing activity in the Fund by such participant(s) or plan, or else the Fund will be withdrawn as an investment option for that account. Calvert expects all service providers that maintain omnibus accounts to make reasonable efforts to identify and restrict the short-term trading activities of underlying participants in the Fund.

The Fund and CID reserve the right at any time to reject or cancel any part of any purchase or exchange order (purchase side only). Orders are canceled within one business day, and the purchase price is returned to the investor. The Fund and CID also may modify any terms or conditions of purchase of shares of the Fund (upon prior notice) or withdraw all or any part of the offering made by this Prospectus.

Electronic Delivery of Prospectuses and Shareholder Reports

You may request electronic delivery of Fund prospectuses and annual and semi-annual reports by calling client services at 800-368-2745 or enrolling online at www.calvert.com.

Combined General Mailings (Householding)

Multiple accounts held directly with Calvert that have the same social security number will receive one mailing per household of information such as prospectuses and semi-annual and annual reports. Call Calvert client services at 800-368-2745 to request further grouping of accounts

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to receive fewer mailings, or to request that each account still receive a separate mailing. Separate statements will be generated for each separate account and will be mailed in one envelope for each combination above. Multiple accounts held through a broker/dealer (or other financial intermediary) that share the same household address may receive one mailing.

Special Services and Charges

The Fund pays for shareholder services but not for special services that are required by a few shareholders, such as a request for a historical transcript of an account or a stop payment on a draft. You may be required to pay a fee for these special services; for example, the fee for stop payments is $25.

If you are purchasing shares through a program of services offered by a broker/dealer or other financial institution, you should read the program materials together with this Prospectus. Certain features may be modified in these programs. Investors may be charged a fee if they effect transactions in Fund shares through a broker/dealer or other agent.

Minimum Account Balance / Low Balance Fee

Please maintain a balance in each of your Fund accounts of at least $5,000 per class for regular accounts/$1,000 per class for IRA accounts. If the balance in your account falls below the minimum during a month, a low balance fee may be charged to your account ($15/year per class).

If the balance in your account falls below the minimum during a month, the account may be closed and the proceeds mailed to the address of record. You will receive notice that your account is below the minimum and will be closed if the balance is not brought up to the required minimum within 30 days.

Shares held through an omnibus account or wrap-fee program for which the Fund has waived investment minimums are not subject to this requirement.

DIVIDENDS, CAPITAL GAINS, AND TAXES

The Fund pays dividends from its net investment income on an annual basis. Net investment income consists of interest income and dividends declared and paid on investments, less expenses. Distributions of net short-term capital gains (treated as dividends for tax purposes) and net long-term capital gains, if any, are normally paid once a year; however, the Fund does not anticipate making any such distributions unless available capital loss carryovers have been used or have expired. Dividend and distribution payments will vary between classes.

Dividend Payment Options

Dividends and any distributions are automatically reinvested in the Fund at NAV (without sales charge), unless you elect to have amounts of $10 or more paid in cash (by electronic funds transfer). Dividends and distributions from any Calvert Fund may be automatically invested in an identically registered account in any other Calvert Fund at NAV. If reinvested in the same account, new shares will be purchased at NAV on the reinvestment date, which is generally 1 to 3 days prior to the payment date. You must notify the Fund in writing to change your payment options. If you elect to have dividends and/or distributions paid in cash, and the U.S. Postal Service returns the check as undeliverable, it, as well as future dividends and distributions, will be reinvested in additional shares. No dividends will accrue on amounts represented by uncashed distribution or redemption checks.

Buying a Dividend

At the time of purchase, the share price of each class may reflect undistributed income, capital gains or unrealized appreciation of securities. Any income or capital gains from these amounts which are later distributed to you are fully taxable. On the ex-dividend date for a distribution, share value is reduced by the amount of the distribution. If you buy shares just before the ex-dividend date (“buying a dividend”), you will pay the full price for the shares and then receive a portion of the price back as a taxable distribution.

Federal Taxes

In January, the Fund will mail Form 1099-DIV indicating the federal tax status of dividends and any capital gain distributions paid to you during the past year. Generally, dividends and distributions are taxable in the year they are paid. However, any dividends and distributions paid in January but declared during the prior three months are taxable in the year declared. Dividends and distributions are taxable to you regardless of whether they are taken in cash or reinvested. Dividends, including short-term capital gains, are taxable as ordinary income. Distributions from long-term capital gains are taxable as long-term capital gains, regardless of how long you have

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owned shares.

You may realize a capital gain or loss when you sell or exchange shares. This capital gain or loss will be short- or long-term, depending on how long you have owned the shares which were sold. In January, the Fund whose shares you have sold or exchanged in the past year will mail Form 1099-B indicating the total amount of all such sales, including exchanges. You should keep your annual year-end account statements to determine the cost (basis) of the shares to report on your tax returns.

Cost Basis Reporting

Effective January 1, 2012, mutual funds must report cost basis information to you and the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) when you sell or exchange shares acquired on or after January 1, 2012 in your non-retirement accounts. The new cost basis regulations do not affect retirement accounts, money market funds, and shares acquired before January 1, 2012. The Fund will permit shareholders to elect from among several IRS-accepted cost basis methods, including average cost. In the absence of an election by a shareholder, the Fund will use the average cost method with respect to that shareholder. The cost basis method a shareholder elects may not be changed with respect to a redemption of shares after the settlement date of the redemption. Shareholders should consult with their tax advisors to determine the best IRS-accepted cost basis method for their tax situation and to obtain more information about how the new cost basis reporting rules apply to them.

Other Tax Information

In addition to federal taxes, you may be subject to state or local taxes on your investment, depending on the laws in your area.

Some of the dividends may be identified as qualified dividend income and be eligible for the reduced federal tax rate if the individual investor meets the holding period requirement. Dividends paid by the Fund may be eligible for the dividends received deduction available to corporate taxpayers. Corporate taxpayers requiring this information may contact Calvert.

Taxpayer Identification Number

If we do not have your correct Social Security or Taxpayer Identification Number (“TIN”) and a signed certified application or Form W-9, Federal law requires us to withhold 28% of your reportable dividends, and possibly 28% of certain redemptions. In addition, you may be subject to a fine by the Internal Revenue Service. You will also be prohibited from opening another account by exchange. If this TIN information is not received within 60 days after your account is established, your account may be redeemed (closed) at the current NAV on the date of redemption. Calvert reserves the right to reject any new account or any purchase order for failure to supply a certified TIN.

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS

The financial highlights table is intended to help you understand the Fund’s financial performance for the past five (5) fiscal years. The Fund’s fiscal year end is September 30. Certain information reflects financial results for a single share, by Fund and Class. The total returns in the table represent the rate that an investor would have earned (or lost) on an investment in the Fund (assuming reinvestment of all dividends and distributions), and does not reflect any applicable front- or back-end sales charge. The information has been derived from the Fund’s financial statements, which were audited by KPMG LLP. Their report, along with the Fund’s financial statements, is included in the Fund’s Annual Report, which is available upon request.

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CALVERT SOCIAL INDEX FUND FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
 
  YEARS ENDED
  September
 30,
  September
 30,
  September
 30,
 
CLASS A SHARES 2011 (z) 2010   2009 (z)
Net asset value, beginning $10.48   $9.70   $10.44  
Income from investment operations:            
Net investment income .09   .08   .11  
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) (.14 ) .80   (.75 )
Total from investment operations (.05 ) .88   (.64 )
Distributions from:            
Net investment income (.08 ) (.10 ) (.10 )
Total distributions (.08 ) (.10 ) (.10 )
Total increase (decrease) in net asset value (0.13 ) .78   (.74 )
Net asset value, ending $10.35   $10.48   $9.70  
 
Total return* (.57 %) 9.06 % (5.80 %)
Ratios to average net assets:A            
Net investment income .81 % .77 % 1.34 %
Total expenses .99 % 1.06 % 1.16 %
Expenses before offsets .75 % .75 % .75 %
Net expenses .75 % .75 % .75 %
Portfolio turnover 8 % 10 % 16 %
Net assets, ending (in thousands) $71,741   $71,952   $63,609  
 
 
      YEARS ENDED  
      September
 30,
  September
 30,
 
CLASS A SHARES     2008   2007 (z)
Net asset value, beginning     $13.67   $12.23  
Income from investment operations:            
Net investment income     .14   .15  
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss)     (3.23 ) 1.41  
Total from investment operations     (3.09 ) 1.56  
Distributions from:            
Net investment income     (.14 ) (.12 )
Total distributions     (.14 ) (.12 )
Total increase (decrease) in net asset value     (3.23 ) 1.44  
Net asset value, ending     $10.44   $13.67  
 
Total return*     (22.81 %) 12.80 %
Ratios to average net assets:A            
Net investment income     1.14 % 1.12 %
Total expenses     1.10 % 1.09 %
Expenses before offsets     .76 % .77 %
Net expenses     .75 % .75 %
Portfolio turnover     14 % 9 %
Net assets, ending (in thousands)     $44,439   $59,291  

 

See notes to financial highlights.

CALVERT SOCIAL INDEX FUND PROSPECTUS CLASS Y 22


 

NOTES TO FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS

A Total expenses do not reflect amounts reimbursed and/or waived by the Advisor or reductions from expense offset arrangements. Expenses before offsets reflect expenses after reimbursement and/or waiver by the Advisor but prior .to reductions from expense offset arrangements. Net expenses are net of all reductions and represent the net expenses paid by the Portfolio.

* Total return is not annualized for periods less than one year and does not reflect deduction of any front-end or deferred sales charge.

(z) Per share figures calculated using the Average Shares Method.

CALVERT SOCIAL INDEX FUND PROSPECTUS CLASS Y 23


 



 

To Open an Account:

800-368-2748

Performance and Prices:

www. calvert.com
24 hours, 7 days a week

Service for Existing Accounts:

Shareholders 800-368-2745
Brokers 800-368-2746

TDD for Hearing-Impaired:

800-541-1524

Calvert Office:

4550 Montgomery Avenue
Suite 1000N
Bethesda, MD 20814

Registered, Certified or Overnight Mail:

Calvert c/o BFDS
330 West 9th Street
Kansas City, MO 64105

PRINCIPAL UNDERWRITER

Calvert Investment Distributors, Inc.
4550 Montgomery Avenue
Suite 1000N
Bethesda, MD 20814


 

For investors who want more information about the Fund, the following documents are available free upon request:

Annual/Semi-Annual Reports: Additional information about the Fund’s investments is available in the Fund’s Annual and Semi-Annual Reports to shareholders. In the Fund’s Annual Report, you will find a discussion of the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected the Fund’s performance during its last fiscal year.

Statement of Additional Information (SAI): The SAI for the Fund provides more detailed information about the Fund, including a description of the Fund’s policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of its portfolio holdings. The SAI for the Fund is incorporated into this prospectus by reference.

You can get free copies of reports and SAIs, request other information and discuss your questions about the Fund by contacting your financial professional, or the Fund at:

Calvert Investments, Inc.
4550 Montgomery Ave.
Suite 1000N
Bethesda, MD 20814
Telephone: 1-800-368-2745

The Fund also makes available its SAI and its Annual and Semi-Annual Reports free of charge on Calvert’s website at the following Internet address: www.calvert.com

You can review and copy information about the Fund (including its SAI) at the SEC’s Public Reference Room in Washington, D.C. Information on the operation of the public reference room may be obtained by calling the SEC at 1-202-551-8090. Reports and other information about the Fund are available on the EDGAR database on the SEC’s Internet site at http://www.sec.gov. Copies of this information may also be obtained, upon payment of a duplicating fee, by electronic request at publicinfo@sec.gov, or by writing to the Public Reference Section of the SEC, Washington, D.C. 20549-1520.

Investment Company Act file:

No. 811-09877 Calvert Social Index Series, Inc. (Calvert Social Index Fund)

Printed on recycled paper using soy inks

 

 

Calvert Signature Strategies®                                                                                         Calvert Investments®                     

                                                                                                                                              A UNIFI Company

 

 

 

CALVERT SOCIAL INVESTMENT FUND (“CSIF”)

Calvert Balanced, Bond, Equity, Enhanced Equity and Money Market Portfolios

 

 

CALVERT SOCIAL INDEX SERIES, INC. (“CSIS”)

Calvert Social Index Fund

 

4550 Montgomery Avenue, Bethesda, Maryland 20814

 

 

STATEMENT OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

 

January 31, 2012, as revised July 13, 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

Class (Ticker) 

 

 

 

Calvert Balanced Portfolio

 

A (CSIFX) 

B (CSLBX) 

C (CSGCX) 

I (CBAIX) 

 

Calvert Bond Portfolio

 

A (CSIBX)

B (CBDBX) 

C (CSBCX) 

I (CBDIX) 

Y (CSIYX) 

Calvert Equity Portfolio

 

A (CSIEX) 

B (CSEBX) 

C (CSECX) 

I (CEYIX) 

Y (CIEYX) 

Calvert Enhanced Equity Portfolio

 

A (CMIFX) 

B (CDXBX) 

C (CMICX) 

I (CMIIX) 

 

Calvert Money Market Portfolio

 

O (CSIXX) 

 

 

 

 

Calvert Social Index Fund

 

A (CSXAX) 

B (CSXBX) 

C (CSXCX) 

I (CISIX) 

Y (CISYX) 

 

 

New Account Information:

(800) 368-2748 (301) 951-4820

Client

Services:

 

(800) 368-2745

Broker

Services:

(800) 368-2746 (301) 951-4850

TDD for the Hearing-Impaired:

 

(800) 541-1524

 

 

 

                This Statement of Additional Information ("SAI") is not a prospectus. Investors should read the SAI in conjunction with the applicable Portfolio's or Fund's (collectively referred to as the "Funds") Prospectus dated January 31, 2012 (as revised July 13, 2012, for Calvert Social Index Fund Class Y). Each Fund's audited financial statements included in its most recent Annual Report to Shareholders are expressly incorporated by reference and made a part of this SAI.  Each Fund’s Prospectus and most recent shareholder report may be obtained free of charge by writing the respective Fund at the above address, calling the Fund at 800-368-2745, or visiting our website at www.calvert.com.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Supplemental Information on Principal Investment Policies and Risks

2

Non-Principal Investment Policies and Risks

9

Additional Risk Disclosure

22

Investment Restrictions

22

Dividends, Distributions, and Taxes

24

Net Asset Value

25

Calculation of Yield and Total Return

28

Purchase and Redemption of Shares

33

Trustees/Directors and Officers

33

Investment Advisor and Subadvisors

43

Portfolio Manager Disclosure

44

Administrative Services Agent

56

Method of Distribution

57

Transfer and Shareholder Servicing Agents

61

Portfolio Transactions

61

Portfolio Holdings Disclosure

63

Personal Securities Transactions

65

Proxy Voting Disclosure

66

Process for Delivering Shareholder Communications to the Board of Trustees/Directors

66

Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm and Custodians

66

General Information

66

Control Persons and Principal Holders of Securities

67

Fund Service Providers

73

Appendix A – Global Proxy Voting Guidelines

 

Appendix B – Corporate Bond & Commercial Paper Ratings

 

 

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION ON PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT POLICIES AND RISKS

 

                The following supplemental discussion of principal investment policies and risks applies to each of the  Funds, unless otherwise noted.

 

Foreign Securities (Applies to Calvert Balanced, Bond, Equity and Enhanced Equity)

Investments in foreign securities may present risks not typically involved in domestic investments. The Balanced, Bond, Equity and Enhanced Equity Portfolios may purchase foreign securities directly on foreign markets. These securities are subject to the risk of currency fluctuation relative to the U.S. dollar. Foreign securities may also involve different accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards and various administrative difficulties such as delays in clearing and settling portfolio trades or in receiving payment of dividends or other distributions.  The Funds may also invest in American Depositary Receipts ("ADRs") and other receipts evidencing ownership of foreign securities, such as Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”). ADRs are United States ("U.S.") dollar-denominated and traded in the United States on exchanges or over the counter, and can be either sponsored or unsponsored. The company sponsoring the ADR is subject to U.S. reporting requirements and will pay the costs of distributing dividends and shareholder materials.  With an unsponsored ADR, the U.S. bank will recover costs from the movement of share prices and the payment of dividends. Less information is normally available on unsponsored ADRs. By investing in ADRs rather than directly in foreign issuers' stock, these Funds may possibly avoid some currency and some liquidity risks. However, the value of the foreign securities underlying the ADR may still be impacted by currency fluctuations.  The information available for ADRs is subject to the more uniform and more exacting accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards of the domestic market or exchange on which they are traded. GDRs can involve currency risk since they may not be U.S. dollar-denominated.

2

 


 

 

                Additional costs may be incurred in connection with international investment since foreign brokerage commissions and the custodial costs associated with maintaining foreign portfolio securities are generally higher than in the United States. Fee expense may also be incurred on currency exchanges when the Funds change investments from one country to another or convert foreign securities holdings into U.S. dollars.

                U.S. government policies have at times, in the past, through imposition of currency controls, changes in tax policy and other restrictions, discouraged certain investments abroad by U.S. investors. In addition, foreign countries may impose withholding and taxes on dividends and interest.

 

Variable Rate Obligations and Demand Notes (Applies to Calvert Money Market)

                The Money Market Portfolio may invest in variable rate obligations. Variable rate obligations have a yield that is adjusted periodically based on changes in the level of prevailing interest rates. Variable rate obligations can have an interest rate fixed to a known lending rate, such as the LIBOR Index or SIFMA Index, and are automatically adjusted when the known rate changes. Variable rate obligations lessen the capital fluctuations usually inherent in fixed income investments. This diminishes the risk of capital depreciation of investment securities in the Fund and, consequently, of Fund shares. However, if interest rates decline, the yield of the Fund will decline, causing the Fund and its shareholders to forego the opportunity for capital appreciation of the Fund’s investments.

The Fund may invest in floating rate and variable rate demand notes. Demand notes provide that the holder may demand payment of the note at its par value plus accrued interest by giving notice to the paying agent and/or dealer. To ensure the ability of the issuer to make payment on demand, a bank letter of credit or other liquidity facility may support the note.

 

Foreign Money Market Instruments (Applies to Calvert Money Market)

                The Money Market Portfolio may invest without limitation in money market instruments of banks, whether foreign or domestic, including obligations of U.S. branches of foreign banks ("Yankee" instruments) and obligations of foreign branches of U.S. banks ("Eurodollar" instruments). All such instruments must be high-quality, U.S. dollar-denominated obligations. Although these instruments are not subject to foreign currency risk since they are U.S. dollar-denominated, investments in foreign money market instruments may involve risks that are different than investments in securities of U.S. issuers. See "Foreign Securities" in this section on “Supplemental Information on Principal Investment Policies and Risks”.

 

Large-Cap Issuers (Applies to Calvert Balanced, Equity and Enhanced Equity, and Calvert Social Index Fund)

Investing in large-cap issuers generally involves the risk that these companies may grow more slowly than the economy as a whole or not at all. Compared to small and mid-cap companies, large-cap companies are more widely followed in the market, which can make it more difficult to find attractive stocks that are not overpriced. Large-cap stocks also may be less responsive to competitive opportunities and challenges, such as changes in technology, and may offer less potential for long-term capital appreciation.

 

Tracking the Index (Applies to Calvert Enhanced Equity and Calvert Social Index Fund)

The process used by the Enhanced Equity Portfolio and the Social Index Fund to attempt to track the applicable Index within its expected tracking error limit relies on assessing the difference between the respective Fund's exposure to factors which influence returns and the Index's exposure to those same factors. The combined variability of these factors and the correlation between factors are used to estimate the risk in the Fund. The extent to which the total risk characteristics of the Fund vary from that of the Index is active risk or tracking error.

A Fund's ability to track the Index will be monitored by analyzing returns to ensure that the returns are reasonably consistent with Index returns. By regressing Fund returns against Index returns, the Advisor can calculate the goodness of fit, as measured by the Coefficient of Determination or R-squared. Values in excess of 90% indicate a very high degree of correlation between the Fund and the Index. The Fund will also be monitored to ensure those general characteristics, such as sector exposures, capitalization and valuation criteria, are relatively consistent over time.

Any deviations of realized returns from the Index which are in excess of those expected will be analyzed for sources of variance.

3

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                The Social Index Fund's portfolio will be invested in a manner to closely track the Index.  To the extent that the Fund has investments in the Special Equities program and/or the High Social Impact Investments program (each described in the “Non-Principal Investment Policies and Risks” section below), the Fund may be less able to closely track the Index than if it did not have investments in these programs.  Both of these investment programs are of limited size (not more than 1% of Fund assets if the Fund commences a program) so that the tracking error induced by such investments would be limited.

 

Below-Investment Grade, High-Yield Debt Securities (Applies to Calvert Bond)

                Below-investment grade, high-yield debt securities are lower quality debt securities (generally those rated BB or lower by Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services (“S&P”) or Ba or lower by Moody’s Investors Service (“Moody’s”), known as "junk bonds"). These securities have moderate to poor protection of principal and interest payments and have speculative characteristics. (See Appendix B for a description of the ratings.)  The Bond Portfolio considers a security to be investment grade if it has received an investment grade rating from at least one nationally recognized statistical rating organization ("NRSRO"), or is an unrated security of comparable quality as determined by the Advisor or Subadvisor, if any. Below-investment grade, high-yield debt securities involve greater risk of default or price declines due to changes in the issuer's creditworthiness than investment-grade debt securities. Because the market for lower-rated securities may be thinner and less active than for higher-rated securities, there may be market price volatility for these securities and limited liquidity in the resale market. Market prices for these securities may decline significantly in periods of general economic difficulty or rising interest rates. Unrated debt securities may fall into the lower quality category. Unrated securities usually are not attractive to as many buyers as rated securities are, which may make them less marketable.

                The quality limitation set forth in the Fund's investment policy is determined immediately after the Fund's acquisition of a given security. Accordingly, any later change in ratings will not be considered when determining whether an investment complies with the Fund's investment policy. Through portfolio diversification and credit analysis, investment risk can be reduced, although there can be no assurance that losses will not occur.

 

Short-Term Instruments (Applies to Calvert Bond and Money MArket)

The Bond and Money Market Portfolios may invest in short-term instruments, including money market instruments, on an ongoing basis to provide liquidity or for other reasons. Money market instruments are generally short-term investments that may include but are not limited to: (i) short-term obligations issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities (including government-sponsored enterprises); (ii) negotiable certificates of deposit, bankers’ acceptances, fixed time deposits and other obligations of U.S. and foreign banks (including foreign branches) and similar instruments; (iii) commercial paper; (iv) repurchase agreements; (v) short-term U.S. dollar-denominated obligations of foreign banks (including U.S. branches) that, in the opinion of the Advisor or Subadvisor, are of comparable quality to obligations of U.S. banks that may be purchased by the Fund; and (vi) money market funds.  Time deposits are non-negotiable deposits maintained in banking institutions for specified periods of time at stated interest rates. Bankers’ acceptances are time drafts drawn on commercial banks by borrowers, usually in connection with international transactions.

 

Issuer Non-Diversification risk (Applies to Calvert Bond)

                The Bond Portfolio is non-diversified and may focus its investments on a small number of issuers. A fund that is "non-diversified" may invest a greater percentage of its assets in the securities of a single issuer than a fund that is "diversified." A fund that invests in a relatively small number of issuers is more susceptible to risks associated with a single economic, political, or regulatory occurrence than a more diversified fund might be. Some of those issuers might also present substantial credit, interest rate or other risks.

 

Trust Preferred Securities (Applies to Calvert Bond)

The Bond Portfolio may purchase trust preferred securities, which are preferred stocks issued by a special purpose trust subsidiary backed by subordinated debt of the corporate parent. These securities typically bear a market rate coupon comparable to interest rates available on debt of a similarly rated company. The securities are generally senior in claim to standard preferred stock but junior to other bondholders. Holders of the trust preferred securities have limited voting rights to control the activities of the trust and no voting rights with respect to the parent company.

Trust preferred securities may have varying maturity dates, at times in excess of 30 years, or may have no specified maturity date. Dividend payments of the trust preferred securities generally coincide with interest payments on the underlying subordinated debt. Trust preferred securities generally have a yield advantage over traditional preferred stocks, but unlike traditional preferred stocks, distributions are treated as interest rather than dividends for federal income tax purposes.  

4

 


 

 

Trust preferred securities are subject to unique risks, which include the fact that dividend payments will only be paid if interest payments on the underlying obligations are made, which interest payments are dependent on the financial condition of the parent corporation and may be deferred for up to 20 consecutive quarters. There is also the risk that the underlying obligations, and thus the trust preferred securities, may be prepaid after a stated call date or as a result of certain tax or regulatory events, resulting in a lower yield to maturity.

Trust preferred securities prices fluctuate for several reasons including changes in investors’ perception of the financial condition of an issuer or the general condition of the market for trust preferred securities, or when political or economic events affecting the issuers occur. Trust preferred securities are also (a) sensitive to interest rate fluctuations, as the cost of capital rises and borrowing costs increase in a rising interest rate environment, and (b) subject to the risk that they may be called for redemption in a falling interest rate environment.

 

Asset-Backed Securities (Applies to Calvert Balanced and Bond)  

                The Balanced and Bond Portfolios may invest in, or have exposure to, asset-backed securities, which are securities that represent a participation in, or are secured by and payable from, a stream of payments generated by particular assets, most often a pool or pools of similar assets (e.g., trade receivables). The credit quality of these securities depends primarily upon the quality of the underlying assets and the level of credit support and/or enhancement provided.

                The underlying assets (e.g., loans) are subject to prepayments, which shorten the securities’ weighted average maturity and may lower their return. If the credit support or enhancement is exhausted, losses or delays in payment may result if the required payments of principal and interest are not made. The value of these securities also may change because of changes in the market’s perception of the creditworthiness of the servicing agent for the pool, the originator of the pool, or the financial institution or trust providing the credit support or enhancement. Typically, there is no perfected security interest in the collateral that relates to the financial assets that support asset-backed securities.

 

Municipal Securities (Applies to Calvert Bond)

Municipal securities share the attributes of debt obligations in general, but are generally issued by states, municipalities and other political subdivisions, agencies, authorities and instrumentalities of states and multi-state agencies or authorities. The municipal securities that the Bond Portfolio may purchase include general obligation bonds and limited obligation bonds (or revenue bonds), including industrial development bonds formerly issued pursuant to federal tax law. General obligation bonds are obligations involving the credit of an issuer possessing taxing power and are payable from such issuer’s general revenues and not from any particular source. Limited obligation bonds are payable only from the revenues derived from a particular facility or class of facilities or, in some cases, from the proceeds of a special excise or other specific revenue source. Tax-exempt private activity bonds and industrial development bonds generally are also revenue bonds and thus are not payable from the issuer’s general revenues. The credit and quality of private activity bonds and industrial development bonds are usually related to the credit of the user of the facilities. Payment of interest on and repayment of principal of such bonds is the responsibility of the user (and/or any guarantor).

Municipal securities are subject to credit and market risk. Generally, prices of higher quality issues tend to fluctuate less with changes in market interest rates than prices of lower quality issues, and prices of longer maturity issues tend to fluctuate more than prices of shorter maturity issues. Prices and yields on municipal bonds are dependent on a variety of factors, including general money-market conditions, the financial condition of the issuer, general conditions of the municipal bond market, the size of a particular offering, the maturity of the obligation and the rating of the issue. A number of these factors, including the ratings of particular issues, are subject to change from time to time. Information about the financial condition of an issuer of municipal bonds may not be as extensive as that which is made available by corporations whose securities are publicly traded. Obligations of issuers of municipal bonds are subject to the provisions of bankruptcy, insolvency and other laws, such as the Federal Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1978, affecting the rights and remedies of creditors. Congress or state legislatures may seek to extend the time for payment of principal or interest, or both, or to impose other constraints upon enforcement of such obligations. There is also the possibility that as a result of litigation or other conditions, the power or ability of issuers to meet their obligations for the payment of interest and principal on their municipal bonds may be materially affected or their obligations may be found to be invalid or unenforceable.

5

 


 

 

 

Collateralized Mortgage Obligations (Applies to Calvert Balanced and Bond)

The Balanced and Bond Portfolios may invest in collateralized mortgage obligations ("CMOs").  CMOs are collateralized bonds that are general obligations of the issuer of the bonds. CMOs are not direct obligations of the U.S. government. CMOs generally are secured by collateral consisting of mortgages or a pool of mortgages. The collateral is assigned to the trustee named in the indenture pursuant to which the bonds are issued. Payments of principal and interest on the underlying mortgages are not passed through directly to the holder of the CMO; rather, payments to the trustee are dedicated to payment of interest on and repayment of principal of the CMO. This means that the character of payments of principal and interest is not passed through, so that payments to holders of CMOs attributable to interest paid and principal repaid on the underlying mortgages or pool of mortgages do not necessarily constitute income and return of capital, respectively, to the CMO holders. Also, because payments of principal and interest are not passed through, CMOs secured by the same pool of mortgages may be, and frequently are, issued with a variety of classes or series, which have different maturities and are retired sequentially. CMOs are designed to be retired as the underlying mortgages are repaid. In the event of prepayment on such mortgages, the class of CMO first to mature generally will be paid down.

                Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“FHLMC”) has introduced a CMO which is a general obligation of FHLMC. This requires FHLMC to use its general funds to make payments on the CMO if payments from the underlying mortgages are insufficient.

 

Interest Only And Principal Only Mortgage-backed Securities (Applies to Calvert Bond)

The Bond Portfolio may also invest in Interest Only (“IO”) and Principal Only (“PO”) mortgage-backed securities. Interest only instruments generally increase in value in a rising interest rate environment, which typically results in a slower rate of prepayments on the underlying mortgages and extends the period during which interest payments are required to be made on the IO security. Interest only securities are subject to prepayment risk, which is the risk that prepayments will accelerate in a declining interest rate environment and will reduce the number of remaining interest payments even though there is no default on the underlying mortgages.

Principal only instruments generally increase in value in a declining interest rate environment, which typically results in a faster rate of prepayments on the underlying mortgages. Since a PO security is usually purchased at a discount, faster prepayments result in a higher rate of return when the face value of the security is paid back sooner than expected. Principal only securities are subject to extension risk, which is the risk that a rising interest rate environment will result in a slower rate of prepayments and will delay the final payment date.

 

U.S. Government-Sponsored Obligations (Applies to Calvert Balanced, Bond, and Money Market)

                The Balanced, Bond and Money Market Portfolios may invest in debt and mortgage-backed securities issued by the Federal National Mortgage Association ("FNMA") and FHLMC, commonly known as Fannie Maes and Freddie Macs, respectively.

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Unlike Government National Mortgage Association ("GNMA") certificates, which are typically interests in pools of mortgages insured or guaranteed by government agencies, FNMA and FHLMC certificates represent undivided interests in pools of conventional mortgage loans. Both FNMA and FHLMC guarantee timely payment of principal and interest on their obligations, but this guarantee is not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. FNMA's guarantee is supported by its ability to borrow from the U.S. Treasury, while FHLMC's guarantee is backed by reserves set aside to protect holders against losses due to default.

        In September 2008, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (“FHFA”) placed FNMA and FHLMC into conservatorship with the objective of returning the entities to normal business operations; FHFA succeeded to all rights, titles, powers and privileges of FNMA and FHLMC. Simultaneously, the U.S. Treasury made a commitment of indefinite duration to maintain the positive net worth of both firms.  FNMA and FHLMC are continuing to operate as going concerns while in conservatorship and each remains liable for all of its obligations, including its guaranty obligations, associated with its mortgage-backed securities.

 

U.S. Government-Backed Obligations (Applies to Calvert Balanced, Bond and Money Market)

                The Balanced, Bond and Money Market Portfolios may invest in U.S. Treasury obligations and other U.S. government-backed obligations.

6

 


 

 

                U.S. Treasury Obligations. Direct obligations of the U.S. Treasury are backed by the full faith and credit of the United States. They differ only with respect to their rates of interest, maturities, and times of issuance. U.S. Treasury obligations consist of: U.S. Treasury bills (having maturities of one year or less), U.S. Treasury notes (having maturities of one to ten years), and U.S. Treasury bonds (generally having maturities greater than ten years).

Ginnie Maes. Debt and mortgage-backed securities issued by GNMA, commonly known as Ginnie Maes, are typically interests in pools of mortgage loans insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the Veterans Administration. A “pool” or group of such mortgages is assembled and, after approval from GNMA, is offered to investors through various securities dealers. GNMA is a U.S. government corporation within the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Ginnie Maes are backed by the full faith and credit of the United States, which means that the U.S. government guarantees that interest and principal will be paid when due.

                Other U.S. Government Obligations. The Funds may invest in other obligations issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government, its agencies, or its instrumentalities. (Certain obligations issued or guaranteed by a U.S. government agency or instrumentality may not be backed by the full faith and credit of the United States.)

 

Futures Transactions (Applies To Calvert Bond)

The Bond Portfolio may purchase and sell futures contracts, but only when, in the judgment of the Advisor, such a position acts as a hedge.  The Fund may not enter into futures contracts for the purpose of speculation or leverage. These futures contracts may include, but are not limited to, market index futures contracts and futures contracts based on U.S. government obligations.

                A futures contract is an agreement between two parties to buy and sell a security on a future date which has the effect of establishing the current price for the security. Many futures contracts by their terms require actual delivery and acceptance of securities, but some allow for cash settlement of the difference between the futures price and the market value of the underlying security or index at time of delivery.  In most cases the contracts are closed out before the settlement date without making or taking delivery of securities. Upon buying or selling a futures contract, the Fund deposits initial margin with its custodian, and thereafter daily payments of maintenance margin are made to and from the executing broker.  Payments of maintenance margin reflect changes in the value of the futures contract, with the Fund being obligated to make such payments if the futures position becomes less valuable and entitled to receive such payments if the futures position becomes more valuable.

                The Fund can use these practices only for hedging purposes and not for speculation or leverage. If the Advisor judges market conditions incorrectly or employs a strategy that does not correlate well with the Fund's investments, these techniques could result in a loss. These techniques may increase the volatility of the Fund and may involve a small investment of cash relative to the magnitude of the risk assumed.

                The purchase and sale of futures contracts is for the purpose of hedging the Fund's holdings of long-term debt securities. Futures contracts based on U.S. government securities and GNMA certificates historically have reacted to an increase or decrease in interest rates in a manner similar to the manner in which mortgage-related securities reacted to the change. If interest rates increase, the value of such securities in the Fund's portfolio would decline, but the value of a short position in futures contracts would increase at approximately the same rate, thereby keeping the net asset value of the Fund from declining as much as it otherwise would have. Thus, if the Fund owns long-term securities and interest rates were expected to increase, it might sell futures contracts rather than sell its holdings of long-term securities. If, on the other hand, the Fund held cash reserves and interest rates were expected to decline, the Fund might enter into futures contracts for the purchase of U.S. government securities or GNMA certificates and thus take advantage of the anticipated rise in the value of long-term securities without actually buying them until the market had stabilized. At that time, the futures contracts could be liquidated and the Fund's cash reserves could then be used to buy long-term securities in the cash market. The Fund could accomplish similar results by selling securities with long maturities and investing in securities with short maturities when interest rates are expected to increase or by buying securities with long maturities and selling securities with short maturities when interest rates are expected to decline. But by using futures contracts as an investment tool to manage risk, it might be possible to accomplish the same result easily and quickly.

Futures contracts are designed by boards of trade which are designated "contracts markets" by the Commodities Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”). As a series of a registered investment company, the Fund is eligible for exclusion from the CFTC's definition of "commodity pool operator," meaning that the Fund may invest in futures contracts under specified conditions without registering with the CFTC. Futures contracts trade on contracts markets in a manner that is similar to the way a stock trades on a stock exchange and the boards of trade, through their clearing corporations, guarantee performance of the contracts.

 

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Additional Risks of Futures Contracts.  If the Fund has sold futures to hedge against a decline in the market and the market later advances, the Fund may suffer a loss on the futures contracts that it would not have experienced if it had not hedged. Correlation is also imperfect between movements in the prices of futures contracts and movements in prices of the securities which are the subject of the hedge. Thus the price of the futures contract may move more than or less than the price of the securities being hedged. Where the Fund has sold futures to hedge against a decline in the market, the price of the futures contract may advance and the value of the portfolio securities in the Fund may decline. If this were to occur, the Fund might lose money on the futures contracts and also experience a decline in the value of its portfolio securities.

                The Fund can close out futures positions in the secondary market only on an exchange or board of trade or with an over-the-counter (“OTC”) market maker. Although the Fund intends to purchase or sell only such futures for which an active secondary market appears to exist, there can be no assurance that such a market will exist for any particular futures contract at any particular time. This might prevent the Fund from closing a futures position, which could require the Fund to make daily margin payments in the event of adverse price movements.

 

Repurchase Agreements (Applies to Calvert Balanced (fixed income portion), Bond and Money Market)

                Each of the Balanced (fixed income portion), Bond and Money Market Portfolios may invest in repurchase agreements. Repurchase agreements are arrangements under which the Fund buys a security, and the seller simultaneously agrees to repurchase the security at a mutually agreed-upon time and price reflecting a market rate of interest. Repurchase agreements are short-term money market investments, designed to generate current income. A Fund engages in repurchase agreements in order to earn a higher rate of return than it could earn simply by investing in the obligation which is the subject of the repurchase agreement.

Repurchase agreements are not, however, without risk. In the event of the bankruptcy of a seller during the term of a repurchase agreement, a legal question exists as to whether a Fund would be deemed the owner of the underlying security or would be deemed only to have a security interest in and lien upon such security. The Funds will only engage in repurchase agreements with recognized securities dealers and banks determined to present minimal credit risk by the Advisor under the direction and supervision of the respective Fund's Board of Trustees/Directors. In addition, the Funds will only engage in repurchase agreements reasonably designed to secure fully during the term of the agreement the seller's obligation to repurchase the underlying security and will monitor the market value of the underlying security during the term of the agreement. If the value of the underlying security declines and is not at least equal to the repurchase price due a Fund pursuant to the agreement, the Fund will require the seller to pledge additional securities or cash to secure the seller's obligations pursuant to the agreement. If the seller defaults on its obligation to repurchase and the value of the underlying security declines, the Fund may incur a loss and may incur expenses in selling the underlying security.

While an underlying security may mature after one year, repurchase agreements are generally for periods of less than one year. Repurchase agreements not terminable within seven days are considered illiquid.

 

Leveraged Loans (Applies to Calvert Balanced and Bond)

The Balanced and Bond Portfolios may invest in leveraged loans. Investments in loans are subject to interest rate risk and credit risk. Interest rate risk refers to fluctuations in the value of a loan resulting from changes in the general level of interest rates. Credit risk refers to the possibility that the borrower of a loan will be unable and/or unwilling to make timely interest payments and/or repay the principal on its obligation. Circumstances surrounding default in the payment of interest or principal on a loan may result in a reduction in the value of the loan and consequently a reduction in the value of a Fund’s investments and a potential decrease in the net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund. Although the loans in which a Fund will invest generally will be secured by specific collateral, there can be no assurance that such collateral would satisfy the borrower’s obligation in the event of non-payment of scheduled interest or principal or that such collateral could be readily liquidated. In the event of the bankruptcy of a borrower, the Fund’s access to the collateral may be limited by bankruptcy and, therefore, the Fund could experience delays or limitations with respect to its ability to realize the benefits of the collateral securing a loan. 

There is no organized exchange on which loans are traded, and reliable market quotations may not be readily available. Therefore, elements of judgment may play a greater role in valuation of loans than for securities with a more developed secondary market, and a Fund may not realize full value in the event of the need to sell a loan. To the extent that a secondary market does exist for certain loans, the market may be subject to irregular trading activity, wide bid/ask spreads and extended trade settlement periods. Many loans are not registered with the SEC or any state securities commission and are not often rated by any NRSRO. Generally there is less readily available, reliable information about most loans than is the case for many other types of securities.

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Some loans are subject to the risk that a court, pursuant to fraudulent conveyance or other similar laws, could subordinate the loans to presently existing or future indebtedness of the borrower or take other action detrimental to lenders, including the Fund, such as invalidation of loans or causing interest previously paid to be refunded to the borrower. Investments in loans are also subject to the risk of changes in legislation or state or federal regulations. If such legislation or regulations impose additional requirements or restrictions on the ability of financial institutions to make loans, the availability of loans for investment by the Fund may be adversely affected.

Although a loan may be senior to equity and other debt securities in a borrower’s capital structure, such obligations may be structurally subordinated to obligations of the borrower’s subsidiaries. From time to time, one or more of the factors described above may create volatility in the markets for debt instruments and decrease the liquidity of the loan market.

 

Risks of Loan Assignments and Participations. As the purchaser of an assignment, a Fund typically succeeds to all the rights and obligations of the assigning institution and becomes a lender under the credit agreement with respect to the debt obligation; however, the Fund may not be able to unilaterally enforce all rights and remedies under the loan and with regard to any associated collateral. Because assignments may be arranged through private negotiations between potential assignees and potential assignors, the rights and obligations acquired by the Fund as the purchaser of an assignment may differ from, and be more limited than, those held by the assigning counterparty. In addition, if the loan is foreclosed, the Fund could become part owner of any collateral and could bear the costs and liabilities of owning and disposing of the collateral. A Fund may be required to pass along to a purchaser that buys a loan from the Fund by way of assignment a portion of any fees to which the Fund is entitled under the loan. In connection with purchasing participations, the Fund generally will have no right to enforce compliance by the borrower with the terms of the loan agreement relating to the loan, nor any rights of set-off against the borrower, and the Fund may not directly benefit from any collateral supporting the loan in which it has purchased the participation. As a result, the Fund will be subject to the credit risk of both the borrower and the counterparty that is selling the participation. In the event of the insolvency of the counterparty selling a participation, the Fund may be treated as a general creditor of the counterparty and may not benefit from any set-off between the counterparty and the borrower.

 

Risk of Investing in Loans to Non-U.S. Borrowers.   A Fund may invest all or a portion of its assets in loans of non-U.S. borrowers. The Fund’s investments in loans of non-U.S. borrowers may be affected by: political and social instability; changes in economic or taxation policies; difficulties when enforcing obligations; decreased liquidity; and increased volatility. Foreign borrowers may be subject to less regulation, resulting in less publicly available information about the borrowers.

 

NON-PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT POLICIES AND RISKS

 

                The following discussion of non-principal investment policies and risks applies to each of the Funds, unless otherwise noted.

 

Foreign Securities (Applies to Calvert Social Index Fund)

                Investments in foreign securities may present risks not typically involved in domestic investments. See the description of Foreign Securities in “Supplemental Infor4mation on Principal Inveswtment Policies and Risks” above.   The Social Index Fund may purchase foreign securities only to the extent they may be in the Calvert Social Index®. The index will not have any foreign stocks in it unless they are listed on a major U.S. exchange.  Thus, there will be no foreign custody or currency involved.  However, because the issuer is located outside the United States, such securities will still be subject to political and economic risks of the country where the issuer is located.

 

Forward Foreign Currency Contracts (Applies to Calvert Balanced, Bond and Equity)

Since investments in securities of issuers domiciled in foreign countries usually involve currencies of the foreign countries, and since the Balanced, Bond and Equity Portfolios may temporarily hold funds in foreign currencies during the completion of investment programs, the value of the assets of the Funds as measured in U.S. dollars may be affected favorably or unfavorably by changes in foreign currency exchange rates and exchange control regulations. For example, if the value of the foreign currency in which a security is denominated increases or decreases in relation to the value of the U.S. dollar, the value of the security in U.S. dollars will increase or decrease correspondingly. The Funds will conduct their foreign currency exchange transactions either on a spot (i.e., cash) basis at the current rate prevailing in the foreign exchange market, or by entering into forward contracts to purchase or sell foreign currencies.

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A forward foreign currency contract involves an obligation to purchase or sell a specific currency at a future date which may be any fixed number of days from the date of the contract agreed upon by the parties, at a price set at the time of the contract. These contracts are traded both in the interbank market conducted directly between currency traders (usually large commercial banks) and between the currency traders and their customers. A forward foreign currency contract generally has no deposit requirement, and no commissions are charged at any stage for trades.

                The Funds may enter into forward foreign currency contracts for two reasons. First, a Fund may desire to preserve the U.S. dollar price of a security when it enters into a contract for the purchase or sale of a security denominated in a foreign currency. The Fund may be able to protect itself against possible losses resulting from changes in the relationship between the U.S. dollar and foreign currencies during the period between the date the security is purchased or sold and the date on which payment is made or received by entering into a forward contract for the purchase or sale, for a fixed amount of dollars, of the amount of the foreign currency involved in the underlying security transactions.

                Second, a Fund may have exposure to a particular foreign currency from the Fund's portfolio securities and the Advisor and/or Subadvisor may anticipate a substantial decline in the value of that currency against the U.S. dollar. The precise matching of the forward foreign currency contract amounts and the value of the portfolio securities involved will not generally be possible since the future value of the securities will change as a consequence of market movements between the date the forward contract is entered into and the date it matures. The projection of currency market movements is difficult, and the successful execution of this hedging strategy is uncertain. Although forward foreign currency contracts tend to limit the risk of loss due to a decline in the value of the hedged currency, at the same time they tend to limit any potential gain which might result should the value of such currency increase. The Funds do not intend to enter into such forward contracts under this circumstance on a regular or continuous basis.

 

Emerging Market Securities (Applies to Calvert Balanced, Bond, Equity and Enhanced Equity)

Investing in emerging markets and in particular, those countries whose economies and capital markets are not as developed as those of more industrialized nations, carries its own special risks. The Balanced, Bond, Equity and Enhanced Equity Portfolios define an emerging market as any country (other than the United States or Canada) that is not included in the Morgan Stanley Capital International ("MSCI") Europe, Australasia, Far East ("EAFE") (Standard) Index. Investments in these countries may be riskier, and may be subject to erratic and abrupt price movements. Some economies are less well developed and less diverse, and more vulnerable to the ebb and flow of international trade, trade barriers and other protectionist or retaliatory measures. Many of these countries are grappling with severe inflation or recession, high levels of national debt, and currency exchange problems. Governments in many emerging market countries participate to a significant degree in their economies and securities markets.  Investments in countries or regions that have recently begun moving away from central planning and state-owned industries toward free markets should be regarded as speculative. Among other risks, the economies of such countries may be affected to a greater extent than in other countries by price fluctuations of a single commodity, by severe cyclical climactic conditions, lack of significant history in operating under a market-oriented economy or by political instability.  Certain emerging market countries have historically experienced, and may continue to experience, high rates of inflation, high interest rates, exchange rate fluctuations, large amounts of external debt, balance of payments and trade difficulties and extreme poverty and unemployment.

 

Real Estate Investment Trusts (Applies to Calvert Balanced, Bond, Equity and Enhanced Equity)

The Balanced, Bond, Equity and Enhanced Equity Portfolios may make investments related to real estate, including real estate investment trusts ("REITs").  Risks associated with investments in securities of companies in the real estate industry include: decline in the value of real estate; risks related to general and local economic conditions; overbuilding and increased competition; increases in property taxes and operating expenses; changes in zoning laws; casualty or condemnation losses; variations in rental income; changes in the value of neighborhoods; the appeal of properties to tenants; and increases in interest rates.  In addition, equity REITs, which own real estate properties, may be affected by changes in the values of the underlying property owned by the REIT, while mortgage REITs, which make construction, development, and long-term mortgage loans, may be affected by the quality of credit extended. REITs are dependent upon management skills, may not be diversified, and are subject to the risks of financing projects.  REITs are also subject to heavy cash flow dependency, defaults by borrowers, self-liquidation and the possibility of failing to qualify for tax-free pass-through of income under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, and failing to maintain exemption from the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended.  If an issuer of debt securities collateralized by real estate defaults, REITs could end up holding the underlying real estate. REITs also have expenses themselves that are ultimately paid by the shareholder.

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Short-Term Instruments (Applies to Calvert  Balanced, Equity and Enhanced Equity, and Calvert Social Index Fund)

See “Short-Term Instruments” in “Supplemental Information on Principal Investment Policies and Risks” above.

 

Temporary Defensive Positions (Not Applicable to Calvert Money Market)

For temporary defensive purposes - which may include a lack of adequate purchase candidates or an unfavorable market environment - the Balanced, Bond, Equity and Enhanced Equity Portfolios and the Social Index Fund may invest in cash or cash equivalents. Cash equivalents include instruments such as, but not limited to, U.S. government and agency obligations, certificates of deposit, banker's acceptances, time deposits, commercial paper, short-term corporate debt securities, and repurchase agreements. The Funds' investments in temporary defensive positions are generally not  insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, even though a bank may be the issuer.

                The Funds may invest in money market instruments of banks, whether foreign or domestic, including obligations of U.S. branches of foreign banks ("Yankee" instruments) and obligations of foreign branches of U.S. banks ("Eurodollar" instruments). All such instruments must be high-quality, U.S. dollar-denominated obligations. Although not subject to foreign currency risk since they are U.S. dollar-denominated, investments in foreign money market instruments may involve risks that are different than investments in securities of U.S. issuers. See "Foreign Securities" in "Supplemental Information on Principal Investment Policies and Risks" above. 

 

Small-Cap Issuers (Applies to Calvert Balanced and Equity, and Calvert Social Index Fund)

                The securities of small-cap issuers may be less actively traded than the securities of larger-cap issuers, may trade in a more limited volume, and may change in value more abruptly than securities of larger companies.

                Information concerning these securities may not be readily available, so the securities’ issuers may be less actively followed by stock analysts. Small-cap issuers do not usually participate in market rallies to the same extent as more widely known securities, and they tend to have a relatively higher percentage of insider ownership.

                Investing in smaller, new issuers generally involves greater risk than investing in larger, established issuers. Small-cap issuers may have limited product lines, markets, or financial resources and may lack management depth. The securities in such companies may also have limited marketability and may be subject to more abrupt or erratic market movements than securities of larger, more established companies or the market averages in general.

 

Repurchase Agreements (Applies to Calvert Balanced (equity portion), Equity and Enhanced Equity, and Calvert Social Index Fund)

                Each of the Balanced (equity portion), Equity and Enhanced Equity Portfolios, and the Social Index Fund may invest up to 10% of its net assets in repurchase agreements, except that investments in repurchase agreements may exceed this limit for temporary defensive purposes. See "Repurchase Agreements" in "Supplemental Information on Principal Investment Policies and Risks" above.

 

Reverse Repurchase Agreements

Each of the Funds may invest up to 10% of its net assets in reverse repurchase agreements. Under a reverse repurchase agreement, a Fund sells portfolio securities to a bank or securities dealer and agrees to repurchase those securities from such party at an agreed upon date and price reflecting a market rate of interest. A Fund invests the proceeds from each reverse repurchase agreement in obligations in which it is authorized to invest. A Fund intends to enter into a reverse repurchase agreement only when the interest income expected to be earned on the obligation in which the Fund plans to invest the proceeds exceeds the amount the Fund will pay in interest to the other party to the agreement plus all costs associated with the transaction. The Funds do not intend to borrow for leverage purposes. The Funds will only be permitted to pledge assets to the extent necessary to secure borrowings and reverse repurchase agreements.

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                During the time a reverse repurchase agreement is outstanding, the Fund will maintain, in a segregated custodial account, an amount of cash, U.S. government securities, or other liquid, high-quality debt securities at least equal in value to the repurchase price. The Fund will mark to market the value of assets held in the segregated account and will place additional assets in the account whenever the total value of the account falls below the amount required under applicable regulations.

                A Fund's use of reverse repurchase agreements involves the risk that the other party to the agreements could become subject to bankruptcy or liquidation proceedings during the period the agreements are outstanding. In such event, the Fund may not be able to repurchase the securities it has sold to that other party. Under those circumstances, if at the expiration of the agreement such securities are of greater value than the proceeds obtained by the Fund under the agreement, the Fund may have been better off had it not entered into the agreement. However, the Funds will enter into reverse repurchase agreements only with banks and dealers which the Advisor believes present minimal credit risks under guidelines adopted by each Fund's Board of Trustees/Directors.

 

Trust Preferred Securities (Applies to Calvert Balanced)

See “Trust Preferred Securities” in “Supplemental Information on Principal Investment Policies and Risks” above.

 

Municipal Securities (Applies to Calvert Balanced)

See “Municipal Securities” in “Supplemental Information on Principal Investment Policies and Risks” above.

 

High Social Impact Investments (Applies to Calvert Balanced, Bond and Equity, and Calvert Social Index Fund)

                The High Social Impact Investments program targets a percentage of a Fund's assets to directly support the growth of community-based organizations for the purposes of promoting business creation, housing development and economic and social development of urban and rural communities. These investments may be either debt or equity investments and are illiquid. High Social Impact debt investments are unrated and are deemed by the Advisor to be the equivalent of below-investment grade, high-yield debt securities –  that is, lower quality debt securities (generally those rated BB or lower by S&P or Ba or lower by Moody's, known as "junk bonds"). These securities have moderate to poor protection of principal and interest payments and have speculative characteristics. (See Appendix B for a description of the ratings.)  Rather than earning a higher rate, as would be expected to compensate for the higher risk (i.e., lower credit quality), they earn a rate of return that is lower than the then-prevailing market rate. There is no secondary market for these securities.

                The Balanced, Bond and Equity Portfolios and the Social Index Fund may make their High Social Impact Investments through direct investments, or through intermediaries, such as through the purchase of notes issued by the Calvert Social Investment Foundation, a non-profit organization, legally distinct from the Funds and Calvert Investments, Inc., organized as a charitable and educational foundation for the purpose of increasing public awareness and knowledge of the concept of socially responsible investing. The Foundation prepares its own careful credit analysis to attempt to identify those community development issuers whose financial condition is adequate to meet future obligations or is expected to be adequate in the future. Through portfolio diversification and credit analysis, investment risk can be reduced, although there can be no assurance that losses will not occur. The Social  Index Fund has not yet commenced investing through this program.

                The Balanced  and Equity Portfolios may make direct High Social Impact Investments through the Special Equities program described below in this “Non-Principal Investment Policies and Risks” section (the Social Index Fund has not yet commenced investing in that program); such investments are referred to as Social Enterprise investments.

 

Limited Partnerships (Applies to Calvert Balanced and Equity, and Calvert Social Index Fund)

The Balanced  and Equity Portfolios may invest in limited partnerships, primarily through the Special Equities program described below in this “Non-Principal Investment Policies and Risks” section (the Social Index Fund has not yet commenced investing in that program).  Investments in limited partnerships pose special investment risks.  A limited partnership is generally taxed as a pass-through entity; i.e., the income and expenses of the partnership are not taxed at the partnership level but are passed through to its limited partners, such as the Funds, who include their pro rata share of the partnership’s income and expenses in their own taxes.  This pass-through may potentially cause non-compliance by the Funds with certain tax laws and regulations to which the Funds are subject, and subject them to penalties under the tax laws, including possible loss of their own pass-through treatment under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986.  The term of a limited partnership is generally 10 years or more. Limited partnership units are illiquid and subject to contractual transfer restrictions; thus a Fund will generally not be able to sell an investment in a limited partnership but will be required to hold it for the entire term of the partnership.  Certain decisions that could adversely affect the Funds, such as whether the limited partnership should be allowed to borrow money, may be made by a majority in interest of the limited partners.  A Fund also bears indirectly its proportionate share of the limited partnership’s management fee and operating expenses. When a Fund makes an investment in a limited partnership, it signs a subscription agreement committing it to a certain investment amount; this amount is generally not paid all at once, but rather drawn down over time by the partnership’s general partner as investment opportunities present themselves.  As a result, a Fund must set aside sufficient assets to be able to fund any future capital calls. Limited partnerships have relatively concentrated holdings; as a consequence, the return on a partnership may be adversely impacted by the poor performance of a small number of investments, especially if the partnership needs to mark down the valuation of one or more of its holdings.

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Securities with Equity and  Debt Characteristics  (Applies to Calvert Balanced and Equity, and Calvert Social Index Fund)

The Balanced  and Equity Portfolios may invest in securities that have a combination of equity and debt characteristics, through the Special Equities program described below in this “Non-Principal Investment Policies and Risks” section (the Social Index Fund has not yet commenced investing in that program). These securities may at times behave more like equity than debt or vice versa.  Some types of convertible bonds, preferred stocks or other preferred securities automatically convert into common stock or other securities at a stated conversion ratio and some may be subject to redemption at the option of the issuer at a predetermined price.  These securities, prior to conversion, may pay a fixed rate of interest or a dividend. Because convertible securities have both debt and equity characteristics, their values vary in response to many factors, including the values of the securities into which they are convertible, general market and economic conditions, as well as changes in the credit quality of the issuer.

 

Special Equities Investments (Applies to calvert Balanced and Equity, and Calvert Social Index Fund)

The Special Equities program allows a Fund to promote especially promising approaches to sustainable and responsible investment goals through privately placed investments. As stated in the Prospectus, the Special Equities Committee of the Fund identifies, evaluates and selects Special Equities investments.

The Special Equities program, while generally comprising a small percentage of any participating Fund’s assets, invests in many investments that involve relatively high risks. These include foreign securities, below-investment grade, high-yield debt securities, emerging market securities, real estate investment trusts, small-cap issuers, limited partnerships, and securities with equity and debt characteristics, among others. See “Foreign Securities” and “Below-Investment Grade, High-Yield Debt Securities” in “Supplemental Information on Principal Investment Policies and Risks” above, and “Emerging Market Securities”, “Real Estate Investment Trusts”, “Small-Cap Issuers”, “Limited Partnerships”, “Securities with Equity and Debt Characteristics”, and “Illiquid Securities” in this section on Non-Principal Investment Policies and Risks.  Funds participating in the Special Equities program may also invest in unsecured debt, which does not have the benefits of a secured creditor in the event of bankruptcy.  A Special Equities investment may lose its entire value if the business enterprise does not succeed.  Because of their illiquid nature and contractual transfer restrictions, Special Equities investments may not be easily sold or transferred.

Each Fund has retained independent consultants to provide investment research and other research-related services with respect to the Special Equities program. The aggregate compensation amount paid by each Fund to the consultants for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011 was as follows (the Social Index Fund has not yet commenced investing in this program):

 

Calvert Balanced

$77,968

Calvert Equity

$66,067

Calvert Social Index Fund

N/A

 

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Below-Investment Grade, High-Yield Debt Securities (Applies to Calvert Balanced and Equity, and Calvert Social Index Fund)

See "Below-Investment Grade, High-Yield Debt Securities" in "Supplemental Information on Principal Investment Policies and Risks" above.

The Social Index Fund will not purchase debt securities other than High Social Impact Investments (or money market instruments).

 

Exchange-Traded Funds ("ETFs") 

                ETFs are shares of other investment companies that can be traded in the secondary market (e.g.,  on an exchange) and whose underlying assets are generally stocks selected to track a particular index. Therefore, an ETF can track the performance of an index in much the same way as a traditional indexed mutual fund. But unlike many traditional investment companies, which are only bought and sold at closing net asset values, ETFs are tradable in the secondary market on an intra-day basis, and are redeemed principally in-kind at each day's next calculated net asset value.  Although there can be no guarantee that an ETF’s intra-day price changes will accurately track the price changes of the related index, ETFs benefit from an in-kind redemption mechanism that is designed to protect ongoing shareholders from adverse effects on the ETFs that could arise from frequent cash creation and redemption transactions. Moreover, in contrast to conventional indexed mutual funds where redemptions can have an adverse tax impact on shareholders because of the need to sell portfolio securities (which sales may generate taxable gains), the in-kind redemption mechanism of the ETFs generally will not lead to a taxable event for the ETF or its ongoing shareholders.

                A Fund may purchase shares of ETFs for the limited purpose of managing the Fund’s cash position consistent with the Fund's applicable benchmark.  For example, an ETF may be purchased if the Fund has excess cash and it may be held until the Advisor and/or Subadvisor decides to make other permissible investments.  Similarly, if the Fund should receive a large redemption request, the Fund could sell some or all of an ETF position to lessen the exposure to the market.  The sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria of the Fund will not apply to an investment in an ETF or to any of the individual underlying securities held by the ETF.  Accordingly, the Fund could have indirect exposure to a company that does not meet the Fund’s sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria and that could therefore not be purchased directly by the Fund.  ETF investments, however, (i) will not constitute a direct ownership interest in any security that does not meet applicable sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria, (ii) will be limited to the amount of net cash available, which, in general, is not expected to be a material portion of the Fund and (iii) will be used principally to help reduce deviations from the Fund’s benchmark.

                Some of the risks of investing in ETFs are similar to those of investing in an indexed mutual fund, including (i) market risk (the risk of fluctuating stock prices in general), (ii) asset class risk (the risk of fluctuating prices of the stocks represented in the ETF's index), (iii) tracking error risk (the risk of errors in matching the ETF's underlying assets to the index), (iv) industry concentration risk (the risk of the stocks in a particular index being concentrated in an industry performing poorly relative to other stocks) and (v) the risk that since an ETF is not actively managed it cannot sell poorly performing stocks as long as they are represented in the index. In addition, ETFs may trade at a discount from their net asset value, and because ETFs operate as open-end investment companies or unit investment trusts, they incur fees that are separate from the fees incurred directly by the Fund.  Therefore, the Fund's purchase of an ETF results in the layering of expenses, such that shareholders of the Fund indirectly bear a proportionate share of any operating expenses of the ETF.

 

Illiquid Securities

Each Fund may not purchase illiquid securities if more than 15% of the value of its net assets (or for the Money Market Portfolio, more than 5% of the value of its net assets) would be invested in such securities.  The Advisor will monitor the amount of illiquid securities in the Fund, under the supervision of the Board, to ensure compliance with the Fund’s investment restrictions.

Historically, illiquid securities have included securities subject to contractual or legal restrictions on resale because they have not been registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), securities that are otherwise not readily marketable, and repurchase agreements having a maturity of longer than seven days. Securities that have not been registered under the Securities Act are referred to as private placement or restricted securities and are purchased directly from the issuer or in the secondary market.  Mutual funds do not typically hold a significant amount of these restricted or other illiquid securities because of the potential for delays on resale and uncertainty in valuation.  Limitations on resale may have an adverse effect on the marketability of the securities, and a Fund might be unable to sell restricted or other illiquid securities promptly or at reasonable prices.

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Notwithstanding the above, a Fund may purchase securities which, while privately placed, are eligible for purchase and sale under Rule 144A under the Securities Act.  This rule permits certain qualified institutional buyers, such as the Funds, to trade in privately placed securities even though such securities are not registered under the Securities Act.  If the Board determines, based upon a continuing review of Rule 144A securities, that they are liquid, they will not be subject to the 15% limit (or in the case of the Money Market Portfolio, the 5% limit) on illiquid investments.  The Board has adopted guidelines as part of the Pricing Procedures and delegated to the Advisor the daily function of determining the liquidity of restricted securities.  The Board retains sufficient oversight and is ultimately responsible for the determinations.

Restricted securities will be priced at fair value as determined in accordance with procedures prescribed by a Fund’s Board.

 

Derivatives

                A Fund may use various techniques to increase or decrease its exposure to changing security prices, interest rates, or other factors that affect security values. These techniques may involve derivative transactions such as buying and selling options and futures contracts and leveraged notes, entering into swap agreements, and purchasing indexed securities for the purpose of adjusting the risk and return characteristics of the Fund. A Fund can use these practices either as a substitute for alternative permissible investments or as protection against a move that has an adverse effect on the Fund's portfolio securities. If the Advisor and/or Subadvisor judges market conditions incorrectly or employs a strategy that does not correlate well with the Fund's investments, or if the counterparty to the transaction does not perform as promised, these techniques could result in a loss. These techniques may increase the volatility of the Fund and may involve a small investment of cash relative to the magnitude of the risk assumed. Derivatives are often illiquid, which can make it difficult to value them.

 

Options and Futures Contracts (Options and Futures Not Applicable to Calvert Money Market; Options not Applicable to Calvert Social Index Fund; See Below Regarding Options Applicable To Calvert Bond)

                The Balanced, Equity and Enhanced Equity Portfolios may purchase put and call options and write covered call options and secured put options on securities which meet the applicable Fund’s sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria, and may employ a variety of option combination strategies.  Each Fund may also engage in the purchase and sale of futures contracts, including interest rate futures contracts.  In addition, each Fund may write covered call options and secured put options on such futures contracts.  Each Fund’s use of options and futures is described more fully below.

                These Funds may engage in such transactions only for hedging purposes, including hedging of a Fund’s cash position (or for the Enhanced Equity Portfolio, also for liquidity). They may not engage in such transactions for the purposes of speculation or leverage.  Such investment policies and techniques may involve a greater degree of risk than those inherent in more conservative investment approaches.

                Options are typically classified as either American-style or European-style, based on the dates on which the option may be exercised. American-style options may be exercised at any time prior to the expiration date and European-style options may be exercised on the expiration date. Option contracts traded on futures exchanges are mainly American-style, and options traded over-the-counter are mainly European-style.

The value of an option will fluctuate based primarily on the time remaining until expiration of the option, known as the option’s time value, and the difference between the then-prevailing price of the underlying security and the option’s exercise price.  This difference, known as the option’s intrinsic value, determines whether an option is in-the-money, at-the-money or out-of-the-money at any point in time.  If there is an existing secondary market for an option, it can be closed out at any time by the Fund for a gain or a loss.  Alternatively, the holder of an in-the-money American-style option may exercise the option at any time prior to the expiration date, while the holder of an in-the-money European-style option must wait until the expiration date to exercise the option.  Options that expire out-of-the-money are worthless resulting in a loss of the entire premium paid.

                Other principal factors that affect the market value of an option include supply and demand, interest rates, and the current market price and price volatility of the underlying security.

 

Purchasing Options.  A Fund will pay a premium (plus any commission) to purchase an option.  The premium reflects the total of the option’s time value and intrinsic value.  The purchaser of an option has a right to buy (in the case of a call option) or sell (in the case of a put option) the underlying security at the exercise price and has no obligation after the premium has been paid.

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Call Options.  The purchase of a call option on a security is similar to taking a long position because the value of the option generally increases as the price of the underlying security increases.  However, in the event that the underlying security declines in value, losses on options are limited to the premium paid to purchase the option.  Although a call option has the potential to increase in value from higher prices for the underlying security, because the option will expire on its expiration date, any such gains may be more than offset by reductions in the option’s time value or other valuation factors.  A Fund may only buy call options to hedge its available cash balance, to limit the risk of a substantial increase in the market price of a security which a Fund intends to purchase, or to close an outstanding position that resulted from writing a corresponding call option.  Any profit or loss from such a closing transaction will depend on whether the amount received is more or less than the premium paid for the call option plus the related transaction costs.  A Fund may purchase securities by exercising a call option solely on the basis of considerations consistent with the investment objectives and policies of the Fund.

                Put Options.  The purchase of a put option on a security is similar to taking a short position (selling a security that you do not own) in that security because the value of the option generally increases as the value of the underlying security decreases.  However, in the event that the underlying security increases in value, losses on the option are limited to the premium paid to purchase the option.  Although a put option has the potential to increase in value from lower prices for the underlying security, because the option will expire on its expiration date, any such gains may be more than offset by reductions in the option’s time value or other valuation factors.  A Fund may purchase put options to protect its portfolio securities against the risk of declining prices or to close an outstanding position that resulted from writing a corresponding put option.  Any profit or loss from such a closing transaction will depend on whether the amount received is more or less than the premium paid for the put option plus the related transaction costs. 

 

Writing Options.   Each of these Funds may write certain types of options.  Writing options means that the Fund is selling an investor the right, but not the obligation, to purchase (in the case of a call option) or to sell (in the case of a put option) a security or index at the exercise price in exchange for the option premium.  The writer of an option has the obligation to sell (in the case of a call option) or buy (in the case of a put option) the underlying security and has no rights other than to receive the premium.  Writing options involves more risk than purchasing options because a writer of an option has the potential to realize a gain that is limited to the value of the premium (less any commission) and takes on potentially unlimited risk from increases in the price of the underlying security, in the case of a call option, and the risk that the underlying security may decline to zero, in the case of a put option (which would require the writer of the put option to pay the exercise price for a security that is worthless).  Accordingly, the Funds may only write covered call options and secured put options, which mitigate these substantial risks.   A call option is deemed “covered” if the Fund owns the security.  A put option is deemed “secured” if the Fund has segregated cash or securities having an aggregate value equal to the total purchase price the Fund will have to pay if the put option is exercised.

Call Options.   A Fund that writes a call option on a security will receive the option premium (less any commission), which helps to mitigate the effect of any depreciation in the market value of that security.  However, because the Fund is obligated to sell that security at the exercise price, this strategy also limits the Fund's ability to benefit from an increase in the price of the security above the exercise price.

Each of these Funds may write covered call options on securities.  This means that so long as a Fund is obligated as the writer of a call option, the Fund will own the underlying security.  A Fund may write such options in order to receive the premiums from options that expire and to seek net gains from closing purchase transactions with respect to such options. Writing covered call options can increase the income of the Fund and thus reduce declines in the net asset value per share of the Fund if securities covered by such options decline in value. Exercise of a call option by the purchaser, however, will cause the Fund to forego future appreciation of the securities covered by the option. A Fund's turnover may increase through the exercise of a call option that it has written; this may occur if the market value of the underlying security increases and the Fund has not entered into a closing purchase transaction. When a Fund writes a covered call option, it will realize a profit in the amount of the premium, less a commission, so long as the price of the underlying security remains below the exercise price.

Put Options.    A Fund that writes a put option on a security will receive the option premium (less any commission), which effectively reduces the Fund's acquisition cost for that security.  A Fund that is contemplating an investment in a security but that is uncertain about its near-term price trajectory could write a put option on a security; the premium will provide the Fund with a partial buffer against a price increase, while providing the Fund with an opportunity to acquire the security at the lower exercise price.  However, the Fund remains obligated to purchase the underlying security from the buyer of the put option (usually in the event the price of the security falls below the exercise price).  Accordingly, this strategy may result in unexpected losses if the option is exercised against the Fund at a time when the price of the security has declined below the exercise price by more than the amount of the premium received.

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A Fund may only write secured put options, which requires the Fund to segregate cash or securities, through its custodian, having a value at least equal to the exercise price of the put option.  If the value of the segregated securities declines below the exercise price of the put option, the Fund will have to segregate additional assets.  When a Fund writes a secured put option, it will realize a profit in the amount of the premium, less a commission, so long as the price of the underlying security remains above the exercise price.  

 

Exchange-Traded Options.   A Fund may purchase and write put and call options in standard contracts traded on national securities exchanges on securities of issuers which meet the Fund's sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria and on foreign currencies.  Options exchanges may provide liquidity in the secondary market. Although these Funds intend to acquire and write only such exchange-traded options for which an active secondary market appears to exist, there can be no assurance that such a market will exist for any particular option contract at any particular time. The absence of a liquid market might prevent the Funds from closing an options position, which could impair the Funds' ability to hedge effectively. The inability to close out a written option position may have an adverse effect on a Fund’s liquidity because it may be required to hold the securities covering or securing the option until the option expires or is exercised.

The information provided above under “Purchasing Options” and “Writing Options” is applicable to exchange-traded options. 

 

Futures Transactions. The Balanced, Equity and Enhanced Equity Portfolios and the Social Index Fund may purchase and sell futures contracts, but only when, in the judgment of the Advisor and/or Subadvisor, such a position acts as a hedge.  The Funds may not enter into futures contracts for the purpose of speculation or leverage. These futures contracts may include, but are not limited to, market index futures contracts and futures contracts based on U.S. government obligations.

                A futures contract is an agreement between two parties to buy and sell a security on a future date which has the effect of establishing the current price for the security. Many futures contracts by their terms require actual delivery and acceptance of securities, but some allow for cash settlement of the difference between the futures price and the market value of the underlying security or index at time of delivery.  In most cases the contracts are closed out before the settlement date without making or taking delivery of securities. Upon buying or selling a futures contract, a Fund deposits initial margin with its custodian, and thereafter daily payments of maintenance margin are made to and from the executing broker.  Payments of maintenance margin reflect changes in the value of the futures contract, with the Fund being obligated to make such payments if the futures position becomes less valuable and entitled to receive such payments if the futures position becomes more valuable.

                The Funds can use these practices only for hedging purposes and not for speculation or leverage. If the Advisor and/or Subadvisor judge market conditions incorrectly or employ a strategy that does not correlate well with a Fund's investments, these techniques could result in a loss. These techniques may increase the volatility of a Fund and may involve a small investment of cash relative to the magnitude of the risk assumed.

The Social Index Fund can use financial futures to increase or decrease its exposure to changing security prices. Futures contracts will be used only for the limited purpose of hedging the Fund's cash position; a futures contract may be purchased if the Fund has excess cash, until the Fund can invest in stocks replicating the Calvert Social Index. Similarly, if this Fund should receive a large redemption request, it could sell a futures contract to lessen its exposure to the market.

                Futures contracts are designed by boards of trade which are designated "contracts markets" by the CFTC. As series of a registered investment company, the Funds are eligible for exclusion from the CFTC's definition of "commodity pool operator," meaning that the Funds may invest in futures contracts under specified conditions without registering with the CFTC. Futures contracts trade on contracts markets in a manner that is similar to the way a stock trades on a stock exchange and the boards of trade, through their clearing corporations, guarantee performance of the contracts.

 

Options on Futures Contracts. Each of these Funds may purchase put or call options, write secured put options or write covered call options on futures contracts that the Fund could otherwise invest in and that are traded on a U.S. exchange or a board of trade.  These Funds may also enter into closing transactions with respect to such options to terminate an existing position.

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Each Fund may only invest in options on futures contracts to hedge its portfolio securities or its available cash balance and not for speculation or leverage purposes.

                The information provided above under “Purchasing Options” and “Writing Options” is applicable to options on futures contracts, except that references therein to securities should instead refer to futures contracts.

 

Additional Risks of Options and Futures Contracts.  If a Fund has sold futures or takes options positions to hedge against a decline in the market and the market later advances, the Fund may suffer a loss on the futures contracts or options which it would not have experienced if it had not hedged. Correlation is also imperfect between movements in the prices of futures contracts and movements in prices of the securities which are the subject of the hedge. Thus the price of the futures contract or option may move more than or less than the price of the securities being hedged. Where a Fund has sold futures or taken options positions to hedge against a decline in the market, the price of the futures contract may advance and the value of the portfolio securities in the Fund may decline. If this were to occur, the Fund might lose money on the futures contracts or options and also experience a decline in the value of its portfolio securities.

                The Funds can close out futures positions and options on futures in the secondary market only on an exchange or board of trade. Although the Funds intend to purchase or sell only such futures, and purchase or write such options, for which an active secondary market appears to exist, there can be no assurance that such a market will exist for any particular futures contract or option at any particular time. This might prevent the Funds from closing a futures position or an option on a futures contract, which could require a Fund to make daily margin payments in the event of adverse price movements. If a Fund cannot close out an option position, it may be required to exercise the option to realize any profit or the option may expire worthless.

                Although some of the securities underlying an index future contract, an option on an index future contract or an option on an index may not necessarily meet the Fund's sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria, any such hedge position taken by the Fund will not constitute a direct ownership interest in the underlying securities.

 

Options (Applies to Calvert Bond)

                The Bond Portfolio may purchase put and call options and write covered call options and secured put options on securities, and may employ a variety of option combination strategies.  In addition, the Fund may write covered call options and secured put options on futures contracts. 

                The Fund may engage in such transactions only for hedging purposes, including hedging of the Fund’s cash position. The Fund may not engage in such transactions for the purposes of speculation or leverage.  Such investment policies and techniques may involve a greater degree of risk than those inherent in more conservative investment approaches.

Options are typically classified as either American-style or European-style, based on the dates on which the option may be exercised. American-style options may be exercised at any time prior to the expiration date, and European-style options may be exercised on the expiration date. Option contracts traded on futures exchanges are mainly American-style, and options traded over-the-counter are mainly European-style.

The value of an option will fluctuate based primarily on the time remaining until expiration of the option, known as the option’s time value, and the difference between the then-prevailing price of the underlying security and the option’s exercise price.  This difference, known as the option’s intrinsic value, determines whether an option is in-the-money, at-the-money or out-of-the-money at any point in time.  If there is an existing secondary market for an option, it can be closed out at any time by the Fund for a gain or a loss.  Alternatively, the holder of an in-the-money American-style option may exercise the option at any time prior to the expiration date, while the holder of an in-the-money European-style option must wait until the expiration date to exercise the option.  Options that expire out-of-the-money are worthless resulting in a loss of the entire premium paid.

                Other principal factors that affect the market value of an option include supply and demand, interest rates, the current market price and the price volatility of the underlying security.

 

Purchasing Options.  The Fund will pay a premium (plus any commission) to purchase an option.  The premium reflects the total of the option’s time value and intrinsic value.  The purchaser of an option has a right to buy (in the case of a call option) or sell (in the case of a put option) the underlying security at the exercise price and has no obligation after the premium has been paid.

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Call Options.  The purchase of a call option on a security is similar to taking a long position because the value of the option generally increases as the price of the underlying security increases.  However, in the event that the underlying security declines in value, losses on options are limited to the premium paid to purchase the option.  Although a call option has the potential to increase in value from higher prices for the underlying security, because the option will expire on its expiration date, any such gains may be more than offset by reductions in the option’s time value or other valuation factors.  The Fund may only buy call options to hedge its available cash balance, to limit the risk of a substantial increase in the market price of a security which the Fund intends to purchase, or to close an outstanding position that resulted from writing a corresponding call option.  Any profit or loss from such a closing transaction will depend on whether the amount received is more or less than the premium paid for the call option plus the related transaction costs.  The Fund may purchase securities by exercising a call option solely on the basis of considerations consistent with the investment objectives and policies of the Fund.

                Put Options.  The purchase of a put option on a security is similar to taking a short position (selling a security that you do not own) in that security because the value of the option generally increases as the value of the underlying security decreases.  However, in the event that the underlying security increases in value, losses on the option are limited to the premium paid to purchase the option.  Although a put option has the potential to increase in value from lower prices for the underlying security, because the option will expire on its expiration date, any such gains may be more than offset by reductions in the option’s time value or other valuation factors.  The Fund may purchase put options to protect its portfolio securities against the risk of declining prices or to close an outstanding position that resulted from writing a corresponding put option.  Any profit or loss from such a closing transaction will depend on whether the amount received is more or less than the premium paid for the put option plus the related transaction costs. 

 

Writing Options.   The Fund may write certain types of options.  Writing options means that the Fund is selling an investor the right, but not the obligation, to purchase (in the case of a call option) or to sell (in the case of a put option) a security or index at the exercise price in exchange for the option premium.  The writer of an option has the obligation to sell (in the case of a call option) or buy (in the case of a put option) the underlying security and has no rights other than to receive the premium.  Writing options involves more risk than purchasing options because a writer of an option has the potential to realize a gain that is limited to the value of the premium (less any commission) and takes on potentially unlimited risk from increases in the price of the underlying security, in the case of a call option, and the risk that the underlying security may decline to zero, in the case of a put option (which would require the writer of the put option to pay the exercise price for a security that is worthless).  Accordingly, the Fund may only write covered call options and secured put options, which mitigate these substantial risks.   A call option is deemed “covered” if the Fund owns the security.  A put option is deemed “secured” if the Fund has segregated cash or securities having an aggregate value equal to the total purchase price the Fund will have to pay if the put option is exercised.

Call Options.   A Fund that writes a call option on a security will receive the option premium (less any commission), which helps to mitigate the effect of any depreciation in the market value of that security.  However, because the Fund is obligated to sell that security at the exercise price, this strategy also limits the Fund's ability to benefit from an increase in the price of the security above the exercise price.

The Fund may write covered call options on securities.  This means that as long as the Fund is obligated as the writer of a call option, the Fund will own the underlying security.  The Fund may write such options in order to receive the premiums from options that expire and to seek net gains from closing purchase transactions with respect to such options. Writing covered call options can increase the income of the Fund and thus reduce declines in the net asset value per share of the Fund if securities covered by such options decline in value. Exercise of a call option by the purchaser, however, will cause the Fund to forego future appreciation of the securities covered by the option. The Fund's turnover may increase through the exercise of a call option that it has written; this will generally occur if the market value of the underlying security increases and the Fund has not entered into a closing purchase transaction. When the Fund writes a covered call option, it will realize a profit in the amount of the premium, less a commission, so long as the price of the underlying security remains below the exercise price.

Put Options.    A Fund that writes a put option on a security will receive the option premium (less any commission), which effectively reduces the Fund's acquisition cost for that security.  A Fund that is contemplating an investment in a security but that is uncertain about its near-term price trajectory could write a put option on a security; the premium will provide the Fund with a partial buffer against a price increase, while providing the Fund with an opportunity to acquire the security at the lower exercise price.  However, the Fund remains obligated to purchase the underlying security from the buyer of the put option (usually in the event the price of the security falls below the exercise price).  Accordingly, this strategy may result in unexpected losses if the option is exercised against the Fund at a time when the price of the security has declined below the exercise price by more than the amount of the premium received.

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The Fund may only write secured put options, which requires the Fund to segregate cash or securities, through its custodian, having a value at least equal to the exercise price of the put option.  If the value of the segregated securities declines below the exercise price of the put option, the Fund will have to segregate additional assets.  When the Fund writes a secured put option, it will realize a profit in the amount of the premium, less a commission, so long as the price of the underlying security remains above the exercise price.

 

Exchange-Traded Options.   The Fund may purchase and write put and call options in standard contracts traded on national securities exchanges on securities of issuers.  Options exchanges may provide liquidity in the secondary market. Although the Fund intends to acquire and write only such exchange-traded options for which an active secondary market appears to exist, there can be no assurance that such a market will exist for any particular option contract at any particular time. The absence of a liquid market might prevent the Fund from closing an options position, which could impair the Fund’s ability to hedge effectively. The inability to close out a written option position may have an adverse effect on the Fund’s liquidity because it may be required to hold the securities covering or securing the option until the option expires or is exercised.

The information provided above under “Purchasing Options” and “Writing Options” is applicable to exchange-traded options. 

 

Options on Futures Contracts.    The Fund may purchase put or call options, write secured put options or write covered call options on futures contracts that the Fund could otherwise invest in and that are traded on a U.S. exchange or a board of trade.  The Fund may also enter into closing transactions with respect to such options to terminate an existing position.

The Fund may only invest in options on futures contracts to hedge its portfolio securities or its available cash balance and not for speculation or leverage purposes.

                The information provided above under “Purchasing Options” and “Writing Options” is applicable to options on futures contracts, except that references therein to securities should instead refer to futures contracts.

 

Additional Risks of Options.  If the Fund takes options positions to hedge against a decline in the market and the market later advances, the Fund may suffer a loss on the options that it would not have experienced if it had not hedged. Correlation is also imperfect between movements in the prices of futures contracts and movements in prices of the securities which are the subject of the hedge. Thus the price of the option may move more than or less than the price of the securities being hedged. Where the Fund has taken options positions to hedge against a decline in the market, the price of the futures contract may advance and the value of the portfolio securities in the Fund may decline. If this were to occur, the Fund might lose money on the options and also experience a decline in the value of its portfolio securities.

                The hours of trading for options on U.S. government securities may not correspond exactly to the hours of trading for the underlying securities. To the extent that the options markets close before the U.S. government securities markets close, significant movements in rates and prices may occur in the government securities markets that cannot be reflected in the options markets.

The Fund can close out options on futures in the secondary market only on an exchange or board of trade or with an OTC market maker. Although the Fund intends to purchase or write only such options for which an active secondary market appears to exist, there can be no assurance that such a market will exist for any particular option at any particular time. This might prevent the Fund from closing an option on a futures contract, which could require the Fund to make daily margin payments in the event of adverse price movements. If the Fund cannot close out an option position, it may be required to exercise the option to realize any profit or the option may expire worthless.

Although some of the securities underlying an index future contract, an option on an index future contract or an option on an index may not necessarily meet the Fund’s sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria, any such hedge position taken by the Fund will not constitute a direct ownership interest in the underlying securities.

 

Swap Agreements (Applies to Calvert Balanced, Bond, Equity and Enhanced Equity)

The Balanced, Bond, Equity and Enhanced Equity Portfolios may invest in swap agreements, which are derivatives that may be used to offset credit, interest rate, market, or other risks.  The Funds will only enter into swap agreements for hedging purposes.  The counterparty to any swap agreements must meet credit guidelines as determined by the Advisor and/or Subadvisor

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The use of swaps is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques, costs, and risks (particularly correlation risk) different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions.  If the Advisor and/or Subadvisor is incorrect in its forecasts of market variables, the investment performance of a Fund may be less favorable than it would have been if this investment technique were not used.

Credit default swaps are one type of swap agreement that the Bond Portfolio may invest in. A credit default swap is an agreement between a protection buyer and a protection seller whereby the buyer makes regular fixed payments in return for a contingent payment by the seller upon either (i) the occurrence of an observable credit event that affects the issuer of a specified bond or (ii) a change in the credit spread of a specified bond. The contingent payment may compensate the protection buyer for losses suffered as a result of the credit event. If the protection seller defaults on its obligation to make the payment, the Fund would bear the losses resulting from the credit event. The Bond Portfolio will only invest in credit default swaps for hedging purposes.

 

Lending Portfolio Securities

The Funds may lend portfolio securities to member firms of the New York Stock Exchange and commercial banks with assets of one billion dollars or more, provided the aggregate value of the securities loaned by a Fund will not exceed 33 1/3% of its total assets.  However, the Funds do not currently intend to lend their portfolio securities.

Any such loans must be secured continuously in the form of cash or cash equivalents such as U.S. Treasury bills. The amount of the collateral must on a current basis equal or exceed the market value of the loaned securities, and a Fund must be able to terminate any such loan upon notice at any time. The Fund will exercise its right to terminate a securities loan in order to preserve its right to vote upon matters of importance affecting holders of the securities, including sustainability and social responsibility matters.

The advantage of a securities loan is that a Fund continues to receive the equivalent of the interest earned or dividends paid by the issuers on the loaned securities while at the same time earning interest on the cash or equivalent collateral which may be invested in accordance with the Fund's investment objective, policies, and restrictions.

                Securities loans are usually made to broker-dealers and other financial institutions to facilitate their delivery of such securities. As with any extension of credit, there may be risks of delay in recovery and possibly loss of rights in the loaned securities should the borrower of the loaned securities fail financially. However, the Funds will make loans of their portfolio securities only to those firms the Advisor and/or Subadvisor deems creditworthy and only on terms the Advisor and/or Subadvisor believes should compensate for such risk. On termination of the loan, the borrower is obligated to return the securities to the Fund. The Fund will recognize any gain or loss in the market value of the securities during the loan period. The Fund may pay reasonable custodial fees in connection with the loan.

 

U.S. Government-Sponsored Obligations (Applies to Calvert Equity and Enhanced Equity, and Calvert Social Index Fund)

                See “U.S. Government-Sponsored Obligations” in “Supplemental Information on Principal Investment Policies and Risks” above.

 

U.S. Government-Backed Obligations (Applies To Calvert Equity and Enhanced Equity, and Calvert Social Index Fund)

                See “U.S. Government-Backed Obligations” in “Supplemental Information on Principal Investment Policies and Risks” above.

 

Charitable Contributions

          On occasion, a Fund may make de minimis charitable contributions to groups intended to further the Fund's sustainable and socially responsible investment purpose, including but not limited to educating investors about sustainable and socially responsible investing.

 

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ADDITIONAL RISK DISCLOSURE

 

Recent Events in the Financial Markets

Since 2008 the United States and other countries have experienced significant disruptions to their financial markets impacting the liquidity and volatility of securities generally, including securities in which the Funds may invest.  During periods of extreme market volatility, prices of securities held by the Funds may be negatively impacted due to imbalances between market participants seeking to sell the same or similar securities and market participants willing or able to buy such securities.  As a result, the market prices of securities held by the Funds could go down, at times without regard to the financial condition of or specific events impacting the issuer of the security. 

This instability in the financial markets has led the U.S. government and other governments to take a number of unprecedented actions designed to support certain financial institutions and segments of the financial markets that have experienced extreme volatility, and in some cases a lack of liquidity. Federal, state, and other governments, their regulatory agencies, or self regulatory organizations may take actions that affect the regulation of the instruments in which the Funds invest, or the issuers of such instruments, in ways that are unforeseeable. Legislation or regulation may also change the way in which the Funds themselves are regulated. Such legislation or regulation could limit or preclude the Funds' ability to achieve their investment objectives.

 

INVESTMENT RESTRICTIONS

 

Fundamental Investment Restrictions

                Each Fund has adopted the following fundamental investment restrictions. These restrictions may not be changed without the approval of the holders of a majority of the outstanding shares of the Fund as defined under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”).

 

(1) Calvert Balanced, Equity, Enhanced Equity and Money Market Portfolios, and the Calvert Social Index Fund: Each Fund may not make any investment inconsistent with its classification as a diversified investment company under the 1940 Act.

(2) No Fund may concentrate its investments in the securities of issuers primarily engaged in any particular industry or group of industries (other than securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government or its agencies or instrumentalities and repurchase agreements secured thereby, or, for Calvert Money Market, domestic bank money market instruments). 

(3) No Fund may issue senior securities or borrow money, except from banks and through reverse repurchase agreements in an amount up to 33 1/3% of the value of the Fund's total assets (including the amount borrowed).

(4) No Fund may underwrite the securities of other issuers, except to the extent that the purchase of obligations, either directly from the issuer, or from an underwriter for an issuer, may be deemed to be an underwriting.

(5) No Fund may invest directly in commodities or real estate, although a Fund may invest in securities which are secured by real estate or real estate mortgages and securities of issuers which invest or deal in commodities, commodity futures, real estate or real estate mortgages.

(6) No Fund may lend any security or make any loan, including engaging in repurchase agreements, if as a result, more than 33 1/3% of the Fund’s total assets would be loaned to other parties, except through the purchase of debt securities or other debt instruments.

 

Under current law, a diversified investment company, with respect to 75% of its total assets, can invest no more than 5% of its total assets in the securities of any one issuer and may not acquire more than 10% of the voting securities of any issuer.

           

Under the interpretation of the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") staff, "concentrate" means to invest 25% or more of total assets in the securities of issuers primarily engaged in any one industry or group of industries.

           

Each Fund may invest up to 10% of its net assets in reverse repurchase agreements.

           

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Under current law a Fund may underwrite securities only in compliance with the conditions of Sections 10(f) and 12(c) of the 1940 Act and the rules thereunder wherein the Fund may underwrite securities to the extent that the Fund may be considered an underwriter within the meaning of the Securities Act in selling a portfolio security

 

Nonfundamental Investment Restrictions

                The Board of Trustees/Directors has adopted the following nonfundamental investment restrictions. A nonfundamental investment restriction can be changed by the Board at any time without a shareholder vote.

 

Calvert Balanced, Bond, and Equity Portfolios may not:

(1) Under normal circumstances, invest less than 80% of its net assets in equities (Equity Portfolio only).

(2) Under normal circumstances, invest less than 80% of its net assets in fixed income securities (Bond Portfolio only).

(3) Purchase the obligations of foreign issuers if, as a result, such securities would exceed 25% of the value of the Fund’s net assets.

(4) Purchase illiquid securities if more than 15% of the value of that Fund’s net assets would be invested in such securities.

(5) Make short sales of securities or purchase any securities on margin except as provided with respect to options, futures contracts, and options on futures contracts.

(6) Enter into a futures contract or an option on a futures contract if the aggregate initial margins and premiums required to establish these positions would exceed 5% of the Fund’s net assets.

(7) Purchase a put or call option on a security (including a straddle or spread) if the value of that option premium, when aggregated with the premiums on all other options on securities held by the Fund, would exceed 5% of the Fund's total assets.

(8) Enter into reverse repurchase agreements if the aggregate proceeds from outstanding reverse repurchase agreements, when added to other outstanding borrowings permitted by the 1940 Act, would exceed 33 1/3% of a Fund's total assets. No Fund will make any purchases of securities if borrowing exceeds 5% of its total assets (15% of total assets for the Bond Portfolio). 

(9) With respect to Fundamental Investment Restriction (3) regarding borrowing, in order to secure any permitted borrowings and reverse repurchase agreements, the Fund may only pledge, mortgage or hypothecate assets up to 33 1/3% of the value of the Fund's total assets.

 

Calvert Enhanced Equity Portfolio may not:

(1) Under normal circumstances, invest less than 80% of its net assets in equities, and may not invest less than 65% of its total assets in stocks contained in the Russell 1000 Index.

(2) Purchase illiquid securities if more than 15% of the value of the Fund's net assets would be invested in such securities.

(3) Purchase debt securities (other than money market instruments).

(4) Make short sales of securities or purchase any securities on margin except as provided with respect to options, futures contracts and options on futures contracts.

(5) Enter into a futures contract or an option on a futures contract if the aggregate initial margins and premiums required to establish these positions would exceed 5% of the Fund's net assets.

(6) Purchase a put or call option on a security (including a straddle or spread) if the value of that option premium, when aggregated with the premiums on all other options on securities held by the Fund, would exceed 5% of the Fund's total assets.

(7) Enter into reverse repurchase agreements if the aggregate proceeds from outstanding reverse repurchase agreements, when added to other outstanding borrowings permitted by the 1940 Act, would exceed 33 1/3% of the Fund's total assets. The Fund will not make any purchases of securities if borrowing exceeds 5% of its total assets.

(8) With respect to Fundamental Investment Restriction (3) regarding borrowing, in order to secure any permitted borrowings and reverse repurchase agreements, the Fund may only pledge, mortgage or hypothecate assets up to 33 1/3% of the value of the Fund's total assets.

 

23

 


 

 

Calvert Money Market Portfolio may not:

(1) Purchase the obligations of foreign issuers (except foreign money market instruments that are U.S. dollar denominated).

(2) Purchase illiquid securities if more than 5% of the value of the Fund’s net assets would be invested in such securities.

(3) Make short sales of securities or purchase any securities on margin.

(4) Write, purchase or sell puts, calls or combinations thereof.

(5) Enter into reverse repurchase agreements if the aggregate proceeds from outstanding reverse repurchase agreements, when added to other outstanding borrowings permitted by the 1940 Act, would exceed 33 1/3% of total assets. The Fund will not make any purchases of securities if borrowing exceeds 5% of its total assets.

(6) With respect to Fundamental Investment Restriction (3) regarding borrowing, in order to secure any permitted borrowings and reverse repurchase agreements, the Fund may only pledge, mortgage or hypothecate assets up to 33 1/3% of the value of the Fund’s total assets.

 

Calvert Social Index Fund may not:

(1) Under normal circumstances, invest less than 95% of its net assets in stocks contained in the Calvert Social Index®.

(2) Purchase the obligations of foreign issuers, if as a result, foreign securities would exceed 5% of the value of the Fund's net assets.

(3) Purchase illiquid securities if more than 15% of the value of the Fund's net assets would be invested in such securities.

(4) Purchase debt securities (other than money market instruments or High Social Impact Investments).

(5) Enter into a futures contract or an option on a futures contract if the aggregate initial margins and premiums required to establish these positions would exceed 5% of the Fund's net assets.

(6) Purchase put or call options.

(7) Enter into reverse repurchase agreements if the aggregate proceeds from outstanding reverse repurchase agreements, when added to other outstanding borrowings permitted by the 1940 Act, would exceed 33 1/3% of the Fund's total assets. The Fund will not make any purchases of securities if borrowing exceeds 5% of its total assets.

(8) With respect to Fundamental Investment Restriction (3) regarding borrowing, in order to secure any permitted borrowings and reverse repurchase agreements, the Fund may only pledge, mortgage or hypothecate assets up to 33 1/3% of the value of the Fund’s total assets.

 

With respect to each Fund, except for the liquidity and borrowing restrictions, any investment restriction that involves a maximum percentage of securities or assets shall not be considered to be violated unless an excess over the applicable percentage occurs immediately after an acquisition of securities or utilization of assets and results therefrom. Note that the Balanced  and Equity Portfolios have no current intention of investing more than 10% of their respective net assets in below-investment grade, high-yield debt securities.

 

DIVIDENDS, DISTRIBUTIONS, AND TAXES

 

                The Funds intend to continue to qualify as regulated investment companies under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the "Code").  If for any reason a Fund should fail to qualify, it would be taxed as a corporation at the Fund level, rather than passing through its income and gains to shareholders.

Distributions of realized net capital gains, if any, are normally paid once a year; however, the Funds do not intend to make any such distributions unless available capital loss carryovers, if any, have been used or have expired. Utilization of these capital loss carryforwards may be subject to annual limitations under section 382 of the Code.

Capital loss carryforwards as of September 30, 2011 were as follows:

 

Calvert Balanced

$30,180,557

Calvert Bond

$0

Calvert Equity

$126,561,476

Calvert Enhanced Equity

$11,643,050

Calvert Money Market

$8,842

Calvert Social Index Fund

$5,169,269

 

 

24

 


 

 

                Generally, dividends (including short-term capital gains) and distributions are taxable to the shareholder in the year they are paid. However, any dividends and distributions paid in January but declared during the prior three months are taxable in the year declared.

                The Funds are required to withhold 28% of any reportable dividends and long-term capital gain distributions paid and 28% of each reportable redemption transaction occurring in the Balanced, Equity, Bond and Enhanced Equity Portfolios, and the Social Index Fund if: (a) the shareholder's social security number or other taxpayer identification number ("TIN") is not provided or an obviously incorrect TIN is provided; (b) the shareholder does not certify under penalties of perjury that the TIN provided is the shareholder's correct TIN and that the shareholder is not subject to backup withholding under section 3406(a)(1)(C) of the Code because of underreporting (however, failure to provide certification as to the application of section 3406(a)(1)(C) will result only in backup withholding on dividends, not on redemptions); or (c) the Funds are notified by the Internal Revenue Service that the TIN provided by the shareholder is incorrect or that there has been underreporting of interest or dividends by the shareholder. Affected shareholders will receive statements at least annually specifying the amount withheld.

                In addition, the Funds are required to report to the Internal Revenue Service the following information with respect to each redemption transaction occurring in the Funds (not applicable to the Money Market Portfolio): (a) the shareholder's name, address, account number and taxpayer identification number; (b) the total dollar value of the redemptions; (c) the Fund's identifying CUSIP number; and (d) cost basis information for shares acquired on or after January 1, 2012.

                Certain shareholders are, however, exempt from the backup withholding and broker reporting requirements. Exempt shareholders include: corporations; financial institutions; tax-exempt organizations; individual retirement plans; the U.S., a state within the U.S., the District of Columbia, a U.S. possession, a foreign government, an international organization, or any political subdivision, agency or instrumentality of any of the foregoing; U.S.-registered commodities or securities dealers; real estate investment trusts; registered investment companies; bank common trust funds; certain charitable trusts; and foreign central banks of issue. Non-resident aliens, certain foreign partnerships, and foreign corporations are generally not subject to either requirement but may instead be subject to withholding under sections 1441 or 1442 of the Code. Shareholders claiming exemption from backup withholding and broker reporting should call or write the Funds for further information.

                Many states do not tax the portion of a Fund's dividends which is derived from interest on U.S. government obligations. State law varies considerably concerning the tax status of dividends derived from U.S. government obligations. Accordingly, shareholders should consult their tax advisors about the tax status of dividends and distributions from a Fund in their respective jurisdictions.

                Dividends paid by a Fund may be eligible for the dividends received deduction available to corporate taxpayers. Corporate taxpayers requiring this information may contact Calvert. In addition, for individual investors who meet certain holding period requirements, some dividends may be identified as “qualified dividend income” and be eligible for the reduced federal tax rate.

 

NET ASSET VALUE

 

                Shares of the Money Market Portfolio are issued and redeemed at the net asset value per share (“NAV”) of the Fund. The public offering price of the shares of the Balanced, Equity, Bond and Enhanced Equity Portfolios, and the Social Index Fund is the respective NAV per share (plus, for Class A shares, the applicable sales charge). A Fund's NAV per share is determined by dividing the total net assets (the value of its assets net of liabilities, including accrued expenses and fees) by the number of shares outstanding for each class. The Money Market Portfolio attempts to maintain a constant NAV of $1.00 per share; the NAVs of the other Funds fluctuate based on the respective market values of the Funds' investments. The NAV per share of each of the Funds is determined every business day as of the close of the regular session of the New York Stock Exchange (generally 4:00 p.m. Eastern time). The Funds do not determine NAV on certain national holidays or other days on which the New York Stock Exchange is closed: New Year's Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents' Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. In calculating NAV, the Fund follows

standard industry practice by recording security transactions and their valuations on the business day following the security transaction trade date. This practice is known as “trade date plus one” or “T + 1 accounting”. Thus, changes in holdings of portfolio securities are reflected in the first calculation of NAV on the first business day following the trade date, as permitted by applicable law. Security transactions for money market instruments are recorded on the trade date.

25

 


 

 

                The Money Market Portfolio’s assets, including securities subject to repurchase agreements, are normally valued at their amortized cost which does not take into account unrealized capital gains or losses. This involves valuing an instrument at its cost and thereafter assuming a constant amortization to maturity of any discount or premium, regardless of the impact of fluctuating interest rates on the market value of the instrument. While this method provides certainty in valuation, it may result in periods during which value, as determined by amortized cost, is higher or lower than the price that would be received upon sale of the instrument.

                Below is a specimen price-make-up sheet showing how the Funds calculate the total offering price per share.

 

Net Asset Value and Offering Price per Share, as of September 30, 2011

 

Calvert Balanced

 

 

Class A net asset value per share

$26.19

 

($405,715,813/15,490,157 shares)

 

 

Maximum sales charge, Class A

$1.31

 

(4.75% of offering price)

 

 

Offering price per share, Class A

$27.50

 

 

 

 

Class B net asset value and offering price per share

$ 25.96

 

($9,305,705/358,415 shares)

 

 

 

 

 

Class C net asset value and offering price per share

$25.72

 

($24,335,256/946,079 shares)

 

 

 

 

 

Class I net asset value and offering price per share

$26.49

 

($1,820,054/68,702 shares)

 

 

 

 

Calvert Bond

 

 

Class A net asset value per share

$15.85

 

($516,883,918/32,612,214 shares)

 

 

Maximum sales charge

$0.62

 

(3.75% of offering price)

 

 

Offering price per share, Class A

$16.47

 

 

 

 

Class B net asset value and offering price per share

$15.74

 

($5,635,205/358,123 shares)

 

 

 

 

 

Class C net asset value and offering price per share

$15.76

 

($47,122,799/2,990,866 shares)

 

 

 

 

 

Class I net asset value and offering price per share

$15.85

 

($224,792,457/14,180,597 shares)

 

 

 

 

 

Class Y net asset value and offering price per share

$15.93

 

($26,987,351/1,693,691 shares)

 

 

 

 

Calvert Equity

 

 

Class A net asset value per share

$32.91

 

($1,297,315,275/39,419,494 shares)

 

 

Maximum sales charge, Class A

$1.64

 

(4.75% of offering price)

 

 

Offering price per share, Class A

$34.55

 

 

 

 

Class B net asset value and offering price per share

$28.40

 

($35,852,078/1,262,505 shares)

 

 

 

 

 

Class C net asset value and offering price per share

$26.24

 

($132,658,291/5,056,423 shares)

 

 

 

 

 

Class I net asset value and offering price per share

$35.22

 

($535,829,055/15,212,884 shares)

 

 

 

 

 

Class Y net asset value and offering price per share

$33.25

 

($66,377,202/1,996,188 shares)

 

     

26

 


 

 

 

Calvert Enhanced Equity

 

 

Class A net asset value per share

$15.16

 

($32,183,831/2,122,974 shares)

 

 

Maximum sales charge, Class A

$0.76

 

(4.75% of offering price)

 

 

Offering price per share, Class A

$15.92

 

 

 

 

Class B net asset value and offering price per share

$13.57

 

($1,704,375/125,562 shares)

 

 

 

 

 

Class C net asset value and offering price per share

$13.82

 

($5,962,080/431,540 shares)

 

 

 

 

 

Class I net asset value and offering price per share

$15.45

 

($31,034,555/2,009,068 shares)

 

     

 

Calvert Money Market

 

 

Class O net asset value per share

$1.00

 

($142,594,955/142,664,064 shares)

 

     

 

Calvert Social Index Fund*

 

 

Class A net asset value per share

$10.35

 

($71,740,783/6,933,965 shares)

 

 

Maximum sales charge, Class A

$0.52

 

(4.75% of offering price)

 

 

Offering price per share, Class A

$10.87

 

 

 

 

Class B net asset value and offering price per share

$9.87

 

($2,323,693/235,392 shares)

 

 

 

 

 

Class C net asset value and offering price per share

$9.87

 

($6,097,549/617,845 shares)

 

 

 

 

 

Class I net asset value and offering price per share

$10.52

 

($26,741,418/2,541,852 shares)

 

 

*No information is available for Class Y shares because the class commenced operations on July 13, 2012.

 

27

 


 

 

CALCULATION OF YIELD AND TOTAL RETURN

 

Calvert Money Market: Yield

                From time to time, the Money Market Portfolio advertises its "yield" and "effective yield." Both yield figures are based on historical earnings and are not intended to indicate future performance. The "yield" of the Money Market Portfolio refers to the actual income generated by an investment in the Portfolio over a particular base period of time. If the base period is less than one year, the yield is then "annualized." That is, the net change, exclusive of capital changes, in the value of a share during the base period is divided by the net asset value per share at the beginning of the period, and the result is multiplied by 365 and divided by the number of days in the base period. Capital changes excluded from the calculation of yield are: (1) realized gains and losses from the sale of securities, and (2) unrealized appreciation and depreciation. The Money Market Portfolio's "effective yield" for a seven-day period is its annualized compounded yield during the period, calculated according to the following formula:

Effective yield = (base period return + 1)365/7 -1

 

                The "effective yield" is calculated like yield, but assumes reinvestment of earned income. The effective yield will be slightly higher than the yield because of the compounding effect of this assumed reinvestment. For the seven-day period ended September 30, 2011, the Money Market Portfolio's yield was 0.01% and its effective yield was 0.01%.

  

Calvert Bond: Yield

                The Bond Portfolio may also advertise its yield from time to time. Yield is calculated separately for each Class of the Portfolio. Yield quotations are historical and are not intended to indicate future performance. Yield quotations for the Bond Portfolio refer to the aggregate imputed yield-to-maturity of each of the Portfolio's investments based on the market value as of the last day of a given thirty-day or one-month period, less accrued expenses (net of reimbursement), divided by the average daily number of outstanding shares entitled to receive dividends times the maximum offering price on the last day of the period (so that the effect of the sales charge is included in the calculation), compounded on a "bond equivalent," or semiannual, basis. The Bond Portfolio's yield is computed according to the following formula:

 

Yield = 2 (a-b/cd+1)6 - 1

 

where a = dividends and interest earned during the period using the aggregate imputed yield-to maturity for each of the Portfolio's investments as noted above; b = expenses accrued for the period (net of reimbursement); c = the average daily number of shares outstanding during the period that were entitled to receive dividends; and d = the maximum offering price per share on the last day of the period. Using this calculation, the Bond Portfolio's yield for the month ended September 30, 2011 was 2.50% for Class A shares, 1.54% for Class B shares, 1.80% for Class C shares, 3.23% for Class I shares and 2.92% for Class Y shares.

                The yield of both the Money Market and Bond Portfolios will fluctuate in response to changes in interest rates and general economic conditions, portfolio quality, portfolio maturity, and operating expenses. Yield is not fixed or insured and therefore is not comparable to a savings or other similar type of account. Yield during any particular time period should not be considered an indication of future yield. It is, however, useful in evaluating a Portfolio’s performance in meeting its investment objective.

 

Calvert Balanced, Equity, Bond, and Enhanced Equity Portfolios, and Calvert Social Index Fund: Total Return and Other Quotations

                The Balanced, Equity, Bond, and Enhanced Equity Portfolios and the Social Index Fund may each advertise "total return." Total return is calculated separately for each class. Total return differs from yield in that yield figures measure only the income component of a Fund's investments, while total return includes not only the effect of income dividends but also any change in NAV, or principal amount, during the stated period. Total return is computed by taking the total number of shares purchased by a hypothetical $1,000 investment after deducting any applicable sales charge, adding all additional shares purchased within the period with reinvested dividends and distributions, calculating the value of those shares at the end of the period, and dividing the result by the initial $1,000 investment. Note: "Total Return" as quoted in the Financial Highlights section of the applicable Fund's Prospectus and Annual Report to Shareholders, however, per SEC instructions, does not  reflect deduction of the sales charge, and corresponds to "return without maximum load" (or "w/o max load" or "at NAV") as referred to herein. For periods of more than one year, the cumulative total return is then adjusted for the number of years, taking compounding into account, to calculate average annual total return during that period.  Total return before taxes is computed according to the following formula:

28

 


 

 

 

P(1 + T)n = ERV

 

where P = a hypothetical initial payment of $1,000; T = total return; n = number of years; and ERV = the ending redeemable value of a hypothetical $1,000 payment made at the beginning of the period.

 

Total return after taxes on distributions is computed according to the following formula:

 

P(1 + T)n = ATVD

 

where P = a hypothetical initial payment of $1,000; T = average annual total return (after taxes on distribution); n = number of years, and ATVD  = the ending value of a hypothetical $1,000 payment made at the beginning of the 1, 5 or 10 year periods at the end of such periods (or portions thereof if applicable) after taxes on fund distributions but not after taxes on redemption.

                Total return after taxes on distributions and sale of fund shares is computed according to the following formula:

P(1 + T)n = ATVDR

 

where P = a hypothetical initial payment of $1,000; T = average annual total return (after taxes on distributions and redemption); n = number of years and ATVDR = the ending value of a hypothetical $1,000 payment made at the beginning of the 1, 5 or 10 year periods at the end of such periods (or portions thereof if applicable) after taxes on fund distributions and redemption.

                Total return is historical in nature and is not intended to indicate future performance. All total return quotations, including returns after taxes, reflect the deduction of the Fund's maximum sales charge ("return with maximum load"), except quotations of "return without maximum load" (or "without CDSC" or "at NAV") which do not deduct a sales charge. Return without maximum load, which will be higher than total return, should be considered only by investors, such as participants in certain pension plans, to whom the sales charge does not apply, or for purposes of comparison only with comparable figures which also do not reflect sales charges, such as Lipper averages.  Thus, in the formula above, for return without maximum load, P = the entire $1,000 hypothetical initial investment and does not reflect the deduction of any sales charge; for return with maximum load, P = a hypothetical initial investment of $1,000 less any sales charge actually imposed at the beginning of the period for which the performance is being calculated.  Class I shares do not have a sales charge.

In the table below, after-tax returns are shown only for Class A shares.  The standardized total return for Class I shares of the Enhanced Equity Portfolio is "linked" to the Class A total return for the period January 18, 2002 through April 29, 2005 because there were no shareholders in Class I for this period. In the table below, Class I performance results for the Enhanced Equity Portfolio for the period January 18, 2002 through April 29, 2005 are for Class A at NAV (i.e.,  they do not reflect the deduction of the Class A front-end sales charge.)  The standardized total return for Class I shares of the Balanced Portfolio is "linked" to the Class A total return for the period June 30, 2003 through December 27, 2004 because there were no shareholders in Class I for this period. In the table below, Class I performance results for the Balanced Portfolio for the period June 30, 2003 through December 27, 2004 are for Class A at NAV (i.e.,  they do not reflect the deduction of the Class A front-end sales charge.) Actual Class I share performance would have been higher than Class A share performance because Class I, unlike Class A, has no Rule 12b-1 fees. The standardized total return for Class Y shares of the Bond and Equity Portfolios is “linked” to the Class A total return for the period prior to October 31, 2008, the inception date for Class Y shares. In the table below, Class Y performance results for the Bond and Equity Portfolios for the period prior to October 31, 2008 are for Class A at NAV (i.e.  they do not reflect the deduction for the Class A front-end sales charge). Actual Class Y share performance would have been higher than Class A share performance because Class Y, unlike Class A, has no Rule 12b-1 fees.  The standardized total returns for Class Y for Social Index Fund are “linked” to the Fund’s Class A total returns for the period prior to July 13, 2012, the inception date for the Fund’s Class Y shares.  In the table below, Class Y investment performance results for the Fund for the period prior to July 13, 2012, are for Class A at NAV (i.e., they do not reflect the deduction of Class A front-end sales charge). Actual Class Y performance would have been higher than Class A share performance because Class Y, unlike Class A, has no Rule 12b-1 fees.

29

 


 

 

                Returns for the Balanced, Bond, Equity, and Enhanced Equity Portfolios' shares and for the Social Index Fund's shares for the periods indicated are as follows:       

 

 

Before Taxes

 

 

 

 

 

Periods Ended

Class A

Class B

Class C

Class I

Class Y

September 30, 2011

Total Return

Total Return

Total Return

Total Return

Total Return

 

With

Without

With

Without

With

Without

 

 

 

Maximum Load

CDSC

CDSC

 

 

Calvert Balanced*

One Year

-2.96%

1.86%

-4.18%

0.82%

-0.04%

0.96%

2.33%

 

Five Years

-0.72%

0.25%

-0.95%

-0.75%

-0.63%

-0.63%

0.77%

 

Ten Years

2.33%

2.83%

1.79%

1.79%

1.86%

1.86%

3.28%

 

From Inception1

7.18%

7.36%

0.95%

0.95%

3.61%

3.61%

2.08%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Calvert Bond**

One Year

-0.94%

2.90%

-2.16%

1.84%

1.14%

2.14%

3.58%

3.23%

Five Years

3.88%

4.68%

3.63%

3.63%

3.87%

3.87%

5.28%

4.84%

Ten Years

4.76%

5.16%

4.15%

4.15%

4.28%

4.28%

5.76%

5.23%

From Inception2

6.79%

6.95%

4.53%

4.53%

4.53%

4.53%

6.46%

6.99%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Calvert Equity**

One Year

-3.72%

1.07%

-4.79%

0.21%

-0.66%

0.34%

1.64%

1.43%

Five Years

0.33%

1.31%

0.22%

0.42%

0.53%

0.53%

1.87%

1.50%

Ten Years

3.60%

4.11%

3.21%

3.21%

3.30%

3.30%

4.68%

4.21%

From Inception3

6.63%

6.85%

3.43%

3.43%

5.53%

5.53%

4.66%

6.89%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Calvert Enhanced Equity*

One Year

-3.40%

1.43%

-5.00%

0.00%

-0.56%

0.44%

1.95%

 

Five Years

-3.48%

-2.55%

-3.90%

-3.71%

-3.41%

-3.41%

-2.01%

 

Ten Years

1.60%

2.10%

0.97%

0.97%

1.13%

1.13%

2.43%

 

From Inception4

1.09%

1.45%

0.33%

0.33%

0.73%

0.73%

1.81%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Calvert Social Index Fund***

One Year

-5.27%

-0.57%

-6.52%

-1.60%

-2.58%

-1.60%

-0.06%

-0.57%

Five Years

-3.26%

-2.32%

-3.48%

-3.28%

-3.28%

-3.28%

-1.77%

-2.32%

Ten Years

0.98%

1.47%

0.45%

0.45%

0.47%

0.47%

1.95%

1.47%

From Inception5

-2.96%

-2.53%

-3.49%

-3.49%

-3.49%

-3.49%

-2.08%

-2.53%

                   

 

* Performance for Class I shares is "linked" to Class A shares because there were no Class I shareholders of Calvert Balanced for the period of 6/30/03 through 12/27/04, and there were no Class I shareholders of Calvert Enhanced Equity for the period of 1/18/02 through 4/29/05, as indicated above.                                                   

** Performance for Class Y shares is “linked” to Class A shares for the period prior to October 31, 2008, the actual inception date for Class Y shares.  

*** Performance for Class Y shares is “linked” to Class A shares for the period prior to July 13, 2012, the actual inception date for Class Y shares.

 

 

30

 


 

 

After Taxes on Distributions

 

Periods Ended

Class A

September 30, 2011

Total Return

 

With Maximum Load

Calvert Balanced

One Year

-3.15%

Five Years

-1.23%

Ten Years

1.84%

From Inception

5.58%

 

 

Calvert Bond

One Year

-2.23%

Five Years

2.33%

Ten Years

2.88%

From Inception

4.43%

 

 

Calvert Equity

 

One Year

-3.72%

Five Years

-0.21%

Ten Years

3.24%

From Inception

5.70%

 

Calvert Enhanced Equity

 

One Year

-3.47%

Five Years

-3.87%

Ten Years

1.34%

From Inception

0.87%

 

Calvert Social Index Fund

 

One Year

-5.36%

Five Years

-3.41%

Ten Years

0.84%

From Inception

-3.08%

 

 

31

 


 

 

After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares

 

Periods Ended

Class A

September 30, 2011

Total Return

 

With Maximum Load

Calvert Balanced

One Year

-1.79%

Five Years

-0.74%

Ten Years

1.83%

From Inception

5.53%

 

Calvert Bond

One Year

-0.63%

Five Years

2.42%

Ten Years

2.95%

From Inception

4.42%

 

Calvert Equity

One Year

-2.42%

Five Years

0.23%

Ten Years

3.08%

From Inception

5.44%

 

Calvert Enhanced Equity

One Year

-2.11%

Five Years

-2.89%

Ten Years

1.40%

From Inception

0.94%

 

Calvert Social Index Fund

One Year

-3.29%

Five Years

-2.75%

Ten Years

0.82%

From Inception

-2.47%

 

 

1

Inception Dates for Calvert Balanced:

3

Inception Dates for Calvert Equity:

 

Class A

October 21, 1982

 

Class A

August 24, 1987

 

Class B

March 31, 1998

 

Class B

March 31, 1998

 

Class C

March 1, 1994

 

Class C

March 1, 1994

 

Class I

February 26, 1999

 

Class I

November 1, 1999

 

 

 

 

Class Y

Performance for Class Y shares is “linked” to Class A shares for the period prior to October 31, 2008, the actual inception date for Class Y shares.

 

 

 

 

2

Inception Dates for Calvert Bond:

4

Inception Dates for Calvert Enhanced Equity:

 

Class A

August 24, 1987

 

Class A

April 15, 1998

 

Class B

March 31, 1988

 

Class B

April 15, 1998

 

Class C

June 1, 1998

 

Class C

June 1, 1998

 

Class I

March 31, 2000

 

Class I

April 15, 1998

 

Class Y

Performance for Class Y shares is “linked” to Class A shares for the period prior to October 31, 2008, the actual inception date for Class Y shares.

5

Inception Dates for Calvert Social Index Fund:

Class A

June 30, 2000  

Class B

June 30, 2000

Class C

June 30, 2000

Class I

June 30, 2000

Class Y

 

Performance for Class Y shares is “linked” to Class A shares for the period prior to July 13, 2012, the actual inception date for Class Y shares.

 

 

32

 


 

 

 

 

Total return, like yield and NAV per share, fluctuates in response to changes in market conditions.  Neither total return nor yield for any particular time period should be considered an indication of future return.

 

PURCHASE AND REDEMPTION OF SHARES

           

                Each Fund has authorized one or more broker/dealers to receive on its behalf purchase and redemption orders.  Such broker/dealers are authorized to designate other intermediaries to receive purchase and redemption orders on the Fund's behalf.  The Fund will be deemed to have received a purchase or redemption order when an authorized broker/dealer, or if applicable, a broker/dealer's authorized designee, receives the order in good order.  The customer orders will be priced at the Fund's NAV next computed after they are received by an authorized broker/dealer or the broker/dealer's authorized designee.

                The Funds have no  arrangement with any person to permit frequent purchases and redemptions of Fund shares.

                Share certificates will not be issued unless requested in writing by the investor.  If share certificates have been issued, then the certificate must be delivered to the Fund's transfer agent with any redemption request.  This could result in delays.  If the certificates have been lost, the shareholder will have to pay to post an indemnity bond in case the original certificates are later presented by another person.  No certificates will be issued for fractional shares.

                Each Fund has filed a notice of election with the SEC pursuant to Rule 18f-1 under the 1940 Act.  The notice states that the Fund may honor redemptions that, during any 90-day period, exceed $250,000 or 1% of the net asset value of the Fund, whichever is less, by redemptions-in-kind (distributions of a pro rata share of the portfolio securities, rather than cash.) The notice of election is irrevocable while Rule 18f-1 is in effect unless the SEC permits the withdrawal of such notice.

                See the Prospectus for additional details on purchases and redemptions.

 

 

TRUSTEES/DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS

 

                Each Fund's Board of Trustees/Directors supervises that Fund's activities and reviews its contracts with companies that provide it with services.  Business information about the Trustees/Directors as well as information regarding the experience, qualifications, attributes and skills of the Trustees/Directors is provided below.  Independent Trustees/Directors refers to those Trustees/Directors who are not “interested persons” as that term is defined in the 1940 Act and the rules thereunder.

 

 

 

Position

 

Position

 

# of Calvert

 

Other

Name &

With

Start

Principal Occupation

Portfolios

Directorships During

Age

Fund

Date

During Last 5 Years

Overseen

the Past Five Years

INDEPENDENT TRUSTEES/DIRECTORS

REBECCA L. ADAMSON

AGE: 62

Trustee of CSIF

 

Director of CSIS

1989

 

 

2000

 

 

 

President of the national non-profit, First People’s Worldwide, formerly First Nations Financial Project. Founded by her in 1980, First People’s Worldwide is the only American Indian alternative development institute in the country.

15

·    Bay & Paul Foundation

 

RICHARD L. BAIRD, JR.

AGE: 63

Chair and Trustee of CSIF

 

Chair and Director of CSIS

1982

 

 

2000

President and CEO of Adagio Health Inc. in Pittsburgh, PA, a non-profit corporation which provides family planning services, nutrition, maternal/child health care, and various health screening services and community preventive health programs.

25

          None

JOHN G. GUFFEY, JR.

AGE: 63

Trustee of CSIF

 

Director of CSIS

1982

 

 

2000

President of Aurora Press Inc., a privately held publisher of trade paperbacks.

25

·    Ariel Funds (3) (through 12/31/11)

·    Calvert Social Investment Foundation

·    Calvert Ventures, LLC

MILES D. HARPER, III

AGE: 49

Trustee of CSIF

 

Director of CSIS

2005

 

 

2005

Partner, Gainer Donnelly & Desroches (public accounting firm) since January 1999.

15

·    Bridgeway Funds (14)

JOY V. JONES

AGE: 61

Trustee of CSIF

 

Director of CSIS

1990

 

 

2000

Attorney.

 

 

 

15

·    Director, Conduit Street Restaurants Limited

TERRENCE J. MOLLNER, Ed.D.

AGE: 67

Trustee of CSIF

 

Director of CSIS

1982

 

 

2000

Founder, Chairperson and President of The Love Skill Foundation, Inc., an educational organization focused on the personal skills and organizations described in Dr. Mollner’s book, The Love Skill: We Are Mastering the 7 Layers of Human Maturity, particularly businesses that freely chose to give priority to the common good. Chairperson, Stakeholder of Capital, Inc., an asset management firm and financial services provider in Amherst, MA.

15

·    Calvert Social Investment Foundation

·    Ben & Jerry's Homemade, Inc.

·    ArtNOW, Inc.

·    Yourolivebranch.org 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SYDNEY A. MORRIS

AGE: 62

Trustee of CSIF

 

Director of CSIS

1982

 

 

 

2000

The Rev. Dr. Morris currently serves as Parish Minister to the Keweenaw Unitarian Universalist Fellowship in Houghton, MI. She is a graduate of Harvard Divinity School and is immediate past chair of the Unitarian Universalist National Committee on Socially Responsible Investing.

15

None

INTERESTED TRUSTEES/DIRECTORS

BARBARA J. KRUMSIEK*

AGE: 59

 

Trustee & Senior Vice

President of CSIF, Director & Senior Vice

President of CSIS

1997

 

President, Chief Executive Officer and Chair of Calvert Investments, Inc.

 

 

 

43

·    Calvert Social Investment Foundation

·    Pepco Holdings, Inc.

·    Acacia Life Insurance Company (Chair)

(through 4/29/12)

·    Griffin Realty Corp.

D. Wayne Silby, Esq.*

AGE: 63

Trustee of CSIF, Director of CSIS, President

1982

 

 

 

 

Mr. Silby is the founding Chair of the Calvert Funds. He is the Chair-Elect and a principal of Syntao.com, a Beijing-based company promoting corporate social responsibility.

25

·    UNIFI Mutual Holding Company

·    Calvert Social Investment Foundation

·    Giving Assets, Inc.

·    Studio School Fund

·    Syntao.com China

·    The ICE Organization

             

33

 


 

 

 

 

Position

Position

Principal Occupation

During Last 5 Years

Name &

With

Start

Age

Fund

Date

OFFICERS

MICHAEL T. ABRAMO

Age: 38

Vice President

2011

Vice President of the Advisor (since 2011) and portfolio manager for Calvert’s taxable fixed-income funds.

KAREN BECKER

Age: 59

Chief Compliance Officer

2005

Chief Compliance Officer for the Calvert Funds and Head of the Securities Operations Department for the Advisor.

SUSAN walker Bender, Esq. 

AGE: 53

Assistant Vice President & Assistant Secretary

1988

 

Assistant Vice President, Assistant Secretary and Associate General Counsel of Calvert Investments, Inc.

THOMAS DAILEY

AGE: 47

Vice President of CSIF

2004

 

Vice President of the Advisor and lead portfolio manager for Calvert’s taxable and tax-exempt money market funds and municipal funds.

.

MATTHEW DUCH

Age: 36

Vice President

2011

Vice President of the Advisor (since 2011) and portfolio manager for Calvert’s taxable fixed-income funds.

IVY WAFFORD DUKE, Esq. 

AGE: 43

Assistant Vice President & Assistant Secretary

1996

 

Assistant Vice President, Assistant Secretary and Deputy General Counsel of Calvert Investments, Inc., and Chief Compliance Officer for the Advisor and Calvert Investment Distributors, Inc.

 

PATRICK FAUL

AGE: 47

Vice President

2010

Vice President of the Advisor since 2008, and Head of Credit Research for the Advisor since 2009. Prior to 2009, Mr. Faul was Co-Head of Credit Research (2008) and a Senior Securities Analyst (prior to 2008) for the Advisor.

TRACI L. GOLDT

AGE: 38

Assistant Secretary

2004

 

Electronic Filing and Administrative Operations Manager (since 2011) and Executive Assistant to General Counsel (prior to 2011), Calvert Investments, Inc.

HUI PING HO, CPA

AGE: 47

Assistant Treasurer

2000

 

Assistant Treasurer and Tax Compliance Manager of Calvert Investments, Inc.

 

LANCELOT A. KING, Esq. 

AGE: 41

Assistant Vice President & Assistant Secretary

2002

 

Assistant Vice President, Assistant Secretary and Associate General Counsel of Calvert Investments, Inc.

 

 

edith lillie

aGE: 55

Assistant Secretary

2007

Assistant Secretary (since 2007) and Regulatory Matters Manager of Calvert Investments, Inc.

AUGUSTO DIVO MACEDO, Esq.

AGE: 49

Assistant Vice President & Assistant Secretary

2007

Assistant Vice President, Assistant Secretary, and Associate Counsel Compliance of Calvert Investments, Inc

JANE B. MAXWELL, Esq.  

AGE: 59

Assistant Vice President & Assistant Secretary

2005

Assistant Vice President, Assistant Secretary & Assistant General Counsel of Calvert Investments, Inc.  

 

ANDREW K. NIEBLER, Esq. 

AGE: 44

Assistant Vice President & Assistant Secretary

2006

Assistant Vice President, Assistant Secretary & Associate General Counsel of Calvert Investments, Inc. 

CATHERINE P. ROY

AGE: 55

Vice President

2004

 

 

Senior Vice President of the Advisor and Chief Investment Officer – Fixed Income.

William M. Tartikoff, Esq.  

AGE: 64

Vice President & Secretary

1990

 

Senior Vice President, Secretary, and General Counsel of Calvert Investments, Inc.

NATALIE TRUNOW

AGE: 44

Vice President

2008

Executive President of the Advisor, and Chief Investment Officer - Equities. Prior to joining Calvert in August 2008, Ms. Trunow was the Section Head (2005-2008) and Portfolio Manager (2001-2008) for the Global Public Markets Group of General Motors Asset Management.

Ronald M. WolfsheimeR,CPA   

AGE: 59

Treasurer

1982

 

Executive Vice President and Chief Financial and Administrative Officer of Calvert Investments, Inc.

MICHAEL V. YUHAS JR., CPA   

AGE: 50

Fund Controller

1999

 

Vice President of Fund Administration of Calvert Investment Administrative Services, Inc.

34

 


 

 

 

*Ms. Krumsiek is an interested person of the Funds since she is an Officer and Director of each Fund's Advisor and certain affiliates.  Mr. Silby is an interested person of the Funds since he is a Director of the parent company of each Fund's Advisor.

 

35

 


 

 

The address of the Trustees/Directors and Officers is 4550 Montgomery Avenue, Suite 1000N, Bethesda, Maryland 20814, with the exception of Mr. Silby, whose address is 1715 18th Street, N.W., Washington, DC  20009. As of December 31, 2011, the Trustees/Directors and Officers as a group owned less than 1% of each Fund's outstanding shares. 

 

Additional Information about the Trustees/Directors

 

Each Fund’s Board of Trustees/Directors believes that each Trustee’s/Director’s experience, qualifications, attributes or skills on an individual basis and in combination with those of the other Trustees/Directors lead to the conclusion that the Trustees/Directors possess the requisite experience, qualifications, attributes and skills to serve on the Board.  Each Board of Trustees/Directors believes that the Trustees’/Directors’ ability to review critically, evaluate, question and discuss information provided to them; to interact effectively with the Advisor, Subadvisors, other service providers, legal counsel and independent public accountants; and to exercise effective business judgment in the performance of their duties as Trustees/Directors, support this conclusion.  Each Board of Trustees/Directors has also considered the contributions that each Trustee/Director can make to the Board and the Funds.  In addition, the following specific experience, qualifications, attributes and/or skills apply as to each Trustee/Director:  Ms. Adamson, experience as a president of a non-profit organization and experience as a board member of a private foundation; Mr. Baird, experience as a chief executive officer of a non-profit corporation; Mr. Guffey, experience as a director and officer of private companies and experience as a board member of various organizations; Mr. Harper, experience as a partner of a public accounting firm and experience as a board member of a mutual fund complex; Ms. Jones, legal experience and experience as a director of a private foundation; Mr. Mollner, experience as a board member of various organizations; Rev. Dr. Morris, ecclesiastical leadership experience; Ms. Krumsiek, leadership roles within the Advisor and certain of its affiliates and experience as a board member of various organizations; and Mr. Silby, experience as a director and officer of private companies and experience as a board member of various organizations.  References to the experience, qualifications, attributes and/or skills of the Trustees/Directors are pursuant to requirements of the SEC, do not constitute holding out of a Board or any Trustee/Director as having special expertise or experience, and shall not impose any greater responsibility or liability on any such Trustee/Director or on a Board by reason thereof.

 

Board Structure

 

Each Fund’s Board of Trustees/Directors is responsible for overseeing the management and operations of the Funds.  Each Board consists of seven Independent Trustees/Directors and two Trustees/Directors who are interested persons of the Funds.  Richard L. Baird, Jr., who is an Independent Trustee/Director, serves as Chairperson of each Board.  Each Board of Trustees/Directors has five standing Committees:  the Governance Committee, the Audit Committee, the Social Committee, the Investment Performance Oversight Committee and the Special Equities Committee.  Each of the Governance, Audit, Social and Investment Performance Oversight Committees is chaired by an Independent Trustee/Director.  In addition, each of the Governance and Audit Committees is composed solely of Independent Trustees/Directors. 

                Through the Governance and Audit Committees, the Independent Trustees/Directors consider and address important matters involving the Funds, including those presenting conflicts or potential conflicts of interest for Fund management.  The Independent Trustees/Directors also regularly meet outside the presence of Fund management and are advised by independent legal counsel.  Each Fund’s Board of Trustees/Directors has determined that its committees help ensure that the Funds have effective and independent governance and oversight.  Each Board of Trustees/Directors has also determined that its leadership structure is appropriate. 

The Governance Committee addresses matters of fund governance, including policies on Trustee/Director compensation and on Board and Committee structure and responsibilities; the functions of the Governance Committee of each Board also include those of a Nominating Committee, e.g.,  initiation and consideration of nominations for the appointment or election of independent Trustees/Directors of the Board.  These matters were addressed in meetings held nine times in the past fiscal year.  The current members of this Committee are Ms. Adamson, Rev. Dr. Morris and Mr. Baird, each an independent Trustee/Director.

The Audit Committee approves and recommends to the Board independent public accountants to conduct the annual audit of each Fund’s financial statements; reviews with the independent public accountants the outline, scope, and results of the annual audit; and reviews the performance and fees charged by the independent public accountants for professional services.  In addition, the Audit Committee meets with each Fund’s independent public accountants and representatives of Fund management to review accounting activities and areas of financial reporting and control. The Audit Committee also oversees Calvert’s High Social Impact Investments program and Fund purchases of Community Investment Notes issued by the Calvert Social Investment Foundation. This Committee met  eleven times in the past fiscal year. The current members of this Committee are Ms. Jones and Messrs. Baird, Harper and Mollner, each an independent Trustee/Director.

36

 


 

 

The Social Committee addresses matters relating to the sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria used by the Funds and their application. This Committee met five times in the past fiscal year.  The current members of this Committee are Mses. Adamson, Jones and Krumsiek, and Rev. Dr. Morris. With the exception of Ms. Krumsiek, the members of this Committee are Independent Trustees/Directors.

The Investment Performance Oversight Committee oversees the Funds’ investment performance, including the performance of the Funds’ subadvisors. This Committee met five times in the past fiscal year.  The current members of this Committee are Ms. Krumsiek and Messrs. Guffey, Harper and Silby. With the exceptions of Ms. Krumsiek and Mr. Silby, the members of this Committee are Independent Trustees/Directors.

The Special Equities Committee oversees the Funds’ Special Equities program, including review, selection and fair valuation of the social venture capital investments. This Committee met twelve times in the past fiscal year. The current members of this Committee are Ms. Krumsiek and Messrs. Guffey, Mollner and Silby.  With the exceptions of Ms. Krumsiek and Mr. Silby, the members of this Committee are Independent Trustees/Directors.

Each Board of Trustees/Directors has retained Lipper Analytical Services, Inc. to provide the Board with an independent analysis of investment performance and expenses for each Fund, in connection with the Board’s annual consideration of the renewal of the Funds’ investment advisory, subadvisory and underwriting agreements, as required by Section 15(c) of the 1940 Act.

 

Board Oversight of Risk

 

An integral part of each Board’s overall responsibility for overseeing the management and operations of the Funds is the Board’s oversight of the risk management of the Funds’ investment programs and business affairs.  The Funds are subject to a number of risks, such as investment risk, credit and counterparty risk, valuation risk, risk of  operational failure or lack of business continuity, and legal, compliance and regulatory risk.  The Funds, the Advisor, the Subadvisors and other service providers to the Funds have implemented various processes, procedures and controls to identify risks to the Funds, to lessen the probability of their occurrence and to mitigate any adverse effect should they occur.  Different processes, procedures and controls are employed with respect to different types of risks.

Each Fund’s Board of Trustees/Directors exercises oversight of the risk management process primarily through the Audit and Investment Performance Oversight Committees, and through oversight by the Board itself.  In addition to adopting, and periodically reviewing, policies and procedures designed to address risks to the Funds, each Board of Trustees/Directors requires management of the Advisor and the Funds, including the Funds’ Chief Compliance Officer (“CCO”), to report to the Board and the Committees of the Board on a variety of matters, including matters relating to risk management, at regular and special meetings. Each Board and each Audit Committee receive regular reports from the Funds’ independent public accountants on internal control and financial reporting matters.  On at least a quarterly basis, the Independent Directors meet with the Funds’ CCO, including outside the presence of management, to discuss issues related to compliance.  Furthermore, each Board receives a quarterly report from the Funds’ CCO regarding the operation of the compliance policies and procedures of the Fund and its primary service providers.  Each Board and each Investment Performance Oversight Committee also receive regular reports from the Advisor on the investments and securities trading of the Funds, including their investment performance and asset weightings compared to appropriate benchmarks, as well as reports regarding the valuation of the Funds’ securities.  Each Board also receives reports from the Funds’ primary service providers, including the Subadvisors, regarding their operations as they relate to the Funds.                   

 

Trustees’/Directors’ Ownership of Fund Shares

 

The Trustees/Directors owned shares in the Funds and in all other Calvert Funds for which they serve on the Board, in the following amounts as of December 31, 2011:

37

 


 

 

 

 

Calvert Balanced 



Name of Trustee

Dollar Range of Equity Securities in the Fund

Aggregate Dollar Range of Equity Securities in All Registered Investment Companies Overseen By Trustee in Calvert Family of Funds

 

 

 

Independent Trustees

 

 

Rebecca Adamson

None

 

>$100,000

 

Richard L. Baird, Jr.

$10,001-$50,000

 

>$100,000

 

John G. Guffey, Jr.

$50,001-$100,000

 

>$100,000

 

Miles D. Harper, III

None

 

>$100,000

 

Joy V. Jones

None

 

>$100,000

 

Terrence J. Mollner

None

 

$10,001-$50,000

 

Sydney A. Morris

$1-$10,000

 

$50,001-$100,000

 

Interested Trustees

 

 

 

 

Barbara J. Krumsiek

None

 

>$100,000

 

D. Wayne Silby

$10,001-$50,000

 

>$100,000

 

 

Calvert Bond



Name of Trustee

Dollar Range of Equity
Securities in the Fund

Aggregate Dollar Range of Equity Securities in All Registered Investment Companies Overseen By Trustee in Calvert Family of Funds

 

 

 

Independent Trustees

 

 

Rebecca Adamson

$1-$10,000

 

>$100,000

 

Richard L. Baird, Jr.

None

 

>$100,000

 

John G. Guffey, Jr.

>$100,000

 

>$100,000

 

Miles D. Harper, III

$50,001-$100,000

 

>$100,000

 

Joy V. Jones

>$100,000

 

>$100,000

 

Terrence J. Mollner

None

 

$10,001-$50,000

 

Sydney A. Morris

$10,001-$50,000

 

$50,001-$100,000

 

Interested Trustees

 

 

 

 

Barbara J. Krumsiek

None

 

>$100,000

 

D. Wayne Silby

$50,001-$100,000

 

>$100,000

 

 

 

Calvert Equity



Name of Trustee

Dollar Range of Equity Securities in the Fund

Aggregate Dollar Range of Equity Securities in All Registered Investment Companies Overseen By Trustee in Calvert Family of Funds

 

 

 

Independent Trustees

 

 

Rebecca Adamson

$10,001-$50,000

 

>$100,000

 

Richard L. Baird, Jr.

>$100,000

 

>$100,000

 

John G. Guffey, Jr.

>$100,000

 

>$100,000

 

Miles D. Harper, III

>$100,000

 

>$100,000

 

Joy V. Jones

>$100,000

 

>$100,000

 

Terrence J. Mollner

$1-$10,000

 

$10,001-$50,000

 

Sydney A. Morris

$10,001-$50,000

 

$50,001-$100,000

 

Interested Trustees

 

 

 

 

Barbara J. Krumsiek

>$100,000

 

>$100,000

 

D. Wayne Silby

>$100,000

 

>$100,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

38

 


 

 

Calvert Enhanced Equity



Name of Trustee

Dollar Range of Equity Securities in the Fund

Aggregate Dollar Range of Equity Securities in All Registered Investment Companies Overseen By Trustee in Calvert Family of Funds

 

 

 

Independent Trustees

 

 

Rebecca Adamson

None

 

>$100,000

 

Richard L. Baird, Jr.

>$100,000

 

>$100,000

 

John G. Guffey, Jr.

$50,001-$100,000

 

>$100,000

 

Miles D. Harper, III

None

 

>$100,000

 

Joy V. Jones

None

 

>$100,000

 

Terrence J. Mollner

None

 

$10,001-$50,000

 

Sydney A. Morris

$1-$10,000

 

$50,001-$100,000

 

Interested Trustees

 

 

 

 

Barbara J. Krumsiek

None

 

>$100,000

 

D. Wayne Silby

$10,001-$50,000

 

>$100,000

 

 

 

 

 

Calvert Money Market



Name of Trustee

Dollar Range of Equity Securities in the Fund

Aggregate Dollar Range of Equity Securities in All Registered Investment Companies Overseen By Trustee in Calvert Family of Funds

 

 

 

Independent Trustees

 

 

Rebecca Adamson

>$100,000

 

>$100,000

 

Richard L. Baird, Jr.

None

 

>$100,000

 

John G. Guffey, Jr.

None

 

>$100,000

 

Miles D. Harper, III

None

 

>$100,000

 

Joy V. Jones

None

 

>$100,000

 

Terrence J. Mollner

None

 

$10,001-$50,000

 

Sydney A. Morris

$1-$10,000

 

$50,001-$100,000

 

Interested Trustees

 

 

 

 

Barbara J. Krumsiek

None

 

>$100,000

 

D. Wayne Silby

$10,001-$50,000

 

>$100,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Calvert Social Index Fund



Name of Director

Dollar Range of Equity Securities in the Fund

Aggregate Dollar Range of Equity Securities in All Registered Investment Companies Overseen By Director in Calvert Family of Funds

 

 

 

Independent Directors

 

 

Rebecca Adamson

None

 

>$100,000

 

Richard L. Baird, Jr.

$10,001-$50,000

 

>$100,000

 

John G. Guffey, Jr.

$10,001-$50,000

 

>$100,000

 

Miles D. Harper, III

None

 

>$100,000

 

Joy V. Jones

$1-$10,000

 

>$100,000

 

Terrence J. Mollner

None

 

$10,001-$50,000

 

Sydney A. Morris

$1-$10,000

 

$50,001-$100,000

 

Interested Directors

 

 

 

 

Barbara J. Krumsiek

None

 

>$100,000

 

D. Wayne Silby

None

 

>$100,000

 

 

 

 

 

                .

 

39

 


 

 

Trustees’/Directors’ Compensation

 

 

Trustee Compensation Table

 

Calvert Social Investment Fund

 

                The following table (unaudited numbers) sets forth information describing the compensation of each Trustee for his/her services to the Funds for each Fund’s most recent fiscal year ended September 30, 2011 and to all of the portfolios in the Fund Complex, as defined below. Each portfolio within the Calvert Social Investment Fund is responsible for a proportionate share of these payments.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name of Person, Position

Aggregate Compensation From Funds (Includes Pension or Retirement Benefits)

 

Pension or Retirement Benefits Accrued As Part of Funds’ Expenses

 

Total Compensation From Funds and Fund Complex Paid to Trustees***

Rebecca Adamson**

(Trustee)

 

$42,198

$3,776

$63,000

Richard L. Baird, Jr.**

(Trustee)

$42,198

$21,099

$136,250

John Guffey, Jr.**

(Trustee)

$48,873

$7,589

$119,500

Miles D. Harper, III**

(Trustee)

$43,873

$43,873

$65,500

Joy V. Jones**

(Trustee)

$43,873

$27,865

$65,500

Terrence J. Mollner, Ed.D**

(Trustee)

$42,198

$0

$63,000

Sydney A. Morris**

(Trustee)

$43,873

$0

$65,500

Barbara J. Krumsiek*

(Trustee & President)

$0

$0

$0

D. Wayne Silby, Esq.*,**

(Trustee & Chair)

$45,897

$13,769

$120,500

 

*Ms. Krumsiek is an interested person of the Funds since she is an Officer and Director of the Advisor and certain affiliates. Mr. Silby is an interested person of the Funds since he is a Director of the parent company of the Advisor.

 

**Mses. Adamson and Jones, Rev. Dr. Morris and Messrs. Baird, Guffey, Harper, Mollner and Silby have chosen to defer a portion of their compensation. As of September 30, 2011, total deferred compensation for service on all applicable Calvert Fund Boards, including dividends and capital appreciation, was $193,744; $497,127; $78,033; $415,067; $414,191; $367,999; $26,064; and $634,255, for each of them, respectively.

 

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***As of September 30, 2011, the Fund Complex consisted of forty-two (42) Funds; there were forty-three (43) Funds as of January 31, 2012.

 

Trustees/Directors not employed by the Advisor or its affiliates may elect to defer receipt of all or a percentage of their fees and deem such deferred amounts to be invested in any Calvert Fund through the Trustees/Directors Deferred Compensation Plan. Management believes this will have a negligible effect on each Fund's assets, liabilities, net assets, and net income per share.

 

Director Compensation Table

 

Calvert Social Index Series, Inc.

 

                The following table (unaudited numbers) sets forth information describing the compensation of each Director for his/her services to the Fund for the Fund’s most recent fiscal year ended September 30, 2011 and to all of the portfolios in the Fund Complex, as defined below.  

 

 

 

 

 

Name of Person, Position

Aggregate Compensation From Funds (Includes Pension or Retirement Benefits)

 

Pension or Retirement Benefits Accrued As Part of Funds’ Expenses

 

Total Compensation From Funds and Fund Complex Paid to Directors***

Rebecca Adamson**

(Director)

 

$1,505

$136

$63,000

Richard L. Baird, Jr.**

(Director)

$1,505

$753

$136,250

John Guffey, Jr.**

(Director)

$1,565

$270

$119,500

Miles D. Harper, III**

(Director)

$1,565

$1,565

$65,500

Joy V. Jones**

(Director)

$1,565

$996

$65,500

Terrence J. Mollner, Ed.D**

(Director)

$1,505

$0

$63,000

Sydney A. Morris**

(Director)

$1,565

$0

$65,500

Barbara J. Krumsiek*

(Director & President)

$0

$0

$0

D. Wayne Silby, Esq.*,**

(Director & Chair)

$1,637

$491

$120,500

 

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*Ms. Krumsiek is an interested person of the Funds since she is an Officer and Director of the Advisor and certain affiliates. Mr. Silby is an interested person of the Funds since he is a Director of the parent company of the Advisor.

 

**Mses. Adamson and Jones, Rev. Dr. Morris and Messrs. Baird, Guffey, Harper, Mollner and Silby have chosen to defer a portion of their compensation. As of September 30, 2011, total deferred compensation for service on all applicable Calvert Fund Boards, including dividends and capital appreciation, was $193,744; $497,127; $78,033; $415,067; $414,191; $367,999; $26,064; and $634,255, for each of them, respectively.

 

***As of September 30, 2011, the Fund Complex consisted of forty-two (42) Funds; there were forty-three (43) Funds as of January 31, 2012.

 

                                Trustees/Directors not affiliated with the Advisor may elect to defer receipt of all or a percentage of their fees and deem such deferred amounts to be invested in any Calvert Fund through the Trustees/Directors Deferred Compensation Plan. Management believes this will have a negligible effect on each Fund's assets, liabilities, net assets, and net income per share.

 

INVESTMENT ADVISOR AND SUBADVISORS

 

                The Funds' Investment Advisor is Calvert Investment Management, Inc. ("Calvert" or the "Advisor"), a subsidiary of Calvert Investments, Inc., which is a subsidiary of UNIFI Mutual Holding Company. Under the Investment Advisory Agreement with respect to the Funds, the Advisor provides investment advice to the Funds and oversees the day-to-day operations, subject to the supervision and direction of each Fund's Board of Trustees/Directors. The Advisor provides the Funds with investment supervision and management, and office space; furnishes executive and other personnel to the Funds; and pays the salaries and fees of all Trustees/Directors who are employees of the Advisor or its affiliates. The Funds pay all their other respective administrative and operating expenses, including: custodial, registrar, dividend disbursing and transfer agency fees; administrative service fees; fund accounting fees (Calvert Social Index Fund only); federal and state securities registration fees; salaries, fees and expenses of Trustees/Directors, executive officers and employees of the Funds, who are not employees of the Advisor or of its affiliates; insurance premiums; trade association dues; legal and audit fees; interest, taxes and other business fees; expenses of printing and mailing reports, notices, prospectuses, and proxy material to shareholders; shareholder meeting expenses; and brokerage commissions and other costs associated with the purchase and sale of portfolio securities. As explained in the Prospectus under the heading “Contractual Fee Waivers and/or Expense Reimbursements”, the Funds have an expense offset arrangement with the custodian bank whereby the custodian fees may be paid indirectly by credits on the Funds' uninvested cash balances. These credits are used to reduce Fund expenses. In those Funds where the total annual fund operating expenses are subject to a contractual expense limitation, the Advisor could be deemed to have an incentive to leave greater cash balances at the custodian, since it receives the benefit of any expense offset credit. The Funds' Board of Trustees/Directors periodically review and evaluate the expense offset arrangement.

Under the Investment Advisory Agreement, the Advisor receives an annual fee, payable monthly, of 0.425% of the first $500 million of the Calvert Balanced Portfolio's average daily net assets, 0.40% of the next $500 million of such assets, and 0.375% of all assets above $1 billion; 0.35% of the first $1 billion of the Calvert Bond Portfolio's average daily net assets and 0.325% of all assets above $1 billion; 0.50% of the first $2 billion of the Calvert Equity Portfolio's average daily net assets, 0.475% of the next $1 billion of such assets, and 0.45% of all assets above $3 billion; 0.60% of the first $250 million of the Calvert Enhanced Equity Portfolio's average daily net assets and 0.55% of all assets above $250 million; 0.30% of the Calvert Money Market Portfolio's average daily net assets; and 0.20% of the Calvert Social Index Fund's average daily net assets. This investment advisory fee includes the cost of evaluating investments according to a Fund’s sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria. For Calvert Enhanced Equity, the Advisor has voluntarily agreed to waive 0.10% of its annual advisory fee based on average daily net assets. Calvert may cease this waiver at any time.

The Advisor reserves the right to (i) waive all or a part of its fee; (ii) reimburse a Fund for expenses; and (iii) pay broker-dealers in consideration of their promotional or administrative services. The Advisor may, but is not required to, waive current payment of its fees, or reimburse expenses of the Fund, except as noted in the Fund's Prospectus. For those Funds with multiple classes, investment advisory fees are allocated among classes as a Fund-level expense based on net assets.

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                The following chart shows the investment advisory fees paid to the Advisor by the Funds for the past three fiscal years:

 

2009

2010

2011

Calvert Balanced

$1,697,119

$1,915,171

$2,018,241

Calvert Bond

$2,865,750

$3,020,969

$2.986,093

Calvert Equity

$4,487,728

$6,107,441

$8,179,345

Calvert Enhanced Equity

$302,846

$356,720

$479,245

Calvert Money Market

$582,413

$467,517

$432,057

Calvert Social Index Fund

$178,878

$236,863

$252,897

 

 

 

 

 

Subadvisors

 

                Atlanta Capital Management Company, LLC ("Atlanta Capital") is controlled by Eaton Vance Corp.  For the assets it manages for the Calvert Equity Portfolio, Atlanta Capital receives a Subadvisory fee, paid by the Advisor, of 0.30% of the Fund's average daily net assets up to $2 billion, 0.25% of the next $1 billion of such assets, and 0.225% of all assets above $3 billion. 

New Amsterdam Partners LLC ("New Amsterdam") is controlled by Michelle Clayman, CFA. New Amsterdam receives a Subadvisory fee, paid by the Advisor, of 0.25% of the Calvert Balanced Portfolio’s first $250 million of average daily net assets it manages and 0.20% of any such assets over $250 million.

                Profit Investment Management ("Profit") is controlled by Eugene A. Profit. Profit receives a fee, paid by the Advisor, of 0.40% of the Calvert Balanced Portfolio's first $10 million of average daily net assets it manages, 0.35% of the next $40 million of such assets, and 0.25% of any such assets over $50 million.

World Asset Management, Inc. ("World Asset") is an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of Comerica Incorporated. World Asset receives a Subadvisory fee, paid by the Advisor, of 0.07% of the Calvert Social Index Fund's first $50 million of average annual daily net assets managed by the Subadvisor, 0.05% of the next $50 million, and 0.03% of such assets over $100 million.

                 

The Advisor and each Fund have received an exemptive order to permit the Advisor and the applicable Fund to enter into and materially amend the respective Investment Subadvisory Agreement (entered into with any subadviser that is not an “affiliated person”, as defined in Section 2(a)(3) of the 1940 Act) without shareholder approval. Within 90 days of the hiring of any Subadvisor or the implementation of any material change in the Investment Subadvisory Agreement, the affected Fund will furnish its shareholders information about the new Subadvisor or Investment Subadvisory Agreement that would be included in a proxy statement. Such information will include any change in such disclosure caused by the addition of a new Subadvisor or any material change in the Investment Subadvisory Agreement of the Fund. The Fund will meet this condition by providing shareholders, within 90 days of the hiring of the Subadvisor or implementation of any material change to the terms of an Investment Subadvisory Agreement, with an information statement to this effect.

 

PORTFOLIO MANAGER DISCLOSURE

 

Additional information about each Fund’s Portfolio Managers, identified in the applicable Prospectus of the Fund, is provided below.  This information is not required for Calvert Money Market.

 

A.            Other Accounts Managed by Fund Portfolio Managers

 

The following Fund Portfolio Managers are also primarily responsible for day-to-day management of the portfolios of the other accounts indicated below.  This information includes accounts managed by any group which includes the identified Portfolio Manager.  The “Other Accounts” category includes accounts managed in the Portfolio Manager’s personal as well as professional capacities.

 

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CALVERT BALANCED PORTFOLIO

Calvert:
Natalie A. Trunow

 

Accounts Managed other than Calvert Balanced as of September 30, 2011

Registered Investment Companies

Other Pooled Investment Vehicles

Other Accounts

Number of Other Accounts Managed

 

8

5

7

Total Assets in Other Accounts Managed

 

$879,133,540

$96,888,217

$27,641,808

Number of Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

0

0

0

Total Assets in Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

$0

$0

$0

 

1.             Fixed Income Investments

 

Calvert:

Matthew Duch

 

Accounts Managed other than Calvert Balanced as of September 30, 2011

Registered Investment Companies

Other Pooled Investment Vehicles

Other Accounts

Number of Other Accounts Managed

 

9

0

0

Total Assets in Other Accounts Managed

 

$6,282,528,983

$0

$0

Number of Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

0

0

0

Total Assets in Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

$0

$0

$0

 

2.             Equity Investments

 

New Amsterdam:

Michelle Clayman, CFA

 

Accounts Managed other than Calvert Balanced as of September 30, 2011

Registered Investment Companies

Other Pooled Investment Vehicles

Other Accounts

Number of Other Accounts Managed

 

4

0

65

Total Assets in Other Accounts Managed

 

$526,000,000

$0

$1,844,000,000

Number of Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

0

0

1

Total Assets in Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

$0

$0

$333,000,000

 

Note: “Other Accounts” category includes accounts managed by any group that includes the specified individual and the personal investments managed by the specified individual.

 

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New Amsterdam:
Nathaniel Paull, CFA

Accounts Managed other than Calvert Balanced as of September 30, 2011

Registered Investment Companies

Other Pooled Investment Vehicles

Other Accounts

Number of Other Accounts Managed

 

4

0

65

Total Assets in Other Accounts Managed

 

$526,000,000

$0

$1,844,000,000

Number of Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

0

0

1

Total Assets in Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

$0

$0

$333,000,000

 

Note: “Other Accounts” category includes accounts managed by any group that includes the specified individual and the personal investments managed by the specified individual.

 

Profit:

Eugene Profit

 

Accounts Managed other than Calvert Balanced as of September 30, 2011

Registered Investment Companies

Other Pooled Investment Vehicles

Other Accounts

Number of Other Accounts Managed

 

2

0

58

Total Assets in Other Accounts Managed

 

$10,156,516

$0

$1,528,366,406

Number of Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

0

0

1

Total Assets in Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

$0

$0

$37,422,259

 

 

CALVERT BOND PORTFOLIO

 

Calvert:

Matthew Duch

 

Accounts Managed other than Calvert Bond as of September 30, 2011

Registered Investment Companies

Other Pooled Investment Vehicles

Other Accounts

Number of Other Accounts Managed

 

9

0

0

Total Assets in Other Accounts Managed

 

$5,615,310,192

$0

$0

Number of Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

0

0

0

Total Assets in Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

$0

$0

$0

 

 

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Calvert:

Michael Abramo

 

Accounts Managed other than Calvert Bond as of September 30, 2011

Registered Investment Companies

Other Pooled Investment Vehicles

Other Accounts

Number of Other Accounts Managed

 

9

0

0

Total Assets in Other Accounts Managed

 

$5,571,074,848

$0

$0

Number of Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

0

0

0

Total Assets in Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

$0

$0

$0

 

 

CALVERT EQUITY PORTFOLIO

 

Atlanta Capital:

Richard B. England, CFA

 

Accounts Managed other than Calvert Equity as of September 30, 2011

Registered Investment Companies

Other Pooled Investment Vehicles

Other Accounts*

Number of Other Accounts Managed

 

6

0

113

Total Assets in Other Accounts Managed

 

$2,273,736,700

$0

$2,057,419,400

Number of Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

0

0

0

Total Assets in Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

$0

$0

$0

 

Atlanta Capital:

Paul J. Marshall, CFA

 

Accounts Managed other than Calvert Equity as of September 30, 2011

Registered Investment Companies

Other Pooled Investment Vehicles

Other Accounts*

Number of Other Accounts Managed

 

5

0

113

Total Assets in Other Accounts Managed

 

$2,229,870,700

$0

$2,057,419,400

Number of Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

0

0

0

Total Assets in Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

$0

$0

$0

 

*Other accounts include separately managed accounts for institutions and individuals, and wrap-free programs.

 

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CALVERT ENHANCED EQUITY PORTFOLIO

 

Calvert:

Natalie A. Trunow

 

Accounts Managed other than Calvert Enhanced Equity as of September 30, 2011

Registered Investment Companies

Other Pooled Investment Vehicles

Other Accounts

Number of Other Accounts Managed

 

8

5

7

Total Assets in Other Accounts Managed

 

$1,250,793,018

$96,888,217

$27,641,808

Number of Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

0

0

0

Total Assets in Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

$0

$0

$0

 

 

 

CALVERT SOCIAL INDEX FUND

 

World Asset:

Eric R. Lessnau

 

Accounts Managed other than Calvert Social Index Fund as of September 30, 2011<