10-K 1 csfl-10k_20151231.htm 10-K csfl-10k_20151231.htm

 

 

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D. C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

x

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 or 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2015

OR

¨

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Commission File Number 000-32017

 

CENTERSTATE BANKS, INC.

(Name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

Florida

 

59-3606741

(State or Other Jurisdiction
of Incorporation or Organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

 

 

 

42745 U.S. Highway 27, Davenport, Florida

 

33837

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

Issuer’s telephone number, including area code:

(863) 419-7750

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

None

 

The registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    YES  ¨    NO  x

The registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    YES  ¨    NO  x

Check whether the registrant has (1) filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the past 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    YES  x]    NO  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    YES  x    NO  ¨

Check if there is no disclosure of delinquent filers in response to Item 405 of Regulation SK contained in this form, and no disclosure will be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  x

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer

 

¨

 

Accelerated filer

 

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer

 

¨

 

Smaller reporting company

 

¨

The registrant is a shell company, as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.    YES  ¨    NO  x

The aggregate market value of the Common Stock of the registrant held by non-affiliates of the registrant (31,240,711 shares) on June 30, 2015, was approximately $423,413,000.  The aggregate market value was computed by reference to the last sale of the Common Stock of the registrant at $13.51 per share on June 30, 2015.  For the purposes of this response, directors, executive officers and holders of 5% or more of the registrant’s Common Stock are considered the affiliates of the issuer at that date.

As of February 29, 2016 there were outstanding 45,651,827 shares of the registrant’s Common Stock.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held on April 28, 2016 to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission pursuant to Regulation 14A within 120 days of the registrant’s fiscal year end are incorporated by reference into Part III, of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

 

 

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

 

 

Page

 

 

 

 

 

PART I

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

 

Business

 

1

 

 

General

 

1

 

 

Note about Forward-Looking Statements

 

2

 

 

Lending Activities

 

3

 

 

Deposit Activities

 

4

 

 

Investments

 

4

 

 

Correspondent Banking

 

4

 

 

Data Processing

 

5

 

 

Effect of Governmental Policies

 

5

 

 

Supervision and Regulation

 

5

 

 

Competition

 

11

 

 

Employees

 

12

 

 

Statistical Profile and Other Financial Data

 

12

 

 

Availability of Reports furnished or filed with SEC

 

12

Item 1A

 

Risk Factors

 

13

Item 1B

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

 

23

Item 2.

 

Properties

 

23

Item 3.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

23

Item 4.

 

[Removed and Reserved]

 

23

 

 

 

 

 

PART II

 

 

 

 

Item 5.

 

Market for Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters, and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

24

Item 6.

 

Selected  Consolidated Financial Data

 

25

Item 7.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

32

Item 7A.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risks

 

62

Item 8.

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

63

Item 9.

 

Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and  Financial Disclosure

 

63

Item 9A.

 

Controls and Procedures

 

63

Item 9B.

 

Other Information

 

63

 

 

 

 

 

PART III

 

 

 

 

Item 10.

 

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

 

63

Item 11.

 

Executive Compensation

 

64

Item 12.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and  Related Stockholder Matters

 

64

Item 13.

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

 

64

Item 14.

 

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

 

64

Item 15.

 

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

 

64

 

 

 

INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

67

 

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

127

 

 

 

EXHIBIT INDEX

 

129

 

 

 


PART I

Item 1.

Business

General

CenterState Banks, Inc. (“We,” “Our,”  “CenterState,” “CSFL,” or the “Company”) was incorporated under the laws of the State of Florida on September 20, 1999.  CenterState is a registered financial holding company under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended (the “BHC Act”), and owns all the outstanding shares of CenterState Bank of Florida, N.A. (“CSB” or the “Bank”), R4ALL, Inc. (“R4ALL”) a non bank subsidiary and CSFL Insurance Corp. (“CSFL IC”) the Company’s captive insurance subsidiary, also a non bank subsidiary.

The Company was formed and commenced operations by acquiring CenterState Bank Central Florida, N.A. (“Central”), CenterState Bank, N.A. (“CSNA”) and First National Bank of Polk County (“FNB/Polk”) in June of 2000.  Central and CSNA commenced operations in 1989.  FNB/Polk commenced operations in 1992.

CSB commenced operations in April of 2000 and was acquired by the Company on December 31, 2002.  In January 2006, FNB/Polk was merged with CSB.  

The Company purchased CenterState Bank Mid Florida in March of 2006 and merged it with CSNA in November of 2007.  In April of 2007 we purchased Valrico State Bank (“VSB”).  In December 2010 Central and CSNA were merged into CSB. In June 2012 VSB was merged into CSB.

In September 2009 we formed a separate non bank subsidiary, R4ALL, for the purpose of acquisition and disposition of troubled assets from our subsidiary bank(s).

Through our subsidiary bank, CSB, we acquired assets and deposits from four failed financial institutions from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) in 2009 and 2010, and a fifth and sixth in January of 2012.

In January 2011, we acquired four branch banking offices with approximately $113 million of deposits and approximately $121 million of performing loans from TD Bank, N.A.

In November 2011, we acquired Federal Trust Corporation in Sanford, Florida, with approximately $157 million of selected performing loans, $198 million of deposits and five branch banking offices from The Hartford Insurance Group, Inc., the sole owner of Federal Trust Corporation.

In January 2014, we acquired Gulfstream Bancshares, Inc. (“Gulfstream”) which added four additional branches (approximately $479 million of deposits) and two additional counties, Palm Beach and Martin, to our market area.

In June 2014, we acquired First Southern Bancorp, Inc. (“FSB”) with approximately $600 million in loans, $853 million in deposits and 17 branches, of which 10 were either sold or closed in September 2014, and added Broward County to our market area.

In July 2015, we purchased the branch real estate, and assumed approximately $15 million in deposits, of SouthBank, F.S.B.’s (“SB”) main banking office located in Palm Beach County.  On the same date, we closed two nearby existing leased branches and consolidated these offices into the newly acquired location.

In October 2015, we entered into an agreement to acquire Community Bank of South Florida, Inc. and its subsidiary bank, Community Bank of Florida, Inc. with approximately $334 million in loans and $438 million in deposits.  Also in October 2015, we entered into an agreement to acquire Hometown of Homestead Banking Company and its subsidiary bank, 1st National Bank of South Florida, with approximately $206 million in loans and $281 million in deposits.  Both acquisitions closed on March 1, 2016.

In December 2015, we created CSFL IC for the purpose of initiating a captive insurance subsidiary pursuant to section 831(b) of the U.S. Tax Code.  


Headquartered in Davenport, Florida between Orlando and Tampa, we provide a range of consumer and commercial banking services to individuals, businesses and industries throughout our branch network located within 20 counties throughout Central, Northeast and Southeastern Florida.  As of December 31, 2015, our 57 bank branch offices were located in the following Florida counties:

 

Broward

 

Indian River

 

Orange

 

Putnam

Duval

 

Lake

 

Osceola

 

St. Lucie

Hendry

 

Marion

 

Palm Beach

 

Seminole

Hernando

 

Martin

 

Pasco

 

Sumter

Hillsborough

 

Okeechobee

 

Polk

 

Volusia

The basic services we offer include:  demand interest-bearing and noninterest-bearing accounts, money market deposit accounts, time deposits, safe deposit services, cash management, direct deposits, notary services, money orders, night depository, travelers’ checks, cashier’s checks, domestic collections, savings bonds, bank drafts, automated teller services, drive-in tellers, and banking by mail and by internet. In addition, we make residential and commercial real estate loans, secured and unsecured commercial loans and consumer loans.  We provide automated teller machine (ATM) cards, thereby permitting customers to utilize the convenience of larger ATM networks.  We also offer internet banking services to our customers.  We also offer trust services to customers throughout our existing markets in Florida.  We also have a wealth management division that offers other financial products to our customers, including mutual funds, annuities and other products.

Our revenue is primarily derived from interest on, and fees received in connection with, real estate and other loans, interest and dividends from investment securities and short-term investments, and commissions on bond sales.  The principal sources of funds for our lending activities are customer deposits, repayment of loans, and the sale and maturity of investment securities.  Our principal expenses are interest paid on deposits, and operating and general administrative expenses.

In addition to providing traditional deposit and lending products and services to our commercial and retail customers through our 57 locations, we also operate a correspondent banking and capital markets division.  The division is integrated with and part of our subsidiary bank, CSB, located in Winter Haven, Florida, although the majority of our bond salesmen, traders and operations personnel are physically housed in leased facilities located in Birmingham, Alabama and Atlanta, Georgia.  Its primary revenue generating activities are related to the capital markets division which includes commissions earned on fixed income security sales, fees from hedging services, loan brokerage fees and consulting fees for services related to these activities.  Income generated related to the correspondent banking services includes spread income earned on correspondent bank deposits (i.e. federal funds purchased) and fees generated from safe-keeping activities, bond accounting services, asset/liability consulting services, international wires, clearing and corporate checking account services and other correspondent banking related services.  The fees derived from the correspondent banking services are less volatile than those generated through the capital markets group. The customer base includes small to medium size financial institutions primarily located throughout the United States.

As is the case with banking institutions generally, our operations are materially and significantly influenced by the real estate market, general economic conditions and by related monetary and fiscal policies of financial institution regulatory agencies, including the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the “Federal Reserve”).  Deposit flows and costs of funds are influenced by interest rates on competing investments and general market rates of interest.  Lending activities are affected by the demand for financing of real estate and other types of loans, which in turn is affected by the interest rates at which such financing may be offered and other factors affecting local demand and availability of funds.  We face strong competition in the attraction of deposits (our primary source of lendable funds) and in the origination of loans.  See “Competition.”

At December 31, 2015, our primary asset is our ownership of 100% of the stock of our subsidiary bank. At December 31, 2015, we had total consolidated assets of $4,022,717,000, total consolidated loans of $2,593,776,000, total consolidated deposits of $3,215,178,000, and total consolidated stockholders’ equity of $490,514,000.

Note about Forward-Looking Statements

This Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements, such as statements relating to our financial condition, results of operations, plans, objectives, future performance and business operations.  These statements relate to expectations concerning matters that are not historical facts.  These forward-looking statements reflect our current views and expectations based largely upon the information currently available to us and are subject to inherent risks and uncertainties.  Although we believe our expectations are based on reasonable assumptions, they are not guarantees of future performance and there are a number of important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements.  By making these forward-looking statements, we do not undertake to update them in any manner except as may be required by our disclosure obligations in filings we make with the Securities and Exchange Commission under the Federal securities laws.  Our actual results may differ materially from our forward-looking statements.

2


Lending Activities

We offer a range of lending services, including real estate, consumer and commercial loans, to individuals and small businesses and other organizations that are located in or conduct a substantial portion of their business in our market area.  Our consolidated loans at December 31, 2015 and 2014 were $2,593,776,000, or 64% and $2,429,525,000, or 64%, respectively, of total consolidated assets.  The interest rates charged on loans vary with the degree of risk, maturity, and amount of the loan, and are further subject to competitive pressures, money market rates, availability of funds, and government regulations.  We have no foreign loans or loans for highly leveraged transactions.  We do have immaterial amounts of loans with foreigners on property located within our Florida market area, primarily vacation and second homes.

Our loans are concentrated in three major areas: real estate loans, commercial loans and consumer loans.  A majority of our loans are made on a secured basis.  As of December 31, 2015, approximately 85% of our consolidated loan portfolio consisted of loans secured by mortgages on real estate, 12% of the loan portfolio consisted of commercial loans (not secured by real estate) and 3% of our loan portfolio consisted of consumer and other loans.

At December 31, 2015, approximately 6.8% of our loans, or $177,320,000, were covered by FDIC loss sharing agreements related to the acquisition of three failed financial institutions during the third quarter of 2010, two during the first quarter of 2012 and two were assumed pursuant to our 2014 acquisition of First Southern Bank.  Pursuant to the terms of the loss sharing agreements, the FDIC was obligated to reimburse us for losses with respect to the covered loans, subject to the terms of the various agreements.  On February 3, 2016, we entered into an agreement with the FDIC to terminate all existing loss share agreements.  We will now recognize the full amounts of all future charge-offs and recoveries related to the former covered assets as the FDIC will no longer be sharing in the such amounts.

Our real estate loans are secured by mortgages and consist primarily of loans to individuals and businesses for the purchase, improvement of or investment in real estate, for the construction of single-family residential and commercial units, and for the development of single-family residential building lots. These real estate loans may be made at fixed or variable interest rates.  Generally, we do not make fixed-rate commercial real estate loans for terms exceeding five years.  Loans in excess of five years are generally adjustable.  Our residential real estate loans generally are repayable in monthly installments based on up to a 15-year or a 30-year amortization schedule with variable or fixed interest rates.

Our commercial loan portfolio includes loans to individuals and small-to-medium sized businesses located primarily in twenty Florida counties listed under “Business” or contiguous counties for working capital, equipment purchases, and various other business purposes.  A majority of commercial loans are secured by equipment or similar assets, but these loans may also be made on an unsecured basis.  Commercial loans may be made at variable or fixed rates of interest.  Commercial lines of credit are typically granted on a one-year basis, with loan covenants and monetary thresholds.  Other commercial loans with terms or amortization schedules of longer than one year will normally carry interest rates which vary with the prime lending rate and will become payable in full and are generally refinanced in three to five years.  Commercial and agricultural loans not secured by real estate amounted to approximately 12% and 12% of our Company’s total loan portfolio as of December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively.

Our consumer loan portfolio consists primarily of loans to individuals for various consumer purposes, but includes some business purpose loans which are payable on an installment basis.  The majority of these loans are for terms of less than five years and are secured by liens on various personal assets of the borrowers, but consumer loans may also be made on an unsecured basis.  Consumer loans are made at fixed and variable interest rates, and are often based on up to a five-year amortization schedule.

At December 31, 2015, approximately 49% of our total non-PCI (“Purchased Credit Impaired”) loan portfolio is fixed rate, 20% is floating rate and 31% is variable rate other than floating.

For additional information regarding our loan portfolio, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”

Loan originations are derived primarily from employee loan officers within our local market areas, but can also be attributed to referrals from existing customers and borrowers, advertising, or walk-in customers.

Certain credit risks are inherent in making loans.  These include prepayment risks, risks resulting from uncertainties in the future value of collateral, risks resulting from changes in economic and industry conditions, and risks inherent in dealing with individual borrowers.  In particular, longer maturities increase the risk that economic conditions will change and adversely affect collectability.  We attempt to minimize credit losses through various means.  In particular, on larger credits, we generally rely on the cash flow of a debtor as the source of repayment and secondarily on the value of the underlying collateral.  In addition, we attempt to utilize shorter loan terms in order to reduce the risk of a decline in the value of such collateral.

3


Deposit Activities

Deposits are the major source of our funds for lending and other investment activities.  We consider the majority of our regular savings, demand, NOW and money market deposit accounts to be core deposits.  These accounts comprised approximately 87% and 84% of our consolidated total deposits at December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively.  Approximately 13% of our consolidated deposits at December 31, 2015, were certificates of deposit compared to 16% at December 31, 2014.  Generally, we attempt to maintain the rates paid on our deposits at a competitive level.  Time deposits of $100,000 and over made up approximately 8% of consolidated total deposits at December 31, 2015 and 9% at December 31, 2014.  The majority of the deposits are generated from market areas where we conduct business.  Generally, we do not accept brokered deposits and we do not solicit deposits on a national level.  We obtain substantially all of our deposits from customers in our local markets.  For additional information regarding the Company’s deposit accounts, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - Deposits.”

Investments

Our investment securities portfolio available for sale was $604,739,000 and $517,457,000 at December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively, representing 15% and 14% of our total consolidated assets.  At December 31, 2015, approximately 94% of this portfolio was invested in U.S. government mortgage backed securities (“MBS”), specifically residential FNMA, FHLMC, and GNMA MBSs.  We do not own any private label MBSs.  Approximately 6%, or $35,287,000, of this portfolio is invested in municipal securities.  Our investments are managed in relation to loan demand and deposit growth, and are generally used to provide for the investment of excess funds at acceptable risks levels while providing liquidity to fund increases in loan demand or to offset fluctuations in deposits.  Investment securities available for sale are recorded on our balance sheet at market value at each balance sheet date.  Any change in market value is recorded directly in our stockholders’ equity account and is not recognized in our income statement unless the security is sold or unless it is impaired and the impairment is other than temporary.  During 2015, we sold approximately $16,305,000 of these securities and recognized a net gain on the sales of approximately $4,000.

We have selected these types of investments because such securities generally represent what we believe to be a minimal investment risk.  Occasionally, we may purchase certificates of deposits of national and state banks.  These investments may exceed $250,000 in any one institution (the limit of FDIC insurance for deposit accounts).  Federal funds sold, money market accounts and interest bearing deposits held at the Federal Reserve Bank represent the excess cash we have available over and above daily cash needs.  Federal funds sold and money market funds are invested on an overnight basis with approved correspondent banks.

We monitor changes in financial markets.  In addition to investments for our portfolio, we monitor daily cash positions to ensure that all available funds earn interest at the earliest possible date.  A portion of the investment account is invested in liquid securities that can be readily converted to cash with minimum risk of market loss.  These investments usually consist of obligations of U.S. government agencies, mortgage backed securities and federal funds.  The remainder of the investment account may be placed in investment securities of different type and/or longer maturity.  Daily surplus funds are sold in the federal funds market for one business day.  We attempt to stagger the maturities of our securities so as to produce a steady cash-flow in the event cash is needed, or economic conditions change.

We also have a trading securities portfolio managed at our subsidiary bank.  For this portfolio, realized and unrealized gains and losses are included in trading securities revenue, a component of non interest income in our Consolidated Statement of Operations and Comprehensive Income.  Securities purchased for this portfolio have primarily been municipal securities and are held for short periods of time.  During 2015, we purchased approximately $147,693,000 of securities for this portfolio and sold $149,409,000 recognizing a net gain on sale of approximately $403,000.  At December 31, 2015 we had $2,107,000 of securities in our trading portfolio.

Our held to maturity securities portfolio was $272,840,000 and $237,362,000 at December 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, respectively, representing 7% and 6% of our total consolidated assets.    These securities had gross unrecognized net gains of approximately $1,143,000 and $1,069,000, resulting in estimated fair values of $273,983,000 and $238,431,000 at December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively.  At December 31, 2015, approximately 57% of this portfolio is invested in mortgage backed securities, 22% in municipal securities and 21% in  obligations of U.S. government sponsored entities and agencies.  It is anticipated that this portfolio will generally hold longer term securities for the primary purpose of yield.  This classification was chosen to minimize temporary effects on our tangible equity and tangible equity ratio due to increases and decreases in general market interest rates.

Correspondent Banking

We have a correspondent banking and capital markets segment which operates as a division within our subsidiary bank.  Its primary revenue generating activities are related to the capital markets division which includes commissions earned on fixed income security sales, fees from hedging services, loan brokerage fees and consulting fees for services related to these activities.  Income generated related to the correspondent banking services includes spread income earned on correspondent bank deposits (i.e. federal funds purchased) and fees generated from safe-keeping activities, bond accounting services, asset/liability consulting services, international wires, clearing and corporate checking account services and other correspondent banking related services.  The fees

4


derived from the correspondent banking services are less volatile than those generated through the capital markets group. The customer base includes small to medium size financial institutions located throughout the United States.

Data Processing

We use a single in-house core data processing solution.  The core data processing system provides deposit processing, loan processing and overall accounting services.  

A division of our subsidiary bank provides item processing services and certain other information technology (“IT”) services for the bank and the Company overall.  These services include; sorting, encoding, processing, and imaging checks and rendering checking and other deposit statements to commercial and retail customers, as well as providing IT services, including intranet and internet services for our bank and the Company overall.

Effect of Governmental Policies

Our earnings and business are and will be affected by the policies of various regulatory authorities of the United States, especially the Federal Reserve.  The Federal Reserve, among other things, regulates the supply of credit and deals with general economic conditions within the United States.  The instruments of monetary policy employed by the Federal Reserve for these purposes influence in various ways the overall level of investments, loans, other extensions of credit and deposits, and the interest rates paid on liabilities and received on assets.  The monetary policies of the Federal Reserve have had a significant effect on the operating results of commercial banks and are expected to continue to do so in the future.  The monetary policies of the Federal Reserve are influenced by various factors, including inflation, unemployment, and short-term and long-term changes in the international trade balance and in the fiscal policies of the U.S. Government.  Future monetary policies and the effect of such policies on the future business and earnings of the Company and our subsidiary bank cannot be predicted.

Supervision and Regulation

Banks and their holding companies, and many of their affiliates, are extensively regulated under both federal and state law. The following is a brief summary of certain statutes, rules, and regulations affecting our Company, and our subsidiary bank. This summary is qualified in its entirety by reference to the particular statutory and regulatory provisions referred to below and is not intended to be an exhaustive description of the statutes or regulations applicable to the business of our Company and subsidiary bank.  Proposals to change the laws and regulations governing the banking industry are frequently raised at both the state and federal levels.  The likelihood and timing of any changes in these laws and regulations, and the impact such changes may have on the Company and the Bank, are difficult to ascertain.  A change in applicable laws and regulations, or in the manner such laws and regulations are interpreted by regulatory agencies or courts, may have a material adverse effect on the Company’s and the Bank’s business, operations, and earnings.  Supervision, regulation, and examination of banks by regulatory agencies are intended primarily for the protection of depositors, rather than shareholders.

Regulation of the Company

Our Company is registered with the Federal Reserve as a financial holding company under the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (“GLB Act”) and is registered with the Federal Reserve as a bank holding company under the BHC Act. As such, we are subject to the supervision, examination and regulation by the Federal Reserve.  The GLB Act, the BHC Act, and other federal laws subject financial holding companies to particular restrictions on the types of activities in which they may engage, and to a range of supervisory requirements and activities, including regulatory enforcement actions for violations of laws and regulations.

Under current law and Federal Reserve policy, a financial holding company is expected to act as a source of financial and managerial strength to its subsidiary bank and to maintain resources adequate to support its bank. The term “source of financial strength” is defined under the Dodd-Frank Act as the ability of a company to provide financial assistance to its insured depository institution subsidiaries in the event of financial distress.  The appropriate federal banking agency for such a depository institution may require reports from companies that control the insured depository institution to assess their abilities to serve as a source of strength and to enforce compliance with the source-of-strength requirements.  The appropriate federal banking agency may also require a holding company to provide financial assistance to a bank with impaired capital. Under this requirement, in the future, we could be required to provide financial assistance to our subsidiary bank should it experience financial distress.  Based on our ownership of a national bank subsidiary, the OCC could assess us if the capital of our subsidiary bank were to become impaired.  If a holding company fails to pay an imposed assessment within three months, it could be ordered to sell its stock of its subsidiary bank to cover the deficiency.  As disclosed below, holding companies also have minimum capital requirements which must be maintained to remain in regulatory compliance.

5


The BHC Act requires that a financial holding company obtain the prior approval of the Federal Reserve before (i) acquiring direct or indirect ownership or control of more than 5% of the voting shares of any bank, (ii) taking any action that causes a bank to become a subsidiary of the financial holding company, or (iii) merging or consolidating with any other financial holding company.

The BHC Act further provides that the Federal Reserve may not approve any transaction that would result in a monopoly or would be in furtherance of any combination or conspiracy to monopolize or attempt to monopolize the business of banking in any section of the United States, or the effect of which may be substantially to lessen competition or to tend to create a monopoly in any section of the country, or that in any other manner would be in restraint of trade, unless the anticompetitive effects of the proposed transaction are clearly outweighed by the public interest in meeting the convenience and needs of the community to be served. The Federal Reserve is also required to consider the financial and managerial resources and future prospects of the bank holding companies and banks concerned and the convenience, and needs of the community to be served.  Consideration of financial resources generally focuses on capital adequacy and consideration of convenience and needs issues includes the parties’ performance under the Community Reinvestment Act of 1977 (the CRA”), both of which are discussed below.

The Federal Reserve requires financial and bank holding companies to maintain capital at adequate levels based on a percentage of assets and off-balance sheet exposures, adjusted for risk weights.  The Federal Reserve’s requirements provide that a bank holding company must have minimum capital equivalent to 8% of risk-weighted assets to be considered adequately capitalized.  At December 31, 2015, our Tier 1 and total risk-based capital ratios were 15.0% and 15.8%, respectively.

Banks are subject to the provisions of the CRA.  Under the terms of the CRA, the appropriate federal bank regulatory agency is required, in connection with its examination of a bank, to assess such bank’s record in meeting the credit needs of the community served by that bank, including low- and moderate-income neighborhoods. The regulatory agency’s assessment of the bank’s record is made available to the public. Further, such assessment is required of any bank which has applied to:

·establish a new branch office that will accept deposits,

·relocate an office, or

·merge or consolidate with, or acquire the assets or assume the liabilities of, a federally regulated financial institution

In the case of a financial holding company applying for approval to acquire a bank or other bank holding company, the Federal Reserve will assess the record of each subsidiary bank of the applicant financial holding company, and such records may be the basis for denying the application.

The BHC Act generally prohibits a financial holding company from engaging in activities other than banking, or managing or controlling banks or other permissible subsidiaries, and from acquiring or retaining direct or indirect control of any company engaged in any activities other than those activities determined by the Federal Reserve to be so closely related to banking or managing or controlling banks as to be a proper incident thereto.  In determining whether a particular activity is permissible, the Federal Reserve must consider whether the performance of such an activity can reasonably be expected to produce benefits to the public, such as greater convenience, increased competition, or gains in efficiency that outweigh possible adverse effects, such as undue concentration of resources, decreased or unfair competition, conflicts of interest, or unsound banking practices. For example, factoring accounts receivable, acquiring or servicing loans, leasing personal property, conducting securities brokerage activities, performing certain data processing services, acting as agent or broker in selling credit life insurance and certain other types of insurance in connection with credit transactions, and certain insurance underwriting activities have all been determined by regulations of the Federal Reserve to be permissible activities of financial holding companies.  Despite prior approval, the Federal Reserve has the power to order a holding company or its subsidiaries to terminate any activity or terminate its ownership or control of any subsidiary, when it has reasonable cause to believe that continuation of such activity or such ownership or control constitutes a serious risk to the financial safety, soundness, or stability of any bank subsidiary of that financial holding company.

Regulation of the Bank

CSB is chartered under the national banking laws and is subject to comprehensive regulation, examination and supervision by the OCC. The deposits of the Bank are insured by the FDIC to the extent provided by law and, accordingly, the Bank is also subject to certain FDIC regulations and the FDIC has backup examination authority and some enforcement powers over the Bank.  The Bank also is subject to various federal and state laws and regulations applicable to banks.  Such regulations include limitations on loans to a single borrower and to its directors, officers and employees; restrictions on the opening and closing of branch offices; the maintenance of required capital and liquidity ratios; the granting of credit under equal and fair conditions; and the disclosure of the costs and terms of such credit. The Bank submits to its examining agencies periodic reports regarding its financial condition and other matters.  The bank regulatory agencies have a broad range of powers to enforce regulations under their jurisdiction, and to take discretionary actions determined to be for the protection and safety and soundness of banks, including the institution of cease and desist orders and the

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removal of directors and officers. The bank regulatory agencies also have the authority to approve or disapprove mergers, consolidations, and similar corporate actions.

There are various statutory limitations on our ability to pay dividends.  The bank regulatory agencies also have the general authority to limit the dividend payment by banks to their holding company parent if such payment may be deemed to constitute an unsafe and unsound practice.  For information on the restrictions on the right of our Bank to pay dividends to us, see Part II - Item 5 “Market for the Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.”

Transactions with Affiliates.  The Bank also is subject to restrictions as to the limit of the size and number of transactions that it may have with its affiliates, as well as restrictions on lending to its and our executive officers and directors and their related interest.  Under federal law, federally insured banks are subject, with certain exceptions, to certain restrictions on any extension of credit to their parent holding companies or other affiliates, on investment in the stock or other securities of affiliates, and on the taking of such stock or securities as collateral from any borrower. Also, the Company and the Bank are prohibited from engaging in asset purchases or sales transactions with their officers, directors, or principal shareholders unless the transaction is on market terms and, if the transaction represents greater than 10% of the capital and surplus of the Bank, a majority of the Bank’s disinterested directors has approved the transaction.  In addition, banks are prohibited from engaging in certain tie-in arrangements in connection with any extension of credit or the providing of any property or service.

FIRREA.  The Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act (“FIRREA”) imposed stronger capital standards and stronger civil and criminal enforcement provisions.  FIRREA also provides that a depository institution insured by the FDIC can be held liable for any loss incurred by, or reasonably expected to be incurred by, the FDIC in connection with:

·the default of a commonly controlled FDIC insured depository institution; or

·any assistance provided by the FDIC to a commonly controlled FDIC insured institution in danger of default.

FDICIA.  The FDIC Improvement Act (“FDICIA) made a number of reforms addressing the safety and soundness of deposit insurance funds, supervision, accounting, and prompt regulatory action, and also implemented other regulatory improvements. Periodic full- scope, on-site examinations are required of all insured depository institutions. The cost for conducting an examination of an institution may be assessed to that institution, with special consideration given to affiliates and any penalties imposed for failure to provide information requested.  Insured state banks also are precluded from engaging as principal in any type of activity that is impermissible for a national bank, including activities relating to insurance and equity investments. The Act also recodified restrictions on extensions of credit to insiders under the Federal Reserve Act.

Basel III. In 2010 the Group of Governors and Heads of Supervision, the oversight body of the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, announced an agreement to a strengthened set of capital requirements known as Basel III.  The OCC and the Federal Reserve have approved a final rule that establishes a new regulatory capital framework that incorporates revisions to the Basel capital framework, including Basel III and other elements. The rule strengthens the definition of regulatory capital, increases risk- based capital requirements, and amends the methodologies for determining risk-weighted assets. The rule applies to all banks, including national banks. Subject to various transition periods, the rule became effective for certain banks (including the Bank) on January 1, 2015. Among other things, the rule:

·Implements strict eligibility criteria for regulatory capital instruments.

·Revises the Prompt Corrective Act action framework to incorporate new regulatory capital minimum thresholds.

·Adds a new common equity Tier 1 capital ratio of 4.5% and increases the minimum Tier 1 capital ratio requirement from 4% to 6%.

·Improves the measure of risk-weighted assets to enhance risk sensitivity.

·Allows certain depository institution holding companies to continue to include in Tier 1 capital previously issued trust preferred securities and cumulative perpetual preferred stock.

·Limits capital distributions and certain discretionary bonus payments if banks do not maintain a capital conservation buffer of common equity Tier 1 capital above minimum capital requirements.

·Establishes due diligence requirements for securitization exposures.

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The Basel III rules provide risk-based capital guidelines designed to make regulatory capital requirements more sensitive to differences in risk profiles among banks, to account for off-balance sheet exposures, and to minimize disincentives for holding certain assets.  Under these guidelines, assets and off-balance sheet items are assigned to broad risk categories, each with appropriate risk-weights.  The institution’s total risk-weighted assets are used to calculate its regulatory capital ratios.  Under the Basel III rules, the minimum ratio of total capital to total risk-weighted assets is 8%.  The required ratio of “Tier 1 Capital” (consisting generally of shareholders’ equity and qualifying preferred stock, less certain goodwill items and other intangible assets) to risk-weighted assets is 6%.  There is a new category of capital ratio of “Common Equity Tier 1 Capital” (which generally consists of common stock, retained earnings, certain qualifying capital instruments issued by consolidated subsidiaries, and accumulated other comprehensive income, subject to certain adjustments) to risk-weighted assets, of 4.5%.  

In addition, the federal banking agencies have established minimum leverage ratio requirements for banking organizations they supervise, calculated as the ratio of Tier 1 Capital to adjusted average consolidated assets. Under the Basel III rules, as of January 1, 2015, the required minimum leverage ratio for all banks is 4%.

The Basel III rules additionally provide for countercyclical capital requirements so that the required amount of capital increases in times of economic expansion and decreases in times of economic contraction, consistent with safety and soundness.  Under the Basel III rules, banks must maintain a capital conservation buffer consisting of additional Common Equity Tier 1 Capital equal to 2.5% of risk-weighted assets above each of the required minimum capital levels in order to avoid limitations on paying dividends, engaging in share repurchases, and paying certain discretionary bonuses.  This new capital conversation buffer requirement was phased in beginning January 2016 at 0.625% of risk-weighted assets and will increase each year until fully implemented at 2.5% in January 2019.

As an additional means of identifying problems in the financial management of depository institutions, the federal banking regulatory agencies have established certain non-capital safety and soundness standards for institutions for which they are the primary federal regulator. The standards relate generally to operations and management, asset quality, interest rate exposure, and executive compensation. The agencies are authorized to take action against institutions that fail to meet such standards.

Prompt Corrective Action.  FDICIA contains prompt corrective action” provisions pursuant to which banks are to be classified into one of five categories based upon capital adequacy, ranging from “well capitalized” to “critically undercapitalized” and which require (subject to certain exceptions) the appropriate federal banking agency to take prompt corrective action with respect to an institution which becomes “significantly undercapitalized” or “critically undercapitalized.”  The classifications depend upon a bank’s ratios of its (i) Tier 1 Capital (generally consisting of shareholders’ equity and qualifying preferred stock, less certain goodwill items and other intangible assets) to risk-weighted assets, (ii) Total Capital to its risk-weighted assets, (iii) Common Equity Tier 1 Capital to risk-weighted assets, and (iv) leverage ratio (e.g., the ratio of its Tier 1 Capital to its adjusted average consolidated assets). A bank’s Total Capital consists of the sum of its Tier 1 Capital and Tier 2 Capital (up the extent of its Tier 1 Capital), less reciprocal holdings of other banking organizations’ capital instruments, investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries, and any other deductions as determined by the appropriate regulator. Tier 2 Capital generally consists of a bank’s (i) allowance for loan losses of up to 1.25% of risk-weighted assets (ii) preferred stock not qualifying as Tier 1 Capital, (iii) hybrid capital instruments, (iv) perpetual debt, (v) mandatory convertible securities, and (vi) certain subordinated debt and intermediate – term preferred stock up to 50% of Tier 1 Capital.  Common Equity Tier 1 Capital generally consists of common stock, retained earnings, certain qualifying capital instruments issued by consolidated subsidiaries, and accumulated other comprehensive income, subject to certain adjustments.

The OCC has issued regulations to implement the “prompt corrective action provisions of FDICIA. A bank is deemed “well- capitalized” if its leverage ratio, Common Equity Tier 1 ratio, Tier 1 Capital Ratio, and Total Capital ratio meet or exceed 5%, 6.5%, 8%, and 10%, respectively. A bank is deemed to be adequately capitalized” or better if its leverage, Common Equity Tier 1, Tier 1, and Total Capital ratios meet or exceed the minimum federal regulatory capital requirements, and undercapitalizedif it fails to meet these minimal capital requirements. An institution is “significantly undercapitalized” if its leverage, Common Equity Tier 1, Tier 1, and Total Capital Ratios fall below 3%, 3%, 4%, and 6%, respectively and “critically undercapitalizedif the institution has a ratio of tangible equity to total assets that is equal to or less than 2%.

The OCC and the FDIC, after an opportunity for a hearing, have authority to downgrade an institution from “well capitalized” to “adequately capitalized” or to subject an “adequately capitalized” or “undercapitalized” institution to the supervisory actions applicable to the next lower category, for supervisory concerns.

Generally, FDICIA requires that an “undercapitalized” institution must submit an acceptable capital restoration plan to the appropriate federal banking agency. The appropriate federal banking agency may not accept a capital restoration plan unless, among other requirements, each company having control of the institution has guaranteed that the institution will comply with the plan until the institution has been adequately capitalized on average during each of the three consecutive calendar quarters and has provided adequate assurances of performance.

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An “undercapitalized” institution may not acquire an interest in any company or any other insured depository institution, establish or acquire additional branch offices or engage in any new business unless the appropriate federal banking agency has accepted its capital restoration plan, the institution is implementing the plan, and the agency determines that the proposed action is consistent with and will further the achievement of the plan, or the appropriate Federal banking agency determines the proposed action will further the purpose of the “prompt corrective action sections of FDICIA.

If an institution is “critically undercapitalized,” it must comply with the restrictions described above.  In addition, the appropriate Federal banking agency is authorized to restrict the activities of any “critically undercapitalized” institution and to prohibit such an institution, without the appropriate Federal banking agency’s prior written approval, from:

·entering into any material transaction other than in the usual course of business;

·engaging in any covered transaction with affiliates (as defined in Section 23A(b) of the Federal Reserve Act);

·paying excessive compensation or bonuses; and

·paying interest on new or renewed liabilities at a rate that would increase the institution’s weighted average costs of funds to a level significantly exceeding the prevailing rates of interest on insured deposits in the institution’s normal market areas.

The “prompt corrective action provisions of FDICIA also provide that in general no institution may make a capital distribution if it would cause the institution to become “undercapitalized.” Capital distributions include cash (but not stock) dividends, stock purchases, redemptions, and other distributions of capital to the owners of an institution.

Additionally, FDICIA requires, among other things, that:

·only a “well capitalized” depository institution may accept brokered deposits without prior regulatory approval and

·the appropriate federal banking agency annually examine all insured depository institutions, with some exceptions for small, “well capitalized” institutions and state-chartered institutions examined by state regulators.

FDICIA also contains a number of consumer banking provisions, including disclosure requirements and substantive contractual limitations with respect to deposit accounts.

Enforcement Powers.  Congress has provided the federal bank regulatory agencies with an array of powers to enforce laws, rules, regulations and orders. Among other things, the agencies may require that institutions cease and desist from certain activities, may preclude persons from participating in the affairs of insured depository institutions, may suspend or remove deposit insurance, and may impose civil money penalties against institution-affiliated parties for certain violations.

Maximum Legal Interest Rates. Like the laws of many states, Florida law contains provisions on interest rates that may be charged by banks and other lenders on certain types of loans. Numerous exceptions exist to the general interest limitations imposed by Florida law. The relative importance of these interest limitation laws to the financial operations of the Banks will vary from time to time, depending on a number of factors, including conditions in the money markets, the costs and availability of funds, and prevailing interest rates.

Change of Control.  Federal law restricts the amount of voting stock of a bank holding company and a bank that a person may acquire without the prior approval of banking regulators. The overall effect of such laws is to make it more difficult to acquire a bank holding company and a bank by tender offer or similar means than it might be to acquire control of another type of corporation. Consequently, shareholders of the Company may be less likely to benefit from the rapid increases in stock prices that may result from tender offers or similar efforts to acquire control of other companies. Federal law also imposes restrictions on acquisitions of stock in a bank holding company and a state bank.  Under the federal Change in Bank Control Act and the regulations thereunder, a person or group must give advance notice to the Federal Reserve before acquiring control of any bank holding company, and the OCC before acquiring control of any national bank. Upon receipt of such notice, the bank regulatory agencies may approve or disapprove the acquisition.  The Change in Bank Control Act creates a rebuttable presumption of control if a member or group acquires a certain percentage or more of a bank holding company’s or banks voting stock, or if one or more other control factors set forth in the Act are present.

Anti-Money Laundering Requirements. Under federal law, including the Bank Secrecy Act, the PATRIOT Act and the International Money Laundering Abatement and Anti-Terrorist Financing Act, certain types of financial institutions, including insured depository institutions, must maintain anti-money laundering programs that include established internal policies, procedures and controls; a designated compliance officer; an ongoing employee training program; and testing of the program by an independent audit

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function. Among other things, these laws are intended to strengthen the ability of U.S. law enforcement agencies and intelligence communities to work together to combat terrorism on a variety of fronts. Financial institutions are prohibited from entering into specified financial transactions and account relationships and must meet enhanced standards for due diligence and customer identification in their dealings with non-U.S. financial institutions and non-U.S. customers. Financial institutions must take reasonable steps to conduct enhanced scrutiny of account relationships to guard against money laundering and to report any suspicious information maintained by financial institutions. Bank regulators routinely examine institutions for compliance with these obligations and they must consider an institution’s compliance in connection with the regulatory review of applications, including applications for banking mergers and acquisitions. The regulatory authorities have imposed “cease and desist” orders and civil money penalty sanctions against institutions found to be violating these obligations.

The OFAC is responsible for helping to insure that U.S. entities do not engage in transactions with certain prohibited parties, as defined by various Executive Orders and Acts of Congress. OFAC publishes lists of persons, organizations and countries suspected of aiding, harboring or engaging in terrorist acts, known as Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons. If we or our Bank find a name on any transaction, account or wire transfer that is on an OFAC list, we or our Bank must freeze or block such account or transaction, file a suspicious activity report and notify the appropriate authorities.

Consumer Laws and Regulations. Banks and other financial institutions are subject to numerous laws and regulations intended to protect consumers in their transactions with banks. These laws include, among others, laws regarding unfair and deceptive acts and practices and usury laws, as well as the following consumer protection statutes: Truth in Lending Act, Truth in Savings Act, Electronic Funds Transfer Act, Expedited Funds Availability Act, Equal Credit Opportunity Act, Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act, Fair Housing Act, Fair Credit Reporting Act, Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, GLB Act, Home Mortgage Disclosure Act, National Flood Insurance Program, Right to Financial Privacy Act and Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act.

Many states and local jurisdictions have consumer protection laws analogous, and in addition, to those listed above. These federal, state and local laws regulate the manner in which financial institutions deal with customers when taking deposits, making loans or conducting other types of transactions. Failure to comply with these laws and regulations could give rise to regulatory sanctions, customer rescission rights, action by state and local attorneys general and civil or criminal liability.

GLB Act.  The GLB Act includes a minimum federal standard of financial privacy.  Financial institutions are required to have written privacy policies that must be disclosed to customers. The disclosure of a financial institution’s privacy policy must take place at the time a customer relationship is established and not less than annually during the continuation of the relationship.  The act also provides for the functional regulation of bank securities activities. The law repealed the exemption that banks were afforded from the definition of “broker,” and replaced it with a set of limited exemptions that allow the continuation of some historical activities performed by banks. In addition, the act amended the securities laws to include banks within the general definition of dealer. Regarding new bank products, the law provides a procedure for handling products sold by banks that have securities elements. In the area of CRA activities, the law generally requires that financial institutions address the credit needs of low-to-moderate income individuals and neighborhoods in the communities in which they operate. Bank regulators are required to take the CRA ratings of a bank or of the bank subsidiaries of a holding company into account when acting upon certain branch and bank merger and acquisition applications filed by the institution.  Under the law, financial holding companies and banks that desire to engage in new financial activities are required to have satisfactory or better CRA Act ratings when they commence the new activity.

Sarbanes-Oxley Act.  In 2002, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act was enacted which imposes a myriad of corporate governance and accounting measures designed that shareholders are treated and have full and accurate information about the public companies in which they invest. All public companies are affected by the Act.  Some of the principal provisions of the Act include:

·the creation of an independent accounting oversight board (“PCAOB) to oversee the audit of public companies and auditors who perform such audits;

·auditor independence provisions which restrict non-audit services that independent accountants may provide to their audit clients;

·additional corporate governance and responsibility measures which (a) require the chief executive officer and chief financial officer to certify financial statements and internal controls and to forfeit salary and bonuses in certain situations, and (b) protect whistleblowers and informants;

·expansion of the authority and responsibilities of the company’s audit, nominating and compensation committees;

·mandatory disclosure by analysts of potential conflicts of interest; and

·enhanced penalties for fraud and other violations.

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Other Provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act.  The Dodd-Frank Act, which became law on July 21, 2010, implements far-reaching changes across the financial regulatory landscape. In addition to the reforms previously mentioned, the Dodd-Frank Act also:

·requires bank holding companies and banks to be both well capitalized and well managed in order to acquire banks located outside their home state and requires any bank holding company electing to be treated as a financial holding company to be both well managed and well capitalized;

·eliminates all remaining restrictions on interstate banking by authorizing national and state banks to establish de novo branches in any state that would permit a bank chartered in that state to open a branch at that location;

·repeals Regulation Q, the federal prohibition on the payment of interest on demand deposits, thereby permitting depository institutions to pay interest on business transaction and other accounts;

·enhances insider transaction limitations by strengthening loan restrictions to insiders and restricting certain asset sales to and from an insider to an institution, including requirements that such sales be on market terms and, in certain circumstances, approved by the institution’s board of directors; and

·strengthens the previous limits on a depository institution’s credit exposure to one borrower (whether a person or group of related persons) in an amount exceeding certain thresholds, by expanding the scope of these restrictions to include credit exposure arising from derivative transactions, repurchase agreements, and securities lending and borrowing transactions.

Although a significant number of the rules and regulations mandated by the Dodd-Frank Act have been finalized, many of the new requirements called for have yet to be implemented and will likely be subject to implementing regulations over the course of several years. Given the uncertainty associated with the manner in which the provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act will be implemented by the various agencies, the full extent of the impact such requirements will have on financial institutions’ operations is unclear.

Effect of Governmental Policies.  Our earnings and businesses are affected by the monetary and fiscal policies of various regulatory authorities of the United States, especially the Federal Reserve. The Federal Reserve, among other things, regulates the supply of credit and deals with general economic conditions within the United States. The instruments of monetary policy employed by the Federal Reserve for those purposes influence in various ways the overall level of investments, loans, other extensions of credit, and deposits, and the interest rates paid on liabilities and received on assets. We cannot project the impact that future changes in monetary and fiscal policies would have on our earnings and business.

Future Legislation and Regulation.  Proposals that could further intensify the regulation of the financial services industry have been and are expected to continue to be introduced in the United States Congress, in state legislatures, and by applicable regulatory authorities, from time to time. These proposals may change banking statutes and regulations and the banking environment in substantial and unpredictable ways. If enacted, these proposals could increase or decrease the cost of doing business, limit or expand permissible activities or affect the competitive balance among banks, savings associations, credit unions, and other financial institutions. We cannot predict whether any of these proposals will be enacted and, if enacted, the effect that these proposals, or any implementing regulations, would have on our business, results of operations or financial condition.

Competition

We encounter strong competition both in making loans and in attracting deposits.  The deregulation of the banking industry and the widespread enactment of state laws which permit multi-bank holding companies as well as an increasing level of interstate banking have created a highly competitive environment for commercial banking. In one or more aspects of its business, our Company competes with other commercial banks, savings and loan associations, credit unions, finance companies, mutual funds, insurance companies, brokerage and investment banking companies, and other financial intermediaries. Most of these competitors, some of which are affiliated with bank holding companies, have substantially greater resources and lending limits, and may offer certain services that we do not currently provide. In addition, many of our non-bank competitors are not subject to the same extensive federal regulations that govern bank holding companies and federally insured banks.  Legislation has continued to heighten the competitive environment in which financial institutions must conduct their business, and the potential for competition among financial institutions of all types has increased significantly.

To compete, we rely upon specialized services, responsive handling of customer needs, and personal contacts by its officers, directors, and staff. Large multi-branch banking competitors tend to compete primarily by rate and the number and location of branches while smaller, independent financial institutions tend to compete primarily by rate and personal service.

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Employees

As of December 31, 2015, we had a total of approximately 784 full-time equivalent employees. The employees are not represented by a collective bargaining unit. We consider relations with employees to be good.

Statistical Profile and Other Financial Data

Reference is hereby made to the statistical and financial data contained in the section captioned “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” for statistical and financial data providing a review of our Company’s business activities.

Availability of Reports furnished or filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)

Our annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act are available on our internet website at www.centerstatebanks.com.

 

 

 

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Item 1A.

Risk Factors   

We have identified risk factors described below, which should be viewed in conjunction with the other information contained in this document and information incorporated by reference, including our consolidated financial statements and related notes. If any of the following risks or other risks which have not been identified or which we may believe are immaterial or unlikely, actually occur, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be harmed. As noted previously, this report contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties, including statements about our future plans, objectives, intentions and expectations. Many factors, including those described below, could cause actual results to differ materially from those discussed in forward-looking statements.

Risks relating to our industry and operations

A resumption of recessionary economic conditions could have an adverse effect on our business in the future.

The economic crisis that began several years ago caused many financial institutions to seek additional capital, to reduce or eliminate dividends, to merge with larger and stronger institutions and, in some cases, to fail. This economic turmoil and tightening of credit led to an increased level of commercial and consumer delinquencies, lack of consumer confidence, increased market volatility and widespread reduction of business activity generally. The resulting economic pressure on consumers and the lack of confidence in the financial markets adversely affected the banking industry, as well as financial condition and operating results. Although economic conditions have been improving, future market developments could affect consumer confidence levels and cause adverse changes in loan payment patterns, causing increases in delinquencies and default rates, which may impact our charge-offs and the provision for credit losses. Changes in the financial services industry and the effects of the Dodd-Frank Act, Basel III and other regulatory responses to the credit crisis also could negatively affect us by restricting our business operations, including our ability to originate or sell loans, and adversely impact our financial performance.

We are subject to extensive regulation that could limit or restrict our activities.

We operate in a highly regulated industry and are subject to examination, supervision, and comprehensive regulation by various agencies, including the Federal Reserve, the OCC, the FDIC, FINRA, and the SEC. This regulation is to protect depositors, the FDIC deposit insurance fund and the banking system as a whole. Our compliance with these regulations is costly and restricts certain of our activities, including payment of dividends, mergers and acquisitions, investments, loans and interest rates charged, interest rates paid and deposits and locations of our offices. We are also subject to capitalization guidelines established by our regulators, which require us to maintain sufficient capital to support our growth. Regulation of the financial services industry has increased significantly since the global financial crisis. The laws and regulations applicable to the banking industry could change at any time. The extent and timing of any regulatory reform as well as any effect on our business and financial results, are uncertain. Additionally, legislation or regulation may impose unexpected or unintended consequences, the impact of which is difficult to predict. Because government regulation greatly affects the business and financial results of all commercial banks and bank holding companies, our cost of compliance could adversely affect our ability to operate profitably.

Our processes for managing risk may not be effective in mitigating risk or losses to us.

The objectives of our risk management processes are to mitigate risk and loss to our organization. We have established procedures that are intended to identify, measure, monitor report and analyze the types of risks to which we are subject, including liquidity risk, credit risk, market risk, interest rate risk, operational risk, legal and compliance risk, and reputational risk, among others. However, as with any risk management processes, there are inherent limitations to our risk management strategies as there may exist, or develop in the future, risks that we have not appropriately anticipated or identified. The ongoing developments in the financial institutions industry continue to highlight both the importance and some of the limitations of managing unanticipated risks. If our risk management processes prove ineffective, we could suffer unexpected losses and could be materially adversely affected.

The soundness of other financial institutions could adversely affect us.

Our ability to engage in routine funding and other transactions could be adversely affected by the actions and commercial soundness of other financial institutions. Financial services institutions are interrelated as a result of trading, clearing, counterparty or other relationships. Defaults by, or even rumors or questions about, one or more financial services institutions, or the financial services industry generally, have led to market-wide liquidity problems and losses of depositor, creditor and counterparty confidence and could lead to losses or defaults by us or by other institutions. We could experience increases in deposits and assets as a result of other banks’ difficulties or failure, which would increase the capital we need to support our growth.

 

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Our loan portfolio includes commercial and commercial real estate loans that may have higher risks.

Our commercial and commercial real estate loans at December 31, 2015 and 2014 were $1.56 billion and $1.43 billion, respectively, or 66% and 66% of total loans, excluding purchased credit impaired loans. Commercial and commercial real estate loans generally carry larger loan balances and can involve a greater degree of financial and credit risk than other loans. As a result, banking regulators continue to give greater scrutiny to lenders with a high concentration of commercial real estate loans in their portfolios, and such lenders are expected to implement stricter underwriting, internal controls, risk management policies and portfolio stress testing, as well as higher capital levels and loss allowances. The increased financial and credit risk associated with these types of loans are a result of several factors, including the concentration of principal in a limited number of loans and borrowers, the size of loan balances, the effects of general economic conditions on income-producing properties and the increased difficulty of evaluating and monitoring these types of loans.

The federal bank regulatory agencies have guidance on “Concentrations in Commercial Real Estate Lending” (the “Guidance”). The Guidance defines commercial real estate loans as exposures secured by raw land, land development and construction (including 1-4 family residential construction), multi-family property, and non-farm nonresidential property where the primary or a significant source of repayment is derived from rental income associated with the property (that is, loans for which 50% or more of the source of repayment comes from third party, non-affiliated, rental income) or the proceeds of the sale, refinancing, or permanent financing of the property. The Guidance requires that appropriate processes be in place to identify, monitor and control risks associated with real estate lending concentrations. This could include enhanced strategic planning, underwriting policies, risk management, internal controls, portfolio stress testing and risk exposure limits as well as appropriately designed compensation and incentive programs. Higher allowances for loan losses and capital levels may also be required. The Guidance is triggered when commercial real estate loan concentrations exceed either:

 

·

total reported loans for construction, land development, and other land of 100% or more of a bank’s total capital (as of December 31, 2015, our consolidated ratio was 28%); or

 

·

Total reported loans secured by multifamily and nonfarm nonresidential properties and loans for construction, land development, and other land of 300% or more of a bank’s total capital (as of December 31, 2015, our consolidated ratio was 226%).

The Guidance applies to the lending activities of our subsidiary bank. Regulators have the right to request banks to maintain elevated levels of capital or liquidity due to commercial real estate loan concentrations, and could do so, especially if there is a further downturn in our local real estate markets.

In addition, when underwriting a commercial or industrial loan, we may take a security interest in commercial real estate, and, in some instances upon a default by the borrower, we may foreclose on and take title to the property, which may lead to potential financial risks for us under applicable environmental laws. If hazardous substances were discovered on any of these properties, we may be liable to governmental agencies or third parties for the costs of remediation of the hazard, as well as for personal injury and property damage. Many environmental laws can impose liability regardless of whether the Company knew of, or were responsible for, the contamination.

Furthermore, the repayment of loans secured by commercial real estate is typically dependent upon the successful operation of the related real estate or commercial project. If the cash flows from the project are reduced, a borrower’s ability to repay the loan may be impaired. This cash flow shortage may result in the failure to make loan payments. In such cases, we may be compelled to modify the terms of the loan. In addition, the nature of these loans is such that they are generally less predictable and more difficult to evaluate and monitor. As a result, repayment of these loans may, to a greater extent than residential loans, be subject to adverse conditions in the real estate market or economy.

Our business is subject to the success of the local economies where we operate.

Our success significantly depends upon the growth in population, income levels, deposits and housing starts in our primary and secondary markets. During the recent economic downturn, the rate of growth of each of these four factors has decreased substantially and in some cases has turned negative. If the communities in which we operate do not grow or if prevailing economic conditions locally or nationally continue to remain challenging, our business may be adversely affected. Our specific market areas have experienced decreased growth, which has affected the ability of our customers to repay their loans to us and has generally affected our financial condition and results of operations. We are less able than a larger institution to spread the risks of unfavorable local economic conditions across a large number of diversified economies. Moreover, we cannot give any assurance we will benefit from any market growth or favorable economic conditions in our primary market areas if they do occur.

A significant portion of our loan portfolio is secured by real estate, substantially all of which is located in Florida, and events that negatively impact the real estate market could hurt our resultant business.

Substantially all of our loans are concentrated in Florida and subject to the volatility of the state’s economy and real estate market. With our loans concentrated in Florida, the decline in local economic conditions has adversely affected the values of our real

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estate collateral and will likely continue to do so for the foreseeable future. Consequently, a continued decline in local economic conditions may have a greater effect on our earnings and capital than on the earnings and capital of larger financial institutions whose real estate loan portfolios are geographically diverse.

In addition to relying on the financial strength and cash flow characteristics of the borrower in each case, we often secure loans with real estate collateral. At December 31, 2015, approximately 85% of our loans have real estate as a primary or secondary component of collateral. The real estate collateral in each case provides an alternate source of repayment in the event of default by the borrower but may deteriorate in value during the time credit is extended. If we are required to liquidate the collateral securing a loan to satisfy the debt during a period of reduced real estate values, our earnings and capital could be adversely affected.

We are subject to environmental risks in our lending activities.  

Since a significant portion of our loan portfolio is secured by real property, we may foreclose upon and take title to such property in the ordinary course of business.  If hazardous substances are found on such property, we could be liable for remediation costs, as well as for personal injury and property damage.  Environmental laws might require us to incur substantial expenses, materially reduce the property’s value, or limit our ability to use or sell the property.  Although our management has policies requiring environmental reviews before loans secured by real property are made and before foreclosure is commenced, it is still possible that environmental risks might not be detected and that the associated costs might have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

An inadequate allowance for loan losses would reduce our earnings.

The risk of credit losses on loans varies with, among other things, general economic conditions, the type of loan being made, the creditworthiness of the borrower over the term of the loan and, in the case of a collateralized loan, the value and marketability of the collateral for the loan. Management maintains an allowance for loan losses based upon, among other things, historical experience, an evaluation of economic conditions and regular reviews of delinquencies and loan portfolio quality. Based upon such factors, management makes various assumptions and judgments about the ultimate collectability of the loan portfolio and provides an allowance for loan losses based upon a percentage of the outstanding balances and for specific loans when their ultimate collectability is considered questionable. If management’s assumptions and judgments prove to be incorrect and the allowance for loan losses is inadequate to absorb losses, or if bank regulatory authorities require us to increase the allowance for loan losses as a part of their examination process, our earnings and capital could be significantly and adversely affected.

We will realize future losses if the proceeds we receive upon liquidation of non-performing assets (“NPAs”) are less than the carrying value of such assets.

We record our NPAs on our financial statements at the estimated net realizable valuable that we expect to receive from ultimately disposing of these assets. We could realize losses in the future as a result of deteriorating market conditions if the proceeds we receive upon disposition of the NPAs are less than our carrying value of such assets.

While we use appraisals in deciding whether to make a loan that is secured by real estate, they do not ensure the value of the real property collateral.

In deciding whether to make a loan secured by real property, we generally require an appraisal. However, an appraisal is only an estimate of the value of the property at the time the appraisal is made. If the appraised amount does not reflect the amount that may be obtained upon any sale or foreclosure of the property, we may not realize an amount equal to the indebtedness secured by the property.

Our accounting policies and processes are critical to how we report our financial condition and results of operations and require our management to make estimates about matters that are uncertain.

Accounting policies and processes are fundamental to how we record and report our financial condition and results of operations. Some of these polices require use of estimates and assumptions that may affect the value of our assets or liabilities and financial results. Several of our accounting policies are critical because they require management to make difficult, subjective and complex judgments about matters that are inherently uncertain and because it is likely that materially different amounts would be reported under different conditions or using different assumptions. Pursuant to generally accepted accounting principles, we are required to make certain assumptions and estimates in preparing our financial statements, including and determining credit loss reserves, reserves related to litigation and the fair value of certain assets and liabilities, among other items. If the assumptions or estimates underling our financial statements are incorrect, we may experience material losses.

Certain of our financial instruments, including trading assets and liabilities, securities, and certain loans, among other items, require a determination of their fair value in order to prepare our financial statements. Where quoted market prices are not available, we may make fair value determinations based on internally developed models or other means which ultimately rely to some degree on

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management judgment. Some of these and other assets and liabilities may have no direct observable price levels, making their valuation particularly subjective, being based on significant estimation and judgment. In addition, some illiquidity in markets and declines in prices of certain loans and securities may make it more difficult to value certain balance sheet items, which may lead to the possibility that such valuations will be subject to further change or adjustment, it could lead to declines in our earnings.

A lack of liquidity could affect our operations and jeopardize our financial condition.

Liquidity is essential to our business. An inability to raise funds through deposits, borrowings, the sale of loans and other sources could have a substantial negative effect on our liquidity. Our funding sources include federal funds purchased, securities sold under repurchase agreements, non-core deposits, and short- and long-term debt. There are other sources of liquidity available to us should they be needed, including our ability to acquire additional non-core deposits, the issuance and sale of debt securities, and the issuance and sale of preferred or common securities in public or private transactions. Our access to funding sources in amounts adequate to finance or capitalize our activities or on terms that are acceptable to us could be impaired by factors that affect us specifically or the financial services industry or economy in general. Our ability to borrow could be impaired by factors that are not specific to us, such as further disruption in the financial markets or negative views and expectations about the prospects for the financial services industry in light of the recent turmoil faced by banking organizations and the continued deterioration in credit markets.

Our profitability is vulnerable to interest rate fluctuations.

Our profitability depends substantially upon our net interest income.  That interest income is the difference between the interest earned on assets (such as loans and securities held in our investment portfolio) and the interest paid for liabilities (such as interest paid on savings and money market accounts and time deposits).  Income associated with interest-earning assets and costs associated with interest-bearing liabilities may not be affected uniformly by fluctuations in interest rates.  The magnitude and duration of changes in interest rates are events over which we have no control, and such changes may have an adverse effect on our net interest income.  Prepayment and early withdrawal levels, which are also impacted by changes in interest rates, can significantly affect our assets and liabilities.  For example, an increase in interest rates could, among other things, reduce the demand for loans and decrease loan repayment rates.  Such an increase could also adversely affect the ability of our floating-rate borrowers to meet their payment obligations, which could in turn lead to an increase in non-performing assets and net charge-offs.  Conversely, a decrease in the general level of interest rates could affect us by, among other things, leading to greater competition for deposits and incentivizing borrowers to prepay or refinance their loans more quickly or frequently than they otherwise would.  Generally, interest rates on our interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities do not change at the same rate, to the same extent or on the same basis.  Even assets and liabilities with similar maturities or repricing periods may react in different degrees to changes in market interest rates.  Interest Rates on certain types of assets and liabilities may fluctuate in advance of changes in general market interest rates, while interest rates on other types of assets and liabilities may lag behind changes in general market rates.  Certain assets, such as fixed and adjustable rate mortgage loans, have features that limit changes in interest rates on a short-term basis and over the life of the asset.  Changes in interest rates could materially and adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.  

We are required to maintain capital to meet regulatory requirements, and if we fail to maintain sufficient capital, whether due to losses, an inability to raise additional capital or otherwise, our financial condition, liquidity and results of operations, as well as our ability to maintain regulatory compliance, would be adversely affected.

Our financial holding company and our subsidiary bank must meet regulatory capital requirements and maintain sufficient liquidity. Banking organizations experiencing growth, especially those making acquisitions are expected to hold additional capital, above regulatory minimums. From time to time, the regulators implement changes to these regulatory capital adequacy guidelines, such as through the Dodd-Frank Act and the Basel III initiatives described above. It is anticipated that these standards will result in higher and more stringent capital requirements for us and our banking subsidiary. In particular, Basel III will require us to maintain an increased minimum ratio of Tier 1 common equity to risk weighed assets.

Actions (if necessary) to increase capital, may adversely affect us. Our ability to raise additional capital, when and if needed, will depend on conditions in the capital markets, economic conditions and a number of other factors, including investor perceptions regarding the banking industry and market condition, and governmental activities, many of which are outside our control, and on our financial condition and performance. Accordingly, we cannot assure you that we will be able to raise additional capital if needed or on terms acceptable to us. If we fail to meet these capital and other regulatory requirements, our financial condition, liquidity and results of operations would be materially and adversely affected.

Our failure to remain “well capitalized” for bank regulatory purposes could affect customer confidence, our ability to grow, our costs of funds and FDIC insurance costs, our ability to pay dividends on common stock and make distributions on our trust preferred securities, our ability to make acquisitions, and our business, results of operations and financial condition. Under FDIC rules, if our subsidiary bank ceases to be a “well capitalized” institution for bank regulatory purposes, the interest rates that it pays and its ability to accept brokered deposits may be restricted. Although we had no wholesale brokered deposits as of December 31, 2015, we

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had approximately $20 million of in-market CDARs deposits, $33 million of ICS deposits and approximately $78 million of deposits related to our prepaid card business, which are considered brokered deposits for regulatory purposes.

Our business strategy includes continued growth, and our financial condition and results of operations could be negatively affected if we fail to grow or fail to manage our growth effectively.

We intend to continue pursuing a growth strategy for our business. Our prospects must be considered in light of the risks, expenses and difficulties frequently encountered by companies in significant growth stages of development. Particularly in light of prevailing economic conditions, we cannot assure you we will be able to expand our market presence in our existing markets or successfully enter new markets or that any such expansion will not adversely affect our results of operations. Failure to manage our growth effectively could have a material adverse effect on our business, future prospects, financial condition or results of operations, and could adversely affect our ability to successfully implement our business strategy. Also, if our growth occurs more slowly than anticipated or declines, our operating results could be materially adversely affected.

Our ability to successfully grow will depend on a variety of factors including the continued availability of desirable business opportunities, the competitive responses from other financial institutions in our market areas, our ability to continue to  implement and improve our operational, credit, financial, management and other risks controls and processes and our reporting systems and procedures in order to manage a growing number of client relationships, and our ability to integrate our acquisitions and develop consistent policies throughout our various businesses. While we believe we have the management resources and internal systems in place to successfully manage our future growth, there can be no assurance growth opportunities will be available or growth will be successfully managed. In addition, if we are unable to manage future expansion in our operations, we may experience compliance and operational problems, have to slow the pace of growth, or have to incur additional expenditures beyond current projections to support such growth, any of which could adversely affect our business.

We may face risks with respect to future expansion.

We have historically pursued acquisitions, and in the future we may acquire other financial institutions or parts of those institutions and we may engage in additional de novo branch expansion. We may also consider and enter into new lines of business or offer new products or services. We also may receive future inquiries and have discussions with potential acquirers of us. Acquisitions and mergers involve a number of risks, including:

 

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the time and costs associated with identifying and evaluating potential acquisitions and merger partners;

 

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inaccurate estimates and judgments regarding credit, operations, management and market risks of the target institution;

 

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the time and costs of evaluating new markets, hiring experienced local management and opening new offices, and the time lags between these activities and the generation of sufficient assets and deposits to support the costs of the expansion;

 

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our ability to receive regulatory approvals on terms that are acceptable to us;

 

·

our ability to finance an acquisition and possible dilution to our existing shareholders;

 

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the diversion of our management’s attention to the negotiation of a transaction, and the integration of the operations and personnel of the combining businesses;

 

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entry into new markets where we lack experience;

 

·

the strain of growth on our infrastructure, staff, internal controls and management, which may require additional personnel, time and expenditures;

 

·

exposure to potential asset quality issues with acquired institutions;

 

·

the introduction of new products and services into our business;

 

·

the possibility of unknown or contingent liabilities;

 

·

the incurrence and possible impairment of goodwill associated with an acquisition and possible adverse short-term effects on our results of operations; and

 

·

the risk of loss of key employees and customers.

We may incur substantial costs to expand, and we can give no assurance such expansion will result in the levels of profits we seek. There can be no assurance that integration efforts for any future mergers or acquisitions will be successful. Also, we may issue equity securities, including common stock and securities convertible into shares of our common stock, in connection with future acquisitions, which could cause ownership and economic dilution to our current shareholders and to investors purchasing common stock in this offering. There is no assurance that, following any future mergers or acquisitions, our integration efforts will be

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successful or our company, after giving effect to the acquisition, will achieve profits comparable to or better than our historical experience.

Attractive acquisition opportunities may not be available to us in the future.

While we seek continued organic growth, as our earnings and capital position improve, we may consider the acquisition of other businesses, including, as discussed above, failed depository institutions offered for sale in FDIC-assisted transactions. The FDIC determines the timing and terms of the sale of failed institutions, and selects the winning bidder based on the “least cost” to the FDIC. The failed banks offered for sale may or may not meet our business objectives. We expect that other banking and financial companies, many of which have significantly greater resources, will compete with us to acquire financial services businesses. This competition could increase prices for potential acquisitions, including the premiums on deposits and the prices paid for assets in FDIC-assisted transactions. This could reduce our potential returns, and reduce the attractiveness of these opportunities and increase their credit and other risks. Also, acquisitions are subject to various regulatory approvals. If we fail to receive the appropriate regulatory approvals, we will not be able to consummate an acquisition that we believe is in our best interests. Among other things, our regulators consider our capital, liquidity, profitability, regulatory compliance and levels of goodwill and intangibles when considering acquisition and expansion proposals. Any acquisition could be dilutive to our earnings and shareholders’ equity per share of our common stock.

Our recent results may not be indicative of our future results.

We may not be able to sustain our historical rate of growth or may not even be able to grow our business at all. In addition, our recent growth may distort some of our historical financial ratios and statistics. Various factors, such as economic conditions, regulatory and legislative considerations and competition, may also impede or prohibit our ability to expand our market presence. If we experience a significant decrease in our historical rate of growth, our results of operations and financial condition may be adversely affected due to a high percentage of our operating costs being fixed expenses.

Our continued pace of growth may require us to raise additional capital in the future, but that capital may not be available when it is needed.

We are required by federal and state regulatory authorities to maintain adequate levels of capital to support our operations. Our ability to raise additional capital, if needed, will depend on conditions in the capital markets at that time, which are outside our control, and on our financial performance. Accordingly, there is no assurance as to our ability to raise additional capital if needed on terms acceptable to us. If we cannot raise additional capital when needed, our ability to further expand our operations through internal growth and acquisitions could be materially impaired.

Our asset and liability structures are monetary in nature and are affected by a variety of factors, including changes in interest rates, which can impact the value of our assets.

Our earnings and cash flows are largely dependent upon our net interest income. Net interest income is the difference between interest income earned on interest-earnings assets, such as loans and investment securities, and interest expense paid on interest-bearing liabilities, such as deposits and borrowed funds. Because different types of assets and liabilities may react differently and at different times to market interest rate changes, changes in interest rates can increase or decrease net interest income. Interest rates are sensitive to many factors that are beyond our control, including general economic conditions, competition and policies of various governmental and regulatory agencies and, in particular, the policies of the Federal Reserve. Changes in monetary policy, including changes in interest rates, could influence not only the interest our Banks receive on loans and investment securities and the amount of interest they pay on deposits and borrowings, but such changes could also affect (i) the Bank’s ability to originate loans and obtain deposits, (ii) the fair value of our financial assets and liabilities, including the available for sale securities portfolio, and (iii) the average duration of our interest-earning assets. Changes in monetary policy could also expose us to the risk that interest-earning assets may be more responsive to changes in interest rates than interest-bearing liabilities, or vice versa (repricing risk), the risk that the individual interest rates or rates indices underlying various interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities may not change in the same degree over a given time period (basis risk), and the risk of changing interest rate relationships across the spectrum of interest-earning asset and interest-bearing liability maturities (yield curve risk), including a prolonged flat or inverted yield curve environment. Any substantial, unexpected, prolonged change in market interest rates could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

Higher FDIC deposit insurance premiums and assessments could adversely affect our financial condition.

The FDIC insures deposits at FDIC-insured depository institutions, such as our subsidiary bank, up to applicable limits. The amount of a particular institution’s deposit insurance assessment is based on that institution’s risk classification under an FDIC risk- based assessment system. An institution’s risk classification is assigned based on its capital levels and the level of supervisory concern the institution poses to its regulators. Market developments have significantly depleted the deposit insurance fund of the FDIC (which is referred to as the “DIF”) and reduced the ratio of reserves to insure deposits. As a result of recent economic conditions and the

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enactment of the Dodd-Frank Act, the FDIC has increased the deposit insurance assessment rates and thus raised deposit premiums for insured depository institutions. If these increases are insufficient for the DIF to meet its funding requirements, there may need to be further special assessments or increases in deposit insurance premiums. We are generally unable to control the amount of premiums that we are required to pay for FDIC insurance. If there are additional bank or financial institution failures, we may be required to pay even higher FDIC premiums than the recently increased levels. Any future additional assessments, increases or required prepayments in FDIC insurance premiums may materially adversely affect results of operations, including by reducing our profitability or limiting our ability to pursue business opportunities.

We are periodically subject to examination and scrutiny by a number of banking agencies and, depending upon the findings and determinations of these agencies, we may be required to make adjustments to our business that could adversely affect us.

The banking agencies periodically conduct examinations of our business, including compliance with applicable laws and regulations. If, as a result of an examination, a banking agency were to determine that the financial condition, capital resources, asset quality, asset concentration, earning prospects, management, liquidity, sensitivity to market risk or other aspects of any of our operations has become unsatisfactory, or that we or our management is in violation of any law or regulation, it could take a number or different remedial actions as it deems appropriate. These actions include the power to enjoin “unsafe or unsound” practices, to require affirmative actions to correct any conditions resulting from any violation or practice, to issue an administrative order that can be judicially enforced, to direct an increase in our capital, to restrict our growth, to change the asset composition of our portfolio or balance sheet, to assess civil money penalties against our officers or directors, to remove officers and directors and, if it is concluded that such conditions cannot be corrected or there is an imminent risk of loss to depositors, to terminate our deposit insurance. If we become subject to such regulatory actions, our business, results of operations and reputation may be negatively impacted.

Market volatility could adversely affect our operations or ability to access capital.

The capital and credit markets have experienced volatility and disruption from time to time during the past several years. In some cases, the markets have produced downward pressure on stock prices and credit availability for certain issuers without regard to those issuers’ underlying financial condition or performance. If these periodic market disruptions and volatility continue or worsen, we may experience adverse effects, which may be material, on our ability to maintain or access capital and on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our cost of funds may increase as a result of general economic conditions, FDIC insurance assessments, interest rates and competitive pressures.

Our cost of funds may increase as a result of general economic conditions, FDIC insurance assessments, interest rates and competitive pressures. We have traditionally obtained funds principally through local deposits and we have a base of lower cost transaction deposits. Generally, we believe local deposits are a less expensive and more stable source of funds than other borrowings because interest rates paid for local deposits are typically lower than interest rates charged for borrowings from other institutional lenders and reflect a mix of transaction and time deposits, whereas brokered deposits typically are higher cost time deposits. Our costs of funds and our profitability and liquidity are likely to be adversely affected, if and to the extent we have to rely upon higher cost borrowings from other institutional lenders or brokers to fund loan demand or liquidity needs, and changes in our deposit mix and growth could adversely affect our profitability and the ability to expand our loan portfolio.

Competition from financial institutions and other financial service providers may adversely affect our profitability.

The banking business is highly competitive and we experience competition in our markets from many other financial institutions. We compete with commercial banks, credit unions, mortgage banking firms, consumer finance companies, securities brokerage firms, insurance companies, money market funds, and other mutual funds, as well as other super-regional, national and international financial institutions that operate offices in our primary market areas and elsewhere. Some of these competitors may have a long history of successful operation in our markets, greater ties to local businesses and more expansive banking relationships, as well as better established depositor bases. Competitors with greater resources may possess an advantage by being capable of maintaining numerous banking locations and more convenient sites, operating more ATMs and conducting extensive promotional and advertising campaigns or operating a more developed Internet platform.

We compete with these institutions both in attracting deposits and in making loans. In addition, we have to attract our customer base from other existing financial institutions and from new residents. Many of our competitors are well-established, larger financial institutions. While we believe we can and do successfully compete with these other financial institutions in our primary markets, we may face a competitive disadvantage as a result of our smaller size, lack of geographic diversification and inability to spread our marketing costs across a broader market. Although we compete by concentrating our marketing efforts in our primary markets with local advertisements, personal contacts, and greater flexibility and responsiveness in working with local customers, we can give no assurance this strategy will be successful.

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The fiscal and monetary policies of the federal government and its agencies could have a material adverse effect on our earnings.

The Federal Reserve regulates the supply of money and credit in the U.S. as its policies determine in large part the cost of funds for lending and investing and return earned on those loans and investments, both of which affect our net interest margin. They can also materially decrease the value of financial assets we hold. Federal Reserve policies also can adversely affect borrowers, potentially increasing the risk that they may fail to repay their loans, or could result in volatile markets and rapid declining collateral values. Changes in Federal Reserve policies are beyond our control and difficult to predict. Accordingly, the impact of these changes on our activities and results of operations is difficult to predict.

We are dependent upon the services of our management team.

Our future success and profitability are substantially dependent upon the management and banking abilities of our senior executives. Although we currently have employment agreements in place with our senior management team, we cannot guarantee you that our senior executives will remain with us. Changes in key personnel and their responsibilities may be disruptive to our business and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. We believe that our future results will also depend in part upon our attracting and retaining highly skilled and qualified management and sales and marketing personnel. Competition for such personnel is intense, and we cannot assure you that we will be successful in retaining such personnel.

Technological changes affect our business, and we may have fewer resources than many competitors to invest in technological improvements.

The financial services industry continues to undergo rapid technological changes with frequent introductions of new technology- driven products and services. In addition to serving clients better, the effective use of technology may increase efficiency and may enable financial institutions to reduce costs. Our future success will depend, in part, upon our ability to use technology to provide products and services that provide convenience to customers and to create additional efficiencies in operations. We may need to make significant additional capital investments in technology in the future, and we may not be able to effectively implement new technology-driven products and services. Many competitors have substantially greater resources to invest in technological improvements.

We rely on other companies to provide key components of our business infrastructure.

Third parties provide key components of our business infrastructure such as banking services, processing, and internet connections and network access. Any disruption in such services provided by these third parties or any failure of these third parties to handle currently or higher volumes of use could adversely affect our ability to deliver products and services to clients and otherwise to conduct business. Technological or financial difficulties of a third party service provider could adversely affect our business to the extent those difficulties result in the interruption or discontinuation of services provided by that party. Further, in some instances we may responsible for the failure of such third parties to comply with government regulations. We may not be insured against all types of losses as a result of third party failures and our insurance coverage may not be inadequate to cover all losses resulting from system failures or other disruptions. Failures in our business structure could interrupt the operations or increase the cost of doing business.

A failure and/or breach of our operational or securities systems or infrastructure, or those of our third party vendors and other service providers, including as a result of cyber-attacks, could disrupt our business, result in a disclosure or misuse of confidential or propriety information, damage our reputation, increase our costs and cause losses.

We depend on our ability to process, record and monitor a large number of client transactions on a continuous basis. As client, public and regulatory expectations regarding operational and information security have increased, our operational systems and infrastructure must continue to be safeguarded and monitored for potential failures, disruptions and breakdowns. Our business, financial, accounting, data processing, or other operating systems and facilities may stop operating properly or become disabled or damaged as a result of a number of factors including events that are wholly or partially beyond our control. Although we have business continuity plans and other safeguards in place, our business operations may be adversely affected by significant and widespread disruption to our physical infrastructure or operating systems that support our businesses and clients.

Information security risks for financial institutions have generally increased in recent years in part because of the proliferation of new technologies, the use of the internet and telecommunications technologies to conduct financial transactions, and the increased sophistication and activities of hackers, terrorists, activists, and other external parties. As noted, above, our operations rely on the secure processing, transmission, and storage of confidential information in our computer systems and networks. Our banking and other businesses rely on our digital technologies, computer and e-mail systems, software and networks to conduct our operations. In addition, to access our products and services, our clients may use personal smartphones, tablets, personal computers, and other mobile devices that are beyond our control systems. Although we have information security procedures and controls in places, our technologies, systems, networks and our client’s devices may become the target of cyber-attacks or information security

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breaches that could result in the unauthorized release, gathering, monitoring, misuse, loss of destruction of our or our client’s confidential, proprietary and other information, or otherwise disrupt our or our clients’ or other third parties’ business operations.

Any failure or interruption in the operation of our communications and information systems could impair or prevent the effective operation of our customer relationship management, general ledger, deposit, lending or other functions.  While we have policies and procedures designed to prevent or limit the effect of a failure or interruption in the operation of our information systems, there could be no assurance that any such failures or interruptions will not occur or, if they do, that they will be adequately addressed.  The occurrence of any failures or interruptions impacting our information systems could damage our reputation, result in a loss of customer business, and expose us to additional regulatory scrutiny, civil litigation, and possible financial liability, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

Although to date we have not experienced any material losses related to cyber-attacks or other information security breaches, there can be no assurance that we will not suffer such losses in the future.

Our disclosure controls and procedures may not prevent or detect all errors or acts of fraud.

Our disclosure control and procedures are designed to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed by us in reports we file or submit with the SEC is accurately accumulated and communicated to management, and recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. We believe that any disclosure controls and procedures or controls and procedures, no matter how well conceived or operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control systems are met.

These inherent limitations include the reality that judgments and decision making can be faulty, that alternative reasoned judgments can be drawn, or that breakdowns can occur because of a simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people or by an authorized override of the controls. Accordingly, because of the inherent limitations in our controls systems, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected, which could result in a material weakness in our internally controls over financial reporting and the restatement of previously filed financial statements.

Our ability to maintain our reputation is critical to the success of our business, and the failure to do so may materially adversely affect our performance.

Our reputation is one of the most valuable components of our business. As such, we strive to conduct our business in a manner that enhances our reputation. This is done, in part, by recruiting, hiring, and retaining employees who share our core values of being an integral part of the communities we serve, delivering superior service to our customers, and caring about our customers and associates. If our reputation is negatively affected by the actions of our employees or otherwise, our business and, therefore, our operating results may be materially adversely affected.

Adverse weather or manmade events could negatively affect our local economies or disrupt our operations, which would have an adverse effect on our business or results of operations.

Our market areas in Florida are susceptible to hurricanes and tropical storms and related flooding and wind damage. Such weather events and manmade events can disrupt operations, result in damage to properties and negatively affect the local economies in the markets where they operate. We cannot predict whether or to what extent damage that may be caused by future natural disasters or manmade events will affect our operations or the economies in our current or future market areas, but such events could result in a decline in loan originations, a decline in the value or destruction of properties securing our loans and an increase in delinquencies, bankruptcies, foreclosures or loan losses that could result in a higher level of non-performing assets, net charge-offs, and provision for loan losses. Our business or results of operations may be adversely affected by these and other negative effects of future hurricanes or tropical storms, including flooding and wind damage, or manmade events. Many of our customers have incurred significantly higher property and casualty insurance premiums on their properties located in our markets, which may adversely affect real estate sales and values in those markets.

We are or may become involved from time to time in suits, legal proceedings, information-gathering requests, investigations, and proceedings by governmental and self-regulatory agencies that may lead to adverse consequences.

Many aspects of the banking business involve a substantial risk of legal liability. The Company and the Bank have been named or threatened to be named as defendants in various law suits arising from our business activities (and in some cases from the activities of companies that we have acquired).  In addition, from time to time, we are, or may become, the subject of self-regulatory agency information-gathering requests, reviews, investigations and proceedings, and other forms of regulatory inquiry, including by bank regulatory agencies, the SEC and law enforcement authorities.  The results of such proceedings could lead to significant civil or criminal penalties, including monetary penalties, damages, adverse judgments, settlements, fines, injunctions, restrictions on the way the Company and the Bank conduct their business, or reputational harm.  

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The Bank is subject to numerous laws designed to protect consumers, including the Community Reinvestment Act and fair lending laws, and failure to comply with these laws could lead to a wide variety of sanctions.

The Community Reinvestment Act (“CRA”), the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, the Fair Housing Act, and other fair lending laws and regulations impose nondiscriminatory lending requirements on financial institutions. The U.S. Department of Justice and other federal agencies are responsible for enforcing these laws and regulations. A successful regulatory challenge to an institution’s performance under the CRA or fair lending laws and regulations could result in a wide variety of sanctions, including damages and civil money penalties, injunctive relief, restrictions on mergers and acquisitions activity, restrictions on expansion, and restrictions on entering new business lines. Private parties may also have the ability to challenge an institution’s performance under fair lending laws in private class action litigation. Such actions could have a material adverse effect on the Bank’s business, financial condition, results of operations, and future prospects.

The Bank is subject to the Bank Secrecy Act and other anti-money laundering statutes and regulations, and any deemed deficiency by the Bank with respect to these laws could result in significant liability.

The Bank Secrecy Act, the USA PATRIOT Act of 2001, and other laws and regulations require financial institutions, among other duties, to institute and maintain an effective anti-money laundering program and file suspicious activity and currency transaction reports when appropriate. In addition to other bank regulatory agencies, the federal Financial Crimes Enforcement Network of the Department of the Treasury is authorized to impose significant civil money penalties for violations of those requirements and has recently engaged in coordinated enforcement efforts with the state and federal banking regulators, as well as the U.S. Department of Justice, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Drug Enforcement Administration, and Internal Revenue Service. the Bank is also subject to increased scrutiny of compliance with the rules enforced by the Office of Foreign Assets Control of the Department of the Treasury regarding, among other things, the prohibition of transacting business with, and the need to freeze assets of, certain persons and organizations identified as a threat to the national security, foreign policy, or economy of the United States. If the Bank’s policies, procedures, and systems are deemed deficient, the Bank could be subject to liability, including fines and regulatory actions, which may include restrictions on its ability to pay dividends and the necessity to obtain regulatory approvals to proceed with certain aspects of its business plan, including acquisition plans. Failure to maintain and implement adequate programs to combat money laundering and terrorist financing could also have serious reputational consequences for the bank. Any of these results could have a material adverse effect on the Bank’s business, financial condition, results of operations, and future prospects.

Risks Relating to our Common Stock

We have provisions in our articles of incorporation that could impede a takeover of CenterState.

Our articles of incorporation contain provisions providing for the ability to issue preferred stock without shareholder approval. Although these provisions were not adopted for the express purpose of preventing or impeding the takeover of CenterState without the approval of our board of directors, such provisions may have that effect. Such provisions may prevent our shareholders from taking part in a transaction in which our shareholders could realize a premium over the current price of our common stock.

Shares of our Common Stock are not insured deposits and may lose value.

Shares of our common stock are not savings or deposit accounts and are not insured by the FDIC, or any other agency or private entity.  Such shares are subject to investment risk, including the possible loss of some or all of the value of your investment.

Future capital needs could result in dilution of shareholder investment.

Our board of directors may determine from time to time there is a need to obtain additional capital through the issuance of additional shares of our common stock or other securities. These issuances would dilute the ownership interest of our shareholders and may dilute the per share book value of our common stock. New investors also may have rights, preferences and privileges senior to our shareholders which may adversely impact our shareholders.

The trading volume in our common stock and the sale of substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market could depress the price of our common stock

We cannot predict the effect, if any, that future sales of our common stock in the market, or availability of shares of our common stock for sale in the market, will have on the market price of our common stock. Our stock price can fluctuate widely in response to a variety of factors. General market fluctuations, industry factors, and general economic and political conditions and events, such as terrorist attacks, economic slowdowns or recessions, interest rate changes, credit loss trends, or currency fluctuations, also could cause our stock price to decrease regardless of operating results. We therefore can give no assurance that sales of substantial amounts of our common stock in the market, or the potential for large amounts of sales in the market, or any of the other

22


 

factors discussed above, would not cause the price of our common stock to decline or impair our ability to raise capital through sales of our common stock.

Our ability to pay dividends is limited and we may be unable to pay future dividends

During the last 60 fiscal quarters, we paid cash dividends on our common stock outstanding. Our ability to pay dividends is limited by regulatory restrictions and the need to maintain sufficient consolidated capital. The ability of the Bank to pay dividends to us is limited by its obligations to maintain sufficient capital and by other general restrictions on its dividends that are applicable to national banks that are regulated by the OCC. If we do not satisfy these regulatory requirements, or if the Bank does not have sufficient earnings to make payments to us while maintaining adequate capital levels, we will be unable to pay dividends on our common stock.

Holders of our junior subordinated debentures have rights that are senior to those of our common stockholders

We have helped support our continued growth through the issuance of, and the acquisition of, through prior mergers, trust preferred securities from special purpose trusts and accompanying junior subordinated debentures. At December 31, 2015, we had outstanding trust preferred securities and accompanying junior subordinated debentures totaling $27.5 million. Payments of the principal and interest on these debt instruments are conditionally guaranteed by us. Further, the accompanying junior subordinated debentures we issued to the special purpose trusts are senior to our shares of common stock. As a result, we must make payments on the junior subordinated debentures before any dividends can be paid on our common stock and, in the event of our bankruptcy, dissolution or liquidation, the holders of the junior subordinated debentures must be satisfied before any distributions can be made on our common stock. We have the right to defer distributions on our junior subordinated debentures (and the related trust preferred securities) for up to five years, during which time no dividends may be paid on our common stock.

At December 31, 2015, our shareholders include three funds owning approximately 18% of our common stock and they may exercise significant influence over us and their interests may be different from our other shareholders.

Based on their 13G forms filed for the year end December 31, 2015, our shareholders include three funds that collectively own approximately 18% of the outstanding shares of our common stock.  Top ten institutional owners collectively own approximately 44% of our outstanding shares of common stock, as reported by SNL. While the federal banking laws require prior bank regulatory approval if shareholders owning in excess of 9.9% of a financial holding company’s outstanding voting shares desire to act in concert, nonetheless the three or ten institutional owners could vote the same way on matters submitted to our shareholders without being deemed to be acting in concert and, if so, could exercise significant influence over us and actions taken by our shareholders. Interests of institutional funds may be different from our other shareholders. Accordingly, given their collective ownership, the funds could have significant influence over whether or not a proposal submitted to our shareholders receives required shareholder approval.

Item 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

None

Item 2.

Properties

Our Holding Company owns no real property.  Our corporate office is leased from our subsidiary bank, and is located at 42745 U.S. Highway 27, Davenport, Florida 33837.  At the end of 2015, our Company, through our subsidiary bank, operated a total of 57 full service banking offices in 20 counties in central, southeast and northeast Florida.  We own 42 and lease 15 of these offices.  We also have four loan production offices of which we own 1 and lease 3.  In addition to our banking locations, we lease non-banking office space in Winter Haven, Florida for IT and operations purposes.  We also lease office space for our Correspondent banking division, primarily in Birmingham, Alabama and in Atlanta, Georgia.  See Note 8 to the Consolidated Financial Statements of our Company included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and Managements Discussion and Analysis – Bank Premises and Equipment, for additional information regarding our premises and equipment.

Item 3.

Legal Proceedings

Our bank subsidiary is periodically a party to or otherwise involved in legal proceedings arising in the normal course of business, such as claims to enforce liens, claims involving the making and servicing of real property loans, and other issues incident to their respective businesses.  We do not believe any pending or threatened legal proceedings in the ordinary course against the bank would have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations or consolidated financial position.

Item 4.

[Removed and Reserved]

23


 

PART II

Item 5.

Market for Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

The shares of our Common Stock are traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market.  The following sets forth the high and low trading prices for trades of our Common Stock that occurred during 2015 and 2014.  

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

 

High

 

 

Low

 

 

High

 

 

Low

 

1st Quarter

 

$

12.35

 

 

$

10.94

 

 

$

11.65

 

 

$

9.87

 

2nd Quarter

 

$

13.98

 

 

$

11.70

 

 

$

11.60

 

 

$

10.28

 

3rd Quarter

 

$

15.00

 

 

$

12.20

 

 

$

11.60

 

 

$

10.03

 

4th Quarter

 

$

16.24

 

 

$

14.24

 

 

$

12.00

 

 

$

10.10

 

As of December 31, 2015, there are 45,459,195 shares of common stock outstanding.  As of this same date we have approximately 1,037 shareholders of record, as reported by our transfer agent, Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company.  

Dividends

We have historically paid cash dividends on a quarterly basis, on the last business day of the calendar quarter.  The following sets forth per share cash dividends paid during 2015 and 2014.  

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

1st Quarter

 

$

0.01

 

 

$

0.01

 

2nd Quarter

 

$

0.02

 

 

$

0.01

 

3rd Quarter

 

$

0.02

 

 

$

0.01

 

4th Quarter

 

$

0.02

 

 

$

0.01

 

The payment of dividends is a decision of our Board of Directors based upon then-existing circumstances, including our rate of growth, profitability, financial condition, existing and anticipated capital requirements, the amount of funds legally available for the payment of cash dividends, regulatory constraints and such other factors as the Board determines relevant.  Our source of funds for payment of dividends is dividends received from our Bank, or excess cash available to us.  Payments by our subsidiary Bank to us are limited by law and regulations of the bank regulatory authorities.  There are various statutory and contractual limitations on the ability of our Bank to pay dividends to us.  The bank regulatory agencies also have the general authority to limit the dividends paid by banks if such payment may be deemed to constitute an unsafe and unsound practice.  Our Bank may not pay dividends from its paid-in surplus.  All dividends must be paid out of undivided profits then on hand, after deducting expenses, including reserves for losses and bad debts.  In addition, a national bank is prohibited from declaring a dividend on its shares of common stock until its surplus equals its stated capital, unless there has been transferred to surplus no less than one/tenth of the bank’s net profits of the preceding two consecutive half-year periods (in the case of an annual dividend).   The approval of the OCC is required if the total of all dividends declared by a national bank in any calendar year exceeds the total of its net profits for that year combined with its retained net profits for the preceding two years, less any required transfers to surplus.  

Share Repurchases

A summary of our common stock repurchases during the fourth quarter of 2015 is set forth in the table below.

 

 

 

 

 

Total Number

Maximum Number

 

 

 

 

of Shares

of Shares that

 

 

Total

 

Purchased as

may yet be

 

 

Number of

Average

part of Publicly

Purchased Under

Period

Shares

Price paid

Announced Plans

the Plans or

Beginning

Ending

Purchased

per Share

or Programs

Programs

October 1, 2015

October 31, 2015

---

---

---

1,934,735

November 1, 2015

November 30, 2015

---

---

---

1,934,735

December 1, 2015

December 31, 2015

11,385

$15.43

---

1,934,735

Total for quarter ending December 31, 2015

11,385

$15.43

---

1,934,735

 

 

(1)

We did not repurchase any shares of our common stock during the fourth quarter of 2015 pursuant to our stock repurchase plan currently in place. We repurchased 11,385 shares of our common stock from our employees during December 2015 for settlement of certain tax withholding obligations related to certain equity based compensation awards.

24


 

Stock Plans

With respect to information regarding our securities authorized for issuance under equity incentive plans, the information contained in the section entitled “Equity Compensation Plan Information” in our Definitive Proxy Statement for the 2015 Annual Meeting of Shareholders is incorporated herein by reference.  

Performance Graph

Shares of our common stock are traded on the Nasdaq Global Select Market.  The following graph compares the yearly percentage change in cumulative shareholder return on the Company’s common stock, with the cumulative total return of the S&P 500 Index and the SNL Southeast Bank Index, since December 31, 2010 (assuming a $100 investment on December 31, 2010 and reinvestment of all dividends).  

 

 

 

 

2010

 

 

2011

 

 

2012

 

 

2013

 

 

2014

 

 

2015

 

CenterState Banks, Inc.

 

 

100

 

 

 

84

 

 

 

109

 

 

 

130

 

 

 

153

 

 

 

203

 

S&P 500

 

 

100

 

 

 

102

 

 

 

118

 

 

 

157

 

 

 

178

 

 

 

181

 

SNL Southeast Bank Index

 

 

100

 

 

 

59

 

 

 

97

 

 

 

132

 

 

 

148

 

 

 

146

 

Item 6.

Selected Consolidated Financial Data

Use of Non-GAAP Financial Measures and Ratios

The accounting and reporting policies of the Company conform to generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) in the United States and prevailing practices in the banking industry. However, certain non-GAAP performance measures and ratios are used by management to evaluate and measure the Company’s performance. These include tax-equivalent net interest income (including its individual components), net interest margin (including its individual components), the efficiency ratio, tangible assets, tangible shareholders’ equity, tangible book value per common share, and tangible equity to tangible assets. Management believes that these measures and ratios provide users of the Company’s financial information with a more meaningful view of the performance of the interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities and of the Company’s operating efficiency.  Other financial holding companies may define or calculate these measures and ratios differently.  Management also uses non-GAAP financial measures to help explain the variance in total non-interest expenses excluding merger and acquisition related expenses, impairment of bank property held for sale, credit related expenses and correspondent banking division expenses between the periods presented.  Management uses this non-GAAP financial measure in its analysis of the Company’s performance and believes this presentation provides useful supplemental information, and a clearer understanding of the Company’s non-interest expense between periods presented.

Management reviews yields on certain asset categories and the net interest margin of the Company and its banking subsidiaries on a fully taxable equivalent basis. In this non-GAAP presentation, net interest income is adjusted to reflect tax-exempt interest income on an equivalent before-tax basis. This measure ensures the comparability of net interest income arising from both taxable and tax-exempt sources. Net interest income on a fully taxable equivalent basis is also used in the calculation of the Company’s efficiency

25


 

ratio. The efficiency ratio is calculated by dividing non-interest expense (less nonrecurring items, credit related expenses and intangible amortization ) by total taxable-equivalent net interest income and non-interest income (less securities gains or losses, FDIC indemnification income and nonrecurring items). The efficiency ratio is also calculated excluding correspondent income and expense from the calculation. These measures provide an estimate of how much it costs to produce one dollar of revenue. The items excluded from this calculation provide a better match of revenue from daily operations to operational expenses.

Tangible assets is defined as total assets reduced by goodwill and other intangible assets. Tangible common equity is defined as total common equity reduced by goodwill and other intangible assets. Tangible common equity to tangible assets is defined as tangible common equity divided by tangible assets. These measures are important to many investors in the marketplace who are interested in the common equity to assets ratio exclusive of the effect of changes in intangible assets on common equity and total assets.

Tangible common equity per common share outstanding is defined as tangible common equity divided by total common shares outstanding. This measure is important to many investors in the marketplace who are interested in changes from period to period in book value per share exclusive of changes in intangible assets. Goodwill, an intangible asset that is recorded in a purchase business combination, has the effect of increasing total book value while not increasing our tangible book value.

These disclosures should not be considered in isolation or a substitute for results determined in accordance with GAAP, and are not necessarily comparable to non-GAAP performance measures which may be presented by other bank holding companies. Management compensates for these limitations by providing detailed reconciliations between GAAP information and the non-GAAP financial measures.

26


 

The following tables present a reconciliation of certain non-GAAP performance measures and ratios used by the Company to evaluate and measure the Company’s performance to the most directly comparable GAAP financial measures:

 

 

 

Years ended December 31,

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

2013

 

 

2012

 

 

2011

 

Income Statement Non-GAAP measures and ratios

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest income (GAAP)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loans, excluding purchase credit impaired ("PCI") loans

 

$

101,051

 

 

$

87,094

 

 

$

55,549

 

 

$

56,376

 

 

$

54,235

 

PCI loans

 

 

40,645

 

 

 

34,168

 

 

 

32,725

 

 

 

25,216

 

 

 

11,658

 

Securities - taxable

 

 

16,460

 

 

 

13,991

 

 

 

9,889

 

 

 

11,297

 

 

 

14,296

 

Securities - tax-exempt

 

 

2,641

 

 

 

1,435

 

 

 

1,430

 

 

 

1,423

 

 

 

1,422

 

Federal funds sold and other

 

 

1,523

 

 

 

1,539

 

 

 

785

 

 

 

638

 

 

 

632

 

Total Interest income (GAAP)

 

 

162,320

 

 

 

138,227

 

 

 

100,378

 

 

 

94,950

 

 

 

82,243

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tax equivalent adjustment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non PCI loans

 

 

819

 

 

 

628

 

 

 

628

 

 

 

646

 

 

 

539

 

Securities - tax-exempt

 

 

1,379

 

 

 

746

 

 

 

744

 

 

 

697

 

 

 

678

 

Total tax equivalent adjustment

 

 

2,198

 

 

 

1,374

 

 

 

1,372

 

 

 

1,343

 

 

 

1,217

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest income - tax equivalent

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loans excluding PCI loans

 

 

101,870

 

 

 

87,722

 

 

 

56,177

 

 

 

57,022

 

 

 

54,774

 

PCI loans

 

 

40,645

 

 

 

34,168

 

 

 

32,725

 

 

 

25,216

 

 

 

11,658

 

Securities - taxable

 

 

16,460

 

 

 

13,991

 

 

 

9,889

 

 

 

11,297

 

 

 

14,296

 

Securities - tax-exempt

 

 

4,020

 

 

 

2,181

 

 

 

2,174

 

 

 

2,120

 

 

 

2,100

 

Federal funds sold and other

 

 

1,523

 

 

 

1,539

 

 

 

785

 

 

 

638

 

 

 

632

 

Total interest income - tax equivalent

 

 

164,518

 

 

 

139,601

 

 

 

101,750

 

 

 

96,293

 

 

 

83,460

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Interest expense (GAAP)

 

 

(7,286

)

 

 

(7,356

)

 

 

(5,885

)

 

 

(8,481

)

 

 

(12,207

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net interest income - tax equivalent

 

$

157,232

 

 

$

132,245

 

 

$

95,865

 

 

$

87,812

 

 

$

71,253

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net interest income (GAAP)

 

$

155,034

 

 

$

130,871

 

 

$

94,493

 

 

$

86,469

 

 

$

70,036

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yields and costs