10-Q 1 cort-10q_20170930.htm 10-Q cort-10q_20170930.htm

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2017

or

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from             to             

Commission File Number:

000-50679

 

CORCEPT THERAPEUTICS INCORPORATED

(Exact Name of Corporation as Specified in Its Charter)

 

 

Delaware

77-0487658

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

149 Commonwealth Drive

Menlo Park, CA 94025

(Address of principal executive offices, including zip code)

 

(650) 327-3270

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

 

  

Accelerated filer

 

Non-accelerated filer

 

  (Do not check if a small reporting company)

  

Smaller reporting company

 

Emerging growth company

 

 

 

 

 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes      No  

On October 30, 2017, there were 114,124,161 shares of common stock outstanding at a par value of $0.001 per share.

 

 

 

 


 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

3

ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

3

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

3

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

 

4

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

5

NOTES TO CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

6

ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

14

ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

18

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

18

PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

 

19

ITEM 1. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

19

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

19

ITEM 2. UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS

 

31

ITEM 3. DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES

 

31

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

31

ITEM 5. OTHER INFORMATION

 

31

ITEM 6. EXHIBITS

 

32

SIGNATURES

 

33

 

 

2


 

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

CORCEPT THERAPEUTICS INCORPORATED

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(In thousands, except per share data)

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

 

(Unaudited)

 

 

(See Note 1)

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

31,060

 

 

$

51,536

 

Short-term marketable securities

 

 

44,096

 

 

 

 

Trade receivables, net of allowances

 

 

11,872

 

 

 

9,860

 

Inventory

 

 

3,828

 

 

 

2,329

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

3,086

 

 

 

1,964

 

Total current assets

 

 

93,942

 

 

 

65,689

 

Strategic inventory

 

 

1,680

 

 

 

2,835

 

Property and equipment, net of accumulated depreciation

 

 

553

 

 

 

205

 

Long-term marketable securities

 

 

1,508

 

 

 

 

Other assets (Note 5)

 

 

12,989

 

 

 

24

 

Total assets

 

$

110,672

 

 

$

68,753

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$

6,226

 

 

$

2,290

 

Accrued clinical expenses

 

 

1,892

 

 

 

1,467

 

Other accrued liabilities

 

 

16,252

 

 

 

8,953

 

Long-term obligation - current portion

 

 

 

 

 

14,664

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

24,370

 

 

 

27,374

 

Commitments and contingencies (Note 5)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders’ equity:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock, par value $0.001 per share, 10,000 shares authorized and no shares

   outstanding at September 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock, par value $0.001 per share, 280,000 shares authorized and 114,082 and 112,710 shares issued and outstanding at September 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively

 

 

114

 

 

 

113

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

377,678

 

 

 

363,534

 

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

 

 

(14

)

 

 

 

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(291,476

)

 

 

(322,268

)

Total stockholders’ equity

 

 

86,302

 

 

 

41,379

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

 

$

110,672

 

 

$

68,753

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

 

3


 

CORCEPT THERAPEUTICS INCORPORATED

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

(Unaudited)

(In thousands, except per share data)

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

September 30,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Product revenue, net

 

$

42,763

 

 

$

21,725

 

 

$

105,921

 

 

$

57,509

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of sales

 

 

976

 

 

 

668

 

 

 

2,397

 

 

 

1,497

 

Research and development

 

 

11,693

 

 

 

7,054

 

 

 

26,745

 

 

 

17,360

 

Selling, general and administrative

 

 

16,471

 

 

 

10,931

 

 

 

45,621

 

 

 

33,480

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

29,140

 

 

 

18,653

 

 

 

74,763

 

 

 

52,337

 

Income from operations

 

 

13,623

 

 

 

3,072

 

 

 

31,158

 

 

 

5,172

 

Interest and other income (expense)

 

 

86

 

 

 

(487

)

 

 

(237

)

 

 

(1,629

)

Income before income taxes

 

 

13,709

 

 

 

2,585

 

 

 

30,921

 

 

 

3,543

 

Income tax benefit (expense)

 

 

48

 

 

 

 

 

 

(129

)

 

 

 

Net income

 

$

13,757

 

 

$

2,585

 

 

$

30,792

 

 

$

3,543

 

Other comprehensive income (loss):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net unrealized gain (loss) on available-for-sale investments

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

(14

)

 

 

 

Total comprehensive income

 

$

13,760

 

 

$

2,585

 

 

$

30,778

 

 

$

3,543

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic net income per common share

 

$

0.12

 

 

$

0.02

 

 

$

0.27

 

 

$

0.03

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diluted net income per common share

 

$

0.11

 

 

$

0.02

 

 

$

0.25

 

 

$

0.03

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted-average shares outstanding used in computing net

   income per share

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

 

113,603

 

 

 

110,652

 

 

 

113,242

 

 

 

110,118

 

Diluted

 

 

125,651

 

 

 

116,419

 

 

 

123,417

 

 

 

115,163

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

 

4


 

CORCEPT THERAPEUTICS INCORPORATED

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(Unaudited)

(In thousands)

 

 

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Cash flows from operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income

 

$

30,792

 

 

$

3,543

 

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash generated from operations:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock-based compensation

 

 

9,529

 

 

 

5,101

 

Accretion of interest expense

 

 

456

 

 

 

1,562

 

Amortization of debt financing costs

 

 

14

 

 

 

16

 

Depreciation and amortization of property and equipment

 

 

58

 

 

 

72

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trade receivables

 

 

(2,012

)

 

 

(2,015

)

Inventory

 

 

(344

)

 

 

(825

)

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

(1,122

)

 

 

(679

)

Other assets (Note 5)

 

 

(12,965

)

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

 

3,922

 

 

 

2,984

 

Accrued clinical expenses

 

 

425

 

 

 

604

 

Other accrued liabilities

 

 

7,299

 

 

 

3,617

 

Deferred revenue

 

 

 

 

 

(158

)

Net cash provided by operating activities

 

 

36,052

 

 

 

13,822

 

Cash flows from investing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchases of property and equipment

 

 

(390

)

 

 

(119

)

Purchases of marketable securities

 

 

(45,618

)

 

 

 

Cash used in investing activities

 

 

(46,008

)

 

 

(119

)

Cash flows from financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from issuance of common stock upon exercise of options and warrants, net

   of issuance costs

 

 

4,614

 

 

 

4,073

 

Payments related to long-term obligation

 

 

(15,134

)

 

 

(10,346

)

Net cash used in financing activities

 

 

(10,520

)

 

 

(6,273

)

Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents

 

 

(20,476

)

 

 

7,430

 

Cash and cash equivalents, at beginning of period

 

 

51,536

 

 

 

40,435

 

Cash and cash equivalents, at end of period

 

$

31,060

 

 

$

47,865

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

 

 

5


CORCEPT THERAPEUTICS INCORPORATED

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

1. Basis of Presentation and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Description of Business and Basis of Presentation

Corcept Therapeutics Incorporated was incorporated in the State of Delaware in May 1998, and our headquarters are located in Menlo Park, California. We are a pharmaceutical company engaged in the discovery, development and commercialization of medications that treat severe metabolic, oncologic, and psychiatric disorders by modulating the effect of the stress hormone cortisol. In 2012, the United States Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) approved Korlym® (“mifepristone”) 300 mg tablets as a once-daily oral medication for treatment of hyperglycemia secondary to hypercortisolism in adult patients with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome who have type 2 diabetes mellitus or glucose intolerance and have failed surgery or are not candidates for surgery. We have discovered and patented three structurally distinct series of selective cortisol modulators, consisting of more than 500 compounds. We are developing compounds from these series to treat a broad range of disorders.

Basis of Presentation

We have prepared the September 30, 2017 balance sheet and the statements of comprehensive income and cash flows in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) for interim financial information and with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 10 of Regulation S-X. They do not include all of the information and footnotes required by GAAP for complete financial statements. In the opinion of management, all adjustments (consisting only of normal recurring adjustments) considered necessary for a fair presentation have been included. Operating results for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year ending December 31, 2017 or any other period. These financial statements and notes should be read in conjunction with the financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2016 included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K. The December 31, 2016 balance sheet has been derived from audited financial statements at that date.

Principles of Consolidation

Our financial statements include the financial position and results of Corcept Therapeutics UK Limited, our wholly owned subsidiary. Corcept Therapeutics UK Limited was incorporated in the United Kingdom in March 2017, and to date, there have been no material financial transactions or balances related to this entity.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. Actual results could differ materially from those estimates.

We reevaluate our estimates and assumptions each quarter, including those related to revenue recognition, sales returns, inventory, allowances for doubtful accounts and accrued liabilities, including our bonus accrual, clinical trial accruals and stock-based compensation.

Fair Value Measurements

We value financial instruments using the assumptions we believe third-party market participants would adopt when valuing such instruments.  Our methodology uses a “fair value hierarchy” that gives the highest priority to quoted prices in active markets for identical instruments (called “Level 1 inputs”).  If no Level 1 inputs are available, we consider (i) quoted prices in non-active markets for identical instruments; (ii) active markets for similar instruments; (iii) inputs other than quoted prices for the instrument; and (iv) inputs that are not directly observable, but that are corroborated by observable data (“Level 2 inputs”).  In the absence of Level 2 inputs, we rely on unobservable inputs, such as our own data about the assumptions market participants would use in pricing the instrument (“Level 3 inputs”). Fair value is a market-based measurement and should therefore be based on the assumptions that third-party market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents and Marketable Securities

 

We consider all highly liquid investments purchased with original maturities of three months or less from the date of purchase to be cash equivalents. Cash equivalents are carried at fair value as measured using Level 1 inputs, which approximates cost. As of December 31, 2016, all of our funds were held in checking and money market fund accounts maintained at major U.S. financial institutions.

6


CORCEPT THERAPEUTICS INCORPORATED

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued

 

 

Effective January 2017, we invested a portion of our funds in marketable securities, primarily U.S. Treasury securities, commercial paper and corporate notes. We classify our marketable securities as available-for-sale securities and report them at fair value as “cash equivalents” or “marketable securities” on our balance sheet, with related unrealized gains and losses included in stockholders' equity. Realized gains and losses and permanent declines in value are included in “interest and other income” in our statement of comprehensive income.

Concentration of Credit Risk

We are subject to credit risk from our portfolio of cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities.  We limit our investments to U.S. Treasury obligations and high-grade corporate debt with less than a 36-month maturity.  We are not exposed to any significant concentration of credit from these investments.

Inventory

We value inventory at the lower of cost or net realizable value. We determine the cost of inventory using the specific identification method, which approximates a first-in, first-out basis. We write down inventory that has become obsolete or has a cost basis in excess of its expected net realizable value. Any expired inventory is disposed of and the related costs are recognized as cost of sales in the statement of comprehensive income in that period.

Inventory amounts that are not expected to be consumed within 12 months following the balance sheet date are classified as strategic inventory, a noncurrent asset.

We expense the manufacturing costs for product candidates incurred prior to regulatory approval as research and development expense as we incur them. We begin capitalizing costs related to the manufacture of a product candidate when we obtain regulatory approval to begin marketing that product.

Long-term Obligation

In August 2012, we entered into a Purchase and Sale Agreement (“Financing Agreement”) with Biopharma Secured Debt Fund II Sub, S.à r.l (“Biopharma”), a private limited liability company organized under the laws of Luxembourg. Under the terms of the Financing Agreement, we received $30.0 million from Biopharma, which we recorded as a long-term obligation. In return, we were obligated to make payments to Biopharma totaling $45.0 million. These payments equaled a percentage of (i) our net product sales, including sales from any product containing mifepristone or any of our proprietary selective cortisol modulators (“Covered Products”) and (ii) cash or cash equivalents received from any licensing transaction or co-promotion arrangement involving Covered Products (together, “Korlym Receipts”). Once we had paid Biopharma a total of $45.0 million, no more payments would be due and the obligation would be extinguished.

We recognized a portion of each quarterly payment under the Financing Agreement as interest expense, which we determined by calculating the interest rate to Biopharma implied by the stream of quarterly payments we expected to make. In each period, the amount shown on our balance sheet as the current portion was our estimate of the amount we expected to pay Biopharma in the following 12 months. We recorded the rest of the outstanding portion of the obligation, if any, as a long-term liability.

We made our final payment to Biopharma, completely satisfying our obligations under the Financing Agreement, in July 2017.

See Note 4, Long-Term Obligation, for additional information regarding this agreement.

Net Product Sales

We primarily sell Korlym directly to patients through a specialty pharmacy. We recognize revenue upon the delivery of Korlym if (i) there is persuasive evidence that an arrangement exists with the customer, (ii) collectability is reasonably assured and (iii) the sales price is fixed or determinable. In order to conclude that the price is fixed or determinable, we must be able to (i) calculate gross product revenue from a sale and (ii) reasonably estimate the associated net revenue.  Confirmation of coverage by the patient’s private or government insurance plan or by a third-party charity is a prerequisite for selling Korlym to a patient. We provide Korlym at no cost to patients without insurance who do not qualify for charitable support.

Through August 9, 2017 our exclusive specialty pharmacy was Dohmen Life Science Services (“Dohmen”).  On August 10, 2017, Optime Care, Inc. (“Optime”) became our exclusive specialty pharmacy.

7


CORCEPT THERAPEUTICS INCORPORATED

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued

 

We also sell Korlym to a specialty distributor (“SD”), which we recognize at the time the SD receives the Korlym. SD sales were less than two percent of our net revenue in the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017.

We donate cash to charities that help patients with financial need pay for the treatment of Cushing’s syndrome. We do not include payments we receive from these organizations in revenue.

We calculate gross product revenues based on the price we charge our customers. We estimate net product revenues by deducting from gross product revenues (a) estimated government rebates, (b) estimated costs of our patient co-pay assistance program, (c) discounts for prompt payment and (d) reserves for expected product returns.  We record estimates for these deductions at the time we recognize the gross revenue and update them as new information becomes available.

Rebates and Chargebacks:  Korlym is eligible for purchase by or qualifies for partial or full reimbursement from Medicaid and other government programs. We estimate any government rebate amounts by applying the discount rates applicable to each government-funded program against our sales to patients covered by such programs.

Allowances for Patient Assistance Program:  It is our policy that no patient be denied Korlym due to inability to pay. We provide financial assistance to eligible patients whose insurance policies require them to pay high deductibles and co-payments. We determine the amount of such assistance by applying our program guidelines to all eligible sales in the period.

Sales Returns: We deduct from each period’s gross revenue the amount of Korlym we estimate will be returned. When estimating returns, we analyze quantitative and qualitative information including, but not limited to, historical return rates, the amount of product in the distribution channel, the expiration date of the product, current and projected product demand, the introduction of competing products that may erode demand, and broad economic and industry-wide indicators. If we cannot reasonably estimate product returns with respect to a particular sale, we defer recognition of revenue from that sale until we can make a reasonable estimate.

Research and Development

Research and development expenses consist of direct expenses, such as the cost of discovery research, pre-clinical studies, and clinical trials relating to our portfolio of proprietary, selective cortisol modulators, manufacturing development, preparations for submissions to the FDA or other regulatory agencies and related overhead expenses. We expense nonrefundable payments and the cost of technologies and materials used in research and development as they are incurred.

We base our cost accruals for research, preclinical activities, and clinical trials on estimates of work completed under service agreements, milestones achieved, patient enrollment and past experience with similar contracts. Our estimates of work completed and associated cost accruals include our assessments of information from third-party contract research organizations and the overall status of clinical trial and other development and administrative activities

Segment Reporting

We determine our operating segments based on the way we organize our business, make decisions and assess performance. We have only one operating segment, which is the discovery, development and commercialization of pharmaceutical products.

Stock-Based Compensation

We account for stock-based compensation related to option grants under the fair value method, based on the value of the award at the grant date, using the Black-Scholes option valuation model. We recognize this expense over the requisite vesting period, net of estimated forfeitures. If actual forfeitures differ from our estimates, we adjust stock-based compensation expense accordingly.

We recognize the expense of options granted to non-employees based on the fair value based measurement of the option grants at the time of vesting.

Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

In August 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2014-15 (Subtopic 205-40), “Presentation of Financial Statements—Going Concern: Disclosure of Uncertainties about an Entity’s Ability to Continue as a Going Concern”.  We adopted this standard on January 1, 2017. Because we generated cash in 2015 and 2016 and expect to generate cash in 2017, adoption had no impact on our financial statements.

8


CORCEPT THERAPEUTICS INCORPORATED

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued

 

In July 2015, FASB issued ASU No. 2015-11, Simplifying the Measurement of Inventory, which requires certain inventory to be measured at the lower of cost or net realizable value. We adopted this standard on January 1, 2017 and it did not have a material impact on our financial statements.

In November 2015, FASB issued ASU No. 2015-17 "Balance Sheet Classification of Deferred Taxes," which requires that deferred tax liabilities and assets be classified as noncurrent.  We adopted this standard prospectively on January 1, 2017.  Because we have a valuation allowance equal to the full amount of our deferred tax assets, adoption did not have a material impact on our financial statements.

In March 2016, FASB issued ASU No. 2016-09, Compensation - Stock Compensation (Topic 718) “Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting,” which simplifies accounting for transactions involving shares awarded to employees.  It requires companies to record excess tax benefits and deficiencies as income tax expenses or benefits instead of including them in additional paid-in capital.  At the start of the year in which they implement the guidance, companies must adjust retained earnings by an amount equal to any previously unrecognized excess tax expenses or benefits. We adopted this guidance on January 1, 2017, at which time we recognized a $0.7 million deferred tax asset, which was offset by a corresponding increase to our deferred tax valuation allowance, resulting in no change to our balance sheet. We elected to report on a prospective basis cash flows related to excess tax benefits as an operating activity and to continue to recognize stock compensation expense net of estimated forfeitures. Adoption of this standard did not have a material impact on our financial statements.

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements Not Yet Adopted

In May 2014, FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers,” which changes the way companies recognize revenue. We plan to adopt this update using the modified retrospective approach, with the cumulative effect of adoption being recorded to our retained earnings on January 1, 2018.  We have completed our evaluation of the contracts governing our sales process and are reviewing our related disclosures, policies and controls, which we will change as required when we adopt the standard. Because our arrangements with customers contain variable consideration, we have focused our analysis on how the new standard will affect our estimate of transaction prices, which we believe the update will not change materially. We do not believe adoption will have a material impact on our financial statements.

In February 2016, FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, “Leases”, which requires the recognition of lease transactions with terms longer than 12 months on the balance sheet as “lease liabilities” and “right-of-use assets.” We plan to adopt this new standard prospectively on January 1, 2019.  We expect that adoption will increase our “lease liabilities” and “right-of-use assets” equally.

In August 2016, FASB issued ASU No. 2016-15, “Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments.” We plan to adopt this standard on January 1, 2018, and do not expect it to have a material impact on our financial statements.

In May 2017 FASB issued ASU No. 2017-09, Stock Compensation (Topic 718): “Scope of Modification Accounting,” which changes the accounting for modifications to the terms and conditions of share-based payment awards. We plan to adopt this standard on January 1, 2018 and do not expect it to have a material impact on our financial statements.

 

 

2. Composition of Certain Balance Sheet Items

Inventory

The composition of inventory was as follows:

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Raw materials

 

$

1,122

 

 

$

1,848

 

Work in progress

 

 

1,934

 

 

 

1,414

 

Finished goods

 

 

2,452

 

 

 

1,902

 

Total inventory

 

 

5,508

 

 

 

5,164

 

Less strategic inventory classified as non-current

 

 

(1,680

)

 

 

(2,835

)

Total inventory classified as current

 

$

3,828

 

 

$

2,329

 

 

9


CORCEPT THERAPEUTICS INCORPORATED

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued

 

In order to be prepared for potential demand for Korlym and because we rely on single-source manufacturers of both the active pharmaceutical ingredient (“API”) for Korlym and Korlym tablets, we have purchased significant inventory of these materials. We classify inventory we do not expect to use within 12 months of the balance sheet date as “Strategic Inventory,” a long-term asset. 

Other Accrued Liabilities

Other accrued liabilities consisted of the following:

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Government rebates

 

$

6,955

 

 

$

3,426

 

Accrued compensation

 

 

7,886

 

 

 

4,702

 

Commercialization costs

 

 

415

 

 

 

308

 

Legal fees

 

 

342

 

 

 

164

 

Professional fees

 

 

247

 

 

 

34

 

Other

 

 

407

 

 

 

319

 

Total other accrued liabilities

 

$

16,252

 

 

$

8,953

 

 

 

3. Available-for-Sale Securities and Fair Value Measurements

 

Our available-for-sale securities included:

 

 

 

Fair Value

 

Estimated Fair Value

 

 

 

Hierarchy

 

September 30,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

Level

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Corporate bonds

 

Level 2

 

$

18,394

 

 

$

 

Commercial paper

 

Level 2

 

 

23,331

 

 

 

 

U.S. treasury securities

 

Level 1

 

 

7,778

 

 

 

 

Money market funds

 

Level 1

 

 

10,330

 

 

 

31,605

 

Total Marketable securities

 

 

 

$

59,833

 

 

$

31,605

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Classified as:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash equivalents

 

 

 

$

14,229

 

 

$

31,605

 

Short-term marketable securities

 

 

 

 

44,096

 

 

 

 

Long-term marketable securities

 

 

 

 

1,508

 

 

 

 

Total marketable securities

 

 

 

$

59,833

 

 

$

31,605

 

 

The estimated fair value of marketable securities is based on quoted market prices for these or similar investments obtained from a commercial pricing service. The fair value of marketable securities classified within Level 2 is based upon inputs that may include benchmark yields, reported trades, broker/dealer quotes and issuer spreads. At September 30, 2017, our accumulated other comprehensive loss on our balance sheets consisted of net unrealized losses on available-for-sale investments of $14,000 and zero at September 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively.

 

As of September 30, 2017, all our marketable securities had original maturities of less than two years. The weighted-average maturity of our holdings was four months. None of our marketable securities changed from one fair value hierarchy to another during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017.

 

 

4. Long-Term Obligation

As discussed in Note 1, Basis of Presentation and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies, Long-term Obligation, under the Financing Agreement with Biopharma we made payments to Biopharma calculated as a percentage of our Korlym revenue. Biopharma’s right to receive payments expired once it received $45.0 million. To secure our obligation, we granted Biopharma a security interest in our patents, trademarks, trade names, domain names, copyrights, know-how, books, records and regulatory

10


CORCEPT THERAPEUTICS INCORPORATED

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued

 

approvals related to the Covered Products and any proceeds from them. Through September 30, 2017, we paid Biopharma $45.0 million.  We extinguished our obligations under the Financing Agreement in July 2017 with a final payment of $4.6 million.

We recorded interest expense of $37,000 and $456,000 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017, respectively, and $455,000 and $1.6 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2016, respectively and total accreted interest of $15.0 million for the period from August 2012 through September 30, 2017.  

The following table provides a summary of the payment obligations under the Financing Agreement as of September 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, utilizing the payment assumptions discussed above:

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Total repayment obligation

 

$

45,000

 

 

$

45,000

 

Less interest in future periods

 

 

 

 

 

(456

)

Less unamortized financing costs

 

 

 

 

 

(14

)

Less payments made

 

 

(45,000

)

 

 

(29,866

)

Less current portion

 

 

 

 

 

(14,664

)

Long-term obligation, net of current portion

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

We capitalized $140,000 of issuance costs related to the Financing Agreement, which we amortized over the term of the obligation, based on the assumptions discussed above. At September 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, the unamortized issuance costs were approximately zero and $14,000, respectively, and are included in “long-term obligation,” netted against debt on our balance sheets.

 

 

5. Commitments and Contingencies

Leases

In February 2016, we extended the lease for our office space through 2019 and added more space.  Effective May 1, 2016, we terminated our lease early and replaced it with a new one effective through March 31, 2019. On June 1, 2017, we amended that lease to add more space. Rent expense for the three months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016 was $279,000 and $246,000, respectively. Rent expense for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016 was $786,000 and $639,000, respectively. 

As of September 30, 2017, future minimum lease payments under non-cancelable operating leases were as follows:

 

 

 

Lease

 

 

 

Payments

 

2017 (remainder)

 

$

264

 

2018

 

 

1,256

 

2019

 

 

314

 

Thereafter

 

 

 

Total

 

$

1,834

 

 

 

Contingencies

 

In the ordinary course of business, we may be subject to legal claims and regulatory actions that could have a material adverse effect on our business or financial position. We assess our potential liability in such situations by analyzing potential outcomes, assuming various litigation, regulatory and settlement strategies.  If we determine a loss is probable and its amount can be reasonably estimated, we accrue an amount equal to the estimated loss.

 

On August 4, 2017, Corcept terminated its pharmaceutical services agreement with Dohmen, dated as of May 21, 2013, as amended July 22, 2013 and again on October 6, 2014 (the “Dohmen Agreement”) for material breach, pursuant to Section 5.2.2 of the Dohmen Agreement.  On August 7, 2017, Dohmen filed a complaint in the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware against Corcept alleging unlawful termination and breach of contract and requesting declaratory relief and damages (the “Dohmen Lawsuit”). On September 27, 2017, Dohmen amended its complaint to add a claim alleging trade secret misappropriation. In its amended complaint, Dohmen has requested specific performance and an injunction.

11


CORCEPT THERAPEUTICS INCORPORATED

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued

 

 

Dohmen has refused to transfer to Corcept the cash it collects from $12.9 million in Korlym® net receivables, despite its obligation to do so. Dohmen has instead placed the funds it collects in an escrow account at U.S. Bank (“Escrow Funds”), subject to release by order of the Court or mutual agreement of Dohmen and Corcept. As of September 30, 2017, the total amount of these receivables has been included in “Other assets” on our balance sheet.  

 

On August 29, 2017, Corcept sued Dohmen in the Superior Court of the State of Delaware alleging fraudulent inducement, negligent misrepresentation, breach of contract, breach of the covenant of good faith and fair dealing and conversion, and seeking monetary damages and declaratory relief (the “Corcept Lawsuit”). On September 20, 2017, Dohmen removed the Corcept Lawsuit to the United States District Court for the District of Delaware. The parties have agreed to stay proceedings with respect to the Corcept Lawsuit pending the resolution of the Dohmen Lawsuit in the Court of Chancery.

 

We cannot reasonably estimate our possible loss or range of possible losses, if any, in this litigation. Therefore, we have made no provision for a loss contingency.

 

 

6. Stock Option Plans

We have two stock option plans – the 2004 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2004 Plan”) and the 2012 Incentive Award Plan (the “2012 Plan”).  On February 10, 2017, our Board of Directors authorized a 4.5 million share increase in the shares available for grant under the 2012 Plan.

During the nine months ended September 30, 2017, we issued 1,372,000 shares of our common stock upon the exercise of stock options.

The following table summarizes our stock-based compensation:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

September 30,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Research and development

 

$

1,049

 

 

$

321

 

 

$

2,552

 

 

$

879

 

Selling, general and administrative

 

 

2,574

 

 

 

1,510

 

 

 

6,977

 

 

 

4,222

 

Total stock-based compensation

 

$

3,623

 

 

$

1,831

 

 

$

9,529

 

 

$

5,101

 

 

 

7. Net Income Per Share

Basic and diluted net income per share is computed by dividing the net income by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period. We used the treasury stock method to determine the number of dilutive shares of common stock resulting from the potential exercise of stock options. The statements of comprehensive income show the computation of net income per share for each period, including the number of weighted-average shares outstanding.

12


CORCEPT THERAPEUTICS INCORPORATED

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued

 

The following table shows the computation of net income per share for each period:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

September 30,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Numerator:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income

 

$

13,757

 

 

$

2,585

 

 

$

30,792

 

 

$

3,543

 

Denominator:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted-average shares used to compute basic net income per

   share

 

 

113,603

 

 

 

110,652

 

 

 

113,242

 

 

 

110,118

 

Dilutive effect of employee stock options

 

 

12,048

 

 

 

5,767

 

 

 

10,175

 

 

 

5,045

 

Weighted-average shares used to compute diluted net income

   per share

 

 

125,651

 

 

 

116,419

 

 

 

123,417

 

 

 

115,163

 

Net income per share attributable to common stockholders

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

$

0.12

 

 

$

0.02

 

 

$

0.27

 

 

$

0.03

 

Diluted

 

$

0.11

 

 

$

0.02

 

 

$

0.25

 

 

$

0.03

 

On a weighted-average basis, 1.1 million and 3.3 million stock options outstanding during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017, respectively, and 4.5 million and 4.6 million stock options outstanding during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2016, respectively, were excluded from the computation of diluted net income per share because including them would have reduced dilution.

The following table presents information on securities outstanding as of the end of each period that could potentially dilute the per share data:

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Stock options outstanding

 

 

20,729

 

 

 

18,570

 

 

 

8. Income taxes

 

Our quarterly income taxes reflect our estimated annual effective tax rate.  We recorded an income tax benefit of $48,000 and expense of $129,000 during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017, respectively, compared to no income tax benefit or expense for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2016.  Income tax benefit for the three months ended September 30, 2017 was primarily due to employee stock option activity. Income tax expense for nine months ended September 30, 2017 was primarily due to income tax in states where we did not have net operating loss carryforwards sufficient to offset our taxable income.  

 

We have recorded an allowance offsetting the entire value of our net deferred tax assets, consisting primarily of accumulated net operating losses, research and development tax credits, and capitalized research and development expenses. As a result, these assets do not appear on our balance sheet.  There is a reasonable possibility that within the next 12 months we will conclude that our future taxable income will be sufficient to allow us to utilize all or some of these assets.  In the period we reach that conclusion, we will add to that period’s net income an amount equal to the value of these assets, net of appropriate reserves, and increase our deferred tax assets by a corresponding amount.

 

 

13


 

ITEM 2.

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Forward-Looking Statements

This Management Discussion should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and accompanying notes in this report. Statements in this section are “forward-looking” within the meaning of the federal securities laws.  Forward-looking statements are subject to known and unknown risks and uncertainties that might cause actual results to differ materially from those the statements express or imply.  For a discussion of these risks and uncertainties, see “Forward-Looking Statements” included in “Risk Factors” in Part II, Item 1A of this Form 10-Q and the “Overview” and “Liquidity and Capital Resources” sections of this Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

Overview

We are engaged in the discovery, development and commercialization of drugs that treat severe metabolic, oncologic and psychiatric disorders by modulating the effects of the hormone cortisol. Elevated levels and abnormal release patterns of cortisol are implicated in a broad range of diseases. Since our founding in 1998, we have developed mifepristone, a compound that modulates the effects of cortisol by acting as a competitive antagonist at the glucocorticoid receptor (“GR”). We have discovered three structurally distinct series of proprietary, selective cortisol modulators, all of which share mifepristone’s affinity for GR but, unlike mifepristone, do not bind to the progesterone receptor and so do not cause effects associated with antagonism of activity at the progesterone receptor. Pre-clinical and clinical development of compounds from these series are in progress.

In 2012, the United States Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) approved Korlym® (mifepristone) 300 mg tablets as a once-daily oral medication for the treatment of hyperglycemia secondary to hypercortisolism in adult patients with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome who have type 2 diabetes mellitus or glucose intolerance and have failed surgery or are not candidates for surgery.  We are conducting two clinical trials of our proprietary selective cortisol modulator, relacorilant (the recently-approved generic name for the compound CORT125134). We are enrolling patients in a Phase 2 trial of relacorilant to treat Cushing’s syndrome. We are also conducting a Phase 1/2 trial of relacorilant combined with nab-paclitaxel (Celgene Corporation’s drug, Abraxane®) as a treatment for a variety of solid-tumor cancers.

We have begun clinical development of two of our other selective cortisol modulators, CORT125281 and CORT118335.  We plan to develop CORT125281 in combination with the androgen receptor antagonist enzalutamide (Pfizer Inc.’s drug, Xtandi®) to treat patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and CORT118335 to treat patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and antipsychotic-induced weight gain.

Cushing’s Syndrome

Background.  Cushing’s syndrome is caused by hypercortisolism – the prolonged exposure of the body’s tissues to high levels of the stress hormone cortisol. Cushing’s syndrome is relatively uncommon and most often affects adults aged 20 to 50. An estimated 10 to 15 of every one million people are newly diagnosed with this syndrome each year, resulting in approximately 3,000 new patients and about 20,000 patients with Cushing’s syndrome in the United States, approximately half of whom are cured by surgery.

Korlym to Treat Patients with Cushing’s Syndrome. We have received Orphan Drug designation from the FDA for Korlym for the treatment of patients with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome. Orphan Drugs receive seven years of marketing exclusivity for the approved indication from the date of drug approval, as well as tax credits for clinical trial costs, marketing application filing fee waivers and assistance from the FDA in the drug development process.

We first made Korlym available to patients commercially in April 2012. We sell Korlym in the United States, using experienced sales representatives, who target the endocrinologists caring for patients with Cushing’s syndrome. We also reach patients directly through web-based initiatives and interactions with patient groups. Because people who suffer from Cushing’s syndrome can remain undiagnosed or be inadequately treated, we have developed and continue to refine and expand programs to educate physicians and patients about diagnosis of this syndrome and the role cortisol modulators can play in treating the disease. In addition, we have a field-based force of medical science liaisons.

We use a specialty pharmacy and a specialty distributor to distribute Korlym and provide logistical support. We donate money to independent charitable foundations. These organizations, along with our own programs, help us ensure that no patient with Cushing’s syndrome is denied access to Korlym for financial reasons.

Relacorilant (CORT125134) to Treat Patients with Cushing’s Syndrome.  We are enrolling patients in a Phase 2 trial of our proprietary, selective cortisol modulator, relacorilant, to treat patients with Cushing’s syndrome. Relacorilant shares Korlym’s affinity for GR. Data from relacorilant’s Phase 1 trial showed that it can prevent the effects of the steroid prednisone, a commonly-used synthetic GR agonist, on serum osteocalcin, white blood cell counts, glucose metabolism and expression of the FKBP5 gene – a

14


 

marker of GR activation. Modulating the effect of prednisone is important because it is a strong surrogate for modulation of the natural hormone cortisol – the essential quality of an effective treatment for patients with Cushing’s syndrome. Unlike Korlym, relacorilant has no affinity for the progesterone receptor.

We have developed a CLIA-validated assay to measure FKBP5 gene expression that we believe will enable physicians to more easily identify new patients with hypercortisolism and better treat patients already in their care.

Oncology

Many tumor types express GR and are potential targets for cortisol modulation therapy, among them triple-negative breast, ovarian, castration-resistant prostate, cervical, and pancreatic cancers, as well as sarcoma and melanoma.

Relacorilant to Treat Patients with Solid-Tumors.  We are conducting a Phase 1/2 trial of Abraxane in combination with relacorilant to treat solid-tumors. Once we identify a recommended dose, we will open expansion cohorts to test the combination’s efficacy in a variety of tumor types. We plan to open the first cohort in the fourth quarter of 2017, enrolling patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer.   We continue to explore opening cohorts in patients with other solid-tumors, including metastatic triple-negative breast and ovarian cancer.

We may also evaluate relacorilant in combination with other cancer therapies, including immunotherapy, to treat solid tumors.

Korlym to Treat Patients with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer (“TNBC”).  In December 2016, we announced the results of our Phase 1/2 trial of Korlym in combination with eribulin (Eisai Inc.’s drug, Halaven®) to treat patients with metastatic TNBC.  The trial studied 21 patients with GR-positive tumors, one with GR-negative tumors and one with tumors whose GR status was not known. As determined using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (“RECIST”), efficacy results were as follows: four patients exhibited a partial response, defined as a 30 percent or greater reduction in tumor size; eight had stable disease; and 11 had progressive disease. Six patients achieved progression-free survival (“PFS”) longer than the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval for PFS (15 weeks) in patients receiving Halaven® monotherapy in a comparable population (Aogi et al., Annals of Oncology 23: 1441-1448, 2012). Median PFS in the trial was 11.1 weeks – compared to 7.2 weeks in the Halaven monotherapy study reported by Aogi.

We believe the addition of Korlym to chemotherapy warrants further study. University of Chicago investigators are leading a 64-patient double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-center, Phase 2 trial of Korlym combined with Abraxane to treat patients with TNBC. Celgene is funding the trial.  We are providing Korlym.

Cortisol Modulators to Treat Patients with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (“CRPC”).  Because androgens stimulate prostate tumor growth, androgen-deprivation is a common treatment for metastatic prostate cancer.  Tumors eventually escape androgen-deprivation therapy, including antagonism of the androgen receptor, through the proliferation of cells for which cortisol’s stimulation of GR is the primary growth factor.  Combining a cortisol modulator with an androgen modulator such as Xtandi may block this escape route.

University of Chicago investigators are leading an 84-patient, controlled, multicenter Phase 2 study of Korlym combined with Xtandi to treat patients with metastatic CRPC.  The Department of Defense and the Prostate Cancer Foundation are funding the trial. Pfizer is providing Xtandi. We are providing Korlym.  

We have begun a Phase 1 trial in healthy subjects of our proprietary, selective cortisol modulator CORT125281.  In the fourth quarter of this year, we will begin a dose-ranging trial of CORT125281 combined with Xtandi to treat patients with metastatic CRPC.

We have exclusively licensed patents from the University of Chicago covering the use of cortisol modulators combined with anticancer agents to treat TNBC and with androgen deprivation agents to treat CRPC.

Our Other Selective Cortisol Modulators

Relacorilant, CORT125281 and CORT118335 are the leading compounds in our portfolio of proprietary selective cortisol modulators, which consists of more than 500 compounds in three structurally distinct families.  All of these compounds potently block GR but not the progesterone, estrogen or androgen receptors. Many of these compounds have demonstrated positive results in animal or in vitro models of cortisol modulation. We are advancing the most promising of them towards the clinic.  

The United States Patent & Trademark Office has issued us nine composition of matter patents covering our selective cortisol modulators and 21 method of use patents covering the use of cortisol modulators to treat a wide range of serious disorders.  We have exclusively licensed three U.S. method of use patents from Stanford University and five method of use patents from the University of Chicago. We also own an extensive portfolio of patents in countries around the world.  We have applied, and will continue to apply, for U.S. and foreign patents covering the composition and method of use of our product candidates.   

15


 

Results of Operations

Net Product Revenue – Net product revenue is gross product revenue from sales to our customers less deductions for estimated government rebates.

Net product revenue was $42.8 million and $105.9 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017, respectively, as compared to $21.7 million and $57.5 million in the corresponding periods in 2016. These increases were driven by the increase in our sales volume as well as a price increase in January 2017. This price increase represented approximately 7.2 percent and 7.7 percent of the increases in revenue for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017, respectively.

Cost of sales – Cost of sales includes the cost of API, tableting, packaging, personnel, overhead, stability testing and distribution.

Cost of sales was $976,000 and $2.4 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017, respectively, compared to $668,000 and $1.5 million for the corresponding periods in 2016. For each of the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017, cost of sales was 2.3 percent of net product revenue, compared to 3.1 percent and 2.6 percent in the corresponding periods of 2016. Cost of sales as a percentage of revenue declined in both periods due to reduced manufacturing costs and increases in the price of Korlym.  The dollar value of our cost of sales increased in both periods due to greater sales volumes.

Research and development expenses – Research and development expenses include the cost of (1) retaining and compensating development personnel, (2) clinical trials, (3) discovery research and pre-clinical studies, (4) drug product for use in clinical trials and to support regulatory submissions, (5) the development of drug formulations and manufacturing processes and (6) regulatory activities.

Research and development expenses increased 65.8 percent to $11.7 million for the three months ended September 30, 2017 compared to $7.1 million for the three months ended September 30, 2016. Research and development expenses increased 54.1 percent to $26.7 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 from $17.4 million for the comparable period in 2016. These increases were due primarily to the advancement of relacorilant and the hiring of additional clinical development employees.

Below is a summary of our research and development expenses by major project:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

September 30,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Project

 

(in thousands)

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Development programs:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oncology

 

$

1,904

 

 

$

1,127

 

 

$

4,483

 

 

$

3,625

 

Cushing's syndrome

 

 

4,066

 

 

 

891

 

 

 

7,450

 

 

 

2,496

 

Pre-clinical selective cortisol modulators

 

 

3,278

 

 

 

3,904

 

 

 

8,678

 

 

 

7,487

 

Unallocated activities, including pre-clinical, manufacturing and

   regulatory activities

 

 

1,396

 

 

 

811

 

 

 

3,582

 

 

 

2,873

 

Stock-based compensation

 

 

1,049

 

 

 

321

 

 

 

2,552

 

 

 

879

 

Total research and development expense

 

$

11,693

 

 

$

7,054

 

 

$

26,745

 

 

$

17,360

 

 

Research and development expenses in 2017 and thereafter will depend on the outcomes of our pre-clinical and clinical trials and our development plans. We expect research and development spending for the rest of 2017 to be higher than it was in the corresponding period of 2016 as our research and development programs advance and we begin new ones.

Many factors affect the cost and timing of pre-clinical and clinical programs, including inconclusive results, slow patient enrollment, adverse side effects, unforeseen difficulties in the formulation or manufacture of study drugs and their real or perceived lack of efficacy or safety. Clinical development is also subject to extensive government regulation. These factors make it difficult to predict the timing and cost of development activities.

Selling, general and administrative expenses – Selling, general and administrative expenses include (1) compensation of employees, consultants and contractors engaged in commercial and administrative activities, (2) the cost of vendors that support commercial activities and (3) legal and accounting fees.

Selling, general and administrative expenses for the three months ended September 30, 2017 increased 50.7 percent, to $16.5 million, from $10.9 million for the comparable period of 2016. Selling, general and administrative expenses for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 increased 36.3 percent, to $45.6 million, from $33.5 million for the comparable period in 2016. These increases were primarily due to the growth of our sales organization and increased professional services fees.

16


 

We expect our selling, general and administrative expenses to be higher in the remainder of 2017 than in the corresponding period of 2016 due to the increased scope of our commercial activities. Selling, general and administrative activities for the rest of 2017 and future years will depend on the cost of our commercial and clinical development efforts. 

Interest and other income (expense) – Interest and other income (expense) for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017 consisted of income of $86,000 and expense of $237,000, respectively, compared to expense of $487,000 and $1.6 million for the corresponding periods in 2016. In the three months ended September 30, 2017, interest and other income consisted of interest income from marketable securities. In all other periods, these amounts primarily consisted of interest expense related to the Biopharma Financing Agreement. There will be no interest expense for the remainder of 2017 due to the retirement of the Financing Agreement in July 2017.

 

Income tax benefit (expense) Income tax benefit (expense) for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017 was $48,000 and ($129,000), respectively.  Income tax benefit for the three months ended September 30, 2017 was primarily due to employee stock option activity.  Income tax expense for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 was for states where we did not have net operating loss carryforwards sufficient to offset our taxable income. We had no income tax benefit (expense) for the corresponding period in 2016.

Non-GAAP Financial Measures

We prepare our financial statements and footnotes in accordance with GAAP. We supplement these with non-GAAP measures of net income and net income per share that exclude non-cash expenses related to stock-based compensation expense and the accretion of interest expense under the Financing Agreement. We use these non-GAAP measures to manage our business and believe that they may help investors better evaluate our past financial performance and potential future results. Non-GAAP measures should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for comparable GAAP accounting and investors should read them in conjunction with our financial statements and notes thereto prepared in accordance with GAAP. The non-GAAP measures of net income and net income per share we use may be different from, and not directly comparable to, similarly titled measures used by other companies.

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

September 30,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

 

(in thousands, except for per share data)

 

GAAP net income

 

$

13,757

 

 

$

2,585

 

 

$

30,792

 

 

$

3,543

 

Non-cash expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock-based compensation

 

 

3,623

 

 

 

1,831

 

 

 

9,529

 

 

 

5,101

 

Accretion of interest expense related to long-term obligation

 

 

37

 

 

 

455

 

 

 

456

 

 

 

1,562

 

Non-GAAP net income, as adjusted for non-cash expenses

 

$

17,417

 

 

$

4,871

 

 

$

40,777

 

 

$

10,206

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic net income per share

 

$

0.12

 

 

$

0.02

 

 

$

0.27

 

 

$

0.03

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diluted net income per share

 

$

0.11

 

 

$

0.02

 

 

$

0.25

 

 

$

0.03

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-GAAP basic net income per share, as

   adjusted for non-cash expenses

 

$

0.15

 

 

$

0.04

 

 

$

0.36

 

 

$

0.09

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-GAAP diluted net income per share, as

   adjusted for non-cash expenses

 

$

0.14

 

 

$

0.04

 

 

$

0.33

 

 

$

0.09

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted-average shares outstanding shares used in computing

   net income per share

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

 

113,603

 

 

 

110,652

 

 

 

113,242

 

 

 

110,118

 

Diluted

 

 

125,651

 

 

 

116,419

 

 

 

123,417

 

 

 

115,163

 

 

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Until 2016, we incurred net operating losses every year. At September 30, 2017, we had an accumulated deficit of $291.5 million. Since 2012, we have relied on revenues from the sale of Korlym and proceeds from the sale of common stock and from the Financing Agreement to fund our operations.

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Based on our current plans, which include fully funding our Cushing’s syndrome commercial operations, conducting Phase 2 and Phase 3 trials of relacorilant in both Cushing’s syndrome and solid tumors and the Phase 1 and Phase 2 trials of CORT125281 and CORT118335, we expect to fund our operations without needing to raise additional funds – although we may choose to raise additional funds to finance our strategic priorities.  If we were to raise funds, equity financing may be dilutive to stockholders. Debt financing, if available, may involve restrictive covenants.  Funds raised through collaborations with other companies, may require us to enter into unfavorable arrangements or may require us to relinquish rights to our product candidates.

At September 30, 2017, we had cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities of $76.7 million, consisting of cash and cash equivalents of $31.1 million and marketable securities of $45.6 million, compared to $51.5 million of cash and cash equivalents at December 31, 2016. Net cash provided by operating activities for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 increased to $36.1 million, compared to $13.8 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2016 due to higher sales volumes. Net cash used in investing activities for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 was $46.0 million, primarily due to purchases of marketable securities, while net cash used in investing activities for the nine months ended September 30, 2016 was $119,000. Net cash provided by stock option exercises was $4.6 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2017, compared to $4.1 million for the comparable period of 2016. We made payments under the Financing Agreement of $15.1 million and $10.3 million during the nine months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively.

No further payments under the Financing Agreement are due.  

The cash in our bank accounts and our marketable securities could be affected if the financial institution holding them were to fail or be subject to adverse conditions in the financial markets. We have never experienced a loss or lack of access to cash.

Contractual Obligations and Commercial Commitments

Our contractual payment obligations and purchase commitments as of December 31, 2016 are disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016, and have not changed materially during the nine months ended September 30, 2017.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

None.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

We have prepared our financial statements in accordance with GAAP, which requires us to make estimates regarding our assets, liabilities and expenses. We base our estimates on assumptions we believe to be reasonable. Actual results may differ if our assumptions are incorrect or the conditions in which we do business change in ways we did not anticipate. Our critical accounting policies and estimates are discussed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016. During nine months ended September 30, 2017, we did not make any significant changes to our critical accounting policies and estimates.

 

 

ITEM 3.

QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

Our market risks as of September 30, 2017 are disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016.  They have not changed materially during the nine months ended September 30, 2017.

 

 

ITEM 4.

CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

Evaluation of disclosure controls and procedures. Our management, under the supervision and with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, evaluated our disclosure controls and procedures, as defined under Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) of the Exchange Act as of September 30, 2017. Based on that evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures provide a reasonable level of assurance that the information required to be disclosed in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q was (i) recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and (ii) communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, so as to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Our disclosure controls and procedures are designed to provide reasonable, not absolute, assurance that our disclosures are accurate and timely.

Changes in internal control over financial reporting.  In connection with our change in specialty pharmacy, we updated our internal controls related to sales, inventory and accounts receivable. Other than the changes to our controls in connection with our specialty pharmacy transition, our management, including our Chief Financial Officer, has evaluated the changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the quarter ended September 30, 2017, and concluded that there was no change during the quarter that materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

 

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PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

ITEM 1.

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

Information pertaining to legal proceedings can be found in “Part I. Financial Information—Item 1. Financial Statements—Notes to Condensed Financial Statements—Note 5. Commitments and Contingencies” and is incorporated by reference herein.

We are involved from time to time in various legal proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business. Although the outcome of any pending matters, and the amount, if any, of our ultimate liability and any other forms of remedies with respect to these matters, cannot be determined or predicted with certainty, we do not believe that the ultimate outcome of these matters will have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position or results of operations.

ITEM 1A.

RISK FACTORS

Investing in our common stock involves significant risks. Before investing, carefully consider the risks described below and the other information in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, including our financial statements and related notes. The risks and uncertainties described below are the ones we believe may materially affect us.  There may be others of which we are unaware, but which become important and materially harm our business or financial condition and cause the price of our stock to decline, in which case you could lose part or all of your investment.

Risks Related to the Commercialization of Korlym®

Failure to generate sufficient revenue from the sale of Korlym would harm our financial results and would likely cause our stock price to decline.

For the foreseeable future, our ability to generate revenue and fund our commercial operations and development programs will be solely dependent on the sale of Korlym. Physicians will prescribe Korlym only if they determine that it is preferable to other treatments, even if those products are not approved for Cushing’s syndrome. Because Cushing’s syndrome is rare, most physicians are inexperienced in the care of patients with the illness and it may be difficult to persuade them to prescribe Korlym, even with clinical trial results that show it is a compelling treatment.

Many factors could hamper our efforts to generate Korlym revenue, including: 

 

the preference of some physicians for familiar, long-standing off-label treatments for Cushing’s syndrome or for Novartis’ drug, Signifor, for the treatment of Cushing’s disease, a subset of patients with Cushing’s syndrome;

 

competition from non-medical treatment methods, such as surgery and radiation therapy;

 

negative publicity and political concerns about Korlym, RU-486, Mifeprex® or mifepristone;

 

the availability of private and government insurance coverage; and

 

rapid technological change that makes Korlym obsolete.

Failure to generate sufficient Korlym revenue would prevent us from fully funding our planned commercial and clinical activities and would likely cause our stock price to decline.

The Orphan Drug designation for Korlym may not prevent competition from companies that develop other compounds for the treatment of Cushing’s syndrome. These companies may have significantly more resources than we do. Competition from them could limit our revenue from the sale of Korlym for the treatment of Cushing’s syndrome or other indications.  

Although we have received Orphan Drug designation in the United States, the regulatory authorities may still approve other drugs for the treatment of patients with Cushing’s syndrome.  When the orphan drug exclusivity period ends, we may be subject to competition from manufacturers offering a generic form of Korlym at a lower price, in which case our business could be harmed.

In 2012, Novartis received approval in both the United States and the European Union (“EU”) to market its somatostatin analogue Signifor for adult patients with Cushing’s disease (a subset of Cushing’s syndrome that accounts for approximately 70 percent of all patients with Cushing’s syndrome) for whom pituitary surgery is not an option or has not been curative. In addition, Novartis has received Orphan Drug designation in the United States for the use of the experimental compound osilodrostat to treat Cushing’s disease and in the EU to treat Cushing’s syndrome. Novartis has begun a Phase 2 clinical trial in Japan investigating the use of this compound to treat Cushing’s syndrome due to causes other than Cushing’s disease and a Phase 3 clinical trial in the EU investigating its use to treat Cushing’s disease. Novartis has substantially more resources and experience than we do and may provide significant competition.

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Strongbridge Biopharma plc (“Strongbridge”) has received Orphan Drug designation in the United States and the EU for the use of levoketoconazole to treat Cushing’s syndrome. Strongbridge has begun two Phase 3 clinical trials in Europe and the United States for this indication. Laboratoire HRA Pharma (“HRA”) received Orphan Drug designation in the United States and the EU for the use of mifepristone to treat patients with ectopic tumors producing ACTH, a subtype of Cushing’s syndrome representing ten percent of those diagnosed with the disease. HRA began and terminated a Phase 2 clinical trial in Europe and the United States for this indication.  Exelgyn Laboratories, which operates as a subsidiary of Medi Challenge (Pty) Ltd., received Orphan Drug designation for mifepristone to treat Cushing’s syndrome in the EU, but has stated that it has not yet conducted any clinical trials.

If we cannot continue to obtain acceptable prices or adequate insurance coverage and reimbursement for Korlym, we will be unable to generate significant revenues.

The commercial success of Korlym depends on the availability of insurance coverage and reimbursement.  Government payors, including Medicare, Medicaid and the Veterans Administration, as well as private insurers and health maintenance organizations, are increasingly attempting to contain healthcare costs by limiting reimbursement for medicines. If government or private payors cease to provide adequate and timely coverage and reimbursement for Korlym, physicians may not prescribe the medication or patients may not purchase it, if it is prescribed. In addition, delays in coverage for individual patients may reduce our revenues.

In some foreign markets, drug prices and the profitability of prescription medications are subject to government control. In the United States, we expect that there will continue to be federal and state proposals for similar controls. Also, the trends toward managed health care in the United States and recent laws and legislation intended to reduce the cost of government insurance programs could significantly influence the purchase of health care services and products and may result in lower prices for Korlym.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“PPACA”), which was passed in 2010, substantially changed the way health care is financed by both governmental and private insurers and significantly impacts the U.S. pharmaceutical industry. The PPACA, among other things, expanded Medicaid program eligibility and access to commercial health insurance coverage, increased the minimum Medicaid rebates owed by manufacturers under the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program and extended the rebate program to individuals enrolled in Medicaid managed care organizations, established annual fees and taxes on manufacturers of certain branded prescription drugs, and promoted a new Medicare Part D coverage gap discount program. The PPACA also appropriated additional funding to comparative clinical effectiveness research, although it remains unclear how the research will impact current Medicare coverage and reimbursement or how new information will influence other third-party payor policies.

Since its enactment, there have been judicial and Congressional challenges to certain aspects of the PPACA, and we expect there will be additional challenges and amendments to the PPACA in the future, particularly in light of the new presidential administration and U.S. Congress. For example, on January 20, 2017, President Trump signed an Executive Order directing federal agencies with authorities and responsibilities under the PPACA to waive, defer, grant exemptions from, or delay the implementation of any provision of the PPACA that would impose a fiscal or regulatory burden on states, individuals, healthcare providers, health insurers, or manufacturers of pharmaceuticals or medical devices. On October 12, 2017, President Trump signed another Executive Order directing federal agencies to expand access to alternative health plans and health reimbursement arrangements, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced that it would immediately cease making Cost-Sharing Reduction (“CSR”) payments to issuers of qualified health plans. At this time, the full effect that the PPACA, the Executive Orders, the halting of CSR payments and any subsequent legislation would have on our business remains unclear. Any new limitations on, changes to, or uncertainty with respect to the ability of individuals to enroll in governmental reimbursement programs or other third-party payor insurance plans could impact demand for Korlym, which in turn could affect our ability to successfully develop and commercialize our products.

Other legislative and regulatory changes have been proposed and adopted in the United States since the PPACA was enacted. These changes included an aggregate reduction in Medicare payments to providers of up to 2 percent per fiscal year, which went into effect on April 1, 2013 and will remain in effect through 2025 unless additional Congressional action is taken. On January 2, 2013, President Obama signed into law the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012, which further reduced Medicare payments to several providers, including hospitals, imaging centers and cancer treatment centers, and increased the statute of limitations period for the government to recover overpayments to providers from three to five years. On February 1, 2016, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, or CMS, published a final rule that revised certain requirements involved in our calculation of prices we report in connection with our participation in government reimbursement programs so that Korlym will be eligible for purchase by, or qualify for partial or full reimbursement from, Medicaid and other government programs. The extent to which this rule may alter our reported prices and estimated rebates and chargebacks under government programs remains unclear.

These new laws and the regulations and policies implementing them, as well as other healthcare reform measures that may be adopted in the future, could materially reduce our ability to successfully develop and commercialize Korlym and our product candidates.

20


 

Public perception of mifepristone may limit our ability to sell Korlym.

The active ingredient in Korlym, mifepristone, is approved by the FDA in another drug for the termination of early pregnancy. As a result, mifepristone has been and continues to be the subject of considerable ethical and political debate in the United States and elsewhere. Public perception of mifepristone may limit our ability to engage alternative manufacturers and may limit the commercial acceptance of Korlym by patients and physicians. Even though we have taken measures to minimize the likelihood of the prescribing of Korlym to a pregnant woman, physicians may choose not to prescribe Korlym to a woman simply to avoid the risk of unintentionally terminating a pregnancy.   

We have no manufacturing or pharmacy capabilities and depend on third-party vendors to manufacture Korlym and dispense it to patients. We also depend on third-party suppliers to manufacture the API and capsules for relacorilant, CORT118335, CORT125281 and our other product candidates. If these suppliers are unable or unwilling to continue to manufacture our drug products or dispense Korlym for us and we cannot transfer our business to qualified replacement vendors in a timely manner or if our vendors fail to comply with FDA or other applicable regulations or their agreements with us or otherwise fail to meet our requirements, our business will be harmed.

PCAS, a third-party manufacturer, supplies all of the API in Korlym. Another third-party manufacturer, Alcami, produces and bottles all of our Korlym tablets.  We have entered into agreements with these vendors that automatically renew. Optime Care, Inc., a specialty pharmacy, dispenses all of the Korlym we sell directly to patients. Our agreement with this vendor has a five-year term and renews upon the written consent of both parties. We rely on other third-parties to manufacture the API and capsules of our selective cortisol modulators, including relacorilant, CORT118335 and CORT125281. If any of these vendors is unable or unwilling to meet our requirements, we may not be able to manufacture or dispense our product in a timely manner. Our arrangements with these manufacturers are terminable by them, subject to notice provisions.  Any third-party manufacturer or specialty pharmacy we engage will be subject to regulation by the FDA and other governmental authorities. We do not control these vendors’ processes or operations and cannot assure that they will meet applicable regulatory requirements or their contractual obligations to us.  Identifying replacements for these vendors and transitioning our business to them would be complex and expensive.  Failure to do so in a timely manner would harm our business.

The facilities used by our vendors to manufacture and package our product and product candidates must be approved by the FDA. We do not control the manufacturing activities of, and are completely dependent on, our contract manufacturing partners for compliance with the regulatory requirements known as current good manufacturing practices (“cGMPs”). If our contract manufacturers cannot successfully manufacture material that conforms to our specifications and the strict requirements of the FDA or others, they will not be able to maintain regulatory approval for their manufacturing facilities. In addition, we have no control over the ability of our contract manufacturers to maintain adequate quality control, quality assurance and qualified personnel. If the FDA or a comparable foreign regulatory authority does not approve these facilities for the manufacture of our products or if it withdraws its approval, we may need to find alternative manufacturing facilities, which would significantly hamper our ability to develop, obtain regulatory approval for or market our products. In addition, sanctions could be imposed on us, including fines, injunctions, civil penalties, failure of regulators to approve our product candidates, delays, suspension or withdrawal of approvals, seizures or recalls of products, operating restrictions and criminal prosecutions, any of which could harm our business. If our suppliers fail to manufacture Korlym or our product candidates on a timely basis in the quantities that we require or fail to maintain manufacturing capabilities that meet regulatory standards, we may exhaust our Korlym inventory and not be able to generate revenue or our clinical development programs may be delayed.

We may not have adequate insurance to cover our exposure to product liability claims.

We may be subject to product liability or other claims based on allegations that Korlym or one of our product candidates has caused adverse effects. Such a claim may damage our reputation by raising questions about Korlym or any of our product candidates’ safety and could prevent or interfere with product commercialization. In some cases, less common adverse effects of a pharmaceutical product are not known until long after the FDA approves the product for marketing. Because the active ingredient in Korlym is used to terminate pregnancy, clinicians using the medicine in our clinical trials and physicians prescribing the medicine to women must take strict precautions to ensure that the medicine is not administered to pregnant women. Failure to observe these precautions could result in significant product liability claims.

We have product liability insurance with coverage limits we believe to be appropriate for a company marketing a single pharmaceutical product and developing others. However, this insurance may become prohibitively expensive or may not fully cover our potential liabilities. Our inability to obtain adequate insurance coverage at an acceptable cost could prevent or inhibit the commercialization of Korlym or our product candidates, or result in meaningful underinsured or uninsured liability. Defending a lawsuit could be costly and significantly divert management’s attention from conducting our business.

21


 

We are subject to ongoing and continued regulatory review. If we are unable to maintain regulatory approval of Korlym for the treatment of patients with Cushing’s syndrome or if we fail to comply with regulatory requirements, we will be unable to generate revenue or may be subject to penalties and our business would be harmed.

The FDA’s approval of Korlym was subject to limitations on the uses for which the product may be marketed. If we violate any of the FDA’s restrictions, the FDA could withdraw its approval. 

We are subject to ongoing obligations and continued regulatory review by the FDA and other regulatory authorities in the United States and other countries with respect to the research, testing, manufacturing, labeling, distribution, adverse event reporting, storage, selling, advertising, promotion, recordkeeping and marketing of products. These requirements include submissions of safety information, annual updates on manufacturing activities and continued compliance with cGMPs, as well as current good laboratory practices (“cGLPs”) and current good clinical practices (“cGCPs”) for any clinical trials that we conduct post-approval. cGLPs, cGCPs and cGMPs are regulations promulgated by the FDA and enforced through periodic inspections of us and the laboratories, manufactures, and clinical sites we use.  (Foreign regulatory authorities have comparable requirements and enforcement mechanisms.)  Discovery of previously unknown problems with a product, including adverse events of unanticipated severity or frequency or with our third-party manufacturers or manufacturing processes, or failure to comply with FDA and other applicable foreign and U.S. regulatory requirements may result in substantial civil and criminal penalties, injunctions, holds on clinical trials, product seizure or detention, refusal to permit the import or export of products, restrictions on product marketing, withdrawal of the product from the market, voluntary or mandatory product recalls, total or partial suspension of production, refusal to approve pending NDAs or supplemental NDAs, and suspension or revocation of product approvals.

The FDA’s policies may change or additional governmental regulations may be enacted that prevent, limit or delay regulatory approval of our product candidates. We cannot predict the likelihood, nature or extent of future government regulations.

For example, on January 30, 2017, President Trump issued an Executive Order directing all executive agencies, including the FDA, that, for each notice of proposed rulemaking or final regulation to be issued in fiscal year 2017, the agency shall identify at least two existing regulations to be repealed, unless prohibited by law. These requirements are referred to as the “two-for-one” provisions. This Executive Order includes a budget neutrality provision that requires the total incremental cost of all new regulations in the 2017 fiscal year, including repealed regulations, to be no greater than zero, except in limited circumstances. For fiscal years 2018 and beyond, the Executive Order requires agencies to identify regulations to offset any incremental cost of a new regulation. In interim guidance issued by the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs within OMB on February 2, 2017, the administration indicates that the “two-for-one” provisions may apply not only to agency regulations, but also to significant agency guidance documents. In addition, on February 24, 2017, President Trump issued an executive order directing each affected agency to designate an agency official as a “Regulatory Reform Officer” and establish a “Regulatory Reform Task Force” to implement the two-for-one provisions and other previously issued executive orders relating to the review of federal regulations; however, it is difficult to predict how these requirements will be implemented, and the extent to which they will impact the FDA’s ability to exercise its regulatory authority. On September 8, 2017, the FDA published notices in the Federal Register soliciting broad public comment to identify regulations that could be modified in c