10-K 1 gden-10k_20191231.htm 10-K gden-10k_20191231.htm

 

 

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

Form 10-K

 

(Mark One)

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019

or

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                 to                

Commission File No. 000-24993

 

Golden Entertainment, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

Minnesota

 

41-1913991

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

6595 S Jones Boulevard - Las Vegas, Nevada 89118

(Address of principal executive offices)

(702) 893-7777

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code) 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of Each Class

 

Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered

Common Stock, $0.01 par value

 

The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes       No  

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

 

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer

 

Smaller reporting company

Emerging growth Company

 

 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ☐    No  

Based upon the last sale price of the registrant’s common stock, $0.01 par value, as reported on the Nasdaq Global Market on June 28, 2019 (the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second quarter), the aggregate market value of the common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of such date was $258,957,566. For purposes of these computations only, all of the Registrant’s executive officers and directors and entities affiliated with them have been deemed to be affiliates.

As of March 10, 2020, 27,914,593 shares of the registrant’s common stock, $0.01 par value, were outstanding.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the Proxy Statement for the registrant’s 2020 annual meeting of shareholders, to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days after the registrant’s year ended December 31, 2019, are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K where indicated. Except with respect to information specifically incorporated by reference in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, the Proxy Statement is not deemed to be filed as part hereof.

 

 


 

GOLDEN ENTERTAINMENT, INC.

ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K

INDEX

 

 

Page

PART I

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM I.

BUSINESS

2

 

 

 

ITEM 1A.

RISK FACTORS

10

 

 

 

ITEM IB.

UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

23

 

 

 

ITEM 2.

PROPERTIES

24

 

 

 

ITEM 3.

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

25

 

 

 

ITEM 4.

MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

25

 

 

 

PART II

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 5.

MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

26

 

 

 

ITEM 6.

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

27

 

 

 

ITEM 7.

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

29

 

 

 

ITEM 7A.

QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

43

 

 

 

ITEM 8.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

44

 

 

 

ITEM 9.

CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

90

 

 

 

ITEM 9A.

CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

90

 

 

 

ITEM 9B.

OTHER INFORMATION

91

 

 

 

PART III

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 10.

DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

91

 

 

 

ITEM 11.

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

91

 

 

 

ITEM 12.

SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

91

 

 

 

ITEM 13.

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

92

 

 

 

ITEM 14.

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES

92

 

 

 

PART IV

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 15.

EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

93

 

 

 

ITEM 16.

FORM 10-K SUMMARY

97

 

 

SIGNATURES

98

 

 


 

PART I

As used in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, unless the context suggests otherwise, the terms “Golden,” “we,” “our” and “us” refer to Golden Entertainment, Inc. and its subsidiaries.

Forward-Looking Statements

This Annual Report on Form 10-K, including Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, contains forward-looking statements regarding future events and our future results that are subject to the safe harbors created under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). Forward-looking statements can generally be identified by the use of words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “continue,” “could,” “estimate,” “expect,” “forecast,” “intend,” “plan,” “project,” “seek,” “should,” “think,” “will,” “would” and similar expressions. In addition, forward-looking statements include statements regarding cost savings, synergies, growth opportunities and other financial and operating benefits of our casino and other acquisitions; our strategies, objectives, business opportunities and plans for future expansion, developments or acquisitions; anticipated future growth and trends in our business or key markets; projections of future financial condition, operating results, income, capital expenditures, costs or other financial items; anticipated regulatory and legislative changes; and other characterizations of future events or circumstances as well as other statements that are not statements of historical fact. Forward-looking statements are based on our current expectations and assumptions regarding our business, the economy and other future conditions. These forward-looking statements are subject to assumptions, risks and uncertainties that may change at any time, and readers are therefore cautioned that actual results could differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially include: our ability to realize the anticipated cost savings, synergies and other benefits of our casino and other acquisitions, including the casinos we recently acquired in Las Vegas and Laughlin, Nevada, and integration risks relating to such transactions; changes in national, regional and local economic and market conditions; legislative and regulatory matters (including the cost of compliance or failure to comply with applicable laws and regulations); increases in gaming taxes and fees in the jurisdictions in which we operate; litigation; increased competition; our ability to renew our distributed gaming contracts; reliance on key personnel (including our Chief Executive Officer, President and Chief Financial Officer, and Chief Operating Officer); the level of our indebtedness and our ability to comply with covenants in our debt instruments; terrorist incidents; natural disasters; severe weather conditions (including weather or road conditions that limit access to our properties); the effects of environmental and structural building conditions; the effects of disruptions to our information technology and other systems and infrastructure; factors affecting the gaming, entertainment and hospitality industries generally; the impact of coronavirus (COVID-19) on our business; and other factors identified under the heading “Risk Factors” in Part I, Item 1A of this report, or appearing elsewhere in this report and in our other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the filing date of this report. We undertake no obligation to revise or update any forward-looking statements for any reason. 

1


 

ITEM 1.

BUSINESS

Corporate Information

We were incorporated in Minnesota in 1998 under the name of GCI Lakes, Inc., which name was subsequently changed to Lakes Gaming, Inc. in August 1998, to Lakes Entertainment, Inc. in June 2002 and to Golden Entertainment, Inc. in July 2015. Our shares began trading publicly in January 1999. The mailing address of our headquarters is 6595 S Jones Boulevard, Las Vegas, Nevada 89118, and our telephone number at that location is (702) 893-7777.

Business Overview

We own and operate a diversified entertainment platform, consisting of a portfolio of gaming assets that focus on resort casino operations and distributed gaming (including gaming in our branded taverns).

 

We conduct our business through two reportable operating segments: Casinos and Distributed Gaming. In our Casinos segment, we own and operate ten resort casinos: nine in Nevada and one in Maryland. Four of our Nevada resort casino properties were added in October 2017 as a result of our acquisition of American Casino & Entertainment Properties LLC (“American”), and in January 2019 we acquired two additional resort casino properties in Laughlin, Nevada, as further described below. Our Distributed Gaming segment involves the installation, maintenance and operation of slots and amusement devices in non-casino locations such as restaurants, bars, taverns, convenience stores, liquor stores and grocery stores in Nevada and Montana, and the operation of branded taverns targeting local patrons located primarily in the greater Las Vegas, Nevada metropolitan area.

 

On April 25, 2019, we issued $375 million of 7.625% Senior Notes due 2026 (the “2026 Notes”) in a private placement to institutional buyers at face value. The 2026 Notes bear interest at 7.625%, payable semi-annually on April 15th and October 15th of each year. The net proceeds of the 2026 Notes were used to (i) repay our former $200 million second lien term loan (the “Second Lien Term Loan”), (ii) repay outstanding borrowings under our revolving credit facility under our senior secured credit facility with JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. (as administrative agent and collateral agent), the lenders party thereto and the other entities party thereto (the “Credit Facility”), (iii) repay $18 million of the outstanding term loan indebtedness under our Credit Facility, and (iv) pay accrued interest, fees and expenses related to each of the foregoing. See Note 8, Debt, in the accompanying consolidated financial statements for additional information.

Acquisitions

On January 14, 2019, we completed the acquisition of Edgewater Gaming, LLC and Colorado Belle Gaming, LLC (the “Laughlin Entities”) from Marnell Gaming, LLC (“Marnell”) for $156.2 million in cash (after giving effect to the post-closing adjustment provisions in the purchase agreement) and the issuance by us of 911,002 shares of our common stock to certain assignees of Marnell (the “Laughlin Acquisition”). The Laughlin Acquisition added two resort casino properties in Laughlin, Nevada to our casino portfolio: the Edgewater Hotel & Casino Resort and the Colorado Belle Hotel & Casino Resort, which increase our scale and presence in the Southern Nevada market. The results of operations of the Laughlin Entities are included in our results subsequent to the acquisition date.

On October 20, 2017, we completed the acquisition of all of the outstanding equity interests of American (the “American Acquisition”) for $787.6 million in cash (after giving effect to post-closing adjustments) and the issuance by us of approximately 4.0 million shares of our common stock to a former American equity holder. The American Acquisition added four Nevada resort casino properties to our casino portfolio, including The STRAT Hotel, Casino & SkyPod in Las Vegas. These additional resort casino properties expanded and strengthened our presence in Nevada and the Las Vegas locals market, significantly increased our operational scale and provided us with an iconic Las Vegas Strip destination property. The results of operations of American have been included in our results subsequent to that date.

See Note 4, Acquisitions, in the accompanying consolidated financial statements for additional information regarding each of these acquisitions.

2


 

Casinos

We own and operate ten resort casino properties in Nevada and Maryland. The following table sets forth certain information regarding our properties as of December 31, 2019:

 

 

 

Location

 

Slot

Machines

 

 

Table

Games

 

 

Hotel

Rooms

 

 

Race and

Sport

Book

 

 

Bingo

(seats)

 

Nevada Casinos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The STRAT Hotel, Casino &

   SkyPod ("The Strat")

 

Las Vegas, NV

 

 

741

 

 

 

44

 

 

 

2,429

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

-

 

Arizona Charlie's Decatur

 

Las Vegas, NV

 

 

1,013

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

259

 

 

 

1

 

 

approx. 400

 

Arizona Charlie's Boulder

 

Las Vegas, NV

 

 

824

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

303

 

 

 

1

 

 

approx. 400

 

Aquarius Casino Report

   ("Aquarius")

 

Laughlin, NV

 

 

1,172

 

 

 

33

 

 

 

1,906

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

-

 

Edgewater Hotel & Casino

   Resort ("Edgewater")

 

Laughlin, NV

 

 

703

 

 

 

20

 

 

 

1,052

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

-

 

Colorado Belle Hotel &

   Casino Report

   ("Colorado Belle")

 

Laughlin, NV

 

 

669

 

 

 

16

 

 

 

1,102

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

-

 

Pahrump Nugget Hotel

   Casino ("Pahrump Nugget")

 

Pahrump, NV

 

 

402

 

 

 

9

 

 

 

69

 

 

 

1

 

 

approx. 200

 

Gold Town Casino

 

Pahrump, NV

 

 

226

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Lakeside Casino & RV Park

 

Pahrump, NV

 

 

168

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

approx. 100

 

Maryland Casino

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rocky Gap Casino Resort

   ("Rocky Gap")

 

Flintstone, MD

 

 

665

 

 

 

18

 

 

 

198

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Totals

 

 

 

 

6,583

 

 

 

150

 

 

 

7,318

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Strat: The Strat is our premier casino property, located on Las Vegas Blvd on the north end of the Las Vegas Strip. The Strat comprises the iconic SkyPod, a casino, a hotel and a retail center. As of December 31, 2019, in addition to hotel rooms and gaming in an 80,000 square foot casino, The Strat featured nine restaurants, two rooftop pools, a fitness center, retail shops and entertainment facilities. As of December 31, 2019, all of the significant renovations planned for The Strat were substantially completed, and we had invested a total of approximately $90 million in such renovations. An additional $20 million is anticipated to be spent in the first quarter of 2020 related to renovations primarily completed in 2019, bringing the total renovation cost to approximately $110 million. Upgrades that have been made to the property encompass room and suite renovations, a new lounge and sports book, renovations to the SkyPod, a remodeled gift shop and food and beverage outlets, improvements to the SkyJump experience, renovations to the Top of the World Restaurant and updated exterior lighting and landscaping surrounding the property.

 

Arizona Charlie’s casinos: Our Arizona Charlie’s Decatur and Arizona Charlie’s Boulder casino properties primarily serve local Las Vegas patrons, and provide an alternative experience to the Las Vegas Strip. Arizona Charlie’s Decatur casino is located four miles west of the Las Vegas Strip in the heavily populated west Las Vegas area, and is easily accessible from US Route 95, a major highway in Las Vegas. Arizona Charlie’s Boulder casino is located on Boulder Highway, in an established retail and residential neighborhood in the eastern metropolitan area of Las Vegas. The property is easily accessible from I-515, the primary east/west highway in Las Vegas. As of December 31, 2019, in addition to hotel rooms, gaming and bingo facilities, Arizona Charlie’s Decatur casino offered five restaurants and Arizona Charlie’s Boulder casino offered four restaurants and an RV park with approximately 220 RV hook-up sites.

3


 

 

Laughlin casinos: We own and operate three casinos in Laughlin, Nevada, which is located approximately 90 miles from Las Vegas on the western riverbank of the Colorado River. Our Laughlin casinos are situated on 56 adjacent acres along the heart of the Laughlin Riverwalk and cater primarily to patrons traveling from Arizona and Southern California, as well as customers from Nevada seeking an alternative to the Las Vegas experience. As of December 31, 2019, in addition to hotel rooms and gaming, the Aquarius had eight restaurants, the Colorado Belle featured three restaurants, and the Edgewater featured six restaurants and dedicated entertainment venues, including the Laughlin Event Center. The Laughlin Event Center, which is situated within walking distance from the Edgewater and in close proximity to our other Laughlin properties, is an outdoor arena that can seat up to approximately 12,000 guests and hosts various entertainment programs throughout the year, such as concerts, festivals, bull riding, rodeo, off-road racing and extreme sports events.

 

Pahrump casinos: We own and operate three casinos in Pahrump, Nevada, which is located approximately 60 miles from Las Vegas and is a gateway to Death Valley National Park. As of December 31, 2019, in addition to hotel rooms, gaming and bingo facilities at our Pahrump casino properties, Pahrump Nugget offered a bowling center and our Lakeside Casino & RV Park offered approximately 160 RV hook-up sites.

 

Rocky Gap: Rocky Gap is situated on approximately 270 acres in the Rocky Gap State Park in Maryland, which we lease from the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (the “Maryland DNR”) under a 40-year ground lease expiring in 2052 (plus a 20-year option renewal). As of December 31, 2019, in addition to hotel rooms and gaming, Rocky Gap offered three restaurants, a spa and the only Jack Nicklaus signature golf course in Maryland. Rocky Gap is a AAA Four Diamond Award® winning resort and includes an event and conference center.

Distributed Gaming

Our Distributed Gaming segment involves the installation, maintenance and operation of slots and amusement devices in non-casino locations such as restaurants, bars, taverns, convenience stores, liquor stores and grocery stores in Nevada and Montana. We place our slots and amusement devices in locations where we believe they will receive maximum customer traffic, generally near a store’s entrance. In addition, we own and operate branded taverns with slots, which target local patrons, primarily in the greater Las Vegas, Nevada metropolitan area. As of December 31, 2019, our distributed gaming operations comprised approximately 10,900 slots in over 1,000 locations. In August 2017, we were licensed as a video gaming terminal operator in Illinois, providing for potential expansion into a new jurisdiction, and in October 2018 we received a conditional license to operate in Pennsylvania.

Nevada law limits distributed gaming operations (also known as “restricted gaming” operations) to certain types of non-casino locations, including grocery stores, drug stores, convenience stores, restaurants, bars, taverns and liquor stores, where gaming is incidental to the primary business being conducted at the location and games are generally limited to 15 or fewer slots and no other forms of gaming activity. The gaming area in these business locations is typically small, and in many instances, segregated from the primary business area, including the use of alcoves in grocery stores and drug stores and installation of slots into the physical bar (also known as “bar top” slots) in bars and taverns. Such segregation provides greater oversight and supervision of the slots. Under Montana law, distributed gaming operations are limited to business locations licensed to sell alcoholic beverages for on-premises consumption only, with such locations generally restricted to offering a maximum of 20 slots.

In Nevada, we generally enter into three types of slot placement contracts as part of our distributed gaming business: space agreements, revenue share agreements and participation agreements. Under space agreements, we pay a fixed monthly rental for the right to install, maintain and operate our slots. Under revenue share agreements, we pay a percentage of the gaming revenue generated from our slots, rather than a fixed monthly rental fee. With regard to both space agreements and revenue share agreements, we hold the applicable gaming license to conduct gaming at the location (although revenue share locations are required to obtain separate regulatory approval to receive a percentage of the gaming revenue). Under participation agreements, the business location holds the applicable gaming license and retains a percentage of the gaming revenue generated from our slots. In Montana, our slot and amusement device placement contracts are all participation agreements.

4


 

Our branded taverns offer a casual, upscale environment catering to local patrons offering superior food, craft beer and other alcoholic beverages, and typically include 15 onsite slots. As of December 31, 2019, we owned and operated 66 branded taverns, which offered a total of over 1,000 onsite slots. We continue to look for opportunistic and accretive opportunities to pursue additional tavern openings and acquisitions. Most of our taverns are located in the greater Las Vegas, Nevada metropolitan area and cater to local patrons seeking more convenient entertainment establishments than traditional casino properties. Our tavern patrons are typically younger than traditional casino customers, which diversifies our customer demographic. Our tavern brands include PT’s Gold, PT’s Pub, Sierra Gold, Sean Patrick’s, PT’s Place, PT’s Ranch, Sierra Junction and SG Bar.

Sales and Marketing

Casinos

We market our Nevada resort casino properties to both the locals market and tourist traffic, targeting the value-driven customer. We seek to attract local residents to our Nevada casinos through promotions geared towards enhancing local play, including dining offerings at our casino restaurants and promotions of our bowling and bingo amenities. Promotional programs for out-of-market patrons focus primarily on The Strat casino property (with almost 600 newly renovated rooms, new and refreshed food and beverage outlets, and the iconic SkyPod), and our award-winning recreational vehicle park surrounding a lake at the Lakeside Casino & RV Park.

Rocky Gap is located in western Maryland in close proximity to the affluent and heavily populated metropolitan areas of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Baltimore, Maryland and Washington, D.C., as well as two major interstate freeways. Rocky Gap serves as a premier destination for both local and out-of-market patrons. Our marketing efforts for Rocky Gap are primarily focused on attracting patrons through local and regional campaigns promoting both the amenities of Rocky Gap and the vast array of outdoor activities available in the Rocky Gap State Park.

Our casino sales and marketing efforts also include our new consolidated loyalty program, True RewardsTM, designed to encourage repeat business at our resort casino properties, as discussed below.

Distributed Gaming

We conduct our operations in our Distributed Gaming segment in Nevada and Montana. Our Distributed Gaming customer base is comprised of the third party distributed gaming customers with whom we enter into slot and amusement device placement contracts for the installation, maintenance and operation of slots and amusement devices at non-casino locations, the primarily local patrons that use our slots and amusement devices in such locations and the primarily local patrons of our branded taverns. We seek to place our slots and amusement devices in strategic, high-traffic areas, including in our branded taverns, and the majority of our marketing efforts are focused on maximizing profitability from a high-frequency, convenience-driven customer base.

Brand equity is also leveraged in our taverns through the number of our branded tavern locations located throughout the greater Las Vegas, Nevada metropolitan area. Our advertising initiatives include both traditional and non-traditional channels such as direct mail, email, radio, print, television, social media, search engine optimization and static/dynamic billboards.

Our Distributed Gaming sales and marketing efforts also include our True Rewards loyalty program, which is designed to encourage repeat business at our branded taverns and at slots located at participating supermarkets, as discussed below.

5


 

True Rewards Loyalty Program

Our marketing efforts also seek to capitalize on repeat visitation through the use of our True Rewards loyalty program. We offer our True Rewards loyalty program at all ten of our resort casino properties, as well as at all of our branded taverns and at participating supermarkets. Members of our True Rewards loyalty program may earn points based on gaming activity and amounts spent on rooms, food, beverage and resort activities at our resort casino properties, and on play and amounts spent on the purchase of food and beverages at our branded taverns and other participating Distributed Gaming locations. Loyalty points are redeemable for complimentary slot play, food, beverages, grocery gift cards and hotel rooms, among other items. All points earned in the loyalty program roll up into a single account balance which is redeemable enterprise-wide at participating locations.

Our rewards technology is designed to track customer behavior indicators such as visitation, customer spend and customer engagement. As of December 31, 2019, we had approximately 800,000 active players in our marketing database, providing us with an avenue to drive customer engagement and cross-marketing opportunities across our resort casino and distributed gaming platform.

Intellectual Property

We pursue registration of our important trademarks and service marks in the states where we do business and with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. We have registered and/or have pending as trademarks with the United States Patent and Trademark Office, among other trademarks and service marks, “Golden Entertainment” and “Golden Gaming,” as well as various names, brands and logos relating to our resort casino properties, customer loyalty programs and branded taverns. In addition, we have also registered or applied to register numerous other trademarks in various jurisdictions in the United States in connection with our properties, facilities and development projects. We also hold a patent in the United States related to player tracking systems.

Competition

The resort casino and distributed gaming industries are highly competitive. Our resort casino business competes with numerous casinos and casino-hotels of varying quality and size in our markets. We also compete with other non-gaming resorts and vacation destinations, and with various other casino and other entertainment businesses. The casino entertainment business is characterized by competitors that vary considerably in their size, quality of facilities, number of operations, brand identities, marketing and growth strategies, financial strength and capabilities, level of amenities, management talent and geographic diversity. Many of our regional and national competitors have greater brand recognition and significantly greater resources than we have. Their greater resources may also provide them with the ability to expand operations in the future.

Furthermore, several states are currently considering legalizing casino gaming in designated areas, and Native American tribes may develop or expand gaming properties in markets located more closely to our customer base (particularly Native American casinos located in California). The expansion of casino gaming in or near any geographic area from which we attract or expect to attract a significant number of our customers, including legalized casino gaming in neighboring states and on Native American land, could have a significant adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

With respect to our distributed gaming businesses, we face direct competition from others involved in the distributed gaming business, as well as substantial competition for customers from other operators of casinos, hotels, taverns and other entertainment venues. Many of our regional and national competitors have greater brand recognition and significantly greater resources than we have. Their greater resources may also provide them with the ability to expand operations in the future.

In addition, in both of our segments we face ever-increasing competition from online gaming, including mobile gaming applications for smart phones and tablet computers, state-sponsored lotteries, card clubs, sports books, fantasy sports websites and other forms of legalized gaming. Various forms of internet gaming have been approved in Nevada, and legislation permitting internet gaming has been proposed by the federal government and other states. The expansion of internet gaming in Nevada and other jurisdictions could result in significant additional competition for our operations.

6


 

Regulation

Gaming Regulation

We are subject to extensive federal, state, and local regulation. State and local government authorities in the jurisdictions in which we operate require us to obtain gaming licenses and require our officers, key employees and business entity affiliates to demonstrate suitability to be involved in gaming operations. These are privileged licenses or approvals which are not guaranteed by statute or regulation. State and local government authorities may limit, condition, suspend or revoke a license, impose substantial fines, and take other actions, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. We cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain and maintain the gaming licenses and related approvals necessary to conduct our gaming operations. Any failure to maintain or renew our existing licenses, registrations, permits or approvals could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. Furthermore, if additional gaming laws or regulations are adopted, these regulations could impose additional restrictions or costs that could have a significant adverse effect on us and our business. For additional information, see “Part I, Item 1A. Risk Factors—Our business is subject to extensive gaming regulation, which is costly to comply with, and gaming authorities have significant control over our operations.”

Gaming authorities may, in their sole and absolute discretion, require the holder of any securities issued by us to file applications, be investigated, and be found suitable to own our securities if they have reason to believe that the security ownership would be inconsistent with the declared policies of their respective states. Further, the costs of any investigation conducted by any gaming authority under these circumstances is typically required to be paid by the applicant, and refusal or failure to pay these charges may constitute grounds for a finding that the applicant is unsuitable to own the securities. Our articles of incorporation require our shareholders to cooperate with gaming authorities in such investigations and permit us to redeem the securities held by any shareholder whose holding of shares of our capital stock may result, in the judgment of our Board of Directors, in our failure to obtain or our loss of any license or franchise from any governmental agency held by us to conduct any portion of our business. If any gaming authority determines that a person is unsuitable to own our securities, then, under the applicable gaming laws and regulations, we can be sanctioned, including the loss of our privileged licenses or approvals, if, without the prior approval of the applicable gaming authority, we conduct certain business with the unsuitable person. For additional information, see “Part I, Item 1A. Risk Factors—Our shareholders are subject to extensive government regulation and, if a shareholder is found unsuitable by a gaming authority, that shareholder would not be able to beneficially own our common stock directly or indirectly. Our shareholders may also be required to provide information that is required by gaming authorities and we have the right, under certain circumstances, to redeem a shareholder’s securities; we may be forced to use our cash or incur debt to fund redemption of our securities.”

Our directors, officers and key employees are also subject to a variety of regulatory requirements and various privileged licensing and related approval procedures in the various jurisdictions in which we operate gaming facilities. If any gaming authority with jurisdiction over our business were to find any of our directors, officers or key employees unsuitable for licensing or unsuitable to continue having a relationship with us, we would have to sever our relationship with that person. Furthermore, such gaming authorities may require us to terminate the employment of any person who refuses to file appropriate applications. Either result could have a material adverse effect on our business, operations and prospects.

Applicable gaming laws and regulations also restrict our ability to issue securities, incur debt, and undertake other financing activities. Such transactions would generally require approval of gaming authorities, and our financing counterparties, including lenders, might be subject to various licensing and related approval procedures in the various jurisdictions in which we operate gaming facilities. If state regulatory authorities were to find any person unsuitable with regard to his, her or its relationship to us or any of our subsidiaries, we would be required to sever our relationship with that person, which could materially adversely affect our business.

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The gaming industry also represents a significant source of tax revenue, particularly to the State of Nevada and its counties and municipalities. From time to time, various federal, state and local legislators and other government officials have proposed and adopted changes in tax laws, or in the administration or interpretation of such laws, affecting the gaming industry. It is not possible to determine the likelihood of possible changes in tax laws or in the administration or interpretation of such laws. Such changes, if adopted, could have a material adverse effect on our future financial position, results of operations, cash flows and prospects. For additional information, see “Part I, Item 1A. Risk Factors—Changes to gaming tax laws could increase our cost of doing business and have a material adverse effect on our financial condition.”

From time to time, local and state lawmakers, as well as special interest groups, have proposed legislation that would expand, restrict or prevent gaming operations in the jurisdictions in which we operate. Any such change to the regulatory environment or the adoption of new federal, state or local government legislation could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Other Regulation

Our business is subject to a variety of other federal, state and local laws, rules, regulations and ordinances. These laws and regulations include, but are not limited to, restrictions and conditions concerning alcoholic beverages, environmental matters, employees, currency transactions, taxation, zoning and building codes, and marketing and advertising. Such laws and regulations could change or could be interpreted differently in the future, or new laws and regulations could be enacted. Changes to any of the laws, rules, regulations or ordinances to which we are subject, new laws or regulations, or material differences in interpretations by courts or governmental authorities could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Our operations are subject to various environmental laws and regulations relating to emissions and discharges into the environment, and the storage, handling and disposal of hazardous and non-hazardous substances and wastes. These laws and regulations are complex, and subject to change, and violations can lead to significant costs for corrective action and remediation, fines and penalties. Under certain of these laws and regulations, a current or previous owner or operator of property may be liable for the costs of remediating contamination on its property, without regard to whether the owner or operator knew of, or caused, the presence of the contaminants, and regardless of whether the practices that resulted in the contamination were legal at the time that they occurred, as well as incur liability to third parties impacted by such contamination. The presence of contamination, or failure to remediate it properly, may adversely affect our ability to use, sell or rent property. As we acquire additional casino, resort and tavern properties, such as the casino properties we acquired in the Laughlin Acquisition, we may not know the full level of exposure that we may have undertaken despite appropriate due diligence. We endeavor to maintain compliance with environmental laws, but from time to time, current or historical operations on or adjacent to, our properties may have resulted or may result in noncompliance with environmental laws or liability for cleanup pursuant to environmental laws. In that regard, we may incur costs for cleaning up contamination relating to historical uses of certain of our properties.

Many of our employees, especially those that interact with our customers, receive a base salary or wage that is established by applicable state and federal laws that establish a minimum hourly wage that is, in turn, supplemented through tips and gratuities from customers. In 2017, several former employees filed two separate purported class action lawsuits against us and on behalf of similarly situated individuals employed by us in Nevada, which lawsuits were settled in 2019. The lawsuits alleged that we violated certain Nevada labor laws, including payment of an hourly wage below the statutory minimum wage without providing a qualified health insurance plan and an associated failure to pay proper overtime compensation. From time to time, state and federal lawmakers have increased the minimum wage. It is difficult to predict when such increases may take place. Any such change to the minimum wage could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Alcoholic beverage control regulations require each of our branded taverns and casino properties to apply to a state authority and, in certain locations, county or municipal authority for a license or permit to sell alcoholic beverages. In addition, each restaurant we operate must obtain a food service license from local authorities. Failure to comply with such regulations could cause our licenses to be revoked or our related business or businesses to be forced to cease operations. Moreover, state liquor laws may prevent the expansion of restaurant operations into certain markets.

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Seasonality

We believe that our Casinos and Distributed Gaming segments are affected by seasonal factors, including holidays, weather and travel conditions. Our casinos and distributed gaming businesses in Nevada have historically experienced lower revenues during the summer as a result of fewer tourists due to higher temperatures, as well as increased vacation activity by local residents. Rocky Gap typically experiences higher revenues during summer months and may be significantly adversely impacted by inclement weather during winter months. Our Nevada distributed gaming operations typically experience higher revenues during the fall which corresponds with several professional sports seasons. Our Montana distributed gaming operations typically experience higher revenues during the fall due to the inclement weather in the state and less opportunity for outdoor activities, in addition to the impact from professional sports seasons. While other factors like unemployment levels, market competition and the diversification of our business may either offset or magnify seasonal effects, some seasonality is likely to continue, which could result in significant fluctuation in our quarterly operating results.

Employees

As of December 31, 2019 we had approximately 8,000 employees, of which approximately 2,000 were covered by various collective bargaining agreements. Other unions may seek to organize the workers of our resort casino properties from time to time. We believe we have good relationships with our employees, including those represented by unions.

At The Strat, four collective bargaining agreements cover our employees. Our collective bargaining agreement with the International Union of Operating Engineers, Local 501, AFL-CIO expired on March 31, 2018 and was successfully renegotiated in the first quarter of 2020. Our collective bargaining agreements with the Professional, Clerical and Miscellaneous Employees, Teamsters Local Union 986 (Valet and Warehouse) expire on March 31, 2024. Our collective bargaining agreement with the Culinary Workers Union, Local 226 and Bartenders Union, Local 165 expires on May 31, 2023.

At the Aquarius, four collective bargaining agreements cover our employees. Our collective bargaining agreement with the International Union of Operating Engineers, Local 501, AFL-CIO expires on March 31, 2020 and is currently under negotiation. Our collective bargaining agreement with the International Union of Security, Police, and Fire Professionals of America expires on February 28, 2021. Our collective bargaining agreement with the United Steelworkers of America expires on March 31, 2021. Our collective bargaining agreement with the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States, Its Territories and Canada, Local 720, Las Vegas, Nevada expires on November 30, 2022.

At Rocky Gap, our collective bargaining agreement with the United Food and Commercial Workers Union, Local 27 expires on November 1, 2023.

Website and Available Information

Our website is located at www.goldenent.com. Through a link on the Investors section of our website, we make the following filings available free of charge and as soon as reasonably practicable after they are electronically filed or furnished with the SEC: our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, our Current Reports on Form 8-K and any amendments to such reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act, and the rules and regulations promulgated thereunder. Copies of these documents are also available to our shareholders upon written request to our Chief Financial Officer at 6595 S Jones Boulevard, Las Vegas, Nevada 89118. Information on the website does not constitute part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

These filings are also available free of charge on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov.

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ITEM 1A.

RISK FACTORS

You should consider each of the following factors as well as the other information in this Annual Report on Form 10-K in evaluating our business and prospects. The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones we face. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or that we currently consider immaterial may also materially adversely impact our business, financial condition, results of operations or prospects. If any of the following risks actually occur, our business, financial condition, results of operations or prospects could be materially harmed and the trading price of our common stock could decline. You should also refer to the other information set forth in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including the information in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in Part II, Item 7 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, as well as our consolidated financial statements and the related notes.

Any failure to successfully integrate our businesses and businesses we acquire, including in the Laughlin Acquisition, could materially adversely affect our business, and we may not realize the full benefits of the Laughlin Acquisition or our other strategic acquisitions.

Our ability to realize the anticipated benefits of our strategic acquisitions, including our January 2019 Laughlin Acquisition, will depend, to a large extent, on our ability to successfully integrate our businesses with the businesses we acquire. Integrating and coordinating the operations and personnel of multiple businesses and managing the expansion in the scope of our operations and financial systems involves complex operational, technological and personnel-related challenges. The potential difficulties, and resulting costs and delays, relating to the integration of our business with our strategic acquisitions include:

 

the difficulty in integrating newly acquired businesses and operations in an efficient and effective manner;

 

the challenges in achieving strategic objectives, cost savings and other benefits expected from acquisitions;

 

the diversion of management’s attention from day-to-day operations;

 

additional demands on management related to the increased size and scope of our company following significant acquisitions, such as the Laughlin Acquisition;

 

the assimilation of employees and the integration of different business cultures;

 

challenges in attracting and retaining key personnel;

 

the need to integrate information, accounting, finance, sales, billing, payroll and regulatory compliance systems;

 

challenges in keeping existing customers and obtaining new customers; and

 

challenges in combining product offerings and sales and marketing activities.

There is no assurance that we will successfully or cost-effectively integrate our businesses with the businesses we acquire, and the costs of achieving systems integration may substantially exceed our current estimates. Integration of recently acquired businesses into our own operations in particular can be time consuming and present financial, managerial and operational challenges. Issues that arise during this process may divert management’s attention away from our day-to-day operations, and any difficulties encountered in the integration process could cause internal disruption in general, which could adversely impact our relationships with customers, suppliers, employees and other constituencies. Combining our different systems, technology, networks and business practices could be more difficult and time consuming than we anticipated, and could result in additional unanticipated expenses. Our combined results of operations could also be adversely affected by any issues we discover that were attributable to operations of the Laughlin Entities that arose before the acquisition. Moreover, as non-public companies at the time of our acquisition, the subsidiaries we acquired in the Laughlin Acquisition did not have to comply with the requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 for internal control over financial reporting and other procedures. Bringing the legacy systems for acquired businesses into compliance with those requirements may cause us to incur substantial additional expense.

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In addition, the integration process may cause an interruption of, or loss of momentum in, the activities of our combined business. If management is not able to effectively manage the integration process, or if any significant business activities are interrupted as a result of the integration process, our business could suffer and our results of operations and financial condition may be harmed. Even if our businesses are successfully integrated, we may not realize the full benefits of the Laughlin Acquisition or our other strategic acquisitions, including anticipated synergies, cost savings or growth opportunities, within the expected timeframes or at all. In addition, we have incurred, and may incur additional, significant integration and restructuring expenses to realize synergies. However, many of the expenses that will be incurred are, by their nature, difficult to estimate accurately. These expenses could, particularly in the near term, exceed the savings that we expect to achieve from elimination of duplicative expenses and the realization of economies of scale and cost savings. Although we expect that the realization of efficiencies related to the integration of the businesses may offset incremental transaction-related and restructuring costs over time, we cannot give any assurance that this net benefit will be achieved in the near term, or at all. Any of these matters could materially adversely affect our businesses or harm our financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Our business may be adversely affected by economic conditions, acts of terrorism, natural disasters, severe weather, contagious diseases and other factors affecting discretionary consumer spending, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business.

The demand for gaming, entertainment and leisure activities is highly sensitive to downturns in the economy and the corresponding impact on discretionary consumer spending. Any actual or perceived deterioration or weakness in general, regional or local economic conditions, unemployment levels, the job or housing markets, consumer debt levels or consumer confidence, as well as any increase in gasoline prices, tax rates, interest rates, inflation rates or other adverse economic or market conditions, may lead to our customers having less discretionary income to spend on gaming, entertainment and discretionary travel, any of which may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Acts of terrorism, natural disasters, severe weather conditions and actual or perceived outbreaks of public health threats and pandemics could also significantly affect demand for gaming, entertainment and leisure activities and discretionary travel, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. For example, in early 2020, an outbreak of a new strain of coronavirus, COVID-19, was identified in Wuhan, China. In response to the Coronavirus outbreak, significant travel warnings and restrictions have been implemented. The extent and duration of such impacts over the longer term remain largely uncertain and dependent on future developments that cannot be accurately predicted at this time, such as the severity and transmission rate of the coronavirus, the extent and effectiveness of containment actions taken, including mobility restrictions, and the impact of these and other factors on travel behavior. It is possible that the spread of the coronavirus may impact our customers’ interest in visiting our casino report properties, our branded taverns and other public facilities. Any such impacts may have an adverse effect on our business.

Furthermore, our properties are subject to the risk that operations could be halted for a temporary or extended period of time, as a result of casualty, forces of nature, adverse weather conditions, flooding, mechanical failure, or extended or extraordinary maintenance, among other causes. If there is a prolonged disruption at any of our casino properties due to natural disasters, terrorist attacks or other catastrophic events, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be materially adversely affected. Additionally, if extreme weather adversely impacts general economic or other conditions in the areas in which our properties are located or from which we draw our patrons or prevents patrons from easily coming to our properties, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be materially adversely affected.

We face substantial competition in both of our business segments and may lose market share.

The resort casino and distributed gaming industries are highly competitive. Our resort casino business competes with numerous casinos and casino-hotels of varying quality and size in our markets. We also compete with other non-gaming resorts and vacation destinations, and with various other casino and other entertainment businesses. The casino entertainment business is characterized by competitors that vary considerably in their size, quality of facilities, number of operations, brand identities, marketing and growth strategies, financial strength and capabilities, level of amenities, management talent and geographic diversity. Many of our regional and national competitors have greater brand recognition and significantly greater resources than we have. Their greater resources may also provide them with the ability to expand operations in the future.

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If our competitors operate more successfully than we do, if they attract customers away from us as a result of aggressive pricing and promotion, if they are more successful than us in attracting and retaining employees, if their properties are enhanced or expanded, if they operate in jurisdictions that give them operating advantages due to differences or changes in gaming regulations or taxes, or if additional hotels and casinos are established in and around our markets, we may lose market share or the ability to attract or retain employees. Furthermore, several states are currently considering legalizing casino gaming in designated areas, and Native American tribes may develop or expand gaming properties in markets located more closely to our customer base (particularly Native American casinos located in California). The expansion of casino gaming in or near any geographic area from which we attract or expect to attract a significant number of our customers, including legalized casino gaming in neighboring states and on Native American land, could have a significant adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, and prospects.

With respect to our distributed gaming businesses, we face direct competition from others involved in the distributed gaming business, as well as substantial competition for customers from other operators of casinos, hotels, taverns and other entertainment venues. In addition, in both of our segments we face ever-increasing competition from online gaming, including mobile gaming applications for smart phones and tablet computers, state-sponsored lotteries, card clubs, sports books, fantasy sports websites and other forms of legalized gaming. Various forms of internet gaming have been approved in Nevada, and legislation permitting internet gaming has been proposed by the federal government and other states. The expansion of internet gaming in Nevada and other jurisdictions could result in significant additional competition for our operations.

Our significant indebtedness could adversely affect our financial health and prevent us from fulfilling our obligations.

We have a significant amount of indebtedness. As of December 31, 2019, our senior indebtedness, excluding unamortized debt issuance costs, was $1.1 billion, which was comprised of $772 million of outstanding term loan borrowings under our Credit Facility and $375 million of 2026 Notes. Our level of debt could, among other things:

 

require us to dedicate a larger portion of our cash flow from operations to the servicing and repayment of our debt, thereby reducing funds available for working capital, capital expenditures and acquisitions, and other general corporate requirements;

 

limit our ability to obtain additional financing to fund future working capital, capital expenditures and other general corporate requirements;

 

limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the industries in which we operate;

 

restrict our ability to make strategic acquisitions or dispositions or to exploit business opportunities;

 

increase our vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions and increases in interest rates;

 

place us at a competitive disadvantage compared to our competitors that have less debt; and

 

adversely affect our credit rating or the market price of our common stock.

Any of these risks could impact our ability to fund our operations or limit our ability to expand our business, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

We may incur additional indebtedness, which could further increase the risks associated with our leverage.

We may incur significant additional indebtedness in the future, which may include financing relating to capital expenditures, potential acquisitions or business expansion, working capital or general corporate purposes. Our Credit Facility includes a $200 million revolving credit facility, which was undrawn at December 31, 2019. In addition, our Credit Facility and the indenture governing the 2026 Notes (the “Indenture”) permit us, subject to specific limitations, to incur additional indebtedness. If new indebtedness is added to our current level of indebtedness, the related risks that we now face could intensify.

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We may not be able to generate sufficient cash flows to service all of our indebtedness and fund our operating expenses, working capital needs and capital expenditures, and we may be forced to take other actions to satisfy our obligations under our indebtedness, which may not be successful.

Our ability to make scheduled payments on or refinance our indebtedness will depend upon our future operating performance and our ability to generate cash flow in the future, which are subject to general economic, financial, business, competitive, legislative, regulatory and other factors that are beyond our control. We cannot assure you that our business will generate sufficient cash flow from operations, or that future borrowings will be available to us, in an amount sufficient to enable us to pay our indebtedness or fund our other liquidity needs. If our cash flows and capital resources are insufficient to fund our debt service obligations, we could face substantial liquidity problems and could be forced to reduce or delay investment and capital expenditures, dispose of material assets or operations, seek additional debt or equity capital or restructure or refinance our indebtedness. We may not be able to effect any such alternative measures, if necessary, on commercially reasonable terms or at all and, even if successful, such alternative actions may not allow us to meet our scheduled debt service obligations. Our Credit Facility restricts our ability to dispose of assets and use the proceeds from asset dispositions and may also restrict our ability to raise debt or equity capital to repay or service our indebtedness. In addition, under the Indenture we are subject to certain limitations, including limitations on our ability to incur additional debt and sell assets. If we cannot make scheduled payments on our debt, we will be in default and, as a result, our lenders could declare all outstanding amounts to be due and payable, terminate or suspend their commitments to loan money and foreclose against the assets securing such debt, and we could be forced into bankruptcy or liquidation, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Covenants in our debt instruments restrict our business and could limit our ability to implement our business plan.

Our Credit Facility and Indenture contain, and any future debt instruments likely will contain, covenants that may restrict our ability to implement our business plan, finance future operations, respond to changing business and economic conditions, secure additional financing, and engage in opportunistic transactions, such as strategic acquisitions. Our Credit Facility and Indenture include covenants restricting, among other things, our ability to do the following:

 

incur, assume or guarantee additional indebtedness;

 

issue redeemable stock and preferred stock;

 

grant or incur liens;

 

sell or otherwise dispose of assets, including capital stock of subsidiaries;

 

make loans and investments;

 

pay dividends, make distributions, or redeem or repurchase capital stock;

 

enter into transactions with affiliates; and

 

consolidate or merge with or into, or sell substantially all of our assets to, another person.

In addition, our revolving credit facility contains a financial covenant applying a maximum net leverage ratio when borrowings under the facility exceed 30% of the total revolving commitment. Our Credit Facility is secured by liens on substantially all of our and the subsidiary guarantors’ present and future assets (subject to certain exceptions).

If we default under the Credit Facility or Indenture because of a covenant breach or otherwise, all outstanding amounts thereunder could become immediately due and payable. We cannot assure you that we will be able to comply with the covenants in our Credit Facility or Indenture or that any covenant violations will be waived. Any violation that is not waived could result in an event of default and, as a result, our lenders could declare all outstanding amounts to be due and payable, terminate or suspend their commitments to loan money and foreclose against the assets securing such debt, and we could be forced into bankruptcy or liquidation, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

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Our variable rate indebtedness subjects us to interest rate risk, which could cause our debt service obligations to increase significantly.

The borrowings under our Credit Facility are subject to variable rates of interest and expose us to interest rate risk. Increases in the interest rate generally, and particularly when coupled with any significant variable rate indebtedness, could materially adversely impact our interest expenses. If interest rates were to increase, our debt service obligations on the variable rate indebtedness would increase even though the amount borrowed remained the same, and our net income and cash flows, including cash available for servicing our indebtedness, will correspondingly decrease. Each quarter point change in interest rates would result in a $1.9 million change in annual interest expense on our indebtedness under our Credit Facility. We are not required to enter into interest rate swaps to hedge such indebtedness. If we decide not to enter into hedges on such indebtedness, our interest expense on such indebtedness will fluctuate based on variable interest rates. Consequently, we may have difficulties servicing such unhedged indebtedness and funding our other fixed costs, and our available cash flow for general corporate requirements may be materially adversely affected. In the future, we may enter into interest rate swaps that involve the exchange of floating for fixed rate interest payments in order to reduce interest rate volatility. However, we may not maintain interest rate swaps with respect to all of our variable rate indebtedness, and any swaps we enter into may not fully mitigate our interest rate risk.

The casino, hotel and hospitality industry is capital intensive and we may not be able to finance development, expansion and renovation projects, which could put us at a competitive disadvantage.

Our casino and tavern properties have an ongoing need for renovations and other capital improvements to remain competitive, including room refurbishments, amenity upgrades, and replacement, from time to time, of furniture, fixtures and equipment. We may also need to make capital expenditures to comply with applicable laws and regulations. Construction projects entail significant risks, which can substantially increase costs or delay completion of a project. Such risks include shortages of materials or skilled labor, unforeseen engineering, environmental or geological problems, work stoppages, weather interference and unanticipated cost increases. Most of these factors are beyond our control. In addition, difficulties or delays in obtaining any of the requisite licenses, permits or authorizations from regulatory authorities can increase the cost or delay the completion of an expansion or development. Significant budget overruns or delays with respect to expansion and development projects could materially adversely affect our results of operations.

Renovations and other capital improvements of casino properties in particular require significant capital expenditures. For example, between May 2018 and December 2019 we invested approximately $90 million in strategic renovations of The Strat. In addition, any such renovations and capital improvements usually generate little or no cash flow until the projects are completed. We may not be able to fund such projects solely from cash provided from operating activities. Consequently, we may have to rely upon the availability of debt or equity capital to fund renovations and capital improvements, and our ability to carry them out will be limited if we cannot obtain satisfactory debt or equity financing, which will depend on, among other things, market conditions. We cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain additional equity or debt financing on favorable terms or at all. Our failure to renovate and maintain our casino and tavern properties from time to time may put us at a competitive disadvantage to casinos or taverns offering more modern and better maintained facilities, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Changes to gaming tax laws could increase our cost of doing business and have a material adverse effect on our financial condition.

The gaming industry represents a significant source of tax revenue, particularly to the State of Nevada and its counties and municipalities. Gaming companies are currently subject to significant state and local taxes and fees in addition to normal federal and state corporate income taxes, and such taxes and fees are subject to increase at any time. From time to time, various federal, state and local legislators and other government officials have proposed and adopted changes in tax laws, or in the administration or interpretation of such laws, affecting the gaming industry. In addition, any worsening of economic conditions and the large number of state and local governments with significant current or projected budget deficits could intensify the efforts of state and local governments to raise revenues through increases in gaming taxes and/or property taxes. It is not possible to determine with certainty the likelihood of changes in tax laws or in the administration or interpretation of such laws. Any material increase, or the adoption of additional taxes or fees, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

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Our business is subject to extensive gaming regulation, which is costly to comply with, and gaming authorities have significant control over our operations.

We are subject to a variety of gaming regulations in the jurisdictions in which we operate, including the extensive gaming laws and regulations of the State of Nevada. Compliance with these regulations is costly and time-consuming. Regulatory authorities at the federal, state and local levels have broad powers with respect to the regulation and licensing of casino and gaming operations and may revoke, suspend, condition or limit our gaming or other licenses, impose substantial fines on us and take other actions, any one of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. We cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain and maintain the gaming licenses and related approvals necessary to conduct our gaming operations. Any failure to maintain or renew our existing licenses, registrations, permits or approvals could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Our directors, officers and key employees are also subject to a variety of regulatory requirements and must be approved by certain gaming authorities. If any gaming authority with jurisdiction over our business were to find an officer, director or key employee of ours unsuitable for licensing or unsuitable to continue having a relationship with us, we would be required to sever our relationship with that person. Furthermore, such gaming authorities may require us to terminate the employment of any person who refuses to file appropriate applications. Either result could have a material adverse effect on our business, operations and prospects.

Applicable gaming laws and regulations also restrict our ability to issue securities, incur debt and undertake other financing activities. Such transactions would generally require approval of gaming authorities, and our financing counterparties, including lenders, might be subject to various licensing and related approval procedures in the various jurisdictions in which we operate gaming facilities. Further, our gaming regulators can require us to disassociate ourselves from suppliers or business partners found unsuitable by the regulators. If any gaming authorities were to find any person unsuitable with regard to his, her or its relationship to us or any of our subsidiaries, we would be required to sever our relationship with that person, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, operations and prospects.

If additional gaming regulations are adopted in a jurisdiction in which we operate, such regulations could impose restrictions on us that would prevent us from operating our business as it is currently operated, or the increased costs associated with compliance with such regulations could lower our profitability. From time to time, various proposals are introduced in the legislatures of the jurisdictions in which we have operations that, if enacted, could adversely affect the tax, regulatory, operational or other aspects of the gaming industry and our company. Any such change to the regulatory environment or the adoption of new federal, state or local government legislation could impose additional restrictions or costs or could otherwise have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Any violation of applicable anti-money laundering laws or regulations or the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

We handle significant amounts of cash in our operations and are subject to various reporting and anti-money laundering laws and regulations. Recently, U.S. governmental authorities have evidenced an increased focus on compliance with anti-money laundering laws and regulations in the gaming industry. Any violation of anti-money laundering laws or regulations could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. Internal control policies and procedures and employee training and compliance programs that we have implemented to deter prohibited practices may not be effective in prohibiting our employees, contractors or agents from violating or circumventing our policies and the law. If we or our employees or agents fail to comply with applicable laws or our policies governing our operations, we may face investigations, prosecutions and other legal proceedings and actions which could result in civil penalties, administrative remedies and criminal sanctions. Any such government investigations, prosecutions or other legal proceedings or actions could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

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We are subject to numerous other federal, state and local laws that may expose us to liabilities or have a significant adverse impact on our operations. Changes to any such laws could have a material adverse effect on our operations and financial condition.

Our business is subject to a variety of other federal, state and local laws, rules, regulations and ordinances. These laws and regulations include, but are not limited to, restrictions and conditions concerning alcoholic beverages, environmental matters, employees, currency transactions, taxation, zoning and building codes, and marketing and advertising. Such laws and regulations could change or could be interpreted differently in the future, or new laws and regulations could be enacted. Changes to any of the laws, rules, regulations or ordinances to which we are subject, new laws or regulations, or material differences in interpretations by courts or governmental authorities could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Our operations are subject to various environmental laws and regulations relating to emissions and discharges into the environment, and the storage, handling and disposal of hazardous and non-hazardous substances and wastes. These laws and regulations are complex, and subject to change, and violations can lead to significant costs for corrective action and remediation, fines and penalties.

Under certain of these laws and regulations, a current or previous owner or operator of property may be liable for the costs of remediating contamination on its property, without regard to whether the owner or operator knew of, or caused, the presence of the contaminants, and regardless of whether the practices that resulted in the contamination were legal at the time that they occurred, as well as incur liability to third parties impacted by such contamination. The presence of contamination, or failure to remediate it properly, may adversely affect our ability to use, sell or rent property. As we acquire additional casino, resort and tavern properties, such as the casino properties we acquired in the American Acquisition, we may not know the full level of exposure that we may have undertaken despite appropriate due diligence. We endeavor to maintain compliance with environmental laws, but from time to time, current or historical operations on or adjacent to, our properties may have resulted or may result in noncompliance with environmental laws or liability for cleanup pursuant to environmental laws. In that regard, we may incur costs for cleaning up contamination relating to historical uses of certain of our properties.

Many of our employees, especially those that interact with our customers, receive a base salary or wage that is established by applicable state and federal laws that establish a minimum hourly wage that is, in turn, supplemented through tips and gratuities from customers. In 2017, several former employees filed two separate purported class action lawsuits against us and on behalf of similarly situated individuals employed by us in Nevada, which lawsuits were settled in 2019. The lawsuits alleged that we violated certain Nevada labor laws, including payment of an hourly wage below the statutory minimum wage without providing a qualified health insurance plan and an associated failure to pay proper overtime compensation. From time to time, state and federal lawmakers have increased the minimum wage. It is difficult to predict when such increases may take place. Any such change to the minimum wage could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Alcoholic beverage control regulations require each of our branded taverns and casino properties to apply to a state authority and, in certain locations, county or municipal authority for a license or permit to sell alcoholic beverages. In addition, each restaurant we operate must obtain a food service license from local authorities. Failure to comply with such regulations could cause our licenses to be revoked or our related business or businesses to be forced to cease operations. Moreover, state liquor laws may prevent the expansion of restaurant operations into certain markets. The loss or suspension of any liquor or food service license could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Our insurance coverage may not be adequate to cover all possible losses that our properties could suffer. In addition, our insurance costs may increase and we may not be able to obtain the same insurance coverage in the future.

Although we have comprehensive property and liability insurance policies for our properties in operation, with coverage features and insured limits that we believe are customary in their breadth and scope, each such policy has certain exclusions. Certain types of losses, generally of a catastrophic nature, such as earthquakes, hurricanes, floods or terrorist acts, or certain liabilities may be uninsurable or too expensive to justify obtaining insurance. Market forces beyond our control may also limit the scope of the insurance coverage we can obtain or our ability to obtain coverage at reasonable rates. As a result, we may not be successful in obtaining insurance without increases in cost

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or decreases in coverage levels. In addition, in the event of a major casualty, the insurance coverage we carry may not be sufficient to pay the full market value or replacement cost of our lost investment or in some cases could result in certain losses being totally uninsured. As a result, we could lose some or all of the capital we have invested in a property, as well as the anticipated future revenue from the property, and we could remain obligated for debt or other financial obligations related to the property, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. In addition to the damage caused to our property by a casualty loss (such as fire, natural disasters, acts of war or terrorism), we may suffer business disruption as a result of these events or be subject to claims by third parties injured or harmed. While we carry business interruption insurance and general liability insurance, this insurance may not be adequate to cover all losses in such event.

We renew our insurance policies on an annual basis. The cost of coverage may become so high that we may need to reduce our policy limits or agree to certain exclusions from our coverage. Among other factors, it is possible that regional political tensions, homeland security concerns, other catastrophic events or any change in government legislation governing insurance coverage for acts of terrorism could materially adversely affect available insurance coverage and result in increased premiums on available coverage (which may cause us to elect to reduce our policy limits), additional exclusions from coverage or higher deductibles.

Increasing prices or shortages of energy and water may increase our cost of operations.

Our properties use significant amounts of water, electricity, natural gas and other forms of energy. Our Nevada properties in particular are located in a desert where water is scarce and the hot temperatures require heavy use of air conditioning. While we have not experienced any shortages of energy or water in the past, we cannot guarantee you that we will not in the future. Other states have suffered from electricity shortages. For example, California and Texas have experienced rolling blackouts due to excessive air conditioner use because of unexpectedly high temperatures in the past. We expect that potable water in Nevada, where the majority of our facilities are located, will become an increasingly scarce commodity at an increasing price.

Work stoppages, labor problems and unexpected shutdowns may limit our operational flexibility and negatively impact our future profits.

A number of employees at our casino properties are covered by collective bargaining agreements, which have staggered expirations over the next several years. We cannot ensure that, upon the expiration of existing collective bargaining agreements, new agreements will be reached without union action or that any such new agreements will be on terms satisfactory to us. The inability to negotiate and enter into a new collective bargaining agreement on favorable terms could result in an increase in our operating expenses or covered employees could strike or engage in other collective behaviors. Any renegotiation of these and other labor agreements could significantly increase our costs for wages, healthcare, pension plans and other benefits, and could have a material adverse effect on the business of our casino properties and our financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Any work stoppage at one or more of our casino properties could cause significant disruption of our operations or require us to expend significant funds to hire replacement workers, and qualified replacement labor may not be available at reasonable costs, if at all. Strikes and work stoppages could also result in adverse media attention or otherwise discourage customers from visiting our casino properties. As a result, a strike or other work stoppage at one of our casino properties could have a material adverse effect on the business of our casino properties and our financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Any unexpected shutdown of one of our casino properties could have an adverse effect on the business of our casino properties and our results of operations. There can be no assurance that we will be adequately prepared for unexpected events, including political or regulatory actions, which may lead to a temporary or permanent shutdown of any of our casino properties.

Our reputation and business could be materially harmed as a result of data breaches, data theft, unauthorized access or hacking.

Our success depends, in part, on the secure and uninterrupted performance of our information technology and other systems and infrastructure, including systems to maintain and transmit customers’ personal and financial information, credit card settlements, credit card funds transmissions and mailing lists. We could encounter difficulties in developing new systems, maintaining and upgrading current systems and preventing security breaches. Among other things, our systems are susceptible to outages due to fire, floods, power loss, break-ins, cyber-attacks,

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network penetration, denial of service attacks and similar events. An increasing number of companies have disclosed breaches of their security, some of which have involved sophisticated and highly targeted attacks on their computer networks. While we have and will continue to implement network security measures and data protection safeguards, our servers and other computer systems are vulnerable to viruses, malicious software, hacking, break-ins or theft, data privacy or security breaches, third-party security breaches, employee error or malfeasance and similar events. Because the techniques used to obtain unauthorized access, disable or degrade service, or sabotage systems, change frequently and often are not recognized until launched against a target, we may be unable to anticipate these techniques or to implement adequate preventative measures. If unauthorized parties gain access to our information technology and other systems, they may be able to misappropriate assets or sensitive information (such as personally identifiable information of our customers, business partners and employees), cause interruption in our operations, corruption of data or computers, or otherwise damage our reputation and business. In such circumstances, we could be held liable to our customers or other parties, or be subject to regulatory or other actions for breaching privacy rules. Any compromise of our security could result in a loss of confidence in our security measures, and subject us to litigation, civil or criminal penalties, and negative publicity, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. Further, if we are unable to comply with the security standards established by banks and the payment card industry, we may be subject to fines, restrictions, and expulsion from card acceptance programs, which could materially adversely affect our operations.

Our revenues may be negatively impacted by volatility in our hold percentage, and we also face the risk of fraud or cheating.

Casino revenue is recorded as the difference between gaming wins and losses or net win from gaming activities. Net win is impacted by variations in the hold percentage (the ratio of net win to total amount wagered), or actual outcome, on our slots, table games, race and sports betting, and all other games we provide to our customers. We use the hold percentage as an indicator of a game’s performance against its expected outcome. Although each game generally performs within a defined statistical range of outcomes, actual outcomes may vary for any given period. The hold percentage and actual outcome on our games can be impacted by the level of a customer’s skill in a given game, errors made by our employees, the number of games played, faults within the computer programs that operate our slots and the random nature of slot payouts. If our games perform below their expected range of outcomes, our cash flow may suffer.

In addition, gaming customers may attempt or commit fraud or otherwise cheat in order to increase their winnings. Acts of fraud or cheating could involve the use of counterfeit chips or other tactics and could include collusion with our employees. Internal acts of cheating could also be conducted by employees through collusion with dealers, surveillance staff, floor managers or other casino or gaming area staff. Failure to discover such acts or schemes in a timely manner could result in losses in our gaming operations, which could be substantial. In addition, negative publicity related to such schemes could have an adverse effect on our reputation, thereby materially adversely affecting our business, financial condition, results of operations, and prospects.

Our business is geographically concentrated, which subjects us to greater risks from changes in local or regional conditions.

We currently operate casinos resort properties solely in Nevada and in Flintstone, Maryland, and conduct our distributed gaming (including gaming in our branded taverns) business solely in Nevada and Montana. Due to this geographic concentration, our results of operations and financial condition are subject to greater risks from changes in local and regional conditions, such as:

 

changes in local or regional economic conditions and unemployment rates;

 

changes in local and state laws and regulations, including gaming laws and regulations;

 

a decline in the number of residents in or near, or visitors to, our properties;

 

changes in the local or regional competitive environment; and

 

adverse weather conditions and natural disasters (including weather or road conditions that limit access to our properties).

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Some of our casino properties and most of our tavern properties largely depend on the local markets for customers. Competition for local customers in Las Vegas in particular is intense. Local competitive risks and our failure to attract a sufficient number of guests, gaming customers and other visitors in these locations could adversely affect our business. In addition, the number of visitors to our Nevada casino properties may be adversely affected by increased transportation costs, the number and frequency of flights into or out of Las Vegas, and capacity constraints of the interstate highways that connect our casino properties with the metropolitan areas in which our customers reside.

As a result of the geographic concentration of our businesses, we face a greater risk of a negative impact on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects in the event that any of the geographic areas in which we operate is more severely impacted by any such adverse condition, as compared to other areas in the United States.

We may experience seasonal fluctuations that could significantly impact our quarterly operating results.

We may experience seasonal fluctuations that could significantly impact our quarterly operating results. Our casinos and distributed gaming businesses in Nevada have historically experienced lower revenues during the summer as a result of fewer tourists due to higher temperatures, as well as increased vacation activity by local residents. Rocky Gap typically experiences higher revenues during summer months and may be significantly adversely impacted by inclement weather during winter months. Our Nevada distributed gaming operations typically experience higher revenues during the fall which corresponds with several professional sports seasons. Our Montana distributed gaming operations typically experience higher revenues during the winter months due to the inclement weather in the state and less opportunity for outdoor activities, in addition to the impact from professional sports seasons. While other factors like unemployment levels, market competition and the diversification of our business may either offset or magnify seasonal effects, some seasonality is likely to continue, which could result in significant fluctuation in our quarterly operating results.

Our success depends in part on our ability to acquire, enhance, and/or introduce successful gaming concepts and game content, and we may be unable to obtain slots or related technology from our third party suppliers on a timely, cost-effective basis.

Our business is heavily dependent on revenue generated by the games, particularly slots, we offer to our customers. We source games and game content through third-party suppliers, and currently rely on a limited number of suppliers for our slots and related technology. We believe that creative and appealing game content, innovative game concepts and licensed brands produce more revenue for our casinos and other gaming locations and provide them with a competitive advantage, which in turn enhances our revenue and our ability to attract new business and to retain existing business. There can be no assurance that we will be able to sustain the acceptance of our existing game content or effectively obtain from third parties game content or licensed brands that will be widely accepted by our customers, or that we will be able to obtain slots or related technology on a cost-effective basis. There can be no assurance that our third party suppliers will be able to produce new creative and appealing game content, innovative game concepts, and licensed brands in the future that will be widely accepted by our customers. As a result, we may be forced to incur significant unanticipated costs to secure alternative third party suppliers or adjust our operations, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

The success of our distributed gaming business is dependent on our ability to renew our agreements.

We conduct the majority of our distributed gaming business under space, revenue share and participation agreements with third parties. Agreements with chain store and other third party customers are renewable at the option of the owner of the applicable chain store or third party. As our distributed gaming agreements expire, we are required to compete for renewals. If we are unable to renew a material portion of our space, revenue share and participation agreements, this could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. We cannot assure you that our existing agreements will be renewed on reasonable or comparable terms, or at all.

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Our business and stock price may be adversely affected if our internal controls are not effective.

We have previously reported material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting. A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the registrant’s annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. Although we believe we have taken appropriate actions to remediate the control deficiencies we have identified and to strengthen our internal control over financial reporting, we cannot assure you that we will not discover other material weaknesses in the future. The existence of one or more internal control deficiencies could result in errors in our financial statements, and substantial costs and resources may be required to rectify internal control deficiencies. If we cannot produce reliable financial reports, investors could lose confidence in our reported financial information, the market price of our common stock could decline significantly, we may be unable to obtain additional financing to operate and expand our business, and our business, financial condition and prospects could be harmed.

We may be subject to litigation which, even if without merit, can be expensive to defend and could expose us to significant liabilities, damage our reputation and result in substantial losses.

From time to time, we are involved in a variety of lawsuits, claims, investigations and other legal proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business, including proceedings concerning labor and employment matters, personal injury claims, breach of contract claims, commercial disputes, business practices, intellectual property, tax and other matters. See Part I, Item 3 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K under the heading “Legal Proceedings” for additional information. Certain litigation claims may not be covered entirely or at all by our insurance policies, or our insurance carriers may seek to deny coverage. In addition, litigation claims can be expensive to defend and may divert our attention from the operations of our businesses. Further, litigation involving visitors to our properties, even if without merit, can attract adverse media attention.

We evaluate all litigation claims and legal proceedings to assess the likelihood of unfavorable outcomes and to estimate, if possible, the amount of potential losses. Based on these assessments and estimates, we establish reserves and/or disclose the relevant litigation claims or legal proceedings, as appropriate. These assessments and estimates are based on the information available to management at the time and involve a significant amount of management judgment. We caution you that actual outcomes or losses may differ materially from those envisioned by our current assessments and estimates. As a result, litigation can have a significant adverse effect on our businesses and, because we cannot predict the outcome of any action, it is possible that adverse judgments or settlements could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

We depend on a limited number of key employees who would be difficult to replace.

We depend on a limited number of key personnel to manage and operate our business, including our Chief Executive Officer, our President and Chief Financial Officer, and our Chief Operating Officer. We believe our success depends to a significant degree on our ability to attract and retain highly skilled personnel. The competition for these types of personnel is intense and we compete with other potential employers for the services of our employees. As a result, we may not succeed in hiring and retaining the executives and other employees that we need. An inability to hire quality employees or the loss of key employees could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Our executive officers and directors own or control a large percentage of our common stock, which permits them to exercise significant control over us.

As of December 31, 2019, our executive officers and directors and entities affiliated with them owned, in the aggregate, approximately 33% of the outstanding shares of our common stock. Accordingly, these shareholders will be able to substantially influence all matters requiring approval by our shareholders, including the approval of mergers or other business combination transactions and the composition of our Board of Directors. This concentration of ownership may also delay, defer or even prevent a change in control of our company and would make some transactions more difficult or impossible without their support. Circumstances may arise in which the interests of these shareholders could conflict with the interests of our other shareholders.

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Our shareholders are subject to extensive governmental regulation and, if a shareholder is found unsuitable by a gaming authority, that shareholder would not be able to beneficially own our common stock directly or indirectly. Our shareholders may also be required to provide information that is requested by gaming authorities and we have the right, under certain circumstances, to redeem a shareholder’s securities; we may be forced to use our cash or incur debt to fund redemption of our securities.

Gaming authorities may, in their sole and absolute discretion, require the holder of any securities issued by us to file applications, be investigated, and be found suitable to own our securities if they have reason to believe that the security ownership would be inconsistent with the declared policies of their respective states. Gaming authorities have very broad discretion in determining whether an applicant should be deemed suitable. Subject to certain administrative proceeding requirements, gaming authorities have the authority to deny any application or limit, condition, restrict, revoke or suspend any license, registration, finding of suitability or approval, or fine any person licensed, registered or found suitable or approved, for any cause deemed reasonable by the gaming authorities. The applicant must pay all costs of investigation incurred by the gaming authorities in conducting any such investigation. In evaluating individual applicants, gaming authorities typically consider the individual’s reputation for good character and criminal and financial history, and the character of those with whom the individual associates. If any gaming authority determines that a person is unsuitable to own our securities, then, under the applicable gaming laws and regulations, we can be sanctioned, including the loss of our privileged licenses or approvals, if, without the prior approval of the applicable gaming authority, we conduct certain business with the unsuitable person or fail to redeem the unsuitable person’s interest in our securities or take such other action with respect to the securities held by the unsuitable person as the applicable gaming authority requires.

For example, under Nevada gaming laws, each person who acquires, directly or indirectly, beneficial ownership of any voting security, or beneficial or record ownership of any non-voting security or any debt security, in a public corporation which is registered with the Nevada Gaming Commission, or the Gaming Commission, may be required to be found suitable if the Gaming Commission has reason to believe that his or her acquisition of that ownership, or his or her continued ownership in general, would be inconsistent with the declared public policy of Nevada, in the sole discretion of the Gaming Commission. Any person required by the Gaming Commission to be found suitable shall apply for a finding of suitability within 30 days after the Gaming Commission’s request that he or she should do so and, together with his or her application for suitability, deposit with the Nevada Gaming Control Board, or the Control Board, a sum of money which, in the sole discretion of the Control Board, will be adequate to pay the anticipated costs and charges incurred in the investigation and processing of that application for suitability, and deposit such additional sums as are required by the Control Board to pay final costs and charges.

Furthermore, any person required by a gaming authority to be found suitable, who is found unsuitable by the gaming authority, may not hold directly or indirectly the beneficial ownership of any voting security or the beneficial or record ownership of any nonvoting security or any debt security of any public corporation which is registered with the gaming authority beyond the time prescribed by the gaming authority. A violation of the foregoing may constitute a criminal offense. A finding of unsuitability by a particular gaming authority impacts that person’s ability to associate or affiliate with gaming licensees in that particular jurisdiction and could impact the person’s ability to associate or affiliate with gaming licensees in other jurisdictions.

 

Many jurisdictions also require any person who acquires beneficial ownership of more than a certain percentage of voting securities of a gaming company and, in some jurisdictions, non-voting securities, typically 5%, to report the acquisition to gaming authorities, and gaming authorities may require such holders to apply for qualification or a finding of suitability, subject to limited exceptions for “institutional investors” that hold a company’s voting securities for investment purposes only. Under Nevada gaming laws, any person who acquires or holds more than 5% of our voting power must report the acquisition or holding to the Gaming Commission. Except for certain pension or employee benefit plans, each person who acquires or holds the beneficial ownership of any amount of any class of voting power and who has the intent to engage in any “proscribed activity” shall (a) within 2 days after possession of such intent, notify the Chair of the Nevada Board in the manner prescribed by the Chair; (b) apply to the Gaming Commission for a finding of suitability within 30 days after notifying the Chair pursuant to paragraph (a); and (c) deposit with the Nevada Board the sum of money required by the Nevada Board to pay the anticipated costs and charges incurred in the investigation and processing of the application. “Proscribed activity” means: 1. An activity that necessitates a change or amendment to our corporate charter, bylaws, management, policies or operation of the Company; 2. An activity that materially influences or affects the affairs of the Company; or 3. Any

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other activity  determined by the Gaming Commission to be inconsistent with holding voting securities for investment purposes.  Nevada gaming regulations also require that beneficial owners of more than 10% of our voting power apply to the Gaming Commission for a finding of suitability within 30 days after the Chairman of the Nevada Board mails written notice requiring such filing. Further, an “institutional investor,” as defined in the Nevada gaming regulations, that acquires more than 10%, but not more than 25%, of our voting power may apply to the Gaming Commission for a waiver of such finding of suitability if such institutional investor holds our voting securities for investment purposes only.

 

Similarly, under Maryland gaming laws, as interpreted by the Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Commission, or the Maryland Commission, any person who acquires 5% or more of our voting securities must report the acquisition to the Maryland Commission and apply for a “Principal Employee” (if an individual) or “Principal Entity” (if an entity) license, both of which require a finding of qualification, or seek an institutional investor waiver. The granting of a waiver rests with the discretion of the Maryland Commission. Further, we may not sell or otherwise transfer in an issuer transaction more than 5% of the legal or beneficial interest in Rocky Gap without the approval of the Maryland Commission, after the Maryland Commission determines that the transferee is qualified or grants the transferee an institutional investor waiver.

Our Articles of Incorporation require our shareholders to provide information that is requested by authorities that regulate our current or proposed gaming operations. Our Articles of Incorporation also permit us to redeem the securities held by persons whose status as a security holder, in the opinion of our Board of Directors, jeopardizes our existing gaming licenses or approvals. The price paid for these securities is, in general, the average closing price for the 30 trading days prior to giving notice of redemption.

In the event a shareholder’s background or status jeopardizes our current or proposed gaming licensure, we may be required to redeem such shareholder’s securities in order to continue gaming operations or obtain a gaming license. This redemption may divert our cash resources from other productive uses and require us to obtain additional financing which, if in the form of equity financing, would be dilutive to our shareholders. Further, any debt financing may involve additional restrictive covenants and further leveraging of our fixed assets. The inability to obtain additional financing to redeem a disqualified shareholder’s securities may result in the loss of a current or potential gaming license.

We expect our stock price to be volatile.

The market price of our common stock has been, and is likely to continue to be, volatile. During 2019, the market price of our common stock has ranged from $12.32 to $20.42. The market price of our common stock may be significantly affected by many factors, including:

 

changes in general or local economic or market conditions;

 

quarterly variations in operating results;

 

strategic developments by us or our competitors;

 

developments in our relationships with our customers, distributors and suppliers;

 

regulatory developments or any breach, revocation or loss of any gaming license;

 

changes in our revenues, expense levels or profitability;

 

changes in financial estimates and recommendations by securities analysts; and

 

failure to meet the expectations of securities analysts.

Any of these events may cause the market price of our common stock to fall. In addition, the stock market in general has experienced significant volatility, which may adversely affect the market price of our common stock regardless of our operating performance.

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Future sales of our common stock could lower our stock price and dilute existing shareholders.

In January 2018, the SEC declared effective a universal shelf registration statement for the future sale of up to $150 million in aggregate amount of common stock, preferred stock, debt securities, warrants and units and the resale of up to approximately 8.0 million shares of our common stock held by the selling securityholders named therein. The securities may be offered from time to time, separately or together, directly by us or through underwriters, dealers or agents at amounts, prices, interest rates and other terms to be determined at the time of the offering. For example, in January 2018, certain of the named selling securityholders completed the resale of 6.5 million shares of our common stock and we completed the sale of 975,000 newly issued shares of our common stock in an underwritten public offering pursuant to this shelf registration statement.

We may also issue additional shares of common stock to finance future acquisitions through the use of equity. For example, we issued approximately 900,000 shares of our common stock in connection with the Laughlin Acquisition in January 2019, approximately 4.0 million shares of our common stock in connection with the American Acquisition in October 2017 (all of which shares were resold in the secondary public offering in January 2018), and approximately 8.5 million shares of our common stock in connection with the acquisition of Sartini Gaming in July 2015 (of which approximately 1.0 million shares were resold in the secondary public offering in January 2018). In addition, a substantial number of shares of our common stock is reserved for issuance upon the exercise of stock options and other equity awards pursuant to our employee benefit plans. We cannot predict the size of future issuances of our common stock or the effect, if any, that future sales and issuances of shares of our common stock will have on the market price of our common stock. Sales of substantial amounts of our common stock (including shares issued in connection with the acquisition of Sartini Gaming, upon the exercise of stock options and warrants or in connection with acquisition financing), or the perception that such sales could occur, may adversely affect prevailing market prices for our common stock. In addition, these sales may be dilutive to existing shareholders.

Provisions in our Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws or our debt facilities may discourage, delay or prevent a change in control or prevent an acquisition of our business at a premium price.

Some of the provisions of our Articles of Incorporation and our Bylaws and Minnesota law could discourage, delay or prevent an acquisition of our business, even if a change in control would be beneficial to the interests of our shareholders and was made at a premium price. These provisions:

 

permit our Board of Directors to increase its own size and fill the resulting vacancies;

 

authorize the issuance of “blank check” preferred stock that our Board of Directors could issue to increase the number of outstanding shares to discourage a takeover attempt; and

 

permit shareholder action by written consent only if the consent is signed by all shareholders entitled to notice of a meeting.

Although we have amended our Bylaws to provide that Section 302A.671 (Control Share Acquisitions) of the Minnesota Business Corporation Act does not apply to or govern us, we remain subject to 302A.673 (Business Combinations) of the Minnesota Business Corporation Act, which generally prohibits us from engaging in business combinations with any “interested” shareholder for a period of four years following the shareholder’s share acquisition date, which may discourage, delay or prevent a change in control of our company. Under the Indenture, if certain specified change of control events occur, each holder of the 2026 Notes may require us to repurchase all of such holder’s 2026 Notes at a purchase price equal to 101% of the principal amount of such notes. In addition, our Credit Facility provides for an event of default upon the occurrence of certain specified change of control events.

ITEM 1B.

UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

Not applicable.

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ITEM 2.

PROPERTIES

Company Headquarters

We lease a 41,000 square foot building in Las Vegas, Nevada, which houses our company headquarters and a portion of which we have sub-leased. The lease for our office headquarters building is with a related party and expires on December 31, 2030. See Note 15, Related Party Transactions, in the accompanying consolidated financial statements for information on our transactions with related parties.

Casinos

The Strat: We own the approximately 34 acres of land on which The Strat is located (of which approximately 17 acres are undeveloped and reserved for future development).

Arizona Charlie’s Decatur: We own the approximately 17 acres of land on which our Arizona Charlie’s Decatur casino property is located. In addition, we lease office, storage and laundry space for our Arizona Charlie’s Decatur casino property in an adjacent shopping center. The lease is with an unrelated party and expires in 2097.

Arizona Charlie’s Boulder: We own the approximately 24 acres of land on which our Arizona Charlie’s Boulder casino property is located.

Laughlin Casinos: We own the approximately 18 acres of land on which the Aquarius casino property is located (of which approximately 1.6 acres are undeveloped and reserved for future development), approximately 22 acres of land on which the Colorado Belle casino property is located and approximately 16 acres of land on which the Edgewater casino property is located. In addition, we lease approximately 20 acres of land for the Laughlin Event Center for our Laughlin casino properties. The lease is with an unrelated party and expires in 2027.

Pahrump Casinos: We own the approximately 40 acres of land on which the Pahrump Nugget is located (of which approximately 20 acres are undeveloped and reserved for future development) and the approximately 35 acres of land on which our Lakeside Casino & RV Park is located. Our Gold Town Casino is located on four leased parcels of land, comprising approximately nine acres in the aggregate. The leases are with unrelated third parties and have various expiration dates beginning in 2026 (for the parcel on which our main casino building is located, which we lease from a competitor), and we sublease approximately two of the acres to an unrelated third party.

Rocky Gap: We lease the approximately 270 acres in the Rocky Gap State Park on which Rocky Gap is situated from the Maryland DNR pursuant to a 40-year ground lease. The lease expires in 2052, with an option to renew for an additional 20 years. We own the 170,000 square foot Rocky Gap building.

All of our owned and leased real property for our casino properties, along with substantially all of the assets of the casino properties, are subject to liens securing all of our obligations under our Credit Facility (subject to receipt of certain approvals).

Distributed Gaming

We lease our 66 branded tavern locations under non-cancelable operating leases. As of December 31, 2019, the terms of our tavern leases ranged from six to 31 years, with various renewal options from four to 10 years.

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ITEM 3.

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

From time to time, we are involved in a variety of lawsuits, claims, investigations and other legal proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business, including proceedings concerning labor and employment matters, personal injury claims, breach of contract claims, commercial disputes, business practices, intellectual property, tax and other matters for which we record reserves. Although lawsuits, claims, investigations and other legal proceedings are inherently uncertain and their results cannot be predicted with certainty, we believe that the resolution of our currently pending matters should not have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations or liquidity. Regardless of the outcome, legal proceedings can have an adverse impact on us because of defense costs, diversion of management resources and other factors. In addition, it is possible that an unfavorable resolution of one or more such proceedings could in the future materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations or liquidity in a particular period.

On August 31, 2018, prior guests of The Strat filed a purported class action complaint against us in the District Court, Clark County, Nevada, on behalf of similarly situated individuals and entities that paid the Clark County Combined Transient Lodging Tax (“Tax”) on the portion of a resort fee that constitutes charges for Internet access, during the period of February 6, 2014 through the date the alleged conduct ceases. The lawsuit alleged that the Tax was charged in violation of the federal Internet Tax Freedom Act, which imposed a national moratorium on the taxation of Internet access by states and their political subdivisions, and sought, on behalf of the plaintiff and the putative class, damages equal to the amount of the Tax collected on the Internet access component of the resort fee, injunctive relief, disgorgement, interest, fees and costs. All defendants to this matter, including Golden Entertainment, Inc., filed a joint motion to dismiss this matter for lack of merit. The District Court granted this joint motion to dismiss on February 21, 2019. The plaintiffs filed an appeal to the Supreme Court of Nevada on April 10, 2019. We, and other defendants, filed an appellate response brief on October 19, 2019.

While legal proceedings are inherently unpredictable and no assurance can be given as to the ultimate outcome of any of the above matters, based on management’s current understanding of the relevant facts and circumstances, we believe that these proceedings should not have a material adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

ITEM 4.

MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable. 

25


 

PART II

ITEM 5.

MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Our common stock is traded on the Nasdaq Global Market under the ticker symbol GDEN.

As of March 10, 2020, there were approximately 230 shareholders of record of our common stock.

Dividends

Other than the special cash dividend that was made in July 2016 pursuant to the terms of the Sartini Gaming merger agreement, we have neither declared nor paid any cash dividends with respect to our common stock. The current policy of our Board of Directors is to retain all future earnings, if any, for use in the operation and development of our business. The payment of any cash dividends in the future will be at the discretion of our Board of Directors and will depend upon such factors as our financial condition, results of operations, capital requirements, our general business condition, restrictions under our Credit Facility and Indenture and any other factors deemed relevant by our Board of Directors.

Share Repurchase Program

Our Board of Directors has authorized us to repurchase up to $25.0 million worth of shares of common stock, subject to available liquidity, general market and economic conditions, alternate uses for the capital and other factors. No shares were repurchased under our share repurchase program during the year ended December 31, 2019. See Note 9, Equity Transactions and Stock Incentive Plans, in the accompanying consolidated financial statements for information regarding our share repurchase program.

 

 

26


 

ITEM 6.

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The Selected Financial Data presented below should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” included in Part II, Item 7 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Selected consolidated statement of operations data and consolidated balance sheet data are derived from our consolidated financial statements. 

 

 

For the Year Ended:

 

 

December 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

2019(1)

 

 

2018(2)

 

 

2017(3)(4)

 

 

2016(3)(5)

 

 

2015(6)

 

(In millions, except per share amounts)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Results of Continuing Operations:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total revenues

$

973

 

 

$

852

 

 

$

507

 

 

$

400

 

 

$

176

 

Income from operations

$

46

 

 

$

51

 

 

$

15

 

 

$

13

 

 

$

18

 

Net income (loss)

$

(40

)

 

$

(21

)

 

$

2

 

 

$

16

 

 

$

25

 

Net income (loss) per

   share — basic

$

(1.43

)

 

$

(0.76

)

 

$

0.09

 

 

$

0.74

 

 

$

1.45

 

Net income (loss) per

   share — diluted

$

(1.43

)

 

$

(0.76

)

 

$

0.08

 

 

$

0.73

 

 

$

1.43

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance Sheet:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

$

112

 

 

$

116

 

 

$

91

 

 

$

47

 

 

$

69

 

Total assets

$

1,741

 

 

$

1,367

 

 

$

1,365

 

 

$

419

 

 

$

379

 

Total long-term liabilities

$

1,318

 

 

$

968

 

 

$

966

 

 

$

172

 

 

$

143

 

Shareholders’ equity

$

290

 

 

$

315

 

 

$

320

 

 

$

209

 

 

$

210

 

 

(1)

Our results for the year ended December 31, 2019 included the operating results of the Laughlin Entities from the closing date of the Laughlin Acquisition on January 14, 2019. We recorded approximately $90.4 million in revenues and $1.8 million in net income from the operations of the Laughlin Entities for the year ended December 31, 2019. Income from operations for the year ended December 31, 2019 included approximately $1.8 million in acquisition expenses primarily related to the Laughlin Acquisition. Net loss for the year ended December 31, 2019 included a loss on extinguishment and modification of debt of $9.2 million.

We adopted Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2016-02, Leases (“Topic 842”), as amended, as of January 1, 2019, and elected the option to apply the transition requirements in the new standard at the effective date of January 1, 2019 with the effects of initially applying Topic 842 recognized as a cumulative-effect adjustment to retained earnings on January 1, 2019. As a result, total assets and total long-term liabilities are not comparable to the prior periods in this first year of adoption.

(2)

Income from operations for the year ended December 31, 2018 included approximately $1.2 million in preopening expenses primarily related to the opening of new taverns in the Las Vegas Valley and $3.0 million in acquisition expenses primarily related to the Laughlin Acquisition. Net loss for the year ended December 31, 2018 included an income tax provision of $9.6 million, which resulted primarily from the change in valuation allowance.

(3)

Selected financial data as of and for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016 have been retrospectively adjusted for the adoption of the new revenue recognition standard. See Note 3, Revenue Recognition, in the accompanying consolidated financial statements for more information. Selected financial data as of and for the year ended December 31, 2015 has not been adjusted and therefore is not comparable.

27


 

(4)

Our results for the year ended December 31, 2017 included the operating results of American from the closing date of the American Acquisition, on October 20, 2017. We recorded approximately $76.3 million in revenues and $5.5 million in net income from the operations of American for the year ended December 31, 2017. Income from operations for the year ended December 31, 2017 included approximately $1.6 million in preopening expenses related to American and the non-capital costs associated with the opening of taverns, and $5.0 million in acquisition expenses related to the American Acquisition. Net income for the year ended December 31, 2017 included an income tax benefit of $7.9 million attributed primarily to a partial release of the valuation allowance on deferred tax assets and the impact of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

(5)

Our results for the year ended December 31, 2016 included the operating results of the Montana distributed gaming businesses we acquired in 2016 from the closing dates of the respective transactions. We recorded approximately $45.4 million in revenues and $1.6 million in net income from the operations of the Montana distributed gaming businesses for the year ended December 31, 2016. Income from operations for the year ended December 31, 2016 included approximately $2.5 million in preopening expenses related to the Montana distributed gaming businesses and the non-capital costs associated with the opening of taverns, and a gain on sale of land held for sale of $4.5 million. Net income for the year ended December 31, 2016 included an income tax benefit of $4.3 million attributed primarily to a partial release of the valuation allowance on deferred tax assets. On July 14, 2016, a special cash dividend of approximately $23.5 million was paid to shareholders (other than shareholders that had waived their right to receive such dividend in connection with the Sartini Gaming merger).

(6)

Our results for the year ended December 31, 2015 included the operating results of Sartini Gaming from the Sartini Gaming merger on August 1, 2015. We recorded approximately $116.8 million in revenues and $10.4 million in net income from the operations of Sartini Gaming’s distributed gaming and casino businesses for the year ended December 31, 2015. Income from operations for the year ended December 31, 2015 included approximately $11.5 million in transaction-related expenses related to the Sartini Gaming merger and net income included income tax benefit of approximately $10.0 million attributed primarily to the income tax benefit recorded from the release of a valuation allowance on deferred tax assets as a result of deferred tax liabilities assumed in the Sartini Gaming merger. Our results for the year ended December 31, 2015 also reflected a gain of $23.6 million related to the disposition of our $60.0 million subordinated promissory note from the Jamul Indian Village to a subsidiary of Penn National Gaming, Inc. in December 2015.

 

28


 

ITEM 7.

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and the related notes thereto and other financial information included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. In addition to the historical information, certain statements in this discussion are forward-looking statements based on current expectations that involve risks and uncertainties. Actual results and the timing of certain events may differ significantly from those projected in such forward-looking statements. See “Forward-Looking Statements” in Part I of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information regarding forward-looking statements.

Overview

We own and operate a diversified entertainment platform, consisting of a portfolio of gaming assets that focus on resort casino operations and distributed gaming (including gaming in our branded taverns).

We conduct our business through two reportable operating segments: Casinos and Distributed Gaming. In our Casinos segment, we own and operate ten resort casino properties in Nevada and Maryland. Our Distributed Gaming segment involves the installation, maintenance and operation of slots and amusement devices in non-casino locations such as restaurants, bars, taverns, convenience stores, liquor stores and grocery stores in Nevada and Montana, and the operation of branded taverns targeting local patrons located primarily in the greater Las Vegas, Nevada metropolitan area.

 

On April 25, 2019, we issued $375 million of 2026 Notes in a private placement to institutional buyers at face value. The 2026 Notes bear interest at 7.625%, payable semi-annually on April 15th and October 15th of each year. See Note 8, Debt, in the accompanying consolidated financial statements for additional information.

 

Casinos

On January 14, 2019, we completed the acquisition of the Laughlin Entities from Marnell for $156.2 million in cash (after giving effect to the post-closing adjustment provisions in the purchase agreement) and the issuance by us of 911,002 shares of our common stock to certain assignees of Marnell. The Laughlin Acquisition added two resort casino properties in Laughlin, Nevada to our casino portfolio: the Edgewater and the Colorado Belle, which increase our scale and presence in the Southern Nevada market. The results of operations of the Laughlin Entities are included in our results subsequent to the acquisition date. See Note 4, Acquisitions, in the accompanying consolidated financial statements for additional information.

On October 20, 2017, we completed the acquisition of all of the outstanding equity interests of American for $787.6 million in cash (after giving effect to post-closing adjustments) and the issuance by us of approximately 4.0 million shares of our common stock to a former American equity holder. The American Acquisition added four Nevada resort casino properties to our casino portfolio, including The Strat in Las Vegas. The results of operations of American and its subsidiaries have been included in our results subsequent to that date. See Note 4, Acquisitions, in the accompanying consolidated financial statements for additional information.

 

29


 

We own and operate ten resort casino properties in Nevada and Maryland. The following table sets forth certain information regarding our properties as of December 31, 2019:

 

 

 

Location

 

Slot

Machines

 

 

Table

Games

 

 

Hotel

Rooms

 

 

Race and

Sport

Book

 

 

Bingo

(seats)

 

Nevada Casinos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The STRAT Hotel, Casino &

   SkyPod ("The Strat")

 

Las Vegas, NV

 

 

741

 

 

 

44

 

 

 

2,429

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

-

 

Arizona Charlie's Decatur

 

Las Vegas, NV

 

 

1,013

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

259

 

 

 

1

 

 

approx. 400

 

Arizona Charlie's Boulder

 

Las Vegas, NV

 

 

824

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

303

 

 

 

1

 

 

approx. 400

 

Aquarius Casino Report

   ("Aquarius")

 

Laughlin, NV

 

 

1,172

 

 

 

33

 

 

 

1,906

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

-

 

Edgewater Hotel & Casino

   Resort ("Edgewater")

 

Laughlin, NV

 

 

703

 

 

 

20

 

 

 

1,052

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

-

 

Colorado Belle Hotel &

   Casino Report

   ("Colorado Belle")

 

Laughlin, NV

 

 

669

 

 

 

16

 

 

 

1,102

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

-

 

Pahrump Nugget Hotel

   Casino ("Pahrump Nugget")

 

Pahrump, NV

 

 

402

 

 

 

9

 

 

 

69

 

 

 

1

 

 

approx. 200

 

Gold Town Casino

 

Pahrump, NV

 

 

226

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Lakeside Casino & RV Park

 

Pahrump, NV

 

 

168

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

approx. 100

 

Maryland Casino

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rocky Gap Casino Resort

   ("Rocky Gap")

 

Flintstone, MD

 

 

665

 

 

 

18

 

 

 

198

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Totals

 

 

 

 

6,583

 

 

 

150

 

 

 

7,318

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Strat: The Strat is our premier casino property, located on Las Vegas Blvd on the north end of the Las Vegas Strip. The Strat comprises the iconic SkyPod, a casino, a hotel and a retail center. As of December 31, 2019, in addition to hotel rooms and gaming in an 80,000 square foot casino, The Strat featured nine restaurants, two rooftop pools, a fitness center, retail shops and entertainment facilities.

 

 

Arizona Charlie’s casinos: Our Arizona Charlie’s Decatur and Arizona Charlie’s Boulder casino properties primarily serve local Las Vegas patrons, and provide an alternative experience to the Las Vegas Strip. As of December 31, 2019, in addition to hotel rooms, gaming and bingo facilities, Arizona Charlie’s Decatur casino offered five restaurants and Arizona Charlie’s Boulder casino offered four restaurants and an RV park with approximately 220 RV hook-up sites.

 

 

Laughlin casinos: We own and operate three casinos in Laughlin, Nevada, which is located approximately 90 miles from Las Vegas on the western riverbank of the Colorado River. As of December 31, 2019, in addition to hotel rooms and gaming, the Aquarius had eight restaurants, the Colorado Belle featured three restaurants, and the Edgewater featured six restaurants and dedicated entertainment venues, including the Laughlin Event Center.

 

 

Pahrump casinos: We own and operate three casinos in Pahrump, Nevada, which is located approximately 60 miles from Las Vegas and is a gateway to Death Valley National Park. As of December 31, 2019, in addition to hotel rooms, gaming and bingo facilities at our Pahrump casino properties, Pahrump Nugget offered a bowling center and our Lakeside Casino & RV Park offered 160 RV hook-up sites.

 

 

Rocky Gap: Rocky Gap is situated on approximately 270 acres in the Rocky Gap State Park in Maryland, which we lease from the Maryland DNR under a 40-year ground lease expiring in 2052 (plus a 20-year option renewal). As of December 31, 2019, in addition to hotel rooms and gaming, Rocky Gap offered three restaurants, a spa and the only Jack Nicklaus signature golf course in Maryland. Rocky Gap is a AAA Four Diamond Award® winning resort and includes an event and conference center.

30


 

Distributed Gaming

 

Our Distributed Gaming segment involves the installation, maintenance and operation of slots and amusement devices in non-casino locations such as restaurants, bars, taverns, convenience stores, liquor stores and grocery stores in Nevada and Montana. We place our slots and amusement devices in locations where we believe they will receive maximum customer traffic, generally near a store’s entrance. In addition, we own and operate branded taverns with slots, which target local patrons, primarily in the greater Las Vegas, Nevada metropolitan area. As of December 31, 2019, our distributed gaming operations comprised approximately 10,900 slots in over 1,000 locations.

Our branded taverns offer a casual, upscale environment catering to local patrons offering superior food, craft beer and other alcoholic beverages, and typically include 15 onsite slots. As of December 31, 2019, we owned and operated 66 branded taverns, which offered a total of over 1,000 onsite slots. Most of our taverns are located in the greater Las Vegas, Nevada metropolitan area and cater to local patrons seeking more convenient entertainment establishments than traditional casino properties. Our tavern brands include PT’s Gold, PT’s Pub, Sierra Gold, Sean Patrick’s, PT’s Place, PT’s Ranch, Sierra Junction and SG Bar.

Results of Operations

The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

(In thousands)

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

Revenues by segment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Casinos

$

615,401

 

 

$

513,949

 

 

$

179,049

 

Distributed Gaming

 

357,239

 

 

 

337,067

 

 

 

327,506

 

Corporate and other

 

770

 

 

 

778

 

 

 

583

 

Total revenues

 

973,410

 

 

 

851,794

 

 

 

507,138

 

Operating expenses by segment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Casinos

 

302,371

 

 

 

247,042

 

 

 

90,037

 

Distributed Gaming

 

275,104

 

 

 

263,953

 

 

 

255,621

 

Corporate and other

 

1,037

 

 

 

3,237

 

 

 

641

 

Total operating expenses

 

578,512

 

 

 

514,232

 

 

 

346,299

 

Selling, general and administrative

 

225,848

 

 

 

183,892

 

 

 

98,382

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

116,592

 

 

 

94,456

 

 

 

40,786

 

Acquisition and severance expenses

 

3,488

 

 

 

3,740

 

 

 

6,183

 

Preopening expenses

 

1,934

 

 

 

1,171

 

 

 

1,632

 

Loss on disposal of assets

 

919

 

 

 

3,336

 

 

 

441

 

Gain on contingent consideration

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(1,719

)

Other operating, net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(157

)

Total expenses

 

927,293

 

 

 

800,827

 

 

 

491,847

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating income

 

46,117

 

 

 

50,967

 

 

 

15,291

 

Non-operating expense, net

 

(87,538

)

 

 

(62,242

)

 

 

(21,128

)

Income tax benefit (provision)

 

1,876

 

 

 

(9,639

)

 

 

7,921

 

Net income (loss)

$

(39,545

)

 

$

(20,914

)

 

$

2,084

 

 

31


 

Year Ended December 31, 2019 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2018

Revenues

The $121.6 million, or 14%, increase in revenues resulted primarily from increases of $53.6 million, $32.5 million, $25.4 million and $10.1 million in gaming, food and beverage, room and other revenues, respectively, due primarily to the inclusion in 2019 of almost a full year of revenues from the resort casino properties acquired in the Laughlin Acquisition, the rebranding of The Strat, and growth in our tavern portfolio and Montana distribution gaming locations.

 

The $101.5 million, or 20.0%, increase in revenues related to our Casinos segment compared to the prior year resulted primarily from increases of $37.4 million, $29.3 million, $25.4 million and $9.3 million in gaming, food and beverage, room and other revenues, respectively, due primarily to the inclusion in 2019 of almost a full year of revenues from the resort casino properties acquired in the Laughlin Acquisition and the rebranding of The Strat.

 

The $20.2 million, or 6%, increase in revenues related to our Distributed Gaming segment resulted primarily from increases of $16.2 million, $3.1 million and $0.8 million in gaming revenues, food and beverage revenues and other revenues, respectively. These increases reflect the opening of six new taverns in the Las Vegas Valley in 2019, as a full year of revenues from the three taverns opened in 2018, stabilized performance of our Nevada distributed gaming locations and the increase of locations and slot product performance in our Montana distributed gaming locations.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, Adjusted EBITDA in our Casinos segment as a percentage of segment revenues (or Adjusted EBITDA margin) was 29%, compared to Adjusted EBITDA margin in our Distributed Gaming segment of 15%. The lower Adjusted EBITDA margin in our Distributed Gaming segment relative to our Casinos segment reflects the fixed and variable amounts paid to third parties under our space and revenue share agreements as expenses in the Distributed Gaming segment (which includes the percentage of gaming revenues paid to third parties under revenue share agreements). See Note 16, Segment Information, in the accompanying consolidated financial statements for additional information regarding segment Adjusted EBITDA and a reconciliation of segment Adjusted EBITDA to segment net income (loss).

Operating Expenses

The $64.3 million, or 13%, increase in operating expenses compared to the prior year resulted primarily from $23.3 million, $21.6 million, $13.4 million and $6.0 million increases in gaming, food and beverage, room and other expenses, respectively. These operating expense increases primarily reflect the inclusion in 2019 of almost a full year of operating expenses relating to the resort casino properties acquired in the Laughlin Acquisition and the operating expenses of six new taverns, renovated food and beverage outlets at The Strat, and additional Montana distributed gaming locations.

Selling, General and Administrative Expenses

The $42.0 million, or 23%, increase in selling, general and administrative (“SG&A”) expenses compared to the prior year resulted primarily from the inclusion in 2019 of almost a full year of SG&A expenses relating to the resort casino properties acquired in the Laughlin Acquisition and corporate related expenses.

 

Within our Casinos segment, SG&A expenses increased $28.8 million, or 26%, resulting primarily from the inclusion in 2019 of almost a full year of SG&A relating to the resort casino properties acquired in the Laughlin Acquisition. The majority of the SG&A expenses in this segment comprised labor costs, marketing and advertising, utilities expenses, repairs and maintenance, and property taxes.

Within our Distributed Gaming segment, SG&A expenses increased $4.8 million or 18%, primarily due to the opening of six new taverns in the Las Vegas Valley in 2019 as well as a full year of expenses from the three taverns opened in 2018. The majority of SG&A expenses in this segment comprised payroll and payroll taxes, marketing, building and rent expense, insurance and property taxes.

32


 

Corporate SG&A expenses increased $9.5 million, or 19% compared to the prior year, primarily from labor costs and professional services in accounting. The majority of SG&A expense in this segment comprised of corporate office overhead, information technology, legal, accounting, third party service providers, executive compensation, share based compensation, payroll expenses and payroll taxes.

Acquisition and Severance Expenses

Acquisition and severance expenses during the year ended December 31, 2019 related primarily to the Laughlin Acquisition, which closed on January 14, 2019 and subsequent integration activities. During the prior year, acquisition expenses primarily related to the American Acquisition and the Laughlin Acquisition.

Preopening Expenses

Preopening expenses consist of labor, food, utilities, training, initial licensing, rent and organizational costs incurred. Non-capital costs associated with the opening of tavern and casino locations are also expensed as preopening expenses as incurred.

During 2019 and 2018, preopening expenses related primarily to costs incurred in the opening of new taverns in the Las Vegas Valley.

Depreciation and Amortization

Depreciation and amortization expenses increased $22.1 million, or 23%, compared to the prior year, primarily due to the depreciation of the assets and the amortization of the intangibles acquired in the Laughlin Acquisition.

Non-Operating Expense, Net

Non-operating expense, net increased $25.3 million compared to the prior year, primarily due to a $10.2 million increase in interest expense from the higher level of indebtedness following the consummation of the Laughlin Acquisition, and a loss on change in fair value of derivative of $3.7 million. Non-operating expense, net in 2019 also included $5.5 million related to a loss on extinguishment of debt.

Income Taxes

Income tax benefit for the year ended December 31, 2019 was approximately $1.9 million, which resulted primarily from the change in valuation allowance. Income tax expense for the year ended December 31, 2018 was approximately $9.6 million, attributable primarily to the change in valuation allowance. The effective tax rate was 4.5% for the year ended December 31, 2019, which differed from the federal tax rate of 21% due primarily to the change in valuation allowance. The effective tax rate for the year ended December 31, 2018 was (85.5)%, which differed from the federal tax rate of 21% due primarily to the change in valuation allowance.

 

As of December 31, 2019, we evaluated all available positive and negative evidence related to our ability to utilize our deferred tax assets. We considered the expected future taxable income (and losses) and deductions from existing deferred tax assets and liabilities, net operating loss carryforwards, tax credit carryforwards, and other factors in reaching the conclusion that the deferred tax assets are not currently expected to be realized, and that therefore, the valuation allowance against the deferred tax assets required adjustment.

 

The Company recognizes penalties and interest related to uncertain tax benefits in the provision for income taxes.

 

Year Ended December 31, 2018 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2017

 

For a discussion of our results of operations for the year ended December 31, 2018 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2017, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in Part II, Item 7 of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 21, 2018.

33


 

Non-GAAP Measures

To supplement our consolidated financial statements presented in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”), we use Adjusted EBITDA, a measure we believe is appropriate to provide meaningful comparison with, and to enhance an overall understanding of, our past financial performance and prospects for the future. We believe Adjusted EBITDA provides useful information to both management and investors by excluding specific expenses and gains that we believe are not indicative of our core operating results. Further, Adjusted EBITDA is a measure of operating performance used by management, as well as industry analysts, to evaluate operations and operating performance and is widely used in the gaming industry. The presentation of this additional information is not meant to be considered in isolation or as a substitute for measures of financial performance prepared in accordance with GAAP. In addition, other companies in our industry may calculate Adjusted EBITDA differently than we do. A reconciliation of net income (loss) to Adjusted EBITDA is provided in the table below.

We define “Adjusted EBITDA” as earnings before interest and other non-operating income (expense), income taxes, depreciation and amortization, preopening expenses, acquisition and severance expenses, loss on disposal of assets, share-based compensation expenses, gain on contingent consideration, loss on extinguishment of debt, gain/loss on change in fair value of derivative, and other operating expenses.

The following table presents a reconciliation of net income (loss) to Adjusted EBITDA:

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

(In thousands)

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

Net income (loss)

$

(39,545

)

 

$

(20,914

)

 

$

2,084

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

116,592

 

 

 

94,456

 

 

 

40,786

 

Preopening and related expenses (1)

 

4,548

 

 

 

1,171

 

 

 

1,632

 

Acquisition and severance expenses

 

3,488

 

 

 

3,740

 

 

 

6,183

 

Asset disposal and other writedowns

 

1,309

 

 

 

3,336

 

 

 

441

 

Share-based compensation

 

10,124

 

 

 

9,988

 

 

 

8,754

 

Other, net

 

2,216

 

 

 

1,088

 

 

 

1,460

 

Gain on contingent consideration

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(1,719

)

Interest expense, net

 

74,220

 

 

 

64,028

 

 

 

19,598

 

Loss on extinguishment of debt

 

9,150

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,708

 

Change in fair value of derivative

 

4,168

 

 

 

(1,786

)

 

 

(178

)

Income tax provision (benefit)

 

(1,876

)

 

 

9,639

 

 

 

(7,921

)

Adjusted EBITDA

$

184,394

 

 

$

164,746

 

 

$

72,828

 

 

(1)

Preopening and related expenses include rent, organizational costs, non-capital costs associated with the opening of tavern and casino locations, and expenses related to The Strat rebranding and the launch of the True Rewards loyalty program.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

As of December 31, 2019, we had $111.7 million in cash and cash equivalents. We currently believe that our cash and cash equivalents, cash flows from operations and borrowing availability under our revolving credit facility will be sufficient to meet our capital requirements during the next 12 months.

Our operating results and performance depend significantly on national, regional and local economic conditions and their effect on consumer spending. Declines in consumer spending would cause revenues generated in both our Casinos and Distributed Gaming segments to be adversely affected.

 

34


 

To further enhance our liquidity position or to finance any future acquisition or other business investment initiatives, we may obtain additional financing, which could consist of debt, convertible debt or equity financing from public and/or private credit and capital markets. In January 2018, the SEC declared our universal shelf registration statement effective for the future sale of up to $150.0 million in aggregate amount of common stock, preferred stock, debt securities, warrants and units and the resale of up to approximately 8.0 million shares of our common stock held by the selling security holders named therein. The securities may be offered from time to time, separately or together, directly by us or through underwriters, dealers or agents at amounts, prices, interest rates and other terms to be determined at the time of the offering.

In January 2018, we completed an underwritten public offering pursuant to our universal shelf registration statement, in which certain of our shareholders resold an aggregate of 6.5 million shares of our common stock, and we sold 975,000 newly issued shares of our common stock. Our net proceeds from the offering were approximately $25.6 million after deducting underwriting discounts and offering expenses.

In April 2019, we issued $375 million of 2026 Notes in a private placement to institutional buyers at face value. The net proceeds of the 2026 Notes were used to (i) repay our former $200 million Second Lien Term Loan, (ii) repay outstanding borrowings under our revolving credit facility under our Credit Facility, (iii) repay $18 million of the outstanding term loan indebtedness under our Credit Facility, and (iv) pay accrued interest, fees and expenses related to each of the foregoing.

Cash Flows

Net cash provided by operating activities was $113.9 million for the year end December 31, 2019 compared to $98.0 million for the prior year. The increase was primarily due to the flow-through effect of higher revenues from the Laughlin Acquisition.

Net cash used in investing activities was $256.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, which included $107.3 million for capital expenditures and $149.0 million for the Laughlin Acquisition. Net cash used in investing activities was $69.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, which included $68.2 million for capital expenditures.

Net cash provided by financing activities was $137.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, which primarily related to $375.0 million of proceeds from the issuance of the 2026 Notes offset by $220.0 million of repayments under our Credit Facility. Net cash used in financing activities was $3.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, which primarily related to $19.6 million of stock repurchases authorized in November 2018 and $8.0 million of repayments under our Credit Facility, offset by $25.6 million of net proceeds to us in the underwritten public offering completed in January 2018.

Senior Secured Credit Facility

 

In October 2017, we entered into the Credit Facility, then consisting of a $800 million term loan and a $100 million revolving credit facility. The revolving credit facility was subsequently increased from $100 million to $200 million in 2018.

 

As of December 31, 2019, we had $772 million in outstanding term loan borrowings under the Credit Facility, no letters of credit outstanding under the Credit Facility, and our revolving credit facility was undrawn, leaving borrowing availability under the revolving credit facility as of December 31, 2019 of $200 million.

 

Borrowings under the Credit Facility bear interest, at our option, at either (1) a base rate equal to the greatest of the federal funds rate plus 0.50%, the applicable administrative agent’s prime rate as announced from time to time, or the LIBOR rate for a one-month interest period plus 1.00%, subject to a floor of 1.75% (with respect to the term loan) or 1.00% (with respect to borrowings under the revolving credit facility) or (2) the LIBOR rate for the applicable interest period, subject to a floor of 0.75% (with respect to the term loan only), plus in each case, an applicable margin. The applicable margin for the term loan under the Credit Facility is 2.00% for base rate loans and 3.00% for LIBOR rate loans. The applicable margin for borrowings under the revolving credit facility ranges from

35


 

1.50% to 2.00% for base rate loans and 2.50% to 3.00% for LIBOR rate loans, based on our net leverage ratio. The commitment fee for the revolving credit facility is payable quarterly at a rate of 0.375% or 0.50%, depending on our net leverage ratio, and is accrued based on the average daily unused amount of the available revolving commitment. As of December 31, 2019, the weighted-average effective interest rate on our outstanding borrowings under the Credit Facility was approximately 5.3%.

 

The revolving credit facility matures on October 20, 2022, and the term loan under the Credit Facility matures on October 20, 2024. The term loan under the Credit Facility is repayable in 27 quarterly installments of $2 million each, which commenced in March 2018, followed by a final installment of $746 million at maturity.

 

Borrowings under the Credit Facility are guaranteed by each of our existing and future wholly-owned domestic subsidiaries (other than certain insignificant or unrestricted subsidiaries) and are secured by substantially all of the present and future assets of Golden and our subsidiary guarantors (subject to certain exceptions).

Under the Credit Facility, we and our restricted subsidiaries are subject to certain limitations, including limitations on our respective ability to: incur additional debt, grant liens, sell assets, make certain investments, pay dividends and make certain other restricted payments. In addition, we will be required to pay down the term loan under the Credit Facility under certain circumstances if we or our restricted subsidiaries issue debt, sell assets, receive certain extraordinary receipts or generate excess cash flow (subject to exceptions). The revolving credit facility contains a financial covenant regarding a maximum net leverage ratio that applies when borrowings under the revolving credit facility exceed 30% of the total revolving commitment. The Credit Facility also prohibits the occurrence of a change of control, which includes the acquisition of beneficial ownership of 50% or more of our capital stock (other than by certain permitted holders, which include, among others, Blake L. Sartini, Lyle A. Berman, and certain affiliated entities). If we default under the Credit Facility due to a covenant breach or otherwise, the lenders may be entitled to, among other things, require the immediate repayment of all outstanding amounts and sell our assets to satisfy the obligations thereunder. We were in compliance with our financial covenants under the Credit Facility as of December 31, 2019.

Senior Notes due 2026

On April 15, 2019, we issued $375 million of 2026 Notes in a private placement to institutional buyers at face value. The 2026 Notes bear interest at 7.625%, payable semi-annually on April 15th and October 15th of each year.

In conjunction with the issuance of the 2026 Notes, we incurred approximately $6.7 million in debt financing costs and fees that have been deferred and are being amortized over the term of the 2026 Notes using the effective interest method.

The net proceeds of the 2026 Notes were used to (i) repay our former $200 million Second Lien Term Loan, (ii) repay outstanding borrowings under the revolving credit facility under our Credit Facility, (iii) repay $18 million of the outstanding term loan indebtedness under the Credit Facility, and (iv) pay accrued interest, fees and expenses related to each of the foregoing.

The 2026 Notes may be redeemed, in whole or in part, at any time during the 12 months beginning on April 15, 2022 at a redemption price of 103.813%, during the 12 months beginning on April 15, 2023 at a redemption price of 101.906%, and at any time on or after April 15, 2024 at a redemption price of 100%, in each case plus accrued and unpaid interest, if any, thereon to the redemption date. Prior to April 15, 2022, we may redeem up to 40% of the 2026 Notes at a redemption price of 107.625% of the principal amount thereof, plus accrued and unpaid interest, if any, thereon to the redemption date, from the net cash proceeds of specified equity offerings. Prior to April 15, 2022, we may also redeem the 2026 Notes, in whole or in part, at a redemption price equal to 100% of the principal amount thereof, plus accrued and unpaid interest and an Applicable Premium (as defined in the Indenture), if any, thereon to the redemption date.

36


 

The 2026 Notes are guaranteed on a senior unsecured basis by each of our existing and future wholly-owned domestic subsidiaries that guarantees the Credit Facility. The 2026 Notes are our and the subsidiary guarantors’ general senior unsecured obligations and rank equally in right of payment with all of our respective existing and future unsecured unsubordinated debt. The 2026 Notes are effectively junior in right of payment to our and the subsidiary guarantors’ existing and future secured debt, including under the Credit Facility (to the extent of the value of the assets securing such debt), are structurally subordinated to all existing and future liabilities (including trade payables) of any of our subsidiaries that do not guarantee the 2026 Notes, and are senior in right of payment to all of our and the subsidiary guarantors’ existing and future subordinated indebtedness.

Under the Indenture, we and our restricted subsidiaries are subject to certain limitations, including limitations on our respective ability to: incur additional debt, grant liens, sell assets, make certain investments, pay dividends and make certain other restricted payments. In the event of a change of control (which includes the acquisition of more than 50% of our capital stock, other than by certain permitted holders, which include, among others, Blake L. Sartini, Lyle A. Berman, and certain affiliated entities), each holder will have the right to require us to repurchase all or any part of such holder’s 2026 Notes at a purchase price in cash equal to 101% of the aggregate principal amount of the 2026 Notes repurchased, plus accrued and unpaid interest, if any, to the date of purchase.

Expenses Related to Extinguishment and Modification of Debt

In April 2019, we recognized a $5.5 million loss on extinguishment of debt and $3.7 million of expense related to modification of debt, related to the repayment of our Second Lien Term Loan and an $18 million prepayment of the term loan under our Credit Facility.

Share Repurchase Program

 

On November 7, 2018, our Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to $25.0 million shares of common stock, subject to available liquidity, general market and economic conditions, alternate uses for the capital and other factors. During the year ended December 31, 2018, we repurchased approximately 1.2 million shares of our common stock in open market transactions for approximately $19.6 million at an average price of $16.06 per share. The November 7, 2018 authorization was replaced on March 12, 2019, when our Board of Directors authorized us to repurchase up to $25.0 million worth of additional shares of common stock, subject to available liquidity, general market and economic conditions, alternate uses for the capital and other factors. Share repurchases may be made from time to time in open market transactions, block trades or in private transactions in accordance with applicable securities laws and regulations and other legal requirements, including compliance with our finance agreements. There is no minimum number of shares that we are required to repurchase and the repurchase program may be suspended or discontinued at any time without prior notice. No shares were repurchased under our share repurchase program during the year ended December 31, 2019. 

Other Items Affecting Liquidity

The outcome of the following specific matters, including our commitments and contingencies, may also affect our liquidity.

Commitments, Capital Spending and Development

We perform on-going refurbishment and maintenance at our facilities, of which certain maintenance costs are capitalized if such improvement or refurbishment extends the life of the related asset, while other maintenance costs that do not so qualify are expensed as incurred. The commitment of capital and the related timing thereof are contingent upon, among other things, negotiation of final agreements and receipt of approvals from the appropriate regulatory bodies. We intend to fund such capital expenditures through our revolving credit facility and operating cash flows.

See Note 14, Commitments and Contingencies, in the accompanying consolidated financial statements for additional information regarding commitments and contingencies that may also affect our liquidity.

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Contractual Obligations

The following table summarizes our contractual obligations as of December 31, 2019:

 

 

2020

 

 

2021

 

 

2022

 

 

2023

 

 

2024

 

 

Thereafter

 

 

Total

 

(In thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Term loan

$

 

 

$

4,000

 

 

$

8,000

 

 

$

8,000

 

 

$

8,000

 

 

$

744,000

 

 

$

772,000

 

Senior Notes due 2026

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

375,000

 

 

 

375,000

 

Notes payable

 

4,835

 

 

 

1,495

 

 

 

25

 

 

 

14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6,369

 

Interest on long-term debt (1)

 

67,890

 

 

 

67,651

 

 

 

67,303

 

 

 

66,898

 

 

 

57,056

 

 

 

38,125

 

 

 

364,923

 

Operating leases (2)

 

45,171

 

 

 

43,653

 

 

 

37,218

 

 

 

31,540

 

 

 

30,490

 

 

 

101,441

 

 

 

289,513

 

Finance lease obligations (3)

 

4,442

 

 

 

3,953

 

 

 

2,617

 

 

 

529

 

 

 

227

 

 

 

3,828

 

 

 

15,596

 

Purchase obligations (4)

 

973

 

 

 

1,296

 

 

 

1,320

 

 

 

910

 

 

 

922

 

 

 

5,734

 

 

 

11,155

 

 

$

123,311

 

 

$

122,048

 

 

$

116,483

 

 

$

107,891

 

 

$

96,695

 

 

$

1,268,128

 

 

$

1,834,556

 

 

(1)

Represents estimated interest payments on our outstanding term loan balance based on interest rates as of December 31, 2019 until maturity. Includes interest on senior notes and notes payable.

(2)

Includes total operating lease interest obligations of $71.3 million.

(3)

Includes total finance lease interest obligations of $3.1 million.

(4)

Represents obligations related to license agreements.

Other Opportunities

We may investigate and pursue expansion opportunities in our existing or new markets from time to time. Such expansions will be influenced and determined by a number of factors, which may include licensing availability and approval, suitable investment opportunities and availability of acceptable financing. Investigation and pursuit of such opportunities may require us to make substantial investments or incur substantial costs, which we may fund through cash flows from operations or borrowing availability under our revolving credit facility. To the extent such sources of funds are not sufficient, we may also seek to raise such additional funds through public or private equity or debt financings or from other sources. No assurance can be given that additional financing will be available or that, if available, such financing will be obtainable on terms favorable to us. Moreover, we can provide no assurances that the investigation or pursuit of an opportunity will result in a completed transaction.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

Management’s discussion and analysis of our results of operations and liquidity and capital resources are based on our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with GAAP. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the balance sheet date and reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates and judgments, including those related to the application of the acquisition method of accounting, long-lived assets, goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets, revenue recognition, income taxes and share-based compensation expenses. We base our estimates and judgments on historical experience and on various other factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ materially from these estimates.

The following represent our accounting policies that involve the more significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statement. See Note 2, Summary of Significant Accounting Policies, in the accompanying consolidated financial statements for information regarding our significant accounting policies.

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Property and Equipment

Property and equipment, net was $1,047 million as of December 31, 2019, comprising 60.1% of our consolidated total assets. We evaluate the carrying value whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value of such assets may not be recoverable. If triggering events are identified, we then compare the estimated undiscounted future cash flows of such assets to the carrying value of the assets. Any such assets are not impaired if the undiscounted future cash flows exceed their carrying value. If the carrying value exceeds the undiscounted future cash flows, then an impairment charge is recorded, typically measured using a discounted cash flow model, which is based on the estimated future results of the relevant reporting unit discounted using our weighted-average cost of capital and market indicators of terminal year free cash flow multiples.

Property and equipment must be tested for recoverability whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that its carrying amount may not be recoverable. Examples include a significant adverse change in the extent or manner in which we use the asset, a change in its physical condition, or an unexpected change in financial performance.

We reconsider changes in circumstances on a frequent basis, as well as whenever a triggering event related to potential impairment has occurred. There are three generally accepted approaches available in developing an opinion of value: the cost, sales comparison and income approaches. We generally consider each of these approaches in developing a recommendation of the fair value of the asset; however, the reliability of each approach is dependent upon the availability and comparability of the market data uncovered, as well as the decision-making criteria used by market participants when evaluating an asset. We will bifurcate our investment and apply the most indicative approach to overall fair valuation, or in some cases, a weighted analysis of any or all of these methods. Given the need for significant judgements in conducting such valuations, we may engage the assistance of independent valuation firms.

 

Goodwill

We test our goodwill for impairment annually during the fourth quarter of each year, and whenever events or circumstances indicate that it is more likely than not that impairment may have occurred. Impairment testing for goodwill is performed at the reporting unit level, and we consider each of our operating properties to be a separate reporting unit.

 

When performing the annual goodwill impairment testing, we either conduct a qualitative assessment to determine whether it is more likely than not that the asset is impaired or elect to bypass this qualitative assessment and perform a quantitative test for impairment. Under the qualitative assessment, we consider both positive and negative factors, including macroeconomic conditions, industry ev