0001070680-19-000006.txt : 20190315 0001070680-19-000006.hdr.sgml : 20190315 20190315114732 ACCESSION NUMBER: 0001070680-19-000006 CONFORMED SUBMISSION TYPE: 10-K PUBLIC DOCUMENT COUNT: 139 CONFORMED PERIOD OF REPORT: 20181231 FILED AS OF DATE: 20190315 DATE AS OF CHANGE: 20190315 FILER: COMPANY DATA: COMPANY CONFORMED NAME: CENTRAL FEDERAL CORP CENTRAL INDEX KEY: 0001070680 STANDARD INDUSTRIAL CLASSIFICATION: SAVINGS INSTITUTION, FEDERALLY CHARTERED [6035] IRS NUMBER: 341877137 STATE OF INCORPORATION: DE FISCAL YEAR END: 1231 FILING VALUES: FORM TYPE: 10-K SEC ACT: 1934 Act SEC FILE NUMBER: 000-25045 FILM NUMBER: 19683897 BUSINESS ADDRESS: STREET 1: C/O CFBANK STREET 2: 7000 N. HIGH ST. CITY: WORTHINGTON STATE: OH ZIP: 43085 BUSINESS PHONE: 6143347979 MAIL ADDRESS: STREET 1: C/O CFBANK STREET 2: 7000 N. HIGH ST. CITY: WORTHINGTON STATE: OH ZIP: 43085 FORMER COMPANY: FORMER CONFORMED NAME: GRAND CENTRAL FINANCIAL CORP DATE OF NAME CHANGE: 19980918 10-K 1 cfbk-20181231x10k.htm 10-K 10K 2018

 

 



UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C.  20549

 

FORM 10-K





[X]     ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934



For the Fiscal Year ended December 31, 2018

 

Or



[    ]     TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934





For the transition period from __________ to______________



Commission File Number 0-25045





CENTRAL FEDERAL CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)





 

Delaware

34-1877137

(State or other jurisdiction of

(IRS Employer

incorporation or organization)

Identification No.)







 

7000 N. High Street, Worthington, Ohio

43085

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

(Zip Code)







(614) 334-7979

(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)



Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:





 

Common Stock, par value $.01 per share

Nasdaq® Capital Market

(Title of Class)

(Name of Exchange on which Registered)





Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act: None

 


 

 





Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act

YES [  ]    NO [X]



Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act

YES [  ]   NO [X]



Indicate by check mark whether the registrant:  (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  YES [X]     NO [  ]



Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (Section 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files.)

YES [X]    NO [  ]



Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (Section 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  [    ]



Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer”,  “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.  (Check one):



Large accelerated filer [  ]    Accelerated filer [  ]Non-accelerated filer [X]    Smaller reporting company [X]

Emerging growth company [  ]



If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  [  ]



Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act)

YES [  ]   NO [X]





The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity of the registrant held by non-affiliates as of June 30, 2018 was $56.1 million based upon the closing price as reported on the Nasdaq® Capital Market for that date.



As of March 8, 2019, there were 4,392,296 shares of the registrant’s Common Stock outstanding.





DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE



Portions of the registrant’s Annual Report to Stockholders  for its fiscal year ended December 31, 2018,  included as Exhibit 13.1 to this Form 10-K, and its Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Stockholders  to be held on  May 29, 2019,  are incorporated herein by reference into Parts II and III, respectively, of this Form 10-K.

 



 

 


 

INDEX





 

 

PART I

 

Item 1.

Business

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

30 

Item 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

37 

Item 2.

Properties

37 

Item 3.

Legal Proceedings

38 

Item 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

38 

PART II

 

Item 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

38 

Item 6.

Selected Financial Data 

38 

Item 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

38 

Item 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

39 

Item 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

39 

Item 9.

Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

39 

Item 9A.

Controls and Procedures

39 

Item 9B.

Other Information

39 

PART III

 

Item 10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

40 

Item 11.

Executive Compensation

40 

Item 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

41 

Item 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

41 

Item 14.

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

41 

PART IV

 

Item 15.

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules    

42 

Item 16.

Form 10-K Summary

43 

SIGNATURES 

44 



 



 

2


 

Forward-Looking Statements

Statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K (this “Form 10-K”) and in our other communications that are not statements of historical fact are forward-looking statements which are made in good faith by us. Forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to: (1) projections of revenues, income or loss, earnings or loss per share of common stock, capital structure and other financial items; (2) plans and objectives of the management or Boards of Directors of Central Federal Corporation (the Holding Company) or CFBank, National Association (“CFBank”); (3) statements regarding future events, actions or economic performance; and (4) statements of assumptions underlying such statements.  Words such as "estimate," "strategy," "may," "believe," "anticipate," "expect," "predict," "will," "intend," "plan," "targeted," and the negative of these terms, or similar expressions, are intended to identify forward-looking statements, but are not the exclusive means of identifying such statements.  Various risks and uncertainties may cause actual results to differ materially from those indicated by our forward-looking statements, including, without limitation, those risks set forth in the section captioned “RISK FACTORS” in Part I, Item 1A of this Form 10-K. 

Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of performance or results.  A forward-looking statement may include a statement of the assumptions or bases underlying the forward-looking statement.  The Holding Company, including its wholly-owned subsidiary, CFBank believes it has chosen these assumptions or bases in good faith and that they are reasonable.  We caution you, however, that assumptions or bases almost always vary from actual results, and the differences between assumptions or bases and actual results can be material.  The forward-looking statements included in this report speak only as of the date of the report.  We undertake no obligation to publicly release revisions to any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date of such statements, except to the extent required by law.



PART I

Item 1.  Business.

General

The Holding Company, was organized as a Delaware corporation in September 1998 as the holding company for CFBank, in connection with CFBank’s conversion from a mutual to stock form of organization.    CFBank was originally organized in 1892 and was formerly known as Central Federal Savings and Loan Association of Wellsville and more recently as Central Federal Bank.  On December 1, 2016, CFBank converted from a federal savings institution to a national bank.  Effective as of December 1, 2016 and in conjunction with the conversion of CFBank to a national bank, the Holding Company became a registered bank holding company and elected financial holding company status.  As a financial holding company, we are subject to regulation by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the “FRB”).  As used herein, the terms “we,” “us,” “our” and the “Company” refer to Central Federal Corporation and its subsidiaries, unless the context indicates to the contrary.

The consolidated financial statements include the Holding Company and CFBank.    Intercompany transactions and balances are eliminated in consolidation.

Central Federal Capital Trust I (the “Trust”), a wholly owned subsidiary of the Holding Company, was formed in 2003 to raise additional funding for the Company.  The Holding Company is not considered the primary beneficiary of this trust (variable interest entity) and, therefore, the trust is not consolidated in the Company’s financial statements, but rather the subordinated debentures are shown as a liability. 

Currently, the Company does not transact material business other than through CFBank.  At December 31, 2018, the Company’s assets totaled $665.0 million and stockholders’ equity totaled $45.6 million. 

CFBank has a presence in four major metro Ohio markets – Columbus, Cleveland, Cincinnati and Akron, as well as its two locations in Columbiana County, Ohio.  CFBank provides personalized Business Banking products and services including commercial loans and leases, commercial and residential real estate loans and treasury management depository services.  As a full service commercial bank, our business, along with our products and services, is focused on serving the banking and financial needs of closely held businesses.  Our business model emphasizes personalized service, customer access to decision makers, quick execution, and the convenience of online internet banking, mobile banking, remote deposit and corporate treasury management.  In addition, CFBank provides residential lending and full service retail banking services and products.  Most of our deposits and loans come from our market area.  Because of CFBank’s concentration of business activities in Ohio, the Company’s financial condition and results of operations depend in large part upon economic conditions in Ohio.    

Our revenues are derived principally from the generation of interest and fees on loans originated and, to a lesser extent, interest and dividends on securities and noninterest income generated on the sale of loansOur primary sources of funds are retail and business deposit accounts and certificates of deposit, brokered certificates of deposit and, to a lesser extent, principal and interest payments on loans and securities, Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB) advances, other borrowings and proceeds from the sale of loans.  

3


 

Our principal market area for loans and deposits includes the following Ohio counties: Franklin County through our office in Worthington, Ohio and our loan production office (opened in February 2018) in Columbus, Ohio;  Hamilton County through our office in Glendale, Ohio, Summit County through our office in Fairlawn, Ohio; Columbiana County through our offices in Calcutta and Wellsville, Ohio; and Cuyahoga County, through our agency office in Woodmere, Ohio.  We originate commercial and business loans primarily throughout Ohio, and residential real estate loans on a national basis. 

Market Area and Competition

Our primary market areas in Ohio are competitive markets for financial services and we face competition both in making loans and in attracting deposits.  Direct competition comes from a number of financial institutions operating in our market area, many of which have a statewide or regional presence, and in some cases, a national presence.  Many of these financial institutions are significantly larger and have greater financial resources than we doCompetition for loans and deposits comes from savings institutions, mortgage banking companies, commercial banks, credit unions, brokerage firms and insurance companies. 

Lending Activities 

Loan and Lease Portfolio Composition.  The loan and lease portfolio consists primarily of commercial, commercial real estate and multi-family mortgage loans, mortgage loans secured by single-family residences and, to a lesser degree, consumer loans.    It also consists of a portfolio of residential mortgage loans totaling $36.8 million as a result of participation in the Northpointe Mortgage Purchase Program.  See Note 4 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in our 2018 Annual Report to Stockholders (our “2018 Annual Report”), included as Exhibit 13.1 to this Form 10-K, for additional information regarding the Northpointe Mortgage Purchase ProgramCFBank also finances a variety of commercial and residential construction projects.  At December 31, 2018, gross loans receivable totaled  $557.7 million and increased approximately $144.3 million, or 34.9%, from $413.4 million at December 31, 2017.  Commercial, commercial real estate and multi-family mortgage loans, including related construction loans, totaled $389.7 million in the aggregate and represented 69.9%  of the gross loan portfolio at December 31, 2018 as compared to 66.8% of the gross loan portfolio at December 31, 2017.  Commercial, commercial real estate and multi-family mortgage loan balances, including related construction loans, increased  $113.5 million, or 41.1%, during 2018. Portfolio single-family residential mortgage loans, including related construction loans and residential mortgage loans originated through the Northpointe Mortgage Purchase Program, totaled $138.4 million and represented 24.8% of total gross loans at year-end 2018, compared to 27.0% at year-end 2017.  The remainder of our loan portfolio consists of consumer loans, which totaled $29.5 million, or 5.3% of gross loans receivable, at year-end 2018.  

The types of loans originated are subject to federal and state laws and regulations.  Interest rates charged on loans are affected by the demand for such loans,  the supply of money available for lending purposes and the rates offered by competitors.  In turn, these factors are affected by, among other things, economic conditions, fiscal policies of the federal government, monetary policies of the FRB and legislative tax policies.



 

4


 

The following table sets forth the composition of the loan and lease portfolio in dollar amounts and as a percentage of the portfolio at the dates indicated.



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



December 31,



2018

 

2017

 

2016

 

2015

 

2014



 

 

 

Percent

 

 

 

 

Percent

 

 

 

 

Percent

 

 

 

 

Percent

 

 

 

 

Percent



Amount

 

of Total

 

Amount

 

of Total

 

Amount

 

of Total

 

Amount

 

of Total

 

Amount

 

of Total



(Dollars in thousands)

Real estate mortgage loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Single-family

$

118,386 

 

21.23% 

 

$

95,578 

 

23.12% 

 

$

92,544 

 

26.21% 

 

$

81,985 

 

27.00% 

 

$

51,445 

 

19.53% 

 Multi-family

 

47,651 

 

8.54% 

 

 

35,665 

 

8.63% 

 

 

34,291 

 

9.71% 

 

 

28,950 

 

9.53% 

 

 

28,790 

 

10.93% 

 Construction

 

61,792 

 

11.08% 

 

 

42,862 

 

10.37% 

 

 

25,822 

 

7.31% 

 

 

24,662 

 

8.12% 

 

 

23,641 

 

8.98% 

 Commercial real estate

 

173,435 

 

31.10% 

 

 

111,866 

 

27.06% 

 

 

105,313 

 

29.83% 

 

 

96,488 

 

31.78% 

 

 

91,119 

 

34.58% 

Total real estate mortgage loans

 

401,264 

 

71.95% 

 

 

285,971 

 

69.18% 

 

 

257,970 

 

73.06% 

 

 

232,085 

 

76.43% 

 

 

194,995 

 

74.02% 

Consumer loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Home equity loans

 

5,321 

 

0.95% 

 

 

224 

 

0.05% 

 

 

479 

 

0.14% 

 

 

504 

 

0.17% 

 

 

549 

 

0.21% 

 Home equity lines of credit

 

23,961 

 

4.30% 

 

 

25,054 

 

6.06% 

 

 

23,109 

 

6.55% 

 

 

21,837 

 

7.19% 

 

 

16,898 

 

6.42% 

 Automobile

 

 -

 

0.00% 

 

 

 -

 

0.00% 

 

 

 -

 

0.00% 

 

 

65 

 

0.02% 

 

 

122 

 

0.05% 

 Other

 

262 

 

0.05% 

 

 

152 

 

0.04% 

 

 

158 

 

0.04% 

 

 

5,449 

 

1.79% 

 

 

4,305 

 

1.63% 

Total consumer loans

 

29,544 

 

5.30% 

 

 

25,430 

 

6.15% 

 

 

23,746 

 

6.73% 

 

 

27,855 

 

9.17% 

 

 

21,874 

 

8.31% 

Commercial loans (1)

 

126,887 

 

22.75% 

 

 

101,975 

 

24.67% 

 

 

71,334 

 

20.21% 

 

 

43,744 

 

14.40% 

 

 

46,532 

 

17.67% 

Total loans receivable

 

557,695 

 

100.0% 

 

 

413,376 

 

100.0% 

 

 

353,050 

 

100.0% 

 

 

303,684 

 

100.0% 

 

 

263,401 

 

100.0% 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Less:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Allowance for loan and lease losses

 

(7,012)

 

 

 

 

(6,970)

 

 

 

 

(6,925)

 

 

 

 

(6,620)

 

 

 

 

(6,316)

 

 

Loans receivable, net

$

550,683 

 

 

 

$

406,406 

 

 

 

$

346,125 

 

 

 

$

297,064 

 

 

 

$

257,085 

 

 



(1)

Includes commercial leases of  $5,403 at December 31, 2018,  $6,008 at December 31, 2017 and $2,874 at December 31, 2016.



 

5


 

Loan Maturity.  The following table shows the remaining contractual maturity of the loan portfolio at December 31, 2018Demand loans and other loans having no stated schedule of repayments or no stated maturity are reported as due within one year.  The table does not include potential prepayments or scheduled principal amortization. 





 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



At December 31, 2018



Real Estate Mortgage Loans(1)

 

Consumer Loans

 

Commercial Loans

 

Total Loans Receivable



(Dollars in thousands)

Amounts due:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Within one year

$

82,387 

 

$

57 

 

$

31,128 

 

$

113,572 

 After one year:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    More than one year to three years

 

60,903 

 

 

221 

 

 

18,719 

 

 

79,843 

    More than three years to five years

 

78,875 

 

 

18 

 

 

34,264 

 

 

113,157 

    More than five years to 10 years

 

92,388 

 

 

1,553 

 

 

20,030 

 

 

113,971 

    More than 10 years to 15 years

 

6,978 

 

 

2,913 

 

 

22,746 

 

 

32,637 

    More than 15 years

 

79,733 

 

 

24,782 

 

 

 -

 

 

104,515 

       Total due after 2019

 

318,877 

 

 

29,487 

 

 

95,759 

 

 

444,123 

 Total amount due

$

401,264 

 

$

29,544 

 

$

126,887 

 

$

557,695 



(1)

Real estate mortgage loans include single-family, multi-family and commercial real estate loans and construction loans.



The following table sets forth at December 31, 2018, the dollar amount of total loans and leases receivable contractually due after December 31, 2019, and whether such loans have fixed interest rates or adjustable interest rates.





 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Due After December 31, 2019



Fixed

 

Adjustable

 

Total



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Real estate mortgage loans(1)

$

185,613 

 

$

133,264 

 

$

318,877 

Consumer loans

 

251 

 

 

29,236 

 

 

29,487 

Commercial loans

 

52,095 

 

 

43,664 

 

 

95,759 

    Total loans

$

237,959 

 

$

206,164 

 

$

444,123 



(1)

Real estate mortgage loans include single-family, multi-family and commercial real estate loans and construction loans.



Origination of Loans and Leases.    Lending activities are conducted through our offices located in Franklin, Cuyahoga, Summit, Hamilton and Columbiana Counties, Ohio. We originate commercial, commercial real estate, multi-family and single-family residential mortgage loans and also expanded into business financial services in the Columbus, Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Akron Ohio markets.    

Commercial, commercial real estate and multi-family loans are originated with fixed, floating and ARM interest rates.  Fixed-rate loans are generally limited to terms of three to five years. Historically, CFBank has also utilized interest-rate swaps to protect the related fixed-rate loans from changes in value due to changes in interest rates.  See Note 19 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in our 2018 Annual Report for additional information on interest-rate swaps.  

6


 

CFBank participates in various loan programs offered by the Small Business Administration (SBA), enabling us to provide our customers and small business owners in our markets with access to funding to support their businesses, as well as reduce credit risk associated with these loans. Individual loans include SBA guarantees of up to 90%. 

A majority of our single-family mortgage loan originations are fixed-rate loans.  Current originations of long-term, fixed-rate single-family mortgages are generally sold rather than retained in portfolio in order to minimize investment in long-term, fixed-rate assets that have the potential to expose the Company to long-term interest rate risk.   Although we currently expect that most of our long-term, fixed-rate mortgage loan originations will continue to be sold, primarily on a servicing-released basis, a portion of these loans may be retained for portfolio within our interest rate risk and profitability guidelines. 

Single-Family Mortgage Lending.    A significant lending activity has been the origination of permanent conventional mortgage loans secured by single-family residences located within and outside of our primary market area. Loan originations are primarily obtained through leads-based marketing and from our loan officers and their contacts within the local real estate industry and with existing or past customers and members of the local communities. We offer both fixed-rate and adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) loans with maturities generally up to 30 years, priced competitively with current market rates.  We offer several ARM loan programs with terms of up to 30 years and, with the majority of the programs, interest rates adjust with a maximum adjustment limitation of 2.0% per year and a 5.0% lifetime cap.  The interest rate adjustments on ARM loans currently offered are indexed to a variety of established indices and these loans do not provide for initial deep discount interest rates. We do not originate option ARM loans or loans with negative amortization.

The volume and types of single-family ARM loan originations are affected by market factors such as the level of interest rates, consumer preferences, competition and the availability of funds.  In recent years, demand for single-family ARM loans has been weak due to consumer preference for fixed-rate loans as a result of the low interest rate environment.  Consequently, our origination of ARM loans on single-family residential properties has not been significant as compared to our origination of fixed-rate loans.  

We currently sell the majority of the single-family mortgage loans that we originate on a servicing released basis.  All single-family mortgage loans sold are underwritten according to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (Freddie Mac) or Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae) guidelines, or are underwritten to comply with additional guidelines as may be required by the individual investorCFBank is  a direct endorsed underwriter, a designation by the Department of Housing and Urban Development that allows us to offer loans insured by the Federal Housing Authority (FHA). 

For the year ended December 31, 2018, single-family mortgage loans originated for sale totaled $233.9 million,  an increase of $211.1 million, or 926.8%, compared to $22.8 million that was originated in 2017. The increase in originations was due to the expansion of our leads-based mortgage business and increased sales activityThe volume of refinance activity, which is very sensitive to market mortgage interest rates, was a significant factor that impacted the level of residential loan originations in 2018.  If market mortgage rates increase, our mortgage production, and the resultant gains on sales of loans, could decrease.  

For the year ended December 31, 2018, portfolio single-family mortgage loans originated by CFBank totaled $15.5 million, or 2.8% of total loans.  Our policy is to originate quality loans that are evaluated for risk based on the borrower’s ability to repay the loan.  Collateral positions are established by obtaining independent appraisal opinions.  Mortgage insurance is generally required when the LTV exceeds 80%.    

Portfolio single-family residential ARM loans, which totaled $42.1 million, or 35.6% of the single-family mortgage loan portfolio, at December 31, 2018, generally pose credit risks not inherent in fixed-rate loans, primarily because as interest rates rise, the borrowers’ payments rise, increasing the potential for default.  Periodic and lifetime caps on interest rate increases help to reduce the credit risks associated with ARM loans, but also limit the interest rate sensitivity of such loans.

CFBank has participated in a Mortgage Purchase Program with Northpointe Bank (Northpointe), a Michigan banking corporation, since December 2012.  Pursuant to the terms of a participation agreement, CFBank purchases participation interests in loans made by Northpointe related to fully underwritten and pre-sold mortgage loans originated by various prescreened mortgage brokers located throughout the U.S.  The underlying loans are individually (MERS) registered loans which are held until funded by the end investor. The mortgage loan investors include Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, and other major financial institutions.  This process on average takes approximately 14 days.  Given the short-term holding period of the underlying loans, common credit risks (such as past due, impairment and TDR, nonperforming, and nonaccrual classification) are substantially reduced.  Therefore, no allowance is allocated by CFBank to these loans.  These loans are 100% risk rated for CFBank capital adequacy purposes.  Under the participation agreement, CFBank agrees to purchase a 95% ownership/participation interest in each of the aforementioned loans, and Northpointe maintains a 5% ownership interest in each loan it participates.    See Note 4 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in our 2018 Annual Report.

7


 

Commercial Real Estate and Multi-Family Residential Mortgage Lending.    Origination of commercial real estate and multi-family residential mortgage loans continues to be a  significant portion of CFBank’s lending activity.    Commercial real estate and multi-family residential mortgage loan balances  increased $73.6 million to $221.1 million at December 31, 2018.  This represented an increase of 49.9% over the $147.5 million balance at December 31, 2017.  

We originate commercial real estate loans that are secured by properties used for business purposes, such as manufacturing facilities, office buildings or retail facilitiesWe originate multi-family residential mortgage loans that are secured by apartment buildings, condominiums, and multi-family residential houses.    Commercial real estate and multi-family residential mortgage loans are secured by properties generally located in our primary market area.

Underwriting policies provide that commercial real estate and multi-family residential mortgage loans may be made in amounts up to 85% of the lower of the appraised value or purchase price of the property.  An independent appraisal of the property is required on all loans greater than or equal to $500,000.   In underwriting commercial real estate and multi-family residential mortgage loans, we consider the appraised value and net operating income of the property, the debt service ratio and the  property owner’s and/or guarantor’s financial strength, expertise and credit history.  We offer both fixed and adjustable rate loans.    Fixed rate loans are generally limited to three to five years, at which time they convert to adjustable rate loans.  At times, CFBank accommodates loans to borrowers who desire fixed-rate loans for longer than three to five years.   We have utilized interest-rate swaps to protect these fixed-rate loans from changes in value due to changes in interest rates, as appropriate.  See Note 19 to the Consolidated Financial Statements  included in our 2018 Annual Report for additional information on interest-rate swapsAdjustable-rate loans are tied to various market indices and generally adjust monthly or annually. Payments on both fixed and adjustable rate loans are based on 15 to 25 year amortization periods.

Commercial real estate and multi-family residential mortgage loans are generally considered to involve a greater degree of risk than single-family residential mortgage loans.  Because payments on loans secured by commercial real estate and multi-family residential properties are dependent on successful operation or management of the properties, repayment of commercial real estate and multi-family residential mortgage loans may be subject to a greater extent to adverse conditions in the real estate market or the economy.  As with single-family residential mortgage loans, adjustable rate commercial real estate and multi-family residential mortgage loans generally pose credit risks not inherent in fixed-rate loans, primarily because as interest rates rise, the borrowers’ payments rise, increasing the potential for default.  Additionally, adjustable rate commercial real estate and multi-family residential mortgage loans generally do not contain periodic and lifetime caps on interest rate changes.  We seek to minimize the additional risk presented by adjustable rate commercial real estate and multi-family residential mortgage loans through underwriting criteria that require such loans to be qualified at origination with sufficient debt coverage ratios under increasing interest rate scenarios.

Commercial real estate and multi-family residential mortgage loans also have larger loan balances to single borrowers or groups of related borrowers compared to single-family residential mortgage loans.  Some of our borrowers also have more than one commercial real estate or multi-family residential mortgage loan outstanding with us.  Additionally, some loans may be collateralized by junior liens. Consequently, an adverse development involving one or more loans or credit relationships can expose us to significantly greater risk of loss compared to an adverse development involving a single-family residential mortgage loan.  We seek to minimize and mitigate these risks through underwriting policies which require such loans to be qualified at origination on the basis of the property’s income and debt coverage ratio and the financial strength of the property owners and/or guarantors.

Commercial LendingThe origination of commercial loans continues to be a significant component of our lending activity.  During 2018, commercial loan balances increased by $24.9 million, or 24.4%, to $126.9 million at year-end 2018.   We originate commercial loans primarily to businesses located within our primary market area. Commercial loans are generally secured by business equipment, inventory, accounts receivable and other business assets.  In underwriting commercial loans, we consider the net operating income of the borrower, the debt service ratio and the financial strength, expertise and credit history of the business owners and/or guarantorsWe offer both fixed and adjustable rate commercial loans.  Fixed-rate loans are generally limited to a maximum term of five years.  Adjustable-rate loans are tied to various market indices and generally adjust monthly or annually.  

Commercial loans are generally considered to involve a greater degree of risk than loans secured by real estate.  Because payments on commercial loans are dependent on successful operation of the business enterprise, repayment of such loans may be subject to a greater extent to adverse conditions in the economy.  We seek to mitigate these risks through underwriting policies which require such loans to be qualified at origination on the basis of the enterprise’s income and debt coverage ratio and the financial strength of the business owners and/or guarantors. 

Adjustable-rate commercial loans generally pose credit risks not inherent in fixed-rate loans, primarily because as interest rates rise, the borrowers’ payments rise, increasing the potential for default. Additionally, adjustable-rate commercial loans generally do not contain periodic and lifetime caps on interest rate changes.  We seek to minimize the additional risk presented by adjustable-rate commercial loans through underwriting criteria that require such loans to be qualified at origination with sufficient debt coverage ratios under increasing interest rate scenarios.

8


 

Construction and Land Lending. With economic improvement in our market areas, there was also an increase in commercial building activity. During 2018, construction loans increased by $18.9 million, or 44.2%, to $61.8 million compared to the $42.9 million in the portfolio at year-end 2017.   CFBank’s strong capital levels has allowed CFBank to take advantage of select market opportunities in this area within the risk tolerances we have identified.

Construction loans are made to finance the construction of residential and commercial properties generally located within our primary market areaConstruction loans are fixed- or adjustable-rate loans which may convert to permanent loans with maturities of up to 30 years.  Our policies provide that construction loans may be made in amounts up to 80% of the appraised value of the property, and an independent appraisal of the property is required.  Loan proceeds are disbursed in increments as construction progresses and as inspections warrant and regular inspections are required to monitor the progress of construction.  Land development loans generally do not exceed 75% of the actual cost or current appraised value of the property, whichever is less.  Loans on raw land generally do not exceed 65% of the actual cost or current appraised value of the property, whichever is less.    

Construction and land financing is considered to involve a higher degree of credit risk than long-term financing on improved, owner-occupied real estate.  Risk of loss on a construction loan is dependent largely upon the accuracy of the initial estimate of the property’s value at completion of construction or development compared to the estimated cost (including interest) of construction.  If the estimate of value proves to be inaccurate, we may be confronted with a project, when completed, having a value which is insufficient to assure full repayment.    We attempt to reduce such risks on construction loans by requiring personal guarantees and reviewing current personal financial statements and tax returns, as well as other projects of the developer. 

Consumer and Other LendingThe consumer loan portfolio generally consists of home equity lines of credit, automobile loans, home improvement loans, loans secured by deposits and purchased loans.  At December 31, 2018, the consumer loan portfolio totaled $29.5 million, which was 5.3% of gross loans receivable.  During 2018, the consumer loan portfolio increased  $4.1 million, or 16.2%, over the year-end 2017 balance of $25.4 million. 

Home equity lines of credit include those loans we originate for our portfolio and purchased loansWe offer a  variable rate home equity line of credit product which we originate for our portfolio.  The interest rate adjusts monthly at various margins above the prime rate of interest as disclosed in The Wall Street Journal.  The margin is based on certain factors including the loan balance, value of collateral, election of auto-payment and the borrowers FICO® score.  The amount of the line is based on the borrower’s credit history,  income and equity in the home.  When combined with the balance of the prior mortgage liens, these lines generally may not exceed 89.9% of the appraised value of the property at the time of the loan commitment.  The lines are secured by a subordinate lien on the underlying real estate and are, therefore, vulnerable to declines in property values in the geographic areas where the properties are located. Credit approval for home equity lines of credit requires income sufficient to repay principal and interest due, stability of employment, an established credit record and sufficient collateral.

Delinquencies and Classified Assets.  Management and the Board of Directors monitors the status of all loans 30 days or more past due on a monthly basis through the analysis of past due statistics and trends for all loans.  Procedures with respect to resolving delinquencies vary depending on the nature and type of the loan and period of delinquency.  We make efforts, consistent with safety and soundness principles, to work with the borrower and develop action steps to have the loan brought current.  If the loan is not brought current, it then becomes necessary to take additional legal actions including the repossession of collateral.

We maintain an internal credit rating system and loan review procedures specifically developed to monitor credit risk for commercial, commercial real estate and multi-family residential loans.  Internal loan reviews for these loan types are performed at least annually, and more often for loans with higher credit risk.  Loan officers maintain close contact with borrowers between reviews.  Adjustments to loan risk ratings are based on the reviews and at any time information is received that may affect risk ratings.  Additionally, an independent third party review of commercial, commercial real estate and multi-family residential loans is performed at least annually.  Management uses the results of these reviews to help determine the effectiveness of the existing policies and procedures and to provide an independent assessment of our internal loan risk rating system.

Federal regulations and CFBank’s asset classification policy require use of an internal asset classification system as a means of reporting and monitoring assets.    We have incorporated the regulatory asset classifications as a part of our credit monitoring and internal loan risk rating system.    Loans are classified into risk categories based on relevant information about the ability of borrowers to service their debt, such as current financial information, historical payment experience, credit documentation, public information and current economic trends, among other factors.  In accordance with regulations, problem loans are classified as special mention, substandard, doubtful or loss, and the classifications are subject to review by banking regulators.    Loans designated as special mention are considered criticized assets.  Loans designated as substandard, doubtful or loss are considered classified assets. Loans designated as special mention possess weaknesses that, if left uncorrected, may result in deterioration of the repayment prospects for the loan or of CFBank’s credit position at some future date. A loan is considered substandard if it is inadequately protected by the current net worth and paying capacity of the obligor or of the collateral pledged, if any.  Loans so classified have a well-defined weakness or weaknesses that jeopardize the liquidation of the debt.  They are characterized by the distinct possibility that there will be some loss if the deficiencies are not corrected. A loan considered doubtful has all of the weaknesses inherent in those classified substandard with

9


 

the added characteristic that the weaknesses make collection or liquidation in full, on the basis of currently existing facts, condition and values, highly questionable and improbable.  Loans designated as loss are considered uncollectible based on the borrower’s inability to make payments, and any value attached to collateral, if any, is based on liquidation value. Loans considered loss are generally uncollectible and have so little value that their continuance as assets is not warranted and are charged off, unless certain circumstances exist that could potentially warrant a specific reserve to be established.

See the section titled Financial Condition - Allowance for loan losses” and Notes 1 and 4  to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in our 2018 Annual Report for detailed information on criticized and classified loans as of December 31, 2018 and 2017

Classified loans include all nonaccrual loans, which are discussed in further detail in the section below titled “Nonperforming Assets.  In addition to nonaccrual loans, classified loans include the following loans that were identified as substandard assets, were still accruing interest at December 31, 2018, but exhibit weaknesses that could lead to nonaccrual status in the future.  





 

 

 

 



# of Loans

 

 

Balance

Commercial

 

$

767 

Multi-family residential real estate

 

 

154 

Commercial real estate

 

 

1,933 

Home equity lines of credit

 

 

68 

Total

 

$

2,922 





 

10


 

The following table sets forth information concerning delinquent loans in dollar amounts and as a percentage of the total loan portfolio.  The amounts presented in the table below represent the total remaining balances of the loans rather than the actual payment amounts which are overdue.  Loans shown as 90 days or more delinquent include nonaccrual loans, regardless of delinquency.







 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



December 31, 2018

 

December 31, 2017

 

December 31, 2016



60-89 Days

 

90 Days or More

 

60-89 Days

 

90 Days or More

 

60-89 Days

 

90 Days or More



Number of Loans

 

Balance of Loans

 

Number of Loans

 

Balance of Loans

 

Number of Loans

 

Balance of Loans

 

Number of Loans

 

Balance of Loans

 

Number of Loans

 

Balance of Loans

 

Number of Loans

 

Balance of Loans



(Dollars in thousands)

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

(Dollars in thousands)

Real estate loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Single-family

 -

 

$

 -

 

 

$

167 

 

 

$

27 

 

 

$

253 

 

 

$

49 

 

 

$

397 

 Commercial

 -

 

 

 -

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 

600 

 

 -

 

 

 -

Consumer loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Home equity lines of credit

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 

89 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 

102 

 

 

 

15 

 

 

 

44 

 Other

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 

21 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 -

 

 

 -

Commercial loans

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 

100 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 

115 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 

263 

    Total delinquent loans

 -

 

$

 -

 

 

$

377 

 

 

$

27 

 

 

$

470 

 

 

$

664 

 

12 

 

$

704 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Delinquent loans as a percent of total loans

 

 

 

.00%

 

 

 

 

.07%

 

 

 

 

.01%

 

 

 

 

.11%

 

 

 

 

.19%

 

 

 

 

.20%





 

11


 







 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



December 31, 2015

 

December 31, 2014



60-89 Days

 

90 Days or More

 

60-89 Days

 

90 Days or More



Number of Loans

 

Balance of Loans

 

Number of Loans

 

Balance of Loans

 

Number of Loans

 

Balance of Loans

 

Number of Loans

 

Balance of Loans



(Dollars in thousands)

 

(Dollars in thousands)

Real estate loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Single-family

 -

 

$

 -

 

12 

 

$

640 

 

 

$

46 

 

 

$

549 

 Commercial

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 

446 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 

477 

Consumer loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Home equity lines of credit

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 

115 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 

153 

 Other

 -

 

 

 -

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 

10 

 

 -

 

 

 -

Commercial loans

 

 

 

 

 

224 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 

369 

    Total delinquent loans

 

$

 

18 

 

$

1,425 

 

 

$

56 

 

15 

 

$

1,548 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Delinquent loans as a percent of total loans

 

 

 

.00%

 

 

 

 

.47%

 

 

 

 

.02%

 

 

 

 

.59%







 

12


 

Nonperforming Assets.  The following table contains information regarding nonperforming loans and repossessed assetsCFBank’s policy is to stop accruing interest on loans 90 days or more past due unless the loan principal and interest are determined by management to be fully secured and in the process of collection. All interest accrued but not received for loans placed on nonaccrual is reversed against interest income.



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



At December 31,



2018

 

2017

 

2016

 

2015

 

2014



(Dollars in thousands)

Loans past due over 90 days still on accrual

$

 -

 

$

 -

 

$

 -

 

$

 -

 

$

 -

Nonaccrual loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Single-family real estate

 

167 

 

 

253 

 

 

397 

 

 

640 

 

 

549 

    Multi-family real estate

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

    Commercial real estate

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

446 

 

 

477 

    Consumer

 

110 

 

 

102 

 

 

44 

 

 

115 

 

 

153 

    Commercial

 

100 

 

 

115 

 

 

263 

 

 

224 

 

 

369 

       Total nonaccrual loans

 

377 

 

 

470 

 

 

704 

 

 

1,425 

 

 

1,548 

Total nonperforming loans

 

377 

 

 

470 

 

 

704 

 

 

1,425 

 

 

1,548 

REO

 

38 

 

 

 -

 

 

204 

 

 

1,636 

 

 

1,636 

Other foreclosed assets

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

Total nonperforming assets

 

415 

 

 

470 

 

 

908 

 

 

3,061 

 

 

3,184 

Troubled Debt Restructurings (TDRs) (1)

 

3,061 

 

 

3,271 

 

 

2,986 

 

 

4,920 

 

 

5,233 

Total nonperforming and troubled debt restructurings

$

3,476 

 

$

3,741 

 

$

3,894 

 

$

7,981 

 

$

8,417 

Nonperforming loans to total loans

 

0.07% 

 

 

0.11% 

 

 

0.20% 

 

 

0.47% 

 

 

0.59% 

Nonperforming assets to total assets

 

0.06% 

 

 

0.10% 

 

 

0.21% 

 

 

0.87% 

 

 

1.01% 



(1)

Reflects TDRs where customers have established a sustained period of repayment performance, loans are current according to their modified terms, and repayment of the remaining contractual payments is expected.



The $93,000 decrease in nonperforming loans in 2018 compared to 2017 was primarily due to loan payments,  payoffs and one loan transferred to REO.  There were  $49,000 in loans that became nonperforming in 2018 related to two single-family residential loans and one consumer loan.  

CFBank has seen steady improvement in credit quality as reflected by the level of nonperforming loans over the last five years.    For the year ended December 31, 2018, the amount of additional interest income that would have been recognized on nonaccrual loans, if such loans had continued to perform in accordance with their contractual terms, was approximately $33,000.  There was no interest income recognized on nonaccrual loans in 2018, except for $18,000 of interest income that was collected from the payoff of two single-family residential loans.

Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2011-02 to Receivables (ASC 310), A Creditor’s Determination of Whether a Restructuring is a Troubled Debt Restructuring, clarified the guidance for a creditor’s evaluation of whether it has granted a concession and whether a debtor is experiencing financial difficulties.  With regard to determining whether a concession has been granted, the ASU clarified that creditors are precluded from using the effective interest method to determine whether a concession has been granted. In the absence of using the effective interest method, a creditor must now focus on other considerations such as the value of the underlying collateral, evaluation of other collateral or guarantees, the debtor’s ability to access other funds at market rates, interest rate increases and whether the restructuring results in a delay in payment that is insignificant.  The Company applies the guidance in this ASU to identify its restructured loans as troubled debt restructurings (“TDRs”).  There were no loans restructured in 2018 identified as TDRs.

13


 

As a component of management’s focus on the work out of troubled credits, the terms of certain loans were modified in TDRs, where concessions were granted to borrowers experiencing financial difficulties.  The modification of the terms of such loans may have included one or a combination of the following: a reduction of the stated interest rate of the loan; an increase in the stated rate of interest lower than the current market rate for new debt with similar risk; an extension of the maturity date; or a change in the payment terms. Nonaccrual loans included $100,000 in TDRs at December 31, 2018, while non-accrual loans included $115,000 of TDRs at December 31, 2017. 

At year-end 2018, there were a total of $3.1 million of TDRs, including $2.9 million in commercial real estate loans and $110,000 in single family residential loans, which were not included in nonperforming loans, where customers have established a sustained period of repayment performance, loans are current according to their modified terms, and repayment of the remaining contractual payments is expected.    

See the section titled Financial Condition - Allowance for loan losses” and Notes 1 and 4  to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in our 2018 Annual Report for additional information on nonperforming loans and TDRs as of December 31, 2018 and 2017

For information on real estate owned (REO) and other foreclosed assets, see the section below titled “Foreclosed Assets.”

Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses (ALLL).  The ALLL is a valuation allowance for probable incurred credit losses.  The ALLL methodology is designed as part of a thorough process that incorporates management’s current judgments about the credit quality of the loan portfolio into a determination of the ALLL in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and supervisory guidance.  Management analyzes the adequacy of the ALLL quarterly through reviews of the loan portfolio, including: the nature and volume of the loan portfolio and segments of the portfolio; industry and loan concentrations; historical loss experience; delinquency statistics and the level of nonperforming loans; specific problem loans; the ability of borrowers to meet loan terms; an evaluation of collateral securing loans and the market for various types of collateral; various collection strategies; current economic condition, trends and outlook; and other factors that warrant recognition in providing for an adequate ALLLSee the section titled Financial Condition - Allowance for loan losses” in our 2018 Annual Report for a detailed discussion of management’s methodology for determining the appropriate level of the ALLL.

The ALLL totaled $7.0 million at December 31, 2018, and increased $42,000, or 0.6%, from $7.0 million at December 31, 2017.  The increase in the ALLL is due to net recoveries during the twelve months ended December 31, 2018.  The ratio of the ALLL to total loans was 1.26% at December 31, 2018, compared to 1.69% at December 31, 2017.  In addition, the ratio of the ALLL to nonperforming loans was 1859.9% at December 31, 2018, compared to 1483.0% at December 31, 2017.

We believe the ALLL is adequate to absorb probable incurred credit losses in the loan portfolio as of December 31, 2018; however, future additions to the allowance may be necessary based on factors including, but not limited to, deterioration in client business performance, recessionary economic conditions, declines in borrowers’ cash flows, and market conditions which result in lower real estate values.  Additionally, various regulatory agencies, as an integral part of their examination process, periodically review the ALLL.  Such agencies may require additional provisions for loan losses based on judgments and estimates that differ from those used by management.  Management continues to diligently monitor credit quality in the existing portfolio and analyze potential loan opportunities carefully in order to manage credit risk.  An increase in estimated probable incurred losses and an increase in required loan provision expense could occur if economic conditions and factors which affect credit quality, real estate values and general business conditions worsen.

14


 

The following table sets forth activity in the ALLL for the years ended December 31:



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



2018

 

2017

 

2016

 

2015

 

2014

ALLL, beginning of period

$

6,970 

 

$

6,925 

 

$

6,620 

 

$

6,316 

 

$

5,729 

Charge-offs:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Real estate loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Single-family

 

 

 

 -

 

 

147 

 

 

40 

 

 

 -

     Multi-family

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

     Commercial real estate

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

25 

 

 

  Consumer loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Home equity

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

53 

 

 

41 

 

 

26 

     Other

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 

 

10 

 

 

 -

  Commercial loans

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

123 

 

 

 

 

44 

         Total charge-offs

 

 

 

 -

 

 

324 

 

 

124 

 

 

75 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recoveries on loans previously charged off:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recoveries 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Real estate loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Single-family

 

24 

 

 

20 

 

 

42 

 

 

 

 

     Multi-family

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

143 

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

     Commercial real estate

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

145 

 

 

33 

 

 

349 

  Consumer loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Home equity

 

22 

 

 

23 

 

 

69 

 

 

113 

 

 

24 

     Automobile

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

     Other

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 

 

 -

  Commercial loans

 

 

 

 

 

 -

 

 

25 

 

 

         Total recoveries

 

48 

 

 

45 

 

 

399 

 

 

178 

 

 

384 

Net charge-offs (recoveries)

 

(42)

 

 

(45)

 

 

(75)

 

 

(54)

 

 

(309)

Provision for loan and lease losses

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

230 

 

 

250 

 

 

278 

Reclassification of ALLL on loan-related commitments

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

ALLL, end of period

$

7,012 

 

$

6,970 

 

$

6,925 

 

$

6,620 

 

$

6,316 

ALLL to total loans and leases