10-K 1 btu-20111231x10k.htm FORM 10-K BTU-2011.12.31-10K
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
_____________________________________________
Form 10-K
( X )
 
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
 
For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2011
or
( )
 
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
Commission File Number 1-16463
____________________________________________
Peabody Energy Corporation
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
 
13-4004153
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
701 Market Street, St. Louis, Missouri
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
63101
(Zip Code)
(314) 342-3400
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code
Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of Each Class
 
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share
 
New York Stock Exchange
Preferred Share Purchase Rights
 
New York Stock Exchange
Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
None
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  Yes ( X )     No ( )
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.  Yes ( )    No ( X )
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes ( X )   No ( )
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes ( X )   No ( )
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  ( )
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
Large accelerated filer ( X )
Accelerated filer ( )
Non-accelerated filer ( )
Smaller reporting company ( )
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  Yes ( )     No ( X )
Aggregate market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates (shareholders who are not directors or executive officers) of the Registrant, calculated using the closing price on June 30, 2011: Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share, $15.9 billion.
Number of shares outstanding of each of the Registrant’s classes of Common Stock, as of February 17, 2012: Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share, 272,259,729 shares outstanding.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the Company’s Proxy Statement to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission in connection with the Company’s 2012 Annual Meeting of Shareholders (the Company’s 2012 Proxy Statement) are incorporated by reference into Part III hereof. Other documents incorporated by reference in this report are listed in the Exhibit Index of this Form 10-K.



CAUTIONARY NOTICE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This report includes statements of our expectations, intentions, plans and beliefs that constitute “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and are intended to come within the safe harbor protection provided by those sections. These statements relate to future events or our future financial performance, including, without limitation, the section captioned “Outlook” in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations. We use words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “expect,” “may,” “project,” “should,” “estimate,” or “plan” or other similar words to identify forward-looking statements.
Without limiting the foregoing, all statements relating to our future operating results, anticipated capital expenditures, future cash flows and borrowings, and sources of funding are forward-looking statements and speak only as of the date of this report. These forward-looking statements are based on numerous assumptions that we believe are reasonable, but are subject to a wide range of uncertainties and business risks and actual results may differ materially from those discussed in these statements. Among the factors that could cause actual results to differ materially are:
global demand for coal, including the seaborne thermal and metallurgical coal markets;
price volatility, particularly in higher-margin products and in our trading and brokerage businesses;
impact of alternative energy sources, including natural gas and renewables;
impact of weather and natural disasters on demand, production and transportation;
reductions and/or deferrals of purchases by major customers and ability to renew sales contracts;
credit and performance risks associated with customers, suppliers, contract miners, co-shippers, and trading, banks and other financial counterparties;
geologic, equipment, permitting and operational risks related to mining;
transportation availability, performance and costs;
availability, timing of delivery and costs of key supplies, capital equipment or commodities such as diesel fuel, steel, explosives and tires;
integration of the newly acquired Macarthur Coal Limited (Macarthur) operations;
successful implementation of business strategies;
negotiation of labor contracts, employee relations and workforce availability;
changes in postretirement benefit and pension obligations and their related funding requirements;
replacement and development of coal reserves;
availability, access to and the related cost of capital and financial markets;
effects of changes in interest rates and currency exchange rates (primarily the Australian dollar);
effects of acquisitions or divestitures;
economic strength and political stability of countries in which we have operations or serve customers;
legislation, regulations and court decisions or other government actions, including new environmental and mine safety requirements, changes in income tax regulations or other regulatory taxes;
litigation, including claims not yet asserted;
terrorist attacks or threats;
impacts of pandemic illnesses; and
other factors, including those discussed in Legal Proceedings, set forth in Item 3 of this report and Risk Factors, set forth in Item 1A of this report.

When considering these forward-looking statements, you should keep in mind the cautionary statements in this document and in our other Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) filings. These forward-looking statements speak only as of the date on which such statements were made, and we undertake no obligation to update these statements except as required by the federal securities laws.


i


TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
Page
 
 
 
 
 
 

1


 
Note:  
The words “we,” “our,” “Peabody” or “the Company” as used in this report, refer to Peabody Energy Corporation or its applicable subsidiary or subsidiaries. Unless otherwise noted herein, disclosures in this Annual Report on Form 10-K relate only to our continuing operations.
PART I

Item 1.   Business.

History and Development of Business
Peabody Energy Corporation is the world’s largest private-sector coal company. We own interests in 30 coal mining operations, including a majority interest in 29 coal operations located in the United States (U.S.) and Australia and a 50% equity interest in the Middlemount Mine in Australia. We also own an equity interest in a joint venture mining operation in Venezuela. In addition to our mining operations, we market, broker and trade coal through our Trading and Brokerage segment.
We were incorporated in Delaware in 1998 and became a public company in 2001. Our history in the coal mining business dates back to 1883. Over the past decade, we have made strategic acquisitions and divestitures to position our company to serve the highest demand coal markets. Acquisitions and divestitures of note include the following.
In 2006, we expanded our presence in Australia with the acquisition of Excel Coal Limited.
In 2007, we spun off Patriot Coal Corporation (Patriot) through a dividend of all outstanding shares, which included mines in West Virginia and Kentucky.
In 2011, we acquired Macarthur, an independent coal company in Australia, which included two operating mines, a 50% equity-affiliate joint venture arrangement and several development projects, along with coal reserves of approximately 213 million tons (approximately 142 million tons on an attributable basis).
In 2011, we continued advancing multiple organic growth projects in Australia and the U.S. that involved future mines, as well as the expansion and extension of existing mines. In 2012 and the near term, our plans for our mining operations include further investments in organic growth projects. In the U.S., development work is expected to begin on our new Gateway North Mine in Illinois and the new Twentymile Sage Creek portal that will serve as an extension of our Twentymile Mine in Colorado. In Australia, we will continue advancing multiple projects that are expected to increase our seaborne coal volumes over the next few years. We also plan to convert our Wilpinjong and Millennium mines in Australia from contract mining to owner-operated mines. In addition, the integration of Macarthur into our Australian operations will continue as we seek to realize synergies through blending, sales and marketing, administrative costs, purchasing, infrastructure and capital project development. We also plan to accelerate development of the new Codrilla Mine, a legacy Macarthur project, which is expected to produce first coal in late 2013.
Other future plans include the continued expansion of our global trading and brokerage platform, which will include the additional sourcing of coal of third-parties from offtake arrangements and joint venture arrangements. We will also continue to explore opportunities to expand our presence in the Asia-Pacific region, such as through partnerships with other companies to utilize our mining experience for joint mine development.
Our core strategies to achieve growth are:
1)
Executing the basics of best-in-class safety, operations and marketing;
2)
Capitalizing on organic growth opportunities; and
3)
Expanding in high-growth global markets.
We are also participating in new generation and Btu Conversion technologies designed to expand the uses of coal technologies, including carbon capture and storage.


2


Segments
Our operations consist of four principal segments: our three mining segments and our Trading and Brokerage segment. Our three mining segments are Western U.S. Mining, Midwestern U.S. Mining and Australian Mining. Our fifth segment, Corporate and Other, includes mining and export/transportation joint ventures, energy-related commercial activities as well as the management of our coal reserve and real estate holdings.
Our Western U.S. Mining operations consist of our Powder River Basin, Southwest and Colorado mines. The mines in that segment are characterized by predominantly surface mining extraction processes and coal with a lower sulfur content and Btu. In addition, the customer transportation costs are generally higher due to longer shipping distances. Our Midwestern U.S. Mining operations include our mines in Illinois and Indiana, which are characterized by a mix of surface and underground mining extraction processes and coal with a higher sulfur content and Btu. In addition, the customer transportation costs are generally lower due to shorter shipping distances. The principal business of our U.S. mining operations is the sale of thermal (steam) coal, sold primarily to electric utilities in the U.S. with a portion sold into the seaborne markets.
Our Australian Mining operations consist of our mines in Queensland and New South Wales, Australia. The mines in that segment are characterized by both surface and underground extraction processes, mining various qualities of metallurgical (low-sulfur, high Btu coal) and thermal coal. The metallurgical coal qualities include hard coking coal, semi-hard coking coal, semi-soft coal and pulverized coal injection (PCI) coal. PCI coal is generally used by steel producers as a replacement for coke made from coking coal. Our recent acquisition of Macarthur increased our proven and probable reserves, which included low volatile PCI (LV PCI) coal, coking coal and thermal coal. Our Australian Mining operations are primarily export focused with customers spread across several countries, while a portion of our coal is sold to Australian steel producers and power generators. Generally, revenues from individual countries vary year by year based on the demand for electricity, the demand for steel, the strength of the global economy and several other factors including those specific to each country.
Financial information regarding our operating segments is contained in Note 25 to our consolidated financial statements.
Mining Segments
The maps that follow display our mine locations as of December 31, 2011, excluding mines held for sale. Also noted are the primary ports utilized in the U.S. and in Australia for our coal exports and our corporate headquarters.
U.S. Mining Operations

3


Australian Mining Operations


4


The table below presents information regarding each of our 30 mines (excluding mines held for sale), including mine location, type of mine, mining method, coal type, transportation method and tons sold in 2011. The mines are sorted by tons sold within each mining segment.
Mine
 
Location
 
Mine
 Type
 
Mining
 Method
 
Coal
Type
 
Transport
 Method
 
2011Tons Sold
 (In millions)
Western U.S. Mining
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

North Antelope Rochelle
 
Wright, WY
 
S
 
DL, T/S
 
T
 
R
 
109.0

Caballo
 
Gillette, WY
 
S
 
D, T/S
 
T
 
R
 
24.2

Rawhide
 
Gillette, WY
 
S
 
D, T/S
 
T
 
R
 
15.0

El Segundo
 
Grants, NM
 
S
 
T/S
 
T
 
R
 
8.0

Kayenta
 
Kayenta, AZ
 
S
 
DL, T/S
 
T
 
R
 
7.9

Twentymile
 
Oak Creek, CO
 
U
 
LW
 
T
 
R, T
 
7.5

Lee Ranch
 
Grants, NM
 
S
 
DL, T/S
 
T
 
R
 
2.0

Midwestern U.S. Mining
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bear Run
 
Carlisle, IN
 
S
 
DL, D, T/S
 
T
 
T, R
 
6.5

Gateway
 
Coulterville, IL
 
U
 
CM
 
T
 
T, R, R/B
 
3.5

Francisco Underground
 
Francisco, IN
 
U
 
CM
 
T
 
R
 
3.0

Somerville Central
 
Oakland City, IN
 
S
 
DL, D, T/S
 
T
 
R, T/R, T/B
 
2.8

Willow Lake
 
Equality, IL
 
U
 
CM
 
T
 
T/B
 
2.2

Cottage Grove
 
Equality, IL
 
S
 
D, T/S
 
T
 
T/B
 
1.9

Wild Boar
 
Lynnville, IN
 
S
 
D, T/S
 
T
 
T, R, R/B
 
1.8

Somerville North (1)
 
Oakland City, IN
 
S
 
D, T/S
 
T
 
R, T/R, T/B
 
1.4

Viking — Corning Pit
 
Cannelburg, IN
 
S
 
D, T/S
 
T
 
T, T/R
 
1.4

Somerville South (1)
 
Oakland City, IN
 
S
 
D, T/S
 
T
 
R, T/R, T/B
 
1.2

Air Quality
 
Vincennes, IN
 
U
 
CM
 
T
 
T, T/R, T/B
 
1.2

Wildcat Hills Underground
 
Eldorado, IL
 
U
 
CM
 
T
 
T/B
 
1.0

Other (2)
 
 
 
 
 
 
2.4

Australian Mining
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Wilpinjong *
 
Wilpinjong, New South Wales
 
S
 
T/S
 
T
 
R, EV
 
9.8

North Wambo Underground (1)
 
Warkworth, New South Wales
 
U
 
LW
 
T/P
 
R, EV
 
3.1

Wambo Open-Cut * (1)
 
Warkworth, New South Wales
 
S
 
T/S
 
T
 
R, EV
 
2.9

Burton *
 
Glenden, Queensland
 
S
 
T/S
 
T/M
 
R, EV
 
2.3

Millennium *
 
Moranbah, Queensland
 
S
 
T/S
 
M
 
R, EV
 
1.9

Metropolitan
 
Helensburgh, New South Wales
 
U
 
LW
 
M
 
R, EV
 
1.6

Eaglefield *
 
Glenden, Queensland
 
S
 
T/S
 
M
 
R, EV
 
1.6

North Goonyella
 
Glenden, Queensland
 
U
 
LW
 
M
 
R, EV
 
1.2

Coppabella (3)
 
Moranbah, Queensland
 
S
 
DL, T/S
 
P
 
R, EV
 
0.5

Moorvale * (3)
 
Moranbah, Queensland
 
S
 
T/S
 
T/M/P
 
R, EV
 
0.4

Middlemount (4)
 
Middlemount, Queensland
 
S
 
T/S
 
M/P
 
R, EV
 
-

Legend:
 
 
 
S
Surface Mine
 
R
Rail
U
Underground Mine
 
T
Truck
DL
Dragline
 
R/B
Rail and Barge
D
Dozer/Casting
 
T/B
Truck and Barge
T/S
Truck and Shovel
 
T/R
Truck and Rail
LW
Longwall
 
EV
Export Vessel
CM
Continuous Miner
 
T
Thermal/Steam
*
Mine is operated by a contract miner
 
M
Metallurgical
 
 
 
P
Pulverized Coal Injection
(1) 
Represents mines that have non-controlling ownership interests.
(2) 
“Other” in Midwestern U.S. Mining primarily consists of purchased coal used to satisfy certain coal supply agreements.
(3) 
We own a 73.3% undivided interest in an unincorporated joint venture that owns the Coppabella and Moorvale mines. Tons sold is for the period from the date of the acquisition (October 26, 2011) to December 31, 2011.
(4) 
We own a 50.0% equity interest in Middlemount Coal Pty Ltd., which owns the Middlemount Mine in Queensland, Australia that was acquired as part of the Macarthur acquisition.

5


 We also own a 48.37% interest in Carbones del Guasare S.A., which operates the Paso Diablo Mine, a surface operation in northwestern Venezuela that produces thermal coal.
See Item 2. “Properties” for additional information regarding coal reserves, coal characteristics and tons produced for each mine.
Trading and Brokerage Segment
We have a global coal trading and brokerage platform with trading and business offices in China, Australia, the United Kingdom, Singapore, Indonesia, Germany and the U.S. Through our Trading and Brokerage segment, we engage in the brokering of coal sales both as principal and agent in support of various coal production-related activities that may involve coal to be produced from our mines, coal sourcing arrangements with third-party mining companies or offtake agreements with producers. We also engage in the trading of coal, freight and freight-related contracts. We also provide transportation-related services in support of our coal trading strategy, as well as hedging activities in support of our mining operations.
Corporate and Other Segment
Our Corporate and Other Segment includes selling and administrative items, activity associated with our joint ventures, resource management activity, past mining obligations and our other commercial activities such as generation development and Btu Conversion development costs.
Resource Management.  We hold approximately 9.0 billion tons of proven and probable coal reserves and more than 500,000 acres of surface property. We have an ongoing asset optimization program where our resource development group regularly reviews these reserves for opportunities to generate earnings and cash flow through the sale of non-strategic coal reserves and surface land. In addition, we generate revenue through royalties from coal reserves and oil and gas rights leased to third parties and farm income from surface land under third-party contracts.
Export Facilities.  We have an interest in a coal export terminal in Newport News, Virginia that exports both metallurgical and thermal coal primarily to European and Brazilian markets.
Generation Development.  We are a 5.06% owner in the Prairie State Energy Campus (Prairie State), a 1,600 megawatt coal-fueled electricity generation project. We are responsible for our 5.06% share of costs and marketing and selling of our share of electricity generated by the facility. The first unit began operations in 2011 and the second unit is expected to commence operations in 2012.
Btu Conversion. Btu Conversion involves projects designed to expand the uses of coal through coal-to-liquids (CTL) and coal gasification technologies. We own an equity interest in GreatPoint Energy, Inc., which is commercializing its coal-to-pipeline quality natural gas technology. We also are pursuing a project with the government of Inner Mongolia and other Chinese partners to explore development opportunities for a large surface mine and downstream coal gasification facility that would produce methanol, chemicals or fuel products.
Clean Coal Technology.  We continue to support clean coal technology development and other “green coal” initiatives seeking to reduce global atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide and other emissions. We are the only non-Chinese equity partner in GreenGen, which is constructing a near-zero emissions coal-fueled power plant with carbon capture and storage (CCS) near Tianjin, China and is expected to begin operations during 2012. In Australia, we have an ongoing commitment to the Australian COAL21 Fund designed to support clean coal technology demonstration projects and research in Australia.
We are also a founding member of the Global Carbon Capture and Storage Institute, an international initiative to accelerate commercialization of CCS technologies through development of 20 integrated, industrial-scale demonstration projects, as well as a participant in the Power Systems Development Facility, the PowerTree Carbon Company LLC, the Midwest Geopolitical Sequestration Consortium, the Asia-Pacific Partnership for Clean Development and Climate, the U.S.-China Energy Cooperation Program, the Consortium for Clean Coal Utilization, the National Carbon Capture Center and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation.

6


Mongolia Joint Venture.  We own a 50% interest in Peabody-Winsway Resources B.V., a joint venture agreement with Winsway Coking Coal Holding Ltd. (Winsway), a Hong Kong stock exchange listed company. The joint venture is in the development stage and plans to ship metallurgical and thermal coal to Asian markets once developed. In 2011, we acquired a 5.1% equity interest in Winsway further strengthening the strategic partnership between the two companies.
Paso Diablo Mine.  We own a 48.37% interest in Carbones del Guasare S.A., which operates the Paso Diablo Mine, a surface operation in northwestern Venezuela that produces thermal coal for export primarily to the U.S. and Europe. We are responsible for marketing our pro-rata share of sales from Paso Diablo; the joint venture is responsible for production, processing and transportation of coal to ocean-going vessels for delivery to customers.
Middlemount Mine.  Through the acquisition of Macarthur, we own a 50% interest in the Middlemount Mine. The mine development was completed in late 2011 and test coal shipments to customers are ongoing. The mine is expected to reach full production in 2012.
Captive Insurance Entity.  A portion of our insurance risks associated with workers’ compensation, general liability and auto liability coverage is self-insured through a wholly-owned captive insurance company. The captive entity invoices certain of our subsidiaries for the premiums on these policies, pays the related claims, maintains reserves for anticipated losses and invests funds to pay future claims.
Coal Supply Agreements
Our coal supply agreements are primarily with electricity generators, industrial facilities and steel manufacturers. Most of our sales (excluding trading transactions) are made under long-term coal supply agreements (those with terms longer than one year). Sales under such agreements comprised approximately 91%, 91% and 93% of our worldwide sales (by volume) for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively.
For the year ended December 31, 2011, we derived 23% of our total coal sales revenues from our five largest customers. Those five customers were supplied primarily from 24 coal supply agreements (excluding trading transactions) expiring at various times from 2012 to 2025. The contract contributing the greatest amount of annual revenue in 2011 was approximately $311 million, or approximately 4% of our 2011 total revenue base and is due to expire in 2019.
Our sales backlog includes coal supply agreements subject to price reopener and/or extension provisions. As of January 31, 2012 and 2011, we had a sales backlog of over 1 billion tons of coal. Contracts in backlog have remaining terms ranging from one to 16 years, representing over four years of production based on our 2011 production of 227.5 million tons. As of January 31, 2012, approximately 78% of our backlog is expected to be filled beyond one year.
U.S.  We expect to continue selling a significant portion of our coal under long-term supply agreements. Customers continue to pursue long-term sales agreements as the importance of reliability, service and predictable prices are recognized. The terms of coal supply agreements result from competitive bidding and extensive negotiations with customers. Consequently, the terms of these agreements vary significantly in many respects, including price adjustment features, price reopener terms, coal quality requirements, quantity parameters, permitted sources of supply, treatment of environmental constraints, extension options, force majeure and termination and assignment provisions. Our strategy is to selectively renew, or enter into new, long-term supply agreements when we can do so at prices we believe are favorable.
Australia. Revenue from our Australian Mining segment represented approximately 39%, 36% and 26% of our total revenue base for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively. Our Australian coal mining activities accounted for 11%, 12% and 9% of our mining operations sales volume in 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively. Production is sold primarily into the export metallurgical and thermal markets. Historically, we predominately entered into multi-year international coal agreements that contained provisions allowing either party to commence a renegotiation of the agreement price annually in the second quarter of each year. Current industry practice, and our practice, is to negotiate pricing for metallurgical coal contracts quarterly and seaborne thermal coal contracts annually.

7


Transportation
Coal consumed in the U.S. is usually sold at the mine with transportation costs borne by the purchaser. Australian and U.S. export coal is usually sold at the loading port, with purchasers paying ocean freight. Producers usually pay shipping costs from the mine to the port, including any demurrage costs (fees paid to third-party shipping companies for loading time that exceeded the stipulated time). Demurrage continues to be part of the shipping costs for our Australian exports as certain ports continue to experience vessel queues due to factors such as lower than expected rail performance, supply constraints, adverse weather and delays in coal availability from time-to-time with those with whom we share vessels (co-shippers).
We believe we have good relationships with U.S. and Australian rail carriers and barge companies due, in part, to our modern coal-loading facilities and the experience of our transportation coordinators. See the table on page 5 for transportation methods by mine.
Our primary ports used for U.S. exports are the Dominion Terminal Associates coal terminal in Newport News, Virginia, the United Bulk Terminal near New Orleans, Louisiana and the Kinder Morgan terminal near Houston, Texas. Our U.S. mining operations exported approximately 3%, 1% and 1% of its tons sold for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively.
In Australia, we own interests in three east coast coal export terminals that are primarily funded through take-or-pay arrangements (see "Liquidity and Capital Resources" for additional information). In Queensland, seaborne metallurgical and thermal coal from our mines, including the Coppabella and Moorvale mines added with the acquisition of Macarthur, is exported through the Dalrymple Bay Coal Terminal. Our joint venture Middlemount Mine is ramping up operations with shipments sent through both Dalrymple Bay Coal Terminal and the Abbot Point Coal Terminal in Queensland, Australia. In New South Wales, our primary ports for exporting metallurgical and thermal coal are at Port Kembla and Newcastle, which includes both the Port Waratah Coal Services terminal and the terminal operated by Newcastle Coal Infrastructure Group (NCIG) that opened in 2010. Our Australian mining operations sold approximately 74%, 71% and 69% of its tons into the seaborne coal markets for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009.
We are also currently pursuing a U.S. west coast port facility that will allow us to export Powder River Basin coal to Asian markets. In Australia, we are exploring potential participation in the development of the Wiggins Island Coal Export Terminal at Gladstone, Queensland, as well as proposed expansion projects at the Abbot Point Coal Terminal.
Suppliers
The main types of goods we purchase in support of our mining activities are mining equipment and replacement parts, diesel fuel, ammonium-nitrate and emulsion-based explosives, off-the-road (OTR) tires, steel-related (including roof control materials) products, lubricants and electricity. For some of these goods, there has been some consolidation in the supplier base providing mining materials to the coal industry, such as with suppliers of explosives and both surface and underground equipment, that has limited the number of sources for these materials. In situations where we have chosen to concentrate a large portion of purchases with one supplier, it has been to take advantage of cost savings from larger volumes of purchases, to benefit from long-term pricing for parts and to ensure security of supply.
Demand and lead times for certain surface and underground mining equipment and OTR tires has increased. Despite these market challenges, we do not expect lead times to have a near-term material impact on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows due to the strategic relationships and long-term supply contracts we have with our suppliers. In addition, we continue to use our global leverage with major suppliers to ensure security of supply to meet the requirements of our growth plans. We have many well-established, strategic relationships with our key suppliers of goods and do not believe we are overly dependent on any of our individual suppliers.
We also purchase services at our mine sites that include maintenance services for mining equipment, temporary labor and other various contracted services, including contract miners and explosive service providers. We do not believe that we are overly dependent on any of our individual service providers.

8


Technical Innovation
We continue to emphasize the application of technical innovation to improve equipment performance and operating efficiencies. Development is typically undertaken and funded by equipment manufacturers with our engineering, maintenance and purchasing personnel providing input and expertise to the manufacturers that will design and produce equipment that we believe will add value to the business. Some examples of these efforts include the following:
Ultra class haul trucks to increase overburden removal capacity and lower mining cost;
Fleet management and vehicle diagnostics systems to enhance equipment availability;
Expanded networking and server capacity to gather detailed information on both production and vehicle diagnostics to allow for real time alerts and long term analysis used to improve production and reduce downtime; and
Longwall automation technology to allow for more efficient longwall mining.

We use maintenance standards based on reliability-centered maintenance practices at all operations to increase equipment utilization and reduce maintenance and capital spending by extending the equipment life, while minimizing the risk of premature failures. Specialized maintenance reliability software is used at many operations to better support improved equipment strategies, predict equipment condition and aid analysis necessary for better decision-making for such issues as component replacement timing. We also use in-house developed software to schedule and monitor trains, mine and pit blending, quality and customer shipments to enhance our reliability and product consistency.
We also continue to advance new technologies to maximize safety. We are currently in process with a pilot program for a new proximity detection system at a section of one of our underground mines that is designed to automatically stop a continuous miner and coal hauler if a person is detected within the operating range. In addition, personnel tracking systems were deployed across all underground operations in the U.S. which can provide continuous real time locations of workers underground.
Competition
The markets in which we sell our coal are highly competitive. We compete on the basis of coal quality, delivered price, customer service and support and reliability. Demand for coal and the prices that we will be able to obtain for our coal are influenced by factors beyond our control, including the demand for electricity and steel and the availability and price of alternatives. Our principal U.S. competitors (listed alphabetically) are other large coal producers, including Alpha Natural Resources, Inc., Arch Coal, Inc., Cloud Peak Energy Inc., and CONSOL Energy Inc., which collectively accounted for approximately 40% of total U.S. coal production in 2010 (most recent publicly available data according to the National Mining Association's “2010 Coal Producer Survey”). Major international competitors (listed alphabetically) include Anglo-American PLC, BHP Billiton, China Coal, Rio Tinto, Shenhua Group and Xstrata PLC.
Employees
As of December 31, 2011, we had approximately 8,300 employees, which included approximately 5,600 hourly employees. As of such date, approximately 24% of our hourly employees were represented by organized labor unions and generated 7% of 2011 coal production. In the U.S., those represented by organized labor unions include hourly workers at our Kayenta Mine in Arizona and at our Willow Lake Mine in Illinois. In Australia, the coal mining industry is highly unionized and the majority of workers employed at our mining operations are members of trade unions. The Construction Forestry Mining and Energy Union represents our Australian hourly production and engineering employees, including those employed through contract mining relationships. All the Australian mine sites have enterprise bargaining agreements. Additional information on labor relations is contained in Note 21 to our consolidated financial statements.
Working Capital
We generally fund our business operations through a combination of available cash and cash equivalents and operating cash flow. In addition, our revolving credit facility (Revolver) available under our senior unsecured credit facility entered into in 2010 (Credit Facility) and our accounts receivable securitization program are available for additional working capital needs. See Liquidity and Capital Resources in Part II, Item 7 for additional information regarding working capital.


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Regulatory Matters — U.S.
Federal, state and local authorities regulate the U.S. coal mining industry with respect to matters such as employee health and safety, permitting and licensing requirements, air quality standards, water pollution, plant and wildlife protection, the reclamation and restoration of mining properties after mining has been completed, the discharge of materials into the environment, surface subsidence from underground mining and the effects of mining on groundwater quality and availability. In addition, the industry is affected by significant legislation mandating certain benefits for current and retired coal miners. Numerous federal, state and local governmental permits and approvals are required for mining operations. We believe that we have obtained all permits currently required to conduct our present mining operations.
We endeavor to conduct our mining operations in compliance with all applicable federal, state and local laws and regulations. However, because of extensive and comprehensive regulatory requirements, violations during mining operations occur from time to time in the industry. None of our violations to date or the monetary penalties assessed have been material.
Mine Safety and Health.  We are subject to health and safety standards both at the federal and state level. The regulations are comprehensive and affect numerous aspects of mining operations, including training of mine personnel, mining procedures, blasting, the equipment used in mining operations and other matters.
The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) is the entity responsible for monitoring compliance with the federal mine health and safety standards. MSHA has various enforcement tools that it can use, including the issuance of monetary penalties and orders of withdrawal from a mine or part of a mine. Some, but not all, of the costs of complying with existing regulations and implementing new safety and health regulations may be passed on to customers.
MSHA has recently taken a number of actions to identify mines with safety issues, and has engaged in a number of targeted enforcement, awareness, outreach and rulemaking activities to reduce the number of mining fatalities, accidents and illnesses. There has also been an industry-wide increase in the monetary penalties assessed for citations of a similar nature.
In Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosure and in Exhibit 95 to this Annual Report on Form 10-K, we provide additional details on how we monitor safety performance and MSHA compliance, as well as provide the mine safety disclosures required pursuant to Section 1503(a) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the Dodd-Frank Act).
Black Lung. Under the Black Lung Benefits Revenue Act of 1977 and the Black Lung Benefits Reform Act of 1977, as amended in 1981, each U.S. coal mine operator must pay federal black lung benefits and medical expenses to claimants who are current and former employees and last worked for the operator after July 1, 1973. Coal mine operators must also make payments to a trust fund for the payment of benefits and medical expenses to claimants who last worked in the coal industry prior to July 1, 1973. Historically, less than 7% of the miners currently seeking federal black lung benefits are awarded these benefits. The trust fund is funded by an excise tax on U.S. production of up to $1.10 per ton for deep-mined coal and up to $0.55 per ton for surface-mined coal, neither amount to exceed 4.4% of the gross sales price.

Environmental Laws. We are subject to various federal and state environmental laws. Some of these laws, discussed below, place many requirements on our coal mining operations. Federal and state regulations require regular monitoring of our mines and other facilities to ensure compliance.

Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. In the U.S., the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), which is administered by the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSM), established mining, environmental protection and reclamation standards for all aspects of U.S. surface mining as well as many aspects of deep mining. Mine operators must obtain SMCRA permits and permit renewals for mining operations from the OSM. Where state regulatory agencies have adopted federal mining programs under SMCRA, the state becomes the regulatory authority. Except for Arizona, states in which we have active mining operations have achieved primary control of enforcement through federal authorization. In Arizona, we mine on tribal lands and are regulated by OSM because the tribes do not have SMCRA authorization.

Once a permit application is prepared and submitted to the regulatory agency, it goes through a completeness and technical review. Public notice of the proposed permit is given for a comment period before a permit can be issued. Some SMCRA mine permits take over a year to prepare, depending on the size and complexity of the mine and often take six months to two years to be issued. Regulatory authorities have considerable discretion in the timing of the permit issuance and the public has the right to comment on and otherwise engage in the permitting process, including public hearings and through intervention in the courts. Before a SMCRA permit is issued, a mine operator must submit a bond or other form of financial security to guarantee the performance of reclamation obligations.


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The Abandoned Mine Land Fund, which is part of SMCRA, requires a fee on all coal produced in the U.S. The proceeds are used to rehabilitate lands mined and left unreclaimed prior to August 3, 1977 and to pay health care benefit costs of orphan beneficiaries of the Combined Fund created by the Coal Industry Retiree Health Benefit Act of 1992. The fee was $0.35 per ton of surface-mined coal and $0.15 per ton of deep-mined coal, effective through September 30, 2007. Pursuant to the Tax Relief and Health Care Act of 2006, from October 1, 2007 through September 30, 2012, the fee is $0.315 per ton of surface-mined coal and $0.135 per ton of underground mined coal. From October 1, 2012 through September 30, 2021, the fee will be reduced to $0.28 per ton of surface-mined coal and $0.12 per ton of underground mined coal. SMCRA stipulates compliance with many other major environmental programs. These programs include the Clean Air Act; Clean Water Act; Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Acts (CERCLA, commonly known as Superfund). Besides OSM, other federal regulatory agencies are involved in monitoring or permitting specific aspects of mining operations. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is the lead agency for states or tribes with no authorized programs under the Clean Water Act, RCRA and CERCLA. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers regulates activities affecting navigable waters and waters of the U.S., including wetlands, and the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms regulates the use of explosive blasting materials.

We do not believe there are any matters that pose a material risk to maintaining our existing mining permits or that materially hinder our ability to secure future mining permits. It is our policy to comply with the requirements of the SMCRA and the state and tribal laws and regulations governing mine reclamation.

Clean Air Act. The Clean Air Act and the comparable state laws that regulate the emissions of materials into the air affect U.S. coal mining operations both directly and indirectly. Direct impacts on coal mining and processing operations may occur through the Clean Air Act permitting requirements and/or emission control requirements relating to particulate matter. It is possible that the more stringent national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) will directly impact our mining operations by, for example, requiring additional controls of emissions from our mining equipment and vehicles. Moreover, if the areas in which our mines and coal preparation plants are located suffer from extreme weather events such as droughts, or are designated as non-attainment areas, we could be required to incur significant costs to install additional emissions control equipment, or otherwise change our operations and future development. In addition, in September 2009 the EPA adopted new rules tightening and adding additional particulate matter emissions limits for coal preparation and processing plants constructed, reconstructed or modified after April 28, 2008.

The Clean Air Act indirectly, but more significantly, affects the coal industry by extensively regulating the air emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, mercury, particulate matter and other substances emitted by coal-based electricity generating plants. Air emissions programs that may affect our operations, directly or indirectly, include, but are not limited to, the Acid Rain Program, NOx SIP Call, the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR), New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) emissions limits for Hazardous Air Pollutants, the Regional Haze program and New Source Review. In addition, in recent years the EPA has adopted more stringent NAAQS for particulate matter, nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide. The EPA has also proposed a more stringent ozone standard but withdrew it last year; the ozone standard is due for reconsideration in 2013. Many of these programs and regulations have resulted in litigation which has not been completely resolved.

On July 6, 2011, the EPA finalized its final Cross State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR) to address interstate transport of emissions from coal-based electrical generation plants. The rule, which was developed to replace CAIR and includes a supplemental rulemaking finalized on December 15, 2011, imposes state-by state budgets on nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide emissions from coal-based electrical generation plants in 23 states from Texas eastward (not including the New England states or Delaware) and provides for an allowance trading program to meet those budgets. While CSAPR has an initial compliance deadline of January 1, 2012, the rule was challenged and on December 30, 2011, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia stayed CSAPR and advised that the EPA is expected to continue administering CAIR until the pending challenges are resolved. Expedited briefing on the merits of the challenge is underway.

On December 16, 2011, the EPA issued the Mercury and Air Toxic Standards which imposes MACT emission limits on hazardous air emissions from new and existing coal-based electric generating plants. The rule also revised NSPS for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxides and particulate matter for coal-based electricity generating plants. The rule provides three years for compliance, or up to four years for existing sources if necessary. We believe that challenges to this rule are likely.

In December 2009, the EPA published its finding that atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases endanger public health and welfare within the meaning of the Clean Air Act, and that emissions of greenhouse gases from new motor vehicles and new motor vehicle engines are contributing to air pollution that are endangering public health and welfare within the meaning of the Clean Air Act. In May 2010, the EPA published final greenhouse gas emission standards for new motor vehicles pursuant to the Clean Air Act. Both the endangerment finding and motor vehicle standards are the subject of litigation.


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Because the Clean Air Act specifies that the prevention of significant deterioration (PSD) program applies once emissions of regulated pollutants exceed either 100 or 250 tons per year (depending on the type of source), millions of sources previously unregulated under the Clean Air Act could be subject to greenhouse gas reduction measures. The EPA published a rule in June 2010 to limit the number of greenhouse gas sources that would be subject to the PSD program. In the so-called “tailoring rule,” the EPA limited the regulation of greenhouse gases from certain stationary sources to those that emit more than 75,000 tons of greenhouse gases per year (for sources that would be subject to PSD permitting regardless of greenhouse gas emissions due to other emissions) or 100,000 tons of greenhouse gases per year (for sources not subject to PSD permitting for any other air emissions), measured by “carbon dioxide equivalent.” Whether the EPA has the statutory authority under the Clean Air Act to adopt the tailoring rule is the subject of litigation.

In December 2010, the EPA announced a settlement with states and environmental groups that had filed litigation challenges to the EPA's decisions not to establish greenhouse gas emission standards for fossil fuel-fired power plants and for petroleum refineries under section 111 of the Clean Air Act. In the settlement, the EPA agreed: (1) to sign proposed new source performance standards for new and modified electric utility steam generating units under section 111(b), as well as proposed guidelines for states' development of emission standards for existing electric utility steam generating units under section 111(d), by July 26, 2011; and (2) to take final action on the proposed section 111(b) standards and section 111(d) guidelines by May 26, 2012. The EPA has not yet proposed these rules. Whatever the EPA determines the new source performance standards to be, this will then be the minimum requirement for best available control technology requirements under the PSD program.

Clean Water Act. The Clean Water Act of 1972 affects U.S. coal mining operations by requiring both technology-based and, if necessary, water quality-based effluent limitations and treatment standards for wastewater discharge through the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). Regular monitoring, reporting requirements and performance standards are requirements of NPDES permits that govern the discharge of pollutants from mine-related point sources into water. Section 404 of the Clean Water Act requires mining companies to obtain U.S. Army Corps of Engineers permits to place material in streams for the purpose of creating slurry ponds, water impoundments, refuse areas, valley fills or other mining activities.

States are empowered to develop and apply “in stream” water quality standards. These standards are subject to change and must be approved by the EPA. Discharges must either meet state water quality standards or be authorized through available regulatory processes such as alternate standards or variances. “In stream” standards vary from state to state. Additionally, through the Clean Water Act section 401 certification program, states have approval authority over federal permits or licenses that might result in a discharge to their waters. States consider whether the activity will comply with their water quality standards and other applicable requirements in deciding whether or not to certify the activity.

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. RCRA, which was enacted in 1976, affects U.S. coal mining operations by establishing “cradle to grave” requirements for the treatment, storage and disposal of hazardous wastes. Typically, the only hazardous wastes generated at a mine site are those from products used in vehicles and for machinery maintenance. Coal mine wastes, such as overburden and coal cleaning wastes, are not considered hazardous wastes under RCRA.

Subtitle C of RCRA exempted fossil fuel combustion wastes from hazardous waste regulation until the EPA completed a report to Congress and made a determination on whether the wastes should be regulated as hazardous. In a 1993 regulatory determination, the EPA addressed some high volume-low toxicity coal combustion materials generated at electric utility and independent power producing facilities. In May 2000, the EPA concluded that coal combustion materials do not warrant regulation as hazardous wastes under RCRA. The EPA has retained the hazardous waste exemption for these materials. The EPA is evaluating national waste guidelines for coal combustion materials placed at a mine. National guidelines for mine-fills may affect the cost of ash placement at mines. The EPA revisited its May 2000 determination and proposed new requirements for coal combustion residue (CCR) management on June 21, 2010. That proposal contains two options: (1) to continue to regulate CCR as a non-hazardous waste, or (2) to regulate CCR as special waste under the hazardous waste regulations.

CERCLA (Superfund). CERCLA affects U.S. coal mining and hard rock operations by creating liability for investigation and remediation in response to releases of hazardous substances into the environment and for damages to natural resources. Under CERCLA, joint and several liabilities may be imposed on waste generators, site owners or operators and others, regardless of fault. Under the EPA's Toxic Release Inventory process, companies are required annually to report the use, manufacture or processing of listed toxic materials that exceed defined thresholds, including chemicals used in equipment maintenance, reclamation, water treatment and ash received for mine placement from power generation customers.


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Endangered Species Act. The U.S. Endangered Species Act and counterpart state legislation is intended to protect species whose populations allow for categorization as either endangered or threatened. With respect to obtaining mining permits, protection of endangered or threatened species may have the effect of prohibiting, limiting the extent or causing delays that may include permit conditions on the timing of soil removal, timber harvesting, road building and other mining or agricultural activities in areas containing the affected species. Based on the species that have been identified on our properties and the current application of these laws and regulations, we do not believe that they will have a material adverse effect on our ability to mine the planned volumes of coal from our properties in accordance with current mining plans. However, there are ongoing lawsuits and petitions under these laws and regulations that, if successful, could have a material adverse effect on our ability to mine some of our properties in accordance with our current mining plans.

Use of Explosives. Our surface mining operations are subject to numerous regulations relating to blasting activities. Pursuant to these regulations, we incur costs to design and implement blast schedules and to conduct pre-blast surveys and blast monitoring. In addition, the storage of explosives is subject to strict federal regulatory requirements.
Regulatory Matters — Australia
The Australian mining industry is regulated by Australian federal, state and local governments with respect to environmental issues such as land reclamation, water quality, air quality, dust control, noise, planning issues (such as approvals to expand existing mines or to develop new mines), and health and safety issues. The Australian federal government retains control over the level of foreign investment and export approvals. Industrial relations are regulated under both federal and state laws. Australian state governments also require coal companies to post deposits or give other security against land which is being used for mining, with those deposits being returned or security released after satisfactory reclamation is completed.
Native Title and Cultural Heritage.  Since 1992, the Australian courts have recognized that native title to lands, as recognized under the laws and customs of the Aboriginal inhabitants of Australia, may have survived the process of European settlement. These developments are supported by the Federal Native Title Act which recognizes and protects native title, and under which a national register of native title claims has been established. Native title rights do not extend to minerals; however, native title rights can be affected by the mining process unless those rights have previously been extinguished. There is also federal and state legislation to prevent damage to Aboriginal cultural heritage and archaeological sites.
Mining Tenements and Environmental.  In Queensland and New South Wales, the development of a mine requires both the grant of a right to impact the environment and an approval which authorizes the environmental impact. These approvals are obtained under separate legislation from separate government authorities. However, the application processes run concurrently and are also concurrent with any native title or cultural heritage process that is required. The environmental impacts of mining projects are regulated by state and federal governments. Federal regulation will only apply if the particular project will significantly impact a matter of national environmental significance (e.g., endangered species or particular protected places). If so, it will also be regulated by the federal government.
Occupational Health and Safety.  The combined effect of various state and federal statutes requires an employer to ensure that persons employed in a mine are safe from injury by providing a safe working environment and systems of work; safety machinery; equipment, plant and substances; and appropriate information, instruction, training and supervision. Currently all states and territories are responsible for making and enforcing their own laws. Although these draw on a similar approach for regulating workplaces, there are some differences in the application and detail of the laws. Mining legislation is currently being harmonized across Australia with a January 1, 2013 target date. The harmonization process will be achieved first by developing core legislation that will be consistent across all of the states; the remainder of each states' legislation may be state specific. The finalized core legislation is expected to be completed by July 1, 2012.
In recognition of the specialized nature of mining and mining activities, specific occupational health and safety obligations have been mandated under state legislation that deals specifically with the coal mining industry. Mining employers, owners, directors and managers, persons in control of work places, mine managers, supervisors and employees are all subject to these duties.
Industrial Relations.  A national industrial relations system administered by the federal government applies to all private sector employers and employees. The system largely became operational in July 2009 and fully operational in January 2010. The matters regulated under the national system include employment conditions, unfair dismissal, enterprise bargaining, industrial action and resolution of workplace disputes.

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National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting Act 2007 (NGER Act).  The NGER Act introduces a single national reporting system relating to greenhouse gas emissions and energy production and consumption, which will underpin a future emissions trading scheme. The NGER Act imposes requirements for certain corporations to report greenhouse gas emissions and abatement actions, as well as energy production and consumption. Both foreign and local corporations that meet the prescribed CO2 and energy production or consumption limits in Australia (controlling corporations) must comply with the NGER Act. One of our subsidiaries is now registered as a controlling corporation and must report each financial year about the greenhouse gas emissions and energy production and consumption of our Australian entities.
Carbon Pricing Framework. In the fourth quarter of 2011, the Australian government passed a legislative package that included a carbon pricing framework that commences July 1, 2012. The carbon price will initially be $23.00 Australian dollars per tonne of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions, escalated by 2.5% per year for inflation over a three year period. After June 30, 2015, the carbon price mechanism will transition to an emissions trading scheme. We believe that all of our Australian operations will be impacted by the fugitive emissions portion of the framework (defined as the methane and carbon dioxide which escapes into the atmosphere when coal is mined and gas is produced), which we estimate will initially average $2.00 to $3.25 Australian dollars per tonne of coal produced annually. Actual results will be dependent upon the volume of tons produced at each of our mining locations as the impact per tonne at our surface mines will generally be less than the impact per tonne at our underground mines. In addition, our Australian mines will be impacted by the phased reduction of the government's diesel fuel rebate to capture emissions from fuel combustion. Our North Goonyella, Wambo and Metropolitan mines will be eligible to apply for a portion of the government's approximately $1.3 billion Australian dollars of transition benefits that would provide assistance based on historical emissions intensity data to the most emissions-intensive coal mines over a six-year period.
Regulatory Matters — Mongolia

As noted above, we currently own a 50% interest in the Peabody-Winsway Resources B.V. joint venture, which holds coal and mineral interests in Mongolia and is regulated by Mongolian federal, provincial and local governments with respect to exploration, development, production, occupational health, mine safety, water use, environmental protection and remediation, foreign investment and other related matters. The Mineral Resources Authority of Mongolia is the government agency with the authority to issue, extend and revoke mineral licenses, which generally give the license holder the right to engage in the mining of minerals within the license area for 30 years (with the right to extend for two additional periods of 20 years). Mongolian law provides for state participation in the exploitation of any mineral deposit of “strategic importance,” as determined by the Mongolian Parliament.

Global Climate

In the U.S., Congress has considered legislation addressing global climate issues and greenhouse gas emissions, but to date nothing has been enacted. While it is possible that the U.S. will adopt legislation in the future, the timing and specific requirements of any such legislation are uncertain. In the absence of new U.S. federal legislation, the EPA is undertaking steps to regulate greenhouse gas emissions pursuant to the Clean Air Act. In response to the 2007 U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Massachusetts v. EPA, the EPA has commenced several rulemaking projects as described above under “Regulatory Matters-U.S. - Clean Air Act.”

A number of states in the U.S. have adopted programs to regulate greenhouse gas emissions. For example, ten northeastern states (Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island and Vermont) entered into the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGCI) in 2005, which is a mandatory cap-and-trade program to cap regional carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. In 2011, New Jersey announced its withdrawal from RGGI effective January 1, 2012. Six midwestern states (Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin) and one Canadian province have entered into the Midwestern Regional Greenhouse Gas Reduction Accord (MGGRA) to establish voluntary regional greenhouse gas reduction targets and develop a voluntary multi-sector cap-and-trade system to help meet the targets, though in the past year the group's website has been taken down and a senior official in the Midwestern Governors Association reported in February 2011 that the program was “effectively abandoned,” according to the press. Seven western states (Arizona, California, Montana, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah and Washington) and four Canadian provinces entered into the Western Climate Initiative (WCI) in 2008 to establish a voluntary regional greenhouse gas reduction goal and develop market-based strategies to achieve emissions reductions. However, in November 2011 the WCI announced that six states had withdrawn from the WCI, leaving California and four Canadian provinces as the remaining members. As of early 2012, only California and Quebec have adopted greenhouse gas cap-and-trade regulations and intend to move forward with a regional trading program. Due to litigation and other delays, the regional trading program is not scheduled to commence until January 1, 2013. Other participants in WCI, RGGI and MGGRA have either left those organizations entirely or have joined the new North America 2050 organization which seeks to address energy and climate issues in other ways.


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In 2006, the California legislature approved legislation allowing the imposition of statewide caps on carbon dioxide emissions. Similar legislation was adopted in 2007 in Hawaii, Minnesota and New Jersey. The California Air Resources Board is in the process of finalizing regulations to implement a cap-and-trade program pursuant to the 2006 legislation, and that program started on January 1, 2012 with an enforceable compliance obligation beginning with the 2013 greenhouse gas emissions.

In the U.S., several states have enacted legislation requiring electricity suppliers to use renewable energy sources to generate a certain percentage of power or that provide financial incentives to electricity suppliers for using renewable energy sources.

We participated in the DOE's Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program until its suspension in May 2011, and regularly disclose the quantity of emissions per ton of coal produced by us in the U.S. The vast majority of our emissions are generated by the operation of heavy machinery to extract and transport material at our mines.

The Kyoto Protocol, adopted in December 1997 by the signatories to the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, established a binding set of emission targets for developed nations. The U.S. signed the Kyoto Protocol but it was not ratified by the U.S. Senate. Australia ratified the Kyoto Protocol in December 2007 and became a full member in March 2008. There are continuing discussions to develop a treaty to replace the Kyoto Protocol after its expiration in 2012, including at the Cancun meetings in late 2010 and initial steps toward that goal were taken and at the Durban meeting in late 2011. At the Durban meeting it was agreed that the Kyoto Protocol would have a second commitment period, from 2013 to 2017, but no further actions were agreed upon.

Australia's Parliament passed carbon pricing legislation in November 2011. The first three years of the program involve the imposition of a carbon tax commencing in July 2012, and a mandatory greenhouse gas emissions trading program commencing in 2015. However, the program is a central issue in current election debates.

Enactment of laws or passage of regulations by the U.S. or some of its states or by other countries regarding emissions from the mining of coal or other actions to limit such emissions, are not expected to have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition or cash flows.

Enactment of laws or passage of regulations by the U.S. or some of its states or by other countries regarding emissions from the combustion of coal or other actions to limit such emissions, could result in electricity generators switching from coal to other fuel sources. The potential financial impact on us of recent or future laws or regulations will depend upon the degree to which any such laws or regulations forces electricity generators to diminish their reliance on coal as a fuel source. That, in turn, will depend on a number of factors, including the specific requirements imposed by any such laws or regulations, the time periods over which those laws or regulations would be phased in, the state of commercial development and deployment of CCS technologies and the alternative markets for coal. In view of the significant uncertainty surrounding each of these factors, it is not possible for us to reasonably predict the impact that any such laws or regulations may have on our results of operations, financial condition or cash flows.
Additional Information
We file annual, quarterly and current reports, and any amendments to those reports, proxy statements and other information with the SEC. You may access and read our SEC filings free of charge through our website, at www.peabodyenergy.com, or the SEC’s website, at www.sec.gov. Information on such websites does not constitute part of this document. You may also read and copy any document we file at the SEC’s public reference room located at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. Please call the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330 for further information on the public reference room.
You may also request copies of our filings, free of charge, by telephone at (314) 342-3400 or by mail at: Peabody Energy Corporation, Peabody Plaza, 701 Market Street, Suite 900, St. Louis, Missouri 63101, attention: Investor Relations.






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Item 1A.   Risk Factors.
The following risk factors relate specifically to the risks associated with our continuing operations.
Risks Associated with Our Operations
A decline in coal prices could negatively affect our profitability.
Our profitability depends upon the prices we receive for our coal. Coal prices are dependent upon factors beyond our control, including:
the strength of the global economy;
the demand for electricity;
the demand for steel, which may lead to price fluctuations in the periodic repricing of our metallurgical coal contracts;
the global supply of thermal and metallurgical coal;
weather patterns and natural disasters;
competition within our industry and the availability and price of alternatives, including natural gas;
the proximity, capacity and cost of transportation;
coal industry capacity;
domestic and foreign governmental regulations and taxes, including those establishing air emission standards for coal-fueled power plants or mandating increased use of electricity from renewable energy sources;
regulatory, administrative and judicial decisions, including those affecting future mining permits; and
technological developments, including those intended to convert coal-to-liquids or gas and those aimed at capturing and storing carbon dioxide.
In the U.S., our strategy is to selectively renew, or enter into new, long-term supply agreements when we can do so at prices we believe are favorable. In Australia, current industry practice, and our practice, is to negotiate pricing for metallurgical coal contracts quarterly and seaborne thermal coal contracts annually.
If a substantial number of our long-term coal supply agreements terminate, our revenues and operating profits could suffer if we are unable to find alternate buyers willing to purchase our coal on comparable terms to those in our contracts.
Most of our sales are made under coal supply agreements, which are important to the stability and profitability of our operations. The execution of a satisfactory coal supply agreement is frequently the basis on which we undertake the development of coal reserves required to be supplied under the contract, particularly in the U.S. In 2011, 91% of our worldwide sales volume was sold under long-term coal supply agreements. At January 31, 2012, our sales backlog, including backlog subject to price reopener and/or extension provisions, was over 1 billion tons, representing over four years of current production in backlog based on our 2011 production from continuing operations of 227.5 million tons. Contracts in backlog have remaining terms ranging up to 16 years.
Many of our coal supply agreements contain provisions that permit the parties to adjust the contract price upward or downward at specified times. We may adjust these contract prices based on inflation or deflation and/or changes in the factors affecting the cost of producing coal, such as taxes, fees, royalties and changes in the laws regulating the mining, production, sale or use of coal. In a limited number of contracts, failure of the parties to agree on a price under those provisions may allow either party to terminate the contract. We sometimes experience a reduction in coal prices in new long-term coal supply agreements replacing some of our expiring contracts. Coal supply agreements also typically contain force majeure provisions allowing temporary suspension of performance by us or the customer during the duration of specified events beyond the control of the affected party. Most of our coal supply agreements contain provisions requiring us to deliver coal meeting quality thresholds for certain characteristics such as Btu, sulfur content, ash content, grindability and ash fusion temperature. Failure to meet these specifications could result in economic penalties, including price adjustments, the rejection of deliveries or termination of the contracts. Moreover, some of these agreements permit the customer to terminate the contract if transportation costs, which our customers typically bear, increase substantially. In addition, some of these contracts allow our customers to terminate their contracts in the event of changes in regulations affecting our industry that restrict the use or type of coal permissible at the customer’s plant or increases the price of coal beyond specified limits.

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The operating profits we realize from coal sold under supply agreements depend on a variety of factors. In addition, price adjustment and other provisions may increase our exposure to short-term coal price volatility provided by those contracts. If a substantial portion of our coal supply agreements were modified or terminated, we could be materially adversely affected to the extent that we are unable to find alternate buyers for our coal at the same level of profitability. Market prices for coal vary by mining region and country. As a result, we cannot predict the future strength of the coal market overall or by mining region and cannot provide assurance that we will be able to replace existing long-term coal supply agreements at the same prices or with similar profit margins when they expire.
The loss of, or significant reduction in, purchases by our largest customers could adversely affect our revenues.
For the year ended December 31, 2011 we derived 23% of our total coal sales revenues from our five largest customers. Those five customers were supplied primarily from 24 coal supply agreements (excluding trading transactions) expiring at various times from 2012 to 2025. The contract contributing the greatest amount of annual revenue in 2011 was approximately $311 million, or approximately 4% of our 2011 total revenue base. We are currently discussing the extension of existing agreements or entering into new long-term agreements with some of these customers, but these negotiations may not be successful and those customers may not continue to purchase coal from us under long-term coal supply agreements. If a number of these customers significantly reduce their purchases of coal from us, or if we are unable to sell coal to them on terms as favorable to us as the terms under our current agreements, our financial condition and results of operations could suffer materially. In addition, our revenue could be adversely affected by a decline in customer purchases due to lack of demand, cost of competing fuels and environmental regulations.
Our operating results could be adversely affected by unfavorable economic and financial market conditions.
In recent years, the global economic recession and the worldwide financial and credit market disruptions had a negative impact on us and on the coal industry generally. If any of these conditions return or if there are downturns in economic conditions, particularly in developing countries such as China and India, our business, financial condition or results of operations could be adversely affected. While we are focused on cost control, productivity improvements, increased contributions from our high-margin operations and capital discipline, there can be no assurance that these actions, or any others we may take, will be sufficient in response to downturns in economic and financial conditions.
Our ability to collect payments from our customers could be impaired if their creditworthiness deteriorates.
Our ability to receive payment for coal sold and delivered or for financially settled contracts depends on the continued creditworthiness of our customers and counterparties. Our customer base has changed with deregulation in the U.S. as utilities have sold their power plants to their non-regulated affiliates or third parties, and with our continued expansion in the Asia-Pacific region. These new customers may have credit ratings that are below investment grade or not rated. If deterioration of the creditworthiness of our customers occurs, our accounts receivable securitization program and our business could be adversely affected.
Risks inherent to mining could increase the cost of operating our business.
Our mining operations are subject to conditions that can impact the safety of our workforce, or delay coal deliveries or increase the cost of mining at particular mines for varying lengths of time. These conditions include fires and explosions from methane gas or coal dust; accidental minewater discharges; weather, flooding and natural disasters; unexpected maintenance problems; key equipment failures; variations in coal seam thickness; variations in the amount of rock and soil overlying the coal deposit; variations in rock and other natural materials and variations in geologic conditions. We maintain insurance policies that provide limited coverage for some of these risks, although there can be no assurance that these risks would be fully covered by our insurance policies. Despite our efforts, significant mine accidents could occur and have a substantial impact on our results of operations, financial condition or cash flows.
If transportation for our coal becomes unavailable or uneconomic for our customers, our ability to sell coal could suffer.
Transportation costs represent a significant portion of the total cost of coal and the cost of transportation is a critical factor in a customer’s purchasing decision. Increases in transportation costs and the lack of sufficient rail and port capacity could lead to reduced coal sales. As of December 31, 2011, certain coal supply agreements permit the customer to terminate the contract if the cost of transportation increases by an amount over specified levels in any given 12-month period.

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We depend upon rail, barge, trucking, overland conveyor and ocean-going vessels to deliver coal to markets. While our coal customers typically arrange and pay for transportation of coal from the mine or port to the point of use, disruption of these transportation services because of weather-related problems, infrastructure damage, strikes, lock-outs, lack of fuel or maintenance items, underperformance of the port and rail infrastructure, congestion and balancing systems which are imposed to manage vessel queuing and demurrage, non-performance or delays by co-shippers, transportation delays or other events could temporarily impair our ability to supply coal to our customers and thus could adversely affect our results of operations.
A decrease in the availability or increase in costs of key supplies, capital equipment or commodities such as diesel fuel, steel, explosives and tires could decrease our anticipated profitability.
Our mining operations require a reliable supply of mining equipment, replacement parts, fuel, explosives, tires, steel-related products (including roof control materials), lubricants and electricity. There has been some consolidation in the supplier base providing mining materials to the coal industry, such as with suppliers of explosives and both surface and underground equipment, that has limited the number of sources for these materials. In situations where we have chosen to concentrate a large portion of purchases with one supplier, it has been to take advantage of cost savings from larger volumes of purchases and to ensure security of supply. If the cost of any of these inputs increased significantly, or if a source for these supplies or mining equipment were unavailable to meet our replacement demands, our profitability could be reduced or we could experience a delay or halt in our production.
An inability of trading, brokerage, mining or freight sources to fulfill the delivery terms of their contracts with us could reduce our profitability.
In conducting our trading, brokerage and mining operations, we utilize third-party sources of coal production and transportation, including contract miners and brokerage sources, to fulfill deliveries under our coal supply agreements. In Australia, the majority of our volume comes from mines that utilize contract miners. Employee relations at mines that use contract miners are the responsibility of the contractor.
Our profitability or exposure to loss on transactions or relationships is dependent upon the reliability (including financial viability) and price of the third-party suppliers, our obligation to supply coal to customers in the event that weather, flooding, natural disasters or adverse geologic mining conditions restrict deliveries from our suppliers, our willingness to participate in temporary cost increases experienced by our third-party coal suppliers, our ability to pass on temporary cost increases to our customers, the ability to substitute, when economical, third-party coal sources with internal production or coal purchased in the market and the ability of our freight sources to fulfill their delivery obligations. Market volatility and price increases for coal or freight on the international and domestic markets could result in non-performance by third-party suppliers under existing contracts with us, in order to take advantage of the higher prices in the current market. Such non-performance could have an adverse impact on our ability to fulfill deliveries under our coal supply agreements.
Our trading and hedging activities may expose us to earnings volatility and other risks.
We enter into hedging arrangements designed primarily to manage market price volatility of foreign currency (primarily the Australian dollar), diesel fuel and explosives. Also, from time to time, we manage the interest rate risk associated with our variable and fixed rate borrowings using interest rate swaps. Generally, we attempt to designate hedging arrangements as cash flow hedges with gains or losses recorded as a separate component of stockholders’ equity until the hedged transaction occurs (or until hedge ineffectiveness is determined). While we utilize a variety of risk monitoring and mitigation strategies, those strategies require judgment and they cannot anticipate every potential outcome or the timing of such outcomes. As such, there is potential for these hedges to no longer qualify for hedge accounting. If that were to happen, we will be required to recognize the mark to market movements through current year earnings, possibly resulting in increased volatility in our income in future periods. In addition, to the extent that we engage in hedging activities, we may be prevented from realizing the benefits of future price decreases of foreign currency, diesel fuel and explosives.
We also enter into derivative trading instruments, some of which require us to post margin based on the value of those instruments and other credit factors. If our credit is downgraded, the fair value of our hedge positions move significantly, or laws or regulations are passed requiring all hedge arrangements to be exchange-traded or exchange-cleared, we could be required to post additional margin, which could impact our liquidity.

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Through our trading and hedging activities, we are also exposed to the nonperformance and credit risk with various counterparties, including exchanges and other financial intermediaries. Should the counterparties to these arrangements fail to perform, we may be forced to enter into alternative arrangements, which could negatively impact our profitability and/or liquidity. In addition, some of our trading and brokerage activities include an increasing number of exchange-settled transactions, which exposes us to the margin requirements of the exchange for daily changes in the value of our positions. If there are significant and extended unfavorable price movements against our positions, or if there are future regulations that impose new margin requirements, position limits and capital charges, even if not directly applicable to us, our liquidity could be impacted.
Our ability to operate our company effectively could be impaired if we lose key personnel or fail to attract qualified personnel.
We manage our business with a number of key personnel, the loss of whom could have a material adverse effect on us. In addition, as our business develops and expands, we believe that our future success will depend greatly on our continued ability to attract and retain highly skilled and qualified personnel, particularly personnel with mining experience. We cannot provide assurance that key personnel will continue to be employed by us or that we will be able to attract and retain qualified personnel in the future. Failure to retain or attract key personnel could have a material adverse effect on us.
We could be negatively affected if we fail to maintain satisfactory labor relations.
As of December 31, 2011, we had approximately 8,300 employees, which included approximately 5,600 hourly employees. Approximately 24% of our hourly employees were represented by organized labor unions and generated 7% of 2011 coal production. Additionally, those employed through contract mining relationships in Australia are also members of trade unions. Relations with our employees and, where applicable, organized labor are important to our success. If some or all of our current non-union operations were to become unionized, we could incur an increased risk of work stoppages, reduced productivity and higher labor costs. Also, if we fail to maintain good relations with our union workforce, we could experience labor disputes, work stoppages or other disruptions in production that could negatively impact our profitability.
Our mining operations could be adversely affected if we fail to appropriately secure our obligations.
U.S. federal and state laws and Australian laws require us to secure certain of our obligations to reclaim lands used for mining, to pay federal and state workers’ compensation, to secure coal lease obligations and to satisfy other miscellaneous obligations. The primary methods we use to meet those obligations are to post a corporate guarantee (i.e., self bond), provide a third-party surety bond or provide a letter of credit. As of December 31, 2011, we had $929.6 million of self bonding in place for our reclamation obligations. As of December 31, 2011, we also had outstanding surety bonds with third parties, bank guarantees and letters of credit of $1,214.6 million, of which $791.6 million was for post-mining reclamation, $76.1 million related to workers’ compensation obligations, $104.7 million was for coal lease obligations and $242.2 million was for other obligations, including collateral for surety companies and bank guarantees, road maintenance and performance guarantees. Surety bonds are typically renewable on a yearly basis. Surety bond issuers and holders may not continue to renew the bonds or may demand additional collateral upon those renewals. Letters of credit are subject to us maintaining compliance under our two primary facilities used for such items, which is our Credit Facility and our accounts receivable securitization program. Our failure to retain, or inability to acquire, surety bonds or letters of credit or to provide a suitable alternative would have a material adverse effect on us. That failure could result from a variety of factors including the following:
lack of availability, higher expense or unfavorable market terms of new surety bonds;
restrictions on the availability of collateral for current and future third-party surety bond issuers under the terms of our indentures, Credit Facility or our 2011 term loan facility (2011 Term Loan Facility);
the exercise by third-party surety bond issuers of their right to refuse to renew the surety; and
the inability to renew our Credit Facility.
Our ability to self bond reduces our costs of providing financial assurances. To the extent we are unable to maintain our current level of self bonding due to legislative or regulatory changes or changes in our financial condition, our costs would increase.

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Our mining operations are extensively regulated, which imposes significant costs on us, and future regulations and developments could increase those costs or limit our ability to produce coal.
Federal, state and local authorities regulate the coal mining industry with respect to matters such as employee health and safety, permitting and licensing requirements, air quality standards, water pollution, plant and wildlife protection, reclamation and restoration of mining properties after mining is completed, the discharge of materials into the environment, surface subsidence from underground mining and the effects that mining has on groundwater quality and availability. Numerous governmental permits and approvals are required for mining operations. We are required to prepare and present to federal, state and local authorities data pertaining to the effect that any proposed exploration for or production of coal may have upon the environment. The public, including non-governmental organizations, opposition groups and individuals, have statutory rights to comment upon and submit objections to requested permits and approvals. The costs, liabilities and requirements associated with these regulations may be costly and time-consuming and may delay commencement or continuation of exploration or production.
The possibility exists that new legislation and/or regulations and orders related to the environment or employee health and safety may be adopted and may materially adversely affect our mining operations, our cost structure and/or our customers’ ability to use coal. New legislation or administrative regulations (or new interpretations by the relevant government authorities of existing laws and regulations), including proposals related to the protection of the environment or the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions that would further regulate and tax the coal industry, may also require us or our customers to change operations significantly or incur increased costs. Some of our coal supply agreements contain provisions that allow a purchaser to terminate its contract if legislation is passed that either restricts the use or type of coal permissible at the purchaser’s plant or results in specified increases in the cost of coal or its use. These factors and legislation, if enacted, could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.
A number of laws, including in the U.S., CERCLA, impose liability relating to contamination by hazardous substances. Such liability may involve the costs of investigating or remediating contamination and damages to natural resources, as well as claims seeking to recover for property damage or personal injury caused by hazardous substances. Such liability may arise from conditions at formerly, as well as currently, owned or operated properties, and at properties to which hazardous substances have been sent for treatment, disposal, or other handling. Liability under CERCLA and similar state statutes is without regard to fault, and typically is joint and several, meaning that a person may be held responsible for more than its share, or even all, of the liability involved. Our mining operations involve some use of hazardous materials. In addition, we have accrued for liability arising out of contamination associated with Gold Fields Mining, LLC (Gold Fields), a dormant, non-coal-producing subsidiary of ours that was previously managed and owned by Hanson PLC, or with Gold Fields’ former affiliates. Hanson PLC, which is a predecessor owner of ours, transferred ownership of Gold Fields to us in the February 1997 spin-off of its energy business. Gold Fields is currently a defendant in several lawsuits and has received notices of several other potential claims arising out of lead contamination from mining and milling operations it conducted in northeastern Oklahoma. Gold Fields is also involved in investigating or remediating a number of other contaminated sites. See Note 23 to our consolidated financial statements for a description of pending legal proceedings involving Gold Fields.
If the assumptions underlying our asset retirement obligations for reclamation and mine closures are materially inaccurate, our costs could be significantly greater than anticipated.
Our asset retirement obligations primarily consist of spending estimates for surface land reclamation and support facilities at both surface and underground mines in accordance with federal and state reclamation laws in the U.S. and Australia as defined by each mining permit. These obligations are determined for each mine using various estimates and assumptions including, among other items, estimates of disturbed acreage as determined from engineering data, estimates of future costs to reclaim the disturbed acreage and the timing of these cash flows, discounted using a credit-adjusted, risk-free rate. Our management and engineers periodically review these estimates. If our assumptions do not materialize as expected, actual cash expenditures and costs that we incur could be materially different than currently estimated. Moreover, regulatory changes could increase our obligation to perform reclamation and mine closing activities. The resulting estimated asset retirement obligation could change significantly if actual amounts change significantly from our assumptions, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

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Our future success depends upon our ability to continue acquiring and developing coal reserves that are economically recoverable.
Our recoverable reserves decline as we produce coal. We have not yet applied for the permits required or developed the mines necessary to use all of our reserves. Moreover, the amount of proven and probable coal reserves described in Item 2. “Properties” involved the use of certain estimates and those estimates could be inaccurate. Furthermore, we may not be able to mine all of our reserves as profitably as we do at our current operations. Our future success depends upon our conducting successful exploration and development activities or acquiring properties containing economically recoverable reserves. Our current strategy includes increasing our reserves through acquisitions of government and other leases and producing properties and continuing to use our existing properties. In certain locations, leases for oil, natural gas and coalbed methane reserves are located on, or adjacent to, some of our reserves, potentially creating conflicting interests between us and lessees of those interests. Other lessees’ rights relating to these mineral interests could prevent, delay or increase the cost of developing our coal reserves. These lessees may also seek damages from us based on claims that our coal mining operations impair their interests. Additionally, the U.S. federal government limits the amount of federal land that may be leased by any company to 150,000 acres nationwide. As of December 31, 2011, we leased a total of 83,582 acres from the federal government. The limit could restrict our ability to lease additional U.S. federal lands.
Our planned mine development projects and acquisition activities may not result in significant additional reserves, and we may not have success developing additional mines. Most of our mining operations are conducted on properties owned or leased by us. Because we do not thoroughly verify title to most of our leased properties and mineral rights until we obtain a permit to mine the property, our right to mine some of our reserves may be materially adversely affected if defects in title or boundaries exist. In addition, in order to develop our reserves, we must also own the rights to the related surface property and receive various governmental permits. We cannot predict whether we will continue to receive the permits necessary for us to operate profitably in the future. We may not be able to negotiate new leases from the government or from private parties, obtain mining contracts for properties containing additional reserves or maintain our leasehold interest in properties on which mining operations have not commenced during the term of the lease. From time to time, we have experienced litigation with lessors of our coal properties and with royalty holders. In addition, from time to time our permit applications have been challenged.
Growth in our global operations increases our risks unique to international mining and trading operations.
We continue to explore ways to expand our international mining operations and global trading and brokerage platform. These efforts have included and are expected to include in the future such things as joint venture mining and exploration interests, such as partnering with other companies to utilize our mining experience for joint mine development, and sourcing coal from off-take arrangements to be sold through our Trading and Brokerage segment. Our international expansion increases our exposure to country risks and the effects of changes in currency exchange rates. Some of our international activities include expansion into developing countries where the economic strength, business practices and counterparty reputations may not be as well developed as in our U.S. or Australian operations. We are also challenged by various political risks, including political instability, the potential for expropriation of assets, costs associated with the repatriation of earnings and the potential for unexpected changes in regulatory requirements. Despite our efforts to mitigate these risks, our results of operations, financial position or cash flow could be adversely affected by these activities.
Risks Related to the Macarthur Acquisition

The extent to which we are able to successfully integrate the newly acquired Macarthur operations and successfully operate and develop the mine sites acquired from Macarthur will have a bearing on our future financial results.

The speed at which we integrate the Macarthur operations will have a direct bearing on the realization of anticipated synergies and benefits. Delays in optimizing the operations of the producing mines and in advancing the development and resource projects into operating mines and coal reserves could impact our future financial results.

We are more exposed to currency exchange rate fluctuations following completion of the Macarthur acquisition, and there is an increased proportion of assets, liabilities and expenses denominated in non-U.S. dollar currencies.

As a result of the completion of the Macarthur acquisition, our consolidated financial results are more exposed to currency exchange rate fluctuations, and an increased proportion of assets, liabilities and expenses are transacted in non-U.S. dollar currencies.


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We present our consolidated financial statements in U.S. dollars and will have a significant proportion of net assets and expenses denominated in the Australian dollar. Our consolidated financial results and capital ratios will, therefore, be sensitive to movements in foreign exchange rates. An appreciation of the Australian dollar relative to the U.S. dollar could have an adverse impact on our consolidated financial results.

If we fail to establish and maintain proper internal controls for the combined business, our ability to produce accurate financial statements or comply with applicable regulations could be impaired.

Prior to the acquisition, Macarthur was not subject to the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. As a subsidiary consolidated with our financial statements, Macarthur is subject to such rules and regulations. We are incorporating the internal controls and procedures of Macarthur into our internal control over financial reporting, and we expect to be able to perform an assessment of and report on internal control over financial reporting for the combined business for the year ending December 31, 2012. If we fail to establish and maintain proper internal controls for the combined business, our ability to produce accurate financial statements or comply with applicable regulations could be impaired.
Risks Associated with Our Indebtedness
We could be adversely affected by the failure of financial institutions to fulfill their commitments under our Credit Facility.
As of December 31, 2011, we had $1.5 billion of available ongoing borrowing capacity under the Revolver portion of our Credit Facility, net of outstanding letters of credit. This committed facility, which matures on June 18, 2015, is provided by a syndicate of financial institutions, with each institution agreeing severally (and not jointly) to make revolving credit loans to us in accordance with the terms of the facility. Although the Credit Facility syndicate consists of over 40 financial institutions, if one or more of these institutions were to default on its obligation to fund its commitment, the portion of the facility provided by such defaulting financial institution would not be available to us.
Our financial performance could be adversely affected by our debt.
As of December 31, 2011, our total indebtedness was $6.7 billion, and we had $1.5 billion of available borrowing capacity under the Revolver portion of our Credit Facility, net of outstanding letters of credit. The indentures governing our Convertible Junior Subordinated Debentures (the Debentures) and the 7.375%, 7.875%, 6.50%, 6.25% and 6.00% Senior Notes (collectively our Senior Notes) do not limit the amount of indebtedness that we may issue. The degree to which we are leveraged could have important consequences, including, but not limited to:
making it more difficult for us to pay interest and satisfy our debt obligations;
increasing the costs of borrowing under our existing credit facilities;
increasing our vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions;
requiring the dedication of a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to the payment of principal and interest on our indebtedness, thereby reducing the availability of our cash flow to fund working capital, capital expenditures, business development, Btu Conversion and clean coal technology projects or other general corporate requirements;
limiting our ability to obtain additional financing to fund future working capital, capital expenditures, business development, Btu Conversion and clean coal technology projects or other general corporate requirements;
making it more difficult to obtain surety bonds, letters of credit or other financing, particularly during periods in which credit markets are weak;
limiting our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and in the coal industry;
causing a decline in our credit ratings; and
placing us at a competitive disadvantage compared to less leveraged competitors.
In addition, our debt agreements subject us to financial and other restrictive covenants. Failure by us to comply with these covenants could result in an event of default that, if not cured or waived, could have a material adverse effect on us and result in amounts outstanding thereunder to be immediately due and payable.

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Any downgrade in our credit ratings could result in an increase in interest rates on our credit facilities, requirements to post additional collateral on derivative trading instruments, or the loss of trading counterparties for corporate hedging and commodity brokerage and trading.
If our cash flows and capital resources are insufficient to fund our debt service obligations, we may be forced to sell assets, seek additional capital or seek to restructure or refinance our indebtedness. These alternative measures may not be successful and may not permit us to meet our scheduled debt service obligations. In the absence of such operating results and resources, we could face substantial liquidity problems and might be required to sell material assets or operations to attempt to meet our debt service and other obligations. Certain agreements governing our indebtedness restrict our ability to sell assets and use the proceeds from the sales. We may not be able to complete those sales or to obtain the proceeds which we could realize from them and these proceeds may not be adequate to meet any debt service obligations then due.
The covenants in our Credit Facility and 2011 Term Loan Facility, and the indentures governing our Senior Notes and Debentures impose restrictions that may limit our operating and financial flexibility.
Our Credit Facility, 2011 Term Loan Facility, the indentures governing our Senior Notes  and our Debentures and the instruments governing our other indebtedness contain certain restrictions and covenants which restrict our ability to incur liens and/or debt or provide guarantees in respect of obligations of any other person. Under our Credit Facility, we must comply with certain financial covenants on a quarterly basis including a minimum interest coverage ratio and a maximum leverage ratio, as defined. The covenants also place limitations on our investments in joint ventures, unrestricted subsidiaries, indebtedness and the imposition of liens on our assets.
Operating results below current levels or other adverse factors, including a significant increase in interest rates, could result in our inability to comply with the financial covenants contained in our Credit Facility and 2011 Term Loan Facility. If we violate these covenants and are unable to obtain waivers from our lenders, our Credit Facility, our 2011 Term Loan Facility, our Senior Notes and our Debentures would be in default and the debt owing under such agreements could be accelerated. If our indebtedness is accelerated, we may not be able to repay our debt or borrow sufficient funds to refinance it. Even if we are able to obtain new financing, it may not be on commercially reasonable terms or on terms that are acceptable to us. If our debt is in default for any reason, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected. In addition, complying with these covenants may also cause us to take actions that are not favorable to holders of our other debt or equity securities and may make it more difficult for us to successfully execute our business strategy and compete against companies who are not subject to such restrictions.
The conversion of our Debentures may result in the dilution of the ownership interests of our existing stockholders.
If the conditions permitting the conversion of our Debentures are met and holders of the Debentures exercise their conversion rights, any conversion value in excess of the principal amount will be delivered in shares of our common stock. If any common stock is issued in connection with a conversion of our Debentures, our existing stockholders will experience dilution in the voting power of their common stock.
Provisions of our Debentures could discourage an acquisition of us by a third-party.
Certain provisions of our Debentures could make it more difficult or more expensive for a third-party to acquire us. Upon the occurrence of certain transactions constituting a “change of control” as defined in the indenture relating to our Debentures, holders of our Debentures will have the right, at their option, to convert their Debentures and thereby require us to pay the principal amount of such Debentures in cash.
Other Business Risks
Under certain circumstances, we could be responsible for certain federal and state black lung occupational disease liabilities assumed by Patriot in connection with its 2007 spin-off from us.
Patriot is responsible for certain federal and state black lung occupational disease liabilities, which are expected to be less than $150 million, as well as related credit capacity in support of these liabilities. Should Patriot not fund these obligations as they become due, we could be responsible for such costs when incurred.

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Our expenditures for postretirement benefit and pension obligations could be materially higher than we have predicted if our underlying assumptions prove to be incorrect.
We provide postretirement health and life insurance benefits to eligible union and non-union employees. We calculated the total accumulated postretirement benefit obligation, which was a liability of $1,121.5 million as of December 31, 2011, $68.4 million of which was a current liability. Net pension liabilities were $194.0 million as of December 31, 2011, $1.7 million of which was a current liability.
These liabilities are actuarially determined and we use various actuarial assumptions, including the discount rate and future cost trends, to estimate the costs and obligations for these items. Our discount rate is determined by utilizing a hypothetical bond portfolio model which approximates the future cash flows necessary to service our liabilities. We have made assumptions related to future trends for medical care costs in the estimates of retiree health care and work-related injuries and illnesses obligations. Our medical trend assumption is developed by annually examining the historical trend of our cost per claim data. In addition, we make assumptions related to rates of return on plan assets in the estimates of pension obligations. If our assumptions do not materialize as expected, actual cash expenditures and costs that we incur could differ materially from our current estimates. Moreover, regulatory changes or changes in medical benefits provided by the government could increase our obligation to satisfy these or additional obligations. In addition, a decrease in the discount rate used to determine pension obligations could result in an increase in the valuation of pension obligations, which could affect the reported funding status of our pension plans and future contributions, as well as the periodic pension cost in subsequent fiscal years. If we experience poor financial performance in asset markets in future years, we may be required to increase contributions.
Concerns about the environmental impacts of coal combustion, including perceived impacts on global climate issues, are resulting in increased regulation of coal combustion in many jurisdictions, and interest in further regulation, which could significantly affect demand for our products.
Global climate issues continue to attract public and scientific attention. Numerous reports, such as the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, have also engendered concern about the impacts of human activity, especially fossil fuel combustion, on global climate issues. In turn, increasing government attention is being paid to global climate issues and to emissions of what are commonly referred to as greenhouse gases, including emissions of carbon dioxide from coal combustion by power plants.
Enactment of laws or passage of regulations regarding emissions from the combustion of coal by the U.S. or some of its states or by other countries, or other actions to limit such emissions, could result in electricity generators switching from coal to other fuel sources. The potential financial impact on us of future laws or regulations will depend upon the degree to which any such laws or regulations force electricity generators to diminish their reliance on coal as a fuel source. That, in turn, will depend on a number of factors, including the specific requirements imposed by any such laws or regulations, the time periods over which those laws or regulations would be phased in, the state of commercial development and deployment of CCS technologies. In view of the significant uncertainty surrounding each of these factors, it is not possible for us to reasonably predict the impact that any such laws or regulations may have on our results of operations, financial condition or cash flows.
Our certificate of incorporation and by-laws include provisions that may discourage a takeover attempt.
Provisions contained in our certificate of incorporation and by-laws and Delaware law could make it more difficult for a third-party to acquire us, even if doing so might be beneficial to our stockholders. Provisions of our by-laws and certificate of incorporation impose various procedural and other requirements that could make it more difficult for stockholders to effect certain corporate actions. For example, a change in control of our Company may be delayed or deterred as a result of the stockholders’ rights plan adopted by our Board of Directors. These provisions could limit the price that certain investors might be willing to pay in the future for shares of our common stock and may have the effect of delaying or preventing a change in control.
Diversity in interpretation and application of accounting literature in the mining industry may impact our reported financial results.
The mining industry has limited industry-specific accounting literature and, as a result, we understand diversity in practice exists in the interpretation and application of accounting literature to mining specific issues. As diversity in mining industry accounting is addressed, we may need to restate our reported results if the resulting interpretations differ from our current accounting practices.

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Item 1B.  Unresolved Staff Comments.
None.

Item 2.  Properties.

Coal Reserves
We had an estimated 9.0 billion tons of proven and probable coal reserves as of December 31, 2011. An estimated 7.8 billion tons of our attributable proven and probable coal reserves are in the U.S. and 1.2 billion tons are in Australia. 32% of our Australian proven and probable coal reserves, or 380 million tons, are metallurgical coal with the remainder being thermal coal. 45% of our reserves, or 4.1 billion tons, are compliance coal and 55% are non-compliance coal (assuming application of the U.S. industry standard definition of compliance coal to all of our reserves). We own approximately 40% of these reserves and lease property containing the remaining 60%. Compliance coal is defined by Phase II of the Clean Air Act as coal having sulfur dioxide content of 1.2 pounds or less per million Btu. Electricity generators are able to use coal that exceeds these specifications by using emissions reduction technology, using emission allowance credits or blending higher sulfur coal with lower sulfur coal.
Below is a table summarizing the locations and reserves of our major operating regions.
 
 
 
 
Proven and Probable
Reserves as of
December 31, 2011(1)
 
 
 
 
Owned
Tons
 
Leased
Tons
 
Total
Tons
Operating Regions
 
Locations
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Tons in millions)
Midwest
 
Illinois, Indiana and Kentucky
 
2,719

 
926

 
3,645

Powder River Basin
 
Wyoming and Montana
 
67

 
2,791

 
2,858

Southwest
 
Arizona and New Mexico
 
805

 
274

 
1,079

Colorado
 
Colorado
 
46

 
182

 
228

Total United States
 
 
 
3,637

 
4,173

 
7,810

Australia
 
New South Wales
 

 
431

 
431

Australia
 
Queensland
 

 
770

 
770

Total Australia
 
 
 

 
1,201

 
1,201

Total Proven and Probable Coal Reserves
 
 
 
3,637

 
5,374

 
9,011

_______________________________________
(1) 
Reserves have been adjusted to take into account estimated losses involved in producing a saleable product.
Reserves are defined by SEC Industry Guide 7 as that part of a mineral deposit which could be economically and legally extracted or produced at the time of the reserve determination. Proven and probable coal reserves are defined by SEC Industry Guide 7 as follows:
Proven (Measured) Reserves — Reserves for which (a) quantity is computed from dimensions revealed in outcrops, trenches, workings or drill holes; grade and/or quality are computed from the results of detailed sampling and (b) the sites for inspection, sampling and measurement are spaced so close and the geographic character is so well defined that size, shape, depth and mineral content of reserves are well-established.

25


Probable (Indicated) Reserves — Reserves for which quantity and grade and/or quality are computed from information similar to that used for proven (measured) reserves, but the sites for inspection, sampling and measurement are farther apart or are otherwise less adequately spaced. The degree of assurance, although lower than that for proven (measured) reserves, is high enough to assume continuity between points of observation.
Our estimates of proven and probable coal reserves are established within these guidelines. Proven reserves require the coal to lie within one-quarter mile of a valid point of measure or point of observation, such as exploratory drill holes or previously mined areas. Estimates of probable reserves may lie more than one-quarter mile, but less than three-quarters of a mile, from a point of thickness measurement. Estimates within the proven category have the highest degree of assurance, while estimates within the probable category have only a moderate degree of geologic assurance. Further exploration is necessary to place probable reserves into the proven reserve category. Our active properties generally have a much higher degree of reliability because of increased drilling density. Active surface reserves generally have points of observation as close as 330 feet to 660 feet.
Our reserve estimates are prepared by our staff of experienced geologists. We also have a chief geologist of reserve reporting whose primary responsibility is to track changes in reserve estimates, supervise our other geologists and coordinate periodic third-party reviews of our reserve estimates by qualified mining consultants.

Our reserve estimates are predicated on information obtained from our ongoing drilling program, which totals nearly 500,000 individual drill holes. We compile data from individual drill holes in a computerized drill-hole database from which the depth, thickness and, where core drilling is used, the quality of the coal is determined. The density of the drill pattern determines whether the reserves will be classified as proven or probable. The reserve estimates are then input into our computerized land management system, which overlays the geological data with data on ownership or control of the mineral and surface interests to determine the extent of our reserves in a given area. The land management system contains reserve information, including the quantity and quality (where available) of reserves as well as production rates, surface ownership, lease payments and other information relating to our coal reserves and land holdings. We periodically update our reserve estimates to reflect production of coal from the reserves and new drilling or other data received. Accordingly, reserve estimates will change from time to time to reflect mining activities, analysis of new engineering and geological data, changes in reserve holdings, modification of mining methods and other factors.
Our estimate of the economic recoverability of our reserves is based upon a comparison of unassigned reserves to assigned reserves currently in production in the same geologic setting to determine an estimated mining cost. These estimated mining costs are compared to expected market prices for the quality of coal expected to be mined and taking into consideration typical contractual sales agreements for the region and product. Where possible, we also review production by competitors in similar mining areas. Only reserves expected to be mined economically are included in our reserve estimates. Finally, our reserve estimates include reductions for recoverability factors to estimate a saleable product.
We periodically engage independent mining and geological consultants and consider their input regarding the procedures used by us to prepare our internal estimates of coal reserves, selected property reserve estimates and tabulation of reserve groups according to standard classifications of reliability.
With respect to the accuracy of our reserve estimates, our experience is that recovered reserves are within plus or minus 10% of our proven and probable estimates, on average, and our probable estimates are generally within the same statistical degree of accuracy when the necessary drilling is completed to move reserves from the probable to the proven classification.
We have numerous U.S. federal coal leases that are administered by the U.S. Department of the Interior under the Federal Coal Leasing Amendments Act of 1976. These leases cover our principal reserves in Wyoming and other reserves in Montana and Colorado. Each of these leases continues indefinitely, provided there is diligent development of the property and continued operation of the related mine or mines. The Bureau of Land Management has asserted the right to adjust the terms and conditions of these leases, including rent and royalties, after the first 20 years of their term and at 10-year intervals thereafter. Annual rents on surface land under our federal coal leases are now set at $3.00 per acre. Production royalties on federal leases are set by statute at 12.5% of the gross proceeds of coal mined and sold for surface-mined coal and 8% for underground-mined coal. The U.S. federal government limits by statute the amount of federal land that may be leased by any company and its affiliates at any time to 75,000 acres in any one state and 150,000 acres nationwide. As of December 31, 2011, we leased 11,536 acres of federal land in Colorado, 11,254 acres in Montana, 60,152 acres in Wyoming and 640 acres in New Mexico, for a total of 83,582 nationwide.
Similar provisions govern three coal leases with the Navajo and Hopi Indian tribes. These leases cover coal contained in 64,785 acres of land in northern Arizona lying within the boundaries of the Navajo Nation and Hopi Indian reservations. We also lease coal-mining properties from various state governments in the U.S.

26


Private U.S. coal leases normally have terms of between 10 and 20 years and usually give us the right to renew the lease for a stated period or to maintain the lease in force until the exhaustion of mineable and merchantable coal contained on the relevant site. These private U.S. leases provide for royalties to be paid to the lessor either as a fixed amount per ton or as a percentage of the sales price. Many U.S. leases also require payment of a lease bonus or minimum royalty, payable either at the time of execution of the lease or in periodic installments. The terms of our private U.S. leases are normally extended by active production at or near the end of the lease term. U.S. leases containing undeveloped reserves may expire or these leases may be renewed periodically.
Mining and exploration in Australia is generally carried on under leases or licenses granted by state governments. Mining leases are typically for an initial term of up to 21 years (but which may be renewed) and contain conditions relating to such matters as minimum annual expenditures, restoration and rehabilitation. Royalties are paid to the state government as a percentage of the sales price. Generally landowners do not own the mineral rights or have the ability to grant rights to mine those minerals. These rights are retained by state governments. Compensation is payable to landowners for loss of access to the land, and the amount of compensation can be determined by agreement or arbitration. Surface rights are typically acquired directly from landowners and, in the absence of agreement, there is an arbitration provision in the mining law.
Consistent with industry practice, we conduct only limited investigation of title to our coal properties prior to leasing. Title to lands and reserves of the lessors or grantors and the boundaries of our leased properties are not completely verified until we prepare to mine those reserves.
With a portfolio of approximately 9.0 billion tons, we believe that we have sufficient reserves to replace capacity from depleting mines for the foreseeable future and that our significant reserve holdings is one of our strengths. We believe that the current level of production at our major mines is sustainable for the foreseeable future.
The following charts provide a summary, by mining complex, of production for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, tonnage of coal reserves that is assigned to our operating mines, our property interest in those reserves and other characteristics of the facilities.

27


PRODUCTION
(Tons in Millions)
 
 
Production
 
 
 
Sulfur Content (1)
 
 
 
 
Year
 
Year
 
Year
 
 
 
 <1.2 lbs.
 
 >1.2 to 2.5 lbs.
 
 >2.5 lbs.
 
As
 
 
Ended
 
Ended
 
Ended
 
 
 
 Sulfur
 
 Sulfur
 
 Sulfur
 
Received
Geographic Region /
 
Dec. 31,
 
Dec. 31,
 
Dec. 31,
 
Type of
 
Dioxide per
 
Dioxide per
 
Dioxide per
 
Btu per
Mining Complex
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
Coal
 
 Million Btu
 
 Million Btu
 
 Million Btu
 
pound (2)
Midwest:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Bear Run
 
6.5

 
2.8

 

 
T
 
5

 
27

 
233

 
11,500
   Gateway
 
3.3

 
3.2

 
3.3

 
T
 

 

 
9

 
11,000
   Somerville Central
 
3.0

 
3.4

 
3.3

 
T
 

 

 
7

 
11,300
   Francisco Underground
 
3.0

 
2.7

 
2.0

 
T
 

 

 
45

 
11,500
   Willow Lake
 
2.2

 
2.9

 
3.4

 
T
 

 

 
24

 
12,100
   Cottage Grove
 
1.9

 
2.1

 
2.1

 
T
 

 

 
22

 
12,500
   Wild Boar
 
1.8

 
0.1

 

 
T
 

 

 
14

 
11,000
   Viking - Corning Pit
 
1.5

 
1.5

 
1.6

 
T
 

 

 
4

 
11,500
   Somerville North
 
1.4

 
2.0

 
2.0

 
T
 

 

 
4

 
10,600
   Somerville South
 
1.2

 
1.7

 
1.8

 
T
 

 

 
6

 
11,100
   Air Quality
 
1.2

 
1.1

 
1.6

 
T
 
21

 
2

 
31

 
11,300
   Wildcat Hills Underground
 
1.0

 
0.8

 
0.7

 
T
 

 

 
21

 
12,200
   Viking - Knox Pit (Closed in 2010)
 

 
1.7

 
2.0

 
T
 

 

 

 
NA
   Farmersburg (Closed in 2010)
 

 
1.5

 
3.5

 
T
 

 

 

 
NA
   Francisco Surface (Closed in 2009)
 

 

 
1.4

 
T
 

 

 

 
NA
      Total
 
28.0

 
27.5

 
28.7

 
 
 
26

 
29

 
420

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Powder River Basin:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   North Antelope Rochelle
 
109.1

 
105.8

 
98.3

 
T
 
1,388

 

 

 
8,700
   Caballo
 
24.1

 
23.5

 
23.3

 
T
 
827

 
127

 
22

 
8,300
   Rawhide
 
15.0

 
11.2

 
15.8

 
T
 
263

 
66

 
4

 
8,300
      Total
 
148.2

 
140.5

 
137.4

 
 
 
2,478

 
193

 
26

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Southwest:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Kayenta
 
8.1

 
7.8

 
7.5

 
T
 
162

 
75

 
2

 
10,600
   El Segundo
 
8.1

 
6.6

 
5.1

 
T
 
23

 
83

 
76

 
9,000
   Lee Ranch
 
2.0

 
1.6

 
1.8

 
T
 
18

 
111

 
13

 
9,300
      Total
 
18.2

 
16.0

 
14.4

 
 
 
203

 
269

 
91

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Colorado:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Twentymile
 
7.7

 
7.7

 
7.8

 
T
 
39

 

 

 
11,300
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Australia:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Wilpinjong
 
10.9

 
9.6

 
8.4

 
T
 

 
186

 

 
11,200
   Wambo (3)
 
5.8

 
6.6

 
4.1

 
T/P
 
207

 

 

 
12,200
   North Goonyella / Eaglefield
 
2.2

 
3.2

 
2.5

 
M
 
113

 

 

 
12,900
   Burton
 
2.1

 
2.5

 
2.0

 
T/M
 
47

 

 

 
12,700
   Millennium
 
1.9

 
1.6

 
0.9

 
M
 
54

 

 

 
12,600
   Metropolitan
 
1.8

 
1.6

 
1.5

 
M
 
38

 

 

 
12,600
   Coppabella
 
0.4

 

 

 
P
 
33

 

 

 
12,700
   Moorvale
 
0.3

 

 

 
T/M/P
 
16

 

 

 
12,100
   Middlemount (4)
 

 

 

 
M/P
 
38

 

 

 
12,300
      Total
 
25.4

 
25.1

 
19.4

 
 
 
546

 
186

 

 
 
Total Continuing Operations
 
227.5

 
216.8

 
207.7

 
 
 
3,292

 
677

 
537

 
 
Discontinued Operations
 
1.4

 
1.6

 
3.1

 
 
 

 

 

 
 
      Total Assigned
 
228.9

 
218.4

 
210.8

 
 
 
3,292

 
677

 
537

 
 

T: Thermal
M: Metallurgical
P: Pulverized Coal Injection


28


ASSIGNED RESERVES (5)
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2011
 
 
 
 
Attributable Ownership
 
100% Project Basis
(Tons in Millions)
 
 
 
Proven and
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Proven and
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Geographic Region/Mining Complex
 
Interest
 
Probable Reserves
 
 Owned
 
 Leased
 
 Surface
 
 Underground
 
Probable Reserves
 
 Owned
 
 Leased
 
 Surface
 
 Underground
Midwest:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Bear Run
 
100%
 
265

 
136

 
129

 
265

 

 
265

 
136

 
129

 
265

 

   Gateway
 
100%
 
9

 
8

 
1

 

 
9

 
9

 
8

 
1

 

 
9

   Somerville Central
 
100%
 
7

 
6

 
1

 
7

 

 
7

 
6

 
1

 
7

 

   Francisco Underground
 
100%
 
45

 
8

 
37

 

 
45

 
45

 
8

 
37

 

 
45

   Willow Lake
 
100%
 
24

 
14

 
10

 

 
24

 
24

 
14

 
10

 

 
24

   Cottage Grove
 
100%
 
22

 
13

 
9

 
22

 

 
22

 
13

 
9

 
22

 

   Wild Boar
 
100%
 
14

 
10

 
4

 
14

 

 
14

 
10

 
4

 
14

 

   Viking - Corning Pit
 
100%
 
4

 

 
4

 
4

 

 
4

 

 
4

 
4

 

   Somerville North
 
100%
 
4

 
1

 
3

 
4

 

 
4

 
1

 
3

 
4

 

   Somerville South
 
100%
 
6

 
5

 
1

 
6

 

 
6

 
5

 
1

 
6

 

   Air Quality
 
100%
 
54

 
3

 
51

 

 
54

 
54

 
3

 
51

 

 
54

   Wildcat Hills Underground
 
100%
 
21

 
16

 
5

 

 
21

 
21

 
16

 
5

 

 
21

      Total
 
 
 
475

 
220

 
255

 
322

 
153

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Powder River Basin:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   North Antelope Rochelle
 
100%
 
1,388

 

 
1,388

 
1,388

 

 
1,388

 

 
1,388

 
1,388

 

   Caballo
 
100%
 
976

 

 
976

 
976

 

 
976

 

 
976

 
976

 

   Rawhide
 
100%
 
333

 

 
333

 
333

 

 
333

 

 
333

 
333

 

      Total
 
 
 
2,697

 

 
2,697

 
2,697

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Southwest:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Kayenta
 
100%
 
239

 

 
239

 
239

 

 
239

 

 
239

 
239

 

   El Segundo
 
100%
 
182

 
167

 
15

 
182

 

 
182

 
167

 
15

 
182

 

   Lee Ranch
 
100%
 
142

 
122

 
20

 
142

 

 
142

 
122

 
20

 
142

 

      Total
 
 
 
563

 
289

 
274

 
563

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Colorado:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Twentymile
 
100%
 
39

 
8

 
31

 

 
39

 
39

 
8

 
31

 

 
39

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Australia:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Wilpinjong
 
100%
 
186

 

 
186

 
186

 

 
186

 

 
186

 
186

 

   Wambo (3)
 
100%
 
207

 

 
207

 
73

 
134

 
207

 

 
207

 
73

 
134

   North Goonyella / Eaglefield
 
100%
 
113

 

 
113

 
3

 
110

 
113

 

 
113

 
3

 
110

   Burton
 
100%
 
47

 

 
47

 
47

 

 
47

 

 
47

 
47

 

   Millennium
 
100%
 
54

 

 
54

 
54

 

 
54

 

 
54

 
54

 

   Metropolitan
 
100%
 
38

 

 
38

 

 
38

 
38

 

 
38

 

 
38

   Coppabella
 
73.3%
 
33

 

 
33

 
33

 

 
45

 

 
45

 
45

 

   Moorvale
 
73.3%
 
16

 

 
16

 
16

 

 
22

 

 
22

 
22

 

   Middlemount (4)
 
50.0%
 
38

 

 
38

 
38

 

 
75

 

 
75

 
75

 

      Total
 
 
 
732

 

 
732

 
450

 
282

 

 

 

 

 

         Total Assigned
 
 
 
4,506

 
517

 
3,989

 
4,032

 
474

 

 

 

 

 





29


ASSIGNED AND UNASSIGNED PROVEN AND PROBABLE COAL RESERVES
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2011
(Tons in Millions)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Attributable Ownership
 
100% Project Basis
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Proven and
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Proven and
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Total Tons
 
 Probable
 
 
 
 
 
 Total Tons
 
 Probable
 
 
 
 
Coal Seam Location
 
 
 
Assigned
 
Unassigned
 
Reserves
 
Proven
 
Probable
 
Assigned
 
Unassigned
 
Reserves
 
Proven
 
Probable
Midwest:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Illinois
 
 
 
76

 
2,232

 
2,308

 
1,186

 
1,122

 
76

 
2,232

 
2,308

 
1,186

 
1,122

   Indiana
 
 
 
399

 
442

 
841

 
614

 
227

 
399

 
442

 
841

 
614

 
227

   Kentucky
 
 
 

 
496

 
496

 
264

 
232

 

 
496

 
496

 
264

 
232

   Total
 
 
 
475

 
3,170

 
3,645

 
2,064

 
1,581

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Powder River Basin:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Montana
 
 
 

 
161

 
161

 
157

 
4

 

 
161

 
161

 
157

 </