10-K 1 hfwa-2015123110k.htm 10-K 10-K
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
 
 
 
FORM 10-K
 
 
 
x
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2015
OR
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
Commission File Number 0-29480 
 
HERITAGE FINANCIAL CORPORATION
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter) 
 
 
 
Washington
 
91-1857900
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
 
 
201 Fifth Avenue SW, Olympia, WA
 
98501
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
(360) 943-1500
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code) 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
  
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock
  
NASDAQ Stock Market LLC
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
None
 Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  ¨    No  ý
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes  ¨    No  ý
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  ý    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  ý    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.    ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer  ¨      Accelerated filer  ý      Non-accelerated filer  ¨      Smaller reporting company  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ¨    No  ý
The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of June 30, 2015, based on the closing price of its common stock on such date, on the NASDAQ Global Select Market, of $17.87 per share, and 29,175,066 shares held by non-affiliates was $521,358,429.
The registrant had 29,965,708 shares of common stock outstanding as of February 19, 2016.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the registrant’s definitive Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Shareholders will be incorporated by reference into Part III of this Form 10-K.



HERITAGE FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
FORM 10-K
December 31, 2015
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
Page
 
 
ITEM 1.
ITEM 1A.
ITEM 1B.
ITEM 2.
ITEM 3.
ITEM 4.
 
 
 
 
 
ITEM 5.
ITEM 6.
ITEM 7.
ITEM 7A.
ITEM 8.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ITEM 9.
ITEM 9A.
ITEM 9B.
 
 
 
 
 
ITEM 10.
ITEM 11.
ITEM 12.
ITEM 13.
ITEM 14.
 
 
 
 
 
ITEM 15.
 
 
 
 

2


PART I.     FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1.     BUSINESS
General
Heritage Financial Corporation (the “Company” or "Heritage") is a bank holding company that was incorporated in the State of Washington in August 1997. We were organized for the purpose of acquiring all of the capital stock of Heritage Savings Bank upon our reorganization from the mutual holding company form of organization to the stock holding company form of organization. Effective September 1, 2004, Heritage Savings Bank switched its charter from a state chartered savings bank to a state chartered commercial bank and changed its legal name from Heritage Savings Bank to Heritage Bank (the "Bank"). The Company acquired Central Valley Bank in March 1999 and changed its charter from a nationally chartered commercial bank to a state chartered commercial bank effective September 1, 2005. In 1998, the Company acquired North Pacific Bank. In June 2006, the Company completed the acquisition of Western Washington Bancorp and its wholly owned subsidiary, Washington State Bank, N.A., at which time Washington State Bank, N.A. was merged into Heritage Bank.
Effective July 30, 2010, Heritage Bank entered into a definitive agreement with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the “FDIC”), pursuant to which Heritage Bank acquired certain assets and assumed certain liabilities of Cowlitz Bank, a Washington state-chartered commercial bank headquartered in Longview, Washington (the “Cowlitz Acquisition”). The Cowlitz Acquisition included nine branches of Cowlitz Bank, including its division Bay Bank, which opened as branches of Heritage Bank on August 2, 2010. The acquisition also included the Trust Services Division of Cowlitz Bank. In 2013, the Company consolidated three of these branches into existing Heritage Bank branches. Effective November 5, 2010, Heritage Bank entered into a definitive agreement with the FDIC, pursuant to which Heritage Bank acquired certain assets and assumed certain liabilities of Pierce Commercial Bank, a Washington state-chartered commercial bank headquartered in Tacoma, Washington (the “Pierce Acquisition”). The Pierce Acquisition included one branch, which opened as a branch of Heritage Bank on November 8, 2010.
On September 14, 2012, the Company announced that it had entered into a definitive agreement along with Heritage Bank, to acquire Northwest Commercial Bank (“NCB”), a full service commercial bank headquartered in Lakewood, Washington that operated two branch locations in Washington State (the “NCB Acquisition”). The NCB Acquisition was completed on January 9, 2013, at which time NCB was merged with and into Heritage Bank. The Lakewood branch was subsequently consolidated with an existing Heritage Bank branch in 2013.
On March 11, 2013, the Company entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Valley Community Bancshares, Inc. ("Valley" or "Valley Community Bancshares") and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Valley Bank, both headquartered in Puyallup, Washington (the “Valley Acquisition”) and its eight branches. The Valley Acquisition was completed on July 15, 2013. Subsequently, four of these branches were consolidated into existing Heritage Bank branches as of December 31, 2013.
On April 8, 2013, the Company announced the proposed merger of its two wholly-owned bank subsidiaries Central Valley Bank and Heritage Bank, with Central Valley Bank merging into Heritage Bank (the "Central Valley Merger"). The common control merger was completed on June 19, 2013. Central Valley Bank now operates as a division of Heritage Bank.
On October 23, 2013, the Company, the Bank, Washington Banking Company (“Washington Banking”) and its wholly owned subsidiary bank, Whidbey Island Bank ("Whidbey"), jointly announced the signing of a definitive merger agreement pursuant to which Heritage and Washington Banking entered into a strategic merger with Washington Banking merging into Heritage (the "Washington Banking Merger"). Washington Banking branches adopted the Heritage Bank name in all markets, with the exception of six branches in Whidbey Island markets which continue to operate using the Whidbey Island Bank name. The Washington Banking Merger was completed on May 1, 2014.
For additional information on the merger and acquisitions completed during the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013, see Note (2) Business Combinations of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in "Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data."
We are primarily engaged in the business of planning, directing, and coordinating the business activities of our wholly owned subsidiary, Heritage Bank. The deposits of the Bank are insured by the FDIC. Heritage Bank is headquartered in Olympia, Washington and conducts business in its 63 branch offices located in Washington and the greater Portland, Oregon area.
Our business consists primarily of lending and deposit relationships with small businesses and their owners in our market areas, and attracting deposits from the general public. We also make real estate construction and land development loans and consumer loans. The Bank also originates for sale or investment purposes one-to-four family

3


residential loans on residential properties located primarily in western and central Washington State and the greater Portland, Oregon area.
Market Areas
We offer financial services to meet the needs of the communities we serve through our community-oriented financial institutions. Headquartered in Olympia, Thurston County, Washington, we conduct business through Heritage Bank and its 63 branch offices located along the I-5 corridor throughout Washington and the greater Portland, Oregon area. We additionally have offices located in eastern Washington, primarily in Yakima County.
Lending Activities
General.    Lending activities are conducted through Heritage Bank. Our focus is on commercial business lending. We also originate consumer loans, real estate construction and land development loans and one-to-four family residential loans. Our loans are originated under policies that are reviewed and approved annually by our Board of Directors. In addition, we have established internal lending guidelines that are updated as needed. These policies and guidelines address underwriting standards, structure and rate considerations, and compliance with laws, regulations and internal lending limits. We conduct post-approval reviews on selected loans and routinely perform internal loan reviews of our loan portfolio to check for credit quality, proper documentation and compliance with laws and regulations.
The Company has acquired loans through mergers and acquisitions, which are designated as "purchased" loans. Prior to August 2015, certain purchased loans were covered under FDIC shared-loss agreements and were identified as "covered". The Company and the FDIC terminated the FDIC shared-loss agreements effective August 4, 2015. For additional information, see Note (6) FDIC Indemnification Asset of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.”
Commercial and industrial loans totaled $596.7 million, or 24.8% of total loans, as of December 31, 2015, and $570.5 million, or 25.3% of total loans, as of December 31, 2014. Owner-occupied commercial real estate loans totaled $629.2 million, or 26.2%, of total loan, as of December 31, 2015 and $595.0 million, or 26.4% of total loans, as of December 31, 2014, and non-owner occupied commercial real estate loans totaled $697.4 million, or 29.0% of total loans, as of December 31, 2015 and $643.6 million, or 28.6% of total loans, as of December 31, 2014. One-to-four family residential loans totaled $72.5 million, or 3.0% of total loans, at December 31, 2015, and $69.5 million, or 3.1% of total loans, at December 31, 2014. Real estate construction and land development loans totaled $107.1 million, or 4.5% of total loans, at December 31, 2015, and $114.1 million, or 5.1% of total loans, at December 31, 2014. Consumer loans totaled $298.2 million, or 12.4% of total loans, as of December 31, 2015, and $259.3 million, or 11.5% of total loans, as of December 31, 2014.

4


The following table provides information about our loan portfolio by type of loan at the dates indicated. These balances are prior to deduction for the allowance for loan losses.
 
December 31,
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
Balance
 
% of Total
(3)
 
Balance
 
% of Total
(3)
 
Balance
 
% of Total
(3)
 
Balance
 
% of Total
(3)
 
Balance
 
% of Total
(3)
 
(Dollars in thousands)
Commercial business:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Commercial and industrial
$
596,726

 
24.8
%
 
$
570,453

 
25.3
 %
 
$
351,230

 
28.5
 %
 
$
327,784

 
31.9
 %
 
$
347,804

 
33.6
 %
Owner-occupied commercial real estate
629,207

 
26.2

 
594,986

 
26.4

 
305,675

 
24.8

 
236,501

 
23.0

 
222,000

 
21.4

Non-owner occupied commercial real estate
697,388

 
29.0

 
643,636

 
28.6

 
414,604

 
33.7

 
289,882

 
28.2

 
279,635

 
27.0

Total commercial business
1,923,321


80.0
%
 
1,809,075

 
80.3

 
1,071,509

 
87.0

 
854,167

 
83.3

 
849,439

 
82.0

One-to-four family residential(1)
72,548

 
3.0

 
69,530

 
3.1

 
47,859

 
3.9

 
46,915

 
4.6

 
45,900

 
4.4

Real estate construction and land development:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
One-to-four family residential
51,752

 
2.2

 
49,195

 
2.2

 
21,280

 
1.7

 
30,121

 
2.8

 
29,536

 
2.9

Five or more family residential and commercial properties
55,325

 
2.3

 
64,920

 
2.9

 
48,655

 
3.9

 
52,939

 
5.2

 
56,032

 
5.4

Total real estate construction and land development (2)
107,077

 
4.5

 
114,115

 
5.1

 
69,935

 
5.6

 
83,060

 
8.1

 
85,568

 
8.3

Consumer
298,167

 
12.4

 
259,294

 
11.5

 
45,287

 
3.7

 
44,892

 
4.4

 
56,348

 
5.4

Gross loans receivable
2,401,113

 
99.9

 
2,252,014

 
100.0

 
1,234,590

 
100.2

 
1,029,034

 
100.2

 
1,037,255

 
100.2

Deferred loan costs (fees), net
929

 
0.1

 
(937
)
 

 
(2,670
)
 
(0.2
)
 
(2,096
)
 
(0.2
)
 
(1,860
)
 
(0.2
)
Loans receivable, net
$
2,402,042

 
100.0
%
 
$
2,251,077

 
100.0
 %
 
$
1,231,920

 
100.0
 %
 
$
1,026,938

 
100.0
 %
 
$
1,035,395

 
100.0
 %
(1)
Excludes loans held for sale of $7.7 million, $5.6 million, $1.7 million and $1.8 million as of December 31, 2015, 2014, 2012 and 2011, respectively. There were no loans held for sale at December 31, 2013.
(2)
Balances are net of undisbursed loan proceeds.
(3)
Percent of loans receivable, net.



5


The following table presents at December 31, 2015 (i) the aggregate contractual maturities of loans in the named categories of our loan portfolio and (ii) the aggregate amounts of fixed rate and variable or adjustable rate loans in the named categories that mature after one year.
 
 
Maturing
 
 
Within
1 year
 
Over 1-5
years
 
After
5 years
 
Total
 
 
(In thousands)
Commercial business
 
$
230,851

 
$
437,885

 
$
1,254,585

 
$
1,923,321

Real estate construction and land development
 
45,685

 
29,195

 
32,197

 
$
107,077

Total
 
$
276,536

 
$
467,080

 
$
1,286,782

 
$
2,030,398

Fixed rate loans, due after 1 year
 
 
 
$
259,411

 
$
323,957

 
$
583,368

Variable or adjustable rate loans, due after 1 year
 
 
 
207,669

 
962,825

 
$
1,170,494

Total
 
 
 
$
467,080

 
$
1,286,782

 
$
1,753,862

Commercial Business Lending
We offer different types of commercial business loans, including lines of credit, term equipment financing and term owner-occupied and non-owner occupied commercial real estate loans. We also originate loans that are guaranteed by the Small Business Administration (“SBA”), for which Heritage Bank is a “preferred lender.” Before extending credit to a business, we review and analyze the borrower’s management ability, financial history, including cash flow of the borrower and all guarantors, and the liquidation value of the collateral. Emphasis is placed on having a comprehensive understanding of the borrower’s global cash flow and performing necessary financial due diligence.
At December 31, 2015 we had $1.92 billion, or 80.0%, of our total loans receivable in commercial business loans with an average outstanding loan balance of approximately $374,000 at December 31, 2015, excluding loans with no outstanding balance.
We originate commercial real estate loans within our primary market areas with a preference for loans secured by owner-occupied properties. Our underwriting standards require that commercial real estate loans not exceed 75% of the lower of appraised value at origination or cost of the underlying collateral. Cash flow coverage to debt servicing requirements is generally a minimum of 1.15 times for five or more family residential loans and 1.25 times for other commercial real estate loans. Cash flow coverage is calculated using an “underwriting” interest rate that is higher than the note rate.
Commercial real estate loans typically involve a greater degree of risk than one-to-four family residential loans. Payments on loans secured by commercial real estate properties are dependent on successful operation and management of the properties and repayment of these loans may be affected by adverse conditions in the real estate market or the economy. We seek to minimize these risks by determining the financial condition of the borrower, the quality and value of the collateral, and the management of the property securing the loan. We also generally obtain personal guarantees from the owners of the collateral after a thorough review of personal financial statements. In addition, we review our commercial real estate loan portfolio annually for performance of individual loans, and stress-test loans for potential changes in interest rates, occupancy, and collateral values.
See “Item 1A. Risk Factors—Our loan portfolio is concentrated in loans with a higher risk of loss—Repayment of our commercial business loans, consisting of commercial and industrial loans as well as owner-occupied and non-owner occupied commercial real estate loans, is often dependent on the cash flows of the borrower, which may be unpredictable, and the collateral securing these loans may fluctuate in value.” See also “Item 1A. Risk Factors—Our loan portfolio is concentrated in loans with a higher risk of loss—Our non-owner occupied commercial real estate loans, which includes five or more family residential real estate loans, involve higher principal amounts than other loans and repayment of these loans may be dependent on factors outside our control or the control of our borrowers.”
One-to-Four Family Residential Loans, Originations and Sales
The majority of our one-to-four family residential loans are secured by single-family residences located in our primary market areas. Our underwriting standards require that one-to-four family residential loans generally are owner-occupied and do not exceed 80% of the lower of appraised value at origination or cost of the underlying collateral. Terms typically range from 15 to 30 years.

6


As part of our asset/liability management strategy, we typically sell a significant portion of our one-to-four family residential loans in the secondary market. See “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Asset/Liability Management.” We discontinued this strategy in the second quarter of 2013 through the second quarter of 2014, and reinstated the strategy following the completion of the Washington Banking Merger.
We typically sell the servicing of the sold one-to-four family residential loans, or the collection of principal and interest payments, to other financial institutions. We did not service any of these sold loans as of or for the years ended December 31, 2015 or 2014.
The following table presents summary information concerning the origination and sale of our one-to-four family residential loans and the gains from the sale of loans.
 
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
 
(In thousands)
One-to-four family residential loans:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Originated (1)
 
$
164,974

 
$
75,500

 
$
18,867

 
$
35,730

 
$
23,865

Sold
 
132,365

 
55,997

 
8,460

 
21,187

 
15,888

Gains on sales of loans, net (2)
 
3,150

 
1,080

 
142

 
295

 
285

(1)
Includes loans originated for our loan portfolio or for sale in the secondary market.
(2)
Excludes net gains on sales of SBA loans.

Real Estate Construction and Land Development
We originate one-to-four family residential construction loans for the construction of custom homes (where the home buyer is the borrower). We also provide financing to builders for the construction of pre-sold homes and, in selected cases, to builders for the construction of speculative residential property. Because of the higher risks present in the residential construction industry, our lending to builders is limited to those who have demonstrated a favorable record of performance and who are building in markets that management understands.
We further endeavor to limit our construction lending risk through adherence to strict underwriting guidelines and procedures. Speculative construction loans are short term in nature and have a variable rate of interest. We require builders to have tangible equity in each construction project and have prompt and thorough documentation of all draw requests, and we inspect the project prior to paying any draw requests.
See “Item 1A. Risk Factors—Our loan portfolio is concentrated in loans with a higher risk of loss—Our real estate construction and land development loans are based upon estimates of costs and the related value associated with the completed project. These estimates may be inaccurate.”
Consumer
At December 31, 2015, we had $298.2 million of consumer loans. We originate consumer loans and lines of credit that are both secured and unsecured. The majority of our consumer loans are for relatively small amounts disbursed among many individual borrowers.
As a result of the Washington Banking Merger, we currently originate indirect consumer loans. These loans are for new and used automobile and recreational vehicles that are originated indirectly by selected dealers located in our market areas. We have limited our indirect loans purchased primarily to dealerships that are established and well known in their market areas and to applicants that are not classified as sub-prime.
Commitments and Contingent Liabilities
In the ordinary course of business, we enter into various types of transactions that include commitments to extend credit that are not included in our Consolidated Financial Statements. We apply the same credit standards to these commitments as we use in all our lending activities and have included these commitments in our lending risk evaluations. Our exposure to credit loss under commitments to extend credit is represented by the amount of these commitments.

7


The following table presents outstanding commitments to extend credit, including letters of credit, at the dates indicated:
 
 
December 31, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
 
 
(In thousands)
Commercial business:
 
 
 
 
Commercial and industrial
 
$
350,227

 
$
288,930

Owner-occupied commercial real estate
 
2,220

 
2,648

Non-owner occupied commercial real estate
 
11,168

 
20,240

Total commercial business
 
363,615

 
311,818

Real estate construction and land development:
 
 
 
 
One-to-four family residential
 
21,778

 
24,028

Five or more family residential and commercial properties
 
52,772

 
32,653

Total real estate construction and land development
 
74,550

 
56,681

Consumer
 
134,313

 
122,633

Total outstanding commitments
 
$
572,478

 
$
491,132

Delinquencies and Nonperforming Assets
Delinquency Procedures.    Delinquencies in the commercial business loan portfolio are handled by the assigned loan officer. Loan officers are responsible for collecting loans they originate or which are assigned to them. We send a borrower a delinquency notice 15 days after the due date when the borrower fails to make a required payment on a loan. If the delinquency is not brought current, additional delinquency notices are mailed at 30 and 45 days for commercial loans. Additional written and oral contacts are made with the borrower between 60 and 90 days after the due date.
If a real estate loan payment is past due for 45 days or more, the collection manager may perform a review of the condition of the property. Depending on the nature of the loan and the type of collateral securing the loan, we may negotiate and accept a modified payment program with the borrower, accept a voluntary deed in lieu of foreclosure or, when considered necessary, begin foreclosure proceedings. If foreclosed on, real property is generally sold at a public sale and we may bid on the property to protect our interest. A decision as to whether and when to begin foreclosure proceedings is based on such factors as the amount of the outstanding loan relative to the value of the property securing the original indebtedness, the extent of the delinquency, and the borrower’s ability and willingness to cooperate in resolving the delinquency.
Real estate acquired by us in partial or full satisfaction of a loan obligation is classified as other real estate owned until it is sold. When property is acquired, it is recorded at the estimated fair value (less costs to sell) at the date of acquisition, not to exceed net realizable value, and any resulting write-down is charged to the allowance for loan losses. Upon acquisition, all costs incurred in maintaining the property are expensed. Costs relating to the development and improvement of the property, however, are capitalized to the extent of the property’s net realizable value. If the estimated realizable value of the other real estate owned property declines after the acquisition date, the adjustment to the value is charged to other real estate owned expense, net.
Classification of Loans.    Federal regulations require that the Bank periodically evaluates the risks inherent in its loan portfolio. In addition, the Division of Banks of the Washington State Department of Financial Institutions (“Division”) and the FDIC have the authority to identify problem loans and, if appropriate, require them to be reclassified. There are three classifications for problem loans: Substandard, Doubtful, and Loss. Substandard loans have one or more defined weaknesses and are characterized by the distinct possibility that the institution will sustain some loss if the deficiencies are not corrected. Doubtful loans have the weaknesses of Substandard loans, with additional characteristics that the weaknesses make collection or liquidation in full on the basis of currently existing facts, conditions, and values questionable. There is a high probability of some loss in loans classified as Doubtful. A loan classified as Loss is considered uncollectible and of such little value that continuance as a loan of the institution is not warranted. If a loan or a portion of the loan is classified as Loss, the institution must charge-off this amount. We also have loans we classify as Watch and Other Assets Especially Mentioned (“OAEM”). Loans classified as Watch are performing assets but have elements of risk that require more monitoring than other performing loans. Loans classified as OAEM are assets that continue to perform but have shown deterioration in credit quality and require closer monitoring.
The Bank routinely tests its problem loans for potential impairment. A loan is considered impaired when, based on current information and events, it is probable that the Bank will be unable to collect all amounts due according to

8


the original contractual terms of the loan agreement. Problem loans that may be impaired are identified using the Bank's normal loan review procedures, which include post-approval reviews, monthly reviews by credit administration of criticized loan reports, scheduled internal reviews, underwriting during extensions and renewals and the analysis of information routinely received on a borrower’s financial performance.
Impairment is measured using the present value of expected future cash flows, discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate, unless the loan is collateral dependent, in which case impairment is measured using the fair value of the collateral after deducting appropriate collateral disposition costs. Furthermore, when it is practically expedient, impairment is measured by the fair market price of the loan.
Subsequent to an initial measure of impairment, if there is a significant change in the amount or timing of a loan’s expected future cash flows or a change in the value of collateral or market price of a loan, based on new information received, the impairment is recalculated. However, the net carrying value of a loan never exceeds the recorded investment in the loan.
Nonperforming Assets.    Nonperforming assets consist of nonaccrual loans and other real estate owned. The following table provides information about our nonaccrual loans and other real estate owned for the indicated dates. The following table also includes information regarding our performing troubled-debt restructured ("TDR") loans for the indicated dates. The performing TDR loans are not considered nonperforming assets as they continue to accrue interest despite being considered impaired due to the restructured status.  
 
 
December 31,
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
 
(Dollars in thousands)
Nonaccrual loans:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Commercial business
 
$
7,122

 
$
8,596

 
$
5,675

 
$
6,068

 
$
8,266

One-to-four family residential
 
38

 

 
340

 
450

 

Real estate construction and land development
 
2,414

 
2,831

 
1,045

 
6,420

 
14,947

Consumer
 
94

 
145

 
685

 
320

 
622

Total nonaccrual loans(1)(2)
 
9,668

 
11,572

 
7,745


13,258

 
23,835

Other real estate owned
 
2,019

 
3,355

 
4,559

 
5,666

 
4,484

Total nonperforming assets
 
$
11,687


$
14,927


$
12,304

 
$
18,924

 
$
28,319

Accruing loans past due 90 days or more(3)
 
$

 
$

 
$
6

 
$
248

 
$
1,342

Potential problem loans(4)
 
110,357

 
162,930

 
67,662

 
31,900

 
32,417

Allowance for loan losses
 
29,746

 
27,729

 
28,824

 
28,594

 
30,915

Nonperforming loans to loans receivable, net
 
0.40
%
 
0.51
%
 
0.63
%
 
1.29
%
 
2.30
%
Allowance for loan losses to loans receivable, net
 
1.24
%
 
1.23
%
 
2.34
%
 
2.78
%
 
2.99
%
Allowance for loan losses to nonperforming loans
 
307.67
%
 
239.62
%
 
372.16
%
 
215.67
%
 
129.70
%
Nonperforming assets to total assets
 
0.32
%
 
0.43
%
 
0.74
%
 
1.41
%
 
2.07
%
Performing TDR loans:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Commercial business
 
$
17,345

 
$
14,421

 
$
19,496

 
$
15,227

 
$
12,606

One-to-four family residential
 
236

 
245

 
702

 
888

 
835

Real estate construction and land development
 
3,014

 
3,927

 
6,043

 
361

 
364

Consumer
 
100

 
66

 
101

 

 

Total performing TDR loans(5)
 
$
20,695

 
$
18,659

 
$
26,342

 
$
16,476

 
$
13,805

(1)
At December 31, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012 and 2011, $6.3 million $7.3 million, $2.6 million, $9.3 million and $11.7 million of nonaccrual loans were considered TDR loans, respectively.
(2)
At December 31, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012 and 2011, $1.1 million, $1.6 million $1.7 million, $1.2 million and $1.8 million of nonaccrual loans were guaranteed by government agencies, respectively.

9


(3)
Excludes purchased credit impaired ("PCI") loans. There were no accruing loans past due 90 days or more that were guaranteed by government agencies at December 31, 2015, 2014, and 2013. There were accruing loans past due 90 days or more of $6,000 and $92,000 guaranteed by government agencies at December 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively.
(4)
At December 31, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012 and 2011, $1.2 million, $2.0 million, $1.8 million, $2.9 million and $2.8 million of potential problem loans were guaranteed by government agencies, respectively.
(5)
At December 31, 2015, 2014, 2013 and 2012, $449,000, $751,000, $1.2 million and $965,000 of performing TDR loans were guaranteed by government agencies. There were no performing TDR loans guaranteed by government agencies at December 31, 2011.
Nonaccrual Loans.    Our Consolidated Financial Statements are prepared on the accrual basis of accounting, including the recognition of interest income on our loan portfolio, unless a loan is placed on nonaccrual status. Loans are considered to be impaired and are placed on nonaccrual status when there are serious doubts about the collectability of principal or interest. Our policy is to place a loan on nonaccrual status when the loan becomes past due for 90 days or more, is less than fully collateralized, and is not in the process of collection. Payments received on nonaccrual loans generally are applied first to principal and then to interest only after all principal has been collected.
Nonaccrual loans decreased $1.9 million to $9.7 million, or 0.40% of loans receivable, net, at December 31, 2015 from $11.6 million, or 0.51% of loans receivable, net, at December 31, 2014 due to the loan resolution efforts of our credit department. During the year ended December 31, 2015, approximately $5.6 million in net principal payments were received on nonaccrual loans and $236,000 of nonaccrual loans were transferred back to accrual status. We also recorded $1.1 million in net charge-offs of nonaccrual loans. The decrease in total nonaccrual loans at December 31, 2015 was partially offset by $5.0 million in additions to nonperforming loans, of which $1.1 million were previously performing TDR loans that were transferred to nonaccrual status.
Nonperforming assets decreased $3.2 million to $11.7 million, or 0.32% of total assets, at December 31, 2015 from $14.9 million, or 0.43% of total assets, at December 31, 2014 due to the decrease in nonperforming loans discussed above as well as an overall decrease in other real estate owned. Other real estate owned decreased $1.3 million, or 39.8%, to $2.0 million at December 31, 2015 from $3.4 million at December 31, 2014 due primarily to dispositions of $3.6 million, which were offset partially by additions of $2.8 million during the year ended December 31, 2015.
Performing TDR loans as of December 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014 were $20.7 million and $18.7 million, respectively. The $2.0 million increase in performing TDR loans during the year ended December 31, 2015 was primarily due to $6.1 million of loans restructured during the year ended December 31, 2015, offset partially by $3.0 million of net principal reductions and $1.1 million in TDR loans transferred to nonaccrual status.
Troubled Debt Restructured Loans.    A TDR loan is a restructuring in which the Bank, for economic or legal reasons related to a borrower’s financial difficulties, grants a concession to a borrower that it would not otherwise consider. The majority of the Bank's TDR loans are a result of granting extensions to troubled credits which have already been adversely classified. We grant such extensions to reassess the borrower’s financial status and develop a plan for repayment. Certain modifications also include interest rate reductions, which is the second most prevalent concession. The interest rate reductions can be for a period of time or over the remainder of the life of the loan. We may also bifurcate troubled credits into a “good” loan and a “bad” loan, whereas the good loan continues to accrue under the modified terms. We perform bifurcations to limit potential losses. The remainder of the Bank's TDRs are the result of converting revolving lines of credits to amortizing loans, changing amortizing loans to interest-only loans with balloon payments, or re-amortizing the loan over a longer period of time. These modifications would all be considered a concession for a borrower that could not obtain financing outside of the Bank. We do not forgive principal for a majority of our TDRs, but in those situations where principal is forgiven, the entire amount of such principal forgiveness is immediately charged off to the extent not done so prior to the modification. We sometimes delay the timing on the repayment of a portion of principal (principal forbearance) and charge-off the amount of forbearance if that amount is not considered fully collectible. We also consider insignificant delays in payments when determining if a loan should be classified as a TDR.
TDRs are considered impaired and are separately measured for impairment under Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 310-10-35, whether on accrual or nonaccrual status. At December 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, the balance of performing TDR loans was $20.7 million and $18.7 million, respectively. The related allowance for loan losses on the performing TDR loans was $2.1 million as of December 31, 2015 and $1.9 million as of December 31, 2014. At December 31, 2015, nonperforming TDR loans were $6.3 million and had a related allowance for loan losses of $679,000. At December 31, 2014, nonperforming TDR loans of $7.3 million had a related allowance for loan losses of $1.0 million.
A loan may have the TDR classification removed if (a) the restructured interest rate was greater than or equal to the interest rate of a new loan with comparable risk at the time of the restructure, and (b) the loan is no longer

10


impaired based on the terms of the restructured agreement. The Bank's policy is that the borrower must demonstrate six consecutive monthly payments in accordance with the modified loan terms before it can be reviewed for removal of TDR classification under the second criteria. However, the loan must be reported as a TDR in at least one of the Company’s Annual Reports on Form 10-K. Once a loan has been classified as a TDR, it will continue to be an impaired loan until paid off or charged-off, even if the loan subsequently is no longer a TDR.
Potential Problem Loans.    Potential problem loans are those loans that are currently accruing interest and are not considered impaired, but which we are monitoring because the financial information of the borrower causes us concerns as to their ability to comply with their loan repayment terms. Loans that are past due 90 days or more and still accruing interest are considered potential problem loans if they are both well-secured and in the process of collection. Potential problem loans decreased $52.6 million, or 32.3%, to $110.4 million at December 31, 2015 from $162.9 million at December 31, 2014 primarily due to loan payments.
Analysis of Allowance for Loan Losses
Management maintains an allowance for loan losses (“ALL”) to provide for estimated probable credit losses inherent in the loan portfolio that have been incurred as of the reporting date. The adequacy of the ALL is monitored through our ongoing quarterly loan quality assessments.
We assess the estimated credit losses inherent in our loan portfolio by considering a number of elements including:
Historical loss experience in a number of homogeneous segments of the loan portfolio;
Balance of potential problem loans in the loan portfolio;
The impact of environmental factors, including:
Levels of and trends in delinquencies and impaired loans;
Levels of and trends in charge-offs and recoveries;
Trends in volume and terms of loans;
Effects of changes in risk selection and underwriting standards, and other changes in lending policies, procedures and practices;
Experience, ability, and depth of lending management and other relevant staff;
National and local economic trends and conditions;
Other external factors such as competition, legal, and regulatory requirements;
Effects of changes in credit concentrations; and
Other factors
We calculate an appropriate ALL for the loans in our loan portfolio by applying historical loss factors for homogeneous classes of the portfolio, adjusted for changes to the above-noted environmental factors. We may record specific provisions for impaired loans, including loans on nonaccrual status and TDR loans, after a careful analysis of each loan’s credit and collateral factors. Our analysis of an appropriate ALL combines the provisions made for our non-impaired loans and the specific provisions made for each impaired loan.
While we believe we use the best information available to determine the allowance for loan losses, results of operations could be significantly affected if circumstances differ substantially from the assumptions used in determining the allowance. A decline in local and national economic conditions, or other factors, could result in a material increase in the allowance for loan losses and may adversely affect the Company’s financial condition and results of operations. In addition, the determination of the amount of the allowance for loan losses is subject to review by bank regulators, as part of their routine examination process, which may result in the establishment of additional allowance allocations based upon their judgment of information available to them at the time of their examination.

11


The following table provides information regarding changes in our allowance for loan losses at and for the indicated years:
 
 
At or For the Years Ended December 31,
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
 
(Dollars in thousands)
Allowance for loan losses at beginning of the year
 
$
27,729

 
$
28,824

 
$
28,594

 
$
30,915

 
$
22,062

Provision for loan losses
 
4,372

 
4,594

 
3,672

 
2,016

 
14,430

Charge-offs:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Commercial business
 
(1,676
)
 
(5,252
)
 
(3,073
)
 
(3,726
)
 
(2,972
)
One-to-four family residential
 

 
(31
)
 
(52
)
 
(391
)
 
(53
)
Real estate construction and land development
 
(106
)
 
(345
)
 
(565
)
 
(1,280
)
 
(2,948
)
Consumer
 
(1,700
)
 
(969
)
 
(681
)
 
(677
)
 
(648
)
Total charge-offs
 
(3,482
)
 
(6,597
)
 
(4,371
)
 
(6,074
)
 
(6,621
)
Recoveries:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Commercial business
 
476

 
716

 
808

 
1,579

 
821

One-to-four family residential
 
13

 
7

 

 

 

Real estate construction and land development
 
100

 
43

 
32

 
125

 
201

Consumer
 
538

 
142

 
89

 
33

 
22

Total recoveries
 
1,127

 
908

 
929

 
1,737

 
1,044

Net charge-offs
 
(2,355
)
 
(5,689
)
 
(3,442
)
 
(4,337
)
 
(5,577
)
Allowance for loan losses at end of the year
 
$
29,746

 
$
27,729

 
$
28,824

 
$
28,594

 
$
30,915

Gross loans receivable at end of the year(1)
 
$
2,401,113

 
$
2,252,014

 
$
1,234,590

 
$
1,029,034

 
$
1,037,255

Average loans receivable during the year(1)
 
2,316,175

 
1,871,696

 
1,124,828

 
996,186

 
981,848

Ratio of net charge-offs on loans to average loans receivable
 
(0.10
)%
 
(0.30
)%

(0.31
)%
 
(0.44
)%
 
(0.57
)%
(1)
Excludes loans held for sale.


12


The following table shows the allocation of the allowance for loan losses at the indicated dates. The allocation is based upon an evaluation of defined loan problems, historical loan loss ratios, and industry wide and other factors that affect loan losses in the categories shown below:
 
December 31,
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
Allowance
for Loan
Losses
 
% of
Total
(1)
 
Allowance
for Loan
Losses
 
% of
Total
(1)
 
Allowance
for Loan
Losses
 
% of
Total
(1)
 
Allowance
for Loan
Losses
 
% of
Total
(1)
 
Allowance
for Loan
Losses
 
% of
Total
(1)
 
(Dollars in thousands)
Commercial business
$
22,064

 
80.1
%
 
$
20,186

 
80.3
%
 
$
22,853

 
86.7
%
 
$
19,302

 
82.9
%
 
$
19,178

 
82.0
%
One-to-four family residential
1,157

 
3.0

 
1,200

 
3.1

 
1,100

 
3.9

 
1,221

 
4.6

 
794

 
4.4

Real estate construction
1,871

 
4.5

 
2,758

 
5.1

 
2,673

 
5.7

 
5,440

 
8.1

 
8,623

 
8.2

Consumer
4,309

 
12.4

 
2,769

 
11.5

 
1,597

 
3.7

 
1,761

 
4.4

 
1,410

 
5.4

Unallocated
345

 

 
816

 

 
601

 

 
870

 

 
910

 

Total allowance for loan losses
$
29,746

 
100.0
%
 
$
27,729

 
100.0
%
 
$
28,824

 
100.0
%
 
$
28,594

 
100.0
%
 
$
30,915

 
100.0
%
(1)
Represents the percent of loans receivable by loan category to total gross loans receivable.

Investment Activities
At December 31, 2015, our investment securities portfolio totaled $811.9 million, which consisted entirely of securities available for sale. This compares with a total portfolio of $778.7 million at December 31, 2014, which was comprised of $742.8 million of securities available for sale and $35.8 million of securities held to maturity. During the year ended December, 31, 2015, the Company transferred investment securities held to maturity with amortized cost of $29.4 million to available for sale to more effectively manage the investment securities portfolio. The $33.2 million, or 4.3%, increase in our investment securities portfolio in fiscal 2015 is attributable primarily to $290.5 million of purchases of investment securities, offset partially by $124.6 million in payments, maturities and calls of investment securities available for sale and $116.3 million in sales of investment securities available for sale. The composition of the investment portfolio by type of security, at each respective date, is presented in Note (3) Investment Securities of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in "Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data."
Our investment policy is established by the Board of Directors and monitored by the Audit and Finance Committee of the Board of Directors. It is designed primarily to provide and maintain liquidity, generate a favorable return on investments without incurring undue interest rate and credit risk, and complements the Bank's lending activities. The policy dictates the criteria for classifying securities as either available for sale or held to maturity. The policy permits investment in various types of liquid assets permissible under applicable regulations, which include U.S. Treasury obligations, U.S. Government agency obligations, some certificates of deposit of insured banks, mortgage backed and mortgage related securities, corporate notes, municipal bonds, and federal funds. Investment in non-investment grade bonds and stripped mortgage backed securities is not permitted under the policy.

13


The following table provides information regarding our investment securities available for sale at the dates indicated.
 
December 31, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
 
December 31, 2013
 
Fair Value
 
% of
Total
Investments
 
Fair Value
 
% of
Total
Investments
 
Fair Value
 
% of
Total
Investments
 
(Dollars in thousands)
U.S. Treasury and U.S. Government-sponsored agencies
$
35,577

 
4.4
%
 
$
21,427

 
2.9
%
 
$
6,039

 
3.7
%
Municipal securities
220,993

 
27.2

 
173,037

 
23.3

 
49,060

 
30.1

Mortgage backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations-residential:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

U.S. Government-sponsored agencies
546,132

 
67.3

 
542,399

 
73.0

 
108,035

 
66.2

Corporate obligations
9,113

 
1.1

 
4,010

 
0.5

 

 

Mutual funds and other equities
54

 

 
1,973

 
0.3

 

 

Total
$
811,869

 
100.0
%
 
$
742,846

 
100.0
%
 
$
163,134

 
100.0
%
The following table provides information regarding our investment securities available for sale, by contractual maturity, at December 31, 2015. Mutual funds and other equities are excluded because they have no stated maturity dates.
 
One Year or Less Than One Year
 
Over One to Five 
Years
 
Over Five to Ten 
Years
 
Over Ten Years
 
Fair 
Value
 
Weighted
Average
Yield(1)
 
Fair 
Value
 
Weighted
Average
Yield(1)
 
Fair 
Value
 
Weighted
Average
Yield(1)
 
Fair 
Value
 
Weighted
Average
Yield(1)
 
(Dollars in thousands)
U.S. Treasury and U.S. Government-sponsored agencies
$
1,500

 
0.91
%
 
$
28,574

 
1.39
%
 
$
5,503

 
2.57
%
 
$

 
%
Municipal securities
6,452

 
2.66

 
42,712

 
3.01

 
69,055

 
3.29

 
102,774

 
3.77

Mortgage backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations-residential:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
U.S. Government-sponsored agencies

 

 
27,401

 
1.59

 
135,580

 
2.10

 
383,151

 
2.09

Corporate obligations

 

 
5,193

 
1.48

 
3,920

 
1.45

 

 

Total
$
7,952

 
2.01
%
 
$
103,880

 
2.11
%
 
$
214,058

 
2.49
%
 
$
485,925

 
2.45
%
(1)Taxable equivalent weighted average yield.


14


The following table provides information regarding our investment securities held to maturity at the dates indicated. As there were no investment securities held to maturity at December 31, 2015, no values are presented in the table.
 
 
December 31, 2014
 
December 31, 2013
 
 
Amortized
Cost
 
% of
Total
Investments
 
Amortized
Cost
 
% of
Total
Investments
 
 
(Dollars in thousands)
U.S. Treasury and U.S. Government-sponsored agencies
 
$
1,591

 
4.4
%
 
$
1,687

 
4.7
%
Municipal securities
 
22,486

 
62.8

 
24,290

 
67.2

Mortgage backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations-residential:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
U.S. Government-sponsored agencies
 
10,866

 
30.4

 
9,129

 
25.2

Private residential collateralized mortgage obligations
 
871

 
2.4

 
1,048

 
2.9

Total
 
$
35,814

 
100.0
%
 
$
36,154

 
100.0
%
The Bank is a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank (“FHLB”) of Des Moines following the voluntary merger of the FHLB of Seattle with and into FHLB of Des Moines effective May 31, 2015. The FHLB of Des Moines is one of 11 regional FHLBs that administer the home financing credit function of savings institutions.  Each FHLB serves as a reserve or central bank for its member financial institutions within its assigned region.  It is funded primarily from proceeds derived from the sale of consolidated obligations of the FHLB System.  It makes loans or advances to members in accordance with policies and procedures, established by the Board of Directors of the FHLB, which are subject to the oversight of the Federal Housing Finance Board (“FHFA”).  
For membership purposes, the Bank is required to maintain an investment in the stock of the FHLB of Des Moines in an amount equal to 0.12% of the Bank's assets as calculated on an annual basis. At December 31, 2015 the Bank had an investment in FHLB stock carried at a cost basis (par value) of $4.1 million. In addition to the FHLB stock required for membership, the Bank must purchase activity stock equal to 4.0% of all outstanding borrowing balances. The activity stock is automatically redeemed in amounts equal to the FHLB advance balances as they are repaid.
Based on the Company’s evaluation of the underlying investment, including the long-term nature of the investment, the liquidity position of the FHLB of Des Moines, and the Company’s intent and ability to hold the investment for a period of time sufficient to recover the par value, the Company did not recognize an other-than-temporary impairment loss on its FHLB stock during the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013. Despite no impairment having been recorded during the indicated fiscal years, any deterioration in the FHLB of Des Moines' financial position may result in future impairment losses.
Deposit Activities and Other Sources of Funds
General.    Our primary sources of funds are deposits, loan repayments and borrowings. Scheduled loan repayments are a relatively stable source of funds, while deposits and unscheduled loan prepayments, which are influenced significantly by general interest rate levels, interest rates available on other investments, competition, economic conditions and other factors, are not. Customer deposits remain an important source of funding, but these balances have been influenced in the past by adverse market conditions in the industry and may be affected by future developments such as interest rate fluctuations and new competitive pressures. In addition to customer deposits, management may utilize brokered deposits on an as-needed basis.
Borrowings may also be used on a short-term basis to compensate for reductions in other sources of funds (such as deposit inflows at less than projected levels). Borrowings may also be used on a longer-term basis to support expanded lending activities and match the maturity of repricing intervals of assets. In addition, the Company utilizes repurchase agreements as a supplement to other funding sources.
During the year ended December 31, 2015, non-maturity deposits (total deposits less certificate of deposit accounts) increased by $307.0 million, or 12.9%, to $2.69 billion from $2.38 billion at December 31, 2014. The increase was primarily a result of an increase in negotiable order of withdrawal ("NOW") account deposits of $124.5 million, or 15.7%, to $917.9 million at December 31, 2015 from $793.4 million at December 31, 2014 and a $96.0 million, or 26.8%, increase in savings deposits to $453.8 million at December 31, 2015 from $357.8 million at December 31,

15


2014. The percentage of non-maturity deposits to total deposits increased to 86.5% at December 31, 2015 compared to 81.9% at December 31, 2014. As a result of this increase, the certificate of deposit ("CD") accounts to total deposits decreased to 13.5% at December 31, 2015 from 18.1% at December 31, 2014. CDs decreased $105.1 million, or 20.0%, to $420.3 million at December 31, 2015 from $525.4 million at December 31, 2014.
Deposit Activities.    We offer a variety of deposit accounts designed to attract both short-term and long-term deposits. These accounts include noninterest demand accounts, NOW accounts, money market accounts, savings accounts and CDs. These accounts, with the exception of noninterest demand accounts, generally earn interest at rates established by management based on competitive market factors and management’s desire to increase or decrease certain types or maturities of deposits. The major categories of deposit accounts are described below.
Noninterest Demand Deposits.    Noninterest demand deposits are noninterest bearing and may be charged service fees based on activity and balances.
NOW Accounts.    NOW accounts are interest bearing and may be charged service fees based on activity and balances. NOW accounts pay interest, but require a higher minimum balance to avoid service charges.
Money Market Accounts.    Money market accounts pay a variable interest rate that is tiered depending on the balance maintained in the account. Minimum opening balances vary.
Savings Accounts.    We offer savings accounts that allow for unlimited deposits and withdrawals, provided that a $300 minimum balance is maintained.
CDs.    We offer several types of CDs with maturities ranging from three months to five years, which require a minimum deposit of $2,500. Negotiable CDs are offered in amounts of $100,000 or more for terms of 30 days to five years.

The following table provides the balances outstanding for each major category of deposits at the dates indicated:
 
 
December 31, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
 
December 31, 2013
 
 
Amount
 
Percent
 
Amount
 
Percent
 
Amount
 
Percent
 
 
(Dollars in thousands)
Noninterest demand deposits
 
$
770,927

 
24.8
%
 
$
709,673

 
24.4
%
 
$
349,902

 
25.0
%
NOW accounts
 
917,859

 
29.5

 
793,362

 
27.3

 
352,051

 
25.2

Money market accounts
 
545,342

 
17.6

 
520,065

 
17.9

 
232,016

 
16.6

Savings accounts
 
453,826

 
14.6

 
357,834

 
12.3

 
155,790

 
11.1

Total non-maturity deposits
 
2,687,954

 
86.5

 
2,380,934

 
81.9

 
1,089,759

 
77.9

CDs
 
420,333

 
13.5

 
525,397

 
18.1

 
309,430

 
22.1

Total deposits
 
$
3,108,287

 
100.0
%
 
$
2,906,331

 
100.0
%
 
$
1,399,189

 
100.0
%


16


The following table provides the average balances outstanding and the weighted average interest rates for each major category of deposits for the years indicated:
 
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
 
Average
Balance
 
Average
Yield/Rate
 
Average
Balance
 
Average
Yield/Rate
 
Average
Balance
 
Average
Yield/Rate
 
 
(Dollars in thousands)
NOW accounts and money market accounts
 
$
1,374,757

 
0.17
%
 
$
1,049,078

 
0.18
%
 
$
541,793

 
0.19
%
Savings accounts
 
405,633

 
0.11

 
282,150

 
0.09

 
143,412

 
0.11

CDs
 
464,277

 
0.51

 
494,948

 
0.60

 
307,464

 
0.81

Total interest bearing deposits
 
2,244,667

 
0.23

 
1,826,176

 
0.28

 
992,669

 
0.37

Noninterest demand deposits
 
740,718

 

 
574,692

 

 
308,582

 

Total deposits
 
$
2,985,385

 
0.18
%
 
$
2,400,868

 
0.21
%
 
$
1,301,251

 
0.28
%

The following table shows the amount and maturity of certificates of deposit of $100,000 or more:
 
December 31, 2015
 
(In thousands)
Remaining maturity:
 
Three months or less
$
42,749

Over three months through twelve months
92,018

Over twelve months through three years
71,390

Over three years
200

Total
$
206,357

Borrowings.    Deposits are the primary source of funds for our lending and investment activities and our general business purposes. We rely upon advances from the FHLB to supplement our supply of lendable funds and meet deposit withdrawal requirements. The FHLB of Des Moines serves as one of our secondary sources of liquidity. Advances from the FHLB of Des Moines are typically secured by our first lien one-to-four family residential loans, commercial real estate loans and stock issued by the FHLB, which is owned by us. At December 31, 2015, the Bank maintained an uncommitted credit facility with the FHLB of Des Moines of $626.9 million and an uncommitted credit facility with the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco of $51.9 million, of which there were no advances or borrowings outstanding. The Bank also maintains advance lines with Wells Fargo Bank, US Bank, TIB and Pacific Coast Bankers’ Bank to purchase federal funds of up to $90.0 million as of December 31, 2015. At December 31, 2015 we had securities sold under agreement to repurchase of $23.2 million which were secured by investment securities available for sale.
The FHLB functions provide credit for member financial institutions. As a member, we are required to own capital stock in the FHLB and are authorized to apply for advances on the security of such stock and certain of our mortgage loans and other assets (principally securities which are obligations of, or guaranteed by, the United States) provided certain standards related to creditworthiness have been met. Advances are made pursuant to several different programs. Each credit program has its own interest rate and range of maturities. Depending on the program, limitations on the amount of advances are based on a percentage of an institution’s assets or on the FHLB’s assessment of the institution’s creditworthiness. Under its current credit policies, the FHLB of Des Moines limits advances to 35% of the Bank's assets.
During the year ended December 31, 2015, the Company had an average balance of $1.8 million in FHLB advances. There were no FHLB advances during the year ended December 31, 2014 other than to test the facilities. There were no FHLB advances outstanding as of December 31, 2015 and 2014. There were no federal funds purchased during the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014.

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Supervision and Regulation
We are subject to extensive Federal and Washington State legislation, regulation, and supervision. These laws and regulations are primarily intended to protect depositors, the FDIC and shareholders. The laws and regulations affecting banks and bank holding companies have changed significantly particularly in connection with the enactment of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (“Dodd-Frank Act”). Among other changes, the Dodd-Frank Act established the Consumer Protection Financial Bureau (“CFPB”) as an independent bureau of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (“Federal Reserve”). The CFPB assumed responsibility for the implementation of the federal financial consumer protection and fair lending laws and regulations and has authority to impose new requirements. See “—Other Regulatory Developments—The Dodd-Frank Act” herein for a discussion of this legislation. Any change in applicable laws, regulations, or regulatory policies may have a material effect on our business, operations, and prospects. We cannot predict the nature or the extent of the effects on our business and earnings that any fiscal or monetary policies or new Federal or State legislation may have in the future.
The following is a summary discussion of certain laws and regulations applicable to Heritage Financial and Heritage Bank which is qualified in its entirety by reference to the actual laws and regulations.
Heritage Financial.    As a registered bank holding company with the Federal Reserve, we are subject to comprehensive regulation and supervision under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended. This regulation and supervision is generally intended to ensure that we limit our activities to those allowed by law and that we operate in a safe and sound manner without endangering the financial health of Heritage Bank. As a bank holding company supervised by the Federal Reserve, we are required to file annual and periodic reports with the Federal Reserve and provide additional information as the Federal Reserve may require. The Federal Reserve may examine us, and any of our subsidiaries, and assess us for the cost of such examination.
The Federal Reserve has extensive enforcement authority over bank holding companies, including the ability to assess civil money penalties and to issue cease and desist or removal orders. The Federal Reserve may also order termination of non-banking activities by non-banking subsidiaries of bank holding companies, or divestiture of ownership and control of a non-banking subsidiary by a bank holding company. Some violations may also result in criminal penalties.
Federal Reserve policy provides that a bank holding company is required to serve as a source of financial and managerial strength to its subsidiary banks and may not conduct its operations in an unsafe or unsound manner. Federal Reserve policy further provides that in its capacity as a source of strength to its subsidiary banks, a bank holding company should have the ability to provide financial assistance to its subsidiary banks during periods of financial distress. A bank holding company’s failure to meet its obligation to serve as a source of strength to its subsidiary banks is generally considered by the Federal Reserve to be an unsafe and unsound banking practice or a violation of the Federal Reserve’s regulations or both. The Dodd-Frank Act also codified the "source of strength" doctrine by adopting a statutory provision requiring, among other things, that bank holding companies serve as a source of financial strength to their subsidiary banks
Under the prompt corrective action provisions of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act ("FDIA"), a bank holding company with an undercapitalized subsidiary bank must guarantee, within limitations, the capital restoration plan that is required to be implemented of its undercapitalized subsidiary bank. If an undercapitalized subsidiary bank fails to file an acceptable capital restoration plan or fails to implement an accepted plan the Federal Reserve may prohibit the bank holding company or its undercapitalized subsidiary bank from, among other restrictions, paying any dividend or making any other form of capital distribution without the prior approval of the Federal Reserve. In addition, the Federal Reserve policy provides that a bank holding company may pay cash dividends only to the extent that the company’s net income for the past year is sufficient to cover both the cash dividend and a rate of earnings retention that is consistent with the company’s capital needs, asset quality and overall financial condition. In addition, under Washington corporate law, companies generally may not pay dividends if after that payment the company would not be able to pay its liabilities as they become due in the usual course of business, or its total assets would be less than its total liabilities.
We, and any subsidiaries which we may control, are considered “affiliates” within the meaning of the Federal Reserve Act, and transactions between our bank subsidiary and affiliates are subject to numerous restrictions. With some exceptions, we and our subsidiaries are prohibited from tying the provision of various products or services, such as extensions of credit, to other products or services offered by us, or our affiliates.
Bank regulations require bank holding companies and banks to maintain a minimum “leverage” ratio of core capital to adjusted quarterly average total assets of at least 4%. In addition, banking regulators have adopted risk-based capital guidelines under which risk percentages are assigned to various categories of assets and off-balance sheet items to calculate a risk-adjusted capital ratio. Tier 1 capital generally consists of common stockholders’ equity (which does not include unrealized gains and losses on investment securities available for sale), less goodwill and

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certain identifiable intangible assets. Tier 2 capital includes Tier 1 capital plus the allowance for loan losses and subordinated debt, both subject to some limitations. Regulatory risk-based capital guidelines require Tier 1 capital of 6% of risk-adjusted assets and minimum total capital ratio (combined Tier 1 and Tier 2) of 8% of risk-adjusted assets. In July 2013, the Federal Reserve and the FDIC approved a new rule that substantially amended the regulatory risk-based capital rules to implement the Basel III regulatory capital reforms and changes required by the Dodd-Frank Act.
For additional information, see “—Capital Adequacy” below.
Subsidiary Bank.    Heritage Bank is a Washington-chartered commercial bank, the deposits of which are insured by the FDIC. Heritage Bank is subject to regulation by the FDIC and the Division.
Applicable Federal and State statutes and regulations which govern a bank’s operations relate to minimum capital requirements, required reserves against deposits, investments, loans, legal lending limits, mergers and consolidation, borrowings, issuance of securities, payment of dividends, establishment of branches, and other aspects of its operations, among other things. The Division and the FDIC also have authority to prohibit banks under their supervision from engaging in what they consider to be unsafe and unsound practices.
The Bank is required to file periodic reports with the FDIC and the Division, and is subject to periodic examinations and evaluations by those regulatory authorities. Based upon these evaluations, the regulators may revalue the assets of an institution and require that it establish specific reserves to compensate for the differences between the determined value and the book value of such assets. These examinations must be conducted every 12 months, with the exception that well-capitalized banks may be examined every 18 months. The FDIC and the Division may each accept the results of an examination by the other in lieu of conducting an independent examination.
Dividends paid by the Bank provide substantially all of our cash flow. Applicable Federal and Washington State regulations restrict capital distributions by the Bank, including dividends. Such restrictions are tied to the institution’s capital levels after giving effect to such distributions. For an additional discussion of restrictions on the payment of dividends, see “Item 5. Market for the Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities” herein.
Capital Adequacy.    The Federal Reserve and FDIC have issued substantially similar risk-based and leverage capital guidelines applicable to bank holding companies and banks. In addition, these regulatory agencies may from time to time require that a bank holding company or bank maintain capital above the minimum levels, based on its financial condition or actual or anticipated growth.
Effective January 1, 2015 (with some changes transitioned into full effectiveness over two to four years), the Company and the Bank became subject to new capital regulations adopted by the Federal Reserve and the FDIC, which create a new required ratio for common equity Tier 1 (“CET1”) capital, increase the minimum leverage and Tier 1 capital ratios, change the risk-weightings of certain assets for purposes of the risk-based capital ratios, create an additional capital conservation buffer over the required capital ratios, and change what qualifies as capital for purposes of meeting the capital requirements. These regulations implement the regulatory capital reforms required by the Dodd-Frank Act and the “Basel III” requirements.
Under the new capital regulations, the minimum capital ratios are: (1) a CET1 capital ratio of 4.5% of risk-weighted assets; (2) a Tier 1 capital ratio of 6.0% of risk-weighted assets; (3) a total risk-based capital ratio of 8.0% of risk-weighted assets; and (4) a leverage ratio (the ratio of Tier 1 capital to average total adjusted assets) of 4.0%.  CET1 generally consists of common stock; retained earnings; accumulated other comprehensive income (“AOCI”) unless an institution elects to exclude AOCI from regulatory capital; and certain minority interests; all subject to applicable regulatory adjustments and deductions. Tier 1 capital generally consists of CET1 and noncumulative perpetual preferred stock. Tier 2 capital generally consists of other preferred stock and subordinated debt meeting certain conditions plus an amount of the allowance for loan and lease losses up to 1.25% of assets. Total capital is the sum of Tier 1 and Tier 2 capital.
In addition to the minimum CET1, Tier 1, leverage ratio and total capital ratios, the Company and the Bank must maintain a capital conservation buffer consisting of additional CET1 capital greater than 2.5% of risk-weighted assets above the required minimum levels in order to avoid limitations on paying dividends, repurchasing shares, and paying discretionary bonuses.  The new capital conservation buffer requirement is to be phased in beginning on January 1, 2016 when a buffer greater than 0.625% of risk-weighted assets will be required, which amount will increase each year until the buffer requirement is fully implemented on January 1, 2019.
To be considered "well capitalized," a bank holding company must have, on a consolidated basis, a total risk-based capital ratio of 10.0% or greater and a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of 6.0% or greater and must not be subject to an individual order, directive or agreement under which the Federal Reserve requires it to maintain a specific capital level. To be consider “well capitalized,” a depository institution must have a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of at least

19


8%, a total risk-based capital ratio of at least 10%, a CET1 capital ratio of at least 5% and a leverage ratio of at least 5% and not be subject to an individualized order, directive or agreement under which its primary federal banking regulator requires it to maintain a specific capital level.  As of December 31, 2015, the Company and the Bank met the requirements to be "well capitalized" and the fully phased-in capital conservation buffer requirement.
The FDIC may impose additional restrictions on institutions that are undercapitalized and generally is authorized to reclassify an institution into a lower capital category and impose the restrictions applicable to such category if the institution is engaged in unsafe or unsound practices or is in an unsafe or unsound condition. An institution is deemed “well capitalized” if it has at least a 6.5% CET1 capital ratio, a 5.0% Tier 1 capital ratio, a 8.0% Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio and 10.0% total risk-based capital ratio. At December 31, 2015, the Bank’s current capital levels exceed the required capital amounts to be considered “well capitalized."
For a complete description of the Company’s and the Bank's required and actual capital levels as of December 31, 2015, see Note (22) Regulatory Capital Requirements of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.”
Prompt Corrective Action.    Federal statutes establish a supervisory framework for FDIC-insured institutions based on five capital categories: well capitalized, adequately capitalized, undercapitalized, significantly undercapitalized and critically undercapitalized. An institution’s category depends upon where its capital levels are in relation to relevant capital measures. The well capitalized category is described above. An institution that is not well capitalized is subject to certain restrictions on brokered deposits, including restrictions on the rates it can offer on its deposits generally. To be considered adequately capitalized, an institution must have the minimum capital ratios described above. Any institution which is neither well capitalized nor adequately capitalized is considered undercapitalized.
Undercapitalized institutions are subject to certain prompt corrective action requirements, regulatory controls and restrictions which become more extensive as an institution becomes more severely undercapitalized. Failure by Heritage Bank to comply with applicable capital requirements would, if unremedied, result in progressively more severe restrictions on its activities and lead to enforcement actions, including, but not limited to, the issuance of a capital directive to ensure the maintenance of required capital levels and, ultimately, the appointment of the FDIC as receiver or conservator. Banking regulators will take prompt corrective action with respect to depository institutions that do not meet minimum capital requirements. Additionally, approval of any regulatory application filed for their review may be dependent on compliance with capital requirements.
As of December 31, 2015, the Bank met the requirements to be classified as “well capitalized.” See Note (22) Regulatory Capital Requirements of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.”
Deposit Insurance and Other FDIC Programs.    The deposits of the Bank are insured up to applicable limits by the Deposit Insurance Fund (“DIF”), which is administered by the FDIC. The FDIC is an independent federal agency that insures the deposits, up to applicable limits, of depository institutions. As insurer of the Bank's deposits, the FDIC has supervisory and enforcement authority over Heritage Bank and this insurance is backed by the full faith and credit of the United States government. As insurer, the FDIC imposes deposit insurance premiums and is authorized to conduct examinations of and to require reporting by institutions insured by the FDIC. It also may prohibit any FDIC-insured institution from engaging in any activity determined by regulation or order to pose a serious risk to the institution and the DIF. The FDIC also has the authority to initiate enforcement actions and may terminate the deposit insurance if it determines that an institution has engaged in unsafe or unsound practices or is in an unsafe or unsound condition.
The Dodd-Frank Act requires the FDIC’s deposit insurance assessments to be based on assets instead of deposits. The FDIC issued rules under which the assessment base for a bank is equal to its total average consolidated assets less average tangible capital. The FDIC assessment rates range from approximately five basis points to 35 basis points, depending on applicable adjustments for unsecured debt issued by an institution and brokered deposits (and to further adjustment for institutions that hold unsecured debt of other FDIC-insured institutions), until such time as the FDIC’s reserve ratio equals 1.15%. Once the FDIC’s reserve ratio reaches 1.15% and the reserve ratio for the immediately prior assessment period is less than 2.0%, the applicable assessment rates may range from three basis points to 30 basis points (subject to adjustments as described above). If the reserve ratio for the prior assessment period is equal to, or greater than 2.0% and less than 2.5%, the assessment rates may range from two basis points to 28 basis points and if the prior assessment period is greater than 2.5%, the assessment rates may range from one basis point to 25 basis points (in each case subject to adjustments as described above). No institution may pay a dividend if it is in default on its federal deposit insurance assessment.
Other Regulatory Developments.    Significant federal banking legislation has been enacted in recent years. The following summarizes some of the recent significant federal banking legislation.

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The Dodd-Frank Act:    The Dodd-Frank-Act imposes new restrictions and an expanded framework of regulatory oversight for financial institutions, including depository institutions and implements new capital regulations that we are subject to and that are discussed above under “- Capital Adequacy.”
The federal banking and securities regulators have issued final rules to implement Section 619 of the Dodd-Frank Act (the “Volcker Rule”) pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Act. Generally, subject to a transition period and certain exceptions, the Volcker Rule restricts insured depository institutions and their affiliated companies from engaging in short-term proprietary trading of certain securities, investing in funds with collateral comprised of less than 100% loans that are not registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) and from engaging in hedging activities that do not hedge a specific identified risk. After the transition period, the Volcker Rule prohibitions and restrictions will apply to banking entities, including the Company, unless an exception applies. We are continuously reviewing our investment portfolio to determine if changes to our investment strategies may be required in order to comply with the various provisions of the Volcker Rule regulations.
In addition, among other changes, the Dodd-Frank Act requires public companies, like us, to (i) provide their shareholders with a non-binding vote (a) at least once every three years on the compensation paid to executive officers and (b) at least once every six years on whether they should have a “say on pay” vote every one, two or three years; (ii) have a separate, non-binding shareholder vote regarding golden parachutes for named executive officers when a shareholder vote takes place on mergers, acquisitions, dispositions or other transactions that would trigger the parachute payments; (iii) provide disclosure in annual proxy materials concerning the relationship between the executive compensation paid and the financial performance of the issuer; and (iv) amend Item 402 of Regulation S-K to require companies to disclose the ratio of the Chief Executive Officer's annual total compensation to the median annual total compensation of all other employees.
Sarbanes-Oxley Act.    As a public company that files periodic reports with the SEC, under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, Heritage is subject to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, which addresses, among other issues, corporate governance, auditing and accounting, executive compensation and enhanced and timely disclosure of corporate information.
The Sarbanes-Oxley Act represents significant federal involvement in matters traditionally left to state regulatory systems, such as the regulation of the accounting profession, and to state corporate law, such as the relationship between a board of directors and management and between a board of directors and its committees. Our policies and procedures have been updated to comply with the requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.
Website Access to Company Reports
We post publicly available reports required to be filed with the SEC on our website, www.HF-WA.com, as soon as reasonably practicable after filing such reports with the SEC. The required reports are available free of charge through our website.
Code of Ethics
We have adopted a Code of Ethics that applies to our principal executive officer, principal financial officer and controller. We have posted the text of our Code of Ethics at www.HF-WA.com in the section titled Investor Information: Corporate Governance. Any waivers of the code of ethics will be publicly disclosed to shareholders.
Competition
We compete for loans and deposits with other commercial banks, credit unions, mortgage bankers, and other institutions in the scope and type of services offered, interest rates paid on deposits, pricing of loans, and number and locations of branches, among other things. Many of our competitors have substantially greater resources than we do. Particularly in times of high or rising interest rates, we also face significant competition for investors’ funds from short-term money market securities and other corporate and government securities.
We compete for loans principally through the range and quality of the services we provide, interest rates and loan fees, and the locations of our Bank's branches. We actively solicit deposit-related clients and compete for deposits by offering depositors a variety of savings accounts, checking accounts, cash management and other services.
Employees
We had 717 full-time equivalent employees at December 31, 2015. We believe that employees play a vital role in the success of a service company. Employees are provided with a variety of benefits such as medical, vision, dental and life insurance, a retirement plan, and paid vacations and sick leave. None of our employees are covered by a collective bargaining agreement.

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Executive Officers
The following table sets forth certain information with respect to the executive officers of the Company at December 31, 2015.
Name
 
Age as of
December 31,
2015
 
Position
 
Has Served the 
Company or Heritage Bank Since
Brian L. Vance
 
61

 
President and Chief Executive Officer of Heritage; Chief Executive Officer of Heritage Bank
 
1996
Jeffrey J. Deuel
 
57

 
Executive Vice President of Heritage; President and Chief Operating Officer of Heritage Bank
 
2010
Donald J. Hinson
 
54

 
Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Heritage and Heritage Bank
 
2005
David A. Spurling
 
62

 
Executive Vice President and Chief Credit Officer of Heritage and Heritage Bank
 
1999
Bryan McDonald (1)
 
44

 
Executive Vice President and Chief Lending Officer of Heritage Bank
 
2014
(1)
Former executive officer of Washington Banking Company.
The business experience of each executive officer is set forth below.
Brian L. Vance is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Heritage and Chief Executive Officer of Heritage Bank as well as a director of Heritage.  Mr. Vance was appointed President and Chief Executive Officer of Heritage and Heritage Bank in 2006.  In 2003, Mr. Vance was appointed President and Chief Executive Officer of Heritage Bank and in 1998, Mr. Vance was named President and Chief Operating Officer of Heritage Bank. Mr. Vance joined Heritage Bank in 1996 as its Executive Vice President and Chief Credit Officer. Prior to joining Heritage Bank, Mr. Vance was employed for 24 years with West One Bank, a bank with offices in Idaho, Utah, Oregon and Washington. Prior to leaving West One, he was Senior Vice President and Regional Manager of Banking Operations for the south Puget Sound region.
Jeffrey J. Deuel was promoted to President and Chief Operating Officer of Heritage Bank and Executive Vice President of Heritage in September 2012.  In November 2010, Mr. Deuel was named Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Heritage Bank and Executive Vice President of the Company. Mr. Deuel joined Heritage Bank in February 2010 as Executive Vice President. Mr. Deuel came to the Company with 28 years of banking experience and most recently held the position of Executive Vice President Commercial Operations with JPMorgan Chase, formerly Washington Mutual. Prior to joining Washington Mutual. Mr. Deuel was based in Philadelphia where he worked for Bank United, First Union Bank, CoreStates Bank, and First Pennsylvania Bank. During his career Mr. Deuel held a variety of leadership positions in commercial banking including lending, retail and support services, corporate strategies, credit administration, and portfolio management. He earned his Bachelor’s degree at Gettysburg College.
Donald J. Hinson became Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Heritage and Heritage Bank in September 2012. In 2007, Mr. Hinson was appointed the Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Heritage and Heritage Bank. Mr. Hinson joined Heritage Bank in 2005 as Vice President and Controller. Prior to that, he served in the banking audit practice of local and national accounting firms of Knight, Vale and Gregory and RSM McGladrey from 1994 to 2005. Mr. Hinson holds a Bachelors of Science degree in Accounting from Central Washington University and is a licensed Certified Public Accountant.
David A. Spurling became Executive Vice President and Chief Credit Officer of Heritage and Heritage Bank in January 2014. Prior to that, he was the Senior Vice President and Chief Credit Officer of Heritage Bank beginning in 2007.  Mr. Spurling joined Heritage Bank in 2001 as a commercial lender, followed by a role as a commercial team leader. He began his banking career as a middle market lender at Seafirst Bank, followed by positions as a commercial lender at Bank of America in Small Business Banking and as a regional manager for Bank of America’s government-guaranteed lending division. Mr. Spurling holds a Master’s Degree in Business Administration from the University of Washington and is Credit Risk Certified by the Risk Management Association.

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Bryan McDonald became Executive Vice President and Chief Lending Officer of Heritage Bank upon completion of the Washington Banking Merger effective on May 1, 2014. Prior to that, Mr. McDonald had served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Whidbey Island Bank since January 1, 2012. Mr. McDonald joined Whidbey Island Bank in 2006 as Commercial Banking Manager and he served as Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Whidbey Island Bank from April 1, 2010 until his promotion to Executive Vice President on August 26, 2010. Mr. McDonald has been serving in the banking industry since 1994, including in regional commercial lending management roles since 1996 for Washington Mutual and Peoples Bank. Mr. McDonald holds a Bachelor's and Master’s Degree in Business Administration from Washington State University.

ITEM 1A.     RISK FACTORS
We assume and manage a certain degree of risk in order to conduct our business strategy. The following provides a discussion of certain risks that management believes are specific to our business. This discussion should not be viewed as an all inclusive list or in any particular order.
Our strategy of pursuing acquisitions and de novo branching exposes us to financial and operational risks that could adversely affect us.
We are pursuing a strategy of supplementing organic growth by acquiring other financial institutions or their businesses that we believe will help us fulfill our strategic objectives and enhance our earnings. There are risks associated with this strategy, however, including the following:
we may be exposed to potential asset quality issues or unknown or contingent liabilities of the banks, businesses, assets and liabilities we acquire. If these issues or liabilities exceed our estimates, our results of operations and financial condition may be materially negatively affected;
prices at which acquisitions can be made fluctuate with market conditions. We have experienced times during which acquisitions could not be made in specific markets at prices we considered acceptable and expect that we may continue to experience this condition in the future;
the acquisition of other entities generally requires integration of systems, procedures and personnel of the acquired entity into our company to make the transaction economically successful. This integration process is complicated and time consuming and can also be disruptive to the customers of the acquired business. If the integration process is not conducted successfully and with minimal effect on the acquired business and its customers, we may not realize the anticipated economic benefits of an acquisition within the expected time frame, and we may lose customers or employees of the acquired business. We may also experience greater than anticipated customer losses even if the integration process is successful. These risks are present in our completed FDIC-assisted transactions involving our assumption of deposits and the acquisition of the assets of Cowlitz Bank and Pierce Commercial Bank in July 2010 and November 2010, respectively; in the completed open-bank acquisitions of NCB and Valley Community Bancshares in January 2013 and July 2013, respectively, and in the merger of Washington Banking Company in May 2014;
to finance an acquisition, we may borrow funds, thereby increasing our leverage and diminishing our liquidity, or raise additional capital, which could dilute the interests of our existing shareholders;
since 2006, we completed six acquisition or mergers, including one acquisition in 2006, two acquisitions during 2010, two acquisitions during 2013 and one merger in 2014 that enhanced our rate of growth. We may not be able to continue to sustain our past rate of growth or to grow at all in the future;
we expect our net income will increase following our acquisitions, however, we also expect our general and administrative expenses and consequently our efficiency ratios will also increase. Ultimately, we would expect our efficiency ratio to improve; however, if we are not successful in our integration process, this may not occur, and our acquisitions or branching activities may not be accretive to earnings in the short or long-term; and
to the extent our costs of an acquisition exceed the fair value of the net assets acquired, the acquisition will generate goodwill. As discussed below under “-If the goodwill we have recorded in connection with acquisitions become impaired, our earnings and capital could be reduced,” we are required to assess our goodwill for impairment at least annually, and any goodwill impairment charge could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

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Our business strategy includes significant growth plans, and our financial condition and results of operations could be negatively affected if we are not successful in executing this strategy or if we fail to grow or manage our growth effectively.
We intend to pursue a significant growth strategy for our business. We regularly evaluate potential acquisitions and expansion opportunities. If appropriate opportunities present themselves, we expect to engage in selected acquisitions of financial institutions in the future, including branch acquisitions, or other business growth initiatives or undertakings. There can be no assurance that we will successfully identify appropriate opportunities, that we will be able to negotiate or finance such activities or that such activities, if undertaken, will be successful.
Our growth initiatives may require us to recruit experienced personnel to assist in such initiatives, which will increase our compensation costs. In addition, the failure to identify and retain such personnel would place significant limitations on our ability to successfully execute our growth strategy. To the extent we expand our lending beyond our current market areas, we also could incur additional risk related to those new market areas. We may not be able to expand our market presence in our existing market areas or successfully enter new markets.
If we do not successfully execute our acquisition growth plan, it could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, reputation and growth prospects. In addition, if we were to conclude that the value of an acquired business had decreased and that the related goodwill had been impaired, that conclusion would result in an impairment of goodwill charge to us, which would adversely affect our results of operations. While we believe we have the executive management resources and internal systems in place to successfully manage our future growth, there can be no assurance that suitable growth opportunities will be available or that we will successfully manage our growth. See “-If the goodwill we have recorded in connection with acquisitions becomes impaired, our earnings and capital could be reduced” and “-Our strategy of pursuing acquisitions and de novo branching exposes us to financial and operational risks that could adversely affect us” for additional risks related to our acquisition strategy.
The required accounting treatment of purchased credit impaired loans we acquire through acquisitions could result in higher net interest margins and interest income in current periods and lower net interest margins and interest income in future periods.
Under generally accepted accounting principles ("GAAP"), we are required to record purchased credit impaired loans acquired through acquisitions at fair value, which may differ from the outstanding balance of such loans. Estimating the fair value of such loans requires management to make estimates based on available information and facts and circumstances on the acquisition date. Actual performance could differ from management’s initial estimates. If these loans outperform our original fair value estimates, the difference between our original estimate and the actual performance of the loan (the “discount”) is accreted into net interest income. This accretable yield may change due to changes in expected timing and amount of future cash flows. The yields on our loans could decline as our acquired loan portfolio pays down or matures, and we expect downward pressure on our interest income to the extent that the runoff on our acquired loan portfolio is not replaced with comparable high-yielding loans. This could result in higher net interest margins and interest income in current periods and lower net interest rate margins and lower interest income in future periods.
We operate in a highly regulated environment and may be adversely affected by changes in federal and state laws and regulations that increase our costs of operations.
The financial services industry is extensively regulated. We are subject to extensive examination, supervision and comprehensive regulation by the Federal Reserve and Heritage Bank is subject to examination, supervision and comprehensive regulation by the FDIC and the Division. The Federal Reserve, FDIC and Division govern the activities in which we may engage, primarily for the protection of depositors and the Deposit Insurance Fund. These regulatory authorities have extensive discretion in connection with their supervisory and enforcement activities, including the ability to impose requirements for additional capital, restrictions on operations, the reclassification of assets, and the determination of the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses and level of deposit insurance premiums assessed. In addition, these bank regulators also have the ability to impose additional conditions in the approval of merger and acquisition transactions.
As discussed under “Item 1. Business - Supervision and Regulation - Capital Adequacy” of this Form 10-K, the Dodd-Frank Act has significantly changed the bank regulatory structure and will affect the lending, deposit, investment, trading and operating activities of financial institutions and their holding companies. The Dodd-Frank Act requires various federal agencies to adopt a broad range of new implementing rules and regulations, and to prepare numerous studies and reports for Congress. The federal agencies are given significant discretion in drafting and implementing rules and regulations, and consequently, many of the details and much of the impact of the Dodd-Frank Act may not be known for many months or years. It is difficult at this time to predict when or how any new standards will ultimately be applied to us or what specific impact the Dodd-Frank Act and the yet to be written implementing rules

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and regulations will have on community banks. However, it is expected that at a minimum they will increase our operating and compliance costs and could increase our noninterest expense.
We may face increased compliance costs and uncertainty in residential mortgage lending as a result of the adoption of consumer protection regulations by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.
The Dodd Frank Act created a new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”) with broad powers to supervise and enforce consumer protection laws. The CFPB has broad rule-making authority for a wide range of consumer protection laws that apply to all banks and savings institutions, including the authority to prohibit “unfair, deceptive or abusive” acts and practices. The CFPB has examination and enforcement authority over all banks and savings institutions with more than $10 billion in assets. Financial institutions such as Heritage Bank with less than $10 billion in assets will continue to be examined for compliance with the consumer laws by their primary bank regulators but are subject to the rules of the CFPB.
In January 2013, the CFPB issued several final regulations and changes to certain consumer protections under existing laws. These final rules, most of the provisions of which (including the qualified mortgage) became effective January 10, 2014, generally prohibit creditors from extending mortgage loans without regard for the consumer’s ability to repay and add restrictions and requirements to mortgage origination and servicing practices. In addition, these rules limit prepayment penalties and require the creditor to retain evidence of compliance with the ability-to-repay requirement for three years. Compliance with these rules will likely increase our overall regulatory compliance costs and may require changes to our underwriting practices with respect to mortgage loans. Moreover, these rules may adversely affect the volume of mortgage loans that we underwrite and may subject us to increased potential liabilities related to such residential loan origination activities.
Our loan portfolio is concentrated in loans with a higher risk of loss.
Repayment of our commercial business loans, consisting of commercial and industrial loans as well as owner-occupied and non-owner occupied commercial real estate loans, is often dependent on the cash flows of the borrower, which may be unpredictable, and the collateral securing these loans may fluctuate in value.    We offer different types of commercial loans to a variety of businesses with a focus on real estate related industries and businesses in agricultural, healthcare, legal, and other professions. The types of commercial loans offered are business lines of credit, term equipment financing and term real estate loans. We also originate loans that are guaranteed by the Small Business Administration, or SBA, and are a “preferred lender” of the SBA. Commercial business lending involves risks that are different from those associated with real estate lending. Real estate lending is generally considered to be collateral based lending with loan amounts established on predetermined loan to collateral values and liquidation of the underlying real estate collateral being viewed as the primary source of repayment in the event of borrower default. Our commercial business loans are primarily made based on our assessment of the cash flow of the borrower and secondarily on the underlying collateral provided by the borrower. The borrower's cash flow may be unpredictable, and collateral securing these loans may fluctuate in value. Although commercial business loans are often collateralized by equipment, inventory, accounts receivable or other business assets, the liquidation of collateral in the event of default is often an insufficient source of repayment because accounts receivable may be uncollectible and inventories may be obsolete or of limited use, among other things. Accordingly, the repayment of commercial business loans depends primarily on the cash flow and creditworthiness of the borrower and secondarily on the underlying collateral provided by the borrower. In addition, as part of our commercial business lending activities, we originate agricultural loans. Payments on agricultural loans are typically dependent on the profitable operation or management of the related farm property. The success of the farm may be affected by many factors outside the control of the borrower, including adverse weather conditions that prevent the planting of a crop or limit crop yields, declines in market prices for agricultural products and the impact of government regulations. In addition, many farms are dependent on a limited number of key individuals whose injury or death may significantly affect the successful operation of the farm. If the cash flow from a farming operation is diminished, the borrower’s ability to repay the loan may be impaired.
At December 31, 2015, our commercial business loans (consisting of commercial and industrial loans, owner-occupied commercial real estate loans and non-owner occupied commercial real estate loans) totaled $1.92 billion, or approximately 80.0% of our total loan portfolio. Approximately $7.1 million, or 0.4%, of our total commercial business loans were nonperforming at December 31, 2015. The majority of the nonperforming commercial business loans were commercial and industrial loans.
Our non-owner occupied commercial real estate loans, which includes five or more family residential real estate loans, involve higher principal amounts than other loans and repayment of these loans may be dependent on factors outside our control or the control of our borrowers.    We originate commercial and five or more family residential real estate loans for individuals and businesses for various purposes, which are secured by commercial properties. These loans typically involve higher principal amounts than other types of loans, and repayment is dependent upon income generated, or expected to be generated, by the property securing the loan in amounts sufficient to cover

25


operating expenses and debt service, which may be adversely affected by changes in the economy or local market conditions. For example, if the cash flow from the borrower’s project is reduced as a result of leases not being obtained or renewed, the borrower’s ability to repay the loan may be impaired.
Commercial and five or more family residential real estate loans also expose us to greater credit risk than loans secured by residential real estate because the collateral securing these loans typically cannot be sold as easily as residential real estate. In addition, many of our commercial and five or more family residential real estate loans are not fully amortizing and contain large balloon payments upon maturity. Such balloon payments may require the borrower to either sell or refinance the underlying property in order to make the payment, which may increase the risk of default or non-payment. If we foreclose on a commercial and five or more family residential real estate loan, our holding period for the collateral typically is longer than for one-to-four family residential loans because there are fewer potential purchasers of the collateral. Additionally, commercial and five or more family residential real estate loans generally have relatively large balances to single borrowers or related groups of borrowers. Accordingly, if we make any errors in judgment regarding the collectability of our commercial and five or more family residential real estate loans, any resulting charge-offs may be larger on a per loan basis than those incurred with our residential or consumer loan portfolios.
As of December 31, 2015, our non-owner occupied commercial real estate loans totaled $697.4 million, or 29.0% of our total loan portfolio. There were no nonperforming non-owner occupied commercial real estate loans at December 31, 2015.
Our real estate construction and land development loans are based upon estimates of costs and the related value associated with the completed project. These estimates may be inaccurate.    Construction lending can involve a higher level of risk than other types of lending because funds are advanced partially based upon the value of the project, which is uncertain prior to the project’s completion. Because of the uncertainties inherent in estimating construction costs as well as the market value of a completed project and the effects of governmental regulation of real property, our estimates with regards to the total funds required to complete a project and the related loan-to-value ratio may vary from actual results. As a result, construction loans often involve the disbursement of substantial funds with repayment dependent, in part, on the success of the ultimate project and the ability of the borrower to sell or lease the property or refinance the indebtedness. If our estimate of the value of a project at completion proves to be overstated, it may have inadequate security for repayment of the loan and may incur a loss.
As of December 31, 2015, our real estate construction and land development loans totaled $107.1 million, or 4.5% of our total loan portfolio. Of these loans, $51.8 million, or 2.2% of our total loan portfolio, were one-to-four family residential construction related and $55.3 million, or 2.3% of our total loan portfolio, were five or more family residential and commercial property construction related. Approximately $2.4 million, or 2.3%, of our total construction and land development loans were nonperforming at December 31, 2015.
Our allowance for loan losses may prove to be insufficient to absorb losses in our loan portfolio.
Lending money is a substantial part of our business. Every loan carries a certain risk that it will not be repaid in accordance with its terms or that any underlying collateral will not be sufficient to assure repayment. This risk is affected by, among other things:
the cash flow of the borrower, guarantors and/or the project being financed;
the changes and uncertainties as to the future value of the collateral, in the case of a collateralized loan;
the character and creditworthiness of a particular borrower or guarantor;
changes in economic and industry conditions; and
the duration of the loan.
We maintain an allowance for loan losses, which is a reserve established through a provision for loan losses charged against earnings, which we believe is appropriate to absorb probable incurred losses in our loan portfolio. The amount of this allowance is determined by our management through a periodic comprehensive review and consideration of several factors, including, but not limited to:
our general reserve, based on our historical default and loss experience;
our specific reserve, based on our evaluation of impaired loans and their underlying collateral or discounted cash flows; and
current macroeconomic factors, regulatory requirements and management’s expectation of future events.
The determination of the appropriate level of the allowance for loan losses inherently involves a high degree of subjectivity and requires us to make significant estimates of current credit risks and future trends, all of which may undergo material changes. Deterioration in economic conditions affecting borrowers, new information regarding

26


existing loans, identification of additional problem loans and other factors, both within and outside of our control, may require an increase in the allowance for loan losses. If current conditions in the housing and real estate markets weaken, we expect we will experience increased delinquencies and credit losses. In addition, bank regulatory agencies periodically review our allowance for loan losses and may require an increase in the provision for loan losses or the recognition of further loan charge-offs, based on their judgments about information available to them at the time of their examination. In addition, if charge-offs in future periods exceed the allowance for loan losses we will need additional provisions to increase the allowance for loan losses. Any increases in the allowance for loan losses will result in a decrease in net income and possibly capital, and may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.
If our allowance for loan losses is not adequate, we may be required to make further increases in our provision for loan losses and charge-off additional loans, which could adversely affect our results of operations and our capital.
For the year ended December 31, 2015 we recorded a provision for loan losses of $4.4 million compared to $4.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2014. We recorded net charge-offs of loans of $2.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2015 compared to $5.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2014. At December 31, 2015 our total nonperforming loans were $9.7 million, or 0.40% of loans receivable, net, compared to $11.6 million or 0.51% of loans receivable, net, at December 31, 2014. Generally, our nonperforming loans reflect operating difficulties of individual borrowers, which may be the result of current economic conditions. If economic conditions deteriorate, we expect that we could experience significantly higher delinquencies and loan charge-offs. As a result, we may be required to make further increases in our provision for loan losses in the future, which could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations, perhaps materially.
General economic conditions tend to impact loan segments at varying degrees. Our commercial and industrial loan portfolio, which contained 52.7% of our nonaccrual loans at December 31, 2015, generally has the largest percentage of nonperforming loans as the borrowers are primarily business owners whose business results are influenced by deteriorating economic conditions. Slower sales and excess inventory in the housing market has been the primary cause of deterioration in our one-to-four family residential real estate construction and land development loans, which contained 25.0% of our nonaccrual loans at December 31, 2015.
The current economic condition in the market areas we serve may adversely impact our earnings and could increase the credit risk associated with our loan portfolio.
Substantially all of our loans are to businesses and individuals in the states of Washington and Oregon. A decline in the economies of our primary market areas of the Pacific Northwest in which we operate could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
    
While real estate values and unemployment rates have improved, a deterioration in economic conditions in our market areas of the Pacific Northwest could result in the following consequences, any of which could have a materially adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations:

loan delinquencies, problem assets and foreclosures may increase;
the sale of foreclosed assets may be slow;
an increase in our provision for loan losses;
demand for our products and services may decline, possibly resulting in a decrease in our total loans;
collateral for loans made may decline further in value, exposing us to increased risk of loss on existing loans;
the net worth and liquidity of loan guarantors may decline, impairing their ability to honor commitments to us; and
the amount of our deposits may decrease and the composition of our deposits may be adversely affected.
If the goodwill we have recorded in connection with acquisitions becomes impaired, our earnings and capital could be reduced.
Accounting standards require that we account for acquisitions using the purchase method of accounting. Under purchase accounting, if the purchase price of an acquired company exceeds the fair value of its net assets, the excess is carried on the acquirer’s balance sheet as goodwill. In accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, our goodwill is evaluated for impairment on an annual basis or more frequently if events or circumstances indicate that a potential impairment exists. The evaluation is based on a variety of factors, including the quoted price of our common stock, market prices of common stock of other banking organizations, common stock trading multiples, discounted

27


cash flows, and data from comparable acquisitions. At December 31, 2015, we had goodwill with a carrying amount of $119.0 million.
Declines in our stock price or a prolonged weakness in the operating environment of the financial services industry may result in a future impairment charge. Any such impairment charge could have a material adverse effect on our operating results and financial condition.
Fluctuating interest rates can adversely affect our profitability.
Our profitability is dependent to a large extent upon net interest income, which is the difference (or “spread”) between the interest earned on loans, securities and other interest earning assets and the interest paid on deposits, borrowings, and other interest bearing liabilities. Because of the differences in maturities and repricing characteristics of our interest earning assets and interest bearing liabilities, changes in interest rates do not produce equivalent changes in interest income earned on interest earning assets and interest paid on interest bearing liabilities. We principally manage interest rate risk by managing our volume and mix of our earning assets and funding liabilities. Thus, in a changing interest rate environment, we may not be able to manage this risk effectively.  Accordingly, fluctuations in interest rates could adversely affect our interest rate spread, and, in turn, our profitability.
During the past several years it has been the policy of the Federal Reserve to maintain interest rates at historically low levels through its targeted federal funds rate and the purchase of mortgage-backed securities. As a result, market rates on the loans we have originated and the yields on securities we have purchased have been at lower levels than available prior to 2008. As a general matter, our interest bearing liabilities reprice or mature more quickly than our interest earning assets, which has been one factor contributing to the increase in our interest rate spread as interest rates decreased. However, our ability to lower our interest expense will be limited at these interest rate levels while the average yield on our interest earning assets may continue to decrease. The Federal Reserve raised short-term interest rates in December 2015 from a quarter to one-half of percent as a result of moderate improvements in the economy, particularly in improvements in the unemployment rate. The increase is relatively small and, thus, we expect our net interest income may be adversely affected and may decrease, which may have an adverse effect on our profitability.
Although management believes it has implemented effective asset and liability management strategies to reduce the potential effects of changes in interest rates on our results of operations, any substantial, unexpected or prolonged change in market interest rates could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. Also, our interest rate risk modeling techniques and assumptions likely may not fully predict or capture the impact of actual interest rate changes on our balance sheet.
Decreased volumes and lower gains on sales of mortgage loans sold could adversely impact our noninterest income.
We originate and sell one-to-four family residential loans. Our mortgage banking income is a significant portion of our noninterest income. We generate gains on the sale of one-to-four family residential loans pursuant to programs currently offered by Freddie Mac and other secondary market purchasers. Any future changes in their purchase programs, our eligibility to participate in such programs, the criteria for loans to be accepted or laws that significantly affect the activity of such entities could, in turn, materially adversely affect our results of operations. Further, in a rising or higher interest rate environment, our originations of mortgage loans may decrease, resulting in fewer loans that are available to be sold to investors. This would result in a decrease in mortgage banking revenues and a corresponding decrease in noninterest income. In addition, our results of operations are affected by the amount of noninterest expense associated with mortgage banking activities, such as salaries and employee benefits, occupancy, equipment and data processing expense and other operating costs. During periods of reduced loan demand, our results of operations may be adversely affected to the extent that we are unable to reduce expenses commensurate with the decline in loan originations.
The tightening of available liquidity could limit our ability to replace deposits and fund loan demand, which could adversely affect our earnings and capital levels.
A tightening of the credit markets and the inability to obtain adequate funding to replace deposits and fund continued loan growth may negatively affect asset growth and, consequently, our earnings capability and capital levels. In addition to any deposit growth, maturity of investment securities and loan payments, we rely from time to time on advances from the FHLB of Des Moines, and certain other wholesale funding sources to fund loans and replace deposits. In the event of a further downturn in the economy, these additional funding sources could be negatively affected which could limit the funds available to us. Our liquidity position could be significantly constrained if we were unable to access funds from the FHLB of Des Moines or other wholesale funding sources.

28


Our growth or future losses may require us to raise additional capital in the future, but that capital may not be available when it is needed or the cost of that capital may be very high; further, the resulting dilution of our equity may adversely affect the market price of our common stock.
We are required by federal and state regulatory authorities to maintain adequate levels of capital to support our operations. At some point we may need to raise additional capital to support our continued internal growth and growth through acquisitions. Our ability to raise additional capital, however, will depend on conditions in the capital markets at that time, which are outside our control, and on our financial condition and performance. If we are able to raise capital it may not be on terms that are acceptable to us. If we cannot raise additional capital when needed, our ability to further expand our operations through internal growth and acquisitions could be materially impaired and our financial condition and liquidity could be materially and adversely affected. Accordingly, we cannot make assurances that we will be able to raise additional capital when needed.
We are not restricted from issuing additional common stock or preferred stock, including any securities that are convertible into or exchangeable for, or that represent the right to receive, common stock or preferred stock or any substantially similar securities. The market price of our common stock could decline as a result of sales of a large number of shares of common stock or preferred stock or similar securities in the market or from the perception that such sales could occur.
Our Board of Directors is authorized generally to cause us to issue additional common stock, as well as series of preferred stock, without any action on the part of our shareholders except as may be required under the listing requirements of the NASDAQ Stock Market. In addition, our Board has the power, without shareholder approval, to set the terms of any such series of preferred stock that may be issued, including voting rights, dividend rights and preferences over the common stock with respect to dividends or upon the liquidation, dissolution or winding-up of our business and other terms.
In addition, if we issue preferred stock in the future that has a preference over the common stock with respect to the payment of dividends or upon liquidation, dissolution or winding-up, or if we issue preferred stock with voting rights that dilute the voting power of the common stock, the rights of holders of the common stock or the market price of the common stock could be adversely affected.
We are subject to certain risks in connection with our use of technology.
Our security measures may not be sufficient to mitigate the risk of a cyber-attack. Communications and information systems are essential to the conduct of our business, as we use such systems to manage our customer relationships, our general ledger and virtually all other aspects of our business. Our operations rely on the secure processing, storage, and transmission of confidential and other information in our computer systems and networks. Although we take protective measures and endeavor to modify them as circumstances warrant, the security of our computer systems, software, and networks may be vulnerable to breaches, unauthorized access, misuse, computer viruses, or other malicious code and cyber-attacks that could have a security impact. If one or more of these events occur, this could jeopardize our or our customers' confidential and other information processed and stored in, and transmitted through, our computer systems and networks, or otherwise cause interruptions or malfunctions in our operations or the operations of our customers or counterparties. We may be required to expend significant additional resources to modify our protective measures or to investigate and remediate vulnerabilities or other exposures, and we may be subject to litigation and financial losses that are either not insured against or not fully covered through any insurance maintained by us. We could also suffer significant reputational damage.
Security breaches in our internet banking activities could further expose us to possible liability and damage our reputation. Any compromise of our security also could deter customers from using our internet banking services that involve the transmission of confidential information. We rely on standard internet security systems to provide the security and authentication necessary to effect secure transmission of data. These precautions may not protect our systems from compromises or breaches of our security measures and could result in significant legal liability and significant damage to our reputation and our business.
Our security measures may not protect us from system failures or interruptions. While we have established policies and procedures to prevent or limit the impact of systems failures and interruptions, there can be no assurance that such events will not occur or that they will be adequately addressed if they do. In addition, we outsource certain aspects of our data processing and other operational functions to certain third-party providers. If our third-party providers encounter difficulties, or if we have difficulty in communicating with them, our ability to adequately process and account for transactions could be affected, and our business operations could be adversely impacted. Threats to information security also exist in the processing of customer information through various other vendors and their personnel.
The occurrence of any failures or interruptions may require us to identify alternative sources of such services, and we cannot assure you that we could negotiate terms that are as favorable to us or could obtain services with

29


similar functionality as found in our existing systems without the need to expend substantial resources, if at all. Further, the occurrence of any systems failure or interruption could damage our reputation and result in a loss of customers and business, could subject us to additional regulatory scrutiny, or could expose us to legal liability. Any of these occurrences could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.
Our business may be adversely affected by an increasing prevalence of fraud and other financial crimes.
Our loans to businesses and individuals and our deposit relationships and related transactions are subject to exposure to the risk of loss due to fraud and other financial crimes. Nationally, reported incidents of fraud and other financial crimes have increased. We have also experienced losses due to apparent fraud and other financial crimes; albeit insignificant. While we have policies and procedures designed to prevent such losses, there can be no assurance that such losses will not occur.
Changes in accounting standards may affect how we record and report our performance.
Our accounting policies and methods are fundamental to how we record and report our financial condition and results of operations. From time to time there are changes in the financial accounting and reporting standards that govern the preparation of our financial statements. These changes can be difficult to predict and can materially impact how we report and record our financial condition and results of operations. In some cases, we could be required to apply a new or revised standard retroactively, resulting in a retrospective adjustment to prior financial statements.
We are dependent on key personnel and the loss of one or more of those key personnel may materially and adversely affect our prospects.
Competition for qualified employees and personnel in the banking industry is intense and there are a limited number of qualified persons with knowledge of, and experience in, the community banking industry where we conduct our business. The process of recruiting personnel with the combination of skills and attributes required to carry out our strategies is often lengthy. Our success depends to a significant degree upon our ability to attract and retain qualified management, loan origination, finance, administrative, marketing and technical personnel and upon the continued contributions of our management and personnel. In particular, our success has been and continues to be highly dependent upon the abilities of key executives, including our President and Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Brian L. Vance, and certain other employees. The loss of key personnel could adversely affect our ability to successfully conduct our business.

ITEM 1B.     UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
The Company has no unresolved staff comments from the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") as it relates to the Company's financial information as reported on Form 10-K.

ITEM 2.     PROPERTIES
Our executive offices and the main office of Heritage Bank are located in approximately 22,000 square feet of the headquarters building and adjacent office space and main branch office which are owned by Heritage Bank and located in downtown Olympia. The Company's branch network at December 31, 2015 is comprised of 67 branches located throughout Washington and Oregon. The number of branches per county, as well as occupancy type, is detailed in the following table.

30


 
 
 
 
 
 
Occupancy Type
County
 
State
 
Number of Branches
 
Owned
 
Leased
Clark
 
WA
 
2

 
1

 
1

Cowlitz
 
WA
 
2

 
2

 

Island
 
WA
 
6

 
5

 
1

Kittitas
 
WA
 
1

 
1

 

King
 
WA
 
10

 
3

 
7

Mason
 
WA
 
1

 
1

 

Multnomah
 
OR
 
1

 

 
1

Pierce
 
WA
 
13

 
8

 
5

San Juan
 
WA
 
1

 

 
1

Skagit
 
WA
 
4

 
3

 
1

Snohomish
 
WA
 
12

 
6

 
6

Thurston
 
WA
 
5

 
3

 
2

Whatcom
 
WA
 
4

 
3

 
1

Yakima
 
WA
 
5

 
5

 

Total
 
 
 
67

 
41

 
26

One Island County branch, one Thurston County branch and the branch in Kittitas County have land leases, which are not included in the leased section above as the building is owned.
In addition, as part of the Company's strategic initiatives, certain measures were taken to transform the Company's branching system subsequent to December 31, 2015. Three branches operating at December 31, 2015 were closed subsequent to year end and consolidated into existing Heritage Bank branches. Two of the three closed branch properties were leased and one branch was owned. The Company additionally consolidated two branches in the Metro markets into business banking centers on upper floor commercial office space, creating strong partnerships between retail, commercial and cash management teams. As of filing date of this Form 10-K, all branch transformations were complete with the exception of one Metro market consolidation which is anticipated to be completed in April 2016.
For additional information concerning our premises and equipment and lease obligations, see Notes (8) and (15), respectively, of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in "Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data."

ITEM 3.     LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
Heritage and Heritage Bank, are not a party to any material pending legal proceedings other than ordinary routine litigation incidental to the business of the Bank as of December 31, 2015. The matter described below was resolved during the year ended December 31, 2015.
On April 4, 2014, Washington Banking, its directors and Heritage entered into and documented an agreement in principle among Washington Banking, its directors, Heritage and the plaintiffs for the settlement of the putative shareholder class action lawsuit captioned In Re Washington Banking Company Shareholder Litigation, Lead Case No. 13-2-38689-5 SEA, pending before the Superior Court of the State of Washington in and for King County (the “Action”).  The Action alleges that Washington Banking’s directors breached their fiduciary duties to Washington Banking and its shareholders in connection with the transactions contemplated by the Agreement and Plan of Merger, dated October 23, 2013 (the “Merger Agreement”), under which Washington Banking and Heritage combined their organizations in a strategic combination, with Washington Banking merging with and into Heritage. The Action also alleges, among other things, that Heritage aided and abetted the alleged breaches of fiduciary duties by Washington Banking's directors and that the public disclosures concerning the Washington Banking Merger are misleading in various respects.
              On December 15, 2014, the Court entered an order preliminarily approving the settlement of the consolidated litigation and ordering Washington Banking to provide notice of the proposed settlement to those persons who held Washington Banking shares during the purported class period. 
On February 27, 2015, the Court held a hearing to consider whether the settlement was fair and reasonable to the class members and, if so, to approve the settlement and to consider plaintiffs’ counsel’s application for an award

31


of attorneys’ fees and costs from Washington Banking.  At the hearing, the Court approved the settlement and entered a Final Judgment and Order of Dismissal with Prejudice awarding plaintiffs’ counsel fees and expenses totaling $450,000 and terminating the litigation.
The settlement of the Action did not affect the Washington Banking Merger consideration paid to Washington Banking’s shareholders in connection with the completion of the Washington Banking Merger on May 1, 2014.  Washington Banking, its directors and Heritage took the position that the Action was without merit and denied any wrongdoing of any kind.  Washington Banking, its directors and Heritage entered into the settlement solely to eliminate the costs, risks, burden, distraction and expense of further litigation and to put the claims that were or could have been asserted to rest.  Nothing in the stipulation of settlement or any public filing, including this Annual Report on Form 10-K, shall be deemed an admission of the legal necessity of filing or the materiality under applicable laws of any of the additional information contained herein or in any public filing associated with the settlement of the Action.

ITEM 4.     MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
Not applicable

PART II

ITEM 5.
MARKET FOR THE REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
Our common stock is traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol HFWA. At December 31, 2015, we had approximately 1,534 shareholders of record (not including the number of persons or entities holding stock in nominee or street name through various brokerage firms) and 29,975,439 outstanding shares of common stock. This total does not reflect the number of persons or entities who hold stock in nominee or “street” name through various brokerage firms. The last reported sales price on February 19, 2016 was $17.31 per share. The following table provides sales information per share of our common stock as reported on the NASDAQ Global Select Market for the indicated quarters.
 
 
2015 Quarter ended,
 
 
March 31
 
June 30
 
September 30
 
December 31
High
 
$
17.16

 
$
17.99

 
$
19.30

 
$
19.70

Low
 
$
15.52

 
$
16.76

 
$
17.22

 
$
18.08

 
For the interim period subsequent to the 2015 fiscal year through the last reported sales price on February 19, 2016, the high and low sales information price per share of our common stock as reported on the NASDAQ Global Selected Market was $18.68 and $16.54, respectively.
 
 
2014 Quarter ended,
 
 
March 31
 
June 30
 
September 30
 
December 31
High
 
$
18.48

 
$
17.86

 
$
16.96

 
$
17.97

Low
 
$
16.18

 
$
15.44

 
$
15.59

 
$
15.80

Quarterly, the Company reviews the potential payment of cash dividends to common shareholders. The timing and amount of cash dividends paid on our common stock depends on the Company’s earnings, capital requirements, financial condition and other relevant factors.

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The dividend activities for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 and subsequent through the date of this filing are listed below:
Declared
 
Cash
Dividend per Share        
 
Record Date        
 
Paid        
 
 
January 29, 2014
 
$0.08
 
February 10, 2014
 
February 24, 2014
 
 
March 27, 2014
 
$0.08
 
April 8, 2014
 
April 23, 2014
 
 
July 24, 2014
 
$0.09
 
August 7, 2014
 
August 21, 2014
 
 
October 23, 2014
 
$0.09
 
November 6, 2014
 
November 20, 2014
 
 
November 11, 2014
 
$0.16
 
December 2, 2014
 
December 12, 2014
 
*
January 28, 2015
 
$0.10
 
February 10, 2015
 
February 24, 2015
 
 
April 22, 2015
 
$0.11
 
May 7, 2015
 
May 21, 2015
 
 
July 22, 2015
 
$0.11
 
August 6, 2015
 
August 20, 2015
 
 
October 21, 2015
 
$0.11
 
November 4, 2015
 
November 18, 2015
 
 
October 21, 2015
 
$0.10
 
November 4, 2015
 
November 18, 2015
 
*
January 27, 2016
 
$0.11
 
February 10, 2016
 
February 24, 2016
 
 
* Denotes special dividend.
The primary source for dividends paid to our shareholders is dividends paid to us from Heritage Bank. There are regulatory restrictions on the ability of our subsidiary bank to pay dividends. Under federal regulations, the dollar amount of dividends the Bank may pay depends upon its capital position and recent net income. Generally, if an institution satisfies its regulatory capital requirements, it may make dividend payments up to the limits prescribed under state law and FDIC regulations. However, an institution that has converted to a stock form of ownership, as Heritage Bank has done, may not declare or pay a dividend on, or repurchase any of, its common stock if the effect thereof would cause the regulatory capital of the institution to be reduced below the amount required for the liquidation account which was established in connection with the mutual stock conversion.
As a bank holding company, our ability to pay dividends is subject to the guidelines of the Federal Reserve regarding capital adequacy and dividends. The Federal Reserve’s policy is that a bank holding company should pay cash dividends only to the extent that its net income for the past year is sufficient to cover both the cash dividends and a rate of earnings retention that is consistent with the holding company’s capital needs, asset quality and overall financial condition, and that it is inappropriate for a bank holding company experiencing serious financial problems to borrow funds to pay dividends. Under Washington law, we are prohibited from paying a dividend if, after making such dividend payment, we would be unable to pay our debts as they become due in the usual course of business, or if our total liabilities, plus the amount that would be needed, in the event we were to be dissolved at the time of the dividend payment, to satisfy preferential rights on dissolution of holders of preferred stock ranking senior in right of payment to the capital stock on which the applicable distribution is to be made exceed our total assets.
The Company has had various stock repurchase programs since March 1999. On October 23, 2014, the Company's Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to 5% of the Company's outstanding common shares, or approximately 1,513,000 shares, under the eleventh stock repurchase plan. At December 31, 2015, the shares remaining to be purchased was approximately 1,071,000. The number, timing and price of shares repurchased will depend on business and market conditions, and other factors, including opportunities to deploy the Company's capital. The Company’s tenth stock repurchase plan was approved by the Board of Directors on August 30, 2012 and authorized the repurchase of up to 5% of the Company’s outstanding shares of common stock, or approximately 757,000 shares. All of the share under tenth stock repurchase plan were purchased except for 52,025 shares which will remain unpurchased as the eleventh plan supersedes the tenth stock repurchase program.


33


The following table provides total repurchased shares and average share prices under the applicable plans and years:
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
Plan Total
Tenth Plan
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Repurchased shares

 
108,075

 
544,000

 
704,975

Stock repurchase average share price
$

 
$
16.88

 
$
15.88

 
$
15.85

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Eleventh Plan
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Repurchased shares
441,966

 

 

 
441,966

Stock repurchase average share price
$
16.64

 
$

 
$

 
$
16.64


During the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013, the Company repurchased 22,300, 48,304 and 13,138 shares at an average price of $17.09, $16.53 and $14.29 to pay withholding taxes on the vesting of restricted stock that vested during the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively, which are not considered repurchased as part of the applicable repurchase plans.
The following table sets forth information about the Company’s purchases of its outstanding common stock during the quarter ended December 31, 2015.
Period
 
Total Number  of
Shares 
Purchased(1)
 
Average Price
Paid Per Share(1)
 
Cumulative Total Number of  Shares Purchased as 
Part of Publicly
Announced Plans or Programs
 
Maximum Number 
of Shares that May
Yet Be Purchased
Under the Plans or
Programs
October 1, 2015—
    October 31, 2015
 
265

 
$18.71
 
7,755,389

 
1,073,034

November 1, 2015—November 30, 2015
 

 

 
7,755,389

 
1,073,034

December 1, 2015—December 31, 2015
 
37

 
18.47
 
7,755,389

 
1,073,034

Total
 
302

 
$18.68
 
7,755,389

 
1,073,034

(1)
Common shares repurchased by the Company between October 1, 2015 and December 31, 2015 represent shares of restricted stock that were canceled to pay withholding taxes.
The information regarding the Company’s equity compensation plan is contained under “Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters” of this Form 10-K and is incorporated by reference herein.
Stock Performance Graph
The chart shown below depicts total return to stockholders during the period beginning December 31, 2010 and ending December 31, 2015. Total return includes appreciation or depreciation in market value of the Company’s common stock as well as actual cash and stock dividends paid to common stockholders. Indices shown below, for comparison purposes only, are the Total Return Index for the NASDAQ Stock Market (U.S. Companies), which is a broad nationally recognized index of stock performance by publicly traded companies and the NASDAQ Bank Index, which is an index that contains securities of NASDAQ-listed companies classified according to the Industry Classification Benchmark as banks. The chart assumes that the value of the investment in Heritage’s common stock and each of the three indices was $100 on December 31, 2010, and that all dividends were reinvested in Heritage common stock.


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Years Ended December 31,
Index
 
2010
 
2011
 
2012
 
2013
 
2014
 
2015
Heritage Financial Corporation
 
$
100.00

 
$
93.18

 
$
115.30

 
$
137.98

 
$
145.90

 
$
161.40

NASDAQ Composite
 
100.00

 
99.21

 
116.82

 
163.75

 
188.03

 
201.40

NASDAQ Bank
 
100.00

 
89.50

 
106.23

 
150.55

 
157.95

 
171.92


ITEM 6.     SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
The following tables set forth certain information concerning our consolidated financial position and results of operations at and for the dates indicated and have been derived from our audited Consolidated Financial Statements. The information below is qualified in its entirety by the detailed information included elsewhere herein and should be read along with “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.”
 
Matters affecting comparability in the five-year summary detailed below include the Valley and NCB Acquisitions in 2013, and the Washington Banking Merger in 2014. See Note (2) Business Combinations in "Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" discussing the fiscal 2014 and 2013 mergers and acquisitions.

35


 
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
 
(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
Operations Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest income
 
$
135,739

 
121,106

 
$
71,428

 
$
69,109

 
$
74,120

Interest expense
 
6,120

 
5,681

 
3,724

 
4,534

 
6,582

Net interest income
 
129,619


115,425


67,704

 
64,575


67,538

Provision for loan losses
 
4,372

 
4,594

 
3,672

 
2,016

 
14,430

Noninterest income
 
32,268

 
16,467

 
9,651

 
7,272

 
5,746

Noninterest expense
 
106,208

 
99,379

 
59,515

 
50,392

 
49,703

Income tax expense
 
13,818

 
6,905

 
4,593

 
6,178

 
2,633

Net income
 
37,489

 
21,014

 
9,575