10-K 1 mtd10k12312017.htm 10-K Document

 
UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
Form 10-K
(Mark One)
 
 
þ
 
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
 
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017
OR
o
 
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
 
For the transition period from          to
Commission file number 001-13595
Mettler-Toledo International Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware
13-3668641
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
1900 Polaris Parkway
Columbus, OH 43240
and
Im Langacher 44
CH 8606 Greifensee, Switzerland
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)
1-614-438-4511 and +41-44-944-22-11
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of Each Class
 
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
Common Stock, $0.01 par value
 
New York Stock Exchange
Preferred Stock Purchase Rights
 
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: NONE
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  Yes þ     No o
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.  Yes o     No þ
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes þ     No o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes þ     No o
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  Yes o     No þ
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
Large accelerated filer þ
Accelerated filer o
Non-accelerated filer o
Smaller reporting company o
Emerging growth company o
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).  Yes o     No þ
As of February 5, 2018 there were 25,472,835 shares of the registrant’s Common Stock, $0.01 par value per share, outstanding. The aggregate market value of the shares of Common Stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant on June 30, 2017 (based on the closing price for the Common Stock on the New York Stock Exchange as of the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter, June 30, 2017) was approximately $15.1 billion. For purposes of this computation, shares held by affiliates and by directors of the registrant have been excluded. Such exclusion of shares held by directors is not intended, nor shall it be deemed, to be an admission that such persons are affiliates of the registrant.
Documents Incorporated by Reference
Document
 
Part of Form 10-K Into Which Incorporated
Certain Sections of the Proxy Statement for 2018
 
Part III
Annual Meeting of Shareholders
 
 



METTLER-TOLEDO INTERNATIONAL INC.
ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2017
 
 
Page
 
 EX-21
 EX-23.1
 EX-31.1
 EX-31.2
 EX-31.3
 EX-32
 EX-101 INSTANCE DOCUMENT
 EX-101 SCHEMA DOCUMENT
 EX-101 CALCULATION LINKBASE DOCUMENT
 EX-101 LABELS LINKBASE DOCUMENT
 EX-101 PRESENTATION LINKBASE DOCUMENT
 EX-101 DEFINITION LINKBASE DOCUMENT


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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS DISCLAIMER

You should not rely on forward-looking statements to predict our actual results. Our actual results or performance may be materially different than reflected in forward-looking statements because of various risks and uncertainties. You can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may,” “will,” “could,” “would,” “should,” “expect,” “plan,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “believe,” “estimate,” “predict,” “potential,” or “continue.”
We make forward-looking statements about future events or our future financial performance, including earnings and sales growth, earnings per share, strategic plans and contingency plans, growth opportunities or economic downturns, our ability to respond to changes in market conditions, planned research and development efforts and product introductions, adequacy of facilities, access to and the costs of raw materials, shipping and supplier costs, gross margins, customer demand, our competitive position, pricing, capital expenditures, cash flow, tax-related matters, the impact of foreign currencies, compliance with laws, and effects of acquisitions.
Our forward-looking statements may not be accurate or complete, and we do not intend to update or revise them in light of actual results. New risks also periodically arise. Please consider the risks and factors that could cause our results to differ materially from what is described in our forward-looking statements. See in particular “Factors Affecting Our Future Operating Results” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”



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PART I


Item 1.
Business
We are a leading global supplier of precision instruments and services. We have strong leadership positions in all of our businesses and believe we hold global number-one market positions in most of them. We are recognized as an innovation leader and our solutions are critical in key research and development, quality control, and manufacturing processes for customers in a wide range of industries including life sciences, food, and chemicals. Our sales and service network is one of the most extensive in the industry. Our products are sold in more than 140 countries and we have a direct presence in approximately 40 countries. With proven growth strategies and a focus on execution, we have achieved a long term track record of strong financial performance.
Our business is geographically diversified, with net sales in 2017 derived 31% from Europe, 39% from North and South America, and 30% from Asia and other countries. Our customer base is also diversified by industry and by individual customer.
Mettler-Toledo International Inc. was incorporated as a Delaware corporation in 1991 and became a publicly traded company with its initial public offering in 1997.
Business Segments
We have five reportable segments: U.S. Operations, Swiss Operations, Western European Operations, Chinese Operations, and Other. See Note 17 to the audited consolidated financial statements and Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations under “Results of Operations by Reportable Segment” for detailed results by segment and geographic region.
We manufacture a wide variety of precision instruments and provide value-added services to our customers. Our principal products and services are described below. We also describe our customers and distribution, sales and service, research and development, manufacturing, and certain other matters. These descriptions apply to substantially all of our products and related reportable segments.
Laboratory Instruments
We make a wide variety of precision laboratory instruments in the sample preparation, synthesis, analytical bench top, and material characterization areas. Our portfolio includes laboratory balances, liquid pipetting solutions, automated laboratory reactors including real-time analytics, titrators, physical value analyzers, thermal analysis systems, and other analytical instruments, such as UV/VIS spectrophotometers, moisture analyzers, and density refractometers. The laboratory instruments and related service business accounted for approximately 50% of our net sales in 2017, 49% in 2016, and 48% in 2015.
Laboratory Balances
Our laboratory balances have weighing ranges from one ten-millionth of a gram up to 64 kilograms. To cover a wide range of customer needs and price points, we market our balances in a range of product tiers offering different levels of functionality. We also provide filter weighing and powder dosing automated systems. Based on the same weighing technology platform, we also manufacture mass comparators, which are used by weights and measures regulators as well as laboratories to ensure the accuracy of reference weights. Laboratory balances are primarily used in the pharmaceutical, food, chemical, cosmetics, academia, and other industries.

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Pipettes
Pipettes are used in laboratories for dispensing small volumes of liquids. We operate our pipette business with the Rainin and Biotix brand names. We develop, manufacture, and distribute advanced pipettes, tips, tubes, and accessories, including single- and multi-channel manual and electronic pipettes. We maintain service centers in the key markets where customers periodically send their pipettes for certified recalibrations. Our principal end markets are pharmaceutical, biotech, and academia.
Analytical Instruments
Titrators measure the chemical composition of samples and are used in environmental and research laboratories as well as in quality control labs in the pharmaceutical, food and beverage, and other industries. Our high-end titrators are multi-tasking models, which can perform two determinations simultaneously on multiple vessels. Our offering includes robotics to automate routine work in quality control applications.
Thermal analysis systems measure material properties as a function of temperature, such as weight, dimension, energy flow, and viscoelastic properties. Thermal analysis systems are used in nearly every industry, but primarily in the plastics and polymer industries and increasingly in the pharmaceutical industry.
pH meters measure acidity in laboratory samples. We also sell density and refractometry instruments, which measure chemical concentrations in solutions. In addition, we manufacture and sell moisture analyzers, which precisely determine the moisture content of a sample by utilizing the loss on drying method, and UV/VIS spectrophotometers that optimize spectroscopic workflows.
Laboratory Software
LabX, our PC-based laboratory embedded software platform, manages and analyzes data generated by our balances, titrators, pH meters, moisture analyzers, and other analytical instruments like UV/VIS spectrophotometers. LabX provides full network capability; assists with workflow automation; has efficient, intuitive protocols; and enables customers to collect and archive data in compliance with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s traceability requirements for electronically stored data (also known as 21 CFR Part 11).
Automated Chemistry Solutions
Our current automated chemistry solutions focus on selected applications in the chemical and drug discovery process. Our automated lab reactors and in situ analysis systems are considered integral to the process development and scale-up activities of our customers. Our on-line measurement technologies, based on infrared and laser light scattering, enable customers to monitor chemical reactions and crystallization processes in real time in the lab and plant. In situ samples allow overnight sampling and testing. We believe that our portfolio of integrated technologies can bring significant efficiencies to the development process, enabling our customers to bring new chemicals and drugs to market faster.
Process Analytics
Our process analytics business provides instruments for the in-line measurement of liquid and gas parameters used primarily in the production process of pharmaceutical, biotech, beverage, microelectronics, chemical, and refining companies, as well as power plants. Close to half of our process analytics sales are to the pharmaceutical and biotech markets, where our customers need fast and secure scale-up and production that meet the validation processes required for GMP (Good Manufacturing Processes) and other regulatory standards like the USP (US Pharmacopoeia) regulations for ultrapure water quality. We are a leading solution provider for liquid analytical measurement to control and optimize production processes. Our solutions include sensor and analyzer technology for measuring pH,

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dissolved oxygen, carbon dioxide, conductivity, turbidity, ozone, total organic carbons, bioburden, sodium, and silica, as well as laser analyzers for gas measurement. Intelligent sensor diagnostics capabilities enable improved asset management solutions for our customers to reduce process downtime and maintenance costs. Our instruments offer leading multi-parameter capabilities and plant-wide control system integration, which are key for integrated measurement of multiple parameters to secure production quality and efficiency. With a worldwide network of specialists, we support customers in critical process applications, compliance, and systems integration questions.
Industrial Instruments
We manufacture numerous industrial weighing instruments and related terminals and offer dedicated software solutions for the pharmaceutical, chemical, food, discrete manufacturing, and other industries. In addition, we manufacture metal detection, x-ray, and other end-of-line product inspection systems used in production and packaging. We supply automatic identification and data capture solutions, which integrate in-motion weighing, dimensioning, and identification technologies for transport, shipping, and logistics customers. We also offer heavy industrial scales and related software. The industrial instruments and related service business accounted for approximately 42% of our net sales in 2017 and 2016 and 43% in 2015.
Industrial Weighing Instruments
We offer a comprehensive line of industrial scales and weighing devices, such as bench scales, floor scales, and weigh modules for weighing loads from a few grams to several thousand kilograms in applications ranging from measuring materials in chemical production to quality completeness control in discrete manufacturing to weighing packages at the end of the line. Our products are used in a wide range of industrial applications, such as counting, formulating and mixing ingredients, and quality control.
Industrial Terminals
Our industrial scale terminals collect data and integrate it into manufacturing processes, helping to automate them. Our terminals allow users to remotely download formulation recipes or access setup data and can minimize downtime through predictive rather than reactive maintenance.
Transportation and Logistics
We supply automatic dimensional measurement and data capture solutions, which integrate in-motion weighing, dimensioning, and identification technologies. With these solutions, customers can measure the weight and cubic volume of packages for appropriate billing, load management, and quality control. Our solutions also integrate into customers’ information systems.
Vehicle Scale Systems
Our primary heavy industrial products are scales for weighing trucks or railcars (i.e., weighing bulk goods as they enter or leave a factory or at a toll station). Heavy industrial scales are capable of measuring weights up to 500 tons and permit accurate weighing under extreme environmental conditions. We also offer advanced computer software that can be used with our heavy industrial scales to facilitate a broad range of customer solutions and provides a complete system for managing vehicle transaction processing.
Industrial Software
We offer software that can be used with our industrial instruments. Examples include FreeWeigh.Net, statistical quality control software; FormWeigh.Net, our formulation/batching software; and DataBridge, which supports the operation of vehicle scales. FreeWeigh.Net and FormWeigh.Net provide full network capability and enable customers to collect and archive data in compliance with FDA 21 CFR Part 11.

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Product Inspection
Increasing safety and consumer protection requirements are driving the need for more sophisticated end-of-line product inspection systems (e.g., for use in food processing and packaging, pharmaceutical, packaged consumer goods, and other industries). We are a leading global provider of metal detectors, x-ray and camera-based imaging equipment, checkweighers, and track-and-trace solutions that are used in these industries. Metal detectors are most commonly used to detect fine particles of metal that may be contained in raw materials or may be generated by the manufacturing process itself. X-ray inspection is used to detect metallic contamination in applications unsuited to metal detectors and many types of non-metallic contamination, such as glass, calcified bone, stones, and pits. Our x-ray systems are also used for mass control and for determining and controlling the fat content in meat. Our camera-based vision inspection solutions provide in-line inspection of package quality, labels, and content, which are needs for food and beverage, consumer goods, and pharmaceutical companies. Vision inspection systems with associated specialist software enable our pharmaceutical customers to implement traceability and serialization tracking, as required by regulation. Checkweighers are used to control the filled weight of packaged goods such as food, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. All of our technologies are integrated with material handling systems to ensure the correct presentation of the customer’s product to the device and the secure rejection of non-conforming product. Our technologies may also be used together as components of integrated packaging lines. ProdX Inspect is our quality and productivity control software for helping customers comply with regulations and optimize process efficiency, either as a stand-alone solution or through integration with the customer’s manufacturing and enterprise systems.
Retail Weighing Solutions
Supermarkets, hypermarkets, and other food retail businesses make use of multiple weighing and food labeling solutions for handling fresh goods (such as meats, vegetables, fruits, or cheeses). We offer networked scales and software, which can integrate backroom, counter, self-service, and checkout functions and can incorporate fresh goods item data into a supermarket’s overall food item and inventory management system. The scale screen display allows for in-store marketing and can help encourage consumers in the store to make more purchase decisions at the point of sale. In addition, we offer stand-alone scales for basic counter weighing and pricing, price finding, and printing. The customer benefits of our retail solutions are in the areas of enterprise-wide article and price management, merchandising, and regulatory compliance. In North America and select other markets, our offering also includes automated packaging and labeling solutions for the meat backroom, which are fully integrated with the scales in the store. The retail business accounted for approximately 8% of our net sales in 2017 and 9% in 2016 and 2015.
Customers and Distribution
Our principal customers include companies in the following key end markets: the life science industry (pharmaceutical and biotech companies, as well as independent research organizations); food and beverage producers; food retailers; chemical, specialty chemicals, and cosmetics companies; the transportation and logistics industry; the metals industry; the electronics industry; and the academic community.
Our products are sold through a variety of distribution channels. Generally, more technically sophisticated products are sold through our direct sales force, while less complicated products are sold through indirect channels. Our sales through direct channels exceed our sales through indirect channels. A significant portion of our sales in the Americas is generated through indirect channels, including sales of our Ohaus-branded products. Ohaus-branded products target markets, such as the educational market, in which customers are interested in lower cost, a more limited set of features, and less comprehensive support and service.

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We have a diversified customer base, with no single end-customer accounting for more than 1% of 2017 net sales.
Sales and Service
Market Organizations
We maintain geographically focused market organizations around the world that are responsible for all aspects of our sales and service. The market organizations are customer-focused, with an emphasis on building and maintaining value-added relationships with customers in our target market segments. Each market organization has the ability to leverage best practices from other units while maintaining the flexibility to adapt its marketing and service efforts to account for different cultural and economic conditions. Market organizations also work closely with our producing organizations (described below) by providing feedback on manufacturing and product development initiatives, new product and application ideas, and information about key market segments.
We have one of the largest and broadest global sales and service organizations among precision instrument manufacturers we compete against. At December 31, 2017, our sales and service group consisted of approximately 7,600 employees in sales, marketing and customer service (including related administration), and post-sales technical service, located in approximately 40 countries. This field organization has the capability to provide service and support to our customers and distributors in major markets across the globe. This is important because our customers increasingly seek to do business with a consistent global approach.
Service
Our service business continues to be successful with a focus on providing uptime and calibration services, as well as further expansion of our offerings to provide value-added services for a range of market needs, including regulatory compliance, performance enhancements, application expertise and training, and remote services. We have a unique offering to our pharmaceutical customers in promoting the use of our instruments in compliance with FDA and other international regulations, and we can provide these services to most customers' locations around the world. Our global service network is also an important factor in our ability to expand in emerging markets. We estimate that we have the largest installed base of weighing instruments in the world. Service (representing service contracts, on demand services, and replacement parts) accounted for approximately 22% of our net sales in 2017, 2016, and 2015.
Beyond revenue opportunities, we believe service is a key part of our solution offering and helps significantly in customer retention. The close relationships and frequent contact with our large customer base allow us to be the trusted advisor of our customers, which provides us with high-quality sales opportunities as well as innovative product and application ideas.
Research and Development and Manufacturing
Producing Organizations
Our research, product development, and manufacturing efforts are organized into a number of producing organizations. Our focused producing organizations help reduce product development time and costs, improve customer focus, and maintain technological leadership. The producing organizations work together to share ideas and best practices, and there is a close interface and coordinated customer interaction among marketing organizations and producing organizations.

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Research and Development
We continue to invest in product innovation to provide technologically advanced products to our customers for existing and new applications. Over the last three years, we have invested $368 million in research and development ($129.3 million in 2017, $120.0 million in 2016, and $119.1 million in 2015), which is approximately 5% of net sales for each year. Our research and development efforts fall into two categories:
technology advancements, which generate new products or features and increase the value of our products. These advancements may be in the form of enhanced or new functionality, new applications for our technologies, more accurate or reliable measurement, additional software capability, or automation through robotics or other means.
cost reductions, which reduce the manufacturing cost of our products through better overall design and/or improve the ease of serviceability.
We devote a substantial proportion of our research and development budget to software development. This includes software to process the signals captured by the sensors of our instruments, application-specific software, and software that connects our solutions into customers’ existing IT systems. We closely integrate research and development with marketing, manufacturing, and product engineering. We have approximately 1,300 employees in research and development and product engineering in countries around the globe.
Manufacturing
We are a worldwide manufacturer, with facilities principally located in China, Switzerland, the United States, Germany, the United Kingdom, and Mexico. We emphasize product quality in our manufacturing operations, and most of our products require very strict tolerances and exact specifications. We use an extensive quality control system that is integrated into each step of the manufacturing process. All major manufacturing facilities have achieved ISO 9001 certification. We believe that our manufacturing capacity is sufficient to meet our present and currently anticipated demand. We expect to make net investments in new or expanded manufacturing facilities of $40 million to $50 million over the next two years.
We generally manufacture critical components, which are components that contain proprietary technology. When outside manufacturing is more efficient, we contract with other manufacturers for certain nonproprietary components. We use a wide range of suppliers. We believe our supply arrangements are adequate and that there are no material constraints on the sources and availability of materials. From time to time, we may rely on a single supplier for all of our requirements of a particular component. Supply arrangements for electronic components are generally made globally.
Backlog; Seasonality
Our manufacturing turnaround time is generally short, which permits us to manufacture orders to fill for most of our products. Backlog is generally a function of requested customer delivery dates and is typically no longer than one to two months.
Our business has historically experienced a slight amount of seasonal variation, particularly the high-end laboratory instruments business. Traditionally, sales in the first quarter are slightly lower than, and sales in the fourth quarter are slightly higher than, sales in the second and third quarters. Fourth quarter sales have historically generated approximately 28% to 30% of our net sales. This trend has a somewhat greater effect on income from operations than on net sales because fixed costs are generally incurred evenly across all quarters.

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Employees
Our total workforce was 15,400 throughout the world, including 13,800 employees and 1,600 temporary personnel, as of December 31, 2017, and includes approximately 5,600 in Europe, 4,700 in North and South America, and 5,100 in Asia and other countries.
We believe our employee relations are good, and we have not suffered any material employee work stoppage or strike during the last five years. Labor unions do not represent a substantial number of our employees. Approximately 600 employees in Germany and France are represented by unions.
Sustainability
Sustainability touches all aspects of our business, from designing and producing our products, to selling and delivering them to our customers, to handling them at the end of their lifecycle. Sustainability helps guide us to make the right decisions for our customers, employees, suppliers, shareholders, and the communities in which we operate our business. We want to manage our business sustainably to position the Company for long-term growth. Our GreenMT program is designed to help save energy and resources. We do this in four key areas: (1) developing products using our Design for Environment criteria that allow us and our customers to reduce energy usage, material, and product waste, (2) energy efficiency projects to reduce energy usage at our sites, (3) managing our sales and service fleets to reduce our fuel consumption, and (4) reducing the environmental impact of our resource consumption, especially in processes related to cooling and packaging. Our goal is to reduce our carbon footprint by the end of 2020 by 20% (relative CO2 emissions per net sales compared with 2010) and at the same time realize financial benefits.
Blue Ocean Program
“Blue Ocean” refers to our program to establish a global operating model with standardized, automated, and integrated processes and high levels of global data transparency. It encompasses an enterprise architecture, with a global, single-instance ERP system. Within our IT systems, we are moving toward integrated, homogeneous applications and common data structures. We will also largely standardize our key business processes. The implementation of the systems and processes has been proceeding on a staggered basis over a multi-year period with the initial go-live rollout having occurred in 2010. We have implemented the Blue Ocean program in our Swiss, Chinese, U.K., Benelux, and certain U.S. and German operations. We estimate that we have approximately 75% of the program completed as measured in users. We will continue to implement the program in additional locations over the coming years.
Intellectual Property
We hold over 5,000 patents and trademarks (including pending applications), primarily in the United States, Switzerland, the European Union, Germany, the United Kingdom, Italy, France, Japan, China, South Korea, Brazil, and India. Our products generally incorporate a wide variety of technological innovations, some of which are protected by patents of various durations. Products are generally not protected as a whole by individual patents, and as a result, no one patent or group of related patents is material to our business. We have numerous trademarks, including the Mettler-Toledo name and logo, which are material to our business. We regularly protect against infringement of our intellectual property.
Regulation
Our products are subject to various regulatory standards and approvals by weights and measures regulatory authorities. All of our electrical components are subject to electrical safety standards. We believe that we are in compliance in all material respects with applicable regulations.

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Approvals are required to ensure our instruments do not impermissibly influence other instruments and are themselves not affected by other instruments. In addition, some of our products are used in “legal for trade” applications, in which prices based on weight are calculated and for which specific weights and measures approvals are required. Although there are a large number of regulatory agencies across our markets, there is an increasing trend toward harmonization of standards, and weights and measures regulation is harmonized across the European Union.
Our products may also be subject to special requirements depending on the end-user and market. For example, laboratory customers are typically subject to Good Laboratory Practices (GLP), industrial customers to Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP), pharmaceutical customers to U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations, and customers in food processing industries may be subject to Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) regulations. Products used in hazardous environments may also be subject to special requirements.
Environmental Matters
We are subject to environmental laws and regulations in the jurisdictions in which we operate. We own or lease a number of properties and manufacturing facilities around the world. Like many of our competitors, we have incurred, and will continue to incur, capital and operating expenditures and other costs in complying with such laws and regulations.
We are currently involved in, or have potential liability with respect to, the remediation of past contamination in certain of our facilities. A former subsidiary of Mettler-Toledo, LLC known as Hi-Speed Checkweigher Co., Inc. was one of two private parties ordered by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, in an administrative consent order signed on June 13, 1988, to investigate and remediate certain ground water contamination at a property in Landing, New Jersey. After the other party under this order failed to fulfill its obligations, Hi-Speed became solely responsible for compliance with the order. Residual ground water contamination at this site is now within a Classification Exception Area which the Department of Environmental Protection has approved and within which the Company oversees monitoring of the decay of contaminants of concern. A concurrent Well Restriction Area also exists for the site. The Department of Environmental Protection does not view these vehicles as remedial measures, but rather as “institutional controls” that must be adequately maintained and periodically evaluated. We estimate that the costs of compliance associated with the site over the next several years will approximate a total of $0.4 million.
In addition, certain of our present and former facilities have or had been in operation for many decades and, over such time, some of these facilities may have used substances or generated and disposed of wastes that are or may be considered hazardous. It is possible that these sites, as well as disposal sites owned by third parties to which we have sent wastes, may in the future be identified and become the subject of remediation. Although we believe that we are in substantial compliance with applicable environmental requirements and, to date, we have not incurred material expenditures in connection with environmental matters, it is possible that we could become subject to additional environmental liabilities in the future that could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows.
Competition
Our markets are highly competitive. Many of the markets in which we compete are fragmented both geographically and by application, particularly the industrial and food retailing markets. As a result, we face numerous regional or specialized competitors, many of which are well established in their markets. For example, some of our competitors are divisions of larger companies with potentially greater financial and other resources than our own. In addition, some of our competitors are domiciled in emerging markets and may have a lower cost structure than ours. We are confronted with new competitors in emerging

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markets which, although relatively small in size today, could become larger companies in their home markets. Given the sometimes significant growth rates of these emerging markets, and in light of their cost advantage over developed markets, emerging market competitors could become more significant global competitors. Taken together, the competitive forces present in our markets can impair our operating margins in certain product lines and geographic markets.
We expect our competitors to continue to improve the design and performance of their products and to introduce new products with competitive prices. Although we believe that we have technological and other competitive advantages over many of our competitors, we may not be able to realize and maintain these advantages. These advantages include our worldwide market leadership positions; our global brand and reputation; our track record of technological innovation; our comprehensive, high-quality solution offering; our global sales and service offering; our large installed base of weighing instruments; and the diversification of our revenue base by geographic region, product range, and customer. To remain competitive, we must continue to invest in research and development, sales and marketing, and customer service and support. We cannot be sure that we will have sufficient resources to continue to make these investments or that we will be successful in identifying, developing, and maintaining any competitive advantages.
We believe the principal competitive factors in developed markets for purchasing decisions are the product itself, application support, service support, and price. In emerging markets, where there is greater demand for less sophisticated products, price is a more important factor than in developed markets. Competition in the U.S. laboratory market is also influenced by the presence of large distributors that sell not only our products but those of our competitors as well.
Company Website and Information
You can find our website on the Internet at www.mt.com. The website contains information about us and our operations. The information contained on our website is not included in, or incorporated by reference into, this annual report on Form 10-K. You can view and download free of charge copies of each of our filings with the SEC on Form 10-K, Form 10-Q, Form 8-K, and Schedule 14A and all amendments to those reports by accessing www.mt.com, clicking on About Us, Investor Relations, and then clicking on SEC Filings. You may also read and copy these filings at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 450 Fifth Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20549. You may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. The SEC maintains a website at http://www.sec.gov that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC.
Our website also contains copies of the following documents that you can download free of charge:
Corporate Governance Guidelines
Audit Committee Charter
Compensation Committee Charter
Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee Charter
Code of Conduct
Equal Employment Opportunity Policy
Business Partner Code of Conduct
Ethical, Social and Quality Standards
Sustainability Report
Environmental Policy
Political Participation Policy
Conflict Mineral Report
Statement on Slavery, Human Trafficking, and Transparency in the Supply Chain

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You can also obtain in print, free of charge, any of the above documents and any of our reports on Form 10-K, Form 10-Q, Form 8-K, and Schedule 14A and all amendments to those reports by sending a written request to our Investor Relations Department:
Investor Relations
Mettler-Toledo International Inc.
1900 Polaris Parkway
Columbus, OH 43240 U.S.A.
Phone: +1 614 438 4748
E-mail: mary.finnegan@mt.com

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Item 1A.
Risk Factors
Factors Affecting Our Future Operating Results
We are subject to certain risks associated with our international operations and have a significant concentration of business in China.
We conduct business in many countries, including emerging markets in Asia, Latin America, and Eastern Europe, and these operations represent a significant portion of our sales and earnings. For example, our Chinese operations accounted for 17% of sales to external customers, approximately 30% of our global production, and 35% of total segment profit during 2017. In addition to the currency risks discussed below, international operations pose other substantial risks and problems for us, including the following:
local tariffs and trade barriers;
countries may revise or alter their respective legal and regulatory requirements;
difficulties in staffing and managing local operations and/or mandatory salary increases;
credit risks arising from financial difficulties facing local customers and distributors;
difficulties in protecting intellectual property;
nationalization of private enterprises which may result in the confiscation of assets, as we hold significant assets around the world in the form of property, plant, and equipment, inventory, and accounts receivable, as well as $101 million of cash at December 31, 2017 in our Chinese subsidiaries;
restrictions on investments and/or limitations regarding foreign ownership;
adverse tax consequences, including tax disputes, imposition or increase of withholding and other taxes on remittances and other payments by subsidiaries;
other uncertain local economic, political, and social conditions, including hyper-inflationary conditions or periods of low or no productivity growth; and
credit tightening or reduction in credit availability for local customers.
We must also comply with regulations regarding the conversion and repatriation of funds earned in local currencies. For example, we need government approval to convert earnings from our operations in China into other currencies and to repatriate these funds. If we cannot comply with these or other applicable regulations, we may face increased difficulties in using cash generated in China.
We are required to comply with various import, export control, and economic sanctions laws, which may affect our transactions with certain customers, business partners, and other persons, including in certain cases dealings with or between our employees and subsidiaries. In certain circumstances, export control and economic sanctions regulations may prohibit the export of certain products, services, and technologies, and in other circumstances, we may be required to obtain an export license before exporting a controlled item. We follow all relevant laws and continue to do business in Russia. Sanctions imposed on business in Russia may affect the economy and our business in Russia. In addition, failure to comply with any of these regulations could result in civil and criminal, monetary and non-monetary penalties, disruptions to our business, limitations on our ability to import and export products and services, and damage to our reputation.
Growth in emerging markets, especially China, can be volatile. While we experienced strong growth in China in 2017, we have also experienced sales declines in recent years and we may see volatility in the future.

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We sell primarily to companies in developed countries. An economic downturn in these countries could hurt our operating results.
Most of our business is derived from companies in developed countries. Economic instability in many parts of the world, including sovereign debt levels in the European Union and the United States, continues to be a situation that we are monitoring closely. A potential financial crisis on financial institutions globally would likely have an adverse effect on the global capital markets and our business. In addition, if developed countries were to experience slow growth or recession, we could see the following effects:
a drop in demand for our products;
companies being unable to finance their businesses;
difficulty in obtaining materials and supplies;
potential devaluation and/or impairment of assets;
difficulty in collecting accounts receivables;
an increase in accounts receivable write-offs; and
greater foreign exchange rate volatility affecting our profitability and cash flow.
Economic downturns or recessions adversely affect our operating results because our customers often decrease or delay capital expenditures. Customers may also purchase lower-cost products made by competitors and not resume purchasing our products even after economic conditions improve. These conditions would reduce our revenues and profitability.
Currency fluctuations affect our operating profits.
Our earnings are affected by changing exchange rates. We are most sensitive to changes in the exchange rates between the Swiss franc, euro, and U.S. dollar. We have more Swiss franc expenses than we do Swiss franc sales because we develop and manufacture products in Switzerland that we sell globally and have a number of corporate functions located in Switzerland. When the Swiss franc strengthens against our other trading currencies, particularly the U.S. dollar and euro, our earnings go down. We also have significantly more sales in the euro than we do expenses. When the euro weakens against the U.S. dollar and Swiss franc, our earnings also go down. We estimate a 1% strengthening of the Swiss franc against the euro would reduce our earnings before tax by approximately $1.6 million to $1.8 million annually.
We also conduct business throughout the world, including Asia Pacific, the United Kingdom, Eastern Europe, Latin America, and Canada. Fluctuations in these currency exchange rates against the U.S. dollar can also affect our operating results. The most significant of these currency exposures is the Chinese renminbi. The impact on our earnings before tax of the Chinese renminbi weakening 1% against the U.S. dollar is a reduction of approximately $1.0 million to $1.2 million annually.
In addition to the effects of exchange rate movements on operating profits, our debt levels can fluctuate due to changes in exchange rates, particularly between the U.S. dollar, the Swiss franc, and euro. Based on our outstanding debt at December 31, 2017, we estimate that a 10% weakening of the U.S. dollar against the currencies in which our debt is denominated would result in an increase of approximately $25.9 million in the reported U.S. dollar value of our debt.

15


Concerns regarding the Eurozone debt levels and market perception concerning the instability of the euro could affect our operating profits.
We conduct business in many countries that use the euro as their currency (the Eurozone). Concerns persist regarding the debt burden of certain Eurozone countries and their ability to meet future financial obligations. In addition, concerns in recent years have existed regarding the overall stability of the euro and the suitability of the euro as a single currency given the diverse economic and political circumstances in individual Eurozone countries.
These concerns could lead to the re-introduction of individual currencies in one or more Eurozone countries or, in more extreme circumstances, the possible dissolution of the euro currency entirely. Should the euro dissolve entirely, the legal and contractual consequences for holders of euro-denominated obligations would be determined by laws in effect at such time. These potential developments, or market perceptions concerning these and related issues, could adversely affect the value of our euro-denominated assets and obligations. In addition, concerns over the effect of this financial crisis on financial institutions in Europe and globally could have an adverse effect on the global capital markets and, more specifically, on the ability of our Company, our customers, suppliers, and lenders to finance their respective businesses, to access liquidity at acceptable financing costs, if at all, on the availability of supplies and materials, and on the demand for our products.
We are vulnerable to system failures and data loss risks, including those that may be related to cyber security attacks, which could harm our business.
We rely on our technology infrastructure to interact with suppliers, sell our products and services, support our customers, fulfill orders, and bill, collect, and make payments. Our systems are vulnerable to damage or interruption from natural disasters, power loss, telecommunication failures, terrorist or hacker attacks, malicious employees or employee negligence, computer viruses, ransomware, and other events. When we upgrade or change systems, we may suffer interruptions in service, loss of data, or reduced functionality. A significant number of our systems are not redundant, and our disaster recovery planning is not sufficient for every eventuality. Despite any precautions we may take, such problems could result in interruptions in our services, fraudulent loss of assets, or unauthorized disclosure of confidential information, which could harm our reputation and financial condition. Our business interruption and cyber liability insurance may not be sufficient to compensate us for losses that may result from interruptions in our services or data loss as a result of system failures.
Customers may use our products to generate or manage confidential information. Though we take steps to ensure our products are secure, it is possible customers could lose confidential information stored on our products. If a customer alleges security failures in our products cause or contribute to a loss, we could face harm to our reputation and financial condition and legal liability.
We also are in the process of implementing a program to globalize our business processes and information technology systems that includes the implementation of a Company-wide enterprise resource planning system. This has been proceeding on a staggered basis over several years with the initial go-live rollout having occurred in 2010. We have implemented the program in our Swiss, Chinese, U.K., Benelux, and certain U.S. and German operations. We estimate that we have approximately 75% of the program implemented, as measured in users. If the implementation is flawed, we could suffer interruptions in operations and customer-facing activities that could harm our reputation and financial condition or cause us to lose data, experience reduced functionality, or have delays in reporting financial information. It may take us longer to implement the program than we have planned, and the project may cost us more than we have estimated, either of which would negatively impact our ability to generate cost savings or other efficiencies. In addition, the implementation will increase our reliance on a single information technology system, which would have greater consequences should we experience a system disruption.

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We operate in highly competitive markets, and it may be difficult for us to preserve operating margins, gain market share, and maintain a technological advantage.
Our markets are highly competitive. Many are fragmented both geographically and by application, particularly the industrial and food retailing markets. As a result, we face numerous regional or specialized competitors, many of which are well established in their markets. In addition, some of our competitors are divisions of larger companies with potentially greater financial and other resources than our own. There has also been an increase in the consolidation of precision instrument companies in recent years. Any consolidation within our market could result in competitors becoming larger and having greater financial and other resources than our own. Some of our competitors are domiciled or operate in emerging markets and may have a lower cost structure than ours. We are confronted with new competitors in emerging markets which, although relatively small in size today, could become larger companies in their home markets. Given the sometimes significant growth rates of these emerging markets, and in light of their cost advantage over developed markets, emerging market competitors could become more significant global competitors. Taken together, the competitive forces present in our markets could harm our operating margins. We expect our competitors to continue to improve the design and performance of their products and to introduce new products with competitive prices. Although we believe that our products and services have advantages over our competitors, we may not be able to realize and maintain these advantages.
Our ability to manufacture and deliver products and services may be disrupted.
We have key manufacturing facilities located in China, Europe, and the United States. Many of our products are developed and manufactured at single locations, with limited alternate facilities. In addition, a large portion of our products and spare parts are distributed through regional logistics centers, in which certain logistics activities are outsourced to third parties. If we experience any significant disruption in these facilities for any reason, such as strikes or other labor unrest, power interruptions, fire, earthquakes, hurricanes, or other events beyond our control, we may be unable to satisfy customer demand for our products or services and lose sales. It may be expensive to resolve these issues, even though some of these risks are covered by insurance policies. More importantly, customers may switch to competitors and may not return to us even if we resolve the interruption.
Our business would suffer if we were unable to obtain supplies of material.
We purchase most of our raw materials, components, and supplies from multiple suppliers. Some items are purchased from a limited or single source of supply, however, and disruption of these sources could affect our ability to manufacture products. Even where multiple sources of materials and components are available, the quality of the alternative materials, regulatory and contractual requirements to qualify materials for use in manufacturing, and the time required to establish new relationships with reliable suppliers could result in manufacturing delays and possible loss of sales. If we are unable to obtain materials or components for an extended time, this could damage our customer relationships and harm our financial condition or results of operations.
Our product development efforts may not produce commercially viable products in a timely manner.
If we do not introduce new products and enhancements, our products could become technologically obsolete over time, which would harm our operating results. To remain competitive, we must continue to make significant investments in research and development, sales and marketing, and customer service and support. We cannot be sure that we will have sufficient resources to continue to make these investments. In developing new products, we may be required to make substantial investments before we can determine

17


their commercial viability. As a result, we may not be successful in developing new products and we may never realize the benefits of our research and development activities.
A prolonged downturn or additional consolidation in the pharmaceutical, food and beverage, and chemical industries could adversely affect our operating results. A reduction in the capital resources or government funding of our customers could reduce our sales.
Our products are used extensively in the pharmaceutical, food and beverage, and chemical industries. Consolidation in these industries hurt our sales in prior years. In recent years, there has been an increase in consolidation within these industries. A prolonged economic downturn or additional consolidation in any of these industries could adversely affect our operating results. In addition, the capital spending policies of our customers in these and other industries are based on a variety of factors we cannot control, including the resources available for purchasing equipment, the spending priorities among various types of equipment, and policies regarding capital expenditures. Any decrease or delay in capital spending by our customers would cause our revenues to decline and could harm our profitability. A decline in government funding of research or education could reduce some customers' ability to purchase our products.
Unanticipated changes in our tax rates or additional income tax liabilities could impact our profitability.
We are subject to income taxes in the United States and various other jurisdictions, and our domestic and international tax liabilities are subject to allocation of expenses among different jurisdictions. Our effective tax rates and tax obligations could be adversely affected by changes in tax laws or rates, changes in the mix of earnings by jurisdiction, changes in the valuation of deferred tax assets and liabilities, and material adjustments from tax audits.
In particular, the carrying value of deferred tax assets, which are predominantly in the U.S., is dependent upon our ability to generate future taxable income in the U.S. In addition, the amount of income taxes we pay is subject to ongoing audits in various jurisdictions, and a material assessment by a governing tax authority could affect our profitability.
Our tax expense and tax obligations could increase as a result of a changing application of tax law.
Governments are facing greater pressure on public finances, which could lead to their more aggressively applying existing tax laws and regulations. Governments also periodically change tax laws and regulations. Any changes in corporate income tax rates or regulations, on repatriation of dividends, earnings or capital, or on transfer pricing, as well as changes in the interpretation of existing tax laws and regulations in the jurisdictions in which we operate, could adversely affect our cash flow and increase our overall tax burden, which would negatively affect our profitability.
We face risks related to sales through distributors and other third parties that we do not control, which could harm our business.
We sell some products through third parties, including distributors and value-added resellers. This exposes us to various risks, including competitive pressure, concentration of sales volumes, credit risks, and compliance risks. We may rely on one or a few key distributors for a product or market, and the loss of these distributors could reduce our revenue and net earnings. Distributors may also face financial difficulties, including bankruptcy, which could harm our collection of accounts receivables. Violations of the FCPA or similar anti-bribery laws by distributors or other third-party intermediaries could materially impact our business. Risks related to our use of distributors may reduce sales, increase expenses, and weaken our competitive position.

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A terrorism attack, other geopolitical crisis, or widespread outbreak of an illness or other health issue could negatively affect our business, making it more difficult and expensive to meet our obligations to our customers, and could result in reduced demand from our customers.
Our global operations are susceptible to global events, including acts or threats of war or terrorism, international conflicts, political instability, and natural disasters. Also, in past years a number of countries have experienced outbreaks of the H1N1 influenza (swine flu) or, in the Asia Pacific region, outbreaks of SARS and/or avian influenza (bird flu), and more recently, Ebola outbreaks in parts of Africa. Despite the implementation of certain precautions, we are susceptible to such outbreaks. As a result of such events, businesses can be shut down and individuals can become ill, quarantined, or otherwise unable to work. These events, particularly in North America, Europe, China, or other locations significant to our operations, could adversely affect general commercial activity, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations, business, or prospects. If our operations are curtailed, we may need to seek alternate sources of supply for services and staff and these alternate sources may be more expensive. Alternate sources may not be available or may result in delays in shipments to our customers, each of which would affect our results of operations. In addition, a curtailment of our product design operations could result in delays in the development of new products. Further, if our customers’ businesses are similarly affected, they might delay or reduce purchases from us, which could adversely affect our results of operations.
We may face risks associated with future acquisitions.
We may pursue acquisitions of complementary product lines, technologies, or businesses. Acquisitions involve numerous risks, including difficulties in integrating the acquired operations, technologies, and products; diversion of management’s attention from other business concerns; and potential departures of key employees of the acquired company. If we successfully identify acquisitions in the future, completing such acquisitions may result in new issuances of our stock that may be dilutive to current owners, increases in our debt and contingent liabilities, and additional amortization expense related to intangible assets. Any of these acquisition-related risks could have a material adverse effect on our profitability.
Larger companies have identified life sciences and instruments as businesses they will consider entering, which could change the competitive dynamics of these markets. In addition, we may not be able to identify, successfully complete, or integrate potential acquisitions in the future. Even if we can do so, we cannot be sure that these acquisitions will have a positive impact on our business or operating results.
If we cannot protect our intellectual property rights, or if we infringe or misappropriate the proprietary rights of others, our operating results could be harmed.
Our success depends on our ability to obtain, maintain, and enforce patents on our technology, maintain our trademarks, and protect our trade secrets. Our patents may not provide complete protection, may expire, and competitors may develop similar products that are not covered by our patents. Our patents may also be challenged by third parties and invalidated or narrowed. We may experience a decline in sales and/or profitability if any of these things occur. Competitors sometimes seek to take advantage of our trademarks or brands in ways that may create customer confusion or weaken our brand. Improper use or disclosure of our trade secrets may still occur.
We may be sued for infringing on the intellectual property rights of others. The cost of any litigation could affect our profitability regardless of the outcome, and management attention could be diverted. If we are unsuccessful in such litigation, we may have to pay damages, stop the infringing activity, and/or

19


obtain a license. If we fail to obtain a required license, we may be unable to sell some of our products, which could result in a decline in our revenues.
Departures of key employees could impair our operations.
Key employees could leave the Company. If any key employees stopped working for us, our operations could be harmed. Important R&D personnel may leave and join competitors, which could substantially delay or hinder ongoing development projects. We have no key man life insurance policies with respect to any of our senior executives.
We may be adversely affected by environmental laws and regulations.
We are subject to various environmental laws and regulations and incur expenditures in complying with environmental laws and regulations. We are currently involved in, or have potential liability with respect to, the remediation of past contamination in various facilities. In addition, some of our facilities are or have been in operation for many decades and may have used substances or generated and disposed of wastes that are hazardous or may be considered hazardous in the future. These sites and disposal sites owned by others to which we sent waste may in the future be identified as contaminated and require remediation. Accordingly, it is possible that we could become subject to additional environmental liabilities in the future that may harm our results of operations or financial condition.
We may be adversely affected by regulations and market expectations related to sourcing and our supply chain, including conflict minerals.
The SEC has adopted disclosures and reporting requirements for companies whose products contain certain minerals and their derivatives, namely tin, tantalum, tungsten, or gold, known as conflict minerals. Companies must report annually whether or not such minerals originate from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries and in some cases to perform extensive due diligence on their supply chains for such minerals. These requirements could adversely affect the sourcing, availability, and pricing of materials used in the manufacturing of our products. In addition, we have incurred additional costs to comply with the disclosure requirements, including cost related to determining the source of any of the relevant minerals used in our products. Since our supply chain is complex, the due diligence procedures that we have implemented may not enable us to ascertain with sufficient certainty the origins for these minerals or determine that these minerals are DRC conflict free, which may harm our reputation. We may also face difficulties in satisfying customers who may require that our products be certified as DRC conflict free, which could harm our relationships with these customers and/or lead to a loss of revenue. These requirements also could have the effect of limiting the pool of suppliers from which we source these minerals, and we may be unable to obtain conflict-free minerals at prices similar to the past, which could increase our costs and adversely affect our manufacturing operations and our profitability.
Future laws, regulations, or customers may make additional demands on supply chain transparency. These demands can include more transparency into the activities of our suppliers with regards to human rights and sustainable sourcing. We have significant protections in place to ensure we partner with responsible suppliers, but increased demands may cause us to incur increased supply chain costs. If we can't satisfy customers' demands, we may lose business, and if we can't meet new regulatory requirements, we may have to alter our sourcing at increased expense.

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We may be adversely affected by failure to comply with regulations of governmental agencies or by the adoption of new regulations. Changes in political policy in the United States and certain European countries may also impact global trade or create uncertainty impacting our business.
Our products are subject to regulation by governmental agencies. These regulations govern a wide variety of activities relating to our products, including design and development, product safety, labeling, manufacturing, promotion, sales, and distribution. We also operate a global business and are subject to various laws and regulations in the many markets we do business, including those relating to competition, employment and labor practices, international trade, and corruption. If we fail to comply with these regulations, or if new regulations are adopted that substantially change existing practice or impose new burdens, we may have to recall products and cease their manufacture and distribution. In addition, we could be subject to investigation costs, reputational harm, fines, criminal prosecution, and other damages that could impact our profitability. Changes in political policy in the United States and certain European countries may impact global trade or create uncertainty. Recently, the United States government formally withdrew from the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement, initiated renegotiations of the North American Free Trade Agreement, and threatened tougher trade terms with China and other countries. These actions may restrict our access to lower cost countries, cause foreign governments to consider tougher trade terms for U.S. companies, or otherwise create uncertainty in global markets. In times of uncertainty, some customers delay investments or defer normal replacement cycles, which could have an adverse impact on our sales.
We may experience impairments of goodwill or other intangible assets.
As of December 31, 2017, our consolidated balance sheet included goodwill of $539.8 million and other intangible assets of $226.7 million.
Our business acquisitions typically result in goodwill and other intangible assets, which affect the amount of future period amortization expense and possible impairment expense. We make estimates and assumptions in valuing such intangible assets that affect our consolidated financial statements.
In accordance with U.S. GAAP, our goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets are not amortized, but are evaluated for impairment annually in the fourth quarter, or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that an asset might be impaired. The evaluation is based on valuation models that estimate fair value. In preparing the valuation models, we consider a number of factors, including operating results, business plans, economic conditions, future cash flows, and transactions and market data. There are inherent uncertainties related to these factors and our judgment in applying them to the impairment analyses. The significant estimates and assumptions within our fair value models include sales growth, controllable cost growth, perpetual growth, effective tax rates, and discount rates. Our assessments to date have indicated that there has been no impairment of these assets.
Should any of these estimates or assumptions change, or should we incur lower-than-expected operating performance or cash flows, including from a prolonged economic slowdown, we may experience a triggering event that requires a new fair value assessment for our reporting units, possibly prior to the required annual assessment. These types of events and resulting analysis could result in impairment charges for goodwill and other indefinite-lived intangible assets if the fair value estimate declines below the carrying value.
Our amortization expense related to intangible assets with finite lives may materially change should our estimates of their useful lives change.

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We have debt and we may incur substantially more debt, which could affect our ability to meet our debt obligations and may otherwise restrict our activities.
We have debt and we may incur substantial additional debt in the future. As of December 31, 2017, we had total indebtedness of approximately $831.2 million, net of cash of $148.7 million. Our debt instruments allow us to incur substantial additional indebtedness.
The existence and magnitude of our debt could have important consequences. For example, it could make it more difficult for us to satisfy our obligations under our debt instruments; require us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow to payments on our indebtedness, which would reduce the amount of cash flow available to fund working capital, capital expenditures, product development, and other corporate requirements; increase our vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions, including changes in raw material costs; limit our ability to respond to business opportunities; limit our ability to borrow additional funds, which may be necessary; and subject us to financial and other restrictive covenants, which, if we fail to comply with these covenants and our failure is not waived or cured, could result in an event of default under our debt instruments.
The agreements governing our debt impose restrictions on our business.
The note purchase agreements governing our notes and the agreements governing our credit facility contain covenants imposing various restrictions on our business. These restrictions may affect our ability to operate our business and may limit our ability to take advantage of potential business opportunities. The restrictions these covenants place on us include limitations on our ability to incur liens and consolidate, merge, sell, or lease all or substantially all of our assets. Our credit facility and the note purchase agreements governing our senior notes also require us to meet certain financial ratios.
Our ability to comply with these agreements may be affected by events beyond our control, including economic, financial, and industry conditions. The breach of any covenants or restrictions could result in a default under the note purchase agreements governing the senior notes and/or under our credit facility. An event of default under the agreements governing our debt would permit holders of our debt to declare all amounts owed to them under such agreements to be immediately due and payable. Acceleration of our other indebtedness may cause us to be unable to make interest payments on the senior notes and repay the principal amount of the senior notes.
The lenders under our credit agreement may be unable to meet their funding commitments, reducing the amount of our borrowing capacity.
We have a revolving credit facility outstanding under which the Company and certain of its subsidiaries may borrow up to $800 million. Our credit facility is provided by a group of 13 financial institutions, which individually have between 2% and 14% of the total funding commitment. At December 31, 2017, we had borrowings of $461.9 million outstanding under our credit facility. Our ability to borrow further funds under our credit facility is subject to the various lenders’ financial condition and ability to make funds available. Even though the financial institutions are contractually obligated to lend funds, if one or more of the lenders encounters financial difficulties or goes bankrupt, such lenders may be unable to meet their obligations. This could result in us being unable to borrow the full $800 million amount available.
We make forward-looking statements, and actual events or results may differ materially from these statements because assumptions we have made prove incorrect due to market conditions in our industries or other factors.
We provide forward-looking statements both in our filings with the SEC and orally in connection with our quarterly earnings calls, including guidance on anticipated earnings per share. You should not

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rely on forward-looking statements to predict our actual results. Our actual results or performance may be materially different than reflected in forward-looking statements because of various risks and uncertainties.
Our forward-looking statements may not be accurate or complete, and we do not intend to update or revise them in light of actual results. New risks also periodically arise. Please consider the risks and factors that could cause our results to differ materially from what is described in our forward-looking statements. See in particular “Factors Affecting Our Future Operating Results” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”
In providing guidance on our future earnings, we evaluate our budgets, strategic plans, and other factors relating to our business. We make assumptions about external factors, including the following:
the outlook for our end markets and the global economy;
the impact of external factors on our competition;
the financial position of our customers;
the estimated costs of purchasing materials;
developments in personnel costs; 
our estimated income tax expense; and
rates for currency exchange, particularly between the Swiss franc and the euro.
Some of these assumptions may prove to be incorrect over time. For example, although no single end-customer accounts for more than 1% of our revenues, if a number of our customers experienced significant deteriorations in their financial positions concurrently, it could have an impact on our results of operations.
Some of our key internal assumptions include the following:
our ability to implement our business strategy;
our ability to implement price increases as forecasted;
the effectiveness of our sales and marketing programs such as our Spinnaker and market penetration and Field Turbo initiatives;
the effectiveness of our programs to improve our service business, including growth, globalization, and productivity initiatives;
our ability to develop and deliver innovative products and services;
the continued growth of our sales in emerging markets; and
the effectiveness of productivity and cost saving initiatives.
These internal assumptions may also prove to be incorrect over time. For example, with respect to our ability to realize our planned price increases without disturbing our customer base in core markets, in certain markets, such as emerging markets, price tends to be a more significant factor in customers’ decisions to purchase our products. Furthermore, we can have no assurance that our cost reduction programs will generate adequate cost savings. Additionally, it may become necessary to take additional restructuring actions resulting in additional restructuring costs.
We believe our current assumptions are reasonable and prudent for planning purposes. However, should any of these assumptions prove to be incorrect, or should we incur lower-than-expected operating performance or cash flows, we may experience results different than our projections.
Our ability to generate and repatriate cash depends in part on factors beyond our control.
Our ability to make payments on our debt and to fund our share repurchase program, planned capital expenditures, and research and development efforts depends on our ability to generate and repatriate cash

23


in the future. This is subject to factors beyond our control, including general economic, financial, competitive, legislative, regulatory, governmental, and other factors described in this section.
We cannot ensure that our business will generate sufficient cash flows from operations or that future borrowings will be available to us under our credit facility in an amount sufficient to enable us to pay our debt or to fund our other liquidity needs. We may need to refinance all or a portion of our indebtedness on or before maturity. We cannot ensure that we will be able to refinance any of our debt, including our credit facility and the senior notes, on commercially reasonable terms or at all.
Our ability to fund our share repurchase program is also dependent on our ability to repatriate our international cash flows. Changes in governmental cash repatriation policies, restrictions, or tax laws could impair our ability to continue our share repurchase program.

Item 1B.
Unresolved Staff Comments
None.

Item 2.
Properties
Our principal executive offices are located in Columbus, Ohio and Greifensee, Switzerland. The following table lists our principal facilities, indicating the location and whether the facility is owned or leased. The properties listed below serve primarily as manufacturing facilities or shared service centers and also typically have a certain amount of space for service, sales and marketing, and administrative activities. The facilities in Giessen, Germany and Viroflay, France are used primarily for sales and marketing. We believe our facilities are adequate for our current and reasonably anticipated future needs.

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Location
 
Owned/Leased
 
Business Segment
 
 
 
 
 
Europe:
 
 
 
 
Greifensee/Nänikon, Switzerland
 
Owned
 
Swiss Operations
Uznach, Switzerland
 
Leased
 
Swiss Operations
Urdorf, Switzerland
 
Owned
 
Swiss Operations
Schwerzenbach, Switzerland
 
Leased
 
Swiss Operations
Manchester, England
 
Leased
 
Western European Operations
Royston, United Kingdom
 
Owned
 
Western European Operations
Salford, United Kingdom
 
Leased
 
Western European Operations
Viroflay, France (two facilities)
 
Owned; Leased
 
Western European Operations
Albstadt, Germany
 
Owned
 
Western European Operations
Giessen, (Hesse) Germany
 
Owned
 
Western European Operations
Giesen, (Lower Saxony) Germany
 
Owned
 
Western European Operations
   Warsaw, Poland
 
Leased
 
Other Operations
Americas:
 
 
 
 
Columbus, Ohio
 
Leased
 
U.S. Operations
Worthington, Ohio (two facilities)
 
Owned
 
U.S. Operations
Oakland, California
 
Owned
 
U.S. Operations
Billerica, Massachusetts
 
Leased
 
U.S. Operations
Tampa, Florida (two facilities)
 
Owned; Leased
 
U.S. Operations
Tijuana, Mexico
 
Leased
 
U.S. Operations
Thorofare, New Jersey
 
Owned
 
U.S. Operations
Other:
 
 
 
 
Shanghai, China (two facilities)
 
Buildings Owned;
 
Chinese Operations
 
 
Land Leased
 
 
Changzhou, China (two facilities)
 
Buildings Owned;
 
Chinese Operations
 
 
Land Leased
 
 
ChengDu, China
 
Buildings Owned;
 
Chinese Operations
 
 
Land Leased
 
 
Mumbai, India (three facilities)
 
Leased
 
Other Operations

Item 3.
Legal Proceedings
We are not currently involved in any legal proceeding that we believe could have a material adverse effect upon our financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows. See the disclosure in Item 1 above under “Environmental Matters.”
Executive Officers of the Registrant
See Part III, Item 10 of this annual report for information about our executive officers.

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PART II

Item 5.
Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters, and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Market Information for Common Stock
Our common stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “MTD.” The following table sets forth on a per share basis the high and low sales prices for consolidated trading in our common stock as reported on the New York Stock Exchange Composite Tape for the quarters indicated.

 
Common Stock Price
Range
 
High
 
Low
2017
 

 
 

Fourth Quarter
$
689.11

 
$
606.80

Third Quarter
$
635.17

 
$
571.25

Second Quarter
$
601.16

 
$
473.87

First Quarter
$
486.90

 
$
414.52

2016
 

 
 

Fourth Quarter
$
429.91

 
$
397.73

Third Quarter
$
419.83

 
$
363.19

Second Quarter
$
385.50

 
$
347.76

First Quarter
$
347.09

 
$
298.14

Holders
At February 5, 2018, there were 52 holders of record of common stock and 25,472,835 shares of common stock outstanding. We estimate we have approximately 62,581 beneficial owners of common stock.
Dividend Policy
Historically, we have not paid dividends on our common stock. However, we will evaluate this policy on a periodic basis taking into account our results of operations, financial condition, capital requirements, including potential acquisitions, our share repurchase program, the taxation of dividends to our shareholders, and other factors deemed relevant by our Board of Directors.


26


Share Performance Graph
The following graph compares the cumulative total returns (assuming reinvestment of dividends) on $100 invested on December 31, 2012 through December 31, 2017 in our common stock, the Standard & Poor’s 500 Composite Stock Index (S&P 500 Index), and the SIC Code 3826 Index — Laboratory Analytical Instruments.
Comparison of Cumulative Total Return Among Mettler-Toledo International Inc., the
S&P 500 Index, and SIC Code 3826 Index — Laboratory Analytical Instruments

mtchart.jpg
 
12/31/12
12/31/13
12/31/14
12/31/15
12/31/16
12/31/17
Mettler-Toledo
$100
$126
$156
$175
$217
$321
S&P 500 Index
$100
$132
$151
$153
$171
$208
SIC Code 3826 Index
$100
$147
$168
$186
$188
$258

27


Purchases of Equity Securities by the Issuer and Affiliated Purchasers
Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
 
 
Total Number of
Shares Purchased
 
Average Price Paid
per Share
 
Total Number of
Shares Purchased as
Part of Publicly
Announced
Program
 
Approximate Dollar
Value (in thousands) of
Shares that may yet be
Purchased under the
Program
Period
 
 
 
 
October 1 to October 31, 2017
 
32,971

 
$
657.00

 
32,971

 
$
626,758

November 1 to November 30, 2017
 
35,598

 
638.89

 
35,598

 
604,015

December 1 to December 31, 2017
 
32,929

 
625.35

 
32,929

 
583,422

Total
 
101,498

 
$
640.38

 
101,498

 
$
583,422

We have a share repurchase program of which there was $583.4 million common shares remaining to be repurchased under the program as of December 31, 2017. The share repurchases are expected to be funded from cash balances, borrowings, and cash generated from operating activities. Repurchases will be made through open market transactions, and the amount and timing of purchases will depend on business and market conditions, the stock price, trading restrictions, the level of acquisition activity, and other factors.
We have purchased 26.7 million common shares since the inception of the program in 2004 through December 31, 2017, at a total cost of $3.9 billion. During the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, we spent $400 million and $500 million on the repurchase of 749,254 shares and 1,348,507 shares at an average price per share of $533.84 and $370.75, respectively. We reissued 270,413 shares and 278,623 shares held in treasury for the exercise of stock options and restricted stock units during 2017 and 2016, respectively.


28


Item 6.
Selected Financial Data
The selected historical financial information set forth below as of and for the years then ended December 31 is derived from our audited consolidated financial statements. The financial information presented below, in thousands except share data, was prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”).
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Statement of Operations Data:
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Net sales
$
2,725,053

 
$
2,508,257

 
$
2,395,447

 
$
2,485,983

 
$
2,378,972

Cost of sales
1,151,740

 
1,072,670

 
1,043,454

 
1,127,233

 
1,097,041

Gross profit
1,573,313

 
1,435,587

 
1,351,993

 
1,358,750

 
1,281,931

Research and development
129,265

 
119,968

 
119,076

 
123,297

 
116,346

Selling, general, and administrative
787,464

 
732,622

 
700,810

 
728,582

 
692,693

Amortization
42,671

 
36,052

 
30,951

 
29,185

 
24,539

Interest expense
32,785

 
28,026

 
27,451

 
24,537

 
22,711

Restructuring charges(a)
12,772

 
6,235

 
11,148

 
5,915

 
19,830

Other charges (income), net(b)
(5,866
)
 
8,491

 
(867
)
 
2,230

 
3,103

Earnings before taxes
574,222

 
504,193

 
463,424

 
445,004

 
402,709

Provision for taxes(c)
198,250

 
119,823

 
110,604

 
106,763

 
96,615

Net earnings
$
375,972

 
$
384,370

 
$
352,820

 
$
338,241

 
$
306,094

Basic earnings per common share:
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Net earnings
$
14.62

 
$
14.49

 
$
12.75

 
$
11.71

 
$
10.22

Weighted average number of common shares
25,713,575

 
26,517,768

 
27,680,918

 
28,890,771

 
29,945,954

Diluted earnings per common share:
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Net earnings
$
14.24

 
$
14.22

 
$
12.48

 
$
11.44

 
$
9.96

Weighted average number of common and common equivalent shares
26,393,783

 
27,023,905

 
28,269,615

 
29,571,308

 
30,728,482

Balance Sheet Data:
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Cash and cash equivalents
$
148,687

 
$
158,674

 
$
98,887

 
$
85,263

 
$
111,874

Working capital(d)
188,040

 
169,569

 
152,721

 
172,380

 
225,551

Total assets
2,549,805

 
2,166,777

 
1,959,335

 
1,973,532

 
2,120,755

Long-term debt(d)
960,170

 
875,056

 
575,138

 
334,134

 
395,102

Other non-current liabilities(e)
301,452

 
204,957

 
194,552

 
218,108

 
193,170

Shareholders’ equity(f)
547,280

 
434,943

 
580,457

 
719,595

 
935,052

_________________________
(a)
Restructuring charges primarily relate to our global cost reduction programs. See Note 14 and Note 17 to the audited consolidated financial statements.
(b)
Other charges (income), net includes $1.7 million and $1.1 million of acquisition costs for 2017 and 2016, respectively. Other charges (income), net for 2017 also includes a one-time gain of $3.4 million relating to the sale of a facility in Switzerland in connection with our initiative to consolidate certain Swiss operations into a new facility, while 2016 includes a one-time non-cash pension settlement charge of $8.2 million related to a lump sum offering to former employees of our U.S. pension plan. Other charges (income), net also includes (gains) losses from foreign currency transactions and hedging activities, interest income, and other items.
(c)
Provision for taxes for 2017 includes a provisional one-time charge of $72 million for the implementation of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. Of this amount, $59 million is expected to be paid over a period of up to eight years. The estimated charge may change with the finalization of implementation. See Note 13 to the audited consolidated financial statements.
(d)
Working capital represents total current assets net of cash, less total current liabilities net of short-term borrowings and current maturities of long-term debt.

29


(e)
Other non-current liabilities consist of pension and other post-retirement liabilities, the long-term taxes payable of $48 million related to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, plus certain other non-current liabilities. See Note 12 to the audited consolidated financial statements for pension and other post-retirement disclosures.
(f)
No dividends were paid during the five-year period ended December 31, 2017.

30


Item 7.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read together with our audited consolidated financial statements.
Changes in local currencies exclude the effect of currency exchange rate fluctuations. Local currency amounts are determined by translating current and previous year consolidated financial information at an index utilizing historical currency exchange rates. We believe local currency information provides a helpful assessment of business performance and a useful measure of results between periods. We do not, nor do we suggest that investors should, consider such non-GAAP financial measures in isolation from, or as a substitute for, financial information prepared in accordance with GAAP. We present non-GAAP financial measures in reporting our financial results to provide investors with an additional analytical tool to evaluate our operating results.
We also include in the discussion below disclosures of immaterial qualitative factors that are not quantified. Although the impact of such factors is not considered material, we believe these disclosures can be useful in evaluating our operating results.
Overview
We operate a global business with sales that are diversified by geographic region, product range, and customer. We hold leading positions worldwide in many of our markets and attribute this leadership to several factors, including the strength of our brand name and reputation, our comprehensive offering of innovative instruments and solutions, and the breadth and quality of our global sales and service network.
Net sales in U.S. dollars increased 9% in 2017 and 5% in 2016. Excluding the effect of currency exchange rate fluctuations, or in local currencies, net sales increased 8% in 2017 and increased 7% in 2016. Net sales growth in local currencies during 2017 reflected broad-based growth across most geographies and product categories as a result of favorable global market conditions and strong execution of our growth initiatives. We expect to continue to benefit from our strong global leadership positions, diversified customer base, robust product offering, investment in emerging markets, significant installed base, and the impact of our global sales and marketing programs. Examples of these programs include identifying and investing in growth and market penetration opportunities, more effectively pricing our products and services, increasing our sales force effectiveness through improved guidance, and continuing to optimize our lead generation and lead nurturing processes. While global market conditions are currently favorable, we will face challenging prior period comparisons in 2018 due to strong results in 2017. Economic conditions can also change quickly, particularly in emerging markets, and it is uncertain that favorable market conditions will continue.
With respect to our end-user markets, we experienced increased results during 2017 versus the prior year in our laboratory-related markets, such as pharmaceutical and biotech customers, as well as the laboratories of chemical companies and food and beverage companies. Demand from these markets was generally favorable during 2017. The local currency increase in net sales of our laboratory-related products during 2017 was driven by strong growth in most product categories.
Our industrial markets continued to benefit from our customers' focus on brand protection and food safety within our product inspection end-market. We also experienced improved market conditions in China with core industrial customers catching up on their product replacement cycles. Emerging market economies have historically been an important source of growth based upon the expansion of their domestic economies, as well as increased exports as companies have moved production to low-cost countries. Our industrial-related products are especially sensitive to changes in economic growth.

31


Our food retailing sales declined during 2017 due to reduced investment by retailers for our type of products. Traditionally the spending levels in this sector have experienced more volatility than our other customer sectors due to the timing of customer project activity and new regulations.
In 2018, we expect to continue to pursue the overall business growth strategies which we have followed in recent years:
Gaining Market Share. Our global sales and marketing initiative, “Spinnaker,” continues to be an important growth strategy. For example, over the past few years, we have added field sales and service resources to pursue under-penetrated market opportunities and will look to continue to make investments to front-end resources in 2018. We also aim to gain market share by implementing sophisticated sales and marketing programs, leveraging our extensive customer databases, and leveraging our product offering to larger customers through key account management. While this initiative is broad-based, efforts to improve these processes include leveraging big data analytics to identify, prioritize, and pursue growth opportunities, the implementation of more effective pricing and value-based selling strategies and processes, improved sales force guidance, training and effectiveness, cross-selling, increased segment marketing, and leads generation and nurturing activities. Our comprehensive service offerings, and our initiatives to globalize and harmonize these offerings, help us further penetrate developed markets. We estimate that we have the largest installed base of weighing instruments in the world, and we continue to leverage big data analytics and invest in sales and marketing activities aimed at increasing the proportion of our installed base that is under service contract, or selling new products that replace old products in our installed base. In addition to traditional repair and maintenance, our service offerings continue to expand into value-added services for a range of market needs, including regulatory compliance.
Expanding Emerging Markets. Emerging markets, comprising Asia (excluding Japan), Eastern Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, and Africa, account for approximately 34% of our total net sales. We have a two-pronged strategy in emerging markets: first, to capitalize on long-term growth opportunities in these markets and second, to leverage our low-cost manufacturing operations in China. We have approximately a 30-year track record in China, and our sales in Asia have grown more than 13% on a compound annual growth basis in local currencies since 1999. We have broadened our product offering to the Asian markets and benefit as multinational customers shift production to China. India has also been a source of emerging market sales growth in past years due to increased life science research activities. Overall, market conditions in emerging markets were favorable during 2017. We experienced a 12% increase in emerging market local currency sales during 2017 versus the prior year, which included 19% local currency sales growth in China. Within China, we continue to redeploy resources and sales and marketing efforts to the faster-growing segments of pharma, food safety, and environment. We believe the long-term growth of these segments will be favorably impacted by the Chinese government's emphasis on science, high-value industries, and product quality. We expect our laboratory, process analytics, and product inspection businesses will particularly benefit from these segments. We also continue to invest and add sales and marketing resources to pursue growth in under-penetrated emerging markets. However, emerging market sales can be volatile. China's credit availability can also be particularly volatile, and certain industrial-related end-user segments still have overcapacity.
Extending Our Technology Lead. We continue to focus on product innovation. In the last three years, we spent approximately 5% of net sales on research and development. We seek to accelerate product replacement cycles, as well as improve our product offerings and their capabilities with additional integrated technologies and software. In addition, we aim to create value for our customers by having an intimate knowledge of their processes via our significant installed product base.
Expanding Our Margins. We continue to strive to improve our margins by more effectively pricing our products and services and optimizing our cost structure. For example, sophisticated data analytic tools

32


provide us new insights to further refine our price strategies and processes. We also focus on reallocating resources and better aligning our cost structure to support our investments in market penetration initiatives, higher growth areas, and opportunities for margin improvement. We have also initiated various restructuring programs over the past few years in response to changing market conditions. As previously mentioned, shifting production to China has also been an important component of our cost savings initiatives. We have also implemented global procurement and supply chain management programs over the last several years aimed at lowering supply costs, and have further increased our focus on these programs during the past year with the global launch of our SternDrive initiative. SternDrive is our global program for continuous improvement efforts within our supply chain, manufacturing, and back-office operations. Blue Ocean is also an important enabler of our various margin expansion initiatives. Our move to standardized business processes, systems, and data structures throughout our global organization provides greater data transparency and faster access to real-time data. Our cost leadership and productivity initiatives are also focused on continuously improving our invested capital efficiency, such as reducing our working capital levels and ensuring appropriate returns on our expenditures.
Pursuing Strategic Acquisitions. We seek to pursue "bolt-on" acquisitions that may leverage our global sales and service network, respected brand, extensive distribution channels, and technological leadership. We have identified life sciences, product inspection, and process analytics as three key areas for acquisitions. For example, during the third quarter of 2017, we acquired the shares of Biotix, Inc., a manufacturer and distributor of plastic consumables associated with pipettes, including tips, tubes, and reagent reservoirs used in the life sciences market, based in the United States for an initial cash payment of $105 million. We also may be required to pay additional cash consideration up to a maximum amount of $65 million, of which we recorded an estimated $30.7 million as of December 31, 2017. During 2016, we acquired substantially all of the assets of Henry Troemner LLC (Troemner), a supplier of lab equipment, weights, and weight calibration based in the United States for an aggregate purchase price of $95.8 million that has been integrated into our laboratory product offering.
Results of Operations — Consolidated
Net sales
Net sales were $2.7 billion for the year ended December 31, 2017, compared to $2.5 billion in 2016 and $2.4 billion in 2015. This represents an increase of 9% in 2017 and an increase of 5% in 2016 in U.S. dollars and an increase of 8% and 7% in local currencies, respectively. The Biotix and Troemner acquisitions contributed 1% to our net sales in 2017. Global market conditions were favorable during 2017 and we continue to benefit from the execution of our global sales and marketing programs and development of our robust product portfolio. However, we will face difficult prior period comparisons in 2018 due to strong results in 2017. Economic conditions can also change quickly, especially in emerging markets, and it's uncertain that favorable market conditions will continue.
In 2017, our net sales by geographic destination increased in U.S. dollars 8% in the Americas, 6% in Europe, and 11% in Asia/Rest of World. In local currencies, our net sales by geographic destination increased in 2017 by 8% in the Americas, 5% in Europe, and 11% in Asia/Rest of World. The Biotix and Troemner acquisitions contributed approximately 2% to net sales in the Americas during 2017. In addition, our food retailing sales declined in 2017 due to reduced investment by retailers for our type of products in the Americas, which decreased local currency sales in the Americas by 3%. A discussion of sales by operating segment is included below.
As described in Note 17 to our audited consolidated financial statements, our net sales comprise product sales of precision instruments and related services. Service revenues are primarily derived from repair and other services, including regulatory compliance qualification, calibration, certification, preventative maintenance, and spare parts.

33


Net sales of products increased 9% in U.S. dollars and in local currencies during 2017 and increased 5% in U.S. dollars and 7% in local currencies in 2016. The Biotix and Troemner acquisitions contributed approximately 2% to our net sales of products during 2017. Service revenue (including spare parts) increased 7% in U.S. dollars and in local currencies in 2017 and increased 4% in U.S. dollars and 6% in local currencies in 2016. The Troemner acquisition contributed approximately 1% to our net sales of service during 2017.
Net sales of our laboratory-related products and services, which represented approximately 50% of our total net sales in 2017, increased 11% in U.S. dollars and 10% in local currencies during 2017. The local currency increase in net sales of our laboratory-related products during 2017 includes strong growth in most product categories, particularly analytical instruments. The Biotix and Troemner acquisitions also contributed approximately 2% to our net sales growth of laboratory-related products and services.
Net sales of our industrial-related products and services, which represented approximately 42% of our total net sales in 2017, increased 8% in U.S. dollars and 8% in local currencies during 2017. In 2017, we experienced strong growth in product inspection and core industrial. Our core-industrial results include very strong results in China.
Net sales of our food retailing products and services, which represented approximately 8% of our total net sales in 2017, decreased 3% in U.S. dollars and 4% in local currencies during 2017. The decline in net sales of our food retailing products is due to a decrease in the Americas driven by reduced investment by these retailers for our type of products.
Gross profit
Gross profit as a percentage of net sales was 57.7% for 2017, compared to 57.2% for 2016 and 56.4% for 2015.
Gross profit as a percentage of net sales for products was 60.9% for 2017, compared to 60.8% for 2016 and 60.1% for 2015. Gross profit as a percentage of net sales for services (including spare parts) was 46.1% for 2017, compared to 44.6% for 2016 and 43.6% for 2015.
The increase in gross profit as a percentage of net sales for 2017 includes favorable price realization, offset in part by unfavorable business mix, changes in foreign currency, and increased material costs.
Research and development and selling, general, and administrative expenses
Research and development expenses as a percentage of net sales were 4.7% for 2017, 4.8% for 2016, and 5.0% for 2015. Research and development expenses in U.S. dollars increased 8% in 2017 and 1% in 2016, and in local currencies increased 8% in 2017 and 4% in 2016, relating to increased investments in new product development.
Selling, general, and administrative expenses as a percentage of net sales were 28.9% for 2017, compared to 29.2% for 2016 and 29.3% for 2015. Selling, general, and administrative expenses increased 8% in both U.S. dollars and local currencies in 2017 and increased 4% in U.S. dollars and 6% in local currencies in 2016. The increase during 2017 includes higher cash incentive expense, investments in our field sales organization, and increased employee benefit costs.
Amortization expense
Amortization expense was $42.7 million in 2017, compared to $36.1 million and $31.0 million in 2016 and 2015, respectively. The increase in amortization expense is primarily related to our investments in information technology, including the Company's Blue Ocean program, as well as the Biotix and Troemner acquisitions.

34


Restructuring charges
During the past few years, we initiated various cost reduction measures. For the year ended December 31, 2017, we have incurred $12.8 million of restructuring expenses which primarily comprise employee-related costs. See Note 14 and Note 17 to our audited consolidated financial statements for a summary of restructuring activity during 2017.
Other charges (income), net
Other charges (income), net consisted of net income of $5.9 million in 2017, compared to net charges of $8.5 million and net income of $0.9 million in 2016 and 2015, respectively. Other charges (income), net includes $1.7 million and $1.1 million of acquisition costs for 2017 and 2016, respectively. Other charges (income), net for 2017 also includes a one-time gain of $3.4 million relating to the sale of a facility in Switzerland in connection with our initiative to consolidate certain Swiss operations into a new facility. Other charges in 2016 includes a one-time non-cash pension settlement charge of $8.2 million related to a lump sum offering to former employees of our U.S. pension plan. Other charges (income), net also includes net (gains) losses from foreign currency transactions and hedging activities, interest income, and other items.
Interest expense and taxes
Interest expense was $32.8 million for 2017, compared to $28.0 million for 2016 and $27.5 million for 2015.
Our annual effective tax rate was 22% for 2017 and 24% for both 2016 and 2015 excluding one-time charges in 2017 associated with the Tax Cuts and Job Act described below. The reduction in our annual effective tax rate from 24% in 2016 and 2015 to 22% in 2017 is primarily related to our adoption of ASU 2016-09 pertaining to excess tax benefits in the current year associated with stock option exercises as discussed in Note 2.
On December 22, 2017, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act ("the Act") significantly revised U.S. corporate income tax law. The Act includes, among other things, a reduction in the U.S. federal corporate income tax rate from 35% to 21% effective for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017, and the implementation of a modified territorial tax system that includes a one-time transition tax on deemed repatriated earnings of foreign subsidiaries ("Transition Tax") that is payable over a period of up to eight years. The tax effects of the Act are reflected in Note 13 to our consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2017.
In connection with the Act, we recorded a provisional one-time charge of $72 million during the fourth quarter of 2017. This amount includes a one-time cash charge of $59 million for un-repatriated foreign earnings which is expected to be paid over a period of up to eight years, and a one-time non-cash charge of $13 million related to certain deferred tax and other non-cash items.
Our accounting for the above items is based upon reasonable estimates of the tax effects of the Act; however, our estimates may change upon the finalization of our implementation and additional interpretive guidance from regulatory authorities. We will complete our accounting for the above tax effects of the Act during 2018, as provided in Staff Accounting Bulletin 118, and will reflect any adjustments to our provisional amounts as an adjustment to the provision for taxes in the reporting period in which the amounts are finally determined.
Additionally, certain provisions of the Act are not effective until 2018. We are in the process of evaluating the impact of these provisions and have not yet recorded any impact in the financial statements, nor have we made any accounting policy elections with respect to these items.

35


Results of Operations — by Operating Segment
The following is a discussion of the financial results of our operating segments. We currently have five reportable segments: U.S. Operations, Swiss Operations, Western European Operations, Chinese Operations, and Other. A more detailed description of these segments is outlined in Note 17 to our audited consolidated financial statements.
U.S. Operations (amounts in thousands)
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
Increase
(Decrease) in %
2017 vs. 2016
 
Increase
(Decrease) in %
2016 vs. 2015
Net sales
$
1,043,942

 
$
958,542

 
$
913,842

 
9%
 
5%
Net sales to external customers
$
944,825

 
$
867,962

 
$
826,354

 
9%
 
5%
Segment profit
$
177,705

 
$
161,539

 
$
147,491

 
10%
 
10%
The increase in both total net sales and net sales to external customers of 9% in 2017 includes strong growth in product inspection and laboratory-related products, offset in part by a significant decline in food retailing, which reduced net sales to external customers by 3% during 2017. Net sales to external customers in our U.S. Operations during 2017 also benefited approximately 3% from the Biotix and Troemner acquisitions.
Segment profit increased $16.2 million in our U.S. Operations segment during 2017, compared to an increase of $14.0 million during 2016. Our segment profit includes the impact of increased net sales and benefits from our margin expansion initiatives, offset in part by increased sales, service, and research and development investments, as well as higher cash incentive and employee benefit costs.
Swiss Operations (amounts in thousands)
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
Increase
(Decrease) in %
 (1)
2017 vs. 2016
 
Increase
(Decrease) in %
(1)
2016 vs. 2015
Net sales
$
697,008

 
$
655,657

 
$
632,326

 
6%
 
4%
Net sales to external customers
$
133,925

 
$
130,674

 
$
133,684

 
2%
 
(2)%
Segment profit
$
174,447

 
$
163,663

 
$
160,763

 
7%
 
2%
(1)
Represents U.S. dollar growth for net sales and segment profit.
Total net sales in U.S. dollars increased 6% in 2017 and 4% in 2016, and in local currencies increased 6% in 2017 and 5% in 2016. Net sales to external customers in U.S. dollars increased 2% in 2017 and decreased 2% in 2016, and in local currencies increased 2% in 2017 and decreased 1% in 2016. The increase in local currency net sales to external customers for 2017 includes modest growth in most product categories.

36


Segment profit increased $10.8 million in our Swiss Operations segment during 2017, compared to an increase of $2.9 million during 2016. Segment profit includes the impact of increased net sales and productivity improvements, offset by currency hedging gains in the prior year, higher cash incentive costs, and increased research and development activity.
Western European Operations (amounts in thousands)
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
Increase
(Decrease) in %
(1)
2017 vs. 2016
 
Increase
(Decrease) in %
 (1)
2016 vs. 2015
Net sales
$
844,596

 
$
817,059

 
$
785,660

 
3%
 
4%
Net sales to external customers
$
673,776

 
$
640,558

 
$
620,128

 
5%
 
3%
Segment profit
$
117,324

 
$
123,507

 
$
107,424

 
(5)%
 
15%
(1)
Represents U.S. dollar growth for net sales and segment profit.
Total net sales in U.S. dollars increased 3% in 2017 and 4% in 2016, and in local currencies increased 2% in 2017 and 7% in 2016. Net sales to external customers in U.S. dollars increased 5% in 2017 and 3% in 2016, and in local currencies increased 3% in 2017 and 5% in 2016. The increase in local currency net sales to external customers during 2017 includes growth in most product categories especially in laboratory-related products.
Segment profit decreased $6.2 million in our Western European Operations segment during 2017, compared to an increase of $16.1 million in 2016. The segment profit decline includes increased research and development activity, sales and service investments, higher cash incentive costs, and the impact of inter-segment product transfers, offset in part by increased net sales to external customers and favorable currency translation.
Chinese Operations (amounts in thousands)
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
Increase
(Decrease) in %
 (1)
2017 vs. 2016
 
Increase
(Decrease) in %
 (1)
2016 vs. 2015
Net sales
$
685,499

 
$
606,307

 
$
591,178

 
13%
 
3%
Net sales to external customers
$
452,617

 
$
386,541

 
$
376,291

 
17%
 
3%
Segment profit
$
231,860

 
$
187,924

 
$
165,532

 
23%
 
14%
(1)
Represents U.S. dollar growth for net sales and segment profit.
Total net sales in U.S. dollars increased 13% in 2017 and 3% in 2016, and in local currencies increased 15% in 2017 and 10% in 2016. Net sales to external customers in U.S. dollars increased 17% in 2017 and increased 3% in 2016, and in local currencies increased 19% in 2017 and increased 9% in 2016. The increase in net sales to external customers during 2017 reflects very strong growth in most product categories. Our Chinese performance reflects a good economic environment with customers catching up in 2017 on their product replacement cycles, as well as our ability to shift resources towards faster growing markets. While Chinese market conditions have improved and are currently favorable, we will face difficult prior period comparisons in 2018 due to the strong performance in 2017. In addition to the tough comparisons, the Chinese economy has historically been volatile and market conditions may deteriorate, especially in industrial markets.
Segment profit increased $43.9 million in our Chinese Operations segment during 2017, compared to an increase of $22.4 million in 2016. The increase in segment profit during 2017 includes increased local currency net sales volume, benefits from our margin expansion and cost savings initiatives, and inter-segment transfers.

37


Other (amounts in thousands)
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
Increase
(Decrease) in %
 (1)
2017 vs. 2016
 
Increase
(Decrease) in %
 (1)
2016 vs. 2015
Net sales
$
527,844

 
$
490,231

 
$
447,077

 
8%
 
10%
Net sales to external customers
$
519,910

 
$
482,522

 
$
438,990

 
8%
 
10%
Segment profit
$
72,744

 
$
64,060

 
$
50,821

 
14%
 
26%
(1)
Represents U.S. dollar growth for net sales and segment profit.
Other includes reporting units in Southeast Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe, and other countries. Total net sales and net sales to external customers in U.S. dollars increased 8% in 2017 and 10% in 2016, and in local currencies increased 6% and 12% in 2017 and 2016, respectively. The local currency increase in total net sales and net sales to external customers includes strong volume growth and increased price realization in several countries.
Segment profit increased $8.7 million in our Other segment during 2017, compared to an increase of $13.2 million during 2016. The increase in segment profit during 2017 includes benefits from increased net sales and our margin expansion initiatives, offset in part by sales and service investments.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
Liquidity is our ability to generate sufficient cash flows from operating activities to meet our obligations and commitments. In addition, liquidity includes the ability to obtain appropriate financing. Currently, our financing requirements are primarily driven by working capital requirements, capital expenditures, share repurchases, and acquisitions. Global market conditions can be uncertain, and our ability to generate cash flows could be reduced by a deterioration in global markets.
Cash provided by operating activities totaled $516.3 million in 2017, compared to $460.8 million in 2016 and $439.8 million in 2015. The increase in 2017 is primarily related to higher net earnings.
Capital expenditures are made primarily for investments in information systems and technology, machinery, equipment, and the purchase and expansion of facilities. Our capital expenditures totaled $127.4 million in 2017, $124.0 million in 2016, and $82.5 million in 2015. Cash flow from investing activities in 2017 also includes proceeds of $9.9 million relating to the sale of a facility in Switzerland in connection with our initiative to consolidate certain Swiss operations into a new facility. We expect to make net investments in new or expanded manufacturing facilities of $40 million to $50 million over the next two years. The 2016 amount also includes a $37 million purchase of our previously leased pipette manufacturing facility.
Cash flows used in financing activities during 2017 included share repurchases. As further described below, in accordance with our share repurchase plan, we repurchased 749,254 shares and 1,348,507 shares in the amount of $400 million and $500 million during 2017 and 2016, respectively.
We continue to explore potential acquisitions. In connection with any acquisition, we may incur additional indebtedness. As further described in Note 3 of our Consolidated Financial Statements, in the third quarter of 2017, we acquired all of the shares of Biotix, Inc., a manufacturer and distributor of plastic consumables associated with pipettes, including tips, tubes, and reagent reservoirs used in the life sciences market, based in the United States for an initial cash payment of $105 million. We may also be required to pay additional cash consideration up to a maximum amount of $65 million of which we recorded an estimated $30.7 million as of December 31, 2017. During 2016, we also acquired substantially all of the assets of Henry Troemner LLC (Troemner), a supplier of lab equipment, weights, and weight calibration based in the United States for an aggregate purchase price of $95.8 million that will be integrated into our laboratory product offering.

38


In 2017 and 2016, we also incurred additional acquisition payments totaling $2.1 million and $15.6 million, respectively.
As previously described, we have recorded a provisional one-time charge of $72 million for the estimated income tax effects of the Transition Tax associated with the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of which $59 million is expected to be paid over a period of up to eight years. We also plan to continue to repatriate earnings from China, Switzerland, Germany, the United Kingdom, and certain other countries in future years and expect the only additional cost associated with the repatriation of such foreign earnings will be withholding taxes. All other undistributed earnings are considered to be permanently reinvested. We believe the ongoing tax impact associated with repatriating our undistributed foreign earnings will not have a material effect on our liquidity.
Senior Notes
As further described in Note 9 of our Consolidated Financial Statements, we have the following Senior Notes.
In 2012, we issued and sold $50 million of 3.67% Senior Notes due December 17, 2022 in a private placement. The 3.67% Senior Notes are senior unsecured obligations of the Company. Interest is payable semi-annually in June and December.
In 2013, we issued and sold $50 million of 4.10% Senior Notes due September 19, 2023 in a private placement. The 4.10% Senior Notes are senior unsecured obligations of the Company. Interest on the 4.10% Senior Notes is payable semi-annually in March and September of each year.
In 2014, we entered into an agreement to issue and sell $250 million of ten-year Senior Notes in a private placement. We issued $125 million with a fixed interest rate of 3.84% ("3.84% Senior Notes") in September 2014 and issued $125 million with a fixed interest rate of 4.24% ("4.24% Senior Notes") in June 2015. The Senior Notes are senior unsecured obligations of the Company. Interest on the 3.84% Senior Notes is payable semi-annually in March and September each year. Interest on the 4.24% Senior Notes is payable semi-annually in June and December each year.
In 2015, we issued in a private placement Euro 125 million fifteen-year Senior Notes with a fixed interest rate of 1.47% ("1.47% Euro Senior Notes"). The Euro Senior Notes are senior unsecured obligations of the Company. We have designated the 1.47% Euro Senior Notes as a hedge of a portion of our net investment in a euro-denominated foreign subsidiary to reduce foreign currency translation risk associated with this net investment. Changes in the carrying value of this debt resulting from fluctuations in the euro to U.S. dollar exchange rate are recorded as foreign currency translation adjustments within other comprehensive income (loss). We recorded in other comprehensive income (loss) related to this net investment hedge an unrealized loss of $18.2 million and an unrealized gain of $5.1 million for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively.
Credit Agreement
In 2015, we entered into an $800 million Amended Credit Agreement (the "Credit Agreement"), which replaced our $800 million Amended and Restated Credit Agreement (the "Prior Credit Agreement"). The Credit Agreement is provided by a group of financial institutions (similar to our Prior Credit Agreement) and has a maturity date of December 17, 2020. It is a revolving credit facility and is not subject to any scheduled principal payments prior to maturity. The obligations under the Credit Agreement are unsecured.
Borrowings under the Credit Agreement bear interest at current market rates plus a margin based on our consolidated leverage ratio, which was, as of December 31, 2017, set at LIBOR plus 97.5 basis points.

39


We must also pay facility fees that are tied to our leverage ratio. As of December 31, 2017, approximately $332.6 million was available under the facility.
Our short-term borrowings and long-term debt consisted of the following at December 31, 2017:
 
U.S. Dollar
 
Other Principal
Trading Currencies
 
Total
3.67% $50 million Senior Notes due December 17, 2022
$
50,000

 
$

 
$
50,000

4.10% $50 million Senior Notes due September 19, 2023
50,000

 

 
50,000

3.84% $125 million Senior Notes due September 19, 2024
125,000

 

 
125,000

4.24% $125 million Senior Notes due June 25, 2025
125,000

 

 
125,000

1.47% EUR 125 million Senior Notes due June 17, 2030

 
149,736

 
149,736

Debt issuance costs, net
(1,082
)
 
(356
)
 
(1,438
)
Total Senior Notes
348,918

 
149,380

 
498,298

$800 million Credit Agreement, interest at LIBOR plus 97.5 basis points(1)
396,107

 
65,765

 
461,872

Other local arrangements
2,402

 
17,275

 
19,677

Total debt
747,427

 
232,420

 
979,847

Less: current portion
(2,402
)
 
(17,275
)
 
(19,677
)
Total long-term debt
$
745,025

 
$
215,145

 
$
960,170

(1) See Note 5 for additional disclosures on the financial instruments associated with the Credit Agreement.
Changes in exchange rates between the currencies in which we generate cash flow and the currencies in which our borrowings are denominated affect our liquidity. In addition, because we borrow in a variety of currencies, our debt balances fluctuate due to changes in exchange rates. Further, we do not have any downgrade triggers relating to ratings from rating agencies that would accelerate the maturity dates of our debt.
We currently believe that cash flows from operating activities, together with liquidity available under our Credit Agreement and local working capital facilities, will be sufficient to fund currently anticipated working capital needs and capital spending requirements for at least the foreseeable future.
Contractual Obligations
The following summarizes certain of our contractual obligations at December 31, 2017 and the effect such obligations are expected to have on our liquidity and cash flows in future periods. We do not have significant outstanding letters of credit or other financial commitments.
 
Payments Due by Period
 
Total
 
Less than 1 Year
 
1-3 Years
 
3-5 Years
 
After 5 Years
Short- and long-term debt
$
981,270

 
$
19,677

 
$
461,857

 
$
50,000

 
$
449,736

Interest on debt
159,780

 
27,021

 
60,965

 
32,381.1

 
39,413

Non-cancelable operating leases
109,126

 
33,939

 
42,424

 
21,474

 
11,289

Pension and post-retirement funding(1)
26,403

 
26,403

 

 

 

Purchase obligations
83,511

 
80,479

 
3,032

 

 

Total(1)
$
1,360,090

 
$
187,519

 
$
568,278

 
$
103,855

 
$
500,438

(1)
In addition to the above table, we also have liabilities for pension and post-retirement funding and income taxes. However, we cannot determine the timing or the amounts for income taxes or the timing and amounts beyond 2018 for pension and post-retirement funding.
We have purchase commitments for materials, supplies, services, and fixed assets in the normal course of business. Due to the proprietary nature of many of our materials and processes, certain supply contracts contain penalty provisions. We do not expect potential payments under these provisions to

40


materially affect our results of operations or financial condition. This conclusion is based upon reasonably likely outcomes derived by reference to historical experience and current business plans.
Share Repurchase Program
We have a share repurchase program of which there were $583.4 million common shares remaining to be repurchased under the program as of December 31, 2017. The share repurchases are expected to be funded from cash balances, borrowings, and cash generated from operating activities. Repurchases will be made through open market transactions, and the amount and timing of purchases will depend on business and market conditions, the stock price, trading restrictions, the level of acquisition activity, and other factors.
We have purchased 26.7 million common shares since the inception of the program in 2004 through December 31, 2017, at a total cost of $3.9 billion. During the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, we spent $400 million and $500 million on the repurchase of 749,254 shares and 1,348,507 shares at an average price per share of $533.84 and $370.75, respectively. We reissued 270,413 shares and 278,623 shares held in treasury for the exercise of stock options and restricted stock units during 2017 and 2016, respectively.
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
Currently, we have no off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures, or capital resources that is material.
Effect of Currency on Results of Operations
Our earnings are affected by changing exchange rates. We are most sensitive to changes in the exchange rates between the Swiss franc, euro, and U.S. dollar. We have more Swiss franc expenses than we do Swiss franc sales because we develop and manufacture products in Switzerland that we sell globally and have a number of corporate functions located in Switzerland. When the Swiss franc strengthens against our other trading currencies, particularly the U.S. dollar and euro, our earnings go down. We also have significantly more sales in the euro than we do expenses. When the euro weakens against the U.S. dollar and Swiss franc, our earnings also go down. We estimate a 1% strengthening of the Swiss franc against the euro would reduce our earnings before tax by approximately $1.6 million to $1.8 million annually.
We also conduct business throughout the world, including Asia Pacific, the United Kingdom, Eastern Europe, Latin America, and Canada. Fluctuations in these currency exchange rates against the U.S. dollar can also affect our operating results. The most significant of these currency exposures is the Chinese renminbi. The impact on our earnings before tax of the Chinese renminbi weakening 1% against the U.S. dollar is a reduction of approximately $1.0 million to $1.2 million annually.
In addition to the effects of exchange rate movements on operating profits, our debt levels can fluctuate due to changes in exchange rates, particularly between the U.S. dollar, the Swiss franc, and euro. Based on our outstanding debt at December 31, 2017, we estimate that a 10% weakening of the U.S. dollar against the currencies in which our debt is denominated would result in an increase of approximately $25.9 million in the reported U.S. dollar value of our debt.

41


Taxes
We are subject to taxation in many jurisdictions throughout the world. Our effective tax rate and tax liability will be affected by a number of factors, such as changes in law, the amount of taxable income in particular jurisdictions, the tax rates in such jurisdictions, tax treaties between jurisdictions, the extent to which we transfer funds between jurisdictions, and earnings repatriations between jurisdictions. Generally, the tax liability for each taxpayer within the group is determined either (i) on a non-consolidated/non-combined basis or (ii) on a consolidated/combined basis only with other eligible entities subject to tax in the same jurisdiction, in either case without regard to the taxable losses of non-consolidated/non-combined affiliated legal entities.
Environmental Matters
We are subject to environmental laws and regulations in the jurisdictions in which we operate. We own or lease a number of properties and manufacturing facilities around the world. Like many of our competitors, we have incurred, and will continue to incur, capital and operating expenditures and other costs in complying with such laws and regulations.
We are currently involved in, or have potential liability with respect to, the remediation of past contamination in certain of our facilities. A former subsidiary of Mettler-Toledo, LLC known as Hi-Speed Checkweigher Co., Inc. was one of two private parties ordered by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, in an administrative consent order signed on June 13, 1988, to investigate and remediate certain ground water contamination at a property in Landing, New Jersey. After the other party under this order failed to fulfill its obligations, Hi-Speed became solely responsible for compliance with the order. Residual ground water contamination at this site is now within a Classification Exception Area which the Department of Environmental Protection has approved and within which the Company oversees monitoring of the decay of contaminants of concern. A concurrent Well Restriction Area also exists for the site. The Department of Environmental Protection does not view these vehicles as remedial measures, but rather as “institutional controls” that must be adequately maintained and periodically evaluated. We estimate that the costs of compliance associated with the site over the next several years will approximate a total of $0.4 million.
In addition, certain of our present and former facilities have or had been in operation for many decades and, over such time, some of these facilities may have used substances or generated and disposed of wastes which are or may be considered hazardous. It is possible that these sites, as well as disposal sites owned by third parties to which we have sent wastes, may in the future be identified and become the subject of remediation. Although we believe that we are in substantial compliance with applicable environmental requirements and, to date, we have not incurred material expenditures in connection with environmental matters, it is possible that we could become subject to additional environmental liabilities in the future that could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows.
Inflation
Inflation can affect the costs of goods and services that we use, including raw materials to manufacture our products. The competitive environment in which we operate limits somewhat our ability to recover higher costs through increased selling prices.
Moreover, there may be differences in inflation rates between countries in which we incur the major portion of our costs and other countries in which we sell products, which may limit our ability to recover increased costs. We remain committed to operations in China, Eastern Europe, India, and Brazil, which have experienced inflationary conditions. To date, inflationary conditions have not had a material effect on

42


our operating results. However, as our presence in China, Eastern Europe, India, and Brazil increases, these inflationary conditions could have a greater impact on our operating results.
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk
We have only limited involvement with derivative financial instruments and do not use them for trading purposes.
We have entered into certain interest rate swap agreements. These contracts are more fully described in Note 5 to our audited consolidated financial statements. The fair value of these contracts was a net loss of $1.3 million at December 31, 2017. Based on our agreements outstanding at December 31, 2017, a 100-basis-point increase in interest rates would result in an increase in the net aggregate market value of these instruments of $5.4 million. Conversely, a 100-basis-point decrease in interest rates would result in a $5.6 million decrease in the net aggregate market value of these instruments at December 31, 2017. Any change in fair value would not affect our consolidated statement of operations unless such agreements and the debt they hedge were prematurely settled.
We also entered into a cross currency swap in 2017. The fair value of this contract was a net loss of $0.1 million at December 31, 2017. Based on our agreements outstanding at December 31, 2017, a 100-basis-point increase in interest rates and foreign currency exchange rates would result in an increase in the net aggregate market value of these instruments of $2.5 million. Conversely, a 100-basis-point decrease in interest rates and foreign currency exchange rates would result in a $1.5 million decrease in the net aggregate market value of these instruments at December 31, 2017. Any change in fair value would not affect our consolidated statement of operations unless such agreements and the debt they hedge were prematurely settled.
Critical Accounting Policies
Management’s discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations is based upon our audited consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP. The preparation of these consolidated financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues, expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates, including those related to pensions and other post-retirement benefits, trade accounts receivable, inventories, intangible assets, income taxes, and revenue. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. The results form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.
We believe the following critical accounting policies affect our more significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of our audited consolidated financial statements. For a detailed discussion on the application of these and other accounting policies, see Note 2 to our audited consolidated financial statements.
Employee benefit plans
The net periodic pension cost for 2017 and projected benefit obligation as of December 31, 2017 were $4.8 million and $142.6 million, respectively, for our U.S. pension plan. The net periodic cost for 2017 and projected benefit obligation as of December 31, 2017 were $10.8 million and $918.5 million, respectively, for our international pension plans. The net periodic post-retirement benefit for 2017 and expected post-retirement benefit obligation as of December 31, 2017 for our U.S. post-retirement medical benefit plan were $2.6 million and $2.7 million, respectively.

43


Pension and post-retirement benefit plan expense and obligations are developed from assumptions utilized in actuarial valuations. The most significant of these assumptions include the discount rate and expected return on plan assets. In accordance with U.S. GAAP, actual results that differ from the assumptions are accumulated and deferred over future periods. While management believes the assumptions used are appropriate, differences in actual experience or changes in assumptions may affect our plan obligations and future expense.
The expected rates of return on the various defined benefit pension plans’ assets are based on the asset allocation of each plan and the long-term projected return of those assets, which represent a diversified mix of U.S. and international corporate equities and government and corporate debt securities. In 2002, we froze our U.S. defined benefit pension plan and discontinued our retiree medical program for certain current and all future employees. Consequently, no significant future service costs will be incurred on these plans. For 2017, the weighted average return on assets assumption was 6.50% for the U.S. plan and 3.86% for the international plans. A change in the rate of return of 1% would impact annual benefit plan expense by approximately $6.4 million after tax.
The discount rates for defined benefit and post-retirement plans are set by benchmarking against high-quality corporate bonds. For 2017, the weighted average discount rate assumption was 3.5% for the U.S. plan and 1.0% for the international plans, representing a weighted average of local rates in countries where such plans exist. A change in the discount rate of 1% would impact annual benefit plan expense by approximately $11.0 million after tax.
In early 2016, in order to reduce the size and potential volatility of our U.S. defined benefit pension plan obligation, we offered approximately 700 former employees who had deferred vested pension plan benefits a one-time option to receive a lump sum distribution of their benefits. Based upon the eligible participant acceptance, $14.6 million was paid from plan assets to these former employees in the second quarter of 2016 with a corresponding decrease in the benefit obligation. The Company incurred a one-time non-cash settlement charge recorded in other charges (income), net during the second quarter of 2016 of approximately $8.2 million, of which $8.0 million, $4.9 million after tax, was reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income.
Equity-based compensation
We also have an equity incentive plan that provides for the grant of stock options, restricted stock units, and other equity-based awards which are accounted for and recognized in the consolidated statement of operations based on the grant-date fair value of the award. This methodology yields an estimate of fair value based in part on a number of management estimates, the most significant of which include future volatility and estimated option lives. Changes in these assumptions could significantly impact the estimated fair value of stock options.
Trade accounts receivable
As of December 31, 2017, trade accounts receivable were $528.6 million, net of a $15.5 million allowance for doubtful accounts.
Trade accounts receivable are recorded at the invoiced amount and do not bear interest. The allowance for doubtful accounts represents our best estimate of probable credit losses in our existing trade accounts receivable. We determine the allowance based upon a review of both specific accounts for collection and the age of the accounts receivable portfolio.
Inventories
As of December 31, 2017, inventories were $255.4 million.

44


We record our inventory at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Cost, which includes direct materials, labor, and overhead, is generally determined using the first in, first out (FIFO) method. The estimated net realizable value is based on assumptions for future demand and related pricing. Adjustments to the cost basis of our inventory are made for excess and obsolete items based on usage, orders, and technological obsolescence. If actual market conditions are less favorable than those projected by management, reductions in the value of inventory may be required.
Goodwill and other intangible assets
As of December 31, 2017, our consolidated balance sheet included goodwill of $539.8 million and other intangible assets of $226.7 million.
Our business acquisitions typically result in goodwill and other intangible assets, which affect the amount of future period amortization expense and possible impairment expense. The determination of the value of such intangible assets requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect our consolidated financial statements.
In accordance with U.S. GAAP, our goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets are not amortized, but are evaluated for impairment annually in the fourth quarter, or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that an asset might be impaired. The annual evaluations of goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets are generally based on an assessment of qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of the asset is less than its carrying amount.
If we are unable to conclude whether the goodwill asset is not impaired after considering the totality of events and circumstances during our qualitative assessment, we perform the first step of the two-step impairment test by estimating the fair value of the goodwill asset and comparing the fair value to the carrying amount of the goodwill asset. If the carrying amount of the goodwill asset exceeds its fair value, then we perform the second step of the impairment test to measure the amount of the impairment loss, if any.
If we are unable to conclude whether the indefinite-lived intangible asset is not impaired after considering the totality of events and circumstances, we perform an impairment test to measure the amount of the impairment loss, if any.
Both the qualitative and quantitative evaluations consider operating results, business plans, economic conditions, and market data, among other factors. There are inherent uncertainties related to these factors and our judgment in applying them to the impairment analyses. Our assessments to date have indicated that there has been no impairment of these assets.
Should any of these estimates or assumptions change, or should we incur lower than expected operating performance or cash flows, including from a prolonged economic slowdown, we may experience a triggering event that requires a new fair value assessment for our reporting units, possibly prior to the required annual assessment. These types of events and resulting analysis could result in impairment charges for goodwill and other indefinite-lived intangible assets if the fair value estimate declines below the carrying value.
Our amortization expense related to intangible assets with finite lives may materially change should our estimates of their useful lives change.

45


Income taxes
Income tax expense, deferred tax assets and liabilities, and reserves for unrecognized tax benefits reflect management’s assessment of estimated future taxes to be paid on items in the consolidated financial statements. We record a valuation allowance to reduce our deferred tax assets to the amount that is more likely than not to be realized. While we have considered future taxable income and ongoing prudent and feasible tax planning strategies in assessing the need for the valuation allowance, in the event we were to determine that we would be able to realize our deferred tax assets in the future in excess of the net recorded amount, an adjustment to the deferred tax asset would increase income or equity in the period such determination was made. Likewise, should we determine that we would not be able to realize all or part of the net deferred tax asset in the future, an adjustment to the deferred tax asset would be charged to income in the period such determination was made.
We plan to repatriate earnings from China, Switzerland, Germany, Luxembourg, the United Kingdom, and certain other countries in future years and expect the only additional cost associated with the repatriation of such earnings outside the United States will be withholding taxes. All other undistributed earnings are considered permanently reinvested.
The significant assumptions and estimates described in the preceding paragraphs are important contributors to our ultimate effective tax rate for each year in addition to our income mix from geographical regions. If any of our assumptions or estimates were to change, or should our income mix from our geographical regions change, our effective tax rate could be materially affected. Based on earnings before taxes of $574.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, each increase of $5.7 million in tax expense would increase our effective tax rate by 1%.
Revenue recognition
Revenue is recognized when title to a product has transferred and any significant customer obligations have been fulfilled. Standard shipping terms are generally FOB shipping point in most countries and, accordingly, title and risk of loss transfer upon shipment. In countries where title cannot legally transfer before delivery, we defer revenue recognition until delivery has occurred. We generally maintain the right to accept or reject a product return in our terms and conditions and also maintain appropriate accruals for outstanding credits. Shipping and handling costs charged to customers are included in total net sales and the associated expense is recorded in cost of sales for all periods presented. Other than a few small software applications, we do not sell software products without the related hardware instrument as the software is embedded in the instrument. Our products typically require no significant production, modification, or customization of the hardware or software that is essential to the functionality of the products. To the extent our solutions have a significant post-shipment obligation, revenue is deferred on the undelivered element until the obligation has been completed. We also sometimes enter into certain arrangements that require the separate delivery of multiple goods and/or services. These deliverables are accounted for separately if the deliverables have stand-alone value and the performance of undelivered items is probable and within our control. The allocation of revenue between the separate deliverables is typically based on the relative selling price at the time of the sale in accordance with a number of factors including service technician billing rates, time to install, and geographic location.
Certain products are also sold through indirect distribution channels whereby the distributor assumes any further obligations to the customer upon title transfer. Revenue is recognized on these products upon transfer of title and risk of loss to distributors. Distributor discounts are offset against revenue at the time such revenue is recognized.

46


Service revenue not under contract is recognized upon the completion of the service performed. Spare parts sold on a stand-alone basis are recognized upon title and risk of loss transfer which are generally at the time of shipment. Revenues from service contracts are recognized ratably over the contract period. These contracts represent an obligation to perform repair and other services including regulatory compliance qualification, calibration, certification, and preventative maintenance on a customer’s pre-defined equipment over the contract period. Service contracts are separately priced and payment is typically received from the customer at the beginning of the contract period.
New Accounting Pronouncements
See Note 2 to the audited consolidated financial statements.
Item 7A.
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk
Discussion of this item is included in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
Item 8.
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
The financial statements required by this item are set forth starting on page F-1 and the related financial schedule is set forth on page S-1.
Item 9.
Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
None.
Item 9A.
Controls and Procedures
Conclusions Regarding the Effectiveness of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
Under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including the Chief Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer, and Principal Accounting Officer, we have evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as required by Exchange Act Rule 13a-15(b) as of the end of the period covered by this report. Based upon that evaluation, the Chief Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer, and Principal Accounting Officer have concluded that these disclosure controls and procedures are effective.
Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting
Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. Our internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of the Company’s financial statements for external reporting purposes in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
Management assessed the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2017. In making this assessment, we used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) in Internal Control — Integrated

47


Framework (2013). Based on our assessment, we concluded that, as of December 31, 2017, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting is effective.
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm that audited the financial statements included in this Report on Form 10-K, has issued their integrated audit report, which covers our internal control over financial reporting, which appears on page F-2.
Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting
There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the quarter ended December 31, 2017 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

Item 9B.
Other Information
None.

48


PART III

Item 10.
Directors, Executive Officers, and Corporate Governance
The executive officers of the Company are set forth below. Officers are appointed by the Board of Directors and serve at the discretion of the Board.
Name
 
Age
 
Position
Olivier A. Filliol
 
51
 
President and Chief Executive Officer
Peter Aggersbjerg
 
49
 
Head of Laboratory
Marc de La Guéronnière
 
54
 
Head of European and North American Market Organizations
William P. Donnelly
 
56
 
Executive Vice President
Michael Heidingsfelder
 
57
 
Head of Industrial
Simon Kirk
 
58
 
Head of Product Inspection
Christian Magloth
 
52
 
Head of Human Resources
Waldemar Rauch
 
55
 
Head of Process Analytics
Shawn P. Vadala
 
49
 
Chief Financial Officer
Olivier A. Filliol has been a director since January 2009. He has been President and Chief Executive Officer of the Company since January 1, 2008. Mr. Filliol served as Head of Global Sales, Service, and Marketing of the Company from April 2004 to December 2007 and Head of Process Analytics of the Company from June 1999 to December 2007. From June 1998 to June 1999, he served as General Manager of the Company’s U.S. checkweighing operations. Prior to joining the Company, he was a Strategy Consultant with the international consulting firm Bain & Company, working in the Geneva, Paris, and Sydney offices.
Peter Aggersbjerg has been Head of Laboratory of the Company since January 2018. From February 2016 to December 2017, he served as the Head of our Laboratory Weighing strategic business unit. He served as the Global BU Head for Medela's Neonatal Care business and a member of their Group management from February 2011 until joining the Company in February 2016. Prior to Medela, Mr. Aggersbjerg was CEO for Swissimplant from July 2010 to February 2011, Vernal from October 2006 to December 2008, and Tytex from October 2001 to October 2006.
Marc de La Guéronnière has been Head of European Market Organizations of the Company since January 2008 and Head of North American Market Organizations since April 2014. He was Head of Region South and General Manager of the Company’s market organization in Spain from January 2006 to January 2008. He joined the Company in 2001 as the Industrial Business Area Manager for our market organization in France. Prior to joining the Company, Mr. de La Guéronnière held various management positions in Europe and the United States with ABB-Elsag Bailey and Danaher-Zellweger.
William P. Donnelly joined the Company in 1997 and has been Executive Vice President since January 2014. He previously served as Chief Financial Officer of the Company since 1997, except for a two-year period when he ran the Company’s Product Inspection and Pipette businesses. Mr. Donnelly is responsible for Investor Relations, Finance, Supply Chain Management, Information Technology, and the Company’s Blue Ocean Program.
Michael Heidingsfelder joined the Company in April 2012 as Head of Industrial Division. Prior to joining the Company, Mr. Heidingsfelder held various management positions within the Freudenberg Group from 2004 to March 2012 in Europe, Asia, and the Americas, including Chief Operating Officer, Americas, and General Manager, China. Previously, he was a Partner of Roland Berger Strategy Consultants in the U.S. and Europe.

49


Simon Kirk joined the Company in January 2012 as Head of Product Inspection. Previously, he worked at Schindler where he served since 2008 as Chief Executive Officer of Jardine Schindler Group, a joint venture responsible for all of Schindler's operations in Southeast Asia. From 2004 until 2008, he was Vice President responsible for Eastern Europe at Schindler. He has also held various management positions at Eaton Corporation, Owens Corning, Imperial Chemical Industries, and British Railways Board.
Christian Magloth joined the Company in October 2010 and has been Head of Human Resources since December 2010. Prior to joining the Company, he served as Head of Human Resources of Straumann, a leading global medical devices company listed on the Swiss stock exchange, from April 2006 to September 2010. He previously served as Head of Human Resources at Hero Group, an international consumer foods company, and in various management positions at Hilti, a leading global construction supply company.
Waldemar Rauch joined the Company in September 2000 as Head of our Ingold business. He has served as Operating Manager since March 2004, was named Head of Process Analytics Division in January 2008, and joined the Group Management Committee in July 2011. Prior to joining the Company, he worked in R&D at Siemens in Germany and held various technical management positions with Atomika Instruments in Germany as well as with Endress + Hauser Flowtec, a leading Swiss supplier of industrial measurement and automation equipment.
Shawn P. Vadala joined the Company in 1997 and has been Chief Financial Officer since January 2014. He is also responsible for the Company's Pricing and Business Intelligence programs. Mr. Vadala previously held various senior financial positions at the Company's Columbus, Ohio and Greifensee, Switzerland offices. Prior to joining the Company, he worked in the Boston and Zurich, Switzerland offices of PricewaterhouseCoopers.
Certifications
Our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer provide certifications pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 in connection with our quarterly and annual financial statement filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The certifications relating to this annual report are attached as Exhibits 31.1 and 31.2.
The remaining information called for by this item is incorporated by reference from the discussion in the sections “Proposal One: Election of Directors,” “Board of Directors — General Information,” “Board of Directors — Operation,” and “Additional Information — Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance” in the 2018 Proxy Statement.
Item 11.
Executive Compensation
The information appearing in the sections captioned “Board of Directors — General Information —Director Compensation,” “Compensation Discussion and Analysis,” “Compensation Committee Report,” and “Additional Information — Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation” in the 2018 Proxy Statement is incorporated by reference herein.
Item 12.
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
The information appearing in the section “Share Ownership” in the 2018 Proxy Statement is incorporated by reference herein. Information appearing in “Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans as of December 31, 2017” is included within Note 11 to the financial statements.

50


Item 13.
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions — None.
Director Independence — The information in the section “Board of Directors — General Information — Independence of the Board” in the 2018 Proxy Statement is incorporated by reference herein.
Item 14.
Principal Accounting Fees and Services
Information appearing in the section “Audit Committee Report” in the 2018 Proxy Statement is hereby incorporated by reference.
PART IV

Item 15.
Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules
(a) Exhibits, Financial Statements, and Schedules:
1. Financial Statements. See Index to Consolidated Financial Statements included on page F-1.
2. Financial Statement Schedule. See Schedule II, which is included on page S-1.
3. List of Exhibits. See Exhibit Index included on page E-1.

51


SIGNATURES
Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

Mettler-Toledo International Inc.
(Registrant)
Date: February 8, 2018
By: 
/s/ Olivier A. Filliol
 
Olivier A. Filliol
 
President and Chief Executive Officer
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, this Annual Report on Form 10-K has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant as of the date set out above and in the capacities indicated.
Signature
 
Title
 
 
 
/s/ Olivier A. Filliol
 
President and Chief Executive Officer
Olivier A. Filliol
 
 
 
 
 
/s/ William P. Donnelly
 
Executive Vice President
William P. Donnelly
 
 
 
 
 
/s/ Shawn P. Vadala
 
Chief Financial Officer
Shawn P. Vadala
 
 
 
 
 
/s/ Olivier A. Filliol
 
Director
Olivier A. Filliol
 
 
 
 
 
/s/ Wah-Hui Chu
 
Director
Wah-Hui Chu
 
 
 
 
 
/s/ Francis A. Contino
 
Director
Francis A. Contino
 
 
 
 
 
/s/ Elisha Finney
 
Director
Elisha Finney
 
 
 
 
 
/s/ Richard Francis
 
Director
Richard Francis
 
 
 
 
 
/s/ Connie L. Harvey
 
Director
Connie L. Harvey
 
 
 
 
 
/s/ Michael A. Kelly
 
Director
Michael A. Kelly
 
 
 
 
 
/s/ Hans Ulrich Maerki
 
Director
Hans Ulrich Maerki
 
 
 
 
 
/s/ Thomas P. Salice
 
Director
Thomas P. Salice
 
 
 
 
 
/s/ Robert F. Spoerry
 
Director
Robert F. Spoerry
 
 

52


EXHIBIT INDEX
Exhibit
 
No.
Description
3.1
3.2
10.1
10.11
10.12
10.13
10.14
10.20
10.21
10.22
10.23
10.24
10.25
10.26
10.27
10.28
10.31
10.32
10.50*
10.51
10.52
10.53
10.54
10.55
10.56
10.57
10.59
10.60
10.61
21*
23.1*

E- 1


Exhibit
 
No.
Description
31.1*
31.2*

32*
101.INS*
XBRL Instance Document
101.SCH*
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
101.CAL*
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
101.LAB*
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
101.PRE*
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document
101.DEF*
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
_______________________________________
(1) 
Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Report on Form 10-K dated March 13, 1998
(2) 
Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Report on Form 8-K dated November 8, 2016
(3) 
Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Report on Form 8-K dated December 18, 2015
(4) 
Incorporated by reference to the Company's Report on Form 8-K dated October 16, 2012
(5) 
Incorporated by reference to the Company's Report on Form 8-K dated July 29, 2013
(6) 
Incorporated by reference to the Company's Report on Form 8-K dated July 2, 2014
(7) 
Incorporated by reference to the Company's Report on Form 8-K dated March 31, 2015
(8) 
Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Form DEF 14-A filed March 29, 2004
(9) 
Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Report on Form 10-K dated February 15, 2008
(10) 
Incorporated by reference to the Company's Registration Statement on Form S-8 dated July 26, 2013 (Reg. No. 333-190181)
(11) 
Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Report on Form 10-K dated February 2, 2017
(12) 
Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Report on Form 10-K dated February 13, 2009
(13) 
Incorporated by reference to the Company's Report on Form 10-K dated February 16, 2011
(14) 
Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Report on Form 8-K dated November 1, 2007
(15) 
Incorporated by reference to the Company's Report on Form 10-K dated February 13, 2012
(16) 
Incorporated by reference to the Company's Report on Form 10-K dated February 8, 2013
*
Filed herewith


E- 2



METTLER-TOLEDO INTERNATIONAL INC.
INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


F-1


Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

To the Board of Directors and Shareholders of Mettler-Toledo International Inc.
Opinions on the Financial Statements and Internal Control over Financial Reporting
We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Mettler-Toledo International Inc. and its subsidiaries as of December 31, 2017 and 2016 and the related consolidated statements of operations, comprehensive income, shareholders’ equity and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2017, including the related notes and schedule of valuation and qualifying accounts for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2017 appearing on page S-1 (collectively referred to as the “consolidated financial statements”). We also have audited the Company's internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2017, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO).
In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2017 and 2016 and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2017 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. Also in our opinion, the Company maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2017 based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the COSO.
Change in Accounting Principle
As discussed in Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company changed the manner in which it accounts for the excess tax benefits from stock option exercises in 2017.
Basis for Opinions
The Company's management is responsible for these consolidated financial statements, for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting, and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in Management's Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting appearing under Item 9A. Our responsibility is to express opinions on the Company’s consolidated financial statements and on the Company's internal control over financial reporting based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) ("PCAOB") and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud, and whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects.
Our audits of the consolidated financial statements included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements. Our audit of internal control over financial reporting included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and

F-2


operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audits also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinions.
Definition and Limitations of Internal Control over Financial Reporting
A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (ii) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

/s/  PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Columbus, Ohio
February 8, 2018

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2005.




F-3


METTLER-TOLEDO INTERNATIONAL INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
For the years ended December 31
(In thousands, except share data)
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
Net sales
 

 
 

 
 

Products
$
2,135,051

 
$
1,957,879

 
$
1,865,884

Service
590,002

 
550,378

 
529,563

Total net sales
2,725,053

 
2,508,257

 
2,395,447

Cost of sales
 

 
 

 
 

Products
833,793

 
767,753

 
744,867

Service
317,947

 
304,917

 
298,587

Gross profit
1,573,313

 
1,435,587

 
1,351,993

Research and development
129,265

 
119,968

 
119,076

Selling, general, and administrative
787,464

 
732,622

 
700,810

Amortization
42,671

 
36,052

 
30,951

Interest expense
32,785

 
28,026

 
27,451

Restructuring charges
12,772

 
6,235

 
11,148

Other charges (income), net
(5,866
)
 
8,491

 
(867
)
Earnings before taxes
574,222

 
504,193

 
463,424

Provision for taxes
198,250

 
119,823

 
110,604

Net earnings
$
375,972

 
$
384,370

 
$
352,820

 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic earnings per common share:
 

 
 

 
 

Net earnings
$
14.62

 
$
14.49

 
$
12.75

Weighted average number of common shares
25,713,575

 
26,517,768

 
27,680,918

Diluted earnings per common share:
 

 
 

 
 

Net earnings
$
14.24

 
$
14.22

 
$
12.48

Weighted average number of common and common equivalent shares
26,393,783

 
27,023,905

 
28,269,615


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.


F-4


METTLER-TOLEDO INTERNATIONAL INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
For the years ended December 31
(In thousands, except share data)

 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net earnings
$
375,972

 
$
384,370

 
$
352,820

 
 
 
 
 
 
Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax:
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency translation adjustment
83,982

 
(57,928
)
 
(52,434
)
Unrealized gains (losses) on cash flow hedging arrangements:
 
 
 
 
 
Unrealized gains (losses)
1,424

 
(513
)
 
13,221

Effective portion of (gains) losses included in net earnings
(273
)
 
(4,735
)
 
(8,261
)
Defined benefit pension and post-retirement plans:
 
 
 
 
 
Net actuarial gains (losses)
(10,378
)
 
(47,788
)
 
(30,759
)
Plan amendments and prior service cost
12,056

 

 
9,189

Amortization of actuarial (gains) losses and plan amendments and prior service cost
14,873

 
16,730

 
9,509

          Impact of foreign currency
(12,092
)
 
5,885

 
5,835

Total other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax
89,592

 
(88,349
)
 
(53,700
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Comprehensive income
$
465,564

 
$
296,021

 
$
299,120


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.


F-5


METTLER-TOLEDO INTERNATIONAL INC.
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
As of December 31
(In thousands, except share data)
 
2017
 
2016
ASSETS
Current assets:
 

 
 

Cash and cash equivalents
$
148,687

 
$
158,674

Trade accounts receivable, less allowances of $15,549 in 2017 and $14,234 in 2016
528,615

 
454,988

Inventories
255,390

 
222,047

Other current assets and prepaid expenses
74,031

 
61,075

Total current assets
1,006,723

 
896,784

Property, plant, and equipment, net
668,271

 
563,707

Goodwill
539,838

 
476,378

Other intangible assets, net
226,718

 
167,055

Deferred tax assets, net
41,425

 
33,951

Other non-current assets
66,830

 
28,902

Total assets
$
2,549,805

 
$
2,166,777

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Current liabilities:
 

 
 

Trade accounts payable
$
167,627

 
$
146,593

Accrued and other liabilities
152,834

 
133,167

Accrued compensation and related items
170,159

 
140,461

Deferred revenue and customer prepayments
107,166

 
100,330

Taxes payable
72,210

 
47,990

Short-term borrowings and current maturities of long-term debt
19,677

 
18,974

Total current liabilities
689,673

 
587,515

Long-term debt
960,170

 
875,056

Deferred tax liabilities, net
51,230

 
64,306

Other non-current liabilities
301,452

 
204,957

Total liabilities
2,002,525

 
1,731,834

Commitments and contingencies (Note 16)


 


Shareholders’ equity:
 

 
 

Preferred stock, $0.01 par value per share; authorized 10,000,000 shares

 

Common stock, $0.01 par value per share; authorized 125,000,000 shares; issued 44,786,011 and 44,786,011 shares, outstanding 25,541,393 and 26,020,234 shares at December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively
448

 
448

Additional paid-in capital
747,138

 
730,556

Treasury stock at cost (19,244,618 and 18,765,777 shares at December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively)
(3,368,182
)
 
(3,006,771
)
Retained earnings
3,433,282

 
3,065,708

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)
(265,406
)
 
(354,998
)
Total shareholders’ equity
547,280

 
434,943

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity
$
2,549,805

 
$
2,166,777


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.


F-6


METTLER-TOLEDO INTERNATIONAL INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
For the years ended December 31
(In thousands, except share data)
 
Common Stock
 
Additional
Paid-In
Capital
 
Treasury
Stock
 
Retained
Earnings
 
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
 
Total
 
Shares
 
Amount
 
 
 
 
 
Balance at December 31, 2014
28,243,007

 
$
448

 
$
670,418

 
$
(2,095,656
)
 
$
2,357,334

 
$
(212,949
)
 
$
719,595

Exercise of stock options and restricted stock units
403,908

 

 

 
47,393

 
(17,837
)
 

 
29,556

Repurchases of common stock
(1,556,797
)
 

 

 
(494,966
)
 

 

 
(494,966
)
Tax benefit resulting from exercise of certain employee stock options

 

 
12,929

 

 

 

 
12,929

Share-based compensation

 

 
14,223

 

 

 

 
14,223

Net earnings

 

 

 

 
352,820

 

 
352,820

Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax

 

 

 

 

 
(53,700
)
 
(53,700
)
Balance at December 31, 2015
27,090,118

 
$
448

 
$
697,570

 
$
(2,543,229
)
 
$
2,692,317

 
$
(266,649
)
 
$
580,457

Exercise of stock options and restricted stock units
278,623

 

 

 
36,450

 
(10,979
)
 

 
25,471

Repurchases of common stock
(1,348,507
)
 

 

 
(499,992
)
 

 

 
(499,992
)
Tax benefit resulting from exercise of certain employee stock options

 

 
17,680

 

 

 

 
17,680

Share-based compensation

 

 
15,306

 

 

 

 
15,306

Net earnings

 

 

 

 
384,370

 

 
384,370

Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax

 

 

 

 

 
(88,349
)
 
(88,349
)
Balance at December 31, 2016
26,020,234

 
$
448

 
$
730,556

 
$
(3,006,771
)
 
$
3,065,708

 
$
(354,998
)
 
$
434,943

Exercise of stock options and restricted stock units
270,413

 

 

 
38,586

 
(9,937
)
 

 
28,649

Repurchases of common stock
(749,254
)
 

 

 
(399,997
)
 

 

 
(399,997
)
Share-based compensation

 

 
16,582

 

 


 

 
16,582

Effect of accounting change (Note 2)

 

 


 

 
1,539

 

 
1,539

Net earnings

 

 

 

 
375,972

 

 
375,972

Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax

 

 

 

 

 
89,592

 
89,592

Balance at December 31, 2017
25,541,393