DEF 14A 1 proxy2016.htm DEF 14A PRE 14A


UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
SCHEDULE 14A
Proxy Statement Pursuant to Section 14(a) of the Securities
Exchange Act of 1934

Filed by the Registrant þ
Filed by a Party other than the Registrant o
Check the appropriate box:
 
o
 
Preliminary Proxy Statement
 
o
 
Confidential, for Use of the Commission Only (as permitted by Rule 14a-6(e)(2))
 
þ
 
Definitive Proxy Statement
 
o
 
Definitive Additional Materials
 
o
 
Soliciting Material Pursuant to §240.14a-12

Valero Energy Corporation
(Name of Registrant as Specified In Its Charter)

(Name of Person(s) Filing Proxy Statement, if other than the Registrant)
Payment of Filing Fee (Check the appropriate box):
þ
 
No fee required.
o
 
Fee computed on table below per Exchange Act Rules 14a-6(i)(1) and 0-11.
(1)
Title of each class of securities to which transaction applies: ____________________
(2)
Aggregate number of securities to which transaction applies: ____________________
(3)
Per unit price or other underlying value of transaction computed pursuant to Exchange Act Rule 0-11 (Set forth the amount on which the filing fee is calculated and state how it was determined): _______
(4)
Proposed maximum aggregate value of transaction: ____________________
(5)
Total fee paid: ____________________
o
 
Fee paid previously with preliminary materials.
 
 
 
o
 
Check box if any part of the fee is offset as provided by Exchange Act Rule 240.0-11 and identify the filing for which the offsetting fee was paid previously. Identify the previous filing by registration statement number, or the Form or Schedule and the date of its filing.
(1)
Amount Previously Paid: ____________________
(2)
Form, Schedule or Registration Statement No.: ________
(3)
Filing Party: ____________________
(4)
Date Filed: ____________________





VALERO ENERGY CORPORATION

NOTICE OF 2016
ANNUAL MEETING OF STOCKHOLDERS
The 2016 annual meeting of stockholders of Valero Energy Corporation is scheduled to be held as follows:
When:    Thursday, May 12, 2016
10:00 a.m., Central Time
Where:    Valero Energy Corporation
One Valero Way
San Antonio, Texas 78249
The purpose of the annual meeting is to consider and vote on the following items:

1.
Election of directors;
2.
Ratification of KPMG LLP as independent auditors;
3.
Advisory vote to approve executive compensation;
4.
Amendment of our Restated Certificate of Incorporation to delete its restriction on stockholders’ ability to remove directors without cause;
5.
Reapproval of our 2011 Omnibus Stock Incentive Plan; and
6.
Other matters, if any, properly brought before the meeting.




By order of the Board of Directors,

J. Stephen Gilbert
Secretary

Valero Energy Corporation
One Valero Way
San Antonio, Texas 78249
March 31, 2016






TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
ANNUAL MEETING OF STOCKHOLDERS
PROPOSAL NO. 1—ELECTION OF DIRECTORS
VALERO’S 2015 ACCOMPLISHMENTS
Process and Timing of Compensation Decisions
Benchmarking Competitive Pay Levels
Relative Size of Major Compensation Elements
Individual Performance and Personal Objectives
Base Salaries
Annual Incentive Bonus
Long-Term Incentive Awards
Perquisites and Other Benefits
Post-Employment Benefits
ACCOUNTING AND TAX TREATMENT
 
 
 
 




TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
PROPOSAL NO. 2—RATIFY APPOINTMENT OF INDEPENDENT AUDITORS
KPMG LLP FEES
REPORT OF THE AUDIT COMMITTEE FOR FISCAL YEAR 2015
PROPOSAL NO. 3—ADVISORY VOTE TO APPROVE COMPENSATION OF NAMED EXECUTIVE OFFICERS
PROPOSAL NO. 4—AMENDMENT OF RESTATED CERTIFICATE OF INCORPORATION
PROPOSAL NO. 5—REAPPROVAL OF THE 2011 OMNIBUS STOCK INCENTIVE PLAN
STOCKHOLDER COMMUNICATIONS, NOMINATIONS, AND PROPOSALS


Appendix AValero Energy Corporation 2011 Omnibus Stock Incentive Plan






VALERO ENERGY CORPORATION
PROXY STATEMENT
2016 ANNUAL MEETING OF STOCKHOLDERS
Our Board is soliciting proxies to be voted at the Annual Meeting of Stockholders on May 12, 2016 (the “Annual Meeting”). The accompanying notice describes the time, place, and purposes of the Annual Meeting. Action may be taken at the Annual Meeting or on any date to which the meeting may be adjourned. Unless otherwise indicated the terms “Valero,” “we,” “our,” and “us” are used in this proxy statement to refer to Valero Energy Corporation, to one or more of our consolidated subsidiaries, or to all of them taken as a whole. “Board” means our board of directors.

We are mailing our Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials (“Notice”) to stockholders on or about March 31, 2016. On this date, you will be able to access all of our proxy materials on the website referenced in the Notice.

Record Date, Shares Outstanding, Quorum
Holders of record of our common stock, $0.01 par value (“Common Stock”), at the close of business on March 15, 2016 (the “record date”) are entitled to vote on the matters presented at the Annual Meeting. On the record date, 469,778,107 shares of Common Stock were issued and outstanding and entitled to one vote per share. Stockholders representing a majority of voting power, present in person or represented by properly executed proxy, will constitute a quorum.

Voting in Person, Revocability of Proxies
If you attend the Annual Meeting and want to vote in person, we will give you a ballot at the meeting. If your shares are registered in your name, you are considered the stockholder “of record” and you have the right to vote the shares at the meeting. If, however, your shares are held in the name of your broker or other nominee, you are considered the beneficial owner of shares held in “street name.” As a beneficial owner, if you wish to vote at the meeting, you will need to bring to the meeting a legal proxy from the stockholder of record (e.g., your broker) authorizing you to vote the shares.
You may revoke your proxy at any time before it is voted at the Annual Meeting by (i) submitting a written revocation to Valero, (ii) returning a subsequently dated proxy to Valero, or (iii) attending the Annual Meeting requesting that your proxy be revoked and voting in person at the Annual Meeting. If instructions to the contrary are not provided, shares will be voted as indicated on the proxy card.

Required Votes
For Proposal No. 1, as required by Valero’s bylaws, each director is to be elected by a majority of votes cast with respect to that director’s election. Proposals 2, 3, and 5 require approval by the affirmative vote of a majority of the voting power of the shares present in person or by proxy at the Annual Meeting and entitled to vote. Proposal No. 4 requires approval by the affirmative vote of the holders of at least 80 percent of the voting power of the outstanding Common Stock.

Effect of Abstentions
Shares voted to abstain are treated as “present” for purposes of determining a quorum. In the election of directors (Proposal No. 1), pursuant to our bylaws, shares voted to abstain are not deemed to be “votes cast,” and are accordingly disregarded. When approval for a proposal requires (a) the affirmative vote of a majority of the voting power of the shares present in person or by proxy and entitled to vote (Proposals 2, 3, and 5),


1



(b) the affirmative vote of a majority of the voting power of the issued and outstanding Common Stock, or (c) the affirmative vote of the holders of at least 80 percent of the voting power of the issued and outstanding Common Stock (Proposal No. 4), then shares voted to “abstain” have the effect of a negative vote (a vote “against”).

Broker Non-Votes
Brokers holding shares must vote according to the specific instructions they receive from the beneficial owners of the stock. If your broker does not receive specific voting instructions from you, in some cases the broker may vote the shares in the broker’s discretion. However, the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) precludes brokers from exercising voting discretion on certain proposals without specific instructions from the beneficial owner. This results in a “broker non-vote” on the proposal. A broker non-vote (i) is treated as “present” for purposes of determining a quorum, (ii) has the effect of a negative vote when a majority of the voting power of the issued and outstanding shares is required for approval of a particular proposal, and (iii) has no effect when a majority of the voting power of the shares present in person or by proxy and entitled to vote or a plurality or majority of the votes cast is required for approval.

Proposal No. 2 is deemed to be a routine matter under NYSE rules. A broker or other nominee generally may vote uninstructed shares on routine matters, and therefore no broker non-votes are expected to occur for Proposal No. 2.

Proposals 1, 3, 4, and 5 are considered non-routine under applicable rules. Because a broker or other nominee cannot vote without instructions on non-routine matters, we expect an undetermined number of broker non-votes to occur on these proposals.

Solicitation of Proxies
Valero pays the cost for soliciting proxies and the Annual Meeting. In addition to solicitation by mail, proxies may be solicited by personal interview, telephone, and similar means by directors, officers, or employees of Valero, none of whom will be specially compensated for such activities. Valero also intends to request that brokers, banks, and other nominees solicit proxies from their principals and will pay such brokers, banks, and other nominees certain expenses incurred by them for such activities. Valero retained Georgeson LLC, a proxy soliciting firm, to assist in the solicitation of proxies, for a fee of $17,500, plus reimbursement of certain out-of-pocket expenses.
For participants in our qualified 401(k) plan (“Thrift Plan”), the proxy card will represent (in addition to any shares held individually of record by the participant) the number of shares allocated to the participant’s account in the Thrift Plan. For shares held by the Thrift Plan, the proxy card will constitute an instruction to the trustee of the plan on how to vote those shares. Shares for which instructions are not received may be voted by the trustee per the terms of the plan.

INFORMATION REGARDING THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Valero’s business is managed under the direction of our Board. Our Board conducts its business through meetings of its members and its committees. During 2015, our Board held six meetings and the standing Board committees held 16 meetings. No member of the Board attended less than 75 percent of the meetings of the Board and committees of which he or she was a member. All Board members are expected to attend the Annual Meeting, and all Board members attended the 2015 annual meeting.



2



INDEPENDENT DIRECTORS
Our Corporate Governance Guidelines require that a majority of the Board be composed of independent directors. The Board presently has nine non-management directors and one member from management: Joseph W. Gorder (our Chief Executive Officer). As a member of management, Mr. Gorder is not an independent director under NYSE listing standards. The Board determined that all of our non-management directors who served on the Board at any time in 2015 met the Board’s applicable independence requirements. Those independent directors are the following.
Jerry D. Choate
 
Philip J. Pfeiffer
 
Stephen M. Waters
Deborah P. Majoras
 
Robert A. Profusek
 
Randall J. Weisenburger
Donald L. Nickles
 
Susan Kaufman Purcell
 
Rayford Wilkins, Jr.

The Board’s Audit Committee, Compensation Committee, and Nominating/Governance and Public Policy Committee are composed entirely of directors who meet the independence requirements of the NYSE. Each member of the Audit Committee also meets the additional independence standards for Audit Committee members required by the SEC.

The Board determines independence on the basis of the standards specified by the NYSE, the standards listed in our Corporate Governance Guidelines, and other facts and circumstances the Board may consider relevant. In general, our Corporate Governance Guidelines require that an independent director must have no material relationship with Valero. A relationship is not material under the guidelines if it:
is not a relationship that would preclude a determination of independence under Section 303A.02(b) of the NYSE Listed Company Manual;
consists of charitable contributions by Valero to an organization in which a director is an executive officer that do not exceed the greater of $1 million or two percent of the organization’s gross revenue in any of the last three years;
consists of charitable contributions to any organization with which a director, or any member of a director’s immediate family, is affiliated as an officer, director, or trustee pursuant to a matching gift program of Valero and made on terms applicable to employees and directors, or is in amounts that do not exceed $1 million per year; and
is not a relationship required to be disclosed by Valero under Item 404 of Regulation S-K (regarding related person transactions).

Under the NYSE’s listing standards, a director is not deemed independent unless the Board affirmatively determines that the director has no material relationship with Valero. The Board has reviewed pertinent information concerning the background, employment, and affiliations (including commercial, banking, consulting, legal, accounting, charitable, and familial relationships) of our directors, and the Board has determined that, other than being a director and/or stockholder of Valero, each of our non-management directors and each member of the Audit, Compensation, and Nominating/Governance and Public Policy Committees has no material relationship with Valero (either directly or as a partner, stockholder, or officer of an organization that has a relationship with Valero), and is therefore independent.


3



COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD
The Board has three standing committees:
Audit Committee,
Compensation Committee, and
Nominating/Governance and Public Policy Committee.
The committees’ charters are available on our website at www.valero.com > Investors > Corporate Governance.

Audit Committee
The Audit Committee assists the Board in oversight of the integrity of Valero’s financial statements and public financial information, the qualifications and independence of Valero’s independent auditor, and the performance of Valero’s internal audit function and independent auditors. We make additional disclosures about the Audit Committee in this proxy statement under the caption “Risk Oversight” and in connection with “Proposal No. 2—Ratify Appointment of KPMG LLP as Independent Auditors” below.

Members of the Audit Committee are:
Randall J. Weisenburger (Chair),
Susan Kaufman Purcell, and
Stephen M. Waters.

In the past year, Rayford Wilkins, Jr. also served as a member of the committee (through August 6, 2015). The Audit Committee met five times in 2015.

The Board has determined that Randall J. Weisenburger is an “audit committee financial expert” (as defined by the SEC) and that he is “independent” as independence for audit committee members is defined in the NYSE listing standards. For more information regarding Mr. Weisenburger’s experience, see Proposal No. 1—Election of Directors—Information Concerning Nominees and Directors.”

Compensation Committee
The Compensation Committee reviews and reports to the Board on matters related to compensation strategies, policies, and programs. The Compensation Committee’s duties are further described in “Compensation Discussion and Analysis” below and in the committee’s charter. The Compensation Committee has, for administrative convenience, delegated authority to our Chief Executive Officer to make non-material amendments to Valero’s benefit plans and to make limited grants of stock options and restricted stock to new hires who are not executive officers.

Members of the Compensation Committee are:
Rayford Wilkins, Jr. (Chair),
Jerry D. Choate, and
Robert A. Profusek.

In the past year, Stephen M. Waters and Randall J. Weisenburger also served as members of the committee (through September 16, 2015). The Compensation Committee met seven times in 2015. The Compensation


4



Committee Report for fiscal year 2015 appears in this proxy statement immediately preceding Compensation Discussion and Analysis.

Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation
There are no compensation committee interlocks. None of the members of the Compensation Committee has served as an officer or employee of Valero or had any relationship requiring disclosure by Valero under Item 404 of the SEC’s Regulation S-K, which addresses related-person transactions.

Nominating/Governance and Public Policy Committee
The Nominating/Governance and Public Policy Committee:
evaluates policies on the size and composition of the Board;
evaluates criteria and procedures for director nominations;
considers and recommends candidates for election to the Board;
evaluates, recommends, and monitors corporate governance guidelines, policies, and procedures, including our codes of business conduct and ethics;
assists the Board in identifying, evaluating, and monitoring public policy trends and social and political issues that could impact our business activities and performance; and
considers and makes recommendations for our strategies relating to corporate responsibility, contributions, and reputation management.

Members of the committee are:
Deborah P. Majoras (Chair),
Donald L. Nickles, and
Philip J. Pfeiffer.

In the past year, Jerry D. Choate and Robert A. Profusek also served as members of the committee (through September 16, 2015). The committee met four times in 2015.

The Nominating/Governance and Public Policy Committee recommended to the Board each director listed in this proxy statement under “Proposal No. 1—Election of Directors—Information Concerning Nominees and Directors—Nominees” as nominees for election as directors at the Annual Meeting. The committee also considered and recommended the appointment of a Lead Director to preside at meetings of the independent directors without management, and recommended assignments for the Board’s committees. The full Board approved the recommendations of the committee and adopted resolutions approving the slate of director nominees to stand for election at the Annual Meeting, the appointment of a Lead Director, and Board committee assignments.

SELECTION OF DIRECTOR NOMINEES
The Nominating/Governance and Public Policy Committee solicits recommendations for Board candidates from a number of sources, including our directors, our officers, individuals personally known to the members of the Board, and third-party research. In addition, the Committee will consider candidates submitted by stockholders when submitted in accordance with the procedures described in this proxy statement under the caption “Miscellaneous—Stockholder Communications, Nominations, and Proposals.”


5



The Committee will consider all candidates identified through the processes described above and will evaluate each of them on the same basis. The level of consideration the Committee will extend to a stockholder’s candidate will be commensurate with the quality and quantity of information about the candidate that the nominating stockholder makes available to the Committee.

Evaluation of Director Candidates
The Nominating/Governance and Public Policy Committee is charged with assessing the skills and character-istics that candidates for election to the Board should possess and with determining the composition of the Board as a whole. The assessments include consideration of (i) applicable independence standards, (ii) skills and experience necessary for service on the Board’s committees, and (iii) skills and expertise to serve the needs of the Board as a whole.

Each candidate must meet certain minimum qualifications, including:
independence of thought and judgment;
the ability to dedicate sufficient time, energy, and attention to the performance of her or his duties, taking into consideration the candidate’s service on other public company boards; and
skills and expertise complementary to those of the existing Board members; in this regard, the Board will consider its need for operational, managerial, financial, governmental affairs, or other expertise.
The Committee also considers (i) diversity concepts such as race, gender, and national origin, (ii) the ability of a prospective candidate to work with the then-existing interpersonal dynamics of the Board, and (iii) the candidate’s ability to contribute to the collaborative culture among Board members.

Based on this initial evaluation, the Committee will determine whether to interview a proposed candidate and, if warranted, will recommend that one or more of its members, other members of the Board, or senior officers, as appropriate, interview the candidate. After completing this process, the Committee ultimately determines its list of nominees and submits the list to the full Board for consideration and approval.

LEADERSHIP STRUCTURE OF THE BOARD
Our bylaws provide that the Chairman of the Board has the power to preside at all meetings of the Board. Joseph W. Gorder, our Chief Executive Officer, serves as the Chairman of our Board. Although the Board believes that the combination of the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer roles is appropriate in current circumstances, Valero’s Corporate Governance Guidelines do not establish this approach as a policy, and in fact, the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer roles were separate from 2005–2007 and from May 1–December 30, 2014.

The Chief Executive Officer is appointed by the Board to manage Valero’s daily affairs and operations. We believe that Mr. Gorder’s extensive industry experience and direct involvement in Valero’s operations make him best suited to serve as Chairman in order to:
lead the Board in productive, strategic planning;
determine necessary and appropriate agenda items for meetings of the Board with input from the Lead Director and Board committee chairs; and
determine and manage the amount of time and information devoted to discussion of agenda items and other matters that may come before the Board.


6



Our Board structure includes strong oversight by independent directors. Mr. Gorder is the only member from our management (past or present) who serves on the Board; all of our other directors are independent. Each of the Board’s committees is chaired by an independent director.

LEAD DIRECTOR AND MEETINGS OF NON-MANAGEMENT DIRECTORS
Our Board appoints a Lead Director whose responsibilities include leading the meetings of our non-management directors outside the presence of management. Our Board regularly meets in executive session outside the presence of management, generally at each Board and committee meeting. Following the recommendation of the Nominating/Governance and Public Policy Committee, the Board selected Robert A. Profusek to serve as Lead Director during 2016. He also served as Lead Director in 2015.

The Lead Director, working with the committee chairs, sets agendas and leads the discussion of regular meetings of the Board outside the presence of management, provides feedback regarding these meetings to the Chairman, and otherwise serves as liaison between the independent directors and the Chairman. The Lead Director is also responsible for receiving, reviewing, and acting upon communications from stock-holders or other interested parties when those interests should be addressed by a person independent of management. The Board believes that this approach appropriately and effectively complements Valero’s combined Chief Executive Officer/Chairman structure.

RISK OVERSIGHT
The Board considers oversight of Valero’s risk management efforts to be a responsibility of the full board. The Board’s role in risk oversight includes receiving regular reports from members of senior management on areas of material risk to Valero, or to the success of a particular project or endeavor under consideration, including operational, financial, legal, regulatory, strategic, and reputational risks. The full Board (or the appropriate Board committee) receives reports from management to enable the Board (or committee) to assess Valero’s risk identification, risk management, and risk mitigation strategies. When a report is vetted at the committee level, the chair of that committee thereafter reports on the matter to the full Board. This enables to the Board and its committees to coordinate the Board’s risk oversight role. The Board also believes that risk management is an integral part of Valero’s annual strategic planning process, which addresses, among other things, the risks and opportunities facing Valero.

One of the Audit Committee’s responsibilities is to discuss with management our major financial risk exposures and the steps we have taken to monitor and control those exposures, including our risk assessment and risk management policies. In this regard, our chief audit officer prepares a comprehensive risk assessment report and reviews that report with the Audit Committee. This report identifies material business risks for Valero and identifies Valero’s internal controls that respond to and mitigate those risks. Valero’s management regularly evaluates these controls, and the Audit Committee is provided regular updates regarding the effectiveness of the controls. The Audit Committee also has oversight responsibility regarding management’s annual assessment of, and report on, Valero’s internal control over financial reporting.

Our Nominating/Governance and Public Policy Committee reviews our policies and performance in areas of employee and contractor safety, environmental compliance, governmental affairs, and policy matters generally. Our Compensation Committee assesses the risk of our compensation programs.



7



PROPOSAL NO. 1ELECTION OF DIRECTORS
(Item 1 on the proxy card)
We do not have a classified board. Each of our directors stands for election every year at the annual meeting of stockholders. If elected at the 2016 Annual Meeting, all of the nominees listed below will serve as director for a one-year term expiring at the 2017 annual meeting of stockholders. The persons named on the proxy card intend to vote for the election of each of these nominees unless you direct otherwise on your proxy card.

The Board recommends a vote “FOR” all nominees.

Under our bylaws, each director to be elected under this proposal will be elected by the vote of the majority of the votes cast at the Annual Meeting if a quorum is present. For this purpose, a “majority of the votes cast” means that the number of shares voted “for” a director’s election exceeds 50 percent of the number of votes cast with respect to that director’s election. Votes “cast” exclude abstentions. If any nominee is unavailable as a candidate at the time of the Annual Meeting, either the number of directors constituting the full Board will be reduced to eliminate the resulting vacancy, or the persons named as proxies will use their best judgment in voting for any available nominee.

INFORMATION CONCERNING NOMINEES AND DIRECTORS
Our directors are listed in the following table. Each is a nominee for election as a director at the Annual Meeting. There is no family relationship among any of the executive officers or nominees for director. There is no arrangement or understanding between any director or any other person pursuant to which the director was or is to be selected a director or nominee.
Directors (1)
 
Executive Officer or Director Since (2)
 
Age as of 12/31/2015
Joseph W. Gorder, Chairman of the Board, President, and Chief Executive Officer
 
2003
 
58
Deborah P. Majoras
 
2012
 
52
Donald L. Nickles
 
2005
 
67
Philip J. Pfeiffer
 
2012
 
68
Robert A. Profusek
 
2005
 
65
Susan Kaufman Purcell
 
1997
 
73
Stephen M. Waters
 
2008
 
69
Randall J. Weisenburger
 
2011
 
57
Rayford Wilkins, Jr.
 
2011
 
64
(1) The table excludes director Jerry D. Choate. Mr. Choate’s term expires on the date of the 2016 Annual Meeting, and he will retire from our Board on that date.
(2) For Dr. Purcell, the reported service date excludes service on the board of Valero’s former parent company prior to Valero’s separation from that company in 1997.
Nominees.
Mr. Gorder is Valero’s Chairman of the Board, President, and Chief Executive Officer. He was first elected to the Board in February 2014. He became Valero’s Chief Executive Officer on May 1, 2014, and Chairman of the Board on December 31, 2014. Previously he served as Valero’s President and Chief Operating Officer since November 2012. Prior to that, Mr. Gorder was Executive Vice President and Chief Commercial Officer beginning in January 2011, and led Valero’s European operations from its London office. Beginning


8



in December 2005, he was Executive Vice President–Marketing and Supply. Mr. Gorder has held several positions with Valero and Ultramar Diamond Shamrock Corporation (UDS) with responsibilities for corporate development and marketing. Mr. Gorder is also Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Valero Energy Partners GP LLC, the general partner of Valero Energy Partners LP (NYSE: VLP), a midstream logistics master limited partnership formed by Valero in 2013. He also serves on the board of directors of Anadarko Petroleum Corporation (NYSE: APC). Mr. Gorder’s pertinent experience, qualifications, attributes, and skills include his multiple years of experience in the refining industry during his years of service with UDS and Valero.
Ms. Majoras is Chief Legal Officer and Secretary of The Procter & Gamble Company (P&G) (NYSE: PG). She joined P&G in 2008 as Senior Vice President and General Counsel. Previously she served as Chair of the Federal Trade Commission from 2004 until 2008. From 2001 to 2004, Ms. Majoras was Deputy Assistant Attorney General in the U.S. Department of Justice, Antitrust Division. Ms. Majoras joined the law firm of Jones Day in 1991, where she became a partner in 1999. Ms. Majoras serves on the boards of The Christ Hospital Health Network, the Cincinnati Legal Aid Society, the Association of General Counsel, Westminster College, and the Leadership Council on Legal Diversity. Ms. Majoras’s pertinent experience, qualifications, attributes, and skills include regulatory knowledge and expertise attained through her positions with the federal government; expertise in legal matters, leadership, and management skills attained while acting as an officer of a major U.S. publicly traded corporation and a partner with Jones Day; and leadership and management skills attained while serving as director or trustee of numerous non-profit organizations and a member of Valero’s Board since 2012.
Senator Nickles retired as U.S. Senator from Oklahoma in 2005 after serving in the U.S. Senate for 24 years. He had also served in the Oklahoma State Senate for two years. During his tenure as a U.S. Senator, he was Assistant Republican Leader for six years, Chairman of the Republican Senatorial Committee, and Chairman of the Republican Policy Committee. He served as Chairman of the Budget Committee and as a member of the Finance and Energy and Natural Resources Committees. In 2005, he formed and is the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of The Nickles Group, a Washington-based consulting and business venture firm. Senator Nickles also serves on the Board of Trustees of Washington Mutual Investors Fund (AWSHX). He has served as a director of Valero since 2005. His pertinent experience, qualifications, attributes, and skills include extensive political, legislative and regulatory knowledge and expertise attained through his years of service as a U.S. Senator; the experience attained through his service on the boards of other public companies; the knowledge and experience he has attained from serving as founder and chief executive officer of a consulting and business venture firm; and the knowledge and experience he has attained through his service on Valero’s Board.
Mr. Pfeiffer is Of Counsel in the San Antonio office of Norton Rose Fulbright LLP, where he was Partner-in-Charge for 25 years and led the office’s labor and employment practice. Through his 42-year career with the firm, Mr. Pfeiffer assisted employers in management–union matters, complex civil rights matters, employment discrimination cases, affirmative action compliance, employment torts, alternative dispute resolution, employment contracts, and ERISA litigation. He is a director and the immediate past Chairman of the Board of Southwest Research Institute, a non-profit contract research corporation based in San Antonio, Texas. He serves or has served on the boards of many other non-profit organizations including the United Way of San Antonio and Bexar County, St. Mary’s University, San Antonio Medical Foundation, Texas Research and Technology Foundation, Christus Children’s Hospital Foundation, Alamo Area Council of Boy Scouts, and the Cancer Therapy and Research Center. Mr. Pfeiffer’s pertinent experience, qualifications, attributes, and skills include expertise in legal matters, including labor and employment issues, leadership and management skills attained while acting as Partner-in-Charge of a law office, and serving as chairman, director, or trustee of numerous non-profit organizations and his service on Valero’s Board.


9



Mr. Profusek is a a partner of the Jones Day law firm where he chairs the firm’s global mergers and acquisitions practice. His law practice focuses on mergers, acquisitions, takeovers, restructurings, and corporate governance matters. Mr. Profusek is also the lead independent director of CTS Corporation (NYSE: CTS). He served as a director of the managing general partner of Valero L.P. (now known as “NuStar Energy L.P.”) from 2001–2005. He has served as a director of Valero since 2005. Mr. Profusek’s pertinent experience, qualifications, attributes, and skills include: legal expertise in legal matters, including corporate governance; capital markets expertise attained through his extensive experience in mergers and acquisitions and financing activities; managerial experience attained through his leadership roles with Jones Day; the knowledge and experience he has attained through his current service on another public company board and prior service as a director of other NYSE-listed companies; and the knowledge and experience he has attained through his service on Valero’s Board.
Dr. Purcell recently retired as Director of the Center for Hemispheric Policy at the University of Miami, a position she held since 2005. The Center examines political, economic, financial, trade, and security issues in Latin America, as well as U.S.-Latin America relations. She previously served as Vice President of the Council of the Americas, a non-profit business organization of mainly Fortune 500 companies with investments in Latin America, and of the Americas Society, a non-profit educational institution, both in New York City. She also was a member of the U.S. Department of State’s Policy Planning Staff. Dr. Purcell has been a director of Valero since 1997, and served as a director of its former parent company from 1994–1997. Her pertinent experience, qualifications, attributes, and skills include: economic, political and international relations expertise attained through her experience with the University of Miami, the Council of Americas, the Americas Society, and the U.S. Dept. of State; a Ph.D in political science; financial literacy and experience attained through her service on the boards and audit committees of several closed-end mutual funds; and the knowledge and experience she has attained through her service on Valero’s Board.
Mr. Waters has been the managing partner of Compass Partners Advisers LLP (Compass Partners) and its predecessor partnerships since 1996 and was the Chief Executive of Compass Partners European Equity Fund from 2005 to 2013. From 1988 to 1996, he served in several capacities at Morgan Stanley, including Co-Head of the Mergers and Acquisitions department from 1990 to 1992, Co-Chief Executive Officer of Morgan Stanley Europe from 1992 to 1996, and as a member of its worldwide Firm Operating Committee from 1992 to 1996. From 1974 to 1988, he was with Lehman Brothers, co-founding the Mergers and Acquisitions department in 1977, becoming a partner in 1980, and serving as Co-Head of the Mergers and Acquisitions department from 1985 to 1988. Mr. Waters is also Chairman of Boston Private Financial Holdings, and serves as trustee of the United States Naval Institute Foundation. His pertinent experience, qualifications, attributes, and skills include: financial literacy and expertise, capital markets expertise, and managerial experience gained through his mergers and acquisitions experience and leadership roles with investment banking firms, Lehman Brothers, Morgan Stanley, and Compass Partners; and the knowledge and experience he has attained through his service on Valero’s Board since 2008 and on other public company boards.
Mr. Weisenburger is the managing member of Mile26 Capital, LLC, a hedge fund based in Greenwich, Connecticut. He served as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Omnicom Group Inc. (NYSE: OMC) from 1998 until September 2014. Prior to joining Omnicom, he was a founding member of Wasserstein Perella and a former member of the First Boston Corporation. While at Wasserstein Perella, Mr. Weisenburger specialized in private equity investing and leveraged acquisitions, and in 1993, he became President and CEO of the firm’s private equity subsidiary. His other corporate board service includes Carnival Corporation and Carnival plc (NYSE: CCL) and Acosta Sales and Marketing. He is a member of the Board of Overseers for the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania, and is the managing member of The Altus One Fund Inc. His pertinent experience, qualifications, attributes, and skills include financial literacy and expertise, capital markets expertise, managerial experience he has attained serving as


10



an executive officer of other public companies, and the experience he has attained from service on Valero’s Board since 2011 and on other public company boards.
Mr. Wilkins previously served as CEO of Diversified Businesses of AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T), where he was responsible for international investments, AT&T Interactive, AT&T Advertising Solutions, customer information services, and the consumer wireless initiative in India. He retired from AT&T at the end of March 2012. Mr. Wilkins held several other leadership positions at AT&T and its predecessor companies, including Group President and CEO of SBC Enterprise Business Services and President and CEO of SBC Pacific Bell. He also serves on the board of Morgan Stanley (NYSE: MS) and the Advisory Council of the McCombs School of Business at the University of Texas at Austin. His pertinent experience, qualifications, attributes, and skills include managerial experience he has attained serving as an executive officer of other public companies, international business acumen he has attained from his responsibilities as executive officer and director for international business concerns, and the experience he has attained from service on Valero’s Board since 2011 and on other public company boards.
For information regarding the nominees’ Common Stock holdings, compensation, and other arrangements, see “Information Regarding the Board of Directors,” “Beneficial Ownership of Valero Securities,” “Compensation Discussion and Analysis,” “Compensation of Directors,” and “Certain Relationships and Related Transactions” elsewhere in this proxy statement.




11



IDENTIFICATION OF EXECUTIVE OFFICERS
The following are Valero’s executive officers (for purposes of Rule 3b-7 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934). There is no arrangement or understanding between any executive officer listed below or any other person under which the executive officer was or is to be selected as an officer.
 
 
Officer Since
 
Age as of
12/31/2015
Joseph W. Gorder, President and Chief Executive Officer
 
2003
 
58
Jay D. Browning, Executive Vice President and General Counsel
 
1997
 
57
Michael S. Ciskowski, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
 
1998
 
58
* R. Michael Crownover, Executive Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer
 
2005
 
58
R. Lane Riggs, Executive Vice President–Refining Operations and Engineering
 
2011
 
50
Mr. Gorder. Mr. Gorder’s biographical information is stated above under the caption “Information Concerning Nominees and Directors—Nominees.”
Mr. Browning was elected Executive Vice President and General Counsel effective May 1, 2014. He was elected Senior Vice President and General Counsel in November 2012. He previously served as Senior Vice President–Corporate Law from 2006 to 2012. Mr. Browning was elected Vice President of Valero in 2002, and was first elected as Secretary in 1997. He also serves as Executive Vice President and General Counsel of Valero Energy Partners GP LLC, the general partner of Valero Energy Partners LP.
Mr. Ciskowski has served as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Valero since August 2003. Before that, he served as Executive Vice President–Corporate Development since April 2003, and Senior Vice President in charge of business and corporate development since 2001.
* Mr. Crownover retired from Valero effective January 4, 2016. During 2015, he served as Executive Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer of Valero, a position he had held since May 1, 2014. Previously, he served as Senior Vice President–Human Resources from 2007 until 2014. He is included as a “named executive officer” in this proxy statement in accordance with Item 402(a)(3)(iii) of Regulation S-K.
Mr. Riggs was elected Executive Vice President–Refining Operations and Engineering effective May 1, 2014. Prior to that, he served as Senior Vice President–Refining Operations since 2011. His previous positions included Senior Vice President–Crude, Feedstock Supply & Trading and Vice President–Refinery Planning & Economics for Valero’s refining division. Mr. Riggs also serves on the board of directors of Valero Energy Partners GP LLC.
As used in this proxy statement, our “named executive officers” are the five persons listed in the Summary Compensation Table.



12



BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP OF VALERO SECURITIES
SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF MANAGEMENT AND DIRECTORS
The following table presents information as of February 1, 2016, regarding Common Stock beneficially owned by each nominee for director, each current director, each executive officer named in the Summary Compensation Table, and all current directors and executive officers of Valero as a group. No executive officer, director, or nominee for director owns any class of equity securities of Valero other than Common Stock. None of the shares listed below are pledged as security. The address for each person is One Valero Way, San Antonio, Texas 78249.
Name of Beneficial Owner
 
Shares Held (1)
 
Shares Under Options (2)
 
Total Shares
 
Percent of Class
Jay D. Browning
 
184,451

 
27,345

 
211,796

 
*
Jerry D. Choate
 
98,044

 

 
98,044

 
*
Michael S. Ciskowski
 
311,336

 
382,466

 
693,802

 
*
R. Michael Crownover (retired)
 
139,563

 

 
139,563

 
*
Joseph W. Gorder
 
359,129

 
206,993

 
566,122

 
*
Deborah P. Majoras
 
16,598

 

 
16,598

 
*
Donald L. Nickles
 
22,653

 

 
22,653

 
*
Philip J. Pfeiffer
 
18,941

 

 
18,941

 
*
Robert A. Profusek
 
34,914

 

 
34,914

 
*
Susan Kaufman Purcell
 
10,405

 

 
10,405

 
*
R. Lane Riggs
 
111,147

 
35,205

 
146,352

 
*
Stephen M. Waters
 
9,442

 

 
9,442

 
*
Randall J. Weisenburger
 
25,603

 

 
25,603

 
*
Rayford Wilkins, Jr.
 
26,477

 

 
26,477

 
*
Directors and current executive officers as a group (13 persons)
 
1,229,140

 
652,009

 
1,881,149

 
*
*
Indicates that the percentage of beneficial ownership does not exceed 1% of the class.
 
 
(1)
Includes shares allocated under the Thrift Plan and shares of restricted stock. Restricted stock may not be sold or transferred until vested. For Mr. Browning, the balance shown also includes shares held by his spouse. For Mr. Ciskowski, the balance shown also includes shares held by an entity that he controls. For Mr. Crownover, the balance is shown as of December 31, 2015. The balance shown for Mr. Waters does not include 2,940 shares held in a trust for which his spouse serves as trustee (Mr. Waters disclaims beneficial ownership of those shares). This column does not include shares that could be acquired under options, which are reported in the column captioned “Shares Under Options.”
 
 
(2)
Represents shares of Common Stock that may be acquired under outstanding stock options currently exercisable and that are exercisable within 60 days from February 1, 2015. Shares subject to options may not be voted unless the options are exercised. Options that may become exercisable within such 60-day period only in the event of a change of control of Valero are excluded.



13



SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS
The following table describes each person or group of affiliated persons known to be a beneficial owner of more than five percent of our Common Stock as of December 31, 2015. The information is based on reports filed by such persons with the SEC.
Name and Address of Beneficial Owner
 
Amount and Nature of Beneficial Ownership
 
Percent of Class
BlackRock, Inc.
   55 East 52nd Street
   New York NY 10055
 
36,217,570

 
(1)
 
7.5
%
The Vanguard Group
   100 Vanguard Blvd
   Malvern PA 19355
 
31,778,833

 
(2)
 
6.6
%
State Street Corporation
   State Street Financial Center
   One Lincoln Street
   Boston MA 02111
 
25,159,045

 
(3)
 
5.2
%
(1)
BlackRock, Inc. filed with the SEC an amended Schedule 13G on January 27, 2016, reporting that it or certain of its affiliates beneficially owned in the aggregate 36,217,570 shares, for which it had sole voting power for 31,286,443 shares, shared voting power for 3,242 shares, sole dispositive power for 36,214,328 shares, and shared dispositive power for 3,242 shares.
(2)
The Vanguard Group filed with the SEC a Schedule 13G on February 11, 2016, reporting that it or certain of its affiliates beneficially owned in the aggregate 31,778,833 shares, for which it had sole voting power for 895,017 shares, shared voting power for 50,700 shares, sole dispositive power for 30,824,905 shares, and shared dispositive power for 953,928 shares.
(3)
State Street Corporation filed with the SEC a Schedule 13G on February 16, 2016, reporting that it or certain of its affiliates beneficially owned in the aggregate 25,159,045 shares, for which it had shared voting power and shared dispositive power.

SECTION 16(a) BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP REPORTING COMPLIANCE
Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, requires our executive officers, directors, and greater than 10 percent stockholders to file with the SEC certain reports of ownership and changes in ownership of our Common Stock. We believe that all Section 16(a) reports applicable to our executive officers, directors, and greater than 10 percent stockholders were timely filed in 2015, except for one Form 5 for one matter affecting Stephen M. Waters that was inadvertently filed after the Form 5 deadline for fiscal year 2014.



14



RISK ASSESSMENT OF COMPENSATION PROGRAMS
We believe that our incentive compensation programs effectively balance risk and reward. When assessing risk, we consider both cash compensation payable under our annual incentive bonus plan as well as long-term incentives that are awarded under our stock incentive plan. We also consider the mix of award opportunities (i.e., short- versus long-term), performance targets and metrics, the target-setting process, and the administration and governance associated with our plans. We do not believe that our compensation policies and practices are reasonably likely to have an adverse effect on Valero. Features of our compensation programs that we believe mitigate excessive risk taking include:
the mix between fixed and variable, annual and long-term, and cash and equity compensation, designed to encourage strategies and actions that are in Valero’s long-term best interests;
determination of incentive awards based on a variety of indicators of performance, thus diversifying the risk associated with a single indicator of performance;
incorporation of relative total stockholder return into our incentive program, calibrating pay and performance relationships to companies facing the same or similar market forces as Valero;
multi-year vesting periods for equity incentive awards, which encourage focus on sustained growth and earnings;
maximum payout ceilings under our annual bonus program and performance share awards;
restricted stock awards that help contain volatility of incentive awards and further align executives’ interests with long-term stockholder value creation; and
our compensation-related policies, including our executive compensation “clawback” policy and stock ownership guidelines (discussed below under the caption “Compensation Discussion and Analysis—Compensation Related Policies”).



15



COMPENSATION CONSULTANT DISCLOSURES
Under the terms of the Compensation Committee’s charter, the Committee may, in its sole discretion, retain or obtain the advice of a compensation consultant, independent legal counsel, or other adviser, and is directly responsible for the appointment, compensation, and oversight of the work of any compensation consultant, independent legal counsel, or other adviser retained by the Committee. Valero is obligated to provide appropriate funding for the Committee’s retention of any such consultant, counsel, or adviser.
In 2015, the Committee retained Exequity LLP as an independent compensation consultant. Exequity provided to the Committee objective expert analysis and independent advice with respect to executive and director compensation. For the 2015 executive and director compensation services rendered to the Committee, Exequity earned professional fees of $288,722. Exequity did not provide other consulting services to the Committee, to Valero, or to any senior executives of Valero. Exequity is an independent adviser as determined under rules promulgated by the SEC and the NYSE’s listing standards.

During 2015, Exequity’s executive and director compensation consulting services included:
assistance with the determination of peer and comparator companies for benchmarking executive pay and monitoring Valero’s performance;
assistance with the determination of our overall executive compensation philosophy in light of Valero’s business strategy and market considerations;
competitive pay assessment of target and actual total direct compensation for executives, with separate analyses of base salary, annual incentive, and long-term incentive compensation;
competitive pay assessment of director compensation;
assessment of, and recommendations for, our annual incentive bonus program;
assessment of, and recommendation of enhancements to, our long-term incentive program strategy, including the design of an appropriate mix of equity incentive vehicles, performance measures and measurement techniques, and determination of competitive equity grant guidelines consistent with our overall pay philosophy;
updates on trends and developments in executive compensation, new regulatory issues, and best practices; and
assistance with proxy statement disclosures.



16



The following Compensation Committee Report is not “soliciting material,” is not deemed filed with the SEC, and is not to be incorporated by reference into any of Valero’s filings under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), or the Exchange Act, respectively, whether made before or after the date of this proxy statement and irrespective of any general incorporation language therein.

COMPENSATION COMMITTEE REPORT
The Compensation Committee has reviewed and discussed the following Compensation Discussion and Analysis with management. Based on the foregoing review and discussions and such other matters the Compensation Committee deemed relevant and appropriate, the Committee recommended to the Board that the Compensation Discussion and Analysis be included in this proxy statement.

Members of the Compensation Committee:
Rayford Wilkins, Jr., Chair
Jerry D. Choate
Robert A. Profusek
COMPENSATION DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS
VALEROS 2015 ACCOMPLISHMENTS
The following highlights Valero’s significant operational and strategic achievements in 2015.
Returns to Stockholders
Our adjusted earnings per share from continuing operations were $9.24, based on adjusted net income attributable to Valero Energy Corporation stockholders from continuing operations of $4.6 billion, compared to $6.68 per share and $3.5 billion for 2014.
We returned $3.7 billion to our stockholders through dividend payments and common stock repurchases.
We increased our regular quarterly cash dividend 82 percent from $0.275 per share to $0.50 per share.
We continued to maintain our investment-grade credit rating.
Operational Excellence
We significantly exceeded our overall health, safety, and environmental target.
We significantly exceeded our mechanical availability target.
We significantly exceeded our $60 million cost savings goal.
Disciplined Capital Strategy
We successfully completed and commissioned a new crude distillation unit at our Corpus Christi refinery.
We successfully completed a hydrocracker expansion at our Port Arthur refinery.
We successfully completed $1.1 billion in drop-down sales of midstream assets to our master limited partnership, Valero Energy Partners LP, consistent with our strategy to unlock value in our pipelines, terminals, and other transportation and logistics assets.
We employed rigorous selection reviews for capital projects and potential mergers and acquisitions.



17



TIGHT LINK BETWEEN PERFORMANCE AND EXECUTIVE PAY
The compensation opportunities of our executives are intimately tied to the performance of Valero. The following elements of our 2015 executive compensation program support our pay-for-performance philosophy.
In 2015, long-term incentives represented the largest component of targeted pay for our named executive officers, ranging from 57 percent of total targeted pay for our executive vice presidents to 71 percent of total targeted pay for our CEO.
All long-term incentives awarded in 2015 are aligned with stock price performance, linking executives’ pay directly with the creation of stockholder value.
Fifty percent of the total shares targeted for our named executive officers in 2015 were performance shares.
The performance share awards require Valero’s Total Shareholder Return (TSR) to meet or exceed the median TSR of our peers in order to reach or exceed targeted payout levels. As such, our executives are motivated to cause Valero’s results to exceed that of our peers.
Our performance shares are described below in this Compensation Discussion and Analysis under the caption “Elements of Executive Compensation—Long-Term Incentive Awards—Performance Shares.”
Restricted stock awards were also a component of the long-term incentive portfolio in 2015. These awards motivate the creation of stockholder value through stock price gains and promote the retention of critical talent.
The annual incentive bonus pool for named executive officers is funded using quantitative company performance measures that correspond to our business priorities: (i) Adjusted Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities (ANC); and (ii) Earnings before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation, and Amortization (EBITDA). Our annual incentive bonus program is discussed below under the caption “Elements of Executive Compensation—Annual Incentive Bonus.”
Our annual performance goals included challenging requirements across an array of financial, operating, and strategic objectives. The 2015 objectives included earnings per share (EPS), mechanical availability, cost management, and pre-established goals relating to health, safety, and environmental concerns.
These annual performance goals are measured primarily on an absolute basis, requiring performance that exceeds goals established in the first quarter of the year. By balancing these absolute goals with the relative TSR requirements under our performance share incentives, we motivate a dual focus on both Valero’s performance versus our operating plan and Valero’s performance compared to our peers.

ADOPTION OF BEST PRACTICES
We use executive pay arrangements that are commonly recognized as best practices. Our executive pay program includes these leading practices.
Incentive compensation (annual bonus and long-term incentives) represents the majority (ranging from 76 percent to 88 percent) of the targeted direct compensation of our named executive officers.
We use multiple performance metrics to motivate achievements that complement one another and that contribute to the long-term creation of stockholder value.


18



Incentives are balanced between absolute performance goals (rewarding the achievement of pre-established goals) and relative measures (linking the incentives to surpassing the performance of our peers).
We target 50 percent of the long-term incentive value granted to our named executive officers to be awarded in the form of performance shares tied to relative TSR performance.
We have maximum payout ceilings on both our annual bonus opportunities and our performance shares.
Valero’s revenues are above the median revenues of the peer group of companies within our industry against which we benchmark our executives’ pay, reflecting that we make pay comparisons in a size-appropriate fashion.
We benchmark against the median pay levels of the peer group for each of base pay, annual bonus, and long-term incentives.
We have eliminated all change-in-control gross ups for potential parachute excise taxes and maintain a policy against the implementation of change-in-control arrangements that contain gross-ups.
We have a policy stipulating that grants of performance shares contain terms and conditions for vesting in a change-of-control context such that performance shares will vest on a partial, pro rata basis following termination of employment (rather than vesting automatically in full upon the change of control).
Our long-term incentive program mandates that stock options cannot be re-priced without stockholder approval.
Our executive officers and directors are subject to meaningful stock ownership guidelines.
Our executive officers and directors are prohibited from pledging shares of Common Stock as collateral or security for indebtedness, and may not purchase, sell, or write calls, puts, or other options or derivative instruments on shares of Common Stock.
We have a “clawback” policy requiring the return of incentive payments in certain restatement situations.
We engage in stockholder outreach to solicit the input of stockholders to our pay programs.
Our executive pay programs include design features that mitigate against the risk of inappropriate behaviors.
Our Compensation Committee is composed entirely of directors who meet the independence requirements of the SEC and NYSE as well as pertinent tax requirements for preserving the deductibility of executive pay.
Our Compensation Committee retains the services of an independent executive compensation consultant that provides services directly to the Committee.
We conduct an annual say-on-pay vote as recommended by our stockholders.
We have a declassified board of directors.

DIALOGUE WITH STOCKHOLDERS
Valero’s strong corporate governance principles, implemented under the guidance of the Board, are a major driving force in encouraging constructive dialogue with stockholders and other stakeholders. Valero’s senior management team reaches out to stockholders for dialogue concerning our compensation programs and other matters of concern to our stockholders. We believe that our stockholder outreach efforts have been constructive and have provided management with insight on executive compensation issues that are important


19



to our stockholders. These discussions also provided management with the opportunity to review our executive compensation practices and explain the principles on which they were designed.

ADMINISTRATION OF EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION PROGRAMS
Our executive compensation programs are administered by our Board’s Compensation Committee, which is composed of three independent directors from our Board. They do not participate in our executive compensation programs. Policies adopted by the Committee are implemented by our compensation and benefits staff. In 2015, the Committee retained Exequity LLP as an independent compensation consultant for executive and director compensation matters. The nature and scope of the consultant’s services are described above under the caption, “Compensation Consultant Disclosures.”

Benchmarking Data
The Compensation Committee uses peer group compensation data in assessing benchmarks of base salary, annual incentive compensation, and long-term incentive compensation. The Compensation Comparator Group (further described below) is used to benchmark compensation for our named executive officers. This reference is sometimes referred to in this proxy statement as “compensation survey data” or “competitive survey data.”

Compensation Comparator Group
The Compensation Comparator Group comprises the following companies that engage in U.S. domestic oil and gas operations:
BP p.l.c.
 
Marathon Petroleum Corporation
Chevron Corporation
 
Murphy Oil Corporation
Exxon Mobil Corporation
 
Phillips 66
Hess Corporation
 
Royal Dutch Shell plc
HollyFrontier Corporation
 
Tesoro Corporation
Marathon Oil Corporation
 
 
We believe that the Compensation Comparator Group is relevant to our business because we compete with the member companies for talent at every level from entry-level employees to senior executives. We believe that our pay comparisons are size-appropriate because the median revenues of the Compensation Comparator Group are below Valero’s revenues. Understanding this group’s compensation programs and levels is vitally important in order to remain competitive in this market for employees. We believe that given the size and complexity of our business, Valero employees at all levels would be qualified candidates for similar jobs at any of the companies included in this group.

Recommendations for base salary, bonuses, and other compensation arrangements are developed under the supervision of the Compensation Committee by our compensation and benefits staff using the compensation survey data with assistance from Exequity. Use of the data is consistent with our philosophy of providing executive compensation and benefits that are competitive with companies competing with us for executive talent. In addition, the use of competitive compensation survey data and analyses assists the Compensation Committee in assessing our pay levels and targets relative to companies in the Compensation Comparator Group. See “Elements of Executive Compensation—Benchmarking Competitive Pay Levels” below.



20



Performance Peer Groups
We also use peer groups to measure Valero’s total stockholder return (TSR) metric, which is used in our performance shares incentive program. For the 2015 performance peer group, companies were selected based on their engagement in U.S. domestic refining and marketing operations.

Our use of different peer groups for compensation and performance is based on the following. While job candidacy can transcend company size, we believe that when measuring business performance, companies with a similar business model should be included. That being said, comparing the performance of Valero’s generally non-integrated operations with those of integrated oil companies can result in anomalies due to the mismatch in how similar industry-specific events can impact companies with these varying business models. In addition, there are relatively few companies in our business against which clear comparisons can be drawn, rendering a peer group composition more challenging than in most industries.

In November 2015, the Compensation Committee established a peer group for TSR measurement applicable to the 2015 awards of performance shares (with TSR measurement periods ending in 2016). Valero is included in this peer group when results are calculated. The peer group is composed of the following entities.
Alon USA Energy, Inc.
PBF Energy Inc.
BP p.l.c.
Phillips 66
CVR Energy Inc.
Royal Dutch Shell plc
Delek US Holdings
Tesoro Corporation
HollyFrontier Corporation
Western Refining Inc.
Marathon Petroleum Corporation
 

Process and Timing of Compensation Decisions
The Compensation Committee reviews and approves all compensation targets and payments for the named executive officers. The Chief Executive Officer evaluates the performance of the other executive officers and develops individual recommendations based upon the competitive survey data. Both the Chief Executive Officer and the Committee may make adjustments to the recommended compensation based upon an assessment of an individual’s performance and contributions to the Company. The compensation for the Chief Executive Officer is reviewed by the Compensation Committee and recommended to the Board’s independent directors for approval. This assessment is based on the competitive survey data and other factors described in this Compensation Discussion and Analysis, and adjustments may be made based upon the non-employee directors’ independent evaluation of the Chief Executive Officer’s performance and contributions.

We evaluate the total compensation opportunity offered to each executive officer at least once annually and have conducted compensation assessments on several occasions during the course of the year. The Compensation Committee establishes the target levels of annual incentive and long-term incentive compensation for the current fiscal year based upon its review of competitive market data provided by Exequity. The Compensation Committee also reviews competitive market data for annual salary rates for executive officer positions for the next fiscal year and recommends new salary rates to become effective the next fiscal year. The Compensation Committee may, however, review salaries or grant long-term incentive awards at other times during the year because of new appointments or promotions during the year. Our Compensation Committee does not time the grants of long-term incentive awards around Valero’s release of undisclosed material information.



21



ELEMENTS OF EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
Our executive compensation programs include the following material elements:
base salary;
annual incentive bonus;
long-term equity-based incentives;
medical and other insurance benefits; and
retirement benefits.

We chose these elements to foster the potential for both current and long-term payouts and to attract and retain executive talent. We believe that variable pay (i.e., annual incentive bonus and long-term equity-based incentives that do not become a permanent part of base salary)—when delivered through appropriate incentives—is ultimately the best way to drive total compensation among our executive officers.

We believe that a significant portion of the compensation paid to our named executive officers should be incentive-based and determined by both company and individual performance. Our executive compensation program is designed to accomplish the following long-term objectives:
to provide compensation payouts that are tied to the performance of internal and external metrics both on a relative and absolute basis; and
to attract, motivate, and retain the best executive talent in our industry.

To motivate superior performance from our executives, Valero targets pay opportunities that are tied to Valero’s performance. We believe that an executive’s earn-out of his or her full compensation opportunities should be contingent on achieving performance results that exceed pre-established goals and outperform our industry peers.

Our annual incentive program rewards:
Valero’s attainment of key financial performance measures;
Valero’s success in key operational and strategic measures;
safe operations;
environmental responsibility;
reliable operations; and
cost management.

Our long-term equity incentive awards are designed to tie the executive’s financial reward opportunities with increased stockholders’ return on investment as measured by:
long-term stock price performance; and
payment of regular dividends.

Base salary is designed to provide a fixed level of competitive pay that reflects the executive officer’s primary duties and responsibilities, and to provide a base upon which incentive opportunities and benefit levels are established.

The long-term incentive awards in our compensation program include performance shares and restricted stock. We believe that incentives that drive stockholder value should also drive executive officer pay. We


22



note that performance shares, when issued, do not assure a payout to the executive officer unless and until stockholder value is created through both company performance and TSR. We believe that executive officers should hold an equity stake in the company to further motivate the creation of stockholder value, which is why we include awards of restricted stock in our long-term incentive program coupled with stock ownership guidelines.

Benchmarking Competitive Pay Levels
Our Compensation Committee benchmarks base salaries for our named executive officers against the 50th percentile (median) of competitive survey data and may make decisions to pay above or below this target based on individual circumstances (e.g., performance of the executive, internal parity, and management succession planning).

We also benchmark annual bonus and long-term incentive targets (expressed as a percentage of base salary) for each executive position by reference to the 50th percentile (median) benchmark of the Compensation Comparator Group, and may make decisions to award above or below this target based on individual circumstances (e.g., performance of the executive, internal parity, and management succession planning). We believe that preserving flexibility to award incentive opportunities above or below the median peer levels helps tailor the incentives to the executive and the role, resulting in a more customized match of competitive pay opportunities and pay-for-performance design attributes.

In addition to benchmarking competitive pay levels to establish compensation levels and targets, we also consider the relative importance of a particular management position in comparison to other management positions in the organization. In this regard, when setting the level and targets for compensation for a particular position, we evaluate that position’s scope and nature of responsibilities, size of business unit, complexity of duties and responsibilities, as well as that position’s relationship to managerial authorities throughout the management ranks of Valero.

Relative Size of Major Compensation Elements
An executive officer’s total direct compensation is structured so that realizing the targeted amount is highly contingent on Valero’s performance due to the executive’s level of at-risk pay. We use the term “total direct compensation” to refer to the sum of an executive’s base salary, targeted incentive bonus, and the grant-date values of long-term incentive target awards. The following charts summarize the relative size of base salary and target incentive compensation for 2015 for our named executive officers.


23



When setting executive compensation, the Compensation Committee considers the amount and form of compensation payable to an executive officer. The Committee seeks to achieve an appropriate balance between immediate cash rewards for the achievement of company and personal objectives and long-term incentives that align the interests of our officers with those of our stockholders. The size of each element is based on the assessment of competitive market practices as well as company and individual performance.

The Compensation Committee analyzes total direct compensation from a market competitive perspective, and then evaluates each component relative to its market reference. The Committee believes that making a significant portion of an executive officer’s incentive compensation contingent on long-term stock price performance more closely aligns the executive officer’s interests with those of our stockholders.

Because we place a large amount of total direct compensation at risk in the form of variable pay (annual bonus and long-term incentives), the Committee generally does not adjust current compensation based upon realized gains or losses from prior incentive awards, prior compensation, or current stock holdings. For example, we normally will not change the size of a target long-term incentive grant in a particular year solely because of Valero’s stock price performance during the immediately preceding years, although this may be taken into account in other compensation decisions. The Compensation Committee recognizes that the refining and marketing industry is volatile and strives to maintain a measure of predictability consistent with a substantial reliance on variable compensation structures in furtherance of a fundamental pay-for-performance philosophy.

Individual Performance and Personal Objectives
The Compensation Committee evaluates the individual performance of, and performance objectives for, our named executive officers. Performance and compensation for our Chief Executive Officer are reviewed and approved by the Compensation Committee and the Board’s independent directors. For officers other than the Chief Executive Officer, individual performance and compensation are evaluated by the Compensation Committee with recommendations from our Chief Executive Officer. Individual performance and objectives are specific to each officer position.

Criteria used to measure an individual’s performance may include assessment of objective criteria (e.g., execution of projects within budget parameters, improving an operating unit’s profitability, or timely completing an acquisition or divestiture) as well as qualitative factors such as the executive’s ability to lead, ability to communicate, and successful adherence to Valero’s stated values (i.e., commitment to safety, commitment to the environment, commitment to our communities, commitment to our employees, and commitment to our stakeholders). There are no specific weights assigned to these various elements of performance.

Base Salaries
Base salaries for our named executive officers are approved by the Compensation Committee after taking into consideration median practices for comparable roles among the peer companies. The Compensation Committee also considers the recommendations of the Chief Executive Officer for officers other than the Chief Executive Officer. The base salary and all other compensation of the Chief Executive Officer are reviewed and approved by the independent directors of the Board.

Base salaries are reviewed annually and may be adjusted to reflect promotions, the assignment of additional responsibilities, individual performance, or the performance of Valero. Salaries are also periodically adjusted to remain competitive with companies within the compensation survey data. An executive’s compensation typically increases in relation to his or her responsibilities within Valero.


24




Annual Incentive Bonus
The annual incentive bonus for our named executive officers has two primary components. First, a maximum bonus pool is funded through determination of Valero’s achievement of quantitative financial performance measures. Second, a minimum earned bonus is determined based on the results of additional financial, operational, and strategic performance measures. The performance measures associated with these two components, along with consideration of the named executive officer’s individual performance, are used to determine the annual incentive bonus payout for each of the named executive officers.
To fund the annual incentive bonus pool for our named executive officers, the Compensation Committee sets quantitative company performance measures during the first quarter of the year. Valero’s performance is measured against these metrics to establish the maximum bonus amounts that can be paid under our program. In 2015, the Committee established measures that correspond to two of our business priorities: Adjusted Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities (“ANC”) and Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation, and Amortization (“EBITDA”). These measures establish the maximum level of funding for the bonus program. The program is funded at an amount equal to the greater of (i) ANC multiplied by 0.80 percent, or (ii) EBITDA multiplied by 0.65 percent.

The maximum bonus that can be paid to a named executive officer is based on the funding results of ANC or EBITDA—subject to an absolute maximum of $20 million for any individual officer. Once the maximum pool is calculated, the funded pool is allocated to each executive officer using the following percentages: 50 percent for the Chief Executive Officer (the highest paid officer), 20 percent for the second highest paid officer, and 10 percent each for the third, fourth, and fifth highest paid officers.

After these maximum funded amounts are calculated, the Compensation Committee considers the following performance goals for the completed fiscal year to determine the minimum earned bonuses for the named executive officers (at amounts that may not exceed the funded levels):
a quantitative financial performance goal (Financial Performance Goal), operational perfor-mance goals (Operational Performance Goals), and qualitative goals and objectives including the effective use of capital (Strategic Company Performance Goals);
the position of the named executive officer, which is used to determine a targeted percentage of base salary that may be awarded as incentive bonus; and
a qualitative evaluation of the individual’s performance.

Thus, the amount of the bonus ultimately paid to a named executive officer takes into consideration (i) Valero’s achievement of the performance objectives established and approved by the Compensation Committee in the first quarter of the performance year (i.e., ANC and EBITDA) in order to fund the bonus program, and (ii) the Compensation Committee’s assessment of Valero’s and each executive’s performance in relation to the pre-established performance goals more fully described below (which provides for potential application of downward discretion by the Compensation Committee to reduce payouts below the funded pool amounts).

Financial Performance Goal
The Financial Performance Goal considered for our annual incentive bonuses is EPS. The Compensation Committee establishes minimum, target, and maximum levels for EPS in the first quarter of the performance year. We believe that this measure appropriately reflects our business planning process and corporate philosophy regarding financial performance measurement. Valero’s performance in 2015 was $9.24 per share (versus a target EPS of $3.91 per share).



25



Operational Performance Goals
The Operational Performance Goals considered for our annual incentive bonuses, as established and approved by the Compensation Committee in the first quarter of the performance year, are measured against:
Valero’s achievements in the areas of health, safety, and environmental;
Valero’s achievements in improving refining competitiveness through improved mechanical availability; and
Valero’s achievements in cost management and expense control.

We believe that these measures appropriately reflect key business objectives of Valero. After completion of the fiscal year, each of the Operational Performance Goals is measured against Valero’s actual performance in these areas and the minimum, target, and maximum levels established by the Compensation Committee. Valero’s performance score for 2015 for this category was 78.36 percent (versus a target score of 40.00 percent). For additional details on Valero’s 2015 performance versus targeted amounts for our Operational Performance Goals, see the “Annual Incentive Bonus Performance Goals” table that follows in this section.

Strategic Company Performance Goals
Valero’s Strategic Company Performance Goals were established in the first quarter of the 2015 performance year by the Chief Executive Officer. Included in these goals for 2015 was a qualitative capital-based performance measure assessed by the Compensation Committee through return on capital employed. After completion of the fiscal year, the Strategic Company Performance Goals were evaluated as a whole. Significant achievements in this area for 2015 included: (i) the creation of long-term stockholder value and the return of cash to stockholders through a quarterly cash dividend increase from $0.275 per share to $0.50 per share and $2.8 billion of common stock repurchases; (ii) the successful sale of $1.1 billion of midstream assets to Valero Energy Partners LP, exceeding the $1 billion goal for the year; and (iii) the successful execution of Valero’s $2.65 billion capital expenditures plan. Valero’s performance score for 2015 for this category was 20.00 percent (versus a target score of 20.00 percent).



26



Valero’s Achievement of Performance Goals for 2015
The following table details the performance targets and final results of Valero’s achievements in 2015 for each of the sub-components of the bonus program’s Financial Performance Goal and Operational Performance Goals.
Annual Incentive Bonus Performance Goals
Component
Weighting
 
Minimum
Target
Maximum
 
Achieved in 2015
Minimum Bonus Percent Earned (1)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Financial Performance Goal
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I.
EPS ($/share)
40.00
%
 
$0.98
$3.91
$7.82
 
$9.24
90.00
%
Operational
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
II.
Health, Safety, and Environmental (2)
13.33
%
 
 
28.36
%
 
III.
Mechanical Availability (3)
13.33
%
 
95.6
96.2 to 96.4
97.6
 
96.70
20.00
%
 
IV.
Cost Management and Expense Control ($ in millions)
13.34
%
 
$15.0
$60.0
$120.0
 
$200.2
30.00
%
 
 
subtotal
40.00
%
 
 
 
 
 
subtotal
78.36
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Strategic
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
V.
Company Goals and Objectives (4)
20.00
%
 
 
20.00
%
Total
 
100.00
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
188.36
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Footnotes:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(1) Represents performance achieved in 2015 and component percent weighting.
 
(2) Consists of 16 separately weighted health, safety, and environmental metrics across three business units. Performance “achieved” was at 94.5% of maximum.
 
(3) Using the Mechanical Availability scoring from the industry-standard Solomon Associates survey in which “Target” represents performance between the 50th and 62nd percentiles.
 
(4) As established by the Compensation Committee in consultation with the CEO, and includes a qualitative assessment of use of capital. Performance “achieved” was at maximum.

As a result of Valero’s 2015 ANC performance, the maximum bonus pool was funded at $55.18 million. The final 2015 bonus amounts paid to our named executive officers were determined as a function of: (i) Valero’s performance and maximum bonus pool funding based on ANC performance, (ii) Valero’s performance as measured against the financial, operational, and strategic performance goals, and (iii) the Committee’s assessment of the named executive officers’ individual performance in 2015. Taking into account Valero’s and the executive officers’ extraordinary results for 2015, the Compensation Committee awarded bonuses for 2015 to our named executive officers at 200 percent of the officers’ bonus target amounts.



27



The following table summarizes the 2015 bonus amounts paid to our named executive officers:
 
Gorder
Ciskowski
Riggs
Browning
Crownover
Base salary (1)
$1,300,000
$845,000
$600,000
$575,000
$550,000
Bonus target percentage (2)
150%

110%

80%

80%

80%

Bonus target amount (3)
$1,950,000
$929,500
$480,000
$460,000
$440,000
Minimum bonus percentage achieved (4)
188.36
%
188.36
%
188.36
%
188.36
%
188.36
%
Minimum incentive bonus earned (5)
$3,673,020
$1,750,806
$904,128
$866,456
$828,784
Maximum possible bonus (6)
$20,000,000
$11,036,000
$5,518,000
$5,518,000
$5,518,000
Bonus amount paid (7)
$3,900,000
$1,859,000
$960,000
$920,000
$880,000
Footnotes:
(1)
Base salary is the officer’s base salary at December 31, 2015.
(2)
Bonus target as a percentage of base salary.
(3)
Determined by multiplying “Bonus target percentage” times “Base salary.”
(4)
Valero’s “Minimum bonus percentage achieved” was 188.36% based on results of the Annual Incentive Bonus Performance Goals detailed in the previous table.
(5)
Determined by multiplying “Bonus target amount” times “Minimum bonus percentage achieved.”
(6)
Allocation of maximum bonus pool funded from the 2015 ANC results apportioned as follows: 50% for CEO, 20% for second highest paid officer, and 10% for next three highest paid officers.
(7)
As disclosed in the Summary Compensation Table. The actual amount paid was determined based on: (i) Valero’s performance and maximum bonus pool funding using ANC, (ii) Valero’s performance as measured against financial, operational, and strategic goals, and (iii) the Committee’s assessment of the named executive officers’ individual performance in 2015. Based on superior ANC results, the maximum bonus funding is significantly greater than the final earned amounts, so the final bonus earnings represent the application of the Compensation Committee’s downward discretion from the maximum bonus award funding.

Long-Term Incentive Awards
We provide stock-based, long-term compensation to our executive officers through our stockholder-approved equity plan (the plan is more fully described in “Proposal No. 5—Reapproval of the 2011 Omnibus Stock Incentive Plan”). The plan provides for a variety of stock and stock-based awards, including restricted stock which vests over a period determined by the Compensation Committee, and performance shares that vest (become non-forfeitable) upon Valero’s achievement of an objective performance goal.
The Compensation Committee presently expects to make awards of performance shares and restricted stock annually. For 2015, the mix of long-term incentives awarded to our named executive officers was split evenly, on a share value basis, between grants of restricted stock and awards of performance shares. We believe that these awards create a powerful link between the creation of stockholder value and executive pay delivered. In addition, we believe that the balance between absolute performance alignment through restricted shares, and the relative performance objectives underscored by the relative TSR performance shares, is appropriate. In order for executives to fully realize their targeted opportunities, Valero must both perform well and beat the stock price performance of its peers. In 2015, the Compensation Committee did not award any performance stock options, which were awarded to executive officers in prior years, in favor of more acutely defined absolute and relative stock price performance objectives delivered through restricted stock and performance shares, respectively.



28



For each officer, a target amount of long-term incentives is established and is expressed as a percentage of base salary. In establishing award sizes, the Compensation Committee makes primary reference to median peer company grant levels and makes individualized determinations of award sizes based on additional factors such as: each executive’s experience and contribution to company success, internal parity, and management succession. In addition, an executive’s targeted award may be adjusted based upon the Compensation Committee’s determination of the officer’s individual performance, which (for officers other than the Chief Executive Officer) takes into consideration the recommendation of the Chief Executive Officer.

Performance Shares
For 2015, performance share targets represent 50 percent of each executive officer’s long-term incentive target on a share value basis. Performance shares are payable in shares of Common Stock on the vesting dates of the performance shares. Shares of Common Stock are earned with respect to vesting performance shares only upon Valero’s achievement of TSR objectives (measured in relation to the TSR of our peers). Shares not earned in a given performance period expire and are forfeited. Performance shares are also subject to forfeiture if an executive terminates his or her employment prior to vesting.

The performance shares awarded in 2015 are subject to vesting in three annual increments, based upon our TSR compared to our peer group during one-year, two-year, and three-year performance periods. Performance periods measure TSR based on the average closing stock prices for the 30 days of December 2 to December 31 at the beginning and end of the performance periods, including dividends. At the end of each performance period, our TSR for the period is compared to the TSR of our peer group. Consistent with typical relative TSR design conventions, shares of Common Stock are awarded based on Valero’s TSR performance versus the peers’ TSR as shown in the table below.
Percentile TSR Rank
 
% of Performance Shares Awarded as Common Shares
below 25th%
 
 0%
25th% (1)
 
25%
50th% (1)
 
100%
75th% or above
 
200%
(1) TSR performances between the 25th and 75th percentiles generate payouts determined by interpolation.

Additional shares of Common Stock may be earned based on the accumulated value of dividends paid on Valero’s Common Stock during the pertinent performance period. The amount of accumulated dividends is multiplied by the earned percentage payout (if any) for the performance shares, and the product is divided by the fair market value of the Common Stock on the performance shares’ vesting date. The resulting amount is paid in a whole number of shares of Common Stock. The value of the dividends credited to the outstanding performance shares is paid to participants only to the extent that the underlying performance shares earn shares of Common Stock, based on Valero’s TSR performance, and is paid (in shares of Common Stock) only when the underlying performance shares vest.

Restricted Stock
Restricted stock targets represent the remaining 50 percent of each executive officer’s long-term incentive target on a share value basis. Restricted stock is subject to forfeiture if an executive terminates his or her employment (other than retirement) prior to vesting. We believe that our mix of long-term incentives provides an appropriate balance between the pay-for-performance attributes of performance shares and the equity alignment and retentive qualities of restricted shares. This mix also generally aligns with market practices, and thus supports recruitment and retention of top-quality executive talent.


29




The Compensation Committee considers and grants long-term incentive awards to our officers and certain other employees annually, typically during the fourth quarter in conjunction with the last regularly scheduled meeting of the Compensation Committee for the year. The performance shares and restricted stock components of our executive officers’ 2015 long-term incentive awards were granted in November 2015.

Perquisites and Other Benefits
Consistent with our goal of providing compensation and benefits that are aligned with market practices among our peers, officers are eligible to receive reimbursement for club dues, personal excess liability insurance, federal income tax preparation, and an annual health examination. We do not provide executive officers with automobiles or automobile allowances or supplemental executive medical coverage.

We provide other benefits, including medical, life, dental, and disability insurance in line with competitive market conditions. Our named executive officers are eligible for the same benefit plans provided to our other employees, including our Thrift Plan and insurance and supplemental plans chosen and paid for by employees who desire additional coverage.

Consistent with typical practices among our peers, executive officers and other employees whose compensation exceeds certain limits are eligible to participate in non-qualified excess benefit programs whereby those individuals can choose to make larger contributions than allowed under the qualified plan rules and receive correspondingly higher benefits. These plans are described below.

Post-Employment Benefits
Pension Plans
We have a noncontributory defined benefit Pension Plan in which most of our employees, including our named executive officers, are eligible to participate and under which contributions by individual participants are neither required nor permitted. We also have a noncontributory, non-qualified Excess Pension Plan and a non-qualified Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan (SERP), which provide supplemental pension benefits to certain highly compensated employees. Our named executive officers are participants in the SERP. The SERP is offered to align with competitive practices among our peers, and to thus support recruitment and retention of critical executive talent. The Excess Pension Plan and the SERP provide eligible employees with additional retirement savings opportunities that cannot be achieved with tax-qualified plans due to Internal Revenue Code limits on (i) annual compensation that can be taken into account under qualified plans, or (ii) annual benefits that can be provided under qualified plans.

Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Plans
Deferred Compensation Plan. Our named executive officers are eligible to participate in our Deferred Compensation Plan (“DC Plan”). The DC Plan is offered to align with competitive practices among our peers, and thereby support recruitment and retention of executive talent. The DC Plan permits eligible employees to defer a portion of their salary and/or bonus until separation (i.e., retirement or termination of employment). Under the DC Plan, each year eligible employees are permitted to elect to defer up to 30 percent of their salary and/or 50 percent of their cash bonuses to be earned for services performed during the following year.

We have not made discretionary contributions to participants’ accounts, and currently we have no plans to do so. We would likely consider such contributions only in the event of a significant, catastrophic economic event (or series of events) that materially impairs the value of participants’ accounts.


30




All amounts credited under the DC Plan (other than discretionary credits) are immediately 100 percent vested. Any discretionary credits will vest in accordance with the vesting schedule determined at the time of the grant of discretionary credits. Participant accounts are credited with earnings (or losses) based on investment fund choices made by the participants among available funds selected by Valero’s Benefits Plans Administrative Committee.

Excess Thrift Plan. Our Excess Thrift Plan provides benefits to participants in our Thrift Plan whose annual additions to the Thrift Plan are subject to the limitations on annual additions as provided under Section 415 of the Internal Revenue Code, and/or who are constrained from making maximum contributions under the Thrift Plan by Section 401(a)(17) of the Internal Revenue Code, which limits the amount of an employee’s annual compensation which may be taken into account under that plan. Two separate components comprise the Excess Thrift Plan: (i) an “excess benefit plan” as defined under Section 3(36) of ERISA; and (ii) a plan that is unfunded and maintained primarily for the purpose of providing deferred compensation for a select group of management or highly compensated employees.

Additional information about these plans and contributions made by Valero and each of our named executive officers under non-qualified defined contribution and other deferred compensation plans are presented in this proxy statement under the caption “Executive Compensation—Nonqualified Deferred Compensation.”

Change of Control Severance Arrangements
We have entered into change of control severance agreements with each of our named executive officers (except Mr. Riggs). The agreements are intended to assure the continued objectivity and availability of the officers in the event of any merger or acquisition that would likely threaten the job security of many top executives. These arrangements are also intended to maintain executive focus and productivity in a period of uncertainty. If a change of control occurs during the term of an agreement, the agreement becomes operative for a fixed three-year period. The agreements provide generally that the officers’ terms and conditions of employment will not be adversely changed during the three-year period after a change of control. For information regarding payments that may be made under these agreements, see the disclosures in this proxy statement under the caption “Executive Compensation—Potential Payments upon Termination or Change of Control.”

ACCOUNTING AND TAX TREATMENT
Accounting Treatment
Compensation expense for our share-based compensation plans is based on the fair value of the awards granted and is recognized in income on a straight-line basis over the shorter of (a) the requisite service period of each award, or (b) the period from the grant date to the date retirement eligibility is achieved if that date is expected to occur during the nominal vesting period. Specific components of our stock-based compensation programs are discussed in Note 14 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Valero’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015.

Tax Treatment
Under Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code, publicly held corporations may not take a tax deduction for compensation in excess of $1 million paid to the Chief Executive Officer or the other four most highly compensated executive officers unless that compensation meets the Internal Revenue Code’s definition of “performance based” compensation. Section 162(m) allows a deduction for compensation that exceeds $1 million if it is paid (i) solely upon attainment of one or more performance goals, (ii) pursuant to a qualifying


31



performance-based compensation plan adopted by the Compensation Committee, and (iii) the material terms, including the performance goals, of such plan are approved by the stockholders before payment of the compensation.

The Compensation Committee considers deductibility under Section 162(m) when designing compensation arrangements for executive officers, but is not required to grant only “performance based” compensation that is deductible under Section 162(m). The Committee believes that it is in our best interests for the Committee to retain its flexibility and discretion to make compensation awards to foster achievement of performance goals established by the Committee and other goals the Committee deems important to our success, such as encouraging employee retention, rewarding achievement of non-quantifiable goals, and achieving progress with specific projects. We believe that the 2015 annual incentive bonus payments, as well as our performance share grants qualify as performance-based compensation and are not subject to any deductibility limitations under Section 162(m). Grants of restricted stock or other equity-based awards that are not subject to specific quantitative performance measures will likely not qualify as performance based compensation and, in such event, would be subject to Section 162(m) deduction restrictions.

COMPENSATION-RELATED POLICIES
Policy on Vesting of Performance Shares upon Change of Control of Valero
In 2014, our Board adopted a policy regarding the vesting of performance shares upon a change of control of Valero. The policy applies to grants of performance shares made in 2014 and thereafter. The policy provides that performance shares granted to participants in Valero’s equity incentive plans will not vest automatically upon the date of a change of control (as defined in the applicable plan) of Valero. The policy further provides that in making awards of performance shares to participants, the Compensation Committee may provide in the award agreement with the participant that if a participant’s employment with Valero is terminated following a change of control, any unvested performance shares held by the participant will vest on a partial, pro rata basis on the date of the participant’s termination of employment, with such qualifications for an award as the Committee may determine. The policy is available on our website at www.valero.com > Investors > Corporate Governance.

Executive Compensation Clawback Policy
Under our executive compensation clawback policy, in the event of a material restatement of Valero’s financial results, the Board, or the appropriate committee thereof, will review all bonuses and other incentive and equity compensation awarded to our executive officers. The policy provides that if the bonuses and other incentive and equity compensation would have been lower had they been calculated based on such restated results, the Board (or committee), will, to the extent permitted by governing law and as appropriate under the circumstances, seek to recover for the benefit of Valero all or a portion of the specified compensation awarded to executive officers whose fraud or misconduct caused or partially caused such restatement, as determined by the Board (or committee). In determining whether to seek recovery, the policy states that the Board (or committee) shall take into account such considerations as it deems appropriate, including governing law and whether the assertion of a claim may prejudice the interests of Valero in any related proceeding or investigation. The policy is available on our website at www.valero.com > Investors > Corporate Governance.

Compensation Consultant Disclosure Policy
Per the terms of our compensation consultant disclosure policy, Valero will make certain disclosures pertaining to compensation consultants in our proxy statements for annual meetings of stockholders. For any compensation consultant retained by the Compensation Committee to provide compensation advice with respect to the compensation disclosed in the Summary Compensation Table in the proxy statement, we will


32



disclose (i) the total fees paid annually to the consultant for compensation-related services and non-compensation-related services, (ii) a description of any non-compensation-related services provided by the consultant, and (iii) any services that the consultant has provided to senior executives of Valero and the nature of those services. The policy is available on our website at www.valero.com > Investors > Corporate Governance.

Stock Ownership Guidelines and Prohibition Against Hedging and Pledging
We have adopted stock ownership guidelines applicable to our officers and non-employee directors. The guidelines require that non-employee directors acquire and hold during their service shares of Common Stock equal in value to at least three times their annual cash retainer. Our officers are required to meet the applicable guidelines stated below.
Officer Position
 
Value of Shares Owned
Chief Executive Officer
 
5x Base Salary
President
 
3x Base Salary
Executive Vice Presidents
 
2x Base Salary
Senior Vice Presidents
 
1x Base Salary
Vice Presidents
 
1x Base Salary
Officers and non-employee directors have five years to meet the requisite ownership threshold and, once attained, are expected to continuously own sufficient shares to meet that threshold.
Our directors, officers, and employees may not purchase, sell, or write calls, puts, or other options or derivative instruments on shares of Common Stock, and our directors and officers are prohibited from pledging shares of Common Stock as collateral or security for indebtedness. Compliance with the guidelines is monitored by the Compensation Committee. The full text of our guidelines is included in our Corporate Governance Guidelines (as Article IX), available on our website at www.valero.com > Investors > Corporate Governance.

Insider Trading and Speculation in Valero Stock
Our officers, directors, and employees are prohibited from purchasing or selling Valero securities while in possession of material, nonpublic information, or otherwise using such information for their personal benefit or in any manner that would violate applicable laws and regulations. In addition, our policies prohibit our employees from speculating in our stock, which includes short selling (profiting if the market price of our stock decreases), buying or selling publicly traded options (including writing covered calls), hedging, or any other type of derivative arrangement that has a similar economic effect.




33



EQUITY COMPENSATION PLAN INFORMATION
The following table presents information regarding our equity compensation plans as of December 31, 2015.
 
 
Number of
Securities
to be Issued
Upon Exercise
of Outstanding
Options, Warrants
and Rights (#)
 
Weighted-
Average
Exercise Price
of Outstanding
Options, Warrants
and Rights ($)
 
Number of
Securities
Remaining Avail-
able for Future
Issuance Under
Equity Compen-
sation Plans (1)
Approved by stockholders:
 
 
 
 
 
 
2011 Omnibus Stock Incentive Plan
 
905,732

 
$
31.83

 
12,109,301

2005 Omnibus Stock Incentive Plan
 
1,328,240

 
17.89

 

Not approved by stockholders:
 
 
 
 
 
 
2003 All-Employee Stock Incentive Plan (2)
 
93,260

 
17.68

 

Total
 
2,327,232

 
23.31

 
12,109,301

Footnotes:
(1)
Securities available for future issuance under these plans can be issued in various forms, including restricted stock and stock options.
(2)
Officers and directors of Valero were not eligible to receive grants under this plan.

The 2011 Omnibus Stock Incentive Plan is described in this proxy statement in the disclosures for “Proposal No. 5—Reapproval of the 2011 Omnibus Stock Incentive Plan,” and in Note 14 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2015, included in Valero’s Annual Report on Form 10-K.



34



EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
The tables that follow provide information required by the SEC regarding compensation paid to or earned by our named executive officers for 2015. We use captions and headings in these tables that correspond to the SEC regulations requiring these disclosures. The footnotes to these tables provide important information to explain the values presented in the tables.

SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE
This table summarizes the compensation paid to our named executive officers for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2015, 2014, and 2013. The elements of compensation listed in the table are described in the “Compensation Discussion and Analysis” section of this proxy statement and in the table’s footnotes.
Principal Position (1)
 
Year
 
Salary ($)
 
Stock Awards
($)(2)(3)
 
Option Awards
($)(2)(4)
 
Non-Equity Incentive Plan Compensa-tion ($)(5)
 
Change in Pension Value and Non-qualified Deferred Compensation Earnings ($) (6)
 
All Other Compensa-tion ($)(7)
 
Total ($)
Joseph W. Gorder,
 
2015
 
1,300,000

 
8,870,341

 

 
3,900,000

 
3,252,393

 
212,411

 
17,535,145

Chairman of the Board, President, and CEO
 
2014
 
1,150,000

 
7,989,851

 
758,205

 
3,525,000

 
3,838,763

 
111,619

 
17,373,438

 
2013
 
900,000

 
4,034,923

 
502,813

 
1,875,000

 
1,188,903

 
1,189,354

 
9,690,993

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Michael S. Ciskowski,
 
2015
 
845,000

 
3,809,824

 

 
1,859,000

 
1,551,671

 
83,683

 
8,149,178

EVP and CFO
 
2014
 
810,000

 
2,912,035

 
299,752

 
1,670,000

 
2,923,019

 
82,337

 
8,697,143

 
2013
 
775,000

 
3,694,076

 
369,236

 
1,520,000

 
418,182

 
76,083

 
6,852,577

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
R. Lane Riggs,
 
2015
 
600,000

 
1,661,614

 

 
960,000

 
1,046,542

 
69,005

 
4,337,161

EVP–Refining Operations and Engineering
 
2014
 
558,333

 
1,464,417

 
138,453

 
862,000

 
1,473,045

 
61,935

 
4,558,183

 
(8)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jay D. Browning,
 
2015
 
575,000

 
1,591,603

 

 
920,000

 
1,012,273

 
66,816

 
4,165,692

EVP and General Counsel
 
2014
 
541,667

 
1,361,956

 
132,223

 
825,000

 
1,384,309

 
70,765

 
4,315,920

 
2013
 
500,000

 
1,040,475

 
110,470

 
540,000

 
311,575

 
55,399

 
2,557,919

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
R. Michael Crownover,
 
2015
 
555,000

 
1,522,802

 

 
880,000

 
743,408

 
61,636

 
3,762,846

EVP and Chief Admin. Officer
 
2014
 
516,667

 
1,318,223

 
126,252

 
787,000

 
1,083,933

 
60,384

 
3,892,459

 
(8)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Footnotes to Summary Compensation Table:
(1)
The persons listed in this table are referred to in this proxy statement as our “named executive officers.”
(2)
The amounts shown represent the grant date fair value of stock awards computed under Financial Accounting Standards Board Accounting Standards Codification Topic 718, Compensation-Stock Compensation (FASB ASC Topic 718). Under FASB ASC Topic 718, the grant date fair values that we must disclose for our performance share awards include the values of certain tranches of unvested performance shares that were awarded in years prior to the fiscal year shown in the table. The computations of grant date fair values for performance shares are more fully described in footnote (5) to the Grants of Plan-Based Awards table in this proxy statement.
footnote (2) is continued on the following page


35




Footnotes to Summary Compensation Table:
footnote (2) continued
The dollar values included in the “Stock Awards” column include the following components:
 
 
Gorder
 
Ciskowski
 
Riggs
 
Browning
 
Crownover
restricted stock
 
4,145,930

 
1,644,404

 
758,359

 
726,614

 
695,574

performance shares
 
4,724,411

 
2,165,420

 
903,255

 
864,989

 
827,228

total (in dollars)
 
8,870,341

 
3,809,824

 
1,661,614

 
1,591,603

 
1,522,802

(3)
For more information regarding the shares of restricted stock and performance shares awarded in 2015, see the Grants of Plan-Based Awards table in this proxy statement and our disclosures in Note 14 (“Stock-Based Compensation”) of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Valero’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015.
(4)
Stock options were not granted to our named executive officers in 2015.
(5)
Represents amounts earned under our annual incentive bonus plan, as described in “Compensation Discussion and AnalysisElements of Executive CompensationAnnual Incentive Bonus.”
(6)
This column represents the sum of the change in pension value and non-qualified deferred compensation earnings for each of the named executive officers. See the Pension Benefits table for the present value assumptions used for these calculations. The amount of above-market or preferential earnings on non-tax-qualified deferred compensation included in the amounts presented above is zero.
(7)
The amounts listed as “All Other Compensation” for 2015 are composed of these items:
Item of income (in dollars)
 
Gorder
 
Ciskowski
 
Riggs
 
Browning
 
Crownover
Valero contribution to Thrift Plan account
 
18,550

 
18,550

 
18,550

 
18,550

 
18,550

Valero contribution to Excess Thrift Plan account
 
72,450

 
40,600

 
23,450

 
21,700

 
19,950

Reimbursement of club membership dues
 
8,803

 
6,682

 
8,803

 
5,070

 
8,839

Unused benefit dollars
 

 
787

 

 

 
1

Imputed income - personal liability insurance (Group Excess Policy)
 
3,499

 
3,499

 
3,499

 
3,499

 
3,499

Imputed income - individual disability insurance
 
4,617

 
4,617

 
2,877

 
3,587

 
3,720

Imputed income - long-term disability premium
 
2,500

 
2,500

 
2,500

 
2,500

 
2,500

Imputed income - insurance (life & survivor) over $50,000
 
4,928

 
3,948

 
6,826

 
9,510

 
2,477

Imputed income - payment of UK tax
 
92,781

 

 

 

 

Imputed income - tax return preparation fees
 
4,283

 
2,500

 
2,500

 
2,400

 
2,100

total
 
212,411

 
83,683

 
69,005

 
66,816

 
61,636


(8)
Mr. Riggs and Mr. Crownover were not named executive officers for 2013.




36



GRANTS OF PLAN-BASED AWARDS
The following table describes plan-based awards for our named executive officers in 2015.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Estimated Future Payouts Under
Non-Equity Incentive Plan Awards
 
Estimated Future Payouts Under
Equity Incentive Plan Awards
 
Grant Date Fair Value of Stock and Option Awards ($) (1)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Threshold
 
Target
 
Maximum
 
Threshold
 
Target
 
Maximum
 
Name
 
Grant Date
 
 
 
($)
 
($)
 
($)
 
(#)
 
(#)
 
(#)
 
Joseph W. Gorder
 
n/a
 
(2)
 

 
1,950,000

 
20,000,000

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11/04/2015
 
(3)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
n/a
 
58,770

 
n/a

 
4,145,930

 
 
n/a
 
(4)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
58,770

 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11/04/2015
 
(5)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
12,710

 
25,420

 
871,207

 
 
11/04/2015
 
(5)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
17,523

 
35,046

 
2,268,177

 
 
11/04/2015
 
(5)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
19,590

 
39,180

 
1,585,027

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Michael S. Ciskowski
 
n/a
 
(2)
 

 
929,500

 
11,036,000

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11/04/2015
 
(3)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
n/a
 
23,310

 
n/a

 
1,644,404

 
 
n/a
 
(4)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
23,310

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11/04/2015
 
(5)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
9,333

 
18,666

 
639,730

 
 
11/04/2015
 
(5)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6,930

 
13,860

 
897,019

 
 
11/04/2015
 
(5)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
7,770

 
15,540

 
628,671

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
R. Lane Riggs
 
n/a
 
(2)
 

 
480,000

 
5,518,000

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11/04/2015
 
(3)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
n/a
 
10,750

 
n/a

 
758,359

 
 
n/a
 
(4)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10,750

 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11/04/2015
 
(5)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2,653

 
5,306

 
181,850

 
 
11/04/2015
 
(5)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3,333

 
6,666

 
431,424

 
 
11/04/2015
 
(5)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3,584

 
7,168

 
289,981

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jay D. Browning
 
n/a
 
(2)
 

 
460,000

 
5,518,000

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11/04/2015
 
(3)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
n/a
 
10,300

 
n/a

 
726,614

 
 
n/a
 
(4)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10,300

 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11/04/2015
 
(5)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2,793

 
5,586

 
191,446

 
 
11/04/2015
 
(5)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3,057

 
6,114

 
395,698

 
 
11/04/2015
 
(5)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3,434

 
6,868

 
277,845

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
R. Michael
 
n/a
 
(2)
 

 
440,000

 
5,518,000

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Crownover
 
11/04/2015
 
(3)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
n/a
 
9,860

 
n/a

 
695,574

 
 
n/a
 
(4)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
9,860

 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11/04/2015
 
(5)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2,680

 
5,360

 
183,701

 
 
11/04/2015
 
(5)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2,917

 
5,834

 
377,576

 
 
11/04/2015
 
(5)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3,287

 
6,574

 
265,951

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Footnotes to Grants of Plan-Based Awards table:
(1)
The reported grant date fair value of stock awards was determined in compliance with Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Topic 718. Stock options were not granted to our named executive officers in 2015.


37



Footnotes to Grants of Plan-Based Awards table:
(2)
Represents potential awards under our annual incentive bonus program for named executive officers (NEOs). Actual amounts earned by our named executive officers for 2015 are reported in the Summary Compensation Table under the column “Non-Equity Incentive Plan Compensation.” The “target” amounts listed in the Grants of Plan-Based Awards table are computed by multiplying base salary by 150%, 110%, 80%, 80%, 80%, for Mr. Gorder, Mr. Ciskowski, Mr. Riggs, Mr. Browning, and Mr. Crownover, respectively. The amounts listed as “maximum” are determined by multiplying the maximum funded bonus pool amount under the program (as a result of Valero’s ANC or EBITDA performance for the year, i.e., $55.18 million for 2015) by 50%, 20%, 10%, 10%, and 10% for Mr. Gorder, Mr. Ciskowski, Mr. Riggs, Mr. Browning, and Mr. Crownover, respectively, subject to a maximum of $20 million for any officer. Our annual incentive bonus program for named executive officers is described in “Compensation Discussion and Analysis—Elements of Executive Compensation—Annual Incentive Bonus.”
(3)
Represents an award of restricted stock granted November 4, 2015. The shares are scheduled to vest (become nonforfeitable) annually in equal one-third increments. Dividends on the restricted shares are paid as and when dividends are declared and paid on our Common Stock. Restricted stock awards are more fully described in “Compensation Discussion and Analysis—Elements of Executive Compensation—Long-Term Incentive Awards.” For each NEO, the dollar amount stated in the column “Grant Date Fair Value of Stock and Option Awards” is included within the amount listed in the “Stock Awards” column of the Summary Compensation Table and in footnote (2) to the Summary Compensation Table.
(4)
Represents the number of performance shares awarded under our 2011 Omnibus Stock Incentive Plan to our NEOs on November 4, 2015 under our long-term incentive awards program described in “Compensation Discussion and Analysis—Long-Term Incentive Awards—Performance Shares.” Per the awards’ terms, on a normal vesting date officers can earn, in shares of Common Stock, from 0% to 200% of the number of performance shares that are vesting, based upon Valero’s achievement of objective performance measures during the performance periods prescribed by our Compensation Committee. The performance shares are scheduled to vest annually in one-third increments (tranches) in January 2017, January 2018, and January 2019, with any resulting payout at those times conditioned upon Valero’s performance during the pertinent performance periods. Only the first tranche of these performance shares is deemed to have a “grant date” in 2015, as explained in footnote (5) below. Our disclosures referenced by footnote (4) are for information purposes only, and tie to disclosures made by our NEOs in 2015 on Forms 4 in compliance with Section 16 of the Exchange Act. Our disclosures in footnote (5) below are intended to comply with the requirements of Item 402 of Regulation S-K with respect to “grants” of performance shares.
(5)
We are required by Item 402(d)(2)(viii) of Regulation S-K to make the disclosures referenced by footnote (5). Item 402(d)(2)(viii) of Regulation S-K requires us to disclose the “grant date fair value” of equity awards “computed in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718” (Topic 718). The amounts referenced in the table by footnote (5) represent three separate tranches from three separate award years—namely, the first tranche of performance shares awarded in 2015, the second tranche of performance shares awarded in 2014, and the third tranche of performance shares awarded in 2013. Under Topic 718, each of these tranches is deemed to be a separate “grant” for fair value purposes. The first tranche of performance shares awarded in 2015, the second tranche of performance shares awarded in 2014, and the third tranche of performance shares awarded in 2013 are deemed, under Topic 718, to have a “grant date” in 2015, that is, November 4, 2015, the date when the Compensation Committee established the peer group of companies for these tranches. The dollar amounts included in the table represent the grant date fair values from the three tranches (awarded in separate fiscal years) that are deemed to have a grant date in 2015.
The first tranche of the performance shares awarded in 2015 was deemed to be granted (under Topic 718) in 2015, and is deemed to have an expected conversion rate (probable outcome) of 113.79% with a fair value per share of $80.91, resulting in grant date fair values of $1,585,027; $628,671; $289,981; $277,845; and $265,951, for Mr. Gorder, Mr. Ciskowski, Mr. Riggs, Mr. Browning, and Mr. Crownover, respectively.


38



Footnotes to Grants of Plan-Based Awards table:
footnote (5) continued
When assuming achievement of the highest level of possible performance conditions (per SEC Regulation S-K, Instruction 3 to Item 402(c)(2)(v)), the calculation produces assumed values for this tranche’s shares of $2,785,698; $1,104,894; $509,645; $488,315; and $467,411, for Mr. Gorder, Mr. Ciskowski, Mr. Riggs, Mr. Browning, and Mr. Crownover, respectively. The grant date (per Topic 718) for the second tranche of the performance shares awarded in 2015 is expected to occur in either the fourth quarter of 2016 or in January 2017, depending on actions to be taken by our Compensation Committee. Similarly, the grant date for the third tranche is expected to occur in either the fourth quarter of 2017 or in January 2018, depending on actions to be taken by our Compensation Committee. The fair values of the second and third tranches will be determined on their respective Topic 718 grant dates.
For performance shares awarded in 2014, the grant date (per Topic 718) for the second tranche is deemed to have occurred in 2015. The performance shares in this tranche were deemed to have an expected conversion rate (probable outcome) of 182.05% and fair value per share of $129.44, resulting in grant date fair values of $2,268,177; $897,019; $431,424; $395,698; and $377,576, for Mr. Gorder, Mr. Ciskowski, Mr. Riggs, Mr. Browning, and Mr. Crownover, respectively. When assuming achievement of the highest level of possible performance conditions (per SEC Regulation S-K, Instruction 3 to Item 402(c)(2)(v)), the calculation produces assumed values for this tranche’s shares of $2,491,771; $985,446; $473,953; $434,705; and $414,797, for Mr. Gorder, Mr. Ciskowski, Mr. Riggs, Mr. Browning, and Mr. Crownover, respectively. The grant date (per Topic 718) for the third tranche of performance shares awarded in 2014 is expected to occur in either the fourth quarter of 2016 or in January 2017, depending on actions to be taken by our Compensation Committee. The fair value of the third tranche will be determined on its Topic 718 grant date.
For performance shares awarded in 2013, the grant date (per Topic 718) for the third tranche is deemed to have occurred in 2015. The performance shares in this tranche were deemed to have an expected conversion rate (probable outcome) of 100% and fair value per share of $68.545, resulting in grant date fair values of $871,207; $639,730; $181,850; $191,446; and $183,701, for Mr. Gorder, Mr. Ciskowski, Mr. Riggs, Mr. Browning, and Mr. Crownover, respectively. When assuming achievement of the highest level of possible performance conditions (per SEC Regulation S-K, Instruction 3 to Item 402(c)(2)(v)), the calculation produces assumed values for this tranche’s shares of $1,742,414; $1,279,461; $363,700; $382,892; and $367,401, for Mr. Gorder, Mr. Ciskowski, Mr. Riggs, Mr. Browning, and Mr. Crownover, respectively.
footnote (5) is continued on the following page


39



Footnotes to Grants of Plan-Based Awards table:
footnote (5) continued
Computations of the grant date fair values for the performance shares included in the Grants of Plan-Based Awards table are summarized below. For each NEO, the sum of the dollar amounts stated in the table’s column “Grant Date Fair Value of Stock and Option Awards” is included within the amount listed in the “Stock Awards” column of the Summary Compensation Table and in footnote (2) to the Summary Compensation Table.
 
performance shares deemed (under Topic 718) to have a grant date in 2015
 
grant date fair value ($)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gorder
3rd tranche of 2013 award
 
12,710

 
871,207

 
2nd tranche of 2014 award
 
17,523

 
2,268,177

 
1st tranche of 2015 award
 
19,590

 
1,585,027

 
total 2015 grant date fair value
 
 
 
4,724,411

 
 
 
 
 
 
Ciskowski
3rd tranche of 2013 award
 
9,333

 
639,730

 
2nd tranche of 2014 award
 
6,930

 
897,019

 
1st tranche of 2015 award
 
7,770

 
628,671

 
total 2015 grant date fair value
 
 
 
2,165,420

 
 
 
 
 
 
Riggs
3rd tranche of 2013 award
 
2,653

 
181,850

 
2nd tranche of 2014 award
 
3,333

 
431,424

 
1st tranche of 2015 award
 
3,584

 
289,981

 
total 2015 grant date fair value
 
 
 
903,255

 
 
 
 
 
 
Browning
3rd tranche of 2013 award
 
2,793

 
191,446

 
2nd tranche of 2014 award
 
3,057

 
395,698

 
1st tranche of 2015 award
 
3,434

 
277,845

 
total 2015 grant date fair value
 
 
 
864,989

 
 
 
 
 
 
Crownover
3rd tranche of 2013 award
 
2,680

 
183,701

 
2nd tranche of 2014 award
 
2,917

 
377,576

 
1st tranche of 2015 award
 
3,287

 
265,951

 
total 2015 grant date fair value
 
 
 
827,228




40



OUTSTANDING EQUITY AWARDS
AT DECEMBER 31, 2015
This table describes unexercised stock options, unvested shares of restricted stock, and unvested performance shares held by our named executive officers as of December 31, 2015.
 
 
Option Awards
 
Stock Awards
 
 
 
 
Restricted Stock
 
Performance Shares
 
 
Number of Securities Underlying Unexercised Options (#) Exercisable
 
Number of Securities Underlying Unexercised Options (#) Unexercisable
 
Option Exercise Price ($)(1)
 
Option Expiration Date
 
Number of Shares or Units of Stock That Have Not Vested (#)
 
Market Value of Shares or Units of Stock That Have Not Vested ($)(2)
 
Equity Incentive Plan Awards: Number of Unearned Shares, Units or Other Rights That Have Not Vested (#) (2)
 
Equity Incentive Plan Awards: Market or Payout Value of Unearned Shares, Units or Other Rights That Have Not Vested ($)(2)
Joseph W. Gorder
 
85,493

 

 
 
 
18.145

 
10/15/2019
 
11,066

 
(5
)
 
782,477

 
15,026

 
(10
)
 
2,124,977

 
 
21,400

 

 
 
 
17.743

 
11/17/2020
 
13,396

 
(6
)
 
947,231

 
25,420

 
(11
)
 
2,696,172

 
 
26,750

 

 
 
 
24.582

 
10/28/2021
 
30,515

 
(7
)
 
2,157,716

 
52,570

 
(12
)
 
4,956,347

 
 
37,567

 

 
 
 
27.318

 
11/09/2022
 
34,115

 
(8
)
 
2,412,272

 
58,770

 
(13
)
 
4,155,627

 
 
21,180

 
10,590

 
(3
)
 
39.665

 
11/08/2023
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
14,603

 
29,207

 
(4
)
 
48.565

 
10/23/2024
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Michael S. Ciskowski
 
251,530

 

 
 
 
18.145

 
10/15/2019
 
8,127

 
(5
)
 
574,660

 
13,025

 
(10
)
 
1,841,996

 
 
32,100

 

 
 
 
17.743

 
11/17/2020
 
12,067

 
(7
)
 
853,258

 
18,666

 
(11
)
 
1,979,809

 
 
44,940

 

 
 
 
24.582

 
10/28/2021
 
13,531

 
(8
)
 
956,777

 
20,790

 
(12
)
 
1,960,081

 
 
32,570

 

 
 
 
27.318

 
11/09/2022
 
 
 
 
 

 
23,310

 
(13
)
 
1,648,250

 
 
15,553

 
7,777

 
(3
)
 
39.665

 
11/08/2023
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5,773

 
11,547

 
(4
)
 
48.565

 
10/23/2024
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
R. Lane Riggs
 
8,560

 

 
 
 
17.678

 
10/29/2019
 
3,977

 
(5
)
 
281,214

 
3,117

 
(10
)
 
440,806

 
 
11,770

 

 
 
 
24.582

 
10/28/2021
 
3,756

 
(6
)
 
265,587

 
5,306

 
(11
)
 
562,781

 
 
7,789

 

 
 
 
27.318

 
11/09/2022
 
9,667

 
(7
)
 
683,554

 
10,000

 
(12
)
 
942,847