10-K 1 v403535_10k.htm FORM 10-K

 

 

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

Form 10-K

 

þ ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
  For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2014
or
o TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)  OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
  For the transition period from __________________ to ___________________

 

Commission File Number: 001-33035

 

WidePoint Corporation
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware   52-2040275
(State or other jurisdiction of   (I.R.S. Employer
incorporation or organization)   Identification No.)

 

7926 Jones  Branch Drive, Suite 520, McLean, Virginia 22102
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

 

(703) 349-2577
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the act:

 

Title of each class  

Name of each exchange

on which registered

Common Stock, $0.001 par value per share   NYSE MKT

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the act:
None

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.      Yes o No þ

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.     Yes o No þ

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days: Yes þ No o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files): Yes þ No o

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. þ

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer  o   Accelerated filer                    o

Non-accelerated filer o

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

  Smaller reporting company   þ

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes o No þ

 

The aggregate market value of the registrant’s Common Stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant, computed by reference to the closing price of the Common Stock on the NYSE MKT on the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter, was approximately $113,810,000.

 

As of March 9, 2015, there were 81,721,763 shares of the registrant’s Common Stock issued and outstanding.

 

 

 

 
 

 

Forward Looking Statements

 

In this Annual Report on Form 10-K, unless the context indicates otherwise, the terms “Company” and “WidePoint,” as well as the words “we,” “our,” “ours” and “us,” refer collectively to WidePoint Corporation and its consolidated subsidiaries.

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements that involve substantial risks and uncertainties, many of which are outside of our control. We believe that these statements are within the definition of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements include, without limitation, any statement that is not a statement of historical fact, including, without limitation, statements regarding the our business strategy and plans and objectives of management for future operations or that may predict, forecast, indicate or imply future results, performance or achievements. The words “estimate,” “project,” “intend,” “forecast,” “anticipate,” “plan,” “planning,” “expect,” “believe,” “will,” “will likely,” “should,” “could,” “would,” “may” or the negative of such words or words or expressions of similar meaning are intended to identify forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance, and all such forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond our ability to control. Actual results may differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements as a result of various factors. We do not undertake, and we disclaim, any obligation to update any forward-looking statements or to announce revisions to any of the forward-looking statements. Certain factors that could cause results to differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements, including the risk factors set forth in this Form 10-K. Readers are cautioned not to put undue reliance on forward-looking statements.

 

Industry and market data used throughout this Annual Report on Form 10-K were obtained through surveys and studies conducted by third parties, industry and general publications and internal company research. We have not independently verified any of the data from third-party sources nor have we ascertained any underlying economic assumptions relied upon therein. While we are not aware of any misstatements regarding the industry data presented herein, estimates involve risks and uncertainties and are subject to change based on various factors.

 

PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

 

Company Overview

 

We are a provider of information technology (IT) based products, services, and solutions. We offer secure, cloud-based, enterprise-wide IT based solutions that enable commercial markets, and federal and state government organizations, to deploy fully compliant IT services in accordance with government-mandated regulations and advanced system requirements. Our Managed Mobility Solutions (MMS) offer a portfolio of IT based services and products with a set of streamlined mobile communications management, identity management, and consulting solutions that provide our customers with the ability to manage and protect their valuable communications assets and deploy compliant identity management solutions that provide secured virtual and physical access to restricted environments. Many of our solutions are accessible on-demand through cloud computing and provide customers with the ability to remotely manage their workforce mobility and identity management requirements in accordance with internal policies, the marketplace and the demands of their internal customers.

 

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Our Solutions

 

We offer a complementary set of streamlined mobile communications solutions using our proprietary cloud-based portals to enable our clients to actively manage their mobile communications assets and expenses in an efficient and cost-effective manner in a safe and secure environment. These portals provide our clients with on-demand access to manage and control deployment of their communications assets and expenses associated with supporting the functional requirements of their mobile workforce. In addition, these portals identify issues that impact our clients’ workflow and business models.

 

Our portfolio of solutions allow our clients to select a single source solution that enables them to establish a viable standard process that focuses on the goals of the client’s entire organization. We build solutions that ensure the privacy of both corporate and personal information. In addition, we find that our telecom services can generally save our clients 30% to 65% of their current communications costs. We believe that our MMS offerings can provide a significant return on investment by enabling our client’s to securely manage their mobile workforce and efficiently manage the total life cycle of their valuable communications assets and services throughout the world.

 

Our core set of offerings are set forth below:

 

§Expense Management – Utilizing our proprietary cloud-based portals, we provide a core set of dash boards and standard reports to evaluate communications carrier compliance against a contract, manage communication assets and expenses and ensure users are on the most cost-effective plans, monitor for potential misuses and threats to the overall communications environment. These standard reports provide users with data for ongoing periodic reviews and strategic decision-making. We also offer customized functionality and dash board reports to satisfy the unique business requirements of our customers’ end users. We also offer a custom analysis of our clients mobile environment, types of devices, spend, communication requirements, usage among other considerations and provide a customized selection and delivery of all available voice, data, and message plans offered by the carriers that best fit the users of the devices so that our customers only pay for the services they utilize on a monthly basis.

 

§Security – We provide a full range of identity management and identity assurance services to protect and defend information and information systems by ensuring confidentiality, integrity, authentication, availability, and non-repudiation. These services include strategic risk analysis and management support that includes physical security, reliability, continuity of operations planning, and support for other enterprise governance issues such as privacy, compliance, audits and disaster recovery. We have been certified by the federal government to facilitate public access to the services offered by government agencies, including on-line access to computers for purposes of reviewing, retrieving, providing, and exchanging information. Our digital certificate credentials are authorized to provide trusted individual or business identity information for use by the Department of Defense (“DoD”), FirstGov, General Services Administration (“GSA”) and participating federal government agencies. Our digital certificate credential services include the DoD External Certificate Authority, Access Certificates for Electronic Services, and the General Services Administration Shared Service Provider.

 

§Cert-on-Device - During the first quarter of 2014, we introduced our Certificate-on-Device (Cert-on-Device) solution. Our Cert-on-Device solution is a robust cloud-based internally developed service that provides secure digital certificates to all types of mobile devices in order to enhance the information security assurance level of mobile transactions and access to corporation networks, databases and other IT assets. Cert-on-Device enables an enterprise to attain a greater level of network security than user authentication alone by ensuring that only authorized devices connect to an organization's IT infrastructure. During the second quarter of 2014, we successfully loaded secure digital certificates onto a number of individual mobile devices, tablets and operating system platforms. We are also delivering machine to machine digital certificates that support data in motion. We are working with leading suppliers and manufacturers of mobile devices to develop and demonstrate mobile devices with this capability built-in as a ready feature and to accommodate other device operating systems.

 

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§Managing Devices – We provide an authenticated order management portal to place, track, and manage devices and services requests, and other services to enable rapid deployment and management of communication assets across an enterprise.

 

§Mobile Applications – We provide services designed to test, monitor, configure and manage mobile applications for both business and personal use.

 

§Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) – We provide BYOD solutions to mitigate risks related to vulnerabilities within an internal information technology infrastructure such as unauthorized access, protection of privacy information, data integrity, and more.

 

§User Support – We provide call centers with 24x7 emergency support and expert technical support to ensure a user’s calls are answered and a timely resolution identified.

 

§Policies – We provide assistance with defining, executing, and measuring effective telecommunications and information technologies architecture planning, policies and best practices that are consistent with an organization’s goal and objectives. Also, we create customized security policies and procedures that ensure that the most cost-effective and secure remote access solutions. We also provide secure asset disposal services and can disable lost or stolen devices.

 

§Consulting – We provide consulting services on an individual basis or as part of our total offerings. These services may include telecommunications audit and optimization, telecommunications carrier contract negotiation, value added resale of third party products and services, telecommunications and/or security assessments, technical subject matter expertise, training and other related MMS services.

 

Global Industry Overview

 

We primarily operate in the IT industry and focus our efforts in the MMS market. We provide our solution offering to both the communications providers and their enterprise customers. A company’s communications infrastructure can be a valuable asset to the organization in terms of the data capture and potential business intelligence from the use of its proprietary information.

 

Advances in communications technology over the last 10 years significantly improved the storage, speed and frequency of communications and the complexity of these devices and enabled rapid proliferation of mobile computing and communications devices. Examples include wireless workstations, personal digital assistants, mobile hot spots, cloud-based video conferencing, converged voice and data for fixed and mobile communications, virtual networking, and other blue tooth enabled devices. Advances and improvements in digital identity and security technologies coupled with smart mobile computing and communications devices increased the speed of business transactions across the globe between businesses, governments and individuals, but it also introduced many unexpected security threats to an organizations critical data and communications infrastructure. The growing number of security incidents across the globe are affecting small and large organizations and these incidents are growing in frequency and causing financial and reputational harm for many companies.

 

The expanded use of cloud-based mobile computing and communications technologies continue to change the way in which our government, businesses and individuals communicate, conduct business, collaborate and share information globally across their respective environments. IT teams at large and small organizations are searching for a market-ready core solution set with easily customizable add-ons that can provide safe and secure mobile computing and communications between any mobile device and the organizations data and communications infrastructure. Many enterprises are managing this risk and related costs by procuring secure communications solutions offered by cloud-based providers thus avoiding the additional infrastructure costs associated with an on premise solution and the cost of hiring expertise in-house to manage the process. This presents a significant opportunity for growth for companies focused in the MMS market with the expertise and technology to meet market demands.

 

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We anticipate that use of mobile business applications will continue to rise and continue to present challenges for our clients to integrate, manage and secure these emerging mobile technologies. Government and commercial enterprises conducting business through e-commerce, online banking and trading, Internet-based enterprise solutions for process automation, or digital signature enablement will require a secure identity assurance solution in today’s cloud-based environment to protect against the growing risk of cyber fraud and other schemes designed to deprive an enterprise and its customer of their valuable assets. We believe our portfolio of solutions (including Cert-on-Device) provides a stronger, more secure and cost-effective solution that both protects our clients’ critical infrastructure and expands our clients’ workforce mobility initiatives. We have partnered with several key communications equipment manufacturers to improve our reach into our target markets and to provide a more integrated market-ready solution that is accessible by our end users and compliant with our customers security and information requirements.

 

In order to effectively compete, we must keep pace with changes and convergences of mobile computing and security technologies in a data driven global environment. The management and oversight of these devices can be expensive and complicated due to the variety of service plans and features offered; significant differences in software technologies and infrastructure requirements for these devices; the growing complexity of communications bills; and recent trends to permit employees to utilize their personal devices to conduct company business. The level of technical expertise and resources required to protect an organization’s valuable communications assets and data presents an opportunity to deliver high quality services and also presents a barrier to new competitors in the marketplace.

 

The challenge for our industry is to provide cost saving solutions that can enable an organization to meet their technology asset and risk management objectives without significantly increasing their operating costs and allowing these organizations to focus on running their business.

 

Global Competitive Market Overview

 

Our global competitive market is highly fragmented and subject to rapid technological change driven in part by periodic introductions of new technologies and devices in the mobile cyber security and communications industries, frequent changes in, and resulting inconsistencies between, the billing platforms utilized by major communications carriers and the changing demands of customers. Changes in billing platforms by major communications carriers may affect automation technologies used to capture, organize, process, analyze and report communications data and tends to increase the costs to deliver services. Requests to modify our core system functionality and more complex operational requirements tend to increase the cost to deliver services.

 

We currently compete with companies from a variety of market sectors, including publicly and privately held firms, large accounting and consulting firms, systems consulting and implementation firms, application software firms, service groups of computer equipment companies and other general management consulting firms. We also compete regularly with offshore outsourcing companies, and we expect competition from these companies to increase in the future, especially on development, application management services and outsourcing engagements. In addition, we and other technology and outsourced service providers compete with internally developed communications management solutions. We compete frequently for client engagements against companies with far more resources than us. Recent consolidations of large competitors (including acquisitions made by our competitors named above) within our market have further increased the size and resources of some of these firms. We believe that the major competitive factors in our marketplace are distinctive technical competencies, governmental certifications and approvals to operate within this space, successful past contract performance, price of services, reputation for quality, and key management personnel with domain expertise.

 

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Our key competitors currently include Tangoe, Inc., Calero, KEYW Holding Corporation, Verisign, Check Point, Motorola Solutions Inc. and On Track Innovations; all of which have varying specialties within the MMS market. Due to our significant federal government contract concentrations we also experience competition from a variety of both large and small companies, including divisions of large federal government integrators such as Lockheed Martin Corporation, Northrop Grumman Corporation, and other large and mid-sized federal contractors, as well as a limited number of small to mid-sized subject matter expert organizations offering specialized capabilities within the identity management space. The same companies that are our competitors will, at times, team with us or subcontract with us in the pursuit of new business.

 

Competitors are often able to offer more scale, which in some instances has enabled them to significantly discount their services in exchange for revenues in other areas or at later dates. Many of our competitors are heavily discounting their services to unprofitable levels in an effort to maintain market share and push other competitors out of the market and then turn around and raise prices for its captive customer base. This type of pricing behavior affects the entire market, creates a commodity pricing environment that directly affects the level of services that can be delivered to meet the customers’ requirements and ensure a reasonable return for the service provider. We believe we provide a strong core solution that is scalable based on the clients requirements and budget. If we cannot keep pace with the intense competition in our marketplace, deliver cost-effective and relevant solutions to our target market, our business, financial condition and results of operations will suffer.

 

Federal Market Overview and Concentration

 

We derive a significant amount of our revenues from contracts funded by federal government agencies for which we act in capacity as the prime contractor, or as a subcontractor. We believe that contracts with federal government agencies in particular, will be a significant source of our revenues for the foreseeable future. Accordingly, changes in federal government fiscal or spending policies or the U.S. defense budget could directly affect our financial performance. Additionally, certain factors outside of our controls including but not limited to potential delays in receiving task orders against our U.S Department of Homeland Security Blank Purchase Agreement may materially affect the amount and timing of revenues we recognize and cause variability in our earnings in the short term.

 

We expect our federal customers to be motivated to meet their organizational missions and objectives and also minimize costs in this challenging environment. We believe these actions may result in lower profit margins across the federal contracting industry in whole if government spending in all areas is reduced. We believe that the federal government’s spending will remain stable in key areas in which WidePoint is well positioned, including mobile telecommunications capabilities that serve to reduce and optimize spending; and in select cyber security initiatives that support trusted, cloud-based, secured-transmission solutions to both protect critical communications and infrastructure, and to do so in a cost-justified manner.

 

Strategic Vision

 

Our objective is to grow our business profitably as a premier technology-based provider of both product and service enterprise solutions to both the public and private sectors. Our strategies for achieving our objective to grow our business profitably include the following:

 

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1.Retain and Cross-Sell Existing Customer Base. Many of our professional staff work on-site or work in close proximity with our customers and we develop close customer relationships and are often able to enhance our customers’ operations by rapidly identifying and developing solutions for customer-specific requirements. We intend to continue to deliver product and service solutions to meet or exceed customer expectations and recommend complementary product and service solutions that will meet the business objectives of our customers.

 

2.Attract New Customers by Referral and Expertise. We intend to leverage our long-term relationships with our existing customers to reach new customers in our target markets. We also intend to use our past performance reputation within the federal, state and local government agencies and corporate customers to attract new customers.

 

3.Establish Key Partnerships with Device Manufacturers. We intend to establish partnerships with large device manufacturers in order to have devices include product offerings such as Cert-on-Device.

 

4.Distribution Channel Growth. Broaden our distribution channels and reach through alliances with telecommunications carriers and organizations that feature national or transnational sales and marketing networks and resources that can feature our unique offerings as part of their respective products and services portfolios.

 

5.Growth Opportunities in Target Markets. We believe that the increased focus on efficient use of financial resources in the public and private sectors creates an opportunity for continued growth in identity management services and communications based management services. Our ability to deliver savings may present additional opportunities to provide management and delivery of secure and advanced technology solutions for enterprise applications and information systems. We will continue to develop our sales and marketing infrastructure and channels to drive new customer growth opportunities in our target market.

 

6.Preparing our Infrastructure for Growth. We continue to develop our operational competencies and disciplines to allow us to both support existing and growth opportunities. We will continue to strengthen our financial infrastructure to support the general and administrative requirements attributable to our growth strategies.

 

7.Attracting, Training and Retaining Highly Skilled Professionals. We continue to attract, train and retain highly skilled professionals, including engineers, scientists, analysts, technicians and support specialists, to ensure that we have the capabilities to fulfill our customers’ requirements. We target candidates who have served in the military or as civilian experts, as well as those who are leading specialists in their technology disciplines. We believe we can continue to retain our employees by offering competitive compensation and benefit plans, opportunities for career growth through company-supported education programs and diverse and challenging assignments.

 

8.Pursuing Strategic Acquisitions. We are focused primarily on acquiring businesses that provide value-added solutions for our present service offerings and customer base. We will also selectively pursue strategic acquisitions of businesses that can cost-effectively further broaden our domain expertise and service solutions to our customers and allow us to establish relationships with new customers or enter new target markets.

 

Marketing and Sales

 

We engage in a wide variety of marketing activities designed to broaden market awareness of our solutions, including e-mail and direct mail campaigns, co-marketing strategies designed to leverage existing strategic relationships, website marketing, topical webcasts, public relations campaigns, speaking engagements and forums and industry analyst visibility initiatives. We participate in and sponsor conferences that cater to our target market and demonstrate and promote our software and services at trade shows targeted to information technology and finance executives. We also publish white papers relating to communications life cycle management issues and develop customer reference programs, such as customer case studies, in an effort to promote better awareness of industry issues and demonstrate that our MMS offerings can address many of these risks to an organization.

 

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In the U.S. market we market and sell our solutions worldwide primarily through our direct sales force and through indirect distribution channel partners. Outside of the U.S. we market and sell our solutions through indirect distribution channel partners. We market our solutions through our direct sales force and alliances with several strategic partners in specific industries. The direct sales force, in concert with our operations managers, is responsible for providing highly responsive, quality service and ensuring client satisfaction. Strategic partnerships and alliances provide us with additional access to potential clients. Our marketing strategy is to build our brand and increase market awareness of our solutions in our target markets and to generate qualified sales leads that will allow successfully build strong relationships with key decision markers involved in the sales process on the customer side that typically consists of information technology executives, finance executives and managers of communications assets and networks. The sales process for an MMS services company can take a year or more to cultivate and close depending on the prospective customers timetable and urgency.

 

Our marketing and sales team has a wide variety of skills and expertise to cultivate qualified leads and guide our prospective customers towards finding a solution that meets their organization’s goals and objectives.

 

Clients

 

Our government client base is located predominantly in the Mid-Atlantic region of the U.S. while our commercial client base is located throughout the continental U.S. Our clients are, for the most part, large governmental agencies, federal government contractors or large commercial enterprises. Historically, we have derived, and may continue to derive in the future, a significant percentage of our total revenues from a relatively small number of federal government contracts.

 

Due to the nature of our business and the relative size of certain contracts which are entered into in the ordinary course of business, the loss of any single significant customer would have a material adverse effect on our results of operations. In future periods, we will continue to focus on diversifying our revenue by increasing the number of commercial customer contracts.

 

Government Contracts

 

We have numerous government contracts and contract vehicles. Contract vehicles include Government Wide Acquisition Contracts (“GWACs”), Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (“ID/IQ”) contracts, and Blanket Purchase Agreements (“BPAs”) based upon General Services Administration (“GSA”) Schedule rates. Our major prime contracts are with various departments of the Department of Defense (“DoD”), the Transportation Safety Administration (“TSA”), the Department of Homeland Security (“DHS”), the Centers for Disease Control (“CDC”), and Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”). We also hold a number of ID/IQ contracts that extend our capability to expand our revenue base, including, but not limited to:

 

§GSA contracts for the Federal Strategic Sourcing Initiative (“FSSI”) for Telecommunications Expense Management (“TEM”), Federal Supply Schedule for Management, Organizational and Business Improvement Services (“MOBIS”), the Federal Supply Schedule for Professional Engineering Services (“PES”), the Solutions and More (“SAM”), Streamlined Technology Acquisition Resources for Services (“STARS”), and the IT Schedule – 70.

 

§The Department of Justice (“DOJ”) Information Technology Support Services (“ITSS”) 3 contract.

 

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§The SeaPort-e Contract to provide engineering, technical, and programmatic support services to the Naval Surface Warfare Centers and the Naval Undersea Warfare Centers.

 

§The Defense Intelligence Agency Solutions for the Information Technology Enterprise (SITE) contract to provide information technology services and capabilities to the Defense Intelligence Agency, the Military Services, the U.S. Coast Guard, the Combatant Commands, the Joint Reserve Intelligence Program; and other Defense and non-Department of Defense departments or Agencies with intelligence missions, or that utilize intelligence information systems.

 

§Subsidiaries of WidePoint are approved subcontractors for the following ID/IQ contracts:

 

oGSA Alliant Small Business
oGSA Networx
oGSA Connections II
oNational Institutes of Health CIO-SP3

 

We also have various relationships with other contractors that allow us to act as a subcontractor, thereby providing us access to various other contracts and contract vehicles in biometrics and identity management infrastructure support, and Information Technology Support Services.

 

Our contracts with the federal government, and many contracts with other entities, permit the government client to modify, curtail or terminate the contract at any time for the convenience of the government, or for default by the contractor. If a contract is terminated for convenience, we are generally reimbursed for our allowable costs through the date of termination and are paid a proportionate amount of the stipulated profit or fee attributable to the work actually performed.

 

Research and Development and Technology Solution Enhancements

 

While we do engage in research and development of products and services, including customized software products for our customers, we did not have material research and development expenses in 2014 or 2013. We did incur non-research and development expenses related to platform integrations and product enhancements during fiscal 2013 and 2014.

 

We may fund certain software development projects to enhance or customize existing software platforms. These projects are aimed at improving the efficiency and effectiveness of our software solutions and our customizing a solution to meet our customer’s organizational requirements, if necessary. We determine which enhancements to further develop after assessing the market capabilities sought by potential customers, considering technological advances, feedback on enhancements from our current customer user groups and other factors. Our current research and development activities are focused on the integration of our software based platforms, certain enhancements to improve the delivery of our information technology services delivered through these platforms and our Cert-on-Device development initiative.

 

We may fund certain product development projects to respond to perceived and/or existing market opportunities. We funded research during fiscal 2013 to deliver a technology solution to respond to communications security issues such as BYOD programs and delivered a “Cert-on-Device” service. We utilized our proven federally authorized credentialing infrastructure to develop a mobile certificate solution that enables an organization to assign different levels of access to employees, consultants, and trading partners, based on the specific BYOD device being used to establish a connection with an organizations infrastructure. Our Cert-on-Device service enables an organization to provide secure virtual private network access through a mobile device, prohibit sensitive data downloads to unauthorized devices and prevent downloads from protected devices, and enable remote revocation of credentials that have been lost or stolen or being to an individual no longer with the organization the credential is linked. We announced the launch of our Cert-on-Device service in January 2014 and we believe this additional capability addresses a significant mobile security issue that exists in the market.

 

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In addition, we have historically acquired assets in research and development through our strategic acquisitions. There were no acquisitions of research and development intangible assets in connection with our acquisition of SCL in 2014.

 

We utilize a standard architecture with centralized technology oversight to ensure enhancements are subject to appropriate oversight and scrutiny and a consistent and efficient process. Our development team is comprised of professionals with hands-on technical and practical client-side development experience. We believe this allows us to design and deploy enhancements that can resolve real-world problems in a timely manner.

 

Data Centers

 

We host our proprietary solutions and operate all servers, systems and networks at 5 data centers located in Ohio, North Carolina and Virginia. Our agreements with our customers contain guarantees regarding specified levels of system availability, and we regularly provide our customers with performance reports against those standards. We deploy monitoring technology that continuously checks the servers and key underlying components at regular intervals for availability and performance, ensuring availability to our customers. Each data center provides security measures, redundant environmental controls, fire suppression systems and redundant electrical generators. To facilitate data loss recovery, we operate a multi-tiered system configuration with load-balanced web server pools, replicated database servers and fault-tolerant storage devices. The architecture is designed to ensure near real-time data recovery in the event of a malfunction of a primary server. Based on customer requirements, we can also provide near real-time asynchronous data replication between operational and disaster recovery backup sites.

 

Intellectual Property

 

Our intellectual property rights are important to our business. We rely on a combination of patent, copyright, trademark, service mark, trade secret and other rights in the United States and other jurisdictions, as well as confidentiality procedures and contractual provisions to protect our proprietary technology, processes and other intellectual property. We protect our intellectual property rights in a number of ways including entering into confidentiality and other written agreements with our employees, customers, consultants and partners in an attempt to control access to and distribution of our software, documentation and other proprietary technology and other information. Despite our efforts to protect our proprietary rights, third parties may, in an unauthorized manner, attempt to use, copy or otherwise obtain and market or distribute our intellectual property rights or technology or otherwise develop software or services with the same functionality as our software and services.

 

U.S. patent filings are intended to provide the holder with a right to exclude others from making, using, selling or importing in the United States the inventions covered by the claims of granted patents. Our patents, including our pending patents, if granted, may be contested, circumvented or invalidated. Moreover, the rights that may be granted in those issued and pending patents may not provide us with proprietary protection or competitive advantages, and we may not be able to prevent third parties from infringing those patents. Therefore, the exact benefits of our issued patents and, if issued, our pending patents and the other steps that we have taken to protect our intellectual property cannot be predicted with certainty.

 

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Seasonality

 

Our business is not seasonal. However, our revenues and operating results may vary significantly from quarter-to-quarter, due to revenues earned on contracts, the number of billable days in a quarter, the timing of the pass-through of other direct costs, the commencement and completion of contracts during any particular quarter; as well as the schedule of the government agencies for awarding contracts, the term of each contract that we have been awarded and general economic conditions. Because a significant portion of our expenses, such as personnel and facilities costs, are fixed in the short term, successful contract performance and variation in the volume of activity as well as in the number of contracts commenced or completed during any quarter may cause significant variations in operating results from quarter to quarter.

 

Employees

 

As of December 31, 2014, we had approximately 296 full-time employees worldwide. We periodically engage additional consultants and employ temporary employees.

 

The majority of our offices are located in areas populated by military personnel (both retired and active duty), and highly-skilled civilian personnel. Potential employees possessing the unique qualifications required are readily available for both part-time and full-time employment. The primary method of soliciting personnel is through recruiting resources directly utilizing all known sources including electronic databases, public forums, and personal networks of friends and former co-workers.

 

We believe that our future success will depend in part on our continued ability to attract and retain highly skilled managerial, technical, sales and support personnel. We generally do not have employment contracts with our employees, but we do selectively maintain employment agreements with key employees. In addition, confidentiality and non-disclosure agreements are in place with many of our employees and included in WidePoint’s policies and procedures. None of our employees are subject to a collective bargaining agreement. We believe that our relations with our employees are good.

 

Corporate Information

 

We were incorporated on May 30, 1997, under the laws of the State of Delaware under the name WidePoint Corporation. Our principal executive offices are located at 7926 Jones Branch Drive, Suite 520, McLean, Virginia 22102. Our internet address is www.widepoint.com. Information on our website is not incorporated into this Form 10-K. We make available free of charge through our website our Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). The SEC maintains an Internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC at http://www.sec.gov.

 

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ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

You should carefully consider the risk factors set forth below and in other reports that we file from time to time with the Securities and Exchange Commission and the other information in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The matters discussed in the risk factors, and additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or that we currently deem immaterial, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operation and future growth prospects and could cause the trading price of our common stock to decline.

 

Risks Related to our Business and our Industry

 

We may not be able to respond to rapid technological changes with new software products and services, which could harm our sales and profitability.

 

The IT-based services offered through our managed mobility portfolio of products, services, and solutions is characterized by rapid technological change and frequent new product and service introductions, driven in part by periodic introductions of new technologies and devices in the mobile cyber security and communications industries, frequent changes in, and resulting inconsistencies between, the billing platforms utilized by major communications carriers and the changing demands of customers regarding the means of delivery of communications management solutions. To achieve and maintain market acceptance for our solution, we must effectively anticipate these changes and offer software products and services that respond to them in a timely manner. Customers may require features and capabilities that our current solution does not have. If we fail to develop software products and services that satisfy customer preferences in a timely and cost-effective manner, our ability to renew our agreements with existing customers and our ability to create or increase demand for our solution will be harmed.

 

Our market is highly competitive and we may not be able to continue to compete effectively.

 

The markets for the services we provide are highly competitive. We currently compete with companies from a variety of market segments, including publicly and privately held firms, large accounting and consulting firms, systems consulting and implementation firms, application software firms, service groups of computer equipment companies and other general management consulting firms. We also compete regularly with offshore outsourcing companies, and we expect competition from these companies to increase in the future, especially on development, application management services and outsourcing engagements. In addition, we and other technology and outsourced service providers compete with internally developed communications management solutions.

 

We compete frequently for client engagements against companies with greater resources than us. Recent consolidations of large competitors within our market have further increased the size and resources of some of these competitors. These competitors are often able to offer more scale, which in some instances has enabled them to significantly discount their services in exchange for revenues in other areas or at later dates. Additionally, in an effort to maintain market share, many of our competitors are heavily discounting their services to unprofitable levels. If we cannot keep pace with the intense competition in our marketplace, our business, financial condition and results of operations will suffer.

 

The intensity of competition in our information technology based managed mobility solutions market could result in pricing pressure as the market continues to develop. We expect the intensity of competition to increase in the future as existing competitors develop their capabilities and as new companies, which could include mobile communications technology, cyber security technology, and solution providers and one or more large communications carriers, enter our market. Some of these competitors, such as large communications carriers, may offer similar and or expanded solutions as part of a broad outsource offering for mobile communications services. Increased competition could result in additional pricing pressure, reduced sales, shorter term lengths for customer contracts, lower margins or the failure of our solution to achieve or maintain broad market acceptance. If we are unable to compete effectively, it will be difficult for us to maintain our pricing rates and add and retain customers, and our business, financial condition and results of operations will be harmed.

 

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We have significant fixed operating costs, which may be difficult to adjust in response to unanticipated fluctuations in revenues.

 

A high percentage of our operating expenses, particularly personnel, rent and depreciation, are fixed in advance of any particular quarter. As a result, an unanticipated decrease in the number or average size of, or an unanticipated delay in the scheduling for our projects may cause significant variations in operating results in any particular quarter and could have a material adverse effect on operations for that quarter. An unanticipated termination or decrease in size or scope of a major project, a client’s decision not to proceed with a project we anticipated or the completion during a quarter of several major client projects could require us to maintain underutilized employees and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Additionally, our revenues and earnings may also fluctuate from quarter to quarter because of such factors as:

 

§the contractual terms and timing of completion of projects, including achievement of certain business results;
§any delays incurred in connection with projects;
§the adequacy of provisions for losses and bad debts;
§the accuracy of our estimates of resources required to complete ongoing projects;
§loss of key highly skilled personnel necessary to complete projects; and
§general economic conditions.

 

We may lose money if we do not accurately estimate the costs of fixed-price engagements.

 

Some of our projects may be based on fixed-price, fixed-time contracts, rather than contracts in which payment to us is determined on a time and materials basis. Our failure to accurately estimate the resources required for a project (including appropriate overhead and general and administrative support costs), client driven actions that causes our original project plan to be delayed, or our failure to complete our contractual obligations in a manner consistent with the project plan upon which our fixed-price, fixed-time contract was based, could adversely affect our overall profitability and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, we may fix the price for some projects at an early stage of the process, which could result in a fixed price that turns out to be too low and, therefore, could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our clients could unexpectedly terminate their contracts for our services.

 

Some of our contracts can be canceled by the client with limited advance notice and without significant penalty. Termination by any client of a contract for our services could result in a loss of expected revenues and additional expenses for staff that were allocated to that client’s project. We could be required to maintain underutilized employees who were assigned to the terminated contract. The unexpected cancellation or significant reduction in the scope of any of our large projects could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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We may be liable to our clients for damages caused by our services or by our failure to remedy system failures.

 

Many of our projects involve technology applications or systems that are critical to the operations of our clients’ businesses. If we fail to perform our services correctly, we may be unable to deliver applications or systems to our clients with the promised functionality or within the promised time frame, or to satisfy the required service levels for support and maintenance. While we have created redundancy and back-up systems, any such failures by us could result in claims by our clients for substantial damages against us. Although we attempt to limit the amount and type of our contractual liability for defects in the applications or systems we provide, and carry insurance coverage that mitigates this liability in certain instances, we cannot be assured that these limitations and insurance coverages will be applicable and enforceable in all cases. Even if these limitations and insurance coverages are found to be applicable and enforceable, our liability to our clients for these types of claims could still exceed our insurance coverage and be material in amount and affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We may be unable to protect our proprietary software and methodology.

 

Our success depends, in part, upon our proprietary software, methodology and other intellectual property rights. We rely upon a combination of trade secrets, nondisclosure and other contractual arrangements, and copyright and trademark laws to protect our proprietary rights. We generally enter into nondisclosure and confidentiality agreements with our employees, partners, consultants, independent sales agents and clients, and limit access to and distribution of our proprietary information. We cannot be certain that the steps we take in this regard will be adequate to deter misappropriation of our proprietary information or that we will be able to detect unauthorized use and take appropriate steps to enforce our intellectual property rights. Furthermore, statutory contracting regulations protect the rights of federal agencies to retain access to, and utilization of, proprietary intellectual property utilized in the delivery of contracted services to such agencies. We have attempted to put in place certain safeguards in our policies and procedures to protect intellectual property developed by employees. WidePoint’s policies and procedures stipulate that intellectual property created by employees and its consultants remain the property of WidePoint. If we are unable to protect our proprietary software and methodology, the value of our business may decrease and we may face increased competition.

 

Assertions by a third party that our software products or technology infringes its intellectual property, whether or not correct, could subject us to costly and time-consuming litigation or expensive licenses.

 

Although we believe that our services and products do not infringe on the intellectual property rights of others, infringement claims may be asserted against us in the future. There is frequent litigation in the communications and technology industries based on allegations of infringement or other violations of intellectual property rights. As we face increasing competition, the possibility of intellectual property rights claims against us may increase. These claims, whether or not successful, could:

 

§divert management’s attention;
§result in costly and time-consuming litigation;
§require us to enter into royalty or licensing agreements, which may not be available on acceptable terms, or at all; or
§require us to redesign our software products to avoid infringement.

 

As a result, any third-party intellectual property claims against us could increase our expenses and impair our business. In addition, although we have licensed proprietary technology, we cannot be certain that the owners’ rights in such technology will not be challenged, invalidated or circumvented. Furthermore, many of our customer agreements require us to indemnify our customers for certain third-party intellectual property infringement claims, which could increase our costs as a result of defending such claims and may require that we pay damages if there were an adverse ruling related to any such claims. These types of claims could harm our relationships with our customers, may deter future customers from purchasing our software products or could expose us to litigation for these claims. Even if we are not a party to any litigation between a customer and a third party, an adverse outcome in any such litigation could make it more difficult for us to defend our intellectual property in any subsequent litigation in which we are a named party.

 

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Our net operating loss carry-forwards may be subject to a valuation adjustment if we do not maintain and increase our profitability.

 

As of December 31, 2014, we had aggregate federal net operating loss carry-forwards of approximately $21.5 million and state net operating loss carry-forwards of approximately $18.5 million. Our ability to utilize our net operating loss carry-forwards and related deferred tax assets is based upon our ability to generate future taxable income. Our ability to generate future taxable income can be impacted by many circumstances. If we fail to maintain or increase our recent profitability, our net operating loss carry-forwards and related deferred tax assets may be subject to a valuation adjustment that would reduce their potential value, as we previously recorded a valuation allowance of $5.0 million against all deferred tax assets during the three month period ended September 30, 2014. In addition, net operating loss carry-forwards may become subject to an annual limitation if there is a cumulative change in the ownership interest of significant stockholders (or certain stockholder groups) over a three-year period in excess of 50%, in accordance with rules established under Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or the Code, and similar state rules (we refer to each as an ownership change). Such an ownership change could limit the amount of historic net operating loss carry-forwards that can be utilized annually to offset future taxable income.

 

The loss of key personnel or an inability to attract and retain additional personnel may impair our ability to grow our business.

 

We are highly dependent upon the continued service and performance of our senior management team and key technical and sales personnel, including our Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, and our key senior managers. The replacement of these individuals likely would involve expenditure of significant time and financial resources, and their loss might significantly delay or prevent the achievement of our business objectives. We do not maintain key man life insurance with respect to any of our executives.

 

We plan to continue to expand our work force both domestically and internationally to increase our customer base and revenue. We face intense competition for qualified individuals from numerous consulting, technology, software and communications companies. Our ability to achieve significant revenue growth will depend, in large part, on our success in recruiting, training and retaining sufficient numbers of personnel to support our growth. New hires may require significant training and may take significant time before they achieve full productivity. If our recruiting, training and retention efforts are not successful or do not generate a corresponding increase in revenue, our business will be harmed.

 

In addition, if our key employees resign from us or our subsidiaries to join a competitor or to form a competing company, the loss of such personnel and any resulting loss of existing or potential clients to any such competitor could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Although we require certain of our employees to sign agreements prohibiting them from joining a competitor, forming a competing company or soliciting our clients or employees for certain periods of time, we cannot be certain that these agreements will be effective in preventing our key employees from engaging in these actions or that courts or other adjudicative entities will substantially enforce these agreements.

 

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We may need to obtain additional funding to meet our future capital needs. If we are unable to obtain such financings, we may be required to significantly cut back our operations, sell assets or cease operations.

 

We may require additional funding to support our operations. Additional funding may be unavailable on favorable terms, if at all. If we are unable to obtain sufficient additional funding when needed, we may have to significantly cut back our operations, defer potentially favorable acquisitions, and/or sell some or all of our assets.

 

We have a credit facility agreement, which requires us to maintain certain financial covenants and failure to maintain such covenants could limit our access to debt capital and simultaneously require immediate payment of borrowings by our lender.

 

Historically, we have had access to a credit facility, which consists of a variable line of credit and a fixed term note to fund acquisition growth and working capital. Our credit facility agreement requires us to maintain certain financial covenants on a quarterly and annual basis. We were in compliance with our financial covenants as of December 31, 2014. If we are unable to meet future covenants, such failures could result in our lender accelerating in part or in full payment of all unpaid principal and interest which could have an adverse our ability to fund acquisition initiatives using debt and fund operational short falls.

 

The loss of one or more significant customers could have an adverse impact on our results of operations.

 

Historically, we have derived, and may in the future derive, a significant percentage of our total revenues from a relatively small number of clients. For the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, revenues from the Transportation Security Administration as a percentage of consolidated revenues represented approximately 17%, 20% and 19%, respectively. For the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, revenues from the Department of Homeland Security as a percentage of consolidated revenues represented approximately 21%, 13% and 15%, respectively.

 

In December 2013, we began performing work under a new blanket purchase agreement from the Department of Homeland Security for cellular wireless management services that will significantly increase the percentage of our revenues that are derived from the Department of Homeland Security. Due to the nature of our business and the relative size of certain contracts, which are entered into in the ordinary course of business, the loss of any single significant customer, including the above customers, could have a material adverse effect on results.

 

We may incur substantial costs in connection with contracts awarded through a competitive procurement process, which could negatively impact our operating results.

 

Many federal government contracts are awarded through a competitive procurement process. We expect that much of the government business we seek in the foreseeable future will be awarded through competitive procedures. Competitive procurements impose substantial costs and present a number of risks, including:

 

§the substantial cost and managerial time and effort that we spend to prepare bids and proposals for contracts that may not be awarded to us;
§requirements to register to conduct business in another state or country could increase our compliance costs;
§requirements to post a bid guarantee or similar performance guarantee as part of a bid submission; and
§the expense and delay that we may face if our competitors protest or challenge contract awards made to us pursuant to competitive procedures, and the risk that any such protest or challenge could result in the resubmission of offers, or in termination, reduction, or modification of the awarded contract.

 

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The costs we incur in the competitive procurement process may be substantial and, to the extent we participate in competitive procurements and are unable to win particular contracts, these costs could negatively affect our operating results. In addition, the General Services Administration multiple award schedule contracts, government-wide acquisitions contracts, blanket purchase agreements, and other indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contracts do not guarantee more than a minimal amount of work for us, but instead provide us access to work generally through further competitive procedures. This competitive process may result in increased competition and pricing pressure, requiring that we make sustained post-award efforts to realize revenues under the relevant contract.

 

We may be unable to successfully implement our acquisition program.

 

Our business strategy includes the potential future acquisition of, or investment in, complementary businesses, services or technologies. Demand for businesses with credible business relationships and capabilities to provide services to large commercial enterprises and/or governmental agencies at the federal, state and local level is very competitive. To the extent that the price of such acquisitions may rise beyond reasonable levels where funding for such acquisitions is no longer available, we may not be able to implement our acquisition strategy. Further, these acquisitions, investments or new business relationships may result in unforeseen difficulties and expenditures. We may encounter difficulties assimilating or integrating the businesses, technologies, products, services, personnel or operations of companies we have acquired or companies that we may in the future acquire. These difficulties may arise if the key personnel of the acquired company choose not to work for us, the company’s technology or services do not easily integrate with ours or we have difficulty retaining the acquired company’s customers due to changes in its management or for other reasons. These acquisitions may also disrupt our business, divert our resources and require significant management attention that would otherwise be available for development of our business. Moreover, the anticipated benefits of any acquisition, investment or business relationship may not be realized or we may be exposed to unknown liabilities. In addition, any future acquisition may require us to:

 

§issue additional equity securities that would dilute our stockholders;
§use cash that we may need in the future to operate our business;
§incur debt on terms unfavorable to us or that we are unable to repay;
§incur large charges or substantial liabilities; or
§become subject to adverse tax consequences, substantial depreciation or deferred compensation charges.

 

If any of these risks materializes, our business and operating results would be harmed.

 

We have identified ineffective disclosure controls and procedures and material weaknesses in the design of our internal control over financial reporting.

 

If we are unable to maintain adequate internal control over financial reporting, we may be unable to report our financial information on a timely basis, may suffer adverse regulatory consequences or violations of applicable stock exchange listing rules. Furthermore, failure to achieve and maintain an effective internal control environment could have a material adverse effect on our business and share price due to a lack of investor confidence.

 

In addition, we will incur additional costs in order to improve our internal control over financial reporting and comply with Section 404, including increased auditing and legal fees and costs associated with hiring additional accounting and administrative staff.

 

Our management has previously determined that our internal control over financial reporting is not effective due to the existence of certain material weaknesses. A material weakness is a control deficiency, or a combination of control deficiencies, that results in more than a remote likelihood that a material misstatement of the annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected. Our management reported material weaknesses in the following areas:

 

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§Inadequate segregation of duties within an account or process. Our management has determined that it continued to not have appropriate segregation of duties within our internal controls that would ensure the consistent application of procedures in our financial reporting process by existing personnel. This control deficiency could result in a misstatement of substantially all of our financial statement accounts and disclosures that would result in a material misstatement to the annual or interim financial statements.

 

§Inadequate policies and procedures. Our management has determined that its existing policies and procedures continued to be limited and/or inadequate in scope to provide staff with guidance or framework for accounting and disclosing financial transactions. This deficiency could result in unintended, misleading entries being made in the financial system and precluding sufficient disclosure of complex transactions.

 

In addition, we will incur additional costs in order to improve our internal control over financial reporting and comply with Section 404, including increased auditing and legal fees and costs associated with hiring additional accounting and administrative staff.

 

Unfavorable government audit results could subject us to a variety of penalties and sanctions, and could harm our reputation and relationships with our clients.

 

The federal government audits and reviews our performance on contracts, pricing practices, cost structure, and compliance with applicable laws, regulations, and standards. Like most large government contractors, our contracts are audited and reviewed on a continual basis by federal agencies, including the Defense Contract Audit Agency. An unfavorable audit of us, or of our subcontractors, could have a substantial adverse effect on our operating results. For example, any costs that were originally reimbursed could subsequently be disallowed. In this case, cash we have already collected may need to be refunded.

 

If a government audit uncovers improper or illegal activities, we may be subject to civil and criminal penalties and administrative sanctions, including termination of contracts, forfeiture of profits, suspension of payments, fines, and suspension or debarment from doing business with U.S. government agencies. In addition, we could suffer serious harm to our reputation if allegations of impropriety were made against us, whether or not true.

 

Security breaches in sensitive government systems could result in the loss of clients and negative publicity.

 

Many of the services we provide involve managing and protecting information involved in intelligence, national security, and other sensitive or classified government functions. A security breach in one of these systems could cause serious harm to our business, damage our reputation, and prevent us from being eligible for further work on sensitive or classified systems for federal government clients. We could incur losses from such a security breach that could exceed the policy limits under our errors and omissions and product liability insurance. Damage to our reputation or limitations on our eligibility for additional work resulting from a security breach in one of the systems we develop, install, and maintain could materially reduce our revenues.

 

Our failure to obtain and maintain necessary security clearances may limit our ability to perform classified work for government clients, which could cause us to lose business.

 

Some government contracts require us to maintain facility security clearances, and require some of our employees to maintain individual security clearances. If our employees lose or are unable to timely obtain security clearances, or we lose a facility clearance, the government client can terminate the contract or decide not to renew it upon its expiration. As a result, to the extent we cannot obtain or maintain the required security clearances for a particular contract, or we fail to obtain them on a timely basis, we may not derive the revenues anticipated from the contract, which, if not replaced with revenues from other contracts, could harm our operating results. To the extent we are not able to obtain facility security clearances or engage employees with the required security clearances for a particular contract, we will be unable to perform that contract and we may not be able to compete for or win new contracts for similar work.

 

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Changes in the spending policies or budget priorities of the federal government could cause us to lose revenues.

 

We derive a significant amount of our revenues from contracts funded by federal government agencies. We believe that contracts with federal government agencies and defense agencies in particular, will be a significant source of our revenues for the foreseeable future. Accordingly, changes in federal government fiscal or spending policies or the U.S. defense budget could directly affect our financial performance. Among the factors that could harm our business are:

 

§curtailment of the federal government’s use of technology services firms;
§a significant decline in spending by the federal government, in general, or by specific agencies such as the Department of Defense;
§budget cuts intended to avoid sequestration;
§reductions in federal government programs or requirements, including government agency shutdowns and/or reductions in connection with sequestration;
§any failure to raise the debt ceiling;
§a shift in spending to federal programs and agencies that we do not support or where we currently do not have contracts;
§delays in the payment of our invoices by government payment offices;
§federal governmental shutdowns, such as the shutdown that occurred during the government’s 2014 fiscal year, and other potential delays in the government appropriations process; and
§general economic and political conditions, including any event that results in a change in spending priorities of the federal government.

 

These or other factors could cause federal government agencies and departments to delay payments owed for our services, to reduce their purchases under contracts, to exercise their right to terminate contracts, or not to exercise options to renew contracts, any of which could cause us to lose revenues. In addition, any limitations imposed on spending by U.S. government agencies that result from efforts to reduce the federal deficit, including as a result of sequestration or otherwise, may limit both the continued funding of our existing contracts and our ability to obtain additional contracts.

 

Federal government contracts contain provisions giving government clients a variety of rights that are unfavorable to us, including the ability to terminate a contract at any time for convenience.

 

Federal government contracts contain provisions and are subject to laws and regulations that provide government clients with rights and remedies not typically found in commercial contracts. These rights and remedies allow government clients, among other things, to:

 

§terminate existing contracts, with short notice, for convenience, as well as for default;
§reduce orders under or otherwise modify contracts;
§for larger contracts subject to the Truth in Negotiations Act, reduce the contract price or cost where it was increased because a contractor or subcontractor during negotiations furnished cost or pricing data that was not complete, accurate, and current;

 

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§for GSA multiple award schedule contracts, government-wide acquisition agreements, and blanket purchase agreements, demand a refund, make a forward price adjustment, or terminate a contract for default if a contractor provided inaccurate or incomplete data during the contract negotiation process, or reduce the contract price under certain triggering circumstances, including the revision of pricelists or other documents
§upon which the contract award was predicated, the granting of more favorable discounts or terms and conditions than those contained in such documents, and the granting of certain special discounts to certain clients;
§terminate our facility security clearances and thereby prevent us from receiving classified contracts;
§cancel multi-year contracts and related orders if funds for contract performance for any subsequent year become unavailable;
§decline to exercise an option to renew a multi-year contract or issue task orders in connection with indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contracts;
§claim rights in solutions, systems, and technology produced by us;
§prohibit future procurement awards with a particular agency due to a finding of organizational conflict of interest based upon prior related work performed for the agency that would give a contractor an unfair advantage over competing contractors or the existence of conflicting roles that might bias a contractor’s judgment;
§subject the award of contracts to protest by competitors, which may require the contracting federal agency or department to suspend our performance pending the outcome of the protest and may also result in a requirement to resubmit offers for the contract or in the termination, reduction, or modification of the awarded contract; and
§suspend or debar us from doing business with the federal government.

 

If a federal government client terminates one of our contracts for convenience, we may recover only our incurred or committed costs, settlement expenses, and profit on work completed prior to the termination. If a federal government client were to unexpectedly terminate, cancel, or decline to exercise an option to renew with respect to one or more of our significant contracts or suspend or debar us from doing business with the federal government, our revenues and operating results would be materially harmed.

 

Our failure to comply with complex procurement laws and regulations could cause us to lose business and subject us to a variety of penalties.

 

We must comply with laws and regulations relating to the formation, administration, and performance of federal government contracts, which affect how we do business with our federal government clients and may impose added costs on our business. Among the most significant laws and regulations are:

 

§the Federal Acquisition Regulation, and agency regulations analogous or supplemental to the Federal Acquisition Regulation, which comprehensively regulate the formation, administration, and performance of government contracts;
§the Truth in Negotiations Act, which requires certification and disclosure of all cost or pricing data in connection with some contract negotiations;
§the Cost Accounting Standards, which impose cost accounting requirements that govern our right to reimbursement under some cost-based government contracts; and
§laws, regulations, and executive orders restricting the use and dissemination of information classified for national security purposes and the exportation of specified solutions and technical data.

 

If a government review or investigation uncovers improper or illegal activities, we may be subject to civil and criminal penalties and administrative sanctions, including the termination of our contracts, the forfeiture of profits, the suspension of payments owed to us, fines, and our suspension or debarment from doing business with federal government agencies. In particular, the civil False Claims Act provides for treble damages and potentially substantial civil penalties where, for example, a contractor presents a false or fraudulent claim to the government for payment or approval, or makes a false statement in order to get a false or fraudulent claim paid or approved by the government. Actions under the civil False Claims Act may be brought by the government or by other persons on behalf of the government. These provisions of the civil False Claims Act permit parties, such as our employees, to sue us on behalf of the government and share a portion of any recovery. Any failure to comply with applicable laws and regulations could result in contract termination, price or fee reductions, or suspension or debarment from contracting with the government, each of which could lead to a material reduction in our revenues.

 

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The adoption of new procurement laws or regulations could reduce the amount of services that are outsourced by the federal government and cause us to experience reduced revenues.

 

New legislation, procurement regulations, or labor organization pressure could cause federal agencies to adopt restrictive procurement practices regarding the use of outside service providers. The American Federation of Government Employees, the largest federal employee union, strongly endorses legislation that may restrict the procedure by which services are outsourced to government contractors. One such proposal, the Truthfulness, Responsibility, and Accountability in Contracting Act, would have effectively reduced the volume of services that is outsourced by the federal government by requiring agencies to give in-house government employees expanded opportunities to compete against contractors for work that could be outsourced. If such legislation, or similar legislation, were to be enacted, it would likely reduce the amount of IT services that could be outsourced by the federal government, which could materially reduce our revenues.

 

If the market for our information technology based managed mobility solutions does not grow as we expect, our business will be harmed.

 

The markets for our information technology based managed mobility solutions are developing, and it is not certain whether these services will achieve market acceptance and sustain high demand. Some potential customers have invested substantial personnel and financial resources into developing internal solutions for communications management, so they may not perceive the benefit of our external solution. If potential customers do not perceive the benefits of our products, services and solutions, then the markets may not continue to develop or may develop more slowly than we expect, either of which would reduce our revenue and profitability.

 

If we are unable to retain our existing customers, our revenue and results of operations would grow more slowly than expected or decline and our results of operations would be impaired.

 

We sell our information technology based managed mobility solutions software products and related services pursuant to agreements that are generally one to five years in duration. Many times they are in the form of a one year agreement with one to four year option periods. Our customers have no obligation to renew their agreements after their terms expire and some of our customers may terminate their agreements for convenience. These agreements may not be maintained or renewed on the same or on more profitable terms. As a result, our ability to both maintain and grow our revenue depends in part on customer renewals. We may not be able to accurately predict future trends in customer renewals, and our customers’ renewal rates may decline or fluctuate because of several factors, including their satisfaction or dissatisfaction with our products, services, and or solutions, the prices of our managed mobility solutions software products, the prices of products and services offered by our competitors or reductions in our customers’ spending levels. In addition, customers that are acquired by companies using competing service offerings may be required to begin using those competing service offerings, rather than renew their license arrangements with us. If our customers do not renew their agreements for our communications management solutions software products, renew on less favorable terms, or do not purchase additional functionality, our revenue may grow more slowly than expected or decline.

 

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Our sales cycles can be long, unpredictable and require considerable time and expense, which may cause our operating results to fluctuate.

 

Our sales cycle, which is the time between initial contact with a potential customer and the ultimate sale, is often lengthy and unpredictable. Some of our potential customers may already have partial managed mobility solutions in place under fixed-term contracts, which may limit their ability to commit to purchase our solution in a timely fashion. In addition, our potential customers typically undertake a significant evaluation process that can last six to nine months or more, and which requires us to expend substantial time, effort and money educating them about the capabilities of our offerings and the potential cost savings they can bring to an organization. Furthermore, the purchase of our solution typically also requires coordination and agreement across many departments within a potential customer’s organization, which further contributes to our lengthy sales cycle. As a result, we have limited ability to forecast the timing and size of specific sales. Any delay in completing, or failure to complete, sales in a particular quarter or year could harm our business and could cause our operating results to vary significantly.

 

If a communications carrier prohibits customer disclosure of communications billing and usage data to us, the value of our solution to customers of that carrier would be impaired, which may limit our ability to compete for their business.

 

Certain of our information technology based managed mobility solutions software functionality and services that we offer depend on our ability to access a customer’s communications billing and usage data. For example, our ability to offer outsourced or automated communications bill auditing, billing dispute resolution, bill payment, cost allocation and expense optimization depends on our ability to access this data. If a communications carrier were to prohibit its customers from disclosing this information to us, those enterprises would only be able to use these billing-related aspects of our solution on a self-serve basis, which would impair some of the value of our solution to those enterprises. This in turn could limit our ability to compete with the internally developed communications management solutions of those enterprises, require us to incur additional expenses to license access to that billing and usage data from the communications carrier, if such a license is made available to us at all, or put us at a competitive disadvantage against any third-party communications management solutions service provider that licenses access to that data.

 

Our long-term success in the managed mobility solutions industry depends, in part, on our ability to expand the sales of our solutions to customers located outside of the United States, and thus our business is susceptible to risks associated with international sales and operations.

 

We are currently seeking to expand the international sales and operations of our portfolio of solutions. This international expansion will subject us to new risks that we have not faced in the United States. These risks include:

 

§geographic localization of our software products, including translation into foreign languages and adaptation for local practices and regulatory requirements;
§lack of familiarity with and unexpected changes in foreign regulatory requirements;
§longer accounts receivable payment cycles and difficulties in collecting accounts receivable;
§difficulties in managing, staffing and overseeing international implementations and operations, including increased reliance on foreign subcontractors;
§challenges in integrating our software with multiple country-specific billing or communications support systems for international customers;
§challenges in providing procurement, help desk and fulfillment capabilities for our international customers;
§fluctuations in currency exchange rates;

 

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§potentially adverse tax consequences, including the complexities of foreign value added or other tax systems and restrictions on the repatriation of earnings;
§the burdens of complying with a wide variety of foreign laws and legal standards;
§increased financial accounting and reporting burdens and complexities;
§potentially slower adoption rates of communications management solutions services internationally;
§political, social and economic instability abroad, terrorist attacks and security concerns in general; and
§reduced or varied protection for intellectual property rights in some countries.

 

Operating in international markets also requires significant management attention and financial resources. The investment and additional resources required to establish operations and manage growth in other countries may not produce desired levels of revenue or profitability.

 

Expansion into international markets could require us to comply with additional billing, invoicing, communications, data privacy and similar regulations, which could make it costly or difficult to operate in these markets.

 

Many international regulatory agencies have adopted regulations related to where and how communications bills may be sent and how the data on such bills must be handled and protected. For instance, certain countries restrict communications bills from being sent outside of the country, either physically or electronically, while other countries require that certain information be encrypted or redacted before bills may be transmitted electronically. These regulations vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and international expansion of our business could subject us to additional similar regulations. Failure to comply with these regulations could result in significant monetary penalties and compliance with these regulations could require expenditure of significant financial and administrative resources.

 

In addition, personally identifiable information is increasingly subject to legislation and regulations in numerous jurisdictions around the world, the intent of which is to protect the privacy of personal information that is collected, processed and transmitted in or from the governing jurisdiction. Our failure to comply with applicable safe harbor, privacy laws and international security regulations or any security breakdown that results in the unauthorized release of personally identifiable information or other customer data could result in fines or proceedings by governmental agencies or private individuals, which could harm our results of operations.

 

If we fail to effectively manage and develop our strategic relationships with our channel partners, or if those third parties choose not to market and sell our communications management solutions, our operating results would suffer.

 

The successful implementation of our strategic goals is dependent in part on strategic relationships with our channel partners to offer our communications management solutions to a larger customer base than we can reach through our current direct sales and marketing efforts. Some of our strategic relationships are relatively new and, therefore, it is uncertain whether these third parties will be able to market and sell our solution successfully or provide the volume and quality of customers that we currently desire.

 

Our success depends in part on the ultimate success of our channel partners and their ability to market and sell our communications management solutions. Some of these third parties may have previously entered, and may in the future enter, into strategic relationships with our competitors. Further, many of our channel partners have multiple strategic relationships and they may not regard us as significant to their businesses. Our channel partners may terminate their respective relationships with us, pursue other partnerships or relationships, or attempt to develop or acquire products or services that compete with our communications management solutions. Our channel partners also may interfere with our ability to enter into other desirable strategic relationships.

 

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If we are unable to manage and develop our strategic relationships, the growth of our customer base may be harmed and we may have to devote substantially more resources to the distribution, sales and marketing of our solution, which would increase our costs and decrease our earnings.

 

The emergence of one or more widely used, standardized communications devices or billing or operational support systems could limit the value and operability of our solution and our ability to compete with the manufacturers of such devices or the carriers using such systems in providing managed mobility solutions services.

 

Our solution derives its value in significant part from our communications management software’s ability to interface with and support the interoperation of diverse communications devices, billing systems and operational support systems. The emergence of a single or a small number of widely used communications devices, billing systems or operational support systems using consolidated, consistent sets of standardized interfaces for the interaction between communications service providers and their enterprise customers could significantly reduce the value of our solution to our customers and potential customers. Furthermore, any such communications device, billing system or operational support system could make use of proprietary software or technology standards that our software might not be able to support. In addition, the manufacturer of such device, or the carrier using such billing system or operational support system, might actively seek to limit the interoperability of such device, billing system or operational support system with our software products for competitive or other reasons. The resulting lack of compatibility of our software products would put us at a significant competitive disadvantage, or entirely prevent us from competing, in that segment of the potential managed mobility solutions market if such manufacturer or carrier, or its authorized licensees, were to develop one or more communications management solutions competitive with our solution.

 

A continued proliferation and diversification of communications technologies or devices could increase the costs of providing our software products or limit our ability to provide our software products to potential customers.

 

Our ability to provide our software products is dependent on the technological compatibility of our products with the communications infrastructures and devices of our customers and their communications service providers. The development and introduction of new communications technologies and devices requires us to expend significant personnel and financial resources to develop and maintain interoperability of our software products with these technologies and devices. The communications industry has recently been characterized by rapid change and diversification in both product and service offerings. Continued proliferation of communications products and services could significantly increase our research and development costs and increase the lag time between the initial release of new technologies and products and our ability to provide support for them in our software products, which would limit the potential market of customers that we have the ability to serve.

 

Actual or perceived breaches of our security measures, or governmental required disclosure of customer information could diminish demand for our solution and subject us to substantial liability.

 

In the processing of communications transactions, we receive, transmit and store a large volume of sensitive customer information, including call records, billing records, contractual terms, and financial and payment information, including credit card information, and we have entered into contractual obligations to maintain the confidentiality of certain of this information. Any person who circumvents our security measures could steal proprietary or confidential customer information or cause interruptions in our operations and any such lapse in security could expose us to litigation, substantial contractual liabilities, loss of customers or damage to our reputation or could otherwise harm our business. We incur significant costs to protect against security breaches and may incur significant additional costs to alleviate problems caused by any breaches. In addition, if we are required to disclose any of this sensitive customer information to governmental authorities, that disclosure could expose us to a risk of losing customers or could otherwise harm our business.

 

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If customers believe that we may be subject to requirements to disclose sensitive customer information to governmental authorities, or that our systems and software products do not provide adequate security for the storage of confidential information or its transmission over the Internet or corporate extranets, or are otherwise inadequate for Internet or extranet use, our business will be harmed. Customers’ concerns about security could deter them from using the Internet to conduct transactions that involve confidential information, including transactions of the types included in our solution, so our failure to prevent security breaches, or the occurrence of well-publicized security breaches affecting the Internet in general, could significantly harm our business and financial results.

 

Defects or errors in our software products and/or processes could harm our reputation, impair our ability to sell our products and result in significant costs to us.

 

Our software products are highly complex and may contain undetected defects or errors that may result in product failures or otherwise cause our software products to fail to perform in accordance with customer expectations. Because our customers use our software products for important aspects of their businesses, any defects or errors in, or other performance problems with, our software products could hurt our reputation and may damage our customers’ businesses. If that occurs, we could lose future sales or our existing customers could elect to not renew their customer agreements with us. Product performance problems could result in loss of market share, failure to achieve market acceptance and the diversion of development resources from software enhancements. If our software products fail to perform or contain a technical defect, a customer might assert a claim against us for damages. Whether or not we are responsible for our software’s failure or defect, we could be required to spend significant time and money in litigation, arbitration or other dispute resolution, and potentially pay significant settlements or damages.

 

We provide minimum service-level commitments to many of our customers, and our inability to meet those commitments could result in significant loss of customers, harm to our reputation and costs to us.

 

Many of our customer agreements currently, or may in the future, require that we meet minimum service level commitments regarding items such as platform availability, invoice processing speed and order processing speed. If we are unable to meet the stated service level commitments under these agreements many of our customers will have the right to terminate their agreements with us and we may be contractually obligated to provide our customers with credits or pay other penalties. If our software products are unavailable for significant periods of time we may lose a substantial number of our customers as a result of these contractual rights, we may suffer harm to our reputation and we may be required to provide our customers with significant credits or pay our customers significant contractual penalties, any of which could harm our business, financial condition, results of operations.

 

Risks Related To Our Common Stock

 

Our common stock price could be volatile.

 

The stock market has, from time to time, experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations. The market prices of the securities of companies in our industry have been especially volatile. Broad market fluctuations of this type may adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

 

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The market price of our common stock has experienced, and may continue to be subject to volatility due to a variety of factors, including:

 

§public announcements concerning us, our competitors or our industry;
§fluctuations in operating results;
§introductions of new products or services by us or our competitors;
§changes in analysts’ earnings estimates; and
§announcements of technological innovations.

 

In the past, some companies that have experienced volatility in the market price of their stock have been the object of securities class action litigation. If we were the object of securities class action litigation, we could incur substantial costs and experience a diversion of our management’s attention and resources and such securities class action litigation could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

A third party could be prevented from acquiring shares of our common stock at a premium to the market price because of our anti-takeover provisions.

 

Various provisions of our certificate of incorporation, by-laws and Delaware law could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire us, even if doing so might be beneficial to you and our other stockholders. We are subject to the provisions of Section 203 of the General Corporation Law of Delaware. Section 203 prohibits a publicly held Delaware corporation from engaging in a “business combination” with any interested stockholder for a period of three years after the date of the transaction in which the person became an interested stockholder, unless the business combination is approved in a prescribed manner. A “business combination” includes mergers, asset sales and other transactions resulting in a financial benefit to the interested stockholder. Subject to certain exceptions, an “interested stockholder” is (i) a person who, together with affiliates and associates, owns 15% or more of our voting stock or (ii) an affiliate or associate of ours who was the owner, together with affiliates and associates, of 15% or more of our outstanding voting stock at any time within the 3-year period prior to the date for determining whether such person is “interested.”

 

Our certificate of incorporation also provides that any action required or permitted to be taken by our stockholders at an annual meeting or special meeting of stockholders may be taken without such meeting only by the unanimous consent of all stockholders entitled to vote on the particular action. In order for any matter to be considered properly brought before a meeting, a stockholder must comply with certain requirements regarding advance notice to us. The foregoing provisions could have the effect of delaying until the next stockholders’ meeting stockholder actions, which are favored by the holders of a majority of our outstanding voting securities. These provisions may also discourage another person or entity from making a tender offer for our common stock, because such person or entity, even if it acquired a majority of our outstanding voting securities, would be able to take action as a stockholder (such as electing new directors or approving a merger) only at a duly called stockholders’ meeting, and not by written consent.

 

The General Corporation Law of Delaware provides generally that the affirmative vote of a majority of the shares entitled to vote on any matter is required to amend a corporation’s certificate of incorporation or bylaws, unless a corporation’s certificate of incorporation or bylaws, as the case may be, requires a greater percentage. Our certificate of incorporation and bylaws do not require a greater percentage vote. Our board of directors is classified into three classes of directors, with approximately one-third of the directors serving in each such class of directors and with one class of directors being elected at each annual meeting of stockholders to serve for a term of three years or until their successors are elected and take office. Our bylaws provide that the board of directors will determine the number of directors to serve on the board. Our board of directors presently consists of six members.

 

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Our certificate of incorporation and bylaws contain certain provisions permitted under the General Corporation Law of Delaware relating to the liability of directors. The provisions eliminate, to the fullest extent permitted by the General Corporation Law of Delaware, a director’s personal liability to us or our stockholders with respect to any act or omission in the performance of his or her duties as a director. Our certificate of incorporation and bylaws also allow us to indemnify our directors, to the fullest extent permitted by the General Corporation Law of Delaware. Our bylaws also provide that we may grant indemnification to any officer, employee, agent or other individual as our Board may approve from time to time. We believe that these provisions will assist us in attracting and retaining qualified individuals to serve as directors.

 

The future sale of shares of our common stock may negatively affect our common stock price.

 

If our stockholders sell substantial amounts of our common stock, the market price of our common stock could fall. These sales also might make it more difficult for us to sell equity securities in the future at a time and price that we deem appropriate.

 

Such stock issuances may be made at a price that reflects a discount from the then-current trading price of our common stock. In addition, in order to raise capital for acquisitions or other general corporate purposes, we would likely need to issue securities that are convertible into or exercisable for a significant number of shares of our common stock. These issuances would dilute our stockholders percentage ownership interest, which would have the effect of reducing our stockholders influence on matters on which our stockholders vote, and might dilute the book value of our common stock.

 

Our quarterly operating results may fluctuate in the future. As a result, we may fail to meet or exceed the expectations of research analysts or investors, which could cause our stock price to decline.

 

Our quarterly operating results may fluctuate as a result of a variety of factors, many of which are outside of our control. If our quarterly operating results or guidance fall below the expectations of research analysts or investors, the price of our common stock could decline substantially. Fluctuations in our quarterly operating results or guidance may be due to a number of factors, including, but not limited to:

 

§our ability to attract new customers, obtain renewals from existing customers and increase sales to existing customers;
§the purchasing and budgeting cycles of our customers;
§changes in our pricing policies or those of our competitors;
§the amount and timing of operating costs and capital expenditures related to the operation, maintenance and expansion of our business;
§service outages or security breaches;
§the timing and success of new service introductions and upgrades by us or our competitors;
§the timing of costs related to the development or acquisition of technologies, services or businesses;
§the timing of collection of payments from channel partners;
§the financial condition of our customers; and
§general economic, industry and market conditions.

 

We do not expect to declare any dividends in the foreseeable future.

 

We do not anticipate declaring any cash dividends to holders of our common stock in the foreseeable future. Consequently, investors must rely on sales of their common stock after price appreciation, which may never occur, as the only way to realize any future gains on their investment. Investors seeking cash dividends should not purchase our common stock.

 

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ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

 

All of our property locations are leased other than our operations office in Lewis Center, Ohio; which has a mortgage obligation of approximately $468,000. We believe we can obtain additional facilities required to accommodate projected needs without difficulty and at commercially reasonable prices, although no assurance can be given that we will be able to do so. The following table presents our property locations at December 31, 2014 for our U.S. locations:

 

                Base   Base 
         Lease  Approx.   Cost per   Annual 
Function  Physical Street Address  City, State Zip Code  Expiration  Sqft   Sqft   Cost 
                         
Executive and Administration  7926 Jones Branch Drive, Suite 520  McLean, VA 22102  August 2019   5,437   $23.14   $125,800 
Administration  1736 South Park Court, Suite 201  Chesapeake, VA 23320  April 2015   2,377   $16.15   $38,400 
Commercial Sales  5950 Canoga Avenue, Suite 500  Woodland Hills, CA 91367  June 2016   3,142   $28.97   $91,016 
Commercial Sales  220 South Main St.  Royal Oak, MI 48067  September 2016   2,860   $18.06   $51,659 
Commercial Sales  18W100 22nd Street Suite 124  Oakbrook Terrace, IL 60181  September 2015   808   $15.74   $12,720 
Operations and Administration  11250 Waples Mill Rd S. Tower, Suite 210  Fairfax, VA 22030  March 2019   11,852   $24.93   $295,470 
Operations  101 Green Meadows Drive South  Lewis Center, OH 43035  n/a   7,600   n/a    n/a 
Operations  2 Eaton Street Suites 800/807  Hampton, VA 23669  November 2019   4,519   $14.04   $63,454 
Operations  104 Cude Lane  Madison, TN 37115  August 2016   3,448   $13.78   $47,521 
Operations  280 Pinehurst Avenue Suite B  Southern Pines, NC 28387  December 2015   2,500   $9.60   $24,000 

 

The following table presents our property locations at December 31, 2014 for our international locations:

 

                 Base   Base 
         Lease  Approx.   Cost per   Annual 
Function  Physical Street Address  City, State Zip Code  Expiration  Sqft   Sqft   Cost 
                         
Administrative Office  South County Business Park  Dublin 18, Ireland  March 2026   6,000   $32.92   $197,519 
Commercial Sales Office  3B Juno House, Calleva Park  Aldermaston,Berkshire RG7 8RA, England  June 2016   1,250   $18.67   $23,342 
Commercial Sales Office  Stoomloggerwey 4 B  3133 KT, Vlaardingen,Netherlands  April 2015   1,600   $18.99   30,388 
Commercial Sales Office  Siriusdreef 55  2132 WT, Hoofddorp,Netherlands  December 2017   500   $14.59   7,293 

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

From time to time we may be involved in claims arising in the ordinary course of business. We are not currently involved in any material legal proceedings, governmental actions, investigations or claims are currently pending against us or involve us that, in the opinion of our management, could reasonably be expected to have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

None.

 

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PART II

 

ITEM 5.MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

Market Information

 

Our common stock trades on the NYSE MKT under the symbol “WYY” and on the Frankfurt and Berlin exchanges under the symbol “ZMX”. The stock prices listed below represent the high and low closing prices of the Common Stock on the NYSE MKT for each of the periods indicated:

 

   2014   2013 
Period  High   Low   High   Low 
December 31,  $1.74   $0.99   $1.79   $0.76 
September 30,  $1.90   $1.45   $1.14   $0.65 
June 30,  $1.87   $1.28   $0.86   $0.45 
March 31,  $1.95   $1.29   $0.73   $0.35 

 

Stock Performance Graph

 

The line graph below compares the cumulative total stockholder return in our common stock between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2014, with cumulative total return on the Russell MicroCap Index and the RDG Technology Index. This graph assumes a $100 investment in each of the Company, the Russell Microcap Index and the RDG Technology Index at the close of trading on January 1, 2009. We selected these indices because they include companies with similar market capitalizations and companies in our industry.

 

The comparisons shown in the graph below are based upon historical data. We caution that the stock price performance shown in the graph below is not necessarily indicative of, nor is it intended to forecast, the potential future performance of our common stock.

 

 

The performance graph above is being furnished solely to accompany this Annual Report on Form 10-K pursuant to Item 201(e) of Regulation S-K, is not being filed for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and is not to be incorporated by reference into any of our filings, whether made before or after the date hereof, regardless of any general incorporation language in such filing.

 

Holders

 

As of the close of business on February 28, 2015, there were 151 registered holders of record of our common stock.

 

Transfer Agent and Registrar

 

The transfer agent and registrar for our common stock is American Stock Transfer & Trust Company.

 

Equity Compensation Plan Information

 

Information regarding our equity compensation plans and the securities authorized for issuance thereunder is incorporated by reference to Item 12 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Dividend Policy

 

The Company has never paid dividends on its Common Stock and intends to continue this policy for the foreseeable future. WidePoint plans to retain earnings for use in growing its business base. Any future determination to pay dividends will be at the discretion of the Board of Directors (the “Board”) of the Company and will be dependent on WidePoint’s results of operations, financial condition, contractual and legal restrictions and any other factors deemed by the management and the Board to be a priority requirement of the business.

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

 

None.

 

Repurchases of Equity Securities

 

The Company repurchased no shares of its Common Stock during the fourth quarter of 2014.

 

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ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

The following table sets forth Selected Financial Data on a historical basis for the five years ended December 31, 2014. This historical Selected Financial Data has been derived from the audited consolidated financial statements and should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and the related notes thereto and Management's Discussion and Analysis of the Financial Condition and Results of Operations, each included elsewhere in this Form 10-K.

 

   2014   2013   2012   2011   2010 
                     
Operating Results                         
Revenues  $53,316,210   $46,825,032   $55,782,742   $41,372,490   $50,812,776 
Gross profit   13,513,917    12,111,561    13,862,581    9,243,502    13,264,758 
Operating expense   18,164,925    13,286,855    12,843,804    105,173    2,804,320 
Interest expense   (186,796)   (175,358)   (294,244)   (69,317)   (90,052)
(Loss) income from operations   (4,651,008)   (1,175,294)   1,018,777    47,820    2,732,708 
Net (loss) income   (8,400,626)   (1,694,785)   832,301    246,866    6,380,854 
                          
Balance Sheet                         
Cash and cash equivalents  $13,154,699   $-   $1,857,614   $2,135,310   $5,816,303 
Accounts receivable, net   8,543,050    7,612,400    6,932,366    7,884,802    7,794,913 
Unbilled accounts receivable   5,547,416    1,561,030    2,969,450    2,715,406    3,059,665 
Deferred income tax asset, net   -    4,407,630    3,820,378    3,738,555    3,529,506 
Total assets   54,078,240    36,074,840    39,579,841    42,290,226    34,396,140 
Line of credit advance   -    916,663    -    -      
Accounts payable   6,165,477    3,228,586    5,555,419    8,418,854    7,725,727 
Accrued expenses   5,980,110    4,407,286    3,539,710    1,851,678    2,643,613 
Current portion of long-term debt   2,184,016    1,150,455    1,102,741    798,319    572,943 
Long-term debt, net   1,327,800    2,509,492    4,918,732    7,769,143    564,490 
Total stockholders’ equity   36,778,856    22,515,738    23,937,267    22,836,152    22,016,398 
                          
Common Stock Statistics                         
Earnings per share:                         
Basic  $(0.115)  $(0.027)  $0.013   $0.004   $0.104 
Diluted  $(0.115)  $(0.027)  $0.013   $0.004   $0.102 
Book value per share  $0.45   $0.35   $0.38   $0.36   $0.35 
Market price per share:                         
High  $1.950   $1.790   $0.950   $1.480   $1.420 
Low  $0.999   $0.350   $0.330   $0.690   $0.630 
Close  $1.380   $1.640   $0.370   $0.690   $1.340 
Average common shares outstanding for earnings per share:                         
Basic   73,048,883    63,802,275    63,474,871    62,882,100    61,555,664 
Diluted   73,048,883    63,802,275    63,758,632    64,148,331    62,862,978 
Shares outstanding at end of the period   81,656,763    63,907,357    63,751,857    63,226,857    62,690,873 
Number of shareholders of record at end of period   151    154    155    155    153 
                          
Other Statistics                         
Number of employees:                         
U.S.   251    227    227    163    115 
Outside the U.S.   45    0    0    0    0 

 

ITEM 7.MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Organizational Overview

 

We were incorporated on May 30, 1997 under the laws of the state of Delaware. We are a leading provider of federally certified secure identity management and communications solutions to the government and commercial sectors. We offer a core set of Managed Mobility Enterprise Solutions (MMS) to enable organizations to deploy fully compliant solutions in accordance with government requirements and the demands of the commercial marketplace. Our on-demand MMS platforms are a suite of advanced and federally certified proprietary cloud-based software solutions designed to enable secure identity management and manage the complex processes and expenses associated with complex communication assets and services of any enterprise.

 

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Our advanced technology-based solutions can be customized to meet functional requirements of any organization and be accessible on-demand through the cloud. Many alternative solutions lack the necessary functionality, security, reliability and depth of technical resources required to successfully administer an efficient and cost-effective solution. We are in the process of realigning our business model to sell recurring technology and services leveraging our identity and communications management platforms and sell customized on premise solutions for enterprises that require an in-house solution.

 

Acquisition of Soft-ex Communications Ltd. (SCL)

 

On May 1, 2014, we purchased all of the outstanding equity of Soft-ex Communications Limited (“SCL”). SCL, with headquarters in Dublin, Ireland is a provider of telecom data intelligence services offered as a software as a service solution throughout European and Middle Eastern markets. SCL has two operating subsidiaries, Soft-Ex BV and Soft-Ex UK Limited, which maintain offices and operations in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, respectively. We believe the combination of WidePoint’s secure managed mobility services coupled with Soft-Ex’s European and Middle East presence, channel partners, and additional portfolio of services provides our combined enterprise with a stronger base of operations, services and global growth opportunities. The transaction complements Soft-Ex’s focus and expertise in delivering business intelligence and subscriber data intelligence to the global telecommunications service provider market. Through the combination of our partnerships and customers we believe that we can leverage Soft-Ex’s innovative Software-as-a-Service solutions combined with the scale and breadth of WidePoint’s managed mobility offerings, thereby optimizing the core strengths of both organizations.

 

We remain focused on continued retention and expansion of services to our existing customer base and attracting new customers in the government and commercial sectors. We are continuing to actively search out new synergistic acquisitions that we believe may further enhance our present base of business and service offerings outside the United States.

 

Recent Public Offering of Common Stock

 

On October 23, 2014, we entered into an underwriting agreement relating to an underwritten public offering of shares of our common stock. We completed the public offering and received net proceeds of approximately $10.8 million before paying estimated offering expenses of approximately $0.2 million incurred by the Company to complete the public offering. The proceeds strengthen our balance sheet in support of our new and expanding business relationships and growth opportunities.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

Refer to Note 2 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for a summary of our significant accounting policies referenced, as applicable, to other notes. In many cases, the accounting treatment of a particular transaction is specifically dictated by U.S. GAAP and does not require management’s judgment in its application. Our senior management has reviewed these critical accounting policies and related disclosures with its Audit Committee. See Note 2 to consolidated financial statements, which contain additional information regarding accounting policies and other disclosures required by U.S. GAAP. The following section below provides information about certain critical accounting policies that are important to the Consolidated Financial Statements and that require significant management assumptions and judgments.

 

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Segments

 

Segments are defined by authoritative guidance as components of a company in which separate financial information is available and is evaluated by the chief operating decision maker (CODM), or a decision making group, in deciding how to allocate resources and in assessing performance. Our CODM is our chief executive officer.

 

In fiscal 2012, the Company previously reported three operating segments: Managed Mobility Solutions, Cybersecurity Solutions, and Consulting and Support Services. Information technology solutions were historically segmented due to technological barriers which prevented delivery of an integrated technology solution to cover an end users mobility, security and network communications requirements. Over the last ten (10) years the proliferation of mobile computing drove the integration of our technology capabilities and solutions into a single MMS market. Our customers and the industry view our MMS market as a singular business and demand an integrated and scalable suite of information technology-based enterprise-wide solutions. Services comprising our MMS offerings have similar client service approaches, delivery costs and operational risks and are led by a project manager and a cross-functional service delivery team comprised of employees across all subsidiaries.

 

During fiscal 2012, our CODM decided that our MMS business constitutes a single business activity and that our financial results should be evaluated on that basis. Our CODM determined that a functional management approach with centralized roles and responsibilities would best to enable the Company to be able to efficiently scale and deliver its MMS solution to its customers. Our CODM assembled an executive advisory group with specific business functional responsibility to move further towards an integrated and scalable operation and drive our MMS business as an integrated offering. In fiscal 2013, our CODM discontinued our historical segmented reporting as a management tool. The Company presents a single segment for purposes of financial reporting and prepared its consolidated financial statements upon that basis.

 

Business Combinations

 

The application of purchase accounting to a business acquisition requires that the Company identify the individual assets acquired and liabilities assumed and estimate the fair value of each. The Company estimates the fair value of purchase consideration in each business combination using an acceptable valuation methodology which may include an income, market and/or cost approach. The Company assigns a provisional value on the date of purchase and engages qualified third party valuation professionals to estimate the fair value of significant assets acquired and liabilities assumed.

 

Purchase consideration is often paid to the seller in the form of cash, seller financed promissory notes and/or shares of common stock that may or may not contain a contingency often tied to future financial performance targets. The Company generally assesses the estimated fair value of contingent obligations using a probability weighted income approach (discounted cash flow) valuation technique which requires the use of observable and unobservable inputs. Fluctuations in the fair value of contingent obligations are impacted by two unobservable inputs, management’s estimate of the probability of the acquired company meeting the operating performance target and the estimated discount rate (a rate that approximates the Company’s weighted average cost of capital). Significant increases (decreases) in either of those inputs in isolation would result in a significantly higher (lower) fair value measurement. Fair value is assessed for contingent obligations on a quarterly basis until such contingencies have been resolved and any changes in fair value are recorded as a gain or loss on change in fair value of contingent obligations within general and administrative expense.

 

Goodwill and intangible assets often represent a significant portion of the assets acquired in a business combination. The Company recognizes the fair value of an acquired intangible apart from goodwill whenever the intangible arises from contractual or other legal rights, or when it can be separated or divided from the acquired entity and sold, transferred, licensed, rented or exchanged, either individually or in combination with a related contract, asset or liability. The Company generally assesses the estimated fair values of acquired intangibles using an income and market approach, except for internally developed software which is valued using a cost approach. The fair values of the intangible assets purchased were determined using a combination of valuation techniques. Fluctuations in the fair value of intangibles are impacted by two unobservable inputs, management’s five year forecast and the estimated discount rate (a rate that approximates the Company’s weighted average cost of capital). Significant increases (decreases) in either of those inputs in isolation would result in a significantly higher (lower) fair value measurement.

 

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The Company had finite lived intangible assets with a carrying value of approximately $6.0 million as of December 31, 2014. The fair value of intangibles acquired in connection with business combinations continued to generate positive returns above its carrying value. Accordingly, the Company has concluded the fair value of its intangibles is not impaired at December 31, 2014. The Company could be exposed to increased risk of recoverability to the extent future revenue estimates may not support the recovery of purchased intangible assets.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

Telecommunications expense management and device management services are delivered on a monthly basis based on a standard fixed pricing scale and sensitive to significant changes in per user or device counts which form the basis for monthly charges. Revenue is recognized upon the completion of the delivery of monthly managed services based on user or device counts or other metrics. Managed services are not interdependent and there are no undelivered elements in these arrangements.

 

Telecommunications carrier invoice management and payment services require the Company to purchase bands of minutes, text messaging and data services from large carriers and optimizes these services for its mobile customers. The Company recognizes revenues and related costs on a gross basis for these arrangements as we have discretion in choosing providers, rate plans, and devices in providing the services to our customers. We establish pricing for our customer contracts. For arrangements in which we do not have such credit risk we recognize revenues and related costs on a net basis.

 

Telecommunications audit and optimization services are professional services conducted over a specified period of time. These professional services are billed based on time incurred and actual costs or on a contingency basis. The Company recognizes revenues for professional services performed based on actual hours worked and actual costs incurred. The Company recognizes contingent based service arrangements when our savings results are verified by the carrier and accepted by the customer. Contingent fees earned are calculated based on projected or proven savings multiplied by an agreed upon recovery rate. Cost associated with contingent fee arrangements are recognized as incurred.

 

Telecommunication mobile device and accessory resale services may require the Company to facilitate as an agent on our customers’ account or transact on our own account to deliver third party vendor products and/or services to meet our customers’ specific functional requirements. For those transactions in which we procure and deliver products and services for our own account the Company recognizes revenues and related costs on a gross basis for these arrangements as we have discretion in choosing providers, rate plans, and devices in providing the services to our customers. For those transactions in which we procure and deliver products and services for our customers’ on their own account we do not recognize revenues and related costs on a gross basis for these arrangements. We recognize revenues earned for arranging the transaction and any related costs.

 

Identity management and identity services are delivered as an on-demand managed service through the cloud to an individual or organization or sold in bulk to an organization capable of self-issuing credentials. Credentialing services are not bundled and do not include other obligations to deliver. Revenue is recognized from the sales of credentials to an individual or organization upon issuance or in the case of bulk sales or consoles upon issue or availability to the customer for issuance. There is no obligation to provide post contract services in relation to certificates issued and consoles delivered. Certificates issued have a fixed life and cannot be modified or reissued.

 

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Technical consulting services are professional services provided on a project basis determined by our customers’ specific requirements. These technical professional services are billed based on time incurred and actual costs. The Company recognizes revenues for professional services performed based on actual hours worked and actual costs incurred.

 

Goodwill

 

Goodwill represents the excess of acquisition cost of an acquired company over the fair value of assets acquired and liabilities assumed. In accordance with GAAP, goodwill is not amortized but is tested for impairment at the reporting unit level annually at December 31 and between annual tests if events or circumstances arise, such as adverse changes in the business climate, that would more likely than not reduce the fair value of the reporting unit below its carrying value.

 

A reporting unit is defined as either an operating segment or a business one level below an operating segment for which discrete financial information is available that management regularly reviews. The Company has a single reporting unit for the purpose of impairment testing.

 

The goodwill impairment test utilizes a two-step approach. The first step identifies whether there is potential impairment by comparing the fair value of a reporting unit to its carrying amount, including goodwill. If the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, the second step of the impairment test is required to measure the amount of any impairment loss. The Company has the option to bypass the qualitative assessment for any reporting period and proceed to performing the first step of the two-step goodwill impairment test and then subsequently resume performing a qualitative assessment in any subsequent period. The Company bypassed using a qualitative assessment for 2014.

 

Goodwill impairment testing involves management judgment, requiring an assessment of whether the carrying value of the reporting unit can be supported by its fair value using widely accepted valuation techniques, such as the market approach (earnings multiples or transaction multiples for the industry in which the reporting unit operates) or the income approach discounted cash flow methods). The fair values of the reporting units were determined using a combination of valuation techniques consistent with the market approach and the income approach.

 

When preparing discounted cash flow models under the income approach, the Company estimates future cash flows using the reporting unit’s internal five year forecast and a terminal value calculated using a growth rate that management believes is appropriate in light of current and expected future economic conditions. The Company then applies a discount rate to discount these future cash flows to arrive at a net present value amount, which represents the estimated fair value of the reporting unit. The discount rate applied approximates the expected cost of equity financing, determined using a capital asset pricing model. The model generates an appropriate discount rate using internal and external inputs to value future cash flows based on the time value of money and the price for bearing the uncertainty inherent in an investment.

 

The Company has approximately $18.2 million of goodwill as of December 31, 2014. The fair value of the Company’s reporting unit is above its carrying value; accordingly, the Company has concluded its goodwill is not impaired at December 31, 2014. The Company could be exposed to increased risk of goodwill impairment if future operating results or macroeconomic conditions differ significantly from management’s current assumptions.

 

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Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

 

The Company has not historically maintained an allowance for doubtful accounts for its federal government customers. Allowances for doubtful accounts relate to commercial accounts receivable and unbilled accounts receivable represent management’s best estimate of the losses inherent in the Company’s outstanding trade accounts receivable. The Company determines its allowance by considering a number of factors, including the length of time accounts receivable are past due, the Company’s previous loss history, the customer’s current ability to pay its obligation to the Company, and the condition of the general economy and the industry as a whole. Customer account balances outstanding longer than 120 days that have not been settled in accordance with contract terms and for which no firm payment commitments exist are placed with a third party collection agency and a reserve is established. The Company writes off accounts receivable after 180 days or earlier when they become uncollectible. Payments subsequently received on such receivables are credited to the allowance for doubtful accounts. If the accounts receivable has been written off and no allowance for doubtful accounts exist subsequent payments received are credited to bad debt expense.

 

To the extent historical credit experience, updated for emerging market trends in credit is not indicative of future performance, actual losses could differ significantly from management’s judgments and expectations, resulting in either higher or lower future provisions for losses, as applicable. The process of determining the allowance for doubtful accounts requires a high degree of judgment. It is possible that others, given the same information, may at any point in time reach different reasonable conclusions.

 

Share-Based Compensation

 

The Company issues share-based compensation awards to company employees upon which the fair value of awards is subject to significant estimates made by management. The fair value of each option award is estimated on the date of grant using a Black-Scholes option pricing model (“Black-Scholes model”), which uses the assumptions of no dividend yield, risk free interest rates and expected life (in years) of approximately 7 years. Share-based compensation awards reflected in the consolidated financial statements are for the period from 1999 through 2014.

 

Expected volatilities are based on the historical volatility of our common stock. The expected term of options granted is based on analyses of historical employee termination rates and option exercises. The risk-free interest rates are based on the U.S. Treasury yield for a period consistent with the expected term of the option in effect at the time of the grant. To the extent historical volatility estimates, risk free interest rates, option terms and forfeiture rates updated for emerging market trends are not indicative of future performance it could differ significantly from management’s judgments and expectations on the fair value of similar share-based awards, resulting in either higher or lower future compensation expense, as applicable. The process of determining fair value of share-based compensation requires a high degree of judgment. It is possible that others, given the same information, may at any point in time reach different reasonable conclusions.

 

Accounting for Income Taxes

 

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on the differences between the financial statement and tax bases of assets and liabilities using the enacted tax rates expected to be in effect for the years in which the differences are expected to reverse. A valuation allowance is established when management determines that it is more likely than not that all or some portion of the benefit of the deferred tax asset will not be realized.

 

Since deferred taxes measure the future tax effects of items recognized in the financial statements, certain estimates and assumptions are required to determine whether it is more likely than not that all or some portion of the benefit of a deferred tax asset will not be realized. In making this assessment, management analyzes and estimates the impact of future taxable income, reversing temporary differences and available tax planning strategies. These assessments are performed quarterly, taking into account any new information. The Company’s significant deferred tax assets consist of net operating loss carryforwards, share-based compensation and intangible asset amortization. Should a change in facts or circumstances lead to a change in judgment about the ultimate ability to realize a deferred tax asset (including our utilization of historical net operating losses and share-based compensation expense), the Company records or adjusts the related valuation allowance in the period that the change in facts or circumstances occurs, along with a corresponding increase or decrease to the income tax provision.

 

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2014 Results of Operations

 

Year Ended December 31, 2014 Compared to the Year ended December 31, 2013

 

Revenues

 

Revenues for the year ended December 31, 2014 were approximately $53.3 million, an increase of approximately $6.5 million (or 14%), as compared to approximately $46.8 million in the same period last year. Although we had increased revenues versus 2013, delays in federal and commercial MMS implementations and government product resale transactions negatively impacted revenues during 2014. Our mix of MMS revenues for the periods presented is set forth below:

 

   years ended
DECEMBER 31,
   Dollar 
MMS Service Mix  2014   2013   Variance 
             
Carrier Services  $20,044,276   $16,815,215   $3,229,061 
Management Services   18,641,702    17,227,862    1,413,840 
Resale and Other Services   14,630,232    12,781,955    1,848,277 
                
   $53,316,210   $46,825,032   $6,491,178 

 

We believe the following factors contributed to higher revenues:

 

§Our carrier services were higher compared to same period last year as a result of the recognition of task orders issued related to our U.S Department Homeland Security (“DHS”) blanket purchase agreement (“BPA”) contract award. We were awarded 12 task orders under the DHS BPA contract during 2014 and we believe our carrier services revenue may continue to increase as we implement existing task orders and win additional task orders associated with this DHS BPA contract.

 

§Our managed services were higher due to additional revenues from our recent acquisition of SCL (that is part of our MMS managed services offering), partially offset by reductions in customer attrition, government delays and cutbacks as a result of Federal Budget sequestration and delays as a result of the protest of our DHS BPA award. We believe as cert on device is deployed in 2015 and the DHS BPA task orders are recognized that managed services should further expand.

 

§Our resale and other services expanded as a result of increased commercial consulting services and software resale transactions. Resale and other services could be erratic year over year due to timing of federal procurement activity and commercial customer mobile equipment upgrades and deployments.

 

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Cost of Revenues

 

Cost of revenues for the year ended December 31, 2014 was approximately $39.8 million (or 75% of revenues) as compared to approximately $34.7 million (or 74% of revenues) in the same period last year. The dollar basis increase in cost of revenues was predominantly attributable to increased costs associated with software resale activities and carrier services delivered during the year. Our cost of revenues will rise in periods in which we recognize higher government product resale transactions and conversely decrease our margins. The addition of SCL did not have a material effect on cost of revenues.

 

Gross Profit

 

Gross profit for the year ended December 31, 2014 was approximately $13.5 million (or 25% of revenues), as compared to approximately $12.1 million (or 26% of revenues) in the same period last year.  The dollar basis increase in gross profit was due to the additional of SCL’s higher margin revenue, partially offset by higher carrier services costs and decreases in higher margin federal consulting revenues. Our focus will remain on growing sales of higher margin recurring services.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Sales and marketing expense for the year ended December 31, 2014 was approximately $3.4 million (or 6% of revenues), as compared to approximately $3.1 million (or 7% of revenues) in the same period last year.  The dollar basis increase in sales and marketing expense reflects the addition of SCL of approximately $0.7 million, partially offset by lower channel partner commissions as a result of a greater direct sales and lower external sales and marketing program consultant costs. We may have increases in sales and marketing going forward as we expand promotion of our latest product and service offerings such as Cert-On-Device.

 

General and administrative expenses for the year ended December 31, 2014 were approximately $14.4 million (or 27% of revenues), as compared to approximately $9.9 million (or 21% of revenues) in the same period last year.   General and administrative expenses for the year ended December 31, 2013 included a non-cash gain of approximately $1.25 million that represented a reduction in the fair value of a contingent obligation (related to the acquisition of Avalon Global Solutions, Inc. (“AGS”)) as re-measured at the reporting date. Excluding this non-cash gain, general and administrative expenses for the year ended December 31, 2013 would have been approximately $11.1 million (or 24% of revenues). The increase in general and administrative expense after excluding this non-cash gain predominantly reflects the inclusion of SCL general and administrative expense of approximately $2.5 million.

 

Depreciation expense for the year ended December 31, 2014 was approximately $376,000, as compared to approximately $288,300 in the same period last year.  The increase in depreciation expense was due to increased pool of depreciable assets to support our technology solutions infrastructure and the addition of SCL’s depreciable assets.  We anticipate additional infrastructure investments in computer equipment and other hardware to respond to anticipated capacity requirements as we growth our revenue base.

 

Other Income (Expense)

 

Interest income for the year ended December 31, 2014 was approximately $17,000, as compared to approximately $7,400, in the same period last year.  This increase was due to higher amounts of invested cash and cash equivalents being held in interest bearing accounts and the length of time these increased deposits were earning interest compared the same period last year.

 

Interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2014 was approximately $186,800 (or less than 1% of revenues), an increase of approximately $11,500 as compared to approximately $175,300 (or less than 1% of revenues) of interest expense in the same period last year. The increase in interest expense reflects accrued interest related to an unsecured loan note payable issued in connection with the SCL acquisition. There were no significant changes in the terms of interest bearing debt during the year ended December 31, 2014.

 

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Other income for the year ended December 31, 2014 was approximately $12,900 as compared to $11,300 for the same period last year. Other income (expense) for both periods did not include any significant items.

 

Provision for Income Taxes

 

Income tax expense for the year ended December 31, 2014 was approximately $3.6 million, as compared to an approximately $0.4 million in the same period last year. The increase in income tax expense reflects a $5.0 million valuation allowance applied against the Company’s deferred tax assets. Objective evidence of cumulative losses carries more weight under the accounting rules than subjective evidence such as projections and tax planning strategies when evaluating whether a valuation reserve is required. Management placed a full valuation allowance on its deferred tax assets after analyzing both positive and negative evidence over the last two years.

 

Net Income

 

As a result of the factors above, the net loss for the year ended December 31, 2014 was approximately $8.4 million as compared to approximately $1.7 million in the same period last year.

 

2013 Results of Operations

 

Year Ended December 31, 2013 Compared to the Year ended December 31, 2012

 

Revenues

 

Revenues for the year ended December 31, 2013 were approximately $46.8 million, a decrease of approximately $9.0 million (or 16%), as compared to approximately $55.8 million in the same period in 2012. Decreased revenues are primarily a result of the federal protest that spanned substantially all of fiscal 2013 that delayed our ability to implement new agencies and generate expected revenues. Our mix of MMS revenues for the periods presented is set forth below:

 

   YEARS ENDED
DECEMBER 31,
   Dollar 
MMS Service Mix  2013   2012   Variance 
             
Carrier Services  $16,815,215   $19,545,439   $(2,730,224)
Management Services   17,227,862    19,611,176    (2,383,314)
Resale and Other Services   12,781,955    16,626,127    (3,844,172)
                
   $46,825,032   $55,782,742   $(8,957,710)

 

We believe the following factors contributed to reduced revenues:

 

§Our carrier services and managed services were lower due to long delays caused by a federal protest associated with our DHS BPA contract award and our continued shift away from lower margin carrier services.

 

§Our managed services were lower due to delays caused by a federal protest of our DHS BPA contract award, slower than anticipated commercial sales cycles, client driven implementation delays as well as some commercial customer attrition.

 

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§Our resale and other services were lower due sequester-related delays that affected the timing of federal procurement activity.

 

Cost of Revenues

 

Cost of revenues for the year ended December 31, 2013 was approximately $34.7 million (or 74% of revenues) as compared to approximately $41.9 million (or 75% of revenues) in the same period in 2012. The dollar basis decrease in cost of revenues was predominantly attributable to lower sales of government product resale transactions due to sequester-related delays and lower variable subcontract labor associated with a closed project. Our cost of revenues will fall in periods in which we recognize lower government product resale transactions.

 

Gross Profit

 

Gross profit for the year ended December 31, 2013 was approximately $12.1 million (or 26% of revenues), as compared to approximately $13.9 million (or 25% of revenues) in the same period in 2012.   The dollar basis decrease in gross profit was due to lower revenues and limited ability to reduce costs in the short term to lessen the impact of sequester-related delays experienced over the last four quarters. Our focus will remain on growing sales of higher margin recurring services and expanding our growth into international markets.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Sales and marketing expense for the year ended December 31, 2013 was approximately $3.1 million (or 7% of revenues), as compared to approximately $2.7 million (or 5% of revenues) in the same period in 2012.  The increase predominantly reflects higher direct and indirect marketing costs and commission payments associated with our commercial business which requires additional resources to reach decision makers and close deals. The increase in sales and marketing spend was conducted in accordance with our overall strategy to reinvest in our commercial sales infrastructure, thereby expanding our growth opportunities, both domestically and abroad.

 

General and administrative expenses for the year ended December 31, 2013 were approximately $9.9 million (or 21% of revenues), as compared to approximately $9.8 million (or 18% of revenues) in the same period in 2012.  The increase reflects both increased salary and fringe costs associated with expanded overhead support positions and carrying cost of staff retained to service the delayed DHS BPA contract award (approximately $400,000), higher outside accounting and legal fees related to contract negotiations (approximately $168,000), higher commercial insurance rates and prior year premium adjustments (approximately $50,000), partially offset by a net increase in recognized non-cash gain on change in fair value of a contingent obligation (approximately $350,000) and a reduction in lease costs realized upon renewal of certain operating leases (approximately $159,000).

 

Depreciation expense for the year ended December 31, 2013 was approximately $288,300, as compared to approximately $281,300 in the same period in 2012.  The increase in depreciation expense was due to increased pool of depreciable assets to support our technology solutions infrastructure.  We anticipate additional infrastructure investments in computer equipment and other hardware to respond to anticipated capacity requirements as we growth our revenue base.

 

Other Income (Expense)

 

Interest income for the year ended December 31, 2013 was approximately $7,400, as compared to approximately $4,900, in the same period in 2012.  This increase was due to slightly higher amounts of invested cash and cash equivalents being held in interest bearing accounts and the length of time these increased deposits were earning interest compared the same period last year.

 

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Interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2013 was approximately $175,300 (or 1% of revenues), an increase of approximately $118,900 as compared to approximately $294,200 (or 1% of revenues) of interest expense in the same period in 2012. The decrease in interest expense was largely driven by changes in the fair value of a contingent obligation that occurred during 2013. This reduction lowered the interest bearing base upon which accrued interest had been previously determined as compared to the same period in 2012. There were no significant changes in the terms of interest bearing debt during the year ended December 31, 2013.

 

Other income for the year ended December 31, 2013 was approximately $11,300 as compared to $3,200 for the same period in 2012. Other income (expense) for both periods did not include any significant items.

 

Provision for Income Taxes

 

Income tax expense for the year ended December 31, 2013 was approximately $362,800, as compared to an income tax benefit of approximately $99,700 in the same period in 2012. While reviewing the Company’s net operating loss schedules for the year ended December 31, 2013, the Company adjusted its deferred tax asset associated with share based compensation in accordance with the with-and-without-approach which resulted in a net tax expense.

 

Net Income

 

As a result of the factors above, the net loss for the year ended December 31, 2013 was approximately $1.7 million as compared to net income of approximately $0.8 million in the same period in 2012.

 

Liquidity and Capital

 

Net Working Capital

 

The Company has, since inception, financed its operations and capital expenditures through the sale of stock, seller notes in connection with acquisitions, convertible notes, convertible exchangeable debentures, senior secured loans and the proceeds from the exercise of the warrants related to a convertible exchangeable debenture. The Company’s immediate sources of liquidity include cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, unbilled receivables and access to a working capital credit facility with Cardinal Bank for up to $8.0 million.

 

At December 31, 2014, the Company’s net working capital was approximately $12.5 million as compared to negative net working capital at December 31, 2013. The negative net working capital was primarily due to net losses incurred while continuing to fund sales and development investments and maintaining critical staffing infrastructure to support the DHS award under protest. To provide for expected capital requirements to support the DHS contract and enable investments in sales and marketing, product and infrastructure development, we utilized our line of credit and completed two public follow on offerings of our common stock to raise additional capital, which resulted in aggregate net proceeds of approximately $22.0 million, after deducting underwriter commissions and offering expenses. During the 2014, the Company used approximately $5.0 million to acquire Soft-ex Communications Ltd and the remainder of the proceeds have been retained to repay debt, fund operations, and pay for strategic investments in new service offerings.

 

Cash Flows from Operating Activities

 

Cash provided by operating activities provides an indication of our ability to generate sufficient cash flow from our recurring business activities. Fixed costs such as labor, direct materials, network and data charges, software and subscription costs and office rent represent a significant portion of the Company’s continuing operating costs. Any changes in the Company’s fixed operating cost structure may require a significant amount of time to take effect depending on the nature of the change made.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2014, net cash used in operations was approximately $2.6 million driven by current year operating losses due to slower than anticipated implementation of our DHS BPA award and planned strategic investments in our new service offerings including Cert-on-Device.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2013, net cash used in operations was approximately $1.2 million driven by receivable billing and collection timing differences on large resale transactions, our decision to invest approximately $0.5 million in property and equipment infrastructure investments and product development, our decision to hire of a Chief Sales and Marketing Officer and additional marketing and lead generation sales professionals with combined salary costs of approximately $0.5 million.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2012, net cash provided by operations was approximately $1.0 million driven by normal collection and vendor payment timing differences.

 

Cash Flows from Investing Activities

 

Cash used in investing activities provides an indication of our long term infrastructure investments. We make recurring purchases of property and equipment to replace or enhance our hardware and software applications that support customer operations.

 

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For the year ended December 31, 2014, cash used in investing activities was approximately $4.4 million reflecting our purchase of all of the equity interests of SCL for approximately $6.0 million, consisting of $5.0 million in cash at closing excluding cash acquired, capital expenditures of approximately $0.3 million and capitalization of approximately $0.1 million in software development related to our PKI credentialing tools and applications.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2013, cash used in investing activities was approximately $0.5 million due to continuing property and equipment expenditures aimed at enhancing our internal infrastructure to support growth.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2012, cash used in investing activities was approximately $0.4 million due to planned partial customer facing technology infrastructure refresh of approximately $0.3 million and capitalization of approximately $0.1 million in software development related to our PKI credentialing tools and applications.

 

Cash Flows from Financing Activities

 

Cash provided by (used in) financing activities provides an indication of our debt financing and proceeds from capital raise transactions and stock option exercises.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2014, cash provided by financing activities was approximately $20.4 million primary reflecting net proceeds of approximately $22.0 million received from two public offerings of our common stock, partially offset by a net line of credit repayment of approximately $0.9 million and term debt repayments of approximately $1.2 million. We realized net proceeds of approximately $0.5 million from the exercise of stock options.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2013, cash used in financing activities was approximately $0.2 million reflecting term debt repayments of approximately $1.2 million partially offset by a net line of credit advances of approximately $0.9 million. We realized net proceeds of approximately $46,200 from the exercise of stock options.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2012, cash used in financing activities was approximately $0.8 million reflecting term debt repayments of approximately $0.8 million. We repaid all line advances of $3.0 million during fiscal 2012. We realized net proceeds of approximately $51,200 from the exercise of stock options.

 

At December 31, 2014, there were no outstanding borrowings against the Company’s working capital credit facility. At December 31, 2014, there were no material commitments for additional capital expenditures, but that could change with the addition of material contract awards or task orders awarded in the future.

 

Future Capital Requirements

 

We believe our working capital credit facility, along with the proceeds from our recent public offering of common stock, should be sufficient to meet our minimum requirements for our current business operations and implementation of new business during fiscal 2015.

 

Our business environment is characterized by rapid technological change with periods of high growth and contraction, and is influenced by material events such as mergers and acquisitions that can substantially change our performance and outlook. Constant growth and technological change in our market makes it difficult to predict future liquidity requirements with certainty. We believe future capital requirements will depend on many factors, including the rate of revenue growth, if any, the timing and extent of spending for new product and service development, strategic acquisition funding and availability of suitable acquisition targets, technological changes in our proprietary software solutions and market acceptance of the Company’s branded products and service solutions.

 

Over the long term, the Company must successfully execute its growth plans to increase profitable revenue and income streams that should generate positive cash flows to sustain adequate liquidity without impairing growth initiatives or requiring the infusion of additional funds from external sources to meet minimum operating requirements, including debt service. There can be no assurance that additional financing, if required, will be available on acceptable terms, if at all, for future acquisitions and/or growth initiatives.

 

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Contractual Obligations

 

The table below identifies transactions that represent our contractually committed future obligations. Purchase obligations include our agreements to purchase goods and services that are enforceable and legally binding and that specify significant terms, including: fixed or minimum quantities to be purchased; fixed, minimum or variable price provisions; and the approximate timing of the transaction. The following reflects a summary of the Company’s contractual obligations for fiscal years ending December 31:

 

Obligation Type  2015   2016   2017   2018   2019   Thereafter   Total 
                             
Long-term debt and interest payments on long-term debt  $2,317,136   $949,356   $46,614   $46,416   $46,398   $383,416   $3,789,336 
Operating lease obligations   1,015,400    883,200    806,000    778,000    442,000    1,234,000    5,158,600 
Capital lease obligations   79,320    35,334    4,185    -    -    -    118,839 
   $3,411,856   $1,867,890   $856,799   $824,416   $488,398   $1,617,416   $9,066,775 

 

(1) Weighted average interest rate of all outstanding long term debt at December 31, 2014 was approximately 4.0%.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

The Company has no existing off-balance sheet arrangements as defined under SEC regulations.

 

ITEM 7A.QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

The Company is exposed to market risk in the normal course of its business primarily due to its international customer base and operations. The primary exposure relates to the exchange rate fluctuations between the Company’s U.S. dollar functional reporting currency and the Euro dollar. This exposure includes trade receivables denominated in currencies other than the Company’s functional currency.

 

If the values of the Euro dollar relative to the U.S. dollar had been ten (10) percent lower than the values that prevailed during 2014, the Company’s pretax income for 2014 would have been approximately $54,000 lower. Conversely, if such values had been ten (10) percent higher, the Company’s reported pretax income for 2014 would have been approximately $54,000 higher.

 

ITEM 8.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTAL DATA

 

The consolidated financial statements and schedules required hereunder and contained herein are listed under Item 15 below.

 

ITEM 9A.  CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

We maintain disclosure controls and procedures designed to provide reasonable assurance that material information required to be disclosed by us in the reports we file or submit under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC's rules and forms, and that the information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. We performed an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this report. Based on the existence of the material weaknesses discussed below in “Management's Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting,” our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective at the reasonable assurance level as of the end of the period covered by this report.

 

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We do not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures will prevent all errors and all instances of fraud. Disclosure controls and procedures, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the disclosure controls and procedures are met. Further, the design of disclosure controls and procedures must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits must be considered relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitations in all disclosure controls and procedures, no evaluation of disclosure controls and procedures can provide absolute assurance that we have detected all our control deficiencies and instances of fraud, if any. The design of disclosure controls and procedures also is based partly on certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions.

 

Management's Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. Internal control over financial reporting is defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, as a process designed by, or under the supervision of, our principal executive and principal financial officers and effected by our Board, management and other personnel to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and includes those policies and procedures that:

 

§pertain to the maintenance of records that in reasonable detail accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of our assets;

 

§provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of our management and directors; and

 

§provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the company's assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

 

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Additionally, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risks that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

 

Management assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2014. In making this assessment, management used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) in Internal Control-Integrated Framework (2013). On May 1, 2014, the Company acquired Soft-ex Communications Limited whose financial statements constitute 7% of the Company’s consolidated total assets and 8% of consolidated net revenues as of and for the year ended December 31, 2014. Accordingly, management’s assessment of internal control over financial reporting did not include Soft-ex Communications Limited. Based on management’s assessment and those criteria, we conclude that, as of December 31, 2014, our internal control over financial reporting was not effective due to the existence of the material weaknesses as of December 31, 2014, discussed below. A material weakness is a control deficiency, or a combination of control deficiencies, that results in more than a remote likelihood that a material misstatement of the annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected. Management has identified material weaknesses in controls related to inadequate controls over revenue recognition and inadequate entity level controls, including inadequate policies and procedures and inadequate segregation of duties within an account or process.

 

The material weaknesses described above comprise control deficiencies that we discovered during our assessment of ICOFR and were not remediated during the financial close process for the December 31, 2014 fiscal period. Management is developing a plan to respond to identified material weaknesses described above and such plan may include investing in accounting workflow technologies that can minimize manual reporting processes, capture and store relevant documentation to support operating effectiveness and strengthen internal controls over financial reporting.

 

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Moss Adams LLP, our independent registered public accounting firm, has audited the consolidated financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2014, and the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2014, as stated in their reports, which are included herein.

 

Remediation Plan for Material Weaknesses

 

The material weaknesses described above comprise control deficiencies that we discovered during our assessment of ICOFR and were not remediated during the financial close process for the December 31, 2014 fiscal period. Management is developing a plan to respond to identified material weaknesses described above and such plan may include investing in accounting workflow technologies that can minimize manual reporting processes, capture and store relevant documentation to support operating effectiveness and strengthen internal controls over financial reporting.

 

We believe that these measures, if effectively implemented and maintained, will remediate the remaining material weaknesses discussed above.

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

Other than as described above, there have been no changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the fourth quarter of 2014 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

Because of its inherent limitations, a system of internal control over financial reporting can provide only reasonable assurance and may not prevent or detect misstatements. Further, because of changes in conditions, effectiveness of internal controls over financial reporting may vary over time. Our system contains self-monitoring mechanisms, and actions are taken to correct deficiencies as they are identified.

 

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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

The Board of Directors and Stockholders

WidePoint Corporation

 

We have audited WidePoint Corporation and subsidiaries’ (the “Company”) internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2014, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. As discussed in Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting, on May 1, 2014, the Company acquired Soft-ex Communications Limited. For the purposes of assessing internal control over financial reporting, management excluded Soft-ex Communications Limited, whose financial statements constitute 7% of the Company’s consolidated total assets and 8% of consolidated net revenues as of and for the year ended December 31, 2014. Accordingly, our audit did not include the internal control over financial reporting of Soft-ex Communications Limited. The Company’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.

 

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audit also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

 

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

 

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A material weakness is a control deficiency, or combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the Company’s annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. The following material weaknesses have been identified and included in management’s assessment. Management has identified material weaknesses in controls related to inadequate controls over revenue recognition and inadequate entity level controls. These material weaknesses were considered in determining the nature, timing, and extend of audit tests applied in our audit of the 2014 financial statements, and this report does not affect our report dated March 16, 2015, on those financial statements.

 

In our opinion, because of the effect of the material weaknesses described above on the achievement of the objectives of the control criteria, WidePoint Corporation and subsidiaries has not maintained effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2014, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission.

 

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated balance sheets of WidePoint Corporation and subsidiaries as of December 31, 2014 and 2013, and the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2014, and our report dated March 16, 2015 expressed an unqualified opinion on those consolidated financial statements.

 

/s/ Moss Adams LLP

 

Scottsdale, Arizona

March 16, 2015

  

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PART III.

 

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

DIRECTORS AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

 

The following sets forth information regarding the directors, executive officers and certain significant employees of the Company as of December 31, 2014:

 

Name

 

Age

 

Position

         
Steve L. Komar   73   Chief Executive Officer, Director, and Chairman of the Board
         
James McCubbin   50   Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Secretary, Treasurer and Director
         
Jin Kang   50   Executive Vice President, Chief Operations Officer, Chief Executive Officer and President of iSYS LLC
         
Otto Guenther   73   Director
         
George Norwood   72   Director
         
James Ritter   70   Director, Chairman of the Compensation and Nominating Committees
         
Morton Taubman   71   Director, Chairman of the Audit Committee

 

Steve L. Komar has served as a director since December 1997 and became Chairman of the Board in October 2001. Mr. Komar has also served as Chief Executive Officer since December 2001. From June 2000 until December 2001, Mr. Komar served as a founding partner of C-III Holdings, a development stage financial services company. From 1991 to June 2000, Mr. Komar served as Group Executive Vice President of Fiserv, Inc., a company that provides advanced data processing services and related products to the financial industry. From 1980 to 1991, Mr. Komar served in a number of financial management positions with CitiGroup, including the role of Chief Financial Officer of Diners Club International and Citicorp Information Resources, respectively. Mr. Komar is a graduate of the City University of New York with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Accounting and holds a Master’s Degree in Finance from Pace University.

 

Mr. Komar serves on the Board of Directors for a term expiring at the 2017 Annual Meeting of Shareholders. Mr. Komar brings extensive financial and operational management experience to the Board as a result of his past operational experience at several large firms where he held senior executive positions in areas including financial and operational management and mergers & acquisitions. The financial and managerial skills he developed over a career that has spanned more than 45 years, as well as Mr. Komar’s experience as our Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, his knowledge of our Company as a result thereof, and his prior performance serving as a Board member of the Company, led the Board to conclude that he should continue to serve as a director of the Company.

 

James T. McCubbin has served as a director and as our Secretary since November 1998. Since August 1998, Mr. McCubbin has also served as our Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. Prior to that time, from December 1997 to August 1998, Mr. McCubbin served as Vice President, Controller, Assistant Secretary and Treasurer. Prior to the commencement of his employment with WidePoint in November 1997, Mr. McCubbin held various financial management positions with several companies in the financial and government sectors. Mr. McCubbin is a graduate of the University of Maryland with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Finance and a Master’s Degree in International Management. Mr. McCubbin brings extensive financial and corporate compliance expertise as well as internal knowledge of the Company as a result of his having over 13 years of experience with the Company. Mr. McCubbin also has significant experience serving in financial managerial roles within a variety of organizations and membership on several boards of directors over the past 25 years.

 

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Mr. McCubbin also presently serves on the Board of Directors of ProPhase Labs, Inc. and serves on their Audit Committee. Mr. McCubbin was also on the Board of Directors of Redmile Entertainment until his resignation on March 1, 2008 and on the Board of Directors of Tianjin Pharmaceutical Company and was its Chairman of its Audit Committee, Nominating Committee, and Compensation Committee until his resignation on June 4, 2012. Mr. McCubbin subsequent to his resignation on the Board of Directors of Tianjin Pharmaceutical Company continued to serve as a consultant with the Company. Mr. McCubbin at times consultants on financial and other compliance matters. These experiences and his prior performance as a Board member led the Board to conclude that he should continue to serve as a director of the Company.

 

Jin Kang has serves as Executive Vice President and Chief Operations Officer of WidePoint since June 30, 2012. Mr. Kang was appointed Chief Operations Officer on June 30, 2012. Mr. Kang has also served as the Chief Executive Officer and President of iSYS, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company, since our acquisition of iSYS on January 4, 2008. Mr. Kang founded the company in 1999 and has managed iSYS since its inception. Mr. Kang has over 26 years of professional experience in the Federal Government Information Technology Services field. Prior to founding iSYS, Mr. Kang was a Division Manager for Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). His responsibilities included the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS), a marquee program for the FBI Laboratory Division. As the Engineering Manager for Northrop Grumman Corporation, Mr. Kang played a critical role in the successful management of the Defense Medical Information Systems/Systems Integration, Design Development, Operations and Maintenance Services (D/SIDDOMS) contract from its inception with zero revenues to a program of $190 million in sales. Mr. Kang received a Bachelor and Masters Degrees in Computer Science and Computer Systems Management from the University of Maryland.

 

Lieutenant General (Ret.) Otto J. Guenther has served as a director since his appointment on August 15, 2007. General Guenther serves as a member of the Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee. He joined the Board after a distinguished 34-year military career, including serving as the Army’s first chief information officer, followed by nearly a decade of exceptional leadership within the federal information technology industry. His key assignments included the following: commanding general for Fort Monmouth, NJ, and the Communications Electronics Command; program executive officer for the Army’s tactical communications equipment; project manager for the Tactical Automated Data Distribution System; and commander for the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council. General Guenther recently retired from Northrop Grumman Mission Systems, where he served as the Sector Vice President and General Manager of Tactical Systems Division. While there, he oversaw battlefield digitization, command and control, and system engineering activities for the U.S. Army. Under his leadership, the division grew to approximately 1,650 employees across several locations and completed over $700 million in acquisitions. Previously General Guenther was general manager of Computer Associates International’s Federal Systems Group, a $300 million operation providing IT products and services to the federal market area. General Guenther was awarded several honors by the U.S. Army, including the Distinguished Service Medal, Legion of Merit (Oak Leaf Cluster), Defense Superior Service Medal (Oak Leaf Cluster), Joint Service Medal, and Army Commendation Medal. Recognized for his work within the industry, he also received several Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association awards and was inducted into the Government Computer News Hall of Fame. General Guenther received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Economics from Western Maryland College, now called McDaniel College, and a Master’s Degree in Procurement and Contracting from the Florida Institute of Technology.

 

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General Guenther brings to the Board extensive knowledge of the federal marketplace as a result of a career that has spanned both military and informational technology industries. In addition, General Guenther’s knowledge of federal infrastructure as well as experience in successful business development and board service is particularly valuable to the Company. This experience, as well as his independence from the Company and his prior performance as a Board member, led the Board to conclude that he should continue to serve as a director of the Company.

 

Major General (Ret.) George W. Norwood has served as a director since his appointment on August 15, 2007. General Norwood serves as a member of the Audit Committee and the Compensation Committee. General Norwood also currently serves on the boards of directors of Airborne Tactical Advantage Company and Scalable Network Technologies. He is also on the board of strategic advisors of AtHoc, Inc. General Norwood brings to the Board extensive knowledge of the federal marketplace as a result of a distinguished 30-year military career and more than 12-years in the commercial market with significant experience in both military and defense contracting.

 

General Norwood is currently President and Chief Executive Officer of Norwood & Associates, Inc. of Tampa, Fla., which maintains extensive international and U.S. networks of government, military and private sector contacts while providing technical and strategic planning expertise to corporations pursuing defense-related opportunities. General Norwood previously served as Deputy Chief of Staff for the United Nations Command and United States Forces in Korea from 1995 to 1997. He also served as the U.S. member of the United Nations Command’s Military Armistice Commission responsible for crucial general officer level negotiations with North Korea.

 

General Norwood received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Mathematics from San Diego State University and a Master’s Degree in Business Administration from Golden Gate University. He is also a graduate of the National War College and Defense Language Institute.

 

General Norwood’s experience supporting the federal infrastructure as well as his experience in successful business development and board service is particularly valuable to the Company. This experience, as well as his independence from the Company and his prior performance as a Board member, led the Board to conclude that he should continue to serve as a director of the Company.

 

James M. Ritter has served as a director since December 1999 and served as Assistant Secretary of the Company from December 2002 until 2008. Mr. Ritter is the Chairman of the Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee and the Compensation Committee and is also a member of the Audit Committee. Mr. Ritter is the retired Corporate Headquarters Chief Information Officer of Lockheed Martin Corporation. Prior to his retirement in February 2001, Mr. Ritter was employed at Lockheed Martin Corporation for over 32 years in various positions involving high level IT strategic planning and implementation, e-commerce development, integrated financial systems, and large-scale distributed systems.

 

Mr. Ritter brings to the Board extensive knowledge of information systems and managerial experience as a result of a career managing and building complex information technology systems. This experience, as well as his independence from the Company, his prior performance as a Board member, and his service on other boards of directors, led the Board to conclude that he should continue to serve as a director of the Company.

 

Morton S. Taubman has served as a director since his appointment on March 10, 2006 to serve out the remaining term of G.W. Norman Wareham, who resigned his position on March 7, 2006. Mr. Taubman is also the Chairman of the Audit Committee and is a member of the Compensation Committee and the Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee. Mr. Taubman has experience as a certified public accountant and is currently an attorney with expertise in corporate law, government contracting and international relations. Prior to forming Leser Hunter Taubman & Taubman law firm, Mr. Taubman was the senior vice president and general counsel to DIGICON Corporation, an IT and telecommunications company. Before joining DIGICON, he was a senior partner at Ginsburg, Feldman and Bress, LLP, an established Washington, D.C. firm that provided expertise in tax, telecommunications, litigation, federal regulatory issues, capital reformation, government contracting and international issues. Before that, he was a founding partner at a number of law firms, was the partner-in-charge of the Washington D.C. office of Laventhol & Harworth, in charge of the Washington, D.C. tax department at Coopers & Lybrand and a special agent with the U.S. Treasury Department. Mr. Taubman has been an adjunct law professor for more than 15 years at Georgetown University and George Washington University. He presently also serves as special corporate counsel to Global Options Group, Inc. and Global Options, Inc., companies focusing on U.S. federal security services and as general counsel to Interior Systems, Inc. d/b/a ISI Professional Services, a United States federal contractor. He holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Accounting from the University of Baltimore, a Juris Doctor Degree from the University of Baltimore Law School, and a Masters of Law Degree from Georgetown University.

 

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Mr. Taubman brings to the Board financial expertise and is qualified as an audit committee financial expert. Mr. Taubman also brings to the Board a wealth of experience as a financial and legal professional serving as a partner at both major auditing and legal firms. This experience, as well as his independence from the Company and his prior performance as a Board member, led the Board to conclude that he should serve as a director of the Company.

 

Our executive officers serve at the discretion of the board of directors.

 

There are no family relationships among any of our executive officers or directors.

 

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

Code of Ethics

 

The Company’s Board of Directors has a code of ethics and business conduct for the chief executive and principal financial and accounting officers. The Company has posted a copy of the code on its website located at www.widepoint.com. We intend to post notice of any waiver from, or amendment to, any provision of our code of ethics and business conduct on our website.

 

Board Meetings – Committees of the Board

 

The Board of Directors held four (4) meetings during 2014. During this period, all of the directors attended or participated in more than 75% of the aggregate of the total number of meetings of the Board of Directors and the total number of meetings held by all Committees of the Board of Directors on which each such director served.

 

The Board currently has the following Committees: Audit; Corporate Governance and Nominating; and Compensation. Each Committee consists entirely of independent, non-employee directors in accordance with the listing standards of the NYSE MKT. Membership and principal responsibilities of the Board’s Committees are described below. Each Committee of the Board has adopted a charter and each such charter is available free of charge on our website, www.widepoint.com, or by writing to WidePoint Corporation, 7926 Jones Branch Drive, Suite 520, McLean, Virginia 22102, c/o Corporate Secretary.

 

Audit Committee

 

The members of the Audit Committee are:

 

§Morton S. Taubman (Chair)
§James M. Ritter

 

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§George W. Norwood
 §Otto J. Guenther

 

The Audit Committee met four (4) times in 2014. The Audit Committee has been established in accordance with Section 3(a)(58)(A) of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934. The primary functions of the Audit Committee are to: appoint (subject to stockholder approval), and be directly responsible for the compensation, retention and oversight of, the firm that will serve as the Company’s independent accountants to audit our financial statements and to perform services related to the audit (including the resolution of disagreements between management and the independent accountants regarding financial reporting); review the scope and results of the audit with the independent accountants; review with management and the independent accountants, prior to the filing thereof, the annual and interim financial results (including Management’s Discussion and Analysis) to be included in our Forms 10-K and 10-Q, respectively; consider the adequacy and effectiveness of our internal accounting controls and auditing procedures; review, approve and thereby establish procedures for the receipt, retention and treatment of complaints received by the Company regarding accounting, internal accounting controls or auditing matters and for the confidential, anonymous submission by employees of concerns regarding questionable accounting or auditing matters; review and approve related person transactions in accordance with the policies and procedures of the Company; and consider the accountants’ independence and establish policies and procedures for pre-approval of all audit and non-audit services provided to WidePoint by the independent accountants who audit its financial statements. At each meeting, Audit Committee members may meet privately with representatives of Moss Adams LLP, our independent accountants, and with the Company’s Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer.

 

The Board has determined that Messrs. Taubman, Ritter and Norwood each meet the definition of "independent directors" for purposes of serving on an audit committee under applicable rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the listing standards of the NYSE MKT. In addition, the Board has determined that Mr. Taubman satisfies the “financially sophisticated” requirements set forth in the NYSE MKT Company Guide, and has designated Mr. Taubman as the “audit committee financial expert,” as such term is defined in the rules and regulations of the SEC.

 

Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee

 

The members of the Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee are:

 

§James M. Ritter (Chair)
§Morton S. Taubman
§Otto J. Guenther
 §George W. Norwood

 

The Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee met one (1) time in 2014. The primary functions of this Committee are to: identify individuals qualified to become Board members and recommend to the Board the nominees for election to the Board at the next Annual Meeting of Stockholders; review annually and recommend changes to the Company’s Corporate Governance Guidelines; lead the Board in its annual review of the performance of the Board and its committees; review policies and make recommendations to the Board concerning the size and composition of the Board, the qualifications and criteria for election to the Board, retirement from the Board, compensation and benefits of non-employee directors, the conduct of business between WidePoint and any person or entity affiliated with a director, and the structure and composition of the Board’s Committees; review the Company’s policies and programs relating to compliance with its Code of Business Conduct and such other matters as may be brought to the attention of the Committee regarding WidePoint’s role as a responsible corporate citizen.

 

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Compensation Committee

 

The members of the Compensation Committee are:

 

§James M. Ritter (Chair)
§Morton S. Taubman
§George W. Norwood
 §Otto J. Guenther

 

The Compensation Committee met two (2) times in 2014. The primary functions of the Compensation Committee are to: evaluate and approve executive compensation plans, policies and programs, including review of relevant corporate and individual goals and objectives, as submitted by the Chief Executive Officer; evaluate the Chief Executive Officer’s performance relative to established goals and objectives and, together with the other independent directors, determine and approve the Chief Executive Officer’s compensation level based on this evaluation; review and approve the annual salary and other remuneration of all other officers; review the management development program, including executive succession plans; review with management, prior to the filing thereof, the executive compensation disclosure included in this proxy statement; recommend individuals for election as officers; and review or take such other action as may be required in connection with the bonus, stock and other benefit plans of WidePoint and its subsidiaries.

 

Director Compensation

 

Directors who are not also officers or employees receive an annual fee of $12,000; however, for a six month period in fiscal 2014, each director voluntarily agreed to a 10% reduction in director fees beginning on June 1, 2014 and ending on December 31, 2014. The following table sets forth director compensation for the year ended December 31, 2014:

 

   Fees Earned   Option   All Other     
   or Paid   Awards   Compensation     
Director Name  ($)   ($)   ($)   Total 
James Ritter  $11,400   $-   $-   $11,400 
Morton Taubman   11,400    -    -    11,400 
George Norwood   11,400    -    -    11,400 
Otto Guenther   11,400    -    -    11,400 

 

Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance

 

Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, requires the Company’s officers and directors, and persons who own more than 10% of a registered class of the Company’s equity securities, to file reports of securities ownership and changes in such ownership with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Statements of Changes in Beneficial Ownership of Securities on Form 4 are generally required to be filed before the end of the second business day following the day on which the change in beneficial ownership occurred. Based on the Company's review of Forms 3 and 4 filed during 2014, all such Forms 3 and Forms 4 were filed on a timely basis.

 

ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

Compensation Discussion and Analysis

 

This compensation discussion and analysis describes the material elements of compensation awarded to, earned by, or paid to each of our named executive officers, whom we refer to as our “NEOs,” during 2014 and describes our policies and decisions made with respect to the information contained in the following tables, related footnotes and narrative for 2014. The NEOs are identified below in the table titled “Summary Compensation Table.” In this compensation discussion and analysis, we also describe various actions regarding NEO compensation take before or after 2014 when we believe it enhances the understanding of our executive compensation program.

 

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Overview of Our Executive Compensation Philosophy and Design

 

We believe that a skilled, experienced and dedicated executive and senior management team is essential to the future performance of our Company and to building stockholder value. We have sought to establish competitive compensation programs that enable us to attract and retain executive officers with these qualities. The other objectives of our compensation programs for our executive officers are the following:

 

§to motivate our executive officers to achieve strong financial performance;
§to attract and retain executive officers who we believe have the experience, temperament, talents and convictions to contribute significantly to our future success; and
§to align the economic interests of our executive officers with the interests of our stockholders.

 

Setting Executive Compensation

 

Our compensation committee has primary responsibility for, among other things, determining our compensation philosophy, evaluating the performance of our NEOs, setting the compensation and other benefits of our NEOs, overseeing the Company’s response to the outcome of the advisory votes of stockholders on executive compensation, assessing the relative enterprise risk of our compensation program and administering our equity compensation plans. The Company’s compensation planning is done annually for cash based performance goals and in multi-year periods for equity based performance goal setting.

 

It is our Chief Executive Officer’s responsibility to provide recommendations to the Compensation Committee for most compensation matters related to executive compensation. The recommendations are based on a general analysis of market standards and trends and an evaluation of the contribution of each executive officer to the Company’s performance. Our Compensation Committee considers, but retains the right to accept, reject or modify such recommendations and has the right to obtain independent compensation advice. Neither the Chief Executive Officer nor any other members of management is present during executive sessions of the Compensation Committee. The Chief Executive Officer is not present when decisions with respect to his compensation are made. Our Board of Directors appoints the members of our compensation committee and delegates to the compensation committee the direct responsibility for overseeing the design and administration of our executive compensation program.

 

We have not historically utilized a compensation consultant to set the compensation of our NEOs.

 

Elements of Executive Compensation

 

We believe the most effective compensation package for our NEOs is one designed to reward achievement of individual and corporate objectives, provide for short-term, medium-term and long-term financial and strategic goals and align the interest of management with those of the stockholders by providing incentives for improving stockholder value. Compensation for our NEOs consists of base salary and an annual bonus opportunity, along with multi-year accelerated vesting goals associated with either stock option awards and or stock grant awards. Our annual bonus opportunity is intended to incentivize the achievement of goals that drive annual and multi-year performance, while our accelerated stock option and or stock grant vesting goals are intended to incentivize the achievement of goals that drive multi-year performance.

 

Base Salary. We pay our NEOs a base salary to compensate them for services rendered and to provide them with a steady source of income for living expenses throughout the year. The fiscal 2015 base salaries for our NEOs, as well as the percentage increase from the fiscal 2014 base salaries, are as follows:

 

       Percentage 
       Increase 
   Fiscal 2015   Over Fiscal 
   Base   2014 Base 
Name  Salary   Salary 
           
Steve Komar  $260,000    4%(1)
James McCubbin  $260,000    4%(1)
Jin Kang  $250,000    4%(1)

 

(1) NEOs original base salary for fiscal 2014 included a voluntarily agreed to 10% reduction in base salary for five months. This voluntary reduction ended on December 31, 2014.

 

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Annual Cash Based Bonus Opportunity. The amount of the annual discretionary cash based bonus award is based on individual performance assessments along with the financial performance of the Company. Our performance-based cash incentive compensation in recent years has included targets for achieving various levels of revenue, operating income, and other financial goals and metrics, along with individual performance assessments that has included goals in personal professional improvement, team building, and other individual personal growth goals. The annual cash based bonus opportunity is for up to 50% of a NEOs base salary. In 2014, none of our NEOs earned a bonus because due to our net operating losses.

 

We believe these cash based award opportunities reinforce the alignment of interests of our executive officers with those of our stockholders in the shorter term as the positive financial performance that drives the cash based bonus awards also indirectly influences the performance of the Company’s common stock. We believe the personal professional improvement goals enhance the value of the NEO to expand their expertise and expand the effectiveness of the Company’s staff allowing for greater organization efficiencies while improving Company performance, which drives short-term, medium-term, and long-term organizational improvement and ultimately value for the stockholders in the form of better financial and common stock performance.

 

Restricted Stock Equity Awards. Mr. Komar and Mr. McCubbin were each awarded 250,000 shares of restricted common stock in 2010 that vest 100% upon the earlier of (i) the seventh anniversary from the date of grant or (ii) upon an acceleration event that is determined by the Compensation Committee.

 

Stock Option Equity Awards. Mr. Kang was awarded 170,000 stock options in 2013 that vest one third per year over a term of three years in order to reward Mr. Kang for improved performance in the Company’s common stock price.

 

Acceleration of Equity Awards. The acceleration of the common shares and or stock options are tied generally to performance measures such as earnings before interest, taxes, amortization and depreciation and other triggers predominately tied to performance goals of the Company. In keeping with our philosophy for incentivizing the performance of our named executive officers over a medium to longer term horizon the Company has used equity grants and awards linked to accelerated vesting goals to reinforce the alignment of interest of our named executive officers with those of our stockholders, as the value of the awards granted thereunder is linked to the value of our Common Stock, which, in turn, is indirectly attributable to the performance of our executive officers.

 

Retirement and Other Benefits. We are strongly committed to encouraging all employees to save for retirement. To provide employees with the opportunity to save for retirement on a tax-deferred basis, we sponsor a defined contribution 401(k) savings plan. We also provide health, dental, vision and short term disability insurance to our NEOs on the same basis offered to all of our employees.

 

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Summary Compensation Table

 

The following table summarizes the compensation paid by us in each of the last three recently completed fiscal years for our NEOs:

 

Name and Principal Position  Year  Base Salary
(1)
   Discretionary
Bonus
   Equity
Awards (2)
   Other
Compensation
(3)
   Total
Compensation
 
Steve Komar  2014  $249,167(4)  $-   $-   $7,200   $256,367 
Chief Executive Officer, Director, and  2013  $255,000   $-   $-   $7,200   $262,200 
Chairman of the Board  2012  $230,000   $-   $-   $7,200   $237,200 
                             
James McCubbin  2014  $249,167 (4)  $-   $-   $7,200   $256,367 
Executive Vice President, Chief Financial  2013  $255,000   $-   $-   $7,200   $262,200 
Officer, Secretary, Treasurer and Director  2012  $230,000   $-   $-   $7,200   $237,200 
                             
Jin Kang  2014  $239,583(4)  $-   $-   $-   $239,583 
Executive Vice President & Chief  2013  $250,000   $-   $96,900(5)  $-   $346,900 
Operations Officer  2012  $250,000   $20,000   $-   $-   $270,000 

  

(1) Amount represents base salary as set forth in an executive employment agreement.

(2) Amount represents the grant date fair value calculated pursuant to ASC Topic 718. Additional information about the assumptions used when valuing equity awards is set forth in the notes the consolidated financial statements included herein.

(3) Monthly combined home office and phone allowance of $600 were paid to Mr. Komar and Mr. McCubbin during fiscal 2014, 2013 and 2012.

(4) For a five month period in fiscal year 2014, Mr. Komar, Mr. McCubbin and Mr. Kang each voluntarily agreed to a 10% reduction in base salary.

(5) During fiscal 2013 Mr. Kang was granted an equity award of 170,000 options on March 21, 2013 with an estimated fair value of approximately $96,900.

 

Grant of Plan Based Awards

 

None of our NEOs received equity awards in fiscal 2014.

 

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Outstanding Equity Awards at December 31, 2014

 

The following table sets forth information on outstanding equity awards held by NEOs at December 31, 2014:

 

   Option Awards  Stock Awards 
Name  Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised
Options (#)
Exercisable
   Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised
Options (#)
Unexercisable
   Option Exercise
Price ($)
   Option
Expiration Date
  Equity Incentive
Plan Awards:
Unearned Shares
or other Rights
that have not
Vested (#)
   Equity Incentive
Plan Awards:
Market or Payout
Value of
Unearned Shares
or Rights that
have not Vested ($)
 
                        
Steve L. Komar, Chief Executive Officer, Director, and Chairman of the Board   -    -    -   -   250,000(1)  $345,000 
                             
James T. McCubbin, Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Secretary, Treasurer and Director   -    -    -   -   250,000(1)  $345,000 
                             
Jin Kang, Executive Vice President and Chief Operations Officer   56,666    113,334   $0.57   3/20/2018(2)  -    - 

  

(1)Equity incentive plan awards unearned represent restricted stock awards which vest on the seventh anniversary of the date of grant or earlier upon a determination by the compensation committee that such shares have been earned.
(2)Options vest one-third per year over a term of three years.

 

Option Exercises and Stock Vested for Fiscal 2014

 

None of our NEOs exercised options or had stock vest during the year ended December 31, 2014.

 

Employment Agreements and Compensation Arrangements;

Termination and Change in Control Provisions

 

The following describes the terms of employment agreements between the Company and the named executive officers included in the above Summary Compensation Table and sets forth information regarding potential payments upon termination of employment or a change in control of the Company.

 

Mr. Komar. On February 18, 2014, we entered into an amendment of an employment agreement with Steve Komar, our Chief Executive Officer and President, dated as of August 13, 2010 and effective as of July 1, 2010. The employment agreement has an initial term expiring on March 31, 2016. The Company had the option to terminate Mr. Komar’s employment agreement as of March 31, 2015 by giving written notice on or before January 31, 2015; however, the Compensation Committee affirmatively decided not to exercise such option. The agreement provides for (1) a base salary of $260,000, (2) a home office/automobile expense allowance of $600 per month to cover such expenses incurred in the pursuit of our business; (3) a phone allowance of $100 per month to cover such expenses incurred in the pursuit of our business; (4) reimbursement for additional actual business expenses consistent with our existing policies that have been incurred for our benefit; (5) paid medical and other benefits consistent with our existing policies with respect to our key executives, as such policies may be amended from time to time in the future; and (6) performance incentive bonuses as may be granted annually at the discretion of the Compensation Committee of the Board. For a five month period in calendar 2014, Mr. Komar voluntarily agreed to a 10% reduction in base salary.

 

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The employment agreement contains a severance provision which provides that upon the termination of his employment without Cause (as described below) or his voluntary resignation for a Good Reason (as described below), Mr. Komar will receive severance compensation payable in a lump-sum of cash equal to the greater of (a) an amount equal to twelve (12) months of his base salary then in effect, or (b) an amount equal to Mr. Komar’s base salary for the remainder of the term of the employment agreement as if the employment agreement had not been terminated; provided that if employment terminates by reason of death or disability, then Mr. McCubbin shall receive a one-time payment equal to the amount of Base Salary owed for the immediate twelve (12) months following the death or disability event, or an amount equal the remainder of the contractual term of the employment agreement whichever is less and all granted but unvested stock options shall be immediately vested and the period of exercise extended for an additional 2 years.

 

The employment agreement further provides that if within two years after a change in control of the Company there occurs any termination of Mr. Komar for any reason other than for Cause or a voluntary resignation without a Good Reason, then the Company will be required to pay to Mr. Komar a one-time severance payment equal to the greater of (a) an amount equal to twelve (12) months of his base salary then in effect, or (b) an amount equal to Mr. Komar’s base salary for the remainder of the term of the employment agreement. If Mr. Komar’s employment terminates for any reason other than for Cause or a voluntary retirement without Good Reason, Mr. Komar will be eligible to participate, at the Company’s expense, in all executive medical and dental plans provided by the Company for the remainder of the term of the employment agreement. Mr. Komar will receive a payment equal to any excise, income and other taxes resulting from the imposition of parachute penalties of the Internal Revenue Code or applicable state tax law.

 

Termination of Mr. Komar’s employment by the Company shall be deemed for “Cause” if, and only if, it is based upon (i) conviction of a felony by a federal or state court of competent jurisdiction; (ii) material disloyalty to the Company such as embezzlement or misappropriation of corporate assets; or (iii) engaging in unethical or illegal behavior which is of a public nature, brings the Company into disrepute, and results in material damage to the Company. A resignation by Mr. Komar shall not be deemed to be voluntary and shall be deemed to be a resignation with “Good Reason” if it is based upon (i) a diminution in Mr. Komar’s title, duties, or salary; (ii) a material reduction in benefits; (iii) a direction by the Board of Directors that Mr. Komar report to any person or group other than the Board of Directors, or (iv) a geographic relocation of the Company’s primary business operations outside of the Washington Metropolitan Area.

 

Mr. McCubbin. On February 18, 2014, we entered into an amendment of an employment agreement with James T. McCubbin, our Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Secretary and Treasurer, dated as of August 13, 2010 and effective as of July 1, 2010. The amendment to Mr. McCubbin’s employment agreement has an initial term expiring on March 31, 2016. The Company had the option to terminate Mr. McCubbin’s employment agreement as of March 31, 2015 by giving written notice on or before January 31, 2015; however, the Compensation Committee affirmatively decided not to exercise such option. The agreement provides for (1) a base salary of $260,000, (2) a home office/automobile expense allowance of $600 per month to cover such expenses incurred in the pursuit of our business; (3) a phone allowance of $100 per month to cover such expenses incurred in the pursuit of our business; (4) reimbursement for additional actual business expenses consistent with our existing policies that have been incurred for our benefit; (5) paid medical and other benefits consistent with our existing policies with respect to our key executives, as such policies may be amended from time to time in the future; and (6) performance incentive bonuses as may be granted annually at the discretion of the Compensation Committee of the Board. For a five month period in calendar 2014, Mr. McCubbin voluntarily agreed to a 10% reduction in base salary.

 

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The employment agreement contains a severance provision which provides that upon the termination of his employment without Cause (as described below) or his voluntary resignation for a Good Reason (as described below), Mr. McCubbin will receive severance compensation payable in a lump-sum of cash equal to the greater of (a) an amount equal to twelve (12) months of his base salary then in effect, or (b) an amount equal to Mr. McCubbin’s base salary for the remainder of the term of the employment agreement as if the employment agreement had not been terminated; provided that if employment terminates by reason of death or disability, then Mr. McCubbin shall receive a one-time payment equal to the amount of Base Salary owed for the immediate twelve (12) months following the death or disability event, or an amount equal the remainder of the contractual term of the employment agreement whichever is less and all granted but unvested stock options shall be immediately vested and the period of exercise extended for an additional 2 years.

 

The employment agreement further provides that if within two years after a change in control of the Company there occurs any termination of Mr. McCubbin for any reason other than for Cause or a voluntary resignation without a Good Reason, then the Company will be required to pay to Mr. McCubbin a one-time severance payment equal to the greater of (a) an amount equal to twelve (12) months of his base salary then in effect, or (b) an amount equal to Mr. McCubbin’s base salary for the remainder of the term of the employment agreement. If Mr. McCubbin’s employment terminates for any reason other than for Cause or a voluntary retirement without Good Reason, Mr. McCubbin will be eligible to participate, at the Company’s expense, in all executive medical and dental plans provided by the Company for the remainder of the term of the employment agreement. Mr. McCubbin will receive a payment equal to any excise, income and other taxes resulting from the imposition of parachute penalties of the Internal Revenue Code or applicable state tax law.

 

Termination of Mr. McCubbin’s employment by the Company shall be deemed for “Cause” if, and only if, it is based upon (i) conviction of a felony by a federal or state court of competent jurisdiction; (ii) material disloyalty to the Company such as embezzlement or misappropriation of corporate assets; or (iii) engaging in unethical or illegal behavior which is of a public nature, brings the Company into disrepute, and results in material damage to the Company. A resignation by Mr. McCubbin shall not be deemed to be voluntary and shall be deemed to be a resignation with “Good Reason” if it is based upon (i) a diminution in Mr. McCubbin’s title, duties, or salary; (ii) a material reduction in benefits; (iii) a direction by the Board of Directors that Mr. McCubbin report to any person or group other than the Board of Directors, or (iv) a geographic relocation of the Company’s primary business operations outside of the Washington Metropolitan Area.

 

Mr. Kang. On November 27, 2012, we entered into an employment agreement with Jin Kang, our Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer of iSYS LLC and Chief Operations Officer, effective as of June 30, 2012, which replaced Mr. Kang’s prior employment agreement, dated January 4, 2008, which expired by its terms on June 30, 2012. The Company and Mr. Kang expect to negotiate a new employment agreement in the future. The Agreement provides for (1) a base salary of $250,000 per year, (2) reimbursement for business expenses consistent with our existing policies that have been incurred for our benefit, (3) paid medical and other benefits consistent with our existing policies with respect to our key executives, as such policies may be amended from time to time in the future, and (4) a performance bonus opportunity of up to $175,000 per year at the discretion of the Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors.

 

Mr. Kang’s employment period will continue from the date of his agreement until he is terminated either by (a) Mr. Kang’s death or permanent disability which renders Mr. Kang unable to perform his duties hereunder (as determined by the Company in its good faith judgment), (b) by Mr. Kang’s resignation, commencing from and after the first anniversary date of this Agreement, or any additional Option period exercised by the Company, upon prior written notice to the Company of ninety (90) days before the annual anniversary date of this Agreement, or (c) the Company for Cause. Termination of Mr. Kang’s employment shall be deemed for “Cause” upon: (i) the repeated failure or refusal of Mr. Kang to follow the lawful directives of the Company, or its designee (except due to sickness, injury or disabilities), after prior notice to Mr. Kang and a reasonable opportunity to cure by Mr. Kang for up to thirty (30) days, (ii) gross inattention to duty or any other willful, reckless or grossly negligent act (or omission to act) by Mr. Kang, which, in the good faith judgment of the Company, materially injures the Company, including the repeated failure to follow the policies and procedures of the Company, after prior written notice to Employee and a reasonable opportunity to cure by Mr. Kang of up to thirty (30) days, (iii) a material breach of this Agreement by Mr. Kang, after prior written notice to Mr. Kang and a reasonable opportunity to cure by Mr. Kang of up to thirty (30) days, (iv) the commission by Mr. Kang of a felony or other crime involving moral turpitude or the commission by Mr. Kang of an act of financial dishonesty against the Company or, (v) a proper business purpose of the Company, which shall be limited to the elimination of the position filled by Mr. Kang as a result of a material decrease in revenues and/or profits of the Company, but with other cost cutting measures and the termination of other employees being first considered and instituted as determined in the sole judgment of the Company prior to the termination of Mr. Kang; provided, however, that in the event the Company terminates Mr. Kang then (I) the scope of the non-compete shall be limited to the products and services offered by the Company as of the termination of Mr. Kang and (II) the Company shall pay to Mr. Kang a continuation of Gross Salary and benefits each month for the six (6) month period immediately following such termination.

 

Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation

 

During the last fiscal year, no member of the Compensation Committee had a relationship with us that required disclosure under Item 404 of Regulation S-K. During the past fiscal year, none of our executive officers served as a member of the board of directors or compensation committee, or other committee serving an equivalent function, of any entity that has one or more executive officers who served as members of our Board of Directors or our Compensation Committee. None of the members of our Compensation Committee is an officer or employee of our Company, nor have they ever been an officer or employee of our Company

 

Compensation Committee Report

 

Our Compensation Committee has reviewed and discussed the “Compensation Discussion and Analysis” contained in this Form 10-K with management. Based on our Compensation Committee’s review and discussions with management, our Compensation Committee recommended to our Board of Directors that the Compensation Discussion and Analysis be included in this Form 10-K.

 

James M. Ritter (Chair)

Morton S. Taubman

George W. Norwood

Otto J. Guenther

 

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ITEM 12.    SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners (Greater than 5% Holders)

 

The following table sets forth beneficial owners of more than 5% based on 81,721,763 outstanding shares of Common Stock as of March 9, 2015:

 

   Number of   Percent of 
   Shares of   Common Stock 
Names and Complete Mailing Address  Common Stock   Outstanding 
         
Nokomis Capital, L.L.C., and   8,770,093    10.7%(1)
Brett Hendrickson          
2305 Cedar Springs Rd., Suite 420          
Dallas, Texas 75201          

 

(1)Based on information provided in a Schedule 13G filed on January 12, 2015, Nokomis Capital, L.L.C. is a Texas limited liability company and Mr. Brett Hendrickson is the principal of Nokomis Capital, L.L.C. The Schedule 13G relates to shares purchased by Nokomis Capital through the accounts of certain private funds and managed accounts (collectively, the “Nokomis Accounts”). Nokomis Capital serves as the investment adviser to the Nokomis Accounts and may direct the vote and dispose of the shares held by the Nokomis Accounts. As the principal of Nokomis Capital, Mr. Hendrickson may direct the vote and disposition of the shares held by the Nokomis Accounts. Pursuant to Rule 16a-1, both Nokomis Capital and Mr. Hendrickson disclaim such beneficial ownership. Stock ownership amounts based on Form 4 filing on February 4, 2015.

 

Security Ownership of Directors and Executive Officers

 

The following table sets forth the number of shares of our Common Stock beneficially owned as of March 9, 2015 with respect to the beneficial ownership of Common Stock by each director, and each executive officer named in the Summary Compensation Table herein. In general, “beneficial ownership” includes those shares a director or executive officer has the power to vote or transfer, except as otherwise noted, and shares underlying warrants and stock options that are exercisable currently or within 60 days. The calculation of the percentage of outstanding shares is based on 81,721,763 shares outstanding as of March 9, 2015.

 

   Number of   Percent of 
Directors, Nominees  Shares of   Common Stock 
and Executive Officers  Common Stock (1)   Outstanding (1) 
         
Steve Komar (2)   2,112,803    2.6%
Morton Taubman (3)   62,000     *
James McCubbin (4)   1,875,203    2.3%
James Ritter (5)   90,500    *
Jin Kang (6)   2,937,010    3.6%
Otto Guenther (7)   62,000    *
George Norwood (8)   62,000    *
           
All directors and officers as a group (7 persons) (9)   7,201,516    8.8%

 

 

*Indicates ownership percentage is less than 1.0%.

 

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(1)  Assumes in the case of each shareholder listed above that all options held by such shareholder that are exercisable currently or within 60 days of March 9, 2015 were fully exercised by such shareholder, without the exercise of any warrants or options held by any other shareholders.

 

(2)  Includes (i) 1,319,700 shares owned directly by Mr. Komar (excludes 250,000 shares of unvested restricted stock awards not vesting within 60 days), and (ii) 793,103 shares held by SLK Diversified L.P., a limited partnership controlled by Mr. Komar, as a result of which such shares are held by Mr. Komar indirectly.

 

(3)  Includes 62,000 shares subject to exercisable options to purchase shares of Common Stock, consisting of (i) 12,000 shares that may be purchased at a price of $2.70 per share through March 10, 2016, pursuant to a director stock option granted on March 10, 2006 and (ii) 50,000 shares that may be purchased at a price of $0.54 per share through May 11, 2019, pursuant to a stock option granted on May 11, 2009.

 

(4)  Includes 1,875,203 shares owned directly by Mr. McCubbin (excludes 250,000 shares of unvested restricted stock awards not vesting within 60 days).

 

(5)  Includes (i) 65,500 shares owned directly by Mr. Ritter and (ii) 25,000 shares of Common Stock that may be purchased at a price of $0.54 per share through May 11, 2019, pursuant to a stock option granted on May 11, 2009.

 

(6)  Includes (i) 2,880,344 shares owned directly by Mr. Kang, and (ii) includes 56,666 earned and exercisable options and excludes 113,334 unearned options to purchase shares from the Company at a price of $0.57 per share until March 20, 2018, pursuant to a stock option granted on March 20, 2013.

 

(7)  Includes 62,000 shares subject to exercisable options to purchase shares Common Stock, consisting of (i) 12,000 shares that may be purchased at a price of $0.93 per share through August 15, 2017, pursuant to a director stock option granted on August 15, 2007 and (ii) 50,000 shares that may be purchased at a price of $0.54 per share through May 11, 2019, pursuant to a stock option granted on May 11, 2009.

 

(8)  Includes 62,000 shares subject to exercisable options to purchase shares Common Stock, consisting of (i) 12,000 shares that may be purchased at a price of $0.93 per share through August 15, 2017, pursuant to a director stock option granted on August 15, 2007 and (ii) 50,000 shares that may be purchased at a price of $0.54 per share through May 11, 2019, pursuant to a stock option granted on May 11, 2009.

 

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(9)  Includes the shares referred to as included in notes (2) through (8) above.

 

Equity Compensation Plan Information

 

The following table sets forth information as of December 31, 2014, with respect to the Company’s compensation plans under which its Common Stock is authorized for issuance:

 

   (a)   (b)   (c) 
           Number of Securities 
   Number of Securities       remaining available 
   to be issued upon   Weighted average   for future issuance 
   exercise of   exercise price of   (excluding securities 
Directors, Nominees  outstanding options,   outstanding options,   reflected in 
and Executive Officers  warrants and rights   warrants and rights   column (a) 
             
Equity Compensation Plans:               
                
Approved by security holders   2,791,601   $0.83    2,318,145 
                
Not approved by security holders   -   $-    - 
                
Total   2,791,601   $0.83    2,318,145 

 

ITEM 13.CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

 

A related person transaction is a consummated or currently proposed transaction in which the Company has been, is or will be a participant and the amount involved exceeds $120,000, and in which a related person (i.e., any director or executive officer or nominee for director, or any member of the immediate family of such person) has or will have a direct or indirect material interest.

 

The Company was not a participant in any related person transactions in the past two fiscal years and no such transactions are currently proposed.

 

Under the Company’s corporate governance principles (the “Corporate Governance Principles”), a majority of the Company’s Board will consist of independent directors. An “independent” director is a director who meets the NYSE MKT definition of independence and other applicable independence standards under SEC guidelines, as determined by the Board. The Company’s Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee conduct an annual review of the independence of the members of the Board and its Committees and report its findings to the full Board of Directors. Based on the report and recommendation of the Corporate Governance Committee, the Board has determined that each of the Company’s non-employee directors—Messrs. Taubman, Ritter, Guenther, and Norwood—satisfies the independence criteria (including the enhanced criteria with respect to members of the Audit Committee) set forth in the applicable NYSE MKT listing standards and SEC rules. Each Board Committee consists entirely of independent, non-employee directors.

 

Non-management members of the Board of Directors conduct at least two regularly-scheduled meetings per year without members of management being present. Mr. Ritter serves as the presiding director of such meetings. Following an executive session of non-employee directors, the presiding director may act as a liaison between the non-employee directors and the Chairman, provide the Chairman with input regarding agenda items for Board of Directors and Committee meetings, and coordinate with the Chairman regarding information to be provided to the non-employee directors in performing their duties.

 

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ITEM 14.  PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES

 

The following table sets forth fees paid to our principal accountants for the years ended December 31:

 

Service Type  2014   2013 
         
Audit and Quarterly Review Fees (1)  $174,864   $185,456 
           
Audit-Related Fees (2)   38,415    - 
           
Total  $213,279   $185,456 

 

(1) Audit and quarterly review fees for the annual audit and review of financial statements included in the Company’s quarterly filings, including reimbursable expenses.

(2) Audit-Related fees for other required regulatory filings including Form S-3 consents included in the Company’s filings, including reimbursable expenses.

 

Audit Committee Policies and Procedures For Pre-Approval of Independent Auditor Services

 

The following describes the Audit Committee’s policies and procedures regarding pre-approval of the engagement of the Company’s independent auditor to perform audit as well as permissible non-audit services for the Company.

 

For audit services and audit-related fees, the independent auditor will provide the Committee with an engagement letter during the March-May quarter of each year outlining the scope of the audit services proposed to be performed in connection with the audit of the current fiscal year. If agreed to by the Committee, the engagement letter will be formally accepted by the Committee at an Audit Committee meeting held as soon as practicable following receipt of the engagement letter. The independent auditor will submit to the Committee for approval an audit services fee proposal after acceptance of the engagement letter.

 

For non-audit services and other fees, Company management may submit to the Committee for approval (during May through September of each fiscal year) the list of non-audit services that it recommends the Committee engage the independent auditor to provide for the fiscal year. The list of services must be detailed as to the particular service and may not call for broad categorical approvals. Company management and the independent auditor will each confirm to the Audit Committee that each non-audit service on the list is permissible under all applicable legal requirements. In addition to the list of planned non-audit services, a budget estimating non-audit service spending for the fiscal year may be provided. The Committee will consider for approval both the list of permissible non-audit services and the budget for such services. The Committee will be informed routinely as to the non-audit services actually provided by the independent auditor pursuant to this pre-approval process.

 

To ensure prompt handling of unexpected matters, the Audit Committee delegates to its Chairman the authority to amend or modify the list of approved permissible non-audit services and fees. The Chairman will report any action taken pursuant to this delegation to the Committee at its next meeting.

 

All audit and non-audit services provided to the Company are required to be pre-approved by the Committee. The Chief Financial Officer of the Company will be responsible for tracking all independent auditor fees against the budget for such services and report at least annually to the Audit Committee.

 

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PART IV.

 

ITEM 15.EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

 

§Financial Statements and Financial Statement Schedule

 

Financial Statements:

 

Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

Report of Moss Adams LLP, Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2014 and 2013

 

Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Years Ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012

 

Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders’ Equity for the Years Ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012

 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flow for the Years Ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

All other schedules are omitted either because they are not applicable or not required, or because the required information is included in the financial statements or notes thereto

 

§Exhibits: The following exhibits are filed herewith or incorporated herein by reference:

 

2.1Share Sale and Purchase Agreement, dated as of May 1, 2014, by and among WidePoint Global Solutions, Inc., Gutteridge Limited and the shareholders of Soft-Ex Holdings Limited. (Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 2.1 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on May 7, 2014).

 

3.1Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation of WidePoint Corporation. (Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit A to the Registrant’s Definitive Proxy Statement, as filed on December 27, 2004.)

 

3.2Bylaws. (Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 3.6 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form S-4 (File No. 333-29833))

 

10.1Employment and Non-Compete Agreement, dated as of November 27, 2012, between the Company, WidePoint Corporation and Jin Kang. * (Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on November 27, 2012.)

 

10.2Debt Modification Agreement, dated September 16, 2011, by and among the Registrant, and its subsidiaries and Cardinal Bank (Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on October 5, 2011).

 

62
 

 

10.3$1,000,000 Subordinated Secured Promissory Note, dated as of December 31, 2011, between the Registrant and its subsidiaries and Avalon Global Solutions, Inc. (Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on January 5, 2012).

 

10.4$4,000,000 Commercial Term Loan Agreement, dated as of December 31, 2011, between the Registrant and its subsidiaries and Cardinal Bank. (Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibits 10.3 and 10.5 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on January 5, 2012).

 

10.5$8,000,000 Commercial Revolving Loan Agreement, dated as of December 31, 2011, between the Registrant and its subsidiaries and Cardinal Bank. (Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.4 and 10.6 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on January 5, 2012).

 

10.6Credit Security Agreement, dated as of December 31, 2011, between the Registrant and its subsidiaries and Cardinal Bank. (Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.7 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on January 5, 2012).

 

10.7Employment Agreement between WidePoint Corporation and John Atkinson, dated January 21, 2013 and amendment thereto (Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.9 to the Form 10-K filed on March 31, 2014.)*

 

10.8Employment Agreement between WidePoint Corporation and Steve L. Komar, dated August 13, 2010.* (Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, as filed on August 16, 2010)

 

10.9Employment Agreement between WidePoint Corporation and James McCubbin, dated August 13, 2010.* (Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, as filed on August 16, 2010)

 

10.10Amendment dated August 13, 2013 to Employment Agreement between WidePoint Corporation and Steve L. Komar.* (Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, as filed on August 14, 2013)

 

10.11Amendment dated August 13, 2013 to Employment Agreement between WidePoint Corporation and James McCubbin.* (Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, as filed on August 14, 2013)

 

10.12Amendment dated February 18, 2014 to Employment Agreement between WidePoint Corporation and Steve L. Komar.* (Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K, as filed on February 20, 2014)

 

10.13Amendment dated February 18, 2014 to Employment Agreement between WidePoint Corporation and James McCubbin.* (Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K, as filed on February 20, 2014)

 

10.14$1,000,000 Subordinated Unsecured Loan Note, dated May 1, 2014, by WidePoint Global Solutions, Inc. in favor of Gutteridge Limited. (Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on May 7, 2014).

 

63
 

 

10.15Deed of Indemnity, dated as of May 1, 2014, by and between WidePoint Global Solutions, Inc. and Gutteridge Limited. (Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on May 7, 2014).

 

10.16Employment Agreement, dated as of May 1, 2014, by and between Soft-ex Communications Limited and Ian Sparling. (Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on May 7, 2014).

 

10.17Amended and Restated 2008 Stock Incentive Plan.* (Incorporated herein by reference to Appendix I to the Company's Definitive Proxy Statement filed on November 24, 2009)

 

10.18Change in Terms Agreement dated June 27, 2014 between Cardinal Bank and the Company (Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Form 8-K filed on June 30, 2014)

 

10.19Change in Terms Agreement dated September 29, 2014 between WidePoint Corporation and its subsidiaries and Cardinal Bank (Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Form 8-K filed on September 30, 2014)

 

21Subsidiaries of WidePoint Corporation (Filed herewith).

 

23.1Consent of Moss Adams LLP (Filed herewith).

 

31.1Certification of Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (Filed herewith).

 

31.2Certification of Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (Filed herewith).

 

32Certification of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (Filed herewith).

 

101.Interactive Data Files

 

101.INS XBRL Instance Document

 

101.SCHXBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document

 

101.CALXBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document

 

101.DEFXBRL Taxonomy Definition Linkbase Document

 

101.LABXBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document

 

101.PREXBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

 

 

 

* Management contract or compensatory plan.

 

64
 

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

  WidePoint Corporation
     
Date: March 16, 2015 s/ STEVE L. KOMAR
    Steve L. Komar
    Chief Executive Officer
     
Date: March 16, 2015 /s/ JAMES T. MCCUBBIN
    James T. McCubbin
    Executive Vice President – Chief Financial Officer

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons, on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

Dated: March 16, 2015 /s/STEVE L. KOMAR
    Steve L. Komar
    Director and Chief Executive Officer
    (Principal Executive Officer)
     
Dated: March 16, 2015 /s/JAMES T. MCCUBBIN
    James T. McCubbin
    Director, Executive Vice President and
    Chief Financial Officer
    (Principal Financial and Accounting Officer)
     
Dated: March 16, 2015 /s/JAMES M. RITTER
    James M. Ritter
    Director
     
Dated: March 16, 2015 /s/MORTON S. TAUBMAN
    Morton S. Taubman
    Director
     
Dated: March 16, 2015 /s/OTTO GUENTHER
    Otto Guenther
    Director
     
Dated: March 16, 2015 /s/GEORGE NORWOOD
    George Norwood
    Director

 

65
 

 

INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

  Page
   
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm F-1
   
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2014 and 2013 F-2
   
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012 F-3
   
Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive (Loss) Income for the Years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012 F-4
   
Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for the Years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012 F-5
   
Consolidated Statements of Cashflows for the Years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012 F-6
   
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements F-8

 

 
 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

The Board of Directors and Stockholders

WidePoint Corporation

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of WidePoint Corporation and subsidiaries (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2014 and 2013, and the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2014. These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall consolidated financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of WidePoint Corporation and subsidiaries as of December 31, 2014 and 2013, and the consolidated results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2014, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), WidePoint Corporation and subsidiaries’ internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2014, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission and our report dated March 16, 2015 expressed an adverse opinion thereon.

 

/s/ Moss Adams LLP

 

Scottsdale, Arizona

March 16, 2015

 

F-1
 

 

WIDEPOINT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

   DECEMBER 31, 
   2014   2013 
         
ASSETS          
CURRENT ASSETS          
Cash and cash equivalents  $13,154,699   $- 
Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts  of $88,719 and $30,038 in 2014 and 2013, respectively   8,543,050    7,612,400 
Unbilled accounts receivable   5,547,416    1,561,030 
Inventories   37,025    61,338 
Prepaid expenses and other assets   426,736    533,944 
Income taxes receivable   25,984    763 
Deferred income taxes   18,584    - 
           
Total current assets   27,753,494    9,769,475 
           
NONCURRENT ASSETS          
Property and equipment, net   1,614,182    1,545,951 
Intangibles, net   5,992,992    3,613,271 
Goodwill   18,555,578    16,618,467 
Deferred income tax asset, net of current   -    4,407,630 
Deposits and other assets   161,994   120,046 
           
TOTAL ASSETS  $54,078,240   $36,074,840 
           
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY          
           
CURRENT LIABILITIES          
Line of credit advance  $-   $916,663 
Short term note payable   137,025    119,336 
Accounts payable   6,165,477    3,228,586 
Accrued expenses   5,980,110    4,407,286 
Deferred revenue   710,275    40,911 
Income taxes payable   12,574    217,982 
Deferred income taxes   -    700,743 
Current portion of long-term debt   2,184,016    1,150,455 
Current portion of deferred rent   9,274    78,525 
Current portion of capital lease obligations   76,597    45,125 
           
Total current liabilities   15,275,348    10,905,612 
           
NONCURRENT LIABILITIES          
Long-term debt, net of current portion   1,327,800    2,509,492 
Capital lease obligation, net of current portion   36,669    57,119 
Deferred rent, net of current portion   152,815    2,421 
Deferred revenue   56,977    82,494 
Deferred income taxes   447,811    - 
Deposits and other liabilities   1,964    1,964 
           
Total liabilities   17,299,384    13,559,102 
           
STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY          
Preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 10,000,000 shares authorized; 2,045,714 shares issued and none outstanding   -    - 
Common stock, $0.001 par value; 110,000,000 shares authorized; 81,656,763 and 63,907,357 shares issued  and outstanding, respectively   81,657    63,907 
Additional paid-in capital   92,661,000    69,867,491 
Accumulated other comprehensive (loss)   (147,515)   - 
Accumulated deficit   (55,816,286)   (47,415,660)
           
Total stockholders’ equity   36,778,856    22,515,738 
           
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity  $54,078,240   $36,074,840 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-2
 

 

WIDEPOINT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

Consolidated Statements of Operations

 

   YEARS ENDED 
   DECEMBER 31, 
   2014   2013   2012 
REVENUES  $53,316,210   $46,825,032   $55,782,742 
COST OF REVENUES (including amortization and depreciation of $1,462,505, $1,462,995, and $1,511,267, respectively)   39,802,293    34,713,471    41,920,161 
                
GROSS PROFIT   13,513,917    12,111,561    13,862,581 
                
OPERATING EXPENSES               
Sales and Marketing   3,432,602    3,125,867    2,741,799 
General and Administrative Expenses (including share-based compensation of $324,281, $227,035, $217,611, respectively, and gain on change in fair value of contingent obligation of $—, $1,250,000, and $900,000, respectively)   14,356,372    9,872,655    9,820,695 
Depreciation and Amortization   375,951    288,333    281,310 
                
Total Operating Expenses   18,164,925    13,286,855    12,843,804 
                
(LOSS) INCOME FROM OPERATIONS   (4,651,008)   (1,175,294)   1,018,777 
                
OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE)               
Interest Income   17,002    7,364    4,881 
Interest (Expense)   (186,796)   (175,358)   (294,244)
Other Income (Expense)   12,890    11,267    3,200 
                
Total Other Income (Expense)   (156,904)   (156,727)   (286,163)
                
(LOSS) INCOME BEFORE PROVISION FOR INCOME TAXES   (4,807,912)   (1,332,021)   732,614 
INCOME TAX (BENEFIT) PROVISION   3,592,714    362,764    (99,687)
                
NET (LOSS) INCOME  $(8,400,626)  $(1,694,785)  $832,301 
                
BASIC EARNINGS PER SHARE  $(0.115)  $(0.027)  $0.013 
                
BASIC WEIGHTED-AVERAGE SHARES OUTSTANDING   73,048,883    63,802,275    63,474,871 
                
DILUTED EARNINGS PER SHARE  $(0.115)  $(0.027)  $0.013 
                
DILUTED WEIGHTED-AVERAGE SHARES OUTSTANDING   73,048,883    63,802,275    63,758,632 

  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-3
 

 

WIDEPOINT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive (Loss) Income

 

   YEARS ENDED 
   DECEMBER 31, 
   2014   2013   2012 
             
NET (LOSS) INCOME  $(8,400,626)  $(1,694,785)  $832,301 
                
Other comprehensive (loss) income:               
Foreign currency translation adjustments, net of tax   (147,515)   -    - 
                
Other comprehensive loss   (147,515)   -    - 
                
Comprehensive (loss) income  $(8,548,141)  $(1,694,785)  $832,301 

  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-4
 

 


WIDEPOINT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders’ Equity

 

               Additional             
   Common Stock   Stock   Paid-In   Accumulated   Accumulated     
   Issued   Amount   Warrants   Capital   OCI   Deficit   Total 
                             
Balance, January 1, 2012   63,226,857   $63,227   $0   $69,326,705   $-   $(46,553,780)  $22,836,152 
                                    
Issuance of common stock — options exercises   525,000    525    -    50,074         604    51,203 
                                    
Issuance of common stock — restricted   -    -    -    87,143    -    -    87,143 
                                    
Stock compensation expense   -    -    -    130,468    -    -    130,468 
                                    
Net loss   -    -    -    -    -    832,301    832,301 
                                    
Balance, December 31, 2012   63,751,857   $63,752   $-   $69,594,390   $-   $(45,720,875)  $23,937,267 
                                    
Issuance of common stock — options exercises   155,500    155    -    46,066              46,221 
                                    
Issuance of common stock — restricted   -    -    -    87,143    -    -    87,143 
                                    
Stock compensation expense   -    -    -    139,892    -    -    139,892 
                                    
Net loss   -    -    -    -    -    (1,694,785)   (1,694,785)
                                    
Balance, December 31, 2013   63,907,357   $63,907   $-   $69,867,491   $-   $(47,415,660)  $22,515,738 
                                    
Issuance of common stock — options exercises   760,399    760    -    461,458    -    -    462,218 
                                    
Issuance of common stock — restricted   -    -    -    87,143    -    -    87,143 
                                    
Issuance of common stock — public offering   16,989,007    16,990         22,007,770    -    -    22,024,760 
                                    
Stock compensation expense   -    -    -    237,138    -    -    237,138 
                                    
Foreign currency translation — gain (loss)                       (147,515)        (147,515)
                                    
Net loss   -    -    -    -         (8,400,626)   (8,400,626)
                                    
Balance, December 31, 2014   81,656,763   $81,657   $-   $92,661,000   $(147,515)  $55,816,286  $36,778,856 

  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-5
 

 

WIDEPOINT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

 

   YEARS ENDED 
   DECEMBER 31, 
   2014   2013   2012 
             
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES               
Net loss  $(8,400,626)  $(1,694,785)  $832,301 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:               
Deferred income tax expense   3,693,521    113,491    (81,823)
Depreciation expense   496,908    395,358    400,154 
Provision for doubtful accounts   37,735    75,389    25,070 
Inventory write-downs   5,408    199,992    52,056 
Amortization of intangibles   1,341,548    1,355,970    1,392,423 
Amortization of deferred financing costs   7,880    8,728    3,088 
Share-based compensation expense   324,281    227,035    217,611 
Gain on change in fair value of contingent obligation   -    (1,250,000)   (900,000)
Loss on disposal of equipment   (2,556)   -    667 
Changes in assets and liabilities:               
Accounts receivable and unbilled receivables   (3,810,821)   652,997    570,883 
Inventories   66,630    25,590    (170,984)
Prepaid expenses and other current assets   317,500    (51,555)   132,481 
Other assets excluding deferred financing costs   (41,828)   (52,656)   10,735 
Accounts payable and accrued expenses   3,862,824    (1,438,975)   (1,155,681)
Income tax (payable) receivable   (442,456)   355,794    (138,575)
Deferred revenue and other liabilities   (43,494)   (75,481)   (189,656)
                
Net cash used in operating activities   (2,587,546)   (1,153,108)   1,000,750 
                
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES               
Proceeds from settlement of net working capital requirement   33,188    -    76,539 
Purchase of property and equipment   (262,737)   (512,986)   (316,833)
Software development costs   (138,781)   -    (132,437)
Business combination, net of cash acquired   (4,079,628)   -    - 
Proceeds from the sale of property and equipment   -    -    - 
                
Net cash used in investing activities   (4,447,958)   (512,986)   (372,731)
                
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES               
Advances on bank line of credit   11,973,106    1,989,259    3,031,063 
Repayments of bank line of credit advances   (12,889,769)   (1,072,596)   (3,031,063)
Issuance of long term debt   -    -    - 
Principal repayments of long term debt   (1,148,131)   (1,111,526)   (794,988)
Principal repayments under capital lease obligations   (52,278)   (42,878)   (53,963)
Debt issuance costs   (8,000)   -    (8,000)
Proceeds from public stock offering, net of offering costs   22,024,760    -    - 
Proceeds from exercise of stock options   462,218    46,221    51,203 
                
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities   20,361,906    (191,520)   (805,748)
                
Net effect of exchange rate on cash and equivalents   (171,703)   -    - 
                
NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH   13,154,699    (1,857,614)   (177,729)
                
CASH, beginning of period   -    1,857,614    2,035,343 
                
CASH, end of period  $13,154,699   $-   $1,857,614 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-6
 

 

WIDEPOINT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

   YEARS ENDED 
   DECEMBER 31, 
   2014   2013   2012 
             
SUPPLEMENTAL CASH FLOW INFORMATION               
Cash paid for interest  $167,899   $205,762   $216,824 
Cash paid for income taxes  $125,036   $10,774   $- 
                
NONCASH INVESTING AND FINANCING ACTIVITIES               
Subordinated unsecured seller financed note payable issued as consideration in the acquisition of Soft-ex Communications Ltd.  $1,000,000   $-   $- 
Insurance policies financed by short term notes payable  $181,068   $163,889   $150,793 
Acquisition of assets under capital lease obligation  $-   $-   $176,177 

  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-7
 

  

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

1.Organization and Nature of Operations

 

Organization

 

WidePoint Corporation (“WidePoint” or the “Company”) was incorporated in Delaware on May 30, 1997. The Company is a global provider of information technology (IT) based products, services, and solutions. The Company offers secure, cloud-based, enterprise-wide information technology-based solutions that enable commercial markets, and federal and state government organizations, to deploy fully compliant IT services in accordance with government-mandated regulations and advanced system requirements. The Company has sales and operational offices strategically located throughout the continental United States, Ireland, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. The Company’s principal executive and administrative headquarters is located in McLean, Virginia. See Note 3 for additional discussion regarding a recent business acquisition during the second quarter of 2014.

 

Nature of Operations

 

The Company has grown through the targeted acquisition of specialized IT companies that now provide a complementary suite of products and services for its Managed Mobility Solutions (MMS) offering. The Company’s MMS offers a portfolio of information technology based services and products with a set of streamlined mobile communications management, identity management, telecommunications data intelligence and consulting solutions that provide its customers with the ability to manage and protect their valuable communications assets and deploy compliant identity management solutions that provide secured virtual and physical access to restricted environments. Many of the Company’s solutions are accessible on-demand through cloud computing and provide customers with the ability to remotely manage their workforce mobility and identity management requirements in accordance with internal policies, the marketplace and the demands of its customers. The Company may authorize the use of discretionary operating capital to fund the development of MMS offerings, functionality and/or streamline the operation of its proprietary applications.

 

The Company’s operating results may vary significantly from quarter-to-quarter, due to revenues earned on contracts, the number of billable days in a quarter, the timing of the pass-through of other direct costs, the commencement and completion of contracts during any particular quarter, the schedule of the government agencies for awarding contracts, the term of each contract awarded and general economic conditions. A significant portion of the Company’s expenses, such as personnel and facilities costs, are fixed in the short term, successful contract performance and variation in the volume of activity as well as in the number of contracts commenced or completed during any quarter may cause significant variations in operating results from quarter to quarter.

 

2.Significant Accounting Policies

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements were prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) and the financial statement rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

F-8
 

 

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly owned subsidiaries. All significant inter-company amounts have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

Foreign Currency

 

Assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are translated into U.S. dollars based upon exchange rates prevailing at the end of each reporting period. The resulting translation adjustments, along with any related tax effects, are included in accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income, a component of stockholders’ equity. Translation adjustments are reclassified to earnings upon the sale or substantial liquidation of investments in foreign operations. Revenues and expenses are translated at the average month-end exchange rates during the year. Gains and losses related to transactions in a currency other than the functional currency, including operations outside the U.S. where the functional currency is the U.S. dollar, are reported net in the Company’s Consolidated Statements of Operations, depending on the nature of the activity. See Note 14 for additional information.

 

Segment Reporting

 

Segments are defined by authoritative guidance as components of a company in which separate financial information is available and is evaluated by the chief operating decision maker (CODM), or a decision making group, in deciding how to allocate resources and in assessing performance. Our CODM is our chief executive officer.

 

In fiscal 2012, the Company previously reported three operating segments: Managed Mobility Solutions, Cybersecurity Solutions, and Consulting and Support Services. Information technology solutions were historically segmented due to technological barriers which prevented delivery of an integrated technology solution to cover an end users mobility, security and network communications requirements. Over the last ten (10) years the proliferation of mobile computing drove the integration of our technology capabilities and solutions into a single MMS market. Our customers and the industry view our MMS market as a singular business and demand an integrated and scalable suite of information technology-based enterprise-wide solutions. The Company markets its workforce mobility technologies as a single MMS offering to all of its customers and prospects in a variety of industries with the primary goal of selling a complete solution. Our MMS offerings are set forth below:

 

§Telecom management services – Full life cycle management of wired and wireless assets.

 

§Mobile security management services – Full life cycle wired and wireless device access and application control management.

 

§Identity management services – Full life cycle wired and wireless (including cloud based services) authentication and information assurance services.

 

§Identity services – Device specific and individual digital certificates required for mobility and infrastructure access in the cloud or within a secured IT environment.

 

Services comprising the Company’s MMS offerings have similar client service approaches, delivery costs and operational risks and are led by a project manager and a cross-functional service delivery team comprised of employees across all subsidiaries to deliver the Company’s products and services to its customers.

 

F-9
 

  

The Company determined that its MMS business constitutes a single business activity and evaluates profitability on that basis and presents a single segment for purposes of financial reporting.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the U.S. requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. The more significant areas requiring use of estimates and judgment relate to revenue recognition, accounts receivable valuation reserves, ability to realize intangible assets and goodwill, ability to realize deferred income tax assets, fair value of certain financial instruments and the evaluation of contingencies and litigation. Management bases its estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Fair Value Measurements

 

Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date, based on the Company’s principal or, in the absence of a principal, most advantageous market for the specific asset or liability. GAAP provides for a three-level hierarchy of inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value, defined as follows:

 

Level 1 - Inputs that are quoted prices (unadjusted) for identical assets or liabilities in active markets that the entity can access.

 

Level 2 - Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly, for substantially the full term of the asset or liability, including:

 

§Quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets
§Quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active
§Inputs other than quoted prices that are observable for the asset or liability
§Inputs that are derived principally from or corroborated by observable market data by correlation or other means

 

Level 3 - Inputs that are unobservable and reflect the Company’s own assumptions about the assumptions market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability based on the best information available in the circumstances (e.g., internally derived assumptions surrounding the timing and amount of expected cash flows). The Company measured the fair value of contingent seller financed promissory notes presented on the consolidated balance sheets at fair value on a recurring basis using significantly unobservable inputs (Level 3) during the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012. See Note 4 for additional information regarding financial liabilities carried at fair value.

 

The Company monitors the market conditions and evaluates the fair value hierarchy levels at least quarterly. For any transfers in and out of the levels of the fair value hierarchy, the Company elects to disclose the fair value measurement at the beginning of the reporting period during which the transfer occurred. See Note 4 for financial assets and liabilities subject to fair value measurements.

 

F-10
 

  

Business Combinations

 

The Company identifies the individual assets acquired and liabilities assumed in connection with a business combination and purchase consideration in each business combination. The Company utilizes third party valuation professionals to estimate the initial fair value of significant assets acquired and liabilities assumed. The Company assigns provisional values to purchase consideration, assets acquired and liabilities assumed on the date of purchase and may revise these provisional values if fair value estimates prepared by outside qualified third party valuation are materially difference.

 

The Company estimates the fair value of each using an acceptable valuation methodology which may include an income, market and/or cost approach. The Company generally assesses the estimated fair value of contingent obligations using a probability weighted income approach (discounted cash flow) valuation technique which requires the use of observable and unobservable inputs. Fluctuations in the fair value of contingent obligations are impacted by two unobservable inputs, management’s estimate of the probability of the acquired company meeting the operating performance target and the estimated discount rate (a rate that approximates the Company’s weighted average cost of capital). Significant increases (decreases) in either of those inputs in isolation would result in a significantly higher (lower) fair value measurement. Fair value is assessed for contingent obligations on a quarterly basis until such contingencies have been resolved and any changes in fair value are recorded as a gain or loss on change in fair value of contingent obligations within general and administrative expense.

 

See Note 3 for a detailed description of material business combinations and see Note 4 for changes in fair value of assets and liabilities recorded in connection with material business combinations that are measured on a recurring basis.

 

Significant Customers and Concentration of Credit Risk

 

Significant Customers

 

The Company has historically derived a significant portion of its revenues from its federal government customer base due to the large size of individual awards. Customers representing ten percent or more of annual consolidated revenues are set forth in the table below for the years ended:

 

   YEARS ENDED 
   DECEMBER 31, 
   2014   2013   2012 
   As a % of   As a % of   As a % of 
Customer Name  Revenues   Revenues   Revenues 
                
Transportation Security Administration   17%   20%   19%
Department of Homeland Security (DHS)   20%   13%   15%

 

Customers representing ten percent or more of consolidated trade accounts receivable receivables are set forth in the table below as of December 31:

 

   DECEMBER 31, 
   2014   2013 
   As a % of   As a % of 
Customer Name  Receivables   Receivables 
           
Department of Homeland Security   20%   27%
Science Applications International Corporation   21%    

 

Due to the nature of the Company’s business and the relative size of certain contracts, which are entered into in the ordinary course of business, the loss of any single significant customer and/or a delay in the continuation of an existing or new contract award could have a material adverse effect on its results of operations.

 

F-11
 

  

Financial Instruments

 

Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to credit risk consist of cash and cash equivalents and accounts receivable.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company maintains interest-bearing cash deposits and short-term overnight investments with a large financial institution. The Company considers all highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less to be cash equivalents for purposes of these consolidated financial statements. Interest-bearing cash deposits are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) up to a maximum of $250,000. At December 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013, the Company had deposits in excess of FDIC limits of approximately $12,695,800 and $2,548,000, respectively.

 

Accounts Receivable

 

The Company enters into standard master contract vehicles or an individual purchase requisitions with federal and state governments and their agencies. Federal contracts are bid on and awarded based on a cost plus fixed fee or fixed award fee, firm fixed price or time and materials basis. Federal and state government customer orders are covered by a contract vehicle or master services agreement and specific goods and services are generally submitted through task orders or purchase requisitions under a master contract or under an individual purchase requisition.

 

The Company enters into standard contractual arrangements with corporations using a master service agreement and customized statement of work which outlines the product or services purchased, optional products and services and standard pricing based on volume or an hourly rate. Consulting services are charged based upon standard professional rates dependent upon level of expertise of the professionals involved. Also, the Company enters into fee arrangements for which the fees earned are based on a percentage of savings or other measures as may be determined in the applicable contract.

 

Credit is extended based on evaluation of a customer’s financial condition and, generally, collateral is not required. Accounts receivable are usually due within 30 to 60 days and are stated at amounts due from customers net of an allowance for doubtful accounts if deemed necessary. The Company determines its allowance by considering a number of factors, including the length of time accounts receivable are past due, the Company’s previous loss history, the customer’s current ability to pay its obligation to the Company, and the condition of the general economy and the industry as a whole. The Company writes off accounts receivable when they become uncollectible, and payments subsequently received on such receivables are credited to the allowance for doubtful accounts. The Company has not historically maintained a bad debt reserve for its federal government customers as it has not experienced material or recurring bad debt charges and the nature and size of the contracts has not necessitated the Company’s establishment of such a bad debt reserve.

 

Customer account balances outstanding longer than the contractual payment terms are reviewed for collectability and after 90 days are considered past due unless arrangements were made at the time of the transaction that specified different payment terms. Upon specific review and its determination that a bad debt reserve may be required, the Company will reserve such amount if it views the account as potentially uncollectable. Customer account balances outstanding longer than 120 days that have not been settled in accordance with contract terms and for which no firm payment commitments exist are placed with a third party collection agency and a reserve is established. The Company writes off accounts receivable after 180 days or earlier when they become uncollectible. Payments subsequently received on such receivables are credited to the allowance for doubtful accounts. If the accounts receivable has been written off and no allowance for doubtful accounts exist subsequent payments received are credited to bad debt expense.

 

F-12
 

  

Unbilled Accounts Receivable

 

Unbilled accounts receivable on time-and-materials contracts represent costs incurred and gross profit recognized near the period-end but not billed until the following period due to contractual terms or due to timing differences. Unbilled accounts receivable on fixed-price contracts predominantly consist of third party value added resale (VAR) of hardware and software products delivered but not invoiced at the end of the reporting period. To a lesser extent unbilled accounts receivable also consists of monthly managed services performed but not invoiced at the end of the reporting period. At December 31, 2014 and 2013 unbilled accounts receivable totaled approximately $5,547,400 and $1,561,000, respectively.

 

Inventories

 

Inventories consist of hardware components that will be used in custom identity management technology solutions and certain software licenses available for resale. Inventories are valued at the lower of cost, using first-in, first-out method, or market. The Company may record a write-down for inventories which have become obsolete or are in excess of anticipated demand or net realizable value. If future demand or market conditions for our products are less favorable than forecasted or if unforeseen technological changes negatively impact the utility of inventory, we may be required to record additional write-downs, which would adversely affect our gross profit. For the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013 the Company recorded inventory write-downs related to obsolete inventory of approximately $5,400 and $199,900, respectively, in the consolidated statements of operations within cost of revenues.

 

Advance Billings and Customer Payments

 

Deferred revenue arises from advanced customer billings as permitted under contractual arrangements or from advanced payments from customers for monthly managed services. Certain federal and state governments and their agencies may prepay for services and/or VAR transactions in advance. These advance payments are recorded as deferred revenue and recognized as services are performed and/or devices delivered. Amounts recorded as deferred revenue are released the monthly services are complete at the end of the month. Our revenue recognition policy is below under the caption “revenue recognition.”

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment (including assets acquired under capital lease arrangements) are stated at historical cost, net of accumulated depreciation and amortization. Depreciation and amortization expense is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives based upon the classification of the property and/or equipment or lease period for assets acquired under capital lease arrangements. The estimated useful lives of the assets are as follows:

 

F-13
 

  

    Estimated
    Useful Life
     
Land and building   20 years
Computer hardware and software   3 years
Furniture and fixtures   5 years
Mobile equipment   3 years

 

The Company assesses the recoverability of property and equipment by determining whether the depreciation of property and equipment over its remaining life can be recovered through projected undiscounted future cash flows. The amount of property and equipment impairment if any, is measured based on fair value and is charged to operations in the period in which property and equipment impairment is determined by management. As of December 31, 2014 and 2013, the Company’s management has not identified any material impairment of its property and equipment.

 

Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

 

The Company accounts for goodwill and other indefinite-lived intangible assets in accordance with ASC Topic 350 “Intangibles”. Under ASC Topic 350, goodwill and certain indefinite-lived intangible assets are not amortized but are subject to an annual impairment test during the fourth quarter of each year, and between annual tests if indicators of potential impairment exist. The Company has elected to perform this review annually on December 31st of each calendar year. See Note 8 to the consolidated financial statements for additional discussion about annual impairment testing.

 

Included within other intangible assets are software development costs. The Company capitalizes costs related to software and implementation in connection with its internal use software systems including its Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) certificate issuance database and application. For software development costs (or “internally developed intangible assets”) related to software products for sale, lease or otherwise marketed, significant development costs are capitalized from the point of demonstrated technological feasibility until the point in time that the product is available for general release to customers. Once the product is available for general release, capitalized costs are amortized based on units sold, or on a straight-line basis generally over a six-year period or such other such shorter period as may be required.

 

Revenue Recognition Principles

 

The Company has a standard internal process that is used to determine whether all required criteria for revenue recognition have been met. A summary of the Company’s specific revenue recognition policies are as follows:

 

§Expense Management: Telecommunications expense management and device management services are delivered on a monthly basis based on a standard fixed pricing scale per user or device or other service utilization metric. Managed services are not interdependent and there are no undelivered elements in these arrangements. Revenue is recognized upon the completion of the delivery of monthly managed services. The Company also offers invoice management and payment services and resells third party products and services, which may subject the Company to credit risk as it is responsible for the payment of multiple billable arrangements by and between its customer and various carriers. The Company recognizes revenues and related costs on a gross basis for these arrangements as it has discretion in choosing providers, rate plans, hardware and devices provided to its customers. For arrangements in which the Company does not have such credit risk, it recognizes revenues and related costs on a net basis. This service is broadly classified as a managed service.

 

F-14
 

 

 

§Security: The Company issues its proprietary PKI identity credentialing software certificates to individuals or as an enterprise solution under which the customer issues the individual certificates. Certificates issued have a fixed life and cannot be modified or reissued. There is no obligation to provide post contract services in relation to certificates issued. Revenue is recognized from the sales of credentials to an individual or as an enterprise solution upon issuance; provided there are no other additional deliverables. Cost of Revenues includes general infrastructure support costs to maintain the continued issuance of credentials. This service is broadly classified as a managed service.

 

§Software: The Company offers telecommunications expense management software under a perpetual and term license.

  

  oPerpetual License - Revenue from software licenses which are sold as a perpetual license and which do not involve the significant production, modification or customization of the software are recognized when the software is delivered. Where an arrangement to deliver software involves significant production, modification or customization, the software revenue is not recognized until such time as the software has been accepted by the client. Implementation fees are recognized once the software has been delivered. Maintenance services, if contracted, are recognized ratably over the term of the maintenance agreement, generally twelve months.

  

  oTerm License - Revenue from software licenses which are sold as term licenses, which do not involve the significant production, modification or customization of the software are recognized evenly over the license term once the software has been delivered. Where an arrangement to deliver software involves significant production, modification or customization, software sold as a term license is recognized ratably over the license term from the date the software is accepted by the client.

  

§User Support: The Company offers call centers with 24x7 emergency support and expert technical support which is delivered on a monthly basis based on a standard fixed pricing scale per ticket, user or device or other service utilization metric. Revenue is recognized upon the completion of the delivery of monthly managed services. This service is broadly classified as a managed service.

 

§Policies: Services performed include policy and contract permission based audits, accounts payable audits, and compliance reviews which are performed on a time and materials basis and contingent fee arrangement. Revenue on time and material arrangements is recognized to the extent of billable rates times hours delivered plus material and other reimbursable costs incurred to deliver consulting services. Revenue on contingent-fee arrangements are recognized upon customer acceptance of proposed billing. This service is broadly classified as a managed service.

 

§Consulting: The Company provides professional services on a project basis determined by our customers’ specific requirements. The Company provides a variety of telecommunication management consulting services, traditional information technology and network consulting and security assurance services and charges a fee for time and materials incurred or a contingent-fee based on expected savings or other metric determined. This service is broadly classified as a professional service.

 

F-15
 

  

Income Taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes in accordance with authoritative guidance which requires that deferred tax assets and liabilities be computed based on the difference between the financial statement and income tax bases of assets and liabilities using the enacted marginal tax rate. The guidance requires that the net deferred tax asset be reduced by a valuation allowance if, based on the weight of available evidence, it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the net deferred tax asset will not be realized. The Company recognizes the impact of an uncertain tax position taken or expected to be taken on an income tax return in the financial statements at the amount that is more likely than not to be sustained upon audit by the relevant taxing authority. An uncertain income tax position will not be recognized in the financial statements unless it is more likely than not of being sustained upon audit by the relevant taxing authority.

 

Basic and Diluted Earnings Per Share (EPS)

 

Basic EPS includes no dilution and is computed by dividing net income by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding for the period. Diluted EPS includes the potential dilution that could occur if securities or other contracts to issue common and restricted stock were exercised or converted into common and restricted stock. The number of incremental shares from assumed conversions of stock options and unvested restricted stock awards included in the calculation of diluted EPS was calculated using the treasury stock method. See Note 13 to the consolidated financial statements for computation of EPS.

 

Employee Stock-Based Compensation

 

The Company accounts for stock-based employee compensation arrangements under provisions of ASC 718-10. The Company recognizes the cost of employee stock awards granted in exchange for employee services based on the grant-date fair value of the award using a Black-Scholes option-pricing model, net of expected forfeitures. Those costs are recognized ratably over the vesting period. Each stock option has an exercise price equal to the market price of the Company’s common stock on the date of grant and a contractual term of 10 years for grants issued prior to fiscal 2007 and 7 years for grants issued after fiscal 2007 from the date of grant. Stock options generally vest over 3-years from the date of grant. See Note 12 to the consolidated financial statements for additional information about stock based compensation programs.

 

Non-Employee Stock-Based Compensation

 

The Company accounts for stock-based non-employee compensation arrangements using the fair value recognition provisions of ASC 505-50, “Equity-Based Payments to Non-Employees” (formerly known as FASB Statement 123, Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation and “Emerging Issues Task Force” EITF 96-18, Accounting for Equity Instruments That Are Issued to Other Than Employees for Acquiring, or in Conjunction with Selling, Goods or Services).

 

Accounting Standards Update

 

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, which requires an entity to recognize the amount of revenue to which it expects to be entitled for the transfer of promised goods or services to customers. The ASU will replace most existing revenue recognition guidance in U.S. GAAP when it becomes effective. The new standard is effective on January 1, 2017. Early application is not permitted. The standard permits the use of either the retrospective or modified retrospective (cumulative effect) transition method. The Company is evaluating the effect that ASU 2014-09 may have on its consolidated financial statements and related disclosures. The Company has neither selected a transition method nor determined the effect of the standard on its ongoing financial reporting.

 

F-16
 

  

In June 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued ASU 2014-12, Compensation – Stock Compensation, which clarifies that share-based awards that include a performance target that affects vesting and that could be achieved after the requisite service period be treated as a performance condition and not reflected in estimating the grant-date fair value of the award. Compensation cost associated with the performance condition should be recognized in the period in which it becomes probable that the performance target will be achieved and should represent the compensation cost attributable to the period(s) for which the requisite service has already been rendered. The new standard is effective for annual periods and interim periods within those annual periods beginning after December 15, 2015. Early application is permitted. The standard permits application either (a) prospectively to all awards granted or modified after the effective date or (b) retrospectively to all awards with performance targets that are outstanding as of the beginning of the earliest annual period presented in the financial statements and to all new or modified awards thereafter. The Company is evaluating the effect that ASU 2014-12 may have on our consolidated financial statements, shared-based awards and related disclosures. The Company has neither selected a transition method nor determined the effect of the standard on its ongoing financial reporting.

 

3.Business Combinations

 

Soft-ex Communications Ltd.

 

On May 1, 2014, WidePoint Global Solutions, Inc. (“WGS”), a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company entered into a Share Sale and Purchase Agreement (the “Agreement”), with Gutteridge Limited (“Gutteridge”), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Soft-Ex Holdings Limited (“SHL”), and the shareholders of Soft-Ex Holdings Limited, pursuant to which WGS purchased all of the outstanding equity of Soft-ex Communications Limited (“SCL”). As a result of this transaction, SCL became a wholly-owned subsidiary of WidePoint. WidePoint acquired all of the outstanding equity of SCL for $6.0 million. The purchase price for the outstanding equity of SCL consisted of (i) the payment at closing of cash in the amount of $5 million, subject to a post-closing net working capital adjustment, and (ii) the delivery of a contingent subordinated unsecured loan note in the principal amount of $1.0 million (the “Note”).

 

WidePoint’s long term strategic objective of expanding its services and presence outside of the United States was launched with the acquisition of SCL. SCL is a leading supplier of telecom data intelligence services offered as a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) solution that provides unique online data intelligence for Communication Service Providers (CSPs) and their enterprise customers for fixed, mobile, and IP/PABX communications. The addition of SCL complements the Company’s MMS offering and provides access to global CSPs and their customers and partners in over 90 countries throughout European and Middle Eastern markets.

 

SCL’s principal executive and administrative office headquarters is in Dublin, Ireland. SCL has two operating subsidiaries, Soft-Ex BV and Soft-Ex UK Limited, which maintain offices and operations in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, respectively. SCL has been in business since 1989.

 

The Company utilized the assistance of a third party valuation expert to estimate the fair value of the assets acquired and the liabilities assumed and the related allocations of purchase consideration. The excess of purchase price over the net tangible and intangible assets has been recorded as goodwill.

 

F-17
 

  

Purchase Consideration

 

The following table sets forth the provisional fair value of consideration paid in connection with acquisition of SCL as of May 1, 2014:

 

    Fair Value 
      
Cash consideration  $             5,000,000(1)
Contingent subordinated unsecured loan note payable consideration   1,000,000(2) 
Net working capital escrow adjustment to consideration paid   (33,188)(3) 
      
Fair value of consideration paid  $5,966,812 

 

(1) The Company used operating cash on hand of $5.0 million, of which $4.35 million was released to the seller upon closing of the transaction and the remainder was delivered into escrow. Under the terms of the escrow agreement, the funds shall be released (subject to satisfaction of the terms of the escrow agreement) in two amounts with the first release of $0.15 million on or about May 1, 2015 and the second release of $0.5 million on or about August 1, 2015. The release of funds held in escrow is subject to adjustment based on final net working capital as described in (3) below.

 

(2) The Company issued a subordinated unsecured loan Note in the principal amount of $1.0 million to satisfy the remainder of the purchase price. This is a US dollar denominated obligation. The likelihood of the loan Note being settled at an amount less than the face value is considered remote based on revenue performance achieved through the end of the current fiscal year. The Note accrues interest at the annual rate of 3% and provides for a lump sum payment of principal and interest on May 31, 2015; provided however that in the event that SCL fails to generate gross revenue for the three (3) months ending April 30, 2015 that is at least equal to 75% of the gross revenue generated by SCL for the three (3) months immediately preceding the acquisition of SCL, then the full face value of the Note shall be abrogated and all obligations of WGS under the Note shall be cancelled and waived.

 

(3) On October 21, 2014, a final determination of net working capital resulted in a deficiency of €26,670 ($33,188 USD) reduced total purchase consideration.

 

Transaction Costs

 

The Company incurred acquisition related due diligence, legal and accounting and transaction costs (including Irish stamp taxes and other processing costs) in connection with acquisition of SCL of approximately $250,300. These transaction-related costs were expensed as incurred and reflected in general and administrative expense in the consolidated statements of operations for the periods presented.

 

F-18
 

  

Fair Value of Assets Acquired and Liabilities Assumed

 

The following table summarizes the fair values of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed in connection with acquisition of SCL as of May 1, 2014:

 

Cash  $920,372 
Trade receivables   1,294,573 
Other current assets   276,443 
Property and equipment   333,650 
Developed technology   663,936 
Channel partners   2,628,080 
Tradenames and trademarks   290,472 
Other assets   1,687 
Accounts payable and accrued expenses   (1,864,888)
Promissory note payable   (447,811)
Capital lease obligation   (66,813)
      
Total identifiable net assets acquired  $4,029,701 
      
Goodwill   1,937,111 
      
Total purchase price  $5,966,812 

 

Employment Agreements

 

In connection with acquisition of SCL, the Company entered into an employment agreement Ian Sparling, the Chief Executive Officer of SCL (the “Employment Agreement”), for Mr. Sparling to continue to serve as the Chief Executive Officer of SCL. The Employment Agreement provides for an annual base salary of €175,000 ($241,500). In addition, Mr. Sparling shall be eligible to receive bonus compensation of up to 50% of his annual salary. Mr. Sparling will also receive an annual automobile allowance in the amount €16,500 ($22,800) and SCL will contribute up to €15,000 ($20,700) to SCL's pension plan. As of December 31, 2014, Mr. Sparling continued to be employed by the Company.

 

Supplemental Unaudited Pro Forma Information

 

The accompanying unaudited pro forma condensed consolidated financial information were prepared in accordance with the acquisition method of accounting. The pro forma adjustments presented herein are preliminary, and do not reflect estimated amortization resulting from intangible assets, and may not reflect any final purchase price adjustments made. As the final fair value calculations are being prepared, increases or decreases in the fair value of relevant balance sheet amounts will result in adjustments, which may result in material differences from the information presented herein.

 

F-19
 

 

 

The following unaudited pro forma condensed consolidated statements of operations of WidePoint for each of the three years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012 have been prepared as if the acquisition of SCL had occurred at January 1, 2012 (unaudited):

 

   DECEMBER 31, 
   2014   2013   2012 
   (a)   (a)   (a) 
   (Unaudited) 
Revenues, net  $55,255,000   $52,570,000   $62,007,000 
Net (loss) income  $(8,822,000)  $(1,160,000)  $2,018,000(b)
Basic (loss) earnings per share  $(0.121)  $(0.018)  $0.032 
Diluted (loss) earnings per share  $(0.121)  $(0.018)  $0.032 

 

(a) To reflect on a pro forma basis unaudited consolidated financial information for the three years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012 for WidePoint. SCL’s most recently completed fiscal year end was April 30, 2014 which differs from WidePoint’s December 31 year end. Subsequent to the acquisition SCL changed its fiscal year end to December 31st. The unaudited financial information presented herein were derived from historical internally prepared financial statements for SCL and WidePoint’s Form 10-K audited financial statements. SCL’s financial statements are prepared in accordance with Irish GAAP, as such additional adjustments were made to convert SCL Irish GAAP presentation to a US GAAP presentation to align with WidePoint’s accounting policies. SCL’s reporting currency unit is the Euro. SCL’s US GAAP unaudited historical statement of operations for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012 were translated into WidePoint’s reporting currency using an average USD/EURO rate of $1.3293, $1.3279, and $1.2856, respectively.

 

(b) As more fully described above under “purchase consideration”, in conjunction with the share sale and purchase agreement with SCL, WidePoint issued a subordinated unsecured loan Note in the principal amount of $1.0 million. Pro forma interest expense was calculated for this Note under the assumption that the probability of failing to generate adequate gross revenues is considered remote at this time based on projection available at the time of the transaction. Pro forma interest expense adjustments included for the year ended December 31, 2012 was approximately $30,000 to reflect total interest paid over the 1 year subordinated unsecured loan note.

 

Avalon Global Solutions, Inc.

 

On December 30, 2011, the Company together with its wholly-owned subsidiary, WidePoint Solutions Corp. (WSC), entered into an Asset Purchase Agreement (“APA”) with Avalon Global Solutions (AGS), pursuant to which WSC acquired certain assets and assumed certain liabilities of AGS. Total purchase consideration paid was approximately $11.5 million, consisting of $3.5 million in cash, $4.0 million in bank loan proceeds, $1.0 million subordinated seller promissory note and a contingent subordinated seller promissory note (“contingent consideration”) with a fair value of $3.0 million as of the acquisition date. In 2012, the Company finalized it fair value accounting and determined the estimated fair value of contingent consideration to be approximately $2.15 million, which revised purchase consideration from $11.5 million to $10.7 million and thereby reduced goodwill in connection with this business combination by approximately $850,000. In 2013, the Company remeasured the fair value of contingent consideration at zero, which revised purchase consideration from $10.7 million to $8.5 million. During the year ended December 31, 2013, the Company recognized a non-cash contingent gain on change in fair value of approximately $1,250,000 and reflected in general and administrative expense in the consolidated statements of operations for the year ended December 31, 2013.

 

F-20
 

  

See Note 4 for changes in fair value of assets and liabilities recorded in connection with material business combinations that are measured on a recurring basis.

 

The Company did not consummate any business combinations during the year ended December 31, 2013.

 

4.Fair Value Measurements

 

The consolidated financial statements include financial instruments for which the fair market value may differ from amounts reflected on a historical basis.

 

Financial Liabilities Carried at Fair Value

 

The Company reports contingent seller financed promissory notes at fair value on the consolidated balance sheets under the caption of long term debt. The Company assesses the estimated fair value of the contingent seller financed promissory note (“contingent consideration”) using a probability weighted income approach (discounted cash flow) valuation technique. When preparing discounted cash flow models under the income approach, the Company uses internal forecasts to estimate future cash flows. The Company’s internal forecasts are developed using observable (Level 2) and unobservable (Level 3) inputs.

 

The Company uses the expected weighted average cost of capital, estimated using a capital asset pricing model, to discount future cash flows. The Company’s cost of equity estimate is developed using a combination of observable (Level 2) and unobservable (Level 3) inputs with appropriate adjustments that take into consideration our risk profile and other factors deemed appropriate. The Company believes the discount rates used appropriately reflect the risks and uncertainties associated with the probability of payout and market conditions generally and specifically in the Company’s internally developed forecasts.

 

Fair value is assessed on a quarterly basis and any changes in estimated fair value are recorded as a non-operating change in fair value of contingent consideration in the consolidated statement of operations. Fluctuations in the fair value of contingent consideration are impacted by two unobservable inputs, management’s estimate of the probability (which are greater than 75%) of the acquired company meeting the operating performance target and the estimated discount rate (a rate that approximates the Company’s weighted average cost of capital). Significant increases (decreases) in either of those inputs in isolation would result in a significantly higher (lower) fair value measurement. Generally, a change in the assumption used for the probability of meeting the performance target is accompanied by a directionally similar change in the fair value of contingent consideration liability, whereas a change in assumption used for the estimated discount rate is accompanied by a directionally opposite change in the fair value of contingent consideration liability.

 

F-21
 

  

Changes in the fair value measurement of contingent seller financed promissory note using significant unobservable inputs classified as Level 3 and valuation method used to estimate fair values are set forth below for the years ended:

 

    YEARS ENDED  
    DECEMBER 31,  
    2014     2013     2012  
                   
Balance, Beginning of Period   $ -     $ 1,250,000     $ 2,150,000  
                         
Total additions for the period:                  
                         
Fair value of SCL contingent obligation (see Notes 3 and 9) (1)     1,000,000       -       -  
                         
Total gains or losses for the period:                        
                         
Non-cash gain on change in fair value of AGS contingent obligation included in general and administrative expense (2)     -       (1,250,000 )     (900,000 )
                         
Balance, End of Period   $ 1,000,000     $ -     $ 1,250,000  

 

(1)Management determined the fair value of its SCL contingent obligation based on a probability weighted discounted cash flow valuation technique. The potential probability of not paying out contingent consideration is considered remote. Contingent consideration has been classified as short term and included in the caption "current portion of long term debt" on the consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2014.

 

(2)Management determined the fair value of its AGS contingent obligation based on a probability weighted discounted cash flow valuation technique. The potential probability for payout of contingent consideration is considered remote during the year ended December 31, 2013. On April 15, 2014, the Company formally cancelled the contingent seller financed promissory note.

 

The Company monitors applicable market conditions and evaluates the fair value hierarchy levels as they pertain to the Company at least quarterly. For any transfers in and out of the levels of the fair value hierarchy, the Company elects to disclose the fair value measurement at the beginning of the reporting period during which the transfer occurred. There were no transfers into or out of Level 3 for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 or 2012. At December 31, 2014, all of the Company’s assets and liabilities are classified as Level 1.

 

Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities Carried at Other Than Fair Value

 

The Company’s financial instruments include cash equivalents, accounts receivable, short and long-term debt (except for contingent promissory notes). The carrying values of cash equivalents and accounts receivable approximate their fair value because of the short maturity of these instruments and past evidence indicates that these instruments settle for their carrying value. The carrying amounts of the Company’s bank borrowings under its credit facility approximate fair value because the interest rates reflect current market rates.

 

5. Accounts Receivable and Unbilled Accounts Receivables

 

Accounts receivable consist of the following:

 

   DECEMBER 31, 
   2014   2013 
         
Commercial  $5,328,988   $2,782,179 
Government   3,302,781    4,860,259 
Gross accounts receivable   8,631,769    7,642,438 
Less: allowances for doubtful accounts   (88,719)   (30,038)
           
Accounts receivable, net  $8,543,050   $7,612,400 

 

F-22
 

 

For the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, the Company had no material recoveries of accounts receivable for which an allowance had been previously established.

 

Unbilled accounts receivable consist of the following:

 

   DECEMBER 31, 
   2014   2013 
         
Commercial  $550,590   $435,230 
Government   4,996,826    1,125,800 
           
Unbilled accounts receivable  $5,547,416   $1,561,030 

 

6. Property and Equipment

 

Major classes of property and equipment (includes equipment and automobile capital leases) consisted of the following:

 

   DECEMBER 31, 
   2014   2013 
         
Land and building  $677,054   $677,054 
Computer hardware and software   2,824,340    2,052,280 
Furniture and fixtures   295,485    218,939 
Leasehold improvements   547,087    368,596 
Automobile   295,844    2,400 
Gross property and equipment   4,639,810    3,319,269 
Less: accumulated depreciation and amortization   (3,025,628)   (1,773,318)
           
Property and equipment, net  $1,614,182   $1,545,951 

 

For the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, depreciation expense recorded was approximately $496,900, $395,400 and $400,160, respectively. For the year ended December 31, 2014 and 2013 there were no material disposals of equipment. For the year ended December 31, 2012 there were disposals of fully depreciated equipment with gross historical cost and accumulated depreciation of approximately $206,900 and $206,200, respectively. For the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012 there were no material sales of property and equipment.

 

Capital Leases

 

The gross value of assets under capital leases at December 31, 2014 and 2013 were approximately $548,000 and $477,500, respectively. For the year ended December 31, 2014 and 2013 there were no capital lease acquisitions, expiration or disposals of equipment leases. For the year ended December 31, 2012 we entered into an equipment capital lease agreement with a net present value of approximately $176,200. For the year ended December 31, 2012 there were disposals of certain expired equipment leases with a gross value and accumulated depreciation of approximately $130,700, respectively. Depreciation expense for leased equipment for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012 was approximately $72,100, $58,700 and $66,700, respectively, and accumulated depreciation at December 31, 2014 and 2013 was $481,000 and $408,900, respectively. Total net book value of assets under capital leases at December 31, 2014 and 2013 was approximately $67,000 and $68,600, respectively.

 

F-23
 

 

7. Intangible Assets

 

The Company’s intangible assets are comprised of purchased intangibles consisting of customer relationships, channel relationships, telecommunications software, trade names and trademarks and non-compete agreements. The Company’s intangible assets also include internally developed software used in the sales and delivery of its MMS offering. The following table summarizes purchased and internally developed intangible assets subject to amortization as follows:

 

    DECEMBER 31, 2014  
                        Weighted  
                        Average  
    Gross Carrying     Accumulated       Net Book     Amortization  
    Amount     Amortization       Value     Period  
                       
Customer Relationships   $ 2,890,000     $ (1,652,500 )     $ 1,237,500       5.5  
Channel Relationships     3,168,080       (440,804 )       2,727,276       13.5  
Telecommunications Software     3,113,936       (1,528,374 )       1,585,562       2.7  
Cybersecurity Software     271,219       (134,377 )       136,842       3.0  
Trade Name and Trademarks     515,472       (209,660 )       305,812       9.0  
Non-Compete Agreements     780,000       (780,000 )       -       5.0  
                                   
    $ 10,738,707     $ (4,745,715 )     $ 5,992,992        

 

    DECEMBER 31, 2013  
                        Weighted  
                        Average  
    Gross Carrying     Accumulated       Net Book     Amortization  
    Amount     Amortization       Value     Period  
                           
Customer Relationships   $ 2,890,000     $ (1,405,000 )     $ 1,485,000       6.0  
Channel Relationships     540,000       (216,000 )       324,000       4.0  
Telecommunications Software     2,450,000       (1,089,667 )       1,360,333       4.0  
Cybersecurity Software     669,171       (530,486 )       138,685       2.0  
Trade Name and Trademarks     225,000