10-K 1 sprint201010k.htm FORM 10-K WebFilings | EDGAR view
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K
x
 
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2010
or
o
 
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from              to  
   
Commission file number 1-04721
SPRINT NEXTEL CORPORATION
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
KANSAS
48-0457967
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 
 
6200 Sprint Parkway, Overland Park, Kansas
66251
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip Code)
Registrant's telephone number, including area code: (800) 829-0965
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
Title of each class
 
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
 
Series 1 common stock, $2.00 par value
 
New York Stock Exchange
Guarantees of Sprint Capital Corporation 6.875% Notes due 2028
 
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  x    No   o
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes o    No   x
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No   o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x    No   o
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendments to this Form 10-K.  o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
 
Large accelerated filer
x
Accelerated filer
o
Non-accelerated filer (Do not check if smaller reporting company)
o
Smaller reporting company
o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.)    Yes  o    No   x
Aggregate market value of voting and non-voting common stock equity held by non-affiliates at June 30, 2010 was $12,633,223,479
 
COMMON SHARES OUTSTANDING AT FEBRUARY 18, 2011:
 
VOTING COMMON STOCK
 
Series 1
2,990,318,170
 
Documents incorporated by reference
Portions of the registrant's definitive proxy statement filed under Regulation 14A promulgated by the Securities and Exchange Commission under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, which definitive proxy statement is to be filed within 120 days after the end of registrant's fiscal year ended December 31, 2010, are incorporated by reference in Part III hereof.
 
 
 


SPRINT NEXTEL CORPORATION
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
 
Page
Reference  
Item
PART I
 
1.
1A.
1B.
2.
3.
4.
 
 
 
 
PART II
 
5.
6.
7.
7A.
8.
9.
9A.
9B.
 
 
 
 
PART III
 
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
 
 
 
 
PART IV
 
15.
See pages 20 and 21 for “Executive Officers of the Registrant.”
 
 


SPRINT NEXTEL CORPORATION
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K
PART I
 
 
 
Item 1.    
Business
OVERVIEW
Sprint Nextel Corporation, incorporated in 1938 under the laws of Kansas, is mainly a holding company, with its operations primarily conducted by its subsidiaries. Our Series 1 voting common stock trades on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) under the symbol “S.” Sprint Nextel Corporation and its subsidiaries (“Sprint,” “we,” “us,” “our” or the “Company”) is a communications company offering a comprehensive range of wireless and wireline communications products and services that are designed to meet the needs of individual consumers, businesses, government subscribers and resellers. Our operations are organized to meet the needs of our targeted subscriber groups through focused communications solutions that incorporate the capabilities of our wireless and wireline services. We are the third largest wireless communications company in the United States based on the number of wireless subscribers, one of the largest providers of wireline long distance services and one of the largest carriers of Internet traffic in the nation. Our services are provided through our ownership of extensive wireless networks, an all-digital global long distance network and a Tier 1 Internet backbone.
We offer wireless and wireline voice and data transmission services to subscribers in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands under the Sprint corporate brand which includes our retail brands of Sprint®, Nextel®, Boost Mobile®, Virgin Mobile®, Assurance Wireless and Common Cents SM on networks that utilize third generation (3G) code division multiple access (CDMA), national push-to-talk integrated Digital Enhanced Network (iDEN), or internet protocol (IP) technologies. We also offer fourth generation (4G) services utilizing Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMAX) technology through our mobile virtual network operator (MVNO) wholesale relationship with Clearwire Corporation and its subsidiary Clearwire Communications LLC (together "Clearwire"). Sprint 4G is currently available in 71 markets reaching more than 110 million people as of the end of 2010. We utilize these networks to offer our wireless and wireline subscribers differentiated products and services whether through the use of a single network or a combination of these networks.
Our Business Segments
Sprint operates two reportable segments: Wireless and Wireline. For information regarding our segments, see “Part II, Item 7 Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and also refer to note 14 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
Wireless
We provide certain wireless services on our 3G network and our national push-to-talk network and 4G services through our MVNO wholesale relationship with Clearwire. We offer wireless services on a postpaid and prepaid payment basis to retail subscribers and also on a wholesale basis, which includes the sale of wireless services to resellers and affiliates. We support the open development of applications and content on our network platforms. We also enable a variety of third-party providers, location-based services and business and consumer product providers through our open-device initiative, also known as our machine-to-machine initiative. The machine-to-machine initiative incorporates selling, marketing, product development and operations resources to address growing non-traditional data needs, which covers a wide variety of products and services including remote monitoring, telematics, in-vehicle devices, e-readers, specialized medical devices and other original equipment manufacturer devices.

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We believe that our value-driven wireless price plans are very competitive. Our family of Simply Everything® postpaid price plans bundle together popular data applications with traditional mobile voice calling and the addition of our Any Mobile AnytimeSM feature to our Everything Data plans offer savings compared to our competition. In addition to savings offered to consumers, Business Advantage pricing plans are available to our business subscribers who can also take advantage of Any Mobile AnytimeSM with certain plans. Sprint's prepaid portfolio currently includes four brands, each designed to appeal to specific customer segments. Boost Mobile serves customers who are voice and text messaging-centric with its popular $50 Monthly Unlimited plan with Shrinkage service where bills are reduced after six on-time payments. Virgin Mobile serves customers who are device and data-oriented with Beyond Talk plans and our broadband plan, Broadband2Go, that offer consumers control, flexibility and connectivity through various communication vehicles. Assurance Wireless provides eligible customers who meet income requirements or are receiving government assistance, with a free wireless phone and 250 free minutes of national local and long distance monthly service. Common CentsSM Mobile caters to budget-conscious customers with 7-cent minutes that Round Down and 7-cent text messages.
Services and Products
Data & Voice Services
Wireless data communications services include mobile productivity applications, such as Internet access and messaging and email services; wireless photo and video offerings; location-based capabilities, including asset and fleet management, dispatch services and navigation tools; and mobile entertainment applications, including the ability to view live television, listen to Sirius-XM® satellite radio, download and listen to music from our Sprint Music Store, a music catalog with thousands of songs from virtually every music genre, and game play with full-color graphics and polyphonic and real-music sounds all from a wireless handset.
Wireless voice communications services include basic local and long distance wireless voice services, as well as voicemail, call waiting, three-way calling, caller identification, directory assistance and call forwarding. We offer Nextel Direct Connect® push-to-talk services on our iDEN network. We also provide voice and data services to areas in numerous countries outside of the United States through roaming arrangements. We offer customized design, development, implementation and support services for wireless services provided to large companies and government agencies.
Products
Our services are provided using a wide variety of multi-functional devices such as smartphones, mobile broadband devices such as aircards and embedded tablets and laptops manufactured by various suppliers for use with our voice and data services. We generally sell these devices at prices below our cost in response to competition, to attract new subscribers and as retention inducements for existing subscribers. We sell accessories, such as carrying cases, hands-free devices, batteries, battery chargers and other items to subscribers, and we sell devices and accessories to agents and other third-party distributors for resale.
Wireless Network Technologies
We deliver wireless services to subscribers primarily through the ownership of our CDMA and iDEN networks or as a reseller of 4G services.
Our CDMA network, an all-digital wireless network with spectrum licenses that allow us to provide service in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, uses a single frequency band and a digital spread-spectrum wireless technology that allows a large number of users to access the band by assigning a code to all voice and data bits, sending a scrambled transmission of the encoded bits over the air and reassembling the voice and data into its original format. We provide nationwide service through a combination of operating our own digital network in both major and smaller U.S. metropolitan areas and rural connecting routes, affiliations under commercial arrangements with third-party affiliates (Affiliates) and roaming on other providers' networks.
Our iDEN network is an all-digital packet data network based on iDEN wireless technology provided by Motorola Mobility, Inc. and Motorola Solutions, Inc. (collectively, "Motorola"). We are the only national wireless service provider in the United States that utilizes iDEN technology and, generally, the iDEN devices that we currently offer are not enabled to roam on wireless networks that do not utilize iDEN technology. iDEN is a proprietary technology that relies principally on our and Motorola's efforts for further research, product development and innovation. For additional information, see Item 1A, “Risk Factors—If Motorola is unable or unwilling to provide us with equipment and devices in support of our iDEN-based services, as well as improvements, our operations will be adversely affected.”
Beginning in 2009, our subscribers in certain markets now have access to Clearwire's 4G network through an MVNO wholesale arrangement that enables us to resell Clearwire's 4G wireless services under the Sprint brand name. The services supported by 4G give subscribers with compatible devices high-speed access to the Internet. This relationship with Clearwire was developed through a transaction that closed on November 28, 2008, at which time we, third parties and Clearwire joined together to combine a next-generation wireless broadband business.

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Sales, Marketing and Customer Care
We focus the marketing and sales of wireless services on targeted groups of retail subscribers: individual consumers, businesses and government subscribers.
We use a variety of sales channels to attract new subscribers of wireless services, including:
•    
direct sales representatives whose efforts are focused on marketing and selling wireless services primarily to mid-sized to large businesses and government agencies;
•    
retail outlets owned and operated by us, that focus on sales to the consumer market as well as third-party retailers;
•    
indirect sales agents that primarily consist of local and national non-affiliated dealers and independent contractors that market and sell services to businesses and the consumer market, and are generally paid through commissions; and
•    
subscriber-convenient channels, including web sales and telesales.
We market our postpaid services under the Sprint® and Nextel® brands. We offer these services on a contract basis typically for one or two year periods, with services billed on a monthly basis according to the applicable pricing plan. We market our prepaid services under the Boost Mobile®, Virgin Mobile®, Assurance Wireless and Common CentsSM brands, as a means to provide value-driven prepaid service plans to particular markets. Our wholesale customers are resellers of our wireless services rather than end-use subscribers and market their products using their brands.
Although we market our services using traditional print and television advertising, we also provide exposure to our brand names and wireless services through various sponsorships, including the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR®). The goal of these marketing initiatives is to increase brand awareness and sales.
Our customer management organization works to improve our customer's experience, with the goal of retaining subscribers of our wireless services. Customer service call centers, some of which are operated by us and some of which are operated by unrelated parties subject to Sprint standards of operation, receive and resolve inquiries from subscribers and proactively address subscriber needs.
 
Competition
We believe that the market for wireless services has been and will continue to be characterized by intense competition on the basis of price, the types of services and devices offered and quality of service. We compete with a number of wireless carriers, including three other national wireless companies: AT&T, Verizon Wireless and T-Mobile. Our primary competitors offer voice, high-speed data, entertainment and location-based services and push-to-talk-type features that are designed to compete with our products and services. Other competitors offer or have announced plans to introduce similar services. AT&T and Verizon also offer competitive wireless services packaged with local and long distance voice, high-speed Internet services and video. Our prepaid services compete with a number of carriers and resellers including Metro PCS Communications, Inc., Leap Wireless International, Inc. and TracFone Wireless, which offer competitively-priced calling plans that include unlimited local calling. Additionally, AT&T, T-Mobile and Verizon also offer competitive prepaid services and wholesale service to resellers. Competition will increase to the extent that new firms enter the market as a result of the introduction of other technologies such as Long Term Evolution (LTE), the availability of previously unavailable spectrum bands, such as the 700 megahertz (MHz) spectrum band and potentially the introduction of new services using unlicensed spectrum. Wholesale services and products also contribute to increased competition. In some instances, resellers that use our network and offer like services compete against our offerings.
Most markets in which we operate have high rates of penetration for wireless services, thereby limiting the growth of subscribers of wireless services. As the wireless market matures, it is becoming increasingly important to retain existing subscribers in addition to attracting new subscribers. Wireless carriers are beginning to address growing non-traditional data needs by working with original equipment manufacturers to develop connected devices such as remote monitoring, in-vehicle devices and digital signage, which utilize wireless networks to increase customer and business mobility. In addition, we and our competitors continue to offer more service plans that combine voice and data offerings, plans that allow users to add additional mobile devices to their plans at attractive rates, plans with a higher number of bundled minutes included in the fixed monthly charge for the plan, plans that offer the ability to share minutes among a group of related subscribers, or combinations of these features. Consumers respond to these plans by migrating to those they deem most attractive. In addition, wireless carriers also try to appeal to subscribers by offering devices at prices lower than their acquisition cost, and we may offer higher cost devices at greater discounts than our competitors, with the expectation that the loss incurred on the device will be offset by future service revenue. As a result, we and our competitors recognize immediate losses that will not be recovered until future periods when service is provided. Our ability to effectively compete in the wireless business is dependent upon our ability to retain existing and attract new subscribers in an increasingly competitive marketplace. See Item 1A, “Risk Factors—If we are not able attract and retain wireless subscribers, our financial performance will be impaired.”

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Wireline
We provide a broad suite of wireline voice and data communications services to other communications companies and targeted business and consumer subscribers. In addition, we provide voice, data and IP communication services to our Wireless segment and IP and other services to cable Multiple System Operators (MSOs) that resell our local and long distance services and use our back office systems and network assets in support of their telephone service provided over cable facilities primarily to residential end-user subscribers. We are one of the nation's largest providers of long distance services and operate all-digital global long distance and Tier 1 IP networks.
Services and Products
Our services and products include domestic and international data communications using various protocols such as multiprotocol label switching technologies (MPLS), IP, managed network services, Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), Session Initiated Protocol (SIP) and traditional voice services. Our IP services can also be combined with wireless services. Such services include our Sprint Mobile Integration service which enables a wireless handset to operate as part of a subscriber's wireline voice network and our DataLinkSM service, which uses our wireless networks to connect a subscriber location into their primarily wireline wide-area IP/MPLS data network, making it easy for businesses to adapt their network to changing business requirements. In addition to providing services to our business customers, the wireline network is carrying increasing amounts of voice and data traffic for our Wireless segment as a result of growing usage by those wireless customers.
We continue to assess the portfolio of services provided by our Wireline business and are focusing our efforts on IP-based services and de-emphasizing stand-alone voice services and non-IP-based data services. We also provide wholesale voice local and long distance services to large cable MSOs, which they offer as part of their bundled service offerings, as well as traditional voice and data services for their enterprise use. However, the digital voice services we provide to some of our MSO's have become large enough in scale that they have decided to in-source these services. Although we continue to provide voice services to residential consumers, we no longer actively market those services. Our Wireline segment markets and sells its services primarily through direct sales representatives.
Competition
Our Wireline segment competes with AT&T, Verizon Communications, Qwest Communications, Level 3 Communications, Inc., other major local incumbent operating companies, cable operators and other telecommunications providers in all segments of the long distance communications market. In recent years, our long distance voice services have experienced an industry-wide trend of lower revenue from lower prices and competition from other wireline and wireless communications companies, as well as cable MSOs and Internet service providers.
Some competitors are targeting the high-end data market and are offering deeply discounted rates in exchange for high-volume traffic as they attempt to utilize excess capacity in their networks. In addition, we face increasing competition from other wireless and IP-based service providers. Many carriers are competing in the residential and small business markets by offering bundled packages of both local and long distance services. Competition in long distance is based on price and pricing plans, the types of services offered, customer service, and communications quality, reliability and availability. Our ability to compete successfully will depend on our ability to anticipate and respond to various competitive factors affecting the industry, including new services that may be introduced, changes in consumer preferences, demographic trends, economic conditions and pricing strategies. See Item 1A, “Risk Factors—Consolidation and competition in the wholesale market for wireline services, as well as consolidation of our roaming partners and access providers used for wireless services, could adversely affect our revenues and profitability” and “—The blurring of the traditional dividing lines among long distance, local, wireless, video and Internet services contribute to increased competition.”
Legislative and Regulatory Developments
Overview
Communications services are subject to regulation at the federal level by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and in certain states by public utilities commissions (PUCs). The Communications Act of 1934 (Communications Act) preempts states from regulating the rates or entry of commercial mobile radio service (CMRS) providers, such as those services provided through our Wireless segment, and imposes various licensing and technical requirements implemented by the FCC, including provisions related to the acquisition, assignment or transfer of radio licenses. CMRS providers are subject to state regulation of other terms and conditions of service. Our Wireline segment also is subject to federal and state regulation.
The following is a summary of the regulatory environment in which we operate and does not describe all present and proposed federal, state and local legislation and regulations affecting the communications industry. Some legislation and regulations are the subject of judicial proceedings, legislative hearings and administrative proceedings that could change the manner in which our industry operates. We cannot predict the outcome of any of these matters or their potential impact on our business. See Item 1A, “Risk Factors—Government regulation could adversely affect our prospects and results of operations; the FCC and state regulatory commissions may adopt new regulations or take other actions that could adversely affect our business prospects, future growth or results of operations.” Regulation in the communications industry is subject to change,

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which could adversely affect us in the future. The following discussion describes some of the major communications-related regulations that affect us, but numerous other substantive areas of regulation not discussed here may also influence our business.
Regulation and Wireless Operations
The FCC regulates the licensing, construction, operation, acquisition and sale of our wireless operations and wireless spectrum holdings. FCC requirements impose operating and other restrictions on our wireless operations that increase our costs. The FCC does not currently regulate rates for services offered by CMRS providers, and states are legally preempted from regulating such rates and entry into any market, although states may regulate other terms and conditions. The Communications Act and FCC rules also require the FCC's prior approval of the assignment or transfer of control of an FCC license, although the FCC's rules permit spectrum lease arrangements for a range of wireless radio service licenses, including our licenses, with FCC oversight. Approval from the Federal Trade Commission and the Department of Justice, as well as state or local regulatory authorities, also may be required if we sell or acquire spectrum interests. The FCC sets rules, regulations and policies to, among other things:
•    
grant licenses in the 800 MHz band, 900 MHz band, 1.9 gigahertz (GHz) personal communications services (PCS) band, and license renewals;
•    
rule on assignments and transfers of control of FCC licenses, and leases covering our use of FCC licenses held by other persons and organizations;
•    
govern the interconnection of our CDMA and iDEN networks with other wireless and wireline carriers;
•    
establish access and universal service funding provisions;
•    
impose rules related to unauthorized use of and access to customer information;
•    
impose fines and forfeitures for violations of FCC rules;
•    
regulate the technical standards governing wireless services; and
•    
impose other obligations that it determines to be in the public interest
We hold several kinds of licenses to deploy our services: 1.9 GHz PCS licenses utilized in the CDMA network, and 800 MHz and 900 MHz licenses utilized in the iDEN network. We also hold 1.9 GHz and other FCC licenses that are not yet placed into service but that we intend to use in accordance with FCC requirements.
1.9 GHz PCS License Conditions
All PCS licenses are granted for ten-year terms. For purposes of issuing PCS licenses, the FCC utilizes major trading areas (MTAs) and basic trading areas (BTAs) with several BTAs making up each MTA. Each license is subject to build-out requirements which we have met in all of our MTA and BTA markets.
If applicable build-out conditions are met, these licenses may be renewed for additional ten-year terms. Renewal applications are not subject to auctions. If a renewal application is challenged, the FCC grants a preference commonly referred to as a license renewal expectancy to the applicant if the applicant can demonstrate that it has provided “substantial service” during the past license term and has substantially complied with applicable FCC rules and policies and the Communications Act. The licenses for the 10 MHz of spectrum in the 1.9 GHz band that we received as part of the FCC's Report and Order, described below, have ten-year terms and are not subject to specific build-out conditions, but are subject to renewal requirements that are similar to those for our PCS licenses.
 
800 MHz and 900 MHz License Conditions
We hold licenses for channels in the 800 MHz and 900 MHz bands that are currently used to deploy our iDEN services. Because spectrum in these bands originally was licensed in small groups of channels, we hold thousands of these licenses, which together allow us to provide coverage across much of the continental United States. Our 800 MHz and 900 MHz licenses are subject to requirements that we meet population coverage benchmarks tied to the initial license grant dates. To date, we have met all of the construction requirements applicable to these licenses, except in the case of licenses that are not material to our business. Our 800 MHz and 900 MHz licenses have ten-year terms, at the end of which each license is subject to renewal requirements that are similar to those for our 1.9 GHz licenses.
Spectrum Reconfiguration Obligations
In 2004, the FCC adopted a Report and Order that included new rules regarding interference in the 800 MHz band and a comprehensive plan to reconfigure the 800 MHz band (the “Report and Order”). The Report and Order provides for the exchange of a portion of our 800 MHz FCC spectrum licenses, and requires us to fund the cost incurred by public safety systems and other incumbent licensees to reconfigure the 800 MHz spectrum band. In addition, we received licenses for 10 MHz of nationwide spectrum in the 1.9 GHz band; however, we were required to relocate and reimburse the incumbent licensees in this band for their costs of relocation to another band designated by the FCC. The minimum cash obligation under the Report and Order is approximately $2.8 billion. We are, however, obligated to pay the full amount of the costs relating to

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the reconfiguration plan, even if those costs exceed $2.8 billion. As required under the terms of the Report and Order, a letter of credit has been secured to provide assurance that funds will be available to pay the relocation costs of the incumbent users of the 800 MHz spectrum. We submit the qualified 800 MHz relocation costs to the FCC for review for potential letter of credit reductions on a periodic basis. As a result of these reviews, our letter of credit was reduced from $2.5 billion at the start of the project to $1.3 billion in 2010 as approved by the FCC.
Completion of the 800 MHz band reconfiguration was initially required by June 26, 2008. The FCC continues to grant 800 MHz public safety licensees additional time to complete their band reconfigurations which, in turn, delays Sprint's access to some of our 800 MHz replacement channels. Under an October 2008 FCC Order, March 31, 2010 was the target date for us to begin to relinquish some of our 800 MHz channels on a region-by-region basis prior to receiving all of our FCC-designated 800 MHz replacement channels. On March 31, 2010, however, the FCC granted Sprint's request that it delay the March 31, 2010 deadline for one year until March 31, 2011 in 21 markets where public safety licensees have not yet moved off most of Sprint's replacement channels. We have requested an additional extension of the deadline in a small subset of the 21 markets where public safety licensees have not yet moved off of Sprint's replacement channels. Accordingly, we will continue to transition to our 800 MHz replacement channels consistent with public safety licensees' reconfiguration progress. We completed all our of 1.9 GHz incumbent relocation and reimbursement obligations in the second half of 2010.
New Spectrum Opportunities and Spectrum Auctions
Several FCC proceedings and initiatives are underway that may affect the availability of spectrum used or useful in the provision of commercial wireless services, which may allow new competitors to enter the wireless market. We cannot predict when or whether the FCC will conduct any spectrum auctions or if it will release additional spectrum that might be useful to wireless carriers, including us, in the future.
911 Services
Pursuant to FCC rules, CMRS providers, including us, are required to provide enhanced 911 (E911) services in a two-tiered manner. Specifically, wireless carriers are required to transmit to a requesting public safety answering point (PSAP) both the 911 caller's telephone number and (a) the location of the cell site from which the call is being made, or (b) the location of the customer's handset using latitude and longitude, depending upon the capability of the PSAP. Implementation of E911 service must be completed within six months of a PSAP request for service in its area, or longer, based on the agreement between the individual PSAP and carrier. As a part of the FCC's approval of the Clearwire transaction, we committed to measure the accuracy of our 911 systems at the county level with certain exceptions. On November 29, 2010, we notified the FCC that we had met the first of our E911 location accuracy commitments. We believe we will be able to comply with the final benchmark by the 2016 deadline.
National Security
Issues involving national security and disaster recovery are likely to continue to receive attention at the FCC, state and local levels, and Congress. A major focus of the federal government is cyber security. Congress is expected to take up legislation implementing measures to increase the security and resiliency of the Nation's digital infrastructure. We cannot predict the cost impact of such legislation. The FCC has chartered the Communications Security, Reliability and Interoperability Council consisting of communications companies, public safety agencies and non-profit consumer and community organizations to make recommendations to the FCC to ensure optimal security, reliability, and interoperability of communications systems. We are a member of the council. In addition, the FCC and the Federal Emergency Management Agency/Department of Homeland Security are likely to continue to focus on disaster preparedness and communications among first responders. We have voluntarily agreed to provide wireless emergency alerts over our CDMA network. Under the time line developed by the FCC, the provision of such alerts is to begin no later than April 2012.
Tower Siting
Wireless systems must comply with various federal, state and local regulations that govern the siting, lighting and construction of transmitter towers and antennas, including requirements imposed by the FCC and the Federal Aviation Administration. FCC rules subject certain cell site locations to extensive zoning, environmental and historic preservation requirements and mandate consultation with various parties, including Native Americans. The FCC adopted significant changes to its rules governing historic preservation review of projects, which makes it more difficult and expensive to deploy antenna facilities. The FCC recently has imposed a tower siting “shot clock” that would require local authorities to address tower applications within a specific timeframe. This may assist carriers in more rapid deployment of towers. Other changes to environmental protection and tower construction rules, however, are still possible. To the extent governmental agencies impose additional requirements on the tower siting process, the time and cost to construct cell towers could be negatively impacted.

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State and Local Regulation
While the Communications Act generally preempts state and local governments from regulating entry of, or the rates charged by, wireless carriers, certain state PUCs and local governments regulate customer billing, termination of service arrangements, advertising, certification of operation, use of handsets when driving, service quality, sales practices, management of customer call records and protected information and many other areas. Also, some state attorneys general have become more active in bringing lawsuits related to the sales practices and services of wireless carriers. Varying practices among the states may make it more difficult for us to implement national sales and marketing programs. States also may impose their own universal service support requirements on wireless and other communications carriers, similar to the contribution requirements that have been established by the FCC, and some states are requiring wireless carriers to help fund the provision of intrastate relay services for consumers who are hearing impaired. We anticipate that these trends will continue to require us to devote legal and other resources to work with the states to respond to their concerns while attempting to minimize any new regulation and enforcement actions that could increase our costs of doing business.
Regulation and Wireline Operations
Competitive Local Service
The Telecommunications Act of 1996 (Telecom Act) the first comprehensive update of the Communications Act, was designed to promote competition, and it eliminated legal and regulatory barriers for entry into local and long distance communications markets. It also required incumbent local exchange carriers (ILECs) to allow resale of specified local services at wholesale rates, negotiate interconnection agreements, provide nondiscriminatory access to certain unbundled network elements and allow co-location of interconnection equipment by competitors. The rules implementing the Telecom Act remain subject to legal challenges. Thus, the scope of future local competition remains uncertain. These local competition rules impact us because we provide wholesale services to cable television companies that wish to compete in the local voice telephony market. Our communications and back-office services enable the cable companies to provide competitive local and long distance telephone services primarily in a VoIP format to their end-user customers.
Voice over Internet Protocol
We offer a growing number of VoIP-based services to business subscribers and transport VoIP-originated traffic for various cable companies. The FCC has not yet resolved the regulatory classification of VoIP services, but continues to consider the regulatory status of various forms of VoIP. In 2004, the FCC issued an order finding that one form of VoIP, involving a specific form of computer-to-computer services for which no charge is assessed and conventional telephone numbers are not used, is an unregulated “information service,” rather than a telecommunications service, and preempted state regulation of this service. The FCC also ruled that long distance offerings in which calls begin and end on the ordinary public switched telephone network, but are transmitted in part through the use of IP, are “telecommunications services,” thereby rendering the services subject to all the regulatory obligations imposed on ordinary long distance services, including payment of access charges and contributions to the universal service fund (USF). In addition, the FCC preempted states from exercising entry and related economic regulation of interconnected VoIP services that require the use of broadband connections and specialized customer premises equipment and permit users to terminate calls to and receive calls from the public switched telephone network. However, the FCC's ruling did not address specifically whether this form of VoIP is an “information service” or a “telecommunications service,” or what regulatory obligations, such as intercarrier compensation, should apply. Nevertheless, the FCC requires interconnected VoIP providers to contribute to the federal USF, offer E911 emergency calling capabilities to their subscribers, and comply with the electronic surveillance obligations set forth in the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA). Because we provide VoIP services and transport VoIP-originated traffic, an FCC ruling on the regulatory classification of VoIP services and the applicability of specific intercarrier compensation rates is likely to affect the cost to provide these services; our pricing of these services; access to numbering resources needed to provide these services; and long-term E911, CALEA and USF obligations. Continued regulatory uncertainty over the appropriate intercarrier compensation for interconnected VoIP services has led to many disputes between carriers.
International Regulation
The wireline services we provide outside the United States are subject to the regulatory jurisdiction of foreign governments and international bodies. In general, this regulation requires that we obtain licenses for the provision of wireline services and comply with certain government requirements.
Other Regulations
Network Neutrality
The regulatory status of broadband services has sparked a debate over “net neutrality” and “open access.” On December 22, 2010, the FCC adopted so-called net neutrality rules. The order adopts three basic rules for fixed broadband Internet access services: (a) an obligation to provide transparency to consumers regarding network management practices, performance characteristics, and commercial terms of service; (b) a prohibition on blocking access to lawful content, applications, services and devices; and (c) no unreasonable discrimination. The FCC acknowledged, however, that mobile

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broadband is in its early stages of development and is rapidly changing. In this environment, the FCC stated that lesser obligations are warranted on mobile providers. Mobile providers must: provide transparency to consumers in the same manner as fixed providers; and not block access to lawful websites and applications that compete with the provider's own voice or video telephony services. The other rules applicable to fixed broadband, including no blocking of other applications, services or devices, will not apply to mobile. Similarly, mobile providers will not be subject to an "unreasonable discrimination" obligation. Since the net neutrality rules applicable to mobile are relatively narrow and because we have deployed open mobile operating platforms on our devices, such as the Android platform created in conjunction with Google and the Open Handset Alliance, the rules should not adversely affect the operation of our broadband networks or significantly constrain our ability to manage the networks and protect our users from harm caused by other users and devices.
Truth in Billing and Consumer Protection
The FCC's Truth in Billing rules generally require both wireline and wireless telecommunications carriers, such as us, to provide full and fair disclosure of all charges on their bills, including brief, clear, and non-misleading plain language descriptions of the services provided. In response to a petition from the National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates, the FCC found that state regulation of CMRS rates, including line items on consumer bills, is preempted by federal statute. This decision was overturned by the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals and the Supreme Court denied further appeal. As a consequence, states may attempt to impose various regulations on the billing practices of wireless carriers. In addition, the FCC has opened a new proceeding to address issues of consumer protection, including the use of early termination fees, and appropriate state and federal roles. If this proceeding or individual state proceedings create changes in the Truth in Billing rules, our billing and customer service costs could increase.
Access Charge Reform
ILECs and competitive local exchange carriers (CLECs) impose access charges for the origination and termination of long distance calls upon wireless and long distance carriers, including our Wireless and Wireline segments. Also, interconnected local carriers, including our Wireless segment, pay to each other reciprocal compensation fees for terminating interconnected local calls. In addition, ILECs and CLECs impose special access charges for their provision of dedicated facilities to other carriers, including both our Wireless and Wireline segments. These fees and charges are a significant cost for our Wireless and Wireline segments. There are ongoing proceedings at the FCC related to access charges and special access rates, which could impact our costs for these services and the FCC has released recently a further Public Notice addressing special access charges. We cannot predict when these proceedings will be completed.
Several ILECs have sought and received forbearance from FCC regulation of certain enterprise broadband services. Specifically, the FCC granted forbearance to AT&T, ACS Anchorage, CenturyLink (formerly Embarq), Frontier and Citizens from price regulation of their non-time division multiplexing (TDM) based high-capacity special access services. Furthermore, in 2007, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia found that Verizon was “deemed granted” forbearance from the same rules when the FCC deadlocked on its similar forbearance petition, and that the “deemed grant” was unreviewable by the Court. Our request for en banc review was denied. The appeal of the FCC's rulings with respect to AT&T, Citizens, Frontier and CenturyLink was denied. These deregulatory actions by the FCC could enable the ILECs to raise their special access prices.
The FCC currently is considering measures to address “traffic pumping” by local exchange carriers (LECs) predominantly in rural exchanges, that have very high access charges. Under traffic pumping arrangements, the LECs partner with other entities to offer “free” or almost free services (such as conference calling and chat lines) to end users; these services (and payments to the LECs' partners) are financed through the assessment of high access charges on the end user's long distance or wireless carrier. Because of the peculiarities of the FCC's access rate rules for small rural carriers, these LECs are allowed to base their rates on low historic demand levels rather than the vastly higher “pumped” demand levels, which enables the LEC to earn windfall profits. The FCC is considering the legality of traffic pumping arrangements as well as rule changes to ensure that rates charged by LECs experiencing substantial increases in demand volumes are just and reasonable. As a major wireless and wireline carrier, we have been assessed millions of dollars in access charges for “pumped” traffic. Adoption by the FCC of measures to limit the windfall profits associated with traffic pumping would have a direct beneficial impact on us resolving outstanding disputes associated with such matters. Positive decisions against several LECs and their traffic pumping partners in U.S. district courts and before the Iowa Utilities Board and the FCC have not resulted in a significant decrease in this activity.

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Universal Service Reform
Communications carriers contribute to and receive support from various universal service funds established by the FCC and many states. The federal USF program funds services provided in high-cost areas, reduced-rate services to low-income consumers, and discounted communications and Internet services for schools, libraries and rural health care facilities. The USF is funded from assessments on communications providers, including our Wireless and Wireline segments, based on FCC-prescribed contribution factors applicable to our interstate and international end-user revenues from telecommunications services and interconnected VoIP services. Similarly, many states have established their own universal service funds to which we contribute. The FCC is considering changing its USF contribution methodology, and may replace the interstate telecommunications revenue-based assessment with one based on either connections (telephone numbers or connections to the public network) or by expanding the revenue base to include data revenues. The latter approach in particular could impact the amount of our assessments. The FCC is expected to issue a notice of proposed rulemaking on USF reform in the near future, but final action on the contribution methodology does not seem imminent (within next 6 months). As permitted, we assess subscribers a fee to recover our USF contributions.
In 2010, Sprint received approximately $47 million in high-cost USF support in 25 jurisdictions as an Eligible Telecommunications Carrier (ETC). Pursuant to the FCC order authorizing the Clearwire transaction, Sprint is required to phase out its high-cost USF support to zero by 2013, and that process is currently being implemented on a state-by-state basis.
Virgin Mobile is now designated as a Lifeline-only ETC in 22 jurisdictions, providing service under our Assurance Wireless brand, and has ETC applications pending or planned in other jurisdictions as well. Virgin Mobile's Federal Lifeline USF receipts are anticipated to increase substantially in 2011.
The FCC also is considering implementation of new broadband universal service funds which may eventually replace the existing high-cost voice-centric USF. Although timing on the new broadband fund is unclear, Sprint will evaluate the relative costs and benefits of requesting support from these new funds when they become available.
Electronic Surveillance Obligations
The CALEA requires telecommunications carriers, including us, to modify equipment, facilities and services to allow for authorized electronic surveillance based on either industry or FCC standards. Our CALEA obligations have been extended to data and VoIP networks, and we are in compliance with these requirements. Certain laws and regulations require that we assist various government agencies with electronic surveillance of communications and records concerning those communications. We are a defendant in four purported class action lawsuits that allege that we participated in a program of intelligence gathering activities for the federal government following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 that violated federal and state law. Relief sought in these cases includes injunctive relief, statutory and punitive damages, and attorneys' fees. We believe these suits have no merit, and they were dismissed by the district court. The plaintiffs' appeal to the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit is pending. We do not disclose customer information to the government or assist government agencies in electronic surveillance unless we have been provided a lawful request for such information.
Environmental Compliance
Our environmental compliance and remediation obligations relate primarily to the operation of standby power generators, batteries and fuel storage for our telecommunications equipment. These obligations require compliance with storage and related standards, obtaining of permits and occasional remediation. Although we cannot assess with certainty the impact of any future compliance and remediation obligations, we do not believe that any such expenditures will have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations.
We have identified seven former manufactured gas plant sites in Nebraska, not currently owned or operated by us, that may have been owned or operated by entities acquired by Centel Corporation, formerly a subsidiary of ours and now a subsidiary of CenturyLink. We and CenturyLink have agreed to share the environmental liabilities arising from these former manufactured gas plant sites. Three of the sites are part of ongoing settlement negotiations and administrative consent orders with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Two of the sites have had initial site assessments conducted by the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ) but no regulatory actions have followed. The two remaining sites have had no regulatory action by the EPA or the NDEQ. Centel has entered into agreements with other potentially responsible parties to share costs in connection with five of the seven sites. We are working to assess the scope and nature of this responsibility, which is not expected to be material.
Patents, Trademarks and Licenses
We own numerous patents, patent applications, service marks, trademarks and other intellectual property in the United States and other countries, including “Sprint®,” “Nextel®,” “Direct Connect®,” and “Boost Mobile®.” Our services often use the intellectual property of others, such as licensed software, and we often license copyrights, patents and trademarks of others, like “Virgin Mobile®.” In total, these licenses and our copyrights, patents, trademarks and service marks are of material importance to the business. Generally, our trademarks and service marks endure and are enforceable so long as they continue to be used. Our patents and licensed patents have remaining terms generally ranging from one to 19 years.

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We occasionally license our intellectual property to others, including licenses to others to use the trademarks “Sprint” and “Nextel.”
We have received claims in the past, and may in the future receive claims, that we, or third parties from whom we license or purchase goods or services, have infringed on the intellectual property of others. These claims can be time-consuming and costly to defend, and divert management resources. If these claims are successful, we could be forced to pay significant damages or stop selling certain products or services or stop using certain trademarks. We, or third parties from whom we license or purchase goods or services, also could enter into licenses with unfavorable terms, including royalty payments, which could adversely affect our business.
Employee Relations
As of December 31, 2010, we employed approximately 40,000 personnel.
Access to Public Filings and Board Committee Charters
Important information is routinely posted on our website at www.sprint.com. Information contained on the website is not part of this annual report. Public access is provided to our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to these reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. These documents may be accessed free of charge on our website at the following address: http://investors.sprint.com. These documents are available as soon as reasonably practicable after filing with the SEC and may also be found at the SEC's website at www.sec.gov.
Public access is provided to our Code of Ethics, entitled the Sprint Nextel Code of Conduct, our Corporate Governance Guidelines and the charters of the following committees of our board of directors: the Audit Committee, the Compensation Committee, the Executive Committee, the Finance Committee, and the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee. The Code of Conduct, corporate governance guidelines and committee charters may be accessed free of charge on our website at the following address: www.sprint.com/governance. Copies of any of these documents can be obtained free of charge by writing to: Sprint Nextel Shareholder Relations, 6200 Sprint Parkway, Mailstop KSOPHF0302-3B424, Overland Park, Kansas 66251 or by email at shareholder.relations@sprint.com. If a provision of the Code of Conduct required under the NYSE corporate governance standards is materially modified, or if a waiver of the Code of Conduct is granted to a director or executive officer, a notice of such action will be posted on our website at the following address: www.sprint.com/governance. Only the Audit Committee may consider a waiver of the Code of Conduct for an executive officer or director.
 
Item 1A.    
Risk Factors
In addition to the other information contained in this Form 10-K, the following risk factors should be considered carefully in evaluating us. Our business, financial condition, liquidity or results of operations could be materially adversely affected by any of these risks.
If we are not able to attract and retain wireless subscribers, our financial performance will be impaired.
We are in the business of selling communications services to subscribers, and our economic success is based on our ability to attract new subscribers and retain current subscribers. If we are unable to attract and retain wireless subscribers, our financial performance will be impaired, and we could fail to meet our financial obligations, which could result in several outcomes, including controlling investments by third parties, takeover bids, liquidation of assets or insolvency. Beginning in 2008 through 2010, we experienced decreases in our total retail postpaid subscriber base of approximately 8.5 million subscribers (excluding the impact of our 2009 acquisitions), while our two largest competitors increased their subscribers. In addition, our average postpaid churn rate was 1.95% and 2.15% for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively, while our two largest competitors had churn rates that were substantially lower. Although we have begun to see a reduction in our net loss of postpaid subscribers, if this trend does not continue our financial condition, results of operations and liquidity could be materially adversely affected.

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Our ability to compete successfully for new subscribers and to retain our existing subscribers and reduce our rate of churn depends on:
•    
our successful execution of marketing and sales strategies, including the acceptance of our value proposition; service delivery and customer care activities, including new account set up and billing; and our credit and collection policies;
•    
Clearwire's ability to successfully obtain additional financing for the continued build-out of its 4G network;
•    
The successful deployment and completion of our network modernization plan, Network Vision, including a multi-mode network infrastructure and CDMA push-to-talk capabilities of comparable quality to our existing iDEN push-to-talk capabilities;
•    
actual or perceived quality and coverage of our networks, including Clearwire's 4G network;
•    
public perception about our brands;
•    
our ability to anticipate and develop new or enhanced technologies, products and services that are attractive to existing or potential subscribers;
•    
our ability to anticipate and respond to various competitive factors affecting the industry, including new technologies, products and services that may be introduced by our competitors, changes in consumer preferences, demographic trends, economic conditions, and discount pricing and other strategies that may be implemented by our competitors; and
•    
our ability to enter into arrangements with MVNOs.
Until recently, our efforts to attract new postpaid subscribers and reduce churn had not been successful. The net loss of postpaid subscribers in 2009 and 2010 can be expected to cause wireless service revenue in 2011 to be approximately $2.4 billion lower than it would have been had those subscribers not been lost. Our ability to retain subscribers may also be negatively affected by industry trends related to subscriber contracts. For example, we and our competitors no longer require subscribers to renew their contracts when making changes to their pricing plans. These types of changes could negatively affect our ability to retain subscribers and could lead to an increase in our churn rates if we are not successful in providing an attractive product and service mix.
We expect to incur expenses to attract new subscribers, improve subscriber retention and reduce churn, but there can be no assurance that our efforts will result in new subscribers or a lower rate of subscriber churn. Subscriber losses and a high rate of churn adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations because they result in lost revenues and cash flow. Although attracting new subscribers and retention of existing subscribers are important to the financial viability of our business, there is an added focus on retention because the cost of adding a new subscriber is higher than the cost associated with retention of an existing subscriber.
As the wireless market matures, we must increasingly seek to attract subscribers from competitors and face increased credit risk from new postpaid wireless subscribers.
We and our competitors increasingly must seek to attract a greater proportion of new subscribers from each other's existing subscriber bases rather than from first-time purchasers of wireless services. Beginning in 2008 through 2010, we experienced decreases in our total retail subscriber base of approximately 8.5 million postpaid subscribers (excluding the impact of our 2009 acquisitions), while our two largest competitors increased their subscribers.
In addition, the higher market penetration also means that subscribers purchasing postpaid wireless services for the first time, on average, have a lower credit score than existing wireless users, and the number of these subscribers we are willing to accept is dependent on our credit policies. To the extent we cannot compete effectively for new subscribers, our revenues and results of operations will be adversely affected.
Competition and technological changes in the market for wireless services could negatively affect our average revenue per subscriber, subscriber churn, operating costs and our ability to attract new subscribers, resulting in adverse effects on our revenues, future cash flows, growth and profitability.
We compete with a number of other wireless service providers in each of the markets in which we provide wireless services, and we expect competition to increase as additional spectrum is made available for commercial wireless services and as new technologies are developed and launched. As competition among wireless communications providers has increased, we have created pricing plans that have resulted in declining average revenue per subscriber for voice and data services. Competition in pricing and service and product offerings may also adversely impact subscriber retention and our ability to attract new subscribers, with adverse effects on our results of operations. A decline in the average revenue per subscriber coupled with a decline in the number of subscribers would negatively impact our revenues, future cash flows, growth and overall profitability, which, in turn, could impact our ability to meet our financial obligations.

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The wireless communications industry is experiencing significant technological change, including improvements in the capacity and quality of digital technology and the deployment of unlicensed spectrum devices. This change causes uncertainty about future subscriber demand for our wireless services and the prices that we will be able to charge for these services. Spending by our competitors on new wireless services and network improvements could enable our competitors to obtain a competitive advantage with new technologies or enhancements that we do not offer. Rapid change in technology may lead to the development of wireless communications technologies, products or alternative services that are superior to our technologies, products,or services or that consumers prefer over ours. If we are unable to meet future advances in competing technologies on a timely basis, or at an acceptable cost, we may not be able to compete effectively and could lose subscribers to our competitors.
Mergers or other business combinations involving our competitors and new entrants, including new wholesale relationships, beginning to offer wireless services may also continue to increase competition. These wireless operators may be able to offer subscribers network features or products and services not offered by us, coverage in areas not served by either of our wireless networks or pricing plans that are lower than those offered by us, all of which would negatively affect our average revenue per subscriber, subscriber churn, ability to attract new subscribers, and operating costs. For example, AT&T, Verizon and T-Mobile now offer competitive wireless services packaged with local and long distance voice and high-speed Internet services, and flat rate voice and data plans. Our prepaid services compete with several regional carriers, including Metro PCS and Leap Wireless, which offer competitively-priced prepaid calling plans that include unlimited local calling. In addition, we may lose subscribers of our higher priced plans to our prepaid offerings.
Several wireless equipment vendors, including Motorola, which supplies equipment for our push-to-talk services, have begun to offer wireless equipment that is capable of providing push-to-talk services that are designed to compete with our current push-to-talk services. Several of our competitors have introduced devices that are capable of providing push-to-talk services. We announced a major network modernization plan in December 2010, Network Vision; one component of Network Vision is the deployment of push-to-talk technology through the use of multi-modal technology on a single integrated network. If our efforts to deploy such technology are not achieved, we may not be able to successfully compete for such services. See “The success of our network modernization plan, Network Vision, will depend on the timing, extent and cost of implementation; the performance of third-parties; upgrade requirements; and the availability and reliability of the various technologies required to provide such modernization.”
The success of our network modernization plan, Network Vision, will depend on the timing, extent and cost of implementation; the performance of third-parties; upgrade requirements; and the availability and reliability of the various technologies required to provide such modernization.
We are implementing Network Vision, which is a multi-year initiative intended to reduce operating costs and provide customers with an enhanced network experience by improving voice quality and faster data speeds, while creating network flexibility and improving environmental sustainability. The focus of the plan is on upgrading the existing Sprint networks and providing flexibility for new 4G technologies. If Network Vision does not provide an enhanced network experience or is unable to provide CDMA push-to-talk capabilities of comparable quality to our existing iDEN push-to-talk capabilities, our ability to provide enhanced wireless services to our customers, to retain and attract customers, and to maintain and grow our customer revenues could be adversely affected.
Using a new and sophisticated technology on a very large scale entails risks. Should implementation of our upgraded network be delayed or costs exceed expected amounts, our margins would be adversely affected and such effects could be material. Should the delivery of services expected to be deployed on our upgraded network be delayed due to technological constraints, performance of third-party suppliers, or other reasons, the cost of providing such services could become higher than expected, which could result in higher costs to customers, potentially resulting in decisions to purchase services from our competitors adversely affecting our revenues, profitability and cash flow from operations.
Failure to complete development, testing and deployment of new technology that supports new services could affect our ability to compete in the industry. The deployment of new technology and new service offerings could result in network degradation or the loss of subscribers. In addition, the technology we use, including WiMAX, may place us at a competitive disadvantage.
We develop, test and deploy various new technologies and support systems intended to enhance our competitiveness by both supporting new services and features and reducing the costs associated with providing those services. Successful development and implementation of technology upgrades depend, in part, on the willingness of third parties to develop new applications or devices in a timely manner. We may not successfully complete the development and rollout of new technology and related features or services in a timely manner, and they may not be widely accepted by our subscribers or may not be profitable, in which case we could not recover our investment in the technology. Deployment of technology supporting new service offerings may also adversely affect the performance or reliability of our networks with respect to both the new and existing services and may require us to take action like curtailing new subscribers in certain markets. Any resulting subscriber dissatisfaction could affect our ability to retain subscribers and have an adverse effect on our results of operations and growth

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prospects.
Our wireless networks provide services utilizing CDMA and iDEN technologies. Wireless subscribers served by these two technologies represent a smaller portion of global wireless subscribers than the subscribers served by wireless networks that utilize Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) technology. As a result, our costs with respect to both CDMA and iDEN network equipment and devices may continue to be higher than the comparable costs incurred by our competitors who use GSM technology, which places us at a competitive disadvantage.
We have expended significant resources and made substantial investments to deploy a 4G mobile broadband network through Clearwire using WiMAX technology. WiMAX may not perform as we expect, and, therefore, we may not be able to deliver the quality or types of services we expect. Other competing technologies, including other 4G or subsequent technologies such as LTE, that may have advantages over WiMAX are being developed, and operators of other networks based on those competing technologies may be able to deploy these alternative technologies at a lower cost and more quickly than the cost and speed with which Clearwire deploys its 4G network providing 4G MVNO services to Sprint, which may allow those operators to compete more effectively or may require us and Clearwire to deploy such technologies. These risks could reduce our subscriber growth, increase our costs of providing services or increase our churn.
We entered into agreements in 2008 with Clearwire to integrate our former 4G wireless broadband business with theirs. See “Risks Related to our Investment in Clearwire” below for additional risks related to our investment in Clearwire and the deployment of 4G.
Current economic conditions, our recent financial performance and our debt ratings could negatively impact our access to the capital markets resulting in less growth than planned or failure to satisfy financial covenants under our existing debt agreements. Moreover, Clearwire may be considered a subsidiary under certain agreements relating to our indebtedness.
Although we do not believe we will require additional capital to make the capital and operating expenditures necessary to implement our business plans or to satisfy our debt service requirements for the next few years, we may need to incur additional debt in the future for a variety of reasons, including future investments or acquisitions. Our ability to arrange additional financing will depend on, among other factors, our financial performance, debt ratings, general economic conditions and prevailing market conditions. Some of these factors are beyond our control, and we may not be able to arrange additional financing on terms acceptable to us, or at all. Failure to obtain suitable financing when needed could, among other things, result in our inability to continue to expand our businesses and meet competitive challenges. Our debt ratings could be downgraded if we incur significant additional indebtedness, or if we do not generate sufficient cash from our operations, which would likely increase our future borrowing costs and could affect our ability to access capital.
Our credit facility, which expires in October 2013, requires that we maintain a ratio of total indebtedness to trailing four quarters earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization and other non-cash gains or losses, such as goodwill impairment charges, of no more than 4.5 to 1.0. The ratio will be reduced to 4.25 to 1.0 beginning in April 2012, and further reduced to 4.0 to 1.0 in January 2013. As of December 31, 2010, the ratio was 3.7 to 1.0. If we do not continue to satisfy this ratio, we will be in default under our credit facility, which could trigger defaults under our other debt obligations, which in turn could result in the maturities of certain debt obligations being accelerated. Certain indentures governing our notes limit, among other things, our ability to incur additional debt, pay dividends, create liens and sell, transfer, lease or dispose of assets.
As of December 31, 2010, we own a 54% economic interest in Clearwire. As a result, Clearwire could be considered a subsidiary under certain agreements relating to our indebtedness. Whether Clearwire could be considered a subsidiary under our debt agreements is subject to interpretation. In December 2010, as a result of an amendment to the Clearwire equityholders' agreement, Sprint obtained the right to unilaterally surrender voting securities to reduce its voting security percentage below 50%, which could eliminate the potential for Clearwire to be considered a subsidiary of Sprint. Until Sprint exercises this right, certain actions or defaults by Clearwire would, if viewed as a subsidiary, result in a breach of covenants, including potential cross-default provisions, under certain agreements relating to our indebtedness.
The trading price of our common stock has been and may continue to be volatile and may not reflect our actual operations and performance.
Market and industry factors may seriously harm the market price of our common stock, regardless of our actual operations and performance. Stock price volatility and sustained decreases in our share price could subject our shareholders to losses and us to takeover bids or lead to action by the NYSE. The trading price of our common stock has been, and may continue to be, subject to fluctuations in price in response to various factors, some of which are beyond our control, including, but not limited to:
•    
quarterly announcements and variations in our results of operations or those of our competitors, either alone or in comparison to analysts expectations, including announcements of subscriber counts and rates of churn that would result in downward pressure on our stock price;
•    
the availability or perceived availability of additional capital and market perceptions relating to our access to this capital;

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•    
seasonality or other variations in our subscriber base, including our rate of churn;
•    
announcements by us or our competitors of acquisitions, new products, technologies, significant contracts, commercial relationships or capital commitments;
•    
the performance of Clearwire and Clearwire's Class A common stock or speculation about the possibility of future actions we or other significant shareholders may take in connection with Clearwire;
•    
disruption to our operations or those of other companies critical to our network operations;
•    
announcements by us regarding the entering into, or termination of, material transactions;
•    
our ability to develop and market new and enhanced technologies, products and services on a timely basis, including our 4G network;
•    
recommendations by securities analysts or changes in estimates concerning us;
•    
the incurrence of additional debt, dilutive issuances of our stock, short sales or hedging of, and other derivative transactions in our common stock;
•    
any major change in our board of directors or management;
•    
litigation;
•    
changes in governmental regulations or approvals; and
•    
perceptions of general market conditions in the technology and communications industries, the U.S. economy and global market conditions.
Consolidation and competition in the wholesale market for wireline services, as well as consolidation of our roaming partners and access providers used for wireless services, could adversely affect our revenues and profitability.
Our Wireline segment competes with AT&T, Verizon, Qwest Communications, Level 3 Communications Inc., other major local incumbent operating companies, and cable operators, as well as a host of smaller competitors, in the provision of wireline services. Some of these companies have high-capacity, IP-based fiber-optic networks capable of supporting large amounts of voice and data traffic. Some of these companies claim certain cost structure advantages that, among other factors, may allow them to offer services at a price below that which we can offer profitably. In addition, consolidation by these companies could lead to fewer companies controlling access to more cell sites, enabling them to control usage and rates, which could negatively affect our revenues and profitability.
We provide wholesale services under long term contracts to cable television operators which enable these operators to provide consumer and business digital telephone services. These contracts may not be renewed as they expire, generally in the time period between 2011 and 2013. Increased competition and the significant increase in capacity resulting from new technologies and networks may drive already low prices down further. AT&T and Verizon continue to be our two largest competitors in the domestic long distance communications market. We and other long distance carriers depend heavily on local access facilities obtained from ILECs to serve our long distance subscribers, and payments to ILECs for these facilities are a significant cost of service for our Wireline segment. The long distance operations of AT&T and Verizon have cost and operational advantages with respect to these access facilities because those carriers serve significant geographic areas, including many large urban areas, as the incumbent local carrier.
In addition, our Wireless segment could be adversely affected by changes in rates and access fees that result from consolidation of our roaming partners and access providers, which could negatively affect our revenues and profitability.
The blurring of the traditional dividing lines among long distance, local, wireless, video and Internet services contribute to increased competition.
The traditional dividing lines among long distance, local, wireless, video and Internet services are increasingly becoming blurred. Through mergers, joint ventures and various service expansion strategies, major providers are striving to provide integrated services in many of the markets we serve. This trend is also reflected in changes in the regulatory environment that have encouraged competition and the offering of integrated services.
We expect competition to intensify across all of our business segments as a result of the entrance of new competitors or the expansion of services offered by existing competitors, and the rapid development of new technologies, products and services. We cannot predict which of many possible future technologies, products, or services will be important to maintain our competitive position or what expenditures we will be required to make in order to develop and provide these technologies, products or services. To the extent we do not keep pace with technological advances or fail to timely respond to changes in the competitive environment affecting our industry, we could lose market share or experience a decline in revenue, cash flows and net income. As a result of the financial strength and benefits of scale enjoyed by some of our competitors, they may be able to offer services at lower prices than we can, thereby adversely affecting our revenues, growth and profitability.

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If we are unable to continue to improve our results of operations, we face the possibility of additional charges for impairments of long-lived or indefinite-lived assets. Further, our future operating results will be impacted by our share of Clearwire's net loss or net income, which during this period of their network build-out will likely negatively affect our results of operations. The carrying value of our investment in Clearwire may be subject to impairment.
We review our wireless and wireline long-lived assets for impairment when changes in circumstances indicate that the book amount may not be recoverable. If we are unable to continue to improve our results of operations and cash flows, a review could lead to a material impairment in our consolidated financial statements. In addition, if we continue to have challenges retaining subscribers and as we continue to assess the impact of rebanding the iDEN network, management may conclude in future periods that certain CDMA and iDEN assets will never be either deployed or redeployed, in which case cash and non-cash charges that could be material to our consolidated financial statements would be recognized.
We account for our investment in Clearwire using the equity method of accounting and, as a result, we record our share of Clearwire's net income or net loss, which could adversely affect our consolidated results of operations. Clearwire disclosed it would be required to raise additional capital in the near term in order to continue its current operations, and that as of September 30, 2010, there was substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern. In December 2010, Clearwire successfully raised $1.4 billion in debt financing. As a result of this action, as of December 31, 2010, Clearwire no longer reported substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern. Clearwire's ability, however, to raise sufficient additional capital in the long-term on acceptable terms, or at all, remains uncertain. Clearwire's inability to obtain sufficient additional funding to continue its current operations may have an adverse effect on its estimated fair value based, in part, on its publicly quoted stock price. A decline in the value of Clearwire may require Sprint to evaluate the decline in relation to Sprint's carrying value of its investment in Clearwire. A conclusion by Sprint that a decline in the value of Clearwire is other than temporary could result in a material impairment in our consolidated financial statements.
If Motorola is unable or unwilling to provide us with equipment and devices in support of our iDEN-based services, as well as improvements, our operations will be adversely affected.
Motorola is our sole source for all of the devices we offer under the Nextel brand, except BlackBerry devices. Although our handset supply agreement with Motorola is structured to provide competitively-priced devices, the cost of iDEN devices is generally higher than devices that do not incorporate a similar multi-function capability. This difference may make it more difficult or costly for us to offer devices at prices that are attractive to potential subscribers. In addition, the higher cost of iDEN devices requires us to absorb a larger part of the cost of offering devices to new and existing subscribers, which may reduce our growth and profitability. Also, we must rely on Motorola to develop devices capable of supporting the features and services we offer to subscribers of services on our iDEN network and to provide maintenance and support for our iDEN-based infrastructure. A decision by Motorola to discontinue, or the inability of either company to continue manufacturing, maintaining or supporting our iDEN-based infrastructure and devices could have a material adverse effect on us. Further, our ability to complete the spectrum reconfiguration plan in connection with the FCC's Report and Order is dependent, in part, on Motorola.
We have entered into agreements with unrelated parties for certain business operations. Any difficulties experienced in these arrangements could result in additional expense, loss of subscribers and revenue, interruption of our services or a delay in the roll-out of new technology.
We have entered into agreements with unrelated parties for the day-to-day execution of services, provisioning and maintenance for our CDMA, iDEN and wireline networks, for the implementation of Network Vision, and for the development and maintenance of certain software systems necessary for the operation of our business. We also have agreements with unrelated parties to provide customer service and related support to our wireless subscribers and outsourced aspects of our wireline network and back office functions to unrelated parties. In addition, we have sublease agreements with unrelated parties for space on communications towers. As a result, we must rely on unrelated parties to perform certain of our operations and, in certain circumstances, interface with our subscribers. If these unrelated parties were unable to perform to our requirements, we would have to pursue alternative strategies to provide these services and that could result in delays, interruptions, additional expenses and loss of subscribers.
The products and services utilized by us and our suppliers and service providers may infringe on intellectual property rights owned by others.
Some of our products and services use intellectual property that we own. We also purchase products from suppliers, including device suppliers, and outsource services to service providers, including billing and customer care functions, that incorporate or utilize intellectual property. We and some of our suppliers and service providers have received, and may receive in the future, assertions and claims from third parties that the products or software utilized by us or our suppliers and service providers infringe on the patents or other intellectual property rights of these third parties. These claims could require us or an infringing supplier or service provider to cease certain activities or to cease selling the relevant products and services. These claims and assertions also could subject us to costly litigation and significant liabilities for damages or royalty payments, or require us to cease certain activities or to cease selling certain products and services.

15


For example, we obtain some of our CDMA handsets from HTC Corp. Apple Inc. has filed an action with the International Trade Commission (ITC) and with U.S District Courts accusing HTC of patent infringement. HTC has filed an action against Apple with the ITC accusing Apple of infringing HTC patents. Apple's claims against HTC, if successful, could require us to cease providing certain products.
Government regulation could adversely affect our prospects and results of operations; the FCC and state regulatory commissions may adopt new regulations or take other actions that could adversely affect our business prospects, future growth or results of operations.
The FCC and other federal, state and local, as well as international, governmental authorities have jurisdiction over our business and could adopt regulations or take other actions that would adversely affect our business prospects or results of operations.
The licensing, construction, operation, sale and interconnection arrangements of wireless telecommunications systems are regulated by the FCC and, depending on the jurisdiction, international, state and local regulatory agencies. In particular, the FCC imposes significant regulation on licensees of wireless spectrum with respect to how radio spectrum is used by licensees, the nature of the services that licensees may offer and how the services may be offered, and resolution of issues of interference between spectrum bands.
The FCC grants wireless licenses for terms of generally ten years that are subject to renewal and revocation. There is no guarantee that our licenses will be renewed. Failure to comply with FCC requirements in a given license area could result in revocation of the license for that license area.
Depending on their outcome, the FCC's proceedings regarding regulation of special access rates could affect the rates paid by our Wireless and Wireline segments for special access services in the future. Similarly, depending on their outcome, the FCC's proceedings on the regulatory classification of VoIP services could affect the intercarrier compensation rates and the level of USF contributions paid by us.
Various states are considering regulations over terms and conditions of service, including certain billing practices and consumer-related issues that may not be pre-empted by federal law. If imposed, these regulations could make it more difficult and expensive to implement national sales and marketing programs and could increase the costs of our wireless operations.
Degradation in network performance caused by compliance with government regulation, loss of spectrum or additional rules associated with the use of spectrum in any market could result in an inability to attract new subscribers or higher subscriber churn in that market, which could adversely affect our revenues and results of operations. In addition, additional costs or fees imposed by governmental regulation could adversely affect our revenues, future growth and results of operations.
Proposed regulatory developments regarding the use of “conflict” minerals mined from the Democratic Republic of Congo and adjoining countries could affect the sourcing and availability of minerals used in the manufacture of certain products, including handsets. Although we do not buy raw materials, manufacture, or produce any electronic equipment directly, the proposed regulation may affect some of our suppliers. As a result, there may only be a limited pool of suppliers who provide conflict free metals, and we cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain products in sufficient quantities or at competitive prices. Also, because our supply chain is complex, we may face reputational challenges with our customers and other stakeholders if we are unable to sufficiently verify the origins for all metals used in the products that we sell.
If our business partners and subscribers fail to meet their contractual obligations it could negatively affect our results of operations.
The current economic environment has made it difficult for businesses and consumers to obtain credit, which could cause our suppliers, distributors and subscribers to have problems meeting their contractual obligations with us. If our suppliers are unable to fulfill our orders or meet their contractual obligations with us, we may not have the services or devices available to meet the needs of our current and future subscribers, which could cause us to lose current and potential subscribers to other carriers. In addition, if our distributors are unable to stay in business, we could lose distribution points, which could negatively affect our business and results of operations. Finally, if our subscribers are unable to pay their bills or potential subscribers feel they are unable to take on additional financial obligations, they may be forced to forgo our services, which could negatively affect our results of operations.
Our business could be negatively impacted by security threats and other disruptions.
Major equipment failures, natural disasters, including severe weather, terrorist acts, cyber attacks or other breaches of network or information technology security that affect our wireline and wireless networks, including transport facilities, communications switches, routers, microwave links, cell sites or other equipment or third-party owned local and long-distance networks on which we rely, could have a material adverse effect on our operations. These events could disrupt our operations, require significant resources, result in a loss of subscribers or impair our ability to attract new subscribers, which in turn could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

16


Concerns about health risks associated with wireless equipment may reduce the demand for our services.
Portable communications devices have been alleged to pose health risks, including cancer, due to radio frequency emissions from these devices. Purported class actions and other lawsuits have been filed against numerous wireless carriers, including us, seeking not only damages but also remedies that could increase our cost of doing business. We cannot be sure of the outcome of those cases or that our business and financial condition will not be adversely affected by litigation of this nature or public perception about health risks. The actual or perceived risk of mobile communications devices could adversely affect us through a reduction in subscribers, reduced network usage per subscriber or reduced financing available to the mobile communications industry. Further research and studies are ongoing, and we cannot guarantee that additional studies will not demonstrate a link between radio frequency emissions and health concerns.
Risks Related to our Investment in Clearwire
We are a majority shareholder of Clearwire, a term we use to refer to the consolidated entity of Clearwire Corporation and its subsidiary Clearwire Communications LLC. Under this section, we have included certain important risk factors with respect to our investment in Clearwire. For more discussion of Clearwire and the risks affecting Clearwire, you should refer to Clearwire's annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2010.
Our investment in Clearwire exposes us to risks because we do not control the board, determine the strategies, manage operations or control management, including decisions relating to the build-out and operation of a 4G network, and the value of our investment in Clearwire or our financial performance may be adversely affected by decisions made by Clearwire or other large investors in Clearwire that are adverse to our interests.
Although we have the ability to nominate seven of Clearwire's 13 directors, at least one of our nominees must be an independent director. Thus, we do not control the board, and we do not manage the operations of Clearwire or control management. Clearwire has a group of investors that have been provided with representation on Clearwire's board of directors. These investors may have interests that diverge from ours or Clearwire's. Differences in views among the large investors could result in delayed decisions by Clearwire's board of directors or failure to agree on major issues. Any differences in our views or problems with respect to the operation of Clearwire could have a material adverse effect on the value of our investment in Clearwire or our business, financial condition, results of operations or cash flows. See also "Current economic conditions, our recent financial performance and our debt ratings could negatively impact our access to the capital markets resulting in less growth than planned or failure to satisfy financial covenants under our existing debt agreements. Moreover, Clearwire may be considered a subsidiary under certain agreements relating to our indebtedness."
In addition, the corporate opportunity provisions in Clearwire's restated certificate of incorporation provide that unless a director is an employee of Clearwire, the person does not have a duty to present to Clearwire a corporate opportunity of which the director becomes aware, except where the corporate opportunity is expressly offered to the director in his or her capacity as a director of Clearwire. This could enable certain Clearwire shareholders to benefit from opportunities that may otherwise be available to Clearwire, which could adversely affect Clearwire's business and our investment in Clearwire.
Clearwire's restated certificate of incorporation also expressly provides that certain shareholders and their affiliates may, and have no duty not to, engage in any businesses that are similar to or competitive with those of Clearwire, do business with Clearwire's competitors, subscribers and suppliers, and employ Clearwire's employees or officers. These shareholders or their affiliates may deploy competing wireless broadband networks or purchase broadband services from other providers. Any such actions could have a material adverse effect on Clearwire's business, financial condition, results of operations or prospects and the value of our investment in Clearwire.
Moreover, we currently rely on Clearwire to build, launch and operate a viable 4G network. Our intention is to integrate these 4G services with our products and services in a manner that preserves our time to market advantage. Clearwire's success could be affected by, among other things, its ability to offer a competitive cost structure and its ability to obtain additional financing in the amounts and at terms that enable it to continue to build a 4G network in a timely manner. Clearwire's delay in its network build and deployment or operation of their 4G network may negatively affect our ability to generate future revenues, cash flows or overall profitability from 4G services. See “Failure to complete development, testing and deployment of new technology that supports new services could affect our ability to compete in the industry. The deployment of new technology and new service offerings could result in network degradation or the loss of subscribers. In addition, the technology we use, including WiMAX, may place us at a competitive disadvantage.”
We are currently engaged in an arbitration with Clearwire relating to the pricing of service on Clearwire's 4G network for dual-mode wireless handsets used by Sprint customers, pursuant to our MVNO agreement with Clearwire. We do not expect the resolution of this matter will have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position, results of operations or operating cash flow; however, ultimate resolution of this matter could affect the pricing and competitiveness of our 4G services.

17


We may be unable to sell some or all of our investment in Clearwire quickly or at all.
Clearwire's publicly traded Class A common stock is volatile. In addition, the daily trading volume of Clearwire's Class A common stock is lower than the number of shares of Class A common stock we would hold if we exchanged all of our Clearwire Class B common stock and interests. If we should decide to sell some or all of our equity securities of Clearwire, there may not be purchasers available for any or all of our stock, or we may be forced to sell at a price that is below the then current trading price or over a significant period of time. We are also subject to certain restrictions with respect to the sale of our equity securities of Clearwire.
 
Item 1B.    
Unresolved Staff Comments
None.
 
 
Item 2.    
Properties
Our corporate headquarters are located in Overland Park, Kansas and consists of about 3,853,000 square feet.
Our gross property, plant and equipment at December 31, 2010 totaled $46.1 billion, as follows:
 
 
2010
 
(in  billions)
Wireless
$
39.2
 
Wireline
4.5
 
Corporate and other
2.4
 
Total
$
46.1
 
Properties utilized by our Wireless segment generally consist of base transceiver stations, switching equipment and towers, as well as leased and owned general office facilities and retail stores. We lease space for base station towers and switch sites for our wireless network.
Properties utilized by our Wireline segment generally consist of land, buildings, switching equipment, digital fiber optic network and other transport facilities. We have been granted easements, rights-of-way and rights-of-occupancy by railroads and other private landowners for our fiber optic network.
As of December 31, 2010, about $1.3 billion of outstanding debt, comprised of certain secured notes, financing and capital lease obligations and mortgages, is secured by $1.1 billion of gross property, plant and equipment, and other assets.
 
Item 3.    
Legal Proceedings
In December 2010, the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas granted summary judgment in favor of Sprint and the other defendants, in a class action lawsuit filed in 2003, which alleged that our 2001 and 2002 proxy statements were false and misleading in violation of federal securities laws to the extent they described new employment agreements with certain senior executives without disclosing that, according to the allegations, replacement of those executives was inevitable. No appeal was taken from that decision, and the case is now closed.
On January 6, 2011, the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas denied our motion to dismiss a shareholder lawsuit, Bennett v. Sprint Nextel Corp., that alleges that the Company and three of our former officers violated Section 10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Rule 10b-5 by failing adequately to disclose certain alleged operations difficulties subsequent to the Sprint-Nextel merger, and by purportedly issuing false and misleading statements regarding the write-down of goodwill. The complaint was originally filed in March 2009 and is allegedly brought on behalf of purchasers of company stock from October 26, 2006 to February 27, 2008. On January 20, 2011, we moved to certify the January 6th order for interlocutory appeal. We believe the complaint is without merit and intend to defend the matter vigorously. We do not expect the resolution of this matter to have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position or results of operations.
Two related shareholder derivative suits were filed against the Company and certain of our present and/or former officers and directors. The first, Murphy v. Forsee, was filed in state court in Kansas in April 2009, was removed to federal court, and was stayed by the court pending resolution of the motion to dismiss the Bennett case. The second, Randolph v. Forsee, was filed in July 2010 in state court in Kansas, was removed to federal court, and was remanded back to state court. The parties are discussing a schedule for these cases going forward in light of the pendency of the Bennett case.
We are currently engaged in an arbitration with Clearwire relating to the pricing of service on Clearwire's 4G network for dual-mode wireless handsets used by Sprint customers, pursuant to our MVNO agreement with Clearwire. We do not expect the resolution of this matter will have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position or results of operations.

18


We are involved in certain legal proceedings that are described in note 11 of Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in this report. During the quarter ended December 31, 2010, there were no material developments in the status of these legal proceedings. Various other suits, proceedings and claims, including purported class actions typical for a large business enterprise, are pending against us or our subsidiaries. While it is not possible to determine the ultimate disposition of each of these proceedings and whether they will be resolved consistent with our beliefs, we expect that the outcome of such proceedings, individually or in the aggregate, will not have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations.
 
 
Item 4.    
(Removed and Reserved)

19


Executive Officers of the Registrant
The following people are serving as our executive officers as of February 24, 2011.These executive officers were elected to serve until their successors have been elected. There is no familial relationship between any of our executive officers and directors.
 
Name
 
Business Experience
 
Current
Position
Held Since 
 
Age
Daniel R. Hesse……
 
Chief Executive Officer and President. He was appointed Chief Executive Officer, President and a member of the Board of Directors on December 17, 2007. He served as Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Embarq Corporation from May 2006 to December 2007. He served as President of our local telecommunications business from June 2005 to May 2006. He served as Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Terabeam Corporation, a Seattle-based communications company, from March 2000 to June 2004. He served as President and Chief Executive Officer of AT&T Wireless Services, a division of AT&T, from 1997 to 2000.
 
2007
 
57
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Robert H. Brust……
 
Chief Financial Officer. He was appointed Chief Financial Officer in May 2008. He served as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Eastman Kodak Company from 2000 to 2007. He also served two years as Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Unisys Corporation. Earlier in his career, he held a series of operations and finance leadership positions at General Electric, concluding his service there as Vice President, Finance for G.E. Plastics.
 
2008
 
67
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Keith O. Cowan……
 
President - Strategic Planning and Corporate Initiatives. He was appointed President - Strategic Planning and Corporate Initiatives in July 2007. He also served as Acting President - CDMA from November 2008 to May 2009. He served as Executive Vice President of Genuine Parts Company from January 2007 to July 2007. He held several key positions with BellSouth Corporation from 1996 to January 2007, including Chief Planning and Development Officer, Chief Field Operations Officer, President - Marketing and Product Management and President - Interconnection Services. He was previously an associate and partner at the law firm of Alston & Bird LLC.
 
2007
 
54
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Robert L. Johnson……
 
Chief Service Officer. He was appointed Chief Service Officer in October 2007. He served as President - Northeast Region from September 2006 to October 2007. He served as Senior Vice President - Consumer Sales, Service and Repair from August 2005 to August 2006. He served as Senior Vice President - National Field Operations of Nextel from February 2002 to July 2005.
 
2007
 
52
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Robert H. Johnson……
 
President - Consumer. He was appointed President - Consumer in May 2009. He co-founded and served as Chief Operating Officer of Sotto Wireless Inc. from February 2006 to January 2009. Prior to joining Sotto Wireless, he served in various executive positions at AT&T Wireless Services, Inc. since 1988, most recently as Executive Vice President, National Operations.
 
2009
 
56
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Charles R. Wunsch……
 
General Counsel and Corporate Secretary. He was appointed General Counsel and Corporate Secretary in October 2008. He served as our Vice President for corporate transactions and business law and has served in various legal positions at the company since 1990. He was previously an associate and partner at the law firm Watson, Ess, Marshall, and Enggas.
 
2008
 
55
 
 

20


Name
 
Business Experience
 
Current
Position
Held Since 
 
Age
Paget L. Alves……
 
President - Business Markets. He was appointed President - Business Markets in February 2009. He served as President - Sales and Distribution from March 2008 until February 2009, and as Regional President from September 2006 through March 2008. He served as Senior Vice President, Enterprise Markets from January 2006 through September 2006. He served as our President, Strategic Market from November 2003 through January 2006.
 
2009
 
56
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Steven L. Elfman……
 
President - Network Operations and Wholesale. He was appointed President - Network Operations and Wholesale in May 2008. He served as President and Chief Operating Officer of Motricity, a mobile data technology company, from January 2008 to May 2008 and as Executive Vice President of Infospace Mobile (currently Motricity) from July 2003 to December 2007. He was an independent consultant working with Accenture Ltd., a consulting company, from May 2003 to July 2003. He served as Executive Vice President of Operations of Terabeam Corporation, a Seattle-based communications company, from May 2000 to May 2003, and he served as Chief Information Officer of AT&T Wireless from June 1997 to May 2000.
 
2008
 
55
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Danny L. Bowman……
 
President - Integrated Solutions Group. He was appointed President - Integrated Solutions Group in September 2009. He served as President - iDEN from June 2008 to August 2009. He served in various executive positions including Product Development and Management, Sales, Marketing and General Management since 1997.
 
2009
 
45
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Matthew Carter……
 
President - 4G. He was appointed President - 4G in January 2010. He served as Senior Vice President, Boost Mobile from April 2008 until January 2010 and as Senior Vice President, Base Management from December 2006 until April 2008. Prior to joining Sprint, he served as Senior Vice President of Marketing at PNC Financial Services.
 
2010
 
50
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ryan H. Siurek……
 
Vice President - Controller. He was appointed Vice President, Controller in November 2009. He served as Vice President and Assistant Controller from January 2009 to November 2009. Prior to joining Sprint, he worked for LyondellBasell Industries, a chemical manufacturing company, from January 2004 through January 2009, where he held various executive level finance and accounting positions, including Controller - European Operations.
 
2009
 
39
 
 
The following individual has been chosen to serve as an executive officer. There is no familial relationship between Mr. Euteneuer and any of our executive officers or directors.
Name
 
Business Experience
 
Start Date 
 
Age
Joseph J. Euteneuer……
 
Mr. Euteneuer has been serving since September 12, 2008 as Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer of Qwest, a telecommunications carrier providing local and long distance voice, data and internet wireline services as well as wireless and digital television services through certain partnerships. Previously, Mr. Euteneuer served as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc., a satellite radio provider, from 2002 until September 2008 after it merged with SIRIUS Satellite Radio, Inc. Prior to joining XM, Mr. Euteneuer held various management positions at Comcast Corporation and its subsidiary, Broadnet Europe.
 
Hire date to be determined
 
 
55
 
 

21


PART II
 
 
Item 5.    
Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.
Common Share Data
The principal trading market for our Series 1 common stock is the NYSE. Our Series 2 common stock is not publicly traded. The high and low Sprint Series 1 common stock prices, as reported on the NYSE composite are as follows:
 
 
2010 Market Price
 
2009 Market Price
 
High
 
Low
 
End of Period
 
High
 
Low
 
End of Period
Series 1 common stock
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
First quarter
$
4.23
 
 
$
3.10
 
 
$
3.80
 
 
$
4.20
 
 
$
1.83
 
 
$
3.57
 
Second quarter
5.31
 
 
3.81
 
 
4.24
 
 
5.94
 
 
3.49
 
 
4.81
 
Third quarter
5.08
 
 
3.82
 
 
4.63
 
 
4.91
 
 
3.47
 
 
3.95
 
Fourth quarter
4.88
 
 
3.70
 
 
4.23
 
 
4.41
 
 
2.78
 
 
3.66
 
Number of Shareholders of Record
As of February 18, 2011, we had about 48,000 Series 1 common stock record holders, no Series 2 common stock record holders and no non-voting common stock record holders.
Dividends
We did not declare any dividends on our common shares in 2008, 2009 or 2010. We are currently restricted from paying cash dividends by the terms of our revolving bank credit facility as described under Item 7 “Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - Liquidity and Capital Resources - Liquidity.”
Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
None.
Performance Graph
The graph below compares the yearly change in the cumulative total shareholder return for our Series 1 common stock with the S&P® 500 Stock Index and the Dow Jones U.S. Telecommunications Index for the five-year period from December 31, 2005 to December 31, 2010. The graph assumes an initial investment of $100 on December 31, 2005 and reinvestment of all dividends.
5-Year Total Return
Value of $100 Invested on December 31, 2005
 
 
2005
 
2006
 
2007
 
2008
 
2009
 
2010
Sprint Nextel
$
100.00
 
 
$
88.46
 
 
$
61.76
 
 
$
8.61
 
 
$
17.22
 
 
$
19.90
 
S&P 500
$
100.00
 
 
$
115.79
 
 
$
122.16
 
 
$
76.96
 
 
$
97.33
 
 
$
111.99
 
Dow Jones U.S. Telecom Index
$
100.00
 
 
$
136.83
 
 
$
150.57
 
 
$
100.98
 
 
$
110.92
 
 
$
130.60
 
 

22


Item 6.    
Selected Financial Data
The selected financial data presented below is not comparable for all periods presented primarily as a result of transactions such as the acquisitons of Nextel Partners, Inc., Virgin Mobile USA, Inc. (Virgin Mobile) and Affiliates, as well as the November 2008 contribution of our next generation wireless network to Clearwire. The acquired companies' results of operations subsequent to their acquisition dates are included in our consolidated financial statements. Embarq Corporation, our former local segment, which was spun-off in 2006, is shown as discontinued operations. The primary reason for the increase in net operating revenues for 2010 was related to the additional subscribers obtained in our 2009 acquisitions and the 783,000 retail wireless subscribers added in 2010 which were partially offset by a decrease in revenue as a result of our losses of subscribers in prior periods. We lost approximately 1.0 million retail wireless subscribers in 2009, 5.1 million in 2008 and 658,000 in 2007, which caused the majority of the reduction in net operating revenues in those periods.
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2010
 
2009
 
2008
 
2007
 
2006
 
(in millions, except per share amounts)
Results of Operations
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net operating revenues
$
32,563
 
 
$
32,260
 
 
$
35,635
 
 
$
40,146
 
 
$
41,003
 
Goodwill impairment
 
 
 
 
963
 
 
29,649
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
6,248
 
 
7,416
 
 
8,407
 
 
8,933
 
 
9,592
 
Operating (loss) income(1) 
(595
)
 
(1,398
)
 
(2,642
)
 
(28,740
)
 
2,484
 
(Loss) income from continuing operations(1)(2) 
(3,465
)
 
(2,436
)
 
(2,796
)
 
(29,444
)
 
995
 
Discontinued operations, net
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
334
 
(Loss) Earnings per Share and Dividends
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic and diluted (loss) earnings per common share Continuing  operations(1)(2) 
$
(1.16
)
 
$
(0.84
)
 
$
(0.98
)
 
$
(10.24
)
 
$
0.34
 
Discontinued operations
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
0.11
 
Dividends per common share(3) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
0.10
 
 
0.10
 
Financial Position
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total assets
$
51,654
 
 
$
55,424
 
 
$
58,550
 
 
$
64,295
 
 
$
97,161
 
Property, plant and equipment, net
15,214
 
 
18,280
 
 
22,373
 
 
26,636
 
 
25,868
 
Intangible assets, net
22,704
 
 
23,462
 
 
22,886
 
 
28,139
 
 
60,057
 
Total debt, capital lease and financing obligations (including equity unit notes)
20,191
 
 
21,061
 
 
21,610
 
 
22,130
 
 
22,154
 
Shareholders' equity
14,546
 
 
18,095
 
 
19,915
 
 
22,445
 
 
53,441
 
Cash Flow Data
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net cash provided by operating activities
$
4,815
 
 
$
4,891
 
 
$
6,179
 
 
$
9,245
 
 
$
10,055
 
Capital expenditures
1,935
 
 
1,603
 
 
3,882
 
 
6,322
 
 
7,556
 
_______________
 
(1)    In 2010, operating loss improved $803 million primarily due to the increase in net operating revenues of $303 million as described above in addition to decreases in operating expenses of $500 million as a result of our cost cutting initiatives in prior periods. In 2009, we recognized net charges of $389 million ($248 million after tax) primarily related to severance exit costs and asset impairments other than goodwill. In 2008, we recorded net charges of $936 million ($586 million after tax) primarily related to asset impairments other than goodwill, severance and exit costs, and merger and integration costs. In 2007, we recognized net charges of $956 million ($590 million after tax) primarily related to merger and integration costs, asset impairments other than goodwill, and severance and exit costs. In 2006, we recognized net charges of $620 million ($381 million after tax) primarily related to merger and integration costs, asset impairments, and severance and exit costs.
(2)    During 2010, the Company did not recognize significant tax benefits associated with federal and state net operating losses generated during the period. As a result, the Company recognized an increase in the valuation allowance on deferred tax assets affecting the income tax provision by approximately $1.4 billion and $281 million for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.
(3)    We did not declare any dividends on our common shares in 2010, 2009 and 2008. In each quarter of 2007 and 2006, the dividend was $0.025 per share.

23


Item 7.    
Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
 
OVERVIEW     
Business Strategies and Key Priorities
Sprint is a communications company offering a comprehensive range of wireless and wireline communications products and services that are designed to meet the needs of individual consumers, businesses, government subscribers and resellers. The communications industry has been and will continue to be highly competitive on the basis of price, the types of services and devices offered and the quality of service. As discussed below in “Effects on our Wireless Business of Postpaid Subscriber Losses,” the Company has experienced significant losses of subscribers in the critical postpaid wireless market since the third quarter 2006, but, as a result of steps taken to attract and retain such subscribers, has reduced net subscriber losses beginning in 2009.
Our business strategy is to be responsive to changing customer mobility demands by being innovative and differentiated in the marketplace. Our future growth plans and strategy revolve around achieving the following three key priorities:
•    
Improve the customer experience;
•    
Strengthen our brands; and
•    
Generate operating cash flow.    
We have reduced confusion over pricing plans and complex bills with our Simply Everything® and Everything Data plans and our Any Mobile AnytimeSM feature that offer savings compared to our competition. In addition to savings offered to consumers, Business Advantage pricing plans are available to our business subscribers who can also take advantage of Any Mobile AnytimeSM with certain plans. To simplify and improve the customer experience, we introduced the Sprint Free Guarantee, which gives any customer opening a new line of service the chance to try Sprint for 30 days for free (excluding overages and premium services not included in price plans). In addition, we have continued to offer Ready Now, which trains our customers before they leave the store on how to use their mobile devices. For our business customers, we aim to increase their productivity by providing differentiated services that utilize the advantages of combining IP networks with wireless technology. This differentiation enables us to acquire and retain both wireline, wireless and combined wireline-wireless subscribers on our networks. We have also continued to focus on further improving customer care. We implemented initiatives that are designed to improve call center processes and procedures, and standardized our performance measures through various metrics, including customer satisfaction ratings with respect to customer care, first call resolution and calls per subscriber.
Our product strategy is to provide our customers with a broad array of device selections and applications and services that run on these devices to meet the growing needs of customer mobility. Our multi-functional device portfolio includes devices such as the Samsung Epic 4G Android device, which can also act as a mobile hotspot for up to five wireless fidelity (WiFi) enabled devices and the world's first 3G/4G Android device, the HTC EVO 4G, which can also act as a mobile hotspot for up to eight WiFi enabled devices. Our portfolio also includes the Motorola i1 which is the world's first Direct Connect® Android-powered smartphone. Other devices in our portfolio are the HTC Hero and the Samsung Moment with Google, the BlackBerry 8530 and BlackBerry® Bold, the Samsung Seek, the Rumor Touch from LG and the Touch Pro 2 from HTC. Our mobile broadband device portfolio consists of devices such as the Overdrive 3G/4G Mobile Hotspot, which allows the connection of up to five WiFi enabled devices, the Sprint 4G USB U1901 and the Ovation U760 by Novatel Wireless. We support the open development of applications and content on our network platforms. We also enable a variety of third-party providers, location-based services and business and consumer product providers through our machine-to-machine initiative. The machine-to-machine initiative incorporates selling, marketing, product development and operations resources to address growing non-traditional data needs, which covers a wide variety of products and services including remote monitoring, telematics, in-vehicle devices, e-readers, specialized medical devices and other original equipment manufacturer devices.
Our prepaid portfolio launched additional brands in the second quarter 2010. Sprint's prepaid portfolio currently includes four brands, each designed to appeal to specific customer segments. Boost Mobile serves customers who are voice and text messaging-centric with its popular $50 Monthly Unlimited plan with Shrinkage service where bills are reduced after six on-time payments. Virgin Mobile serves customers who are device and data-oriented with Beyond Talk plans and our broadband plan, Broadband2Go, that offer consumers control, flexibility and connectivity through various communication vehicles. Assurance Wireless provides eligible customers, who meet income requirements or are receiving government assistance, with a free wireless phone and 250 free minutes of national local and long-distance monthly service. Common CentsSM Mobile caters to budget-conscious customers with 7-cent minutes that Round Down and 7-cent text messages.
Sprint has focused its wholesale business as a reseller of new converged services that leverage the Sprint network but are sold under the wholesaler's brand by providing a suite of integrated and customizeable value-added solutions focused on assisting our customers to improve their business. We have adopted new pricing models, made it easier for our wholesalers to acquire access and resell our services by bundling wireless and wireline services and focused our attention to partners with existing distribution channels. In addition, we have strengthened our sales efforts and expanded to new markets in the rapidly

24


growing machine-to-machine space.
In addition to our brand and customer-oriented goals, we have also taken steps, beginning in 2008, to generate increased operating cash flow through competitive new rate plans for postpaid and prepaid subscribers, multi-branded strategies and reductions to our cost structure to align with the reduced revenues from fewer postpaid subscribers. Our cost reductions are primarily attributable to reductions in capital spending, workforce reductions, call center closures as a result of fewer calls per subscriber and limiting marketing spend to focused initiatives. We believe these actions, as well as our continued efforts to reduce other operating expenses, will allow us to continue to maintain an adequate cash position.
Network Vision
In December 2010, Sprint announced Network Vision, a multi-year network infrastructure initiative intended to provide customers with an enhanced network experience by improving voice quality and providing faster data speeds, while creating network flexibility, reducing operating costs, and improving environmental sustainability by enabling the aggregation of multiple spectrum bands onto a single multi-mode base station. In addition to implementing these multi-mode base stations, this plan encompasses next-generation push-to-talk technology with broadband capabilities and the integration of multi-mode chipsets into smartphones, tablets and other broadband devices, including machine-to-machine capabilities. Consolidating and optimizing the use of Sprint's 800 MHz, 1.9GHz and potentially other spectrum (such as the 2.5GHz owned by Clearwire) into multi-mode stations should allow Sprint to repurpose spectrum to enhance coverage, particularly around the in-building experience. The multi-mode technology also utilizes software-based solutions with interchangeable hardware to provide greater network flexibility, which allows for opportunities to evaluate new 4G technologies to better utilize Sprint's available spectrum.
The first stages of equipment testing are expected to begin in early 2011 and, if successful, broad scale deployment is expected in the latter half of 2011 with an expected completion time of anywhere from three to five years. As Network Vision is implemented, the size and power required to operate cell sites used by Sprint is expected to be reduced. Sprint expects the plan to bring financial benefit to the company through convergence to one common network, which is expected to reduce network maintenance and operating costs through capital efficiencies, reduced energy costs, lower roaming expenses, backhaul savings and the eventual reduction in total cell sites and also by reducing the cost of handling expanded data traffic.
Sprint has entered into agreements relating to Network Vision to deploy a cost-effective, innovative network to enhance the voice quality and data speeds by consolidating multiple technologies into one network. The successful testing and deployment related to these changes in technology will result in incremental charges during the period of implementation including, but not limited to, an increase in depreciation and amortization associated with existing iDEN assets due to changes in our estimates of the remaining useful lives of long-lived assets, and the expected timing of asset retirement obligations, which could have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements. The successful testing of push-to-talk technology on the CDMA network in our test markets in 2011 would result in increased depreciation and amortization expense expected to range from $1.0 billion to $1.5 billion if implementation can be completed by the end of 2014. Successful completion of Network Vision earlier or later than the end of 2014 would result in an acceleration or delay, respectively, of these depreciation and amortization costs.
Effects on our Wireless Business of Postpaid Subscriber Losses
The following table shows annual net additions (losses) of postpaid subscribers for the past five years, excluding subscribers obtained through business combinations.
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2010
 
2009
 
2008
 
2007
 
2006
 
( in thousands)
Total net additions (losses) of postpaid subscribers
(855
)
 
(3,546
)
 
(4,073
)
 
(1,224
)
 
279
 
As shown by the table below under “Results of Operations,” Wireless segment earnings represents approximately 80% of Sprint's total consolidated segment earnings. The wireless industry is subject to intense competition to acquire and retain subscribers of wireless services. Most markets in which we operate have high rates of penetration for wireless services. Wireless carriers accordingly must attract a greater proportion of new subscribers from competitors rather than from first time subscribers. Within the Wireless segment, postpaid wireless voice and data services represent the most significant contributors to earnings, and are driven by the number of postpaid subscribers to our services, as well as the average revenue per subscriber or user (ARPU).

25


Beginning in 2008, in conjunction with changes in senior management, Sprint undertook steps to address and reduce postpaid subscriber losses. Perceptions in the marketplace, in part as a result of the subscriber losses themselves, as well as other factors, reduced the Sprint brand's effectiveness in attracting and retaining customers. Steps were taken to improve the Sprint networks, as well as to improve the quality of Sprint's customer care experience, as confirmed by independent comparisons with competitors. Steps were also taken to improve the credit quality mix of our subscriber base and to improve our financial stability, including cost control actions, which have resulted in our continuing strong cash flow from operations. In addition, beginning in 2008 and continuing through 2010, we have undertaken initiatives to strengthen the Sprint brand. We continue to increase market awareness of the improvements that have been achieved in the customer experience, including the speed and dependability of our networks. We have also introduced new devices improving our overall lineup and providing a competitive portfolio for customer selection, as well as competitive new rate plans providing simplicity and value. We believe these actions had a favorable impact on net postpaid subscriber losses in 2009 and 2010, and we expect these to further improve our subscriber results.
Beginning in the second quarter 2009 and continuing through 2010, the Company has begun to see a reduction in our net loss of postpaid subscribers. For the year ended December 31, 2010, net postpaid subscriber losses of 855,000 improved by 2.7 million, or 76% compared to losses of 3.5 million in 2009.
The net loss of postpaid subscribers in 2009 and 2010 can be expected to cause wireless service revenue in 2011 to be approximately $2.4 billion lower than it would have been had those subscribers not been lost. Notwithstanding our historical postpaid subscriber losses, consolidated service revenue has begun to stabilize primarily as a result of increased service revenue associated with our prepaid wireless offerings, including the acquisition of Virgin Mobile in the fourth quarter of 2009. As a result, Sprint's prepaid wireless offerings, as well as cost controls that have been implemented, will continue to partially offset the effects of net postpaid subscriber losses, but are unlikely to be sufficient to sustain the Company's level of results from operations and cash flows unless we are successful in further improving our postpaid subscriber results. If our trend of improved postpaid subscriber results does not continue, it could have a material negative impact on our financial condition, results of operations and liquidity in 2011 and beyond. The Company believes the actions that have been taken, as described above, and that continue to be taken in marketing, customer service, device offerings, and network quality, should continue to reduce the number of net postpaid subscriber losses experienced during 2011.
 
 
RESULTS OF OPERATIONS  
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2010
 
2009
 
2008(1)
 
 
(in millions)
Wireless segment earnings
$
4,531
 
 
$
5,198
 
 
$
6,776
 
Wireline segment earnings
1,090
 
 
1,221
 
 
1,175
 
Corporate, other and eliminations
12
 
 
(12
)
 
(287
)
Consolidated segment earnings
5,633
 
 
6,407
 
 
7,664
 
Depreciation and amortization
(6,248
)
 
(7,416
)
 
(8,407
)
Goodwill impairment
 
 
 
 
(963
)
Merger and integration expenses
 
 
 
 
(130
)
Other, net
20
 
 
(389
)
 
(806
)
Operating loss
(595
)
 
(1,398
)
 
(2,642
)
Interest expense, net
(1,464
)
 
(1,450
)
 
(1,362
)
Equity in losses of unconsolidated investments, net
(1,286
)
 
(803
)
 
(145
)
Other income, net
46
 
 
157
 
 
89
 
Income tax (expense) benefit
(166
)
 
1,058
 
 
1,264
 
Net loss
$
(3,465
)
 
$
(2,436
)
 
$
(2,796
)
 ________
(1)    Consolidated results of operations include the results of our next-generation wireless broadband network, which was contributed to Clearwire in a transaction that closed on November 28, 2008.
Consolidated segment earnings decreased $774 million, or 12%, in 2010 compared to 2009 and $1.26 billion, or 16%, in 2009 compared to 2008. Consolidated segment earnings consist of our Wireless and Wireline segments, which are discussed below, and Corporate, other and eliminations. Corporate, other and eliminations improved $275 million for 2009 compared to 2008 primarily as a result of costs incurred related to the build-up of our next-generation wireless broadband network in 2008 that are no longer being incurred in 2009 due to the close of the transaction with Clearwire in late 2008.

26


Depreciation and Amortization Expense
Depreciation expense decreased $753 million, or 13%, in 2010 compared to 2009 and $137 million, or 2%, in 2009 compared to 2008 primarily due to a reduction in the replacement rate of capital additions resulting from reduced capital spending associated with our cost control actions beginning in 2008. The average annual capital expenditures for the three years ended 2007 were approximately $6.3 billion as compared to average annual capital expenditures of $2.5 billion for the three years ended 2010. Amortization expense declined $415 million, or 26%, in 2010 compared to 2009 and $854 million, or 35%, in 2009 as compared to 2008, primarily due to reductions in amortization of customer relationship intangible assets as a result of those related to the 2005 acquisition of Nextel becoming fully amortized. These reductions were partially offset by an increase in amortization related to customer relationship intangible assets acquired in connection with the iPCS, Inc. (iPCS) and Virgin Mobile acquisitions in the fourth quarter 2009. Customer relationships are amortized using the sum-of-the-years'-digits method, resulting in higher amortization rates in early periods that decline over time.
Goodwill Impairment and Merger and Integration Expenses
The Company recognized a non-cash goodwill impairment of $963 million during 2008. The impaired goodwill was primarily attributable to the Company's acquisition of Nextel in 2005 and reflects the reduction in the estimated fair value of Sprint's wireless reporting unit subsequent to the acquisition resulting from, among other factors, net losses of postpaid subscribers. Merger and integration expenses decreased $130 million, or 100%, in 2009 compared to 2008 as integration activities were completed during 2008.
Other, net
The following table provides additional information of items included in “Other, net” for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008.
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2010
 
2009
 
2008
 
(in millions)
Severance and exit costs
$
(8
)
 
$
(400
)
 
$
(355
)
Asset impairments
(125
)
 
(47
)
 
(480
)
Gains from asset dispositions and exchanges
69
 
 
68
 
 
29
 
Other
84
 
 
(10
)
 
 
Total
$
20
 
 
$
(389
)
 
$
(806
)
Other, net improved $409 million, or 105%, in 2010 compared to 2009 and $417 million, or 52%, in 2009 compared to 2008. During 2010 we recognized $8 million of severance and exit costs primarily related to exit costs incurred in the second and fourth quarter 2010 associated with vacating certain office space which is no longer being utilized. We recognized $400 million and $355 million in 2009 and 2008, respectively, of severance and exit costs related to the separation of employees and organizational realignment initiatives. Asset impairments increased by $78 million, or 166%, in 2010 compared to 2009 and decreased $433 million, or 90%, in 2009 compared to 2008. Asset impairments primarily relate to assets that are no longer necessary for management's strategic plans. In 2010 and 2009 these costs were primarily related to network asset equipment. Asset impairments in 2008 also include previously recognized cell site development costs. Gains from asset dispositions and exchanges for 2010, 2009, and 2008 are primarily related to spectrum exchange transactions. Other increased $94 million primarily due to an increase in benefits resulting from favorable developments relating to access cost disputes with certain exchange carriers in 2010 as compared to 2009.
Interest Expense
Interest expense increased $14 million, or 1%, in 2010 as compared to 2009. This increase was primarily due to higher effective interest rates on our average long-term debt balances and increased costs on our revolving credit facilities, which include the accelerated amortization of previously unamortized debt issuance costs from the retirement of our former credit facility in May 2010 partially offset by reductions in interest expense previously recorded as a result of favorable tax outcomes. Interest expense increased $88 million, or 7%, in 2009 as compared to 2008, as fewer capital projects led to a decrease of $111 million of capitalized interest partially offset by a decrease of $56 million related to a $1.5 billion decline in the weighted average long-term debt balance between the comparative periods. The effective interest rate on the weighted average long-term debt balance of $20.6 billion, $21.4 billion and $22.9 billion was 7.2%, 6.8% and 6.6% for 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively. See “Liquidity and Capital Resources” for more information on the Company's financing activities.

27


Equity in Losses of Unconsolidated Investments, net
This item consists mainly of our proportionate share of losses from our equity method investments. Equity losses associated with the investment in Clearwire consists of Sprint's share of Clearwire's net loss and other adjustments such as gains or losses associated with the dilution of Sprint's ownership interest resulting from Clearwire's equity issuances. Equity in losses from Clearwire were $1.3 billion, $803 million, and $142 million for 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively. The 2009 equity in losses of Clearwire include a pre-tax dilution loss of $154 million ($96 million after tax) recognized in the first quarter 2009, representing the finalization of ownership percentages associated with the formation of Clearwire, which was subject to change based on the trading price of Clearwire stock during the 90 days subsequent to the November 2008 closing.
Clearwire owns and operates a next generation mobile broadband network that provides high-speed residential and mobile internet access services and residential voice services in communities throughout the country. Clearwire is an early stage company, and as such, has heavily invested in building its network and acquiring other assets necessary to expand the business during 2009 and 2010, which has resulted in increased operating losses and reduced liquidity. We expect Clearwire to continue to generate significant net losses in the near term as it executes its business plan.
Other income, net
The following table provides additional information of items included in “Other income, net” for each of the three years ended December 31, 2010.
 
 
Year Ended December 31, 
 
2010
 
2009
 
2008
 
(in millions)
Interest income
$
35
 
 
$
34
 
 
$
97
 
Realized loss from investments
(3
)
 
(29
)
 
(24
)
Gain on previously held non-controlling interest in Virgin Mobile
 
 
151
 
 
 
Other
14
 
 
1
 
 
16
 
Total
$
46
 
 
$
157
 
 
$
89
 
Interest income remained relatively stable in 2010, as compared to 2009. Interest income decreased $63 million, or 65%, in 2009 as compared to 2008, primarily due to lower interest rates. Realized loss from investments decreased $26 million, or 90%, in 2010, as compared to 2009 primarily due to fewer sales of marketable securities. As a result of the acquisition of Virgin Mobile, a non-cash gain of $151 million ($92 million after tax) was recognized in the fourth quarter 2009 related to the estimated fair value over net carrying value of our previously held non-controlling interest in Virgin Mobile.
Income Tax (Expense) Benefit
The consolidated effective tax rate was an expense of approximately 5% in 2010 and a benefit of approximately 30% and 31% in 2009 and 2008, respectively. The income tax expense for 2010 and the benefit for 2009 include a $1.4 billion and $281 million net increase to the valuation allowance for federal and state deferred tax assets related to net operating loss carryforwards generated during the periods. We do not expect to record significant tax benefits on future net operating losses until our circumstances justify the recognition of such benefits. The 2008 income tax benefit includes $278 million related to non-cash goodwill impairment as substantially all of the charges are not separately deductible for tax purposes. Additional information related to items impacting the effective tax rates can be found in note 10 of Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
 
Segment Earnings - Wireless
Wireless segment earnings are primarily a function of wireless service revenue, costs to acquire subscribers, network and interconnection costs to serve those subscribers and other Wireless segment operating expenses. The costs to acquire our subscribers include the net cost at which we sell our devices, referred to as subsidies, as well as the marketing and sales costs incurred to attract those subscribers. Network costs primarily represent switch and cell site costs and interconnection costs, which generally consist of per-minute usage fees and roaming fees paid to other carriers. The remaining costs associated with operating the Wireless segment include the costs to operate our customer care organization and administrative support. Wireless service revenue, costs to acquire subscribers, and variable network and interconnection costs fluctuate with the changes in our subscriber base and their related usage, but some cost elements do not fluctuate in the short term with these changes. The following table provides an overview of the results of operations of our Wireless segment for each of the three years ended December 31, 2010.
 

28


 
Year Ended December 31,
Wireless Earnings
2010
 
2009
 
2008
 
(in millions)
Postpaid
$
21,921
 
 
$
23,205
 
 
$
25,994
 
Prepaid
3,756
 
 
2,081
 
 
1,498
 
Retail service revenue
25,677
 
 
25,286
 
 
27,492
 
Wholesale, affiliate and other revenue
217
 
 
546
 
 
943
 
Total service revenue
25,894
 
 
25,832
 
 
28,435
 
Cost of services (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)
(8,288
)
 
(8,384
)
 
(8,745
)
Service gross margin
17,606
 
 
17,448
 
 
19,690
 
Service gross margin percentage
68
 %
 
68
 %
 
69
 %
Equipment revenue
2,703
 
 
1,954
 
 
1,992
 
Cost of products
(6,965
)
 
(5,545
)
 
(4,859
)
Equipment net subsidy
(4,262
)
 
(3,591
)
 
(2,867
)
Equipment net subsidy percentage
(158
)%
 
(184
)%
 
(144
)%
Selling, general and administrative expense
(8,813
)
 
(8,659
)
 
(10,047
)
Wireless segment earnings
$
4,531
 
 
$
5,198
 
 
$
6,776
 
Service Revenue
Our Wireless segment generates revenues from the sale of wireless services, the sale of wireless devices and accessories and the sale of wholesale and other services. Service revenue consists of fixed monthly recurring charges, variable usage charges and miscellaneous fees such as activation fees, directory assistance, roaming, equipment protection, late payment and early termination charges and certain regulatory related fees, net of service credits. The ability of our Wireless segment to generate service revenues is primarily a function of:
•    
revenue generated from each subscriber, which in turn is a function of the types and amount of services utilized by each subscriber and the rates charged for those services; and
•    
the number of subscribers that we serve, which in turn is a function of our ability to acquire new and retain existing subscribers.
Retail comprises those subscribers to whom Sprint directly provides wireless services on our networks or networks we utilize through MVNO relationships, such as our relationship with Clearwire, whether those services are provided on a postpaid or a prepaid basis. Retail service revenue increased $391 million, or 2%, in 2010 as compared to 2009 and decreased $2.2 billion, or 8% in 2009 as compared to 2008. The increase in retail service revenue was primarily driven by attracting subscribers to the Company's National Boost Monthly Unlimited prepaid plan in addition to service revenue related to the subscribers acquired through our fourth quarter 2009 acquisitions of Virgin Mobile and iPCS. This increase in retail service revenue was partially offset by a decrease in postpaid service revenue driven by a reduction in the Company's average number of postpaid subscribers of approximately 1.4 million, or 4%, in 2010 as compared to 2009. The majority of the decline in 2009 as compared to 2008 is primarily due to a decrease in postpaid service revenue driven by a reduction in the Company's average number of postpaid subscribers of approximately 4.1 million, or 11%, for the year ended December 31, 2009 partially offset by an increase in prepaid revenue primarily driven by attracting subscribers to the Company's National Boost Monthly Unlimited prepaid plan.
 
Wholesale and affiliates are those subscribers who are served through MVNO and affiliate relationships, such as our relationship with Clearwire, and other arrangements through which wireless services are sold by Sprint to other companies that resell those services to subscribers. Wholesale, affiliate and other revenues, in total, decreased $329 million, or 60%, for 2010 as compared to 2009, and $397 million, or 42%, for 2009 as compared to 2008. The majority of the decrease in 2010 as compared to 2009 was due to the transfer of 5.4 million subscribers from wholesale and affiliates into postpaid and prepaid classifications as a result of the fourth quarter 2009 acquisitions of Virgin Mobile and iPCS. The remaining decline in 2010 as compared to 2009 was primarily due to losses from two of our large MVNOs throughout 2009 in addition to lower revenues received from services provided through our machine-to-machine initiative. The decrease in 2009 as compared to 2008 was primarily due to losses from two of our large MVNOs during 2009. Approximately 41% of our wholesale and affiliate subscribers represent a growing number of devices that utilize our network under our machine-to-machine initiative. These devices generate revenue from non-contract usage which varies depending on the machine-to-machine service being utilized. Average revenue per subscriber for our open-device machine-to-machine services is generally significantly lower than revenue from other wholesale and affiliate subscribers; however, the cost to service these customers is also lower resulting in a higher profit margin as a percent of revenue.

29


Average Monthly Service Revenue per Subscriber and Subscriber Trends
The table below summarizes average number of retail subscribers and average revenue per subscriber for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008. Additional information about the number of subscribers, net additions to subscribers, average monthly service revenue per subscriber and average rates of monthly postpaid and prepaid customer churn for each quarter since the first quarter 2008 may be found in the table on the following page.
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2010
 
2009
 
2008
 
(subscribers in thousands)
Average postpaid subscribers(1) 
33,249
 
 
34,640
 
 
38,752
 
Average prepaid subscribers(1) 
11,272
 
 
5,313
 
 
4,135
 
Average monthly service revenue per subscriber(2):
 
 
 
 
 
Postpaid
$
55
 
 
$
56
 
 
$
56
 
Prepaid
28
 
 
33
 
 
30
 
Average retail
48
 
 
53
 
 
53
 
 ________
(1)    Average subscribers include subscribers acquired through business combinations prospectively from the date of acquisition. Average subscribers for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009 are inclusive of prepaid and postpaid subscribers acquired through our 2009 business combinations of Virgin Mobile and iPCS, which were previously included within wholesale and affiliate subscribers. In addition, average prepaid subscribers for the same periods are exclusive of 49,000 subscribers transferred to wholesale and affiliates as a result of a sale and transfer of customers to an affiliate in 2010.
(2)    Average monthly service revenue per subscriber is calculated by dividing service revenue by the sum of the average number of subscribers. Changes in average monthly service revenue reflect subscribers who change rate plans, the level of voice and data usage, the amount of service credits which are offered to subscribers, plus the net effect of average monthly revenue generated by new subscribers and deactivating subscribers. 
Average monthly postpaid service revenue per subscriber for 2010 declined slightly as compared to 2009 due to declines in overage revenues resulting from the increased popularity of fixed-rate bundled plans including the Any Mobile AnytimeSM feature. Average monthly retail postpaid service revenue per subscriber was stable for 2009 compared to 2008 as a result of improved retention of higher revenue subscribers on bundled rate plans offset by lower overage and roaming revenues.
Average monthly prepaid service revenue per subscriber for 2010 decreased compared to 2009 due to prepaid subscribers acquired in our fourth quarter 2009 business combination of Virgin Mobile as well as net subscriber additions under our Assurance Wireless brand launched in early 2010, which carry a lower average revenue per subscriber compared to Sprint's other prepaid subscribers. Average monthly prepaid service revenue per subscriber increased during 2009 as compared to 2008 due to higher revenue from our National Boost Monthly Unlimited users combined with more stable average revenue per subscriber from our traditional prepaid users. The lower prepaid average revenue per subscriber and the increased weighting of average prepaid subscribers to total subscribers resulted in a decline in our average retail service revenue per subscriber for 2010 compared to 2009.
 

30


The following table shows (a) net additions (losses) of wireless subscribers for the past twelve quarters, excluding subscribers obtained through business combinations, (b) our total subscribers as of the end of each quarterly period, (c) our average monthly post paid and prepaid service revenue per subscriber, and (d) our average rates of monthly postpaid and prepaid customer churn for the past twelve quarters.
 
Quarter Ended 
 
March 31,
2008
 
June 30,
2008
 
September 30,
2008
 
December 31,
2008
 
March 31,
2009
 
June 30,
2009
 
September 30,
2009
 
December 31,
2009
 
March 31,
2010
 
June 30,
2010
 
September 30,
2010
 
December 31,
2010
Net additions (losses) (in thousands)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Postpaid(1):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
iDEN
(1,067
)
 
(849
)
 
(864
)
 
(856
)
 
(720
)
 
(598
)
 
(530
)
 
(507
)
 
(447
)
 
(364
)
 
(383
)
 
(395
)
CDMA(2)
(3
)
 
73
 
 
(258
)
 
(249
)
 
(530
)
 
(393
)
 
(271
)
 
3
 
 
(131
)
 
136
 
 
276
 
 
453
 
Total retail postpaid
(1,070
)
 
(776
)
 
(1,122
)
 
(1,105
)
 
(1,250
)
 
(991
)
 
(801
)
 
(504
)
 
(578
)
 
(228
)
 
(107
)
 
58
 
Prepaid(3):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
iDEN
(543
)
 
(250
)
 
(305
)
 
(264
)
 
764
 
 
938
 
 
801
 
 
483
 
 
(44
)
 
(465
)
 
(700
)
 
(768
)
CDMA
343
 
 
112
 
 
(24
)
 
(50
)
 
(90
)
 
(161
)
 
(135
)
 
(48
)
 
392
 
 
638
 
 
1,171
 
 
1,414
 
Total retail prepaid
(200
)
 
(138
)
 
(329
)
 
(314
)
 
674
 
 
777
 
 
666
 
 
435
 
 
348
 
 
173
 
 
471
 
 
646
 
Wholesale and affiliates
183
 
 
13
 
 
130
 
 
146
 
 
394
 
 
(43
)
 
(410
)
 
(79
)
 
155
 
 
166
 
 
280
 
 
393
 
Total Wireless
(1,087
)
 
(901
)
 
(1,321
)
 
(1,273
)
 
(182
)
 
(257
)
 
(545
)
 
(148
)
 
(75
)
 
111
 
 
644
 
 
1,097
 
End of period subscribers (in thousands)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Postpaid:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
iDEN
12,179
 
 
11,330
 
 
10,466
 
 
9,610
 
 
8,890
 
 
8,292
 
 
7,762
 
 
7,255
 
 
6,808
 
 
6,444
 
 
6,061
 
 
5,666
 
CDMA(2)(4)
27,502
 
 
27,575
 
 
27,317
 
 
27,068
 
 
26,538
 
 
26,145
 
 
25,874
 
 
26,712
 
 
26,581
 
 
26,717
 
 
26,993
 
 
27,446
 
Total retail postpaid
39,681
 
 
38,905
 
 
37,783
 
 
36,678
 
 
35,428
 
 
34,437
 
 
33,636
 
 
33,967
 
 
33,389
 
 
33,161
 
 
33,054
 
 
33,112
 
Prepaid:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
iDEN
3,552
 
 
3,302
 
 
2,997
 
 
2,733
 
 
3,497
 
 
4,435
 
 
5,236
 
 
5,719
 
 
5,675
 
 
5,210
 
 
4,510
 
 
3,742
 
CDMA(4)
826
 
 
938
 
 
914
 
 
864
 
 
774
 
 
613
 
 
478
 
 
4,969
 
 
5,361
 
 
5,999
 
 
7,121
 
 
8,535
 
Total retail prepaid
4,378
 
 
4,240
 
 
3,911
 
 
3,597
 
 
4,271
 
 
5,048
 
 
5,714
 
 
10,688
 
 
11,036
 
 
11,209
 
 
11,631
 
 
12,277
 
Wholesale and affiliates(4)
8,701
 
 
8,714
 
 
8,844
 
 
8,990
 
 
9,384
 
 
9,341
 
 
8,931
 
 
3,478
 
 
3,633
 
 
3,799
 
 
4,128
 
 
4,521
 
Total Wireless
52,760
 
 
51,859
 
 
50,538
 
 
49,265
 
 
49,083
 
 
48,826
 
 
48,281
 
 
48,133
 
 
48,058
 
 
48,169
 
 
48,813
 
 
49,910
 
Average monthly service revenue per subscriber
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Retail Postpaid
$
56
 
 
$
56
 
 
$
56
 
 
$
56
 
 
$
56
 
 
$
56
 
 
$
56
 
 
$
55
 
 
$
55
 
 
$
55
 
 
$
55
 
 
$
55
 
Retail Prepaid
$
29
 
 
$
30
 
 
$
31
 
 
$
30
 
 
$
31
 
 
$
34
 
 
$
35
 
 
$
31
 
 
$
27
 
 
$
28
 
 
$
28
 
 
$
28
 
Monthly customer churn rate(5)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Retail postpaid
2.45
%
 
1.98
%
 
2.15
%
 
2.16
%
 
2.25
%
 
2.05
%
 
2.17
%
 
2.11
%
 
2.15
%
 
1.85
%
 
1.93
%
 
1.86
%
Retail prepaid
9.93
%
 
7.36
%
 
8.16
%
 
8.20
%
 
6.86
%
 
6.38
%
 
6.65
%
 
5.56
%
 
5.74
%
 
5.61
%
 
5.32
%
 
4.93
%
________ 
(1)     Postpaid subscriber net additions by platform (iDEN and CDMA) have been modified for all periods presented to include subscribers that migrated between network technologies, which were previously excluded. This change in presentation of previously reported amounts had no effect on total retail postpaid net additions or other subscriber related performance metrics in any prior periods and better reflects Sprint's trend of subscriber activity by network technology.
(2)     Includes subscribers with PowerSource devices, which operate seamlessly between our CDMA and iDEN networks.
(3)     In the first quarter 2009, Boost Monthly Unlimited was launched on iDEN. In the first quarter 2010, Boost Monthly Unlimited was launched on CDMA.
(4)     Reflects the transfer of 4,539,000 Prepaid and 835,000 Postpaid subscribers from Wholesale and affiliates as a result of the business combinations completed in the fourth quarter 2009 as well as the third quarter 2010 transfer of 49,000 Wholesale and affiliates subscribers from Prepaid as a result of a sale and transfer of customers to an affiliate.
(5)    Churn is calculated by dividing net subscriber deactivations for the quarter by the sum of the average number of subscribers for each month in the quarter. For postpaid accounts comprising multiple subscribers, such as family plans and enterprise accounts, net deactivations are defined as deactivations in excess of customer activations in a particular account within 30 days. Postpaid and Prepaid churn consist of both voluntary churn, where the subscriber makes his or her own determination to cease being a customer, and involuntary churn, where the customer's service is terminated due to a lack of payment or other reasons. 

31


Retail Postpaid Subscribers—We lost 855,000 net postpaid subscribers during 2010 as compared to losing 3.5 million and 4.1 million net postpaid subscribers during 2009 and 2008, respectively. Our improvement in net postpaid subscriber losses year over year can be attributed to our improvements in retail postpaid gross adds and lower postpaid churn resulting from simplified and value-driven bundled offers, a more competitive device line-up, as well as our continued improvements in overall customer experience and customer care satisfaction.
Retail Prepaid Subscribers—We added approximately 1.6 million net prepaid subscribers during 2010 as compared to adding 2.6 million and losing 981,000 net prepaid subscribers in 2009 and 2008, respectively. Our net prepaid subscriber additions in 2010 were principally driven by net additions from the Assurance Wireless and Boost Mobile brands, partially offset by net losses associated with the Virgin Mobile brand including a transfer of 49,000 subscribers from prepaid to wholesale and affiliates as a result of a sale and transfer of customers to an affiliate. Our net prepaid subscriber additions in 2009 as compared to losses in 2008 were principally driven by the Boost Monthly Unlimited plan. Prepaid subscribers are generally deactivated between 60 days and up to 150 days from the date of activation or replenishment; however, prior to account deactivation, targeted retention programs can be offered to qualifying subscribers to maintain ongoing service by providing up to an additional 150 days to make a replenishment. Subscribers targeted through these retention offers are not included in the calculation of churn until their retention offer expires without a replenishment to their account. As a result, end of period prepaid subscribers include subscribers engaged in these retention programs. Retention offers to these targeted subscribers remained consistent as a percentage of our total prepaid subscriber base during 2010.
Wholesale and Affiliate Subscribers—Wholesale and affiliate subscribers represent customers that are served on our networks through companies that resell our services to their subscribers, customers residing in affiliate territories and a growing portion of subscribers from our machine-to-machine initiative primarily representing devices that utilize our network. During 2010, wholesale and affiliate subscriber additions were 994,000 resulting in approximately 4.5 million wholesale and affiliate subscribers as of December 31, 2010, compared to approximately 3.5 million and 9.0 million wholesale and affiliate subscribers as of December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively. The increase in the wholesale subscriber base was primarily due to subscriber additions in other MVNO relationships during 2010. The decrease from 2008 to 2009 was primarily due to subscribers transferred to postpaid and prepaid as result of the fourth quarter 2009 business combinations of Virgin Mobile and iPCS. Of the remaining 4.5 million subscribers included in wholesale and affiliate, approximately 41% represent machine-to-machine activities such as e-readers, in-vehicle devices and telematics. Subscribers through some of our MVNO relationships have inactivity either in voice usage or primarily as a result of the nature of the device, where activity only occurs when data retrieval is initiated by the end-user and may occur infrequently. Although we continue to provide these customers access to our network through our MVNO relationships, approximately 959,000 subscribers through these MVNO relationships have been inactive for at least six months, with no associated revenue.
Cost of Services
Cost of services consists primarily of:
•    
costs to operate and maintain our CDMA and iDEN networks, including direct switch and cell site costs, such as rent, utilities, maintenance, labor costs associated with network employees and spectrum frequency leasing costs;
•    
fixed and variable interconnection costs, the fixed component of which consists of monthly flat-rate fees for facilities leased from local exchange carriers based on the number of cell sites and switches in service in a particular period and the related equipment installed at each site, and the variable component of which generally consists of per-minute use fees charged by wireline providers for calls terminating on their networks, which fluctuate in relation to the level and duration of those terminating calls;
•    
long distance costs paid to the Wireline segment;
•    
costs to service and repair devices;
•    
regulatory fees;
•    
roaming fees paid to other carriers; and
•    
fixed and variable costs relating to payments to third parties for the use of their proprietary data applications, such as messaging, music, TV and navigation services by our subscribers.
Cost of services decreased $96 million, or 1%, in 2010 compared to 2009, primarily reflecting a decline in service and repair costs by focusing on device repairs and refurbishment rather than utilizing new devices, a decline in long distance network costs as a result of lower market rates as well as a decline in payments to third party vendors providing premium services as a result of changing from usage based payments to flat rates. This decline was partially offset by increased roaming due to higher data usage and an increase in license fees as a result of the continued growth in smartphone devices, which carry higher fees. Cost of services decreased $361 million, or 4%, in 2009 as compared to 2008 primarily reflecting a decline in labor, outside services and maintenance costs consistent with the Company's cost cutting efforts, as well as a decline in network costs associated with fewer subscribers.

32


Equipment Net Subsidy
We recognize equipment revenue and corresponding costs of devices when title of the device passes to the dealer or end-user customer. Our marketing plans assume that devices typically will be sold at prices below cost, which is consistent with industry practice, as subscriber retention efforts often include providing incentives to subscribers such as offering new devices at discounted prices. We reduce equipment revenue for these discounts offered directly to the customer, or for certain payments to third-party dealers to reimburse the dealer for point of sale discounts that are offered to the end-user subscriber. Additionally, the cost of devices is reduced by any rebates that are earned from the supplier. Cost of devices and accessories also includes order fulfillment related expenses and write-downs of device and related accessory inventory for shrinkage and obsolescence. Equipment cost in excess of the revenue generated from equipment sales is referred to in the industry as equipment net subsidy. Equipment revenue increased $749 million, or 38%, in 2010 compared to 2009 and cost of devices increased $1.4 billion, or 26%, in 2010 compared to 2009. The increase in both equipment revenue and cost of devices is primarily due to an increase in the number of postpaid devices sold with a greater mix of devices that have a higher average sales price and cost, as well as an increase in the number of prepaid devices sold. Equipment revenue decreased $38 million, or 2%, in 2009 compared to 2008 primarily due to declining average sales prices for devices with higher functionality as a result of competitive and economic pressures, partially offset by an increase in the number of lower priced prepaid devices sold in 2009 as compared to 2008. Cost of devices increased $699 million, or 15%, in 2009 compared to 2008, primarily due to our mix of devices sold reflecting a greater mix of postpaid devices sold with a higher functionality and an increase in the number of devices sold.
Selling, General and Administrative Expense
Sales and marketing costs primarily consist of customer acquisition costs, including commissions paid to our indirect dealers, third-party distributors and retail sales force for new device activations and upgrades, residual payments to our indirect dealers, payroll and facilities costs associated with our retail sales force, marketing employees, advertising, media programs and sponsorships, including costs related to branding. General and administrative expenses primarily consist of costs for billing, customer care and information technology operations, bad debt expense and administrative support activities, including collections, legal, finance, human resources, strategic planning and technology and product development.
Sales and marketing expense increased $322 million, or 7%, in 2010 from 2009 as compared to a decrease of $273 million, or 6%, in 2009 from 2008. The increase in sales and marketing expenses for the year ended December 31, 2010 is primarily due to the additional costs associated with our increase in subscriber gross additions combined with incremental costs associated with our business combinations in the fourth quarter 2009, offset by a decline in marketing expenditures related to our cost cutting initiatives. The decline in sales and marketing expenses for the year ended December 31,  2009 is primarily due to a decline in gross subscriber additions compared to 2008 and a decline in labor related costs due to our workforce and cost reduction activities.
General and administrative costs decreased $203 million, or 5%, in 2010 from 2009 and $1.1 billion, or 22%, in 2009 from 2008. The decline in general and administrative costs for the year ended December 31, 2010 reflects a reduction in customer care costs and minor continued effects of workforce reductions and cost cutting initiatives announced in 2009 offset by increases as a result of the fourth quarter 2009 business combinations of Virgin Mobile and iPCS in addition to an increase in bad debt expense. The decline in general and administrative costs for the year ended December 31, 2009 is primarily due to reductions in customer care costs, the decrease in employee related costs as part of our cost cutting initiatives and lower bad debt expense. Customer care costs decreased $87 million in 2010 as compared to 2009 and $363 million in 2009 as compared to 2008. The improvement in customer care costs is largely attributable to customer care quality initiatives launched in 2008 that have resulted in a reduction in calls per subscriber by 39% from 2007 peak levels which allowed for a reduction of 19 call centers in 2009 and 11 call centers in 2008. Employee related costs in 2010 were consistent with 2009 and costs decreased approximately $536 million in 2009 as compared to 2008, due to workforce reductions announced in January and November 2009. Bad debt expense was $423 million for the year ended December 31, 2010 representing a $31 million increase, as compared to bad debt expense of $392 million in 2009. The increase in bad debt expense primarily reflects 2009 reductions in allowances for bad debt due to increased rates of recovery. For the year ended December 31, 2009, bad debt expense decreased $240 million as compared to bad debt expense of $632 million in 2008. The improvement in bad debt expense resulted from lower rates of uncollectibility during the period, as well as lower estimated uncollectible accounts in outstanding accounts receivable. We reassess our allowance for doubtful accounts quarterly. Changes in our allowance for doubtful accounts are largely attributable to credit policies established for subscribers and analysis of historical collection experience. Our mix of prime postpaid subscribers to total postpaid subscribers remained flat at 84% as of December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.
 
 

33


Segment Earnings - Wireline
Wireline segment earnings are primarily a function of wireline service revenue, network and interconnection costs and other Wireline segment operating expenses. Network costs primarily represent special access costs and interconnection costs which generally consist of domestic and international per-minute usage fees paid to other carriers. The remaining costs associated with operating the Wireline segment include the costs to operate our customer care and billing organizations in addition to administrative support. Wireline service revenue, and variable network and interconnection costs fluctuate with the changes in our customer base and their related usage, but some cost elements do not fluctuate in the short term with the changes in our customer usage. Our wireline services provided to our Wireless segment are generally accounted for based on market rates which we believe approximate fair value. The Company generally re-establishes these rates at the beginning of each fiscal year. Over the past several years, there has been an industry wide trend of lower rates due to increased competition from other wireline and wireless communications companies as well as cable and internet service providers. For 2011, we expect wireline service gross margin to decline by approximately $200 to $250 million to reflect changes in market prices for services provided by our Wireline segment to our Wireless segment. This decline in wireline service gross margin related to intercompany pricing will not affect Sprint's consolidated results of operations as our Wireless segment will benefit from an equivalent reduction in cost of service. The following table provides an overview of the results of operations of our Wireline segment for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008.
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
Wireline Earnings
2010
 
2009
 
2008
 
(in millions)
Voice
$
2,249
 
 
$
2,563
 
 
$
3,079
 
Data
519
 
 
662
 
 
959
 
Internet
2,175
 
 
2,293
 
 
2,148
 
Other
97
 
 
111
 
 
146
 
Total net service revenue
5,040
 
 
5,629
 
 
6,332
 
Cost of services and products
(3,319
)
 
(3,663
)
 
(4,192
)
Service gross margin
1,721
 
 
1,966
 
 
2,140
 
Service gross margin percentage
34
%
 
35
%
 
34
%
Selling, general and administrative expense
(631
)
 
(745
)
 
(965
)
Wireline segment earnings
$
1,090
 
 
$
1,221
 
 
$
1,175
 
Wireline Revenue
Voice Revenues
Voice revenues decreased $314 million, or 12%, in 2010 as compared to 2009 and decreased $516 million, or 17%, in 2009 as compared to 2008. The 2010 and 2009 decreases were primarily driven by volume declines due to customer churn as well as overall price declines. Voice revenues generated from the sale of services to our Wireless segment represented 33% of total voice revenues in 2010 as compared to 31% in 2009 and 26% in 2008.
Data Revenues
Data revenues reflect sales of data services, including ATM, frame relay and managed network services. Data revenues decreased $143 million, or 22%, in 2010 as compared to 2009 and decreased $297 million, or 31%, in 2009 as compared to 2008 due to declines in frame relay and asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) services as subscribers migrated to IP-based technologies. Data revenues generated from the provision of services to the Wireless segment represented 27% of total data revenue in 2010 as compared to 19% in 2009 and 13% in 2008.
Internet Revenues
Internet revenues reflect sales of IP-based data services, including MPLS, VoIP and SIP. Internet revenues decreased $118 million, or 5%, in 2010 from 2009 as compared to an increase of $145 million, or 7%, in 2009 from 2008. The 2010 decrease was due to a decline in new IP customers with lower market rates as a result of increased competition. The 2009 increase was due to higher IP revenues as business subscribers were increasing requirements to support wireless customer's data traffic, in addition to revenue growth in cable VoIP, which experienced a 15% increase in subscribers in 2009 as compared to 2008. Internet revenues generated from the provision of services to the Wireless segment represented 10% of total Internet revenues in 2010 as compared to 11% in 2009 and 9% in 2008. Some MSO's are in the process of in-sourcing their digital voice products for which the transition and associated revenue reductions will occur over the next several years with a decrease of approximately $200 million to occur in 2011. 

34


Other Revenues
Other revenues, which primarily consist of sales of customer premises equipment (CPE), decreased $14 million, or 13% in 2010 as compared to 2009 and $35 million, or 24%, in 2009 as compared to 2008 as a result of fewer projects in 2010 and 2009.
Costs of Services and Products
Costs of services and products include access costs paid to local phone companies, other domestic service providers and foreign phone companies to complete calls made by our domestic subscribers, costs to operate and maintain our networks and costs of equipment. Costs of services and products decreased $344 million, or 9%, in 2010 from 2009 and $529 million, or 13%, in 2009 from 2008. The decrease in 2010 and 2009 is primarily due to declining voice volumes and a shift in mix to lower cost products as a result of the migration from data to IP-based technologies. Service gross margin percentage increased from 34% in 2008 to 35% in 2009 and decreased back to 34% in 2010. The increase from 2008 to 2009 was primarily due to revenue growth in our cable VoIP business and a decrease in costs of services and products offset by a decrease in voice revenue. The decrease from 2009 to 2010 was as a result of a decrease in net service revenue offset by a decrease in costs of services and products.
Selling, General and Administrative Expense
Selling, general and administrative expense decreased $114 million, or 15%, in 2010 as compared to 2009 and $220 million, or 23% in 2009 as compared 2008. The decreases were primarily due to a reduction in employee headcount and a decline in the use of outside services and maintenance as part of our cost cutting initiatives. Total selling, general and administrative expense as a percentage of net services revenue was 13% in 2010 and 2009 and 15% in 2008.
 
LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES
Cash Flow
 
 
Year Ended December 31, 
 
2010
 
2009
 
2008
 
(in millions)
Net cash provided by operating activities
$
4,815
 
 
$
4,891
 
 
$
6,179
 
Net cash used in investing activities
(2,556
)
 
(3,844
)
 
(4,250
)
Net cash used in financing activities
(905
)
 
(919
)
 
(484
)
Operating Activities
Net cash provided by operating activities of $4.8 billion in 2010 decreased $76 million from the same period in 2009 primarily due to a $196 million decrease in cash received from our subscribers resulting from a decline in our postpaid subscriber customer base, an increase of $217 million in cash paid to our suppliers and employees, and an increase of $36 million in cash paid for interest. These were partially offset by an increase of $170 million in cash received for income tax refunds. Net cash provided by operating activities for 2009 also includes a cash payment of $200 million resulting from a contribution to the Company pension plan.
Net cash provided by operating activities of $4.9 billion in 2009 decreased by $1.3 billion from 2008, primarily due to a $3.6 billion decrease in cash received from our subscribers as a result of declining service revenues from our loss of post-paid subscribers and a $200 million contribution to the Company pension plan during 2009. These declines were offset by a decrease of $2.1 billion in cash paid to our suppliers and employees primarily due to reductions in variable cost of services and products and selling, general and administrative expenses due to the various cost cutting initiatives implemented over the past year.
Net cash provided by operating activities for 2008 is net of cash used for operating activities of approximately $300 million that related to our operations that were contributed to Clearwire in November 2008.
Investing Activities
Net cash used in investing activities for 2010 decreased by $1.3 billion from 2009, due to a decrease of $300 million in purchases of short-term investments and a decrease of $132 million in expenditures related to FCC licenses as determined by specific operations requirements of the Report and Order. These decreases were partially offset by reduced proceeds from sales and maturities of short-term investments of $418 million and increased capital expenditures of $332 million to add coverage and capacity to our wireless networks. Sprint also increased its investment in Clearwire by $1.1 billion and acquired iPCS and Virgin Mobile for $560 million in 2009, which resulted in the remaining decline in 2010 as compared to 2009.
Net cash used in investing activities for 2009 decreased by $406 million from 2008, primarily due to an increase of $369 million in proceeds from short-term investments and a decrease in capital expenditures of $2.3 billion in 2009 as

35


compared to 2008 mainly due to fewer cell sites built in 2009, fewer IT and network development projects and costs incurred related to the build-up of WiMAX in 2008 that are no longer being incurred in 2009 due to the close of the transaction with Clearwire in November 2008. The decreases were offset by increased purchases of $599 million in short-term investments, a $1.1 billion increase of Sprint's investment in Clearwire and $560 million used to acquire Virgin Mobile and iPCS in the fourth quarter 2009.
Net cash used in investing activities for 2008 include expenditures of approximately $600 million related to capital assets and FCC licenses that were contributed to Clearwire in November 2008.
Financing Activities
Net cash used in financing activities was $905 million during 2010 compared to net cash used by financing activities of $919 million in 2009. Activities in 2010 included a $750 million debt payment in June 2010 and a $51 million payment for debt financing costs associated with our new revolving credit facility. In addition, in the fourth quarter 2010, we exercised an option to terminate our relationship with a variable interest entity, which resulted in the repayment of financing, capital lease and other obligations of $105 million.
Net cash used in financing activities was $919 million during 2009 as compared to net cash used in financing activities of $484 million in 2008. Activities in 2009 include debt repayments of $600 million of senior notes in May 2009, the early redemption of $607 million of our convertible senior notes in September 2009, and a $1.0 billion payment on our revolving bank credit facility in November 2009 offset by the issuance of $1.3 billion of senior notes in August 2009.
Net cash used in financing activities was $484 million during 2008. Activities in 2008 include the draw-down of $2.5 billion under our revolving bank credit facility in February 2008, the net proceeds from the financing obligation with TowerCo Acquisition LLC related to a sale and subsequent leaseback of multiple tower locations in September 2008 of $645 million, and proceeds from the issuance of commercial paper of $681 million, offset by the early redemption of $1.25 billion of our senior notes in June 2008, the extinguishment in September 2008 of $235 million of US Unwired Inc.'s 10% Second Priority Senior Secured Notes due 2012, the extinguishment in September 2008 of $250 million of Alamosa (Delaware), Inc.'s 8.5% Senior Notes due 2012, the repayment of $1.5 billion of our revolving bank credit facility in the third and fourth quarters of 2008 and maturities of commercial paper of $1.1 billion.
We received $8 million, $4 million and $57 million in 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively, in proceeds from common share issuances, primarily resulting from exercises of employee options.
Liquidity
As of December 31, 2010, our cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments totaled $5.5 billion. On May 21, 2010, we entered into a new $2.1 billion unsecured revolving credit facility that expires in October 2013. This new credit facility replaced the $4.5 billion credit facility that was due to expire in December 2010. As of December 31, 2010, $1.4 billion in letters of credit, including a $1.3 billion letter of credit required by the Report and Order to reconfigure the 800 MHz band, were outstanding under our $2.1 billion revolving bank credit facility. As a result of the outstanding letters of credit, which directly reduce the availability of the revolving bank credit facility, we had $700 million of borrowing capacity available under our revolving bank credit facility as of December 31, 2010. Accordingly, Sprint's liquidity as of December 31, 2010, including cash, cash equivalents, short-term investments and available borrowing capacity under our revolving credit facility was $6.2 billion. In addition, in January 2011, $1.65 billion of Sprint Capital Corporation 7.625% senior notes were repaid upon maturity and we amended $500 million of our $750 million Export Development Canada loan to extend the maturity date from 2012 to 2015.
The terms and conditions of our revolving bank credit facility require the ratio of total indebtedness to trailing four quarters earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization and certain other non-recurring items, as defined by the credit facility (adjusted EBITDA), to be no more than 4.5 to 1.0. Beginning in April 2012, the ratio will be reduced to 4.25 to 1.0, and further reduced to 4.0 to 1.0 in January 2013. As of December 31, 2010, the ratio was 3.7 to 1.0 as compared to 3.5 to 1.0 as of December 31, 2009 resulting from our decline in adjusted EBITDA. Under this revolving bank credit facility, we are currently restricted from paying cash dividends because our ratio of total indebtedness to adjusted EBITDA exceeds 2.5 to 1.0. The terms of the revolving bank credit facility provide for an interest rate equal to the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR), plus a margin of between 2.75% and 3.50%, depending on our debt ratings. Certain of our domestic subsidiaries have guaranteed the revolving bank credit facility.
A default under our borrowings could trigger defaults under our other debt obligations, which in turn could result in the maturities being accelerated. Certain indentures that govern our outstanding notes also require compliance with various covenants, including limitations on the incurrence of indebtedness and liens by the Company and its subsidiaries, as defined by the terms of the indentures. As of December 31, 2010, we own a 54% economic interest in Clearwire. As a result, Clearwire could be considered a subsidiary under certain agreements relating to our indebtedness. Whether Clearwire could be considered a subsidiary under our debt agreements is subject to interpretation. In December 2010, as a result of an amendment to the Clearwire equityholders' agreement, Sprint obtained the right to unilaterally surrender voting securities to reduce its voting security percentage below 50%, which could eliminate the potential for Clearwire to be considered a subsidiary of Sprint.

36


Certain actions or defaults by Clearwire would, if viewed as a subsidiary, result in a breach of covenants, including potential cross-default provisions, under certain agreements relating to our indebtedness. However, we believe the unilateral rights obtained in December significantly mitigate the possibility of an event that would cross-default against Sprint's debt obligations.
We expect to remain in compliance with our covenants through at least the end of 2012, although there can be no assurance that we will do so. Although we expect to improve our postpaid subscriber results, if we do not meet our plan, depending on the severity of the actual subscriber results versus what we currently anticipate, it is possible that we would not remain in compliance with our covenants or be able to meet our debt service obligations, which could result in acceleration of our indebtedness. If such unforeseen events occur, we may engage with our lenders to obtain appropriate waivers or amendments of our credit facilities or refinance borrowings, although there is no assurance we would be successful in any of these actions.
Sprint's current liquidity position makes it likely that we will be able to meet our debt service requirements and other funding needs currently identified through at least the end of 2012 by using our anticipated cash flows from operating activities as well as our cash and cash equivalents on hand. In addition, we also have available the remaining borrowing capacity under our revolving bank credit facility. Nevertheless, if we are unable to continue to reduce the rate of losses of postpaid subscribers, it could have a significant negative impact on cash provided by operating activities and our liquidity in future years.
In determining that we expect to meet our funding needs through at least 2012, we have considered:
•    
expenses relating to our operations;
•    
anticipated levels of capital expenditures, including the capacity and upgrading of our networks and the deployment of new technologies in our networks, and FCC license acquisitions;
•    
anticipated payments under the Report and Order, as supplemented;
•    
any contributions we may make to our pension plan;
•    
scheduled debt service requirements;
•    
any additional investment we may choose to make in Clearwire; and
•    
other future contractual obligations and general corporate expenditures.
Any of these events or circumstances could involve significant additional funding needs in excess of anticipated cash flows from operating activities and the identified currently available funding sources, including existing cash and cash equivalents and borrowings available under our existing revolving credit facility. If existing capital resources are not sufficient to meet these funding needs, it would be necessary to raise additional capital to meet those needs.
Our ability to fund our capital needs from outside sources is ultimately affected by the overall capacity and terms of the banking and securities markets, as well as our performance and our credit ratings. Given our recent financial performance as well as the volatility in these markets, we continue to monitor them closely and to take steps to maintain financial flexibility and a reasonable cost of capital.
As of December 31, 2010, Moody's Investor Service, Standard & Poor's Ratings Services, and Fitch Ratings had assigned the following credit ratings to certain of our outstanding obligations:
 
 
 
Rating 
 
 
Rating Agency
 
Senior Unsecured
Bank Credit
Facility
 
Senior
Unsecured Debt
 
Outlook
Moody's
 
Baa2
 
Ba3
 
Under Review
Standard and Poor's
 
Not Rated
 
BB-
 
Negative
Fitch
 
BB-
 
BB-
 
Negative
Downgrades of our current ratings do not accelerate scheduled principal payments of our existing debt. However, downgrades may cause us to incur higher interest costs on our credit facilities and future borrowings, if any, and could negatively impact our access to the public capital markets.
As of December 31, 2010, we had working capital of $2.0 billion compared to $1.8 billion as of December 31, 2009.
 

37


CURRENT BUSINESS OUTLOOK     
We endeavor to both add new and retain our existing wireless subscribers in order to reverse the net loss in postpaid wireless subscribers that we have experienced. We expect to improve our subscriber trends by continuing to improve the customer experience and through offers which provide value, simplicity and productivity.
Given the current economic environment, the difficulties the economic uncertainties create in forecasting, as well as the inherent uncertainties in predicting future customer behavior, we are unable to forecast with assurance the net retail postpaid subscriber results we will experience during 2011 or thereafter. However, the Company expects postpaid subscriber net additions for the full year 2011 and to improve total wireless subscriber net additions in 2011, as compared to 2010.
Our net subscriber losses have significantly reduced our revenue and operating cash flow. These effects will continue if we do not continue to attract new subscribers and/or reduce our rate of churn. See “Effects on our Wireless Business of Postpaid Subscriber Losses” above for a discussion of how our subscriber trends will impact our segment earnings trends. Also, subscriber losses will further decrease our adjusted EBITDA, as defined by our revolving bank credit facility. Management implemented cost reduction programs designed to decrease our cost structure by reducing our labor and other costs; however, we do not expect that the reduction in costs will fully offset the revenue declines described above.
The above discussion is subject to the risks and other cautionary and qualifying factors set forth under “—Forward-Looking Statements” and Part I, Item 1A “Risk Factors” in this report. 

38


 
FUTURE CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS
The following table sets forth our best estimates as to the amounts and timing of contractual payments as of December 31, 2010. Future events, including additional purchases of our securities and refinancing of those securities, could cause actual payments to differ significantly from these amounts. See “—Forward-Looking Statements.”
 
Future Contractual Obligations
 
Total
 
2011
 
2012
 
2013 
 
2014
 
2015
 
2016 and
thereafter
 
 
(in millions)
Senior notes, bank credit facilities and debentures(1) 
 
$
30,586
 
 
$
2,969
 
 
$
3,914
 
 
$
2,831
 
 
$
2,261
 
 
$
3,007
 
 
$
15,604
 
Capital leases and financing obligation(2) 
 
1,748
 
 
84
 
 
86
 
 
87
 
 
82
 
 
82
 
 
1,327
 
Operating leases(3) 
 
13,392
 
 
1,694
 
 
1,705
 
 
1,576
 
 
1,415
 
 
1,136
 
 
5,866
 
Purchase orders and other commitments(4) 
 
11,788
 
 
7,166
 
 
1,925
 
 
1,227
 
 
589
 
 
326
 
 
555
 
Total
 
$
57,514
 
 
$
11,913
 
 
$
7,630
 
 
$
5,721
 
 
$
4,347
 
 
$
4,551
 
 
$
23,352
 
________________
 
(1)    Includes principal and estimated interest payments. Interest payments are based on management's expectations for future interest rates. In January 2011, $500 million of our $750 million Export Development Canada loan was amended to extend the maturity date from 2012 to 2015, which is not reflected in the table above.
(2)    Represents capital lease payments including interest and financing obligation related to the sale and subsequent leaseback of multiple tower sites.
(3)    Includes future lease costs related to cell and switch sites, real estate, network equipment and office space.
(4)    Includes service, spectrum, network capacity and other executory contracts. Excludes blanket purchase orders in the amount of $44 million. See below for further discussion.
“Purchase orders and other commitments” include minimum purchases we commit to purchase from suppliers over time and/or the unconditional purchase obligations where we guarantee to make a minimum payment to suppliers for goods and services regardless of whether suppliers fully deliver them. Amounts actually paid under some of these “other” agreements will likely be higher due to variable components of these agreements. The more significant variable components that determine the ultimate obligation owed include hours contracted, subscribers and other factors. In addition, we are party to various arrangements that are conditional in nature and create an obligation to make payments only upon the occurrence of certain events, such as the delivery of functioning software or products. Because it is not possible to predict the timing or amounts that may be due under these conditional arrangements, no such amounts have been included in the table above. The table above also excludes about $44 million of blanket purchase order amounts since their agreement terms are not specified. No time frame is set for these purchase orders and they are not legally binding. As a result, they are not firm commitments. Our liability for uncertain tax positions was $228 million as of December 31, 2010. Due to the inherent uncertainty of the timing of the resolution of the underlying tax positions, it is not practicable to assign this liability to any particular year(s) in the table.
The table above does not include remaining costs to be paid in connection with the fulfillment of our obligations under the Report and Order. The Report and Order requires us to make a payment to the U.S. Treasury at the conclusion of the band reconfiguration process to the extent that the value of the 1.9 GHz spectrum we received exceeds the total of the value of licenses for spectrum in the 700 MHz and 800 MHz bands that we surrendered under the decision plus the actual costs, or qualifying costs, that we incur to retune incumbents and our own facilities. The total minimum cash obligation for the Report and Order is $2.8 billion. From the inception of the program through December 31, 2010, we have incurred approximately $2.8 billion of costs directly attributable to the spectrum reconfiguration program. This amount does not include any of our internal network costs that we have preliminarily allocated to the reconfiguration program for capacity sites and modifications for which we may request credit under the reconfiguration program. We estimate, based on our experience to date with the reconfiguration program and on information currently available, that our total direct costs attributable to complete the spectrum reconfigurations will range between $3.4 and $3.7 billion. Accordingly, we believe that it is unlikely that we will be required to make a payment to the U.S. Treasury.
 
 
OFF-BALANCE SHEET FINANCING
We do not participate in, or secure, financings for any unconsolidated, special purpose entities.
 

39


CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES
Sprint applies those accounting policies that management believes best reflect the underlying business and economic events, consistent with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. Sprint's more critical accounting policies include those related to the basis of presentation, allowance for doubtful accounts, valuation and recoverability of our equity method investment in Clearwire, valuation and recoverability of long-lived assets, evaluation of goodwill and indefinite-lived assets for impairment, and accruals for taxes based on income. Inherent in such policies are certain key assumptions and estimates made by management. Management periodically updates its estimates used in the preparation of the financial statements based on its latest assessment of the current and projected business and general economic environment. These critical accounting policies have been discussed with Sprint's Board of Directors. Sprint's significant accounting policies are summarized in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
Basis of Presentation
The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Sprint and its consolidated subsidiaries. Investments where Sprint maintains majority ownership, but lacks full decision making ability over all major issues, are accounted for using the equity method. Governance for Sprint's major unconsolidated investment, Clearwire, is based on Clearwire board representation for which Sprint does not have a majority vote.
Allowance for Doubtful Accounts
We maintain an allowance for doubtful accounts for estimated losses that result from failure of our subscribers to make required payments. Our estimate of the allowance for doubtful accounts considers a number of factors, including collection experience, aging of the accounts receivable portfolios, credit quality of the subscriber base, estimated proceeds from future bad debt sales and other qualitative considerations. To the extent that actual loss experience differs significantly from historical trends, the required allowance amounts could differ from our estimate. A 10% change in the amount estimated to be uncollectible would result in a corresponding change in bad debt expense of about $19 million for the Wireless segment and $1 million for the Wireline segment.
Valuation and Recoverability of our Equity Method Investment in Clearwire
We assess our equity method investment for other-than-temporary impairment when indicators such as decline in quoted prices in active markets indicate a value below the carrying value of our investment. This evaluation requires significant judgment regarding, but not limited to, the severity and duration of decline in market prices; the ability and intent to hold the securities until recovery; financial condition, liquidity, and near-term prospects of the issuer, specific events, and other factors. Sprint's assessment that an investment is not other-than-temporarily impaired could change in the future due to changes in facts and circumstances.
Sprint owns a 54% ownership interest in Clearwire for which the carrying value as of December 31, 2010 was $3.1 billion while the value of such investment based on Clearwire's closing stock price was $2.7 billion. Sprint's ability to recover the carrying value of its investment depends, in part, upon Clearwire's ability to obtain sufficient funding to support its operations and its ability to successfully develop, deploy, and maintain its 4G network. A decline in the estimated fair value of Clearwire that would be deemed to be other-than-temporary could result in a material impairment to the carrying value of our investment. We do not intend to sell our 54% economic interest in the foreseeable future, and recoverability of our equity investment is not affected by short-term fluctuations in Clearwire's stock price. Accordingly, we expect to fully recover the carrying value of our investment in Clearwire.
Valuation and Recoverability of Long-lived Assets
Long-lived assets consist primarily of property, plant and equipment and intangible assets subject to amortization. Changes in technology or in our intended use of these assets, as well as changes in economic or industry factors or in our business or prospects, may cause the estimated period of use or the value of these assets to change.
Property, plant and equipment are generally depreciated on a straight-line basis over estimated economic useful lives. Certain network assets are depreciated using the group life method. Depreciable life studies are performed periodically to confirm the appropriateness of depreciable lives for certain categories of property, plant and equipment. These studies take into account actual usage, physical wear and tear, replacement history and assumptions about technology evolution. When these factors indicate that an asset's useful life is different from the previous assessment, we depreciate the remaining book values prospectively over the adjusted remaining estimated useful life. Depreciation rates for assets using the group life method are revised periodically as required under this method. Changes made as a result of depreciable life studies and rate changes generally do not have a material effect on depreciation expense.
Long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may not be recoverable. Long-lived asset groups were determined based upon certain factors including assessing the lowest level for which identifiable cash flows are largely independent of the cash flows of other groups of assets and liabilities. If the total of the expected undiscounted future cash flows is less than the carrying amount of our assets, a loss is recognized for the difference between the estimated fair value and carrying value of the assets. Impairment analyses, when

40


performed, are based on our current business and technology strategy, views of growth rates for our business, anticipated future economic and regulatory conditions and expected technological availability. During 2010, we analyzed long-lived assets in our Wireless segment for recoverability and, based on our estimate of undiscounted cash flows, determined the carrying value to be recoverable. Our estimate of undiscounted cash flows exceeded the carrying value of these assets by more than 10%. If we continue to have operational challenges, including obtaining and retaining subscribers, future cash flows of the Company may not be sufficient to recover the carrying value of our wireless asset group, and we could record asset impairments that are material to Sprint's consolidated results of operations and financial condition.
In addition to the analyses described above, certain assets that have not yet been deployed in the business, including network equipment, cell site development costs and software in development, are periodically assessed to determine recoverability. Network equipment and cell site development costs are expensed whenever events or changes in circumstances cause the Company to conclude the assets are no longer needed to meet management's strategic network plans and will not be deployed. Software development costs are expensed when it is no longer probable that the software project will be deployed. Network equipment that has been removed from the network is also periodically assessed to determine recoverability. If we continue to have challenges retaining subscribers and as we continue to assess the impact of rebanding the iDEN network, management may conclude in future periods that certain CDMA and iDEN assets will never be either deployed or redeployed, in which case non-cash charges that could be material to our consolidated financial statements would be recognized.
Evaluation of Goodwill and Indefinite-Lived Intangible Assets for Impairment
Goodwill represents the excess of purchase price paid over the fair value assigned to the net tangible and identifiable intangible assets of acquired businesses. Sprint evaluates the carrying value of goodwill annually or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may exceed estimated fair value. Our analysis includes a comparison of the estimated fair value of the reporting unit to which goodwill applies to the carrying value, including goodwill, of that reporting unit.
We regularly assess whether any indicators of impairment exist, which requires a significant amount of judgment. Such indicators may include a sustained significant decline in our share price and market capitalization; a decline in our expected future cash flows; a significant adverse change in legal factors or in the business climate; unanticipated competition; the testing for recoverability of a significant asset group within a reporting unit; and/or slower growth rates, among others. Any adverse change in these factors could result in an impairment that could be material to our consolidated financial statements.
The determination of the estimated fair value of the wireless reporting unit requires significant estimates and assumptions. These estimates and assumptions primarily include, but are not limited to, transactions within the wireless industry and related control premiums, discount rate, terminal growth rates, operating income before depreciation and amortization (OIBDA) and capital expenditures forecasts. Due to the inherent uncertainty involved in making those estimates, actual results could differ from those estimates. The merits of each significant assumption, both individually and in the aggregate, used to estimate the fair value of a reporting unit are evaluated for reasonableness.
FCC licenses and our Sprint and Boost Mobile trademarks have been identified as indefinite-lived intangible assets, in addition to goodwill, after considering the expected use of the assets, the regulatory and economic environment within which they are being used, and the effects of obsolescence on their use. When required, Sprint assesses the recoverability of other indefinite-lived intangibles, including FCC licenses which are carried as a single unit of accounting. In assessing recoverability of FCC licenses, we estimate the fair value of such licenses using the Greenfield direct value method, which approximates value through estimating the discounted future cash flows of a hypothetical start-up business. Assumptions key in estimating fair value under this method include, but are not limited to, capital expenditures, subscriber activations and deactivations, market share achieved, tax rates in effect and discount rate. A one percent decline in our assumed revenue growth rate used to estimate terminal value, a one percent decline in our assumed net cash flows or a one percent adverse change in any of the key assumptions referred to above would not result in an impairment of our FCC licenses as of the most recent testing date. A decline in the estimated fair value of FCC licenses of approximately 20% also would not result in an impairment of the carrying value.
Accruals for Taxes Based on Income
Uncertainties exist with respect to interpretation of complex U.S. federal and state tax regulations. Management expects that Sprint's interpretations will prevail. Also, Sprint has recognized deferred tax benefits relating to its future utilization of past operating losses. Sprint believes it is more likely than not that the amounts of deferred tax assets in excess of the related valuation allowances will be realized.
The accounting estimates related to the tax valuation allowance require us to make assumptions regarding the timing of future events, including the probability of expected future taxable income and available tax planning opportunities. These assumptions require significant judgment because actual performance has fluctuated in the past and may do so in the future. The impact that changes in actual performance versus these estimates could have on the realization of tax benefits as reported in our results of operations could be material.
The accounting estimates related to the liability for unrecognized tax benefits require us to make judgments

41


regarding the sustainability of each uncertain tax position based on its technical merits. These estimates are updated based on the facts, circumstances and information available. We are also required to assess at each annual reporting date whether it is reasonably possible that any significant increases or decreases to the unrecognized tax benefits will occur during the next twelve months.
 
 
NEW ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS
In June 2009, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued authoritative literature regarding Amendments to FASB Interpretation No. 46(R), which changes various aspects of accounting for and disclosures of interests in variable interest entities, and Accounting for Transfers of Financial Assets, which was issued in order to improve the relevance, representational faithfulness, and comparability of the information that a reporting entity provides in its financial statements about a transfer of financial assets; the effects of a transfer on its financial position, financial performance, and cash flows; and a transferor's continuing involvement, if any, in transferred financial assets. This guidance was effective beginning in January 2010 and did not have a material effect on our consolidated financial statements.
In September 2009, the FASB modified the accounting for Multiple-Deliverable Revenue Arrangements and Certain Revenue Arrangements that Include Software Elements. These modifications alter the methods previously required for allocating consideration received in multiple-element arrangements to require revenue allocation based on a relative selling price method, including arrangements containing software components and non-software components that function together to deliver the product's essential functionality. These modifications will be effective prospectively for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2011 and are not expected to have a material effect on our consolidated financial statements.
In January 2010, the FASB issued authoritative guidance regarding Improving Disclosures about Fair Value Measurements, which requires new and amended disclosure requirements for classes of assets and liabilities, inputs and valuation techniques and transfers between levels of fair value measurements and Accounting for Distributions to Shareholders with Components of Stock and Cash, which clarifies the accounting for distributions to shareholders that offer them the ability to elect to receive their entire distribution in cash or shares of equivalent value. This guidance was effective beginning in January 2010 and did not have a material effect on our consolidated financial statements.
In July 2010, the FASB amended the requirements for Disclosures about the Credit Quality of Financing Receivables and the Allowance for Credit Losses. As a result of these amendments, an entity is required to disaggregate by portfolio segment or class certain existing disclosures and provide certain new disclosures about its financing receivables and related allowance for credit losses. The new disclosures as of the end of the reporting period are effective for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2010, while the disclosures about activity that occurs during a reporting period are effective for the first fiscal quarter of 2011. The disclosure requirements effective for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2010 did not have a material effect on our consolidated financial statements. The requirements effective for the first fiscal quarter of 2011 are not expected to have a material effect on our consolidated financial statements.
 
FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
We include certain estimates, projections and other forward-looking statements in our annual, quarterly and current reports, and in other publicly available material. Statements regarding expectations, including performance assumptions and estimates relating to capital requirements, as well as other statements that are not historical facts, are forward-looking statements.
These statements reflect management's judgments based on currently available information and involve a number of risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements. With respect to these forward-looking statements, management has made assumptions regarding, among other things, subscriber and network usage, subscriber growth and retention, pricing, operating costs, the timing of various events and the economic and regulatory environment.
Future performance cannot be assured. Actual results may differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements. Some factors that could cause actual results to differ include:
•    
our ability to attract and retain subscribers;
•    
the ability of our competitors to offer products and services at lower prices due to lower cost structures;
•    
the effects of vigorous competition on a highly penetrated market, including the impact of competition on the price we are able to charge subscribers for services and equipment we provide and our ability to attract new subscribers and retain existing subscribers; the overall demand for our service offerings, including the impact of decisions of new or existing subscribers between our postpaid and prepaid services offerings and between our two network platforms; and the impact of new, emerging and competing technologies on our business;
•    
the ability to generate sufficient cash flow to fully implement our network modernization plan to improve and enhance our networks and service offerings, implement our business strategies and provide competitive new

42


technologies;
•    
the effective implementation of our network modernization plan, Network Vision, including timing, technologies, and costs;
•    
changes in available technology and the effects of such changes, including product substitutions and deployment costs;
•    
our ability to obtain additional financing on terms acceptable to us, or at all;
•    
volatility in the trading price of our common stock, current economic conditions and our ability to access capital;
•    
the impact of unrelated parties not meeting our business requirements, including a significant adverse change in the ability or willingness of such parties to provide devices or infrastructure equipment for our CDMA network, or Motorola's ability or willingness to provide related devices, infrastructure equipment and software applications for our iDEN network;
•    
the costs and business risks associated with providing new services and entering new geographic markets;
•    
the financial performance of Clearwire and its deployment of a 4G network;
•    
the impact of difficulties we may encounter in connection with the continued integration of the business and assets of Virgin Mobile, including the risk that these difficulties may limit our ability to fully integrate the operations of this business;
•    
the effects of mergers and consolidations and new entrants in the communications industry and unexpected announcements or developments from others in the communications industry;
•    
unexpected results of litigation filed against us or our suppliers or vendors;
•    
the impact of adverse network performance;
•    
the costs or potential customer impacts of compliance with regulatory mandates including, but not limited to, compliance with the FCC's Report and Order to reconfigure the 800 MHz band;
•    
equipment failure, natural disasters, terrorist acts or other breaches of network or information technology security;
•    
one or more of the markets in which we compete being impacted by changes in political, economic or other factors such as monetary policy, legal and regulatory changes or other external factors over which we have no control; and
•    
other risks referenced from time to time in this report, including in Part I, Item 1A “Risk Factors” and other filings of ours with the SEC.
The words “may,” “could,” “estimate,” “project,” “forecast,” “intend,” “expect,” “believe,” “target,” “plan,” “providing guidance” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are found throughout this Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, and elsewhere in this report. Readers are cautioned that other factors, although not listed above, could also materially affect our future performance and operating results. The reader should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this report. We are not obligated to publicly release any revisions to forward-looking statements to reflect events after the date of this report, including unforeseen events.
 
FINANCIAL STRATEGIES
General Risk Management Policies
Our board of directors has adopted a financial risk management policy that authorizes us to enter into derivative transactions, and all transactions comply with the policy. We do not purchase or hold any derivative financial instruments for speculative purposes with the exception of equity rights obtained in connection with commercial agreements or strategic investments, usually in the form of warrants to purchase common shares.
Derivative instruments are primarily used for hedging and risk management purposes. Hedging activities may be done for various purposes, including, but not limited to, mitigating the risks associated with an asset, liability, committed transaction or probable forecasted transaction. We seek to minimize counterparty credit risk through stringent credit approval and review processes, credit support agreements, continual review and monitoring of all counterparties, and thorough legal review of contracts. Exposure to market risk is controlled by regularly monitoring changes in hedge positions under normal and stress conditions to ensure they do not exceed established limits.
 
Item 7A.    
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
We are primarily exposed to the market risk associated with unfavorable movements in interest rates, foreign

43


currencies, and equity prices. The risk inherent in our market risk sensitive instruments and positions is the potential loss arising from adverse changes in those factors.
Interest Rate Risk
The communications industry is a capital intensive, technology driven business. We are subject to interest rate risk primarily associated with our borrowings. Interest rate risk is the risk that changes in interest rates could adversely affect earnings and cash flows. Specific interest rate risk includes: the risk of increasing interest rates on floating-rate debt and the risk of increasing interest rates for planned new fixed rate long-term financings or refinancings.
About 86% of our debt as of December 31, 2010 was fixed-rate debt. While changes in interest rates impact the fair value of this debt, there is no impact to earnings and cash flows because we intend to hold these obligations to maturity unless market and other conditions are favorable.
We perform interest rate sensitivity analyses on our variable rate debt. These analyses indicate that a one percentage point change in interest rates would have an annual pre-tax impact of $27 million on our consolidated statements of operations and cash flows for the year ended December 31, 2010. We also perform a sensitivity analysis on the fair market value of our outstanding debt. A 10% decline in market interest rates would cause a $751 million increase in the fair market value of our debt to $20.8 billion.
Foreign Currency Risk
We also enter into forward contracts and options in foreign currencies to reduce the impact of changes in foreign exchange rates. Our foreign exchange risk management program focuses on reducing transaction exposure to optimize consolidated cash flow. We use foreign currency derivatives to hedge our foreign currency exposure related to settlement of international telecommunications access charges and the operation of our international subsidiaries. The dollar equivalent of our net foreign currency payables from international settlements was $7 million and the net foreign currency receivables from international operations were $4 million as of December 31, 2010. The potential immediate pre-tax loss to us that would result from a hypothetical 10% change in foreign currency exchange rates based on these positions would be insignificant.
Equity Risk
We are exposed to market risk as it relates to changes in the market value of our investments. We invest in equity instruments of public companies for operational and strategic business purposes. These securities are subject to significant fluctuations in fair market value due to volatility of the stock market and industries in which the companies operate. These securities, which are classified in investments on the consolidated balance sheets, primarily include equity method investments, such as our investment in Clearwire and available-for-sale securities.
In certain business transactions, we are granted warrants to purchase the securities of other companies at fixed rates. These warrants are supplemental to the terms of the business transaction and are not designated as hedging instruments.
 
Item 8.    
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
The consolidated financial statements required by this item begin on page F-1 of this annual report on Form 10-K and are incorporated herein by reference. The financial statements of Clearwire, as required under Regulation S-X, are filed pursuant to Item 15 of this annual report on Form 10-K and incorporated herein by reference.
 
Item 9.    
Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
None.
 
Item 9A.    
Controls and Procedures
Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
Disclosure controls are procedures that are designed with the objective of ensuring that information required to be disclosed in our reports under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, such as this Form 10-K, is reported in accordance with the SEC's rules. Disclosure controls are also designed with the objective of ensuring that such information is accumulated and communicated to management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.
In connection with the preparation of this Form 10-K, under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, we carried out an evaluation of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures. Based on this evaluation, the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that the design and operation of the disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of December 31, 2010 in providing reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed in reports we file or submit under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is accumulated and communicated to management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure and in providing reasonable assurance that the information is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in

44


the SEC's rules and forms.
Internal controls over our financial reporting continue to be updated as necessary to accommodate modifications to our business processes and accounting procedures. There have been no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the fourth quarter 2010 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.
Management's Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting
Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. Our internal control system was designed to provide reasonable assurance to our management and board of directors regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes.
Our management conducted an assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2010. This assessment was based on the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission in Internal Control—Integrated Framework. Based on this assessment, management believes that, as of December 31, 2010, our internal control over financial reporting was effective.
Our independent registered public accounting firm has issued a report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. This report appears on page F-2.