10-K 1 a2011093010-k.htm 2011.09.30 10-K
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, DC 20549
____________________________________________________________ 
FORM 10-K
____________________________________________________________ 
ý
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011
or
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from                      to                     
Commission file number 033-80655
____________________________________________________________ 
MOHEGAN TRIBAL GAMING AUTHORITY
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
____________________________________________________________ 
Not Applicable
 
06-1436334
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 
 
 
One Mohegan Sun Boulevard, Uncasville, CT
 
06382
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
(860) 862-8000
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
None
 
None
(Title of each class)
 
(Name of each exchange on which registered)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
None
(Title of Class)
 ____________________________________________________________ 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act:    Yes  ¨    No  ý
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act:    Yes  ý    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days:    Yes  ý    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files):    Yes  ý     No  ¨
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K:  ý
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act:
Large accelerated filer  ¨     Accelerated filer  ¨    Non-accelerated filer  ý    Smaller reporting company  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act):    Yes  ¨    No  ý
 


MOHEGAN TRIBAL GAMING AUTHORITY
INDEX TO FORM 10-K
 
 
 
Page
Number
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PART I
 
 
 
 
Item 1.
 
 
 
Item 1A.
 
 
 
Item 1B.
 
 
 
Item 2.
 
 
 
Item 3.
 
 
 
 
PART II
 
 
 
 
Item 5.
 
 
 
Item 6.
 
 
 
Item 7.
 
 
 
Item 7A.
 
 
 
Item 8.
 
 
 
Item 9.
 
 
 
Item 9A.
 
 
 
Item 9B.
 
 
 
 
PART III
 
 
 
 
Item 10.
 
 
 
Item 11.
 
 
 
Item 12.
 
 
 
Item 13.
 
 
 
Item 14.
 
 
 
 
PART IV
 
 
 
 
Item 15.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



References in this Annual Report on Form 10-K to the “Authority” and the “Mohegan Tribe or Tribe” are to the Mohegan Tribal Gaming Authority and the Mohegan Tribe of Indians of Connecticut, respectively. The terms “we,” “us” and “our” refer to the Authority.

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
This Form 10-K contains statements about future events, including, without limitation, information relating to business development activities, as well as capital spending, financing sources, the effects of regulation (including gaming and tax regulation) and increased competition. All statements other than statements of historical fact are, or may be deemed to be, forward-looking statements, within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. These statements sometimes can be identified by our use of forward-looking words such as “may,” “will,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “expect,” or “intend” and similar expressions. Such forward-looking information involves important risks and uncertainties that could significantly affect anticipated future results and, accordingly, such results may differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statements made by us or on our behalf. You should review carefully all of the information in this Form 10-K, including the consolidated financial statements.
In addition to the risk factors described under “Part I. Item 1A. Risk Factors,” the following important factors, among others, could affect our future financial condition or results of operations, causing actual results to differ materially from those expressed in the forward-looking statements:
the financial performance of Mohegan Sun and Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs and the Pennsylvania off-track wagering facilities;
the local, regional, national or global economic climate, including the lingering effects of the economic recession, which has affected our revenues and earnings;
increased competition, including the expansion of gaming in New England, New York, New Jersey or Pennsylvania;
our leverage and ability to meet our debt service obligations and maintain compliance with financial debt covenants;
the continued availability of financing, including our ability to refinance or extend our significant indebtedness maturing in fiscal year 2012;
our dependence on existing management;
our ability to integrate new amenities from expansions to our facilities into our current operations and manage the expanded facilities;
changes in federal or state tax laws or the administration of such laws;
changes in gaming laws or regulations, including the limitation, denial or suspension of licenses required under gaming laws and regulations;
changes in applicable laws pertaining to the service of alcohol, smoking or other amenities offered at Mohegan Sun and Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs;
our ability to implement successfully our diversification strategy;
an act of terrorism on the United States;
our customers' access to inexpensive transportation to our facilities and changes in oil, fuel or other transportation-related expenses; and
unfavorable weather conditions.
These factors and the other risk factors discussed in this Form 10-K are not necessarily all of the important factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those expressed in any of the forward-looking statements. Other unknown or unpredictable factors also could have material adverse effects on our future results. The forward-looking statements included in this Form 10-K are made only as of the date of this Form 10-K. We do not have and do not undertake any obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statements to reflect subsequent events or circumstances, except as required by law. We cannot assure you that projected results or events will be achieved or will occur.
 


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PART I

Item 1.
Business.
Overview
The Tribe and the Authority
The Mohegan Tribe of Indians of Connecticut, or the Mohegan Tribe or the Tribe, is a federally-recognized Indian tribe with an approximately 507-acre reservation situated in Southeastern Connecticut, adjacent to Uncasville, Connecticut. Under the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988, or IGRA, federally-recognized Indian tribes are permitted to conduct full-scale casino gaming operations on tribal land, subject to, among other things, the negotiation of a compact with the affected state. The Tribe and the State of Connecticut entered into a compact, the Mohegan Compact, which was approved by the United States Secretary of the Interior. We were established as an instrumentality of the Tribe, with the exclusive authority to conduct and regulate gaming activities for the Tribe on Tribal lands and the non-exclusive authority to conduct such activities elsewhere. Our gaming operation at Mohegan Sun is one of only two legally authorized gaming operations in New England offering traditional slot machines and table games. Through our subsidiary, Downs Racing, L.P., or Downs Racing, we also own and operate Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, a gaming and entertainment facility located in Plains Township, Pennsylvania, and several off-track wagering facilities, or OTW facilities, located elsewhere in Pennsylvania, collectively the Pennsylvania entities. We are governed by a nine-member Management Board, whose members also comprise the Mohegan Tribal Council, the governing body of the Tribe. Any change in the composition of the Mohegan Tribal Council results in a corresponding change in our Management Board.
Our principal executive office and mailing address is One Mohegan Sun Boulevard, Uncasville, CT 06382. Our telephone number is (860) 862-8000. Our website is www.mtga.com. Our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and any amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 are made available free of charge on our website as soon as reasonably practicable after they are electronically filed with, or furnished to, the Securities and Exchange Commission.
Mohegan Sun
In October 1996, we opened a gaming and entertainment complex known as Mohegan Sun. Mohegan Sun is located on a 185-acre site on the Tribe's reservation overlooking the Thames River with direct access from Interstate 395 and Connecticut Route 2A. Mohegan Sun is approximately 125 miles from New York City, New York, and approximately 100 miles from Boston, Massachusetts. In 2002, we completed a major expansion of Mohegan Sun known as Project Sunburst, which included increased gaming, restaurant and retail space, an entertainment arena, an approximately 1,200-room luxury Sky Hotel Tower and approximately 100,000 square feet of convention space. In 2007, we opened Sunrise Square, and, in 2008, we opened Casino of the Wind.
Mohegan Sun currently operates in an approximately 3.1 million square-foot facility, which includes the following:
Casino of the Earth
As of September 30, 2011, Casino of the Earth offered:
approximately 188,000 square feet of gaming space;
approximately 3,400 slot machines and 180 table games, including blackjack, roulette and craps;
Sunrise Square, a 9,800-square-foot Asian-themed gaming area, including approximately 50 table games;
an approximately 9,000-square-foot simulcasting Racebook facility;
food and beverage amenities, including: Seasons Buffet, a 784-seat multi-station buffet with live cooking stations, Birches Bar & Grill, a Hong Kong-style food outlet offering authentic Southeast Asian cuisine, Bobby Flay's Bobby's Burger Palace and multiple service bars, all operated by us, as well as Ballo Italian Restaurant & Social Club, Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana and Fidelia's Market, an approximately 290-seat multi-station food court, operated by third-parties, for a total seating of approximately 1,700;
four Mohegan Sun-owned retail shops, offering products ranging from Mohegan Sun logo souvenirs to cigars; and
the Wolf Den, an approximately 10,000-square-foot, 400-seat lounge featuring live entertainment seven days a week.
Casino of the Sky
As of September 30, 2011, Casino of the Sky offered:
approximately 119,000 square feet of gaming space;

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approximately 2,200 slot machines and 110 table games, including blackjack, roulette and craps;
food and beverage amenities, including: Todd English's Tuscany, Bobby Flay's Bar Americain, a 24-hour coffee shop and four lounges and bars, all operated by us, as well as five full-service restaurants, three quick-service restaurants and a multi-station food court operated by third-parties, for a total seating of approximately 2,350;
The Shops at Mohegan Sun containing 31 retail shops, six of which we own;
the Mohegan Sun Arena with seating for up to 10,000;
an approximately 1,200-room luxury Sky Hotel Tower, including a private high-limit table games suite;
Mohegan After Dark, consisting of Ultra 88, a nightclub, Lucky's Lounge and Dubliner, an Irish pub, all operated by a third-party;
an approximately 20,000-square-foot spa operated by a third-party;
approximately 100,000 square feet of convention space; and
a child care facility and an arcade-style entertainment area operated by a third-party.
Casino of the Wind
As of September 30, 2011, Casino of the Wind offered:
approximately 45,000 square feet of gaming space;
approximately 725 slot machines, 30 table games, including blackjack, roulette and craps, and a 42-table themed poker room;
food and beverage amenities, including: a two-level, 16,000-square-foot Jimmy Buffett's Margaritaville Restaurant, operated by a third-party, and Chief's Deli, a casual dining restaurant, and a bar, both operated by us, for a total seating of approximately 450; and
a retail shop operated by a third-party.
Mohegan Sun offers parking for approximately 13,000 patrons and 3,900 employees. In addition, we operate a gasoline and convenience center, an approximately 3,600-square-foot, 20-pump facility located adjacent to Mohegan Sun.
Mohegan Basketball Club
We formed Mohegan Basketball Club, LLC, or MBC, to own and operate a professional basketball team in the Women's National Basketball Association, or the WNBA. In January 2003, MBC entered into a membership agreement with the WNBA permitting it to operate the Connecticut Sun basketball team. The team plays its home games in the Mohegan Sun Arena.
Mohegan Golf
We formed Mohegan Golf, LLC, or Mohegan Golf, to purchase and operate a golf course in Southeastern Connecticut. In May 2007, Mohegan Golf acquired substantially all of the assets of Pautipaug Country Club, Inc., which included a golf course in Sprague and Franklin, Connecticut. The golf course was renamed Mohegan Sun Country Club at Pautipaug and reopened under the ownership of Mohegan Golf in June 2007. In August 2010, the golf course and related facilities were temporarily closed for renovations and are scheduled to re-open in the spring of 2012.
Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs
Through Downs Racing, we own and operate a gaming and entertainment facility known as Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs located on a 400-acre site in Plains Township, Pennsylvania, and OTW facilities located in Carbondale, East Stroudsburg, Hazleton and Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania. In November 2006, Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs became the first location to offer slot machine gaming in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania when Phase I of its gaming and entertainment facility opened. In July 2008, we completed a major expansion of Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs known as Project Sunrise, which included increased gaming, restaurant and retail space. In July 2010, Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs opened its table game and poker operations, including additional non-smoking sections and a high-limit gaming area.
As of September 30, 2011, Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs operates in an approximately 400,000-square-foot facility, which includes the following:
approximately 82,000 square feet of gaming space;
approximately 2,300 slot machines, 66 table games, including blackjack, roulette and craps, and an 18-table poker room;

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live harness racing and simulcast and off-track wagering;
food and beverage amenities, including: Ruth's Chris Steakhouse, Rustic Kitchen Bistro and Bar, which features dining and a live cooking show, Bar Louie, a casual bar and restaurant, Timbers Buffet, a 300-seat Mohegan Indian cultural heritage themed multi-station buffet, and a food court, including: Johnny Rockets, Hot Dog Hall of Fame, Puck Express by Wolfgang Puck and Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream, for a total seating of approximately 1,800;
five retail shops, one of which we own, offering products ranging from Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs logo souvenirs to fine apparel; and
three bars/lounges: Sunburst Bar, featured in the center of the gaming floor, Breakers Night Club and Pearl Sushi Bar.
Strategy
Our overall strategy is to profit from gaming in our core markets, as well as to diversify the Tribe’s business interests within the gaming industry. Mohegan Sun primarily receives patronage from guests residing within 100 miles of Mohegan Sun, which represents our primary market. Mohegan Sun also receives patronage from guests residing within a 100 to 200 mile radius, which represents our secondary market. With the completion of Project Sunburst in 2002, we have developed Mohegan Sun into a full-scale entertainment and destination resort. The addition of Casino of the Wind and Sunrise Square further strengthens our presence in the Northeast United States gaming market. In addition, we have taken significant steps in our diversification efforts with the addition of our Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs operations, including the July 2010 introduction of table game and poker operations.
Diversification
The Tribe has determined that it is in its best interest to pursue diversification of its business interests, both directly and through us. As a result, from time to time, we and the Tribe pursue various business opportunities. These opportunities primarily include proposed development and/or management of, investment in or ownership of additional gaming operations through direct investments, acquisitions, joint venture arrangements and loan or financial/credit support transactions. In addition, we and the Tribe are currently exploring other opportunities; however we can provide no assurance that we or the Tribe will continue to pursue any of these opportunities or that any of them will be consummated.
Cowlitz Project
In July 2004, we formed Mohegan Ventures-Northwest, LLC, or Mohegan Ventures-NW. Mohegan Ventures-NW is one of three current members in Salishan-Mohegan, LLC, or Salishan-Mohegan, which was formed to participate in the Cowlitz Project, a proposed casino to be owned by the Cowlitz Tribe and to be located in Clark County, Washington. Mohegan Ventures-NW, Salishan Company, LLC, an unrelated entity, and the Tribe hold membership interests in Salishan-Mohegan of 49.15%, 43% and 7.85%, respectively.
In September 2004, Salishan-Mohegan entered into development and management agreements with the Cowlitz Tribe in connection with the Cowlitz Project, which agreements have been amended from time to time. Under the terms of the development agreement, Salishan-Mohegan will assist in securing financing, as well as administer and oversee the planning, designing, development, construction and furnishing of the proposed casino. The development agreement provides for development fees of 3% of total project costs, as defined under the development agreement, which are to be distributed to Mohegan Ventures-NW, pursuant to the Salishan-Mohegan operating agreement. In 2006, Salishan-Mohegan purchased a 152-acre site for the proposed casino, which will be transferred to the Cowlitz Tribe or the United States pursuant to the development agreement. Development of the Cowlitz Project is subject to certain governmental and regulatory approvals, including, but not limited to, negotiation of a gaming compact with the State of Washington and acceptance of land into trust on behalf of the Cowlitz Tribe by the United States Department of the Interior. The development agreement provides for termination of Salishan-Mohegan’s exclusive development rights if the land is not taken into trust by December 31, 2015. Under the terms of the management agreement, Salishan-Mohegan will manage, operate and maintain the proposed casino for a period of seven years following its opening. The management agreement provides for management fees of 24% of net revenues, as defined under the management agreement, which approximates net income earned from the Cowlitz Project. Under the terms of the Salishan-Mohegan operating agreement, management fees will be allocated to the members of Salishan-Mohegan based on their respective membership interest. The management agreement is subject to approval by the National Indian Gaming Commission, or the NIGC.
In December 2010, the Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs of the Department of the Interior made a final agency determination to acquire the 152-acre Cowlitz Project site into trust for the benefit of the Cowlitz Tribe pursuant to the Indian Reorganization Act. The Assistant Secretary also determined that the acquired lands will serve as the initial reservation of the Cowlitz Tribe and that the tribe may conduct gaming on such lands under IGRA. Transfer of the property to the United States remains subject to final action by the Department of the Interior, including resolution of two lawsuits challenging the federal government's actions. In January 2011, Clark County, Washington, the City of Vancouver, Washington, and certain other plaintiffs

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filed suit against the Department of the Interior, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, or the BIA, the NIGC and various government officials, and in February 2011, the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde of Oregon filed suit against the Department of the Interior, the BIA and their officials. Pursuant to the Department of the Interior practice, the United States is not expected to take the Cowlitz Project site into trust while these lawsuits are pending. Class III gaming on the property remains subject to the negotiation and federal approval of a gaming compact between the Cowlitz Tribe and the State of Washington, which is a party to gaming compacts with twenty eight other federally-recognized Indian tribes in that state. We can provide no assurance that these conditions will be satisfied or that we will be able to obtain the necessary financing for the development of the proposed casino.
Menominee Project
In March 2007, we formed Mohegan Ventures Wisconsin, LLC, or MVW. MVW was one of two members in Wisconsin Tribal Gaming, LLC, or WTG, which we formed to participate in the Menominee Project, a proposed casino to be owned by the Menominee Tribe and to be located in Kenosha, Wisconsin. At inception, MVW held an 85.4% membership interest in WTG and Mohegan Ventures, LLC, or MV, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Tribe, held the remaining 14.6% membership interest. In September 2010, MV surrendered its membership interest in WTG, subject to rights to future reimbursement of its contributions to WTG. MVW currently holds 100% membership interest in WTG.
In October 2004, we entered into a management agreement with the Menominee Tribe and the Menominee Kenosha Gaming Authority, or the MKGA, in connection with the Menominee Project. Under the terms of the management agreement, we will manage, operate and maintain the proposed casino for a period of seven years following its opening. The management agreement provides for management fees of 13.4% of net revenues, as defined under the management agreement, which approximates net income earned from the Menominee Project. The management agreement is subject to approval by the NIGC.
In March 2007, WTG also purchased the development rights for the Menominee Project under a development agreement with the Menominee Tribe and the MKGA. In September 2010, WTG entered into a release and reimbursement agreement pursuant to which WTG: (1) relinquished its development rights and was relieved of its development obligations for the Menominee Project; (2) retained its rights to reimbursement of a portion of certain receivables related to reimbursable costs and expenses advanced by WTG on behalf of the Menominee Tribe for the Menominee Project, subject to certain conditions; and (3) assigned the option to purchase the proposed Menominee Project site in Kenosha to MKGA. We retained our interest in the management agreement.
In January 2009, the BIA informed the Menominee Tribe of the decision by the United States Secretary of the Interior to decline to take the Menominee Project site in Kenosha into trust for the Menominee Tribe. The rejection of the Menominee Tribe’s trust land application was based on a policy for reviewing trust land acquisitions for off-reservation gaming projects adopted by the BIA in January 2008 in a guidance memorandum and contradicted an earlier recommendation from the BIA’s Regional Director. In May 2009, the Menominee Tribe filed a lawsuit against the federal government challenging the rejection. In June 2011, the Assistant Secretary-Indian Affairs of the Department of the Interior withdrew the BIA's January 2008 policy guidance which led to the rejection of the Menominee Tribe’s trust land application, and, in August 2011, the lawsuit was settled, allowing the Menominee Tribe to proceed with its trust land application. In December 2011, the County and City of Kenosha approved extensions to their intergovernmental agreements with the Menominee Tribe for the Menominee Project through March 2013. The Menominee Tribe's trust land application remains pending.
Other Projects
In March 2008, we formed Mohegan Gaming & Hospitality, LLC, or MG&H, with the Tribe to evaluate and pursue business opportunities. Our wholly-owned subsidiary, MTGA Gaming, LLC, or MTGA Gaming, and the Tribe hold 49% and 51% membership interests in MG&H, respectively. MG&H subsequently formed a wholly-owned subsidiary, Mohegan Resorts, LLC, or Mohegan Resorts. Certain of our and the Tribe’s diversification efforts are conducted, either directly or indirectly, through MG&H and Mohegan Resorts. Mohegan Resorts holds a 100% membership interest in Mohegan Resorts Mass, LLC, or Mohegan Resorts Mass, which was formed to pursue potential gaming opportunities in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Mohegan Resorts Mass has entered into a lease agreement for a 152-acre site located in Palmer, Massachusetts, which would serve as a potential site for gaming development. Mohegan Resorts also holds 100% membership interests in Mohegan Resorts New York, LLC and Mohegan Gaming New York, LLC, or collectively, the Mohegan New York entities, which were formed to pursue potential gaming opportunities in the state of New York. The Mohegan New York entities have agreed in principle to enter into a joint venture arrangement with unrelated third-party investors and developers to manage a proposed gaming facility to be located in Thompson, New York.
We can provide no assurance that we will continue to pursue any of these projects or that any of them will be consummated.
Market and Competition from Other Gaming Operations
Our gaming operation at Mohegan Sun is one of only two current gaming operations in New England offering traditional

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slot machines and table games, with the other operation being our sole gaming competitor in Connecticut, Foxwoods Resort Casino, or Foxwoods, owned by the Mashantucket Pequot Tribe, or the MPT, and located approximately 10 miles from Mohegan Sun. We face competition from racino and video lottery terminal facilities, or VLT facilities, in the states of New York and Rhode Island and from casinos in Atlantic City, New Jersey and, to a lesser extent, several casinos and gaming facilities located on Indian tribal lands in the State of New York. In addition, we face competition in and from the Northeastern Pennsylvania gaming market, both in the immediate market for Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, and for Mohegan Sun, in marketing and attracting patrons from the New York City metropolitan region.
We also face potential competition from the current or future expansion of state-licensed gaming in New England and the Northeastern United States and prospective gaming projects under consideration by other Indian tribes, including federally-recognized tribes in Massachusetts and New York. With the addition of table gaming to existing slot machine facilities in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and VLT facilities in the State of Delaware, commercial casino gaming has expanded in the Northeastern United States, in particular with the passing of legislation authorizing commercial casino gaming in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in 2011. Federal recognition of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe, located in Massachusetts, and the Shinnecock Indian Nation of New York, in addition to tribal gaming related provisions of the expanded gaming legislation passed in Massachusetts, also increase the possibility of new tribal gaming in the Northeastern United States in the future. Other federally-recognized Indian tribes continue to pursue full-scale commercial casino gaming in the Catskills region of New York and elsewhere in the Northeastern United States. Under federal law, subsequent to obtaining federal recognition, Indian tribes are subject to certain governmental and regulatory approvals before commencing gaming operations, including, but not limited to: (1) negotiation of a gaming compact with the affected state, (2) acceptance of land into trust by the United States Department of the Interior, and (3) adoption of a tribal gaming ordinance. Indian tribes also may need to negotiate a management agreement and obtain financing to construct a facility. As further discussed below, groups seeking federal recognition as Indian tribes, as well as federally-recognized Indian tribes, continue efforts to establish or expand reservation lands with an interest in commercial casino gaming on such lands.
We are unable to predict whether efforts by federally-recognized Indian tribes or groups seeking federal recognition as Indian tribes will lead to the establishment of additional commercial casino gaming operations in the Northeastern United States. We are also unable to predict whether or when additional commercial casino gaming operations in the Northeastern United States will open. If established, we are uncertain of the impact such commercial casino gaming operations will have on our operations.
Mohegan Sun
The following is a summary of competition affecting Mohegan Sun:
Connecticut
Only the Tribe and the MPT are authorized to conduct commercial casino gaming in the State of Connecticut. As required by each tribe's separate Memorandum of Understanding, or MOU, with the State of Connecticut, the Tribe and the MPT make monthly contribution payments to the state based on a portion of revenues earned on slot machines. Pursuant to the terms of an exclusivity clause in each MOU, contribution payments to the state will terminate if there is any change in state law that permits operation of slot machines or other commercial casino games or if any other person lawfully operates slot machines or other commercial casino games within the State of Connecticut, except those consented to by the Tribe and the MPT.
In 2009, the MPT reportedly defaulted on certain of its debt obligations and entered into a forbearance agreement with its lenders under its bank credit facility and, in 2010, the MPT reportedly failed to repay its bank credit facility at maturity and announced the suspension of per capita gaming revenue distribution payments to its tribal members. According to reports, MPT is currently exploring the restructuring of their debt. It is uncertain whether any of these actions related to the MPT's debt structure will affect the Northeastern United States gaming market or will have an impact on our operations. The MPT continues to advertise, market and promote its facilities aggressively, and such efforts may be aided in the future by any debt relief or restructuring.
Rhode Island
The state's two pari-mutuel facilities, Twin River Casino in Lincoln and Newport Grand in Newport, reportedly offer approximately 5,700 VLTs. In addition, the Rhode Island legislature and governor have approved a law authorizing table gaming at Twin River, subject to the approval of voters in referenda to be held statewide and locally in Lincoln in November 2012. That law also included new promotional and marketing allowances for Twin River and Newport Grand. The Narragansett Indian Tribe of Rhode Island has filed suit challenging the referendum and new law on constitutional grounds.
Massachusetts
In November 2011, the governor of Massachusetts signed into law comprehensive gaming legislation which authorizes

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up to three casino resort licenses and one facility limited to 1,250 slot machines in Massachusetts to be licensed by a new gaming commission. Each of the three casino resort licenses is restricted to one of three geographic regions of the state, including Western Massachusetts, where we have leased property which would serve as a potential site for gaming development. Under the law, the new gaming commission is directed to assist the governor in compact negotiations with a federally-recognized Indian tribe in the commonwealth. A private developer in New Bedford has filed suit challenging the new legislation which allows for the consideration of tribal gaming.
While the governor of Massachusetts has announced his appointment to chair the five-member gaming commission, no schedule has yet been established for the promulgation of regulations or the consideration of gaming license applications.
New York
Racinos in Yonkers, Queens, Batavia, Hamburg, Nichols, Vernon, Monticello, Saratoga Springs and Farmington, New York, reportedly operate an aggregate of approximately 15,777 VLTs. Two of these racinos are located in or close to New York City - Empire City Casino at Yonkers Raceway, or Empire City, in Yonkers and Resorts World New York at Aqueduct Raceway in Queens, or Aqueduct, which opened on October 28, 2011.
Empire City operates approximately 5,380 VLTs and Aqueduct opened with approximately 2,486 VLTs and reportedly completed a second phase in December 2011 which brings the total number of gaming positions to approximately 5,000. Given Empire City's and Aqueduct's location in or near New York City, they have a distinct advantage over Mohegan Sun in competing for day-trip and other potential patrons from the New York metropolitan region.
The New York state legislature and governor have approved legislation which authorizes racinos to issue subsidized free play in amounts up to 10 percent of a facility's net machine income, subject to approval by the State Lottery, and the use of subsidized free play has reportedly increased significantly in New York. Various racinos, including Empire City and Aqueduct, have reportedly added electronic table games following the introduction of electronic roulette games at Saratoga Raceway.
There are eight federally-recognized Indian tribes in New York, and it has been reported that one of them, the Shinnecock Indian Nation of New York, is considering various sites on or near Long Island for a potential reservation and casino. Only three of the federally-recognized Indian tribes in the state, the Oneida Nation of New York, or the Oneida Nation, the Seneca Nation of New York, or the Seneca Nation, and the St. Regis Band of Mohawk Indians of New York, or the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe, currently engage in commercial casino gaming. However, several New York Indian tribes and at least two Indian tribes based in the State of Wisconsin have been pursuing potential gaming projects in the State of New York which, if completed, would add significant gaming space, as well as hotel capacity to the Northeastern United States gaming market.
In 2001, the state legislature approved legislation to permit as many as six new gaming operations by Indian tribes in addition to those then operated by the Oneida Nation and the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe. Under the legislation, three additional gaming operations are owned and operated by the Seneca Nation, while the remaining three may be located in either Ulster County or Sullivan County in the Catskills region of the state but have not received federal or final state approval to date. This legislation approved the use of traditional slot machines, rather than VLTs, where the possession and use of traditional slot machines are authorized pursuant to a tribal-state compact. The governor had reached tentative land claim settlements with various Indian tribes and supported legislation for as many as five tribal commercial casinos to be located in the Catskills region since that law was first adopted in 2001. However, a 2005 United States Supreme Court decision regarding tribal jurisdiction over Indian tribal lands not held in trust by the United States and subsequent federal court decisions led to the withdrawal of these land claim settlement agreements. Several federally-recognized Indian tribes, including the Seneca Nation, the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe and the Stockbridge-Munsee Tribe of Wisconsin, have continued to pursue tribal commercial casinos in the Catskills region.
In June 2011, the Assistant Secretary-Indian Affairs of the Department of the Interior withdrew earlier Bureau of Indian Affairs policy guidance issued in January 2008 relating to trust land acquisitions for so-called off-reservation gaming projects. The January 2008 policy guidance had led to the rejection of certain trust land applications in the Catskills region. According to published reports, several tribes are now reconsidering or renewing efforts to develop gaming facilities in the Catskills region.
The following is a summary of current and potential gaming operations by federally-recognized Indian tribes in the State of New York:
The Oneida Nation-The Oneida Nation operates Turning Stone Resort Casino in Verona, approximately 270 miles from Mohegan Sun.
The St. Regis Mohawk Tribe-The St. Regis Mohawk Tribe operates Akwesasne Mohawk Casino in Hogansburg and Mohawk Bingo Palace in Akwesasne, each approximately 400 miles from Mohegan Sun.
The Seneca Nation-The Seneca Nation operates three casinos in the western region of the state more than 400 miles from Mohegan Sun.
The Cayuga Nation of New York-The Cayuga Nation of New York previously operated bingo gaming halls in Union

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Springs and Seneca Falls, but the tribe's application with the BIA to take 125 acres into trust for gaming at those facilities was rejected in December 2011. The tribe also has pursued gaming in the Catskills region at various times.
The Shinnecock Indian Nation of New York-The Shinnecock Indian Nation of New York has an approximately 800-acre state reservation on the east side of Shinnecock Bay, adjacent to Southampton on Long Island, but has reportedly considered as many as 30 other locations for a casino site. Gaming on the tribe's existing state reservation or any other location will likely require various regulatory approvals and/or legislation.
The Oneida Nation, the Seneca Nation and the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe reportedly have one or more ongoing disputes with the State of New York regarding property taxes, cigarette taxes or gaming revenue sharing payments. In 2010, the Seneca Nation and the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe ceased making certain gaming revenue sharing payments to the state, and in November 2011, the Seneca Nation reportedly agreed to binding arbitration of its gaming payment dispute with the state. These disputes or their ultimate resolutions may increase the likelihood of new tribal or commercial gaming operations in the Catskills region and may impact competition in the Northeastern United States gaming market.
New Jersey
The Atlantic City gaming market currently consists of 11 gaming properties reportedly offering approximately 17,000 hotel rooms and 1.4 million square feet of gaming space, including approximately 31,000 slot machines and 1,600 table games.
In the past year, the New Jersey governor and state legislature have acted on a series of legislative reforms and public-private initiatives to revitalize gaming in the state and respond to competition from expanded gaming in nearby states. In early 2011, the governor signed bills authorizing up to two “boutique hotel casinos” in Atlantic City and the creation of a new Atlantic City tourism district, as well as regulatory reforms to, among other things, allocate certain regulatory cost savings into a casino marketing fund. The governor also signed legislation permitting betting exchanges for horse racing and the pooling of pari-mutuel wagers. Also in early 2011, the governor announced a planned state investment of $261 million in tax increment financing and other incentives for a $1.1 billion financing plan for the suspended Revel Entertainment Group project in Atlantic City. It has been reported that the project will be completed in June 2012. In November 2011, New Jersey voters approved a sports betting initiative which authorizes the legislature to pass laws allowing sports wagering, which reportedly would permit litigation to proceed challenging a ban on sports wagering in New Jersey under a 1992 federal law.
Maine
Full-scale casino gaming operations are now authorized in the State of Maine on a limited basis as a result of two successful referenda in 2010 and 2011, while other new or relocated gaming facilities were rejected by voters in 2011. Voters in the state have approved a proposed commercial casino for a single site in Oxford County, subject to local approval. The developers of the proposed casino have announced plans for a 100,000-square-foot casino resort to be completed in phases over five years, including table games. Penn National Gaming, Inc., the operator of Hollywood Slots Hotel & Raceway, a racino located in Bangor, with 1,000 slot machines and a six-story hotel, won approval by county voters in 2011 to add table games, and will reportedly add 14 poker, blackjack, roulette and other table games in March 2012 and be renamed Hollywood Casino Bangor.
New Hampshire
Commercial casino gaming operations are not currently permitted in the State of New Hampshire, with the exception of limited charitable table gaming. There are no federally-recognized Indian tribes in the state.
Vermont
Currently, gaming is not permitted in the State of Vermont nor is there any significant initiative underway to legalize commercial casino gaming operations in the state. There are no federally-recognized Indian tribes in the state.
Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs
The following is a summary of competition affecting Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs:
In 2004, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania passed the Pennsylvania Race Horse Development and Gaming Act, or the Pennsylvania Gaming Act, which permitted the operation of up to 61,000 slot machines at 14 locations throughout the state. In addition, the Pennsylvania Gaming Act authorized the operation of up to 500 slot machines at two resort facilities. The Pennsylvania Gaming Act also includes prohibitions against locating facilities within close proximity to other operations, which, among other things, effectively prohibits locating a slot machine facility within twenty miles of Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs or a smaller resort slot machine facility within fifteen miles of Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs. In 2010, the Pennsylvania Gaming Act was amended to allow slot machine operators in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to operate certain table games, including poker.

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The amendment also authorized a resort facility to be awarded in 2017, which is prohibited from being located within thirty miles of Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs. In addition, the amendment increased the number of slot machines at such smaller resort facilities from 500 to 600 and restricted the number of table games at such facilities to 50. All operating slot machine facilities in the state have added table game operations.
Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs faces competition from several facilities in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, as well as neighboring states. However, its most immediate competitors are Mount Airy Casino Resort, or Mount Airy, and Sands Casino Resort Bethlehem, or Sands Bethlehem, both of which are located in Northeastern Pennsylvania:
Mount Airy-Mount Airy, located at the former Mount Airy Lodge in Mount Pocono, opened in October 2007 and is approximately 40 miles from Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs. Mount Airy reportedly offers 2,540 slot machines, 78 table games, a 188-room hotel, a spa and a golf course.
Sands Bethlehem-Sands Bethlehem, owned by Las Vegas Sands Corporation, opened in May 2009 and is approximately 70 miles from Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs. Sands Bethlehem reportedly offers 3,250 slot machines and 89 table games. Sands Bethlehem opened a new 300 room hotel at the facility in May 2011.
In addition to existing slot machine and table game operations in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs faces existing competition from the VLT facility at the Monticello Raceway in Monticello, New York, approximately 90 miles from Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs. Additionally, Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs faces competition from Tioga Downs Casino in Nichols, New York, approximately 100 miles from Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs. Tioga Downs Casino offers a racetrack and reportedly 750 VLTs. Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs also faces potential competition from any gaming operation that is ultimately developed in the Catskills region of New York.

In 2010, the PGCB voted to revoke a license awarded to an affiliate of Foxwoods Development, LLC for a second stand-alone facility in Philadelphia and, in 2011, the developers reportedly filed an appeal from a decision in commonwealth court upholding the PGCB's action. Additionally, new gaming projects are reportedly proceeding in Maryland and Ohio; however, we do not believe that these developments will have a direct impact on Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs. The expansion of gaming in nearby states may nevertheless impact the overall Pennsylvania gaming market.
Mohegan Tribe of Indians of Connecticut
General
The Tribe has lived in a cohesive community for hundreds of years in what is today southeastern Connecticut, and became a federally-recognized Indian tribe in 1994. The Tribe currently has approximately 1,900 members including 1,200 adult voting members. The Tribe historically has cooperated with the United States and is proud of the fact that members of the Tribe have fought on the side of the United States in every war from the Revolutionary War to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The Tribe believes that this philosophy of cooperation exemplifies its approach to developing Mohegan Sun and pursuing diversification of its business interests.
Although the Tribe is a sovereign entity, it has sought to work with, and to gain the support of, local communities in establishing Mohegan Sun. For example, the Tribe settled its claim to extensive tracts of land that had been guaranteed by various treaties in consideration for certain arrangements in the Mohegan Compact. As a result, local residents and businesses whose property values had been clouded by this dispute were able to gain clear title to their property. In addition, the Tribe has been sensitive to the concerns of the local community in developing Mohegan Sun. This philosophy of cooperation has enabled the Tribe to build a solid alliance among local, state and federal officials to achieve its goal of economic development through the success of Mohegan Sun and other projects.
Governance of the Tribe
The Tribe's Constitution provides for the governance of the Tribe by a Tribal Council consisting of nine members, and a Council of Elders consisting of seven members. The registered voters of the Tribe elect all members of the Tribal Council and the Council of Elders. As the result of an amendment to the Tribe's Constitution in September 2003, the members of both the Council of Elders and the Tribal Council are elected on a staggered term basis and members of each Council are currently elected for four-year terms. The terms of four members of the Council of Elders expire in October 2012, and the terms for the remaining three members will expire in October 2014. The terms for five members of the Tribal Council expire in October 2013 and the terms for the remaining four members will expire in October 2015. Members of the Tribal Council must be at least 21 years of age when elected, and members of the Council of Elders must be at least 55 years of age when elected. The members of the Tribal Council also serve as members and officers on our Management Board.
The Tribe's Constitution vests all legislative and executive powers of the Tribe in the Tribal Council, with the exception

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of the enrollment of Tribal members and cultural duties, which are vested in the Council of Elders. The powers of the Tribal Council include the power to establish an executive branch departmental structure with agencies and subdivisions and to delegate appropriate powers to such agencies and sub-divisions.
The Tribe may amend the provisions of its Constitution that established us and the Gaming Disputes Court, which is described below. Such an amendment requires the approval of two-thirds of the members of the Tribal Council and must be ratified by registered voters of the Tribe by a two-thirds majority of all votes cast, with at least 40% of the registered voters of the Tribe voting. In addition, the Tribe's Constitution currently prohibits the Tribe from enacting any law that would impair the obligations of contracts entered into in furtherance of the development, construction, operation and promotion of gaming on Tribal lands. An amendment to this provision requires the affirmative vote of 75% of all registered voters of the Tribe. Prior to the enactment of any such amendment by the Tribal Council, any non-Tribal party would have the opportunity to seek a ruling from the Appellate Branch of the Gaming Disputes Court that the proposed amendment would constitute an impermissible impairment of contract.
The Council of Elders acts in the capacity of an appellate court of final review and may hear appeals of any case or controversy arising under the Tribe's Constitution, except those matters related to Mohegan Sun, which are required to be submitted to the Gaming Disputes Court.
Gaming Disputes Court
Under the Constitution and laws of the Tribe, the Gaming Disputes Court is vested with exclusive jurisdiction over all disputes related to gaming and associated facilities on Tribal lands, including appeals from certain final administrative agency decisions. The Gaming Disputes Court is composed of a Trial Branch and an Appellate Branch. Cases tried in the Trial Branch are heard by a single judge, whose decision can be appealed to the Appellate Branch. Appeals are decided by a panel of three judges, consisting of the Chief Judge and two judges selected in rotation, and the judge whose decision is on appeal may not serve on the appellate panel. Decisions of the Appellate Branch are final, and no further appeal is available.
The Gaming Disputes Court has jurisdiction over all disputes or controversies related to gaming between any person or entity and us or the Tribe. The Gaming Disputes Court also has jurisdiction over certain appeals arising out of tribal agency regulatory powers, including licensing actions. The Tribe has adopted the substantive law of the State of Connecticut as the applicable law of the Gaming Disputes Court to the extent that such law is not in conflict with Mohegan Tribal Law. Also, the Tribe has adopted all of Connecticut's rules of civil and appellate procedure and professional and judicial conduct to govern the Gaming Disputes Court.
Judges of the Gaming Disputes Court are chosen by the Tribal Council from a publicly available list of eligible retired federal judges and Connecticut Attorney Trial Referees, who are appointed by the Chief Justice of the Connecticut Supreme Court, each of whom must remain licensed to practice law in the State of Connecticut.
Judges are selected sequentially as cases are filed with the clerk of the Gaming Disputes Court. The Chief Judge of the Gaming Disputes Court, who serves as the Gaming Disputes Court's administrative superintendent, is chosen by the Tribal Council from the list of eligible judges and serves a five-year term. The remaining judges may serve an unlimited term on the bench. Judges of the Gaming Disputes Court are subject to discipline and removal for cause pursuant to the rules of the Gaming Disputes Court. The Chief Judge is vested with the sole authority to revise the rules of the Gaming Disputes Court. Judges are compensated by the Tribe at an agreed rate of pay commensurate with their duties and responsibilities. Such rate cannot be diminished during a judge's tenure.
Below is a description of certain information regarding judges currently serving on the Gaming Disputes Court:
Paul M. Guernsey, Chief Judge. Age: 61. Judge Guernsey has served on the Gaming Disputes Court since 1996. He was appointed Acting Chief Judge in November 1999 and appointed as Chief Judge in January 2000. Judge Guernsey also has served as Fact Finder for the New London Judicial District from 1990 to 1992 and as State of Connecticut Attorney Trial Referee, Judicial District of New London, since 1992.
F. Owen Eagan, Judge. Age: 81. Judge Eagan was appointed to the Gaming Disputes Court in 1996. He served as United States Magistrate Judge from 1975 to 1996 and was formerly Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Connecticut and United States Attorney for the District of Connecticut. He also served as an adjunct law faculty member at Western New England College School of Law.
Frank A. Manfredi, Judge. Age: 60. Judge Manfredi was appointed to the Gaming Disputes Court in 2001. He has been a partner at Cotter, Greenfield, Manfredi & Lanes, P.C., since 1983. Judge Manfredi also has served as State of Connecticut Attorney Trial Referee since 1993, State of Connecticut Attorney Fact Finder since 1992 and Town Attorney for the Town of Preston since 1988.
Thomas B. Wilson, Judge. Age: 72. Judge Wilson was appointed to the Gaming Disputes Court in 1996. Judge Wilson

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served as a partner and director at Suisman, Shapiro, Wool, Brennan & Gray, P.C., from 1967 to 2003. Judge Wilson also has served as State Attorney Trial Referee since 1988 and as Town Attorney for the Town of Ledyard from 1971 to 1979, 1983 to 1991 and 1995 to 2003.
Workers' Compensation Department
Effective September 1, 2004, the Tribal Council established a Workers' Compensation Department that oversees a self-administered workers' compensation program for employees of the Tribe and us, but does not include employees of any of the Pocono Downs entities. Prior to the formation of this department, we participated in the State of Connecticut workers' compensation program. Duties of the Workers' Compensation Department, including judgment on claims, are performed by two commissioners retained by the Tribe.
Below is a description of certain information regarding the commissioners serving in the Workers' Compensation Department:
Giancarlo Rossi, Chief Commissioner. Age: 62. Mr. Rossi was appointed Chief Commissioner of the Tribe's Workers' Compensation Department in September 2004. Mr. Rossi is a practicing attorney with over 20 years of workers' compensation experience in Connecticut.
Louis M. Pacelli, Commissioner. Age: 57. Mr. Pacelli was appointed Commissioner of the Tribe's Workers' Compensation Department in September 2004. Mr. Pacelli is a partner in the law firm of Grillo and Pacelli, LLC in East Haven, Connecticut and has practiced general law, including workers' compensation matters, for over 20 years in Connecticut.
Mohegan Tribal Gaming Authority
We were established by the Tribe in July 1995 with the exclusive power to conduct and regulate gaming activities on tribal lands for the Tribe and the non-exclusive authority to conduct such activities elsewhere. We are governed by a nine-member Management Board, whose members also comprise the Mohegan Tribal Council, the governing body of the Tribe. Any change in the composition of the Mohegan Tribal Council results in a corresponding change in our Management Board. See “—Mohegan Tribe of Indians of Connecticut” and “Part III. Item 10. Directors and Executive Officers of the Registrant.”
We have three major functions. The first major function is to direct the operation, management and promotion of gaming enterprises on tribal lands and all related activities. The second major function is to regulate gaming activities on tribal lands. Our Management Board has appointed an independent Director of Regulation to be responsible for the regulation of gaming activities at Mohegan Sun. The Director of Regulation serves at the will of the Management Board and ensures the integrity of the gaming operation through the promulgation and enforcement of appropriate regulations. The Director of Regulation and his staff also are responsible for performing background investigations and licensing of non-gaming employees, as well as vendors seeking to provide non-gaming products or services within the casino. Pursuant to the Mohegan Compact, the State of Connecticut is responsible for performing background investigations and licensing of gaming employees, as well as gaming vendors seeking to provide gaming products or services within the casino. The third major function is to identify and evaluate various diversification opportunities in conjunction with the Tribe. These opportunities primarily include the development and/or management, ownership or investments in, other gaming enterprises through direct investment, acquisition, joint venture arrangements and loan transactions.
Government Regulation
General
Our operations at Mohegan Sun are subject to certain federal, state and tribal laws applicable to both commercial relationships with Indians generally and to Indian gaming and the management and financing of Indian casinos specifically. Our operations at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs also are subject to Pennsylvania laws and regulations applicable to harness racing, simulcasting, slot machine and table gaming. The following description of the regulatory environment in which gaming takes place and in which we operate is only a summary and not a complete recitation of all applicable law. Moreover, since this regulatory environment is susceptible to changes in public policy considerations, it is impossible to predict how particular provisions will be interpreted, from time to time, or whether they will remain intact. Changes in such laws could have a material adverse impact on our operations. See “Risk Factors.”
Tribal Law and Legal Systems
Applicability of State and Federal Law
Federally-recognized Indian tribes are independent governments, subordinate to the United States, with sovereign powers, except as those powers may have been limited by treaty or by Congress. The power of Indian tribes to enact their own laws to regulate gaming derives from the exercise of this tribal sovereignty. Indian tribes maintain their own governmental systems and

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often their own judicial systems. Indian tribes have the right to tax persons and enterprises conducting business on tribal lands, and also have the right to require licenses and to impose other forms of regulations and regulatory fees on persons and businesses operating on their lands.
Absent the consent of the Tribe or action of Congress, the laws of the State of Connecticut do not apply to us or the Tribe. Pursuant to the federal law that settled the Tribe's land claims in 1994, the United States and the Tribe consented to, among other things, the extension of Connecticut criminal law and Connecticut state traffic controls over Mohegan Sun.
Waiver of Sovereign Immunity; Jurisdiction; Exhaustion of Tribal Remedies
Indian tribes enjoy sovereign immunity from unconsented suit similar to that of the states and the United States. In order to sue an Indian tribe (or an agency or instrumentality of an Indian tribe, such as us), the Tribe must have effectively waived its sovereign immunity with respect to the matter in dispute. Further, in most commercial disputes with Indian tribes, the jurisdiction of the federal courts, which are courts of limited jurisdiction, may be difficult or impossible to obtain. A commercial dispute is unlikely to present a federal question, and some courts have ruled that an Indian tribe as a party is not a citizen of any state for purposes of establishing diversity jurisdiction in the federal courts. State courts also may lack jurisdiction over suits brought by non-Indians against Indian tribes in Connecticut. The remedies available against an Indian tribe also depend, at least in part, upon the rules of comity requiring initial exhaustion of remedies in tribal tribunals and, as to some judicial remedies, the tribe's consent to jurisdictional provisions contained in the disputed agreements. The U.S. Supreme Court has held that, where a tribal court exists, jurisdiction in that forum first must be exhausted before any dispute can be heard properly by federal courts which otherwise would have jurisdiction. Where a dispute as to the jurisdiction of the tribal forum exists, the tribal court first must rule as to the limits of its own jurisdiction.
In connection with some of our contractual arrangements, including substantially all of our outstanding indebtedness, we, the Tribe, MBC, Mohegan Ventures-NW, Mohegan Golf and to the extent applicable, the Pocono Downs entities, WTG, MTGA Gaming and certain other of our subsidiaries and entities have agreed to waive our and their respective sovereign immunity from unconsented suit to permit any court of competent jurisdiction to: (1) enforce and interpret the terms of our applicable outstanding indebtedness, and award and enforce the award of damages owing as a consequence of a breach thereof, whether such award is the product of litigation, administrative proceedings, or arbitration; (2) determine whether any consent or approval of the Tribe or us has been granted improperly or withheld unreasonably; (3) enforce any judgment prohibiting the Tribe or us from taking any action, or mandating or obligating the Tribe or us to take any action, including a judgment compelling the Tribe or us to submit to binding arbitration; and (4) adjudicate any claim under the Indian Civil Rights Act of 1968, 25 U.S.C. § 1302 (or any successor statute).
The Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988
Regulatory Authority
The operation of casinos and of all gaming on Indian land is subject to IGRA, which is administered by the NIGC, an independent agency within the United States Department of the Interior, which exercises primary federal regulatory responsibility over Indian gaming. The NIGC has exclusive federal authority to issue regulations governing tribal gaming activities, approve tribal ordinances for regulating Class II and Class III Gaming (as described below), approve management agreements for gaming facilities, conduct investigations and generally monitor tribal gaming. Certain responsibilities under IGRA (such as the approval of gaming compacts, gaming revenue allocation plans for tribal members and the review of applications to take land into trust for gaming) are retained by the BIA. The BIA also has responsibility to review and approve certain agreements and land leases relating to Indian lands. The U.S. Department of Justice also retains responsibility for federal criminal law enforcement on the Mohegan reservation.
The NIGC is empowered to inspect and audit all Indian gaming facilities, to conduct background checks on all persons associated with Class II Gaming and management contractors involved in Class III Gaming, to hold hearings, issue subpoenas, take depositions, adopt regulations and assess fees and impose civil penalties for violations of IGRA. IGRA also prohibits illegal gaming on Indian land and theft from Indian gaming facilities. The NIGC has adopted rules implementing specific provisions of IGRA, which govern, among other things, the submission and approval of tribal gaming ordinances or resolutions and require an Indian tribe to have the sole proprietary interest in and responsibility for the conduct of any gaming. Tribes are required to issue gaming licenses only under articulated standards, to conduct or commission financial audits of their gaming enterprises, to perform or commission background investigations for primary management officials and key employees and to maintain their facilities in a manner that adequately protects the environment and the public health and safety. These rules also set out review and reporting procedures for tribal licensing of gaming operation employees and tribal gaming facilities.
Tribal Ordinances
Under IGRA, except to the extent otherwise provided in a tribal-state compact, Indian tribal governments have primary

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regulatory authority over Class III Gaming on land within a tribe's jurisdiction. Therefore, our gaming operations, and persons engaged in gaming activities, are guided by and subject to the provisions of the Tribe's ordinances and regulations regarding gaming, in addition to the provisions of the Mohegan Compact.
IGRA requires that the NIGC review tribal gaming ordinances and authorizes the NIGC to approve such ordinances only if they meet specific requirements relating to: (1) the ownership, security, personnel background, record keeping and auditing of a tribe's gaming enterprises; (2) the use of the revenues from such gaming; and (3) the protection of the environment and the public health and safety. The Tribe adopted its gaming ordinance in July 1994, and the NIGC approved the gaming ordinance in November 1994.
Classes of Gaming
IGRA classifies games that may be conducted on Indian lands into three categories. “Class I Gaming” includes social games solely for prizes of minimal value or traditional forms of Indian gaming engaged in by individuals as part of, or in connection with, tribal ceremonies or celebrations. “Class II Gaming” includes bingo, pull-tabs, lotto, punch boards, tip jars, certain non-banked card games (if such games are played legally elsewhere in the state), instant bingo and other games similar to bingo, if those games are played at the same location where bingo is played. “Class III Gaming” includes all other forms of gaming, such as slot machines, video casino games (e.g., video blackjack and video poker), so-called banked table games (e.g., blackjack, craps and roulette) and other commercial gaming (e.g., sports betting and pari-mutuel wagering).
Class I Gaming on Indian lands is within the exclusive jurisdiction of the Indian tribes and is not subject to IGRA. Class II Gaming is permitted on Indian lands if: (1) the state in which the Indian lands lie permits such gaming for any purpose by any person, organization or entity; (2) the gaming is not otherwise specifically prohibited on Indian lands by federal law; (3) the gaming is conducted in accordance with a tribal ordinance or resolution which has been approved by the NIGC; (4) an Indian tribe has sole proprietary interest and responsibility for the conduct of gaming; (5) the primary management officials and key employees are tribally licensed; and (6) several other requirements are met. Class III Gaming is permitted on Indian lands if the conditions applicable to Class II Gaming are met, and in addition, the gaming is conducted in conformance with the terms of a tribal-state compact (a written agreement between the tribal government and the government of the state within whose boundaries the tribe's lands lie).

With the growth of the Internet and other modern advances, computers and other technology aids are increasingly used to conduct specific kinds of gaming, such as poker or wagering on horse racing. Congress has adopted and continues to consider legislation to limit or otherwise regulate on-line gaming by U.S. residents. Individual states are also considering legislation to license and regulate Internet gaming on an intrastate basis under safe harbor provisions of the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006, or the UIGEA, adopted in October 2006. Congress has considered but, to date, not passed amendments to the UIGEA or new legislation to establish a licensing, taxing and enforcement framework for Internet gaming. The U.S. Department of Justice has brought indictments against various operators and payment processors involved in offshore on-line gaming transactions with persons located in the United States and also authored an opinion clarifying the department’s view of permissible on-line activities by state lotteries under federal law.
Tribal-State Compacts
IGRA requires states to negotiate in good faith with Indian tribes that seek to enter into tribal-state compacts for the conduct of Class III Gaming. Such tribal-state compacts may include provisions for the allocation of criminal and civil jurisdiction between the state and the Indian tribe necessary for the enforcement of such laws and regulations, taxation by the Indian tribe of gaming activities in amounts comparable to those amounts assessed by the state for comparable activities, remedies for breach of compacts, standards for the operation of gaming and maintenance of the gaming facility, including licensing and any other subjects that are directly related to the operation of gaming activities. While the terms of tribal-state compacts vary from state to state, compacts within one state tend to be substantially similar. Tribal-state compacts usually specify the types of permitted games, establish technical standards for gaming, set maximum and minimum machine payout percentages, entitle the state to inspect casinos, require background investigations and licensing of casino employees and may require the tribe to pay a portion of the state's expenses for establishing and maintaining regulatory agencies. Some tribal-state compacts are for set terms, while others are for an indefinite duration.
IGRA provides that if an Indian tribe and state fail to successfully negotiate a tribal-state compact, the United States Department of the Interior may approve gaming procedures pursuant to which Class III Gaming may be conducted on Indian lands. Gaming compacts or approved gaming procedures take effect upon notice of approval by the Secretary of the Interior published in the Federal Register. The Mohegan Compact, approved by the United States Secretary of the Interior in 1994, does not have a specific term and will remain in effect until terminated by written agreement of both parties, or the provisions are modified as a result of a change in applicable law. Our gaming operations are subject to the requirements and restrictions contained

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in the Mohegan Compact, which authorizes the Tribe to conduct most forms of Class III Gaming.
Tribal-state compacts have been the subject of litigation in a number of states, including Alabama, California, Florida, Kansas, Michigan, Mississippi, New Mexico, New York, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Texas, Washington and Wisconsin. Tribes frequently seek to enforce the provision of IGRA which entitles tribes to bring suit in federal court against a state that fails to negotiate a tribal-state compact in good faith. The U.S. Supreme Court resolved this issue by holding that the Indian Commerce Clause does not grant Congress authority to abrogate sovereign immunity granted to the states under the Eleventh Amendment. Accordingly, IGRA does not grant jurisdiction over a state that did not consent to be sued.
There has been litigation in a number of states challenging the authority of state governors, under state law, to enter into tribal-state compacts without legislative approval. Federal courts have upheld such authority in Louisiana and Mississippi. The highest state courts of Arizona, Kansas, Michigan, New Mexico, New York and Rhode Island have held that the governors of those states did not have authority to enter into such compacts without the consent or authorization of the legislatures of those states. In the New Mexico and Kansas cases, the courts held that the authority to enter into such compacts is a legislative function under their respective state constitutions. The court in the New Mexico case also held that state law does not permit casino-style gaming.
In Connecticut, there has been no litigation challenging the governor's authority to enter into tribal-state compacts. If such a suit were filed, however, the Tribe does not believe that the precedent in the New Mexico or Kansas cases would apply. At the time of execution of the Mohegan Compact, the Connecticut Attorney General issued a formal opinion, which states that, “existing state statutes provide the Governor with the authority to negotiate and execute the Mohegan Compact.” Thus, the Attorney General declined to follow the Kansas case. In addition, in a case brought by the MPT, the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit has held that Connecticut law authorizes casino gaming. After execution of the Mohegan Compact, the Connecticut General Assembly passed a law requiring that future gaming compacts be approved by the legislature, but that law does not apply to previously executed compacts such as the Mohegan Compact.
Possible Changes in Federal Law
Bills have been introduced in Congress from time to time which would amend IGRA. While there have been a number of technical amendments to the law, to date there have been no material changes to IGRA. Any amendment to IGRA could change the regulatory environment and requirements within which the Tribe could conduct gaming.
Pennsylvania Racing Regulations
Our harness racing operations at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs is subject to extensive regulation under the Pennsylvania Racing Act. Under that law, the Pennsylvania Harness Racing Commission, or Harness Racing Commission, is responsible for, among other things:
granting permission annually to maintain racing licenses and schedule races;
approving, after a public hearing, the opening of additional OTWs and racetracks;
approving simulcasting activities;
licensing all officers, directors, racing officials and certain other employees of a company; and
approving all contracts entered into by a company affecting racing, pari-mutuel wagering, phone/internet wagering and OTW operations.
As in most states, the regulations and oversight applicable to our operations in Pennsylvania are intended primarily to safeguard the legitimacy of the sport and its freedom from inappropriate or criminal influences. The Harness Racing Commission has broad authority to regulate in the best interests of racing and may, to that end, disapprove the involvement of certain personnel in our operations, deny approval of certain acquisitions following their consummation or withhold permission for a proposed OTW site for a variety of reasons, including community opposition. The Pennsylvania legislature also has reserved the right to revoke the power of the Harness Racing Commission to approve additional OTWs and could, at any time, terminate pari-mutuel wagering as a form of legalized gaming in Pennsylvania or subject such wagering to additional restrictive regulation or taxation.
Pennsylvania Gaming Regulations
Our slot machine and table game operations at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs are subject to extensive regulation under the Pennsylvania Gaming Act. Under that law, as amended, the PGCB is responsible for, among other things:
issuing and renewing slot machine licenses and table game certificates;
approving, after a public hearing, the granting of additional slot machine licenses or table game certificates (to the extent allowed under the Pennsylvania Gaming Act);

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licensing all officers, directors, principals and certain other employees and vendors of a company with gaming operations; and
approving certain contracts entered into by a company affecting gaming operations.
As in most states, the regulations and oversight applicable to our operations in Pennsylvania are intended primarily to safeguard the legitimacy of gaming and its freedom from inappropriate or criminal influences. The PGCB has broad authority to regulate in the best interests of gaming and may, to that end, disapprove the involvement of certain personnel in our operations, reject certain transactions following their consummation, require divestiture by unsuitable persons or withhold permission on applicable gaming matters for a variety of reasons.
Material Agreements
The following summarizes the terms of our material agreements. This summary does not restate in entirety the terms of each agreement. We urge you to read each agreement because they, and not this summary, define our rights and obligations, and, in some cases, those of the Tribe. Material agreements are included by reference to previous filings in the schedule of exhibits to this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Gaming Compact with the State of Connecticut
In April 1994, the Tribe and the State of Connecticut entered into a gaming compact to authorize and regulate the Tribe's conduct of gaming on the Tribe's land in Connecticut, and the U.S. Secretary of the Interior approved the Mohegan Compact by notice published in the Federal Register on December 16, 1994. The Mohegan Compact has a perpetual term and is substantively similar to the procedures that govern gaming operations of the MPT in Connecticut and provide, among other things, as follows:
(1) The Tribe is authorized to conduct on its reservation those Class III Gaming activities specifically enumerated in the Mohegan Compact or amendments thereto. The forms of Class III Gaming authorized under the Mohegan Compact include: (a) specific types of games of chance; (b) video facsimiles of such authorized games of chance (i.e., slot machines); (c) off-track pari-mutuel betting on animal races; (d) pari-mutuel betting, through simulcasting, on animal races; and (e) certain other types of pari-mutuel betting on games and races conducted at the gaming facility (some types currently are together with off-track pari-mutuel telephone betting on animal races, under a moratorium).
(2) The Tribe must establish standards of operations and management of all gaming operations in order to protect the public interest, ensure the fair and honest operation of gaming activities and maintain the integrity of all Class III Gaming activities conducted on the Tribe's lands. The first of these standards was set forth in the Mohegan Compact and approved by the State of Connecticut gaming agency. State of Connecticut gaming agency approval is required for any revision to such standards affecting gaming. The Tribe must supervise the implementation of these standards by regulation through a Tribal gaming agency.
(3) Criminal law enforcement matters relating to Class III Gaming activities are under the concurrent jurisdiction of the State of Connecticut and the Tribe.
(4) All gaming employees must obtain and maintain a gaming employee license issued by the State of Connecticut gaming agency.
(5) Any enterprise providing gaming services or gaming equipment to the Tribe is required to hold a valid, current gaming services registration issued by the State of Connecticut gaming agency.
(6) The State of Connecticut annually assesses the Tribe for the costs attributable to its regulation of the Tribe's gaming operations and for the provision of law enforcement at the Tribe's gaming facility.
 
(7) Net revenues from the Tribe's gaming operations may be applied only for purposes related to Tribal government operations and general welfare, Tribal economic development, charitable contributions and payments to local governmental agencies.
(8) Tribal ordinances and regulations governing health and safety standards at the gaming facilities shall be no less rigorous than certain State of Connecticut standards.
(9) Service of alcoholic beverages within any gaming facility is subject to regulation by the State of Connecticut.
(10) The Tribe waives any defense which it may have by virtue of sovereign immunity with respect to any action brought by the State of Connecticut to enforce the Mohegan Compact in the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut.
In May 1994, the Tribe and the State of Connecticut entered into a MOU, which sets forth certain matters regarding the implementation of the Mohegan Compact. The MOU stipulates that a portion of the revenues earned on slot machines must be

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paid to the State of Connecticut. This payment is known as the Slot Win Contribution. For each 12-month period commencing July 1, 1995, the Slot Win Contribution shall be the lesser of: (1) 30% of gross revenues from slot machines, or (2) the greater of (a) 25% of gross revenues from slot machines or (b) $80.0 million. The Slot Win Contribution payments will not be required if the State of Connecticut legalizes any other gaming operations with slot machines or other commercial casino games within the State of Connecticut except those operations consented to by the Tribe and the MPT.
Relinquishment Agreement
In February 1998, we and Trading Cove Associates, or TCA, entered into a relinquishment agreement, or the relinquishment agreement. Effective January 1, 2000, or the relinquishment date, the relinquishment agreement superseded a then-existing management agreement with TCA. The relinquishment agreement provides, among other things, that we make certain payments to TCA out of, and determined as a percentage of, revenues, as defined under the relinquishment agreement, generated by Mohegan Sun over a 15-year period commencing on the relinquishment date. The payments, or senior relinquishment payments and junior relinquishment payments, have separate schedules and priorities. Senior relinquishment payments commenced on April 25, 2000, 25 days following the end of the first three-month period after the relinquishment date, and continue at the end of each three-month period thereafter until January 25, 2015. Junior relinquishment payments commenced on July 25, 2000, 25 days following the end of the first six-month period after the relinquishment date, and continue at the end of each six-month period thereafter until January 25, 2015. Each senior and junior relinquishment payment is 2.5% of revenues generated by Mohegan Sun over the immediate preceding three-month or six-month payment period, as the case may be. Revenues are defined under the relinquishment agreement as gross gaming revenues, other than Class II gaming revenues, and all other revenues, as defined, including, without limitation, hotel revenues, room service revenues, food and beverage revenues, ticket revenues, fees or receipts from the convention/events center and all rental revenues or other receipts from lessees and concessionaires, but not the gross receipts of such lessees, licenses and concessionaires, derived directly or indirectly from the facilities, as defined. Revenues under the relinquishment agreement exclude revenues generated from certain expansion areas of Mohegan Sun, such as Casino of the Wind, as such areas do not constitute facilities as defined under the relinquishment agreement.
In the event of any bankruptcy, liquidation, reorganization or similar proceeding, the relinquishment agreement provides that senior and junior relinquishment payments then due and owing are subordinated in right of payment to our senior secured obligations, which include our bank credit facility, 2009 second lien senior secured notes and capital lease obligations, and that junior relinquishment payments then due and owing are further subordinated in right of payment to all of our other senior obligations, including our 2005 senior unsecured notes. The relinquishment agreement also provides that all relinquishment payments are subordinated in right of payment to minimum priority distribution payments, which are required monthly payments made by us to the Tribe under a priority distribution agreement, to the extent then due.
In connection with a relinquishment agreement, TCA granted us an exclusive, irrevocable, perpetual, world-wide and royalty-free license with respect to trademarks and other similar rights, including the “Mohegan Sun” name.
Priority Distribution Agreement
In August 2001, we and the Tribe entered into an agreement, or the priority distribution agreement, which stipulates that we must make monthly payments to the Tribe to the extent of our net cash flow, as defined under the priority distribution agreement. The priority distribution agreement, which has a perpetual term, limits the maximum aggregate priority distribution payments in each calendar year to $14.0 million, as adjusted annually in accordance with a formula specified in the priority distribution agreement to reflect the effects of inflation. Payments under the priority distribution agreement: (1) do not reduce our obligations to reimburse the Tribe for governmental and administrative services provided by the Tribe or to make payments under any other agreements with the Tribe; (2) are limited obligations and are payable only to the extent of our net cash flow, as defined under the priority distribution agreement; and (3) are not secured by a lien or encumbrance on any of our assets or properties.
Town of Montville Agreement
In June 1994, the Tribe entered into an agreement with the Town of Montville, or the Town under which the Tribe agreed to pay the Town $500,000 annually to minimize the impact of Tribe’s reservation being held in trust on the Town. The Tribe has assigned its rights and obligations under this agreement to us.
Land Lease Agreement
The land upon which Mohegan Sun is located is held in trust for the Tribe by the United States. We entered into a land lease agreement with the Tribe to lease the property and improvements and related facilities constructed or installed on the property. In March 2007, the agreement was amended to update the legal description of the property, and, in April 2007, the amended agreement was approved by the Secretary of the Interior. The following summarizes the key provisions of the land lease agreement:


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Term
The term of the agreement is 25 years with an option, exercisable by us, to extend the term for one additional 25-year period. Upon termination of the agreement, we will be required to surrender to the Tribe possession of the property and improvements, excluding any equipment, furniture, fixtures or other personal property.

Rent and Other Operating Costs and Expenses
The agreement requires us to pay the Tribe a nominal annual rental fee. For any period that the Tribe or another agency or instrumentality of the Tribe is not the tenant, the rent will be 8% of such tenant’s gross revenues from the property. We are responsible for all costs and expenses of owning, operating, constructing, maintaining, repairing, replacing and insuring the property.
Use of Property
We may utilize the property and improvements solely for the operation of Mohegan Sun, unless prior approval is obtained from the Tribe for any proposed alternative use. We may not construct or alter any building or improvement located on the property unless complete and final plans and specifications are approved by the Tribe. Following foreclosure of any mortgage on our interest under the agreement or any transfer of such interest to the holder of such mortgage in lieu of foreclosure, the property and improvements may be utilized for any lawful purpose, subject to applicable codes and governmental regulations; provided, however, that a non-Indian holder of the property may under no circumstance conduct gaming operations on the property.
Permitted Mortgages and Rights of Permitted Mortgagees
We may not mortgage, pledge or otherwise encumber our leasehold estate in the property except to a holder of a permitted mortgage. Under the terms of the agreement, permitted mortgages include the leasehold mortgage securing our obligations under the bank credit facility and 2009 second lien senior secured notes, provided that, among other things: (1) the Tribe will have the right to notice of, and to cure, any default by us; (2) the Tribe will have the right to prior notice of an intention by the holder to foreclose on the permitted mortgage and the right to purchase the mortgage in lieu of any foreclosure; and (3) the permitted mortgage is subject and subordinated to any and all access and utility easements granted by the Tribe under the agreement. Under the terms of the agreement, each holder of a permitted mortgage has the right to notice of any default by us under the agreement and the opportunity to cure such default within the applicable cure period.
Default Remedies
We will be in default under the agreement if, subject to the notice provisions, we fail to make lease payments or comply with covenants under the agreement or if we pledge, encumber or convey our interest in violation of the terms of the agreement. Following a default, the Tribe may, with approval from the Secretary of the Interior, terminate the agreement unless a permitted mortgage remains outstanding with respect to the property. In such case, the Tribe may not: (1) terminate the agreement or our right to possession of the property; (2) exercise any right of re-entry; (3) take possession of and/or relet the property or any portion thereof; or (4) enforce any other right or remedy, which may materially and adversely affect the rights of the holder of the permitted mortgage, unless the default triggering such rights was a monetary default of which such holder failed to cure after notice.
Agreements with Other Indian Tribes
Cowlitz Project
In September 2004, Salishan-Mohegan entered into development and management agreements with the Cowlitz Tribe in connection with the Cowlitz Project, which agreements have been amended from time to time. Under the terms of the development agreement, Salishan-Mohegan will assist in securing financing, as well as administer and oversee the planning, designing, development, construction and furnishing of the proposed casino. The development agreement provides for development fees of 3% of total project costs, as defined under the development agreement, which are to be distributed to Mohegan Ventures-NW, pursuant to the Salishan-Mohegan operating agreement. In 2006, Salishan-Mohegan purchased a 152-acre site for the proposed casino, which will be transferred to the Cowlitz Tribe or the United States pursuant to the development agreement. Development of the Cowlitz Project is subject to certain governmental and regulatory approvals, including, but not limited to, negotiation of a gaming compact with the State of Washington and acceptance of land into trust on behalf of the Cowlitz Tribe by the United States Department of the Interior. The development agreement provides for termination of Salishan-Mohegan’s exclusive development rights if the land is not taken into trust by December 31, 2015. Under the terms of the management agreement, Salishan-Mohegan will manage, operate and maintain the proposed casino for a period of seven years following its opening. The management agreement provides for management fees of 24% of net revenues, as defined under the management agreement, which approximates net income earned from the Cowlitz Project. Under the terms of the Salishan-Mohegan operating agreement, management fees will be allocated to the members of Salishan-Mohegan based on their respective membership interest. The management agreement

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is subject to approval by the NIGC.
Menominee Project
In October 2004, we entered into a management agreement with the Menominee Tribe and the MKGA, in connection with the Menominee Project. Under the terms of the management agreement, we will manage, operate and maintain the proposed casino for a period of seven years following its opening. The management agreement provides for management fees of 13.4% of net revenues, as defined under the management agreement, which approximates net income earned from the Menominee Project. The management agreement is subject to approval by the NIGC.
Certain Indebtedness
The following summarizes the terms of our debt agreements. This summary does not restate in entirety the terms of each agreement. We urge you to read each agreement because they, and not this summary, define our rights and obligations, and, in some cases, those of the Tribe. Material agreements are included by reference to previous filings in the schedule of exhibits to this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Certain other matters relating to our debt obligations are further discussed under “Item 1A. Risk Factors,” “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules” to this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Bank Credit Facility

In December 2008, we entered into a third amended and restated bank credit facility. The bank credit facility was amended in October 2009. As amended, the bank credit facility provides for a revolving loan and letter of credit borrowing capacity of up to $675.0 million from a syndicate of financial institutions and commercial banks, with Bank of America, N.A., serving as Administrative Agent. The bank credit facility has no mandatory amortization provision and is payable in full on March 9, 2012. As of September 30, 2011, $535.0 million was drawn on the bank credit facility. As of September 30, 2011, letters of credit issued under the bank credit facility totaled $3.7 million, of which no amount was drawn. Inclusive of letters of credit, which reduce borrowing availability under the bank credit facility, and after taking into account restrictive financial covenant requirements under the bank credit facility, line of credit and note indentures, we had approximately $133.7 million of borrowing capacity under the bank credit facility as of September 30, 2011.
Under the bank credit facility, at our option, each advance of loan proceeds accrues interest on the basis of a base rate or on the basis of a one-month, two-month, three-month, six-month or twelve-month Eurodollar rate, plus in either case, an applicable rate based on our total leverage ratio, as each term is defined under the bank credit facility. We also pay commitment fees for the unused portion of borrowing capacity under the bank credit facility on a quarterly basis equal to the product obtained by multiplying the applicable rate for commitment fees by the average daily unused borrowing capacity for that calendar quarter. The applicable rate for base rate loans is between 1.25% and 2.75%. The applicable rate for Eurodollar rate loans is between 2.50% and 4.00%. The applicable rate for commitment fees is between 0.20% and 0.50%. The base rate is the higher of Bank of America's announced prime rate, the Eurodollar rate for one-month contracts plus 1.25% or the federal funds rate plus 0.50%. Interest on base rate loans is payable quarterly in arrears. Interest on Eurodollar rate loans is payable at the end of each applicable interest period or quarterly in arrears, if earlier.
The bank credit facility is collateralized by a first priority lien on substantially all of our assets, including the assets that comprise Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs and a leasehold mortgage on the land and improvements that comprise Mohegan Sun. We also are required to pledge additional assets as collateral for the bank credit facility as we or our existing and future guarantor subsidiaries acquire them. Our obligations under the bank credit facility are fully and unconditionally guaranteed, jointly and severally, by the Pennsylvania entities, MBC, Mohegan Golf, MCV-PA, Mohegan Ventures-NW, MVW, WTG and MTGA Gaming. The bank credit facility includes non-financial covenant requirements of the types customarily found in loan agreements for similar transactions. The bank credit facility also subjects us to a number of restrictive financial covenant requirements. These financial covenant requirements include, among other things, a minimum fixed charge coverage ratio, maximum total leverage and senior leverage ratios and maximum capital expenditures and investments.
Senior Notes
2009 11 1/2% Second Lien Senior Secured Notes
In October 2009, we issued $200.0 million second lien senior secured notes with fixed interest payable at a rate of 11.50% per annum, or the 2009 second lien senior secured notes. The 2009 second lien senior secured notes were issued at a price of 96.234% of par, to yield an effective interest rate of 12.25% per annum. The 2009 second lien senior secured notes mature on November 1, 2017. The first call date for the 2009 second lien senior secured notes is November 1, 2013. Interest on the 2009 second lien senior secured notes is payable semi-annually on May 1st and November 1st. The 2009 second lien senior secured notes

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are collateralized by a second priority lien on substantially all of our and our existing and future guarantor subsidiaries' properties and assets, and are effectively subordinated to all of our and our existing and future guarantor subsidiaries' first priority lien secured indebtedness, including borrowings under the bank credit facility, to the extent of the value of the collateral securing such indebtedness. The 2009 second lien senior secured notes rank equally in right of payment with all of our and our existing and future guarantor subsidiaries' senior indebtedness and senior relinquishment payment obligations under the relinquishment agreement that are then due and owing, but, to the extent of the value of the collateral securing such indebtedness, rank effectively senior to all of our and our existing and future guarantor subsidiaries' unsecured senior indebtedness, including our 2005 6 1/8% senior unsecured notes and senior and junior relinquishment payment obligations under the relinquishment agreement that are then due and owing. The 2009 second lien senior secured notes rank senior to all of our and our existing and future guarantor subsidiaries' subordinated indebtedness, including our 2001 8 3/8% senior subordinated notes, 2002 8% senior subordinated notes, 2004 7 1/8% senior subordinated notes and 2005 6 7/8% senior subordinated notes.
The 2009 second lien senior secured notes are fully and unconditionally guaranteed, jointly and severally, on a second priority lien senior secured basis, by the Pennsylvania entities, MBC, Mohegan Golf, MCV-PA, Mohegan Ventures-NW, MVW, WTG and MTGA Gaming.
The 2009 second lien senior secured notes and guarantees have not been and will not be registered under the Securities Act of 1933 or the securities laws of any other jurisdiction and may not be offered or sold in the United States absent registration or an applicable exemption from such registration requirements.
2005 6 1/8% Senior Unsecured Notes
In February 2005, we issued $250.0 million senior unsecured notes with fixed interest payable at a rate of 6.125% per annum, or the 2005 senior unsecured notes. The 2005 senior unsecured notes mature on February 15, 2013. The 2005 senior unsecured notes are callable at our option at par. Interest on the 2005 senior unsecured notes is payable semi-annually on February 15th and August 15th. The 2005 senior unsecured notes are uncollateralized general obligations, and are effectively subordinated to all of our and our existing and future guarantor subsidiaries' senior secured indebtedness, including borrowings under the bank credit facility and 2009 second lien senior secured notes, to the extent of the value of the collateral securing such debt. The 2005 senior unsecured notes rank equally in right of payment with the 2009 second lien senior secured notes and senior relinquishment payment obligations under the relinquishment agreement that are then due and owing. The 2005 senior unsecured notes rank senior to junior relinquishment payment obligations under the relinquishment agreement that are then due and owing and all of our and our existing and future guarantor subsidiaries' subordinated indebtedness, including our 2001 8 3/8% senior subordinated notes, 2002 8% senior subordinated notes, 2004 7 1/8% senior subordinated notes and 2005 6 7/8% senior subordinated notes.
The 2005 Senior Unsecured Notes are fully and unconditionally guaranteed, jointly and severally, by the Pennsylvania entities, MBC, Mohegan Golf, MCV-PA, Mohegan Ventures-NW, MVW, WTG and MTGA Gaming.
Senior Subordinated Notes
2001 8 3/8% Senior Subordinated Notes
In July 2001, we issued $150.0 million senior subordinated notes with fixed interest payable at a rate of 8.375% per annum, or the 2001 senior subordinated notes. In August 2004, we completed a cash tender offer and consent solicitation and repurchase of $133.7 million aggregate principal amount of the 2001 senior subordinated notes. In March 2009, we repurchased an additional $14.3 million aggregate principal amount of the 2001 senior subordinated notes. The remaining outstanding 2001 senior subordinated notes, including accrued interest, matured on July 1, 2011, at which time we repaid them with proceeds from the bank credit facility.
2002 8% Senior Subordinated Notes
In February 2002, we issued $250.0 million senior subordinated notes with fixed interest payable at a rate of 8.000% per annum, or the 2002 senior subordinated notes. The 2002 senior subordinated notes mature on April 1, 2012. The 2002 senior subordinated notes are callable at our option at par. Interest on the 2002 senior subordinated notes is payable semi-annually on April 1st and October 1st.
2004 7 1/8% Senior Subordinated Notes
In August 2004, we issued $225.0 million senior subordinated notes with fixed interest payable at a rate of 7.125% per annum, or the 2004 senior subordinated notes. The 2004 senior subordinated notes mature on August 15, 2014. The 2004 senior subordinated notes are callable at our option at par. Interest on the 2004 senior subordinated notes is payable semi-annually on February 15th and August 15th.


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2005 6 7/8% Senior Subordinated Notes
In February 2005, we issued $150.0 million senior subordinated notes with fixed interest payable at a rate of 6.875% per annum, or the 2005 senior subordinated notes. The 2005 senior subordinated notes mature on February 15, 2015. The 2005 senior subordinated notes are callable at our option at par. Interest on the 2005 senior subordinated notes is payable semi-annually on February 15th and August 15th.

The senior subordinated notes are uncollateralized general obligations, and are subordinated to borrowings under the bank credit facility, 2009 second lien senior secured notes, 2005 senior unsecured notes and senior relinquishment payment obligations under the relinquishment agreement that are then due and owing. The senior subordinated notes rank equally in right of payment with each other and junior relinquishment payment obligations under the relinquishment agreement that are then due and owing. The senior subordinated notes are fully and unconditionally guaranteed, jointly and severally, by the Pennsylvania entities, MBC, Mohegan Golf, MCV-PA, Mohegan Ventures-NW, MVW, WTG and MTGA Gaming.
We or our affiliates may, from time to time, seek to purchase or otherwise retire outstanding indebtedness for cash in open market purchases, privately negotiated transactions or otherwise. Any such transaction will depend on prevailing market conditions and our liquidity and covenant requirement restrictions, among other factors.
Senior and Senior Subordinated Notes Covenants
The senior and senior subordinated note indentures contain certain non-financial and financial covenant requirements with which we and the Tribe must comply. The non-financial covenant requirements include, among other things, reporting obligations, compliance with laws and regulations, maintenance of licenses and insurances and our continued existence. The financial covenant requirements include, among other things, limitations on our ability to make restricted payments, as defined under the note indentures, and incur additional indebtedness.
Line of Credit
As of September 30, 2011, we had a $16.5 million revolving loan agreement with Bank of America, N.A., or the line of credit. The line of credit matures on March 9, 2012. Under the line of credit, at our option, each advance accrues interest on the basis of a one-month Eurodollar rate or prime rate, plus in either case, an applicable rate based on our total leverage ratio, as each term is defined under the line of credit. Borrowings under the line of credit are uncollateralized obligations. As of September 30, 2011, we had no amount drawn on the line of credit. The line of credit subjects us to certain covenants, including a covenant to maintain at least the line of credit commitment amount available for borrowing under the bank credit facility. We have commenced discussions with Bank of America, N.A. to extend the maturity date of the line of credit; however, we can provide no assurance of the terms of such extension or whether such extension will be granted.
Letters of Credit
As of September 30, 2011, we maintained seven uncollateralized letters of credit to satisfy certain potential liabilities at Mohegan Sun and Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs. As of September 30, 2011, letters of credit issued totaled $3.7 million, of which no amount was drawn. The letters of credit expire in March 2012, subject to renewals.
Salishan-Mohegan Bank Credit Facility
As of September 30, 2011, Salishan-Mohegan had a fully drawn $15.25 million revolving loan agreement with Bank of America, N.A., or the Salishan-Mohegan bank credit facility. The Salishan-Mohegan bank credit facility matures on March 9, 2012. Under the Salishan-Mohegan bank credit facility, at the option of Salishan-Mohegan, each advance of loan proceeds accrues interest on the basis of a base rate or on the basis of a one-month, two-month, three-month or six-month Eurodollar rate, plus in either case, an applicable rate, as defined under the Salishan-Mohegan bank credit facility. The applicable rate is 2.50% for base rate loans and 3.50% for Eurodollar rate loans. The base rate is the higher of Bank of America's announced prime rate or the federal funds rate plus 0.50%. The Salishan-Mohegan bank credit facility has no mandatory amortization provision and is payable in full at maturity. The Salishan-Mohegan bank credit facility is collateralized by a lien on substantially all of the existing and future assets of Salishan-Mohegan. The obligations of Salishan-Mohegan under the Salishan-Mohegan bank credit facility also are guaranteed by the Tribe. The Salishan-Mohegan bank credit facility subjects Salishan-Mohegan to certain covenant requirements customarily found in loan agreements for similar transactions. We have commenced discussions with Bank of America, N.A. to extend the maturity date of the Salishan-Mohegan bank credit facility; however, we can provide no assurance of the terms of such extension or whether such extension will be granted.


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Mohegan Tribe Promissory Note
In September 2009, the Tribe made a $10.0 million loan to Salishan-Mohegan, or the Mohegan Tribe promissory note. The Mohegan Tribe promissory note matures on March 31, 2012. The Mohegan Tribe promissory note accrues interest at an annual rate of 15.0%. Under the terms of the Mohegan Tribe promissory note, as amended, accrued interest from November 2009 through October 2010 was paid at a monthly rate of 3.0%, with the remaining 12.0% due at maturity; and from November 2010 through maturity, all accrued interest under the Mohegan Tribe promissory note is payable at maturity. We have commenced discussions with the Tribe to extend the maturity date of the Mohegan Tribe promissory note; however, we can provide no assurance of the terms of such extension or whether such extension will be granted.
Mohegan Tribe Credit Facility
In February 2011, the Tribe agreed to lend Salishan-Mohegan up to $300,000 to fund its working capital requirements pursuant to a revolving commercial promissory note, or the Mohegan Tribe credit facility. In May 2011, Salishan-Mohegan entered into an amendment to the terms of the Mohegan Tribe credit facility to increase the borrowing capacity from $300,000 to $1.0 million. In December 2011, the Mohegan Tribe credit facility was further amended to increase the borrowing capacity to $1.75 million. The Mohegan Tribe credit facility matures on March 31, 2012. The Mohegan Tribe credit facility accrues interest at an annual rate of 15.0% payable at maturity. We have commenced discussions with the Tribe to extend the maturity date of the Mohegan Tribe credit facility; however, we can provide no assurance of the terms of such extension or whether such extension will be granted.
Environmental Matters
The site on which Mohegan Sun is located was formerly occupied by United Nuclear Corporation, a naval products manufacturer of, among other things, nuclear reactor fuel components. United Nuclear Corporation’s facility was officially decommissioned in June 1994 when the Nuclear Regulatory Commission confirmed that all licensable quantities of such nuclear material had been removed from the site and that any residual contamination from such material was remediated according to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved decommissioning plan.
From 1991 through 1993, United Nuclear Corporation commissioned environmental audits and soil sampling programs which detected, among other things, volatile organic chemicals, heavy metals and fuel hydrocarbons in the soil and groundwater. The Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, or the DEP, reviewed the environmental audits and reports and established cleanup requirements for the site. In December 1994, the DEP approved United Nuclear Corporation’s remedial plan, which determined that groundwater remediation was unnecessary because although the groundwater beneath the site was contaminated, it met the applicable groundwater criteria given the classification of the groundwater under the site. In addition, extensive remediation of contaminated soils and additional investigation were completed to achieve the DEP’s cleanup criteria and demonstrate that the remaining soils complied with applicable cleanup criteria. Initial construction at the site also involved extensive soil excavation. According to the data gathered in a 1995 environmental report commissioned by United Nuclear Corporation, remediation is complete and is consistent with the applicable Connecticut cleanup requirements. The DEP has reviewed and approved the cleanup activities at the site, and, as part of the DEP’s approval, United Nuclear Corporation was required to perform post-closure groundwater monitoring at the site to ensure the adequacy of the cleanup. In addition, under the terms of United Nuclear Corporation’s environmental certification and indemnity agreement with the Department of the Interior (which took the former United Nuclear Corporation land into trust for the Tribe), United Nuclear Corporation agreed to indemnify the Department of the Interior for environmental actions and expenses based on acts or conditions existing or occurring as a result of United Nuclear Corporation’s activities on the property.
We are not currently incurring, and did not incur in the fiscal years ended September 30, 2011, 2010 and 2009, any material costs related to compliance with environmental requirements with respect to the Mohegan Sun site’s former use by the United Nuclear Corporation. Notwithstanding the foregoing, no assurance can be given that any existing environmental studies reveal all environmental liabilities, or that future laws, ordinances or regulations will not impose any material environmental liability, or that a material environmental condition does not otherwise currently exist.
Prior to acquiring our interest in Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, we conducted an extensive environmental investigation of the Pocono Downs facilities. In the course of that investigation, we identified several environmental conditions that required corrective actions to bring the property into compliance with applicable laws and regulations. These remedial actions, including an ongoing monitoring program for the portion of the property that was formerly used as a solid waste landfill, were addressed as part of a comprehensive plan that was implemented by July 2008.
Employees and Labor Relations
As of September 30, 2011, the Connecticut entities employed approximately 6,800 full-time employees and 1,625

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seasonal, part-time and on-call employees. Pursuant to the Tribal Employment Rights Ordinance, when recruiting and hiring personnel, except with respect to key personnel, Mohegan Sun is obligated to give preference first to qualified members of the Tribe and then to enrolled members of other Indian tribes. See “Certain Relationships and Related Transactions.” None of Mohegan Sun’s employees are covered by collective bargaining agreements.
As of September 30, 2011, the Pocono Downs entities employed approximately 1,100 full-time employees and 750 part-time and on-call employees. Certain of our Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs’ employees are represented under collective bargaining agreements between Downs Racing and either, the International Union of Operating Engineers Local Union 542C, or Local Union 542C, or Teamsters Local No. 401, or Local No. 401. The agreement with Local Union 542C expires on March 31, 2013 and relates to equipment and heavy equipment operators. The agreement with Local No. 401 expires on January 31, 2012 and relates to truck drivers and maintenance employees.

Item 1A. Risk Factors.
In connection with the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, set forth below are cautionary statements identifying important factors that could cause actual events or results to differ materially from any forward-looking statements made by or on behalf of us, whether oral or written. We wish to ensure that any forward-looking statements are accompanied by meaningful cautionary statements in order to maximize to the fullest extent possible the protections of the safe harbor established in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Accordingly, any such statements are qualified in their entirety by reference to, and are accompanied by, the following important factors that could cause actual events or results to differ materially from our forward-looking statements. Refer also to “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” on page 1 of this Form 10-K.
Risks Related to Our Business
Our substantial indebtedness could adversely affect our financial condition.
We currently have and will continue to have a substantial amount of indebtedness. As of September 30, 2011, our debt totaled $1.6 billion. As of September 30, 2011, $535.0 million was drawn on our bank credit facility. Inclusive of letters of credit, which reduce borrowing availability under the bank credit facility, and after taking into account restrictive financial covenant requirements under our bank credit facility, line of credit and note indentures, we had approximately $133.7 million of borrowing capacity under the bank credit facility as of September 30, 2011.
Our substantial indebtedness could have significant adverse effects on our business. Such adverse effects include, but are not limited to, the following:
make it more difficult for us to satisfy our debt service obligations;
increase our vulnerability to adverse economic, industry and competitive conditions;
require us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flows from operations to payments on our indebtedness, thereby reducing the availability of our cash flows to fund working capital, capital expenditures and other general operating requirements;
limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the gaming industry, which may place us at a disadvantage compared to our competitors with stronger liquidity positions, thereby negatively affecting our results of operations and ability to meet our debt service obligations with respect to our outstanding indebtedness;
restrict us from exploring or taking advantage of business opportunities;
place us at a competitive disadvantage compared to our competitors that may have less debt; and
limit, along with the financial and other restrictive covenants in our outstanding indebtedness, the ability to borrow additional funds for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions, investments, debt service requirements, execution of our business strategy or other general operating requirements on satisfactory terms or at all.
In addition, our bank credit facility and the indentures governing our existing senior and senior subordinated notes contain, and the agreements evidencing or governing other future indebtedness may contain, restrictive covenants that limit our ability to engage in activities that may be in our best interests. Our failure to comply with those covenants could result in an event of default which, if not cured or waived, could result in the acceleration of the required repayment of some or all of our indebtedness.

We may be unable to refinance or extend our substantial indebtedness, including substantial indebtedness maturing in fiscal year 2012, raising doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

We have a significant amount of indebtedness maturing in fiscal 2012, including our $675 million bank credit facility which matures on March 9, 2012 and our $250 million 2002 8% senior subordinated notes which mature on April 1, 2012, and a substantial portion of our other existing debt matures over the following three fiscal years. We have determined that we will need to refinance all or part of this indebtedness at or prior to each maturity thereof. Our consolidated financial statements contained

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elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K have been prepared under the assumption that we will continue as a going concern. However, because we have not yet completed a refinancing of our fiscal 2012 maturities, the report of our independent registered public accounting firm on our consolidated financial statements contains an explanatory paragraph describing the existence of substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern due to the substantial amount of current debt maturing and the uncertainty relating to the refinancing of this debt. This report may adversely impact our ability to refinance or replace our outstanding indebtedness, including our fiscal 2012 maturities, at or prior to their maturities, and may impair our relationships with vendors and ability to attract patrons to our properties, attract and retain key executive employees and maintain and promote our properties, which could materially adversely affect our results of operations.
We have engaged Blackstone Advisory Partners, L.P. and Credit Suisse Securities (USA) LLC to assist us in crafting a strategic plan relating to our debt maturities, including the refinancing of our fiscal 2012 maturities. However, as of the date of this filing, we have not yet completed this refinancing. While our efforts to refinance or replace our outstanding indebtedness, including our fiscal 2012 maturities, at or prior to their maturities are ongoing, we can provide no assurances in this regard.

Our ability to refinance or replace our outstanding indebtedness in a timely manner is dependent upon the willingness of banks and investors to lend to us, our credit rating and capital market conditions. We may need to obtain waivers or consents from our lenders in order to execute our refinancing plans on satisfactory terms; however, we can provide no assurance that we would be able to obtain such waivers or consents. If we are unable to obtain such waivers or consents or are unable to refinance or replace the bank credit facility or the $250.0 million 8% senior subordinated notes or any of our other outstanding indebtedness at or prior to their respective maturities, we would be in default thereof, which may result in cross-defaults under our other outstanding indebtedness. If such defaults or cross-defaults were to occur, it would allow our lenders and creditors to exercise their rights and remedies as defined under their respective agreements, including their right to accelerate the repayment of our outstanding indebtedness. In such event, we would not have sufficient available funds to repay such accelerated indebtedness and our ability to otherwise refinance or replace our outstanding indebtedness is limited. If such acceleration were to occur, we can provide no assurance that we would be able to obtain the financing necessary for such repayment and may have to adopt one or more alternative strategies, such as disposing of some of our assets and/or restructuring some or all of our debt. Such strategies may not be sufficient or effected on satisfactory terms, if at all.
We, the Tribe and our wholly-owned subsidiaries may not be subject to the federal bankruptcy laws, which could impair the ability of creditors to participate in the realization on our or our subsidiaries' assets or the restructuring of related liabilities if we are unwilling or unable to meet our debt service obligations.  
    We, the Tribe and our wholly-owned subsidiaries may or may not be subject to, or permitted to seek protection under, the federal bankruptcy laws since an Indian tribe and we, as an instrumentality of the Tribe, may or may not be eligible to be a debtor under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. Therefore, our creditors may not be able to seek liquidation of our assets or other action under federal bankruptcy laws. Also, the Gaming Disputes Court may lack powers typically associated with a federal bankruptcy court, such as the power to non-consensually alter liabilities, direct the priority of creditors' claims and liquidate certain assets. The Gaming Disputes Court is a court of limited jurisdiction and may not have jurisdiction over all creditors of ours or our subsidiaries or over all of the territory in which we and our subsidiaries carry on business.
A person or entity's ability to enforce its rights against us is limited by our sovereign immunity and that of the Tribe, MBC, Mohegan Ventures-NW, Mohegan Golf, MVW and, to the extent applicable, the Pocono Downs entities, WTG and MTGA Gaming.
Although we, the Tribe, MBC, Mohegan Ventures-NW, Mohegan Golf, MVW, and to the extent applicable, the Pocono Downs entities, WTG and MTGA Gaming, each have sovereign immunity and generally may not be sued without our and their respective consents, a limited waiver of sovereign immunity and consent to suit has been granted in connection with substantially all of our outstanding indebtedness. Each such waiver includes suits against us to enforce our obligation to repay certain outstanding indebtedness. Generally, waivers of sovereign immunity have been held to be enforceable against Indian tribes. In the event that any waiver of sovereign immunity is held to be ineffective, a claimant could be precluded from judicially enforcing its rights and remedies. With limited exceptions, we, the Tribe, MBC, Mohegan Ventures-NW, Mohegan Golf, MVW, the Pocono Downs entities, WTG and MTGA Gaming have not waived sovereign immunity from private civil suits, including violations of the federal securities laws. For this reason, a claimant may not have any remedy against us, the Tribe, MBC, Mohegan Ventures-NW, Mohegan Golf, MVW, the Pocono Downs entities, WTG or MTGA Gaming for violations of federal securities laws.
Disputes may be brought in a federal or state court that has jurisdiction over the matter. However, federal courts may not exercise jurisdiction over disputes not arising under federal law or between litigants that are not citizens of different states, and some courts have ruled that an Indian tribe is not a citizen of any state for purposes of obtaining federal diversity jurisdiction. Without our consent, state courts may not exercise jurisdiction over disputes with us arising on the Mohegan reservation. In

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addition, the Tribe's Constitution has established a special court, the Gaming Disputes Court, to rule on disputes with respect to Mohegan Sun. The federal and state courts, under the doctrines of comity and exhaustion of tribal remedies, may (1) defer to the jurisdiction of the Gaming Disputes Court or (2) require that any plaintiff exhaust its remedies in the Gaming Disputes Court before bringing any action in federal or state court. Thus, there may be no federal or state court forum with respect to a dispute.
If an event of default occurs in connection with our indebtedness, no assurance can be given that a forum will be available to creditors other than the Gaming Disputes Court. In such court, there are presently limited precedents for the interpretation of Tribal law with respect to insolvency. Any execution of a judgment of the Gaming Disputes Court or any other court on Tribal lands will require the cooperation of the Tribe's officials in the exercise of their police powers. Thus, to the extent that a judgment of the Gaming Disputes Court must be executed on Tribal lands, the practical realization of any benefit of such a judgment will be dependent upon the willingness and ability of Tribal officials to carry out such judgment. In addition, the land on which Mohegan Sun is located is owned by the United States in trust for the Tribe, and our creditors and the creditors of the Tribe may not foreclose upon or obtain title to the land. Additionally, although we do not presently hold any fee interest in real property, if we did in the future, federal law may not allow for real property interest to be mortgaged or, if mortgaged, transferred as a result of foreclosure.
Any rights as a creditor are limited to our assets and those of our guarantor subsidiaries.
Any rights as a creditor in a bankruptcy, if applicable, liquidation or reorganization or similar proceeding would be limited to our assets and the assets of our guarantor subsidiaries, and would not encompass the assets of any other subsidiary that is not a guarantor, the Tribe or its other affiliates.
Our failure to generate sufficient cash flows and current and future economic and credit market conditions could adversely affect our ability to fulfill our debt service obligations.
Our ability to make payments on and to refinance our indebtedness will depend upon our ability to generate cash flows from operations in the future and current and future economic and credit market conditions. Our ability to generate cash flows is subject to financial, economic, political, competitive, regulatory and other factors beyond our control. If we are unable to generate sufficient cash flows from operations, or if future borrowings are not available to us under our bank credit facility or from other sources, we may be unable to meet our debt service obligations with respect to our outstanding indebtedness. There is also a risk that the banks that participate in our bank credit facility may not be able to perform when we request additional funds to be advanced to us under our bank credit facility. If funds are not available to be drawn under the terms of the bank credit facility, we may not be able to secure additional financing.
Restrictions contained in our bank credit facility and the indentures to which we are a party may impose limits on our ability to pursue our business strategies.
Our bank credit facility and the indentures to which we are a party contain customary operating and financial restrictions that limit our discretion on various business matters. These restrictions include, among other things, covenants limiting our ability to:
incur additional indebtedness;
pay dividends or make other distributions;
make certain investments;
use assets as security in other transactions;
sell certain assets or merge with or into another person;
grant liens;
make capital expenditures; and
enter into transactions with affiliates.
These restrictions may, among other things, reduce our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the gaming industry in general and thereby may negatively impact our financial condition, results of operations and our ability to meet our debt service obligations.
Our bank credit facility requires us to maintain a fixed charge coverage ratio and not to exceed certain ratios of senior leverage and total leverage, as defined under the bank credit facility. If these ratios are not maintained or are exceeded, as applicable, it may not be possible for us to borrow additional funds to meet our obligations.
In addition, our indentures place certain limitations on our ability to incur indebtedness. Under these indentures, we are generally able to incur indebtedness that otherwise may be restricted, provided we meet a minimum fixed charge coverage ratio, as defined. At September 30, 2011, we were above the minimum fixed charge coverage ratio. If we were to fall below the minimum fixed charge coverage ratio, our ability to incur additional debt would be limited and subject to other applicable exceptions contained in the indentures, and the options available to us to refinance our existing indebtedness would be restricted. We may need to obtain waivers or consents from our lenders in order to obtain additional debt or refinance our existing debt on satisfactory terms; however,

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we cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain such waivers or consents. In such event, it may not be possible for us to borrow additional funds to meet our obligations or refinance our maturities.
Additionally, our failure to comply with covenants in our debt instruments could result in an event of default, which, if not cured or waived, could have a material adverse effect on us and could result in the acceleration of the required repayment of some or all of the then-outstanding amounts of such debt and an inability to make debt service payments.
Continued weakness or a further downturn in the United States economy could negatively impact our financial performance.
During periods of economic contraction, our revenues may decrease while some of our costs remain fixed, resulting in decreased earnings. This is because the gaming and other leisure activities that we offer are discretionary expenditures and participation in such activities may decline during economic downturns because consumers have less disposable income. Even an uncertain economic outlook may adversely affect consumer spending in our gaming operations and related facilities, because consumers spend less in anticipation of a potential economic downturn.
The global economic recession negatively impacted consumer confidence and the amount of consumer spending at Mohegan Sun and Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs. Continued adverse economic conditions such as a prolonged regional, national or global general economic downturn or slow growth period, including periods of increased inflation, rising unemployment levels, tax rates, interest rates, energy and gasoline prices or declining consumer confidence could also further reduce consumer spending. Reduced consumer spending has and may continue to result in an adverse impact on our business, financial condition and operating results. Furthermore, uncertainty and adverse changes in the economy could also increase the cost and reduce the availability of sources of financing, which could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition and operating results. If adverse economic conditions continue or worsen, our business, assets, financial condition and results of operations could continue to be affected adversely.
Our diversification efforts may not be successful.
We receive and evaluate various opportunities to diversify our business interests. These opportunities primarily include the development and/or management of, investment in, or ownership of other gaming enterprises through direct investments, acquisitions, joint venture arrangements and loan transactions. We are currently pursuing diversification efforts in Clark County, Washington, Kenosha, Wisconsin, Palmer, Massachusetts and Thompson, New York and we are evaluating other opportunities in various jurisdictions. Each of these efforts may require various levels of regulatory or legislative approval, and may require the commitment of financial and capital resources, and a failure to achieve any such approval or to obtain or generate sufficient funds to meet such financial or capital requirements may result in the termination of the respective project. Additionally, there can be no assurance that we will continue to pursue any of these opportunities or that any of them will be consummated.
The loss of a key management member could have a material adverse effect on us, Mohegan Sun and the Pocono Downs entities.
Our success depends in large part on the continued service of key management personnel. The loss of the services of key personnel could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results and financial condition. Our key management personnel are currently retained pursuant to employment agreements.
The non-impairment provision of the Tribe's Constitution is subject to change.
Unlike states, the Tribe is not subject to the U.S. Constitution's provision restricting governmental impairment of contracts. The Tribe's Constitution currently has a provision that prohibits the Tribe from enacting any law that would impair the obligations of contracts entered into in furtherance of the development, construction, operation and promotion of gaming on Tribal lands. However, this provision could be amended by a vote of 75% of the Tribe's registered voters to impair the obligation of such contracts.
We and the Guarantors are controlled by a tribal government and may not necessarily be operated in the same way as if we and they were privately owned for-profit businesses.
We and the guarantors are subject to control by the Tribe. Our Management Board is comprised of the same nine members as the Mohegan Tribal Council, the governing body of the Tribe with legislative and executive authority. As a sovereign government, the Tribe is governed by officials elected by tribal members who have a responsibility for the general welfare of all members of the Tribe. In making decisions relative to us and the guarantors, these officials may consider the interests of their electorate, instead of pure economic or other business factors.


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We may be subject to material environmental liability, including as a result of possible incomplete remediation of known environmental hazards and the existence of unknown environmental hazards.
Our properties and operations are subject to a wide range of federal, state, local and tribal environmental laws and regulations governing, among other things, air emissions, wastewater discharges, the use, management and disposal of, or exposure to, hazardous and non-hazardous materials and wastes, and the clean-up of contamination. Noncompliance with such laws and regulations, and past or future activities resulting in environmental releases, could affect our operations or could cause us to incur substantial costs, including clean-up costs, fines and penalties, or investments to retrofit or upgrade our facilities and programs. In addition, should unknown contamination be discovered on our property, or should a release of hazardous material occur on our property, we could be required to investigate and clean up the contamination and could also be held responsible to a governmental entity or third parties for personal injury, property damage or investigation and cleanup costs, which may be substantial. Moreover, such contamination may also impair the use or value of the affected property. Liability for contamination could be joint and several in nature, and in many instances can be imposed on the owner or operator of property regardless of whether it is responsible for creating the contamination or is otherwise at fault.
At both the Mohegan Sun and Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs properties, investigations and remedial actions have been successfully undertaken to address significant site contamination resulting from historical operations. The site on which Mohegan Sun is located was formerly occupied by United Nuclear Corporation, a naval products manufacturer of, among other things, nuclear reactor fuel components. Prior to the decommissioning of the United Nuclear Corporation facilities on the site, extensive investigations were completed and contaminated soils were remediated to applicable standards. Prior to our taking possession of the property and development of Mohegan Sun, the site was determined to be safe for general public use.
Prior to acquiring our interest in Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, we conducted an extensive environmental investigation of the Pocono Downs facilities. In the course of that investigation, we identified several environmental conditions that required corrective actions to bring the property into compliance with applicable laws and regulations. These remedial actions, including an ongoing monitoring program for the portion of the property that was formerly used as a solid waste landfill, were addressed as part of a comprehensive plan that was implemented by Downs Racing by July 2008.
Notwithstanding the foregoing, we cannot assure you that:
any environmental reports or studies prepared with respect to these sites or any other properties owned or operated by us revealed all environmental liabilities;
prior owners or tenants did not create any material environmental condition not presently known to us that may be discovered in the future;
future laws, ordinances or regulations will not impose any material environmental liability with regard to existing conditions or operations; or
a material environmental condition does not otherwise exist on any site.
 
Any of the above could have a material adverse effect upon our future operating results and ability to meet our debt service obligations.
Our business could be affected by weather-related factors.
Our results of operations could be adversely affected by weather-related factors, such as the unfavorable winter weather conditions experienced during December 2010 and January and February 2011, and the effects of Hurricane Irene in August and September 2011. Severe weather conditions may discourage potential customers from traveling, or may deter or prevent patrons from reaching our facilities. If this occurs, it could have a material adverse effect on our future operating results and ability to meet our debt service obligations.
Energy and fuel price increases may adversely affect our business and results of operations.
Our properties use significant amounts of electricity, natural gas and other forms of energy. Increases in the cost of any of our sources of energy may negatively affect our results of operations. In addition, energy and fuel price increases could negatively impact our business and results of operations by causing a decrease in visitation to our properties, including by making it difficult for potential patrons to travel to our properties, or by causing patrons who do visit our properties to decrease their spending, including due to reductions in disposable income as a result of escalating energy and fuel prices.
Risks Related to Mohegan Sun
We face intense competition in our primary market from Foxwoods.
The existing gaming industry in our primary market is highly competitive. Mohegan Sun primarily competes with

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Foxwoods which is owned and operated by the MPT. Foxwoods is located approximately 10 miles from Mohegan Sun and is reportedly one of the largest gaming facilities in the United States in terms of total gaming positions. Foxwoods has been in operation for more than 19 years. In addition, it has been reported that Foxwoods has defaulted on certain debt obligations and is seeking to restructure its debt. A material reduction or delay in repayment of Foxwoods' debt obligations through such a restructuring could give Foxwoods competitive advantages over Mohegan Sun.
In addition to Foxwoods, we also face competition from casinos and other gaming operations elsewhere in our market areas.
While Mohegan Sun and Foxwoods are the only two current gaming operations in New England offering traditional slot machines and table games, we face new competition in New York with the opening of Resorts World New York at Aqueduct Raceway in Queens, in October 2011 and ongoing competition from other VLT facilities in the states of New York and Rhode Island, casinos in Atlantic City, New Jersey, and several casinos and gaming facilities located on Indian tribal lands in the State of New York, as well as newly authorized or expanded gaming facilities and gaming offerings in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions. We also face existing and future competition in and from the Northeastern Pennsylvania gaming market, both in the immediate market for Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, and for Mohegan Sun, in marketing to and attracting patrons from the New York City metropolitan region. New or expanded gaming facilities in the states of Delaware, Maryland and West Virginia may also attract patrons from that region.
Racinos in Queens, Yonkers, Batavia, Hamburg, Nichols, Vernon, Monticello, Saratoga Springs and Farmington, New York, reportedly operate an aggregate of approximately 15,777 VLTs and several have reportedly added electronic table gaming in the past year. Twin River Casino and Newport Grand in the State of Rhode Island reportedly offer approximately 5,700 VLTs. Given the geographic proximity of Empire City at Yonkers Raceway, Resorts World New York at Aqueduct Raceway to New York City and Twin River to Boston, they may have distinct advantages over Mohegan Sun in competition for day-trip and other patrons from the New York and Boston metropolitan regions.
Mohegan Sun also competes for patrons with casinos in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Many of these casinos may have greater resources, operating experience and name recognition than Mohegan Sun. In addition, several Atlantic City casinos have completed or are undergoing debt restructuring efforts, and may benefit from reform legislation adopted in 2011 to protect and enhance the gaming and racing industries in the State of New Jersey. Under that legislation, up to two new casino hotels were authorized with a minimum hotel room requirement of 200.
New market entrants in our market areas or the expansion of on-line gaming could adversely affect our operations and our ability to meet our financial obligations.
In November 2011, the governor of Massachusetts signed comprehensive gaming legislation which authorizes up to three casino resort licenses and one facility limited to 1,250 slot machines in Massachusetts to be licensed by a new gaming commission. In Maine, the existing racino in Bangor has been authorized to add table games and the racino project under development in Oxford reportedly will also include table games when it opens. A ballot referendum to allow table gaming at Twin River in Rhode Island has been authorized for November 2012. In New York, racino operators and various state political leaders have called for the expansion of commercial gaming in that state, and gaming compact and other disputes between the State of New York and Indian tribes currently engaged in gaming in that state may increase the likelihood of new Indian tribal or commercial gaming in the Catskills region or the passage of a constitutional amendment to allow table gaming at state-licensed racinos or elsewhere in the state.
Federal recognition of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe in Massachusetts in 2007 and the Shinnecock Indian Tribe of New York in October 2010 in addition to tribal gaming related provisions of the expanded gaming legislation passed in Massachusetts also increase the likelihood that there will be new Indian tribal gaming in the region in the future. Other federally-recognized Indian tribes continue to pursue tribal commercial casinos in the Catskills region of the State of New York and elsewhere in the region. Other groups seeking federal recognition as Indian tribes with an interest in engaging in commercial casino gaming in the Northeastern United States may continue those efforts. Indian tribal groups from the State of Connecticut whose petitions have been rejected in recent years by the BIA may continue to pursue appeals or reconsiderations of those petitions.

In the State of Connecticut, the state lottery has sought to expand its choice of games to include keno, currently offered only at Mohegan Sun and Foxwoods in the state, and legislation was introduced in 2011 to repeal a state statute which restricts the state lottery from conducting on-line interactive lottery games and promotions. Furthermore, Congress and various states, including New Hampshire and New Jersey, have renewed efforts to pass legislation to license and tax internet poker and other on-line gaming, while state lotteries in New York and Illinois have sought and received a favorable opinion from the U.S. Department of Justice on their ability to conduct certain activities on-line under federal law.


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Based on our analysis of existing and potential gaming activity in our market areas, we believe that competition from other commercial casino gaming operations will continue to increase in the future. In the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, where we expect to seek to operate one of the authorized commercial casinos, we are unable to predict if we will be successful in our efforts. We also are unable to predict whether any of the efforts discussed above by federally-recognized Indian tribes, Indian tribal groups attempting to gain federal recognition as Indian tribes or whether or when additional commercial casino gaming operations in the Northeastern United States will open. We also are unable to predict whether on-line gaming legislation will be adopted on a federal basis, an intrastate basis in one or more of the states where we operate or draw patrons or among more than one state under a multi-state compact, and the impact of such legislation on our business. We are also unable to predict if on-line gaming will be expanded under existing law on an intrastate or national basis. If new gaming operations are established or those operating or under construction are expanded, we are uncertain of the impact such gaming operations will have on our operations and our ability to meet our financial obligations.
Because the gaming industry in the State of Connecticut has experienced seasonal fluctuations in the past, we also may experience seasonal variations in our revenues and operating results that could adversely affect our cash flows.
The gaming industry in the State of Connecticut has experienced seasonal fluctuations, with the heaviest gaming activity occurring between the months of May and August. Similarly, the heaviest gaming activity at Mohegan Sun has occurred between the months of May and August. As a result of these seasonal fluctuations, we likely will continue to experience seasonal variations in our quarterly revenues and operating results that could result in decreased cash flows during periods in which gaming activity is not at peak levels. These variations in quarterly revenues and operating results could adversely affect our overall financial condition.
Negative conditions affecting the lodging industry may have an adverse effect on our revenues and cash flows.
We depend on the revenues generated from the hotel at Mohegan Sun, together with the revenues generated from the other portions of Mohegan Sun, to meet our debt service obligations and fund our operations. Revenues generated from the operation of the hotel are subject primarily to conditions affecting our gaming operations, but also are subject to the lodging industry in general, and as a result, our cash flows and financial performance may be affected not only by the conditions in the gaming industry, but also by those in the lodging industry. Some of these conditions are as follows:
changes in the local, regional or national economic climate;
changes in local conditions such as an oversupply of hotel properties;
decreases in the level of demand for hotel rooms and related services;
the attractiveness of our hotel to patrons and competition from comparable hotels;
cyclical over-building in the hotel industry;
changes in travel patterns;
public health concerns affecting public accommodations or travel generally or regionally;
changes in room rates and increases in operating costs due to inflation and other factors; and
the periodic need to repair and renovate the hotel.
The recent global economic recession has had a negative impact on the lodging industry and on our financial results. The continuation of, or adverse changes in, these conditions could further adversely affect our hotel's financial performance and results of operations.
Our obligations under the relinquishment agreement could affect adversely our financial condition and prevent us from fulfilling our debt service obligations.
Pursuant to the terms of the relinquishment agreement, we are required, among other things, to pay TCA 5% of certain revenues (as defined under the relinquishment agreement) generated by certain areas of Mohegan Sun during the 15-year period which commenced on January 1, 2000. During the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010, we paid $56.6 million in relinquishment payments, and during the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011, we paid $55.0 million in relinquishment payments.
This obligation consumes a significant portion of our operating cash flows that might otherwise be available to, among other things, reduce indebtedness and fund working capital, make distributions to the Tribe, make capital expenditures and other general operating requirements and thereby affect our ability to meet our debt service obligations. As a result, our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the gaming industry in general is reduced. This may place us at a disadvantage compared to our competitors that do not have such an obligation.


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Our renovation projects may face significant inherent risks that could adversely affect our financial condition.
Construction costs and completion dates for renovation projects are based on budgets, design documents and schedule estimates prepared with the assistance of architects, contractors and consultants. Such projects are inherently subject to significant development and construction risks, which could cause unanticipated cost increases. These include the following:
escalation of construction costs above anticipated amounts;
shortage of material and skilled labor;
weather interference;
engineering problems;
environmental problems;
fire, flood and other natural disasters;
labor disputes; and
geological, construction, demolition, excavation and/or equipment problems.
Furthermore, although construction activities may be planned to minimize disruption, construction noise and debris and the temporary closing of some of the facility, such activities may disrupt our current operations. Unexpected construction delays could exacerbate or magnify these disruptions. We cannot assure you that any construction, renovation or expansion projects will not have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.
We may suspend or elect not to proceed with construction, renovation or expansion projects once they have been undertaken, resulting in charges that could adversely affect our financial condition.
In connection with any of our construction, renovation or expansion projects, we may suspend, elect not to proceed with or fail to complete such projects once they have been undertaken. In such case, we may be required to carry assets on our balance sheet for suspended projects or incur significant costs relating to design and construction work performed and materials purchased that may no longer be useful for terminated projects. In addition, our agreements or arrangements with third-parties relating to the suspension or termination of such projects could cause us to incur additional fees and costs. Our suspension of, election not to proceed with, or failure to complete any construction, renovation or expansion projects may result in adverse effects to our financial condition.
The risks associated with operating expanded facilities and managing growth could have a material adverse effect on Mohegan Sun's future performance.
We may expand our facilities from time to time. We can provide no assurance that we will be successful in integrating the new amenities from such expansions into Mohegan Sun's current operations or in managing the expanded resort. The failure to successfully integrate and manage new services and amenities could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and our ability to meet our debt service obligations with respect to our outstanding indebtedness.
Risks Related to the Indian Gaming Industry
Gaming is a highly regulated industry, and changes in applicable laws could have a material adverse effect on the Tribe's and our ability to conduct gaming, and thus on our operations and our ability to meet our financial obligations.
Gaming on the Tribe's reservation is regulated extensively by federal, state and tribal regulatory agencies, including the NIGC and agencies of the State of Connecticut, such as the Department of Revenue Services' Division of Special Revenue, Consumer Protection's Gaming Division and Division of Liquor Control and the State Police. As is the case with any casino, changes in applicable laws and regulations could limit or materially affect the types of gaming that may be conducted, or services provided, by us and the revenues realized therefrom.
Currently, the operation of gaming on Indian tribal lands is subject to IGRA. Legislation has been introduced in Congress from time to time with the intent of modifying a variety of perceived problems with IGRA. Some of the proposals that have been considered would be prospective in effect and contain clauses that would grandfather existing Indian tribal gaming operations such as Mohegan Sun. Legislation also has been proposed, however, from time to time which would have the effect of repealing many of the key provisions of IGRA and prohibiting the continued operation of particular classes of gaming on Indian tribal reservations in states where such gaming is not otherwise allowed on a commercial basis. While none of the substantive proposed amendments to IGRA have been enacted, we cannot predict the effects of future legislative acts. In the event that Congress passes prohibitory legislation that does not include any grandfathering exemption for existing Indian tribal gaming operations, and if such legislation is sustained in the courts against tribal challenge, our ability to meet our debt service obligations would be materially and adversely affected.

29


In addition, under federal law, gaming on Indian tribal land is dependent on the permissibility under state law of specific forms of gaming or similar activities, and gaming at Mohegan Sun is dependent on the perpetual tribal-state compact between the Mohegan Tribe and State of Connecticut. Adverse decisions or legal actions with respect to gaming or the Mohegan Compact may have an adverse effect on our ability to conduct our gaming operations.
A change in our current tax-exempt status, and that of our subsidiaries, could reduce our cash flows and have a material adverse effect on our operations and our ability to meet our financial obligations.
Based on current interpretation of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, we, the Tribe and certain of our subsidiaries are not subject to U.S. federal income taxes. However, we can provide no assurance that Congress or the Internal Revenue Service will not reverse or modify the exemption for Indian tribes from U.S. federal income taxation. A change in the tax law could have a material adverse effect on our financial performance.
Risks Related to Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs
The adoption of modifications to the Pennsylvania Gaming Act or other applicable laws in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the implementation of the new table gaming legislation could negatively impact our operations and expected profitability.
Changes in applicable laws or regulations, tax rates or the enforcement of applicable laws and regulations in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania could limit or materially affect the types of gaming we may conduct, the services we may provide at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs or the profitability of such operations. Our ability to continue to operate Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs also could be adversely affected by such legal or regulatory changes.
The risks associated with our ability to successfully integrate table gaming, operate the expanded facility and manage its growth could have a material adverse effect on the future performance of Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs.
In January 2010, the Pennsylvania Gaming Act was amended to allow slot machine operators in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to obtain a table game operation certificate and operate certain table games, including poker. Following the receipt of a table game operation certificate in July 2010, Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs opened its table game and poker operations.
Table gaming remains new to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. We can provide no assurance that we will be successful with table gaming at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs over the short or long term. The failure to successfully integrate and manage table gaming could have a material adverse effect on the profitability of Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs.
If Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs is not able to compete successfully with existing and potential competitors, we may not be able to generate sufficient cash flows for our operations or to fulfill our financial obligations.
Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs faces competition from several facilities in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, as well as neighboring states. The closest competitors are Mount Airy and Sands Bethlehem, both of which are located in Northeastern Pennsylvania, approximately 40 miles and 70 miles from Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, respectively, and offer on-site hotel facilities not currently available at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs. Additionally, the state legislature has considered expanding the ability of bars, restaurants and other non-casino facilities throughout the state to offer expanded bingo, keno or other games of chance on a limited basis. The development of other gaming facilities in Pennsylvania also may impact the competitive environment for Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs.
In addition to existing slot machine and table game operations in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs faces competition from the VLT facility at the Monticello Raceway in Monticello, New York, approximately 90 miles from Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs. Additionally, Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs faces competition from Tioga Downs Casino in Nichols, New York, approximately 100 miles from Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs. Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs also faces potential competition from any gaming operation that is ultimately developed in the Catskills region including Mohegan Sun at Concord Downs, proposed for the Town of Thompson, New York. Expanded gaming in any or all of Maryland, Ohio, New Jersey, Delaware and West Virginia may affect overall gaming in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the OTW facilities and other gaming facilities with which Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs competes for patrons.
We are uncertain of the impact these other facilities or the introduction or expansion of gaming elsewhere will have on our operations and ability to meet our financial obligations.
Our operation of the Pocono Downs entities subject us to regulation and enforcement by various state agencies.
As owner and operator of the Pocono Downs entities, we are subject to extensive state regulation by the PGCB, the Pennsylvania State Harness Racing Commission, or the PSHRC, and other state regulatory agencies, such as the Liquor Control

30


Board. Applicable rules and regulations may require that we obtain and periodically renew a variety of licenses, registrations, permits and approvals to conduct our operations. Regulatory agencies may, for any reason set forth in the applicable legislation, rules and regulations, limit, condition, suspend, deny or revoke our license to conduct our operations as intended. We can provide no assurance that we will be able to continually renew all registrations, permits, approvals or licenses necessary to conduct our operations in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania as intended. Any of these events, or any changes in applicable laws or regulations or the enforcement thereof, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Changes in or the issuance of additional regulations by the PGCB may adversely affect our operations at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs.
Under the Pennsylvania Gaming Act, the PGCB has extensive authority to regulate gaming activities. Casino gaming is still a relatively new industry in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and many of the rules and regulations governing gaming are still evolving, particularly with respect to table gaming, which was authorized by legislation in January 2010. New or changing regulations could adversely affect our gaming operations at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs.
Changes in or the issuance of additional regulations by the PSHRC may adversely affect the Authority's operations at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs.
Under the Pennsylvania Race Horse Industry Reform Act, the PSHRC has extensive authority to regulate harness racing activities. While harness racing is a well-established industry in Pennsylvania, new or changing regulations could adversely affect our harness racing operations at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs. Our inability or failure to conduct harness racing operations at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs in accordance with applicable regulations could adversely affect our ability to conduct gaming operations at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.
None.

Item 2. Properties.
Mohegan Sun is located on a 185-acre site on the Tribe’s reservation in Southeastern Connecticut, adjacent to Uncasville, Connecticut. The land upon which Mohegan Sun is located is held in trust for the Tribe by the United States. Mohegan Sun has its own exit from Connecticut Route 2A, providing patrons with direct access to Interstates 395 and 95, the main highways connecting New York City, New York, Boston, Massachusetts, and Providence, Rhode Island. Mohegan Sun is approximately 125 miles from New York City, 100 miles from Boston and 50 miles from Providence.
The land upon which Mohegan Sun is located is leased from the Tribe. The term of the lease is 25 years with an option, exercisable by us, to extend the term for one additional 25-year period provided that we are not in default under the lease. Upon termination of the lease, we will be required to surrender to the Tribe possession of the property and improvements, excluding any equipment, furniture, fixtures or other personal property. The lease requires us to pay the Tribe a nominal annual rental fee and assume all costs and expenses of owning, operating, constructing, maintaining, repairing, replacing and insuring the property.
We also have entered into various lease agreements with the Tribe for properties that are utilized for parking and access to Mohegan Sun.
The Mohegan Sun Country Club at Pautipaug is located in Sprague and Franklin, Connecticut, approximately 15 miles from Mohegan Sun.
Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs is located on a 400-acre site in Plains Township, Pennsylvania. We also own OTW facilities located in Carbondale and Lehigh Valley (Allentown), Pennsylvania, and lease OTW facilities located in East Stroudsburg and Hazleton, Pennsylvania.
Salishan-Mohegan owns land located in Clark County, Washington for the purposes of developing a proposed casino to be owned by the Cowlitz Tribe. The land shall be transferred to the Cowlitz Tribe or the United States upon: (1) receipt of necessary financing for the development of the proposed casino; and (2) the underlying property being accepted to be taken into trust by the United States Department of the Interior.

Item 3. Legal Proceedings.
We are a defendant in various litigation matters resulting from our normal course of business. We believe that the aggregate liability, if any, arising from such litigations will not have a material impact on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.


31


PART II

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.
We have not issued or sold any equity securities.


Item 6. Selected Financial Data.
 
As of or for the Fiscal Years Ended September 30,
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
2008
 
2007
Operating Results:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gross revenues
$
1,527,188

  
$
1,539,626

 
$
1,572,714

 
$
1,707,738

 
$
1,751,912

Promotional allowances
(108,809
)
 
(117,664
)
 
(117,597
)
 
(135,555
)
 
(131,846
)
Net revenues
$
1,418,379

  
$
1,421,962

 
$
1,455,117

 
$
1,572,183

 
$
1,620,066

Income from operations (1) (2)
$
238,404

 
$
139,257

 
$
242,746

 
$
263,366

 
$
292,568

Other expense, net (3)
(126,561
)
 
(131,803
)
 
(125,394
)
 
(116,835
)
 
(120,670
)
Net income
111,843

  
7,454

 
117,352

 
146,531

 
171,898

Loss attributable to non-controlling interests
2,134

  
2,258

 
1,992

 
2,729

 
648

Income from discontinued operations

  

 

 

 
21

Net income attributable to Mohegan Tribal Gaming Authority
$
113,977

  
$
9,712

 
$
119,344

 
$
149,260

 
$
172,567

Other Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest expense, net of capitalized interest
$
117,710

  
$
116,784

 
$
109,689

 
$
93,793

 
$
94,363

Capital expenditures incurred
$
46,477

  
$
43,544

 
$
93,532

 
$
383,688

 
$
162,195

Net cash flows provided by operating activities
$
194,278

  
$
170,506

 
$
170,197

 
$
170,672

 
$
284,598

Balance Sheet Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total assets
$
2,203,196

  
$
2,200,623

 
$
2,295,083

 
$
2,362,905

 
$
2,079,977

Long-term debt and capital leases, net of current portions
$
823,951

  
$
1,601,471

 
$
1,609,215

 
$
1,528,991

 
$
1,276,109

 ________________________
(1)
Total operating costs and expenses, included in income from operations, include non-cash relinquishment liability reassessment (credits) charge of ($8.8) million, ($26.5) million, ($45.7) million, ($68.9) million and $3.0 million in fiscal 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. A discussion of the relinquishment liability may be found in Notes 3 and 12 to our consolidated financial statements, beginning on page F-1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
(2)
Total operating costs and expenses, included in income from operations, include an impairment charge related to Project Horizon of $58.1 million in fiscal 2010. A discussion of this impairment charge may be found in Note 5 to our consolidated financial statements, beginning on page F-1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
(3)
Total other expense, net, includes accretion of discount to the relinquishment liability of $11.4 million, $15.4 million, $20.4 million, $27.1 million and $29.8 million in fiscal 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. A discussion of the accretion of discount to the relinquishment liability may be found in Notes 3 and 12 to our consolidated financial statements, beginning on page F-1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and related notes beginning on page F-1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, Item 1. Business and Item 6. Selected Financial Data.

Sufficiency of Resources
 
We have significant outstanding indebtedness and financial commitments. As of September 30, 2011, our debt totaled $1.6 billion, of which $811.1 million matures within the next twelve months, including $535.0 million outstanding under our bank credit facility which matures on March 9, 2012 and our $250.0 million 8% senior subordinated notes which mature on April 1, 2012. In addition, a substantial amount of our other outstanding indebtedness matures over the following three fiscal years. We do not anticipate that cash flows from operations and cash on hand will be sufficient to repay amounts outstanding under the bank credit facility or the $250.0 million 8% senior subordinated notes at maturity. Accordingly, we have determined that we will need to refinance such outstanding indebtedness or otherwise access the debt capital markets to replace such outstanding indebtedness prior to their maturity in order to maintain sufficient resources for our operations. However, as of the date of this filing, we have not yet completed this refinancing. Our consolidated financial statements have been prepared under the assumption that we will continue as a going concern. The conditions and events described above and the current uncertainty relating to the refinancing of our fiscal 2012 maturities raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern, and the report of our independent registered public accounting firm contains an explanatory paragraph describing the existence of substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. Our consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments to reflect the possible effects on the recoverability and classification of assets or the amounts and classification of liabilities that may result should we be unable

32


to continue as a going concern.
 
We have engaged Blackstone Advisory Partners, L.P. and Credit Suisse Securities (USA) LLC to assist us in crafting a strategic plan relating to our debt maturities, including the refinancing of our fiscal 2012 maturities. While our efforts to refinance or replace our outstanding indebtedness, including our fiscal 2012 maturities, at or prior to their maturities are ongoing, we can provide no assurances in this regard.
 
Our ability to refinance or replace our outstanding indebtedness in a timely manner is dependent upon the willingness of banks and investors to lend to us, our credit rating and capital market conditions. We may need to obtain waivers or consents from our lenders in order to execute our refinancing plans on satisfactory terms; however, we can provide no assurance that we would be able to obtain such waivers or consents. If we are unable to obtain such waivers or consents or are unable to refinance or replace the bank credit facility or the $250.0 million 8% senior subordinated notes or any of our other outstanding indebtedness at or prior to their respective maturities, we would be in default thereof, which may result in cross-defaults under our other outstanding indebtedness. If such defaults or cross-defaults were to occur, it would allow our lenders and creditors to exercise their rights and remedies as defined under their respective agreements, including their right to accelerate the repayment of our outstanding indebtedness. In such event, we would not have sufficient available funds to repay such accelerated indebtedness and our ability to otherwise refinance or replace our outstanding indebtedness is limited. If such acceleration were to occur, we can provide no assurance that we would be able to obtain the financing necessary for such repayment and may have to adopt one or more alternative strategies, such as disposing of some of our assets and/or restructuring some or all of our debt. Such strategies may not be sufficient or effected on satisfactory terms, if at all.
 
If we are successful in our refinancing efforts, we estimate, but can provide no assurance, that cash flows from operations, combined with existing cash balances and available borrowings under the bank credit facility, including any extensions or replacements thereof, will be sufficient to fund our cash requirements for scheduled interest payments on our outstanding indebtedness, relinquishment payments, planned capital expenditures, distributions to the Tribe and projected working capital needs over the next twelve months.
 
In addition, if our pro forma fixed charge coverage ratio, as defined under our senior and senior subordinated note indentures, was to fall below 2.0 to 1.0, we would be unable to refinance our outstanding subordinated indebtedness with senior indebtedness without waivers or consents from certain of our creditors, thus limiting the options available to us to refinance or replace our outstanding indebtedness. In such event, we can provide no assurance that we would be able to obtain such waivers or consents or that we would be able to refinance or replace our outstanding indebtedness or that financing options available to us, if any, would be on favorable or acceptable terms. As of September 30, 2011, our fixed charge coverage ratio was above 2.0 to 1.0.
Inclusive of letters of credit, which reduce borrowing availability under the bank credit facility, and after taking into account restrictive financial covenant requirements under the bank credit facility, line of credit and note indentures, we had approximately $133.7 million of borrowing capacity under the bank credit facility as of September 30, 2011.

Please refer to “Part I. Item 1A. Risk Factors” for further details regarding risks relating to our sufficiency of resources and debt maturities.
  

Explanation of Key Financial Statement Captions
Gross Revenues
Our gross revenues are derived primarily from the following four sources:
gaming revenues, which include revenues from slot machines, table games, poker, keno, live harness racing and racebook operations, including pari-mutuel wagering revenues from our racebook operations at Mohegan Sun and the OTW facilities in Pennsylvania;
food and beverage revenues;
hotel revenues; and
retail, entertainment and other revenues, which primarily include revenues from our retail shops, the Mohegan Sun Arena, MBC and Mohegan Golf.
The largest component of revenues is gaming revenues, which are recognized as amounts wagered less prizes paid out, and comprised primarily of revenues from slot machines and table games. Revenues from slot machines are the largest component of gaming revenues. Gross slot revenues, also referred to as gross slot win, represent all amounts wagered by patrons on slot machines reduced by: (1) free promotional slot plays redeemed; (2) winnings paid out; and (3) slot tickets issued. Pursuant to the

33


Mohegan Compact and requirements of our Category One slot machine license, we report gross slot revenues and other statistical information related to slot machine operations to the State of Connecticut and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. On a monthly basis, we also post such information on our website at www.mtga.com.
Other commonly used slot machine related terms include base jackpots, progressive slot machines, progressive jackpots, net slot revenues, slot handle, gross slot hold percentage, net slot hold percentage, rated players and slot win efficiency. Base jackpots represent the fixed minimum amount of payouts for a specific combination. We record base jackpots as reductions to revenues when established. Progressive slot machines retain a portion of each amount wagered and aggregate the retained amounts with similar amounts from other slot machines in order to create one-time payouts that are substantially larger than those paid in the ordinary course of play. We refer to such aggregated amounts as progressive jackpots. Wide-area progressive jackpot amounts are paid by third-party vendors and remitted as a weekly payment to each vendor based on a percentage of slot handle for each wide-area progressive slot machine. We accrue in-house progressive jackpot amounts until paid, and such accrued amounts are deducted from gross slot revenues, along with wide-area progressive jackpot amounts to arrive at net slot revenues, also referred to as net slot win. Net slot revenues are included in gaming revenues in our consolidated statements of income. Slot handle is the total amount wagered by patrons on slot machines, including free promotional slot plays. Gross slot hold percentage is gross slot revenues as a percentage of slot handle. Net slot hold percentage is net slot revenues as a percentage of slot handle. Rated players are patrons whose gaming activities are tracked under our Player’s Club program. Slot win efficiency is a measure of our percentage of gross slot revenues in a market area compared to the percentage of the slot machines we operate in that market area.
Commonly used table games related terms include table game revenues, table game drop and table game hold percentage. Table game revenues represent the closing table game inventory plus table game drop and credit slips for cash, chips or tokens returned to the casino cage, less opening table game inventory, discounts provided on patron losses, free bet coupons and chip fills to the tables. Table game drop is the total amount of cash, free bet coupons, cash advance drafts, customer deposit withdrawals, safekeeping withdrawals and credits issued at tables. Table game hold percentage is table game revenues as a percentage of table game drop.
Revenues from food and beverage, hotel, retail, entertainment and other services are recognized at the time such service is performed. Minimum rental revenues are recognized on a straight-line basis over the terms of the related leases. Percentage rental revenues are recognized in the periods in which the tenants exceed their respective percentage rent thresholds.
Promotional Allowances
We operate a program for patrons at Mohegan Sun and Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, without membership fees, called the Player’s Club. This program provides complimentary food and beverage, hotel, retail, entertainment and other services to patrons, as applicable, based on points that are awarded for patrons’ gaming activities. Points may be utilized to purchase, among other things, items at retail stores and restaurants located within Mohegan Sun and Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, including The Shops at Mohegan Sun and the Mohegan Sun gasoline and convenience center. Points also may be utilized to purchase hotel services and tickets to entertainment events held at facilities located at Mohegan Sun and Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs. The retail value of these complimentary items is included in gross revenues when redeemed at facilities operated by us and then deducted as promotional allowances to arrive at net revenues. The cost associated with reimbursing third parties for the value of complimentary items redeemed at third-party outlets is charged to gaming costs and expenses.
In addition, we offer ongoing promotional coupon programs to patrons for the purchase of food and beverage, hotel and retail amenities offered within Mohegan Sun and Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, as applicable. The retail value of items or services purchased with coupons at facilities operated by us is included in gross revenues and the respective coupon value is deducted as promotional allowances to arrive at net revenues. The cost associated with reimbursing third parties for the value of coupons redeemed at third-party outlets is charged to gaming costs and expenses.
Gaming Costs and Expenses
Gaming costs and expenses primarily include portions of gaming revenues that must be paid to the State of Connecticut and the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board, or the PGCB. Gaming costs and expenses also include, among other things, payroll costs, expenses associated with the operation of slot machines, table games, poker, keno, live harness racing and racebook, certain marketing expenditures and promotional expenses related to Player’s Club point and coupon redemptions.
Income from Operations
Income from operations represents net revenues less total operating costs and expenses. Income from operations excludes accretion of discount to the relinquishment liability, interest income and expense, gain (loss) on early extinguishment of debt, write-off of debt issuance costs, other non-operating income and expense and loss attributable to non-controlling interests.


34



Reassessment and Accretion of Discount to the Relinquishment Liability
In February 1998, we entered into a relinquishment agreement with Trading Cove Associates, or TCA. The relinquishment agreement provides, among other things, that we make certain payments to TCA out of, and determined as a percentage of, revenues, as defined under the relinquishment agreement, generated by Mohegan Sun over a 15-year period. We have recorded a relinquishment liability based on the estimated present value of our obligations under the relinquishment agreement. We reassess projected revenues and consequently the relinquishment liability: (1) annually in conjunction with our budgeting process, or (2) when necessary to account for material increases or decreases in projected revenues over the relinquishment period. In addition, we recognize a quarterly accretion to the relinquishment liability to reflect the impact of the time value of money. Since the calculation of this liability requires a high level of estimates and judgments (including those related to projected revenues and impact and timing of future competition), future events that affect such estimates and judgments may cause the actual liability to materially differ from the current estimate.

Results of Operations
Summary Operating Results
As of September 30, 2011, we own and operate either directly or through wholly-owned subsidiaries Mohegan Sun, the Connecticut Sun WNBA franchise and the Mohegan Sun Country Club, or collectively, the Connecticut entities, and the Pennsylvania entities. All of our revenues are derived from these operations. The Connecticut Sun WNBA franchise and the Mohegan Sun Country Club are aggregated with the Mohegan Sun operating segment because these operations all share similar economic characteristics, which is to generate gaming and entertainment revenues by attracting patrons to Mohegan Sun. Our executive officers review and assess the performance and operating results and determine the proper allocation of resources to the Connecticut entities and the Pennsylvania entities on a separate basis. We, therefore, believe that we have two separate reportable segments: (1) Mohegan Sun, which includes the operations of the Connecticut entities, and (2) Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, which includes the operations of the Pennsylvania entities.
The following table summarizes our results on a property basis (in thousands, except where noted): 
 
For the Fiscal Years Ended September 30,
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Variance
 
Percentage Variance
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
Net revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mohegan Sun
$
1,115,326

 
$
1,157,419

 
$
1,203,765

 
$
(42,093
)
 
$
(46,346
)
 
(3.6
)%
 
(3.9
)%
Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs
303,053

 
264,543

 
251,352

 
38,510

 
13,191

 
14.6
 %
 
5.2
 %
Total
$
1,418,379

 
$
1,421,962

 
$
1,455,117

 
$
(3,583
)
 
$
(33,155
)
 
(0.3
)%
 
(2.3
)%
Income (loss) from operations:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mohegan Sun
$
223,778

 
$
142,143

 
$
247,678

 
$
81,635

 
$
(105,535
)
 
57.4
 %
 
(42.6
)%
Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs
31,491

 
15,652

 
12,378

 
15,839

 
3,274

 
101.2
 %
 
26.5
 %
Corporate
(16,865
)
 
(18,538
)
 
(17,310
)
 
1,673

 
(1,228
)
 
(9.0
)%
 
7.1
 %
Total
$
238,404

 
$
139,257

 
$
242,746

 
$
99,147

 
$
(103,489
)
 
71.2
 %
 
(42.6
)%
Net income attributable to Mohegan Tribal Gaming Authority
$
113,977

 
$
9,712

 
$
119,344

 
$
104,265

 
$
(109,632
)
 
1,073.6
 %
 
(91.9
)%
Operating margin:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mohegan Sun
20.1
%
 
12.3
%
 
20.6
%
 
7.8
%
 
(8.3
)%
 
63.4
 %
 
(40.3
)%
Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs
10.4
%
 
5.9
%
 
4.9
%
 
4.5
%
 
1.0
 %
 
76.3
 %
 
20.4
 %
Total
16.8
%
 
9.8
%
 
16.7
%
 
7.0
%
 
(6.9
)%
 
71.4
 %
 
(41.3
)%
The most significant factors and trends that we believe impacted our financial performance were as follows:
cost containment initiatives implemented in September 2010 at Mohegan Sun;
continued weakness in consumer spending;
the July 2010 addition of table game and poker operations at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs;
changes in promotional offers designed to improve profitability; and
an elevated promotional environment in the Northeast region.


35



Other factors that affected our financial performance were as follows:
non-cash relinquishment liability reassessment credits of $8.8 million, $26.5 million and $45.7 million in fiscal 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively;
a $58.1 million impairment charge in fiscal 2010 related to the suspended elements of Project Horizon;
$9.9 million in severance charges in fiscal 2010 related to a workforce reduction;
an $8.5 million gain in fiscal 2009 related to early extinguishment of debt; and
$5.2 million in tribal services credits and utility rebates in fiscal 2009 from the Tribe.
Net revenues for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011 compared to the prior fiscal year decreased primarily as a result of declines in slot and non-gaming revenues at Mohegan Sun. These results were partially offset by higher gaming and non-gaming revenues at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, as well as increased table game revenues at Mohegan Sun.
Net revenues for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010 compared to the prior fiscal year decreased primarily due to lower gaming and non-gaming revenues at Mohegan Sun. These results were partially offset by the addition of table game and poker revenues and higher slot revenues at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs.
Income from operations for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011 compared to the prior fiscal year increased primarily as a result of lower operating costs and expenses. The decline in operating costs and expenses reflects the impact of the non-recurring impairment charge related to the suspended elements of Project Horizon that was recorded in fiscal 2010. The decline in operating costs and expenses also reflects our continued focus on managing expenses and enhancing operating efficiencies, including cost containment initiatives implemented in September 2010 at Mohegan Sun and changes in our promotional offers designed to improve profitability. These results were partially offset by the decrease in the non-cash relinquishment liability reassessment credit, which was $8.8 million for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011 compared to $26.5 million in the prior fiscal year. The non-cash relinquishment liability reassessment credits had the effect of reducing operating expenses.
Income from operations for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010 compared to the prior fiscal year decreased primarily due to higher operating costs and expenses. The increase in operating costs and expenses resulted primarily from the impairment charge related to the suspended elements of Project Horizon and the decrease in the non-cash relinquishment liability reassessment credit, which was $26.5 million for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010 compared to $45.7 million in the prior fiscal year. The increase in operating costs and expenses also reflects the severance charges related to the workforce reduction and higher expenses related to governmental and administrative services and utilities provided by the Tribe due to the receipt of tribal service credits and utility rebates in fiscal 2009.
Net income attributable to the Authority for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011 compared to the prior fiscal year increased primarily as a result of the growth in income from operations.
Net income attributable to the Authority for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010 compared to the prior fiscal year decreased primarily due to the decline in income from operations, combined with the impact of the non-recurring gain related to early extinguishment of debt and higher interest expense.
Mohegan Sun
Gross Revenues
Gross revenues consisted of the following (in thousands):
 
For the Fiscal Years Ended September 30,
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Variance
 
Percentage Variance
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
Gaming
$
1,004,025

 
$
1,035,462

 
$
1,078,286

 
$
(31,437
)
 
$
(42,824
)
 
(3.0
)%
 
(4.0
)%
Food and beverage
66,828

 
78,767

 
77,457

 
(11,939
)
 
1,310

 
(15.2
)%
 
1.7
 %
Hotel
35,892

 
38,261

 
39,567

 
(2,369
)
 
(1,306
)
 
(6.2
)%
 
(3.3
)%
Retail, entertainment and other
102,262

 
111,519

 
116,982

 
(9,257
)
 
(5,463
)
 
(8.3
)%
 
(4.7
)%
Total
$
1,209,007

 
$
1,264,009

 
$
1,312,292

 
$
(55,002
)
 
$
(48,283
)
 
(4.4
)%
 
(3.7
)%





36


The following table summarizes the percentage of gross revenues from each of the four revenue sources:
 
For the Fiscal Years Ended
September 30,
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
Gaming
83.0
%
 
81.9
%
 
82.2
%
Food and beverage
5.5
%
 
6.3
%
 
5.9
%
Hotel
3.0
%
 
3.0
%
 
3.0
%
Retail, entertainment and other
8.5
%
 
8.8
%
 
8.9
%
Total
100.0
%
 
100.0
%
 
100.0
%

The following table presents data related to gaming operations (in thousands, except where noted): 
 
For the Fiscal Years Ended September 30,
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Variance
 
Percentage Variance
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
Slots:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Handle
$
8,812,893

 
$
9,278,620

 
$
9,255,718

 
$
(465,727
)
 
$
22,902

 
(5.0
)%
 
0.2
 %
Gross revenues
$
707,218

 
$
746,392

 
$
779,625

 
$
(39,174
)
 
$
(33,233
)
 
(5.2
)%
 
(4.3
)%
Net revenues
$
679,435

 
$
718,517

 
$
751,304

 
$
(39,082
)
 
$
(32,787
)
 
(5.4
)%
 
(4.4
)%
Free promotional slot plays (1)
$
63,444

 
$
56,642

 
$
27,981

 
$
6,802

 
$
28,661

 
12.0
 %
 
102.4
 %
Weighted average number of machines (in units)
6,360

 
6,484

 
6,752

 
(124
)
 
(268
)
 
(1.9
)%
 
(4.0
)%
Hold percentage (gross)
8.1
%
 
8.0
%
 
8.4
%
 
0.1
%
 
(0.4
)%
 
1.3
 %
 
(4.8
)%
Win per unit per day (gross) (in dollars)
$
306

 
$
315

 
$
316

 
$
(9
)
 
$
(1
)
 
(2.9
)%
 
(0.3
)%
                                                                                Table games:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Drop
$
1,999,693

 
$
2,082,137

 
$
2,108,767

 
$
(82,444
)
 
$
(26,630
)
 
(4.0
)%
 
(1.3
)%
Revenues
$
304,665

 
$
296,183

 
$
305,896

 
$
8,482

 
$
(9,713
)
 
2.9
 %
 
(3.2
)%
Weighted average number of games (in units)
325

 
326

 
326

 
(1
)
 

 
(0.3
)%
 

Hold percentage (2)
15.2
%
 
14.2
%
 
14.5
%
 
1.0
%
 
(0.3
)%
 
7.0
 %
 
(2.1
)%
Win per unit per day (in dollars)
$
2,567

 
$
2,487

 
$
2,573

 
$
80

 
$
(86
)
 
3.2
 %
 
(3.3
)%
                                                                         Poker:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenues
$
11,768

 
$
12,316

 
$
11,974

 
$
(548
)
 
$
342

 
(4.4
)%
 
2.9
 %
Weighted average number of tables (in units)
42

 
42

 
42

 

 

 

 

Revenue per unit per day (in dollars)
$
768

 
$
803

 
$
781

 
$
(35
)
 
$
22

 
(4.4
)%
 
2.8
 %
 ________________________
(1)
Free promotional slot plays are included in slot handle, but not reflected in slot revenues.
(2)
Table game hold percentage is relatively predictable over longer periods of time, but can significantly fluctuate over shorter periods.











37


The following table presents slot data related to Mohegan Sun’s market area (in thousands, except where noted):
 
For the Fiscal Years Ended September 30,
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Variance
 
Percentage Variance
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
Northeast slot gaming market (1) (2):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gross revenues
$
2,630,399

 
$
2,566,305

 
$
2,538,152

 
$
64,094

 
$
28,153

 
2.5
 %
 
1.1
 %
Mohegan Sun win market share
29.4
%
 
31.3
%
 
31.9
%
 
(1.9
)%
 
(0.6
)%
 
(6.1
)%
 
(1.9
)%
Mohegan Sun win efficiency
111.3
%
 
120.4
%
 
123.5
%
 
(9.1
)%
 
(3.1
)%
 
(7.6
)%
 
(2.5
)%
Connecticut slot gaming market (3):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gross revenues
$
1,347,615

 
$
1,396,580

 
$
1,467,457

 
$
(48,965
)
 
$
(70,877
)
 
(3.5
)%
 
(4.8
)%
Free promotional slot plays
$
143,499

 
$
126,042

 
$
85,288

 
$
17,457

 
$
40,754

 
13.9
 %
 
47.8
 %
Mohegan Sun win market share
52.8
%
 
53.4
%
 
53.1
%
 
(0.6
)%
 
0.3
 %
 
(1.1
)%
 
0.6
 %
Mohegan Sun win efficiency
106.7
%
 
112.5
%
 
114.8
%
 
(5.8
)%
 
(2.3
)%
 
(5.2
)%
 
(2.0
)%
 ________________________
(1)
Northeast slot gaming market consists of Mohegan Sun, Foxwoods Resort Casino, Twin River Casino, Newport Grand and Empire City Casino.
(2)
Includes free promotional slot plays. Free promotional slot plays are included in slot handle, but not reflected in slot revenues.
(3)
Connecticut slot gaming market consists of Mohegan Sun and Foxwoods Resort Casino.

Gaming revenues for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011 compared to the prior fiscal year declined primarily as a result of lower slot revenues, partially offset by higher table game revenues. The decline in slot revenues likely was attributable to the continued weakness in consumer spending, unfavorable weather conditions and changes in our promotional offers designed to improve profitability. Slot revenues also were negatively impacted by an elevated promotional environment in the Northeast region. The declines in our slot win market share and efficiency in the Northeast slot gaming market were attributable to changes in our promotional offers designed to improve profitability which likely resulted in patrons in the New York and Rhode Island area markets choosing to visit closer gaming facilities in the states of New York and Rhode Island. The decrease in our slot win efficiency in the Connecticut slot gaming market was primarily the result of a reduction in Foxwoods Resort Casino's weighted average number of slot machines. The growth in table game revenues for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011 compared to the prior fiscal year was attributable to higher table game hold percentage, partially offset by lower table game drop. The decline in table game drop reflects changes in our promotional offers designed to improve profitability which likely resulted in patrons in the State of New York choosing to visit expanded gaming facilities in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
Gaming revenues for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010 compared to the prior fiscal year decreased primarily due to the declines in slot and table game revenues. The decline in slot revenues likely was attributable to weakness in consumer spending and an elevated promotional environment. The decrease in gross slot hold percentage reflects the increase in free promotional slot plays provided to Player’s Club members in response to the competitive promotional environment. The decline in table game revenues for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010 compared to the prior fiscal year also likely reflects the overall weakness in consumer spending.
The following table presents data related to food and beverage operations (in thousands, except where noted):
 
For the Fiscal Years Ended September 30,
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Variance
 
Percentage Variance
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
Meals served
3,373

 
4,287

 
4,275

 
(914
)
 
12

 
(21.3
)%
 
0.3
%
Average price per meal served (in dollars)
$
15.82

 
$
14.97

 
$
14.88

 
$
0.85

 
$
0.09

 
5.7
 %
 
0.6
%

Food and beverage revenues for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011 compared to the prior fiscal year declined primarily due to a $10.8 million decrease in food revenues resulting from the reduction in the number of meals served at Mohegan Sun-owned food and beverage outlets. The reduction in the number of meals served reflects the permanent closure of Sunburst Buffet and the temporary closure of Season's Buffet, as well as the replacement of the Fidelia's Market food court outlets and certain other Mohegan Sun-owned food and beverage outlets with third-party operators. The reduction in the number of meals served was partially offset by the increase in the average price per meal served resulting, in part, from the July 2011 re-opening of the renovated Season's Buffet featuring expanded offerings.
Food and beverage revenues for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010 compared to the prior fiscal year were stable.


38



The following table presents data related to hotel operations (in thousands, except where noted):
 
 
For the Fiscal Years Ended September 30,
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Variance
 
Percentage Variance
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
Rooms occupied
415

 
410

 
409

 
5

 
1

 
1.2
 %
 
0.2
 %
Occupancy rate
96.8
%
 
95.7
%
 
95.4
%
 
1.1
%
 
0.3
%
 
1.1
 %
 
0.3
 %
Average daily room rate (in dollars)
$
83

 
$
89

 
$
92

 
$
(6
)
 
$
(3
)
 
(6.7
)%
 
(3.3
)%
Revenue per available room (in dollars)
$
80

 
$
86

 
$
88

 
$
(6
)
 
$
(2
)
 
(7.0
)%
 
(2.3
)%

Hotel revenues for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011 compared to the prior fiscal year declined primarily as a result of our strategy of offering lower room rates to targeted gaming patrons, which we believe partially offset the decline in gaming revenues. This shift in hotel occupancy from transient guests to more profitable gaming business had the effect of lowering the average daily room rate.
Hotel revenues for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010 compared to the prior fiscal year decreased primarily due to lower room rates offered to gaming patrons as a result of highly competitive room offers from competitors.
The following table presents data related to entertainment operations (in thousands, except where noted):
 
For the Fiscal Years Ended September 30,
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Variance
 
Percentage Variance
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
Arena events (in events)
117

 
132

 
124

 
(15
)
 
8

 
(11.4
)%
 
6.5
 %
Arena tickets
701

 
835

 
763

 
(134
)
 
72

 
(16.0
)%
 
9.4
 %
Average price per Arena ticket (in dollars)
$
51.38

 
$
52.75

 
$
63.63

 
$
(1.37
)
 
$
(10.88
)
 
(2.6
)%
 
(17.1
)%

Retail, entertainment and other revenues for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011 compared to the prior fiscal year declined primarily as a result of an $8.0 million decrease in entertainment revenues. The decrease in entertainment revenues resulted from the reduction in the number of Arena tickets due to fewer events at the Mohegan Sun Arena. The decline in retail, entertainment and other revenues also reflects lower retail revenues.
Retail, entertainment and other revenues for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010 compared to the prior fiscal year decreased primarily due to a $4.7 million decline in entertainment revenues. The decline in entertainment revenues resulted from the reduction in the average price per Arena ticket due to fewer headliner shows at the Mohegan Sun Arena.
Promotional Allowances
The retail value of providing promotional allowances was included in revenues as follows (in thousands): 
 
For the Fiscal Years Ended September 30,
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Variance
 
Percentage Variance
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
Food and beverage
$
30,284

 
$
37,714

 
$
37,115

 
$
(7,430
)
 
$
599

 
(19.7
)%
 
1.6
 %
Hotel
14,850

 
15,365

 
16,369

 
(515
)
 
(1,004
)
 
(3.4
)%
 
(6.1
)%
Retail, entertainment and other
48,547

 
53,511

 
55,043

 
(4,964
)
 
(1,532
)
 
(9.3
)%
 
(2.8
)%
Total
$
93,681

 
$
106,590

 
$
108,527

 
$
(12,909
)
 
$
(1,937
)
 
(12.1
)%
 
(1.8
)%







39



The estimated cost of providing promotional allowances was included in gaming costs and expenses as follows (in thousands): 
 
For the Fiscal Years Ended September 30,
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Variance
 
Percentage Variance
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
Food and beverage
$
30,003

 
$
39,203

 
$
38,231

 
$
(9,200
)
 
$
972

 
(23.5
)%
 
2.5
 %
Hotel
8,873

 
9,117

 
9,552

 
(244
)
 
(435
)
 
(2.7
)%
 
(4.6
)%
Retail, entertainment and other
40,191

 
44,973

 
45,874

 
(4,782
)
 
(901
)
 
(10.6
)%
 
(2.0
)%
Total
$
79,067

 
$
93,293

 
$
93,657

 
$
(14,226
)
 
$
(364
)
 
(15.2
)%
 
(0.4
)%

Promotional allowances for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011 compared to the prior fiscal year declined primarily as a result of changes in our promotional offers designed to improve profitability.
Promotional allowances for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010 compared to the prior fiscal year decreased primarily due to lower entertainment promotional allowances as a result of the reduction in headliner shows at the Mohegan Sun Arena. The overall decline in promotional allowances also reflects lower redemptions under the Player’s Club program.

Operating Costs and Expenses
Operating costs and expenses consisted of the following (in thousands):
 
For the Fiscal Years Ended September 30,
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Variance
 
Percentage Variance
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
Gaming
$
578,678

 
$
630,842

 
$
654,806

 
$
(52,164
)
 
$
(23,964
)
 
(8.3
)%
 
(3.7
)%
Food and beverage
33,061

 
39,007

 
36,239

 
(5,946
)
 
2,768

 
(15.2
)%
 
7.6
 %
Hotel
12,996

 
13,770

 
13,513

 
(774
)
 
257

 
(5.6
)%
 
1.9
 %
Retail, entertainment and other
33,234

 
36,172

 
40,761

 
(2,938
)
 
(4,589
)
 
(8.1
)%
 
(11.3
)%
Advertising, general and administrative
172,309

 
179,252

 
178,852

 
(6,943
)
 
400

 
(3.9
)%
 
0.2
 %
Depreciation and amortization
69,833

 
74,794

 
77,536

 
(4,961
)
 
(2,742
)
 
(6.6
)%
 
(3.5
)%
Severance
242

 
9,830

 

 
(9,588
)
 
9,830

 
(97.5
)%
 
100.0
 %
Pre-opening

 
42

 
58

 
(42
)
 
(16
)
 
(100.0
)%
 
(27.6
)%
Impairment of Project Horizon

 
58,079

 

 
(58,079
)
 
58,079

 
(100.0
)%
 
100.0
 %
Relinquishment liability reassessment
(8,805
)
 
(26,512
)
 
(45,678
)
 
17,707

 
19,166

 
(66.8
)%
 
(42.0
)%
Total
$
891,548

 
$
1,015,276

 
$
956,087

 
$
(123,728
)
 
$
59,189

 
(12.2
)%
 
6.2
 %

Gaming costs and expenses for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011 compared to the prior fiscal year declined primarily as a result of reductions in payroll costs and promotional and advertising expenditures, resulting, in part, from our continued focus on managing expenses and enhancing operating efficiencies, including cost containment initiatives implemented in September 2010 and targeted marketing programs and changes in our promotional offers designed to improve profitability. The decline in gaming costs and expenses also reflect lower non-gaming complimentaries redeemed by casino patrons at Mohegan Sun-owned outlets and reduced Slot Win Contribution expenses commensurate with the declines in slot revenues. Expenses associated with the combined Slot Win Contribution and free promotional slot play contribution totaled $183.8 million and $190.5 million for the fiscal years ended September 30, 2011 and 2010, respectively. Gaming costs and expenses as a percentage of gaming revenues were 57.6% and 60.9% for the fiscal years ended September 30, 2011 and 2010, respectively.
Gaming costs and expenses for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010 compared to the prior fiscal year decreased primarily due to reduced Slot Win Contribution expenses commensurate with the decline in slot revenues and lower payroll costs. The decrease in gaming costs and expenses also reflects lower reserves for doubtful accounts related to gaming receivables and reduced redemption costs due to decreased utilization of Player’s Club points at third-party outlets. These results were partially offset by higher free promotional slot play contribution expenses reflecting the impact of a credit received in fiscal 2009 in connection with an agreement reached with the State of Connecticut regarding the treatment of contribution payments on our free promotional slot play program. Expenses associated with the combined Slot Win Contribution and free promotional slot play contribution totaled $190.5 million and $193.8 million for the fiscal years ended September 30, 2010 and 2009, respectively. Gaming costs and expenses as a percentage of gaming revenues were 60.9% and 60.7% for the fiscal years ended September 30,

40


2010 and 2009, respectively.
Food and beverage costs and expenses for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011 compared to the prior fiscal year declined primarily as a result of lower payroll costs and cost of goods sold resulting from the consolidation and replacement of certain Mohegan Sun-owned food and beverage outlets with third-party operators in connection with our cost containment initiatives implemented in September 2010. These results were partially offset by decreased use of food and beverage complimentaries, resulting in lower amounts of food and beverage costs being allocated to gaming costs and expenses.
Food and beverage costs and expenses for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010 compared to the prior fiscal year increased primarily due to additional costs and expenses to operate new food and beverage outlets and higher medical benefit costs. These results were partially offset by lower payroll costs and increased use of food and beverage complimentaries, resulting in higher amounts of food and beverage costs being allocated to gaming costs and expenses.
Hotel costs and expenses for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011 compared to the prior fiscal year declined primarily as a result of lower payroll costs, partially offset by decreased use of hotel complimentaries, resulting in lower amounts of hotel costs being allocated to gaming costs and expenses.
Hotel costs and expenses for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010 compared to the prior fiscal year increased primarily due to decreased use of hotel complimentaries, resulting in lower amounts of hotel costs being allocated to gaming costs and expenses. The increase in hotel costs and expenses also reflects higher medical benefit costs.
Retail, entertainment and other costs and expenses for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011 compared to the prior fiscal year declined primarily as a result of lower direct entertainment costs due to the reduction in the number of events at the Mohegan Sun Arena. The decline in retail, entertainment and other costs and expenses also reflects lower payroll costs. These results were partially offset by decreased use of retail, entertainment and other complimentaries, resulting in lower amounts of retail, entertainment and other costs and expenses being allocated to gaming costs and expenses.
Retail, entertainment and other costs and expenses for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010 compared to the prior fiscal year decreased primarily due to lower direct entertainment costs resulting from fewer scheduled headliner shows at the Mohegan Sun Arena, partially offset by decreased use of retail, entertainment and other complimentaries, resulting in lower amounts of retail, entertainment and other costs and expenses being allocated to gaming costs and expenses.
Advertising, general and administrative costs and expenses for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011 compared to the prior fiscal year declined primarily as a result of lower payroll costs reflecting our cost containment initiatives implemented in September 2010 and reduced utility expenses.
Advertising, general and administrative costs and expenses for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010 compared to the prior fiscal year were flat. Advertising, general and administrative costs and expenses for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010 reflect higher expenses related to governmental and administrative services and utilities provided by the Tribe due to the receipt of tribal service credits and utility rebates in fiscal 2009. Advertising, general and administrative costs and expenses for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010 also reflect lower payroll costs, partially offset by increased medical benefit costs.
Depreciation and amortization expenses for the fiscal years ended September 30, 2011 and 2010 compared to the respective prior fiscal years decreased primarily due to fully depreciated assets related to Project Sunburst.
Severance for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011 resulted from adjustments to the initial estimates utilized under our September 2010 workforce reduction plan. Cash payments commenced in September 2010 and are anticipated to be completed in March 2012. We do not anticipate incurring any additional severance charges in connection with this workforce reduction, other than charges that may arise from adjustments to the initial estimates utilized under the plan.
Severance for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010 resulted from the initial charges related to our September 2010 workforce reduction plan.
Pre-opening costs and expenses for the fiscal years ended September 30, 2010 and 2009 were minimal.
Impairment of Project Horizon for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010 resulted from the re-evaluation of our plans with respect to the development of the new hotel element of the project. Based on our modified plan, which encompasses a smaller hotel to be located closer to the existing hotel, we determined that certain assets related to excavation and foundation work for the planned podium and hotel tower, as well as professional fees for design and architectural work, did not have any future benefit, and accordingly, we recorded the related $58.1 million impairment charge.
Relinquishment liability reassessments for the fiscal years ended September 30, 2011 and 2010 had the effect of reducing operating expenses. The relinquishment liability reassessment credits resulted from reductions in Mohegan Sun revenue projections

41


as of the end of each respective fiscal year compared to projections as of the end of the related prior fiscal year. Our accounting policy is to reassess Mohegan Sun revenue projections, and consequently the relinquishment liability, at least annually in conjunction with our budgeting process or when necessary to account for material increases or decreases in Mohegan Sun revenue projections over the remaining relinquishment period, which expires on December 31, 2014.
Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs
Gross Revenues
Gross revenues consisted of the following (in thousands):
 
For the Fiscal Years Ended September 30,
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Variance
 
Percentage Variance
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
Gaming
$
285,631

 
$
251,056

 
$
239,055

 
$
34,575

 
$
12,001

 
13.8
%
 
5.0
%
Food and beverage
24,244

 
17,821

 
15,648

 
6,423

 
2,173

 
36.0
%
 
13.9
%
Retail, entertainment and other
8,306

 
6,740

 
5,719

 
1,566

 
1,021

 
23.2
%
 
17.9
%
Total
$
318,181

 
$
275,617

 
$
260,422

 
$
42,564

 
$
15,195

 
15.4
%
 
5.8
%

The following table summarizes the percentage of gross revenues from each of the three revenue sources:
 
For the Fiscal Years Ended  September 30,
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
Gaming
89.8
%
 
91.1
%
 
91.8
%
Food and beverage
7.6
%
 
6.5
%
 
6.0
%
Retail, entertainment and other
2.6
%
 
2.4
%
 
2.2
%
Total
100.0
%
 
100.0
%
 
100.0
%

The following table presents data related to gaming operations (in thousands, except where noted):
 
For the Fiscal Years Ended September 30,
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Variance
 
Percentage Variance
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
 
11 vs. 10
 
10 vs. 09
Slots:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Handle
$
2,916,204

 
$
2,876,068

 
$
2,628,844

 
$
40,136

 
$
247,224

 
1.4
 %
 
9.4
 %
Gross revenues
$
227,328

 
$
223,588

 
$
217,679

 
$
3,740

 
$
5,909

 
1.7
 %
 
2.7
 %
Net revenues
$
227,215

 
$
223,589

 
$
217,835

 
$
3,626

 
$
5,754

 
1.6
 %
 
2.6
 %
Free promotional slot plays (1)
$
65,098

 
$
46,043

 
$
26,348

 
$
19,055

 
$
19,695

 
41.4
 %
 
74.7
 %
Weighted average number of machines (in units)
2,390

 
2,356

 
2,470

 
34

 
(114
)
 
1.4
 %
 
(4.6
)%
Hold percentage (gross)
7.8
%
 
7.8
%
 
8.3
%
 

 
(0.5
)%
 

 
(6.0
)%
Win per unit per day (gross) (in dollars)
$
261

 
$
260

 
$
241

 
$
1

 
$
19

 
0.4
 %
 
7.9
 %
Table games (2):